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Sample records for cells degrade atherosclerotic

  1. Human macrophage foam cells degrade atherosclerotic plaques through cathepsin K mediated processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Skjøt-Arkil, Helene; Register, Thomas C; Larsen, Lise; Byrjalsen, Inger; Christiansen, Claus; Karsdal, Morten A

    2010-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Proteolytic degradation of Type I Collagen by proteases may play an important role in remodeling of atherosclerotic plaques, contributing to increased risk of plaque rupture.The aim of the current study was to investigate whether human macrophage foam cells degrade the extracellular...... matrix (ECM) of atherosclerotic plaques by cathepsin K mediated processes. METHODS: We 1) cultured human macrophages on ECM and measured cathepsin K generated fragments of type I collagen (C-terminal fragments of Type I collagen (CTX-I) 2) investigated the presence of CTX-I in human coronary arteries and......-I in areas of intimal hyperplasia and in shoulder regions of advanced plaques. Treatment of human monocytes with M-CSF or M-CSF+LDL generated macrophages and foam cells producing CTX-I when cultured on type I collagen enriched matrix. Circulating levels of CTX-I were not significantly different in...

  2. Prevalence of Foam Cells and Helper-T cells in Atherosclerotic Plaques of Korean Patients with Carotid Atheroma

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Won-Ha; Ko, Young-Hyeh; Kim, Dong-Ik; Lee, Byung-Boong; Park, Jeong-Euy

    2000-01-01

    Background Inflammation and activation of immune cells have important roles in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. We analyzed the involvement of various immune cells in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Methods We investigated the presence of foam cells, lymphocytes and killer cells in 11 atherosclerotic plaque specimens removed from Korean patients who underwent carotid endoarterectomy. Atherosclerotic plaques were analyzed by immunohistochemistry using monoclonal antibody specific to f...

  3. T Cell CX3CR1 Mediates Excess Atherosclerotic Inflammation in Renal Impairment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Lei; Nordlohne, Johannes; Ge, Shuwang; Hertel, Barbara; Melk, Anette; Rong, Song; Haller, Hermann; von Vietinghoff, Sibylle

    2016-06-01

    Reduced kidney function increases the risk for atherosclerosis and cardiovascular death. Leukocytes in the arterial wall contribute to atherosclerotic plaque formation. We investigated the role of fractalkine receptor CX3CR1 in atherosclerotic inflammation in renal impairment. Apoe(-/-) (apolipoprotein E) CX3CR1(-/-) mice with renal impairment were protected from increased aortic atherosclerotic lesion size and macrophage accumulation. Deficiency of CX3CR1 in bone marrow, only, attenuated atherosclerosis in renal impairment in an independent atherosclerosis model of LDL receptor-deficient (LDLr(-/-)) mice as well. Analysis of inflammatory leukocytes in atherosclerotic mixed bone-marrow chimeric mice (50% wild-type/50% CX3CR1(-/-) bone marrow into LDLr(-/-) mice) showed that CX3CR1 cell intrinsically promoted aortic T cell accumulation much more than CD11b(+)CD11c(+) myeloid cell accumulation and increased IL-17-producing T cell counts. In vitro, fewer TH17 cells were obtained from CX3CR1(-/-) splenocytes than from wild-type splenocytes after polarization with IL-6, IL-23, and TGFβ Polarization of TH17 or TREG cells, or stimulation of splenocytes with TGFβ alone, increased T cell CX3CR1 reporter gene expression. Furthermore, TGFβ induced CX3CR1 mRNA expression in wild-type cells in a dose- and time-dependent manner. In atherosclerotic LDLr(-/-) mice, CX3CR1(+/-) T cells upregulated CX3CR1 and IL-17A production in renal impairment, whereas CX3CR1(-/-) T cells did not. Transfer of CX3CR1(+/-) but not Il17a(-/-) T cells into LDLr(-/-)CX3CR1(-/-) mice increased aortic lesion size and aortic CD11b(+)CD11c(+) myeloid cell accumulation in renal impairment. In summary, T cell CX3CR1 expression can be induced by TGFβ and is instrumental in enhanced atherosclerosis in renal impairment. PMID:26449606

  4. Protective effects ofMallotus furetianus on functions of endothelial progenitor cells in atherosclerotic rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Li Liu; Dan Zhou; Lian-Bo Lin; Chen Yang

    2015-01-01

    Objective:To investigate protective effects ofMallotus furetianus(M. furetianus)on functions of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) in atherosclerotic rats.Methods:Atherosclerosis was established by intraperitoneal injection of vitamin D3 combined with high fat diet for 9 weeks. Extracts ofM. furetianus were given to prevent damage of EPCs in dose of 0.081 g/kg and 0.026 g/kg. Rats were sacrificed, and then mononuclear cells were isolated from bone marrow to culture EPCs and test the functions of EPCs.Results:M. furetianus can improve the capacities of EPCs on proliferation, migration, adhesion, and tubule formation in doses of 0.081 g/kg; improve adhesion, and tubule formation in dose of 0.026 g/kg in atherosclerotic rats. Conclusion:M. furetianus can protect functions of EPCs in atherosclerotic rats.

  5. Selective expansion of influenza A virus-specific T cells in symptomatic human carotid artery atherosclerotic plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Keller, Tymen; Meer, Jelger; Teeling, Peter; Sluijs, Koenraad; Idu, Mirza; Rimmelzwaan, Guus; Levi, Michael; Wal, Allard; Boer, Onno

    2008-01-01

    textabstractBACKGROUND AND PURPOSE - Evidence is accumulating that infection with influenza A virus contributes to atherothrombotic disease. Vaccination against influenza decreases the risk of atherosclerotic syndromes, indicating that inflammatory mechanisms may be involved. We tested the hypothesis that influenza A virus-specific T cells contribute to atherosclerotic plaque inflammation, which mediates the onset of plaque rupture. METHODS - T-cell cultures were generated from atheroscleroti...

  6. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    OpenAIRE

    Son, Dong Ju; Kim, Soo Yeon; Han, Seong Su; Kim, Chan Woo; Kumar, Sandeep; Park, Byeoung Soo; Lee, Sung Eun; Yun, Yeo Pyo; Jo, Hanjoong; Park, Young Hyun

    2012-01-01

    Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significant...

  7. Myeloid CD34+CD13+ Precursor Cells Transdifferentiate into Chondrocyte-Like Cells in Atherosclerotic Intimal Calcification

    OpenAIRE

    Doehring, Lars Christian; Heeger, Christian; Aherrahrou, Zouhair; Kaczmarek, Piotr Maciel; Erdmann, Jeanette; Schunkert, Heribert; Ehlers, Eva-Maria

    2010-01-01

    Chondrogenic differentiation is pivotal in the active regulation of artery calcification. We investigated the cellular origin of chondrocyte-like cells in atherosclerotic intimal calcification of C57BL/6 LDLr−/− mice using bone marrow transplantation to trace ROSA26-LacZ-labeled cells. Immunohistochemical costaining of collagen type II with LacZ and leukocyte defining surface antigens was performed and analyzed by high-resolution confocal microscopy. Chondrocyte-like cells were detected in me...

  8. Oleic acid induces smooth muscle foam cell formation and enhances atherosclerotic lesion development via CD36

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tang Bing

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA levels have been linked to the development of atherosclerosis. However, how FFA causes atherosclerosis has not been determined. Because fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36 is responsible for the uptake of FFA, we hypothesized that the atherogenic effects of FFA may be mediated via CD36. Results We tested this hypothesis using cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs treated with oleic acid (OA. We found that OA induces lipid accumulation in SMCs in a dose dependent manner. Rat aortic SMCs treated for 48 hours with OA (250 μmol/L became foam cells based on morphological (Oil Red O staining and biochemical (5 times increase in cellular triglyceride criteria. Moreover, specific inhibition of CD36 by sulfo-N-succinimidyl oleate significantly attenuated OA induced lipid accumulation and foam cell formation. To confirm these results in vivo, we used ApoE-deficient mice fed with normal chow (NC, OA diet, NC plus lipolysis inhibitor acipimox or OA plus acipimox. OA-fed mice showed increased plasma FFA levels and enhanced atherosclerotic lesions in the aortic sinus compared to the NC group (both p 5 μm2 vs. OA plus acipimox: 2.60 ± 0.10 ×105 μm2, p p Conclusions These findings suggest that OA induces smooth muscle foam cell formation and enhances atherosclerotic lesions in part though CD36. Furthermore, these findings provide a novel model for the investigation of atherosclerosis.

  9. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Son, Dong Ju [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Kim, Soo Yeon [Division of Life Science, Korea Basic Science Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Han, Seong Su [University of Iowa Carver College of Medicine, Department of Pathology, Iowa City, IA (United States); Kim, Chan Woo [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kumar, Sandeep [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Park, Byeoung Soo [Nanotoxtech Co., Ansan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Sung Eun [Division of Applied Biology and Chemistry, Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Yun, Yeo Pyo [College of Pharmacy, Chungbuk National University, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Jo, Hanjoong, E-mail: hjo@emory.edu [Wallace H. Coulter Department of Biomedical Engineering, Georgia Institute of Technology and Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Division of Cardiology, Department of Medicine, Emory University, Atlanta, GA (United States); Department of Bioinspired Science, Ehwa Womans University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Young Hyun, E-mail: pyh012@sch.ac.kr [Department of Food Science and Nutrition, College of Natural Sciences, Soonchunhyang University, Asan (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Anti-atherogenic effect of PL was examined using partial carotid ligation model in ApoE KO mice. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL prevented atherosclerotic plaque development, VSMCs proliferation, and NF-{kappa}B activation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Piperlongumine reduced vascular smooth muscle cell activation through PDGF-R{beta} and NF-{kappa}B-signaling. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for atherosclerosis treatment. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-{kappa}B) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase C{gamma}1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-{kappa}B-a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo.

  10. Anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin via inhibiting LDL oxidation and foam cell formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gossypetin, a flavone originally isolated from Hibiscus species, has been shown to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay showed that the addition of > 50 μM of gossypetin could scavenge over 50% of DPPH radicals. The inhibitory effects of gossypetin on the lipid and protein oxidation of LDL were defined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay, the relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and fragmentation of apoB in the Cu2+-induced oxidation of LDL. Gossypetin showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and intracellular lipid accumulation, and uptake ability of macrophages under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Molecular data showed that these influences of gossypetin might be mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/liver-X receptor α (LXRα)/ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and PPARγ/scavenger receptor CD36 pathways, as demonstrated by the transfection of PPARα siRNA or PPARγ expression vector. Our data implied that gossypetin regulated the PPAR signals, which in turn led to stimulation of cholesterol removal from macrophages and delay atherosclerosis. These results suggested that gossypetin potentially could be developed as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. - Highlights: • The anti-atherosclerotic effect of gossypetin in vitro was examined. • Gossypetin inhibited LDL oxidation. • Gossypetin showed potential in reducing on the formation of foam cells. • Gossypetin functions against ox-LDL through PPARa activation and PPARγ depression

  11. Piperlongumine inhibits atherosclerotic plaque formation and vascular smooth muscle cell proliferation by suppressing PDGF receptor signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Anti-atherogenic effect of PL was examined using partial carotid ligation model in ApoE KO mice. ► PL prevented atherosclerotic plaque development, VSMCs proliferation, and NF-κB activation. ► Piperlongumine reduced vascular smooth muscle cell activation through PDGF-Rβ and NF-κB-signaling. ► PL may serve as a new therapeutic molecule for atherosclerosis treatment. -- Abstract: Piperlongumine (piplartine, PL) is an alkaloid found in the long pepper (Piper longum L.) and has well-documented anti-platelet aggregation, anti-inflammatory, and anti-cancer properties; however, the role of PL in prevention of atherosclerosis is unknown. We evaluated the anti-atherosclerotic potential of PL in an in vivo murine model of accelerated atherosclerosis and defined its mechanism of action in aortic vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs) in vitro. Local treatment with PL significantly reduced atherosclerotic plaque formation as well as proliferation and nuclear factor-kappa B (NF-κB) activation in an in vivo setting. PL treatment in VSMCs in vitro showed inhibition of migration and platelet-derived growth factor BB (PDGF-BB)-induced proliferation to the in vivo findings. We further identified that PL inhibited PDGF-BB-induced PDGF receptor beta activation and suppressed downstream signaling molecules such as phospholipase Cγ1, extracellular signal-regulated kinases 1 and 2 and Akt. Lastly, PL significantly attenuated activation of NF-κB—a downstream transcriptional regulator in PDGF receptor signaling, in response to PDGF-BB stimulation. In conclusion, our findings demonstrate a novel, therapeutic mechanism by which PL suppresses atherosclerosis plaque formation in vivo.

  12. Anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin via inhibiting LDL oxidation and foam cell formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jing-Hsien [School of Nutrition, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Tsai, Chia-Wen [Department of Nutrition, China Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Wang, Chi-Ping [Department of Clinical Laboratory, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); Lin, Hui-Hsuan, E-mail: linhh@csmu.edu.tw [Department of Medical Research, Chung Shan Medical University Hospital, Taichung, Taiwan (China); School of Medical Laboratory and Biotechnology, Chung Shan Medical University, Taichung, Taiwan (China)

    2013-10-15

    Gossypetin, a flavone originally isolated from Hibiscus species, has been shown to possess antioxidant, antimicrobial, and antimutagenic activities. Here, we investigated the mechanism(s) underlying the anti-atherosclerotic potential of gossypetin. 1,1-Diphenyl-2-picrylhydrazyl (DPPH) scavenging activity assay showed that the addition of > 50 μM of gossypetin could scavenge over 50% of DPPH radicals. The inhibitory effects of gossypetin on the lipid and protein oxidation of LDL were defined by thiobarbituric acid reactive substance (TBARS) assay, the relative electrophoretic mobility (REM) of oxidized LDL (ox-LDL), and fragmentation of apoB in the Cu{sup 2+}-induced oxidation of LDL. Gossypetin showed potential in reducing ox-LDL-induced foam cell formation and intracellular lipid accumulation, and uptake ability of macrophages under non-cytotoxic concentrations. Molecular data showed that these influences of gossypetin might be mediated via peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (PPARα)/liver-X receptor α (LXRα)/ATP-binding cassette transporter A1 (ABCA1) and PPARγ/scavenger receptor CD36 pathways, as demonstrated by the transfection of PPARα siRNA or PPARγ expression vector. Our data implied that gossypetin regulated the PPAR signals, which in turn led to stimulation of cholesterol removal from macrophages and delay atherosclerosis. These results suggested that gossypetin potentially could be developed as an anti-atherosclerotic agent. - Highlights: • The anti-atherosclerotic effect of gossypetin in vitro was examined. • Gossypetin inhibited LDL oxidation. • Gossypetin showed potential in reducing on the formation of foam cells. • Gossypetin functions against ox-LDL through PPARa activation and PPARγ depression.

  13. Phage display identification of CD100 in human atherosclerotic plaque macrophages and foam cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Carolina Aquino Luque

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a complex disease in which vessels develop plaques comprising dysfunctional endothelium, monocyte derived lipid laden foam cells and activated lymphocytes. Considering that humans and animal models of the disease develop quite distinct plaques, we used human plaques to search for proteins that could be used as markers of human atheromas. Phage display peptide libraries were probed to fresh human carotid plaques, and a bound phage homologous to plexin B1, a high affinity receptor for CD100, was identified. CD100 is a member of the semaphorin family expressed by most hematopoietic cells and particularly by activated T cells. CD100 expression was analyzed in human plaques and normal samples. CD100 mRNA and protein were analyzed in cultured monocytes, macrophages and foam cells. The effects of CD100 in oxLDL-induced foam cell formation and in CD36 mRNA abundance were evaluated. Human atherosclerotic plaques showed strong labeling of CD100/SEMA4D. CD100 expression was further demonstrated in peripheral blood monocytes and in in vitro differentiated macrophages and foam cells, with diminished CD100 transcript along the differentiation of these cells. Incubation of macrophages with CD100 led to a reduction in oxLDL-induced foam cell formation probably through a decrease of CD36 expression, suggesting for the first time an atheroprotective role for CD100 in the human disease. Given its differential expression in the numerous foam cells and macrophages of the plaques and its capacity to decrease oxLDL engulfment by macrophages we propose that CD100 may have a role in atherosclerotic plaque development, and may possibly be employed in targeted treatments of these atheromas.

  14. MRI of the transplanted endothelial progenitor cells for prevent atherosclerotic plaque formation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging system to depict and track in vivo of magnetically labeled endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs), and to study the possibility for preventing the atherosclerotic plaque formation in New Zealand rabbit model of carotid arterial injury after transplantation. Methods: New Zealand rabbit EPCs were isolated, confirmed, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe2O3-PLL, Prussian blue stain was performed for showing intracellular irons. The model of carotid arterial injury was performed by 2.5F balloons, the group A of 8 rabbits received magnetically labeled EPCs, group B of 3 rabbits received fluorescent-labeled EPCs and the group C of 5 rabbits were given same volume saline injection after endothelial injury of the carotid artery. MR imaging and histology were performed and compared 4 days later for randomly chosen three rabbit, each from one of the three group; all the other rabbits were fed with high lipid diet and examed using MR imaging and histology after 15 weeks. Results: Epcs labeling efficiency was more than 95% by Prussian blue stain, 4 days after transplantation of EPCs, only in group A, the injured endothelium of carotid artery had signal intensity loss in T2*WI, which were correlated well with the area where the most Prussian blue staining positive cells were found in histopathology analyses. The rabbits of group A and B which received EPCs transplantation exhibited fewer plaques formation than those of the group C (P2O3-PLL. The 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging system could depict and monitor the magnetically labeled endothelial progenitor cells homing to the injured endothelium of the artery, and EPCs contribute to preventing atherosclerotic plaque formation in New Zealand rabbit model of atherosclerosis. (authors)

  15. Nox4 NADPH oxidase contributes to smooth muscle cell phenotypes associated with unstable atherosclerotic plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaoping Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Plaque instability associated with acute coronary syndromes results in part from apoptosis and senescence of cells within the atherosclerotic (AS lesion. Increased cellular oxidative stress has been proposed to contribute to plaque progression and changes in composition, leading to plaque instability. Our objective was to examine the role of NADPH oxidase in smooth muscle cell (SMC phenotypes associated with an unstable plaque. Aortae were isolated from pre-lesion (8 weeks of age and post-lesion (35 weeks of age hypercholesterolemic mice (ApoE−/−/LDLR−/−, AS, and age-matched normal C57BL/6J mice. We observed an age-dependent increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS in aorta from AS mice, with evidence for elevated ROS prior to lesion development. Whereas macrophage infiltration was restricted to the lesion, oxidized lipids extended beyond the plaque and into the vessel wall. Consistent with these findings, we observed dynamic changes in the expression of NADPH oxidases in AS vessels. Specifically, Nox1 expression was increased early and decreased with lesion progression, while induction of Nox4 was a late event. Nox2 and p22phox were elevated throughout lesion development. Similar to observations in aortae, SMCs isolated from the lesion of AS aortae had decreased Nox1 and increased Nox4 levels as compared to SMCs from normal mice. AS SMCs demonstrated increased generation of ROS, cell cycle arrest, evidence of senescence, and increased susceptibility to apoptosis. Overexpression of Nox4 in normal SMCs recapitulated the phenotypes of the AS SMCs. We conclude that increased expression of Nox4 in AS may drive SMC phenotypes that lead to the plaque instability and rupture responsible for myocardial infarction and stroke.

  16. Mediterranean diet polyphenols reduce inflammatory angiogenesis through MMP-9 and COX-2 inhibition in human vascular endothelial cells: a potentially protective mechanism in atherosclerotic vascular disease and cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scoditti, Egeria; Calabriso, Nadia; Massaro, Marika; Pellegrino, Mariangela; Storelli, Carlo; Martines, Giuseppe; De Caterina, Raffaele; Carluccio, Maria Annunziata

    2012-11-15

    Diets with high content of antioxidant polyphenols are associated with low prevalence of cardiovascular diseases and cancer. Inflammatory angiogenesis is a key pathogenic process both in cancer and atherosclerosis, and is tightly regulated by the proinflammatory enzyme cyclooxygenase (COX)-2 and the matrix degrading enzymes matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We studied the effects of antioxidant polyphenols from virgin olive oil (oleuropein and hydroxytyrosol) and red wine (resveratrol and quercetin) on endothelial cell angiogenic response in vitro, and explored underlying mechanisms. Cultured endothelial cells were pre-incubated with 0.1-50 μmol/L polyphenols before stimulation with phorbol myristate acetate (PMA). All tested polyphenols reduced endothelial cell tube formation on matrigel and migration in wound healing assays. The reduced angiogenesis was associated with the inhibition of PMA-induced COX-2 protein expression and prostanoid production, as well as MMP-9 protein release and gelatinolytic activity. These effects were accompanied by a significant reduction in the stimulated intracellular reactive oxygen species levels and in the activation of the redox-sensitive transcription factor nuclear factor (NF)-κB. Our findings reveal that olive oil and red wine polyphenols reduce inflammatory angiogenesis in cultured endothelial cells, through MMP-9 and COX-2 inhibition, supporting a potential protective role for dietary polyphenols in atherosclerotic vascular disease and cancer. PMID:22595400

  17. Statins meditate anti-atherosclerotic action in smooth muscle cells by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fukuda, Kazuki [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Matsumura, Takeshi, E-mail: takeshim@gpo.kumamoto-u.ac.jp [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Senokuchi, Takafumi; Ishii, Norio; Kinoshita, Hiroyuki; Yamada, Sarie; Murakami, Saiko [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Nakao, Saya [Department of Environmental & Symbiotic Sciences, Prefectural University of Kumamoto, Kumamoto (Japan); Motoshima, Hiroyuki; Kondo, Tatsuya; Kukidome, Daisuke; Kawasaki, Shuji [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan); Kawada, Teruo [Laboratory of Nutrition Chemistry, Division of Food Science and Biotechnology, Graduate School of Agriculture, Kyoto University, Kyoto (Japan); Nishikawa, Takeshi; Araki, Eiichi [Department of Metabolic Medicine, Faculty of Life Sciences, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto (Japan)

    2015-01-30

    Highlights: • Statins induce PPARγ activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statin-induced PPARγ activation is mediated by COX-2 expression. • Statins suppress cell migration and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statins inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory responses by PPARγ activation. • Fluvastatin suppress the progression of atherosclerosis and induces PPARγ activation in the aorta of apoE-deficient mice. - Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism, and its activation is reported to suppress the progression of atherosclerosis. We have reported that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) activate PPARγ in macrophages. However, it is not yet known whether statins activate PPARγ in other vascular cells. In the present study, we investigated whether statins activate PPARγ in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) and thus mediate anti-atherosclerotic effects. Human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) and human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were used in this study. Fluvastatin and pitavastatin activated PPARγ in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Statins induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Moreover, treatment with COX-2-siRNA abrogated statin-mediated PPARγ activation in HASMCs. Statins suppressed migration and proliferation of HASMCs, and inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in HASMCs. These effects of statins were abrogated by treatment with PPARγ-siRNA. Treatment with statins suppressed atherosclerotic lesion formation in Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In addition, transcriptional activity of PPARγ and CD36 expression were increased, and the expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α was decreased, in the aorta of statin-treated Apoe{sup −/−} mice. In conclusion, statins mediate anti-atherogenic effects

  18. Statins meditate anti-atherosclerotic action in smooth muscle cells by peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Statins induce PPARγ activation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statin-induced PPARγ activation is mediated by COX-2 expression. • Statins suppress cell migration and proliferation in vascular smooth muscle cells. • Statins inhibit LPS-induced inflammatory responses by PPARγ activation. • Fluvastatin suppress the progression of atherosclerosis and induces PPARγ activation in the aorta of apoE-deficient mice. - Abstract: The peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor-γ (PPARγ) is an important regulator of lipid and glucose metabolism, and its activation is reported to suppress the progression of atherosclerosis. We have reported that 3-hydroxy-3-methylglutaryl coenzyme A reductase inhibitors (statins) activate PPARγ in macrophages. However, it is not yet known whether statins activate PPARγ in other vascular cells. In the present study, we investigated whether statins activate PPARγ in smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) and thus mediate anti-atherosclerotic effects. Human aortic SMCs (HASMCs) and human umbilical vein ECs (HUVECs) were used in this study. Fluvastatin and pitavastatin activated PPARγ in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Statins induced cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) expression in HASMCs, but not in HUVECs. Moreover, treatment with COX-2-siRNA abrogated statin-mediated PPARγ activation in HASMCs. Statins suppressed migration and proliferation of HASMCs, and inhibited lipopolysaccharide-induced expression of monocyte chemoattractant protein-1 (MCP-1) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) in HASMCs. These effects of statins were abrogated by treatment with PPARγ-siRNA. Treatment with statins suppressed atherosclerotic lesion formation in Apoe−/− mice. In addition, transcriptional activity of PPARγ and CD36 expression were increased, and the expression of MCP-1 and TNF-α was decreased, in the aorta of statin-treated Apoe−/− mice. In conclusion, statins mediate anti-atherogenic effects through PPAR

  19. Smooth muscle cells healing atherosclerotic plaque disruptions are of local, not blood, origin in apolipoprotein E knockout mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bentzon, Jacob F; Sondergaard, Claus S; Kassem, Mustafa;

    2007-01-01

    circulating bone marrow-derived progenitor cells. Here, we analyzed the contribution of this mechanism to plaque healing after spontaneous and mechanical plaque disruption in apolipoprotein E knockout (apoE-/-) mice. METHODS AND RESULTS: To determine the origin of SMCs after spontaneous plaque disruption......GFP+ SMCs were detected. To examine the origin of healing SMCs in a model that recapitulates more features of human plaque rupture and healing, we developed a mechanical technique that produced consistent plaque disruption, superimposed thrombosis, and SMC-mediated plaque healing in apoE-/- mice. Mechanical...... originating from outside the local arterial segment were detected in healed plaques. CONCLUSIONS: Healing SMCs after atherosclerotic plaque disruption are derived entirely from the local arterial wall and not circulating progenitor cells in apoE-/- mice. Udgivelsesdato: 2007-Oct-30...

  20. Anti-atherosclerotic activity of platycodin D derived from roots of Platycodon grandiflorum in human endothelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Jingtao; Yang, Guiwen; Zhu, Wenxing; Wen, Wujun; Zhang, Fumiao; Yuan, Jinduo; An, Liguo

    2012-01-01

    This study examined the effects of platycodin D (PD), a triterpene saponin from the the root of Platycodon grandiflorum A.DC on human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) in vitro, which were pre-treated with PD (0.01, 0.15, 0.25 mg/mL), respectively, and treated with 50 mg/L oxidized low-density lipoprotein (oxLDL). The levels of nitric oxide (NO) and malonaldehyde (MAD) in the culture medium, vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 (VCAM-1) and intercellular cell adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) mRNA expression in endothelium cells and the adhesion of monocytes to endothelial cells were measured. The results showed that PD increased NO concentration and decreased MDA level induced by oxLDL in the medium of endothelial cells. Moreover, PD significantly inhibited the oxLDL-induced increase in monocyte adhesion to endothelial cells as well as decreasing mRNA expression levels of VCAM-1 and ICAM-1 on these cells. Based on these results, it is suggested that PD is a promising anti-atherosclerotic activity, which is at least in part the result of its increasing NO concentration, reducing the oxLDL-induced cell adhesion molecule expression in endothelial cells and the endothelial adhesion to monocytes. PMID:22863916

  1. Degradation of CIGS solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Theelen, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Large scale commercial introduction of CIGS photovoltaics (PV) requires modules with low costs, high efficiencies and long and predictable lifetimes. Unfortunately,knowledge about the lifetime of CIGS PV is limited, which is reflected in the results of field studies: degradation rates varying from 0% to about 4% per year have been observed. Since warrantees are given out that the modules will still yield 80% of their initial power after 20 years of field exposure, degradation rates are often ...

  2. Degradation of CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.J.

    2015-01-01

    Thin film CIGS solar cells and individual layers within these solar cells have been tested in order to assess their long term stability. Alongside with the execution of standard tests, in which elevated temperatures and humidity levels are used, the solar cells have also been exposed to a combinatio

  3. Stability and Degradation of Polymer Solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Kion

    The current state-of-the-art allows for roll-to-roll manufacture of polymer solar cells in high volume with stability and efficiency sufficient to grant success in low-energy applications. However, further improvement is needed for the successful application of the devices in real life applications...... chemical degradation mechanisms are currently scarce. An overview of known degradation mechanisms will be presented and discussed in relation to state-of-the-art methodologies to study failure mechanisms with focus on chemical degradation....

  4. Effect of Low Level Ionizing Radiation on Endothelial Progenitor Cells in Atherosclerotic Patients with Lower Limb Ischemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality throughout the developed world (Williamson et al., 2012). Coronary artery disease (CAD) or atherosclerotic heart disease is a chronic life-threatening disease, which characterized by reducing blood supply to the heart as a result of the accumulation of atheromatous plaques within the walls of the arteries supplying the myocardium. Progressive atherosclerosis in the coronary arteries may lead to intimal thickening and eventual artery occlusion. Coronary artery occlusion can cause acute myocardial ischemia as a result of reduced oxygen supply or increased oxygen demand (Luthje and Andreas, 2008). Convincing evidence indicates that atherosclerosis is associated with endothelial dysfunction at the early stage of the disease process (Chiang et al., 2012). The endothelium is a dynamic cell layer that represents a physiological barrier between circulating blood and the surrounding tissues. Impaired endothelial function is a critical event in the initiation of atherosclerotic plaque development and thus may lead to vasoconstriction, vascular smooth muscle proliferation, hypercoagulability, thrombosis, and eventually, adverse cardiovascular events (Berger and Lavie, 2011). Asahara et al., (1997) described endothelial progenitor cells (EPC) in human peripheral blood. EPC are immature endothelial circulating cells mobilized from the bone marrow. These cells are involved in Introduction and aim of the work repairing the damaged endothelium and in facilitating neovascularization after ischemia (Rouhl et al., 2008). The role of EPC in health and disease is not understood completely. Most studies of healthy subjects and patients with coronary artery disease (CAD) report that the number and function of circulating EPC decrease with age and with the presence of classical vascular risk factors (Fadini et al., 2007). Recent studies suggested that EPCs play an important role in the risk of vascular

  5. Orp8 deficiency in bone marrow-derived cells reduces atherosclerotic lesion progression in LDL receptor knockout mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erik van Kampen

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION: Oxysterol binding protein Related Proteins (ORPs mediate intracellular lipid transport and homeostatic regulation. ORP8 downregulates ABCA1 expression in macrophages and cellular cholesterol efflux to apolipoprotein A-I. In line, ORP8 knockout mice display increased amounts of HDL cholesterol in blood. However, the role of macrophage ORP8 in atherosclerotic lesion development is unknown. METHODS AND RESULTS: LDL receptor knockout (KO mice were transplanted with bone marrow (BM from ORP8 KO mice and C57Bl/6 wild type mice. Subsequently, the animals were challenged with a high fat/high cholesterol Western-type diet to induce atherosclerosis. After 9 weeks of Western-Type diet feeding, serum levels of VLDL cholesterol were increased by 50% in ORP8 KO BM recipients compared to the wild-type recipients. However, no differences were observed in HDL cholesterol. Despite the increase in VLDL cholesterol, lesions in mice transplanted with ORP8 KO bone marrow were 20% smaller compared to WT transplanted controls. In addition, ORP8 KO transplanted mice displayed a modest increase in the percentage of macrophages in the lesion as compared to the wild-type transplanted group. ORP8 deficient macrophages displayed decreased production of pro-inflammatory factors IL-6 and TNFα, decreased expression of differentiation markers and showed a reduced capacity to form foam cells in the peritoneal cavity. CONCLUSIONS: Deletion of ORP8 in bone marrow-derived cells, including macrophages, reduces lesion progression after 9 weeks of WTD challenge, despite increased amounts of circulating pro-atherogenic VLDL. Reduced macrophage foam cell formation and lower macrophage inflammatory potential are plausible mechanisms contributing to the observed reduction in atherosclerosis.

  6. Actin Is a Target of T-Cell Reactivity in Patients with Advanced Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Elisabetta Profumo; Brigitta Buttari; Linda Petrone; Giada Lacroce; Maria Chiara Tesori; Raffaele Capoano; Bruno Salvati; Rachele Riganò

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall associated with autoimmune reactions. In a previous study, we observed the presence of actin-specific antibodies in sera from patients with carotid atherosclerosis. To extend our previous results we evaluated the possible role of actin as antigenic target of cell-mediated immune reactions in carotid atherosclerosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from 17 patients and 16 healthy subjects were tested by cell proli...

  7. Degradation of TNT by plant cell cultures

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podlipná, Radka; Nepovím, Aleš; Zeman, S.; Vágner, Martin; Vaněk, Tomáš

    Smolenice, 2003, s. 78-79. [Xenobiochemické sympózium /22./. Smolenice (SK), 09.06.2003-11.06.2003] R&D Projects: GA ČR GP206/02/P065; GA MŠk OC 837.10 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5038910; CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : degradation * plant cell cultures Subject RIV: DK - Soil Contamination ; De-contamination incl. Pesticides

  8. Alfalfa stem tissues: Cell wall deposition, composition, and degradability

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, H.G.; Engels, F.M.

    2002-01-01

    Declining cell wall degradability of alfalfa (Medicago sativa L.) stems with maturation limits the nutritional value of alfalfa for ruminants. This study characterized changes in cell wall concentration, composition, and degradability by rumen microbes resulting from alfalfa stem tissue proliferatio

  9. Oleic acid induces smooth muscle foam cell formation and enhances atherosclerotic lesion development via CD36

    OpenAIRE

    Tang Bing; Li; Yang Dachun; Ma Shuangtao; Yang Yongjian

    2011-01-01

    Abstract Background Elevated plasma free fatty acid (FFA) levels have been linked to the development of atherosclerosis. However, how FFA causes atherosclerosis has not been determined. Because fatty acid translocase (FAT/CD36) is responsible for the uptake of FFA, we hypothesized that the atherogenic effects of FFA may be mediated via CD36. Results We tested this hypothesis using cultured rat aortic smooth muscle cells (SMCs) treated with oleic acid (OA). We found that OA induces lipid accum...

  10. Phage Display Identification of CD100 in Human Atherosclerotic Plaque Macrophages and Foam Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Luque, Maria Carolina Aquino; Gutierrez, Paulo Sampaio; Debbas, Victor; Martins, Waleska Kerllen; Puech-Leao, Pedro; Porto, Georgia; Coelho, Verônica; Boumsell, Laurence; Kalil, Jorge; Stolf, Beatriz

    2013-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is a complex disease in which vessels develop plaques comprising dysfunctional endothelium, monocyte derived lipid laden foam cells and activated lymphocytes. Considering that humans and animal models of the disease develop quite distinct plaques, we used human plaques to search for proteins that could be used as markers of human atheromas. Phage display peptide libraries were probed to fresh human carotid plaques, and a bound phage homologous to plexin B1, a high affinity rec...

  11. Actin Is a Target of T-Cell Reactivity in Patients with Advanced Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisabetta Profumo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall associated with autoimmune reactions. In a previous study, we observed the presence of actin-specific antibodies in sera from patients with carotid atherosclerosis. To extend our previous results we evaluated the possible role of actin as antigenic target of cell-mediated immune reactions in carotid atherosclerosis. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC from 17 patients and 16 healthy subjects were tested by cell proliferation assay and by ELISA for cytokine production. Actin induced a proliferative response in 47% of patients’ PBMC samples, with SI ranging from 2.6 to 21.1, and in none of the healthy subjects’ samples (patients versus healthy subjects, P=0.02. The presence of diabetes in patients was significantly associated with proliferative response to actin (P=0.04. IFN-γ and TNF-α concentrations were higher in PBMC from patients than in those from healthy subjects and in PBMC proliferating to actin than in nonproliferating ones. Our data demonstrate for the first time a role of actin as a target autoantigen of cellular immune reactions in patients with carotid atherosclerosis. The preferential proinflammatory Th1 activation suggests that actin could contribute to endothelial dysfunction, tissue damage, and systemic inflammation in carotid atherosclerosis.

  12. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar S. Sohal; Anil V. Virkar; Sergey N. Rashkeev; Michael V. Glazoff

    2010-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic no equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential, , within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, no equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  13. Advanced Cell Development and Degradation Studies

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; J. S. Herring; R. C. O' Brien; K. G. Condie; M. Sohal; G. K. Housley; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; G. Tao; B. Yildiz; V. Sharma; P. Singh; N. Petigny; T. L. Cable

    2010-09-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cells for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. From 2003 – 2009, this work was sponsored by the DOE Nuclear Hydrogen Initiative (NHI). Starting in 2010, the HTE research program has been sponsored by the Next Generation Nuclear Plant (NGNP) program. HTSE research priorities in FY10 are centered on understanding and reducing cell and stack performance degradation to an acceptable level to advance the technology readiness level of HTSE and to justify further large-scale demonstration activities. This report provides a summary of our FY10 experimental program, which has been focused on advanced cell and stack development and degradation studies. Advanced cell and stack development activities are under way at five technology partners: MSRI, Versa Power, Ceramatec, NASA Glenn, and St. Gobain. Performance evaluation of the advanced technology cells and stacks has been performed by the technology partners, by MIT and the University of Connecticut and at the INL HTE Laboratory. Summaries of these development activities and test results are presented.

  14. Decreased Regulatory T Cells in Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Lesions: Imbalance between Pro- and Anti-Inflammatory Cells in Atherosclerosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilonka Rohm

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory disease of the arterial wall in which presentation of autoantigens by dendritic cells (DCs leads to the activation of T cells. Anti-inflammatory cells like Tregs counterbalance inflammation in atherogenesis. In our study, human carotid plaque specimens were classified as stable (14 and unstable (15 according to established morphological criteria. Vessel specimens (n=12 without any signs of atherosclerosis were used as controls. Immunohistochemical staining was performed to detect different types of DCs (S100, fascin, CD83, CD209, CD304, and CD123, proinflammatory T cells (CD3, CD4, CD8, and CD161, and anti-inflammatory Tregs (FoxP3. The following results were observed: in unstable lesions, significantly higher numbers of proinflammatory cells like DCs, T helper cells, cytotoxic T cells, and natural killer cells were detected compared to stable plaques. Additionally, there was a significantly higher expression of HLA-DR and more T cell activation (CD25, CD69 in unstable lesions. On the contrary, unstable lesions contained significantly lower numbers of Tregs. Furthermore, a significant inverse correlation between myeloid DCs and Tregs was shown. These data suggest an increased inflammatory state in vulnerable plaques resulting from an imbalance of the frequency of local pro- and anti-inflammatory immune cells.

  15. Degradation in Solid Oxide Cells During High Temperature Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Sohal

    2009-05-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells. One goal of that project is to address the technical and degradation issues associated with solid oxide electrolysis cells. This report covers a variety of these degradation issues, which were discussed during a workshop on “Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells and Strategies for its Mitigation,” held in Phoenix, AZ on October 27, 2008. Three major degradation issues related to solid oxide electrolysis cells discussed at the workshop are: • Delamination of O2-electrode and bond layer on steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites (triple-phase boundary) • Loss of electrical/ionic conductivity of electrolyte. This list is not all inclusive, but the workshop summary can be useful in providing a direction for future research related to the degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells.

  16. Inhibitory effects of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) on H2O2-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury and apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) atherosclerotic mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Guo, Xiaobing; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is initiated by vascular endothelial cell injury, which is induced by lipid and protein oxidation. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a dietary fat-derived lipid, has shown atheroprotective effect. In vitro studies demonstrated that OEA showed cytoprotective effects on H2O2-induced primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury model. Further investigation of the cytoprotective effects of OEA demonstrated that OEA exerted its function by scavenging for reactive oxygen species, as well as increasing anti-oxidative enzymes, reducing lipid peroxidation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and apoptosis-related proteins expression. The in vivo study using an ApoE-/- mouse model fed with high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed that OEA (10 mg/kg/day, i.g.) administration reduced blood lipid levels, prevented endothelial cell damage and inhibited early AS plaque formation. In conclusion, our results suggested that OEA exerted a pharmacological effect on ameliorating atherosclerotic plaque formation through the inhibition of oxidative stress-induced endothelial cell injury and therefore OEA can be a potential candidate drug for anti-atherosclerosis. PMID:26261506

  17. Inhibitory effects of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) on H₂O₂-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury and apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) atherosclerotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Guo, Xiaobing; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is initiated by vascular endothelial cell injury, which is induced by lipid and protein oxidation. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a dietary fat-derived lipid, has shown atheroprotective effect. In vitro studies demonstrated that OEA showed cytoprotective effects on H2O2-induced primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury model. Further investigation of the cytoprotective effects of OEA demonstrated that OEA exerted its function by scavenging for reactive oxygen species, as well as increasing anti-oxidative enzymes, reducing lipid peroxidation, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL)-positive cells and apoptosis-related proteins expression. The in vivo study using an ApoE-/- mouse model fed with high-fat diet for 8 weeks showed that OEA (10 mg/kg/day, i.g.) administration reduced blood lipid levels, prevented endothelial cell damage and inhibited early AS plaque formation. In conclusion, our results suggested that OEA exerted a pharmacological effect on ameliorating atherosclerotic plaque formation through the inhibition of oxidative stress-induced endothelial cell injury and therefore OEA can be a potential candidate drug for anti-atherosclerosis. PMID:26261506

  18. Pt/C Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zana, Alessandro

    This thesis investigates the degradation behavior of Pt/C catalysts under simulated automotive conditions. By using the “tool box” synthesis method the Pt loading has been changed from low to high Pt loadings, therefore permitting to study the role of Pt on the degradation of high surface area (HSA......) Pt/C catalyst. Diverse degradation mechanisms have been found to be responsible for the electrochemical surface area loss (ECSA). The different degradation mechanisms have been found to be dependent from the diverse potential windows applied during the stress test. Furthermore the synthesis approach......).  Interestingly increasing the Pt to carbon ratio was found to enhance the ECSA loss during start/stop cycling up to a certain ratio. However, a further increase in the Pt to carbon ratio results in a decrease of the ECSA loss. Moreover a significant difference in the ESCA loss was found between two standard CBs...

  19. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsueh, Tun-Pin; Sheen, Jer-Ming; Pang, Jong-Hwei S; Bi, Kuo-Wei; Huang, Chao-Chun; Wu, Hsiao-Ting; Huang, Sheng-Teng

    2016-01-01

    Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, including VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, at both the mRNA and protein levels, were significantly suppressed by naringin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, the TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein levels of chemokines, including fractalkine/CX3CL1, MCP-1 and RANTES, were also reduced by naringin. Naringin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which resulted from the inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IκB-α and NF-κB. Altogether, we proposed that naringin modulated TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules and chemokines through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced activation of IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway to exert the anti-atherosclerotic effect. PMID:26861272

  20. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tun-Pin Hsueh

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs. The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated HUVECs. The TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, including VCAM-1, ICAM-1 and E-selectin, at both the mRNA and protein levels, were significantly suppressed by naringin in a dose dependent manner. In addition, the TNF-α-induced mRNA and protein levels of chemokines, including fractalkine/CX3CL1, MCP-1 and RANTES, were also reduced by naringin. Naringin significantly inhibited TNF-α-induced nuclear translocation of NF-κB, which resulted from the inhibited phosphorylation of IKKα/β, IκB-α and NF-κB. Altogether, we proposed that naringin modulated TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules and chemokines through the inhibition of TNF-α-induced activation of IKK/NF-κB signaling pathway to exert the anti-atherosclerotic effect.

  1. Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Khan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is the most common proximate mechanism of ischemic stroke worldwide. Approximately half of those affected are Asians. For diagnosis of ICAD, intra-arterial angiography is the gold standard to identify extent of stenosis. However, noninvasive techniques including transcranial ultrasound and MRA are now emerging as reliable modalities to exclude moderate to severe (50%–99% stenosis. Little is known about measures for primary prevention of the disease. In terms of secondary prevention of stroke due to intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis, aspirin continues to be the preferred antiplatelet agent although clopidogrel along with aspirin has shown promise in the acute phase. Among Asians, cilostazol has shown a favorable effect on symptomatic stenosis and is of benefit in terms of fewer bleeds. Moreover, aggressive risk factor management alone and in combination with dual antiplatelets been shown to be most effective in this group of patients. Interventional trials on intracranial atherosclerotic stenosis have so far only been carried out among Caucasians and have not yielded consistent results. Since the Asian population is known to be preferentially effected, focused trials need to be performed to establish treatment modalities that are most effective in this population.

  2. IL-1β enhances cell adhesion to degraded fibronectin

    OpenAIRE

    Rajshankar, Dhaarmini; Downey, Gregory P.; McCulloch, Christopher A.

    2012-01-01

    IL-1β is a prominent proinflammatory cytokine that mediates degradation of extracellular matrix proteins through increased expression of matrix metalloproteinases, which involves a signaling pathway in adherent cells that is restricted by focal adhesions. Currently, the mechanism by which IL-1β affects cell adhesion to matrix proteins is not defined, and it is not known whether degraded matrix proteins affect IL-1β signaling. We examined adhesion-related IL-1β signaling in fibroblasts attachi...

  3. Degradation of C3a anaphylatoxins by rat mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incubation of 125I-human C3a with rat peritoneal mast cells (RMC) causes extensive degradation of the ligand. Both cell-bound and free 125I-C3a (hu) was degraded by RMC, even at 00C, based on SDS-PAGE analysis. The authors examined several protease inhibitors for their ability to prevent degradation of 125I-C3a (hu). Degradation of 125I-C3a (hu) by RMC was not inhibited by leupeptin, antipain, elastatinal, pepstatin, α1-antitrypsin or EDTA. TPCK and TLCK were only partially effective. PMSF, chymostatin and SBTI were most effective in preventing 125I-C3a (hu) degradation. These latter compounds are effective inhibitors of the chymotrypsin-like enzyme chymase extracted from RMC, as is TPCK, based on hydrolysis of the substrate BTEE. Degradation of cell-bound ligand is totally prevented only by PMSF (or DFP). Therefore, 125I-C3a (hu) bound to the RMC appears to be degraded predominantly by chymase; however the cell-bound ligand is attacked by other surface proteases. Degradation of rat C3a by RMC was examined. After incubation with RMC, cell-bound and free 125I-C3a (rat) showed no evidence of degradation with or without inhibitors present. From these results, the authors conclude that chymase may not play a significant role in regulating anaphylatoxin activity. Furthermore, the authors propose that rat C3a is a preferred ligand for identifying receptors on mast cells because of its resistance to proteolysis

  4. Fuel Cell Testing - Degradation of Fuel Cells and its Impact on Fuel Cell Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Pfrang, Andreas

    2008-01-01

    Fuel cells are expected to play a major role in the future energy supply, especially polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells could become an integral part in future cars. Reduction of degradation of fuel cell performance while keeping fuel cell cost under control is the key for an introduction into mass markets.

  5. Degradation of bulk diffusion length in CZ silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reiss, J.H.; King, R.R.; Mitchell, K.W. [Siemens Solar Industries, Camarillo, CA (United States)

    1995-08-01

    Commercially-produced, unencapsulated, CZ silicon solar cells can lose 3 to 4% of their initial efficiency after exposure to light. After this initial, rapid ( < 30 min.) decrease, the cell power output remains stable. The cell performance recovers in a matter of hours in the dark at room temperature, and degrades again under light exposure. The different conditions under which CZ silicon cells degrade, and the reverse process, annealing, are characterized with the methods of spectral response and current-voltage (I-V) measurements. Iron impurities are a possible cause of this effect.

  6. Stability and Degradation of Organic and Polymer Solar Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Organic photovoltaics (OPV) are a new generation of solar cells with the potential to offer very short energy pay back times, mechanical flexibility and significantly lower production costs compared to traditional crystalline photovoltaic systems. A weakness of OPV is their comparative instability...... during operation and this is a critical area of research towards the successful development and commercialization of these 3rd generation solar cells. Covering both small molecule and polymer solar cells, Stability and Degradation of Organic and Polymer Solar Cells summarizes the state of the art...... understanding of stability and provides a detailed analysis of the mechanisms by which degradation occurs. Following an introductory chapter which compares different photovoltaic technologies, the book focuses on OPV degradation, discussing the origin and characterization of the instability and describing...

  7. Degradation of organometallic perovskite solar cells induced by trap states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Dandan; Ji, Jun; Li, Yaoyao; Li, Guanying; Li, Meicheng; Wang, Tianyue; Wei, Dong; Cui, Peng; He, Yue; Mbengue, Joseph Michel

    2016-02-01

    The degradation of organometallic perovskite solar cells (PSCs) is the key bottleneck hampering their development, which is typically ascribed to the decomposition of perovskite (CH3NH3PbI3). In this work, the degradation of PSCs is observed to be significant, with the decrease in efficiency from 18.2% to 11.5% in ambient air for 7 days. However, no obvious decomposition or structural evolution of the perovskite was observed, except the notable degradation phenomenon of the device. The degradation of PSCs derives from deteriorated photocurrent and fill factor, which are proven to be induced by increased trap states for enlarged carrier recombination in degraded PSCs. The increased trap states in PSCs over storage time are probably induced by the increased defects at the surface of perovskite. The trap states induced degradation provides a physical insight into the degradation mechanisms of PSCs. Moreover, as the investigations were performed on real PSCs instead of individual perovskite films, the findings here present one of their actual degradation mechanisms.

  8. Modelling cathode catalyst degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Rinaldo, Steven Giordano

    2013-01-01

    Nano-sized Pt particles in the cathode catalyst layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell afford a high initial electrochemically active surface-area. However, the gain in active surface area for desired surface reactions is offset in part by enhanced rates of degradation processes that cause losses in catalyst mass, catalyst surface-area, and electrocatalytic activity. The loss of electrochemically active surface-area of the catalyst causes severe performance degradation over relevant lifetim...

  9. Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells: Degradation at High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knibbe, Ruth; Traulsen, Marie Lund; Hauch, Anne; Ebbesen, Sune; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2010-01-01

    The degradation of Ni/yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ)-based solid oxide electrolysis cells operated at high current densities was studied. The degradation was examined at 850°C, at current densities of −1.0, −1.5, and −2.0 A/cm2, with a 50:50 (H2O:H2) gas supplied to the Ni/YSZ hydrogen electrode...

  10. Nuclear Molecular Imaging for Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Lee, Soo Jin; Paeng, Jin Chul

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis is an inflammatory disease as well as a lipid disorder. Atherosclerotic plaque formed in vessel walls may cause ischemia, and the rupture of vulnerable plaque may result in fatal events, like myocardial infarction or stroke. Because morphological imaging has limitations in diagnosing vulnerable plaque, molecular imaging has been developed, in particular, the use of nuclear imaging probes. Molecular imaging targets various aspects of vulnerable plaque, such as inflammatory cell...

  11. Chromium related degradation of solid oxide fuel cells; Chrom-bezogene Degradation von Festoxid-Brennstoffzellen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neumann, Anita

    2011-05-04

    Solid Oxide Fuel Cells (SOFCs) offer a high potential for application as an auxiliary power unit (APU) for heavy goods vehicles as well as combined heat and power (CHP) systems. SOFCs are especially attractive due to their high efficiencies and the use of different fuel types. However, optimization in terms of long term stability and costs are still necessary. This work characterized the degradation of SOFCs with lanthanum strontium manganite (LSM) cathodes under chromium influence. Galvanostatic cell tests were carried out at 800 C with operation times from 250 - 3000 h and variation of the chromium source and current density. The current densities of j = 0 (A)/(cm{sup 2}), j = 0,3 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) and j = 0,5 (A)/(cm{sup 2}) were applied. The high temperature ferritic alloy Crofer22APU was used as a chromium source. Variation of the chromium source was realized by coating the Crofer22APU insert with the chromium retention layer Mn{sub 3}O{sub 4} and the cathode contact layer LCC10. Cell degradation was analyzed with regard to cell voltage, current density and area specific resistance (ASR). Microstructural alterations of the cathode as well as chromium content and distribution across the cell were investigated after completion of the cell tests. For cells with a chromium source present and operation with a nonzero current density, the course of cell degradation was divided into three phases: a run-in, weak linear degradation and strong linear degradation. A decrease of the chromium release rate by means of different coatings stretched the course of degradation along the timescale. Strong degradation, which is characterized by a significant increase in ASR as well as a decrease of current density at the operating point, was only observed when a chromium source in the setup was comb ined with operation of the cell with a non-zero current density. Operation of the cell with a chromium source but no current density caused a degradation of current density at the

  12. Influence of Magnesium Alloy Degradation on Undifferentiated Human Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francesca Cecchinato

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys are of particular interest in medical science since they provide compatible mechanical properties with those of the cortical bone and, depending on the alloying elements, they have the capability to tailor the degradation rate in physiological conditions, providing alternative bioresorbable materials for bone applications. The present study investigates the in vitro short-term response of human undifferentiated cells on three magnesium alloys and high-purity magnesium (Mg.The degradation parameters of magnesium-silver (Mg2Ag, magnesium-gadolinium (Mg10Gd and magnesium-rare-earth (Mg4Y3RE alloys were analysed after 1, 2, and 3 days of incubation in cell culture medium under cell culture condition. Changes in cell viability and cell adhesion were evaluated by culturing human umbilical cord perivascular cells on corroded Mg materials to examine how the degradation influences the cellular development.The pH and osmolality of the medium increased with increasing degradation rate and it was found to be most pronounced for Mg4Y3RE alloy. The biological observations showed that HUCPV exhibited a more homogeneous cell growth on Mg alloys compared to high-purity Mg, where they showed a clustered morphology. Moreover, cells exhibited a slightly higher density on Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd in comparison to Mg4Y3RE, due to the lower alkalinisation and osmolality of the incubation medium. However, cells grown on Mg10Gd and Mg4Y3RE generated more developed and healthy cellular structures that allowed them to better adhere to the surface. This can be attributable to a more stable and homogeneous degradation of the outer surface with respect to the incubation time.

  13. Influence of Magnesium Alloy Degradation on Undifferentiated Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martinez-Sanchez, Adela Helvia; Luthringer, Berengere Julie Christine; Feyerabend, Frank; Jimbo, Ryo; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Wennerberg, Ann

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnesium alloys are of particular interest in medical science since they provide compatible mechanical properties with those of the cortical bone and, depending on the alloying elements, they have the capability to tailor the degradation rate in physiological conditions, providing alternative bioresorbable materials for bone applications. The present study investigates the in vitro short-term response of human undifferentiated cells on three magnesium alloys and high-purity magnesium (Mg). Materials and Methods The degradation parameters of magnesium-silver (Mg2Ag), magnesium-gadolinium (Mg10Gd) and magnesium-rare-earth (Mg4Y3RE) alloys were analysed after 1, 2, and 3 days of incubation in cell culture medium under cell culture condition. Changes in cell viability and cell adhesion were evaluated by culturing human umbilical cord perivascular cells on corroded Mg materials to examine how the degradation influences the cellular development. Results and Conclusions The pH and osmolality of the medium increased with increasing degradation rate and it was found to be most pronounced for Mg4Y3RE alloy. The biological observations showed that HUCPV exhibited a more homogeneous cell growth on Mg alloys compared to high-purity Mg, where they showed a clustered morphology. Moreover, cells exhibited a slightly higher density on Mg2Ag and Mg10Gd in comparison to Mg4Y3RE, due to the lower alkalinisation and osmolality of the incubation medium. However, cells grown on Mg10Gd and Mg4Y3RE generated more developed and healthy cellular structures that allowed them to better adhere to the surface. This can be attributable to a more stable and homogeneous degradation of the outer surface with respect to the incubation time. PMID:26600388

  14. Enhanced regeneration of degraded polymer solar cells by thermal annealing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation and thermal regeneration of poly(3-hexylethiophene) (P3HT):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) and P3HT:indene-C60 bisadduct (ICBA) polymer solar cells, with Ca/Al and Ca/Ag cathodes and indium tin oxide/poly(ethylene-dioxythiophene):polystyrene sulfonate anode have been investigated. Degradation occurs via a combination of three primary pathways: (1) cathodic oxidation, (2) active layer phase segregation, and (3) anodic diffusion. Fully degraded devices were subjected to thermal annealing under inert atmosphere. Degraded solar cells possessing Ca/Ag electrodes were observed to regenerate their performance, whereas solar cells having Ca/Al electrodes exhibited no significant regeneration of device characteristics after thermal annealing. Moreover, the solar cells with a P3HT:ICBA active layer exhibited enhanced regeneration compared to P3HT:PCBM active layer devices as a result of reduced changes to the active layer morphology. Devices combining a Ca/Ag cathode and P3HT:ICBA active layer demonstrated ∼50% performance restoration over several degradation/regeneration cycles

  15. Stability and Degradation of Polymer Solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Kion

    The current state-of-the-art allows for roll-to-roll manufacture of polymer solar cells in high volume with stability and efficiency sufficient to grant success in low-energy applications. However, further improvement is needed for the successful application of the devices in real life applications...

  16. Stability and degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ecker, Bernhard

    2012-04-26

    This thesis deals with stability improvements and the investigation of degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells. Organic solar cells have been in the focus of extensive academic research for over almost two decades and are currently entering the market in small scale applications. For successful large scale applications, next to the improvement of the power conversion efficiency, the stability of organic solar cells has to be increased. This thesis is dedicated to the investigation of novel materials and architectures to study stability-related issues and degradation mechanisms in order to contribute to the basic understanding of the working principles of organic solar cells. Here, impedance spectroscopy, a frequency domain technique, is used to gain information about stability and degradation mechanisms in organic solar cells. In combination with systematic variations in the preparation of solar cells, impedance spectroscopy gives the possibility to differentiate between interface and bulk dominated effects. Additionally, impedance spectroscopy gives access to the dielectric properties of the device, such as capacitance. This offers among other things the opportunity to probe the charge carrier concentration and the density of states. Another powerful way of evaluation is the combination of experimentally obtained impedance spectra with equivalent circuit modelling. The thesis presents results on novel materials and solar cell architectures for efficient hole and electron extraction. This indicates the importance of knowledge over interlayers and interfaces for improving both the efficiency and stability of organic solar cells.

  17. Mast cell degranulator compound 48-80 promotes atherosclerotic plaque in apolipoprotein E knockout mice with perivascular common carotid collar placement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Ya-ling; YANG Yong-zong; WANG Shuang; HUANG Tao; TANG Chao-ke; XU Zeng-xiang; SUN Yu-hui

    2009-01-01

    Background Study of the relationship between mast cells and atherosclerosis is mostly dependent on pathological observation and cytology experiments. To investigate the effects of mast cells degranulation on plaque and their possible mechanisms we used apolipoprotein E knockout mice which had been placed perivascular common carotid collar with mast cells degranulator compound 48-80.Methods Forty apolipoprotein E knockout mice were fed a western-type diet and operated on with placement of perivascular right common carotid collar. Four weeks after surgery, the mice were intraperitoneally injected with compound 48-80 (0.5 mg/kg) or D-Hanks every other day for 4 times. The serum lipids and activity of tryptase were measured. Tissue sections were stained with hematoxylin and eosin. Corresponding sections were stained with toluidine blue and immunohistochemically with antibodies against macrophage-specific antigen, α-smooth muscle actin, interleukin-1β and van Willebrand factor. Simultaneously, basic fibroblast growth factor was detected by in situ hybridization and immunofluorescence.Results No pathological change was observed in common carotid non-collar placement but atherogenesis in common carotid collar placement of both groups. There was a significant increase in plaque area ((5.85±0.75)×104 vs (0.86±0.28)×104 μm2, P<0.05), the degree of lumen stenosis ((81±15)% vs (41±12)%, P <0.05), the activity of tryptase in serum ((0.57±0.13) U/L vs (0.36±0.10) U/L, P <0.05), and the percentage of degranulated mast cells ((80.6±17.8)% vs (13.5±4.1)%, P <0.05). The expressions of macrophage-specific antigen, α-smooth muscle actin, interleukin-1β, basic fibroblast growth factor and the density of neovessel in plaque were more in the compound 48-80 group than in the control group.Conclusions Perivascular common carotid collar placement can promote atherosclerotic plaque formation in apolipoprotein E knockout mice. Compound 48-80 increases plaque area and the degree

  18. Monocytes/macrophages activation contributes to b-gamma-glutamyltransferase accumulation inside atherosclerotic plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Belcastro, Eugenia; Franzini, Maria; Cianchetti, Silvana; Lorenzini, Evelina; Masotti, Silvia; Fierabracci, Vanna; Pucci, Angela; Pompella, Alfonso; Corti, Alessandro

    2015-01-01

    Background Gamma-glutamyltransferase (GGT) is a well-established independent risk factor for cardiovascular mortality related to atherosclerotic disease. Four GGT fractions have been identified in plasma, but only b-GGT fraction accumulates in atherosclerotic plaques, and correlates with other histological markers of vulnerability. The present study was aimed to evaluate whether macrophagic lineage cells may provide a source of b-GGT within the atherosclerotic plaque. Methods GGT expression a...

  19. The identification of cell wall degrading enzymes in Globodera rostochiensis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Popeijus, H.E.

    2002-01-01

    This thesis describes the identification of cell wall degrading enzymes of the potato cyst nematode Globodera rostochiensis . A robust method using expressed sequence tags (ESTs) was applied to identify new parasitism related enzymes. One of the ESTs revealed the first pectate lyase from a metazoan

  20. DEGRADATION ISSUES IN SOLID OXIDE CELLS DURING HIGH TEMPERATURE ELECTROLYSIS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. E. O' Brien; C. M. Stoots; V. I. Sharma; B. Yildiz; A. V. Virkar

    2010-06-01

    Idaho National Laboratory (INL) is performing high-temperature electrolysis research to generate hydrogen using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). The project goals are to address the technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs. This paper provides a summary of various ongoing INL and INL sponsored activities aimed at addressing SOEC degradation. These activities include stack testing, post-test examination, degradation modeling, and a list of issues that need to be addressed in future. Major degradation issues relating to solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) are relatively better understood than those for SOECs. Some of the degradation mechanisms in SOFCs include contact problems between adjacent cell components, microstructural deterioration (coarsening) of the porous electrodes, and blocking of the reaction sites within the electrodes. Contact problems include delamination of an electrode from the electrolyte, growth of a poorly (electronically) conducting oxide layer between the metallic interconnect plates and the electrodes, and lack of contact between the interconnect and the electrode. INL’s test results on high temperature electrolysis (HTE) using solid oxide cells do not provide a clear evidence whether different events lead to similar or drastically different electrochemical degradation mechanisms. Post-test examination of the solid oxide electrolysis cells showed that the hydrogen electrode and interconnect get partially oxidized and become non-conductive. This is most likely caused by the hydrogen stream composition and flow rate during cool down. The oxygen electrode side of the stacks seemed to be responsible for the observed degradation due to large areas of electrode delamination. Based on the oxygen electrode appearance, the degradation of these stacks was largely controlled by the oxygen electrode delamination rate. University of Utah (Virkar) has developed a SOEC model based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in

  1. Modulation of insulin degrading enzyme activity and liver cell proliferation

    OpenAIRE

    Pivovarova, Olga; von Loeffelholz, Christian; Ilkavets, Iryna; Sticht, Carsten; Zhuk, Sergei; Murahovschi, Veronica; Lukowski, Sonja; Döcke, Stephanie; Kriebel, Jennifer; de las Heras Gala, Tonia; Malashicheva, Anna; Kostareva, Anna; Lock, Johan F; Stockmann, Martin; Grallert, Harald

    2015-01-01

    Diabetes mellitus type 2 (T2DM), insulin therapy, and hyperinsulinemia are independent risk factors of liver cancer. Recently, the use of a novel inhibitor of insulin degrading enzyme (IDE) was proposed as a new therapeutic strategy in T2DM. However, IDE inhibition might stimulate liver cell proliferation via increased intracellular insulin concentration. The aim of this study was to characterize effects of inhibition of IDE activity in HepG2 hepatoma cells and to analyze liver specific expre...

  2. Degradation of elastomeric gasket materials in PEM fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack requires gaskets in each cell to keep the reactant gases within their respective regions. Long-term durability of the fuel cell stacks depends heavily on the functionality of the gaskets. Both the leachants from the seal materials and the cracking of the seals are of great concern to the overall durability of the fuel cell stacks. The degradation of four commercially available gasket materials was investigated in a PEM fuel cell environment in this study. Optical microscopy reveals that the degradation starts with surface roughness from the early stage of exposure and finally results in cracks over time. Attenuated total reflection Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) were employed to study the surface chemistry of the gasket materials before and after exposure to the PEM fuel cell environment over time. Results from these analyses indicate that the surface chemistry changed initially as a manifestation of the chemical degradation and proceeded via de-cross-linking and chain scission in the backbone. Atomic adsorption spectrometry analysis was used to identify the leachants in the soaking solution from the gasket materials. The effect due to applied stress is reported as well

  3. Polyacylurethanes as Novel Degradable Cell Carrier Materials for Tissue Engineering

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arend Jan Schouten

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Polycaprolactone (PCL polyester and segmented aliphatic polyester urethanes based on PCL soft segment have been thoroughly investigated as biodegradable scaffolds for tissue engineering. Although proven beneficial as long term implants, these materials degrade very slowly and are therefore not suitable in applications in which scaffold support is needed for a shorter time. A recently developed class of polyacylurethanes (PAUs is expected to fulfill such requirements. Our aim was to assess in vitro the degradation of PAUs and evaluate their suitability as temporary scaffold materials to support soft tissue repair. With both a mass loss of 2.5–3.0% and a decrease in molar mass of approx. 35% over a period of 80 days, PAUs were shown to degrade via both bulk and surface erosion mechanisms. Fourier Transform Infra Red (FTIR spectroscopy was successfully applied to study the extent of PAUs microphase separation during in vitro degradation. The microphase separated morphology of PAU1000 (molar mass of the oligocaprolactone soft segment = 1000 g/mol provided this polymer with mechano-physical characteristics that would render it a suitable material for constructs and devices. PAU1000 exhibited excellent haemocompatibility in vitro. In addition, PAU1000 supported both adhesion and proliferation of vascular endothelial cells and this could be further enhanced by pre-coating of PAU1000 with fibronectin (Fn. The contact angle of PAU1000 decreased both with in vitro degradation and by incubation in biological fluids. In endothelial cell culture medium the contact angle reached 60°, which is optimal for cell adhesion. Taken together, these results support the application of PAU1000 in the field of soft tissue repair as a temporary degradable scaffold.

  4. Aerobic degradation of BDE-209 by Enterococcus casseliflavus: Isolation, identification and cell changes during degradation process.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Shaoyu; Yin, Hua; Chen, Shuona; Peng, Hui; Chang, Jingjing; Liu, Zehua; Dang, Zhi

    2016-05-01

    Decabromodiphenyl ether (BDE-209) is one of the most commonly used brominated flame retardants that have contaminated the environment worldwide. Microbial bioremediation has been considered as an effective technique to remove these sorts of persistent organic pollutants. Enterococcus casseliflavus, a gram-positive bacterium capable of aerobically transforming BDE-209, was isolated by our team from sediments in Guiyu, an e-waste dismantling area in Guangdong Province, China. To promote microbial bioremediation of BDE-209 and elucidate the mechanism behind its aerobic degradation, the effects of BDE-209 on the cell changes of E. casseliflavus were examined in this study. The experimental results demonstrated that the high cell surface hydrophobicity (CSH) of E. casseliflavus made the bacteria absorb hydrophobic BDE-209 more easily. E. casseliflavus responded to BDE-209 stress, resulting in an increase in cell membrane permeability and accumulation of BDE-209 inside the cell. The differential expression of intracellular protein was analyzed through two-dimensional gel electrophoresis (2-DE). More than 50 differentially expressed protein spots were reproducibly detected, including 25 up, and 25 down regulated after a 4 days exposure. Moreover, the apoptotic-like cell changes were observed during E. casseliflavus mediated degradation of BDE-209 by means of flow cytometry. PMID:26852209

  5. Coronary-Heart-Disease-Associated Genetic Variant at the COL4A1/COL4A2 Locus Affects COL4A1/COL4A2 Expression, Vascular Cell Survival, Atherosclerotic Plaque Stability and Risk of Myocardial Infarction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Wei; Ng, Fu Liang; Chan, Kenneth; Pu, Xiangyuan; Poston, Robin N; Ren, Meixia; An, Weiwei; Zhang, Ruoxin; Wu, Jingchun; Yan, Shunying; Situ, Haiteng; He, Xinjie; Chen, Yequn; Tan, Xuerui; Xiao, Qingzhong; Tucker, Arthur T; Caulfield, Mark J; Ye, Shu

    2016-07-01

    Genome-wide association studies have revealed an association between coronary heart disease (CHD) and genetic variation on chromosome 13q34, with the lead single nucleotide polymorphism rs4773144 residing in the COL4A2 gene in this genomic region. We investigated the functional effects of this genetic variant. Analyses of primary cultures of vascular smooth muscle cells (SMCs) and endothelial cells (ECs) from different individuals showed a difference between rs4773144 genotypes in COL4A2 and COL4A1 expression levels, being lowest in the G/G genotype, intermediate in A/G and highest in A/A. Chromatin immunoprecipitation followed by allelic imbalance assays of primary cultures of SMCs and ECs that were of the A/G genotype revealed that the G allele had lower transcriptional activity than the A allele. Electrophoretic mobility shift assays and luciferase reporter gene assays showed that a short DNA sequence encompassing the rs4773144 site interacted with a nuclear protein, with lower efficiency for the G allele, and that the G allele sequence had lower activity in driving reporter gene expression. Analyses of cultured SMCs from different individuals demonstrated that cells of the G/G genotype had higher apoptosis rates. Immunohistochemical and histological examinations of ex vivo atherosclerotic coronary arteries from different individuals disclosed that atherosclerotic plaques with the G/G genotype had lower collagen IV abundance and thinner fibrous cap, a hallmark of unstable, rupture-prone plaques. A study of a cohort of patients with angiographically documented coronary artery disease showed that patients of the G/G genotype had higher rates of myocardial infarction, a phenotype often caused by plaque rupture. These results indicate that the CHD-related genetic variant at the COL4A2 locus affects COL4A2/COL4A1 expression, SMC survival, and atherosclerotic plaque stability, providing a mechanistic explanation for the association between the genetic variant and CHD

  6. Expression of apolipoprotein serum amyloid A mRNA in human atherosclerotic lesions and cultured vascular cells: implications for serum amyloid A function.

    OpenAIRE

    Meek, R L; Urieli-Shoval, S.; Benditt, E. P.

    1994-01-01

    Altered lipoprotein metabolism and vascular injury are considered to be major parts of the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic lesions. Serum amyloid A (SAA) is a family of acute-phase reactants found residing mainly on high density lipoproteins (HDL) in the circulation. Several functions for the SAAs have been proposed that could be important in atherosclerosis. These include involvement in cholesterol metabolism, participation in detoxification, depression of immune responses, and interference ...

  7. Light-Induced Degradation of Thin Film Silicon Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamelmann, F. U.; Weicht, J. A.; Behrens, G.

    2016-02-01

    Silicon-wafer based solar cells are still domination the market for photovoltaic energy conversion. However, most of the silicon is used only for mechanical stability, while only a small percentage of the material is needed for the light absorption. Thin film silicon technology reduces the material demand to just some hundred nanometer thickness. But even in a tandem stack (amorphous and microcrystalline silicon) the efficiencies are lower, and light-induced degradation is an important issue. The established standard tests for characterisation are not precise enough to predict the performance of thin film silicon solar cells under real conditions, since many factors do have an influence on the degradation. We will show some results of laboratory and outdoor measurements that we are going to use as a base for advanced modelling and simulation methods.

  8. Inhibiting extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer maybe beneficial for diminishing the atherosclerotic plaque instability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie S

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic plaque rupture and local thrombosis activation in the artery cause acute serious incidents such as acute coronary syndrome and stroke. The exact mechanism of plaque rupture remains unclear but excessive degradation of the extracellular matrix scaffold by matrix-degrading metalloproteinases (MMPs has been implicated as one of the major molecular mechanisms in this process. Convincing evidence is available to prove that extracellular matrix metalloproteinase inducer (EMMPRIN induces MMP expression and is involved in the inflammatory responses in the artery wall. The inflammation and MMPs have been shown to play a critical role for atherosclerotic lesion development and progression. More recent data showed that increased EMMPRIN expression was associated with vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions. Therefore, we speculate that EMMPRIN may be pivotal for atherosclerotic plaque instability, and hence inhibition of EMMPRIN expression could be a promising approach for the prevention or treatment of atheroma instability.

  9. Influence of Magnesium Alloy Degradation on Undifferentiated Human Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Francesca Cecchinato; Nezha Ahmad Agha; Adela Helvia Martinez-Sanchez; Berengere Julie Christine Luthringer; Frank Feyerabend; Ryo Jimbo; Regine Willumeit-Römer; Ann Wennerberg

    2015-01-01

    Background Magnesium alloys are of particular interest in medical science since they provide compatible mechanical properties with those of the cortical bone and, depending on the alloying elements, they have the capability to tailor the degradation rate in physiological conditions, providing alternative bioresorbable materials for bone applications. The present study investigates the in vitro short-term response of human undifferentiated cells on three magnesium alloys and high-purity magnes...

  10. Fuel starvation. Irreversible degradation mechanisms in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rangel, Carmen M.; Silva, R.A.; Travassos, M.A.; Paiva, T.I.; Fernandes, V.R. [LNEG, National Laboratory for Energy and Geology, Lisboa (Portugal). UPCH Fuel Cells and Hydrogen Unit

    2010-07-01

    PEM fuel cell operates under very aggressive conditions in both anode and cathode. Failure modes and mechanism in PEM fuel cells include those related to thermal, chemical or mechanical issues that may constrain stability, power and lifetime. In this work, the case of fuel starvation is examined. The anode potential may rise to levels compatible with the oxidization of water. If water is not available, oxidation of the carbon support will accelerate catalyst sintering. Diagnostics methods used for in-situ and ex-situ analysis of PEM fuel cells are selected in order to better categorize irreversible changes of the cell. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is found instrumental in the identification of fuel cell flooding conditions and membrane dehydration associated to mass transport limitations / reactant starvation and protonic conductivity decrease, respectively. Furthermore, it indicates that water electrolysis might happen at the anode. Cross sections of the membrane catalyst and gas diffusion layers examined by scanning electron microscopy indicate electrode thickness reduction as a result of reactions taking place during hydrogen starvation. Catalyst particles are found to migrate outwards and located on carbon backings. Membrane degradation in fuel cell environment is analyzed in terms of the mechanism for fluoride release which is considered an early predictor of membrane degradation. (orig.)

  11. Photon degradation in silicon solar cells - Status report 1974

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Following the discovery of the photon degradation phenomenon in irradiated silicon solar cells during 1972, several studies were undertaken to elucidate the degradation mechanism and the practical significance for solar array design. Results of intramural experimental work are presented together with results obtained from two extramural contracts. In January 1973, ESTEC placed a contract with Centre d'Etude Spatiale des Rayonnements, Toulouse, France, to characterize effective recombination levels. The diagnostic experiments are based on studies of minority carrier lifetime variations with injection level using a pulsed neodymium laser, coupled with isochronal annealing experiments. A second contract was placed at the same time with Departement d'Etudes et de Recherches en Technologie Spatiale, Toulouse, France, for the simultaneous photon and 1 MeV electron irradiation of CZ and FZ silicon solar cells. The results of both contracts are presented. The laboratory measurements are compared with spaceflight results for the solar array performances of the ESRO spacecraft HEOS A1, HEOS A2, ESRO II and ESRO IV, together with data from the UK spacecraft PROSPERO; all satellites, with the exception of ESRO IV, employed solar cells susceptible to photon degradation. (orig.)

  12. Interfacial Degradation of Planar Lead Halide Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero, Antonio; You, Jingbi; Aranda, Clara; Kang, Yong Soo; Garcia-Belmonte, Germà; Zhou, Huanping; Bisquert, Juan; Yang, Yang

    2016-01-26

    The stability of perovskite solar cells is one of the major challenges for this technology to reach commercialization, with water believed to be the major degradation source. In this work, a range of devices containing different cathode metal contacts in the configuration ITO/PEDOT:PSS/MAPbI3/PCBM/Metal are fully electrically characterized before and after degradation caused by steady illumination during 4 h that induces a dramatic reduction in power conversion efficiency from values of 12 to 1.8%. We show that a decrease in performance and generation of the S-shape is associated with chemical degradation of the metal contact. Alternatively, use of Cr2O3/Cr as the contact enhances the stability, but modification of the energetic profile during steady illumination takes place, significantly reducing the performance. Several techniques including capacitance-voltage, X-ray diffraction, and optical absorption results suggest that the properties of the bulk perovskite layer are little affected in the device degradation process. Capacitance-voltage and impedance spectroscopy results show that the electrical properties of the cathode contact are being modified by generation of a dipole at the cathode that causes a large shift of the flat-band potential that modifies the interfacial energy barrier and impedes efficient extraction of electrons. Ionic movement in the perovskite layer changes the energy profile close to the contacts, modifying the energy level stabilization at the cathode. These results provide insights into the degradation mechanisms of perovskite solar cells and highlight the importance to further study the use of protecting layers to avoid the chemical reactivity of the perovskite with the external contacts. PMID:26679510

  13. Electron Spin Resonance Study of Fuel Cell Polymer Membrane Degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Alexander Panchenko; Elena Aleksandrova; Emil Roduner

    2005-01-01

    @@ 1Introduction The long term stability of the membrane is an important factor limiting the fuel cell lifetime. During extended use the membrane degrades, probably via reaction with hydroxyl and superoxide radicals which are regular intermediates of the oxygen reduction at the cathode. Only extremely stable membranes can withstand the aggressive chemical and physical environment in an operating fuel cell. Within a given set of operating conditions, intrinsic chemical and mechanical properties of the membrane as well as its water content impact its durability dramatically.

  14. Reversible degradation of inverted organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tromholt, Thomas; Manor, Assaf; Katz, Eugene A; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    cell, after 30 min exposure at 5 suns and after 30 min of rest in the dark. High intensity exposure introduced a major performance decrease for all solar intensities, followed by a partial recovery of the lost performance over time: at 1 sun only 6% of the initial performance was conserved after the....... The transient state is believed to be a result of the breakdown of the diode behaviour of the ZnO electron transport layer by O2 desorption, increasing the hole conductivity. These results imply that accelerated degradation of organic solar cells by concentrated sunlight is not a straightforward...

  15. Modeling Degradation in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells - Volume II

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Manohar Motwani

    2011-09-01

    Idaho National Laboratory has an ongoing project to generate hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOECs). To accomplish this, technical and degradation issues associated with the SOECs will need to be addressed. This report covers various approaches being pursued to model degradation issues in SOECs. An electrochemical model for degradation of SOECs is presented. The model is based on concepts in local thermodynamic equilibrium in systems otherwise in global thermodynamic non-equilibrium. It is shown that electronic conduction through the electrolyte, however small, must be taken into account for determining local oxygen chemical potential,, within the electrolyte. The within the electrolyte may lie out of bounds in relation to values at the electrodes in the electrolyzer mode. Under certain conditions, high pressures can develop in the electrolyte just near the oxygen electrode/electrolyte interface, leading to oxygen electrode delamination. These predictions are in accordance with the reported literature on the subject. Development of high pressures may be avoided by introducing some electronic conduction in the electrolyte. By combining equilibrium thermodynamics, non-equilibrium (diffusion) modeling, and first-principles, atomic scale calculations were performed to understand the degradation mechanisms and provide practical recommendations on how to inhibit and/or completely mitigate them.

  16. Ultrafast laser ablation for targeted atherosclerotic plaque removal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanvin, Thomas; Conkey, Donald B.; Descloux, Laurent; Frobert, Aurelien; Valentin, Jeremy; Goy, Jean-Jacques; Cook, Stéphane; Giraud, Marie-Noelle; Psaltis, Demetri

    2015-07-01

    Coronary artery disease, the main cause of heart disease, develops as immune cells and lipids accumulate into plaques within the coronary arterial wall. As a plaque grows, the tissue layer (fibrous cap) separating it from the blood flow becomes thinner and increasingly susceptible to rupturing and causing a potentially lethal thrombosis. The stabilization and/or treatment of atherosclerotic plaque is required to prevent rupturing and remains an unsolved medical problem. Here we show for the first time targeted, subsurface ablation of atherosclerotic plaque using ultrafast laser pulses. Excised atherosclerotic mouse aortas were ablated with ultrafast near-infrared (NIR) laser pulses. The physical damage was characterized with histological sections of the ablated atherosclerotic arteries from six different mice. The ultrafast ablation system was integrated with optical coherence tomography (OCT) imaging for plaque-specific targeting and monitoring of the resulting ablation volume. We find that ultrafast ablation of plaque just below the surface is possible without causing damage to the fibrous cap, which indicates the potential use of ultrafast ablation for subsurface atherosclerotic plaque removal. We further demonstrate ex vivo subsurface ablation of a plaque volume through a catheter device with the high-energy ultrafast pulse delivered via hollow-core photonic crystal fiber.

  17. Degradation mechanism for planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Kouhei; Furumoto, Yoshikazu; Shahiduzzaman, M.; Kuwabara, Takayuki; Takahashi, Kohshin; Taima, Tetsuya

    2016-04-01

    Organic-inorganic hybrid perovskite materials have recently emerged as a promising cost- and energy-efficient light absorber material for photovoltaic applications. Unfortunately, perovskite solar cells have a problem with decreasing power conversion efficiency owing to their degradation in air. To clarify the cause of the degradation of perovskite solar cells, we exposed deposited CH3NH3PbI3 and HC(NH2)2PbI3 films to an O2 or (H2O+N2) atmosphere condition. Analysis of these films revealed that a large energy band gap was observed as a result of the influence of the H2O molecule in CH3NH3PbI3 and HC(NH2)2PbI3. Under the (H2O+N2) atmosphere condition, the existence of CH3NH3I and HC(NH2)2I molecules was found to affect the morphology and as well as the crystalline diffraction peak. The resultant perovskite crystalline structure was degraded by H2O molecules under the air exposure condition.

  18. Development and validation of an enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay for the quantification of a specific MMP-9 mediated degradation fragment of type III collagen--A novel biomarker of atherosclerotic plaque remodeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barascuk, Natasha; Vassiliadis, Efstathios; Larsen, Lise;

    2011-01-01

    Degradation of collagen in the arterial wall by matrix metalloproteinases is the hallmark of atherosclerosis. We have developed an ELISA for the quantification of type III collagen degradation mediated by MMP-9 in urine....

  19. Degradation of solid oxide fuel cells with wood

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Technical University of Munich investigates the degradation effects observed on SOFCs when fired with product gases from biomass gasification processes. The TUM has concentrated its research on tubular SOFCs. For this purpose tubular electrolyte-supported SOFCs have been manufactured using commercially available electrolyte tubes, anode foil and cathode paste. The tubular SOFCs were first run with hydrogen and synthetic fuels. Once stable and reproducible results were achieved, tests with product gas from four different biomass gasifiers have started. These gasifiers have been coupled to a gas cleaning device which includes sulphur and particle removal and pre-reforming. Different operation conditions of the gasifiers and the gas cleaning device have been realized and the corresponding fuel cell degradations have been analysed. (authors)

  20. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions

  1. Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Choe, Yoong-Kee [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology, Umezono 1-1-1, Tsukuba (Japan); Henson, Neil J.; Kim, Yu Seung [Los Alamos National Laboratory, Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2015-12-31

    Chemical degradation mechanisms of membranes for alkaline membrane fuel cells have been investigated using density functional theory (DFT). We have elucidated that the aryl-ether moiety of membranes is one of the weakest site against attack of hydroxide ions. The results of DFT calculations for hydroxide initiated aryl-ether cleavage indicated that the aryl-ether cleavage occurred prior to degradation of cationic functional group. Such a weak nature of the aryl-ether group arises from the electron deficiency of the aryl group as well as the low bond dissociation energy. The DFT results suggests that removal of the aryl-ether group in the membrane should enhance the stability of membranes under alkaline conditions. In fact, an ether fee poly(phenylene) membrane exhibits excellent stability against the attack from hydroxide ions.

  2. Degradation of high density lipoprotein in cultured rat luteal cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In rat ovary luteal cells, degradation of high density lipoprotein (HDL) to tricholoracetic acid (TCA)-soluble products accounts for only a fraction of the HDL-derived cholesterol used for steroidogenesis. In this study the authors have investigated the fate of 125I]HDL bound to cultured luteal cells using pulse-chase technique. Luteal cell cultures were pulse labeled with [125I]HDL3 and reincubated in the absence of HDL. By 24 h about 50% of the initallay bound radioactivity was released into the medium, of which 60-65% could be precipitated with 10% TCA. Gel filtration of the chase incubation medium on 10% agarose showed that the amount of TCA-soluble radioactivity was nearly completely accounted for by a sharp peak in the low molecular weight region which was identified as 96% monoiodotyrosine by paper chromatography. The TCA-precipitable radioactivity was nearly completely accounted for by a sharp peak in the low molecular weight region which was identified as 96% monoiodotyrosine by paper chromatography. The TCA-precipitable radioactivity eluted over a wide range of molecular weights (15,000-80,000), and there was very little intact HDL present. Electrophoresis of the chase medium showed that component of the TCA-precipitable portion had mobility similar to apo AI. Lysosomal inhibitors of receptor-mediated endocytosis had no effect on the composition or quantity of radioactivity released during chase incubation. The results show that HDL3 binding to luteal cells is followed by complete degradation of the lipoprotein, although the TCA-soluble part does not reflect the extent of degradation

  3. Investigation of thermal and electrochemical degradation of fuel cell catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cai, Mei; Ruthkosky, Martin S.; Balogh, Michael P.; Oh, Se H. [General Motors Research and Development Center (United States); Merzougui, Belabbes [Aerotek (United States); Swathirajan, Swathy [General Motors Fuel Cell Activities (United States)

    2006-10-06

    A significant problem hindering large-scale implementation of proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell technology is the loss of performance during extended operation and automotive cycling. Recent investigations of the deterioration of cell performance have revealed that a considerable part of the performance loss is due to the degradation of the electrocatalyst. In this study, an attempt is made to experimentally simulate the degradation processes such as carbon corrosion and platinum (Pt) surface area loss using an accelerated thermal sintering protocol. Two types of Tanaka fuel cell catalyst samples were heat-treated at 250{sup o}C in humidified helium (He) gas streams and several oxygen (O{sub 2}) concentrations. The catalysts were then cycled electrochemically in pellet electrodes to determine the hydrogen adsorption (HAD) area and its evolution in subsequent electrochemical cycling. Samples that had undergone different degrees of carbon corrosion and Pt sintering were characterized for changes in carbon mass, active Pt surface area, BET (Brunauer, Emmett and Teller) surface area, and Pt crystallite size. Studies of the effect of oxygen and water concentration on two Tanaka catalysts, dispersed on carbon supports with varying BET areas, revealed that carbon oxidation in the presence of Pt follows two pathways: an oxygen pathway that leads to mass loss due to formation of gaseous products, and a water pathway that results in mass gains, especially for high BET area supports. These processes may be assisted by the formation of highly reactive OH and OOH type radicals. Platinum surface area loss, measured at varying oxygen concentrations and as a function of sintering time using X-ray diffraction (XRD), CO chemisorption, and electrochemical hydrogen adsorption, reveal an important role for carbon corrosion rather than an increase in Pt particle size for the surface area loss. Platinum surface area loss during 10h of thermal degradation was equivalent to

  4. Investigation of Solar Cells Power Degradation Due to Electrostatic Discharge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hossein Fayazi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Satellites are surrounded with protons, electrons and heavy charged particles. Space radiation impact on satellite sub-systems cause several anomalies which are important problem for satellite designers. Until recently, the majority of spacecraft primary power systems used solar arrays and rechargeable batteries to supply 28 V. For low-inclination spacecraft, 28 V systems have not been observed to arc. As the power requirements for spacecraft increased, however, high-voltage solar arrays were baselined to minimize total mass and increase power production efficiency. With the advent of 100 V systems in the late 1980s, arcing began to be observed on a number of spacecraft. The mechanism proposed in this paper, described electrical and physical degradation of solar cells due to electrostatic discharge anomalies on satellites. The cell was characterized again after arcing to determine the change in efficiency. This paper details the process for designing the circuit to create the arcing, and the different setups used to degrade the cells electrically and physically. It also describes the final setups to be used in space laboratory. This model is designed using Matlab and SPENVIS. Identification and simulation this mechanism is an important step in solar array design for space application

  5. High temperature PEM fuel cells - Degradation and durability

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Araya, S.S.

    2012-12-15

    This work analyses the degradation issues of a High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (HT-PEMFC). It is based on the assumption that given the current challenges for storage and distribution of hydrogen, it is more practical to use liquid alcohols as energy carriers for fuel cells. Among these, methanol is very attractive, as it can be obtained from a variety of renewable sources and has a relatively low reforming temperature for the production of hydrogen rich gaseous mixture. The effects on HT-PEMFC of the different constituents of this gaseous mixture, known as a reformate gas, are investigated in the current work. For this, an experimental set up, in which all these constituents can be fed to the anode side of a fuel cell for testing, is put in place. It includes mass flow controllers for the gaseous species, and a vapor delivery system for the vapor mixture of the unconverted reforming reactants. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) is used to characterize the effects of these impurities. The effects of CO were tested up to 2% by volume along with other impurities. All the reformate impurities, including ethanol-water vapor mixture, cause loss in the performance of the fuel cell. In general, CO{sub 2} dilutes the reactants, if tested alone at high operating temperatures (180 C), but tends to exacerbate the effects of CO if they are tested together. On the other hand, CO and methanol-water vapor mixture degrade the fuel cell proportionally to the amounts in which they are tested. In this dissertation some of the mechanisms with which the impurities affect the fuel cell are discussed and interdependence among the effects is also studied. This showed that the combined effect of reformate impurities is more than the arithmetic sum of the individual effects of reformate constituents. The results of the thesis help to understand better the issues of degradation and durability in fuel cells, which can help to make them more durable and

  6. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Song, Chun-Hua [Department of Epidemiology and Biostatistics, College of Public Health, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Liu, Zhi-Qiang [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Huang, Shelly [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada); Zheng, Peng-Yuan, E-mail: medp7123@126.com [Department of Gastroenterology, The Second Hospital, Zhengzhou University, Zhengzhou (China); Yang, Ping-Chang, E-mail: yangp@mcmaster.ca [Department of Pathology and Molecular Medicine, McMaster University, Hamilton, ON (Canada)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  7. Probiotics promote endocytic allergen degradation in gut epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function. ► The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. ► Antigens transported across A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers conserved antigenicity. ► Probiotic proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. -- Abstract: Background and aims: Epithelial barrier dysfunction plays a critical role in the pathogenesis of allergic diseases; the mechanism is to be further understood. The ubiquitin E3 ligase A20 (A20) plays a role in the endocytic protein degradation in the cells. This study aims to elucidate the role of A20 in the maintenance of gut epithelial barrier function. Methods: Gut epithelial cell line, HT-29 cell, was cultured into monolayers to evaluate the barrier function in transwells. RNA interference was employed to knock down the A20 gene in HT-29 cells to test the role of A20 in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function. Probiotic derived proteins were extracted from the culture supernatants using to enhance the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells. Results: The results showed that the knockdown of A20 compromised the epithelial barrier function in HT-29 monolayers, mainly increased the intracellular permeability. The fusion of endosome/lysosome was disturbed in the A20-deficient HT-29 cells. Allergens collected from the transwell basal chambers of A20-deficient HT-29 monolayers still conserved functional antigenicity. Treating with probiotic derived proteins increased the expression of A20 in HT-29 cells and promote the barrier function. Conclusion: A20 plays an important role in the maintenance of epithelial barrier function as shown by HT-29 monolayer. Probiotic derived protein increases the expression of A20 and promote the HT-29 monolayer barrier function.

  8. Degradation of Flexible, ITO-Free Oligothiophene Organic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bormann, Ludwig; Nehm, Frederik; Sonntag, Luisa; Chen, Fan-Yu; Selzer, Franz; Müller-Meskamp, Lars; Eychmüller, Alexander; Leo, Karl

    2016-06-15

    We investigate the degradation of organic solar cells based on an oligothiophene (DCV5T-Me) small molecule donor and the acceptor C60. Two different flexible, transparent bottom electrode types are employed: a transparent metal electrode (TME) and silver nanowires (AgNWs). They exhibit high optical transparency up to 86% and a sheet resistance as low as 12Ω/□. Power conversion efficiencies of 7.0%, 5.7%, and 7.2% on TME, AgNWs, and indium tin oxide (ITO, reference) are reached, respectively. The solar cells are protected against moisture ingress utilizing a flexible alumina thin-film, exhibiting water vapor transmission rates down to 3 × 10(-5) g m(-2) day(-1) at 38 °C and 90% relative humidity (RH). Implementation of this ultrabarrier as top and bottom encapsulation enables fabrication of fully flexible devices. A decrease in PCE to 80% of initial values is observed after 1000 ± 50 h on flexible, encapsulated TME but only 20 ± 5 h on AgNWs in a climate of 38 °C/50% RH. Degradation in AgNW-based devices is attributed to electrode decomposition. PMID:27218608

  9. Interfacial thermal degradation in inverted organic solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The efficiency of organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells is constantly improving; however, the lifetime of the devices still requires significant improvement if the potential of OPV is to be realised. In this study, several series of inverted OPV were fabricated and thermally aged in the dark in an inert atmosphere. It was demonstrated that all of the devices undergo short circuit current-driven degradation, which is assigned to morphology changes in the active layer. In addition, a previously unreported, open circuit voltage-driven degradation mechanism was observed that is highly material specific and interfacial in origin. This mechanism was specifically observed in devices containing MoO3 and silver as hole transporting layers and electrode materials, respectively. Devices with this combination were among the worst performing devices with respect to thermal ageing. The physical origins of this mechanism were explored by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and atomic force microscopy and an increase in roughness with thermal ageing was observed that may be partially responsible for the ageing mechanism

  10. Interfacial thermal degradation in inverted organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenbank, William; Hirsch, Lionel; Wantz, Guillaume; Chambon, Sylvain, E-mail: sylvain.chambon@ims-bordeaux.fr [University of Bordeaux, CNRS, Bordeaux INP, IMS, UMR 5218, F-33405 Talence (France)

    2015-12-28

    The efficiency of organic photovoltaic (OPV) solar cells is constantly improving; however, the lifetime of the devices still requires significant improvement if the potential of OPV is to be realised. In this study, several series of inverted OPV were fabricated and thermally aged in the dark in an inert atmosphere. It was demonstrated that all of the devices undergo short circuit current-driven degradation, which is assigned to morphology changes in the active layer. In addition, a previously unreported, open circuit voltage-driven degradation mechanism was observed that is highly material specific and interfacial in origin. This mechanism was specifically observed in devices containing MoO{sub 3} and silver as hole transporting layers and electrode materials, respectively. Devices with this combination were among the worst performing devices with respect to thermal ageing. The physical origins of this mechanism were explored by Rutherford backscattering spectrometry and atomic force microscopy and an increase in roughness with thermal ageing was observed that may be partially responsible for the ageing mechanism.

  11. Identification of periodontal pathogens in atherosclerotic vessels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fiehn, Nils-Erik; Larsen, Tove; Christiansen, Natalia;

    2005-01-01

    Epidemiological studies have shown that periodontitis may be associated with presence of atherosclerosis. DNA from periodontal pathogens has been detected in atherosclerotic lesions, but viable oral bacteria have not yet been isolated from atherosclerotic plaques. The purpose of the present study...... was to determine if viable oral bacteria could be isolated from atherosclerotic lesions and if DNA from periodontal pathogens could be detected by use of polymerase chain reaction (PCR) techniques....

  12. Degradation of solar cell electric performance due to arcing in LEO plasma environment

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura, Teppei; Hosoda, Satoshi; Kagawa, Hideshi; 奥村 哲平; 細田 聡史; Kim, Jeongho; Cho, Mengu; 香河 英史

    2005-01-01

    When we operate solar array at high voltage (greater than 100 V) in LEO environment, arcing occurs on the solar array surface. The solar cell can suffer degradation of electric performance due to only one arc with some probability. We performed degradation test of solar array coupons against arcing under simulated LEO environment in order to identify the threshold of arc energy to cause the solar cell degradation. The solar array coupons are made of silicon solar cells. The LCR circuit was at...

  13. SELECTINS IN CORONARY ATHEROSCLEROTIC DISEASE:A REVIEW

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李远方; 胡健

    2001-01-01

    The development of atherosclerotic lesions appears to be inflammatory in nature. It involves the recruitment of blood monocytes to the vascular endothelium, followed by intimal infiltration. Monocytes differentiate to macrophages, then internalize lipids to form foam cells, thus develop fatty streak lesion. A wide range of adhesion molecules governs these interactions between cells, among these molecules are selectins. Selectins mediate the first step in leukocyte adhesion at sites of inflammation or injury, characterized by rolling and tethering

  14. Characterization of HSP27 phosphorylation sites in human atherosclerotic plaque secretome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Durán, Mari-Carmen; Boeri-Erba, Elisabetta; Mohammed, Shabaz;

    2007-01-01

    -lymphocytes). These interactions can be mediated by proteins secreted from these cells, which therefore exert an important role in the atherosclerotic process. We recently described a novel strategy for the characterization of the human atherosclerotic plaque secretome, combining two-dimensional gel electrophoresis...... are unknown. Thus, the role that phosphorylated HSP27 could play in the atherosclerotic process is actually under study. The present work shows the strategies employed to characterize the phosphorylation in the HSP27 secreted by atheroma plaque samples. The application of liquid chromatography tandem...

  15. Proton exchange membrane fuel cell degradation: A parametric analysis using Computational Fluid Dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozden, Ender; Tari, Ilker

    2016-02-01

    A Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell is numerically investigated both as fresh and as degraded with the help of observed degradation patterns reported in the literature. The fresh fuel cell model is validated and verified with the data from the literature. Modifying the model by varying the parameters affected by degradation, a degraded PEM fuel cell model is created. The degraded fuel cell is parametrically analyzed by using a commercial Computational Fluid Dynamics (CFD) software. The investigated parameters are the membrane equivalent weight, the Catalyst Layer (CL) porosity and viscous resistance, the Gas Diffusion Layer (GDL) porosity and viscous resistance, and the bipolar plate contact resistance. It is shown for the first time that PEM fuel cell overall degradation can be numerically estimated by combining experimental data from degraded individual components. By comparing the simulation results for the fresh and the degraded PEM fuel cells for two years of operation, it is concluded that the effects of overall degradation on cell potential is significant - estimated to be 17% around the operating point of the fuel cell at 0.95 V open circuit voltage and 70 °C operating temperature.

  16. Aspects of the chemical degradation of PFSA ionomers used in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Healy, J.; Brundage, M.; Gasteiger, H.; Abbott, J. [General Motors Fuel Cell Activities, 10 Carriage Street, Honeoye Falls, NY 14472 (United States); Hayden, C.; Xie, T.; Olson, K.; Waldo, R. [General Motors Research and Development Center, 30500 Mound Road, Warren MI 48090 (United States)

    2005-04-01

    The chemical degradation of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) membranes was studied both in-situ (during fuel cell operation) and ex-situ (by Fenton's test). During fuel cell operation, the degradation rate was quantified by monitoring the rate of fluoride release. The rate of degradation was found to be strongly dependent on operating conditions. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) and mass spectrometry (MS) were used to identify degradation products other than fluoride generated during fuel cell operation. Strong similarities were found between the organic fragments generated from both the in-situ (fuel cell operation) and ex-situ (Fenton's test) degradation processes. The chemical structure of the fragment is consistent with that of the side chain on the PFSA ionomer used in the experiments. The implications of the existence of this product for the chemical degradation mechanism are discussed. (Abstract Copyright [2005], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  17. Imaging Atherosclerotic Plaque Calcification: Translating Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Grant; Meadows, Judith; Morrison, Alan R

    2016-08-01

    Calcification of atherosclerotic lesions was long thought to be an age - related, passive process, but increasingly data has revealed that atherosclerotic calcification is a more active process, involving complex signaling pathways and bone-like genetic programs. Initially, imaging of atherosclerotic calcification was limited to gross assessment of calcium burden, which is associated with total atherosclerotic burden and risk of cardiovascular mortality and of all cause mortality. More recently, sophisticated molecular imaging studies of the various processes involved in calcification have begun to elucidate information about plaque calcium composition and consequent vulnerability to rupture, leading to hard cardiovascular events like myocardial infarction. As such, there has been renewed interest in imaging calcification to advance risk assessment accuracy in an evolving era of precision medicine. Here we summarize recent advances in our understanding of the biologic process of atherosclerotic calcification as well as some of the molecular imaging tools used to assess it. PMID:27339750

  18. On the degradation of fuel cell catalyst. From model systems to high surface area catalysts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arenz, M. [Copenhagen Univ. (Denmark). Dept. of Chemistry

    2010-07-01

    In the presented work, as an alternative accelerated degradation tests in the form of half-cell measurements combined with identical location transmission electron microscopy (IL-TEM){sup 10,} {sup 11} are presented. It is demonstrated that for different catalysts the degradation mechanism can be scrutinized in detail. Thus this approach enables the systematic investigation of fuel cell catalyst degradation in a reduced period of time. (orig.)

  19. Macrophage p53 controls macrophage death in atherosclerotic lesions of apolipoprotein E deficient mice

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boesten, L.S.M.; Zadelaar, A.S.M.; Nieuwkoop, A. van; Hu, L.; Teunisse, A.F.A.S.; Jochemsen, A.G.; Evers, B.; Water, B. van de; Gijbels, M.J.J.; Vlijmen, B.J.M. van; Havekes, L.M.; Winther, M.P.J. de

    2009-01-01

    The cellular composition of atherosclerotic lesions is determined by many factors including cell infiltration, proliferation and cell death. Tumor suppressor gene p53 has been shown to regulate both cell proliferation and cell death in many cell types. In the present study, we investigated the role

  20. Consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of plant biomass expressing cell wall degrading enzymes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raab, R. Michael; Zhang, Dongcheng; Bougri, Oleg

    2016-02-02

    Methods for consolidated pretreatment and hydrolysis of genetically engineered plants expressing cell wall degrading enzymes are provided. Expression cassettes and vectors for making transgenic plants are described. Plants engineered to express one or more cell wall degrading enzymes using expression cassettes and vectors of the invention are also provided.

  1. Calcification Locates to Transglutaminases in Advanced Human Atherosclerotic Lesions

    OpenAIRE

    2009-01-01

    Transglutaminases play an important role in vascular smooth muscle cell-induced calcification in vitro. In this study, we determined whether these enzymes are also involved in human atherosclerotic calcification using nine carotid artery specimens obtained at endarterectomy. Sections of the carotid artery specimens were registered to micro-computed tomography images and stained for tissue-type transglutaminase, plasma transglutaminase factor XIIIA (FXIIIA), the Nε(γ-glutamyl)lysine cross-link...

  2. Human urotensin II promotes hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takuya; Arita, Shigeko; Shiraishi, Yuji; Suguro, Toshiaki; Sakai, Tetsuo; Hongo, Shigeki; Miyazaki, Akira

    2009-01-01

    Human urotensin II (U-II), the most potent vasoconstrictor undecapeptide identified to date, and its receptor (UT) are involved in the pathogenesis of systemic and pulmonary hypertension. Here, we review recent advances in our understanding of the pathophysiology of U-II with particular reference to its role in atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases. Single-nucleotide polymorphisms of U-II gene (S89N) are associated with onset of essential hypertension, type II diabetes mellitus, and insulin resistance in the Asian population. Plasma U-II levels are elevated in patients with vascular endothelial dysfunction-related diseases such as essential hypertension, diabetes mellitus, atherosclerosis, ischemic heart disease, and heart failure. Chronic infusion of U-II enhances atherosclerotic lesions in the aorta in apolipoprotein E-knockout mice. In human atherosclerotic plaques from the aorta and coronary and carotid arteries, U-II is expressed at high levels in endothelial cells (ECs) and lymphocytes, whereas UT is expressed at high levels in vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs), ECs, monocytes, and macrophages. U-II stimulates vascular cell adhesion molecule-1 and intercellular adhesion molecule-1 expression in human ECs as chemoattractant for monocytes, and accelerates foam cell formation by up-regulation of acyl-coenzyme A:cholesterol acyltransferase-1 in human monocyte-derived macrophages. U-II produces reactive oxygen species (ROS) via nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide phosphate oxidase activation in human VSMCs, and stimulates VSMC proliferation with synergistic effects when combined with ROS, oxidized LDL, and serotonin. Clinical studies demonstrated increased plasma U-II levels in accordance with the severity of carotid atherosclerosis in patients with essential hypertension and that of coronary artery lesions in patients with ischemic heart disease. Here, we summarize the key roles of U-II in progression of hypertension and atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases

  3. Effects of X-irradiation on artificial blood vessel wall degradation by invasive tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Artificial vessel wall cultures, constructed by growing arterial endothelial cells on preformed layers of rat smooth muscle cells, were used to evaluate the effects of X-irradiation on tumor cell-induced tissue degradation. Bovine endothelial cells had radiation sensitivities similar to those of rat smooth muscle cells. Preirradiation of smooth muscle cells, before the addition of human fibrosarcoma (HT 1080) cells, did not increase the rate of degradation and destruction by the invasive cells. However, the degradation rate was decreased if the cultures were irradiated after the addition of HT 1080 cells. The presence of bovine endothelial cells markedly inhibited the destructive abilities of fibrosarcoma cells, but preirradiation of artificial vessel walls substantially decreased their capabilities to resist HT 1080-induced lysis. These findings suggest that the abilities of blood vessels to limit extravasation may be compromised by ionizing radiation

  4. Revascularisation of atherosclerotic mesenteric arteries

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, Max Greve; Lorentzen, Jørgen Ewald; Schroeder, T V

    1994-01-01

    25 patients, chronic ischaemia in 53 and prophylactic reconstruction in connection with aortic surgery in 12 patients. The superior mesenteric artery (SMA) was revascularised in 87 patients and the coeliac axis or common hepatic artery in six. Thus, only three patients had both territories......OBJECTIVES: Visceral artery surgery is well known to vascular surgeons, but most have limited personal experience. We report our experience with 90 patients treated for atherosclerotic lesions of the visceral arteries during a 25-year period 1968-1993. DESIGN: Retrospective study. SETTING...... revascularised. Thromboendarterectomy was performed in 15 patients, transposition of the SMA directly into the infrarenal aorta in 30 and bypass in 48 patients. CHIEF OUTCOME MEASURES: Cumulative symptom-free and survival rates. MAIN RESULTS: The overall perioperative (30 days) mortality rate was 13%, mainly...

  5. CAROTID ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESION IN YOUNG PATIENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N. V. Pizova

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: to determine the incidence of atherosclerotic lesions in the carotid and vertebral arteries of young patients from Doppler ultrasound data and to compare the quantitatively assessed traditional risk factors of coronary heart disease (CHD with severe extracranial artery atherosclerotic lesion.Subjects and methods. Doppler ultrasound was carried out evaluating structural changes in the aortic arch branches in 1563 railway transport workers less than 45 years of age. A separate sample consisted of 68 young people with carotid atherosclerotic changes, in whom traditional risk factors for CHD were studied, so were in a control group of individuals without atherosclerotic changes (n = 38.Results. Among the examinees, carotid atherosclerotic lesion was detected in 112 (7.1 % cases, the increase in the rate of atherosclerotic plaques in patients aged 35–45 years being 9.08 %; that in the rate of local intima-media thickness in those aged 31–40 years being 5.1 %. Smoking (particularly that along with hypercholesterolemia and a family history of cardiovascular diseases, obesity (along with low activity, and emotional overstrain were defined as important risk factors in the young patients. Moreover, factor analysis has shown that smoking,hypertension, and early cardiovascular pathology in the next of kin makes the greatest contribution to the development of carotid atherosclerotic lesion.Conclusion. Among the patients less than 45 years of age, carotid and vertebral artery atherosclerotic changes were found in 112 (7.1 % cases, which were more pronounced in male patients. Smoking, particularly along with hypercholesterolemia and genetic predisposition to cardiovascular diseases, was a risk factor that had the highest impact on the degree of atherosclerotic lesion in the aortic arch branches of the young patients.

  6. The Protective Effect of Apamin on LPS/Fat-Induced Atherosclerotic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soo-Jung Kim

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Apamin, a peptide component of bee venom (BV, has anti-inflammatory properties. However, the molecular mechanisms by which apamin prevents atherosclerosis are not fully understood. We examined the effect of apamin on atherosclerotic mice. Atherosclerotic mice received intraperitoneal (ip injections of lipopolysaccharide (LPS, 2 mg/kg to induce atherosclerotic change and were fed an atherogenic diet for 12 weeks. Apamin (0.05 mg/kg was administered by ip injection. LPS-induced THP-1-derived macrophage inflammation treated with apamin reduced expression of tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, vascular cell adhesion molecule (VCAM-1, and intracellular cell adhesion molecule (ICAM-1, as well as the nuclear factor kappa B (NF-κB signaling pathway. Apamin decreased the formation of atherosclerotic lesions as assessed by hematoxylin and elastic staining. Treatment with apamin reduced lipids, Ca2+ levels, and TNF-α in the serum from atherosclerotic mice. Further, apamin significantly attenuated expression of VCAM-1, ICAM-1, TGF-β1, and fibronectin in the descending aorta from atherosclerotic mice. These results indicate that apamin plays an important role in monocyte/macrophage inflammatory processing and may be of potential value for preventing atherosclerosis.

  7. Anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hidekatsu Yanai

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Definition: The Konjac plant comes from the genus Amorphophallus. Japanese food uses Konjac cake. Konjac contains almost no calories and a great amount of dietary fiber. Here, we reviewed possible anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac, using the search Pubmed ®. Konjac ingestion is likely beneficially associated with obesity, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism. However, evidence is lacking on the relationship between konjac ingestion and development of atherosclerotic diseases. To more fully understand the anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac, future studies, preferably with larger numbers of subjects, will be performed.

  8. Diversity of beetle genes encoding novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Pauchet, Y.; Wilkinson, P.; Chauhan, R.; Ffrench-Constant, R.

    2010-01-01

    Plant cell walls are a heterogeneous mixture of polysaccharides and proteins that require a range of different enzymes to degrade them. Plant cell walls are also the primary source of cellulose, the most abundant and useful biopolymer on the planet. Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are therefore important in a wide range of biotechnological processes from the production of biofuels and food to waste processing. However, despite the fact that the last common ancestor of all deuterost...

  9. Adiponectin-coated nanoparticles for enhanced imaging of atherosclerotic plaques

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almer G

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Gunter Almer1,6, Karin Wernig2, Matthias Saba-Lepek3, Samih Haj-Yahya1, Johannes Rattenberger4, Julian Wagner4, Kerstin Gradauer3, Daniela Frascione3, Georg Pabst3, Gerd Leitinger5, Harald Mangge1, Andreas Zimmer2, Ruth Prassl31Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, 2Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, 3Institute of Biophysics and Nanosystems Research, Austrian Academy of Science, 4Institute for Electron Microscopy and Fine Structure Research, Graz University of Technology, 5Institute of Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Medical University of Graz, 6Center for Medical Research, Medical University of Graz, AustriaBackground: Atherosclerosis is a leading cause of mortality in the Western world, and plaque diagnosis is still a challenge in cardiovascular medicine. The main focus of this study was to make atherosclerotic plaques visible using targeted nanoparticles for improved imaging. Today various biomarkers are known to be involved in the pathophysiologic scenario of atherosclerotic plaques. One promising new candidate is the globular domain of the adipocytokine adiponectin (gAd, which was used as a targeting sequence in this study.Methods: gAd was coupled to two different types of nanoparticles, namely protamine-oligonucleotide nanoparticles, known as proticles, and sterically stabilized liposomes. Both gAd-targeted nanoparticles were investigated for their potency to characterize critical scenarios within early and advanced atherosclerotic plaque lesions using an atherosclerotic mouse model. Aortic tissue from wild type and apolipoprotein E-deficient mice, both fed a high-fat diet, were stained with either fluorescent-labeled gAd or gAd-coupled nanoparticles. Ex vivo imaging was performed using confocal laser scanning microscopy.Results: gAd-targeted sterically stabilized liposomes generated a strong signal by accumulating at the surface of

  10. Degradation of insulin by isolated mouse pancreatic acini. Evidence for cell surface protease activity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the present study, we have used isolated mouse pancreatic acini were used to investigate the relationship between 125I-insulin binding and its degradation in order to probe the nature and cellular localization of the degradative process. In these cells, the proteolysis of 125I-insulin was dependent on time and cell concentration, and was saturated by unlabeled insulin with a Km of 290 nM. Since this value was much higher than the Kd for insulin binding to its receptor (1.1 nM), the data indicated that 125I-insulin degradation by acini occurred primarily via nonreceptor mechanisms. Several lines of evidence suggested that insulin was being degraded by the neutral thiol protease, insulin degrading enzyme (IDE). First, insulin degradation was inhibited by thiolreacting agents such as N-ethylmaleimide and p-chloromercuribenzoate. Second, the Km for degradation in acini was similar to the reported Km for IDE in other tissues. Third, the enzyme activity had a relative mol wt of approximately 130,000 by gel filtration, a value similar to that reported for purified IDE. Fourth, the degrading activity was removed with a specific antibody to IDE. Other lines of evidence suggested that enzymes located on the cell surface played a role in insulin degradation by acini. First, the nonpenetrating sulfhydryl reacting agent 5,5' dithiobis-2-nitrobenzoic acid blocked 125I-insulin degradation. Second, a specific antibody to IDE identified the presence of the enzyme on the cell surface. Third, chloroquine, leupeptin and antipain, agents that inhibit lysosomal function, did not influence 125I-insulin degradation. Fourth, highly purified pancreatic plasma membranes degraded 125I-insulin

  11. A Porous Tissue Engineering Scaffold Selectively Degraded by Cell-Generated Reactive Oxygen Species

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, John R.; Gupta, Mukesh K.; Page, Jonathan M.; Yu, Fang; Davidson, Jeffrey M.; Guelcher, Scott A.

    2014-01-01

    Biodegradable tissue engineering scaffolds are commonly fabricated from poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) or similar polyesters that degrade by hydrolysis. PLGA hydrolysis generates acidic breakdown products that trigger an accelerated, autocatalytic degradation mechanism that can create mismatched rates of biomaterial breakdown and tissue formation. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) are key mediators of cell function in both health and disease, especially at sites of inflammation and tissue healing, and induction of inflammation and ROS are natural components of the in vivo response to biomaterial implantation. Thus, polymeric biomaterials that are selectively degraded by cell-generated ROS may have potential for creating tissue engineering scaffolds with better matched rates of tissue in-growth and cell-mediated scaffold biodegradation. To explore this approach, a series of poly(thioketal) (PTK) urethane (PTK-UR) biomaterial scaffolds were synthesized that degrade specifically by an ROS-dependent mechanism. PTK-UR scaffolds had significantly higher compressive moduli than analogous poly(ester urethane) (PEUR) scaffolds formed from hydrolytically-degradable ester-based diols (p < 0.05). Unlike PEUR scaffolds, the PTK-UR scaffolds were stable under aqueous conditions out to 25 weeks but were selectively degraded by ROS, indicating that their biodegradation would be exclusively cell-mediated. The in vitro oxidative degradation rates of the PTK-URs followed first-order degradation kinetics, were significantly dependent on PTK composition (p < 0.05), and correlated to ROS concentration. In subcutaneous rat wounds, PTK-UR scaffolds supported cellular infiltration and granulation tissue formation, followed first-order degradation kinetics over 7 weeks, and produced significantly greater stenting of subcutaneous wounds compared to PEUR scaffolds. These combined results indicate that ROS-degradable PTK-UR tissue engineering scaffolds have significant advantages over analogous

  12. X-ray induced degradation of DNA in Aspergillus nidulans cells comparative analysis of UV- and X-ray induced DNA degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Irradiating cells of Aspergillus nidulans of the wild type in the logarythmical growth phase with X-rays leads to a certain retention in DNA synthesis. This period is characterized by an insignificant fermentative DNA degradation connected with a process of its repair. There is no direct dependence between the radiation dose and the level of DNA degradation. The investigation of X-ray induced DNA degradation in a number of UVS-mutants permits to show the existence of two branches of DNA degradation - dependent and independent of the exogenic energy source. The dependence of DNA degradation on albumen synthesis prior to irradiation and after it, is demonstrated. It is supposed that the level of X-ray induced DNA degradation is determined by two albumen systems, one of which initiates degradation and the other terminates it. The comparative analysis of UV and X-ray induced DNA degradation is carried out

  13. Natural History of Intracranial Atherosclerotic Disease

    OpenAIRE

    YuehuaPu

    2014-01-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease was very common among stroke patients of Asians, Blacks, and Hispanics ancestry. Furthermore, stroke patients with intracranial atherosclerosis (ICAS) have higher recurrence rate of cerebral ischemia and death than those without ICAS. However, the natural history of intracranial atherosclerotic disease is still in controversy. Most of the studies were retrospective and randomized controlled trial of drugs. This review summarized the prognosis of symptomati...

  14. Anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac

    OpenAIRE

    Hidekatsu Yanai; Hiroki Adachi; Hisayuki Katsuyama; Hidetaka Hamasaki; Akahito Sako

    2015-01-01

    Definition: The Konjac plant comes from the genus Amorphophallus. Japanese food uses Konjac cake. Konjac contains almost no calories and a great amount of dietary fiber. Here, we reviewed possible anti-atherosclerotic effects of konjac, using the search Pubmed ®. Konjac ingestion is likely beneficially associated with obesity, blood pressure, lipid and glucose metabolism. However, evidence is lacking on the relationship between konjac ingestion and development of atherosclerotic diseases. To ...

  15. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped PBI Membrane Based High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela;

    2014-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation. Continuous tests with H2 and simulated reformate which was composed...

  16. Degradation chemistry of RuLL´(NCS)2 complexes in the Dye-sensitized solar cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Torben

    lecture I will present and overview of our degradation investigations of the ruthenium dyes N719, Z907 and C106 with the general structure RuLL´(NCS)2 and show how detailed degradation mechanistic knowledge is important in the developing of DSC cells with improved thermal dye stability. The various...

  17. PI5P Triggers ICAM-1 Degradation in Shigella Infected Cells, Thus Dampening Immune Cell Recruitment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boal, Frédéric; Puhar, Andrea; Xuereb, Jean-Marie; Kunduzova, Oksana; Sansonetti, Philippe J; Payrastre, Bernard; Tronchère, Hélène

    2016-02-01

    Shigella flexneri, the pathogen responsible for bacillary dysentery, has evolved multiple strategies to control the inflammatory response. Here, we show that Shigella subverts the subcellular trafficking of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1), a key molecule in immune cell recruitment, in a mechanism dependent on the injected bacterial enzyme IpgD and its product, the lipid mediator PI5P. Overexpression of IpgD, but not a phosphatase dead mutant, induced the internalization and the degradation of ICAM-1 in intestinal epithelial cells. Remarkably, addition of permeant PI5P reproduced IpgD effects and led to the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment. Finally, these results were confirmed in an in vivo model of Shigella infection where IpgD-dependent ICAM-1 internalization reduced neutrophil adhesion. In conclusion, we describe here an immune evasion mechanism used by the pathogen Shigella to divert the host cell trafficking machinery in order to reduce immune cell recruitment. PMID:26776508

  18. PI5P Triggers ICAM-1 Degradation in Shigella Infected Cells, Thus Dampening Immune Cell Recruitment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frédéric Boal

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Shigella flexneri, the pathogen responsible for bacillary dysentery, has evolved multiple strategies to control the inflammatory response. Here, we show that Shigella subverts the subcellular trafficking of the intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1, a key molecule in immune cell recruitment, in a mechanism dependent on the injected bacterial enzyme IpgD and its product, the lipid mediator PI5P. Overexpression of IpgD, but not a phosphatase dead mutant, induced the internalization and the degradation of ICAM-1 in intestinal epithelial cells. Remarkably, addition of permeant PI5P reproduced IpgD effects and led to the inhibition of neutrophil recruitment. Finally, these results were confirmed in an in vivo model of Shigella infection where IpgD-dependent ICAM-1 internalization reduced neutrophil adhesion. In conclusion, we describe here an immune evasion mechanism used by the pathogen Shigella to divert the host cell trafficking machinery in order to reduce immune cell recruitment.

  19. Fate and degradation of petroleum hydrocarbons in stormwater bioretention cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    LeFevre, Gregory Hallett

    This dissertation describes the investigation of the fate of hydrocarbons in stormwater bioretention areas and those mechanisms that affect hydrocarbon fate in such systems. Seventy-five samples from 58 bioretention areas were collected and analyzed to measure total petroleum hydrocarbon (TPH) residual and biodegradation functional genes. TPH residual in bioretention areas was greater than background sites but low overall (<3 µg/kg), and well below either the TPH concentration of concern or the expected concentration, assuming no losses. Bioretention areas with deep-root vegetation contained significantly greater quantites of bacterial 16S rRNA genes and two functional genes involved in hydrocarbon biodegradation. Field soils were capable of mineralizing naphthalene, a polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) when incubated in the laboratory. In an additional laboratory investigation, a column study was initiated to comprehensively determine naphthalene fate in a simulated bioretention cell using a 14C-labeled tracer. Sorption to soil was the greatest sink of naphthalene in the columns, although biodegradation and vegetative uptake were also important loss mechanisms. Little leaching occurred following the first flush, and volatilization was insignificant. Significant enrichment of naphthalene degrading bacteria occurred over the course of the experiment as a result of naphthalene exposure. This was evident from enhanced naphthalene biodegradation kinetics (measured via batch tests), significant increases in naphthalene dioxygenase gene quantities, and a significant correlation observed between naphthalene residual and biodegradation functional genes. Vegetated columns outperformed the unplanted control column in terms of total naphthalene removal and biodegradation kinetics. As a result of these experiments, a final study focused on why planted systems outperform unplanted systems was conducted. Plant root exudates were harvested from hydroponic setups for three

  20. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Noerenberg, Dominik [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); University of Munich - Grosshadern, Department of Clinical Radiology, Munich (Germany); Ebersberger, Hans U. [Heart Center Munich-Bogenhausen, Department of Cardiology and Intensive Care Medicine, Munich (Germany); Diederichs, Gerd; Hamm, Bernd [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); Botnar, Rene M. [King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Makowski, Marcus R. [Charite - University Medicine Berlin, Department of Radiology, Berlin (Germany); King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom)

    2016-03-15

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  1. Molecular magnetic resonance imaging of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging aims to improve the identification and characterization of pathological processes in vivo by visualizing the underlying biological mechanisms. Molecular imaging techniques are increasingly used to assess vascular inflammation, remodeling, cell migration, angioneogenesis and apoptosis. In cardiovascular diseases, molecular magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) offers new insights into the in vivo biology of pathological vessel wall processes of the coronary and carotid arteries and the aorta. This includes detection of early vascular changes preceding plaque development, visualization of unstable plaques and assessment of response to therapy. The current review focuses on recent developments in the field of molecular MRI to characterise different stages of atherosclerotic vessel wall disease. A variety of molecular MR-probes have been developed to improve the non-invasive detection and characterization of atherosclerotic plaques. Specifically targeted molecular probes allow for the visualization of key biological steps in the cascade leading to the development of arterial vessel wall lesions. Early detection of processes which lead to the development of atherosclerosis and the identification of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaques may enable the early assessment of response to therapy, improve therapy planning, foster the prevention of cardiovascular events and may open the door for the development of patient-specific treatment strategies. (orig.)

  2. Cell wall degrading enzymes in Trichoderma asperellum grown on wheat bran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Lasse; Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma asperellum is a filamentous fungus that is able to produce and secrete a wide range of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes used for plant cell wall degradation. The Trichoderma genus has attracted considerable attention from the biorefinery industry due to the production of cell wall...... degrading enzymes and strong secretion ability of this genus. Here we report extensive transcriptome analysis of plant cell wall degrading enzymes in T. asperellum. The production of cell wall degrading enzymes by T. asperellum was tested on a range of cellulosic materials under various conditions. When T...... the theory that the glycoside hydrolases have evolved from a common ancestor, followed by a specialization in which saprotrophic fungi such as T. reesei and T. longibrachiatum lost a significant number of genes including several glycoside hydrolases....

  3. Biochemical and microscopic evidence for the internalization and degradation of heparin-containing mast cell granules by bovine endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Incubation of [35S]heparin-containing mast cell granules with cultured bovine endothelial cells was followed by the appearance of 35S-granule-associated radioactivity within the endothelial cells and a decrease in radioactivity in the extracellular fluid. These changes occurred during the first 24 hours of incubation and suggested ingestion of the mast cell granules by the endothelial cells. Periodic electron microscopic examination of the monolayers confirmed this hypothesis by demonstrating apposition of the granules to the plasmalemma of endothelial cells, which was followed by the engulfment of the granules by cytoplasmic projections. Under light microscopic examination, mast cell granules within endothelial cells then appeared to undergo degradation. The degradation of [35S]heparin in mast cell granules was demonstrated by a decrease in the amount of intracellular [35S]heparin proteoglycan after 24 hours and the appearance of free [35S]sulfate in the extracellular compartment. Intact endothelial cells were more efficient at degrading [35S]heparin than were cell lysates or cell supernatants. These data provide evidence of the ability of endothelial cells to ingest mast cell granules and degrade native heparin that is presented as a part of the mast cell granule

  4. 3'-5' RNA degradation pathways in human cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lubas, Michal Szymon

    revealed the interaction network of the main 3'-5' RNA degradation machinery – the RNA exosome complex. One of the key findings was the identification and characterisation of the Nuclear Exosome Targeting (NEXT) complex, important for nuclear functions of the exosome. Michal Lubas also studied the role...

  5. Degradation of trinitrotoluene by plant cell cultures of Arabidopsis thaliana

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Podlipná, Radka; Nepovím, Aleš; Vaněk, Tomáš

    Gliwice : Silesian University of Technology, 2004, s. 49. [International Conference on Bioremediation of Soil and Groundwater. Cracow (PL), 05.09.2004-08.09.2004] Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z4055905 Keywords : degradation * TNT * in vitro cultures Subject RIV: EI - Biotechnology ; Bionics

  6. Enhanced degradation of 2-nitrotoluene by immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain SMN-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mulla, Sikandar I; Talwar, Manjunatha P; Bagewadi, Zabin K; Hoskeri, Robertcyril S; Ninnekar, Harichandra Z

    2013-02-01

    Nitrotoluenes are the toxic pollutants of the environment because of their large scale use in the production of explosives. Biodegradation of such chemicals by microorganisms may provide an effective method for their detoxification. We have studied the degradation of 2-nitrotoluene by cells of Micrococcus sp. strain SMN-1 immobilized in various matrices such as polyurethane foam (PUF), sodium alginate (SA), sodium alginate-polyvinyl alcohol (SA-PVA), agar and polyacrylamide. The rate of degradation of 15 and 30 mM 2-nitrotoluene by freely suspended cells and immobilized cells in batches and fed-batch with shaken cultures were compared. The PUF-immobilized cells achieved higher degradation of 15 and 30 mM 2-nitrotoluene than freely suspended cells and the cells immobilized in SA-PVA, polyacrylamide, SA and agar. The PUF-immobilized cells could be reused more than 24 cycles without loosing their degradation capacity and showed more tolerance to pH and temperature changes than freely suspended cells. These results revealed the enhanced rate of degradation of 2-nitrotoluene by PUF-immobilized cells of Micrococcus sp. strain SMN-1. PMID:23153775

  7. A review of the gas diffusion layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells: Durability and degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • This paper focuses on the evaluation of the durability characteristics of GDL. • GDL degradation can be categorized into mechanical and chemical degradation. • Standardized test protocols need to be established to evaluate GDL durability. - Abstract: For successful commercialization of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell, the durability requirement must be satisfied. The degradation of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell has been extensively studied, and a number of review papers investigating the durability issue have already been published. However, the gas diffusion layer has rarely been examined, even though it might be a key factor for managing mass transport and two-phase flow while mechanically supporting a membrane-electrode assembly and a bipolar plate. This paper reviews the published works on the durability of the gas diffusion layer of the proton exchange membrane fuel cell. The degradation of the gas diffusion layer can be divided into mechanical degradation, including the compression force effect, freeze/thaw cycle effect, dissolution effect, and erosion effect, and chemical degradation, which consists of the carbon corrosion effect. Following these categories, the methods of accelerated stress tests, the degradation mechanisms, and the influential factors are investigated along with various measurements of gas diffusion layer properties and cell performances

  8. Human breast cancer cell-mediated bone collagen degradation requires plasminogen activation and matrix metalloproteinase activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hill Peter A

    2005-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Breast cancer cells frequently metastasize to the skeleton and induce extensive bone destruction. Cancer cells produce proteinases, including matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and the plasminogen activator system (PAS which promote invasion of extracellular matrices, but whether these proteinases degrade bone matrix is unclear. To characterize the role that breast cancer cell proteinases play in bone degradation we compared the effects of three human breast cancer cell lines, MDA-MB-231, ZR-75-1 and MCF-7 with those of a normal breast epithelial cell line, HME. The cell lines were cultured atop radiolabelled matrices of either mineralized or non-mineralized bone or type I collagen, the principal organic constituent of bone. Results The 3 breast cancer cell lines all produced significant degradation of the 3 collagenous extracellular matrices (ECMs whilst the normal breast cell line was without effect. Breast cancer cells displayed an absolute requirement for serum to dissolve collagen. Degradation of collagen was abolished in plasminogen-depleted serum and could be restored by the addition of exogenous plasminogen. Localization of plasmin activity to the cell surface was critical for the degradation process as aprotinin, but not α2 antiplasmin, prevented collagen dissolution. During ECM degradation breast cancer cell lines expressed urokinase-type plasminogen activator (u-PA and uPA receptor, and MMPs-1, -3, -9,-13, and -14. The normal breast epithelial cell line expressed low levels of MMPs-1, and -3, uPA and uPA receptor. Inhibitors of both the PAS (aprotinin and PA inhibitor-1 and MMPs (CT1166 and tisue inhibitor of metalloproteinase blocked collagen degradation, demonstrating the requirement of both plasminogen activation and MMP activity for degradation. The activation of MMP-13 in human breast cancer cells was prevented by plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 but not by tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinase-1, suggesting

  9. Atherosclerotic Vessel Changes in Sarcoidosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tuleta, I; Pingel, S; Biener, L; Pizarro, C; Hammerstingl, C; Öztürk, C; Schahab, N; Grohé, C; Nickenig, G; Schaefer, C; Skowasch, D

    2016-01-01

    Sarcoidosis is a systemic granulomatous disease. Atherosclerosis is a chronic inflammatory vessel disease. The aim of our present study was to investigate whether sarcoidosis could be associated with increased risk of atherosclerotic vessel changes. Angiological analysis and blood tests were performed in 71 sarcoidosis patients and 12 matched controls in this prospective cross-sectional study. Specifically, angiological measurements comprised ankle brachial index (ABI), central pulse wave velocity (cPWV), pulse wave index (PWI), and duplex sonography of central and peripheral arteries. Sarcoidosis activity markers (angiotensin converting enzyme, soluble interleukin-2 receptor) and cardiovascular risk parameters such as cholesterol, lipoprotein(a), C-reactive protein, interleukin 6, fibrinogen, d-dimer, and blood count were analyzed in blood. We found no relevant differences in ABI, cPWV, and plaque burden between the sarcoidosis and control groups (1.10 ± 0.02 vs. 1.10 ± 0.02, 6.7 ± 0.5 vs. 6.1 ± 1.2, 53.7 % vs. 54.5 %, respectively). However, PWI was significantly higher in sarcoidosis patients (146.2 ± 6.8) compared with controls (104.9 ± 8.8), irrespectively of the activity of sarcoidosis and immunosuppressive medication. Except for increased lipoprotein(a) and d-dimer in sarcoidosis, the remaining cardiovascular markers were similar in both groups. We conclude that sarcoidosis is associated with increased pulse wave index, which may indicate an early stage of atherosclerosis. PMID:26820732

  10. Enhanced recovery of light-induced degradation on the micromorph solar cells by electric field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, H.-C.; Yang, Y.-J.; Chen, J. Y.; Chao, T.-M.; Liu, C. W.; Lin, W.-Y.; Bi, C.-C.; Yeh, C.-H.

    2012-09-01

    The recovery of light-induced degradation of the tandem micromorph solar cell by applying reverse bias is compared with the single-junction amorphous silicon solar cell. The illuminated current density-voltage characteristics and external quantum efficiency show that the degradation of both the micromorph and the amorphous silicon cells can be recovered by applying sufficient reverse bias. The micromorph cell was recovered at smaller reverse bias than amorphous silicon cell. The abundant H in the microcrystalline silicon bottom cell of the micromorph cell can act as a reservoir to repair the defects in the amorphous silicon top cell at the reverse bias. This is responsible for small recovery bias of tandem cells.

  11. Androgen and FSH synergistically stimulate lipoprotein degradation and utilization by ovary granulosa cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Androgen can directly modulate the induction of steroidogenic enzymes by FSH (follicle stimulating hormone) in ovary granulosa cells. In studies of its mechanism of action, the authors examined the androgen effect on granulosa cell interaction with lipoproteins, the physiologic source of cholesterol. After granulosa cells were cultured for 48 hours with and without androgen and/or FSH, the cells were incubated for 24 hours with 125I-lipoproteins [human high density lipoprotein (HDL), rat HDL, or human low density lipoprotein (LDL)]. The media were then analyzed for lipoprotein protein coat degradation products (mainly 125I-monoiodotyrosine) and progestin [mainly 20 alpha-dihydroprogesterone (20 alpha-DHP)]. In the absence of FSH and androgen, 2 X 10(5) granulosa cells degraded basal levels of all three lipoproteins, but produced no measurable 20 alpha-DHP. The addition of 10(-7) M androstenedione (A), testosterone (T), or 5 alpha-dihydrotestosterone (DHT) had no effect on lipoprotein protein degradation or 20 alpha-DHP production. FSH alone stimulated lipoprotein protein degradation by 50 to 300% while the addition of androgen synergistically augmented the FSH-stimulated 20 alpha-DHP production as well as protein coat degradation of all three lipoproteins. DHT and T were both effective, indicating that androgens themselves, and not estrogen products, were responsible for the effect on lipoprotein protein degradation and 20 alpha-DHP production

  12. The Anti-Atherosclerotic Effect of Naringin Is Associated with Reduced Expressions of Cell Adhesion Molecules and Chemokines through NF-κB Pathway

    OpenAIRE

    Tun-Pin Hsueh; Jer-Ming Sheen; Pang, Jong-Hwei S.; Kuo-Wei Bi; Chao-Chun Huang; Hsiao-Ting Wu; Sheng-Teng Huang

    2016-01-01

    Naringin has been reported to have an anti-atherosclerosis effect but the underlying mechanism is not fully understood. The aim of this study is to investigate the impact of naringin on the TNF-α-induced expressions of cell adhesion molecules, chemokines and NF-κB signaling pathway in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs). The experiments revealed that naringin, at concentrations without cytotoxicity, dose-dependently inhibited the adhesion of THP-1 monocytes to the TNF-α-stimulated...

  13. Inhibitory effects of oleoylethanolamide (OEA) on H2O2-induced human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury and apolipoprotein E knockout (ApoE-/-) atherosclerotic mice

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Li; Guo, Xiaobing; Chen, Wei

    2015-01-01

    Atherosclerosis (AS) is initiated by vascular endothelial cell injury, which is induced by lipid and protein oxidation. Oleoylethanolamide (OEA), a dietary fat-derived lipid, has shown atheroprotective effect. In vitro studies demonstrated that OEA showed cytoprotective effects on H2O2-induced primary cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC) injury model. Further investigation of the cytoprotective effects of OEA demonstrated that OEA exerted its function by scavenging for react...

  14. Salusins: Potential Use as a Biomarker for Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kengo Sato

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Human salusin-α and salusin-β are related peptides produced from prosalusin. Bolus injection of salusin-β into rats induces more profound hypotension and bradycardia than salusin-α. Central administration of salusin-β increases blood pressure via release of norepinephrine and arginine-vasopressin. Circulating levels of salusin-α and salusin-β are lower in patients with essential hypertension. Salusin-β exerts more potent mitogenic effects on human vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs and fibroblasts than salusin-α. Salusin-β accelerates inflammatory responses in human endothelial cells and monocyte-endothelial adhesion. Human macrophage foam cell formation is stimulated by salusin-β but suppressed by salusin-α. Chronic salusin-β infusion into apolipoprotein E-deficient mice enhances atherosclerotic lesions; salusin-α infusion reduces lesions. Salusin-β is expressed in proliferative neointimal lesions of porcine coronary arteries after stenting. Salusin-α and salusin-β immunoreactivity have been detected in human coronary atherosclerotic plaques, with dominance of salusin-β in macrophage foam cells, VSMCs, and fibroblasts. Circulating salusin-β levels increase and salusin-α levels decrease in patients with coronary artery disease. These findings suggest that salusin-β and salusin-α may contribute to proatherogenesis and antiatherogenesis, respectively. Increased salusin-β and/or decreased salusin-α levels in circulating blood and vascular tissue are closely linked with atherosclerosis. Salusin-α and salusin-β could be candidate biomarkers and therapeutic targets for atherosclerotic cardiovascular diseases.

  15. Influence of anabolic agents on protein synthesis and degradation in muscle cells grown in culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roeder, R.A.; Thorpe, S.D.; Byers, F.M.; Schelling, G.T.; Gunn, J.M.

    Muscle cell culture (L/sub 6/) studies were conducted to determine whether anabolic agents have a direct effect on the muscle cell. The effect of zeranol, testosterone propionate, estradiol benzoate, progesterone, dexamethasone and anabolic agent-dexamethasone combinations on protein synthesis and degradation were measured. Myoblast and myotube cultures were pretreated with 1 ..mu..M compounds for 12, 24 and 48 h before a 6-h synthesis or degradation measuring period. Protein synthesis was determined as cpm of (/sup 3/H) leucine incorporated per mg cell protein. Protein degradation was measured by a pulse-chase procedure using (/sup 3/H) leucine and expressed as the percentage labeled protein degraded in 6 h. Progesterone slightly increased protein synthesis in myoblast cultures. Testosterone propionate had no effect on synthesis. Protein synthesis was decreased by estradiol benzoate in myotube cultures. Protein degradation was not altered appreciably by anabolic agents. Protein synthesis was initially inhibited in myotubes by dexamethasone, but increased in myoblasts and myotubes in the extended incubation time. Dexamethasone also consistently increased protein degradation, but this required several hours to be expressed. Anabolic agents did not interfere with dexamethasone-induced increases in protein synthesis and degradation. The magnitude of response and sensitivity were similar for both the myoblast and the more fully differentiated myotube for all compounds tested. These results indicate that anabolic agents at the 1 ..mu..M level do not have a direct anabolic effect on muscle or alter glucocorticoid-induced catabolic response in muscle.

  16. The Role of Microscopy in Understanding Atherosclerotic Lysosomal Lipid Metabolism

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gray Jerome, W.; Yancey, Patricia G.

    2003-02-01

    Microscopy has played a critical role in first identifying and then defining the role of lysosomes in formation of atherosclerotic foam cells. We review the evidence implicating lysosomal lipid accumulation as a factor in the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis with reference to the role of microscopy. In addition, we explore mechanisms by which lysosomal lipid engorgement occurs. Low density lipoproteins which have become modified are the major source of lipid for foam cell formation. These altered lipoproteins are taken into the cell via receptor-mediated endocytosis and delivered to lysosomes. Under normal conditions, lipids from these lipoproteins are metabolized and do not accumulate in lysosomes. In the atherosclerotic foam cell, this normal metabolism is inhibited so that cholesterol and cholesteryl esters accumulate in lysosomes. Studies of cultured cells incubated with modified lipoproteins suggests this abnormal metabolism occurs in two steps. Initially, hydrolysis of lipoprotein cholesteryl esters occurs normally, but the resultant free cholesterol cannot exit the lysosome. Further lysosomal cholesterol accumulation inhibits hydrolysis, producing a mixture of cholesterol and cholesteryl esters within swollen lysosomes. Various lipoprotein modifications can produce this lysosomal engorgement in vitro and it remains to be seen which modifications are most important in vivo.

  17. Mitochondrial DNA damage and vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease

    OpenAIRE

    Fetterman, Jessica L.; Holbrook, Monica; Westbrook, David G.; Brown, Jamelle A.; Kyle P. Feeley; Bretón-Romero, Rosa; Linder, Erika A.; Berk, Brittany D.; Weisbrod, Robert M.; Widlansky, Michael E.; Gokce, Noyan; Ballinger, Scott W.; Hamburg, Naomi M.

    2016-01-01

    Objective Prior studies demonstrate mitochondrial dysfunction with increased reactive oxygen species generation in peripheral blood mononuclear cells in diabetes mellitus. Oxidative stress-mediated damage to mitochondrial DNA promotes atherosclerosis in animal models. Thus, we evaluated the relation of mitochondrial DNA damage in peripheral blood mononuclear cells s with vascular function in patients with diabetes mellitus and with atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease. Approach and results ...

  18. Cardiovascular magnetic resonance in carotid atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chen Huijun

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, inflammatory disease affecting many vascular beds. Disease progression leads to acute cardiovascular events such as myocardial infarction, stroke and death. The diseased carotid alone is responsible for one third of the 700,000 new or recurrent strokes occurring yearly in the United States. Imaging plays an important role in the management of atherosclerosis, and cardiovascular magnetic resonance (CMR of the carotid vessel wall is one promising modality in the evaluation of patients with carotid atherosclerotic disease. Advances in carotid vessel wall CMR allow comprehensive assessment of morphology inside the wall, contributing substantial disease-specific information beyond luminal stenosis. Although carotid vessel wall CMR has not been widely used to screen for carotid atherosclerotic disease, many trials support its potential for this indication. This review summarizes the current state of knowledge regarding carotid vessel wall CMR and its potential clinical application for management of carotid atherosclerotic disease.

  19. The Degradation Interface of Magnesium Based Alloys in Direct Contact with Human Primary Osteoblast Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nezha Ahmad Agha

    Full Text Available Magnesium alloys have been identified as a new generation material of orthopaedic implants. In vitro setups mimicking physiological conditions are promising for material / degradation analysis prior to in vivo studies however the direct influence of cell on the degradation mechanism has never been investigated. For the first time, the direct, active, influence of human primary osteoblasts on magnesium-based materials (pure magnesium, Mg-2Ag and Mg-10Gd alloys is studied for up to 14 days. Several parameters such as composition of the degradation interface (directly beneath the cells are analysed with a scanning electron microscope equipped with energy dispersive X-ray and focused ion beam. Furthermore, influence of the materials on cell metabolism is examined via different parameters like active mineralisation process. The results are highlighting the influences of the selected alloying element on the initial cells metabolic activity.

  20. Enhanced lipid recovery from Nannochloropsis microalgae by treatment with optimized cell wall degrading enzyme mixtures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zuorro, Antonio; Miglietta, Selenia; Familiari, Giuseppe; Lavecchia, Roberto

    2016-07-01

    A statistical mixture design approach was used to investigate the effects of cell wall degrading enzymes on the recovery of lipids from Nannochloropsis sp. A preliminary screening of potentially suitable enzyme preparations, including lysozyme, cellulase and different types of hemicellulases, was carried out. The most effective preparations were then taken as basic components for the formulation of enzyme mixtures. Optimized ternary mixtures consisting of cellulase and two hemicellulases were obtained which allowed the recovery of up to 37.2g of lipids per 100g of dry biomass. SEM and TEM images of the enzymatically treated microalga revealed extensive cell damage, with degradation of the cell wall and release of intracellular material. Overall, the results obtained demonstrate that the mixture design method can be used to prepare cell wall degrading enzyme cocktails that can significantly improve the recovery of lipids or other valuable components from microalgae. PMID:27078205

  1. Comparative Indoor and Outdoor Degradation of Organic Photovoltaic Cells via Inter-laboratory Collaboration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owens, Charles; Ferguson, Gretta Mae; Hermenau, Martin;

    2015-01-01

    We report on the degradation of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells in both indoor and outdoor environments. Eight different research groups contributed state of the art OPV cells to be studied at Pomona College. Power conversion efficiency, fill factor, and IV curves were collected at regular inter...

  2. Mechanical properties of catalyst coated membranes: A powerful indicator of membrane degradation in fuel cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sadeghi Alavijeh, Alireza

    2015-01-01

    Mechanical durability of perfluorosulfonic acid (PFSA) ionomer membranes in polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is investigated in this thesis. This work contributes to a systematic characterization of the decay in mechanical properties of membranes and catalyst coated membranes (CCMs) that are subjected to controlled chemical and/or mechanical degradation mechanisms. During field operation of PEFCs, the membrane is subjected to a combination of chemical and mechanical degradation, resulti...

  3. The Degradation Interface of Magnesium Based Alloys in Direct Contact with Human Primary Osteoblast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Ahmad Agha, Nezha; Willumeit-Römer, Regine; Laipple, Daniel; Luthringer, Bérengère; Feyerabend, Frank

    2016-01-01

    Magnesium alloys have been identified as a new generation material of orthopaedic implants. In vitro setups mimicking physiological conditions are promising for material / degradation analysis prior to in vivo studies however the direct influence of cell on the degradation mechanism has never been investigated. For the first time, the direct, active, influence of human primary osteoblasts on magnesium-based materials (pure magnesium, Mg-2Ag and Mg-10Gd alloys) is studied for up to 14 days. Se...

  4. Degradation of tannic acid by cell-free extracts of Lactobacillus plantarum

    OpenAIRE

    Rodríguez, Héctor; Rivas, Blanca de las; Gómez-Cordovés, Carmen; Muñoz, Rosario

    2008-01-01

    The ability of Lactobacillus plantarum CECT 748T to degrade hydrolysable tannins was evaluated. Three commercial tannic acids were incubated in presence of cell-free extracts containing soluble proteins from L. plantarum. By HPLC analyses, almost a complete tannic acid degradation was observed in the three samples assayed. By using HPLC-DAD/ESI-MS, we partially determined the composition of tannic acid from Quercus infectoria galls. This tannic acid is a gallotannin mainly composed o...

  5. Hemicellulose biosynthesis and degradation in tobacco cell walls

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Compier, M.G.M.

    2005-01-01

    Natural fibres have a wide range of technological applications, such as in paper and textile industries. The basic properties and the quality of plant fibres are determined by the composition of the plant cell wall. Characteristic for fibres are thick secondary cell walls, which consist of cellulose

  6. Cells on fibers to degrade PAH and upgrade coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    There are over 2000 sites contaminated with PAH's from coal burning plants. White rot fungus degrades phenanthrene and anthracene, but the fungus needs air to grow. When grown on old cardboard boxes and buried, air is entrapped in the corrugations for growth of the fungus. When holes are put in the valleys of the corrugations and rotated in a half full reactor, drops are formed. Mass transfer to drops is much faster than to a flat surface, as described in Patent 5,256,570, so the fungus grows faster. Low rank coal can be upgraded to more valuable products with the fungus, say some Australians, but the problem is supplying oxygen. Celite can be entrapped in the fibers to ferment coal derived synthesis gas. The paper describes these processes

  7. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy to Characterize Inflammatory Atherosclerotic Plaques

    OpenAIRE

    Yu, Fei; Dai, Xiaohu; Beebe, Tyler; Hsiai, Tzung

    2011-01-01

    Despite advances in diagnosis and therapy, atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality in the Western world. Predicting metabolically active atherosclerotic lesions has remained an unmet clinical need. We hereby developed an electrochemical strategy to characterize the inflammatory states of high-risk atherosclerotic plaques. Using the concentric bipolar microelectrodes, we sought to demonstrate distinct Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopic (...

  8. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells - Degradation and Durability

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Araya, Samuel Simon

    A harmonious mix of renewable and alternative energy sources, including fuel cells is necessary to mitigate problems associated with the current fossil fuel based energy system, like air pollution, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, and economic dependence on oil, and therefore on unstable areas of...... the globe. Fuel cells can harness the excess energy from other renewable sources, such as the big players in the renewable energy market, Photovoltaic (PV) panels and wind turbines, which inherently suffer from intermittency problems. The excess energy can be used to produce hydrogen from water or can...... be stored in liquid alcohols such as methanol, which can be sources of hydrogen for fuel cell applications. In addition, fuel cells unlike other technologies can use a variety of other fuels that can provide a source of hydrogen, such as biogas, methane, butane, etc. More fuel flexibility combined...

  9. High Temperature PEM Fuel Cells - Degradation and Durability

    OpenAIRE

    Araya, Samuel Simon

    2012-01-01

    A harmonious mix of renewable and alternative energy sources, including fuel cells is necessary to mitigate problems associated with the current fossil fuel based energy system, like air pollution, Greenhouse Gas (GHG) emissions, and economic dependence on oil, and therefore on unstable areas of the globe. Fuel cells can harness the excess energy from other renewable sources, such as the big players in the renewable energy market, Photovoltaic (PV) panels and wind turbines, which inherently s...

  10. Enhancement of light-induced degradation under reverse bias in hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of light- and current-induced metastabilities under electrical bias in hydrogenated nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) solar cells has been found to be different from those in hydrogenated amorphous silicon (a-Si:H)-based solar cells. First, a forward-bias current injection in the dark does not cause any degradation in nc-Si:H cell performance. The phenomenon is explained by the percolation transport through crystalline paths, where the excess carrier recombination does not cause degradation. Second, a reverse bias does not reduce, but enhances the light-induced degradation in the nc-Si:H cell performance. The enhancement increases with the magnitude of the applied reverse bias. By measuring the quantum efficiency losses and color (blue, wavelength=390 nm and red, wavelength=670 nm) fill factors, we suggest that the reverse-bias-enhanced defect generation mostly takes place in the grain-boundary regions. Light-soaking experiments using light with different spectra show that a reverse bias under white light causes more enhancement in the degradation than under blue light (wavelength shorter than 650 nm). No degradation occurs under red light (wavelength longer than 665 nm) in either open-circuit or reverse-bias condition. A ''back-to-back'' diode model is proposed to explain these phenomena in terms of the heterogeneity of the material structure

  11. Enzymatic cyanide degradation by cell-free extract of Rhodococcus UKMP-5M.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nallapan Maniyam, Maegala; Sjahrir, Fridelina; Latif Ibrahim, Abdul; Cass, Anthony E G

    2015-01-01

    The cell-free extract of locally isolated Rhodococcus UKMP-5M strain was used as an alternative to develop greener and cost effective cyanide removal technology. The present study aims to assess the viability of the cell-free extract to detoxify high concentrations of cyanide which is measured through the monitoring of protein concentration and specific cyanide-degrading activity. When cyanide-grown cells were subjected to grinding in liquid nitrogen which is relatively an inexpressive and fast cell disruption method, highest cyanide-degrading activity of 0.63 mM min(-1) mg(-1) protein was obtained in comparison to enzymatic lysis and agitation with fine glass beads. The cell-free extracts managed to degrade 80% of 20 mM KCN within 80 min and the rate of cyanide consumption increased linearly as the concentration of protein was raised. In both cases, the addition of co-factor was not required which proved to be advantageous economically. The successful formation of ammonia and formate as endproducts indicated that the degradation of cyanide by Rhodococcus UKMP-5M proceeded via the activity of cyanidase and the resulting non-toxic products are safe for disposal into the environment. Further verification with SDS-PAGE revealed that the molecular weight of the active enzyme was estimated to be 38 kDa, which is consistent with previously reported cyanidases. Thus, the utilization of cell-free extracts as an alternative to live microbial in cyanide degradation offers numerous advantageous such as the potential to tolerate and degrade higher concentration of cyanide and total reduction in the overall cost of operation since the requirement for nutrient support is irrelevant. PMID:25723061

  12. Animal model of high cholesterol atherosclerotic erectile dysfunction and mechanism of atherosclerotic erectile dysfunction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Guo-ShengYang; Zhao-DianChen; Hong-JuWang

    2004-01-01

    Aim: To establish the animal model of atherosclerotic erectile dysfunction (ED) induced by high cholesterol diet and explore the mechanism of atherosclerotic ED. Methods: Thirty male rabbits were divided at random into two groups: the normal diet (ND)group (n=10) and the high cholesterol (HCH) group fed with 1.5% cholesterol diet (n=20). Serum total cholesterol, plaque areas of the ascending aorta,

  13. Ligand independent aryl hydrocarbon receptor inhibits lung cancer cell invasion by degradation of Smad4.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Chen-Chen; Yang, Wen-Hao; Li, Ching-Hao; Cheng, Yu-Wen; Tsai, Chi-Hao; Kang, Jaw-Jou

    2016-07-01

    The aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR) is a ligand-dependent-activated transcriptional factor that regulates the metabolism of xenobiotic and endogenous compounds. Although AhR plays a crucial role in air toxicant-induced carcinogenesis, AhR expression was shown to negatively regulate tumorigenesis. Therefore, in the present study, we investigated the effect of AhR without ligand treatment on cancer invasion in lung cancer cell lines. Lung cancer cells expressing lower levels of AhR showed higher invasion ability (H1299 cells) compared with cells expressing higher levels of AhR (A549 cells). Overexpression of AhR in H1299 cells inhibited the invasion ability. We found that vimentin expression was inhibited in AhR-overexpressing H1299 cells. Additionally, the expression of EMT-related transcriptional factors Snail and ID-1 decreased. Interestingly, we found that Smad4 degradation was induced in AhR-overexpressing H1299 cells. Our data showed that AhR could interact with Jun-activation domain binding protein (Jab1) and Smad4, which may cause degradation of Smad4 by the proteasome. Our data suggest that AhR affects the transforming growth factor-β signaling pathway by inducing Smad4 degradation by the proteasome and suppressing tumor metastasis via epithelial to mesenchymal transition reduction in lung cancer cells. PMID:27060206

  14. Cathode degradation of the polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Morphological changes occurring in membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs) of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC's) were monitored using scanning microscopy (SEM) during the course of 600 hours testing of hydrogen/air polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs). The microstructural study suggests a structural change caused by loss of the recast ionomer could result in deterioration of the integrity of the electrode, a drop in both ionic and electronic conductivities, loss of platinum particle clusters (for carbon support), and increased resistance within the interfacial zone of the membrane and catalyst layer.(author)

  15. Osteoprotegerin is bound, internalized, and degraded by multiple myeloma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Standal, Therese; Seidel, Carina; Hjertner, Øyvind;

    2002-01-01

    Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy characterized by accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). Bone destruction is a complication of the disease and is usually associated with severe morbidity. The balance between receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF-kappaB) l......Multiple myeloma (MM) is a hematologic malignancy characterized by accumulation of plasma cells in the bone marrow (BM). Bone destruction is a complication of the disease and is usually associated with severe morbidity. The balance between receptor activator of nuclear factor-kappaB (NF...

  16. The Effect of the PLA Degradation Chemical on cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Kuan-Che

    PLA is a material easy to manufacture. The biodegradability makes it a perfect material for tissue engineering. Several conditions for biodegradability experiments for spin-coating Polylactic acid thin films were tried. Polylactic acid thin films were immersed in different solution for different times. Thickness, morphology and mechanical properties were analyzed after the Polylactic acid thin films immersing test. Dermal fibroblasts were plated on the Polylactic acid thin films, culturing with conditioning medium. Thickness, morphology, mechanical properties and cell count were analyzed after the Polylactic acid thin films cell culture test.

  17. Importance of hyaluronan biosynthesis and degradation in cell differentiation and tumor formation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heldin P.

    2003-01-01

    Full Text Available Hyaluronan is an important connective tissue glycosaminoglycan. Elevated hyaluronan biosynthesis is a common feature during tissue remodeling under both physiological and pathological conditions. Through its interactions with hyaladherins, hyaluronan affects several cellular functions such as cell migration and differentiation. The activities of hyaluronan-synthesizing and -degrading enzymes have been shown to be regulated in response to growth factors. During tumor progression hyaluronan stimulates tumor cell growth and invasiveness. Thus, elucidation of the molecular mechanisms which regulate the activities of hyaluronan-synthesizing and -degrading enzymes during tumor progression is highly desired.

  18. Applicability of X-ray reflectometry to studies of polymer solar cell degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Jens Wenzel; Gevorgyan, Suren; Schleputz, C.M.; Krebs, Frederik C

    2008-01-01

    Although degradation of polymer solar cells is widely acknowledged, the cause, physical or chemical, has not been identified. The purpose of this work is to determine the applicability of X-ray reflectometry for in situ observation of physical degradation mechanisms. We find that the rough...... interfaces of the polymer solar cell constituent layers seriously obstruct the sensitivity of the technique, rendering it impossible to elucidate changes in the layer/interface structure at the sub-nanometer level. (c) 2008 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  19. Degradation of a-Si:H Solar Cells: New Evidence for a Bulk Effect

    OpenAIRE

    N. Wyrsch; Shah, A

    1994-01-01

    Well defined sequences of non-uniform and uniform degradation steps are applied on several high quality bifacial p-i-n solar cells with different thicknesses of the intrinsic layer. This procedure allows one to separate interface and bulk effects in the degradation of a-Si:H solar cells, or more precisely to separate the influence of the modification of the internal electric field profile (due mainly to effect near the interface) from that of an increase in the deep defect density in the bul...

  20. Patterns of efficiency and degradation of composite polymer solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jeranko, T; Tributsch, H; Sariciftci, NS; Hummelen, JC

    2004-01-01

    Bulk-heterojunction plastic solar cells (PSC) produced from a conjugated polymer, poly(2-methoxy-5-(3',7'-dimethyloctyl-oxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene) (MDMO-PPV), and a methanofullerene [6,6]-phenyl C-61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) were investigated using photocurrent imaging techniques to determi

  1. Ultrasound Tissue Characterization of Vulnerable Atherosclerotic Plaque

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenio Picano

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available A thrombotic occlusion of the vessel fed by ruptured coronary atherosclerotic plaque may result in unstable angina, myocardial infarction or death, whereas embolization from a plaque in carotid arteries may result in transient ischemic attack or stroke. The atherosclerotic plaque prone to such clinical events is termed high-risk or vulnerable plaque, and its identification in humans before it becomes symptomatic has been elusive to date. Ultrasonic tissue characterization of the atherosclerotic plaque is possible with different techniques—such as vascular, transesophageal, and intravascular ultrasound—on a variety of arterial segments, including carotid, aorta, and coronary districts. The image analysis can be based on visual, video-densitometric or radiofrequency methods and identifies three distinct textural patterns: hypo-echoic (corresponding to lipid- and hemorrhage-rich plaque, iso- or moderately hyper-echoic (fibrotic or fibro-fatty plaque, and markedly hyperechoic with shadowing (calcific plaque. Hypoechoic or dishomogeneous plaques, with spotty microcalcification and large plaque burden, with plaque neovascularization and surface irregularities by contrast-enhanced ultrasound, are more prone to clinical complications than hyperechoic, extensively calcified, homogeneous plaques with limited plaque burden, smooth luminal plaque surface and absence of neovascularization. Plaque ultrasound morphology is important, along with plaque geometry, in determining the atherosclerotic prognostic burden in the individual patient. New quantitative methods beyond backscatter (to include speed of sound, attenuation, strain, temperature, and high order statistics are under development to evaluate vascular tissues. Although not yet ready for widespread clinical use, tissue characterization is listed by the American Society of Echocardiography roadmap to 2020 as one of the most promising fields of application in cardiovascular ultrasound imaging

  2. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membrane Based High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela;

    2015-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation of the HT-PEM fuel cell. Continuous tests with pure dry H2 and meth......Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation of the HT-PEM fuel cell. Continuous tests with pure dry H2...

  3. DNA degradation within mouse brain and dental pulp cells 72 hours postmortem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jilong Zheng; Xiaona Li; Di Shan; Han Zhang; Dawei Guan

    2012-01-01

    In this study, we sought to elucidate the process of DNA degradation in brain and dental pulp cells of mice, within postmortem 0-72 hours, by using the single cell gel electrophoresis assay and professional comet image analysis and processing techniques. The frequency of comet-like cells, the percentage of tail DNA, tail length, tail moment, Olive moment and tail area increased in tandem with increasing postmortem interval. In contrast, the head radius, the percentage of head DNA and head area showed a decreasing trend. Linear regression analysis revealed a high correlation between these parameters and the postmortem interval. The findings suggest that the single cell gel electrophoresis assay is a quick and sensitive method to detect DNA degradation in brain and dental pulp cells, providing an objective and accurate new way to estimate postmortem interval.

  4. Comparative Indoor and Outdoor Degradation of Organic Photovoltaic Cells via Inter-laboratory Collaboration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Charles Owens

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on the degradation of organic photovoltaic (OPV cells in both indoor and outdoor environments. Eight different research groups contributed state of the art OPV cells to be studied at Pomona College. Power conversion efficiency and fill factor were determined from IV curves collected at regular intervals over six to eight months. Similarly prepared devices were measured indoors, outdoors, and after dark storage. Device architectures are compared. Cells kept indoors performed better than outdoors due to the lack of temperature and humidity extremes. Encapsulated cells performed better due to the minimal oxidation. Some devices showed steady aging but many failed catastrophically due to corrosion of electrodes not active device layers. Degradation of cells kept in dark storage was minimal over periods up to one year.

  5. Effect of catalyst layer defects on local membrane degradation in polymer electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavassoli, Arash; Lim, Chan; Kolodziej, Joanna; Lauritzen, Michael; Knights, Shanna; Wang, G. Gary; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-08-01

    Aiming at durability issues of fuel cells, this research is dedicated to a novel experimental approach in the analysis of local membrane degradation phenomena in polymer electrolyte fuel cells, shedding light on the potential effects of manufacturing imperfections on this process. With a comprehensive review on historical failure analysis data from field operated fuel cells, local sources of iron oxide contaminants, catalyst layer cracks, and catalyst layer delamination are considered as potential candidates for initiating or accelerating the local membrane degradation phenomena. Customized membrane electrode assemblies with artificial defects are designed, fabricated, and subjected to membrane accelerated stress tests followed by extensive post-mortem analysis. The results reveal a significant accelerating effect of iron oxide contamination on the global chemical degradation of the membrane, but dismiss local traces of iron oxide as a potential stressor for local membrane degradation. Anode and cathode catalyst layer cracks are observed to have negligible impact on the membrane degradation phenomena. Notably however, distinct evidence is found that anode catalyst layer delamination can accelerate local membrane thinning, while cathode delamination has no apparent effect. Moreover, a substantial mitigating effect for platinum residuals on the site of delamination is observed.

  6. Bioprinting three-dimensional cell-laden tissue constructs with controllable degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengjie; Su, Xin; Xu, Yuanyuan; Kong, Bin; Sun, Wei; Mi, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Alginate hydrogel is a popular biologically inert material that is widely used in 3D bioprinting, especially in extrusion-based printing. However, the printed cells in this hydrogel could not degrade the surrounding alginate gel matrix, causing them to remain in a poorly proliferating and non-differentiating state. Here, we report a novel study of the 3D printing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs)/collagen/gelatin/alginate hydrogel incubated with a medium containing sodium citrate to obtain degradation-controllable cell-laden tissue constructs. The 3D-printed hydrogel network with interconnected channels and a macroporous structure was stable and achieved high cell viability (over 90%). By altering the mole ratio of sodium citrate/sodium alginate, the degradation time of the bioprinting constructs can be controlled. Cell proliferation and specific marker protein expression results also revealed that with the help of sodium citrate degradation, the printed HCECs showed a higher proliferation rate and greater cytokeratin 3(CK3) expression, indicating that this newly developed method may help to improve the alginate bioink system for the application of 3D bioprinting in tissue engineering. PMID:27091175

  7. Bioprinting three-dimensional cell-laden tissue constructs with controllable degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zhengjie; Su, Xin; Xu, Yuanyuan; Kong, Bin; Sun, Wei; Mi, Shengli

    2016-01-01

    Alginate hydrogel is a popular biologically inert material that is widely used in 3D bioprinting, especially in extrusion-based printing. However, the printed cells in this hydrogel could not degrade the surrounding alginate gel matrix, causing them to remain in a poorly proliferating and non-differentiating state. Here, we report a novel study of the 3D printing of human corneal epithelial cells (HCECs)/collagen/gelatin/alginate hydrogel incubated with a medium containing sodium citrate to obtain degradation-controllable cell-laden tissue constructs. The 3D-printed hydrogel network with interconnected channels and a macroporous structure was stable and achieved high cell viability (over 90%). By altering the mole ratio of sodium citrate/sodium alginate, the degradation time of the bioprinting constructs can be controlled. Cell proliferation and specific marker protein expression results also revealed that with the help of sodium citrate degradation, the printed HCECs showed a higher proliferation rate and greater cytokeratin 3(CK3) expression, indicating that this newly developed method may help to improve the alginate bioink system for the application of 3D bioprinting in tissue engineering. PMID:27091175

  8. Endothelial lipase is highly expressed in macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bartels, Emil D; Nielsen, John E; Lindegaard, Marie Louise Skakkebæk;

    2007-01-01

    monocytes. EL mRNA expression increased markedly when either type of monocytes was differentiated into macrophages. Upon further differentiation into foam cells EL mRNA decreased whereas protein levels remained high compared to monocytes. In conclusion, macrophages in advanced human atherosclerotic lesions...

  9. A distributed real-time model of degradation in a solid oxide fuel cell, part I: Model characterization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaccaria, V.; Tucker, D.; Traverso, A.

    2016-04-01

    Despite the high efficiency and flexibility of fuel cells, which make them an attractive technology for the future energy generation, their economic competitiveness is still penalized by their short lifetime, due to multiple degradation phenomena. As a matter of fact, electrochemical performance of solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) is reduced because of different degradation mechanisms, which depend on operating conditions, fuel and air contaminants, impurities in materials, and others. In this work, a real-time, one dimensional (1D) model of a SOFC is used to simulate the effects of voltage degradation in the cell. Different mechanisms are summarized in a simple empirical expression that relates degradation rate to cell operating parameters (current density, fuel utilization and temperature), on a localized basis. Profile distributions of different variables during cell degradation are analyzed. In particular, the effect of degradation on current density, temperature, and total resistance of the cell are investigated. An analysis of localized degradation effects shows how different parts of the cell degrade at a different time rate, and how the various profiles are redistributed along the cell as consequence of different degradation rates.

  10. Actin-associated protein palladin promotes tumor cell invasion by linking extracellular matrix degradation to cell cytoskeleton

    Science.gov (United States)

    von Nandelstadh, Pernilla; Gucciardo, Erika; Lohi, Jouko; Li, Rui; Sugiyama, Nami; Carpen, Olli; Lehti, Kaisa

    2014-01-01

    Basal-like breast carcinomas, characterized by unfavorable prognosis and frequent metastases, are associated with epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition. During this process, cancer cells undergo cytoskeletal reorganization and up-regulate membrane-type 1 matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP; MMP14), which functions in actin-based pseudopods to drive invasion by extracellular matrix degradation. However, the mechanisms that couple matrix proteolysis to the actin cytoskeleton in cell invasion have remained unclear. On the basis of a yeast two-hybrid screen for the MT1-MMP cytoplasmic tail-binding proteins, we identify here a novel Src-regulated protein interaction between the dynamic cytoskeletal scaffold protein palladin and MT1-MMP. These proteins were coexpressed in invasive human basal-like breast carcinomas and corresponding cell lines, where they were associated in the same matrix contacting and degrading membrane complexes. The silencing and overexpression of the 90-kDa palladin isoform revealed the functional importance of the interaction with MT1-MMP in pericellular matrix degradation and mesenchymal tumor cell invasion, whereas in MT1-MMP–negative cells, palladin overexpression was insufficient for invasion. Moreover, this invasion was inhibited in a dominant-negative manner by an immunoglobulin domain–containing palladin fragment lacking the dynamic scaffold and Src-binding domains. These results identify a novel protein interaction that links matrix degradation to cytoskeletal dynamics and migration signaling in mesenchymal cell invasion. PMID:24989798

  11. Histochemical and immunohistochemical analysis of ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm wall

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanasković Irena

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. The main complication of the atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurism (AAA is her rupture that begins with lesion in intima and rupture. The purpose of this work was to determine immunocytochemical and morphofunctional characteristics of the cells in aortic wall in ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm. Method. During the course of this study, 20 samples of atherosclerotic AAA were analyzed, all of them obtained during authopsy. The samples were fixed in 4% formalin and embedded in paraffin. Sections of 5 μm thickness were stained histochemically (of Heidenhain azan stain and Periodic acid Schiff - PAS stain and immunocytochemically using a DAKO LSAB+/HRP technique to identify α-smooth muscle actin (α-SMA, vimentin, myosin heavy chains (MHC, desmin, S-100 protein, CD45 and CD68 (DAKO specification. Results. The results of our study showed that ruptured atherosclerotic AAA is characterized by a complete absence of endothelial cells, the disruption of basal membrane and internal elastic lamina, as well as a presence of the remains of hypocellular complicated atherosclerotic lesion in intima. On the plaque margins, as well as in the media, smooth muscle cells (SMCs are present, which express a α-SMA and vimentin (but without MHC or desmin expression, as well as leukocyte infiltration, and a large number of foam cells. Some of the foam cells show a CD68-immunoreactivity, while the others show vimentin- and S-100 protein-immunoreactivity. Media is thinned out with a disorganized elastic lamellas, while adventitia is characterized by inflammatory inflitrate (infection. Conclusion. Rupture of aneurysm occurs from the primary intimal disruption, which spreads into thinned out media and adventitia. Rupture is caused by unstable atherom, hypocellularity, loss of contractile characteristics of smooth muscle cells in intima and media, neovascularization of the media, as well as by the activity of the macrophages in the

  12. Degradation/oxidation susceptibility of organic photovoltaic cells in aqueous solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, K.; Husain, A.; Al-Hazza, A.

    2015-12-01

    A criterion of the degradation/oxidation susceptibility of organic photovoltaic (OPV) cells in aqueous solutions was proposed for the first time. The criterion was derived based on calculating the limit of the ratio value of the polarization resistance of an OPV cell in aqueous solution (Rps) to the polarization resistance of the OPV cell in air (Rpair). In other words, the criterion lim(Rps/Rpair) = 1 was applied to determine the degradation/oxidation of the OPV cell in the aqueous solution when Rpair became equal (increased) to Rps as a function of time of the exposure of the OPV cell to the aqueous solution. This criterion was not only used to determine the degradation/oxidation of different OPV cells in a simulated operational environment but also it was used to determine the electrochemical behavior of OPV cells in deionized water and a polluted water with fine particles of sand. The values of Rps were determined by the electrochemical impedance spectroscopy at low frequency. In addition, the criterion can be applied under diverse test conditions with a predetermined period of OPV operations.

  13. Degradation of retinoid X receptor α by TPA through proteasome pathway in gastric cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiao-Feng Ye; Su Liu; Qiao Wu; Xiao-Feng Lin; Bing Zhang; Jia-Fa Wu; Ming-Qing Zhang; Wen-Jin Su

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To investigate and determine the mechanism and signal pathway of tetradecanoylphorbol-1, 3-acetate (TPA) in degradation of RXRα.METHODS: Gastric cancer cell line, BGC-823 was used in the experiments. The expression level of R XRα protein was detected by Western blot. Nuclear and cytoplasmic protein fractions were prepared through lysis of cell and centrifugation.Localization and translocation of RXRα were observed under laser-scanning confocal microscope through labeling specific anti-RXRα antibody and corresponding immunofiuorescent antibody as secondary antibody. Different inhibitors were used as required.RESULTS: In BGC-823 cells, RXRα was expressed in the nucleus. When cells were treated with TPA, expression of RXRα was repressed in a time-dependent and TPAconcentration-dependent manner. Meanwhile, translocation of RXR from the nucleus to the cytoplasm occurred, also in a time-dependent manner. When cells were pre-incubated with proteasome inhibitor MG132 for 3 hrs, followed by TPA for another 12 hrs, TPA-induced RXRα degradation was inhibited. Further observation of RXRα translocation in the presence of MG132 showed that MG-132 could block TPAinduced RXRα redistribution. Conversely, when RXRαtranslocation was inhibited by LMB, an inhibitor for blocking protein export from the nucleus, TPA could not repress expression of RXRα.CONCLUSION: TPA could induce the degradation of RXRα protein in BGC-823 cells, and this degradation is time-and TPA-concentration-dependent. Furthermore, the degradation of RXRα by TPA is via a proteasome pathway and associated with RXRα translocation from the nucleus to the cytoplasm.

  14. A random-effects model for long-term degradation analysis of solid oxide fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are electrochemical devices converting the chemical energy into electricity with high efficiency and low pollutant emissions. Tough very promising, this technology is still in a developing phase, and degradation at the cell/stack level with operating time is still an issue of major concern. Methods to directly observe degradation modes and to measure their evolution over time are difficult to implement, and indirect performance indicators are adopted, typically related to voltage measurements in long-term tests. In order to describe long-term degradation tests, three components of the voltage measurements should be modelled: the smooth decay of voltage over time for each single unit; the variability of voltage decay among units; and the high-frequency small fluctuations of voltage due to experimental noise and lack of fit. In this paper, we propose an empirical random-effects regression model of polynomial type enabling to evaluate separately these three types of variability. Point and interval estimates are also derived for some performance measures, such as the mean voltage, the prediction of cell voltage, the reliability function and the cell-to-cell variability in SOFC stacks. Finally, the proposed methodology is applied to two real case-studies of long-term degradation tests of SOFC stacks. - Highlights: • We propose an empirical random-effects model for SOFC cells voltage in long runs. • Some SOFC performance and manufacturing quality measures are derived. • An application to two real case-studies of long-term degradation tests is provided. • The reliability function of SOFCs and its lower confidence limit are computed

  15. The impact of atmospheric species on the degradation of CIGS solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Theelen, M.; Foster, C.; Steijvers, H.; Barreau, N.; Vroon, Z.; Zeman, M.

    2015-01-01

    CIGS solar cells were exposed to liquid water purged with the atmospheric gases carbon dioxide (CO2), oxygen (O2), nitrogen (N2) and air in order to investigate their chemical degradation behavior. The samples were analyzed by electrical, compositional and optical me

  16. Catalyst Degradation in High Temperature Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells Based on Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cleemann, Lars Nilausen; Buazar, F.; Li, Qingfeng; Jensen, Jens Oluf; Pan, Chao; Steenberg, T.; Dai, S.; Bjerrum, Niels J.

    2013-01-01

    Degradation of carbon supported platinum catalysts is a major failure mode for the long term durability of high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells based on phosphoric acid doped polybenzimidazole membranes. With Vulcan carbon black as a reference, thermally treated carbon black and...

  17. Importance of hyaluronan biosynthesis and degradation in cell differentiation and tumor formation

    OpenAIRE

    Heldin P.

    2003-01-01

    Hyaluronan is an important connective tissue glycosaminoglycan. Elevated hyaluronan biosynthesis is a common feature during tissue remodeling under both physiological and pathological conditions. Through its interactions with hyaladherins, hyaluronan affects several cellular functions such as cell migration and differentiation. The activities of hyaluronan-synthesizing and -degrading enzymes have been shown to be regulated in response to growth factors. During tumor progression hyaluronan sti...

  18. Chemical composition and cell wall polysaccharide degradability of pith and rind tissues from mature maize internodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Our study was undertaken to identify tissue-specific biochemical traits that may be targeted in breeding programs for improving forage digestibility. We compared cell wall chemical composition and 24- and 96-h in vitro degradabilities in separated pith and rind tissues from six maize inbred lines. A...

  19. Arsenal of plant cell wall degrading enzymes reflects host preference among plant pathogenic fungi

    Science.gov (United States)

    Discovery and development of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes is a key step towards more efficient depolymerization of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars for production of liquid transportation biofuels and other bioproducts. The industrial fungus Trichoderma reesei is known to be highly c...

  20. High performance liquid chromatographic analysis of insulin degradation products from a cultured kidney cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The kidney is a major site for insulin removal and degradation, but the subcellular processes and enzymes involved have not been established. We have examined this process by analyzing insulin degradation products by HPLC. Monoiodoinsulin specifically labeled on either the A14 or B26 tyrosine residue was incubated with a cultured kidney epithelial cell line, and both intracellular and extracellular products were examined on HPLC. The products were then compared with products of known structure generated by hepatocytes and the enzyme insulin protease. Intracellular and extracellular products were different, suggesting two different degradative pathways, as previously shown in liver. The extracellular degradation products eluted from HPLC both before and after sulfitolysis similarly with hepatocyte products and products generated by insulin protease. The intracellular products also eluted identically with hepatocyte products. Based on comparisons with identified products, the kidney cell generates two fragments from the A chain of intact insulin, one with a cleavage at A13-A14 and the other at A14-A15. The B chain of intact insulin is cleaved in a number of different sites, resulting in peptides that elute identically with B chain peptides cleaved at B9-B10, B13-B14, B16-B17, B24-B25, and B25-B26. These similarities with hepatocytes and insulin protease suggest that liver and kidney have similar mechanisms for insulin degradation and that insulin protease or a very similar enzyme is involved in both tissues

  1. ATGL has a key role in lipid droplet/adiposome degradation in mammalian cells

    OpenAIRE

    Smirnova, Elena; Goldberg, Elysa B; Makarova, Kira S; Lin, Lin; Brown, William J.; Jackson, Catherine L.

    2005-01-01

    Lipid droplets (LDs), also called adiposomes, are found in many eukaryotic cells, and are highly upregulated in lipid-storage cells, such as adipocytes. The mechanism by which adiposomes and their component neutral lipids are degraded is an important health issue with the rapidly spreading epidemic of obesity. Recently, a novel triglyceride lipase (adipose triglyceride lipase (ATGL)) that catalyses the initial step in triglyceride hydrolysis in adipocyte LDs was identified. Here, we show that...

  2. Model-based Interpretation of the Performance and Degradation of Reformate Fueled Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kromp, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells offer great prospects for the sustainable, clean and safe conversion of various fuels into electrical energy. In this thesis, the performance-determining loss processes for the cell operation on reformate fuels are elucidated via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Model-based analyses reveal the electrochemical fuel oxidation mechanism, the coupling of fuel gas transport and reforming chemistry and the impact of fuel impurities on the degradation of each loss process.

  3. Cell Surface Determinants Important for Biofilm-Based Solid Substrate Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Jitka Dostálková; Vladimír Jirků; Gita Procházková; Lucie Křiklavová; Tomáš Lederer; Tomáš Brányik

    2013-01-01

    The study links targeted cell surface characterization to the quantified capacity of cellulose degrading Pseudomonas fluorescens cells to colonize a (similarly characterized) cellulosic carrier. The experiments were conducted to clarify the effect of cultivation conditions on the achieved state of this carrier colonization. The suggested approach seems to be sufficient to verify the right choice of cultivation medium as a major factor determining the binding complementarity between micro...

  4. Degradation of micromorph silicon solar cells after exposure to 65 MeV protons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neitzert, Heinz-Christoph [DIIIE, Salerno University, Fisciano (Italy); NanoMates, Salerno University, Fisciano (Italy); Labonia, Laura; Citro, Michele [DIIIE, Salerno University, Fisciano (Italy); Delli Veneri, Paola; Mercaldo, Lucia [ENEA Portici Research Center (Italy)

    2010-04-15

    Silicon micromorph tandem solar cells, grown on commercial TCO coated substrates by plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition, with an initial efficiency higher than 10%, have been degraded, in order to check their stability under space conditions, by irradiation with 65 MeV protons with fluences ranging from 10{sup 12}protons/cm{sup 2} up to 10{sup 14}protons/cm{sup 2}. For low proton fluences we find a stronger decrease of the top amorphous cell photocurrent due to the stronger impact of the proton beam on the glass substrate transparency in the visible wavelength range, as compared to the infrared range. Only for very high fluences a stronger degradation of the photocurrent in the infrared wavelength range where the bottom microcrystalline cell is dominating the spectral response, has been observed. Because the non-irradiated cell has been found to be spectrally mismatched in favour of the top amorphous cell under AM1.5 and even more under AM0 irradiation conditions, for low and intermediate fluences the irradiation decreases the spectral mismatch of the micromorph tandem cells and results consequently in a relative stabilization of the irradiation induced degradation. (copyright 2010 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  5. Measuring equipment of solar cell characteristics on board the satellite 'JIKIKEN' and data of radiation degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the measuring equipment of solar cell characteristics (SCM) on board the satellite ''JIKIKEN'' to investigate the degradation of solar cell output mainly in Van Allen belt in the geomagnetic sphere, solar cells were mounted on the special panel of SCM on the surface of the satellite. The solar cells were six n/p elements of 1 cm square with various cover glasses. After confirming the normal operation of SCM, the I-V (current-voltage) characteristics of the solar cells were investigated. The examination on short circuit current and maximum power is reported among the data obtained from the 32nd to the 622nd orbiting. The facts somewhat differing from the results published so far about the above two items have been obtained. The facts include that (1) when the thickness of fused quartz cover glasses on the back surface field solar cells was varied to 0.15, 0.3 and 0.6 mm, the degradation of the characteristics at 0.6 mm thick was larger than expected, specifically in the maximum power, though the degradation was less as the glasses were thicker. (2) The short circuit current obtained at the 5th orbiting decreased by 4.1 to 10.8% from the data on the ground before flight. The presumption of the causes is described. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  6. Iron-contamination-induced performance degradation of an iron-fed fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Min; Song, Wei; Zhai, Lin-Feng; Tong, Zhong-Hua

    2014-02-01

    The iron-fed fuel cell is an effective technology to recover iron and electricity from acid mine drainage (AMD). However, this technology suffers from the problem of performance degradation which significantly reduces its power output during long-term operation. In this work, the performance degradation of iron-fed fuel cell is comprehensively evaluated with the objective to elucidate the mechanisms involved in such a phenomenon. The iron contamination is identified as the main cause responsible for the performance degradation of fuel cell. The iron contaminant is present in the form of α-FeO(OH), which is the main product recovered by the iron-fed fuel cell. Both the electrode and membrane are deteriorated by iron contamination, whereas the membrane deterioration is more significant. Fed-batch experiments demonstrate the performance loss of fuel cell due to contamination of membrane is more than 50% greater than the performance loss due to contamination of electrode. The α-FeO(OH) contaminant not only forms fouling layers on the surfaces of carbon electrode and membrane, but also migrates into the membrane to damage the membrane structure. As a result, both the charge transfer and mass transfer resistances of fuel cell are dramatically increased, which leads to delayed electro-oxidation kinetics of Fe(II).

  7. Blue Light Induces a Distinct Starch Degradation Pathway in Guard Cells for Stomatal Opening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horrer, Daniel; Flütsch, Sabrina; Pazmino, Diana; Matthews, Jack S A; Thalmann, Matthias; Nigro, Arianna; Leonhardt, Nathalie; Lawson, Tracy; Santelia, Diana

    2016-02-01

    Stomatal pores form a crucial interface between the leaf mesophyll and the atmosphere, controlling water and carbon balance in plants [1]. Major advances have been made in understanding the regulatory networks and ion fluxes in the guard cells surrounding the stomatal pore [2]. However, our knowledge on the role of carbon metabolism in these cells is still fragmentary [3-5]. In particular, the contribution of starch in stomatal opening remains elusive [6]. Here, we used Arabidopsis thaliana as a model plant to provide the first quantitative analysis of starch turnover in guard cells of intact leaves during the diurnal cycle. Starch is present in guard cells at the end of night, unlike in the rest of the leaf, but is rapidly degraded within 30 min of light. This process is critical for the rapidity of stomatal opening and biomass production. We exploited Arabidopsis molecular genetics to define the mechanism and regulation of guard cell starch metabolism, showing it to be mediated by a previously uncharacterized pathway. This involves the synergistic action of β-amylase 1 (BAM1) and α-amylase 3 (AMY3)-enzymes that are normally not required for nighttime starch degradation in other leaf tissues. This pathway is under the control of the phototropin-dependent blue-light signaling cascade and correlated with the activity of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Our results show that guard cell starch degradation has an important role in plant growth by driving stomatal responses to light. PMID:26774787

  8. Experimental study and modelling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks for use in CHP systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andreasen, Søren Juhl

    2009-01-01

    Degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cells for use in CHP systems were investigated experimentally and by modelling. It was found that the two main degradation mechanisms in HTPEM fuel cells are carbon corrosion and Pt agglomeration. On basis of this conclusion a mechanistic model, describing the...

  9. Experimental study and modeling of degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cell stacks for use in CHP systems

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Mads Pagh; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Rasmussen, Peder Lund;

    2009-01-01

    Degradation phenomena in HTPEM fuel cells for use in CHP systems were investigated experimentally and by modeling. It was found that the two main degradation mechanisms in HTPEM fuel cells are carbon corrosion and Pt agglomeration. On basis of this conclusion a mechanistic model, describing the...

  10. Strain-Dependent Effect of Macroautophagy on Abnormally Folded Prion Protein Degradation in Infected Neuronal Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daisuke Ishibashi

    Full Text Available Prion diseases are neurodegenerative disorders caused by the accumulation of abnormal prion protein (PrPSc in the central nervous system. With the aim of elucidating the mechanism underlying the accumulation and degradation of PrPSc, we investigated the role of autophagy in its degradation, using cultured cells stably infected with distinct prion strains. The effects of pharmacological compounds that inhibit or stimulate the cellular signal transduction pathways that mediate autophagy during PrPSc degradation were evaluated. The accumulation of PrPSc in cells persistently infected with the prion strain Fukuoka-1 (FK, derived from a patient with Gerstmann-Sträussler-Scheinker syndrome, was significantly increased in cultures treated with the macroautophagy inhibitor 3-methyladenine (3MA but substantially reduced in those treated with the macroautophagy inducer rapamycin. The decrease in FK-derived PrPSc levels was mediated, at least in part, by the phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase/MEK signalling pathway. By contrast, neither rapamycin nor 3MA had any apparently effect on PrPSc from either the 22L or the Chandler strain, indicating that the degradation of PrPSc in host cells might be strain-dependent.

  11. Amyloid-beta peptide degradation in cell cultures by mycoplasma contaminants

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Davies Peter

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell cultures have become an indispensable tool in Alzheimer's disease research for studying amyloid-β (Aβ metabolism. It is estimated that up to 35% of cell cultures in current use are infected with various mycoplasma species. In contrast with common bacterial and fungal infections, contaminations of cell cultures with mycoplasmas represent a challenging issue in terms of detectability and prevention. Mycoplasmas are the smallest and simplest self-replicating bacteria and the consequences of an infection for the host cells are variable, ranging from no apparent effect to induction of apoptosis. Findings Here we present evidence that mycoplasmas from a cell culture contamination are able to efficiently and rapidly degrade extracellular Aβ. As a result, we observed no accumulation of Aβ in the conditioned medium of mycoplasma-positive cells stably transfected with the amyloid-β precursor protein (APP. Importantly, eradication of the mycoplasma contaminant – identified as M. hyorhinis – by treatments with a quinolone-based antibiotic, restored extracellular Aβ accumulation in the APP-transfected cells. Conclusion These data show that mycoplasmas degrade Aβ and thus may represent a significant source of variability when comparing extracellular Aβ levels in different cell lines. On the basis of these results, we recommend assessment of mycoplasma contaminations prior to extracellular Aβ level measurements in cultured cells.

  12. Chlamydia pneumoniae Infection in Atherosclerotic Lesion Development through Oxidative Stress: A Brief Overview

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosa Sessa

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Chlamydia pneumoniae, an obligate intracellular pathogen, is known as a leading cause of respiratory tract infections and, in the last two decades, has been widely associated with atherosclerosis by seroepidemiological studies, and direct detection of the microorganism within atheroma. C. pneumoniae is presumed to play a role in atherosclerosis for its ability to disseminate via peripheral blood mononuclear cells, to replicate and persist within vascular cells, and for its pro-inflammatory and angiogenic effects. Once inside the vascular tissue, C. pneumoniae infection has been shown to induce the production of reactive oxygen species in all the cells involved in atherosclerotic process such as macrophages, platelets, endothelial cells, and vascular smooth muscle cells, leading to oxidative stress. The aim of this review is to summarize the data linking C. pneumoniae-induced oxidative stress to atherosclerotic lesion development.

  13. Return to quiescence of mouse neural stem cells by degradation of a proactivation protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbán, Noelia; van den Berg, Debbie L C; Forget, Antoine; Andersen, Jimena; Demmers, Jeroen A A; Hunt, Charles; Ayrault, Olivier; Guillemot, François

    2016-07-15

    Quiescence is essential for long-term maintenance of adult stem cells. Niche signals regulate the transit of stem cells from dormant to activated states. Here, we show that the E3-ubiquitin ligase Huwe1 (HECT, UBA, and WWE domain-containing 1) is required for proliferating stem cells of the adult mouse hippocampus to return to quiescence. Huwe1 destabilizes proactivation protein Ascl1 (achaete-scute family bHLH transcription factor 1) in proliferating hippocampal stem cells, which prevents accumulation of cyclin Ds and promotes the return to a resting state. When stem cells fail to return to quiescence, the proliferative stem cell pool becomes depleted. Thus, long-term maintenance of hippocampal neurogenesis depends on the return of stem cells to a transient quiescent state through the rapid degradation of a key proactivation factor. PMID:27418510

  14. Degradation mechanisms of sulfonated poly-aromatic membranes in fuel cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel cell development requires an improvement in the electrode-membrane assembly durability which depends on both the polymer used and the fuel cell operating conditions. The origin of the degradation can be either electrochemical, chemical and/or mechanical. This study deals with the understanding of alternative membranes ageing mechanisms, i.e. non fluorinated membranes, such as sPEEK and sPI. For this kind of membranes, the first process is chemical. Understanding these mechanisms is the first essential step to develop more stable structures. An original approach is developed to overcome the analytical difficulties encountered with polymers. It consists in studying the degradation mechanism on model structures. Ageing are carried out in water, with H2O2 in some cases (identified as a cause of membrane chemical ageing in the fuel cell system), and at different temperatures. The approach consists in separating the different products formed by chromatography. Then they are identified (NMR, IR, MS) and quantified. This method allows us to establish the ageing mechanism. We show that the ageing of a sPEEK structure mainly results from an attack by end chains which spreads to the whole. This mechanism is confirmed on ex-situ and in-situ aged membranes. These two kinds of ageing lead to an important decrease in polymerisation degree (determined by SEC). Formation of the same degradation products is observed. In fuel cells, a heterogeneous degradation is noticed. It takes place mainly on the cathode side. sPI are known for their high sensitivity to hydrolysis. Nevertheless, we highlight a limited degradation at 80 Celsius degrees due to the recombination of hydrolyzed species at this temperature. (author)

  15. Model for the J-V characteristics of degraded polymer solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Pankaj; Gaur, Ankita

    2013-03-01

    An equivalent circuit model was developed for polymer solar cells (PSCs), which explains correctly their behavior under different test conditions. We examine here the validity of that model for degraded PSCs. For that purpose, investigations were carried out on solar cells based on the interpenetrating bulk heterojunctions of poly(3-hehylthiophene) and phenyl[6,6] C61 butyric acid methyl ester. Current density-voltage (J-V) characteristics were measured in dark and under illumination at different time intervals. The characteristics of fresh solar cells are explained well by the developed model, with exponential dependence of photocurrent on applied voltage. However, the degraded characteristics showed space charge limited conduction and the characteristics could be explained well by the same model but with different voltage dependence of photocurrent.

  16. Overcoming Degradation Mechanisms in CdTe Solar Cells; Second Annual Report, August 1999-August 2000

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cahen, D.; Hodes, G.; Gartsman, K. (Weizmann Institute of Science, Rehovot, Israel)

    2001-02-01

    The scientific literature concerning degradation and atomic diffusion in CdTe/CdS cells has been reviewed. This led to the conclusion that there appear to be unexplained differences between module and cell stability, possibly due to the difference between encapsulated and air-exposed systems. A comprehensive model for Cu-assisted cell degradation is suggested, which should now be tested experimentally by the appropriate R and D teams. Both LBIC and EBIC have been used to distinguish between stressed and unstressed cells. From these we conclude that decrease in charge separation efficiency is correlated with increase in electrical heterogeneity of the cell. Cells without back contacts were treated with a series of simple organic compounds, where the dipole is varied systematically. We find, grosso modo, such systematics in the electronic behavior and electrical characteristics of these cells, suggesting significant porosity of the CdTe film. NiTe2 was found to be the product of electroles s Ni:P back contact deposition from baths of low reductant concentrations. Such back contacts were further optimized and characterized, with special attention being given to cell stability considerations.

  17. Estrogen receptor and progesterone receptor synthesis and degradation in target cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was the intent of this study to determine the turnover of the estrogen receptor (ER) and progesterone receptors (PR) in rat uterine and human breast cancer cells, respectively, and to examine the effect of estrogen and progestin on PR levels. The rates of synthesis and degradation of ER were determined in rat uterine cells in vitro and in vivo. The affinity labeling antiestrogen, [3H]tamoxifen aziridine, was used in pulse chase experiments to show that the 65,000 molecular weight ER has a half-life of 3-4h in primary cultures of rat uterine cells in vitro and in the intact rat uterus in vivo. Density shift analyses using dense (15N, 13C, 2H) amino acid incorporation corroborate the rapid turnover of ER in rat uterine cell cultures. The regulation of PR by progestins in T47D human breast cancer cells was examined using density shift-dense amino acid incorporation. When T47D cells, which normally maintain high PR levels, are exposed to progestin (R5020), PR levels decline. Receptor half-life, which is 21h in control cells, is reduced to 6h when cells are exposed to 20 nM [3H]R5020. In addition, PR synthesis rate declines exponentially following R5020 exposure. The reduction in receptor level is thus due to dramatic increases in PR degradation as well as marked decreases in PR synthesis

  18. Autophagy in Atherosclerosis: A Phenomenon Found in Human Carotid Atherosclerotic Plaques

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huihui Liu; Yongjun Cao; Tong Tong; Jijun Shi; Yanlin Zhang; Yaping Yang; Chunfeng Liu

    2015-01-01

    Background:Autophagy has been found to be involved in animal and cell models ofatherosclerosis,but to date,it lacks general observation in human atherosclerotic plaques.Here,we investigated autophagy in smooth muscle cells (SMCs),endothelial cells (ECs),and macrophages in human atherosclerotic plaques via transmission electron microscopy (TEM),western blotting,and immunohistochemistry analysis.Methods:The histopathologic morphology of these plaques was observed via hematoxylin and eosin staining.The ultrastructural morphology of the SMCs,ECs,and macrophages in these plaques was observed via TEM.The localization ofmicrotubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3 (MAP 1-LC3),a relatively special maker ofautophagy,in plaques was observed by double fluorescent immunochemistty and western blotting.Results:All of these human atherosclerotic plaques were considered advanced and unstable in histologically observation.By double fluorescent immunochemistry,the expression of LC3-Ⅱ increased in the SMCs of the fibrous cap,the macrophages,and the microvascular ECs of the plaque shoulders.The protein level of LC3-Ⅱ by western blotting significantly increased in plaques compared with normal controls.In addition,TEM observation of plaques revealed certain features of autophagy in SMCs,ECs,and macrophages including the formation of myelin figures,vacuolization,and the accumulation of inclusions in the cytosol.These results indicate that autophagy is activated in SMCs,ECs,and macrophages in human advanced atherosclerotic plaques.Conclusions:Our study is to demonstrate the existence of autophagy in human atherosclerotic plaques by different methods,which may contribute to the development of pharmacological approaches to stabilize vulnerable and rupture-prone lesions.

  19. Whole-Cell Kinetics of Trichloroethylene Degradation by Phenol Hydroxylase in a Ralstonia eutropha JMP134 Derivative

    OpenAIRE

    Ayoubi, Patricia J.; Harker, Alan R.

    1998-01-01

    The rate, progress, and limits of trichloroethylene (TCE) degradation by Ralstonia eutropha AEK301/pYK3021 whole cells were examined in the absence of aromatic induction. At TCE concentrations up to 800 μM, degradation rates were sustained until TCE was no longer detectable. The Ks and Vmax for TCE degradation by AEK301/pYK3021 whole cells were determined to be 630 μM and 22.6 nmol/min/mg of total protein, respectively. The sustained linear rates of TCE degradation by AEK301/pYK3021 up to a c...

  20. In silico analyses of metagenomes from human atherosclerotic plaque samples

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mitra, Suparna; Drautz-Moses, Daniela I; Alhede, Morten;

    2015-01-01

    microbes isolated from human atherosclerotic vessels. However, high-resolution investigation of microbial infectious agents from human vessels that may contribute to atherosclerosis is very limited. In spite of the progress in recent sequencing technologies, analyzing host-associated metagenomes remain...... a challenge. RESULTS: To investigate microbiome diversity within human atherosclerotic tissue samples, we employed high-throughput metagenomic analysis on: (1) atherosclerotic plaques obtained from a group of patients who underwent endarterectomy due to recent transient cerebral ischemia or stroke. (2...

  1. LIMK Regulates Tumor-Cell Invasion and Matrix Degradation Through Tyrosine Phosphorylation of MT1-MMP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lagoutte, Emilie; Villeneuve, Clémentine; Lafanechère, Laurence; Wells, Claire M.; Jones, Gareth E.; Chavrier, Philippe; Rossé, Carine

    2016-01-01

    During their metastatic spread, cancer cells need to remodel the extracellular matrix in order to migrate through stromal compartments adjacent to the primary tumor. Dissemination of breast carcinoma cells is mediated by membrane type 1-matrix metalloproteinase (MT1-MMP/MMP14), the main invadopodial matrix degradative component. Here, we identify MT1-MMP as a novel interacting partner of dual-specificity LIM Kinase-1 and -2 (LIMK1/2), and provide several evidence for phosphorylation of tyrosine Y573 in the cytoplasmic domain of MT1-MMP by LIMK. Phosphorylation of Y573 influences association of F-actin binding protein cortactin to MT1-MMP-positive endosomes and invadopodia formation and matrix degradation. Moreover, we show that LIMK1 regulates cortactin association to MT1-MMP-positive endosomes, while LIMK2 controls invadopodia-associated cortactin. In turn, LIMK1 and LIMK2 are required for MT1-MMP-dependent matrix degradation and cell invasion in a three-dimensional type I collagen environment. This novel link between LIMK1/2 and MT1-MMP may have important consequences for therapeutic control of breast cancer cell invasion. PMID:27116935

  2. Photoinitiator-free synthesis of endothelial cell-adhesive and enzymatically degradable hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Derek R; Marchant, Roger E; von Recum, Horst; Sen Gupta, Anirban; Kottke-Marchant, Kandice

    2015-02-01

    We report on a photoinitiator-free synthetic method of incorporating bioactivity into poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels in order to control physical properties, enzymatic biodegradability and cell-specific adhesiveness of the polymer network, while eliminating the need for UV-mediated photopolymerization. To accomplish this, hydrogel networks were polymerized using Michael addition with four-arm PEG acrylate (10 kDa), using a collagenase-sensitive peptide (CSP) as a crosslinker, and introducing an endothelial cell-adhesive peptide either terminally (RGD) or attached to the crosslinking peptide sequence (CSP-RGD). The efficiency of the Michael addition reactions were determined by nuclear magnetic resonance and Ellman's assay. Successful decoupling of cell adhesivity and physical properties was demonstrated by quantifying and comparing the swelling ratios and Young's moduli of various hydrogel formulations. Degradation profiles were established by incubating functionalized hydrogels in collagenase solutions (0.0-1.0 μg ml(-1)), demonstrating that functionalized hydrogels degraded at a rate dependent upon collagenase concentration. Moreover, it was shown that the degradation rate was independent of CSP-RGD concentration. Cell attachment and proliferation on functionalized hydrogels were compared for various RGD concentrations, providing evidence that cell attachment and proliferation were directly related to relative amounts of the CSP-RGD combination peptide. An increase in cell viability was achieved using Michael addition techniques when compared to UV polymerization, and was assessed by a LIVE/DEAD fluorescence assay. This photoinitiator-free method shows promise in creating hydrogel-based tissue engineering scaffolds allow for decoupled cell adhesivity and physical properties and that render greater cell viability. PMID:25462848

  3. Regulated intramembrane proteolysis and degradation of murine epithelial cell adhesion molecule mEpCAM.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Hachmeister

    Full Text Available Epithelial cell adhesion molecule EpCAM is a transmembrane glycoprotein, which is highly and frequently expressed in carcinomas and (cancer-stem cells, and which plays an important role in the regulation of stem cell pluripotency. We show here that murine EpCAM (mEpCAM is subject to regulated intramembrane proteolysis in various cells including embryonic stem cells and teratocarcinomas. As shown with ectopically expressed EpCAM variants, cleavages occur at α-, β-, γ-, and ε-sites to generate soluble ectodomains, soluble Aβ-like-, and intracellular fragments termed mEpEX, mEp-β, and mEpICD, respectively. Proteolytic sites in the extracellular part of mEpCAM were mapped using mass spectrometry and represent cleavages at the α- and β-sites by metalloproteases and the b-secretase BACE1, respectively. Resulting C-terminal fragments (CTF are further processed to soluble Aβ-like fragments mEp-β and cytoplasmic mEpICD variants by the g-secretase complex. Noteworthy, cytoplasmic mEpICD fragments were subject to efficient degradation in a proteasome-dependent manner. In addition the γ-secretase complex dependent cleavage of EpCAM CTF liberates different EpICDs with different stabilities towards proteasomal degradation. Generation of CTF and EpICD fragments and the degradation of hEpICD via the proteasome were similarly demonstrated for the human EpCAM ortholog. Additional EpCAM orthologs have been unequivocally identified in silico in 52 species. Sequence comparisons across species disclosed highest homology of BACE1 cleavage sites and in presenilin-dependent γ-cleavage sites, whereas strongest heterogeneity was observed in metalloprotease cleavage sites. In summary, EpCAM is a highly conserved protein present in fishes, amphibians, reptiles, birds, marsupials, and placental mammals, and is subject to shedding, γ-secretase-dependent regulated intramembrane proteolysis, and proteasome-mediated degradation.

  4. Experimental design and analysis for accelerated degradation tests with Li-ion cells.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doughty, Daniel Harvey; Thomas, Edward Victor; Jungst, Rudolph George; Roth, Emanuel Peter

    2003-08-01

    This document describes a general protocol (involving both experimental and data analytic aspects) that is designed to be a roadmap for rapidly obtaining a useful assessment of the average lifetime (at some specified use conditions) that might be expected from cells of a particular design. The proposed experimental protocol involves a series of accelerated degradation experiments. Through the acquisition of degradation data over time specified by the experimental protocol, an unambiguous assessment of the effects of accelerating factors (e.g., temperature and state of charge) on various measures of the health of a cell (e.g., power fade and capacity fade) will result. In order to assess cell lifetime, it is necessary to develop a model that accurately predicts degradation over a range of the experimental factors. In general, it is difficult to specify an appropriate model form without some preliminary analysis of the data. Nevertheless, assuming that the aging phenomenon relates to a chemical reaction with simple first-order rate kinetics, a data analysis protocol is also provided to construct a useful model that relates performance degradation to the levels of the accelerating factors. This model can then be used to make an accurate assessment of the average cell lifetime. The proposed experimental and data analysis protocols are illustrated with a case study involving the effects of accelerated aging on the power output from Gen-2 cells. For this case study, inadequacies of the simple first-order kinetics model were observed. However, a more complex model allowing for the effects of two concurrent mechanisms provided an accurate representation of the experimental data.

  5. Protein synthesis and degradation are essential to regulate germline stem cell homeostasis in Drosophila testes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jun; Lan, Xiang; Chen, Xia; Yu, Chao; Xu, Yiwen; Liu, Yujuan; Xu, Lingna; Fan, Heng-Yu; Tong, Chao

    2016-08-15

    The homeostasis of self-renewal and differentiation in stem cells is controlled by intrinsic signals and their niche. We conducted a large-scale RNA interference (RNAi) screen in Drosophila testes and identified 221 genes required for germline stem cell (GSC) maintenance or differentiation. Knockdown of these genes in transit-amplifying spermatogonia and cyst cells further revealed various phenotypes. Complex analysis uncovered that many of the identified genes are involved in key steps of protein synthesis and degradation. A group of genes that are required for mRNA splicing and protein translation contributes to both GSC self-renewal and early germ cell differentiation. Loss of genes in the protein degradation pathway in cyst cells leads to testis tumors consisting of overproliferated germ cells. Importantly, in the Cullin 4-RING E3 ubiquitin ligase (CRL4) complex, we identified multiple proteins that are crucial to GSC self-renewal: pic/DDB1, a CRL4 linker protein, is not only required for GSC self-renewal in flies but also for maintenance of spermatogonial stem cells (SSCs) in mice. PMID:27471256

  6. Degradation of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells Operated at High Current Densities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tao, Youkun; Ebbesen, Sune Dalgaard; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2014-01-01

    process and the reaction process at the Ni-YSZ triple-phase boundaries. The performance degradation is mainly ascribed to the microstructural changes in the Ni-YSZ electrode close to the YSZ electrolyte, including percolation loss of Ni and the contact loss of Ni and YSZ electrolyte. The type of the......In this work the durability of solid oxide cells for co-electrolysis of steam and carbon dioxide (45 % H2O + 45 % CO2 + 10 % H2) at high current densities was investigated. The tested cells are Ni-YSZ electrode supported, with a YSZ electrolyte and either a LSM-YSZ or LSCF-CGO oxygen electrode. A...... oxygen electrode showed an influence to the ohmic degradation: the better performing oxygen electrode corresponded to a lower Rs increase. However, the oxygen electrode itself was found to be relative stable both with respect to the electrochemical performance and microstructure....

  7. Understanding degradation of solid oxide electrolysis cells through modeling of electrochemical potential profiles

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chatzichristodoulou, Christodoulos; Chen, Ming; Hendriksen, Peter Vang;

    2016-01-01

    Establishing the spatial distribution of the various chemical and electrochemical potentials in an operating SOEC is critical as several degradation mechanisms are tightly connected to them, but at the same time very challenging to achieve experimentally. Such distributions are presented here...... conductivities in the electrolyte, the gas composition, temperature, and pressure on the current density distribution over the cell and the oxygen activity distribution within the electrolyte. The developed model is further used to simulate long-term durability experiments during different stages of operation......, thereby helping to rationalize microstructural and chemical changes observed in post-mortem analysis. Finally, measures to mitigate degradation by changing conditions of operation, material or electrode properties or overall cell geometry are suggested....

  8. Analysis on anomalous degradation in silicon solar cell designed for space use

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ohshima, Takeshi; Morita, Yousuke; Nashiyama, Isamu [Japan Atomic Energy Research Inst., Takasaki, Gunma (Japan). Takasaki Radiation Chemistry Research Establishment; Kawasaki, Osamu; Hisamatsu, Tadashi; Yamamoto, Yasunari; Matsuda, Sumio; Nakao, Tetsuya; Wakow, Yoshihito

    1997-03-01

    Recently, we have found the anomalous degradation of electrical performance in silicon solar cells irradiated with charged particles in a high-fluence region. This anomalous phenomenon has two typical features, which are sudden-drop-down of electrical performances in a high-fluence region and slight recovery of the short circuit current I{sub SC} just before the sudden-drop-down. These features cannot be understood by a conventional model coming from the decrease of minority-carriers life-time. We introduce this anomalous degradation of the electrical performance in Si solar cells irradiated with electrons or protons. We also report the result of simulation for the fluence dependence of the I{sub SC}, and discuss the mechanism of this anomalous phenomenon. (author)

  9. Degradation of Epidermal Growth Factor Receptor Mediates Dasatinib-Induced Apoptosis in Head and Neck Squamous Cell Carcinoma Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu-Chin Lin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR is an important oncoprotein that promotes cell growth and proliferation. Dasatinib, a bcr-abl inhibitor, has been approved clinically for the treatment of chronic myeloid leukemia and demonstrated to be effective against solid tumors in vitro through Src inhibition. Here, we disclose that EGFR degradation mediated dasatinib-induced apoptosis in head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC cells. HNSCC cells, including Ca9-22, FaDu, HSC3, SAS, SCC-25, and UMSCC1, were treated with dasatinib, and cell viability, apoptosis, and underlying signal transduction were evaluated. Dasatinib exhibited differential sensitivities against HNSCC cells. Growth inhibition and apoptosis were correlated with its inhibition on Akt, Erk, and Bcl-2, irrespective of Src inhibition. Accordingly, we found that down-regulation of EGFR was a determinant of dasatinib sensitivity. Lysosome inhibitor reversed dasatinib-induced EGFR down-regulation, and c-cbl activity was increased by dasatinib, indicating that dasatinib-induced EGFR down-regulation might be through c-cbl-mediated lysosome degradation. Increased EGFR activation by ligand administration rescued cells from dasatinib-induced apoptosis, whereas inhibition of EGFR enhanced its apoptotic effect. Estrogen receptor α (ERα was demonstrated to play a role in Bcl-2 expression, and dasatinib inhibited ERα at the pretranslational level. ERα was associated with EGFR in dasatinib-treated HNSCC cells. Furthermore, the xenograft model showed that dasatinib inhibited HSC3 tumor growth through in vivo down-regulation of EGFR and ERα. In conclusion, degradation of EGFR is a novel mechanism responsible for dasatinib-induced apoptosis in HNSCC cells.

  10. Protective effect of policosanol on atherosclerotic lesions in rabbits with exogenous hypercholesterolemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arruzazabala M.L.

    2000-01-01

    Full Text Available Policosanol is a mixture of higher aliphatic alcohols purified from sugar cane wax, with cholesterol-lowering effects demonstrable in experimental models and in patients with type II hypercholesterolemia. The protective effects of policosanol on atherosclerotic lesions experimentally induced by lipofundin in rabbits and rats and spontaneously developed in stumptail monkeys have been described. The present study was conducted to determine whether policosanol administered orally to rabbits with exogenous hypercholesterolemia also protects against the development of atherosclerotic lesions. Male New Zealand rabbits weighing 1.5 to 2 kg were randomly divided into three experimental groups which received 25 or 200 mg/kg policosanol (N = 7 orally for 60 days with acacia gum as vehicle or acacia gum alone (control group, N = 9. All animals received a cholesterol-rich diet (0.5% during the entire period. Control animals developed marked hypercholesterolemia, macroscopic lesions and arterial intimal thickening. Intima thickness was significantly less (32.5 ± 7 and 25.4 ± 4 µm in hypercholesterolemic rabbits treated with policosanol than in controls (57.6 ± 9 µm. In most policosanol-treated animals, atherosclerotic lesions were not present, and in others, thickness of fatty streaks had less foam cell layers than in controls. We conclude that policosanol has a protective effect on the atherosclerotic lesions occurring in this experimental model.

  11. Simulation Biomass Effecting On Microbial Fuel Cell Electricity Properties and Substrate Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Jinxiang Fu; Xiangxin Xue; Yulan Tang; Jiao Wang; Xingguan Ma

    2013-01-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) mathematical model was established with suspended microorganisms, biomass on the electrode material, soluble chemical substrates and intermediary. By simulating the process of the substrate degradation, biomass growth and the electric current production process, With different initial biomass concentration, suspended microbial biomass and biomass attaching on electrode varing with time,current and charge varing with time,substrate concentration varing with time and m...

  12. Influence of realistic load profiles on Lithium-Ion Cell Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Bauder, Alexander; Weiss-Ungethüm, Jörg; Sattler, Johannes; Schneider, Dirk

    2014-01-01

    The degradation of batteries is dependent of the use in their particular application. The loss of capacity because of cycling correlates in some degree to utilization in consumer electronic devices. But the utilization in battery electric vehicles (BEV) or stationary applications like frequency regulation for grid stability imply a different strain for the used battery cells. For example a BEV (with recuperation) in urban traffic accelerates and decelerates periodically. This represents a spe...

  13. Recognition and degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides by two human gut symbionts.

    OpenAIRE

    Martens, Eric C.; Lowe, Elisabeth C.; Herbert Chiang; Nicholas A Pudlo; Meng Wu; McNulty, Nathan P.; D Wade Abbott; Bernard Henrissat; Gilbert, Harry J.; Bolam, David N.; Jeffrey I Gordon

    2011-01-01

    Symbiotic bacteria inhabiting the human gut have evolved under intense pressure to utilize complex carbohydrates, primarily plant cell wall glycans in our diets. These polysaccharides are not digested by human enzymes, but are processed to absorbable short chain fatty acids by gut bacteria. The Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant bacterial phyla in the adult gut, possess broad glycan-degrading abilities. These species use a series of membrane protein complexes, termed Sus-like systems, for cat...

  14. Degradation Mechanism in a Direct Carbon Fuel Cell Operated with Demineralised Brown Coal

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • Degradation mechanism studied for demineralised coal in a direct carbon fuel cell. • Diffusion limited processes dominate the electrode polarisation losses in pure N2. • Major fuel cell performance loss occurred due to loss of carbon/anode contacts. • The anode retained its phase structure with minor other phases formed in operation. - Abstract: The performance of a demineralised and devolatilised coal from the Morwell mine in the Latrobe Valley, Victoria, has been investigated in a direct carbon fuel cell (DCFC) operated at 850 °C. The focus of the investigation has been on understanding degradation issues as a function of time involving a sequence of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and voltage-current characteristic. Diffusion limited processes dominate the electrode polarisation losses in pure N2 atmosphere, however, these decrease substantially in the presence of CO2 as the anode chamber purge gas, due to in situ generation of fuel species by the reaction of CO2 with carbon. Post-mortem analysis of anode by SEM and XRD revealed only a minor degradation due to its reduction, particle agglomeration as well as the formation of small quantity of new phases. However, major fuel cell performance degradation (increase of ohmic resistive and electrode polarisation losses) occurred due to loss of carbon/anode contacts and a reduction in the electron-conducting pathways as the fuel was consumed. The investigations revealed that the demineralised coal char can be used as a viable fuel for DCFC, however, further developments on anode materials and fuel feed mechanism would be required to achieve long-term sustained performance

  15. Effect of mea on DNA degradation in permeable irradiated Bac. stearothermophilus cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It was shown that DNA-degrading activity of permeable, intact and γ-irradiated cells of Bac. stearothermophilus decreased under the effect of β-mercaptoethylamine (MEA). MEA decreased also a DNAase activity, in a crude acellular extract of Bac. stearothermophilus, and activities of S1-nuclease and DNAase. I. The data obtained prompt an assumption that MEA has an inhibitory action on the activity of endonucleases irrespective of their substrate specificity

  16. Temporally degradable collagen-mimetic hydrogels tuned to chondrogenesis of human mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parmar, Paresh A; Skaalure, Stacey C; Chow, Lesley W; St-Pierre, Jean-Philippe; Stoichevska, Violet; Peng, Yong Y; Werkmeister, Jerome A; Ramshaw, John A M; Stevens, Molly M

    2016-08-01

    Tissue engineering strategies for repairing and regenerating articular cartilage face critical challenges to recapitulate the dynamic and complex biochemical microenvironment of native tissues. One approach to mimic the biochemical complexity of articular cartilage is through the use of recombinant bacterial collagens as they provide a well-defined biological 'blank template' that can be modified to incorporate bioactive and biodegradable peptide sequences within a precisely defined three-dimensional system. We customized the backbone of a Streptococcal collagen-like 2 (Scl2) protein with heparin-binding, integrin-binding, and hyaluronic acid-binding peptide sequences previously shown to modulate chondrogenesis and then cross-linked the recombinant Scl2 protein with a combination of matrix metalloproteinase 7 (MMP7)- and aggrecanase (ADAMTS4)-cleavable peptides at varying ratios to form biodegradable hydrogels with degradation characteristics matching the temporal expression pattern of these enzymes in human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) during chondrogenesis. hMSCs encapsulated within the hydrogels cross-linked with both degradable peptides exhibited enhanced chondrogenic characteristics as demonstrated by gene expression and extracellular matrix deposition compared to the hydrogels cross-linked with a single peptide. Additionally, these combined peptide hydrogels displayed increased MMP7 and ADAMTS4 activities and yet increased compression moduli after 6 weeks, suggesting a positive correlation between the degradation of the hydrogels and the accumulation of matrix by hMSCs undergoing chondrogenesis. Our results suggest that including dual degradation motifs designed to respond to enzymatic activity of hMSCs going through chondrogenic differentiation led to improvements in chondrogenesis. Our hydrogel system demonstrates a bimodal enzymatically degradable biological platform that can mimic native cellular processes in a temporal manner. As such, this novel

  17. Tussilagone suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation by promoting the degradation of β-catenin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Hua [College of Pharmacy and Research Center for Cell Fate Control, Sookmyung Women’s University, 52 Hyochangwon-Gil, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hwa Jin [Department of Natural Medicine Resources, Semyung University, 65 Semyung-ro, Jecheon, Chungbuk 390-711 (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Yeon Hwa; Kwon, Hye Jin; Jang, Chang-Young; Kim, Woo-Young [College of Pharmacy and Research Center for Cell Fate Control, Sookmyung Women’s University, 52 Hyochangwon-Gil, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of); Ryu, Jae-Ha, E-mail: ryuha@sookmyung.ac.kr [College of Pharmacy and Research Center for Cell Fate Control, Sookmyung Women’s University, 52 Hyochangwon-Gil, Yongsan-Gu, Seoul 140-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-01-03

    Highlights: •Tussilagone (TSL) was purified from plant as an inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. •TSL suppressed the β-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity. •The proteasomal degradation of β-catenin was induced by TSL. •TSL suppressed the Wnt/β-catenin target genes, cyclin D1 and c-myc. •TSL inhibit the proliferation of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Abnormal activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway frequently induces colon cancer progression. In the present study, we identified tussilagone (TSL), a compound isolated from the flower buds of Tussilago farfara, as an inhibitor on β-catenin dependent Wnt pathway. TSL suppressed β-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity and down-regulated β-catenin level both in cytoplasm and nuclei of HEK293 reporter cells when they were stimulated by Wnt3a or activated by an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Since the mRNA level was not changed by TSL, proteasomal degradation might be responsible for the decreased level of β-catenin. In SW480 and HCT116 colon cancer cell lines, TSL suppressed the β-catenin activity and also decreased the expression of cyclin D1 and c-myc, representative target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and consequently inhibited the proliferation of colon cancer cells. Taken together, TSL might be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of human colon cancer.

  18. Tussilagone suppresses colon cancer cell proliferation by promoting the degradation of β-catenin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •Tussilagone (TSL) was purified from plant as an inhibitor of Wnt/β-catenin pathway. •TSL suppressed the β-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity. •The proteasomal degradation of β-catenin was induced by TSL. •TSL suppressed the Wnt/β-catenin target genes, cyclin D1 and c-myc. •TSL inhibit the proliferation of colon cancer cells. -- Abstract: Abnormal activation of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway frequently induces colon cancer progression. In the present study, we identified tussilagone (TSL), a compound isolated from the flower buds of Tussilago farfara, as an inhibitor on β-catenin dependent Wnt pathway. TSL suppressed β-catenin/T-cell factor transcriptional activity and down-regulated β-catenin level both in cytoplasm and nuclei of HEK293 reporter cells when they were stimulated by Wnt3a or activated by an inhibitor of glycogen synthase kinase-3β. Since the mRNA level was not changed by TSL, proteasomal degradation might be responsible for the decreased level of β-catenin. In SW480 and HCT116 colon cancer cell lines, TSL suppressed the β-catenin activity and also decreased the expression of cyclin D1 and c-myc, representative target genes of the Wnt/β-catenin signaling pathway, and consequently inhibited the proliferation of colon cancer cells. Taken together, TSL might be a potential chemotherapeutic agent for the prevention and treatment of human colon cancer

  19. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Radulescu, Razvan T., E-mail: ratura@gmx.net [Molecular Concepts Research (MCR), Muenster (Germany); Duckworth, William C. [Department of Medicine, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Levy, Jennifer L. [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States); Fawcett, Janet, E-mail: janet.fawcett@va.gov [Research Service, Phoenix VA Health Care System, Phoenix, AZ (United States)

    2010-04-30

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  20. A compact multi-chamber setup for degradation and lifetime studies of organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gevorgyan, Suren; Jørgensen, Mikkel; Krebs, Frederik C;

    2011-01-01

    chambers with temperature and atmosphere control. The four chambers are situated at close proximity in the setup thereby allowing the solar cells to be subjected to as uniform an illumination distribution as possible for the given solar simulator employed. The cell substrates serve as the front window and...... present a tight seal. Hence no illumination correction needs to be performed due to transmission and reflection losses as otherwise seen with test chambers employing a window as a seal. The solar cells in each chamber are continuously and individually electrically monitored under biased conditions by......A controlled atmosphere setup designed for long-term degradation studies of organic solar cells under illumination is presented. The setup was designed with ease-of-use and compactness in mind and allows for multiple solar cells distributed on four glass substrates to be studied in four different...

  1. Retinoblastoma protein co-purifies with proteasomal insulin-degrading enzyme: Implications for cell proliferation control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Previous investigations on proteasomal preparations containing insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE; EC 3.4.24.56) have invariably yielded a co-purifying protein with a molecular weight of about 110 kDa. We have now found both in MCF-7 breast cancer and HepG2 hepatoma cells that this associated molecule is the retinoblastoma tumor suppressor protein (RB). Interestingly, the amount of RB in this protein complex seemed to be lower in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells, indicating a higher (cytoplasmic) protein turnover in the former vs. the latter cells. Moreover, immunofluorescence showed increased nuclear localization of RB in HepG2 vs. MCF-7 cells. Beyond these subtle differences between these distinct tumor cell types, our present study more generally suggests an interplay between RB and IDE within the proteasome that may have important growth-regulatory consequences.

  2. Degradation of miR-21 induces apoptosis and inhibits cell proliferation in human hepatocellular carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najafi, Z; Sharifi, M; Javadi, G

    2015-11-01

    MicroRNAs (miRNAs) are small non-coding RNAs, 18-25 nucleotides long and have an important role in post-transcriptional regulation of gene. Several aspects of cellular activities such as cell growth, proliferation and differentiation are regulated by miRNAs. In many cancers and malignancies, up- or downregulation of different miRNAs has been reported. In human hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC), upregulation of miR-21 has been reported in human in vitro studies. Here, we made an assessment of the effect of miR-21 degradation on viability and apoptosis of HCC cell line (HepG2) using locked nucleic acid (LNA). At different time points (24, 48, 72 h) after LNA-anti-miR-21 transfection, 3-[4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl]-2, 5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide assay and Annexin/propidium iodide staining were performed. The results show that miR-21 degradation can decrease the viability of cells, mainly by induction of apoptosis and necrosis. These findings suggest that degradation of miR-21 could be used as a novel approach in treatment of HCC. PMID:26427512

  3. Mitochondrial impairment and oxidative stress compromise autophagosomal degradation of α-synuclein in oligodendroglial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pukaß, Katharina; Goldbaum, Olaf; Richter-Landsberg, Christiane

    2015-10-01

    α-Synuclein (α-syn)-containing glial cytoplasmic inclusions originating in oligodendrocytes are characteristically observed in multiple system atrophy. The mechanisms of glial cytoplasmic inclusion formation remain rather elusive. α-Syn over-expression, uptake from the environment, oxidative stress or impairment of the proteolytic degradation systems have been discussed. Here, we investigated whether in oligodendrocytes autophagy plays a major role in the degradation and aggregation of endogenously expressed α-syn and of α-syn taken up from the extracellular environment. Furthermore, we studied whether in cells with impaired mitochondria the accumulation and aggregation of exogenously added α-syn is promoted. Using primary cultures of rat brain oligodendrocytes and an oligodendroglial cell line, genetically engineered to express green fluorescent protein-microtubule-associated light chain 3 with or without α-syn to monitor the autophagic flux, we demonstrate that both exogenously applied α-syn and α-syn stably expressed endogenously are effectively degraded by autophagy and do not affect the autophagic flux per se. Mitochondrial impairment with the protonophore carbonyl cyanide 3-chlorophenylhydrazone or 3-nitropropionic acid disturbs the autophagic pathway and leads to the accumulation of exogenously applied α-syn and enhances its propensity to form aggregates intracellularly. Thus, mitochondrial dysfunction and oxidative stress, which occur over time and are significant pathological features in synucleinopathies, have an impact on the autophagic pathway and participate in pathogenesis. Glial cytoplasmic inclusions are characteristically observed in multiple system atrophy, their occurrence might be related to failure in protein degradation systems. Here, we show that in oligodendrocytes autophagy is the major route of α-synuclein degradation which is either endogenously expressed or added exogenously (1, 2). Mitochondrial impairment (3) disturbs the

  4. Critical Causes of Degradation in Integrated Laboratory Scale Cells during High Temperature Electrolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    M.S. Sohal; J.E. O' Brien; C.M. Stoots; J. J. Hartvigsen; D. Larsen; S. Elangovan; J.S. Herring; J.D. Carter; V.I. Sharma; B. Yildiz

    2009-05-01

    An ongoing project at Idaho National Laboratory involves generating hydrogen from steam using solid oxide electrolysis cells (SOEC). This report describes background information about SOECs, the Integrated Laboratory Scale (ILS) testing of solid-oxide electrolysis stacks, ILS performance degradation, and post-test examination of SOECs by various researchers. The ILS test was a 720- cell, three-module test comprised of 12 stacks of 60 cells each. A peak H2 production rate of 5.7 Nm3/hr was achieved. Initially, the module area-specific resistance ranged from 1.25 Ocm2 to just over 2 Ocm2. Total H2 production rate decreased from 5.7 Nm3/hr to a steady state value of 0.7 Nm3/hr. The decrease was primarily due to cell degradation. Post test examination by Ceramatec showed that the hydrogen electrode appeared to be in good condition. The oxygen evolution electrode does show delamination in operation and an apparent foreign layer deposited at the electrolyte interface. Post test examination by Argonne National Laboratory showed that the O2-electrode delaminated from the electrolyte near the edge. One possible reason for this delamination is excessive pressure buildup with high O2 flow in the over-sintered region. According to post test examination at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, the electrochemical reactions have been recognized as one of the prevalent causes of their degradation. Specifically, two important degradation mechanisms were examined: (1) transport of Crcontaining species from steel interconnects into the oxygen electrode and LSC bond layers in SOECs, and (2) cation segregation and phase separation in the bond layer. INL conducted a workshop October 27, 2008 to discuss possible causes of degradation in a SOEC stack. Generally, it was agreed that the following are major degradation issues relating to SOECs: • Delamination of the O2-electrode and bond layer on the steam/O2-electrode side • Contaminants (Ni, Cr, Si, etc.) on reaction sites

  5. Coilin phosphomutants disrupt Cajal body formation, reduce cell proliferation and produce a distinct coilin degradation product.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zunamys I Carrero

    Full Text Available Coilin is a nuclear phosphoprotein that accumulates in Cajal bodies (CBs. CBs participate in ribonucleoprotein and telomerase biogenesis, and are often found in cells with high transcriptional demands such as neuronal and cancer cells, but can also be observed less frequently in other cell types such as fibroblasts. Many proteins enriched within the CB are phosphorylated, but it is not clear what role this modification has on the activity of these proteins in the CB. Coilin is considered to be the CB marker protein and is essential for proper CB formation and composition in mammalian cells. In order to characterize the role of coilin phosphorylation on CB formation, we evaluated various coilin phosphomutants using transient expression. Additionally, we generated inducible coilin phosphomutant cell lines that, when used in combination with endogenous coilin knockdown, allow for the expression of the phosphomutants at physiological levels. Transient expression of all coilin phosphomutants except the phosphonull mutant (OFF significantly reduces proliferation. Interestingly, a stable cell line induced to express the coilin S489D phosphomutant displays nucleolar accumulation of the mutant and generates a N-terminal degradation product; neither of which is observed upon transient expression. A N-terminal degradation product and nucleolar localization are also observed in a stable cell line induced to express a coilin phosphonull mutant (OFF. The nucleolar localization of the S489D and OFF coilin mutants observed in the stable cell lines is decreased when endogenous coilin is reduced. Furthermore, all the phosphomutant cells lines show a significant reduction in CB formation when compared to wild-type after endogenous coilin knockdown. Cell proliferation studies on these lines reveal that only wild-type coilin and the OFF mutant are sufficient to rescue the reduction in proliferation associated with endogenous coilin depletion. These results emphasize

  6. In vitro degradation of electrodeposited calcium phosphate coatings by osteoclast-like cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The aim of this study is to investigate the in vitro degradation of electrolytically deposited calcium phosphate coatings in the presence of osteoclast-like cells. Titanium alloy plates electrolytically coated with calcium phosphate with or without chitosan were incubated with RAW264.7 cells for 14 days. The TRAP activity was measured and the cell attachment and proliferation capacity were analyzed. The calcium ion concentrations in the culture medium before and after incubation were calculated. Both coatings were observed with scanning electron microscopy and characterized through an x-ray diffractometer and Fourier transform infrared spectrum. The RAW264.7 cells differentiated into TRAP-positive osteoclast-like cells on both coatings after 7 days. Although presenting different cell attachment pattern, the RAW264.7 cells demonstrated the similar TRAP activity and proliferation capacity. It was found that the calcium ion concentrations in the medium decreased at the beginning, but increased after 11 and 14 days. The chitosan containing coatings had higher Ca2+ concentration in the medium compared to that without chitosan. Besides, the incubation of coatings with cells induced higher calcium ion concentrations than those without cells at day 11 and day 14. Despite the structural changes of dissolution pits and osteoclastic resorption lacunae present on both coatings, the x-ray diffractometer and Fourier transform infrared spectrum showed few alternations in their chemical compositions. Both electrodeposited calcium phosphate coatings can be resorbed by osteoclast-like RAW264.7 cells and dissolved in the culture medium in vitro. The degradation brings little change to the chemical compositions of both coatings. (paper)

  7. Endovascular revascularization for aortoiliac atherosclerotic disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aggarwal, Vikas; Waldo, Stephen W; Armstrong, Ehrin J

    2016-01-01

    Atherosclerotic iliac artery disease is increasingly being treated with endovascular techniques. A number of new stent technologies can be utilized with high long-term patency, including self-expanding stents, balloon-expandable stents, and covered stents, but comparative data on these stent types and in more complex lesions are lacking. This article provides a review of currently available iliac stent technologies, as well as complex procedural aspects of iliac artery interventions, including approaches to the treatment of iliac bifurcation disease, long segment occlusions, choice of stent type, and treatment of iliac artery in-stent restenosis. PMID:27099509

  8. Oxidative degradation of polybenzimidazole membranes as electrolytes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liao, J.H.; Li, Qingfeng; Rudbeck, H.C.;

    2011-01-01

    Polybenzimidazole membranes imbibed with acid are emerging as a suitable electrolyte material for high-temperature polymer electrolyte fuel cells. The oxidative stability of polybenzimidazole has been identified as an important issue for the long-term durability of such cells. In this paper the...... oxidative degradation of the polymer membrane was studied under the Fenton test conditions by the weight loss, intrinsic viscosity, size exclusion chromatography, scanning electron microscopy and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. During the Fenton test, significant weight losses depending on the...

  9. Cell wall degrading enzymes in Trichoderma asperellum grown on wheat bran

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bech, Lasse; Busk, Peter Kamp; Lange, Lene

    2015-01-01

    Trichoderma asperellum is a filamentous fungus that is able to produce and secrete a wide range of extracellular hydrolytic enzymes used for plant cell wall degradation. The Trichoderma genus has attracted considerable attention from the biorefinery industry due to the production of cell wall...... Pattern Recognition enabling an efficient enzyme discovery. This was furthermore used to re-annotate CAZYmes present in five publically available Trichoderma species, hereby elucidating differences in CAZYmes on a functional level in contrary to glycoside hydrolase family level. This comparison supports...

  10. Degradation and stability of R2R manufactured polymer solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Kion; Krebs, Frederik C

    2009-01-01

    produce polymer solar cells at a very low cost. We have employed state-of-the-art analytical techniques to address the challenging issues of degradation and stability of R2R manufactured devices. We have specifically studied the relative effect of oxygen and water on the operational devices in regard to......Polymer solar cells have many advantages such as light weight, flexibility, environmental friendliness, low thermal budget, low cost and most notably very fast modes of production by printing techniques. Production experiments have shown that it is highly feasible with existing technology to mass...

  11. Yeast Extract Promotes Cell Growth and Induces Production of Polyvinyl Alcohol-Degrading Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Min Li; Xianyan Liao; Dongxu Zhang; Guocheng Du; Jian Chen

    2011-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol-degrading enzymes (PVAases) have a great potential in bio-desizing processes for its low environmental impact and low energy consumption. In this study, the effect of yeast extract on PVAases production was investigated. A strategy of four-point yeast extract addition was developed and applied to maximize cell growth and PVAases production. As a result, the maximum dry cell weight achieved was 1.48 g/L and the corresponding PVAases activity was 2.99 U/mL, which are 46.5% and...

  12. Impact of process variations and long term degradation on 6T-SRAM cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Th. Fischer

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available In modern deep-submicron CMOS technologies voltage scaling can not keep up with the scaling of the dimensions of transistors. Therefore the electrical fields inside the transistors are not constant anymore, while scaling down the device area. The rising electrical fields bring up reliability problems, such as hot carrier injection. Also other long term degradation mechanisms like Negative Bias Temperature Instability (NBTI come into the focus of circuit design.

    Along with process device parameter variations (threshold voltage, mobility, variations due to the degradation of devices form a big challenge for designers to build circuits that both yield high under the influence of process variations and remain functional with respect to long term device drift.

    In this work we present the influence of long term degradation and process variations on the performance of SRAM core-cells and parametric yield of SRAM arrays. For different use cases we show the performance degradation depending on temperature and supply voltage.

  13. HUWE1 Ubiquitylates and Degrades the RAC Activator TIAM1 Promoting Cell-Cell Adhesion Disassembly, Migration, and Invasion

    OpenAIRE

    Lynsey Vaughan; Chong-Teik Tan; Anna Chapman; Daisuke Nonaka; Mack, Natalie A; Duncan Smith; Richard Booton; Adam F.L. Hurlstone; Angeliki Malliri

    2015-01-01

    Summary The E3 ubiquitin ligase HUWE1, deregulated in carcinoma, has been implicated in tumor formation. Here, we uncover a role for HUWE1 in cell migration and invasion through degrading the RAC activator TIAM1, implying an additional function in malignant progression. In MDCKII cells in response to HGF, HUWE1 catalyzes TIAM1 ubiquitylation and degradation predominantly at cell-cell adhesions, facilitating junction disassembly, migration, and invasion. Depleting HUWE1 or mutating the TIAM1 u...

  14. Recognition and degradation of plant cell wall polysaccharides by two human gut symbionts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric C Martens

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Symbiotic bacteria inhabiting the human gut have evolved under intense pressure to utilize complex carbohydrates, primarily plant cell wall glycans in our diets. These polysaccharides are not digested by human enzymes, but are processed to absorbable short chain fatty acids by gut bacteria. The Bacteroidetes, one of two dominant bacterial phyla in the adult gut, possess broad glycan-degrading abilities. These species use a series of membrane protein complexes, termed Sus-like systems, for catabolism of many complex carbohydrates. However, the role of these systems in degrading the chemically diverse repertoire of plant cell wall glycans remains unknown. Here we show that two closely related human gut Bacteroides, B. thetaiotaomicron and B. ovatus, are capable of utilizing nearly all of the major plant and host glycans, including rhamnogalacturonan II, a highly complex polymer thought to be recalcitrant to microbial degradation. Transcriptional profiling and gene inactivation experiments revealed the identity and specificity of the polysaccharide utilization loci (PULs that encode individual Sus-like systems that target various plant polysaccharides. Comparative genomic analysis indicated that B. ovatus possesses several unique PULs that enable degradation of hemicellulosic polysaccharides, a phenotype absent from B. thetaiotaomicron. In contrast, the B. thetaiotaomicron genome has been shaped by increased numbers of PULs involved in metabolism of host mucin O-glycans, a phenotype that is undetectable in B. ovatus. Binding studies of the purified sensor domains of PUL-associated hybrid two-component systems in conjunction with transcriptional analyses demonstrate that complex oligosaccharides provide the regulatory cues that induce PUL activation and that each PUL is highly specific for a defined cell wall polymer. These results provide a view of how these species have diverged into different carbohydrate niches by evolving genes that target

  15. Rictor regulates FBXW7-dependent c-Myc and cyclin E degradation in colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► Rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex. ► Knockdown of rictor decreases ubiquitination of c-Myc and cylin E. ► Knockdown of rictor increases protein levels of c-Myc and cylin E. ► Overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. ► Rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. -- Abstract: Rictor (Rapamycin-insensitive companion of mTOR) forms a complex with mTOR and phosphorylates and activates Akt. Activation of Akt induces expression of c-Myc and cyclin E, which are overexpressed in colorectal cancer and play an important role in colorectal cancer cell proliferation. Here, we show that rictor associates with FBXW7 to form an E3 complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E degradation. The Rictor–FBXW7 complex is biochemically distinct from the previously reported mTORC2 and can be immunoprecipitated independently of mTORC2. Moreover, knocking down of rictor in serum-deprived colorectal cancer cells results in the decreased ubiquitination and increased protein levels of c-Myc and cyclin E while overexpression of rictor induces the degradation of c-Myc and cyclin E proteins. Genetic knockout of FBXW7 blunts the effects of rictor, suggesting that rictor regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E requires FBXW7. Our findings identify rictor as an important component of FBXW7 E3 ligase complex participating in the regulation of c-Myc and cyclin E protein ubiquitination and degradation. Importantly, our results suggest that elevated growth factor signaling may contribute to decrease rictor/FBXW7-mediated ubiquitination of c-Myc and cyclin E, thus leading to accumulation of cyclin E and c-Myc in colorectal cancer cells.

  16. Arsenal of plant cell wall degrading enzymes reflects host preference among plant pathogenic fungi

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bergstrom Gary C

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The discovery and development of novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes is a key step towards more efficient depolymerization of polysaccharides to fermentable sugars for the production of liquid transportation biofuels and other bioproducts. The industrial fungus Trichoderma reesei is known to be highly cellulolytic and is a major industrial microbial source for commercial cellulases, xylanases and other cell wall degrading enzymes. However, enzyme-prospecting research continues to identify opportunities to enhance the activity of T. reesei enzyme preparations by supplementing with enzymatic diversity from other microbes. The goal of this study was to evaluate the enzymatic potential of a broad range of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi for their ability to degrade plant biomass and isolated polysaccharides. Results Large-scale screening identified a range of hydrolytic activities among 348 unique isolates representing 156 species of plant pathogenic and non-pathogenic fungi. Hierarchical clustering was used to identify groups of species with similar hydrolytic profiles. Among moderately and highly active species, plant pathogenic species were found to be more active than non-pathogens on six of eight substrates tested, with no significant difference seen on the other two substrates. Among the pathogenic fungi, greater hydrolysis was seen when they were tested on biomass and hemicellulose derived from their host plants (commelinoid monocot or dicot. Although T. reesei has a hydrolytic profile that is highly active on cellulose and pretreated biomass, it was less active than some natural isolates of fungi when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. Conclusions Several highly active isolates of plant pathogenic fungi were identified, particularly when tested on xylans and untreated biomass. There were statistically significant preferences for biomass type reflecting the monocot or dicot host preference of the

  17. Degradation of DNA and chromatin in cells of mouse lymphoid organs after irradiation and administration of PHA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Phytohemagglutinin (PHA) adminiestered to irradiated mice did not influence the postirradiation degradation of DNA and the yield of polydeoxynucleotides (PDN) in cells of thymus, spleen and bone marrow. The degree of degradation of DNA and chromatin was higher in the thymus as compared to other studied organs. A possible mechanism of the radiotherapeutic action of PHA is discussed

  18. Nanoporous metals for biodegradable implants: Initial bone mesenchymal stem cell adhesion and degradation behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heiden, Michael; Huang, Sabrina; Nauman, Eric; Johnson, David; Stanciu, Lia

    2016-07-01

    Nanostructured Fe-Mn and Fe-Mn-Zn metal scaffolds were generated through a well-controlled selective leaching process in order to fulfill the growing demand for adjustable degradation rates and improved cellular response of resorbable materials. Mouse bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (D1 ORL UVA) were seeded onto eleven, carefully chosen nanoporous surfaces for 24 h in vitro. Using a combination of fluorescence microscopy, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and an MTS assay, it was discovered that scaffolds with nanoscale roughened surfaces had increased cell attachment by up to 123% compared to polished smooth Fe-Mn surfaces. Significant cell spreading and construction of cell multilayers were also apparent after 24 h, suggesting better adhesion. Additionally, static electrochemical polarization experiments revealed an improvement of up to 26% in the actual rate of biodegradation for Fe-Mn surface-modified materials. However, any residual concentration of zinc after leaching was shown to slightly increase corrosion resistance. The results demonstrate that selectively leached, nanostructured Fe-Mn surfaces have the potential of being tailored to a diverse set of transient implant scenarios, while also effectively boosting overall biocompatibility, initial cell attachment, and degradation rate. © 2016 Wiley Periodicals, Inc. J Biomed Mater Res Part A: 104A: 1747-1758, 2016. PMID:26990484

  19. Ndfip-mediated degradation of Jak1 tunes cytokine signalling to limit expansion of CD4+ effector T cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Leary, Claire E.; Riling, Christopher R.; Spruce, Lynn A.; Ding, Hua; Kumar, Suresh; Deng, Guoping; Liu, Yuhong; Seeholzer, Steven H.; Oliver, Paula M.

    2016-01-01

    Nedd4 family E3 ubiquitin ligases have been shown to restrict T-cell function and impact T-cell differentiation. We show here that Ndfip1 and Ndfip2, activators of Nedd4 family ligases, together limit accumulation and function of effector CD4+ T cells. Using a three-part proteomics approach in primary T cells, we identify stabilization of Jak1 in Ndfip1/2-deficient T cells stimulated through the TCR. Jak1 degradation is aborted in activated T cells that lack Ndfips. In wild-type cells, Jak1 degradation lessens CD4+ cell sensitivity to cytokines during TCR stimulation, while in Ndfip-deficient cells cytokine responsiveness persists, promoting increased expansion and survival of pathogenic effector T cells. Thus, Ndfip1/Ndfip2 regulate the cross talk between the T-cell receptor and cytokine signalling pathways to limit inappropriate T-cell responses. PMID:27088444

  20. Degradation mechanisms of sulfonated poly-aromatic membranes in fuel cell; Mecanismes de degradation des membranes polyaromatiques sulfonees en pile a combustible

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrot, C

    2006-11-15

    Fuel cell development requires an improvement in the electrode-membrane assembly durability which depends on both the polymer used and the fuel cell operating conditions. The origin of the degradation can be either electrochemical, chemical and/or mechanical. This study deals with the understanding of alternative membranes ageing mechanisms, i.e. non fluorinated membranes, such as sPEEK and sPI. For this kind of membranes, the first process is chemical. Understanding these mechanisms is the first essential step to develop more stable structures. An original approach is developed to overcome the analytical difficulties encountered with polymers. It consists in studying the degradation mechanism on model structures. Ageing are carried out in water, with H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in some cases (identified as a cause of membrane chemical ageing in the fuel cell system), and at different temperatures. The approach consists in separating the different products formed by chromatography. Then they are identified (NMR, IR, MS) and quantified. This method allows us to establish the ageing mechanism. We show that the ageing of a sPEEK structure mainly results from an attack by end chains which spreads to the whole. This mechanism is confirmed on ex-situ and in-situ aged membranes. These two kinds of ageing lead to an important decrease in polymerisation degree (determined by SEC). Formation of the same degradation products is observed. In fuel cells, a heterogeneous degradation is noticed. It takes place mainly on the cathode side. sPI are known for their high sensitivity to hydrolysis. Nevertheless, we highlight a limited degradation at 80 Celsius degrees due to the recombination of hydrolyzed species at this temperature. (author)

  1. Degradation mechanism of Cu(In,Ga)Se2 solar cells induced by exposure to air

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishinaga, Jiro; Kamikawa, Yukiko; Koida, Takashi; Shibata, Hajime; Niki, Shigeru

    2016-07-01

    The degradation mechanism of unencapsulated Cu(In,Ga)Se2 (CIGS) solar cells upon exposure to air has been investigated. Exposure to air at room temperature slightly reduces the conversion efficiency of CIGS solar cells. However, this conversion efficiency decreases significantly under damp heat testing at 85 °C and a relative humidity of 85% for 15 h. The shunt resistance and conversion efficiency are completely recovered after removing the side edges of the CIGS solar cells by mechanical scribing. This result suggests that low-resistive layers are formed on the sidewalls of the solar cells during damp heat testing. In addition, alkaline solution etching has been confirmed to be an effective way of removing the low-resistive layers. The low-resistive layers on the sidewalls are identified to be molybdenum oxides and sodium molybdate by Auger electron spectroscopy. After etching the oxides on the sidewalls, the saturation current density and ideality factor are confirmed to be improved.

  2. A rapid fluorescence based method for the quantitative analysis of cell culture media photo-degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvet, Amandine; Li, Boyan; Ryder, Alan G

    2014-01-01

    Cell culture media are very complex chemical mixtures that are one of the most important aspects in biopharmaceutical manufacturing. The complex composition of many media leads to materials that are inherently unstable and of particular concern, is media photo-damage which can adversely affect cell culture performance. This can be significant particularly with small scale transparent bioreactors and media containers are used for process development or research. Chromatographic and/or mass spectrometry based analyses are often time-consuming and expensive for routine high-throughput media analysis particularly during scale up or development processes. Fluorescence excitation-emission matrix (EEM) spectroscopy combined with multi-way chemometrics is a robust methodology applicable for the analysis of raw materials, media, and bioprocess broths. Here we demonstrate how EEM spectroscopy was used for the rapid, quantitative analysis of media degradation caused by ambient visible light exposure. The primary degradation pathways involve riboflavin (leading to the formation of lumichrome, LmC) which also causes photo-sensitised degradation of tryptophan, which was validated using high pressure liquid chromatography (HPLC) measurements. The use of PARallel FACtor analysis (PARAFAC), multivariate curve resolution (MCR), and N-way partial least squares (NPLS) enabled the rapid and easy monitoring of the compositional changes in tryptophan (Trp), tyrosine (Tyr), and riboflavin (Rf) concentration caused by ambient light exposure. Excellent agreement between HPLC and EEM methods was found for the change in Trp, Rf, and LmC concentrations. PMID:24356227

  3. Study on hydrophobicity degradation of gas diffusion layer in proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The hydrophobicity degradation mechanism of GDL was proposed thoroughly. • C-O and C=O groups appeared on the surfaces of GDL after immersion. • The relative content of PTFE in GDL decreased after immersion. • The surfaces and inner structure of GDL destroyed after immersion. - Abstract: As one of the essential components of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC), gas diffusion layer (GDL) is of importance on water management, as well on the performance and durability of PEMFC. In this paper, the hydrophobicity degradation of GDL was investigated by immersing it in the 1.0 mol L−1 H2SO4 solution saturated by air for 1200 h. From the measurements of contact angle and water permeability, the hydrophobic characteristics of the pristine and immersed GDLs were compared. To investigate the causes for hydrophobicity degradation, the GDLs were analyzed by scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and thermogravimetry. Further, the chemical compositions of H2SO4 solutions before and after immersion test were analyzed with infrared spectroscopy. Results showed that the hydrophobicity of immersed GDL decreased distinctly, which was caused by the damage of physical structure and surface characteristics. Moreover, the immersed GDL showed a worse fuel cell performance than the pristine GDL, especially under a low humidity condition

  4. Dynamic three-dimensional micropatterned cell co-cultures within photocurable and chemically degradable hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugiura, Shinji; Cha, Jae Min; Yanagawa, Fumiki; Zorlutuna, Pinar; Bae, Hojae; Khademhosseini, Ali

    2016-08-01

    In this paper we report on the development of dynamically controlled three-dimensional (3D) micropatterned cellular co-cultures within photocurable and chemically degradable hydrogels. Specifically, we generated dynamic co-cultures of micropatterned murine embryonic stem (mES) cells with human hepatocellular carcinoma (HepG2) cells within 3D hydrogels. HepG2 cells were used due to their ability to direct the differentiation of mES cells through secreted paracrine factors. To generate dynamic co-cultures, mES cells were first encapsulated within micropatterned photocurable poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG) hydrogels. These micropatterned cell-laden PEG hydrogels were subsequently surrounded by calcium alginate (Ca-Alg) hydrogels containing HepG2 cells. After 4 days, the co-culture step was halted by exposing the system to sodium citrate solution, which removed the alginate gels and the encapsulated HepG2 cells. The encapsulated mES cells were then maintained in the resulting cultures for 16 days and cardiac differentiation was analysed. We observed that the mES cells that were exposed to HepG2 cells in the co-cultures generated cells with higher expression of cardiac genes and proteins, as well as increased spontaneous beating. Due to its ability to control the 3D microenvironment of cells in a spatially and temporally regulated manner, the method presented in this study is useful for a range of cell-culture applications related to tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Copyright © 2013 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd. PMID:24170301

  5. Endovascular treatment of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    SyedIHussain

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease (ICAD is responsible for approximately 10% of all ischemic strokes in the United States. The risk of recurrent stroke may be as high as 35% in patient with critical stenosis greater than 70% in diameter narrowing. Recent advances in medical and endovascular therapy have placed ICAD at the forefront of clinical stroke research to optimize the best medical and endovascular approach to treat this important underlying stroke etiology. Analysis of symptomatic ICAD studies lead to the question that whether angioplasty and or stenting is a safe, suitable and efficacious therapeutic strategy in patients with critical stenoses that are deemed refractory to medical management. Most of the currently available data in support of angioplasty and or stenting in high risk patients with severe symptomatic ICAD is in the form of case series and randomized trial results of endovascular therapy versus medical treatment are awaited. This is a comprehensive review of the state of the art in the endovascular approach with angioplasty and or stenting of symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

  6. The contemporary management of intracranial atherosclerotic disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leng, Xinyi; Wong, Ka Sing; Leung, Thomas W

    2016-06-01

    Intracranial atherosclerotic disease is the most common cause of cerebral vasculopathy and an important stroke etiology worldwide, with a higher prevalence in Asian, Hispanic and African ethnicities. Symptomatic intracranial atherosclerotic disease portends a recurrent stroke risk as high as 18% at one year. The key to secondary prevention is an understanding of the underlying stroke mechanism and aggressive control of conventional cardiovascular risks. Contemporary treatment includes antiplatelet therapy, optimal glycemic and blood pressure control, statin therapy and lifestyle modifications. For patients with high-grade (70-99%) symptomatic steno-occlusion, short-term dual antiplatelet therapy with aspirin and clopidogrel followed by life-long single antiplatelet therapy may reduce the recurrent risk. Current evidence does not advocate percutaneous transluminal angioplasty and stenting as an initial treatment. External counterpulsation, encephaloduroarteriosynangiosis and remote limb ischemic preconditioning are treatments under investigation. Future studies should aim at predicting patients prone to recurrence despite of medical therapies and testing the efficacy of emerging therapies. PMID:27082149

  7. Hyperspectral imaging of atherosclerotic plaques in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Eivind L. P.; Randeberg, Lise L.; Olstad, Elisabeth; Haugen, Olav A.; Aksnes, Astrid; Svaasand, Lars O.

    2011-02-01

    Vulnerable plaques constitute a risk for serious heart problems, and are difficult to identify using existing methods. Hyperspectral imaging combines spectral- and spatial information, providing new possibilities for precise optical characterization of atherosclerotic lesions. Hyperspectral data were collected from excised aorta samples (n = 11) using both white-light and ultraviolet illumination. Single lesions (n = 42) were chosen for further investigation, and classified according to histological findings. The corresponding hyperspectral images were characterized using statistical image analysis tools (minimum noise fraction, K-means clustering, principal component analysis) and evaluation of reflectance/fluorescence spectra. Image analysis combined with histology revealed the complexity and heterogeneity of aortic plaques. Plaque features such as lipids and calcifications could be identified from the hyperspectral images. Most of the advanced lesions had a central region surrounded by an outer rim or shoulder-region of the plaque, which is considered a weak spot in vulnerable lesions. These features could be identified in both the white-light and fluorescence data. Hyperspectral imaging was shown to be a promising tool for detection and characterization of advanced atherosclerotic plaques in vitro. Hyperspectral imaging provides more diagnostic information about the heterogeneity of the lesions than conventional single point spectroscopic measurements.

  8. Role of cell wall degrading enzymes in the interaction of poplar and Melampsora larici-populina Kleb.

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chengming TIAN; Peng ZHAO; Zhimin CAO

    2009-01-01

    The activity of cell wall-degrading enzymes,produced in poplar cultivars infected Melampsora larici-populina Kleb., was studied. The results show that PMG,PMTE, Cx and fl-glucosidase played roles during the infection. After inoculation, the activity of PMG in both susceptible and resistant cultivars had two peak values in 2 dpi and 5 dpi. The activities of PMTE and β-glucosidase had a peak value in 3 dpi, and Cx in 2 dpi. Among these cell wall-degrading enzymes, the activities of PMG and PMTE were higher and the activities of Cx and β-glucosidase were relatively lower. The activities of these cell wall-degrading enzymes were significantly higher in susceptible cultivars than those in resistant cultivars. All these demonstrated that these cell wall-degrading enzymes played certain roles in the infection ofM. larici-populina.

  9. Acetaminophen degradation by electro-Fenton and photoelectro-Fenton using a double cathode electrochemical cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The electro-Fenton reactor using a double cathode electrochemical cell was applied. ► The initial Fe2+ concentration was the most significant parameter for the acetaminophen degradation. ► Thirteen intermediates were identified and a degradation pathway was proposed. - Abstract: Acetaminophen is a widely used drug worldwide and is one of the most frequently detected in bodies of water making it a high priority trace pollutant. This study investigated the applicability of the electro-Fenton and photoelectro-Fenton processes using a double cathode electrochemical cell in the treatment of acetaminophen containing wastewater. The Box–Behnken design was used to determine the effects of initial Fe2+ and H2O2 concentrations and applied current density. Results showed that all parameters positively affected the degradation efficiency of acetaminophen with the initial Fe2+ concentration being the most significant parameter for both processes. The acetaminophen removal efficiency for electro-Fenton was 98% and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of 43% while a 97% acetaminophen removal and 42% COD removal were observed for the photoelectro-Fenton method operated at optimum conditions. The electro-Fenton process was only able to obtain 19% total organic carbon (TOC) removal while the photoelectro-Fenton process obtained 20%. Due to negligible difference between the treatment efficiencies of the two processes, the electro-Fenton method was proven to be more economically advantageous. The models obtained from the study were applicable to a wide range of acetaminophen concentrations and can be used in scale-ups. Thirteen different types of intermediates were identified and a degradation pathway was proposed.

  10. Acetaminophen degradation by electro-Fenton and photoelectro-Fenton using a double cathode electrochemical cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luna, Mark Daniel G. de [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of the Philippines, 1011 Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Environmental Engineering Graduate Program, University of the Philippines, 1011 Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Veciana, Mersabel L. [Environmental Engineering Graduate Program, University of the Philippines, 1011 Diliman, Quezon City (Philippines); Su, Chia-Chi [Department of Environmental Resources Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 717, Taiwan (China); Lu, Ming-Chun, E-mail: mmclu@mail.chan.edu.tw [Department of Environmental Resources Management, Chia Nan University of Pharmacy and Science, Tainan 717, Taiwan (China)

    2012-05-30

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The electro-Fenton reactor using a double cathode electrochemical cell was applied. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The initial Fe{sup 2+} concentration was the most significant parameter for the acetaminophen degradation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Thirteen intermediates were identified and a degradation pathway was proposed. - Abstract: Acetaminophen is a widely used drug worldwide and is one of the most frequently detected in bodies of water making it a high priority trace pollutant. This study investigated the applicability of the electro-Fenton and photoelectro-Fenton processes using a double cathode electrochemical cell in the treatment of acetaminophen containing wastewater. The Box-Behnken design was used to determine the effects of initial Fe{sup 2+} and H{sub 2}O{sub 2} concentrations and applied current density. Results showed that all parameters positively affected the degradation efficiency of acetaminophen with the initial Fe{sup 2+} concentration being the most significant parameter for both processes. The acetaminophen removal efficiency for electro-Fenton was 98% and chemical oxygen demand (COD) removal of 43% while a 97% acetaminophen removal and 42% COD removal were observed for the photoelectro-Fenton method operated at optimum conditions. The electro-Fenton process was only able to obtain 19% total organic carbon (TOC) removal while the photoelectro-Fenton process obtained 20%. Due to negligible difference between the treatment efficiencies of the two processes, the electro-Fenton method was proven to be more economically advantageous. The models obtained from the study were applicable to a wide range of acetaminophen concentrations and can be used in scale-ups. Thirteen different types of intermediates were identified and a degradation pathway was proposed.

  11. Long-Term Degradation Testing of High-Temperature Electrolytic Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    C.M. Stoots; J.E. O' Brien; J.S. Herring; G.K. Housley; D.G. Milobar; M.S. Sohal

    2009-08-01

    The Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has been researching the application of solid-oxide electrolysis cell for large-scale hydrogen production from steam over a temperature range of 800 to 900ºC. The INL has been testing various solid oxide cell designs to characterize their electrolytic performance operating in the electrolysis mode for hydrogen production. Some results presented in this report were obtained from cells, with an active area of 16 cm2 per cell. The electrolysis cells are electrode-supported, with ~10 µm thick yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) electrolytes, ~1400 µm thick nickel-YSZ steam-hydrogen electrodes, and manganite (LSM) air-oxygen electrodes. The experiments were performed over a range of steam inlet mole fractions (0.1 to 0.6), gas flow rates, and current densities (0 to 0.6 A/cm2). Steam consumption rates associated with electrolysis were measured directly using inlet and outlet dewpoint instrumentation. On a molar basis, the steam consumption rate is equal to the hydrogen production rate. Cell performance was evaluated by performing DC potential sweeps at 800, 850, and 900°C. The voltage-current characteristics are presented, along with values of area-specific resistance as a function of current density. Long-term cell performance is also assessed to evaluate cell degradation. Details of the custom single-cell test apparatus developed for these experiments are also presented. NASA, in conjunction with the University of Toledo, has developed a new cell concept with the goals of reduced weight and high power density. This report presents results of the INL's testing of this new solid oxide cell design as an electrolyzer. Gas composition, operating voltage, and other parameters were varied during testing. Results to date show the NASA cell to be a promising design for both high power-to-weight fuel cell and electrolyzer applications.

  12. Proteasome-independent degradation of HIV-1 in naturally non-permissive human placental trophoblast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barré-Sinoussi Françoise

    2009-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The human placenta-derived cell line BeWo has been demonstrated to be restrictive to cell-free HIV-1 infection. BeWo cells are however permissive to infection by VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1, which enters cells by a receptor-independent mechanism, and to infection by HIV-1 via a cell-to-cell route. Results Here we analysed viral entry in wild type BeWo (CCR5+, CXCR4+ and BeWo-CD4+ (CD4+, CCR5+, CXCR4+ cells. We report that HIV-1 internalisation is not restricted in either cell line. Levels of internalised p24 antigen between VSV-G HIV-1 pseudotypes and R5 or X4 virions were comparable. We next analysed the fate of internalised virions; X4 and R5 HIV-1 virions were less stable over time in BeWo cells than VSV-G HIV-1 pseudotypes. We then investigated the role of the proteasome in restricting cell-free HIV-1 infection in BeWo cells using proteasome inhibitors. We observed an increase in the levels of VSV-G pseudotyped HIV-1 infection in proteasome-inhibitor treated cells, but the infection by R5-Env or X4-Env pseudotyped virions remains restricted. Conclusion Collectively these results suggest that cell-free HIV-1 infection encounters a surface block leading to a non-productive entry route, which either actively targets incoming virions for non-proteasomal degradation, and impedes their release into the cytoplasm, or causes the inactivation of mechanisms essential for viral replication.

  13. Degradation of T-cell receptor chains in the endoplasmic reticulum is inhibited by inhibitors of cysteine proteases.

    OpenAIRE

    Wileman, T; Kane, L. P.; Terhorst, C

    1991-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum, or an organelle closely associated with it, contains proteases that can be used to remove partially assembled or improperly folded proteins. Very little is known at present about the types of protease that degrade these proteins. The beta chain and cluster of differentiation (CD)3 delta subunit of the human T-cell antigen receptor (TCR) are degraded shortly after synthesis. In this study Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells transfected with either beta or delta were in...

  14. High modulus biodegradable polyurethanes for applications in cardiovascular stents: Evaluation of in-vitro degradation and cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa eSagarito

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available We have recently reported the mechanical properties and hydrolytic degradation behaviour of a series of NovoSorb™ [1] biodegradable polyurethanes (PUs prepared by varying the hard segment (HS weight percentage from 60-100. In this study the in-vitro degradation behaviour of the PUs with and without extracellular matrix (ECM coating was investigated under accelerated hydrolytic degradation (phosphate buffer saline; PBS/70°C conditions to allow complete degradation. The mass loss at different time intervals and the effect of aqueous degradation products on the viability and growth of Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells (HUVEC were examined.The results showed that for most PUs in the series the degradation medium turned acidic and the extent of this was dependent on the HS percentage. As the HS decreased, a drop in pH was observed, suggesting that the by-products of soft segment (SS degradation causing the solution to be acidic. Most of the samples were completely eroded by 18 weeks, except PU containing more than 70% HS which only showed partial degradation with no significant change in appearance. The cytotoxicity tests on HUVEC cells of the aqueous extracts obtained after 18 weeks incubation showed that toxicity was dependent on 3 factors: dose, percentage of HS and degradation time. HUVEC growth is similar to but not identical to that observed with tissue culture polystyrene (TCPS standard. The results from this in-vitro cytotoxicity study suggest that the mixture of degradation products formed during the accelerated degradation of this PU series are not toxic to cells under the experimental conditions used.

  15. Analysis of accelerated degradation of a HT-PEM fuel cell caused by cell reversal in fuel starvation condition

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen;

    2015-01-01

    starvation condition, and the cell performance indicated by cell voltage at H2 stoichiometry of 3.0 declines from 0.59 V to 0.41 V in 19 cycles. Since CO2 is detected in anode exhaust under H2 starvation condition, carbon corrosion is believed to be the reason for the degradation in this test. After the test......This paper reports an accelerated degradation test of a high temperature PEM fuel cell under repeated H2 starvation condition. The H2 stoichiometry is cycled between 3.0 and 0.8 every 2 min during the test. The experimental results show that the polarity of the fuel cell is reversed under H2......, there is only a slight decrease in open circuit voltage of the fuel cell which implies the membrane is not affected by the test. The electrochemical impedance spectrum measurement shows that the H2 starvation can cause significant increase in the ohmic resistance and charge transfer resistance. By...

  16. Chimeric molecules facilitate the degradation of androgen receptors and repress the growth of LNCaP cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yue-Qing Tang; Bang-Min Han; Xin-Quan Yao; Yan Hong; Yan Wang; Fu-Jun Zhao; Sheng-Qiang Yu; Xiao-Wen Sun; Shu-Jie Xia

    2009-01-01

    Post-translational degradation of protein plays an important role in cell life.We employed chimeric molecules (dihydrotestosterone-based proteolysis-targeting chimeric molecule [DHT-PROTAC]) to facilitate androgen receptor (AR) degradation via the ubiquitin-proteasome pathway (UPP) and to investigate the role of AR in cell proliferation and viability in androgen-sensitive prostate cancer cells.Western blot analysis and immunohistochemistry were applied to analyse AR levels in LNCaP cells after DHT-PROTAC treatment.Cell counting and the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assay were used to evaluate cell proliferation and viability after AR elimination in both LNCaP and PC-3 cells.AR was tagged for elimination via the UPP by DHT-PROTAC,and this could be blocked by proteasome inhibitors.Degradation of AR depended on DHT-PROTAC concentration,and either DHT or an ALAPYIP-(arg)s peptide could compete with DHT-PROTAC.Inhibition of cell proliferation and decreased viability were observed in LNCaP cells,but not in PC-3 or 786-O cells after DHT-PROTAC treatment.These data indicate that AR elimination is facilitated via the UPP by DHT-PROTAC,and that the growth of LNCaP cells is repressed after AR degradation.

  17. Chemical sporulation and germination: cytoprotective nanocoating of individual mammalian cells with a degradable tannic acid-FeIII complex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Juno; Cho, Hyeoncheol; Choi, Jinsu; Kim, Doyeon; Hong, Daewha; Park, Ji Hun; Yang, Sung Ho; Choi, Insung S.

    2015-11-01

    Individual mammalian cells were coated with cytoprotective and degradable films by cytocompatible processes maintaining the cell viability. Three types of mammalian cells (HeLa, NIH 3T3, and Jurkat cells) were coated with a metal-organic complex of tannic acid (TA) and ferric ion, and the TA-FeIII nanocoat effectively protected the coated mammalian cells against UV-C irradiation and a toxic compound. More importantly, the cell proliferation was controlled by programmed formation and degradation of the TA-FeIII nanocoat, mimicking the sporulation and germination processes found in nature.Individual mammalian cells were coated with cytoprotective and degradable films by cytocompatible processes maintaining the cell viability. Three types of mammalian cells (HeLa, NIH 3T3, and Jurkat cells) were coated with a metal-organic complex of tannic acid (TA) and ferric ion, and the TA-FeIII nanocoat effectively protected the coated mammalian cells against UV-C irradiation and a toxic compound. More importantly, the cell proliferation was controlled by programmed formation and degradation of the TA-FeIII nanocoat, mimicking the sporulation and germination processes found in nature. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Experimental details, LSCM images, and SEM and TEM images. See DOI: 10.1039/c5nr05573c

  18. Identification and Ultrastructural Characterization of a Novel Nuclear Degradation Complex in Differentiating Lens Fiber Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costello, M Joseph; Brennan, Lisa A; Mohamed, Ashik; Gilliland, Kurt O; Johnsen, Sönke; Kantorow, Marc

    2016-01-01

    An unresolved issue in structural biology is how the encapsulated lens removes membranous organelles to carry out its role as a transparent optical element. In this ultrastructural study, we establish a mechanism for nuclear elimination in the developing chick lens during the formation of the organelle-free zone. Day 12-15 chick embryo lenses were examined by high-resolution confocal light microscopy and thin section transmission electron microscopy (TEM) following fixation in 10% formalin and 4% paraformaldehyde, and then processing for confocal or TEM as described previously. Examination of developing fiber cells revealed normal nuclei with dispersed chromatin and clear nucleoli typical of cells in active ribosome production to support protein synthesis. Early signs of nuclear degradation were observed about 300 μm from the lens capsule in Day 15 lenses where the nuclei display irregular nuclear stain and prominent indentations that sometimes contained a previously undescribed macromolecular aggregate attached to the nuclear envelope. We have termed this novel structure the nuclear excisosome. This complex by confocal is closely adherent to the nuclear envelope and by TEM appears to degrade the outer leaflet of the nuclear envelope, then the inner leaflet up to 500 μm depth. The images suggest that the nuclear excisosome separates nuclear membrane proteins from lipids, which then form multilamellar assemblies that stain intensely in confocal and in TEM have 5 nm spacing consistent with pure lipid bilayers. The denuded nucleoplasm then degrades by condensation and loss of structure in the range 600 to 700 μm depth producing pyknotic nuclear remnants. None of these stages display any classic autophagic vesicles or lysosomes associated with nuclei. Uniquely, the origin of the nuclear excisosome is from filopodial-like projections of adjacent lens fiber cells that initially contact, and then appear to fuse with the outer nuclear membrane. These filopodial

  19. Overexpression of TGF-ß1 in macrophages reduces and stabilizes atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE-deficient mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kurt Reifenberg

    Full Text Available Although macrophages represent the hallmark of both human and murine atherosclerotic lesions and have been shown to express TGF-ß1 (transforming growth factor β1 and its receptors, it has so far not been experimentally addressed whether the pleiotropic cytokine TGF-ß1 may influence atherogenesis by a macrophage specific mechanism. We developed transgenic mice with macrophage specific TGF-ß1 overexpression, crossed the transgenics to the atherosclerotic ApoE (apolipoprotein E knock-out strain and quantitatively analyzed both atherosclerotic lesion development and composition of the resulting double mutants. Compared with control ApoE(-/- mice, animals with macrophage specific TGF-ß1 overexpression developed significantly less atherosclerosis after 24 weeks on the WTD (Western type diet as indicated by aortic plaque area en face (p<0.05. Reduced atherosclerotic lesion development was associated with significantly less macrophages (p<0.05 after both 8 and 24 weeks on the WTD, significantly more smooth muscle cells (SMCs; p<0.01 after 24 weeks on the WTD, significantly more collagen (p<0.01 and p<0.05 after 16 and 24 weeks on the WTD, respectively without significant differences of inner aortic arch intima thickness or the number of total macrophages in the mice pointing to a plaque stabilizing effect of macrophage-specific TGF-ß1 overexpression. Our data shows that macrophage specific TGF-ß1 overexpression reduces and stabilizes atherosclerotic plaques in ApoE-deficient mice.

  20. Abiotic and enzymatic degradation of wheat straw cell wall: a biochemical and ultrastructural investigation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lequart, C; Ruel, K; Lapierre, C; Pollet, B; Kurek, B

    2000-07-14

    The action of an abiotic lignin oxidant and a diffusible xylanase on wheat straw was studied and characterized at the levels of the molecular structures by chemical analysis and of the cell wall ultrastructure by transmission electron microscopy. While distinct chemical changes in the target polymers were observed when each system was used separately, a combination of the two types of catalysts did not significantly increase either lignin oxidation or hemicellulose hydrolysis. Microscopic observations however revealed that the supramolecular organization of the cell wall polymers was significantly altered. This suggests that the abiotic Mn-oxalate complex and the xylanase cooperate in modifying the cell wall architecture, without noticeably enhancing the degradation of the constitutive polymers. PMID:10949315

  1. Phosphorylation Regulates Id2 Degradation and Mediates the Proliferation of Neural Precursor Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sullivan, Jaclyn M; Havrda, Matthew C; Kettenbach, Arminja N; Paolella, Brenton R; Zhang, Zhonghua; Gerber, Scott A; Israel, Mark A

    2016-05-01

    Inhibitor of DNA binding proteins (Id1-Id4) function to inhibit differentiation and promote proliferation of many different cell types. Among the Id family members, Id2 has been most extensively studied in the central nervous system (CNS). Id2 contributes to cultured neural precursor cell (NPC) proliferation as well as to the proliferation of CNS tumors such as glioblastoma that are likely to arise from NPC-like cells. We identified three phosphorylation sites near the N-terminus of Id2 in NPCs. To interrogate the importance of Id2 phosphorylation, Id2(-/-) NPCs were modified to express wild type (WT) Id2 or an Id2 mutant protein that could not be phosphorylated at the identified sites. We observed that NPCs expressing this mutant lacking phosphorylation near the N-terminus had higher steady-state levels of Id2 when compared to NPCs expressing WT Id2. This elevated level was the result of a longer half-life and reduced proteasome-mediated degradation. Moreover, NPCs expressing constitutively de-phosphorylated Id2 proliferated more rapidly than NPCs expressing WT Id2, a finding consistent with the well-characterized function of Id2 in driving proliferation. Observing that phosphorylation of Id2 modulates the degradation of this important cell-cycle regulator, we sought to identify a phosphatase that would stabilize Id2 enhancing its activity in NPCs and extended our analysis to include human glioblastoma-derived stem cells (GSCs). We found that expression of the phosphatase PP2A altered Id2 levels. Our findings suggest that inhibition of PP2A may be a novel strategy to regulate the proliferation of normal NPCs and malignant GSCs by decreasing Id2 levels. Stem Cells 2016;34:1321-1331. PMID:26756672

  2. Organelle interactions and possible degradation pathways visualized in high-pressure frozen algal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aichinger, N; Lütz-Meindl, U

    2005-08-01

    Summary Organelle interactions, although essential for both anabolic and catabolic pathways in plant cells have not been examined in detail so far. In the present study the structure of different organelle-organelle, organelle-vesicle and organelle-membrane interactions were investigated in growing and nongrowing cells of the green alga Micrasterias denticulata by use of high pressure freeze fixation and energy filtering transmission electron microscopy. It became clear that contacts between mitochondria always occur by formation of a cone-shaped protuberance of one of the mitochondria which penetrates into its fusion partner. In the same way, structural interactions between mitochondria and mucilage vesicles and between microbodies and mucilage vesicles are achieved. Lytic compartments contact mitochondria or mucilage vesicles again by forming protuberances and by extending their contents into the respective compartment. Detached portions of mitochondria are found inside lytic compartments as a consequence of such interactions. Mitochondria found in contact with the plasma membrane reveal structural disintegration. Our study shows that interactions of organelles and vesicles are frequent events in Micrasterias cells of different ages. The interactive contacts between lytic compartments and organelles or vesicles suggest a degradation pathway different from autophagy processes described in the literature. Both the interactions between vesicles and organelles and the degradation pathways occur independently from cytoskeleton function as demonstrated by use of cytochalasin D and the microtubule inhibitor amiprophos-methyl. PMID:16159344

  3. Impact of heat and water management on proton exchange membrane fuel cells degradation in automotive application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nandjou, F.; Poirot-Crouvezier, J.-P.; Chandesris, M.; Blachot, J.-F.; Bonnaud, C.; Bultel, Y.

    2016-09-01

    In Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells, local temperature is a driving force for many degradation mechanisms such as hygrothermal deformation and creep of the membrane, platinum dissolution and bipolar plates corrosion. In order to investigate and quantify those effects in automotive application, durability testing is conducted in this work. During the ageing tests, the local performance and temperature are investigated using in situ measurements of a printed circuit board. At the end of life, post-mortem analyses of the aged components are conducted. The experimental results are compared with the simulated temperature and humidity in the cell obtained from a pseudo-3D multiphysics model in order to correlate the observed degradations to the local conditions inside the stack. The primary cause of failure in automotive cycling is pinhole/crack formation in the membrane, induced by high variations of its water content over time. It is also observed that water condensation largely increases the probability of the bipolar plates corrosion while evaporation phenomena induce local deposits in the cell.

  4. Magnetization transfer magnetic resonance of human atherosclerotic plaques ex vivo detects areas of high protein density

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiao Ye

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Proteins are major plaque components, and their degradation is related to the plaque instability. We sought to assess the feasibility of magnetization transfer (MT magnetic resonance (MR for identifying fibrin and collagen in carotid atherosclerotic plaques ex vivo. Methods Human carotid artery specimens (n = 34 were obtained after resection from patients undergoing endarterectomy. MR was completed within 12 hr after surgery on an 11.7T MR microscope prior to fixation. Two sets of T1W spoiled gradient echo images were acquired with and without the application of a saturation pulse set to 10 kHz off resonance. The magnetization transfer ratio (MTR was calculated, and the degree of MT contrast was correlated with histology. Results MT with appropriate calibration clearly detected regions with high protein density, which showed a higher MTR (thick fibers (collagen type I (54 ± 8% compared to regions with a low amount of protein including lipid (46 ± 8% (p = 0.05, thin fibers (collagen type III (11 ± 6% (p = 0.03, and calcification (6.8 ± 4% (p = 0.02. Intraplaque hemorrhage (IPH with different protein density demonstrated different MT effects. Old (rich in protein debris and recent IPH (rich in fibrin had a much higher MTR 69 ± 6% and 55 ± 9%, respectively, compared to fresh IPH (rich in intact red blood cells(9 ± 3%. Conclusions MT MR enhances plaque tissue contrast and identifies the protein-rich regions of carotid artery specimens. The additional information from MTR of IPH may provide important insight into the role of IPH on plaque stability, evolution, and the risk for future ischemic events.

  5. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease: New Insights From Epidemiology, Genetics, and Biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-02-19

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need to reduce levels to no advice on treatment. New insight in epidemiology now suggests that these lipoproteins, marked by high triglycerides, are strong and independent predictors of ASCVD and all-cause mortality, and that their cholesterol content or remnant cholesterol likewise are strong predictors of ASCVD. Of all adults, 27% have triglycerides >2 mmol/L (176 mg/dL), and 21% have remnant cholesterol >1 mmol/L (39 mg/dL). For individuals in the general population with nonfasting triglycerides of 6.6 mmol/L (580 mg/dL) compared with individuals with levels of 0.8 mmol/L (70 mg/dL), the risks were 5.1-fold for myocardial infarction, 3.2-fold for ischemic heart disease, 3.2-fold for ischemic stroke, and 2.2-fold for all-cause mortality. Also, genetic studies using the Mendelian randomization design, an approach that minimizes problems with confounding and reverse causation, now demonstrate that triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with ASCVD and all-cause mortality. Finally, genetic evidence also demonstrates that high concentrations of triglyceride-rich lipoproteins are causally associated with low-grade inflammation. This suggests that an important part of inflammation in atherosclerosis and ASCVD is because of triglyceride-rich lipoprotein degradation and uptake into macrophage foam cells in the arterial intima. Taken together, new insights now strongly suggest that elevated triglyceride-rich lipoproteins represent causal risk factors for low-grade inflammation, ASCVD, and all-cause mortality. PMID:26892957

  6. Light-activated photocurrent degradation and self-healing in perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wanyi; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Neukirch, Amanda J; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Tsai, Hsinhan; Chhowalla, Manish; Alam, Muhammad A; Sfeir, Matthew Y; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky; Tretiak, Sergei; Crochet, Jared J; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed organometallic perovskite solar cells have emerged as one of the most promising thin-film photovoltaic technology. However, a key challenge is their lack of stability over prolonged solar irradiation. Few studies have investigated the effect of light soaking on hybrid perovskites and have attributed the degradation in the optoelectronic properties to photochemical or field-assisted ion migration. Here we show that the slow photocurrent degradation in thin-film photovoltaic devices is due to the formation of light-activated meta-stable deep-level trap states. However, the devices can self-heal completely by resting them in the dark for <1 min or the degradation can be completely prevented by operating the devices at 0 °C. We investigate several physical mechanisms to explain the microscopic origin for the formation of these trap states, among which the creation of small polaronic states involving localized cooperative lattice strain and molecular orientations emerges as a credible microscopic mechanism requiring further detailed studies. PMID:27181192

  7. Light-activated photocurrent degradation and self-healing in perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wanyi; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Neukirch, Amanda J.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Tsai, Hsinhan; Chhowalla, Manish; Alam, Muhammad A.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky; Tretiak, Sergei; Crochet, Jared J.; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2016-01-01

    Solution-processed organometallic perovskite solar cells have emerged as one of the most promising thin-film photovoltaic technology. However, a key challenge is their lack of stability over prolonged solar irradiation. Few studies have investigated the effect of light soaking on hybrid perovskites and have attributed the degradation in the optoelectronic properties to photochemical or field-assisted ion migration. Here we show that the slow photocurrent degradation in thin-film photovoltaic devices is due to the formation of light-activated meta-stable deep-level trap states. However, the devices can self-heal completely by resting them in the dark for <1 min or the degradation can be completely prevented by operating the devices at 0 °C. We investigate several physical mechanisms to explain the microscopic origin for the formation of these trap states, among which the creation of small polaronic states involving localized cooperative lattice strain and molecular orientations emerges as a credible microscopic mechanism requiring further detailed studies. PMID:27181192

  8. Light-activated photocurrent degradation and self-healing in perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Wanyi; Blancon, Jean-Christophe; Neukirch, Amanda J.; Appavoo, Kannatassen; Tsai, Hsinhan; Chhowalla, Manish; Alam, Muhammad A.; Sfeir, Matthew Y.; Katan, Claudine; Even, Jacky; Tretiak, Sergei; Crochet, Jared J.; Gupta, Gautam; Mohite, Aditya D.

    2016-05-01

    Solution-processed organometallic perovskite solar cells have emerged as one of the most promising thin-film photovoltaic technology. However, a key challenge is their lack of stability over prolonged solar irradiation. Few studies have investigated the effect of light soaking on hybrid perovskites and have attributed the degradation in the optoelectronic properties to photochemical or field-assisted ion migration. Here we show that the slow photocurrent degradation in thin-film photovoltaic devices is due to the formation of light-activated meta-stable deep-level trap states. However, the devices can self-heal completely by resting them in the dark for <1 min or the degradation can be completely prevented by operating the devices at 0 °C. We investigate several physical mechanisms to explain the microscopic origin for the formation of these trap states, among which the creation of small polaronic states involving localized cooperative lattice strain and molecular orientations emerges as a credible microscopic mechanism requiring further detailed studies.

  9. Synthesis and degradation of nitrate reductase during the cell cycle of Chlorella sorokiniana

    Science.gov (United States)

    Velasco, P. J.; Tischner, R.; Huffaker, R. C.; Whitaker, J. R.

    1989-01-01

    Studies on the diurnal variations of nitrate reductase (NR) activity during the life cycle of synchronized Chlorella sorokiniana cells grown with a 7:5 light-dark cycle showed that the NADH:NR activity, as well as the NR partial activities NADH:cytochrome c reductase and reduced methyl viologen:NR, closely paralleled the appearance and disappearance of NR protein as shown by sodium dodecyl sulfate gel electrophoresis and immunoblots. Results of pulse-labeling experiments with [35S]methionine further confirmed that diurnal variations of the enzyme activities can be entirely accounted for by the concomitant synthesis and degradation of the NR protein.

  10. Accelerated Degradation for Hardware in the Loop Simulation of Fuel Cell-Gas Turbine Hybrid System

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abreu-Sepulveda, Maria A.; Harun, Nor Farida; Hackett, Gregory;

    2015-01-01

    hardware-in-the-loop simulation. To assess the long-term stability of the SOFC part of the system, electrochemical degradation due to operating conditions such as current density and fuel utilization have been incorporated into the SOFC model and successfully recreated in real time. The mathematical......The U.S. Department of Energy (DOE)-National Energy Technology Laboratory (NETL) in Morgantown, WV has developed the hybrid performance (HyPer) project in which a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) one-dimensional (1D), real-time operating model is coupled to a gas turbine hardware system by utilizing...

  11. Activity of cell wall degrading glycanases in methyl jasmonate-induced leaf abscission in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marian Saniewski

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available It was found previously that methyl jasmonate (JA-Me induced leaf abscission in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana. In present studies it was shown that JA-Me markedly increased the total activities of cellulase, polygalacturonase, pectinase and xylanase in petioles, but did not affect activities of these enzymes in the blades and apical part of shoots of K. blossfeldiana. These results suggest that methyl jasmonate promotes the degradation of cell wall polysaccharides in the abscission zone and in this way induces leaf abscission in Kalanchoe blossfeldiana.

  12. Effect of calcium on cell-wall degrading enzymes of Botrytis cinerea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasanuma, Izumi; Suzuki, Takuya

    2016-09-01

    Effective anti-Botrytis strategies leading to reduce pesticides on strawberries are examined to provide the protection that is harmless to humans, higher animals and plants. Calcium treatments significantly inhibited the spore germination and mycelial growth of B. cinerea. The intracellular polygalacturonase and CMCase showed low activities in B. cinerea cultivated by medium containing calcium. On the other hand, calcium-stimulated β-glucosidases production occurred. Our findings suggest that the calcium treatments keep CMCase activity low and cause low activities of cell-wall degrading enzymes of B. cinerea in the late stage of growth. PMID:26998660

  13. Thermally-restorable optical degradation and the mechanism of current transport in Cu2S-CdS photovoltaic cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fahrenbruch, A. L.; Bube, R. H.

    1974-01-01

    The photovoltaic properties of single-crystal Cu2S-CdS heterojunctions have been investigated as a function of heat treatment by detailed measurements of the dependence of short-circuit current on photon energy, temperature, and the state of optical degradation or enhancement. A coherent picture is formulated for the relationship between enhancement and optical degradation, and their effect on the transport of short-circuit photoexcited current and dark, forward-bias current in the cell. Optical degradation in the Cu2S-CdS cell is shown to be closely identical to optical degradation of lifetime in a homogeneous CdS:Cd:Cu crystal, indicating that the CdS:Cu layer near the junction interface controls carrier transport in the cell. It is proposed that both the photoexcited short-circuit current and the dark, forward-bias current are controlled by a tunneling-recombination process through interface states.

  14. Fluorescence imaging of macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques using plasmonic gold nanorose

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Tianyi; Sapozhnikova, Veronika; Mancuso, J. Jacob; Willsey, Brian; Qiu, Jinze; Ma, Li L.; Li, Xiankai; Johnston, Keith P.; Feldman, Marc D.; Milner, Thomas E.

    2011-03-01

    Macrophages are one of the most important cell types involved in the progression of atherosclerosis which can lead to myocardial infarction. To detect macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques, plasmonic gold nanorose is introduced as a nontoxic contrast agent for fluorescence imaging. We report macrophage cell culture and ex vivo tissue studies to visualize macrophages targeted by nanorose using scanning confocal microscopy. Atherosclerotic lesions were created in the aorta of a New Zealand white rabbit model subjected to a high cholesterol diet and double balloon injury. The rabbit was injected with nanoroses coated with dextran. A HeNe laser at 633 nm was used as an excitation light source and a acousto-optical beam splitter was utilized to collect fluorescence emission in 650-760 nm spectral range. Results of scanning confocal microscopy of macrophage cell culture and ex vivo tissue showed that nanoroses produce a strong fluorescence signal. The presence of nanorose in ex vivo tissue was further confirmed by photothermal wave imaging. These results suggest that scanning confocal microscopy can identify the presence and location of nanorose-loaded macrophages in atherosclerotic plaques.

  15. Performance degradation studies on an poly 2,5-benzimidazole high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell using an accelerated degradation technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Guo-Bin; Chen, Hsin-Hung; Yan, Wei-Mon

    2014-02-01

    In this work, the performance degradation of a poly 2,5-benzimidazole (ABPBI) based high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) was examined using an accelerated degradation technique (ADT). Experiments using an ADT with 30 min intervals were performed by applying 1.5 V to a membrane electrode assembly (MEA) with hydrogen and nitrogen feeding to the anode and cathode, respectively, to simulate the high voltage generated during fuel cell shutdown and restart. The characterization of the MEAs was performed using in-situ and ex-situ electrochemical methods, such as polarization curves, AC impedance, and cyclic voltammetry (CV), and TEM imaging before and after the ADT experiments. The measured results demonstrated that the ADT testing could be used to dramatically reduce the duration of the degradation. The current output at 0.4 V decreased by 48% after performing ADT testing for 30 min. From the AC impedance, CV and RTGA measurements, the decline in cell performance was found to be primarily due to corrosion and thinning of the catalyst layer (or carbon support) during the first 30 min, leading to the dissolution and agglomeration of the platinum catalyst.

  16. Comparative secretome analysis suggests low plant cell wall degrading capacity in Frankia symbionts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Normand Philippe

    2008-01-01

    genomes, suggesting that plant cell wall polysaccharide degradation may not be crucial to root infection, or that this degradation varies among strains. We hypothesize that the relative lack of secreted polysaccharide-degrading enzymes in Frankia reflects a strategy used by these bacteria to avoid eliciting host defense responses. The esterases, lipases, and proteases found in the core Frankia secretome might facilitate hyphal penetration through the cell wall, release carbon sources, or modify chemical signals. The core secretome also includes extracellular solute-binding proteins and Frankia-specific hypothetical proteins that may enable the actinorhizal symbiosis.

  17. In vitro degradation of biodegradable polymer-coated magnesium under cell culture condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnesium (Mg) coated with four kinds of polymers, poly (L-lactic acid) (PLLA)-high molecular weight (HMW), PLLA-low molecular weight (LMW), poly (ε-caprolactone) (PCL)-HMW and PCL-LMW, and uncoated Mg were immersed under cell culture condition to study the degradation/corrosion behavior of the polymer-coated Mg. The releases of Mg2+ are measured during the immersion. Surface morphology and chemical composition are observed and identified by SEM and EDX. The tomography is obtained by X-ray CT observation and degradation rate is calculated by image analysis after 10-day immersion. All kinds of polymer-coated Mg showed significantly low release of Mg2+ (p < 0.05) in the whole immersion process comparing to that of uncoated Mg. In SEM and EDX results show, a corrosion layer can be observed on both polymer-coated and uncoated Mg after immersion. There is no obvious difference on the morphology and chemical composition of the corrosion layer between polymer-coated and uncoated Mg, indicating the corrosion/degradation process and corrosion product of Mg substrate are not changed by the polymer films under the present condition compared with uncoated Mg. Concerning the tomography and degradation rate of 10-day immersion, it can be found that the polymer-coated Mg shows a significantly low corrosion rate (p < 0.05) compared with that of uncoated Mg. PLLA coated Mg shows relatively uniform corrosion than PCL coated Mg and uncoated Mg. The largest pitting corrosion depth of PCL-LMW is about 3 times as large as the PLLA-LMW, which might be attributed to the difference of polymer microstructure. It is suggested that PLLA coating might be a suitable option for retarding the loss of mechanical properties of Mg substrate.

  18. Influence of supporting electrolyte in electricity generation and degradation of organic pollutants in photocatalytic fuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalik, Wan Fadhilah; Ong, Soon-An; Ho, Li-Ngee; Wong, Yee-Shian; Voon, Chun-Hong; Yusuf, Sara Yasina; Yusoff, Nik Athirah; Lee, Sin-Li

    2016-08-01

    This study investigated the effect of different supporting electrolyte (Na2SO4, MgSO4, NaCl) in degradation of Reactive Black 5 (RB5) and generation of electricity. Zinc oxide (ZnO) was immobilized onto carbon felt acted as photoanode, while Pt-coated carbon paper as photocathode was placed in a single chamber photocatalytic fuel cell, which then irradiated by UV lamp for 24 h. The degradation and mineralization of RB5 with 0.1 M NaCl rapidly decreased after 24-h irradiation time, followed by MgSO4, Na2SO4 and without electrolyte. The voltage outputs for Na2SO4, MgSO4 and NaCl were 908, 628 and 523 mV, respectively, after 24-h irradiation time; meanwhile, their short-circuit current density, J SC, was 1.3, 1.2 and 1.05 mA cm(-2), respectively. The power densities for Na2SO4, MgSO4 and NaCl were 0.335, 0.256 and 0.245 mW cm(-2), respectively. On the other hand, for without supporting electrolyte, the voltage output and short-circuit current density was 271.6 mV and 0.055 mA cm(-2), respectively. The supporting electrolyte NaCl showed greater performance in degradation of RB5 and generation of electricity due to the formation of superoxide radical anions which enhance the degradation of dye. The mineralization of RB5 with different supporting electrolyte was measured through spectrum analysis and reduction in COD concentration. PMID:27184147

  19. Potential Anti-Atherosclerotic Properties of Astaxanthin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kishimoto, Yoshimi; Yoshida, Hiroshi; Kondo, Kazuo

    2016-02-01

    Astaxanthin is a naturally occurring red carotenoid pigment classified as a xanthophyll, found in microalgae and seafood such as salmon, trout, and shrimp. This review focuses on astaxanthin as a bioactive compound and outlines the evidence associated with its potential role in the prevention of atherosclerosis. Astaxanthin has a unique molecular structure that is responsible for its powerful antioxidant activities by quenching singlet oxygen and scavenging free radicals. Astaxanthin has been reported to inhibit low-density lipoprotein (LDL) oxidation and to increase high-density lipoprotein (HDL)-cholesterol and adiponectin levels in clinical studies. Accumulating evidence suggests that astaxanthin could exert preventive actions against atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (CVD) via its potential to improve oxidative stress, inflammation, lipid metabolism, and glucose metabolism. In addition to identifying mechanisms of astaxanthin bioactivity by basic research, much more epidemiological and clinical evidence linking reduced CVD risk with dietary astaxanthin intake is needed. PMID:26861359

  20. Ophthalmic masquerades of the atherosclerotic carotids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anupriya Arthur

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Patients with carotid atherosclerosis can present with ophthalmic symptoms. These symptoms and signs can be due to retinal emboli, hypoperfusion of the retina and choroid, opening up of collateral channels, or chronic hypoperfusion of the globe (ocular ischemic syndrome. These pathological mechanisms can produce many interesting signs and a careful history can bring out important past symptoms pointing toward the carotid as the source of the patient′s presenting symptom. Such patients are at high risk for an ischemic stroke, especially in the subsequent few days following their first acute symptom. It is important for clinicians to be familiar with these ophthalmic symptoms and signs caused by carotid atherosclerosis for making an early diagnosis and to take appropriate measures to prevent a stroke. This review elaborates the clinical features, importance, and implications of various ophthalmic symptoms and signs resulting from atherosclerotic carotid artery disease.

  1. Biocompatibility and degradation of gold-covered magneto-elastic biosensors exposed to cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menti, C; Beltrami, M; Possan, A L; Martins, S T; Henriques, J A P; Santos, A D; Missell, F P; Roesch-Ely, M

    2016-07-01

    Magneto-elastic materials (ME) have important advantages when applied as biosensors due to the possibility of wireless monitoring. Commercial Metglas 2826MB3™ (FeNiMoB) is widely used, however sensor stabilization is an important factor for biosensor performance. This study compared the effects of biocompatibility and degradation of the Metglas 2826MB3™ alloy, covered or not with a gold layer, when in contact with cell culture medium. Strips of amorphous Metglas 2826MB3™ were cut and coated with thin layers of Cr and Au, as verified by Rutherford Backscattering Spectroscopy (RBS). Using Inductively Coupled Plasma-Optical Emission Spectrometry (ICP-OES), the presence of metals in the culture medium was quantitatively determined for up to seven days after alloy exposure. Biocompatibility of fibroblast Chinese Hamster Ovary (CHO) cultures was tested and cytotoxicity parameters were investigated by indirect means of reduction of MTT (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide) at 1, 2 and 7 days. Cell death was further evaluated through in situ analysis using Acridine Orange/Ethidium Bromide (AO/EB) staining and images were processed with ImageJ software. Ions from Metglas(®) 2826MB3™ induced a degradation process in living organisms. The cytotoxicity assay showed a decrease in the percentage of live cells compared to control for the ME strip not coated with gold. AO/EB in situ staining revealed that most of the cells grown on top of the gold-covered sensor presented a normal morphology (85.46%). Covering ME sensors with a gold coating improved their effectiveness by generating protection of the transducer by reducing the release of ions and promoting a significant cell survival. PMID:26998872

  2. Cellular imaging of human atherosclerotic lesions by intravascular electric impedance spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ines Streitner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Newer techniques are required to identify atherosclerotic lesions that are prone to rupture. Electric impedance spectroscopy (EIS is able to provide information about the cellular composition of biological tissue. The present study was performed to determine the influence of inflammatory processes in type Va (lipid core, thick fibrous cap and Vc (abundant fibrous connective tissue while lipid is minimal or even absent human atherosclerotic lesions on the electrical impedance of these lesions measured by EIS. METHODS AND RESULTS: EIS was performed on 1 aortic and 3 femoral human arteries at 25 spots with visually heavy plaque burden. Severely calcified lesions were excluded from analysis. A highly flexible micro-electrode mounted onto a balloon catheter was placed on marked regions to measure impedance values at 100 kHz. After paraffin embedding, visible marked cross sections (n = 21 were processed. Assessment of lesion types was performed by Movats staining. Immunostaining for CD31 (marker of neovascularisation, CD36 (scavenger cells and MMP-3 (matrix metalloproteinase-3 was performed. The amount of positive cells was assessed semi-quantitatively. 15 type Va lesions and 6 type Vc lesions were identified. Lesions containing abundant CD36-, CD31- and MMP-3-positive staining revealed significantly higher impedance values compared to lesions with marginal or without positive staining (CD36 + 455 ± 50 Ω vs. CD36- 346 ± 53 Ω, p = 0.001; CD31 + 436 ± 43 Ω vs. CD31- 340 ± 55 Ω, p = 0.001; MMP-3 + 400 ± 68 Ω vs. MMP-3- 323 ± 33 Ω, p = 0.03. CONCLUSIONS: Atherosclerotic lesions with abundant neovascularisation (CD31, many scavenger receptor class B expressing cells (CD36 or high amount of MMP-3 immunoreactivity reveal significantly higher impedance values compared to lesions with marginal or no detection of immunoreactivity. Findings suggest that inflammatory processes in vulnerable plaques affect the impedance of atherosclerotic

  3. [Comparative transcriptome analysis of human aorta atherosclerotic lesions and peripheral blood leukocytes from essential hypertension patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Timofeeva, A V; Goriunova, L E; Khaspekov, G L; Il'inskaia, O P; Sirotkin, V N; Andreeva, E R; Tararak, E M; Bulkina, O S; Buza, V V; Britareva, V V; Karpov, Iu A; Bibilashvili, R Sh

    2009-01-01

    One of the major cardiovascular risk factor which predisposes to and accelerates atherosclerosis is arterial hypertension (AH). To determine the molecular basis of the crosslink between AH and atherosclerosis for the development of new treatment strategies large-scale transcriptome analysis of the cells implicated in atherogenesis is needed. We used cDNA microarray technique for simultaneous analysis of gene expression in human abdominal aorta normal sites and atherosclerotic lesions of different histological types, as well as in peripheral blood leukocytes from patients with essential hypertension (EH) and donors. The microarray data were verified by quantitative RT-PCR (reverse transcription coupled with polymerase chain reaction) and immunohistochemical analysis. Differential expression of 40 genes has been found, among which twenty two genes demonstrated up-regulation and 18 genes demonstrated down-regulation in atherosclerotic aorta compared with normal vessel. New gene-candidates, implicated in atherogenesis, have been identified - FPRL2, CD37, CD53, RGS1, LCP1, SPI1, CTSA, EPAS1, FHL1, GEM, RHOB, SPARCL1, ITGA8, PLN, and COL14A1. These genes participate in cell migration and adhesion, phenotypic changes of smooth muscle cells, immune and inflammatory reactions, oxidative processes and extracellular matrix remodeling. We have found increased expression levels of CD53, SPI1, FPRL2, SPP1, CTSD, ACP5, LCP1, CTSA and LIPA genes in peripheral blood leukocytes from EH patients and in atherosclerotic lesions of human aorta. The majority of these genes significantly (p0.5) correlated with AH stage as well as with histological grading of atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:19772500

  4. Evaluation of recombinant endostatin in the treatment of atherosclerotic plaques and neovascularization in rabbits*

    OpenAIRE

    Mao, Wei; Kong, Jing; Dai, Jin; Huang, Zhao-quan; Wang, Dong-zhi; Ni, Gui-bao; Chen, Min-Li

    2010-01-01

    Objective: Atherosclerotic plaques and neovascularization play an important role in the course of coronary atherosclerosis. This study evaluated the effect of recombinant endostatin on experimental atherosclerotic plaques and neovascularization in rabbits. Methods: Eighteen healthy male rabbits were divided into three groups: control group, atherosclerotic model group, and recombinant endostatin treated group. The atherosclerotic model was established via a high-cholesterol diet after balloon...

  5. IgM antibody level against proinflammatory bacterial peptidoglycan is inversely correlated with extent of atherosclerotic disease

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.M.O. Nijhuis; Y. van der Graaf (Yolanda); M.J. Melief; A.H. Schoneveld (Arjan); D.P.V. de Kleijn (Dominique); J.D. Laman (Jon); G. Pasterkamp (Gerard)

    2004-01-01

    textabstractObjective: Atherosclerosis may lead to acute clinical events by rupture of a vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. Previously, we demonstrated that peptidoglycan (PGN), a major cell wall component of gram-positive bacteria that induces production of proinflammatory cytokines through TLR2 an

  6. Particulate matter air pollution disrupts endothelial cell barrier via calpain-mediated tight junction protein degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Ting

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exposure to particulate matter (PM is a significant risk factor for increased cardiopulmonary morbidity and mortality. The mechanism of PM-mediated pathophysiology remains unknown. However, PM is proinflammatory to the endothelium and increases vascular permeability in vitro and in vivo via ROS generation. Objectives We explored the role of tight junction proteins as targets for PM-induced loss of lung endothelial cell (EC barrier integrity and enhanced cardiopulmonary dysfunction. Methods Changes in human lung EC monolayer permeability were assessed by Transendothelial Electrical Resistance (TER in response to PM challenge (collected from Ft. McHenry Tunnel, Baltimore, MD, particle size >0.1 μm. Biochemical assessment of ROS generation and Ca2+ mobilization were also measured. Results PM exposure induced tight junction protein Zona occludens-1 (ZO-1 relocation from the cell periphery, which was accompanied by significant reductions in ZO-1 protein levels but not in adherens junction proteins (VE-cadherin and β-catenin. N-acetyl-cysteine (NAC, 5 mM reduced PM-induced ROS generation in ECs, which further prevented TER decreases and atteneuated ZO-1 degradation. PM also mediated intracellular calcium mobilization via the transient receptor potential cation channel M2 (TRPM2, in a ROS-dependent manner with subsequent activation of the Ca2+-dependent protease calpain. PM-activated calpain is responsible for ZO-1 degradation and EC barrier disruption. Overexpression of ZO-1 attenuated PM-induced endothelial barrier disruption and vascular hyperpermeability in vivo and in vitro. Conclusions These results demonstrate that PM induces marked increases in vascular permeability via ROS-mediated calcium leakage via activated TRPM2, and via ZO-1 degradation by activated calpain. These findings support a novel mechanism for PM-induced lung damage and adverse cardiovascular outcomes.

  7. Synthesis, degradability, and cell affinity of poly (DL-lactide-co-RS-hydroxyethyl-beta-malolactonate).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang; Jia, Xiaohua; Chen, Yongsheng; Che, Yongzhe; Yuan, Zhi

    2008-11-01

    Poly(DL-lactide-co-RS-hydroxyethyl-beta-malolactonate) (PLMAH), a novel functionalized polylactide with hydroxyl arms, was synthesized by a two-step reaction. DL-lactide (DLLA) and RS-benzyloxyethyl-beta-malolactonate were first copolymerized by ring-opening polymerization with Sn(Oct)(2) as catalyst to generate poly(DL-lactide-co-RS-benzyloxyethyl-beta-malolactonate) (PLMAB); next the benzyl protective groups of PLMAB were removed by the hydrogenation reaction catalyzed by Pd/C to generate the final polymer PLMAH. The composition and structure of PLMAB and PLMAH were characterized by (1)H and (13)C NMR. In vitro degradation experiments of PLMAH copolymers showed that the more RS-hydroxyethyl-beta-malolactonate (MAHE) content in the copolymer film, the faster the degradation occurred. The results of human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV-304) cultivated on PDLLA and PLMAH films suggested that among all the films, the PLMAH film containing 9.4 mol % MAHE had the highest cell attachment efficiency. PMID:18186058

  8. Role of Connective Tissue Growth Factor in Extracellular Matrix Degradation in Renal Tubular Epithelial Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG Chun; ZHU Zhonghua; LIU Jianshe; YANG Xiao; FU Ling; DENG Anguo

    2007-01-01

    In order to investigate the effects of connective tissue growth factor (CTGF) antisense oligodeoxynucleotide (ODN) on plasminogen activator inhibitor-1 (PAI-1) expression in renal tubular cells induced by transforming growth factor β1 (TGF-β1) and to explore the role of CTGF in the degradation of renal extracellular matrix (ECM), a human proximal tubular epithelial cell line (HKC) was cultured in vitro. Cationic lipid-mediated CTGF antisense ODN was transfected into HKC. After HKC were stimulated with TGF-β1 (5 μg/L), the mRNA level of PAI-1 was detected by RT-PCR. Intracellular PAI-1 protein synthesis was assessed by flow cytometry. The secreted PAI-1 in the media was determined by Western blot. The results showed that TGF-β1 could induce tubular CTGF and PAI-1 mRNA expression. The PAI-1 mRNA expression induced by TGF-β1 was significantly inhibited by CTGF antisense ODN. CTGF antisense ODN also inhibited intracellular PAI-1 protein synthesis and lowered the levels of PAI-1 protein secreted into the media. It was concluded that CTGF might play a crucial role in the degradation of excessive ECM during tubulointerstitial fibrosis, and blocking the biological effect of CTGF may be a novel way in preventing renal fibrosis.

  9. Thermal degradation products of saccharides: effect study over Escherichia coli K12S cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The heat sterilization of reducing sugars, in the presence of phosphates, in alkaline pH, promotes caramelization reactions, yielding a serie of degradation products. Among them, aldehyde-like compounds seem to be responsible for the decrease in viability of DNA repair-proficient E.coli cells. A positive interaction between toxic solutions and UV-radiation effects is observed in these cells. The sinergism UV-toxic solutions varies in function of post-irradiation time and is dependent on UV dose, indicating the interference of repair processes in toxicity. The effect of non-reducing sugars on cellular viability is negligible, suggesting that toxic substances generation is linked to the presence of at least a free carbonyl group in sugar structure. All tested reducing sugars, when experimental conditions remained constant, have similarly shaped inactivation kinetics and their effects are equally inhibited by catalase activity, during incubation. (author)

  10. p53-independent pRB degradation contributes to a drug-induced apoptosis in AGS cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2005-01-01

    The retinoblastoma (RB) tumor suppressor protein, pRB, plays an important role in the regulation of mammalian cell cycle. Furthermore, several lines of evidence suggest that pRB also involves in the regulation of apoptosis. In the present study, the degradation of pRB was observed in apoptotic gastric tumor cells treated with a new potent anti-tumor component, tripchlorolide (TC). The inhibition of pRB degradation by a general cysteine protease inhibitor IDAM resulted in the reduction of the apoptotic cells. Furthermore, the survival of the gastric tumor cells under the TC treatment was enhanced by an over-expression of exogenous pRB. These results suggest that the pRB degradation of the gastric tumor cells under the TC treatment involves in the apoptotic progression. In addition, the same extent of TC-induced pRB-degradation was detected in the gastric tumor cells containing a p53 dominant-negative construct, indicating that this kind of pRB degradation is p53-independent.

  11. Glucosylated cholesterol in mammalian cells and tissues: formation and degradation by multiple cellular β-glucosidases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marques, André R A; Mirzaian, Mina; Akiyama, Hisako; Wisse, Patrick; Ferraz, Maria J; Gaspar, Paulo; Ghauharali-van der Vlugt, Karen; Meijer, Rianne; Giraldo, Pilar; Alfonso, Pilar; Irún, Pilar; Dahl, Maria; Karlsson, Stefan; Pavlova, Elena V; Cox, Timothy M; Scheij, Saskia; Verhoek, Marri; Ottenhoff, Roelof; van Roomen, Cindy P A A; Pannu, Navraj S; van Eijk, Marco; Dekker, Nick; Boot, Rolf G; Overkleeft, Herman S; Blommaart, Edward; Hirabayashi, Yoshio; Aerts, Johannes M

    2016-03-01

    The membrane lipid glucosylceramide (GlcCer) is continuously formed and degraded. Cells express two GlcCer-degrading β-glucosidases, glucocerebrosidase (GBA) and GBA2, located in and outside the lysosome, respectively. Here we demonstrate that through transglucosylation both GBA and GBA2 are able to catalyze in vitro the transfer of glucosyl-moieties from GlcCer to cholesterol, and vice versa. Furthermore, the natural occurrence of 1-O-cholesteryl-β-D-glucopyranoside (GlcChol) in mouse tissues and human plasma is demonstrated using LC-MS/MS and (13)C6-labeled GlcChol as internal standard. In cells, the inhibition of GBA increases GlcChol, whereas inhibition of GBA2 decreases glucosylated sterol. Similarly, in GBA2-deficient mice, GlcChol is reduced. Depletion of GlcCer by inhibition of GlcCer synthase decreases GlcChol in cells and likewise in plasma of inhibitor-treated Gaucher disease patients. In tissues of mice with Niemann-Pick type C disease, a condition characterized by intralysosomal accumulation of cholesterol, marked elevations in GlcChol occur as well. When lysosomal accumulation of cholesterol is induced in cultured cells, GlcChol is formed via lysosomal GBA. This illustrates that reversible transglucosylation reactions are highly dependent on local availability of suitable acceptors. In conclusion, mammalian tissues contain GlcChol formed by transglucosylation through β-glucosidases using GlcCer as donor. Our findings reveal a novel metabolic function for GlcCer. PMID:26724485

  12. Irradiation of existing atherosclerotic lesions increased inflammation by favoring pro-inflammatory macrophages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background and purpose: Recent studies have shown an increased incidence of localized atherosclerosis and subsequent cardiovascular events in cancer patients treated with thoracic radiotherapy. We previously demonstrated that irradiation accelerated the development of atherosclerosis and predisposed to an inflammatory plaque phenotype in young hypercholesterolemic ApoE−/− mice. However, as older cancer patients already have early or advanced stages of atherosclerosis at the time of radiotherapy, we investigated the effects of irradiation on the progression of existing atherosclerotic lesions in vivo. Material and methods: ApoE−/− mice (28 weeks old) received local irradiation with 14 or 0 Gy (sham-treated) at the aortic arch and were examined after 4 and 12 weeks for atherosclerotic lesions, plaque size and phenotype. Moreover, we investigated the impact of irradiation on macrophage phenotype (pro- or anti-inflammatory) and function (efferocytotic capacity, i.e. clearance of apoptotic cells) in vitro. Results: Irradiation of existing lesions in the aortic arch resulted in smaller, macrophage-rich plaques with intraplaque hemorrhage and increased apoptosis. In keeping with the latter, in vitro studies revealed augmented polarization toward pro-inflammatory macrophages after irradiation and reduced efferocytosis by anti-inflammatory macrophages. In addition, considerably more lesions in irradiated mice were enriched in pro-inflammatory macrophages. Conclusions: Irradiation of existing atherosclerotic lesions led to smaller but more inflamed plaques, with increased numbers of apoptotic cells, most likely due to a shift toward pro-inflammatory macrophages in the plaque

  13. A Proteomic Focus on the Alterations Occurring at the Human Atherosclerotic Coronary Intima*

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cuesta, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Maroto, Aroa S.; Donado, Alicia; Zubiri, Irene; Posada, Maria; Padial, Luis R.; Pinto, Angel G.; Barderas, Maria G.; Vivanco, Fernando

    2011-01-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis still represents the major cause of mortality in western societies. Initiation of atherosclerosis occurs within the intima, where major histological and molecular changes are produced during pathogenesis. So far, proteomic analysis of the atherome plaque has been mainly tackled by the analysis of the entire tissue, which may be a challenging approach because of the great complexity of this sample in terms of layers and cell type composition. Based on this, we aimed to study the intimal proteome from the human atherosclerotic coronary artery. For this purpose, we analyzed the intimal layer from human atherosclerotic coronaries, which were isolated by laser microdissection, and compared with those from preatherosclerotic coronary and radial arteries, using a two-dimensional Differential-In-Gel-Electrophoresis (DIGE) approach. Results have pointed out 13 proteins to be altered (seven up-regulated and six down-regulated), which are implicated in the migrative capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells, extracellular matrix composition, coagulation, apoptosis, heat shock response, and intraplaque hemorrhage deposition. Among these, three proteins (annexin 4, myosin regulatory light 2, smooth muscle isoform, and ferritin light chain) constitute novel atherosclerotic coronary intima proteins, because they were not previously identified at this human coronary layer. For this reason, these novel proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry, together with hemoglobin and vimentin, in an independent cohort of arteries. PMID:21248247

  14. A proteomic focus on the alterations occurring at the human atherosclerotic coronary intima.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de la Cuesta, Fernando; Alvarez-Llamas, Gloria; Maroto, Aroa S; Donado, Alicia; Zubiri, Irene; Posada, Maria; Padial, Luis R; Pinto, Angel G; Barderas, Maria G; Vivanco, Fernando

    2011-04-01

    Coronary atherosclerosis still represents the major cause of mortality in western societies. Initiation of atherosclerosis occurs within the intima, where major histological and molecular changes are produced during pathogenesis. So far, proteomic analysis of the atherome plaque has been mainly tackled by the analysis of the entire tissue, which may be a challenging approach because of the great complexity of this sample in terms of layers and cell type composition. Based on this, we aimed to study the intimal proteome from the human atherosclerotic coronary artery. For this purpose, we analyzed the intimal layer from human atherosclerotic coronaries, which were isolated by laser microdissection, and compared with those from preatherosclerotic coronary and radial arteries, using a two-dimensional Differential-In-Gel-Electrophoresis (DIGE) approach. Results have pointed out 13 proteins to be altered (seven up-regulated and six down-regulated), which are implicated in the migrative capacity of vascular smooth muscle cells, extracellular matrix composition, coagulation, apoptosis, heat shock response, and intraplaque hemorrhage deposition. Among these, three proteins (annexin 4, myosin regulatory light 2, smooth muscle isoform, and ferritin light chain) constitute novel atherosclerotic coronary intima proteins, because they were not previously identified at this human coronary layer. For this reason, these novel proteins were validated by immunohistochemistry, together with hemoglobin and vimentin, in an independent cohort of arteries. PMID:21248247

  15. Diagnostic examination of Generation 2 lithium-ion cells and assessment ofperformance degradation mechanisms.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Abraham, D. P.; Dees, D. W.; Knuth, J.; Reynolds, E.; Gerald, R.; Hyung,Y.-E.; Belharouak, I.; Stoll, M.; Sammann, E.; MacLaren, S.; Haasch, R.; Twesten,R.; Sardela, M.; Battaglia, V.; Cairns, E.; Kerr, J.; Kerlau, M.; Kostecki, R.; Lei,J.; McCarthy, K.; McLarnon, F.; Reimer, J.; Richardson, T.; Ross, P.; Sloop,S.; Song, X.; Zhuang, V.; Balasubramanian, M.; McBreen, J.; Chung, K.-Y.; Yang, X.Q.; Yoon, W.-S.; Norin, L.

    2005-07-15

    The Advanced Technology Development (ATD) Program is a multilaboratory effort to assist industrial developers of high-power lithium-ion batteries overcome the barriers of cost, calendar life, abuse tolerance, and low-temperature performance so that this technology may be rendered practical for use in hybrid electric vehicles (HEVs). Included in the ATD Program is a comprehensive diagnostics effort conducted by researchers at Argonne National Laboratory (ANL), Brookhaven National Laboratory (BNL), and Lawrence Berkeley National Laboratory (LBNL). The goals of this effort are to identify and characterize processes that limit lithium-ion battery performance and calendar life, and ultimately to describe the specific mechanisms that cause performance degradation. This report is a compilation of the diagnostics effort conducted since spring 2001 to characterize Generation 2 ATD cells and cell components. The report is divided into a main body and appendices. Information on the diagnostic approach, details from individual diagnostic techniques, and details on the phenomenological model used to link the diagnostic data to the loss of 18650-cell electrochemical performance are included in the appendices. The main body of the report includes an overview of the 18650-cell test data, summarizes diagnostic data and modeling information contained in the appendices, and provides an assessment of the various mechanisms that have been postulated to explain performance degradation of the 18650 cells during accelerated aging. This report is intended to serve as a ready reference on ATD Generation 2 18650-cell performance and provide information on the tools for diagnostic examination and relevance of the acquired data. A comprehensive account of our experimental procedures and resulting data may be obtained by consulting the various references listed in the text. We hope that this report will serve as a roadmap for the diagnostic analyses of other lithium-ion technologies being

  16. Tributyltin induces mitochondrial fission through Mfn1 degradation in human induced pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Asanagi, Miki; Hirata, Naoya; Itagaki, Hiroshi; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2016-08-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are well-known endocrine disruptors. TBT is also known to cause various forms of cytotoxicity, including neurotoxicity and immunotoxicity. However, TBT toxicity has not been identified in normal stem cells. In the present study, we examined the effects of TBT on cell growth in human induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs). We found that exposure to nanomolar concentrations of TBT decreased intracellular ATP levels and inhibited cell viability in iPSCs. Because TBT suppressed energy production, which is a critical function of the mitochondria, we further assessed the effects of TBT on mitochondrial dynamics. Staining with MitoTracker revealed that nanomolar concentrations of TBT induced mitochondrial fragmentation. TBT also reduced the expression of mitochondrial fusion protein mitofusin 1 (Mfn1), and this effect was abolished by knockdown of the E3 ubiquitin ligase membrane-associated RING-CH 5 (MARCH5), suggesting that nanomolar concentrations of TBT could induce mitochondrial dysfunction via MARCH5-mediated Mfn1 degradation in iPSCs. Thus, mitochondrial function in normal stem cells could be used to assess cytotoxicity associated with metal exposure. PMID:27133438

  17. Effect of glucose degradation products on human peritoneal mesothelial cell function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witowski, J; Korybalska, K; Wisniewska, J; Breborowicz, A; Gahl, G M; Frei, U; Passlick-Deetjen, J; Jörres, A

    2000-04-01

    Bioincompatibility of conventional glucose-based peritoneal dialysis fluids (PDF) has been partially attributed to the presence of glucose degradation products (GDP) generated during heat sterilization of PDF. Most previous studies on GDP toxicity were performed on animal and/or transformed cell lines, and the impact of GDP on peritoneal cells remains obscure. The short-term effects of six identified GDP on human peritoneal mesothelial cell (HPMC) functions were examined in comparison to murine L929 fibroblasts. Exposure of HPMC to acetaldehyde, formaldehyde, glyoxal, methylglyoxal, furaldehyde, but not to 5-hydroxymethyl-furfural, resulted in dose-dependent inhibition of cell growth, viability, and interleukin-1beta (IL-1beta)-stimulated IL-6 release; for several GDP, this suppression was significantly greater compared with L929 cells. Although the addition of GDP to culture medium at concentrations found in PDF had no major impact on HPMC function, the exposure of HPMC to filter-sterilized PDF led to a significantly smaller suppression of HPMC proliferation compared to that induced by heat-sterilized PDF. The growth inhibition mediated by filter-sterilized PDF could be increased after the addition of clinically relevant doses of GDP. These effects were equally evident in L929 cells. In conclusion, GDP reveal a significant cytotoxic potential toward HPMC that may be underestimated in test systems using L929 cells. GDP-related toxicity appears to be particularly evident in experimental systems using proliferating cells and the milieu of dialysis fluids. Thus, these observations may bear biologic relevance in vivo where HPMC are repeatedly exposed to GDP-containing PDF for extended periods of time. PMID:10752532

  18. Barrier height determination on Schottky contacts formed at the back contact-semiconductor interface of degraded solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misiakos, K.; Lathrop, J. W.

    A method is described of determining an equivalent circuit for solar cells which have degraded as a result of the formation of a rectifying Schottky barrier at the back contact. An excellent fit of experimental data has been achieved using SCEPTRE with an equivalent circuit derived from the shape of the measured current voltage characteristics. One key parameter of the Schottky barrier diode, the reverse saturation current, can be used to determine the barrier potential. The barrier potential increases as the cell is stressed with 0.5 volts being a typical experimentally determined value for a degraded cell.

  19. Proteotoxic stress induces a cell-cycle arrest by stimulating Lon to degrade the replication initiator DnaA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jonas, Kristina; Liu, Jing; Chien, Peter; Laub, Michael T

    2013-08-01

    The decision to initiate DNA replication is a critical step in the cell cycle of all organisms. Cells often delay replication in the face of stressful conditions, but the underlying mechanisms remain incompletely defined. Here, we demonstrate in Caulobacter crescentus that proteotoxic stress induces a cell-cycle arrest by triggering the degradation of DnaA, the conserved replication initiator. A depletion of available Hsp70 chaperone, DnaK, either through genetic manipulation or heat shock, induces synthesis of the Lon protease, which can directly degrade DnaA. Unexpectedly, we find that unfolded proteins, which accumulate following a loss of DnaK, also allosterically activate Lon to degrade DnaA, thereby ensuring a cell-cycle arrest. Our work reveals a mechanism for regulating DNA replication under adverse growth conditions. Additionally, our data indicate that unfolded proteins can actively and directly alter substrate recognition by cellular proteases. PMID:23911325

  20. Performance Degradation Tests of Phosphoric Acid Doped Polybenzimidazole Membrane Based High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan; Araya, Samuel Simon; Grigoras, Ionela; Andreasen, Søren Juhl; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2015-01-01

    Degradation tests of two phosphoric acid (PA) doped PBI membrane based HT-PEM fuel cells were reported in this paper to investigate the effects of start/stop and the presence of methanol in the fuel to the performance degradation of the HT-PEM fuel cell. Continuous tests with pure dry H2 and...... performance during the H2 continuous tests, because of a decrease in the reaction kinetic resistance mainly in the cathode due to the redistribution of PA between the membrane and electrodes. The performance of both single cells decreased in the following tests, with highest performance decay rate in the...... corrosion of carbon support in the catalyst layer and degradation of the PBI membrane. During the continuous test with methanol containing H2 as the fuel the reaction kinetic resistance and mass transfer resistance of both single cells increased, which may be caused by the adsorption of methanol...

  1. Preliminary study of the influence of solar cell degradation due to ESD on solar array power generation

    OpenAIRE

    Okumura, Teppei; Toyoda, Kazuhiro; Kawakita, Shiro; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; 奥村 哲平; 豊田 和弘; 川北 史朗; 今泉 充; Cho, Mengu

    2008-01-01

    In space, an ElectroStatic Discharge (ESD) can occur on a solar array due to the plasma interaction. One of the issues of ESD is the degradation of solar cell electric performance. To establish the power degradation estimation method due to ESD in solar arrays, light current-voltage characteristics are evaluated in the current value at maximum power. From the results of the calculation, InGaP/GaAs/Ge solar arrays potentially suffer more serious power degradation than Si solar array.

  2. Evaluation of Bioaugmentation with Entrapped Degrading Cells as a Soil Remediation Technology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Owsianiak, Mikolaj; Dechesne, Arnaud; Binning, Philip John; Chambon, Julie Claire Claudia; Sørensen, Sebastian R.; Smets, Barth F.

    2010-01-01

    Soil augmentation with microbial degraders immobilized on carriers is evaluated as a potential remediation technology using a mathematical model that includes degradation within spatially distributed carriers and diffusion or advectiondispersion as contaminant mass transfer mechanisms. The total...... degraders have low intrinsic degradation rates and that only limited carrier to soil volume ratios are practically feasible, bioaugmented soils are characterized by low effective degradation ratesandcanbeconsidered fully mixed. A simple exponential model is then sufficient to predict biodegradation as...

  3. Gene expression and 18FDG uptake in atherosclerotic carotid plaques

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pedersen, Sune Folke; Græbe, Martin; Hag, Anne Mette Fisker;

    2010-01-01

    PURPOSE: Metabolic assessment of vascular inflammation by 2-[F]fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose positron emission tomography (FDG)-PET is a promising new approach for the evaluation of the vulnerability of atherosclerotic plaques. Quantitative real-time PCR allows measurement of gene expression of markers...... of atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability. These techniques were applied in advanced atherosclerotic disease to relate metabolism and inflammatory activity to the gene expression profile of the vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque. METHODS: Seventeen patients with clinical symptoms of cerebral vascular...... subsequently recovered by carotid endarterectomy. The gene expression of markers of vulnerability - CD68, IL-18, matrix metalloproteinase 9, cathepsin K, GLUT-1, and hexokinase type II (HK2) - were measured in plaques by quantitative PCR. RESULTS: In a multivariate linear regression model, GLUT-1, CD68...

  4. Pregnancy loss and later risk of atherosclerotic disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranthe, Mattis Flyvholm; Andersen, Elisabeth Anne Wreford; Wohlfahrt, Jan;

    2013-01-01

    Pregnancy losses and atherosclerotic disease may be etiologically linked through underlying pathology. We examined whether miscarriage and stillbirth increase later risk of myocardial infarction, cerebral infarction, and renovascular hypertension....

  5. The histamine degradative uptake pathway in human vascular endothelial cells and skin fibroblasts is dependent on extracellular Na+ and Cl-

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have previously reported that human vascular endothelial cells and skin fibroblasts carry out degradation of [3H]histamine by a mechanism involving two successive enzymatic steps: imidazole ring tele-methylation by the cells' endogenous methyltransferase and subsequent amine oxidation by an exogenous diamine oxidase. Both histamine and the exogenous second enzyme in the pathway associate with the cells via separate binding sites or receptors. The enzymatic degradation process results in cellular accumulation of the proximal and distal metabolites tele-methylhistamine and 1-methyl-4-imidazoleacetic acid (MIAA). We have now demonstrated that this two-stage histamine degradative pathway is dependent on Na+ and Cl- in the extracellular environment. Accumulation of [3H] histamine-derived products is partially inhibited under conditions of Na+ deprivation and more substantially when Cl- is also withdrawn. The individual tele-methylation and amine oxidation enzymatic reactions themselves are unaffected or actually facilitated under these conditions. This indicates that it is the cellular mechanism for uptake coupled to the degradative pathway which reflects the cation and anion dependency. Restoration of degradative uptake displays a biphasic Na+ concentration curve, suggesting that the uptake process may be driven by multiple components. These findings indicate a role for both inward Na+ and Cl- ion movement in this cellular degradative uptake mechanism

  6. WWP2 promotes degradation of transcription factor OCT4 in human embryonic stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Huiming Xu; Weicheng Wang; Chunliang Li; Hongyao Yu; Acong Yang; Beibei Wang; Ying Jin

    2009-01-01

    POU transcription factor OCT4 not only plays an essential role in maintaining the pluripotent and self-renewing state of embryonic stem (ES) cells but also acts as a cell fate determinant through a gene dosage effect. However, the molecular mechanisms that control the intracellular OCT4 protein level remain elusive. Here, we report that human WWP2, an E3 ubiquitin (Ub)-protein ligase, interacts with OCT4 specifically through its WW domain and enhances Ub modification of OCT4 both in vitro and in vivo. We first demonstrated that endogenous OCT4 in hu-man ES cells can be post-translationally modified by Ub. Furthermore, we found that WWP2 promoted degradation of OCT4 through the 26S proteasome in a dosage-dependent manner, and the active site cysteine residue of WWP2 was required for both its enzymatic activity and proteolytic effect on OCT4. Remarkably, our data show that the en-dogenous OCT4 protein level was significantly elevated when WWP2 expression was downregulated by specific RNA interference (RNAi), suggesting that WWP2 is an important regulator for maintaining a proper OCT4 protein level in human ES cells. Moreover, northern blot analysis showed that the WWP2 transcript was widely present in diverse human tissues/organs and highly expressed in undifferentiated human ES cells. However, its expression level was quickly decreased after human ES cells differentiated, indicating that WWP2 expression might be developmentally regulated. Our findings demonstrate that WWP2 is an important regulator of the OCT4 protein level in human ES cells.

  7. Diversity of beetle genes encoding novel plant cell wall degrading enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pauchet, Yannick; Wilkinson, Paul; Chauhan, Ritika; Ffrench-Constant, Richard H

    2010-01-01

    Plant cell walls are a heterogeneous mixture of polysaccharides and proteins that require a range of different enzymes to degrade them. Plant cell walls are also the primary source of cellulose, the most abundant and useful biopolymer on the planet. Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are therefore important in a wide range of biotechnological processes from the production of biofuels and food to waste processing. However, despite the fact that the last common ancestor of all deuterostomes was inferred to be able to digest, or even synthesize, cellulose using endogenous genes, all model insects whose complete genomes have been sequenced lack genes encoding such enzymes. To establish if the apparent "disappearance" of PCWDEs from insects is simply a sampling problem, we used 454 mediated pyrosequencing to scan the gut transcriptomes of beetles that feed on a variety of plant derived diets. By sequencing the transcriptome of five beetles, and surveying publicly available ESTs, we describe 167 new beetle PCWDEs belonging to eight different enzyme families. This survey proves that these enzymes are not only present in non-model insects but that the multigene families that encode them are apparently undergoing complex birth-death dynamics. This reinforces the observation that insects themselves, and not just their microbial symbionts, are a rich source of PCWDEs. Further it emphasises that the apparent absence of genes encoding PCWDEs from model organisms is indeed simply a sampling artefact. Given the huge diversity of beetles alive today, and the diversity of their lifestyles and diets, we predict that beetle guts will emerge as an important new source of enzymes for use in biotechnology. PMID:21179425

  8. Multimodality imaging of carotid atherosclerotic plaque: Going beyond stenosis

    OpenAIRE

    Divyata Hingwala; Chandrasekharan Kesavadas; Sylaja, Padmavathy N; Bejoy Thomas; Tirur Raman Kapilamoorthy

    2013-01-01

    Apart from the degree of stenosis, the morphology of carotid atherosclerotic plaques and presence of neovascularization are important factors that may help to evaluate the risk and ′vulnerability′ of plaques and may also influence the choice of treatment. In this article, we aim to describe the techniques and imaging findings on CTA, high resolution MRI and contrast enhanced ultrasound in the evaluation of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. We also discuss a few representative cases from our in...

  9. Atherosclerotic lesions of supra-aortic arteries in diabetic patients

    OpenAIRE

    Vidjak, Vinko; Hebrang, Andrija; Brkljačić, Boris; Brajša, Mladen; Novačić, Karlo; Barada, Ante; Škopljanac, Andrija; Erdelez, Lidija; Crnčević, Maja; Kučan, Damir; Flegar-Meštrić, Zlata; Vrhovski-Hebrang, Danijela; Roić, Goran

    2007-01-01

    The aim of this prospective study was to determine the prevalence and localization of stenotic atherosclerotic lesions of supra-aortic arteries in diabetic patients according to age and sex. Angiograms obtained by digital subtraction angiography were analyzed in 150 diabetic patients (study group) and 150 non-diabetic patients (control group) with symptoms of cerebral ischemia. Diabetic patients were found to have a significantly higher prevalence of stenotic atherosclerotic lesions ...

  10. Degradation of Rhodamine B using a Visible-light driven Photocatalytic Fuel Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • The PFC system of WO3/TiO2-CuO/TiO2 provides an interior bias potential (0.18 V). • The photoelectrodes of the PFC system can be stimulated by visible light. • The PFC is effective for photocatalytic degradation of Rhodamine B. - Abstract: A visible-light driven Photocatalytic Fuel Cell (PFC) system comprising WO3/TiO2 and CuO/TiO2 nanotube array materials as photoanode and photocathode, was established with a dual objective of degrading an organic water pollutant and generating electric power as well. Under illumination, the Fermi level of WO3/TiO2 nanotube arrays photoanode was higher than that of CuO/TiO2 nanotube arrays photocathode. Arising an interior bias (0.18 V) induced the transfer of electrons from the photoanode across the external circuit to the photocathode and combination with the holes produced therein with electric power generation. In this manner, the separation of electron/hole pair was achieved in the photoelectrodes by releasing the holes of WO3/TiO2 nanotube arrays photoanode and electrons of CuO/TiO2 nanotube arrays photocathode. Using this PFC based system, the degradation of an organic water pollutant, Rhodamine B, was successfully accomplished with determining its decolorization and the variation in total organic carbon (TOC) content. The decolorization and TOC removal were obtained to the extent of 100% and 57%, respectively at 4 h reaction time. The stability of the photoelectrodes for scaling up applications could also be confirmed by the repeated several experimental runs using the electrodes. The proposed photoelectrocatalytic system provides a self-sustained and energy-saving methodology for wastewater treatment with a parallel energy production

  11. Tributyltin induces mitochondrial fission through NAD-IDH dependent mitofusin degradation in human embryonic carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamada, Shigeru; Kotake, Yaichiro; Nakano, Mizuho; Sekino, Yuko; Kanda, Yasunari

    2015-08-01

    Organotin compounds, such as tributyltin (TBT), are well-known endocrine disruptors. TBT acts at the nanomolar level through genomic pathways via the peroxisome proliferator activated receptor (PPAR)/retinoid X receptor (RXR). We recently reported that TBT inhibits cell growth and the ATP content in the human embryonic carcinoma cell line NT2/D1 via a non-genomic pathway involving NAD(+)-dependent isocitrate dehydrogenase (NAD-IDH), which metabolizes isocitrate to α-ketoglutarate. However, the molecular mechanisms by which NAD-IDH mediates TBT toxicity remain unclear. In the present study, we evaluated the effects of TBT on mitochondrial NAD-IDH and energy production. Staining with MitoTracker revealed that nanomolar TBT levels induced mitochondrial fragmentation. TBT also degraded the mitochondrial fusion proteins, mitofusins 1 and 2. Interestingly, apigenin, an inhibitor of NAD-IDH, mimicked the effects of TBT. Incubation with an α-ketoglutarate analogue partially recovered TBT-induced mitochondrial dysfunction, supporting the involvement of NAD-IDH. Our data suggest that nanomolar TBT levels impair mitochondrial quality control via NAD-IDH in NT2/D1 cells. Thus, mitochondrial function in embryonic cells could be used to assess cytotoxicity associated with metal exposure. PMID:25909344

  12. Altered electrode degradation with temperature in LiFePO4/mesocarbon microbead graphite cells diagnosed with impedance spectroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Aging of LiFePO4/mesocarbon microbead graphite cells from hybrid electric vehicle cycling. • Electrode degradation evaluated post-mortem by impedance spectroscopy and physics-based modeling. • Increased temperature promotes different degradation processes on the electrode level. • Conductive carbon degradation at 55 °C in the LiFePO4 electrode. • Mesocarbon microbead graphite electrode degraded by cycling rather than temperature. - Abstract: Electrode degradation in LiFePO4/mesocarbon microbead graphite (MCMB) pouch cells aged at 55 °C by a synthetic hybrid drive cycle or storage is diagnosed and put into context with previous results of aging at 22 °C. The electrode degradation is evaluated by means of electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS), measured separately on electrodes harvested from the cells, and by using a physics-based impedance model for aging evaluation. Additional capacity measurements, scanning electron microscopy (SEM), and energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDX) are used in the evaluation. At 55 °C the LiFePO4 electrode shows increased particle/electronic conductor resistance, for both stored and cycled electrodes. This differs from results obtained at 22 °C, where the electrode suffered lowered porosity, particle fracture, and loss of active material. For graphite, only cycling gave a sustained effect on electrode performance at 55 °C due to lowered porosity and changes of surface properties, and to greater extent than at low temperature. Furthermore, increased current collector resistance also contributes to a large part of the pouch cell impedance when aged at increased temperatures. The result shows that increased temperature promotes different degradation on the electrode level, and is an important implication for high temperature accelerated aging. In light of the electrode observations, the correlation between full-cell and electrode impedances is discussed

  13. In vitro degradation and cell response of calcium carbonate composite ceramic in comparison with other synthetic bone substitute materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) can be acquired by fast sintering calcium carbonate at a low temperature (650 °C) using a biocompatible, degradable phosphate-based glass (PG) as sintering agent. In the present study, the in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were assessed and compared with 4 synthetic bone substitute materials, calcium carbonate ceramic (CC), PG, hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics. The degradation rates in decreasing order were as follows: PG, CC, CC/PG, β-TCP, and HA. The proliferation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) cultured on the CC/PG was comparable with that on CC and PG, but inferior to HA and β-TCP. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of rMSCs on CC/PG was lower than PG, comparable with β-TCP, but higher than HA. The rMSCs on CC/PG and PG had enhanced gene expression in specific osteogenic markers, respectively. Compared to HA and β-TCP, the rMSCs on the CC/PG expressed relatively lower level of collagen I and runt-related transcription factor 2, but showed more considerable expression of osteopontin. Although CC, PG, HA, and β-TCP possessed impressive performances in some specific aspects, they faced extant intrinsic drawbacks in either degradation rate or mechanical strength. Based on considerable compressive strength, moderate degradation rate, good cell response, and being free of obvious shortcoming, the CC/PG is promising as another choice for bone substitute materials. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were compared to 4 materials. • The CC/PG showed moderate degradation rate. • The CC/PG exhibited good cell response. • The CC/PG was free of obvious drawback compared to other materials

  14. In vitro degradation and cell response of calcium carbonate composite ceramic in comparison with other synthetic bone substitute materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Fupo [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Zhang, Jing [School of Materials Science and Engineering, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510641 (China); Yang, Fanwen; Zhu, Jixiang; Tian, Xiumei [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China); Chen, Xiaoming, E-mail: xmchenw@126.com [Department of Biomedical Engineering, School of Basic Sciences, Guangzhou Medical University, Guangzhou 510182 (China)

    2015-05-01

    The robust calcium carbonate composite ceramics (CC/PG) can be acquired by fast sintering calcium carbonate at a low temperature (650 °C) using a biocompatible, degradable phosphate-based glass (PG) as sintering agent. In the present study, the in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were assessed and compared with 4 synthetic bone substitute materials, calcium carbonate ceramic (CC), PG, hydroxyapatite (HA) and β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP) ceramics. The degradation rates in decreasing order were as follows: PG, CC, CC/PG, β-TCP, and HA. The proliferation of rat bone mesenchymal stem cells (rMSCs) cultured on the CC/PG was comparable with that on CC and PG, but inferior to HA and β-TCP. The alkaline phosphatase (ALP) activity of rMSCs on CC/PG was lower than PG, comparable with β-TCP, but higher than HA. The rMSCs on CC/PG and PG had enhanced gene expression in specific osteogenic markers, respectively. Compared to HA and β-TCP, the rMSCs on the CC/PG expressed relatively lower level of collagen I and runt-related transcription factor 2, but showed more considerable expression of osteopontin. Although CC, PG, HA, and β-TCP possessed impressive performances in some specific aspects, they faced extant intrinsic drawbacks in either degradation rate or mechanical strength. Based on considerable compressive strength, moderate degradation rate, good cell response, and being free of obvious shortcoming, the CC/PG is promising as another choice for bone substitute materials. - Highlights: • A calcium carbonate composite ceramic (CC/PG) was acquired. • The in vitro degradation and cell response of CC/PG were compared to 4 materials. • The CC/PG showed moderate degradation rate. • The CC/PG exhibited good cell response. • The CC/PG was free of obvious drawback compared to other materials.

  15. Hyaluronic acid binding, endocytosis and degradation by sinusoidal liver endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The binding, endocytosis, and degradation of 125I-hyaluronic acid (125I-HA) by liver endothelial cells (LEC) was studied under several conditions. The dissociation of receptor-bound 125I-HA was rapid, with a half time of ∼31 min and a Koff of 6.3 x 10-4/sec. A large reversible increase in 125I-HA binding to LEC at pH 5.0 was due to an increase in the observed affinity of the binding interaction. Pronase digestion suggested the protein nature of the receptor and the intracellular location of the digitonin exposed binding activity. Binding and endocytosis occur in the presence of 10 mM EGTA indicating that divalent cations are not required for receptor function. To study the degradation of 125I-HA by LEC, a cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) precipitation assay was characterized. The minimum HA length required for precipitation was elucidated. The fate of the LEC HA receptor after endocytosis was examined

  16. Hyaluronic acid binding, endocytosis and degradation by sinusoidal liver endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGary, C.T.

    1988-01-01

    The binding, endocytosis, and degradation of {sup 125}I-hyaluronic acid ({sup 125}I-HA) by liver endothelial cells (LEC) was studied under several conditions. The dissociation of receptor-bound {sup 125}I-HA was rapid, with a half time of {approx}31 min and a K{sub off} of 6.3 {times} 10{sup {minus}4}/sec. A large reversible increase in {sup 125}I-HA binding to LEC at pH 5.0 was due to an increase in the observed affinity of the binding interaction. Pronase digestion suggested the protein nature of the receptor and the intracellular location of the digitonin exposed binding activity. Binding and endocytosis occur in the presence of 10 mM EGTA indicating that divalent cations are not required for receptor function. To study the degradation of {sup 125}I-HA by LEC, a cetylpyridinium chloride (CPC) precipitation assay was characterized. The minimum HA length required for precipitation was elucidated. The fate of the LEC HA receptor after endocytosis was examined.

  17. [Electricity generation and contaminants degradation performances of a microbial fuel cell fed with Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhu, Xiu-Ping; Xu, Nan; Ni, Jin-Ren

    2011-01-01

    The electricity generation performance of a microbial fuel cell (MFC) utilizing Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater was studied with an H-shape reactor. Indexes including pH, conductivity, oxidation peak potential and chemical oxygen demand (COD) of the anolyte were monitored to investigate the contaminants degradation performance of the MFC during the electricity generation process, besides, contaminant ingredients in anodic influent and effluent were analyzed by GC-MS and IR spectra as well. The maximum power density of the MFC could achieve 118.1 mW/m2 and the internal resistance was about 480 omega. Connected with a 1 000 omega external resistance, the output potential was about 0.4 V. Fed with 5 mL Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater, the electricity generation lasted about 133 h and the coulombic efficiency was about 3.93%. At the end of electricity generation cycle, COD decreased by 90.1% while NH4(+) -N decreased by 66.8%. Furfural compounds, phenols and some other complicated organics could be decomposed and utilized in the electricity generation process, and the residual contaminants in effluent included some long-chain fatty acids, esters, ethers, and esters with benzene ring, cycloalkanes, cycloolefins, etc. The results indicate that MFC, which can degrade and utilize the organic contaminants in Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater simultaneously, provides a new approach for resource recovery treatment of Dioscorea zingiberensis wastewater. PMID:21404685

  18. XBP-1u suppresses autophagy by promoting the degradation of Fox01 in cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ying Zhao; Xue Li; Mu-Yan Cai; Ke Ma; Jing Yang; Jingyi Zhou; Wan Fu

    2013-01-01

    Autophagy is activated to maintain cellular energy homeostasis in response to nutrient starvation.However,autophagy is not persistently activated,which is poorly understood at a mechanistic level.Here,we report that turnover of FoxO1 is involved in the dynamic autophagic process caused by glutamine starvation.X-box-binding protein-1u (XBP-1u) has a critical role in FoxO1 degradation by recruiting FoxO1 to the 20S proteasome.In addition,the phosphorylation of XBP-1u by extracellular regulated protein kinases1/2 (ERK1/2) on Ser61 and Ser176 was found to be critical for the increased interaction between XBP-1u and FoxO1 upon glutamine starvation.Furthermore,knockdown of XBP-1u caused the sustained level of FoxO1 and the persistent activation of autophagy,leading to a significant decrease in cell viability.Finally,the inverse correlation between XBP-1u and FoxO1 expression agrees well with the expression profiles observed in many human cancer tissues.Thus,our findings link the dynamic process of autophagy to XBP-1u-induced FoxO1 degradation.

  19. Management of atherosclerotic renovascular disease after Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herrmann, Sandra M S; Saad, Ahmed; Textor, Stephen C

    2015-03-01

    Many patients with occlusive atherosclerotic renovascular disease (ARVD) may be managed effectively with medical therapy for several years without endovascular stenting, as demonstrated by randomized, prospective trials including the Cardiovascular Outcomes in Renal Atherosclerotic Lesions (CORAL) trial, the Angioplasty and Stenting for Renal Artery Lesions (ASTRAL) trial and the Stent Placement and Blood Pressure and Lipid-Lowering for the Prevention of Progression of Renal Dysfunction Caused by Atherosclerotic Ostial Stenosis of the Renal Artery (STAR) and ASTRAL. These trials share the limitation of excluding subsets of patients with high-risk clinical presentations, including episodic pulmonary edema and rapidly progressing renal failure and hypertension. Although hemodynamically significant, ARVD can reduce renal blood flow and glomerular filtration rate; adaptive mechanisms preserve both cortical and medullary oxygenation over a wide range of vascular occlusion. Progression of ARVD to severe vascular compromise eventually produces cortical hypoxia, however, associated with active inflammatory cytokine release and cellular infiltration of the renal parenchyma. In such cases ARVD produces a loss of glomerular filtration rate that no longer is reversible simply by restoring vessel patency with technically successful renal revascularization. Each of these trials reported adverse renal functional outcomes ranging between 16 and 22% over periods of 2-5 years of follow-up. Blood pressure control and medication adjustment may become more difficult with declining renal function and may prevent the use of angiotensin receptor blocker and angiotensin-converting enzyme inhibitors. The objective of this review is to evaluate the current management of ARVD for clinical nephrologists in the context of recent randomized clinical trials and experimental research. PMID:24723543

  20. Overexpression of ABCG1 protein attenuates arteriosclerosis and endothelial dysfunction in atherosclerotic rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Ungerer

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The ABCG1 protein is centrally involved in reverse cholesterol transport from the vessel wall. Investigation of the effects of ABCG1 overexpression or knockdown in vivo has produced controversial results and strongly depended on the gene intervention model in which it was studied. Therefore, we investigated the effect of local overexpression of human ABCG1 in a novel model of vessel wall-directed adenoviral gene transfer in atherosclerotic rabbits. We conducted local, vascular-specific gene transfer by adenoviral delivery of human ABCG1 (Ad-ABCG1-GFP in cholesterol-fed atherosclerotic rabbits in vivo. Endothelial overexpression of ABCG1 markedly reduced atheroprogression (plaque size and almost blunted vascular inflammation, as shown by markedly reduced macrophage and smooth muscle cell invasion into the vascular wall. Also endothelial function, as determined by vascular ultrasound in vivo, was improved in rabbits after gene transfer with Ad-ABCG1-GFP. Therefore, both earlier and later stages of atherosclerosis were improved in this model of somatic gene transfer into the vessel wall. In contrast to results in transgenic mice, overexpression of ABCG1 by somatic gene transfer to the atherosclerotic vessel wall results in a significant improvement of plaque morphology and composition, and of vascular function in vivo.

  1. Treatment with sulphated galactan inhibits macrophage chemotaxis and reduces intraplaque macrophage content in atherosclerotic mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes Quinderé, Ana Luíza; Barros Benevides, Norma Maria; Pelli, Graziano; Lenglet, Sébastien; Burger, Fabienne; Carbone, Federico; Fraga-Silva, Rodrigo A; Stergiopulos, Nikolaos; Pagano, Sabrina; Bertolotto, Maria; Dallegri, Franco; Vuilleumier, Nicolas; Mach, François; Montecucco, Fabrizio

    2015-08-01

    Experimental data from animal models and clinical studies support connections between the haemostasis and inflammation in atherogenesis. These interfaces among inflammation and thrombogenesis have been suggested as targets for pharmacological intervention to reduce disease progression. We hypothesize that the recently discovered antithrombotic drug Sulphated Galactan (SG) (isolated from the red marine alga Acanthophora muscoides) might reduce atherosclerotic plaque vulnerability and inflammatory gene expression in 10-week aged apolipoprotein E deficient (ApoE-/-) mice under high-cholesterol diet for additional 11weeks. Then, the underlying cellular mechanisms were investigated in vitro. SG (10mg/kg) or Vehicle was subcutaneously injected from week 6 until week 11 of the diet. Treatment with SG reduced intraplaque macrophage and Tissue Factor (TF) content as compared to Vehicle-treated animals. Intraplaque TF co-localized and positively correlated with macrophage rich-areas. No changes on atherosclerotic plaque size, and other intraplaque features of vulnerability (such as lipid, neutrophil, MMP-9 and collagen contents) were observed. Moreover, mRNA expression of MMPs, chemokines and genetic markers of Th1/2/reg/17 lymphocyte polarization within mouse aortic arches and spleens was not affected by SG treatment. In vitro, treatment with SG dose-dependently reduced macrophage chemotaxis without affecting TF production. Overall, the chronic SG treatment was well tolerated. In conclusion, our results indicate that SG treatment reduced intraplaque macrophage content (by impacting on cell recruitment) and, concomitantly, intraplaque TF content of potential macrophage origin in atherosclerotic mice. PMID:25869506

  2. Bacillus-produced surfactin attenuates chronic inflammation in atherosclerotic lesions of ApoE(-/-) mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gan, Ping; Jin, Dong; Zhao, Xiuyun; Gao, Zhenqiu; Wang, Shengying; Du, Peng; Qi, Gaofu

    2016-06-01

    Bacillus-produced surfactin can inhibit acute inflammation in vitro and in vivo. However, there is no report whether surfactin could inhibit chronic inflammation in the atherosclerotic lesions. Apoliprotein E deficient (ApoE(-/-)) mice (fed on atherogenic diet) were intragastrically administered with surfactin for 9 doses, then the athero-protective effect of surfactin was determined in vivo. The results showed surfactin could induce anti-inflammatory factors such as IgA, transforming growth factor (TGF)-β and interleukin (IL)-10 in the intestine. Further investigation discovered that surfactin also systemically induced CD4(+)CD25(+)FoxP3(+) Tregs in spleen, which could inhibit T cells to produce pro-inflammatory cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and interferon (IFN)-γ. The IgG subclass pattern with high titer of IgG1 (Th2-type) but low titer of IgG2a (Th1-type) was also found in the surfactin-treated mice. As a result, the attenuation of chronic inflammation was observed in the surfactin-treated groups accompanying with less TNF-α but more IL-10 in the atherosclerotic lesions. Moreover, surfactin could reduce serum total cholesterol and cholesterol in low-density lipoprotein, and increase serum cholesterol in high-density lipoprotein in mice. Collectively, surfactin could significantly attenuate atherosclerotic lesions on the aorta by restoration of the delicate balance of Th1/Th2 response in mice. PMID:27082998

  3. Endogenous Bioactive Peptides as Potential Biomarkers for Atherosclerotic Coronary Heart Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsutomu Hirano

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Cardiovascular disease is the leading cause of death worldwide, with high medical costs and rates of disability. It is therefore important to evaluate the use of cardiovascular biomarkers in the early diagnosis of coronary artery disease (CAD. We have screened a variety of recently identified bioactive peptides candidates in anticipation that they would allow detection of atherosclerotic CAD. Especially, we have focused on novel anti-atherogenic peptides as indicators and negative risk factors for CAD. In vitro, in vivo and clinical studies indicated that human adiponectin, heregulin-β1, glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1, and salusin-α, peptides of 244, 71, 30, and 28 amino acids, respectively, attenuate the development and progression of atherosclerotic lesions by suppressing macrophage foam cell formation via down-regulation of acyl-coenzyme A: cholesterol acyltransferase-1. Circulating levels of these peptides in the blood are significantly decreased in patients with CAD compared to patients without CAD. Receiver operating characteristic analyses showed that salusin-α is a more useful biomarker, with better sensitivity and specificity, compared with the others for detecting CAD. Therefore, salusin-α, heregulin-β1, adiponectin, and/or GLP-1, alone or in various combinations, may be useful as biomarkers for atherosclerotic CAD.

  4. Engineering hyaluronic acid hydrogel degradation to control cellular interactions and adult stem cell fate in 3D

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khetan, Sudhir

    The design and implementation of extracellular matrix (ECM)-mimetic hydrogels for tissue engineering (TE) applications requires an intensive understanding of cell-material interactions, including matrix remodeling and stem cell differentiation. However, the influence of microenvironmental cues, e.g., matrix biodegradability, on cell behavior in vitro has not been well studied in the case of direct cell encapsulation within 3-dimensional (3D) hydrogels. To address these issues, a facile sequential crosslinking technique was developed that provides spatial and temporal control of 3D hydrogel degradability to investigate the importance of material design on cell behavior. Specifically, hydrogels were synthesized from hyaluronic acid (HA) macromers in a sequential process: (1) a primary Michael-type addition crosslinking using cell adhesive and matrix metalloprotease (MMP)-degradable oligopeptides to consume a portion of total reactive groups and resulting in "-UV" hydrogels permissive to cell-mediated degradation, followed by (2) a secondary, light initiated free-radical crosslinking to consume remaining reactive groups and "switch" the network to a non-degradable structure ("+UV") via the addition of non-degradable kinetic chains. Using this approach, we demonstrated control of encapsulated hMSC spreading by varying the crosslink type (i.e., the relative hydrogel biodegradability), including with spatial control. Upon incubation with bipotential soluble differentiation factors, these same degradation-mediated spreading cues resulted in an hMSC differentiation fate switch within -UV versus +UV environments. Follow-up studies demonstrated that degradation-mediated traction generation, rather than matrix mechanics or cell morphology, is the critical biophysical signal determining hMSC fate. Sequentially crosslinked HA hydrogels were also studied for the capacity to support remodeling by in vivo and ex vivo tissues, including with spatial control, toward tissue

  5. Carotid endarterectomy for atherosclerotic carotid artery stenosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Several randomized controlled trials (RCTs) have demonstrated carotid endarterectomy (CEA) to be more beneficial for the prevention of recurrent or first-ever ischemic stroke than treatment with antiplatelet agents in patients with moderate-severe stenosis of the cervical internal carotid artery. CEA is the standard treatment for such lesions; however, other RCTs have demonstrated carotid artery stenting (CAS) with a protective device to be comparable to CEA in patients with or without radiological or medical high-risks for CEA, although the selection criteria among these treatments have not yet been established in clinical practice. This review compares the results of RCTs valuating the superiority of CEA over medical treatment or CAS, preoperative examination, procedures of CEA, perioperative management and complications, long-term results, and indications for CEA based on the currently available evidence-based publications. A preoperative evaluation of the patients' medical condition, including atherosclerosis, is therefore important to minimize the perioperative complications of CEA, because myocardial infarction during the perioperative period is frequently observed in patients undergoing CEA. A through radiological examination such as plaque imaging is essential for selecting appropriate treatment strategies involving revascularization or medical treatment for atherosclerotic carotid artery stenosis. In addition, the surgical indications, particularly for asymptomatic lesions, should be carefully considered in light of the recent improvements in medical treatments including antihypertensive agents and statins. (author)

  6. Gene expression levels of matrix metalloproteinases in human atherosclerotic plaques and evaluation of radiolabeled inhibitors as imaging agents for plaque vulnerability

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: Atherosclerotic plaque rupture is the primary cause for myocardial infarction and stroke. During plaque progression macrophages and mast cells secrete matrix-degrading proteolytic enzymes, such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs). We studied levels of MMPs and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-3 (TIMP-3) in relation to the characteristics of carotid plaques. We evaluated in vitro two radiolabeled probes targeting active MMPs towards non-invasive imaging of rupture-prone plaques. Methods: Human carotid plaques obtained from endarterectomy were classified into stable and vulnerable by visual and histological analysis. MMP-1, MMP-2, MMP-8, MMP-9, MMP-10, MMP-12, MMP-14, TIMP-3, and CD68 levels were investigated by quantitative polymerase chain reaction. Immunohistochemistry was used to localize MMP-2 and MMP-9 with respect to CD68-expressing macrophages. Western blotting was applied to detect their active forms. A fluorine-18-labeled MMP-2/MMP-9 inhibitor and a tritiated selective MMP-9 inhibitor were evaluated by in vitro autoradiography as potential lead structures for non-invasive imaging. Results: Gene expression levels of all MMPs and CD68 were elevated in plaques. MMP-1, MMP-9, MMP-12 and MMP-14 were significantly higher in vulnerable than stable plaques. TIMP-3 expression was highest in stable and low in vulnerable plaques. Immunohistochemistry revealed intensive staining of MMP-9 in vulnerable plaques. Western blotting confirmed presence of the active form in plaque lysates. In vitro autoradiography showed binding of both inhibitors to stable and vulnerable plaques. Conclusions: MMPs differed in their expression patterns among plaque phenotypes, providing possible imaging targets. The two tested MMP-2/MMP-9 and MMP-9 inhibitors may be useful to detect atherosclerotic plaques, but not the vulnerable lesions selectively

  7. Ultrastructural characteristics of the vascular wall components of ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanasković Irena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study was to determine the ultrastructural characteristics of cell populations and extracellular matrix components in the wall of ruptured atherosclerotic abdominal aortic aneurysm (AAA. We analyzed 20 samples of ruptured AAA. For orientation to the light microscopy, we used routine histochemical techniques by standard procedures. For ultrastructural analysis, we applied transmission electron microscopy (TEM. Our results have shown that ruptured AAA is characterized by the remains of an advanced atherosclerotic lesion in the intima followed by a complete absence of endothelial cells, the disruption of basal membrane and disruption of internal elastic lamina. On plaque margins as well as in the inner media we observed smooth muscle cells (SMCs that posses a euchromatic nucleus, a well-developed granulated endoplasmic reticulum around the nucleus and reduced myofilaments. The remains of the ruptured lipid core were acellular in all samples; however, on the lateral sides of ruptured plaque we observed a presence of two types of foam cells (FCs, spindle- and star-shaped. Fusiform FCs possess a well-differentiated basal lamina, caveolae and electron dense bodies, followed by a small number of lipid droplets in the cytoplasm. Star-shaped FCs contain a large number of lipid droplets and do not possess basal lamina. On the inner margins of the plaque, we observed a large number of cells undergoing apoptosis and necrosis, extracellular lipid droplets as well as a large number of lymphocytes. The media was thinned out with disorganized elastic lamellas, while the adventitia exhibited leukocyte infiltration. The presented results suggest that atherosclerotic plaque in ruptured AAA contains vascular SMC synthetic phenotype and two different types of FCs: some were derived from monocyte/macrophage lineage, while others were derived from SMCs of synthetic phenotype. The striking plaque hypocellularity was the result of apoptosis and necrosis

  8. Evaluation of reversible and irreversible degradation rates of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells tested in automotive conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gazdzick, Pawel; Mitzel, Jens; Garcia Sanchez, Daniel; Schulze, Mathias; Friedrich, K. Andreas

    2016-09-01

    This work provides single cell durability tests of membrane electrode assemblies in dynamic operation regularly interrupted by recovery procedures for the removal of reversible voltage losses. Degradation rates at different loads in one single test can be determined from these tests. Hence, it is possible to report degradation rates versus current density instead of a single degradation rate value. A clear discrimination between reversible and irreversible voltage loss rates is provided. The irreversible degradation rate can be described by a linear regression of voltage values after the recovery steps. Using voltage values before refresh is less adequate due to possible impacts of reversible effects. The reversible contribution to the voltage decay is dominated by an exponential decay after restart, eventually turning into a linear one. A linear-exponential function is proposed to fit the reversible voltage degradation. Due to this function, the degradation behavior of an automotive fuel cell can be described correctly during the first hours after restart. The fit parameters decay constant, exponential amplitude and linear slope are evaluated. Eventually, the reasons for the voltage recovery during shutdown are analyzed showing that ionomer effects in the catalyst layer and/or membrane seem to be the key factor in this process.

  9. Degradation of proton exchange membrane fuel cells due to CO and CO 2 poisoning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Wei-Mon; Chu, Hsin-Sen; Lu, Meng-Xi; Weng, Fang-Bor; Jung, Guo-Bin; Lee, Chi-Yuan

    The CO and CO 2 poisoning effects on the degradation of cell performance of proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) under transient stage were investigated. The mechanism of CO poisoning lies in the preferential adsorbing of CO to the platinum surface and the blocking of active sites of hydrogen. These phenomena were described with adsorption, desorption, and electro-oxidation processes of CO and hydrogen in the present work. In addition, it is well known that the reverse water gas shift reaction (RWGS) is the main effect of the CO 2 poisoning, through which a large part of the catalytic surface area becomes inactive due to the hydrogen dissociation. The predicted results showed that, by contaminating the fuel with 10 ppm CO at the condition of P H = 0.8 atm and PCO2 = 0.2 atm , the current density of the PEM fuel cell was lowered 28% with rate constant of RWGS k rs from zero to 0.02. With 50 ppm CO, the performance drop was only 18%. For the reformed gas, CO 2 poisoning became much more significantly when the CO content in the reactant gas was small.

  10. Performance and Degradation of A Lithium-Bromine Rechargeable Fuel Cell Using Highly Concentrated Catholytes

    CERN Document Server

    Bai, Peng

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-air batteries have been considered as ultimate solutions for the power source of long-range electrified transportation, but state-of-the-art prototypes still suffer from short cycle life, low efficiency and poor power output. Here, a lithium-bromine rechargeable fuel cell using highly concentrated bromine catholytes is demonstrated with comparable specific energy, improved power density, and higher efficiency. The cell is similar in structure to a hybrid-electrolyte Li-air battery, where a lithium metal anode in nonaqueous electrolyte is separated from aqueous bromine catholytes by a lithium-ion conducting ceramic plate. The cell with a flat graphite electrode can discharge at a peak power density around 9mW cm-2 and in principle could provide a specific energy of 791.8 Wh kg-1, superior to most existing cathode materials and catholytes. It can also run in regenerative mode to recover the lithium metal anode and free bromine with 80-90% voltage efficiency, without any catalysts. Degradation of the sol...

  11. Microstructural degradation of Ni-YSZ anodes for solid oxide fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thyden, K.

    2008-03-15

    Ni-YSZ cermets have been used as anode materials in SOFCs for more than 20 years. Despite this fact, the major cause of degradation within the Ni-YSZ anode, namely Ni sintering / coarsening, is still not fully understood. Even if microstructural studies of anodes in tested cells are of technological relevance, it is difficult to identify the effect from isolated parameters such as temperature, fuel gas composition and polarization. Model studies of high temperature aged Ni-YSZ cermets are generally performed in atmospheres containing relatively low concentrations of H2O. In this work, the microstructural degradation in both electrochemically longterm tested cells and high-temperature aged model materials are studied. Since Ni particle sintering / coarsening is attributed to be the major cause of anode degradation, this subject attains the primary focus. A large part of the work is focused on improving microstructural techniques and shows that the application of low acceleration voltages (<= 1 kV) in a FE-SEM makes it possible to obtain two useful types of contrast between the phases in Ni-YSZ composites. By changing between the ordinary lateral SE detector and the inlens detector, using similar microscope settings, two very different sample characteristics are probed: 1) The difference in secondary emission coefficient, delta, between the percolating and non-percolating Ni is maximized in the low-voltage range due to a high delta for the former and the suppression of delta by a positive charge for the latter. This difference yields a contrast between the two phases which is picked up by an inlens secondary electron detector. 2) The difference in backscatter coefficient, eta, between Ni and YSZ is shown to increase with decreasing voltage. The contrast is illustrated in images collected by the normal secondary detector since parts of the secondary signals are generated by backscattered electrons. High temperature aging experiments of model Ni-YSZ anode cermets show

  12. Differentiation-inducing factor-1 induces cyclin D1 degradation through the phosphorylation of Thr286 in squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Differentiation-inducing factors (DIFs) are morphogens which induce cell differentiation in Dictyostelium. We reported that DIF-1 and DIF-3 inhibit proliferation and induce differentiation in mammalian cells. In this study, we investigated the effect of DIF-1 on oral squamous cell carcinoma cell lines NA and SAS, well differentiated and poorly differentiated cell lines, respectively. Although DIF-1 did not induce the expression of cell differentiation makers in these cell lines, it inhibited the proliferation of NA and SAS in a dose-dependent manner by restricting the cell cycle in the G0/G1 phase. DIF-1 induced cyclin D1 degradation, but this effect was prevented by treatment with lithium chloride and SB216763, the inhibitors of glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β). Depletion of endogenous GSK-3β by RNA interference also attenuated the effect of DIF-1 on cyclin D1 degradation. Therefore, we investigated the effect of DIF-1 on GSK-3β and found that DIF-1 dephosphorylated GSK-3β on Ser9 and induced the nuclear translocation of GSK-3β, suggesting that DIF-1 activated GSK-3β. Then, we examined the effect of DIF-1 on cyclin D1 mutants (Thr286Ala, Thr288Ala, and Thr286/288Ala). We revealed that Thr286Ala and Thr286/288Ala mutants were highly resistant to DIF-1-induced degradation compared with wild-type cyclin D1, indicating that the phosphorylation of Thr286 was critical for cyclin D1 degradation induced by DIF-1. These results suggest that DIF-1 induces degradation of cyclin D1 through the GSK-3β-mediated phosphorylation of Thr286

  13. Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Testing (SSADT) for Photovoltaic (PV) Devices and Cells (Presentation)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J.; Elmore, R.; Suh, C.; Jones, W.

    2010-10-01

    Presentation on step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) for photovoltaics (PV). Developed are a step-stress degradation test (SSADT) for PV reliability tests and a lifetime prediction model for PV products.

  14. Interleukin 10-coated nanoparticle systems compared for molecular imaging of atherosclerotic lesions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Almer G

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Gunter Almer,1,* Kelli L Summers,1,2,* Bernhard Scheicher,2 Josef Kellner,3 Ingeborg Stelzer,1 Gerd Leitinger,4,5 Anna Gries,3 Ruth Prassl,6 Andreas Zimmer,2 Harald Mangge1,7 1Clinical Institute of Medical and Chemical Laboratory Diagnostics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 2Institute of Pharmaceutical Sciences, Department of Pharmaceutical Technology, University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 3Institute of Physiological Chemistry, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 4Research Unit Electron Microscopic Techniques, Institute of Cell Biology, Histology and Embryology, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 5Center for Medical Research (ZMF, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 6Institute of Biophysics, Medical University of Graz, Graz, Austria; 7BioTechMed, Graz, Austria*These authors contributed equally to the study Abstract: Atherosclerosis (AS is one of the leading causes of mortality in high-income countries. Early diagnosis of vulnerable atherosclerotic lesions is one of the biggest challenges currently facing cardiovascular medicine. The present study focuses on developing targeted nanoparticles (NPs in order to improve the detection of vulnerable atherosclerotic-plaques. Various biomarkers involved in the pathogenesis of atherosclerotic-plaques have been identified and one of these promising candidates for diagnostic targeting is interleukin 10 (IL10. IL10 has been shown to be a key anti-inflammatory responding cytokine in the early stages of atherogenesis, and has already been used for therapeutic interventions in humans and mice. IL10, the targeting sequence, was coupled to two different types of NPs: protamine-oligonucleotide NPs (proticles and sterically stabilized liposomes in order to address the question of whether the recognition and detection of atherosclerotic-lesions is primarily determined by the targeting sequence itself, or whether it depends on the NP carrier system to which the biomarker is coupled. Each

  15. Degradation of amyloid beta by human induced pluripotent stem cell-derived macrophages expressing Neprilysin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koutaro Takamatsu

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to evaluate the therapeutic potential of human induced pluripotent stem (iPS cell-derived macrophage-like cells for Alzheimer's disease (AD. In previous studies, we established the technology to generate macrophage-like myeloid lineage cells with proliferating capacity from human iPS cells, and we designated the cells iPS-ML. iPS-ML reduced the level of Aβ added into the culture medium, and the culture supernatant of iPS-ML alleviated the neurotoxicity of Aβ. We generated iPS-ML expressing the Fc-receptor-fused form of a single chain antibody specific to Aβ. In addition, we made iPS-ML expressing Neprilysin-2 (NEP2, which is a protease with Aβ-degrading activity. In vitro, expression of NEP2 but not anti-Aβ scFv enhanced the effect to reduce the level of soluble Aβ oligomer in the culture medium and to alleviate the neurotoxicity of Aβ. To analyze the effect of iPS-ML expressing NEP2 (iPS-ML/NEP2 in vivo, we intracerebrally administered the iPS-ML/NEP2 to 5XFAD mice, which is a mouse model of AD. We observed significant reduction in the level of Aβ in the brain interstitial fluid following administration of iPS-ML/NEP2. These results suggested that iPS-ML/NEP2 may be a potential therapeutic agent in the treatment of AD.

  16. Solid oxide fuel cell anode degradation by the effect of hydrogen chloride in stack and single cell environments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madi, Hossein; Lanzini, Andrea; Papurello, Davide; Diethelm, Stefan; Ludwig, Christian; Santarelli, Massimo; Van herle, Jan

    2016-09-01

    The poisoning effect by hydrogen chloride (HCl) on state-of-the-art Ni anode-supported solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) at 750 °C is evaluated in either hydrogen or syngas fuel. Experiments are performed on single cells and short stacks and HCl concentration in the fuel gas is increased from 1 ppm(v) up to 1000 ppm(v) at different current densities. Characterization methods such as cell voltage monitoring vs. time and electrochemical impedance response analysis (distribution of relaxation times (DRT), equivalent electrical circuit) are used to identify the prevailing degradation mechanism. Single cell experiments revealed that the poisoning is more severe when feeding with hydrogen than with syngas. Performance loss is attributed to the effects of HCl adsorption onto nickel surfaces, which lowered the catalyst activity. Interestingly, in syngas HCl does not affect stack performance even at concentrations up to 500 ppm(v), even when causing severe corrosion of the anode exhaust pipe. Furthermore, post-test analysis suggests that chlorine is present on the nickel particles in the form of adsorbed chlorine, rather than forming a secondary phase of nickel chlorine.

  17. Relative rates of repair of single-strand breaks and postirradiation DNA degradation in normal and induced cells of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Labeled DNA from irradiated Escherichia coli cells was studied on an alkaline sucrose gradient without acid precipitation of the DNA. This enabled the observation of both DNA repair and DNA degradation. The use of a predose of ultraviolet light (uv) caused induction of an inhibitor of postirradiation DNA degradation in le lambda+ strains. The effect of this induction on both the repair of single-strand breaks and DNA degradation was followed in strains WU3610 (uvr+) and WU3610-89 (uvr-). The repair process was more rapid than the degradation, and when degradation was inhibited more repair was apparent. Cells that were lex- (B/sub s-1/ and AB2474) could not be induced for inhibition of degradation. Nevertheless, by observation at short times repair could be seen clearly. This repaired DNA was degraded, suggesting that the signal for DNA degradation is not a single-strand break

  18. Lipid peroxidation-derived etheno-DNA adducts in human atherosclerotic lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nair, Jagadeesan [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany); De Flora, Silvio [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Izzotti, Alberto [Department of Health Sciences, University of Genoa, Via A. Pastore 1, I-16132 Genoa (Italy); Bartsch, Helmut [Division of Toxicology and Cancer Risk Factors, German Cancer Research Center (DKFZ), Im Neuenheimer Feld 280, D-69120 Heidelberg (Germany)]. E-mail: h.bartsch@dkfz.de

    2007-08-01

    Atherosclerosis and cancer are characterized by uncontrolled cell proliferation and share common risk factors, such as cigarette smoking, dietary habits and ageing. Growth of smooth muscle cells (SMCs) in atherosclerotic plaques may result from DNA damage, caused either by exogenous mutagens or by agents endogenously generated due to oxidative stress and lipid peroxidation (LPO). Hydroxy-2-nonenal (HNE), a major LPO product, binds covalently to cellular DNA to form the exocyclic etheno-DNA-base adducts, 1,N {sup 6}-ethenodeoxyadenine ({epsilon}dA) and 3,N {sup 4}-ethenodeoxycytosine ({epsilon}dC). By applying an ultrasensitive {sup 32}P-postlabeling-immunoaffinity method, {epsilon}dA and {epsilon}dC were quantified in abdominal aorta SMCs from 13 atherosclerotic patients and 3 non-smoking subjects without atherosclerotic lesions. The levels of etheno-adducts ranged for {epsilon}dA from 2.3 to 39.6/10{sup 8} dA and for {epsilon}dC from 10.7 to 157.7/10{sup 8} dC, with a high correlation between {epsilon}dA and {epsilon}dC (r = 0.84, P = 0.0001). Etheno-adduct levels were higher in atherosclerotic smokers than in ex-smokers for both {epsilon}dA (means 15.2 versus 7.3, P = 0.06) and {epsilon}dC (71.9 versus 51.6, not significant). {epsilon}dC levels were higher in either ex-smokers (P = 0.03) or smokers (P = 0.07) than in non-smokers. There was a poor correlation between either {epsilon}dA or {epsilon}dC and 8-hydroxy-2'-deoxyguanosine, whereas significant positive correlations were detected with the levels of several postlabeled bulky aromatic DNA adducts. In conclusion, two different types of DNA damage may be involved in atherosclerotic plaque formation and progression: (i) bulky aromatic compounds, to which aorta SMCs are chronically exposed in smokers, can either covalently bind to DNA, induce redox-cycling via quinone intermediates and/or activate local chronic inflammatory processes in the arterial wall; ii) this in turn leads to a self perpetuating

  19. The significance of 3H-thymidine degradation in cell culture experiments with special reference to rheumatoid arthritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The degradation of 3H-thymidine under various cell culture conditions was analysed. It was found that a half of 3H-thymidine was degraded to 3H-thymine during 24 hours in PHA stimulation of blood lymphocytes. A control culture in which PHA was not added also caused 3H-thymidine degradation. 3H-thymidine degradation was prevented by adding 5-nitrouracil to the incubation medium at a concentration of 0.577 mg/ml. At the same time 5-NU increased 3H-thymidine incorporation into lymphocytes by 47%. 5-NU also eliminated the inhibitory effect of rheumatoid arthritis synovial tissue eluate on PHA stimulation. In addition 5-NU and nonradioactive thymine increased the 3H-thymidine labelling index of fresh rheumatoid arthritis synovial membrane biopsies, and also more of the isotope was accumulated in the individual cells of the membrane. These studies demonstrate that 3H-thymidine degradation is an important phenomenon in cell cultures and that it can be prevented effectively by using 5-nitrouracil with 3H-thymidine. (author)

  20. Alternation of histone and DNA methylation in human atherosclerotic carotid plaques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greißel, A; Culmes, M; Napieralski, R; Wagner, E; Gebhard, H; Schmitt, M; Zimmermann, A; Eckstein, H-H; Zernecke, A; Pelisek, J

    2015-08-01

    Little is known about epigenetics and its possible role in atherosclerosis. We here analysed histone and DNA methylation and the expression of corresponding methyltransferases in early and advanced human atherosclerotic carotid lesions in comparison to healthy carotid arteries. Western Blotting was performed on carotid plaques from our biobank with early (n=60) or advanced (n=60) stages of atherosclerosis and healthy carotid arteries (n=12) to analyse di-methylation patterns of histone H3 at positions K4, K9 and K27. In atherosclerotic lesions, di-methylation of H3K4 was unaltered and that of H3K9 and H3K27 significantly decreased compared to control arteries. Immunohistochemistry revealed an increased appearance of di-methylated H3K4 in smooth muscle cells (SMCs), a decreased expression of di-methylated H3K9 in SMCs and inflammatory cells, and reduced di-methylated H3K27 in inflammatory cells in advanced versus early atherosclerosis. Expression of corresponding histone methyltransferases MLL2 and G9a was increased in advanced versus early atherosclerosis. Genomic DNA hypomethylation, as determined by PCR for methylated LINE1 and SAT-alpha, was observed in early and advanced plaques compared to control arteries and in cell-free serum of patients with high-grade carotid stenosis compared to healthy volunteers. In contrast, no differences in DNA methylation were observed in blood cells. Expression of DNA-methyltransferase DNMT1 was reduced in atherosclerotic plaques versus controls, DNMT3A was undetectable, and DNMT3B not altered. DNA-demethylase TET1 was increased in atherosclerosisc plaques. The extent of histone and DNA methylation and expression of some corresponding methyltransferases are significantly altered in atherosclerosis, suggesting a possible contribution of epigenetics in disease development. PMID:25993995

  1. Degradation behavior of anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell using LNF cathode as function of current load

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Komatsu, Takeshi; Yoshida, Yoshiteru; Watanabe, Kimitaka; Chiba, Reiichi; Taguchi, Hiroaki; Orui, Himeko; Arai, Hajime [NTT Energy and Environment Systems Laboratories, Atsugi-shi, Kanagawa 243-0198 (Japan)

    2010-09-01

    We investigated the effect of current loading on the degradation behavior of an anode-supported solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC). The cell consisted of LaNi{sub 0.6}Fe{sub 0.4}O{sub 3} (LNF), alumina-doped scandia stabilized zirconia (SASZ), and a Ni-SASZ cermet as the cathode, electrolyte, and anode, respectively. The test was carried out at 1073 K with constant loads of 0.3, 1.0, 1.5, and 2.3 A cm{sup -2}. The degradation rate, defined by the voltage loss during a fixed period (about 1000 h), was faster at higher current densities. From an impedance analysis, the degradation depended mainly on increases in the cathodic resistance, while the anodic and ohmic resistances contributed very little. The cathode microstructures were observed using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and transmission electron microscopy (TEM). (author)

  2. Association of postalimentary lipemia with atherosclerotic manifestations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. Tentor

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We identified different lipemic and metabolic responses after the ingestion of a standardized meal by healthy adults and related them to atherosclerotic markers. Samples from 60 normolipidemic adults were collected before and after a liquid meal (40 g fat/m² body surface at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h for measurements of lipids, free fatty acids (FFA, insulin, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP, autoantibodies to epitopes of oxidized LDL (oxLDL Ab, lipolytic activities, and apolipoprotein E polymorphism. Mean carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT was determined by Doppler ultrasound. The volunteers were classified into early (N = 39 and late (N = 31 triacylglycerol (TAG responders to the test meal. Late responders showed lower HDL cholesterol concentration at fasting and in the TAG peak, lower insulin and higher FFA concentrations compared to early responders. Multivariate regression analyses showed that mean cIMT was associated with gender (male and age in early responders and by cholesterol levels at the 6th hour in late responders. oxLDL Ab were explained by lipoprotein lipase and negatively by hepatic lipase and oxLDL Ab (fasting period by CETP (negative and FFA (positive. This study is the first to identify a postalimentary insulin resistance state, combined with a reduced CETP response exclusively among late responders, and the identification of the regulators of postalimentary atherogenicity. Further research is required to determine the metabolic mechanisms described in the different postalimentary phenotypes observed in this study, as well as in different pathological states, as currently investigated in our laboratory.

  3. Association of postalimentary lipemia with atherosclerotic manifestations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We identified different lipemic and metabolic responses after the ingestion of a standardized meal by healthy adults and related them to atherosclerotic markers. Samples from 60 normolipidemic adults were collected before and after a liquid meal (40 g fat/m2 body surface) at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h for measurements of lipids, free fatty acids (FFA), insulin, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), autoantibodies to epitopes of oxidized LDL (oxLDL Ab), lipolytic activities, and apolipoprotein E polymorphism. Mean carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) was determined by Doppler ultrasound. The volunteers were classified into early (N = 39) and late (N = 31) triacylglycerol (TAG) responders to the test meal. Late responders showed lower HDL cholesterol concentration at fasting and in the TAG peak, lower insulin and higher FFA concentrations compared to early responders. Multivariate regression analyses showed that mean cIMT was associated with gender (male) and age in early responders and by cholesterol levels at the 6th hour in late responders. oxLDL Ab were explained by lipoprotein lipase and negatively by hepatic lipase and oxLDL Ab (fasting period) by CETP (negative) and FFA (positive). This study is the first to identify a postalimentary insulin resistance state, combined with a reduced CETP response exclusively among late responders, and the identification of the regulators of postalimentary atherogenicity. Further research is required to determine the metabolic mechanisms described in the different postalimentary phenotypes observed in this study, as well as in different pathological states, as currently investigated in our laboratory

  4. Association of postalimentary lipemia with atherosclerotic manifestations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tentor, J. [Departamento de Patologia Clínica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Nakamura, R.T. [Laboratório de Diagnóstico por Imagem, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Departamento de Radiologia, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Gidlund, M. [Laboratório de Imunofisiopatologia, Instituto de Ciências Biológicas, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Barros-Mazon, S. [Departamento de Patologia Clínica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil); Harada, L.M. [Laboratório de Lípides, Faculdade de Medicina, Universidade de São Paulo, São Paulo, SP (Brazil); Zago, V.S.; Oba, J.F.; Faria, E.C. de [Departamento de Patologia Clínica, Faculdade de Ciências Médicas, Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2012-08-10

    We identified different lipemic and metabolic responses after the ingestion of a standardized meal by healthy adults and related them to atherosclerotic markers. Samples from 60 normolipidemic adults were collected before and after a liquid meal (40 g fat/m{sup 2} body surface) at 0, 2, 4, 6, and 8 h for measurements of lipids, free fatty acids (FFA), insulin, cholesteryl ester transfer protein (CETP), autoantibodies to epitopes of oxidized LDL (oxLDL Ab), lipolytic activities, and apolipoprotein E polymorphism. Mean carotid intima-media thickness (cIMT) was determined by Doppler ultrasound. The volunteers were classified into early (N = 39) and late (N = 31) triacylglycerol (TAG) responders to the test meal. Late responders showed lower HDL cholesterol concentration at fasting and in the TAG peak, lower insulin and higher FFA concentrations compared to early responders. Multivariate regression analyses showed that mean cIMT was associated with gender (male) and age in early responders and by cholesterol levels at the 6th hour in late responders. oxLDL Ab were explained by lipoprotein lipase and negatively by hepatic lipase and oxLDL Ab (fasting period) by CETP (negative) and FFA (positive). This study is the first to identify a postalimentary insulin resistance state, combined with a reduced CETP response exclusively among late responders, and the identification of the regulators of postalimentary atherogenicity. Further research is required to determine the metabolic mechanisms described in the different postalimentary phenotypes observed in this study, as well as in different pathological states, as currently investigated in our laboratory.

  5. Cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs are frequently bound to and degraded at ribosomes in human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlevaro-Fita, Joana; Rahim, Anisa; Guigó, Roderic; Vardy, Leah A; Johnson, Rory

    2016-06-01

    Recent footprinting studies have made the surprising observation that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) physically interact with ribosomes. However, these findings remain controversial, and the overall proportion of cytoplasmic lncRNAs involved is unknown. Here we make a global, absolute estimate of the cytoplasmic and ribosome-associated population of stringently filtered lncRNAs in a human cell line using polysome profiling coupled to spike-in normalized microarray analysis. Fifty-four percent of expressed lncRNAs are detected in the cytoplasm. The majority of these (70%) have >50% of their cytoplasmic copies associated with polysomal fractions. These interactions are lost upon disruption of ribosomes by puromycin. Polysomal lncRNAs are distinguished by a number of 5' mRNA-like features, including capping and 5'UTR length. On the other hand, nonpolysomal "free cytoplasmic" lncRNAs have more conserved promoters and a wider range of expression across cell types. Exons of polysomal lncRNAs are depleted of endogenous retroviral insertions, suggesting a role for repetitive elements in lncRNA localization. Finally, we show that blocking of ribosomal elongation results in stabilization of many associated lncRNAs. Together these findings suggest that the ribosome is the default destination for the majority of cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs and may play a role in their degradation. PMID:27090285

  6. Heterologous Expression of Plant Cell Wall Degrading Enzymes for Effective Production of Cellulosic Biofuels

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sang-Kyu Jung

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A major technical challenge in the cost-effective production of cellulosic biofuel is the need to lower the cost of plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCDE, which is required for the production of sugars from biomass. Several competitive, low-cost technologies have been developed to produce PCDE in different host organisms such as Escherichia coli, Zymomonas mobilis, and plant. Selection of an ideal host organism is very important, because each host organism has its own unique features. Synthetic biology-aided tools enable heterologous expression of PCDE in recombinant E. coli or Z. mobilis and allow successful consolidated bioprocessing (CBP in these microorganisms. In-planta expression provides an opportunity to simplify the process of enzyme production and plant biomass processing and leads to self-deconstruction of plant cell walls. Although the future of currently available technologies is difficult to predict, a complete and viable platform will most likely be available through the integration of the existing approaches with the development of breakthrough technologies.

  7. Modulation of cell surface GABA B receptors by desensitization,trafficking and regulated degradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Dietmar; Benke; Khaled; Zemoura; Patrick; J; Maier

    2012-01-01

    Inhibitory neurotransmission ensures normal brain function by counteracting and integrating excitatory activity.-Aminobutyric acid (GABA) is the main inhibitory neurotransmitter in the mammalian central nervous system,and mediates its effects via two classes of receptors:the GABA A and GABA B receptors.GABA A receptors are heteropentameric GABA-gated chloride channels and responsible for fast inhibitory neurotransmission.GABA B receptors are heterodimeric G protein coupled receptors (GPCR) that mediate slow and prolonged inhibitory transmission.The extent of inhibitory neurotransmission is determined by a variety of factors,such as the degree of transmitter release and changes in receptor activity by posttranslational modifications (e.g.,phosphorylation),as well as by the number of receptors present in the plasma membrane available for signal transduction.The level of GABA B receptors at the cell surface critically depends on the residence time at the cell surface and finally the rates of endocytosis and degradation.In this review we focus primarily on recent advances in the understanding of trafficking mechanisms that determine the expression level of GABA B receptors in the plasma membrane,and thereby signaling strength.

  8. Cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs are frequently bound to and degraded at ribosomes in human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlevaro-Fita, Joana; Rahim, Anisa; Guigó, Roderic; Vardy, Leah A.; Johnson, Rory

    2016-01-01

    Recent footprinting studies have made the surprising observation that long noncoding RNAs (lncRNAs) physically interact with ribosomes. However, these findings remain controversial, and the overall proportion of cytoplasmic lncRNAs involved is unknown. Here we make a global, absolute estimate of the cytoplasmic and ribosome-associated population of stringently filtered lncRNAs in a human cell line using polysome profiling coupled to spike-in normalized microarray analysis. Fifty-four percent of expressed lncRNAs are detected in the cytoplasm. The majority of these (70%) have >50% of their cytoplasmic copies associated with polysomal fractions. These interactions are lost upon disruption of ribosomes by puromycin. Polysomal lncRNAs are distinguished by a number of 5′ mRNA-like features, including capping and 5′UTR length. On the other hand, nonpolysomal “free cytoplasmic” lncRNAs have more conserved promoters and a wider range of expression across cell types. Exons of polysomal lncRNAs are depleted of endogenous retroviral insertions, suggesting a role for repetitive elements in lncRNA localization. Finally, we show that blocking of ribosomal elongation results in stabilization of many associated lncRNAs. Together these findings suggest that the ribosome is the default destination for the majority of cytoplasmic long noncoding RNAs and may play a role in their degradation. PMID:27090285

  9. Radiotoxicity of plutonium in NTA-degrading Chelatobacter heintzii cell suspensions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The radiotoxicity of plutonium in NTA-degrading Chelatobacter heintzii cell suspensions was investigated as part of a more general study to establish the key interactions between actinide-organic complexes and microorganisms in the subsurface. The radiation tolerance of C. heintzii, based on 60Co gamma irradiation experiments, was 165 ± 30 Gy. No bacteria survived irradiation doses greater than 500 Gy. In the presence of plutonium, where alpha particle decay was the primary source of ionizing radiation, the observed toxicity was predominantly radiolytic rather than chemical. This was evident by the greater effect of activity, rather than concentration, on the toxicity noted. Bioassociation of plutonium with C. heintzii was postulated to be an important and necessary step in the observed loss of cell viability since this was the best way to account for the observed death rate. The radiotoxicity of plutonium towards bacteria is a potentially important consideration in the bioremediation of sites contaminated with radionuclide-organic mixtures and the bioprocessing of nuclear waste

  10. Degradation of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell by siloxane in biogas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Ji-Sung; Kim, Da-Yeong; Hwang, Sun-Mi; Seo, Min Ho; Seo, Dong-Jun; Yang, Seung Yong; Han, Chan Hui; Jung, Yong-Min; Guim, Hwanuk; Nahm, Kee Suk; Yoon, Young-Gi; Kim, Tae-Young

    2016-06-01

    We studied the degradation and durability of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) at membrane-electrode-assembly (MEA) level by injection of octamethylcyclotetrasiloxane (D4) as a representative siloxane, which has been found in many industrial and personal products. Specifically, i) GC/MS analysis demonstrated that the ring-opening polymerization of D4 could result in the formation of various linear and cyclic siloxanes in both electrodes of MEA; ii) post-test analysis revealed that the transformed siloxanes were transported from the anode to the cathode via free-volumes in the polymer membrane; iii) RDE measurement and DFT calculation revealed that D4 was not directly responsible for the electrocatalytic activity of Pt; iv) electrochemical analysis demonstrated that the residual methyl groups of siloxane and various siloxanes did not hinder the proton transport in the polymer membrane; and v) siloxanes accumulated in the primary and secondary pores with the exception of an external surface of carbon, causing an increase in the oxygen reactant's resistance and resulting in a decrease of the cell performance. In addition, we confirmed that injection of D4 did not affect the carbon corrosion adversely because the siloxane had little influence on water sorption in the catalyst layer.

  11. In Situ Degradation of Chitosan-Polygalacturonic Acid/Hydroxyapatite Nano composites in Cell Culture Media

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The molecular and mechanical characteristics of in situ degradation behavior of chitosan-polygalacturonic acid/hydroxyapatite (Chi-PgA-HAP) nano composite films is investigated using Fourier Transform Infrared spectroscopy (FTIR), Atomic Force Microscopy (AFM), and modulus mapping techniques for up to 48 days of soaking in cell culture media. The surface molecular structure of media-soaked samples changes over the course of 48 days of soaking, as indicated by significant changes in phosphate vibrations (1200-900cm-1) indicating apatite formation. Chitosan-Polygalacturonic acid polyelectrolyte complexes (PECs) govern structural integrity of Chi-PgA-HAP nano composites and FTIR spectra indicate that PECs remain intact until 48 days of soaking. In situ AFM experiments on media-soaked samples indicate that soaking results in a change in topography and swelling proceeds differently at the initial soaking periods of about 8 days than for longer soaking. In situ modulus mapping experiments are done on soaked samples by probing 13 nm of surface indicating elastic moduli of 4 GPa resulting from proteins adsorbed on Chi-PgA-HAP nano composites. The elastic modulus decreases by 2 GPa over a long exposure to cell culture media (48 days). Thus, as water enters the Chi-PgA-HAP sample, surface molecular interactions in Chi-PgA-HAP structure occur that result in swelling, causing small changes in nano scale mechanical properties.

  12. Enhancement of Palm Oil Extraction Using Cell Wall Degrading Enzyme Formulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this recent work, application of aqueous enzymatic process to enhance recovery of palm oil was studied. Experiments were carried out to investigate the structural carbohydrate composition of oil palm mesocarp (Elaeis guineensis) and to analyze the effect of different combination of enzymes on the palm oil recovery and degree of digestibility and the respective correlation. The optimum combination of enzymes comprising of Cellic CTec2 (X1), Cellic HTec2 (X2) and Pectinex Ultra SP-L (X3) for Aqueous Enzymatic Oil Extraction Process (AEOEP), were determined using Simplex Lattice mixture design under fixed parameters. Maximum oil recovery of 88 % was achieved with ratio of enzymes at 0.46: 0.34: 0.2 (X1:X2:X3), at enzyme loading of 30 mg protein/ 10 g substrate, substrate loading of 50 % w/v, pH 4.8, and 2 hours of incubation at 50 degree Celsius. The conversion of reducing sugar at corresponding condition was measured to evaluate the effectiveness of enzymes in degrading fruit cell wall releasing trapped oil. Moreover, transmission electron microscopy (TEM) was utilized to indicate the increase in cell wall disintegration leading to higher release of oil with enzymatic treatment. (author)

  13. Guidelines for the optimization of microsurgery in atherosclerotic patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hung-Chi; Coskunfirat, O Koray; Ozkan, Omer; Mardini, Samir; Cigna, Emanuele; Salgado, Christopher J; Spanio, Stefano

    2006-01-01

    We review the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis and the issues that must be taken into consideration when performing microsurgery in atherosclerotic patients. Atherosclerosis is a systemic disease, and may affect the success of microsurgery. Atherosclerotic patients have a tendency toward thrombosis, because the nature of the arteries is changed. Such patients are usually old and have additional medical problems. To increase the success rate of microsurgery in atherosclerotic patients, special precautions should be considered. Patients must be evaluated properly for the suitability of microsurgery. The microsurgical technique requires a meticulous approach, and various technical tricks can be used to avoid thrombosis. Recipient-vessel selection, anastomotic technique, and the use of vein grafts are all important issues. Prophylactic anticoagulation is recommended in severely atherosclerotic patients. Close monitoring of the patient and flap is necessary after the operation, as with routine microvascular free-tissue transfers. We conclude that atherosclerosis is not a contraindication for microsurgery. If the microsurgeon knows how to deal with the difficulties in atherosclerotic patients, microsurgery can be performed safely. PMID:16761266

  14. Atherosclerotic Renal Artery Stenosis and Hypertension: Pragmatism, Pitfalls, and Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bavishi, Chirag; de Leeuw, Peter W; Messerli, Franz H

    2016-06-01

    For many years and even decades, a diagnostic work-up to look for a secondary form of hypertension, particularly of renovascular origin, has been a central tenet in medicine. Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis is considered the most common cause of renovascular hypertension. However, advances in understanding the complex pathophysiology of this condition and the recently documented futility of renal revascularization bring into question whether atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis truly causes "renovascular hypertension." From a clinical point of view, a clear distinction should be made between hypertension associated with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and hypertension caused by renal artery stenosis-induced activation of the renin-angiotensin-aldosterone system. Most patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis do not have a form of hypertension that is remediable or improved by angioplasty; to expose them to the cost, inconvenience, and risk of a diagnostic work-up add up to little more than a wild goose chase. However, with very few exceptions, medical therapy with antihypertensives and statins remains the cornerstone for the management of patients with atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis and hypertension. PMID:26522797

  15. Phenylethyl isothiocyanate reverses cisplatin resistance in biliary tract cancer cells via glutathionylation-dependent degradation of Mcl-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Qiwei; Zhan, Ming; Chen, Wei; Zhao, Benpeng; Yang, Kai; Yang, Jie; Yi, Jing; Huang, Qihong; Mohan, Man; Hou, Zhaoyuan; Wang, Jian

    2016-01-01

    Biliary tract cancer (BTC) is a highly malignant cancer. BTC exhibits a low response rate to cisplatin (CDDP) treatment, and therefore, an understanding of the mechanism of CDDP resistance is urgently needed. Here, we show that BTC cells develop CDDP resistance due, in part, to upregulation of myeloid cell leukemia 1 (Mcl-1). Phenylethyl isothiocyanate (PEITC), a natural compound found in watercress, could enhance the efficacy of CDDP by degrading Mcl-1. PEITC-CDDP co-treatment also increased the rate of apoptosis of cancer stem-like side population (SP) cells and inhibited xenograft tumor growth without obvious toxic effects. In vitro, PEITC decreased reduced glutathione (GSH), which resulted in decreased GSH/oxidized glutathione (GSSG) ratio and increased glutathionylation of Mcl-1, leading to rapid proteasomal degradation of Mcl-1. Furthermore, we identified Cys16 and Cys286 as Mcl-1 glutathionylation sites, and mutating them resulted in PEITC-mediated degradation resistant Mcl-1 protein. In conclusion, we demonstrate for the first time that CDDP resistance is partially associated with Mcl-1 in BTC cells and we identify a novel mechanism that PEITC can enhance CDDP-induced apoptosis via glutathionylation-dependent degradation of Mcl-1. Hence, our results provide support that dietary intake of watercress may help reverse CDDP resistance in BTC patients. PMID:26848531

  16. Genomic characterization of plant cell wall degrading enzymes and in silico analysis of xylanses and polygalacturonases of Fusarium virguliforme

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs) are important effectors for plant pathogens to invade plants. In this study, the composition of PCWDEs in Fusarium virguliforme that were grown for 5-days and 20 days in liquid medium was determined by RNA-Seq. Differential expression analysis showed more P...

  17. Protein degradation in a LAMP-2-deficient B-lymphoblastoid cell line from a patient with Danon disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sánchez-Lanzas, Raul; Alvarez-Castelao, Beatriz; Bermejo, Teresa; Ayuso, Teresa; Tuñón, Teresa; Castaño, José G

    2016-08-01

    Danon disease, a condition characterized by cardiomyopathy, myopathy, and intellectual disability, is caused by mutations in the LAMP-2 gene. Lamp-2A protein, generated by alternative splicing from the Lamp-2 pre-mRNA, is reported to be the lysosomal membrane receptor essential for the chaperone-mediated autophagic pathway (CMA) aimed to selective protein targeting and translocation into the lysosomal lumen for degradation. To study the relevance of Lamp-2 in protein degradation, a lymphoblastoid cell line was obtained by EBV transformation of B-cells from a Danon patient. The derived cell line showed no significant expression of Lamp-2 protein. The steady-state mRNA and protein levels of alpha-synuclein, IΚBα, Rcan1, and glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase, four proteins reported to be selective substrates of the CMA pathway, were similar in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells. Inhibition of protein synthesis showed that the half-life of alpha-synuclein, IΚBα, and Rcan1 was similar in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells, and its degradation prevented by proteasome inhibitors. Both in control and Lamp-2-deficient cells, induction of CMA and macroautophagy by serum and aminoacid starvation of cells for 8h produced a similar decrease in IΚBα and Rcan1 protein levels and was prevented by the addition of lysosome and autophagy inhibitors. In conclusion, the results presented here showed that Lamp-2 deficiency in human lymphoblastoid cells did not modify the steady-state levels or the degradation of several protein substrates reported as selective substrates of the CMA pathway. PMID:27130438

  18. RETROSPECTIVE STUDY OF MORPHOLOGICAL AND EVOLUTIVE PARTICULARITIES OF ATHEROSCLEROTIC LESIONS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Cojocaru

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis is not a simple vascular senescence process, but also is a progressive and high risk disease. From morphologic point of vue it can be found a large variety of atherosclerotic lesions depending on their evolution and localization. The aim of this study was to investigate and to correlate clinical and evolutive aspects of the atherosclerotic process, regarding 213 patients of Cardiovascular Department of Cardiovascular Disease Institute ``Prof. Dr. George IM Georgescu``, Iaşi, which have been investigated for a period during 2005-2009. The arterial fragments from both muscular and elastic types of arteries were prelevated by endarterectomy and were specifically prepared for histopathological exam. The microscopic exam revealed the high frequency of advanced atherosclerotic lesions, especially type V and type VI in a positive correlation with age, sex, clinical diagnostic and other associated risk factors.

  19. Value of detection of atherosclerotic lesions using autologous labelled platelets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sinzinger, H.; Silberbauer, K.; Fitscha, P.; Kaliman, J. (Vienna Univ. (Austria). 2. Medizinische Klinik; Vienna Univ. (Austria). Kardiologische Abt.; Allgem. Poliklinik, Vienna (Austria). 2. Medizinische Abteilung)

    1982-01-01

    In 44 patients with clinical signs of carotid artery stenosis a positive Doppler-ultrasound was obtained. In all patients the lesions were confirmed by angiography. In the patients labelling of autologous platelets with 111 Indium-oxine-sulphate was done in order to calculate the platelet half-life. In addition we tried to visualize the verified atherosclerotic lesions under a gamma-camera. In all patients the platelet half-life was significantly shortened in comparison to the controls. In none of the patients studied a visualization of the angiographically verified atherosclerotic lesions could be obtained. These findings point out, that only in recently developed and very severe atherosclerotic lesions the number of platelets deposed on the vascular surface is enough to allow gamma-camera imaging.

  20. High shear stress induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation through angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yi; Qiu, Juhui; Luo, Shisui; Xie, Xiang; Zheng, Yiming; Zhang, Kang; Ye, Zhiyi; Liu, Wanqian; Gregersen, Hans; Wang, Guixue

    2016-12-01

    Rupture of atherosclerotic plaques causing thrombosis is the main cause of acute coronary syndrome and ischemic strokes. Inhibition of thrombosis is one of the important tasks developing biomedical materials such as intravascular stents and vascular grafts. Shear stress (SS) influences the formation and development of atherosclerosis. The current review focuses on the vulnerable plaques observed in the high shear stress (HSS) regions, which localizes at the proximal region of the plaque intruding into the lumen. The vascular outward remodelling occurs in the HSS region for vascular compensation and that angiogenesis is a critical factor for HSS which induces atherosclerotic vulnerable plaque formation. These results greatly challenge the established belief that low shear stress is important for expansive remodelling, which provides a new perspective for preventing the transition of stable plaques to high-risk atherosclerotic lesions. PMID:27482467

  1. Induction of the Chemokines CCL3α, CCL3α and CCL5 in Atherosclerotic Patients

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alyaa Mousa

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Chemokines recruit immune cells to inflammatory sites and promote the process of inflammation. The role of these mediators in the disease process in atherosclerosis is not fully studied. The spontaneous mRNA expression and intracellular protein production of the potential inflammatory chemokines CCL3 and CCL3 (macrophage- inflammatory protein-1and ; CCR3 ligand and CCL5 (regulated upon activation, normal T cell expressed and secreted (RANTES; CCR5 ligand in atherosclerotic patients was examined together with the effects of the chlamydial antigen HSP60 and LPS on the gene expression and protein induction of these mediators. Detection of chemokine mRNA and protein levels was assessed by in situ hybridization and immunohistochemistry respectively. The examined chemokines were detected at significantly high levels on atherosclerotic patients compared to healthy controls at both mRNA and protein levels. Stimulation with HSP60 and LPS from Chlamydia pneumoniae (C. pneumoniae and E. coli showed increased numbers of CCL3, CCL3 and CCL5 mRNA expressing cells in patients compared to health controls. Protein translation of these chemokines was depicted in correspondence to the mRNA gene expression for all examined chemokines spontaneously and after stimulation with chlamydial HSP60 and LPS and E. coli LPS. Thus, the herein data demonstrate the induction of potential inflammatory chemokines in atherosclerotic patients and that bacterial antigens play a role in the immunopathologic events in this disease by generating more inflammatory mediators.

  2. Building and degradation of secondary cell walls: are there common patterns of lamellar assembly of cellulose microfibrils and cell wall delamination?

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Micco, Veronica; Ruel, Katia; Joseleau, Jean-Paul; Aronne, Giovanna

    2010-08-01

    During cell wall formation and degradation, it is possible to detect cellulose microfibrils assembled into thicker and thinner lamellar structures, respectively, following inverse parallel patterns. The aim of this study was to analyse such patterns of microfibril aggregation and cell wall delamination. The thickness of microfibrils and lamellae was measured on digital images of both growing and degrading cell walls viewed by means of transmission electron microscopy. To objectively detect, measure and classify microfibrils and lamellae into thickness classes, a method based on the application of computerized image analysis combined with graphical and statistical methods was developed. The method allowed common classes of microfibrils and lamellae in cell walls to be identified from different origins. During both the formation and degradation of cell walls, a preferential formation of structures with specific thickness was evidenced. The results obtained with the developed method allowed objective analysis of patterns of microfibril aggregation and evidenced a trend of doubling/halving lamellar structures, during cell wall formation/degradation in materials from different origin and which have undergone different treatments. PMID:20532796

  3. PRDM14 Promotes the Migration of Human Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Through Extracellular Matrix Degradation in vitro

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Xia Bi; Han-Bing Shi; Ting Zhang; Ge Cui

    2015-01-01

    Background:As a novel molecular markerof non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC),PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing protein 14 (PRDM 14) is over-expressed in NSCLC tumor tissues.Extracellular matrix degradation mediated by the balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs) is one of the most important mechanism in lung cancer metastasis.This study aimed to determine if PRDM 14 promoted the migration of NSCLC cells through extracellular matrix degradation mediated by change of MMP/TIMP expression.Methods:The expression of PRDM14 was down-regulated in human cell line A 549 after transfection with lentiviral vector-mediated short-hairpin ribonucleic acids (shRNAs) which targeted the PRDM 14 promoter.Cellular migration ofshRNA-infected cells was detected by a scratch wound healing assay and transwell cell migration assay.Expression levels of MMP1,MMP2,TIMP1,and TIMP2 were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR).Results:Migration ofPRDM 14-shRNA-infected cells was significantly inhibited relative to control cells as measured by the scratch wound healing (P < 0.05) and transwell cell migration assays (P < 0.01).The expression of MMP1 in A549 cells infected by PRDM14-shRNA was down-regulated significantly (P < 0.01),whereas the expression of TIMPl and TIMP2 was up-regulated significantly (P < 0.01).Conclusions:PRDM 14 accelerates A549 cells migration in vitro through extracellular matrix degradation.PRDM 14 is considered as a potential therapeutic target in metastatic NSCLC.

  4. PRDM14 Promotes the Migration of Human Non-small Cell Lung Cancer Through Extracellular Matrix Degradation in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong-Xia Bi

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: As a novel molecular markerof non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC, PRDI-BF1 and RIZ homology domain containing protein 14 (PRDM14 is over-expressed in NSCLC tumor tissues. Extracellular matrix degradation mediated by the balance between matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases (TIMPs is one of the most important mechanism in lung cancer metastasis. This study aimed to determine if PRDM14 promoted the migration of NSCLC cells through extracellular matrix degradation mediated by change of MMP/TIMP expression. Methods: The expression of PRDM14 was down-regulated in human cell line A 549 after transfection with lentiviral vector-mediated short-hairpin ribonucleic acids (shRNAs which targeted the PRDM14 promoter. Cellular migration of shRNA-infected cells was detected by a scratch wound healing assay and transwell cell migration assay. Expression levels of MMP1, MMP2, TIMP1, and TIMP2 were measured by quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR. Results: Migration of PRDM14-shRNA-infected cells was significantly inhibited relative to control cells as measured by the scratch wound healing (P < 0.05 and transwell cell migration assays (P < 0.01. The expression of MMP1 in A549 cells infected by PRDM14-shRNA was down-regulated significantly (P < 0.01, whereas the expression of TIMP1 and TIMP2 was up-regulated significantly (P < 0.01. Conclusions: PRDM14 accelerates A549 cells migration in vitro through extracellular matrix degradation. PRDM14 is considered as a potential therapeutic target in metastatic NSCLC.

  5. Multimodality imaging of carotid atherosclerotic plaque: Going beyond stenosis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hingwala, Divyata; Kesavadas, Chandrasekharan; Sylaja, Padmavathy N; Thomas, Bejoy; Kapilamoorthy, Tirur Raman

    2013-01-01

    Apart from the degree of stenosis, the morphology of carotid atherosclerotic plaques and presence of neovascularization are important factors that may help to evaluate the risk and ‘vulnerability’ of plaques and may also influence the choice of treatment. In this article, we aim to describe the techniques and imaging findings on CTA, high resolution MRI and contrast enhanced ultrasound in the evaluation of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. We also discuss a few representative cases from our institute with the related clinical implications. PMID:23986615

  6. Multimodality imaging of carotid atherosclerotic plaque: Going beyond stenosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Divyata Hingwala

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Apart from the degree of stenosis, the morphology of carotid atherosclerotic plaques and presence of neovascularization are important factors that may help to evaluate the risk and ′vulnerability′ of plaques and may also influence the choice of treatment. In this article, we aim to describe the techniques and imaging findings on CTA, high resolution MRI and contrast enhanced ultrasound in the evaluation of carotid atherosclerotic plaques. We also discuss a few representative cases from our institute with the related clinical implications.

  7. Prion infection impairs lysosomal degradation capacity by interfering with rab7 membrane attachment in neuronal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Su Yeon; Karri, Srinivasarao; Law, Sampson; Schatzl, Hermann M; Gilch, Sabine

    2016-01-01

    Prions are proteinaceous infectious particles which cause fatal neurodegenerative disorders in humans and animals. They consist of a mostly β-sheeted aggregated isoform (PrP(Sc)) of the cellular prion protein (PrP(c)). Prions replicate autocatalytically in neurons and other cell types by inducing conformational conversion of PrP(c) into PrP(Sc). Within neurons, PrP(Sc) accumulates at the plasma membrane and in vesicles of the endocytic pathway. To better understand the mechanisms underlying neuronal dysfunction and death it is critical to know the impact of PrP(Sc) accumulation on cellular pathways. We have investigated the effects of prion infection on endo-lysosomal transport. Our study demonstrates that prion infection interferes with rab7 membrane association. Consequently, lysosomal maturation and degradation are impaired. Our findings indicate a mechanism induced by prion infection that supports stable prion replication. We suggest modulation of endo-lysosomal vesicle trafficking and enhancement of lysosomal maturation as novel targets for the treatment of prion diseases. PMID:26865414

  8. Structure, physicochemical properties and in vitro fermentation of enzymatically degraded cell wall materials from apples.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, S; Dongowski, G; Kunzek, H

    2002-06-01

    Cell wall materials (CWM) prepared from apple parenchyma tissue by treatment with commercial enzymes for maceration, mash fermentation and liquefaction were characterised with regard to their composition and structure as well as their physicochemical and physiological properties. Increasing enzymatic degradation of the CWM resulted in growing loss of the pectin matrix, decreasing porosity as well as increasing particle aggregation. Due to these structural alterations the water binding, the viscoelastic properties of the CWM-water-suspensions and the in vitro fermentation, forming short chain fatty acids, were reduced. The investigations showed that interrelations exist between enzymatic treatment and changes of (i) structure and state of matrices (evaluated by means of thermal analysis), (ii) physicochemical properties and (iii) physiological properties. So the application of liquefying enzymes can lead to a complete removal of the pectin matrix, causing an essentially improved thermal stability of the CWM preparation, but strongly reduced water binding and reduced structure-forming properties into the CWM-water-suspensions. The formation of short-chain fatty acids during in vitro fermentation of the CWM preparations by fresh human faeces flora depended on the portion and the state of the pectin matrix and the cellulose network, respectively. PMID:12108214

  9. Not All That Glitters Is Gold: Metal-Migration-Induced Degradation in Perovskite Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Domanski, Konrad; Correa-Baena, Juan-Pablo; Mine, Nicolas; Nazeeruddin, Mohammad Khaja; Abate, Antonio; Saliba, Michael; Tress, Wolfgang; Hagfeldt, Anders; Grätzel, Michael

    2016-06-28

    Perovskite solar cells (PSCs) have now achieved efficiencies in excess of 22%, but very little is known about their long-term stability under thermal stress. So far, stability reports have hinted at the importance of substituting the organic components, but little attention has been given to the metal contact. We investigated the stability of state-of-the-art PSCs with efficiencies exceeding 20%. Remarkably, we found that exposing PSCs to a temperature of 70 °C is enough to induce gold migration through the hole-transporting layer (HTL), spiro-MeOTAD, and into the perovskite material, which in turn severely affects the device performance metrics under working conditions. Importantly, we found that the main cause of irreversible degradation is not due to decomposition of the organic and hybrid perovskite layers. By introducing a Cr metal interlayer between the HTL and gold electrode, high-temperature-induced irreversible long-term losses are avoided. This key finding is essential in the quest for achieving high efficiency, long-term stable PSCs which, in order to be commercially viable, need to withstand hard thermal stress tests. PMID:27187798

  10. Effect of humic acids on electricity generation integrated with xylose degradation in microbial fuel cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Huang, Liping; Angelidaki, Irini

    2008-01-01

    Pentose and humic acids (HA) are the main components of hydrolysates, the liquid fraction produced during thermohydrolysis of lignocellulosic material. Electricity generation integrated with xylose (typical pentose) degradation as well as the effect of HA on electricity production in microbial fuel...... cells (MFCs) was examined. Without HA addition the maximum power density increased from 39.5 mW/m2 to 83 mW/m2 when initial xylose concentrations increased from 1.5 to 30 mM, while coulombic efficiency ranged from 13.5% to 52.4% for xylose concentrations of 15 and 0.5 mM, respectively. Compared to...... controls where HAs were not added, addition of commercial HA resulted in increase of power density and coulombic efficiency, which ranged from 7.5% to 67.4% and 24% to 92.6%, respectively. Digested manure wastewater (DMW) was tested as potential mediator for power generation due to its content of natural...

  11. Culture & differentiation of mesenchymal stem cell into osteoblast on degradable biomedical composite scaffold: In vitro study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krishan G Jain

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background & objectives: There is a significant bone tissue loss in patients from diseases and traumatic injury. The current autograft transplantation gold standard treatment has drawbacks, namely donor site morbidity and limited supply. The field of tissue engineering has emerged with a goal to provide alternative sources for transplantations to bridge this gap between the need and lack of bone graft. The aim of this study was to prepare biocomposite scaffolds based on chitosan (CHT, polycaprolactone (PCL and hydroxyapatite (HAP by freeze drying method and to assess the role of scaffolds in spatial organization, proliferation, and osteogenic differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs in vitro, in order to achieve bone graft substitutes with improved physical-chemical and biological properties. Methods: Pure chitosan (100CHT and composites (40CHT/HAP, 30CHT/HAP/PCL and 25CHT/HAP/PCL scaffolds containing 40, 30, 25 parts per hundred resin (phr filler, respectively in acetic acid were freeze dried and the porous foams were studied for physicochemical and in vitro biological properties. Results: Scanning electron microscope (SEM images of the scaffolds showed porous microstructure (20-300 μm with uniform pore distribution in all compositions. Materials were tested under compressive load in wet condition (using phosphate buffered saline at pH 7.4. The in vitro studies showed that all the scaffold compositions supported mesenchymal stem cell attachment, proliferation and differentiation as visible from SEM images, [3-(4,5-dimethylthiazole-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide] (MTT assay, alkaline phosphatase (ALP assay and quantitative reverse transcription (qRT-PCR. Interpretation & conclusions: Scaffold composition 25CHT/HAP/PCL showed better biomechanical and osteoinductive properties as evident by mechanical test and alkaline phosphatase activity and osteoblast specific gene expression studies. This study suggests that this novel

  12. Degradation of methyl bromide by methanotrophic bacteria in cell suspensions and soils

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oremland, R.S.; Miller, L.G.; Culbertson, C.W.; Connell, T.L.; Jahnke, L.

    1994-01-01

    Cell suspensions of Methylococcus capsulatus mineralized methyl bromide (MeBr), as evidenced by its removal from the gas phase, the quantitative recovery of Br- in the spent medium, and the production of 14CO2 from [14C]MeBr. Methyl fluoride (MeF) inhibited oxidation of methane as well as that of [14C]MeBr. The rate of MeBr consumption by cells varied inversely with the supply of methane, which suggested a competitive relationship between these two substrates. However, MeBr did not support growth of the methanotroph. In soils exposed to high levels (10,000 ppm) of MeBr, methane oxidation was completely inhibited. At this concentration, MeBr removal rates were equivalent in killed and live controls, which indicated a chemical rather than biological removal reaction. At lower concentrations (1,000 ppm) of MeBr, methanotrophs were active and MeBr consumption rates were 10-fold higher in live controls than in killed controls. Soils exposed to trace levels (10 ppm) of MeBr demonstrated complete consumption within 5 h of incubation, while controls inhibited with MeF or incubated without O2 had 50% lower removal rates. Aerobic soils oxidized [14C]MeBr to 14CO2, and MeF inhibited oxidation by 72%. Field experiments demonstrated slightly lower MeBr removal rates in chambers containing MeF than in chambers lacking MeF. Collectively, these results show that soil methanotrophic bacteria, as well as other microbes, can degrade MeBr present in the environment.

  13. Oxidative stress induces caveolin 1 degradation and impairs caveolae functions in skeletal muscle cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexis Mougeolle

    Full Text Available Increased level of oxidative stress, a major actor of cellular aging, impairs the regenerative capacity of skeletal muscle and leads to the reduction in the number and size of muscle fibers causing sarcopenia. Caveolin 1 is the major component of caveolae, small membrane invaginations involved in signaling and endocytic trafficking. Their role has recently expanded to mechanosensing and to the regulation of oxidative stress-induced pathways. Here, we increased the amount of reactive oxidative species in myoblasts by addition of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 at non-toxic concentrations. The expression level of caveolin 1 was significantly decreased as early as 10 min after 500 μM H2O2 treatment. This reduction was not observed in the presence of a proteasome inhibitor, suggesting that caveolin 1 was rapidly degraded by the proteasome. In spite of caveolin 1 decrease, caveolae were still able to assemble at the plasma membrane. Their functions however were significantly perturbed by oxidative stress. Endocytosis of a ceramide analog monitored by flow cytometry was significantly diminished after H2O2 treatment, indicating that oxidative stress impaired its selective internalization via caveolae. The contribution of caveolae to the plasma membrane reservoir has been monitored after osmotic cell swelling. H2O2 treatment increased membrane fragility revealing that treated cells were more sensitive to an acute mechanical stress. Altogether, our results indicate that H2O2 decreased caveolin 1 expression and impaired caveolae functions. These data give new insights on age-related deficiencies in skeletal muscle.

  14. Stability of CIGS Solar Cells and Component Materials Evaluated by a Step-Stress Accelerated Degradation Test Method: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F. J.; Noufi, R.

    2012-10-01

    A step-stress accelerated degradation testing (SSADT) method was employed for the first time to evaluate the stability of CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cells and device component materials in four Al-framed test structures encapsulated with an edge sealant and three kinds of backsheet or moisture barrier film for moisture ingress control. The SSADT exposure used a 15oC and then a 15% relative humidity (RH) increment step, beginning from 40oC/40%RH (T/RH = 40/40) to 85oC/70%RH (85/70) as of the moment. The voluminous data acquired and processed as of total DH = 3956 h with 85/70 = 704 h produced the following results. The best CIGS solar cells in sample Set-1 with a moisture-permeable TPT backsheet showed essentially identical I-V degradation trend regardless of the Al-doped ZnO (AZO) layer thickness ranging from standard 0.12 μm to 0.50 μm on the cells. No clear 'stepwise' feature in the I-V parameter degradation curves corresponding to the SSADT T/RH/time profile was observed. Irregularity in I-V performance degradation pattern was observed with some cells showing early degradation at low T/RH < 55/55 and some showing large Voc, FF, and efficiency degradation due to increased series Rs (ohm-cm2) at T/RH ≥ 70/70. Results of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (ECIS) analysis indicate degradation of the CIGS solar cells corresponded to increased series resistance Rs (ohm) and degraded parallel (minority carrier diffusion/recombination) resistance Rp, capacitance C, overall time constant Rp*C, and 'capacitor quality' factor (CPE-P), which were related to the cells? p-n junction properties. Heating at 85/70 appeared to benefit the CIGS solar cells as indicated by the largely recovered CPE-P factor. Device component materials, Mo on soda lime glass (Mo/SLG), bilayer ZnO (BZO), AlNi grid contact, and CdS/CIGS/Mo/SLG in test structures with TPT showed notable to significant degradation at T/RH ≥ 70/70. At T/RH = 85/70, substantial blistering of

  15. Degradation behaviour of phosphinothricin in nontransgenic and transgenic maize- and rape cells as well as in whole plants. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Up to now only very few publications are available about the metabolism of phosphinothricin (D/L-PPT, trade names: BASTA trademark, LIBERTY trademark) in plants. In most of these reports degradation studies with cell cultures using very low herbicide concentrations are described. There are no publications about the degradation in transgenic intact plants under outdoor conditions yet. In order to clarify the question, whether the degradation in transgenic crops may differ from that in nontransgenic plants and if there exist differences between D- and L-PPT, the degradation of 14C-D/L-, -L- and -D-PPT in transgenic and nontransgenic cell cultures as well as in intact, transgenic rape and maize plants was studied under outdoor conditions. D-PPT was not metabolised to a reasonable extent both in cell cultures and whole plants, all metabolites were formed from L-PPT. At harvest the amounts of total residues in maize plants ranged from 9 to 16% of the applied herbicide dosage and in rape plants from 35 to 47%. In nontransgenic plant cells L-PPT was exclusively metabolised to different methylphosphinico fatty acids. The main metabolite both in transgenic cells and whole plants with a content of 60 to 90% of total residues in rape and maize was N-acetyl-L-PPT, which seems to be stable in transgenic plants. In addition very low amounts of the same methylphosphinico fatty acids as in nontransgenic cells were detected in transgenic plants. More than 95% of the total residues were extractable by water, the formation of nonpolar and nonextractable residues was below 4%. At harvest the highest amounts of the residues were found in the treated leaves (4-15%), the lowest in the kernals (0,07-0,6%). According to these results total residues of PPT will not exceed the official tolerances in transgenic rape and maize if application follows good agricultural practice. (orig.)

  16. Microstructural Degradation of Ni/YSZ Electrodes in Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells under High Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chen, Ming; Liu, Yi-Lin; Bentzen, Janet Jonna;

    2013-01-01

    current densities below −0.75 A/cm2. The formation of ZrO2 nano-particles deteriorates Ni percolation and presumably decreases the number of active triple phase boundaries (TPBs) and is therefore considered a degradation phenomenon. It is hypothesized that the degradation of the Ni surface is a result of...

  17. HUWE1 Ubiquitylates and Degrades the RAC Activator TIAM1 Promoting Cell-Cell Adhesion Disassembly, Migration, and Invasion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynsey Vaughan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The E3 ubiquitin ligase HUWE1, deregulated in carcinoma, has been implicated in tumor formation. Here, we uncover a role for HUWE1 in cell migration and invasion through degrading the RAC activator TIAM1, implying an additional function in malignant progression. In MDCKII cells in response to HGF, HUWE1 catalyzes TIAM1 ubiquitylation and degradation predominantly at cell-cell adhesions, facilitating junction disassembly, migration, and invasion. Depleting HUWE1 or mutating the TIAM1 ubiquitylation site prevents TIAM1 degradation, antagonizing scattering, and invasion. Moreover, simultaneous depletion of TIAM1 restores migration and invasion in HUWE1-depleted cells. Significantly, we show that HUWE1 stimulates human lung cancer cell invasion through regulating TIAM1 stability. Finally, we demonstrate that HUWE1 and TIAM1 protein levels are inversely correlated in human lung carcinomas. Thus, we elucidate a critical role for HUWE1 in regulating epithelial cell-cell adhesion and provide additional evidence that ubiquitylation contributes to spatiotemporal control of RAC.

  18. Protein Never in Mitosis Gene A Interacting-1 regulates calpain activity and the degradation of cyclooxygenase-2 in endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Tongzheng; Schneider, Ryan A; Shah, Vaibhav; Huang, Yongcheng; Likhotvorik, Rostislav I; Keshvara, Lakhu; Hoyt, Dale G

    2009-01-01

    Background The peptidyl-proline isomerase, Protein Never in Mitosis Gene A Interacting-1 (PIN1), regulates turnover of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in murine aortic endothelial cells (MAEC) stimulated with E. coli endotoxin (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFN). Degradation of iNOS was reduced by a calpain inhibitor, suggesting that PIN1 may affect induction of other calpain-sensitive inflammatory proteins, such as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, in MAEC. Methods MAEC, transduced with lentivirus encoding an inactive control short hairpin (sh) RNA or one targeting PIN1 that reduced PIN1 by 85%, were used. Cells were treated with LPS/IFN, calpain inhibitors (carbobenzoxy-valinyl-phenylalaninal (zVF), PD150606), cycloheximide and COX inhibitors to determine the effect of PIN1 depletion on COX-2 and calpain. Results LPS or IFN alone did not induce COX-2. However, treatment with 10 μg LPS plus 20 ng IFN per ml induced COX-2 protein 10-fold in Control shRNA MAEC. Induction was significantly greater (47-fold) in PIN1 shRNA cells. COX-2-dependent prostaglandin E2 production increased 3-fold in KD MAEC, but did not increase in Control cells. The additional increase in COX-2 protein due to PIN1 depletion was post-transcriptional, as induction of COX-2 mRNA by LPS/IFN was the same in cells containing or lacking PIN1. Instead, the loss of COX-2 protein, after treatment with cycloheximide to block protein synthesis, was reduced in cells lacking PIN1 in comparison with Control cells, indicating that degradation of the enzyme was reduced. zVF and PD150606 each enhanced the induction of COX-2 by LPS/IFN. zVF also slowed the loss of COX-2 after treatment with cycloheximide, and COX-2 was degraded by exogenous μ-calpain in vitro. In contrast to iNOS, physical interaction between COX-2 and PIN1 was not detected, suggesting that effects of PIN1 on calpain, rather than COX-2 itself, affect COX-2 degradation. While cathepsin activity was unaltered, depletion of PIN1 reduced calpain activity

  19. Protein Never in Mitosis Gene A Interacting-1 regulates calpain activity and the degradation of cyclooxygenase-2 in endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Likhotvorik Rostislav I

    2009-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The peptidyl-proline isomerase, Protein Never in Mitosis Gene A Interacting-1 (PIN1, regulates turnover of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS in murine aortic endothelial cells (MAEC stimulated with E. coli endotoxin (LPS and interferon-γ (IFN. Degradation of iNOS was reduced by a calpain inhibitor, suggesting that PIN1 may affect induction of other calpain-sensitive inflammatory proteins, such as cyclooxygenase (COX-2, in MAEC. Methods MAEC, transduced with lentivirus encoding an inactive control short hairpin (sh RNA or one targeting PIN1 that reduced PIN1 by 85%, were used. Cells were treated with LPS/IFN, calpain inhibitors (carbobenzoxy-valinyl-phenylalaninal (zVF, PD150606, cycloheximide and COX inhibitors to determine the effect of PIN1 depletion on COX-2 and calpain. Results LPS or IFN alone did not induce COX-2. However, treatment with 10 μg LPS plus 20 ng IFN per ml induced COX-2 protein 10-fold in Control shRNA MAEC. Induction was significantly greater (47-fold in PIN1 shRNA cells. COX-2-dependent prostaglandin E2 production increased 3-fold in KD MAEC, but did not increase in Control cells. The additional increase in COX-2 protein due to PIN1 depletion was post-transcriptional, as induction of COX-2 mRNA by LPS/IFN was the same in cells containing or lacking PIN1. Instead, the loss of COX-2 protein, after treatment with cycloheximide to block protein synthesis, was reduced in cells lacking PIN1 in comparison with Control cells, indicating that degradation of the enzyme was reduced. zVF and PD150606 each enhanced the induction of COX-2 by LPS/IFN. zVF also slowed the loss of COX-2 after treatment with cycloheximide, and COX-2 was degraded by exogenous μ-calpain in vitro. In contrast to iNOS, physical interaction between COX-2 and PIN1 was not detected, suggesting that effects of PIN1 on calpain, rather than COX-2 itself, affect COX-2 degradation. While cathepsin activity was unaltered, depletion of PIN1

  20. Quantitative Evaluation of the Polarization Characteristics of Coronary Arteries Atherosclerotic Plaques at Different Development Stages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    E.V. Gubarkova

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The aim of the investigation was to develop an approach to quantitative evaluation of polarization properties (birefringence and cross-scattering basing on cross-polarization OCT images (CP OCT in order to characterize the development stages of atherosclerotic plaques and to reveal unstable ones. Materials and Methods. We report on quantitative analysis of CP OCT images of the seven development stages of atherosclerotic plaques ex vivo. Integral depolarization factor (IDF and effective birefringence coefficient (Δn were proposed as parameters for quantitative characterization of the CP OCT images. Results. Calculation of the IDF and Δn in the local region of interest (intima/fibrous cap showed a statistically relevant difference between stable (stage IV and unstable (stage Va plaques (0.46±0.21 against 0.09±0.04 for IDF and (0.47±0.10·10–3 against (0.25±0.07·10–3 for Δn; (p<0.05. It was found that Δn value in the range (0.22–0.29·10–3 (within the limits of two standard deviations indicates the presence of only a small amount of highly organized collagen in the fibrous cap of an unstable plaque which can indicate its tendency to rupture. We believe that these changes are connected with the prevalence of disorganized fibers during the inflammatory process in the fibrous cap of an unstable plaque, and to the presence of clusters of foam cells and inflammatory cells between them. Conclusion. The proposed approach to the quantitative evaluation of CP OCT images (calculation of IDF and building Δn maps allows to assess both cross-scattering and birefringence of atherosclerotic plaques at various development stages and more reliably reveal their vulnerability.

  1. Hematopoietic Fas Deficiency Does Not Affect Experimental Atherosclerotic Lesion Formation despite Inducing a Proatherogenic State

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Claro, R. Angelo; Zhu, Xiaodong; Tang, Jingjing; Morgan-Stevenson, Vicki; Schwartz, Barbara R.; Iwata, Akiko; Liles, W. Conrad; Raines, Elaine W.; Harlan, John M.

    2011-01-01

    The Fas death receptor (CD95) is expressed on macrophages, smooth muscle cells, and T cells within atherosclerotic lesions. Given the dual roles of Fas in both apoptotic and nonapoptotic signaling, the aim of the present study was to test the effect of hematopoietic Fas deficiency on experimental atherosclerosis in low-density lipoprotein receptor-null mice (Ldlr−/−). Bone marrow from Fas−/− mice was used to reconstitute irradiated Ldlr−/− mice as a model for atherosclerosis. After 16 weeks on an 0.5% cholesterol diet, no differences were noted in brachiocephalic artery lesion size, cellularity, or vessel wall apoptosis. However, Ldlr−/− mice reconstituted with Fas−/− hematopoietic cells had elevated hyperlipidemia [80% increase, relative to wild-type (WT) controls; P < 0.001] and showed marked elevation of plasma levels of CXCL1/KC, CCL2/MCP-1, IL-6, IL-10, IL-12 subunit p70, and soluble Fas ligand (P < 0.01), as well as systemic microvascular inflammation. It was not possible to assess later stages of atherosclerosis because of increased mortality in Fas−/− bone marrow recipients. Our data indicate that hematopoietic Fas deficiency does not affect early atherosclerotic lesion development in Ldlr−/− mice. PMID:21550016

  2. Performance and degradation of Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells: State of the art in modeling from atomistic to system scale

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jahnke, T.; Futter, G.; Latz, A.; Malkow, T.; Papakonstantinou, G.; Tsotridis, G.; Schott, P.; Gérard, M.; Quinaud, M.; Quiroga, M.; Franco, A. A.; Malek, K.; Calle-Vallejo, F.; Ferreira de Morais, R.; Kerber, T.; Sautet, P.; Loffreda, D.; Strahl, S.; Serra, M.; Polverino, P.; Pianese, C.; Mayur, M.; Bessler, W. G.; Kompis, C.

    2016-02-01

    Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cells (PEMFC) are energy efficient and environmentally friendly alternatives to conventional energy conversion systems in many yet emerging applications. In order to enable prediction of their performance and durability, it is crucial to gain a deeper understanding of the relevant operation phenomena, e.g., electrochemistry, transport phenomena, thermodynamics as well as the mechanisms leading to the degradation of cell components. Achieving the goal of providing predictive tools to model PEMFC performance, durability and degradation is a challenging task requiring the development of detailed and realistic models reaching from the atomic/molecular scale over the meso scale of structures and materials up to components, stack and system level. In addition an appropriate way of coupling the different scales is required. This review provides a comprehensive overview of the state of the art in modeling of PEMFC, covering all relevant scales from atomistic up to system level as well as the coupling between these scales. Furthermore, it focuses on the modeling of PEMFC degradation mechanisms and on the coupling between performance and degradation models.

  3. Isoreserpine promotes {beta}-catenin degradation via Siah-1 up-regulation in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gwak, Jungsug; Song, Taeyun [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Song, Jie-Young; Yun, Yeon-Sook [Laboratory of Radiation Cancer Science, Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul 139-706 (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Il-Whan [Department of Microbiology, Center for Viral Disease Research, Inje University College of Medicine, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Yongsu [Department of Genetic Engineering, and Graduate School of Biotechnology, Kyung Hee University, Yongin 446-701 (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jae-Gook [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Department of Clinical Pharmacology, Inje University Busan Paik Hospital, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of); Oh, Sangtaek, E-mail: ohsa@inje.ac.kr [PharmacoGenomics Research Center, Inje University, Busan 614-735 (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-09-25

    Aberrant accumulation of intracellular {beta}-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells is a frequent early event during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that decrease the level of intracellular {beta}-catenin, we performed cell-based chemical screening using genetically engineered HEK293 reporter cells to detect compounds that inhibit TOPFlash reporter activity, which was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium. We found that isoreserpine promoted the degradation of intracellular {beta}-catenin by up-regulation of Siah-1 in HEK293 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Moreover, isoreserpine repressed the expression of {beta}-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, resulting in the suppression of HCT116 cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that isoreserpine can potentially be used as a chemotherapeutic agent against colon cancer.

  4. Isoreserpine promotes β-catenin degradation via Siah-1 up-regulation in HCT116 colon cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aberrant accumulation of intracellular β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells is a frequent early event during the development of colon cancer. To identify small molecules that decrease the level of intracellular β-catenin, we performed cell-based chemical screening using genetically engineered HEK293 reporter cells to detect compounds that inhibit TOPFlash reporter activity, which was stimulated by Wnt3a-conditioned medium. We found that isoreserpine promoted the degradation of intracellular β-catenin by up-regulation of Siah-1 in HEK293 and HCT116 colon cancer cells. Moreover, isoreserpine repressed the expression of β-catenin/T-cell factor (TCF)-dependent genes, such as cyclin D1 and c-myc, resulting in the suppression of HCT116 cell proliferation. Our findings suggest that isoreserpine can potentially be used as a chemotherapeutic agent against colon cancer.

  5. Slit-Robo signaling induces malignant transformation through Hakai-mediated E-cadherin degradation during colorectal epithelial cell carcinogenesis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Jie Zhou; Yan-Qing Ding; Jian-Guo Geng; Zhen H Geng; Shan Chi; Wenli Zhang; Xiao-Feng Niu; Shu-Jue Lan; Li Ma; Xuesong Yang; Li-Jing Wang

    2011-01-01

    The Slit family of guidance cues binds to Roundabout (Robo) receptors and modulates cell migration. We report here that ectopic expression of Slit2 and Robol or recombinant Slit2 treatment of Robol-expressing colorectal epithelial carcinoma cells recruited an ubiquitin ligase Hakai for E-cadherin (E-cad) ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation, epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), and tumor growth and liver metastasis, which were rescued by knockdown of Hakai. In contrast, knockdown of endogenous Robol or specific blockade of Slit2 binding to Robol prevented E-cad degradation and reversed EMT, resulting in diminished tumor growth and liver metastasis.Ectopic expression of Robol also triggered a malignant transformation in Siit2-positive human embryonic kidney 293 cells. Importantly, the expression of Slit2 and Robol was significantly associated with an increased metastatic risk and poorer overall survival in colorectal carcinoma patients. We conclude that engagement of Robol by Slit2 induces malignant transformation through Hakai-mediated E-cad ubiquitination and lysosomal degradation during colorectal epithelial cell carcinogenesis.

  6. A significant correlation between C - reactive protein levels in blood monocytes derived macrophages versus content in carotid atherosclerotic lesions

    OpenAIRE

    Kaplan, Marielle; Hamoud, Shadi; Tendler, Yevgeny; Meilin, Edna; Lazarovitch, Aviva; Nitecki, Samy; Hayek, Tony

    2014-01-01

    Background Atherosclerosis is a complex disease involving different cell types, including macrophages that play a major role in the inflammatory events occurring in atherogenesis. C-Reactive Protein (CRP) is a sensitive systemic marker of inflammation and was identified as a biomarker of cardiovascular diseases. Histological studies demonstrate CRP presence in human atherosclerotic lesions, and we have previously shown that macrophages express CRP mRNA. CRP could be locally secreted in the at...

  7. Melanoma cell therapy: Endothelial progenitor cells as shuttle of the MMP12 uPAR-degrading enzyme.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; D'Alessio, Silvia; Bianchini, Francesca; Chillà, Anastasia; Margheri, Francesca; Luciani, Cristina; Mazzanti, Benedetta; Pimpinelli, Nicola; Torre, Eugenio; Danese, Silvio; Calorini, Lido; Del Rosso, Mario; Fibbi, Gabriella

    2014-06-15

    The receptor for the urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPAR) accounts for many features of cancer progression, and is therefore considered a target for anti-tumoral therapy. Only full length uPAR mediates tumor progression. Matrix-metallo-proteinase-12 (MMP12)-dependent uPAR cleavage results into the loss of invasion properties and angiogenesis. MMP12 can be employed in the field of "targeted therapies" as a biological drug to be delivered directly in patient's tumor mass. Endothelial Progenitor Cells (EPCs) are selectively recruited within the tumor and could be used as cellular vehicles for delivering anti-cancer molecules. The aim of our study is to inhibit cancer progression by engeneering ECFCs, a subset of EPC, with a lentivirus encoding the anti-tumor uPAR-degrading enzyme MMP12. Ex vivo manipulated ECFCs lost the capacity to perform capillary morphogenesis and acquired the anti-tumor and anti-angiogenetic activity. In vivo MMP12-engineered ECFCs cleaved uPAR within the tumor mass and strongly inhibited tumor growth, tumor angiogenesis and development of lung metastasis. The possibility to exploit tumor homing and activity of autologous MMP12-engineered ECFCs represents a novel way to combat melanoma by a "personalized therapy", without rejection risk. The i.v. injection of radiolabelled MMP12-ECFCs can thus provide a new theranostic approach to control melanoma progression and metastasis. PMID:25003596

  8. Chemokine Receptor 7 Knockout Attenuates Atherosclerotic Plaque Development

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Luchtefeld, Maren; Grothusen, Christina; Gagalick, Andreas; Jagavelu, Kumaravelu; Schuett, Harald; Tietge, Uwe J. F.; Pabst, Oliver; Grote, Karsten; Drexler, Helmut; Foerster, Reinhold; Schieffer, Bernhard

    2010-01-01

    Background-Atherosclerosis is a systemic inflammatory disease characterized by the formation of atherosclerotic plaques. Both innate immunity and adaptive immunity contribute to atherogenesis, but the mode of interaction is poorly understood. Chemokine receptor 7 (CCR7) is critically involved in the

  9. Acute type II cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis mimicking atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Saeed, A

    2012-01-31

    Atherosclerotic peripheral vascular disease is a common presenting cause for digital ischaemia in life long smokers. Acute severe Type II Cryoglobulinaemic vasculitis is a rare yet important cause, which may present with similar clinical features and which if undiagnosed may be rapidly fatal. Following the instigation of therapy with intravenous methylprednisolone and cyclophosphamide this patient made an excellent recovery.

  10. Atherosclerotic Plaque Destabilization in Mice: A Comparative Study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Helene Hartwig

    Full Text Available Atherosclerosis-associated diseases are the main cause of mortality and morbidity in western societies. The progression of atherosclerosis is a dynamic process evolving from early to advanced lesions that may become rupture-prone vulnerable plaques. Acute coronary syndromes are the clinical manifestation of life-threatening thrombotic events associated with high-risk vulnerable plaques. Hyperlipidemic mouse models have been extensively used in studying the mechanisms controlling initiation and progression of atherosclerosis. However, the understanding of mechanisms leading to atherosclerotic plaque destabilization has been hampered by the lack of proper animal models mimicking this process. Although various mouse models generate atherosclerotic plaques with histological features of human advanced lesions, a consensus model to study atherosclerotic plaque destabilization is still lacking. Hence, we studied the degree and features of plaque vulnerability in different mouse models of atherosclerotic plaque destabilization and find that the model based on the placement of a shear stress modifier in combination with hypercholesterolemia represent with high incidence the most human like lesions compared to the other models.

  11. ATHEROSCLEROTIC CARDIOVASCULAR DISEASE IN OLDER ADULTS WITH DIABETES MELLITUS

    OpenAIRE

    Barzilay, Joshua I.; Mukamal, Kenneth J.; Kizer, Jorge R.

    2014-01-01

    Diabetes Mellitus exerts a strong effect on atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease risk into older age (beyond ages 70 to 74 years). This effect is particularly noticeable with regard to coronary artery disease and cerebral microvascular disease. Thus Diabetes Mellitus in older age deserves the same careful medical attention as it does in middle age.

  12. In vivo determination of arterial collagen synthesis in atherosclerotic rabbits

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collagen and non-collagen protein synthesis rates were determined in vivo in tissues from rabbits fed a control or atherogenic diet supplemented with 2% peanut oil and 0.25% cholesterol for 4 months. Rabbits received a bolus intravenous injection of L-[3H]-proline (1.0 mCi/kg) and unlabeled L-proline (7 mmoles/kg) in 0.9% NaCl. Plasma proline specific activity decreased only 20% over 5 hr and was similar to the specific activity of free proline in tissues. Thoracic aortas from atherosclerotic rabbits exhibited raised plaques covering at least 75% of the surface. Thoracic intima plus a portion of the media (TIM) was separated from the remaining media plus adventitia (TMA). Dry delipidated weight, total collagen content, and collagen as a percent of dry weight were increased significantly in the TIM of atherosclerotic rabbits. Collagen synthesis rates and collagen synthesis as a percent of total protein synthesis were likewise increased both in the TIM and in the abdominal aortas. No differences from controls either in collagen content or collagen synthesis rates were observed in the TMA, lung or skin. These results demonstrate for the first time in vivo that formation of atherosclerotic plaques is associated with increased rates of collagen synthesis. Furthermore, as previously observed with incubations in vitro, collagen synthesis was elevated to a greater extent than noncollagen protein synthesis in atherosclerotic aortas from rabbits fed cholesterol plus peanut oil

  13. Cell wall degrading isoenzyme profiles of Trichoderma biocontrol strains show correlation with rDNA species

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanz L; Hermosa M R; González F J; Monte E

    2004-01-01

    @@ Species of the fungus Trichoderma, a genus of Hyphomycetes, are ubiquitous in the environment, but especially in soil. They have been used in a wide range of commercial applications including the production of hydrolases and in the biological control of plant diseases. A fundamental part of the Trichoderma antifungal system consists of a series of genes coding for a surprising variety of extracellular cell wall degrading enzymes (CWDE).Characterisation and identification of strains at the species level is the first step in utilizing the full potential of fungi in specific applications. One aim when isolating Trichoderma strains is to identify those which can be used in new agricultural and industrial applications. In the past it was not uncommon that biocontrol strains were defined as T. harzianum Rifai, due to the limited classification system of the genus Trichoderma. In recent years, several PCR-based molecular techniques have been used to detect and discriminate among microorganisms. Sequence analysis of the ITS regions of the ribosomal DNA and gene fragments as those corresponding to tef1 gene have been helpful in the neotypification, description and characterization of species in the genus Trichoderna.Another useful method for the identification of Trichoderma strains is the randomly amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD) technique.Isozyme polymorphisms evaluation of five putative extracellular lytic enzymes loci (β-1,3-glucanase, β-1,6-glucanase, cellulase, chitinase and protease antivities) were carried out using representative strains of defined molecular groups. CWDE groupings obtained from biocontrol strains are discussed in relation to their phylogenetic location and antifungal activities.Compiling morphological, biochemical and sequence information data into a common database would provide a useful resource that could be used to accurately name new haplotypes identified in the future and correctly place them within the genus Trichoderma.

  14. From Accumulation to Degradation: Reprogramming Polyamine Metabolism Facilitates Dark-Induced Senescence in Barley Leaf Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sobieszczuk-Nowicka, Ewa; Kubala, Szymon; Zmienko, Agnieszka; Małecka, Arleta; Legocka, Jolanta

    2016-01-01

    The aim of this study was to analyze whether polyamine (PA) metabolism is involved in dark-induced Hordeum vulgare L. ‘Nagrad’ leaf senescence. In the cell, the titer of PAs is relatively constant and is carefully controlled. Senescence-dependent increases in the titer of the free PAs putrescine, spermidine, and spermine occurred when the process was induced, accompanied by the formation of putrescine conjugates. The addition of the anti-senescing agent cytokinin, which delays senescence, to dark-incubated leaves slowed the senescence-dependent PA accumulation. A feature of the senescence process was initial accumulation of PAs at the beginning of the process and their subsequent decrease during the later stages. Indeed, the process was accompanied by both enhanced expression of PA biosynthesis and catabolism genes and an increase in the activity of enzymes involved in the two metabolic pathways. To confirm whether the capacity of the plant to control senescence might be linked to PA, chlorophyll fluorescence parameters, and leaf nitrogen status in senescing barley leaves were measured after PA catabolism inhibition and exogenously applied γ-aminobutyric acid (GABA). The results obtained by blocking putrescine oxidation showed that the senescence process was accelerated. However, when the inhibitor was applied together with GABA, senescence continued without disruption. On the other hand, inhibition of spermidine and spermine oxidation delayed the process. It could be concluded that in dark-induced leaf senescence, the initial accumulation of PAs leads to facilitating their catabolism. Putrescine supports senescence through GABA production and spermidine/spermine supports senescence-dependent degradation processes, is verified by H2O2 generation. PMID:26779231

  15. Artificial Neural Network Modeling of Pt/C Cathode Degradation in PEM Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Erfan; Maleki, Nasim

    2016-08-01

    Use of computational modeling with a few experiments is considered useful to obtain the best possible result for a final product, without performing expensive and time-consuming experiments. Proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) can produce clean electricity, but still require further study. An oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) takes place at the cathode, and carbon-supported platinum (Pt/C) is commonly used as an electrocatalyst. The harsh conditions during PEMFC operation result in Pt/C degradation. Observation of changes in the Pt/C layer under operating conditions provides a tool to study the lifetime of PEMFCs and overcome durability issues. Recently, artificial neural networks (ANNs) have been used to solve, predict, and optimize a wide range of scientific problems. In this study, several rates of change at the cathode were modeled using ANNs. The backpropagation (BP) algorithm was used to train the network, and experimental data were employed for network training and testing. Two different models are constructed in the present study. First, the potential cycles, temperature, and humidity are used as inputs to predict the resulting Pt dissolution rate of the Pt/C at the cathode as the output parameter of the network. Thereafter, the Pt dissolution rate and Pt ion diffusivity are regarded as inputs to obtain values of the Pt particle radius change rate, Pt mass loss rate, and surface area loss rate as outputs. The networks are finely tuned, and the modeling results agree well with experimental data. The modeled responses of the ANNs are acceptable for this application.

  16. Cross-reacting antibacterial auto-antibodies are produced within coronary atherosclerotic plaques of acute coronary syndrome patients.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Filippo Canducci

    Full Text Available Coronary atherosclerosis, the main condition predisposing to acute myocardial infarction, has an inflammatory component caused by stimuli that are yet unknown. We molecularly investigated the nature of the immune response within human coronary lesion in four coronary plaques obtained by endoluminal atherectomy from four patients. We constructed phage-display libraries containing the IgG1/kappa antibody fragments produced by B-lymphocytes present in each plaque. By immunoaffinity, we selected from these libraries a monoclonal antibody, arbitrarily named Fab7816, able to react both with coronary and carotid atherosclerotic tissue samples. We also demonstrated by confocal microscopy that this monoclonal antibody recognized human transgelin type 1, a cytoskeleton protein involved in atherogenesis, and that it co-localized with fibrocyte-like cells transgelin+, CD68+, CD45+ in human sections of coronary and carotid plaques. In vitro fibrocytes obtained by differentiating CD14+ cells isolated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells also interacted with Fab7816, thus supporting the hypothesis of a specific recognition of fibrocytes into the atherosclerotic lesions. Interestingly, the same antibody, cross-reacted with the outer membrane proteins of Proteus mirabilis and Klebsiella pneumoniae (and possibly with homologous proteins of other enterobacteriaceae present in the microbiota. From all the other three libraries, we were able to clone, by immunoaffinity selection, human monoclonal antibodies cross-reacting with bacterial outer membrane proteins and with transgelin. These findings demonstrated that in human atherosclerotic plaques a local cross-reactive immune response takes place.

  17. Quantifying pretreatment degradation compounds in solution and accumulated by cells during solids and yeast recycling in the Rapid Bioconversion with Integrated recycling Technology process using AFEX™ corn stover.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarks, Cory; Higbee, Alan; Piotrowski, Jeff; Xue, Saisi; Coon, Joshua J; Sato, Trey K; Jin, Mingjie; Balan, Venkatesh; Dale, Bruce E

    2016-04-01

    Effects of degradation products (low molecular weight compounds produced during pretreatment) on the microbes used in the RaBIT (Rapid Bioconversion with Integrated recycling Technology) process that reduces enzyme usage up to 40% by efficient enzyme recycling were studied. Chemical genomic profiling was performed, showing no yeast response differences in hydrolysates produced during RaBIT enzymatic hydrolysis. Concentrations of degradation products in solution were quantified after different enzymatic hydrolysis cycles and fermentation cycles. Intracellular degradation product concentrations were also measured following fermentation. Degradation product concentrations in hydrolysate did not change between RaBIT enzymatic hydrolysis cycles; the cell population retained its ability to oxidize/reduce (detoxify) aldehydes over five RaBIT fermentation cycles; and degradation products accumulated within or on the cells as RaBIT fermentation cycles increased. Synthetic hydrolysate was used to confirm that pretreatment degradation products are the sole cause of decreased xylose consumption during RaBIT fermentations. PMID:26802184

  18. Vitamin D3 regulates the formation and degradation of gap junctions in androgen-responsive human prostate cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda Kelsey

    Full Text Available 1α-25(OH2 vitamin D3 (1-25D, an active hormonal form of Vitamin D3, is a well-known chemopreventive and pro-differentiating agent. It has been shown to inhibit the growth of several prostate cancer cell lines. Gap junctions, formed of proteins called connexins (Cx, are ensembles of cell-cell channels, which permit the exchange of small growth regulatory molecules between adjoining cells. Cell-cell communication mediated by gap junctional channels is an important homeostatic control mechanism for regulating cell growth and differentiation. We have investigated the effect of 1-25D on the formation and degradation of gap junctions in an androgen-responsive prostate cancer cell line, LNCaP, which expresses retrovirally-introduced Cx32. Connexin32 is expressed by the luminal and well-differentiated cells of normal prostate and prostate tumors. Our results document that 1-25D enhances the expression of Cx32 and its subsequent assembly into gap junctions. Our results further show that 1-25D prevents androgen-regulated degradation of Cx32, post-translationally, independent of androgen receptor (AR-mediated signaling. Finally, our findings document that formation of gap junctions sensitizes Cx32-expressing LNCaP cells to the growth inhibitory effects of 1-25D and alters their morphology. These findings suggest that the growth-inhibitory effects of 1-25D in LNCaP cells may be related to its ability to modulate the assembly of Cx32 into gap junctions.

  19. Protein Never in Mitosis Gene A Interacting-1 regulates calpain activity and the degradation of cyclooxygenase-2 in endothelial cells

    OpenAIRE

    Likhotvorik Rostislav I; Huang Yongcheng; Shah Vaibhav; Schneider Ryan A; Liu Tongzheng; Keshvara Lakhu; Hoyt Dale G

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Background The peptidyl-proline isomerase, Protein Never in Mitosis Gene A Interacting-1 (PIN1), regulates turnover of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS) in murine aortic endothelial cells (MAEC) stimulated with E. coli endotoxin (LPS) and interferon-γ (IFN). Degradation of iNOS was reduced by a calpain inhibitor, suggesting that PIN1 may affect induction of other calpain-sensitive inflammatory proteins, such as cyclooxygenase (COX)-2, in MAEC. Methods MAEC, transduced with lenti...

  20. BRCA1 loss activates cathepsin L–mediated degradation of 53BP1 in breast cancer cells

    OpenAIRE

    Grotsky, David A.; González-Suárez, Ignacio; Novell Álvarez, Anna; Neumann, Martin; Yaddanapudi, Sree C.; Croke, Monica; Martínez Alonso, Montserrat; Redwood, Abena B.; Ortega-Martinez, Sylvia; Feng, Zhihui; Lerma, Enrique; Ramon y Cajal, Teresa; Zhang, Junran; Matias-Guiu, Xavier; Dusso, Adriana

    2013-01-01

    Loss of 53BP1 rescues BRCA1 deficiency and is associated with BRCA1-deficient and triple-negative breast cancers (TNBC) and with resistance to genotoxic drugs. The mechanisms responsible for decreased 53BP1 transcript and protein levels in tumors remain unknown. Here, we demonstrate that BRCA1 loss activates cathepsin L (CTSL)–mediated degradation of 53BP1. Activation of this pathway rescued homologous recombination repair and allowed BRCA1-deficient cells to bypass growth arrest. Importantly...

  1. AMBRA1 links autophagy to cell proliferation and tumorigenesis by promoting c-MYC dephosphorylation and degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cianfanelli, Valentina; Fuoco, Claudia; Lorente, Mar; Salazar, Maria; Quondamatteo, Fabio; Gherardini, Pier Federico; De Zio, Daniela; Nazio, Francesca; Antonioli, Manuela; D’Orazio, Melania; Skobo, Tatjana; Bordi, Matteo; Rohde, Mikkel; Dalla Valle, Luisa; Helmer-Citterich, Manuela; Gretzmeier, Christine; Dengjel, Joern; Fimia, Gian Maria; Piacentini, Mauro; Di Bartolomeo, Sabrina; Velasco, Guillermo; Cecconi, Francesco

    2016-01-01

    Inhibition of a main regulator of cell metabolism, the protein kinase mTOR, induces autophagy and inhibits cell proliferation. However, the molecular pathways involved in the cross-talk between these two mTOR-dependent cell processes are largely unknown. Here we show that the scaffold protein AMBRA1, a member of the autophagy signalling network and a downstream target of mTOR, regulates cell proliferation by facilitating the dephosphorylation and degradation of the proto-oncogene C-MYC. We found that AMBRA1 favors the interaction between C-MYC and its phosphatase PP2A and that, when mTOR is inhibited, it enhances PP2A activity on this specific target, thereby reducing the cell division rate. As expected, such a de-regulation of C-MYC correlates with increased tumorigenesis in AMBRA1-defective systems, thus supporting a role for AMBRA1 as a haploinsufficient tumour suppressor gene. PMID:25438055

  2. Evaluation and prediction of the degradation of space Si solar cells induced by a low-earth-orbit radiation environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Space-graded silicon solar cells are evaluated by 1 MeV and 2 MeV electron-irradiation. The mean degradation of the maximum power (Pmax) is presented and analyzed. The degradation at both electron energies has been correlated with the displacement damage dose (Dd). A good linearity between the electron Dd and the mean Pmax degradation is obtained. The concept of Dd has also been used to predict the Si solar cell response in a low-earth-orbit (Altitude 799 km, Inclination 99°) radiation environment, considering the shielded effect of a 120 μm-thick silica coverglass on reducing the radiation. Compared with the on-orbit data from a Si solar array of a Chinese satellite (duration from April 2007 to July 2010), a good match can be found between the on-orbit data and the predicted results using Dd methodology, indicating the method is appropriate for evaluating the radiation damage of the solar cells, and also to provide a new technique for studying radiation effects on the optoelectronic detectors used in many high energy physics applications, where harsh radiation environments produce damage in optoelectronic device materials. (authors)

  3. Matrix metalloproteinase-13 mediated degradation of hyaluronic acid-based matrices orchestrates stem cell engraftment through vascular integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jha, Amit K; Tharp, Kevin M; Browne, Shane; Ye, Jianqin; Stahl, Andreas; Yeghiazarians, Yerem; Healy, Kevin E

    2016-05-01

    A critical design parameter for the function of synthetic extracellular matrices is to synchronize the gradual cell-mediated degradation of the matrix with the endogenous secretion of natural extracellular matrix (ECM) (e.g., creeping substitution). In hyaluronic acid (HyA)-based hydrogel matrices, we have investigated the effects of peptide crosslinkers with different matrix metalloproteinases (MMP) sensitivities on network degradation and neovascularization in vivo. The HyA hydrogel matrices consisted of cell adhesive peptides, heparin for both the presentation of exogenous and sequestration of endogenously synthesized growth factors, and MMP cleavable peptide linkages (i.e., QPQGLAK, GPLGMHGK, and GPLGLSLGK). Sca1(+)/CD45(-)/CD34(+)/CD44(+) cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs) cultured in the matrices with the slowly degradable QPQGLAK hydrogels supported the highest production of MMP-2, MMP-9, MMP-13, VEGF165, and a range of angiogenesis related proteins. Hydrogels with QPQGLAK crosslinks supported prolonged retention of these proteins via heparin within the matrix, stimulating rapid vascular development, and anastomosis with the host vasculature when implanted in the murine hindlimb. PMID:26967648

  4. A critical role for FBXW8 and MAPK in cyclin D1 degradation and cancer cell proliferation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroshi Okabe

    Full Text Available Cyclin D1 regulates G1 progression. Its transcriptional regulation is well understood. However, the mechanism underlying cyclin D1 ubiquitination and its subsequent degradation is not yet clear. We report that cyclin D1 undergoes increased degradation in the cytoplasm during S phase in a variety of cancer cells. This is mediated by phosphorylation at Thr286 through the activity of the Ras/Raf/MEK/ERK cascade and the F-box protein FBXW8, which is an E3 ligase. The majority of FBXW8 is expressed in the cytoplasm during G1 and S phase. In contrast, cyclin D1 accumulates in the nucleus during G1 phase and exits into the cytoplasm in S phase. Increased cyclin D1 degradation is linked to association with FBXW8 in the cytoplasm, and enhanced phosphorylation of cyclin D1 through sustained ERK1/2 signaling. Depletion of FBXW8 caused a significant accumulation of cyclin D1, as well as sequestration of CDK1 in the cytoplasm. This resulted in a severe reduction of cell proliferation. These effects could be rescued by constitutive nuclear expression of cyclin D1-T286A. Thus, FBXW8 plays an essential role in cancer cell proliferation through proteolysis of cyclin D1. It may present new opportunities to develop therapies targeting destruction of cyclin D1 or its regulator E3 ligase selectively.

  5. Evaluation and prediction of the degradation of space Si solar cells induced by a low-earth-orbit radiation environment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GAO Xin; YANG Sheng-Sheng; FENG Zhan-Zu; ZHANG Lei

    2012-01-01

    Space-graded silicon solar cells are evaluated by 1 MeV and 2 MeV electron-irradiation.The mean degradation of the maximum power (Pmax) is presented and analyzed.The degradation at both electron energies has been correlated with the displacement damage dose (Dd).A good linearity between the electron Dd and the mean Pmax degradation is obtained.The concept of Dd has also been used to predict the Si solar cell response in a low-earth-orbit (Altitude 799 km,Inclination 99°) radiation environment,considering the shielded effect of a 120 μm-thick silica coverglass on reducing the radiation.Compared with the on-orbit data from a Si solar array of a Chinese satellite (duration from April 2007 to July 2010),a good match can be found between the on-orbit data and the predicted results using Dd methodology,indicating the method is appropriate for evaluating the radiation damage of the solar cells,and also to provide a new technique for studying radiation effects on the optoelectronic detectors used in many high energy physics applications,where harsh radiation environments produce damage in optoelectronic device materials.

  6. Biophysical regulation of Chlamydia pneumoniae-infected monocyte recruitment to atherosclerotic foci

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evani, Shankar J.; Ramasubramanian, Anand K.

    2016-01-01

    Chlamydia pneumoniae infection is implicated in atherosclerosis although the contributory mechanisms are poorly understood. We hypothesize that C. pneumoniae infection favors the recruitment of monocytes to atherosclerotic foci by altering monocyte biophysics. Primary, fresh human monocytes were infected with C. pneumoniae for 8 h, and the interactions between monocytes and E-selectin or aortic endothelium under flow were characterized by video microscopy and image analysis. The distribution of membrane lipid rafts and adhesion receptors were analyzed by imaging flow cytometry. Infected cells rolled on E-selectin and endothelial surfaces, and this rolling was slower, steady and uniform compared to uninfected cells. Infection decreases cholesterol levels, increases membrane fluidity, disrupts lipid rafts, and redistributes CD44, which is the primary mediator of rolling interactions. Together, these changes translate to higher firm adhesion of infected monocytes on endothelium, which is enhanced in the presence of LDL. Uninfected monocytes treated with LDL or left untreated were used as baseline control. Our results demonstrate that the membrane biophysical changes due to infection and hyperlipidemia are one of the key mechanisms by which C. pneumoniae can exacerbate atherosclerotic pathology. These findings provide a framework to characterize the role of ‘infectious burden’ in the development and progression of atherosclerosis.

  7. Detection of atherosclerotic lesions and intimal macrophages using CD36-targeted nanovesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Shufang; Zhang, Jia; Martinez-Zaguilan, Raul; Sennoune, Souad; Hossen, Md Nazir; Lichtenstein, Alice H; Cao, Jun; Meyerrose, Gary E; Paone, Ralph; Soontrapa, Suthipong; Fan, Zhaoyang; Wang, Shu

    2015-12-28

    Current approaches to the diagnosis and therapy of atherosclerosis cannot target lesion-determinant cells in the artery wall. Intimal macrophage infiltration promotes atherosclerotic lesion development by facilitating the accumulation of oxidized low-density lipoproteins (oxLDL) and increasing inflammatory responses. The presence of these cells is positively associated with lesion progression, severity and destabilization. Hence, they are an important diagnostic and therapeutic target. The objective of this study was to noninvasively assess the distribution and accumulation of intimal macrophages using CD36-targeted nanovesicles. Soy phosphatidylcholine was used to synthesize liposome-like nanovesicles. 1-(Palmitoyl)-2-(5-keto-6-octene-dioyl) phosphatidylcholine was incorporated on their surface to target the CD36 receptor. All in vitro data demonstrate that these targeted nanovesicles had a high binding affinity for the oxLDL binding site of the CD36 receptor and participated in CD36-mediated recognition and uptake of nanovesicles by macrophages. Intravenous administration into LDL receptor null mice of targeted compared to non-targeted nanovesicles resulted in higher uptake in aortic lesions. The nanovesicles co-localized with macrophages and their CD36 receptors in aortic lesions. This molecular target approach may facilitate the in vivo noninvasive imaging of atherosclerotic lesions in terms of intimal macrophage accumulation and distribution and disclose lesion features related to inflammation and possibly vulnerability thereby facilitate early lesion detection and targeted delivery of therapeutic compounds to intimal macrophages. PMID:26450668

  8. Discovery of LPMO activity on hemicelluloses shows the importance of oxidative processes in plant cell wall degradation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Agger, Jane W.; Isaksen, Trine; Várnai, Anikó;

    2014-01-01

    LPMOs, and considering the complexity and copolymeric nature of the plant cell wall, it has been speculated that some LPMOs may act on other substrates, in particular the hemicelluloses that tether to cellulose microfibrils. We demonstrate that an LPMO from Neurospora crassa, NcLPMO9C, indeed degrades...... various hemicelluloses, in particular xyloglucan. This activity was discovered using a glycan microarray-based screening method for detection of substrate specificities of carbohydrate-active enzymes, and further explored using defined oligomeric hemicelluloses, isolated polymeric hemicelluloses and cell...... the LPMOs that are present in current commercial cellulase mixtures in part is due to hitherto undetected LPMO activities on recalcitrant hemicellulose structures....

  9. Charge Transport and Photocurrent Generation Characteristics in Dye Solar Cells Containing Thermally Degraded N719 Dye Molecules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, A. R.; Halme, J.; Lund, T.;

    2011-01-01

    By deliberately introducing the thermally degraded form of the dye solar cell sensitizer N719 in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) using synthetically prepared N719-TBP ([Ru(L-H)(2)(NCS)(4-tert-butylpyridine)](-+)N-(Bu)(4)), we have investigated the devastating influence of this ligand substitution...... absorption spectrum of the dye, ca. 50% shorter electron diffusion length due to lower electron recombination resistance, and ca. 14% lower charge separation efficiency, which most likely can be ascribed to decreased dye regeneration efficiency caused by the replacement of one NCS ligand with TBP in the...

  10. A combined in-situ and post-mortem investigation on local permanent degradation in a direct methanol fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bresciani, F.; Rabissi, C.; Zago, M.; Gazdzicki, P.; Schulze, M.; Guétaz, L.; Escribano, S.; Bonde, J. L.; Marchesi, R.; Casalegno, A.

    2016-02-01

    Performance degradation is one of the key issues hindering direct methanol fuel cell commercialization, caused by different mechanisms interplaying locally and resulting in both temporary and permanent contributions. This work proposes a systematic experimental investigation, coupling in-situ diagnostics (electrochemical and mass transport investigation) with ex-situ analyses of pristine, activated and aged components (X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and transmission electron microscopy), with an in-plane and through-plane local resolution. Such a combined approach allows to identify on one hand the degradation mechanisms, the affected components and the presence of heterogeneities; on the other hand, it allows to quantify the effect of the major mechanisms on performance decay. Thanks to a novel procedure, temporary (21 μV h-1) and permanent degradation (59 μV h-1) are separated, distinguishing the latter in different contributions: the effects of active area loss at both at anode (9 μV h-1) and cathode (31 μV h-1), mass transport issue (15 μV h-1) and membrane decay (4 μV h-1). The post-mortem analysis highlights the effect of degradation mechanisms consistent with the in-situ analysis and reveals the presence of considerable in plane and through plane heterogeneities in: particle size growth in catalyst layers, Pt/Ru and polymer content in catalyst and diffusion layers, Pt/Ru precipitates in the membrane.

  11. Functional and modular analyses of diverse endoglucanases from Ruminococcus albus 8, a specialist plant cell wall degrading bacterium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iakiviak, Michael; Devendran, Saravanan; Skorupski, Anna; Moon, Young Hwan; Mackie, Roderick I; Cann, Isaac

    2016-01-01

    Ruminococcus albus 8 is a specialist plant cell wall degrading ruminal bacterium capable of utilizing hemicellulose and cellulose. Cellulose degradation requires a suite of enzymes including endoglucanases, exoglucanases, and β-glucosidases. The enzymes employed by R. albus 8 in degrading cellulose are yet to be completely elucidated. Through bioinformatic analysis of a draft genome sequence of R. albus 8, seventeen putatively cellulolytic genes were identified. The genes were heterologously expressed in E. coli, and purified to near homogeneity. On biochemical analysis with cellulosic substrates, seven of the gene products (Ra0185, Ra0259, Ra0325, Ra0903, Ra1831, Ra2461, and Ra2535) were identified as endoglucanases, releasing predominantly cellobiose and cellotriose. Each of the R. albus 8 endoglucanases, except for Ra0259 and Ra0325, bound to the model crystalline cellulose Avicel, confirming functional carbohydrate binding modules (CBMs). The polypeptides for Ra1831 and Ra2535 were found to contain distantly related homologs of CBM65. Mutational analysis of residues within the CBM65 of Ra1831 identified key residues required for binding. Phylogenetic analysis of the endoglucanases revealed three distinct subfamilies of glycoside hydrolase family 5 (GH5). Our results demonstrate that this fibrolytic bacterium uses diverse GH5 catalytic domains appended with different CBMs, including novel forms of CBM65, to degrade cellulose. PMID:27439730

  12. Docetaxel induced-JNK2/PHD1 signaling pathway increases degradation of HIF-1α and causes cancer cell death under hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Eun-Taex; Kim, Chan Woo; Kim, Soo Jung; Lee, Jae-Seon; Hong, Soon-Sun; Park, Heon Joo

    2016-01-01

    HIF-1 (hypoxia-inducible factor-1) regulates the expression of more than 70 genes involved in angiogenesis, tumor growth, metastasis, chemoresistance, and radioresistance. Thus, there is growing interest in using HIF-1 inhibitors as anticancer drugs. Docetaxel, a Food and Drug Administration-approved anticancer drug, is reported to enhance HIF-1α degradation. Here, we investigated the molecular mechanism underlying docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death under hypoxic conditions. Docetaxel pretreatment enhanced the polyubiquitination and proteasome-mediated degradation of HIF-1α, and increased cancer cell death under hypoxic conditions. Docetaxel also activated the prolyl hydroxylase, PHD1, in hypoxia, and pharmacological inhibition or siRNA-mediated knockdown of PHD1 prevented docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death. Additionally, siRNA-mediated JNK2 knockdown blocked docetaxel-induced HIF-1α degradation and cancer cell death by inhibiting PHD1 activation. A luciferase reporter assay revealed that inhibition of the JNK2/PHD1 signaling pathway significantly increased the transcriptional activity of HIF-1 in docetaxel-treated cancer cells under hypoxia. Consistent with these results, docetaxel-treated JNK2-knockdown tumors grew much faster than control tumors through inhibition of docetaxel-induced PHD1 activation and degradation of HIF-1α. Our results collectively show that, under hypoxic conditions, docetaxel induces apoptotic cell death through JNK2/PHD1 signaling-mediated HIF-1α degradation. PMID:27263528

  13. Human TRIB2 Oscillates during the Cell Cycle and Promotes Ubiquitination and Degradation of CDC25C.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Kai Ling; Paredes, Roberto; Carmody, Ruaidhri; Eyers, Patrick A; Meyer, Stefan; McCarthy, Tommie V; Keeshan, Karen

    2016-01-01

    Tribbles homolog 2 (TRIB2) is a member of the mammalian Tribbles family of serine/threonine pseudokinases (TRIB1-3). Studies of TRIB2 indicate that many of the molecular interactions between the single Drosophila Tribbles (Trbl) protein and interacting partners are evolutionary conserved. In this study, we examined the relationship between TRIB2 and cell division cycle 25 (CDC25) family of dual-specificity protein phosphatases (mammalian homologues of Drosophila String), which are key physiological cell cycle regulators. Using co-immunoprecipitation we demonstrate that TRIB2 interacts with CDC25B and CDC25C selectively. Forced overexpression of TRIB2 caused a marked decrease in total CDC25C protein levels. Following inhibition of the proteasome, CDC25C was stabilized in the nuclear compartment. This implicates TRIB2 as a regulator of nuclear CDC25C turnover. In complementary ubiquitination assays, we show that TRIB2-mediated degradation of CDC25C is associated with lysine-48-linked CDC25C polyubiquitination driven by the TRIB2 kinase-like domain. A cell cycle associated role for TRIB2 is further supported by the cell cycle regulated expression of TRIB2 protein levels. Our findings reveal mitotic CDC25C as a new target of TRIB2 that is degraded via the ubiquitin proteasome system. Inappropriate CDC25C regulation could mechanistically underlie TRIB2 mediated regulation of cellular proliferation in neoplastic cells. PMID:27563873

  14. Nonionic surfactants induced changes in cell characteristics and phenanthrene degradation ability of Sphingomonas sp. GY2B.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shasha; Guo, Chuling; Liang, Xujun; Wu, Fengji; Dang, Zhi

    2016-07-01

    Surfactant-mediated bioremediation has been widely applied in decontaminating PAH-polluted sites. However, the impacts of surfactants on the biodegradation of PAHs have been controversial in the past years. To gain a clear insight into the influencing mechanisms, three nonionic surfactants (Tween80, TritonX-100 and Brij30) were selected to systematically investigate their effects on cell surface properties (membrane permeability, functional groups and elements), cell vitality as well as subsequent phenanthrene degradation ability of Sphingomonas sp. GY2B. Results showed that biodegradation of phenanthrene was stimulated by Tween80, slightly inhibited by TritonX-100 and severely inhibited by Brij30, respectively. Positive effect of Tween80 may arise from its role as the additional carbon source for GY2B to increase bacterial growth and activity, as demonstrated by the increasing viable cells in Tween80 amended degradation systems determined by flow cytometry. Although TritonX-100 could inhibit bacterial growth and disrupt cell membrane, its adverse impacts on microbial cells were weaker than Brij30, which may result in its weaker inhibitive extent. Results from this study can provide a rational basis on selecting surfactants for enhancing bioremediation of PAHs. PMID:27045921

  15. Accumulation of sigmaS due to enhanced synthesis and decreased degradation in acidic phospholipid-deficient Escherichia coli cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uchiyama, Junji; Sasaki, Yu; Nagahama, Hideki; Itou, Aya; Matsuoka, Satoshi; Matsumoto, Kouji; Hara, Hiroshi

    2010-06-01

    The Escherichia coli pgsA3 mutation, which causes deficiency in acidic phospholipids, leads to a significant accumulation of sigma(S). This accumulation is partly accounted for by the higher transcription level of rpoS; however, it has also been suggested that the cells accumulate sigma(S) post-transcriptionally. We found that the level of the small regulatory RNA RprA, which is involved in the promotion of rpoS translation, is higher in pgsA3 cells than in pgsA(+) cells. Induction of altered rpoS mRNA that does not depend on RprA in pgsA(+) cells did not increase the level of sigma(S) to the high level observed in pgsA3 cells, suggesting post-translational sigma(S) accumulation in the latter. The mRNA levels of clpX and clpP, whose products form a ClpXP protease that degrades sigma(S), were much reduced in pgsA3 cells. Consistent with the reduced mRNA levels, the half-life of sigma(S) in pgsA3 cells was much longer than in pgsA(+) cells, indicating that downregulation of the degradation is a major cause for the high sigma(S) content. We show that the downregulation can be partially attributed to activated CpxAR in the mutant cells, which causes repression of rpoE on whose gene product the expression of clpPX depends. PMID:20455949

  16. Integration of porosity and bio-functionalization to form a 3D scaffold: cell culture studies and in vitro degradation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, porous poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) (50/50) microspheres have been fabricated by the gas-foaming technique using ammonium bicarbonate as a gas-foaming agent. Microspheres of different porosities have been formulated by varying the concentration of the gas-foaming agent (0%, 5%, 10% and 15% w/v). These microspheres were characterized for particle size, porosity and average pore size, morphology, water uptake ratio and surface area and it was found that the porosity, pore size and surface area increased on increasing the concentration of the gas-foaming agent. Further, the effect of porosity on degradation behavior was evaluated over a 12 week period by measuring changes in mass, pH, molecular weight and morphology. Porosity was found to have an inverse relationship with degradation rate. To render the surface of the microspheres biomimetic, peptide P-15 was coupled to the surface of these microspheres. In vitro cell viability, proliferation and morphological evaluation were carried out on these microsphere scaffolds using MG-63 cell line to study the effect of the porosity and pore size of scaffolds and to evaluate the effect of P-15 on cell growth on porous scaffolds. MTT assay, actin, alizarin staining and SEM revealed the potential of biomimetic porous PLGA (50/50) microspheres as scaffolds for tissue engineering. As shown in graphical representation, an attempt has been made to correlate the cell behavior on the scaffolds (growth, proliferation and cell death) with the concurrent degradation of the porous microsphere scaffold as a function of time.

  17. Lysosome-dependent p300/FOXP3 degradation and limits Treg cell functions and enhances targeted therapy against cancers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Taofeng; Nagai, Yasuhiro; Xiao, Yan; Greene, Mark I; Zhang, Hongtao

    2013-08-01

    p300 is one of several acetyltransferases that regulate FOXP3 acetylation and functions. Our recent studies have defined a complex set of histone acetyltransferase interactions which can lead to enhanced or repressed changes in FOXP3 function. We have explored the use of a natural p300 inhibitor, Garcinol, as a tool to understand mechanisms by which p300 regulates FOXP3 acetylation. In the presence of Garcinol, p300 appears to become disassociated from the FOXP3 complex and undergoes lysosome-dependent degradation. As a consequence of p300's physical absence, FOXP3 becomes less acetylated and eventually degraded, a process that cannot be rescued by the proteasome inhibitor MG132. p300 plays a complex role in FOXP3 acetylation, as it could also acetylate a subset of four Lys residues that repressively regulate total FOXP3 acetylation. Garcinol acts as a degradation device to reduce the suppressive activity of regulatory T cells (Treg) and to enhance the in vivo anti-tumor activity of a targeted therapeutic anti-p185(her2/neu) (ERBB2) antibody in MMTV-neu transgenics implanted with neu transformed breast tumor cells. Our studies provide the rationale for molecules that disrupt p300 stability to limit Treg functions in targeted therapies for cancers. PMID:23644046

  18. Combining 3-dimensional degradable electrostatic spinning scaffold and dental follicle cells to build peri-implant periodontium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ximu Zhang

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction: Some inevitable problems, such as concentrated bite force and lacked ability of self-renewal, are proved to be the major challenge in the management of implants failures. Thus, it is meaningful to find an ideal dental implant harboring its own peri-implant periodontium, just as the natural teeth. Various studies attempted to reconstruct the periodontium around implants, but unfortunately, it was previously revealed that the artificial periodotium around implants was just a wilderness of fibers, while without the physiological function of natural periodontium, like sensory and homeostatic. The Hypothesis: In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that a modified three-dimensional scaffold with reconstructed peri-implant tissues can be a network for stem cells differentiation. After seeded on the scaffold, stem cells produce various growth factors and differentiate to different orientations in places necessary. This hypothesis, if proven to be valid, will offer a novel and effective therapy for the restoration of missing teeth by implant. Evaluation of the Hypothesis: The scaffold involves three different tissues. Though degradation rate of electrospinning scaffold is under control, its degradation rate should be in consistent with the generation of three tissues. Therefore, the relative experiments are necessary to define the best rate of degradation. Further verification is necessary to check whether the rebuilt cementum, bone and periodontium are strong enough to keep the implant stable and maintain its function.

  19. Controlled degradation stochastic resonance in adaptive averaging cell-based architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Aymerich Capdevila, Nivard; Cotofana, Sorin; Rubio Sola, Jose Antonio

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we first analyze the degradation stochastic resonance (DSR) effect in the context of adaptive averaging (AD-AVG) architectures. The AD-AVG is the adaptive version of the well-known AVG architecture . It is an optimized fault-tolerant design for future technologies with very high rates of failures and defects. With system degradation the AD-AVG reliability is diminishing, as expected, but at a certain moment in time it increases due to the DSR occurrence, which is counterintuiti...

  20. Investigation on degradation of long chain n-alkanes through single cell green algae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schroeder, E.

    1980-01-01

    30 green algae stems of the chlorococcales order and one of the volvocales were investigated for their ability to oxidize alkanes and their degradation. It could be concluded from the results that chlorella vulgaris can oxidize alkanes by subterminal ways during photosynthesis or if glucose is available, i.e. that it only attackes in cooxidation and c. vulgaris alkanes apparently do not terminally (mono or diterminally) oxidize as oxidation products as no oxidation products of this type of degradation nor any indications in the fatty acid pattern of lipids was found.

  1. Steady state performance, photo-induced performance degradation and their relation to transient hysteresis in perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jena, Ajay Kumar; Kulkarni, Ashish; Ikegami, Masashi; Miyasaka, Tsutomu

    2016-03-01

    Hysteresis in current-voltage curves of perovskite solar cells is a serious concern as it creates confusions about actual cell performance and raises questions on its reliability. Although a lot of effort has been made to understand the origin of hysteresis, knowing whether hysteresis affects the cell performance while they are in practical use (operated constantly at maximum power point) is not yet examined. In the present study, we investigate steady state performance and performance stability of perovskite solar cells (planar architecture with varying perovskite film thickness and TiO2 mesoscopic structure with different TiO2 compact layer thickness exhibiting hysteresis of different magnitudes) operating across an external load in relation to hysteresis. The planar cells with larger hysteresis exhibit a steady state current that closely matches the value determined on forward voltage scan. Cyclic photocurrent-dark current measurements on cells with hysteresis of different magnitudes reveal that photo-induced electrical instability (not material degradation), which might be originated from ion migration or photo-induced traps formation, is not related to hysteresis. Performance of the cells is recovered partially or fully, depending on the device structure, on storage in dark. TiO2 meso-structure cells tend to show complete recovery while the planar cells recover partially.

  2. How endogenous plant cell-wall degradation mechanisms can help achieve higher efficiency in saccharification of biomass.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tavares, Eveline Q P; De Souza, Amanda P; Buckeridge, Marcos S

    2015-07-01

    Cell-wall recalcitrance to hydrolysis still represents one of the major bottlenecks for second-generation bioethanol production. This occurs despite the development of pre-treatments, the prospect of new enzymes, and the production of transgenic plants with less-recalcitrant cell walls. Recalcitrance, which is the intrinsic resistance to breakdown imposed by polymer assembly, is the result of inherent limitations in its three domains. These consist of: (i) porosity, associated with a pectin matrix impairing trafficking through the wall; (ii) the glycomic code, which refers to the fine-structural emergent complexity of cell-wall polymers that are unique to cells, tissues, and species; and (iii) cellulose crystallinity, which refers to the organization in micro- and/or macrofibrils. One way to circumvent recalcitrance could be by following cell-wall hydrolysis strategies underlying plant endogenous mechanisms that are optimized to precisely modify cell walls in planta. Thus, the cell-wall degradation that occurs during fruit ripening, abscission, storage cell-wall mobilization, and aerenchyma formation are reviewed in order to highlight how plants deal with recalcitrance and which are the routes to couple prospective enzymes and cocktail designs with cell-wall features. The manipulation of key enzyme levels in planta can help achieving biologically pre-treated walls (i.e. less recalcitrant) before plants are harvested for bioethanol production. This may be helpful in decreasing the costs associated with producing bioethanol from biomass. PMID:25922489

  3. Degradation of H3PO4/PBI High Temperature Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell under Stressed Operating Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Fan

    HT-PEM fuel cell based micro-CHP units for households, the daily startup/shutdown operation is necessary. Moreover, the faults in the H2 supply system or in controlling the reformer can cause the H2 starvation of the HT-PEM fuel cell. The effects of these operating conditions to the degradation of......The Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells are promising fuel cell technology which can convert the chemical energy in for example hydrogen into electricity efficiently and environmentally friendly. In this work, some degradation issues of the HT-PEM fuel cell are experimentally investigated...... the HT-PEM fuel cell are studied in the current work. Both in-situ and ex-situ characterization techniques are conducted to gain insight into the degradation mechanisms of the HT-PEM fuel cell under these operating conditions. The experimental results in this work suggest that the presence of methanol...

  4. Chaperone-Mediated Autophagy Targets IFNAR1 for Lysosomal Degradation in Free Fatty Acid Treated HCV Cell Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramazan Kurt

    Full Text Available Hepatic steatosis is a risk factor for both liver disease progression and an impaired response to interferon alpha (IFN-α-based combination therapy in chronic hepatitis C virus (HCV infection. Previously, we reported that free fatty acid (FFA-treated HCV cell culture induces hepatocellular steatosis and impairs the expression of interferon alpha receptor-1 (IFNAR1, which is why the antiviral activity of IFN-α against HCV is impaired.To investigate the molecular mechanism by which IFNAR1 expression is impaired in HCV cell culture with or without free fatty acid-treatment.HCV-infected Huh 7.5 cells were cultured with or without a mixture of saturated (palmitate and unsaturated (oleate long-chain free fatty acids (FFA. Intracytoplasmic fat accumulation in HCV-infected culture was visualized by oil red staining. Clearance of HCV in FFA cell culture treated with type I IFN (IFN-α and Type III IFN (IFN-λ was determined by Renilla luciferase activity, and the expression of HCV core was determined by immunostaining. Activation of Jak-Stat signaling in the FFA-treated HCV culture by IFN-α alone and IFN-λ alone was examined by Western blot analysis and confocal microscopy. Lysosomal degradation of IFNAR1 by chaperone-mediated autophagy (CMA in the FFA-treated HCV cell culture model was investigated.FFA treatment induced dose-dependent hepatocellular steatosis and lipid droplet accumulation in HCV-infected Huh-7.5 cells. FFA treatment of infected culture increased HCV replication in a concentration-dependent manner. Intracellular lipid accumulation led to reduced Stat phosphorylation and nuclear translocation, causing an impaired IFN-α antiviral response and HCV clearance. Type III IFN (IFN-λ, which binds to a separate receptor, induces Stat phosphorylation, and nuclear translocation as well as antiviral clearance in FFA-treated HCV cell culture. We show here that the HCV-induced autophagy response is increased in FFA-treated cell culture

  5. Exosome-bound WD repeat protein Monad inhibits breast cancer cell invasion by degrading amphiregulin mRNA.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Makio Saeki

    Full Text Available Increased stabilization of mRNA coding for key cancer genes can contribute to invasiveness. This is achieved by down-regulation of exosome cofactors, which bind to 3'-UTR in cancer-related genes. Here, we identified amphiregulin, an EGFR ligand, as a target of WD repeat protein Monad, a component of R2TP/prefoldin-like complex, in MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cells. Monad specifically interacted with both the 3'-UTR of amphiregulin mRNA and the RNA degrading exosome, and enhanced decay of amphiregulin transcripts. Knockdown of Monad increased invasion and this effect was abolished with anti-amphiregulin neutralizing antibody. These results suggest that Monad could prevent amphiregulin-mediated invasion by degrading amphiregulin mRNA.

  6. Comparison of the degradation of the DNA of Micrococcus radiodurans and Micrococcus radioproteolyticus cells after γ-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The release of the acid-soluble fraction of cellular DNA into the cytoplasm and incubation medium after irradiation of M.radiodurans and M.radioproteolyticus cells with a dose of 2 kGy in liquid medium in the absence of oxygen was studied. While the time dependence of the release of DNA into the medium showed no significant difference between the two species, a difference in time dependence was recorded in case of concentration of the acid-soluble fraction of DNA in the cytoplasm. There was no accumulation of DNA degradation products in the cytoplasm of M.radioproteolyticus, while in case of M.radiodurans there was in the initial stages an increase of the concentration of degraded DNA with a subsequent decrease. The possible causes of this phenomenon are discussed. (author)

  7. Conditioned Media from Human Umbilical Cord Blood-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells Inhibits Melanogenesis by Promoting Proteasomal Degradation of MITF.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eun Sung Kim

    Full Text Available Human umbilical cord blood-derived mesenchymal stem cells (hUCB-MSCs secrete various beneficial molecules, which have anti-apoptotic activity and cell proliferation. However, the effect of hUCB-MSCs in melanogenesis is largely unclear. In this study, we show that conditioned media (CM derived from hUCB-MSCs inhibit melanogenesis by regulating microphthalmia-associated transcription factor (MITF expression via the ERK signalling pathway. Treatment of hUCB-MSC-CM strongly inhibited the alpha-melanocyte stimulating hormone-induced hyperpigmentation in melanoma cells as well as melanocytes. Treatment of hUCB-MSC-CM induced ERK1/2 activation in melanocytes. In addition, inhibition of ERK1/2 suppressed the anti-pigmentation activity of the hUCB-MSC-CM in melanocytes and in vitro artificial skin models. We also found that the expression of MITF was appreciably diminished while expression of phosphorylated MITF, which leads to its proteasomal degradation, was increased in cells treated with hUCB-MSC-CM. These results suggested that hUCB-MSC-CM significantly suppresses melanin synthesis via MITF degradation by the ERK pathway activation.

  8. Degradation of lucerne stem cell walls by five rumen bacterial species

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Jung, H.G.; Engels, F.M.; Weimer, P.J.

    2004-01-01

    The rumen bacterial strains Butyrivibrio fibrisolvens H17c, Fibrobacter succinogenes S85, Lachnospira multiparus 40, Ruminococcus albus 7 and R. flavefaciens FD-1 were compared individually and as a five-species mixture with a rumen inoculum for their ability to degrade lucerne (Medicago sativa L.)

  9. Imaging Modalities to Identity Inflammation in an Atherosclerotic Plaque

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherosclerosis is a chronic, progressive, multifocal arterial wall disease caused by local and systemic inflammation responsible for major cardiovascular complications such as myocardial infarction and stroke. With the recent understanding that vulnerable plaque erosion and rupture, with subsequent thrombosis, rather than luminal stenosis, is the underlying cause of acute ischemic events, there has been a shift of focus to understand the mechanisms that make an atherosclerotic plaque unstable or vulnerable to rupture. The presence of inflammation in the atherosclerotic plaque has been considered as one of the initial events which convert a stable plaque into an unstable and vulnerable plaque. This paper systemically reviews the noninvasive and invasive imaging modalities that are currently available to detect this inflammatory process, at least in the intermediate stages, and discusses the ongoing studies that will help us to better understand and identify it at the molecular level

  10. From anatomy to function: diagnosis of atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Odudu, Aghogho; Vassallo, Diana; Kalra, Philip A

    2015-12-01

    Atherosclerotic renal artery stenosis (ARAS) affects 7% of the over 65 s and will be increasingly common with an ageing population. ARAS obstructs normal renal perfusion with adverse renal and cardiovascular consequences. Drug therapy is directed at reducing atherosclerotic risk. Two recent major trials of revascularization for ARAS showed that clinical outcomes were not improved beyond those offered by optimal drug therapy in most patients. This reflects experimental data showing that restoration of blood flow alone may not attenuate a cascade of tissue injury. A shift from anatomic to functional imaging of ARAS coupled to novel therapies might improve clinical outcomes in selected patients. This review outlines the case for separately assessing hemodynamic significance of arterial stenosis and functional reserve of renal parenchymal tissue. The authors consider current and emerging diagnostic techniques for ARAS and their potential to allow individualized and functionally directed treatments. PMID:26480218

  11. Early identification of atherosclerotic disease by noninvasive imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuster, Valentin; Lois, Fátima; Franco, Manuel

    2010-06-01

    Cardiovascular disease (CVD) is the leading cause of death worldwide, and its prevalence is expected to increase further, which will be associated with a substantial economic burden. High-risk or vulnerable plaques and, indirectly, the burden of atherosclerotic disease, are responsible for most major cardiovascular events. Most of the current prevention strategies are focused on identifying and managing the established risk factors (smoking, hypertension, hypercholesterolemia, diabetes, obesity, physical inactivity) for atherosclerosis. Another opportunity for further characterizing the population at high CVD risk would be to measure the occurrence and progression of subclinical (asymptomatic) atherosclerotic burden. The detection of subclinical atherosclerosis and high-risk plaques, if proven to predict cardiovascular events, may enable the establishment of earlier control of CVD risk factors and help preventing CVD. In this Review, we address the potential progress in CVD prevention brought about by the use of noninvasive imaging techniques to identify subclinical atherosclerosis. PMID:20440291

  12. An in vitro Assessment on the Efficacy of Clay-Based Formulated Cells of Pseudomonas Isolate UTAR EPA2 for Petrol Degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. S.Y. Ting

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: Application of free-cell forms is usually impractical to achieve satisfactory bioremediative effect because the microbes are encumbered by the biotic and abiotic stresses from the environment. Approach: In this study, a hydrocarbon-degrading bacterium (Pseudomonas isolate UTAR EPA2 was formulated with various combinations of formulative materials, comprising of clay-based carrier materials such as Bentonite (B and Kaolin (K, enrichment materials such as Non-fat skimmed milk (N and Sucrose (S and a UV-protectant agent Para-aminobenzoic acid (P. Formulated cells were treated to sunlight exposure for 6 h to mimic the conditions in the environment prior to testing for their efficacy in degrading petrol, a mixed hydrocarbon substrate. Results: Cells in all formulations including free-cell suspension were able to degrade petrol with a relatively high degradation efficacy of more than 66% even after exposure to sunlight. Degradation efficacy was slightly higher for kaolin-based formulated cells compared to bentonite-based formulations, especially after exposure to sunlight, although their percentages of degradation were not statistically different. Nevertheless, kaolin-based formulations have very low viable cell count especially in formulations with P (KP, KNP, KSP, KNSP. This suggested that aside from viable cells, the physical properties of the clays could have also contributed to the degradation of petrol. Conclusion: For storage purposes and applications in the field, we suggest that the bacterium is formulated with bentonite-based formulations especially using Bentonite (B clay singly, as relatively high percentage of petrol degradation and viable cell count was achieved with this formulation.

  13. Severe Brown Fat Lipoatrophy Aggravates Atherosclerotic Process in Male Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Hernández, Almudena; Beneit, Nuria; Escribano, Óscar; Díaz-Castroverde, Sabela; García-Gómez, Gema; Fernández, Silvia; Benito, Manuel

    2016-09-01

    Obesity is one of the major risk factors for the development of cardiovascular diseases and is characterized by abnormal accumulation of adipose tissue, including perivascular adipose tissue (PVAT). However, brown adipose tissue (BAT) activation reduces visceral adiposity. To demonstrate that severe brown fat lipoatrophy might accelerate atherosclerotic process, we generated a new mouse model without insulin receptor (IR) in BAT and without apolipoprotein (Apo)E (BAT-specific IR knockout [BATIRKO];ApoE(-/-) mice) and assessed vascular and metabolic alterations associated to obesity. In addition, we analyzed the contribution of the adipose organ to vascular inflammation. Brown fat lipoatrophy induces visceral adiposity, mainly in gonadal depot (gonadal white adipose tissue [gWAT]), severe glucose intolerance, high postprandial glucose levels, and a severe defect in acute insulin secretion. BATIRKO;ApoE(-/-) mice showed greater hypertriglyceridemia than the obtained in ApoE(-/-) and hypercholesterolemia similar to ApoE(-/-) mice. BATIRKO;ApoE(-/-) mice, in addition to primary insulin resistance in BAT, also showed a significant decrease in insulin signaling in liver, gWAT, heart, aorta artery, and thoracic PVAT. More importantly, our results suggest that severe brown fat lipoatrophy aggravates the atherosclerotic process, characterized by a significant increase of lipid depots, atherosclerotic coverage, lesion size and complexity, increased macrophage infiltration, and proinflammatory markers expression. Finally, an increase of TNF-α and leptin as well as a decrease of adiponectin by BAT, gWAT, and thoracic PVAT might also be responsible of vascular damage. Our results suggest that severe brown lipoatrophy aggravates atherosclerotic process. Thus, BAT activation might protect against obesity and its associated metabolic alterations. PMID:27414981

  14. Platelet inhibition with Ticlopidine in atherosclerotic intermittent claudication.

    OpenAIRE

    Aukland, A; Hurlow, R. A.; George, A J; Stuart, J

    1982-01-01

    Fifty-one men with atherosclerotic intermittent claudication and haemorheological abnormalities completed a double-blind, one-year randomised trial of Ticlopidine (500 mg/day), a new antiplatelet agent. Ticlopidine caused significant inhibition of platelet aggregation but did not fully correct abnormalities of coagulation, viscosity, and fibrinolysis. There was no significant improvement in walking ability, Doppler ankle-pressure indices, or calf blood flow. Sustained platelet inhibition for ...

  15. Amputation of extremity in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tsareva Yu.O.

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Aim of investigation — to analyze the results of treatment of patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of a limb, to identify the causes of adverse outcomes amputation. Materials and methods: We analyzed the results of examination and treatment of 218 patients with atherosclerotic gangrene of the limb. Good outcome of amputation was considered the primary surgical wound healing of the stump. Suppuration, secondary healing, re-amputation and death we attributed to the adverse results of amputation. Results: The adverse outcomes of amputation due to technical errors in surgery, properly chosen level, inadequate drainage of the wound stump, an unsuccessful operation on the arteries of a limb, inadequate empirical antibiotic therapy, patient's age, functional capabilities of myocardium, the duration of critical ischemia, as well as the lack of psychological adaptation of patients before amputation. Conclusion: To decide the need for amputation in patients with atherosclerotic gangrene follows the assessment of possible vascular reconstructive surgery. In determining the level of amputation is necessary to objectively assess the degree of disruption of regional blood flow using multilevel manometry and laser Dopplerflowmetry. In preparation for amputation should be paid special attention to the correction of rheological and coagulation properties of blood, normalization of the functional state of the myocardium, as well as specialized psychotherapeutic training for timely and adequate psychological adaptation of the patient

  16. A Laboratory Shear Cell Used for Simulation of Shear Strength and Asperity Degradation of Rough Rock Fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asadi, M. S.; Rasouli, V.; Barla, G.

    2013-07-01

    Different failure modes during fracture shearing have been introduced including dilation, sliding, asperity cut-off and degradation. Several laboratory studies have reported the complexity of these failure modes during shear tests performed under either constant normal load (CNL) or constant normal stiffness (CNS) conditions. This paper is concerned with the mechanical behaviour of synthetic fractures during direct shear tests using a modified shear cell and related numerical simulation studies. The modifications made to an existing true triaxial stress cell (TTSC) in order to use it for performing shear tests under CNL conditions are presented. The large loading capacity and the use of accurate hydraulic pumps capable of applying a constant shear velocity are the main elements of this cell. Synthetic mortar specimens with different fracture surface geometries are tested to study the failure modes, including fracture sliding, asperity degradation, and to understand failure during shearing. A bonded particle model of the direct shear test with the PFC2D particle flow code is used to mimic the tests performed. The results of a number of tests are presented and compared with PFC2D simulations. The satisfactory results obtained both qualitatively and quantitatively are discussed.

  17. Resibufogenin Induces G1-Phase Arrest through the Proteasomal Degradation of Cyclin D1 in Human Malignant Tumor Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masami Ichikawa

    Full Text Available Huachansu, a traditional Chinese medicine prepared from the dried toad skin, has been used in clinical studies for various cancers in China. Resibufogenin is a component of huachansu and classified as bufadienolides. Resibufogenin has been shown to exhibit the anti-proliferative effect against cancer cells. However, the molecular mechanism of resibufogenin remains unknown. Here we report that resibufogenin induces G1-phase arrest with hypophosphorylation of retinoblastoma (RB protein and down-regulation of cyclin D1 expression in human colon cancer HT-29 cells. Since the down-regulation of cyclin D1 was completely blocked by a proteasome inhibitor MG132, the suppression of cyclin D1 expression by resibufogenin was considered to be in a proteasome-dependent manner. It is known that glycogen synthase kinase-3β (GSK-3β induces the proteasomal degradation of cyclin D1. The addition of GSK-3β inhibitor SB216763 inhibited the reduction of cyclin D1 caused by resibufogenin. These effects on cyclin D1 by resibufogenin were also observed in human lung cancer A549 cells. These findings suggest that the anti-proliferative effect of resibufogenin may be attributed to the degradation of cyclin D1 caused by the activation of GSK-3β.

  18. Electro- and photoluminescence imaging as fast screening technique of the layer uniformity and device degradation in planar perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soufiani, Arman Mahboubi; Tayebjee, Murad J. Y.; Meyer, Steffen; Ho-Baillie, Anita; Sung Yun, Jae; McQueen, Rowan W.; Spiccia, Leone; Green, Martin A.; Hameiri, Ziv

    2016-07-01

    In this study, we provide insights into planar structure methylammonium lead triiodide (MAPbI3) perovskite solar cells (PSCs) using electroluminescence and photoluminescence imaging techniques. We demonstrate the strength of these techniques in screening relatively large area PSCs, correlating the solar cell electrical parameters to the images and visualizing the features which contribute to the variation of the parameters extracted from current density-voltage characterizations. It is further used to investigate one of the major concerns about perovskite solar cells, their long term stability and aging. Upon storage under dark in dry glovebox condition for more than two months, the major parameter found to have deteriorated in electrical performance measurements was the fill factor; this was elucidated via electroluminescence image comparisons which revealed that the contacts' quality degrades. Interestingly, by deploying electroluminescence imaging, the significance of having a pin-hole free active layer is demonstrated. Pin-holes can grow over time and can cause degradation of the active layer surrounding them.

  19. Degradation of coeliac disease-inducing rye secalin by germinating cereal enzymes: diminishing toxic effects in intestinal epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stenman, S M; Lindfors, K; Venäläinen, J I; Hautala, A; Männistö, P T; Garcia-Horsman, J A; Kaukovirta-Norja, A; Auriola, S; Mauriala, T; Mäki, M; Kaukinen, K

    2010-08-01

    Currently the only treatment for coeliac disease is a lifelong gluten-free diet excluding food products containing wheat, rye and barley. There is, however, only scarce evidence as to harmful effects of rye in coeliac disease. To confirm the assumption that rye should be excluded from the coeliac patient's diet, we now sought to establish whether rye secalin activates toxic reactions in vitro in intestinal epithelial cell models as extensively as wheat gliadin. Further, we investigated the efficacy of germinating cereal enzymes from oat, wheat and barley to hydrolyse secalin into short fragments and whether secalin-induced harmful effects can be reduced by such pretreatment. In the current study, secalin elicited toxic reactions in intestinal Caco-2 epithelial cells similarly to gliadin: it induced epithelial cell layer permeability, tight junctional protein occludin and ZO-1 distortion and actin reorganization. In high-performance liquid chromatography and mass spectroscopy (HPLC-MS), germinating barley enzymes provided the most efficient degradation of secalin and gliadin peptides and was thus selected for further in vitro analysis. After germinating barley enzyme pretreatment, all toxic reactions induced by secalin were ameliorated. We conclude that germinating enzymes from barley are particularly efficient in the degradation of rye secalin. In future, these enzymes might be utilized as a novel medical treatment for coeliac disease or in food processing in order to develop high-quality coeliac-safe food products. PMID:20560983

  20. Combining proteomics and transcriptome sequencing to identify active plant-cell-wall-degrading enzymes in a leaf beetle

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kirsch Roy

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The primary plant cell wall is a complex mixture of polysaccharides and proteins encasing living plant cells. Among these polysaccharides, cellulose is the most abundant and useful biopolymer present on earth. These polysaccharides also represent a rich source of energy for organisms which have evolved the ability to degrade them. A growing body of evidence suggests that phytophagous beetles, mainly species from the superfamilies Chrysomeloidea and Curculionoidea, possess endogenous genes encoding complex and diverse families of so-called plant cell wall degrading enzymes (PCWDEs. The presence of these genes in phytophagous beetles may have been a key element in their success as herbivores. Here, we combined a proteomics approach and transcriptome sequencing to identify PCWDEs present in larval gut contents of the mustard leaf beetle, Phaedon cochleariae. Results Using a two-dimensional proteomics approach, we recovered 11 protein bands, isolated using activity assays targeting cellulose-, pectin- and xylan-degrading enzymes. After mass spectrometry analyses, a total of 13 proteins putatively responsible for degrading plant cell wall polysaccharides were identified; these proteins belong to three glycoside hydrolase (GH families: GH11 (xylanases, GH28 (polygalacturonases or pectinases, and GH45 (β-1,4-glucanases or cellulases. Additionally, highly stable and proteolysis-resistant host plant-derived proteins from various pathogenesis-related protein (PRs families as well as polygalacturonase-inhibiting proteins (PGIPs were also identified from the gut contents proteome. In parallel, transcriptome sequencing revealed the presence of at least 19 putative PCWDE transcripts encoded by the P. cochleariae genome. All of these were specifically expressed in the insect gut rather than the rest of the body, and in adults as well as larvae. The discrepancy observed in the number of putative PCWDEs between transcriptome and proteome

  1. Water-Induced Degradation of Polymer Solar Cells Studied by (H2O)-O-18 Labeling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrman, Kion; Gevorgyan, Suren; Krebs, Frederik C

    2009-01-01

    Water-induced degradation of polymer photovoltaics based on the active materials poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) or poly[2-methoxy-5-(2′-ethylhexyloxy)-1,4-phenylenevinylene] (MEHPPV) was studied. The solar cell devices comprised a bulk heterojunction formed by the active material and [6,6]-phenyl-C......61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) in a standard device geometry. The use of H218O in conjunction with time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry enabled mapping of the parts of the device that were induced by water. A comparison was made between the two active materials and between devices that...

  2. Comparative analysis of fungal genomes reveals different plant cell wall degrading capacity in fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zhongtao; Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2013-01-01

    Background Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes or infection mechanisms may provide information for better understanding of their life styles and infection models. To date, over hundreds of fungal genomes are publicly available. However, a systematic comparative analysis of fungal CAZyme...

  3. Comparative Analysis of Fungal Genomes Reveals Different Plant Cell Wall Degrading Capacity in Fungi

    OpenAIRE

    Zhao, Zhongtao; Liu, Huiquan; Wang, Chenfang; Xu, Jin-Rong

    2013-01-01

    EDITOR'S NOTE Readers are alerted that there is currently a discussion regarding the use of some of the unpublished genomic data presented in this manuscript. Appropriate editorial action will be taken once this matter is resolved. Background Fungi produce a variety of carbohydrate activity enzymes (CAZymes) for the degradation of plant polysaccharide materials to facilitate infection and/or gain nutrition. Identifying and comparing CAZymes from fungi with different nutritional modes o...

  4. Effect of cell metabolism inhibitors on postradiation DNA repair and degradation in rat thymocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The viscometry method of determining the molecular weight of high polymeric single-stranded DNA in alkaline nuclear lysates was used to test the effects of some inhibitors of DNA synthesis (hydroxyurea), macroergs (2,4-dinitrophenol, EDTA) and DNAase (Na+ cytrate, Ca++ ions) on repair and secondary postradiation degradation of DNA of thymocytes of rast irradiated in vitro in a dosage of 3 kR

  5. Impact of process variations and long term degradation on 6T-SRAM cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Th.; Olbrich, A.; G. Georgakos; Lemaitre, B; D. Schmitt-Landsiedel

    2007-01-01

    In modern deep-submicron CMOS technologies voltage scaling can not keep up with the scaling of the dimensions of transistors. Therefore the electrical fields inside the transistors are not constant anymore, while scaling down the device area. The rising electrical fields bring up reliability problems, such as hot carrier injection. Also other long term degradation mechanisms like Negative Bias Temperature Instability (NBTI) come into the focus of circuit design. Alon...

  6. Impact of process variations and long term degradation on 6T-SRAM cells

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Th.; Olbrich, A.; G. Georgakos; Lemaitre, B.; D. Schmitt-Landsiedel

    2007-01-01

    In modern deep-submicron CMOS technologies voltage scaling can not keep up with the scaling of the dimensions of transistors. Therefore the electrical fields inside the transistors are not constant anymore, while scaling down the device area. The rising electrical fields bring up reliability problems, such as hot carrier injection. Also other long term degradation mechanisms like Negative Bias Temperature Instability (NBTI) come into the focus of circuit design.

    Along wit...

  7. Displacement damage dose used for analyzing electron irradiation-induced degradation of GaInP/GaAs/Ge space solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2011-01-01

    Displacement damage dose (Dd) approach was applied to analyze the electron irradiation-induced degradation of GaInP/ GaAs/Ge space solar cells by effective 1 MeV electron Dd, the electron irradiation-induced maximum power Pmax degradation of the solar cells is plotted as a function of the effective 1 MeV electron Dd , and the result shows that all the measured electron data can be represented by a single curve using displacement damage dose. Obviously, the displacement damage dose approach simplifies the description of electron irradiation-induced degradation of GaInP/GaAs/Ge space solar cells, and also offers an alternative for handling the case where degradation occurs as a result of combined electron and proton irradiation.

  8. Detergent resistant membrane-associated IDE in brain tissue and cultured cells: Relevance to Aβ and insulin degradation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Castaño Eduardo M

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Insulin degrading enzyme (IDE is implicated in the regulation of amyloid β (Aβ steady-state levels in the brain, and its deficient expression and/or activity may be a risk factor in sporadic Alzheimer's disease (AD. Although IDE sub-cellular localization has been well studied, the compartments relevant to Aβ degradation remain to be determined. Results Our results of live immunofluorescence, immuno gold electron-microscopy and gradient fractionation concurred to the demonstration that endogenous IDE from brain tissues and cell cultures is, in addition to its other localizations, a detergent-resistant membrane (DRM-associated metallopeptidase. Our pulse chase experiments were in accordance with the existence of two pools of IDE: the cytosolic one with a longer half-life and the membrane-IDE with a faster turn-over. DRMs-associated IDE co-localized with Aβ and its distribution (DRMs vs. non-DRMs and activity was sensitive to manipulation of lipid composition in vitro and in vivo. When IDE was mis-located from DRMs by treating cells with methyl-β-cyclodextrin (MβCD, endogenous Aβ accumulated in the extracellular space and exogenous Aβ proteolysis was impaired. We detected a reduced amount of IDE in DRMs of membranes isolated from mice brain with endogenous reduced levels of cholesterol (Chol due to targeted deletion of one seladin-1 allele. We confirmed that a moderate shift of IDE from DRMs induced a substantial decrement on IDE-mediated insulin and Aβ degradation in vitro. Conclusion Our results support the notion that optimal substrate degradation by IDE may require its association with organized-DRMs. Alternatively, DRMs but not other plasma membrane regions, may act as platforms where Aβ accumulates, due to its hydrophobic properties, reaching local concentration close to its Km for IDE facilitating its clearance. Structural integrity of DRMs may also be required to tightly retain insulin receptor and IDE for

  9. Determination of membrane degradation products in the product water of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells using liquid chromatography mass spectrometry

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zedda, Marco

    2011-05-12

    The predominant long term failure of polymer electrolyte membranes (PEM) is caused by hydroxyl radicals generated during fuel cell operation. These radicals attack the polymer, leading to chain scission, unzipping and consequently to membrane decomposition products. The present work has investigated decomposition products of novel sulfonated aromatic hydrocarbon membranes on the basis of a product water analysis. Degradation products from the investigated membrane type and the possibility to detect these compounds in the product water for diagnostic purposes have not been discovered yet. This thesis demonstrates the potential of solid phase extraction and liquid chromatography tandem mass spectrometry (SPE-LC-MS/MS) for the extraction, separation, characterization, identification and quantification of membrane degradation products in the product water of fuel cells. For this purpose, several polar aromatic hydrocarbons with different functional groups were selected as model compounds for the development of reliable extraction, separation and detection methods. The results of this thesis have shown that mixed mode sorbent materials with both weak anion exchange and reversed phase retention properties are well suited for reproducible extraction of both molecules and ions from the product water. The chromatographic separation of various polar aromatic hydrocarbons was achieved by means of phase optimized liquid chromatography using a solvent gradient and on a C18 stationary phase. Sensitive and selective detection of model compounds could be successfully demonstrated by the analysis of the product water using tandem mass spectrometry. The application of a hybrid mass spectrometer (Q Trap) for the characterization of unknown polar aromatic hydrocarbons has led to the identification and confirmation of 4-hydroxybenzoic acid in the product water. In addition, 4-HBA could be verified as a degradation product resulting from PEM decomposition by hydroxyl radicals using an

  10. Targeted polypeptide degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Church, George M.; Janse, Daniel M.

    2008-05-13

    This invention pertains to compositions, methods, cells and organisms useful for selectively localizing polypeptides to the proteasome for degradation. Therapeutic methods and pharmaceutical compositions for treating disorders associated with the expression and/or activity of a polypeptide by targeting these polypeptides for degradation, as well as methods for targeting therapeutic polypeptides for degradation and/or activating therapeutic polypeptides by degradation are provided. The invention provides methods for identifying compounds that mediate proteasome localization and/or polypeptide degradation. The invention also provides research tools for the study of protein function.

  11. Degradation of wheat straw cell wall by white rot fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zeng, Jijiao

    The main aim of this dissertation research was to understand the natural microbial degradation process of lignocellulosic materials in order to develop a new, green and more effective pretreatment technology for bio-fuel production. The biodegradation of wheat straw by white rot fungi Phanerochaete chrysosporium was investigated. The addition of nutrients significantly improved the performance of P.chrysosporium on wheat straw degradation. The proteomic analysis indicated that this fungus produced various pepetides related to cellulose and lignin degradation while grown on the biomass. The structural analysis of lignin further showed that P.chrysosporium preferentially degraded hydroxycinnamtes in order to access cellulose. In details, the effects of carbon resource and metabolic pathway regulating compounds on manganeses peroxidase (MnP) were studied. The results indicated that MnP activity of 4.7 +/- 0.31 U mL-1 was obtained using mannose as a carbon source. The enzyme productivity further reached 7.36 +/- 0.05 U mL-1 and 8.77 +/- 0.23 U mL -1 when the mannose medium was supplemented with cyclic adenosine monophosphate (cAMP) and S-adenosylmethionine (SAM) respectively, revealing highest MnP productivity obtained by optimizing the carbon sources and supplementation with small molecules. In addition, the effects of nutrient additives for improving biological pretreatment of lignocellulosic biomass were studied. The pretreatment of wheat straw supplemented with inorganic salts (salts group) and tween 80 was examined. The extra nutrient significantly improved the ligninase expression leading to improve digestibility of lignocellulosic biomass. Among the solid state fermentation groups, salts group resulted in a substantial degradation of wheat straw within one week, along with the highest lignin loss (25 %) and ˜ 250% higher efficiency for the total sugar release through enzymatic hydrolysis. The results were correlated with pyrolysis GC-MS (Py

  12. Internalization, lysosomal degradation and new synthesis of surface membrane CD4 in phorbol ester-activated T-lymphocytes and U-937 cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, C M; Christensen, E I; Andresen, B S;

    1992-01-01

    degradation was low in resting cells. Endocytosis and/or degradation of anti-CD4 mAb was suppressed by H7, and by inhibitors of membrane traffic (Monensin) and lysosome function (methylamine, chloroquine). Immunocytochemistry localized CD4 to the surface of unstimulated T-cells. Upon PMA stimulation...... occasional labeling was seen in endosomes but whole cell CD4 decreased dramatically. However, methylamine-treated PMA blasts showed accumulation of CD4 in lysosomes and accordingly, pulse-chase experiments in biolabeled cell cultures suggested a manifest reduction of CD4 half-life in response to PMA. Despite...... lysosomal degradation of membrane CD4. Transport of CD4 to the cell surface and CD4 synthesis is unaffected by activation....

  13. The CCR4-NOT complex mediates deadenylation and degradation of stem cell mRNAs and promotes planarian stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solana, Jordi; Gamberi, Chiara; Mihaylova, Yuliana; Grosswendt, Stefanie; Chen, Chen; Lasko, Paul; Rajewsky, Nikolaus; Aboobaker, A Aziz

    2013-01-01

    Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A) tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A) tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology. PMID:24367277

  14. The CCR4-NOT complex mediates deadenylation and degradation of stem cell mRNAs and promotes planarian stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jordi Solana

    Full Text Available Post-transcriptional regulatory mechanisms are of fundamental importance to form robust genetic networks, but their roles in stem cell pluripotency remain poorly understood. Here, we use freshwater planarians as a model system to investigate this and uncover a role for CCR4-NOT mediated deadenylation of mRNAs in stem cell differentiation. Planarian adult stem cells, the so-called neoblasts, drive the almost unlimited regenerative capabilities of planarians and allow their ongoing homeostatic tissue turnover. While many genes have been demonstrated to be required for these processes, currently almost no mechanistic insight is available into their regulation. We show that knockdown of planarian Not1, the CCR4-NOT deadenylating complex scaffolding subunit, abrogates regeneration and normal homeostasis. This abrogation is primarily due to severe impairment of their differentiation potential. We describe a stem cell specific increase in the mRNA levels of key neoblast genes after Smed-not1 knock down, consistent with a role of the CCR4-NOT complex in degradation of neoblast mRNAs upon the onset of differentiation. We also observe a stem cell specific increase in the frequency of longer poly(A tails in these same mRNAs, showing that stem cells after Smed-not1 knock down fail to differentiate as they accumulate populations of transcripts with longer poly(A tails. As other transcripts are unaffected our data hint at a targeted regulation of these key stem cell mRNAs by post-transcriptional regulators such as RNA-binding proteins or microRNAs. Together, our results show that the CCR4-NOT complex is crucial for stem cell differentiation and controls stem cell-specific degradation of mRNAs, thus providing clear mechanistic insight into this aspect of neoblast biology.

  15. Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Increased expression of integrins and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is important for the survival, growth and metastasis of melanoma cells. Based on this well-established observation in oncology, we propose to use degradation of integrin and FAK proteins as a potential strategy for melanoma cancer therapy. A low-temperature radio-frequency atmospheric microplasma jet is used to study their effects on the adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells. Microplasma treatment is shown to (1) cause significant cell detachment from the bottom of microtiter plates coated with collagen, (2) induce the death of human melanoma cells, (3) inhibit the expression of integrin α2, integrin α4 and FAK on the cell surface and finally (4) change well-stretched actin filaments to a diffuse pattern. These results suggest that cold atmospheric pressure plasmas can strongly inhibit the adhesion of melanoma cells by reducing the activities of adhesion proteins such as integrins and FAK, key biomolecules that are known to be important in malignant transformation and acquisition of metastatic phenotypes.

  16. Degradation of adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells by a non-thermal atmospheric pressure microplasma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, H J [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pusan National University, Busan 609-735 (Korea, Republic of); Shon, C H [Korea Electrotechnology Research Institute, Changwon 641-120 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Y S; Kim, S [Department of Pediatric Dentistry, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, G C [Department of Oral Anatomy, Pusan National University, Busan 602-739 (Korea, Republic of); Kong, M G [Department of Electronics and Electrical Engineering, Loughborough University, Leics LE11 3TU (United Kingdom)], E-mail: ki9100m@pusan.ac.kr, E-mail: m.g.kong@lboro.ac.uk

    2009-11-15

    Increased expression of integrins and focal adhesion kinase (FAK) is important for the survival, growth and metastasis of melanoma cells. Based on this well-established observation in oncology, we propose to use degradation of integrin and FAK proteins as a potential strategy for melanoma cancer therapy. A low-temperature radio-frequency atmospheric microplasma jet is used to study their effects on the adhesion molecules of G361 melanoma cells. Microplasma treatment is shown to (1) cause significant cell detachment from the bottom of microtiter plates coated with collagen, (2) induce the death of human melanoma cells, (3) inhibit the expression of integrin {alpha}{sub 2}, integrin {alpha}{sub 4} and FAK on the cell surface and finally (4) change well-stretched actin filaments to a diffuse pattern. These results suggest that cold atmospheric pressure plasmas can strongly inhibit the adhesion of melanoma cells by reducing the activities of adhesion proteins such as integrins and FAK, key biomolecules that are known to be important in malignant transformation and acquisition of metastatic phenotypes.

  17. Formation of model hepatocellular aggregates in a hydrogel scaffold using degradable genipin crosslinked gelatin microspheres as cell carriers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Primary hepatocyte is probably the preferred cell for cell therapy in liver regeneration. However, its non-ideal proliferation capacity and rapid loss of phenotype during 2D culture compromises the quality and quantity of the transplanted hepatocytes, resulting in variable success rates of this treatment. Many studies have shown that the formation of 3D hepatocellular spheroids aids in the maintenance of liver-specific functions in hepatocytes. However, many of the methodologies employed require a sophisticated set-up or specialized equipment which makes it uneconomical to scale up for clinical applications. In this study, we have developed dual-functioning genipin crosslinked gelatin microspheres that serve as cell carriers as well as porogens for delivering the model cells and also for creating cavities. The cells were first seeded onto genipin crosslinked gelatin microspheres for attachment, followed by encapsulation in alginate hydrogel. Collagenase, MMP-9, was introduced either in the culture media or mixed with alginate precursor solution to allow microsphere degradation for creating cavities within the gel bulk. Accordingly, the cells proliferate within the cavities, forming hepatocellular aggregates while the alginate hydrogel serves as a confinement, restricting the size and the shape of the aggregates to the size of the cavities. In addition, the final hepatocellular aggregates could be harvested from the system by removing the alginate hydrogel via citrate treatment. Therefore, this versatile platform not only has the advantage of injectability and simplicity, the cellular aggregates generated are in a controlled size and shape and can be extracted from the system. (paper)

  18. Influences of water in bis-benzimidazole-derivative electrolyte additives to the degradation of the dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Hung-Lin; Yang, Thomas C.-K. [Department of Chemical Engineering, National Taipei University of Technology, No. 1, Section 3, Chung-hsiao East Road, Taipei 106 (China); Lee, Yu-Hui; Huang, Sheng-Tung [Institute of Biotechnology, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 106 (China); Su, Chaochin [Institute of Organic and Polymeric Materials, National Taipei University of Technology, Taipei 106 (China)

    2011-01-15

    The chemical stability of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) determines both the cell performance and the cell life-time. The presence of water in the solar cell from surrounding leakage through the imperfection packaging sealants causes the decrease in life-time of photogenerated electrons on the working electrodes, which induces the occurrence of the dark current to the electrolytes and thus leakage current significantly deteriorated the life-time of the DSSC. Reliable electrolyte additives diminishing the influences of water to the DSSCs degradation process becomes a critical issue in maintaining an acceptable cell life-time. In this work, the effects of four benzimidazole derivatives a-d as the electrolyte additives in the presence of water were comprehensively examined by time-dependent photovoltaic performance of the cells. As a result, open-circuit voltage (V{sub oc}), short-circuit current (J{sub sc}), efficiency ({eta}), and fill factor (FF) collected from I-V curves were studied. In addition, electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) technique was implemented to evaluate the effects of the charge-transfer resistance (R{sub ct}) at the interfaces between TiO{sub 2}/dye/electrolyte. Results showed that the bis-benzimidazole derivative c gives significant improvement in the long-term stability due to the effective protection of the ligands between dye and working electrodes from the attack by environmental water molecules. (author)

  19. Data Mining of Atherosclerotic Plaque Transcriptomes Predicts STAT1-Dependent Inflammatory Signal Integration in Vascular Disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krzysztof Sikorski

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Atherosclerotic plaque development involves multiple extra- and intra-cellular signals engaging cells from the immune system and from the vasculature. Pro-inflammatory pathways activated by interferon gamma (IFNγ and toll-like receptor 4 (TLR4 ligands are profoundly involved in plaque formation and have been shown to involve cross-talk in all atheroma-interacting cell types leading to increased activation of signal transducer and activator of transcription-1 (STAT1 and elevated expression of pro-inflammatory mediators. Here we demonstrate that in Gene Expression Omnibus repository (GEO deposited microarray datasets, obtained from human coronary and carotid atherosclerotic plaques, a significant increase in expression of pro-inflammatory and immunomodulatory genes can be detected. Moreover, increased expression of multiple chemokines, adhesion molecules and matrix-remodeling molecules was commonly detected in both plaque types and correlated with the presence of putative STAT1 binding sites in their promoters, suggesting strong involvement of STAT1 in plaque development. We also provide evidence to suggest that STAT1-nuclear factor kappa-light-chain-enhancer of activated B cells (NFκB or STAT1-interferon-regulated factor (IRF regulatory modules are over-represented in the promoters of these inflammatory genes, which points to a possible contribution of IFNγ and TLR4 cross-talk in the process of atherogenesis. Finally, a subset of these genes encodes for secreted proteins that could serve as a basis of a non-invasive diagnostic assay. The results of our in silico analysis in vitro provide potential evidence that STAT1-dependent IFNγ-TLR4 cross-talk plays a crucial role in coronary and carotid artery plaque development and identifies a STAT1-dependent gene signature that could represent a novel diagnostic tool to monitor and diagnose plaque progression in human atherosclerosis.

  20. In-Situ Anomalous Small-Angle X-ray Scattering Studies of Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell Catalyst Degradation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, James Andrew

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) are a promising high efficiency energy conversion technology, but their cost effective implementation, especially for automotive power, has been hindered by degradation of the electrochemically-active surface area (ECA) of the Pt nanoparticle electrocatalysts. While numerous studies using ex-situ post-mortem techniques have provided insight into the effect of operating conditions on ECA loss, the governing mechanisms and underlying processes are not fully understood. Toward the goal of elucidating the electrocatalyst degradation mechanisms, we have followed particle size distribution (PSD) growth evolutions of Pt and Pt-alloy nanoparticle catalysts during potential cycling in an aqueous acidic environment (with and without flow of electrolyte) and in a fuel cell environment using in-situ anomalous small-angle X-ray scattering (ASAXS). The results of this thesis show a surface area loss mechanism of Pt nanoparticles supported on carbon to be predominantly controlled by Pt dissolution, the particle size dependence of Pt dissolution, the loss of dissolved Pt into the membrane and electrolyte, and, to a lesser extent, the re-deposition of dissolved Pt onto larger particles. The relative extent of these loss mechanisms are shown to be dependent on the environment, the temperature, and the potential cycling conditions. Correlation of ASAXS-determined particle growth with both calculated and voltammetrically-determined oxide coverages demonstrates that the oxide coverage is playing a key role in the dissolution process and in the corresponding growth of the mean Pt nanoparticle size and loss of ECA. This understanding potentially reduces the complex changes in PSDs and ECA resulting from various voltage profiles to the response to a single variable, oxide coverage. A better understanding of the degradation mechanisms of Pt and Pt-alloy nanoparticle distributions could lead to more stable electrocatalysts while

  1. Cell Surface Display Fungal Laccase as a Renewable Biocatalyst for Degradation of Persistent Micropollutants Bisphenol A and Sulfamethoxazole.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yingying; Stemple, Brooke; Kumar, Manish; Wei, Na

    2016-08-16

    Fungal laccases have high activity in degrading various persistent organic pollutants. However, using enzymes in solution for water treatment has limitations of nonreusability, short enzyme lifetimes, and high cost of single use. In this study, we developed a new type of biocatalyst by immobilizing fungal laccase on the surface of yeast cells using synthetic biology techniques. The biocatalyst, referred to as surface display laccase (SDL), had an enzyme activity of 104 ± 3 mU/g dry cell (with 2,2-azinobis-3-ethylbenzothiazoline-6-sulfonate (ABTS)). The SDL retained over 90% of the initial enzyme activity after 25 days storage at room temperature, while, in contrast, activity of free laccase declined to 60% of its initial activity. The SDL could be reused with high stability as it retained 74% of initial activity after eight repeated batch reactions. Proof-of-concept evaluations of the effectiveness of SDL in treating contaminants of emerging concern were performed with bisphenol A and sulfamethoxazole. Results from contaminant degradation kinetics and the effects of redox mediator amendment provided insights into the factors affecting the efficacy of the SDL system. This study reports, for the first time, the development of a surface display enzyme biocatalyst as an effective and renewable alternative for treating recalcitrant organic micropollutants. PMID:27414990

  2. Links between atherosclerotic and periodontal disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chistiakov, Dimitry A; Orekhov, Alexander N; Bobryshev, Yuri V

    2016-02-01

    Periodontal disease (PD) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are highly prevalent in the modern community. Both pathologies are chronic inflammatory disorders, which are influenced by multiple risk factors. In part, these factors such as age, smoking, and diabetes overlap between PD and CVD. Epidemiological studies suggest that PD is strongly associated with increased CVD risk. Biochemical and physiological analyses involving in vitro experiments, animal models, and clinical studies provided evidence for the substantial impact of periodontal pathogens, their virulence factors, and bacterial endotoxins on all general pathogenic CVD mechanisms such as endothelial dysfunction, systemic inflammation, oxidative stress, foam cell formation, lipid accumulation, vascular remodeling, and atherothrombosis. Interventional studies showed moderate beneficial effects of PD treatment on reducing systemic inflammation and endothelial dysfunction. However, no interventional studies were performed to assess whether periodontal therapy can primarily prevent CVD. In summary, current data suggest for a strong contributory role of periodontal infection to CVD but cannot provide sufficient evidence for a role of PD as a cause for cardiovascular pathology. PMID:26777261

  3. The construction of an oxalate-degrading intestinal stem cell population in mice: a potential new treatment option for patients with calcium oxalate calculus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Zhiqiang; Liu, Guanlin; Ye, Zhangqun; Kong, Debo; Yao, Lingfang; Guo, Hui; Yang, Weimin; Yu, Xiao

    2012-04-01

    About 80% of all urological stones are calcium oxalate, mainly caused by idiopathic hyperoxaluria (IH). The increased absorption of oxalate from the intestine is the major factor underlying IH. The continuous self-renewal of the intestinal epithelium is due to the vigorous proliferation and differentiation of intestinal stem cells. If the intestinal stem cell population can acquire the ability to metabolize calcium oxalate by means of oxc and frc transgenes, this will prove a promising new therapy option for IH. In our research, the oxalate-degrading genes of Oxalobacter formigenes (Oxf)-the frc gene and oxc gene-were cloned and transfected into a cultured mouse-derived intestinal SC population to give the latter an oxalate-degrading function. Oxf was isolated and cultivated and the oxalate-degrading genes-frc and oxc-were cloned. The dicistronic eukaryotic expression vector pIRES-oxc-frc was constructed and transferred into the mouse stem cell population. After selection with G418, the expression of the genes was identified. The oxalate-degrading function of transfected cells was determined by transfection into the intestinal stem cell population of the mouse. The change in oxalate concentration was determined with an ion chromatograph. The recombinant plasmid containing oxc and frc genes was transfected into the stem cell population of the mouse and the expression of the genes found normal. The cell population had acquired an oxalate-degrading function. The oxc and frc genes could be transfected into the intestinal stem cell population of the mouse and the cells acquired an oxalate-degrading function. PMID:21892601

  4. Cilostazol Modulates Autophagic Degradation of β-Amyloid Peptide via SIRT1-Coupled LKB1/AMPKα Signaling in Neuronal Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Won Suk; Shin, Hwa Kyoung; Kim, Hye Young; Hong, Ki Whan; Kim, Chi Dae

    2016-01-01

    A neuroprotective role of autophagy mediates the degradation of β-amyloid peptide (Aβ) in Alzheimer’s disease (AD). The previous study showed cilostazol modulates autophagy by increasing beclin1, Atg5 and LC3-II expressions, and depletes intracellular Aβ accumulation. This study elucidated the mechanisms through which cilostazol modulates the autophagic degradation of Aβ in neurons. In N2a cells, cilostazol (10–30 μM), significantly increased the expression of P-AMPKα (Thr 172) and downstream P-ACC (acetyl-CoA carboxylase) (Ser 79) as did resveratrol (SIRT1 activator), or AICAR (AMPK activator), which were blocked by KT5720, compound C (AMPK inhibitor), or sirtinol. Furthermore, phosphorylated-mTOR (Ser 2448) and phosphorylated-P70S6K (Thr 389) expressions were suppressed, and LC3-II levels were elevated in association with decreased P62/Sqstm1 by cilostazol. Cilostazol increased cathepsin B activity and decreased p62/SQSTM 1, consequently decreased accumulation of Aβ1–42 in the activated N2aSwe cells, and these results were blocked by sirtinol, compound C and bafilomycin A1 (autophagosome blocker), suggesting enhanced autophagosome formation by cilostazol. In SIRT1 gene-silenced N2a cells, cilostazol failed to increase the expressions of P-LKB1 (Ser 428) and P-AMPKα, which contrasted with its effect in negative control cells transfected with scrambled siRNA duplex. Further, N2a cells transfected with expression vectors encoding pcDNA SIRT1 showed increased P-AMPKα expression, which mimicked the effect of cilostazol in N2a cells; suggesting cilostazol-stimulated expressions of P-LKB1 and P-AMPKα were SIRT1-dependent. Unlike their effects in N2a cells, in HeLa cells, which lack LKB1, cilostazol and resveratrol did not elevate SIRT1 or P-AMPKα expression, indicating cilostazol and resveratrol-stimulated expressions of SIRT1 and P-AMPKα are LKB1-dependent. In conclusion, cilostazol upregulates autophagy by activating SIRT1-coupled P-LKB1/P-AMPKα and

  5. Optimizing Polychlorinated Biphenyl Degradation by Flavonoid-Induced Cells of the Rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Thi Thanh My Pham

    Full Text Available There is evidence that many plant secondary metabolites may act as signal molecules to trigger the bacterial ability to metabolize polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs during the rhizoremediation process. However, the bases for the PCB rhizoremediation process are still largely unknown. The rhizobacterium Rhodococcus erythropolis U23A is unable to use flavanone as a growth substrate. However, on the basis of an assay that monitors the amount of 4-chlorobenzoate produced from 4-chlorobiphenyl by cells grown co-metabolically on flavanone plus sodium acetate, this flavonoid was previously found to be a potential inducer of the U23A biphenyl catabolic pathway. In this work, and using the same assay, we identified ten other flavonoids that did not support growth, but that acted as inducers of the U23A biphenyl pathway, and we confirmed flavonoid induction of the biphenyl catabolic pathway using quantitative real-time polymerase chain reaction (RT-qPCR on the bphA gene. We also examined the effect of the growth co-substrate on flavonoid induction. Sodium acetate was replaced by glucose, mannose, sucrose, or mannitol, which are sugars found in plant root exudates. The data showed that the level of induction of strain U23A biphenyl-degrading enzymes was significantly influenced by the nature and concentration of the flavonoid in the growth medium, as well as by the substrate used for growth. Sucrose allowed for an optimal induction response for most flavonoids. Some flavonoids, such as flavone and isoflavone, were better inducers of the biphenyl catabolic enzymes than biphenyl itself. We also found that all flavonoids tested in this work were metabolized by strain U23A during co-metabolic growth, but that the metabolite profiles, as well as the level of efficiency of degradation, differed for each flavonoid. To obtain insight into how flavonoids interact with strain U23A to promote polychlorinated biphenyl (PCB degradation, we determined the concentration of

  6. Skip Regulates TGF-β1-Induced Extracellular Matrix Degrading Proteases Expression in Human PC-3 Prostate Cancer Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victor Villar

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose. To determine whether Ski-interacting protein (SKIP regulates TGF-β1-stimulated expression of urokinase-type plasminogen activator (uPA, matrix metalloproteinase-9 (MMP-9, and uPA Inhibitor (PAI-1 in the androgen-independent human prostate cancer cell model. Materials and Methods. PC-3 prostate cancer cell line was used. The role of SKIP was evaluated using synthetic small interference RNA (siRNA compounds. The expression of uPA, MMP-9, and PAI-1 was evaluated by zymography assays, RT-PCR, and promoter transactivation analysis. Results. In PC-3 cells TGF-β1 treatment stimulated uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 expressions. The knockdown of SKIP in PC-3 cells enhanced the basal level of uPA, and TGF-β1 treatment inhibited uPA production. Both PAI-1 and MMP-9 production levels were increased in response to TGF-β1. The ectopic expression of SKIP inhibited both TGF-β1-induced uPA and MMP-9 promoter transactivation, while PAI-1 promoter response to the factor was unaffected. Conclusions. SKIP regulates the expression of uPA, PAI-1, and MMP-9 stimulated by TGF-β1 in PC-3 cells. Thus, SKIP is implicated in the regulation of extracellular matrix degradation and can therefore be suggested as a novel therapeutic target in prostate cancer treatment.

  7. Chemical degradation of five elastomeric seal materials in a simulated and an accelerated PEM fuel cell environment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Chih-Wei [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804 (China); Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Chien, Chi-Hui [Department of Mechanical and Electro-Mechanical Engineering, National Sun Yat-Sen University, Kaohsiung 804 (China); Tan, Jinzhu [College of Mechanical and Power Engineering, Nanjing University of Technology, Nanjing, Jiangsu 210009 (China); Chao, Yuh J. [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States); Van Zee, J.W. [Department of Chemical Engineering, University of South Carolina, Columbia, SC 29208 (United States)

    2011-02-15

    Polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell stack requires gaskets and seals in each cell to keep the hydrogen and air/oxygen within their respective regions. The stability of the gaskets/seals is critical to the operating life as well as the electrochemical performance of the fuel cell. Chemical degradation of five elastomeric gasket materials in a simulated and an aggressive accelerated fuel cell solution at PEM operating temperature for up to 63 weeks was investigated in this work. The five materials are copolymeric resin (CR), liquid silicone rubber (LSR), fluorosilicone rubber (FSR), ethylene propylene diene monomer rubber (EPDM), and fluoroelastomer copolymer (FKM). Using optical microscopy, topographical changes on the sample surface due to the acidic environment were revealed. Weight loss of the test samples was monitored. Atomic absorption spectrometer analysis was performed to study the silicon, calcium, and magnesium leachants from the materials into the soaking solution. Attenuated total reflection-Fourier transform infrared (ATR-FTIR) spectroscopy was employed to study the surface chemistry of the materials before and after exposure to the simulated fuel cell environment over time. Among the five materials studied, CR and LSR in the accelerated solution are not as stable as the other three materials. FSR appears to be the most stable. (author)

  8. Lipocalin (LCN 2 Mediates Pro-Atherosclerotic Processes and Is Elevated in Patients with Coronary Artery Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raghav Oberoi

    Full Text Available Lipocalin (LCN 2 is associated with multiple acute and chronic inflammatory diseases but the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms remain unclear. Here, we investigated whether LCN2 is released from macrophages and contributes to pro-atherosclerotic processes and whether LCN2 plasma levels are associated with the severity of coronary artery disease progression in humans.In an autocrine-paracrine loop, tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α promoted the release of LCN2 from murine bone-marrow derived macrophages (BMDM and vice versa. Moreover, LCN2 stimulation of BMDM led to up-regulation of M1 macrophage markers. In addition, enhanced migration of monocytic J774A.1 cells towards LCN2 was observed. Furthermore, LCN2 increased the expression of the scavenger receptors Lectin-like oxidized low-density lipoprotein receptor-1 (LOX-1 as well as scavenger receptor class A-1 (SRA-1 and induced the conversion of macrophages to foam cells. In atherosclerotic lesions of low density lipoprotein receptor-deficient (ldlr-/- mice fed a high fat, high cholesterol diet, LCN2 was found to be co-localized with macrophages in the shoulder region of the atherosclerotic plaque. In addition, LCN2 plasma levels were significantly increased in plasma samples of these mice. Finally, LCN2 plasma levels correlated with the severity of coronary artery disease (CAD in patients as determined by coronary angiography.Here we demonstrated that LCN2 plays a pivotal role in processes involved in atherogenesis by promoting polarization and migration of monocytic cells and development of macrophages towards foam cells. Moreover, LCN2 may be used as a prognostic marker to determine the status of CAD progression.

  9. Stability of templated and nanoparticles dye-sensitized solar cells: photovoltaic and electrochemical investigation of degradation mechanisms at the photoelectrode interface

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Highly porous templated TiO2 films are promising alternative to nanoparticle layers for dye-sensitized solar cell applications. However, the increase of the electron transfer surface could promote detrimental side reactions and accelerate cell degradation upon ageing. Therefore, stability of templated cells under UV exposure, visible light soaking and thermal stress was studied in comparison to nanoparticle cells. -- Highlights: •Stability of templated and nanoparticle dye-sensitized solar cells is compared. •Templated cells are more sensitive to UV degradation than nanoparticle cells. •Templated cells are as stable as nanoparticle cells under light soaking. •Templated cells are more stable than nanoparticle cells under thermal stress. •Templated cells present better overall performances than nanoparticle cells. -- Abstract: A key issue in the commercialization of dye-sensitized solar cells is to maintain high efficiency and long lifetime. As reported in the literature, dye-sensitized solar cells are stable under visible light soaking but thermal stress and UV exposure lead to efficiency degradation. However, all the stability studies published so far have been performed on cells whose TiO2 electrodes were prepared by tape casting or screen printing of nanoparticle pastes/inks. The present study concerns cells based on highly porous templated TiO2 electrodes, whose larger surface area could enhance the negative effects of thermal stress, light soaking and UV exposure. The long-term stability of these cells is compared with a classical nanoparticle-based cell using current-voltage measurements (I-V curves) and electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Due to their higher active interface, templated cells are more sensitive than nanoparticle cells to UV illumination, although this can be easily solved in both cases by the use of a UV filter. The templated cells are as stable as the nanoparticle cells under visible light soaking (UV

  10. Polymer electrolyte membrane degradation and mobility in fuel cells : a solid-state NMR investigation

    OpenAIRE

    Ghassemzadeh Khoshkroodi, Lida

    2010-01-01

    It is generally believed that fuel cells will play an important role in energy technology already in the near future. Operating polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) at temperatures higher than 100 °C and reduced humidity is anticipated to avoid most of the shortcomings associated with the low-temperature fuel cell operation, such as CO poisoning of the electrode catalysts, slow electrode kinetics of the oxygen reduction reaction and expensive water/thermal management. To date, the...

  11. Host cell capable of producing enzymes useful for degradation of lignocellulosic material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Los, Alrik Pieter; Sagt, Cornelis Maria Jacobus; Schooneveld-Bergmans, Margot Elisabeth Francoise; Damveld, Robbertus Antonius

    2015-08-18

    The invention relates to a host cell comprising at least four different heterologous polynucleotides chosen from the group of polynucleotides encoding cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is capable of producing the at least four different enzymes chosen from the group of cellulases, hemicellulases and pectinases, wherein the host cell is a filamentous fungus and is capable of secretion of the at least four different enzymes. This host cell can suitably be used for the production of an enzyme composition that can be used in a process for the saccharification of cellulosic material.

  12. A 3-D Model of a Perennial Ryegrass Primary Cell Wall and Its Enzymatic Degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Indrakumar Vetharaniam; Kelly, William J.; Graeme T. Attwood; Harris, Philip J.

    2014-01-01

    We have developed a novel 3-D, agent-based model of cell-wall digestion to improve our understanding of ruminal cell-wall digestion. It offers a capability to study cell walls and their enzymatic modification, by providing a representation of cellulose microfibrils and non-cellulosic polysaccharides and by simulating their spatial and catalytic interactions with enzymes. One can vary cell-wall composition and the types and numbers of enzyme molecules, allowing the model to be applied to a ran...

  13. Reduction of atherosclerotic lesions in rabbits treated with etoposide associated with cholesterol-rich nanoemulsions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tavares ER

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Elaine R Tavares1, Fatima R Freitas1, Jayme Diament1, Raul C Maranhão1,21Heart Institute of the Medical School Hospital (InCor, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, Brazil; 2Faculty of Pharmaceutical Sciences, University of São Paulo, São Paulo, BrazilObjectives: Cholesterol-rich nanoemulsions (LDE bind to low-density lipoprotein (LDL receptors and after injection into the bloodstream concentrate in aortas of atherosclerotic rabbits. Association of paclitaxel with LDE markedly reduces the lesions. In previous studies, treatment of refractory cancer patients with etoposide associated with LDE had been shown devoid of toxicity. In this study, the ability of etoposide to reduce lesions and inflammatory factors in atherosclerotic rabbits was investigated.Methods: Eighteen New Zealand rabbits were fed a 1% cholesterol diet for 60 days. Starting from day 30, nine animals were treated with four weekly intravenous injections of etoposide oleate (6 mg/kg associated with LDE, and nine control animals were treated with saline solution injections.Results: LDE-etoposide reduced the lesion areas of cholesterol-fed animals by 85% and intima width by 50% and impaired macrophage and smooth muscle cell invasion of the intima. Treatment also markedly reduced the protein expression of lipoprotein receptors (LDL receptor, LDL-related protein-1, cluster of differentiation 36, and scavenger receptor class B member 1, inflammatory cytokines (interleukin-1β and tumor necrosis factor-α, matrix metallopeptidase-9, and cell proliferation markers (topoisomerase IIα and tubulin.Conclusion: The ability of LDE-etoposide to strongly reduce the lesion area and the inflammatory process warrants the great therapeutic potential of this novel preparation to target the inflammatory-proliferative basic mechanisms of the disease.Keywords: atherosclerosis treatment, drug delivery, LDL-receptors

  14. An uncommon cause of chest pain - penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer

    OpenAIRE

    Kyaw, Htoo; Sadiq, Sanah; Chowdhury, Arnab; Gholamrezaee, Rashin; Yoe, Linus

    2016-01-01

    Chest pain is a very common symptom and can be of cardiac or non-cardiac origin. It accounts for approximately 5.5 million annual emergency room visits in the United States, according to 2011 CDC data. Penetrating atherosclerotic aortic ulcer (PAU), an uncommon condition, is also a potential cause of chest pain. We here report the case of a 65-year-old woman who presented with atypical chest and back pain. The pain persisted for 4 weeks necessitating two emergency room visits. Initial tests w...

  15. ADIPONECTIN LEVELS AND ATHEROSCLEROTIC RISK FACTORS IN CHILDREN ON HEMODIALYSIS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ACVD) is the major cause of mortality in patients with end stage renal disease (ESRD) treated with hemodialysis (HD), even in children. Adiponectin (ADPN) is an adipocyte derived plasma protein having anti-atherogenic properties. ADPN levels are elevated in ESRD but it has been reported that ESRD patients with low plasma ADPN levels have a high risk of cardiovascular death. The aim of this study is to evaluate the relation between ADPN and atherosclerotic risk factors in children on hemodialysis.Twenty-eight children (17 boys and 11girls) with a mean age of 10.6 ± 3.34 years undergoing hemodialysis (HD) for a mean period of 11.96 ± 8.32 months (ranged from 6 to 36 months) and 10 healthy age and sex matched control subjects were enrolled in this study. The acute effect of a hemodialysis session on serum ADPN and other atherosclerotic risk factors , including blood pressure, serum lipids, C-reactive protein (CRP) and tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) were assessed by comparison of pre- and post-hemodialysis determinations. Serum levels of ADPN and TNF-α were measured by enzyme linked immunosorbant assay (ELISA) while CRP was measured by the semi-quantitative latex agglutination assay.The data showed that serum ADPN levels were twice higher in the HD group as compared to the control subjects. Concerning the atherosclerotic risk factors, TNF-α, CRP and triglycerides levels showed significant elevation in the HD group. Meanwhile, serum albumin, cholesterol and phosphorus levels showed significant decreases. The linear regression analysis showed that adiponectin was negatively correlated with glomerular filtration rate (GFR) (r = -0.68,P < 0.0001), and body mass index (r = -0.73, P < 0.0007); ADPN levels are directly related to HDL cholesterol levels (r = 0.76, P < 0.0001) and inversely related to triglycerides level (r = -0.63, P < 0.0003). No relationship was found between adiponectin and CRP.It could be concluded that

  16. Triglyceride-Rich Lipoproteins and Atherosclerotic Cardiovascular Disease

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordestgaard, Børge G

    2016-01-01

    Scientific interest in triglyceride-rich lipoproteins has fluctuated over the past many years, ranging from beliefs that these lipoproteins cause atherosclerotic cardiovascular disease (ASCVD) to being innocent bystanders. Correspondingly, clinical recommendations have fluctuated from a need.......1-fold for myocardial infarction, 3.2-fold for ischemic heart disease, 3.2-fold for ischemic stroke, and 2.2-fold for all-cause mortality. Also, genetic studies using the Mendelian randomization design, an approach that minimizes problems with confounding and reverse causation, now demonstrate...

  17. Atherosclerotic plaque detection by confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meng, Zhaokai; Basagaoglu, Berkay; Yakovlev, Vladislav V.

    2015-02-01

    Atherosclerosis, the development of intraluminal plaque, is a fundamental pathology of cardiovascular system and remains the leading cause of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Biomechanical in nature, plaque rupture occurs when the mechanical properties of the plaque, related to the morphology and viscoelastic properties, are compromised, resulting in intraluminal thrombosis and reduction of coronary blood flow. In this report, we describe the first simultaneous application of confocal Brillouin and Raman microscopies to ex-vivo aortic wall samples. Such a non-invasive, high specific approach allows revealing a direct relationship between the biochemical and mechanical properties of atherosclerotic tissue.

  18. Blocking autophagy prevents bortezomib-induced NF-κB activation by reducing I-κBα degradation in lymphoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Jia

    Full Text Available Here we show that bortezomib induces effective proteasome inhibition and accumulation of poly-ubiquitinated proteins in diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL cells. This leads to induction of endoplasmic reticulum (ER stress as demonstrated by accumulation of the protein CHOP, as well as autophagy, as demonstrated by accumulation of LC3-II proteins. Our data suggest that recruitment of both ubiquitinated proteins and LC3-II by p62 directs ubiquitinated proteins, including I-κBα, to the autophagosome. Degradation of I-κBα results in increased NF-κB nuclear translocation and transcription activity. Since bortezomib treatment promoted I-κBα phosphorylation, ubiquitination and degradation, this suggests that the route of I-κBα degradation was not via the ubiquitin-proteasome degradation system. The autophagy inhibitor chloroquine (CQ significantly inhibited bortezomib-induced I-κBα degradation, increased complex formation with NF-κB and reduced NF-κB nuclear translocation and DNA binding activity. Importantly, the combination of proteasome and autophagy inhibitors showed synergy in killing DLBCL cells. In summary, bortezomib-induced autophagy confers relative DLBCL cell drug resistance by eliminating I-κBα. Inhibition of both autophagy and the proteasome has great potential to kill apoptosis-resistant lymphoma cells.

  19. Irradiation-induced degradation of amorphous silicon solar cells in space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaver, A.

    2007-01-01

    Solar cells are the prime power supply for satellites in space. Space is, however, a hostile environment for electronic devices, such as solar cells: in space the devices are subjected to large temperature cycles, atomic oxygen, space dust, meteorites, and high-energy charged-particle irradiation. I

  20. Ni/YSZ anode – Effect of pre-treatments on cell degradation and microstructures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Jørgensen, Peter Stanley; Brodersen, Karen;

    2011-01-01

    -treatments included operating at OCV (4% and 40% H2O in H2) prior to fuel cell testing, cleaning of the inlet H2 gas at 700°C and processing the anode half cell via multilayer tape casting. Analyses of impedance spectra showed that the increase in the charge transfer reaction resistance in the Ni/YSZ (RNi,TPB) was...

  1. Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cells: Microstructure and Degradation of the Ni/Yttria-Stabilized Zirconia Electrode

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hauch, Anne; Ebbesen, Sune; Jensen, Søren Højgaard;

    2008-01-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells produced at Risø DTU have been tested as solid oxide electrolysis cells for steam electrolysis by applying an external voltage. Varying the sealing on the hydrogen electrode side of the setup verifies that the previously reported passivation over the first few hundred hours...

  2. Oxygen- and water-induced degradation of an inverted polymer solar cell: the barrier effect

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vesterager Madsen, Morten; Norrman, Kion; Krebs, Frederik C

    2011-01-01

    The work focuses on the degradation of performance induced by both water and oxygen in an inverted geometry organic photovoltaic device with emphasis on the accumulated barrier effect of the layers comprising the layer stack. By studying the exchange of oxygen in the zinc oxide (ZnO) layer......, the barrier effect is reported in both a dry oxygen atmosphere and an oxygen-free humid atmosphere. The devices under study are comprised of a bulk heterojunction formed by poly(3-hexylthiophene) and [6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester sandwiched between a layer of zinc oxide (electron transporting...... layer) and a layer of poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenesulfonate) (hole transport layer) and the two electrodes indium tin oxide and silver. Time-of-flight secondary ion mass spectrometry is employed to characterize the accumulated barrier effect. A pronounced barrier effect is observed...

  3. Matrix-degrading and pro-inflammatory changes in human vascular endothelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke condensate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nordskog, Brian K; Blixt, Allison D; Morgan, Walter T; Fields, Wanda R; Hellmann, Gary M

    2003-01-01

    Cigarette smoking has been associated with an increase in the severity and prevalence of atherosclerosis in the abdominal aorta. To begin our investigation of this finding, we used an integrated approach combining gene expression profiling, protein analysis, cytokine measurements, and cytotoxicity determinations to examine molecular responses of cultured human aortic and coronary endothelial cells exposed to cigarette smoke condensate (CSC) and nicotine. Exposure of endothelial cells to CSC (30 and 60 microg/mL TPM) for 24 h resulted in minimal cytotoxicity, and the upregulation of genes involved in matrix degradation (MMP-1, MMP-8, and MMP-9), xenobiotic metabolism (HO-1 and CYP1A2), and downregulation of genes involved in cell cycle regulation (including TOP2A, CCNB1, CCNA, CDKN3). Exposure of cells to a high physiological concentration of nicotine resulted in few differentially expressed genes. Immunoblot analysis of proteins selected from genes shown to be differentially regulated by microarray analysis revealed similar responses. Finally, a number of inflammatory cytokines measured in culture media were elevated in response to CSC. Together, these results describe a complex proinflammatory response, possibly mediating the recruitment of leukocytes through cytokine signaling. Additionally, fibrous cap destabilization may be facilitated by matrix metalloproteinase upregulation. PMID:14501029

  4. Cathepsin B is up-regulated and mediates extracellular matrix degradation in trabecular meshwork cells following phagocytic challenge.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristine Porter

    Full Text Available Cells in the trabecular meshwork (TM, a tissue responsible for draining aqueous humor out of the eye, are known to be highly phagocytic. Phagocytic activity in TM cells is thought to play an important role in outflow pathway physiology. However, the molecular mechanisms triggered by phagocytosis in TM cells are unknown. Here we investigated the effects of chronic phagocytic stress on lysosomal function using different phagocytic ligands (E. coli, carboxylated beads, collagen I-coated beads, and pigment. Lysotracker red co-localization and electron micrographs showed the maturation of E. coli- and collagen I-coated beads-containing phagosomes into phagolysosomes. Maturation of phagosomes into phagolysosomes was not observed with carboxylated beads or pigment particles. In addition, phagocytosis of E. coli and collagen I-coated beads led to increased lysosomal mass, and the specific up-regulation and activity of cathepsin B (CTSB. Higher levels of membrane-bound and secreted CTSB were also detected. Moreover, in vivo zymography showed the intralysosomal degradation of ECM components associated with active CTSB, as well as an overall increased gelatinolytic activity in phagocytically challenged TM cells. This increased gelatinolytic activity with phagocytosis was partially blocked with an intracellular CTSB inhibitor. Altogether, these results suggest a potential role of phagocytosis in outflow pathway tissue homeostasis through the up-regulation and/or proteolytic activation of extracellular matrix remodeling genes.

  5. MDA-7/IL-24 induces Bcl-2 denitrosylation and ubiquitin-degradation involved in cancer cell apoptosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Tian

    Full Text Available MDA-7/IL-24 was involved in the specific cancer apoptosis through suppression of Bcl-2 expression, which is a key apoptosis regulatory protein of the mitochondrial death pathway. However, the underlying mechanisms of this regulation are unclear. We report here that tumor-selective replicating adenovirus ZD55-IL-24 leads to Bcl-2 S-denitrosylation and concomitant ubiquitination, which take part in the 26S proteasome degradation. IL-24-siRNA completely blocks Bcl-2 ubiquitination via reversion of Bcl-2 S-denitrosylation and protects it from proteasomal degradation which confirmed the significant role of MDA-7/IL-24 in regulating posttranslational modification of Bcl-2 in cancer cells. Nitric oxide (NO is a key regulator of protein S-nitrosylation and denitrosylation. The NO donor, sodium nitroprusside (SNP, down-regulates Bcl-2 S-denitrosylation, attenuates Bcl-2 ubiquitination and subsequently counteracts MDA-7/IL-24 induced cancer cell apoptosis, whereas NO inhibitor 2-(4-carboxyphenyl-4,4,5,5-tetramethylimidazoline-1-oxy-3-oxide (PTIO shows the opposite effect. At the same time, these NO modulators fail to affect Bcl-2 phosphorylation, suggesting that NO regulates Bcl-2 stability in a phosphorylation-independent manner. In addition, Bcl-2 S-nitrosylation reduction induced by ZD55-IL-24 was attributed to both iNOS decrease and TrxR1 increase. iNOS-siRNA facilitates Bcl-2 S-denitrosylation and ubiquitin-degradation, whereas the TrxR1 inhibitor auranofin prevents Bcl-2 from denitrosylation and ubiquitination, thus restrains the caspase signal pathway activation and subsequent cancer cell apoptosis. Taken together, our studies reveal that MDA-7/IL-24 induces Bcl-2 S-denitrosylation via regulation of iNOS and TrxR1. Moreover, denitrosylation of Bcl-2 results in its ubiquitination and subsequent caspase protease family activation, as a consequence, apoptosis susceptibility. These findings provide a novel insight into MDA-7/IL-24 induced growth

  6. Performance and degradation evaluation of five different commercial lithium-ion cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Striebel, Kathryn A.; Shim, Joongpyo

    2004-04-20

    The initial performance of five different types of Li-ion rechargeable batteries, from Quallion Corp, UltraLife Battery and Toshiba, was measured and compared. Cell characterization included variable-rate constant-current cycling, various USDOE pulse-test protocols and full-spectrum electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. Changes in impedance and capacity were monitored during electrochemical cycling under various conditions, including constant-current cycling over 100 percent DOD at a range of temperature and pulse profile cycling over a very narrow range of DOD at room temperature. All cells were found to maintain more than 80 percent of their rated capacity for more than 400 constant current 100 percent DOD cycles. The power fade (or impedance rise) of the cells varied considerably. New methods for interpreting the pulse resistance data were evaluated for their usefulness in interpreting performance mechanism as a function of test protocol and cell design.

  7. Promoting Cell Survival and Proliferation in Degradable Poly(vinyl alcohol)-Tyramine Hydrogels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Khoon S; Ramaswamy, Yogambha; Roberts, Justine J; Alves, Marie-Helene; Poole-Warren, Laura A; Martens, Penny J

    2015-10-01

    A photopolymerizable-tyraminated poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA-Tyr) system that has the ability to covalently bind proteins in their native state was evaluated as a platform for cell encapsulation. However, a key hurdle to this system is the radicals generated during the cross-linking that can cause oxidative stress to the cells. This research hypothesized that incorporation of anti-oxidative proteins (sericin and gelatin) into PVA-Tyr gels would mitigate any toxicity caused by the radicals. The results showed that although incorporation of 1 wt% sericin promoted survival of the fibroblasts, both sericin and gelatin acted synergistically to facilitate long-term 3D cell function. The encapsulated cells formed clusters with deposition of laminin and collagen, as well as remaining metabolically active after 21 d. PMID:26097045

  8. Coniferyl Ferulate Incorporation into Lignin Enhances the Alkaline Delignification and Enzymatic Degradation of Cell Walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Incorporating ester interunit linkages into lignin could facilitate fiber delignification and utilization. In model studies with maize cell walls, we examined how partial substitution of coniferyl alcohol (a normal monolignol) with coniferyl ferulate (an ester conjugate from lignan biosynthesis) alt...

  9. Photoelectrochemical determination of chemical oxygen demand based on an exhaustive degradation model in a thin-layer cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work focuses on the experimental optimisation of a newly developed photoelectrochemical system for the determination of chemical oxygen demand (PECOD). This method is developed based on a photoelectrochemical degradation principle. Chemical oxygen demand (COD) is directly quantified by measuring the amount of electron transferred at a TiO2 nanoporous thin-film electrode during an exhaustive photoelectrocatalytic degradation process in a thin-layer photoelectrochemical cell. In this fashion, the COD value of a sample can be determined in a simple, rapid and accurate manner. The PECOD is a direct and absolute method that requires no calibration. The effects of important experimental conditions, such as light intensity, applied potential bias, supporting electrolyte concentration and oxygen concentration, on analytical performance have been investigated and optimum experimental conditions were obtained. Analytical linear range of 0-360 ppm COD with a practical detection limit of 0.2 ppm COD were achieved. Real sample analyses were also carried out. The results demonstrated that the measured COD values using the PECOD and the standard methods were in an excellent agreement

  10. Performance and Degradation of A Lithium-Bromine Rechargeable Fuel Cell Using Highly Concentrated Catholytes

    OpenAIRE

    Bai, Peng; Bazant, Martin Z.

    2016-01-01

    Lithium-air batteries have been considered as ultimate solutions for the power source of long-range electrified transportation, but state-of-the-art prototypes still suffer from short cycle life, low efficiency and poor power output. Here, a lithium-bromine rechargeable fuel cell using highly concentrated bromine catholytes is demonstrated with comparable specific energy, improved power density, and higher efficiency. The cell is similar in structure to a hybrid-electrolyte Li-air battery, wh...

  11. Rapid Evaluation of Power Degradation in Series Connection of Single Feeding Microsized Microbial Fuel Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Rojas, Jhonathan Prieto

    2014-07-08

    We have developed a sustainable, single feeding, microsized, air-cathode and membrane-free microbial fuel cells with a volume of 40 mu L each, which we have used for rapid evaluation of power generation and viability of a series array of three cells seeking higher voltage levels. Contrary to expectations, the achieved power density was modest (45 mWm(-3)), limited due to non-uniformities in assembly and the single-channel feeding system.

  12. Preparation, characterization and degradation investigations of cathode catalysts for automotive PEM fuel cells systems

    OpenAIRE

    Marcu, Alina

    2014-01-01

    This research was designed to meet Daimler systematic efforts to address future electromobility demands. The work focuses on developing potential cathode catalysts and tests procedures to be employed in prototype fuel cells. In order to achieve commercial cost-competitive polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEM FC), the following major challenges have to be addressed: i) The catalytic mass activity of the cathode catalysts has to be at least 0.44 A/mg Pt representing an increased factor ...

  13. Rhizobium sp. Degradation of Legume Root Hair Cell Wall at the Site of Infection Thread Origin

    OpenAIRE

    Ridge, Robert W.; Rolfe, Barry G.

    1985-01-01

    Using a new microinoculation technique, we demonstrated that penetration of Rhizobium sp. into the host root hair cell occurs at 20 to 22 h after inoculation. It did this by dissolving the cell wall maxtrix, leaving a layer of depolymerized wall microfibrils. Colony growth pressure “stretched” the weakened wall, forming a bulge into an interfacial zone between the wall and plasmalemma. At the same time vesicular bodies, similar to plasmalemmasomes, accumulated at the penetration site in a man...

  14. Identification of atherosclerotic plaque components with intravascular ultrasound elastography in vivo: a Yucatan pig study.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Korte, C.L. de; Sierevogel, M.J.; Mastik, F.; Strijder, C.; Schaar, J.A.; Velema, E.; Pasterkamp, G.; Serruys, P.W.; Steen, A.F.W. van der

    2002-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Intravascular ultrasound elastography assesses the local strain of the atherosclerotic vessel wall. In the present study, the potential to identify different plaque components in vivo was investigated. METHODS AND RESULTS: Atherosclerotic external iliac and femoral arteries (n=24) of 6 Y

  15. The extracellular matrix modulates H2O2 degradation and redox signaling in endothelial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagulho, Ana; Vilas-Boas, Filipe; Pena, Andreia; Peneda, Catarina; Santos, Filipa C.; Jerónimo, Ana; de Almeida, Rodrigo F.M.; Real, Carla

    2015-01-01

    The molecular processes that are crucial for cell function, such as proliferation, migration and survival, are regulated by hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Although environmental cues, such as growth factors, regulate redox signaling, it was still unknown whether the ECM, a component of the cell microenvironment, had a function in this process. Here, we showed that the extracellular matrix (ECM) differently regulated H2O2 consumption by endothelial cells and that this effect was not general for all types of cells. The analysis of biophysical properties of the endothelial cell membrane suggested that this modification in H2O2 consumption rates was not due to altered membrane permeability. Instead, we found that the ECM regulated GPx activity, a known H2O2 scavenger. Finally, we showed that the extent of PTEN oxidation was dependent on the ECM, indicating that the ECM was able to modulate H2O2-dependent protein oxidation. Thus, our results unraveled a new mechanism by which the ECM regulates endothelial cell function by altering redox balance. These results pinpoint the ECM as an important component of redox-signaling. PMID:26409032

  16. CO2 vascular anastomosis of atherosclerotic and calcified arteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, John V.; Leefmans, Eric; Stewart, Gwendolyn J.; Katz, Mira L.; Comerota, Anthony J.

    1990-06-01

    The technique for CO2 laser fusion vascular anastomosis in normal vessels has been well established. Normal arterial wall has a predictable thermal response to the incident laser energy, with rapid heating and cooling of collagen within the arterial wall. Since atherosclerosis involves subendothelial cellular proliferation, lipid and calcium deposition, it may modify the thermal responsiveness of the arterial wall. To this study, CO2 laser fusion anastomoses were attempted in rabbits with non-calcific atherosclerosis and humans with calcific atherosclerosis. All anastomoses were successfully completed without alteration in technique despite the presence of plaque at the site of laser fusion. Histology of rabbit vessels revealed the classic laser fusion cap within the adventitia and persistent atherosclerotic plaque at the flow surface. Duplex imaging of patients post-operatively demonstrated long term anastomotic patency in 2 of 3 fistulae. These results suggest that neither non-calcified or calcified atherosclerosis significantly alters the arterial wall thermal responsiveness to CO2 laser energy or inhibits creation of laser fusion anastomoses. Therefore, this technique may be applicable to the treatment of patients with atherosclerotic occlusive disease.

  17. Spectral CT of carotid atherosclerotic plaque: comparison with histology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To distinguish components of vulnerable atherosclerotic plaque by imaging their energy response using spectral CT and comparing images with histology. After spectroscopic calibration using phantoms of plaque surrogates, excised human carotid atherosclerotic plaques were imaged using MARS CT using a photon-processing detector with a silicon sensor layer and microfocus X-ray tube (50 kVp, 0.5 mA) at 38-μm voxel size. The plaques were imaged, sectioned and re-imaged using four threshold energies: 10, 16, 22 and 28 keV; then sequentially stained with modified Von Kossa, Perl's Prussian blue and Oil-Red O, and photographed. Relative Hounsfield units across the energies were entered into a linear algebraic material decomposition model to identify the unknown plaque components. Lipid, calcium, iron and water-like components of plaque have distinguishable energy responses to X-ray, visible on spectral CT images. CT images of the plaque surface correlated very well with histological photographs. Calcium deposits (>1,000 μm) in plaque are larger than iron deposits (<100 μm), but could not be distinguished from each other within the same voxel using the energy range available. Spectral CT displays energy information in image form at high spatial resolution, enhancing the intrinsic contrast of lipid, calcium and iron within atheroma. (orig.)

  18. Tensile and compressive properties of fresh human carotid atherosclerotic plaques.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Maher, Eoghan

    2009-12-11

    Accurate characterisation of the mechanical properties of human atherosclerotic plaque is important for our understanding of the role of vascular mechanics in the development and treatment of atherosclerosis. The majority of previous studies investigating the mechanical properties of human plaque are based on tests of plaque tissue removed following autopsy. This study aims to characterise the mechanical behaviour of fresh human carotid plaques removed during endarterectomy and tested within 2h. A total of 50 radial compressive and 17 circumferential tensile uniaxial tests were performed on samples taken from 14 carotid plaques. The clinical classification of each plaque, as determined by duplex ultrasound is also reported. Plaques were classified as calcified, mixed or echolucent. Experimental data indicated that plaques were highly inhomogeneous; with variations seen in the mechanical properties of plaque obtained from individual donors and between donors. The mean behaviour of samples for each classification indicated that calcified plaques had the stiffest response, while echolucent plaques were the least stiff. Results also indicated that there may be a difference in behaviour of samples taken from different anatomical locations (common, internal and external carotid), however the large variability indicates that more testing is needed to reach significant conclusions. This work represents a step towards a better understanding of the in vivo mechanical behaviour of human atherosclerotic plaque.

  19. DNA degradation and Apoptosis : DNA degradation

    OpenAIRE

    Torriglia, Alicia; Padron, Laura

    2005-01-01

    Apoptosis, is a form of programmed cell death essential for the development and maintenance of multicellular organisms. DNA degradation is one of the hallmarks of apoptosis. The central component of the apoptotic machinery is a proteolytic system involving caspases and non-caspases proteases. CAD, a caspase-activated DNase, is the endonuclease responsible for DNA degradation during caspase-dependent apoptosis. The relationship between non-caspase proteases and endonucleases is less clear and ...

  20. Superoxide anion radical (O2(-)) degrades methylmercury to inorganic mercury in human astrocytoma cell line (CCF-STTG1).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mailloux, Ryan J; Yumvihoze, Emmanuel; Chan, Hing Man

    2015-09-01

    Methylmercury (MeHg) is a global pollutant that is affecting the health of millions of people worldwide. However, the mechanism of MeHg toxicity still remains somewhat elusive and there is no treatment. It has been known for some time that MeHg can be progressively converted to inorganic mercury (iHg) in various tissues including the brain. Recent work has suggested that cleavage of the carbon-metal bond in MeHg in a biological environment is facilitated by reactive oxygen species (ROS). However, the oxyradical species that actually mediates this process has not been identified. Here, we provide evidence that superoxide anion radical (O2(-)) can convert MeHg to iHg. The calculated second-order rate constant for the degradation of 1μM MeHg by O2(-) generated by xanthine/xanthine oxidase was calculated to be 2×10(5)M(-1)s(-1). We were also able to show that this bioconversion can proceed in intact CCF-STTG1 human astrocytoma cells exposed to paraquat (PQ), a O2(-) generating viologen. Notably, exposure of cells to increasing amounts of PQ led to a dose dependent increase in both MeHg and iHg. Indeed, a 24h exposure to 500μM PQ induced a ∼13-fold and ∼18-fold increase in intracellular MeHg and iHg respectively. These effects were inhibited by superoxide dismutase mimetic MnTBAP. In addition, we also observed that a 24h exposure to a biologically relevant concentration of MeHg (1μM) did not induce cell death, oxidative stress, or even changes in cellular O2(-) and H2O2. However, co-exposure to PQ enhanced MeHg toxicity which was associated with a robust increase in cell death and oxidative stress. Collectively our results show that O2(-) can bioconvert MeHg to iHg in vitro and in intact cells exposed to conditions that simulate high intracellular O2(-) production. In addition, we show for the first time that O2(-) mediated degradation of MeHg to iHg enhances the toxicity of MeHg by facilitating an accumulation of both MeHg and iHg in the intracellular