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Sample records for cell tracking clinical

  1. Nanoparticles and clinically applicable cell tracking

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    M.R. Bernsen (Monique); J. Guenoun (Jamal); S.T. van Tiel (Sandra); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIn vivo cell tracking has emerged as a much sought after tool for design and monitoring of cell-based treatment strategies. Various techniques are available for pre-clinical animal studies, from which much has been learned and still can be learned. However, there is also a need for clini

  2. Nanoparticles and clinically applicable cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernsen, Monique R; Guenoun, Jamal; van Tiel, Sandra T; Krestin, Gabriel P

    2015-10-01

    In vivo cell tracking has emerged as a much sought after tool for design and monitoring of cell-based treatment strategies. Various techniques are available for pre-clinical animal studies, from which much has been learned and still can be learned. However, there is also a need for clinically translatable techniques. Central to in vivo cell imaging is labelling of cells with agents that can give rise to signals in vivo, that can be detected and measured non-invasively. The current imaging technology of choice for clinical translation is MRI in combination with labelling of cells with magnetic agents. The main challenge encountered during the cell labelling procedure is to efficiently incorporate the label into the cell, such that the labelled cells can be imaged at high sensitivity for prolonged periods of time, without the labelling process affecting the functionality of the cells. In this respect, nanoparticles offer attractive features since their structure and chemical properties can be modified to facilitate cellular incorporation and because they can carry a high payload of the relevant label into cells. While these technologies have already been applied in clinical trials and have increased the understanding of cell-based therapy mechanism, many challenges are still faced. PMID:26248872

  3. Tracking antigen-specific T-cells during clinical tolerance induction in humans.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aamir Aslam

    Full Text Available Allergen immunotherapy presents an opportunity to define mechanisms of induction of clinical tolerance in humans. Significant progress has been made in our understanding of changes in T cell responses during immunotherapy, but existing work has largely been based on functional T cell assays. HLA-peptide-tetrameric complexes allow the tracking of antigen-specific T-cell populations based on the presence of specific T-cell receptors and when combined with functional assays allow a closer assessment of the potential roles of T-cell anergy and clonotype evolution. We sought to develop tools to facilitate tracking of antigen-specific T-cell populations during wasp-venom immunotherapy in people with wasp-venom allergy. We first defined dominant immunogenic regions within Ves v 5, a constituent of wasp venom that is known to represent a target antigen for T-cells. We next identified HLA-DRB1*1501 restricted epitopes and used HLA class II tetrameric complexes alongside cytokine responses to Ves v 5 to track T-cell responses during immunotherapy. In contrast to previous reports, we show that there was a significant initial induction of IL-4 producing antigen-specific T-cells within the first 3-5 weeks of immunotherapy which was followed by reduction of circulating effector antigen-specific T-cells despite escalation of wasp-venom dosage. However, there was sustained induction of IL-10-producing and FOXP3 positive antigen-specific T cells. We observed that these IL-10 producing cells could share a common precursor with IL-4-producing T cells specific for the same epitope. Clinical tolerance induction in humans is associated with dynamic changes in frequencies of antigen-specific T-cells, with a marked loss of IL-4-producing T-cells and the acquisition of IL-10-producing and FOXP3-positive antigen-specific CD4+ T-cells that can derive from a common shared precursor to pre-treatment effector T-cells. The development of new approaches to track antigen

  4. Track B Clinical Science

    OpenAIRE

    Kyrychenko, T.; Dubynska, G.; Koval, T.; Kaidashev, I; Korshenko, V.; Rono, K.; Kibuuka, H.; Maganga, L; Kosgei, J.; Sekiziyivu, A.; Sanga, E.; Ngetich, E.; Bolen Valenzuela, A.; Michael, N.; Robb, M

    2012-01-01

    Background Toll-like receptors (TLRs) are transmembrane receptors that activate cells of the innate immune systems upon recognition of pathogen-associated molecular patterns. The TLR4 is an essential component of the innate immune response to various microorganisms. We investigated the impact of TLR4 polymorphism on development of opportunistic diseases in HIV-infected patients. Methods The presence of TLR4 Asp299Gly single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs) was determined in a cohort of 180 ant...

  5. Cell tracking. Principles and applications; Cell Tracking. Prinzipien und Anwendungen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Grimm, Jan [Memorial Sloan Kettering Cancer Center, Dept. of Radiology, New York, NY (United States); Kircher, Moritz F. [Beth Israel Deaconess Medical Center/Harvard Medical School, Dept. of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States); Weissleder, Ralph [Massachusetts General Hospital/ Harvard Medical School, Center for Molecular Imaging Research, Boston, MA (United States)

    2007-01-15

    Cell based therapies such as stem cell therapies or adoptive immunotherapies are currently being explored as a potential treatment for a variety of diseases such as Parkinson's disease, diabetes or cancer. However, quantitative and qualitative evaluation of adoptively transferred cells is indispensable for monitoring the efficiency of the treatment. Current approaches mostly analyze transferred cells from peripheral blood, which cannot assess whether transferred cells actuallyhome to and stay in the targeted tissue. Using cell-labeling methods such as direct labeling or transfection with a marker gene in conjunction with various imaging modalities (MRI, optical or nuclear imaging), labeled cells can be followed in vivo in real-time, and their accumulation as well as function in vivo can be monitored and quantified accurately. This method is usually referred to as ''cell tracking'' or ''cell trafficking'' and is also being applied in basic biological sciences, exemplified in the evaluation of genes contributing to metastasis. This review focuses on principles of this promising methodology and explains various approaches by highlighting recent examples. (orig.) [German] Zellulaere Therapieverfahren wie Stammzelltherapien bei Morbus Parkinson oder Diabetes sowie adoptive Immuntherapien bei Krebs werden in Zukunft zunehmend an Bedeutung gewinnen. Ein Problem bei beiden Therapieverfahren stellt jedoch das qualitative und quantitative Monitoring der Therapie dar. Es ist wichtig zu wissen, ob die applizierten Zellen auch zu ihrem Zielgewebe gelangen und darueber hinaus auch noch funktionsfaehig sind. Diese Informationen sind heute meist nur durch invasive Massnahmen wie Blut- oder Gewebeproben zu erlangen. Das Verfahren des ''Cell Tracking'', bei dem entweder direkt oder ueber Markergene markierte Zellen mit verschiedenen bildgebenden Verfahren (MRT, optische oder nuklearmedizinische Verfahren) in vivo

  6. Cell tracking. Principles and applications

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell based therapies such as stem cell therapies or adoptive immunotherapies are currently being explored as a potential treatment for a variety of diseases such as Parkinson's disease, diabetes or cancer. However, quantitative and qualitative evaluation of adoptively transferred cells is indispensable for monitoring the efficiency of the treatment. Current approaches mostly analyze transferred cells from peripheral blood, which cannot assess whether transferred cells actuallyhome to and stay in the targeted tissue. Using cell-labeling methods such as direct labeling or transfection with a marker gene in conjunction with various imaging modalities (MRI, optical or nuclear imaging), labeled cells can be followed in vivo in real-time, and their accumulation as well as function in vivo can be monitored and quantified accurately. This method is usually referred to as ''cell tracking'' or ''cell trafficking'' and is also being applied in basic biological sciences, exemplified in the evaluation of genes contributing to metastasis. This review focuses on principles of this promising methodology and explains various approaches by highlighting recent examples. (orig.)

  7. Analysis of Patient Service Time in Ambulatory Clinics: Patient Tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Zerbe, Tony R.; Zerbe, Shirleen D.

    1990-01-01

    Historically, analysis of patient service time (patient tracking) in ambulatory clinics has been performed manually. A case study of Eye and Ear Clinic in Pittsburgh, PA, revealed that this approach to patient data collection was prone to clerical error and did not satisfy the clinic's information-processing needs. Initial attempts at automation identified the features required of a successful computerized scheduling and patient tracking system.

  8. Segmentation and Tracking of Neural Stem Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Chun-ming; ZHAO Chun-hui; Ewert Bengtsson

    2005-01-01

    In order to understand the development of stem cells into specialized mature cells it is necessary to study the growth of cells in culture. For this purpose it is very useful to have an efficient computerized cell tracking system. In this paper a prototype system for tracking neural stem cells in a sequence of images is described. In order to get reliable tracking results it is important to have good and robust segmentation of the cells. To achieve this we have implemented three levels of segmentation. The primary level, applied to all frames, is based on fuzzy threshold and watershed segmentation of a fuzzy gray weighted distance transformed image.The second level, applied to difficult frames where the first algorithm seems to have failed, is based on a fast geometric active contour model based on the level set algorithm. Finally, the automatic segmentation result on the crucial first frame can be interactively inspected and corrected. Visual inspection and correction can also be applied to other frames but this is generally not needed. For the tracking all cells are classified into inactive, active, dividing and clustered cells. Different algorithms are used to deal with the different cell categories. A special backtracking step is used to automatically correct for some common errors that appear in the initial forward tracking process.

  9. In vivo cell tracking with bioluminescence imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Molecular imaging is a fast growing biomedical research that allows the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms. In vivo tracking of cells is an indispensable technology for development and optimization of cell therapy for replacement or renewal of damaged or diseased tissue using transplanted cells, often autologous cells. With outstanding advantages of bioluminescence imaging, the imaging approach is most commonly applied for in vivo monitoring of transplanted stem cells or immune cells in order to assess viability of administered cells with therapeutic efficacy in preclinical small animal models. In this review, a general overview of bioluminescence is provided and recent updates of in vivo cell tracking using the bioluminescence signal are discussed

  10. In vivo cell tracking with bioluminescence imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jung Eun; Kalimuthu, Senthilkumar; Ahn, Byeong Cheol [Dept. of Nuclear Medicine, Kyungpook National University School of Medicine and Hospital, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-15

    Molecular imaging is a fast growing biomedical research that allows the visual representation, characterization and quantification of biological processes at the cellular and subcellular levels within intact living organisms. In vivo tracking of cells is an indispensable technology for development and optimization of cell therapy for replacement or renewal of damaged or diseased tissue using transplanted cells, often autologous cells. With outstanding advantages of bioluminescence imaging, the imaging approach is most commonly applied for in vivo monitoring of transplanted stem cells or immune cells in order to assess viability of administered cells with therapeutic efficacy in preclinical small animal models. In this review, a general overview of bioluminescence is provided and recent updates of in vivo cell tracking using the bioluminescence signal are discussed.

  11. Pipeline for Tracking Neural Progenitor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Holm, Peter;

    2012-01-01

    Automated methods for neural stem cell lineage construction become increasingly important due to the large amount of data produced from time lapse imagery of in vitro cell growth experiments. Segmentation algorithms with the ability to adapt to the problem at hand and robust tracking methods play a...... key role in constructing these lineages. We present here a tracking pipeline based on learning a dictionary of discriminative image patches for segmentation and a graph formulation of the cell matching problem incorporating topology changes and acknowledging the fact that segmentation errors do occur...

  12. In vivo tracking for cell therapies

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The success of a particular cellular therapy regime requires the therapeutic agent to migrate expeditiously to the intended target in sufficient numbers and to provoke a desirable response. There are many variables associated with the production, administration and host that need to be investigated to maximize the resulting therapeutic benefit. The large number of factors which may contribute to, or detract from, treatment efficacy can make therapy optimization an arduous procedure. Direct visualization of in vivo migration patterns using nuclear medicine techniques greatly assists the appraisal of the multitude of variables. Conventional radionuclide cell labeling is a proven, simple and sensitive technique which can provide whole body biodistribution information. Labeling with a PET isotope offers greater sensitivity, much improved 3-dimensional resolution and quantification. In general, current efforts are increasingly concentrating on this technology. Imaging studies can supply definitive evidence of successful targeting and allow quantification of the degree of migration to a particular site. Incorporating tracking studies into clinical trials of cell-based therapy at the earliest stage can provide proof of mechanism of the therapy and permit evaluation of the many contributory variables, even on a patient-by-patient basis

  13. Software for precise tracking of cell proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurokawa, Hiroshi [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Life Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Noda, Hisayori [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Tokyo Institute of Technology, 2-12-1 Ookayama, Meguro-ku, Tokyo 152-8550 (Japan); Sugiyama, Mayu [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); School of Life Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Sakaue-Sawano, Asako [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Fukami, Kiyoko [School of Life Science, Tokyo University of Pharmacy and Life Science, 1432-1 Horinouchi, Hachioji, Tokyo 192-0392 (Japan); Miyawaki, Atsushi, E-mail: matsushi@brain.riken.jp [Brain Science Institute, RIKEN, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Life Function and Dynamics, ERATO, JST, 2-1 Hirosawa, Wako-city, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan)

    2012-01-20

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We developed software for analyzing cultured cells that divide as well as migrate. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The active contour model (Snakes) was used as the core algorithm. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The time backward analysis was also used for efficient detection of cell division. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer With user-interactive correction functions, the software enables precise tracking. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The software was successfully applied to cells with fluorescently-labeled nuclei. -- Abstract: We have developed a multi-target cell tracking program TADOR, which we applied to a series of fluorescence images. TADOR is based on an active contour model that is modified in order to be free of the problem of locally optimal solutions, and thus is resistant to signal fluctuation and morphological changes. Due to adoption of backward tracing and addition of user-interactive correction functions, TADOR is used in an off-line and semi-automated mode, but enables precise tracking of cell division. By applying TADOR to the analysis of cultured cells whose nuclei had been fluorescently labeled, we tracked cell division and cell-cycle progression on coverslips over an extended period of time.

  14. Software for precise tracking of cell proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► We developed software for analyzing cultured cells that divide as well as migrate. ► The active contour model (Snakes) was used as the core algorithm. ► The time backward analysis was also used for efficient detection of cell division. ► With user-interactive correction functions, the software enables precise tracking. ► The software was successfully applied to cells with fluorescently-labeled nuclei. -- Abstract: We have developed a multi-target cell tracking program TADOR, which we applied to a series of fluorescence images. TADOR is based on an active contour model that is modified in order to be free of the problem of locally optimal solutions, and thus is resistant to signal fluctuation and morphological changes. Due to adoption of backward tracing and addition of user-interactive correction functions, TADOR is used in an off-line and semi-automated mode, but enables precise tracking of cell division. By applying TADOR to the analysis of cultured cells whose nuclei had been fluorescently labeled, we tracked cell division and cell-cycle progression on coverslips over an extended period of time.

  15. Stem cell tracking using iron oxide nanoparticles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bull E

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Elizabeth Bull,1 Seyed Yazdan Madani,1 Roosey Sheth,1 Amelia Seifalian,1 Mark Green,2 Alexander M Seifalian1,31UCL Centre for Nanotechnology and Regenerative Medicine, Division of Surgery and Interventional Science, University College London, London, 2Department of Physics, King’s College London, Strand Campus, London, UK; 3Royal Free London National Health Service Foundation Trust Hospital, London, UKAbstract: Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs are an exciting advancement in the field of nanotechnology. They expand the possibilities of noninvasive analysis and have many useful properties, making them potential candidates for numerous novel applications. Notably, they have been shown that they can be tracked by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI and are capable of conjugation with various cell types, including stem cells. In-depth research has been undertaken to establish these benefits, so that a deeper level of understanding of stem cell migratory pathways and differentiation, tumor migration, and improved drug delivery can be achieved. Stem cells have the ability to treat and cure many debilitating diseases with limited side effects, but a main problem that arises is in the noninvasive tracking and analysis of these stem cells. Recently, researchers have acknowledged the use of SPIONs for this purpose and have set out to establish suitable protocols for coating and attachment, so as to bring MRI tracking of SPION-labeled stem cells into common practice. This review paper explains the manner in which SPIONs are produced, conjugated, and tracked using MRI, as well as a discussion on their limitations. A concise summary of recently researched magnetic particle coatings is provided, and the effects of SPIONs on stem cells are evaluated, while animal and human studies investigating the role of SPIONs in stem cell tracking will be explored.Keywords: stem cells, nanoparticle, magnetic

  16. In Vivo Patellar Tracking: Clinical Motions and Patellofemoral Indices

    OpenAIRE

    Nha, Kyung W.; Papannagari, Ramprasad; Gill, Thomas J.; Van de Velde, Samuel K.; Freiberg, Andrew A.; Rubash, Harry E.; Li, Guoan

    2008-01-01

    Patellar tracking during in vivo weightbearing knee function is not well understood. This study investigated patellar tracking of eight subjects during a full range of weightbearing flexion using magnetic resonance imaging and dual orthogonal fluoroscopy. The data were reported using a clinical description based on patellar and femoral joint coordinate systems and using patellar indices based on geometrical features of the femur and patella. The mean patellar shift was within 3 mm over the en...

  17. Error tracking in a clinical biochemistry laboratory

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Szecsi, Pal Bela; Ødum, Lars

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: We report our results for the systematic recording of all errors in a standard clinical laboratory over a 1-year period. METHODS: Recording was performed using a commercial database program. All individuals in the laboratory were allowed to report errors. The testing processes were cl...

  18. Casebook: a system for tracking clinical encounters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kahn, J A; Piggins, J; Blewett, D R; Hassan, L; Raila, W; Link, D; Oliver, D E; Barnett, G O

    1991-01-01

    Casebook is a clinically oriented database, written in MUMPS, and designed for recording the clinical encounters of medical students at Harvard Medical School. Its main goals are to 1) increase student use of computer technology, 2) help faculty evaluate the diversity of clinical experiences on their service, 3) provide data to the faculty on the "typical" experience of medical students on their service to aid in the evaluation of the curriculum and, 4) provide report-generation capabilities for the students to improve dialog with their preceptors. Students are able to enter information on "Problems" and "Procedures" selecting from a pop-up menu of medical terms or by entering free text. Casebook is currently in use in the Medicine, OB/GYN, Pediatric and Ambulatory rotations. At sites where the faculty take an active interest in the use of Casebook students perceive it to be valuable and subsequently use it more frequently. It is currently being expanded for use by medical students in their second, third, and fourth years of school. PMID:1807697

  19. A new method for multiple sperm cells tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imani, Yoones; Teyfouri, Niloufar; Ahmadzadeh, Mohammad Reza; Golabbakhsh, Marzieh

    2014-01-01

    Motion analysis or quality assessment of human sperm cell is great important for clinical applications of male infertility. Sperm tracking is quite complex due to cell collision, occlusion and missed detection. The aim of this study is simultaneous tracking of multiple human sperm cells. In the first step in this research, the frame difference algorithm is used for background subtraction. There are some limitations to select an appropriate threshold value since the output accuracy is strongly dependent on the selected threshold value. To eliminate this dependency, we propose an improved non-linear diffusion filtering in the time domain. Non-linear diffusion filtering is a smoothing and noise removing approach that can preserve edges in images. Many sperms that move with different speeds in different directions eventually coincide. For multiple tracking over time, an optimal matching strategy is introduced that is based on the optimization of a new cost function. A Hungarian search method is utilized to obtain the best matching for all possible candidates. The results show nearly 3.24% frame based error in dataset of videos that contain more than 1 and less than 10 sperm cells. Hence the accuracy rate was 96.76%. These results indicate the validity of the proposed algorithm to perform multiple sperms tracking. PMID:24696807

  20. Tracking Mesenchymal Stem Cells with Iron Oxide Nanoparticle Loaded Poly(lactide-co-glycolide) Microparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Xu, Chenjie; Miranda-Nieves, David; Ankrum, James A.; Matthiesen, Mads Emil; Phillips, Joseph A.; Roes, Isaac; Wojtkiewicz, Gregory R.; Juneja, Vikram; Kultima, Jens Roat; Zhao, Weian; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Lin, Charles P.; Nahrendorf, Matthias; Karp, Jeffrey M.

    2012-01-01

    Monitoring the location, distribution and long-term engraftment of administered cells is critical for demonstrating the success of a cell therapy. Among available imaging-based cell tracking tools, magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is advantageous due to its non-invasiveness, deep penetration, and high spatial resolution. While tracking cells in pre-clinical models via internalized MRI contrast agents (iron oxide nanoparticles, IO-NPs) is a widely used method, IO-NPs suffer from low iron conte...

  1. Tracking Down Mutations Cell by Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosik, Kenneth S

    2016-03-16

    Using somatic cell nuclear transfer, Hazen et al. (2016) examined clonally expanded single neurons for mutations and found ∼100 mutations from a variety of classes. Post-mitotic mutations in individual neurons represent an exploratory direction for finding fundamental origins of neurodegeneration. PMID:26985720

  2. A benchmark for comparison of cell tracking algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Maška, Martin; Ulman, Vladimír; Svoboda, David; Matula, Pavel; Matula, Petr; Ederra, Cristina; Urbiola, Ainhoa; España, Tomás; Venkatesan, Subramanian; Balak, Deepak M.W.; Karas, Pavel; Bolcková, Tereza; Štreitová, Markéta; Carthel, Craig; Coraluppi, Stefano

    2014-01-01

    Motivation: Automatic tracking of cells in multidimensional time-lapse fluorescence microscopy is an important task in many biomedical applications. A novel framework for objective evaluation of cell tracking algorithms has been established under the auspices of the IEEE International Symposium on Biomedical Imaging 2013 Cell Tracking Challenge. In this article, we present the logistics, datasets, methods and results of the challenge and lay down the principles for future uses of this benchma...

  3. Mesenchymal stem cell tracking in the intervertebral disc

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Charles Handley; Tony Goldschlager; David Oehme; Peter Ghosh; Graham Jenkin

    2015-01-01

    Low back pain is a common clinical problem, whichleads to significant social, economic and public healthcosts. Intervertebral disc (IVD) degeneration is acceptedas a common cause of low back pain. Initially, thisis characterized by a loss of proteoglycans from thenucleus pulposus resulting in loss of tissue hydrationand hydrostatic pressure. Conservative management,including analgesia and physiotherapy often fails andsurgical treatment, such as spinal fusion, is required. Stemcells offer an exciting possible regenerative approachto IVD disease. Preclinical research has demonstratedpromising biochemical, histological and radiological resultsin restoring degenerate IVDs. Cell tracking provides anopportunity to develop an in-depth understanding ofstem cell survival, differentiation and migration, enablingoptimization of stem cell treatment. Magnetic ResonanceImaging (MRI) is a non-invasive, non-ionizing imagingmodality with high spatial resolution, ideally suited for stemcell tracking. Furthermore, novel MRI sequences have thepotential to quantitatively assess IVD disease, providingan improved method to review response to biologicaltreatment. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticleshave been extensively researched for the purpose of celltracking. These particles are biocompatible, non-toxicand act as excellent MRI contrast agents. This review willexplore recent advances and issues in stem cell trackingand molecular imaging in relation to the IVD.

  4. Clinical implementation of target tracking by breathing synchronized delivery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Target-tracking techniques can be categorized based on the mechanism of the feedback loop. In real time tracking, breathing-delivery phase correlation is provided to the treatment delivery hardware. Clinical implementation of target tracking in real time requires major hardware modifications. In breathing synchronized delivery (BSD), the patient is guided to breathe in accordance with target motion derived from four-dimensional computed tomography (4D-CT). Violations of mechanical limitations of hardware are to be avoided at the treatment planning stage. Hardware modifications are not required. In this article, using sliding window IMRT delivery as an example, we have described step-by-step the implementation of target tracking by the BSD technique: (1) A breathing guide is developed from patient's normal breathing pattern. The patient tries to reproduce this guiding cycle by following the display in the goggles; (2) 4D-CT scans are acquired at all the phases of the breathing cycle; (3) The average tumor trajectory is obtained by deformable image registration of 4D-CT datasets and is smoothed by Fourier filtering; (4) Conventional IMRT planning is performed using the images at reference phase (full exhalation phase) and a leaf sequence based on optimized fluence map is generated; (5) Assuming the patient breathes with a reproducible breathing pattern and the machine maintains a constant dose rate, the treatment process is correlated with the breathing phase; (6) The instantaneous average tumor displacement is overlaid on the dMLC position at corresponding phase; and (7) DMLC leaf speed and acceleration are evaluated to ensure treatment delivery. A custom-built mobile phantom driven by a computer-controlled stepper motor was used in the dosimetry verification. A stepper motor was programmed such that the phantom moved according to the linear component of tumor motion used in BSD treatment planning. A conventional plan was delivered on the phantom with and without

  5. Biological Insights from Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Sanamrad, Arash

    2014-01-01

    Single-particle tracking is a technique that allows for quantitative analysis of the localization and movement of particles. In this technique, trajectories are constructed by determining and connecting the positions of individual particles from consecutive images. Recent advances have made it possible to track hundreds of particles in an individual cell by labeling the particles of interest with photoactivatable or photoconvertible fluorescent proteins and tracking one or a few at a time. Si...

  6. Accelerated fluorine-19 MRI cell tracking using compressed sensing

    OpenAIRE

    Zhong, Jia; Mills, Parker H.; Hitchens, T. Kevin; Ahrens, Eric T.

    2012-01-01

    Cell tracking using perfluorocarbon (PFC) labels and fluorine-19 (19F) MRI is a noninvasive approach to visualize and quantify cell populations in vivo. In this study, we investigated three-dimensional (3D) compressed sensing (CS) methods to accelerate 19F MRI data acquisition for cell tracking and evaluate the impact of acceleration on 19F signal quantification. We show that a greater than eight-fold reduction in imaging time was feasible without pronounced image degradation and with minimal...

  7. Engineering cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The lack of sensitive biocompatible particle track detectors has so far limited parallel detection of physical energy deposition and biological response. Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3:C,Mg single crystals combined with confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM) provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution limited by light diffraction. Here we report the development of next generation cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). The biocompatibility of FNTDs was tested using six different cell lines, i.e. human non-small cell lung carcinoma (A549), glioblastoma (U87), androgen independent prostate cancer (PC3), epidermoid cancer (A431) and murine (VmDk) glioma SMA-560. To evaluate cell adherence, viability and conformal coverage of the crystals different seeding densities and alternative coating with extracellular matrix (fibronectin) was tested. Carbon irradiation was performed in Bragg peak (initial 270.55 MeV u−1). A series of cell compartment specific fluorescence stains including nuclear (HOECHST), membrane (Glut-1), cytoplasm (Calcein AM, CM-DiI) were tested on Cell-Fit-HDs and a single CLSM was employed to co-detect the physical (crystal) as well as the biological (cell layer) information. The FNTD provides a biocompatible surface. Among the cells tested, A549 cells formed the most uniform, viable, tightly packed epithelial like monolayer. The ion track information was not compromised in Cell-Fit-HD as compared to the FNTD alone. Neither cell coating and culturing, nor additional staining procedures affected the properties of the FNTD surface to detect ion tracks. Standard immunofluorescence and live staining procedures could be employed to co-register cell biology and ion track information. The Cell-Fit-Hybrid Detector system is a promising platform for a multitude of studies linking biological response to energy deposition at high level of optical microscopy resolution

  8. Correlation of Particle Traversals with Clonogenic Survival Using Cell-Fluorescent Ion Track Hybrid Detector

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivana eDokic

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Development of novel approaches linking the physical characteristics of particles with biological responses are of high relevance for the field of particle therapy. In radiobiology, the clonogenic survival of cells is considered the gold standard assay for assessment of cellular sensitivity to ionizing radiation. Towards further development of next generation biodosimeters in particle therapy, cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-FIT-HD was recently engineered by our group and successfully employed to study physical particle track information in correlation with irradiation- induced DNA damage in cell nuclei. In this work, we investigated the feasibility of Cell-FIT-HD as a tool to study the effects of clinical beams on cellular clonogenic survival. Tumor cells were grown on the FNTD as cell culture, mimicking the standard procedures for clonogenic assay. Cell-FIT-HD was used to detect the spatial distribution of particle tracks within colony-initiating cells. The physical data were associated to radiation induced foci as surrogates for DNA double strand breakages (DSB, the hallmark of radiation ‐induced cell lethality. Long‐term cell fate was monitored to determine the ability of cells to form colonies. We report the first successful detection of particle traversal within colony-initiating cells at subcellular resolution using Cell-FIT-HD.

  9. Superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles for direct labeling of stem cells and in vivo MRI tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Saejeong J; Lewis, Bobbi; Steiner, Mark-Steven; Bissa, Ursula V; Dose, Christian; Frank, Joseph A

    2016-01-01

    To develop effective stem cell therapies, it is important to track therapeutic cells non-invasively and monitor homing to areas of pathology. The purpose of this study was to design and evaluate the labeling efficiency of commercially available dextran-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles, FeraTrack Direct (FTD), in various stem and immune cells; assess the cytotoxicity and tolerability of the FTD in stem cells; and monitor stem cell homing using FTD-labeled bone-marrow-derived mesenchymal stromal cells (BMSCs) and neural stem cells (NSCs) in a tumor model by in vivo MRI. BMSCs, NSCs, hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), T-lymphocytes, and monocytes were labeled effectively with FTD without the need for transfection agents, and Prussian blue (PB) staining and transmission electron microscopy (TEM) confirmed intracellular uptake of the agent. The viability, proliferation, and functionality of the labeled cells were minimally or not affected after labeling. When 10(6) FTD-labeled BMSCs or NSCs were injected into C6 glioma bearing nude mice, the cells homing to the tumors were detected as hypointense regions within the tumor using 3 T clinical MRI up to 10 days post injection. Histological analysis confirmed the homing of injected cells to the tumor by the presence of PB positive cells that are not macrophages. Labeling of stem cells or immune cells with FTD was non-toxic, and should facilitate the translation of this agent to clinical trials for evaluation of trafficking of cells by MRI. PMID:26234504

  10. Dynamically constrained pipeline for tracking neural progenitor cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders; Holm, Peter;

    2013-01-01

    . A mitosis detector constructed from empirical observations of cells in a pre-mitotic state interacts with the graph formulation to dynamically allow for cell mitosis when appropriate. Track consistency is ensured by introducing pragmatic constraints and the notion of blob states. We validate the...

  11. Mast cell tumors: clinical management

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mast cell tumors are commonly diagnosed in small animal practice; however, appropriate treatment and prognosis remain controversial. These tumors are considered malignant in dogs but generally are benign in cats. Mast cell tumors are associated with various clinical signs that are related to the release of biologic mediators from the granules of the neoplastic cells, and these signs may be the primary presenting complaint. Clinical staging as well as histopathologic grading are important in determining the treatment of choice and prognosis. Treatment consists of several options, including surgery, radiation therapy, and chemotherapy. This article summarizes the available information regarding diagnosis, treatment, and prognosis of mast cell tumors and makes recommendations for therapy

  12. Time-resolved local strain tracking microscopy for cell mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydin, O.; Aksoy, B.; Akalin, O. B.; Bayraktar, H.; Alaca, B. E.

    2016-02-01

    A uniaxial cell stretching technique to measure time-resolved local substrate strain while simultaneously imaging adherent cells is presented. The experimental setup comprises a uniaxial stretcher platform compatible with inverted microscopy and transparent elastomer samples with embedded fluorescent beads. This integration enables the acquisition of real-time spatiotemporal data, which is then processed using a single-particle tracking algorithm to track the positions of fluorescent beads for the subsequent computation of local strain. The present local strain tracking method is demonstrated using polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) samples of rectangular and dogbone geometries. The comparison of experimental results and finite element simulations for the two sample geometries illustrates the capability of the present system to accurately quantify local deformation even when the strain distribution is non-uniform over the sample. For a regular dogbone sample, the experimentally obtained value of local strain at the center of the sample is 77%, while the average strain calculated using the applied cross-head displacement is 48%. This observation indicates that considerable errors may arise when cross-head measurement is utilized to estimate strain in the case of non-uniform sample geometry. Finally, the compatibility of the proposed platform with biological samples is tested using a unibody PDMS sample with a well to contain cells and culture media. HeLa S3 cells are plated on collagen-coated samples and cell adhesion and proliferation are observed. Samples with adherent cells are then stretched to demonstrate simultaneous cell imaging and tracking of embedded fluorescent beads.

  13. Clinical applications of cells labelling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blood cells labelled with radionuclides are reviewed and main applications are described. Red blood cell labelling by both random and specific principle. A table with most important clinical uses, 99mTc labelling of RBC are described pre tinning and in vivo reduction of Tc, in vitro labelling and administration of labelled RBC and in vivo modified technique. Labelled leucocytes with several 99mTc-complex radiopharmaceuticals by in vitro technique and specific monoclonal s for white cells(neutrofiles). Labelled platelets for clinical use and research by in vitro technique and in vivo labelling

  14. Track segment studies with Chinese hamster cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Survival curves of near-diploid and near-tetraploid Chinese hamster cell cultures following irradiation by an 241Am α source indicate different growth rates for the two clones. Possible reasons for the difference are discussed

  15. A New Method for Preparing Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Labeling with Ferumoxytol for Cell Tracking by MRI.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Li; Tseng, Lanya; Ye, Qing; Wu, Yijen L; Bain, Daniel J; Ho, Chien

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are among the major stem cells used for cell therapy and regenerative medicine. In-vivo cell-tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is crucial for regenerative medicine, allowing verification that the transplanted cells reach the targeted sites. Cellular MRI combined with superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) contrast agents is an effective cell-tracking method. Here, we are reporting a new "bio-mimicry" method by making use of the "in-vivo environment" of MSCs to prepare native MSCs, so that (i) the phagocytic activity of cultured MSCs can be recovered and expanded MSCs can be ex-vivo labeled with Ferumoxytol, which is currently the only FDA approved SPIO nanoparticles for human use. Using our new method, 7-day cultured MSCs regain the capability to take up Ferumoxytol and exhibit an intracellular iron concentration of 2.50 ± 0.50 pg/MSC, comparable to that obtained by using Ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine nanocomplex; and (ii) cells can be re-sized to more native size, reducing from 32.0 ± 7.2 μm to 19.5 ± 5.2 μm. Our method can be very useful for expanding MSCs and labeling with Ferumoxytol, without the need for transfection agents and/or electroporation, allowing cell-tracking by MRI in both pre-clinical and clinical studies. PMID:27188664

  16. Evaluation of motion tracking by cell survival measurements

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At GSI patients with stationary tumors are treated with a rasterscanned carbon ion beam. For moving targets interplay possibly deteriorates the dose distribution because target motion and scanner motion interfere. Several motion mitigation techniques are proposed to solve this problem. We use a fully integrated 3D online motion compensation system to track target motion of phantoms which includes adaptation of the Bragg peak position. To validate motion tracking with biological systems we conducted a series of repetitive experiments with hamster cells grown in wellplates. The wellplates were placed on a sliding table to induce lateral as well as longitudinal motion. Irradiations were performed with stationary wellplates and by tracking moving wellplates. Multiple samples were irradiated to gain statistics. As a result, we observed no significant difference in cell survival between the motion compensated measurements in comparison to a stationary reference irradiation. We conclude that our motion compensation system allows correct delivery of the biologically effective dose to moving phantoms

  17. Tracking hypoxic signaling within encapsulated cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Skiles, Matthew L; Sahai, Suchit; Blanchette, James O

    2011-01-01

    In Diabetes mellitus type 1, autoimmune destruction of the pancreatic β-cells results in loss of insulin production and potentially lethal hyperglycemia. As an alternative treatment option to exogenous insulin injection, transplantation of functional pancreatic tissue has been explored. This approach offers the promise of a more natural, long-term restoration of normoglycemia. Protection of the donor tissue from the host's immune system is required to prevent rejection and encapsulation is a method used to help achieve this aim. Biologically-derived materials, such as alginate and agarose, have been the traditional choice for capsule construction but may induce inflammation or fibrotic overgrowth which can impede nutrient and oxygen transport. Alternatively, synthetic poly(ethylene glycol) (PEG)-based hydrogels are non-degrading, easily functionalized, available at high purity, have controllable pore size, and are extremely biocompatible. As an additional benefit, PEG hydrogels may be formed rapidly in a simple photo-crosslinking reaction that does not require application of non-physiological temperatures. Such a procedure is described here. In the crosslinking reaction, UV degradation of the photoinitiator, 1-[4-(2-Hydroxyethoxy)-phenyl]-2-hydroxy-2-methyl-1-propane-1-one (Irgacure 2959), produces free radicals which attack the vinyl carbon-carbon double bonds of dimethacrylated PEG (PEGDM) inducing crosslinking at the chain ends. Crosslinking can be achieved within 10 minutes. PEG hydrogels constructed in such a manner have been shown to favorably support cells, and the low photoinitiator concentration and brief exposure to UV irradiation is not detrimental to viability and function of the encapsulated tissue. While we methacrylate our PEG with the method described below, PEGDM can also be directly purchased from vendors such as Sigma. An inherent consequence of encapsulation is isolation of the cells from a vascular network. Supply of nutrients, notably oxygen

  18. Biocompatible fluorescent nanoparticles for in vivo stem cell tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Efficient application of stem cells to the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases requires safe cell tracking to follow stem cell fate over time in the host environment after transplantation. In this work, for the first time, fluorescent and biocompatible methyl methacrylate (MMA)-based nanoparticles (fluoNPs) were synthesized through a free-radical co-polymerization process with a fluorescent macromonomer obtained by linking Rhodamine B and hydroxyethyl methacrylate. We demonstrate that the fluoNPs produced by polymerization of MMA–Rhodamine complexes (1) were efficient for the labeling and tracking of multipotent human amniotic fluid cells (hAFCs); (2) did not alter the main biological features of hAFCs (such as viability, cell growth and metabolic activity); (3) enabled us to determine the longitudinal bio-distribution of hAFCs in different brain areas after graft in the brain ventricles of healthy mice by a direct fluorescence-based technique. The reliability of our approach was furthermore confirmed by magnetic resonance imaging analyses, carried out by incubating hAFCs with both superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles and fluoNPs. Our data suggest that these finely tunable and biocompatible fluoNPs can be exploited for the longitudinal tracking of stem cells. (paper)

  19. The first clinical implementation of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: We report on the clinical process, quality assurance, and geometric and dosimetric results of the first clinical implementation of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking which occurred on 28 November 2013 at the Northern Sydney Cancer Centre. Methods: An electromagnetic transponder-based positioning system (Calypso) was modified to send the target position output to in-house-developed MLC tracking code, which adjusts the leaf positions to optimally align the treatment beam with the real-time target position. Clinical process and quality assurance procedures were developed and performed. The first clinical implementation of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking was for a prostate cancer patient being treated with dual-arc VMAT (RapidArc). For the first fraction of the first patient treatment of electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking we recorded the in-room time and transponder positions, and performed dose reconstruction to estimate the delivered dose and also the dose received had MLC tracking not been used. Results: The total in-room time was 21 min with 2 min of beam delivery. No additional time was needed for MLC tracking and there were no beam holds. The average prostate position from the initial setup was 1.2 mm, mostly an anterior shift. Dose reconstruction analysis of the delivered dose with MLC tracking showed similar isodose and target dose volume histograms to the planned treatment and a 4.6% increase in the fractional rectal V60. Dose reconstruction without motion compensation showed a 30% increase in the fractional rectal V60 from that planned, even for the small motion. Conclusions: The real-time beam-target correction method, electromagnetic transponder-guided MLC tracking, has been translated to the clinic. This achievement represents a milestone in improving geometric and dosimetric accuracy, and by inference treatment outcomes, in cancer radiotherapy

  20. In vivo cell tracking and quantification method in adult zebrafish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Li; Alt, Clemens; Li, Pulin; White, Richard M.; Zon, Leonard I.; Wei, Xunbin; Lin, Charles P.

    2012-03-01

    Zebrafish have become a powerful vertebrate model organism for drug discovery, cancer and stem cell research. A recently developed transparent adult zebrafish using double pigmentation mutant, called casper, provide unparalleled imaging power in in vivo longitudinal analysis of biological processes at an anatomic resolution not readily achievable in murine or other systems. In this paper we introduce an optical method for simultaneous visualization and cell quantification, which combines the laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) and the in vivo flow cytometry (IVFC). The system is designed specifically for non-invasive tracking of both stationary and circulating cells in adult zebrafish casper, under physiological conditions in the same fish over time. The confocal imaging part in this system serves the dual purposes of imaging fish tissue microstructure and a 3D navigation tool to locate a suitable vessel for circulating cell counting. The multi-color, multi-channel instrument allows the detection of multiple cell populations or different tissues or organs simultaneously. We demonstrate initial testing of this novel instrument by imaging vasculature and tracking circulating cells in CD41: GFP/Gata1: DsRed transgenic casper fish whose thrombocytes/erythrocytes express the green and red fluorescent proteins. Circulating fluorescent cell incidents were recorded and counted repeatedly over time and in different types of vessels. Great application opportunities in cancer and stem cell researches are discussed.

  1. Molecular tracking of antigen-specific T cell clones in neurological immune-mediated disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muraro, Paolo A.; Wandinger, Klaus-Peter; Bielekova, Bibiana; Gran, Bruno; Marques, Adriana; Utz, Ursula; McFarland, Henry F.; Jacobson, Steve; Martin, Roland

    2016-01-01

    Summary T cells recognizing self or microbial antigens may trigger or reactivate immune-mediated diseases. Monitoring the frequency of specific T cell clonotypes to assess a possible link with the course of disease has been a difficult task with currently available technology. Our goal was to track individual candidate pathogenic T cell clones, selected on the basis of previous extensive studies from patients with immune-mediated disorders of the CNS, including multiple sclerosis, HTLV-I associated myelopathy/tropical spastic paraparesis (HAM/ TSP) and chronic Lyme neuroborreliosis. We developed and applied a highly specific and sensitive technique to track single CD4+ and CD8+ T cell clones through the detection and quantification of T cell receptor (TCR) α or β chain complementarity-determining region 3 transcripts by real-time reverse transcriptase (RT)-PCR. We examined the frequency of the candidate pathogenic T cell clones in the peripheral blood and CSF during the course of neurological disease. Using this approach, we detected variations of clonal frequencies that appeared to be related to clinical course, significant enrichment in the CSF, or both. By integrating clono-type tracking with direct visualization of antigen-specific staining, we showed that a single T cell clone contributed substantially to the overall recognition of the viral peptide/MHC complex in a patient with HAM/ TSP. T cell clonotype tracking is a powerful new technology enabling further elucidation of the dynamics of expansion of autoreactive or pathogen-specific T cells that mediate pathological or protective immune responses in neurological disorders. PMID:12477694

  2. White Matter Fiber Tracking Computation Based on Diffusion Tensor Imaging for Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dellani, Paulo R.; Glaser, Martin; Wille, Paulo R.; Vucurevic, Goran; Stadie, Axel; Bauermann, Thomas; Tropine, Andrei; Perneczky, Axel; von Wangenheim, Aldo; Stoeter, Peter

    2006-01-01

    Fiber tracking allows the in vivo reconstruction of human brain white matter fiber trajectories based on magnetic resonance diffusion tensor imaging (MR-DTI), but its application in the clinical routine is still in its infancy. In this study, we present a new software for fiber tracking, developed on top of a general-purpose DICOM (digital imaging and communications in medicine) framework, which can be easily integrated into existing picture archiving and communication system (PACS) of radiol...

  3. Tracking and localization of calmodulin in live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, Carey K; Harms, Gregory S

    2016-08-01

    The calcium signaling protein calmodulin (CaM) interacts with many target proteins inside the cell to regulate a wide range of biological signals. CaM's availability to propagate signals depends on its mobility, which may be regulated by interactions with multiple target proteins. We detected single molecules of CaM labeled with a fluorescent dye and injected into living HEK 293 cells, and we used high-speed, wide-field, single-molecule imaging to track single CaM molecules. Single-molecule trajectories were analyzed to characterize the motions of individual CaM molecules. Single-molecule localization resolved CaM positions with a position accuracy of tracking demonstrated the presence of a wide range of mobilities of individual calmodulin molecules in a cell, with diffusion coefficients ranging from 10μm(2)s(-1). For molecules confined to small regions of the cell, super-resolved images of presumed signaling complexes were recovered. Individual trajectories were classified as normal diffusion, confined diffusion, or directed motion, and could suggest how the individual CaM molecules were bound in the cell. The results show that interactions of CaM with target proteins result in decreased translational mobilities of a significant fraction of CaM molecules inside cells. The work presented here illustrates methods that can characterize location, mobilities, and the availability of signaling molecules in live cells. PMID:27113857

  4. Development of Multifunctional Magnetic Nanoparticles for Genetic Engineering and Tracking of Neural Stem Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adams, Christopher; Israel, Liron Limor; Ostrovsky, Stella; Taylor, Arthur; Poptani, Harish; Lellouche, Jean-Paul; Chari, Divya

    2016-04-01

    Genetic modification of cell transplant populations and cell tracking ability are key underpinnings for effective cell therapies. Current strategies to achieve these goals utilize methods which are unsuitable for clinical translation because of related safety issues, and multiple protocol steps adding to cost and complexity. Multifunctional magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) offering dual mode gene delivery and imaging contrast capacity offer a valuable tool in this context. Despite their key benefits, there is a critical lack of neurocompatible and multifunctional particles described for use with transplant populations for neurological applications. Here, a systematic screen of MNPs (using a core shown to cause contrast in magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)) bearing various surface chemistries (polyethylenimine (PEI) and oxidized PEI and hybrids of oxidized PEI/alginic acid, PEI/chitosan and PEI/polyamidoamine) is performed to test their ability to genetically engineer neural stem cells (NSCs; a cell population of high clinical relevance for central nervous system disorders). It is demonstrated that gene delivery to NSCs can be safely achieved using two of the developed formulations (PEI and oxPEI/alginic acid) when used in conjunction with oscillating magnetofection technology. After transfection, intracellular particles can be detected by histological procedures with labeled cells displaying contrast in MRI (for real time cell tracking). PMID:26867130

  5. Tracking single mRNA molecules in live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Hyungseok C.; Lee, Byung Hun; Lim, Kiseong; Son, Jae Seok; Song, Minho S.; Park, Hye Yoon

    2016-06-01

    mRNAs inside cells interact with numerous RNA-binding proteins, microRNAs, and ribosomes that together compose a highly heterogeneous population of messenger ribonucleoprotein (mRNP) particles. Perhaps one of the best ways to investigate the complex regulation of mRNA is to observe individual molecules. Single molecule imaging allows the collection of quantitative and statistical data on subpopulations and transient states that are otherwise obscured by ensemble averaging. In addition, single particle tracking reveals the sequence of events that occur in the formation and remodeling of mRNPs in real time. Here, we review the current state-of-the-art techniques in tagging, delivery, and imaging to track single mRNAs in live cells. We also discuss how these techniques are applied to extract dynamic information on the transcription, transport, localization, and translation of mRNAs. These studies demonstrate how single molecule tracking is transforming the understanding of mRNA regulation in live cells.

  6. A track-event theory of cell survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Besserer, Juergen; Schneider, Uwe [Zuerich Univ. (Switzerland). Inst. of Physics; Radiotherapy Hirslanden, Zuerich (Switzerland)

    2015-09-01

    When fractionation schemes for hypofractionation and stereotactic body radiotherapy are considered, a reliable cell survival model at high dose is needed for calculating doses of similar biological effectiveness. In this work a simple model for cell survival which is valid also at high dose is developed from Poisson statistics. An event is defined by two double strand breaks (DSB) on the same or different chromosomes. An event is always lethal due to direct lethal damage or lethal binary misrepair by the formation of chromosome aberrations. Two different mechanisms can produce events: one-track events (OTE) or two-track-events (TTE). The target for an OTE is always a lethal event, the target for an TTE is one DSB. At least two TTEs on the same or different chromosomes are necessary to produce an event. Both, the OTE and the TTE are statistically independent. From the stochastic nature of cell kill which is described by the Poisson distribution the cell survival probability was derived. It was shown that a solution based on Poisson statistics exists for cell survival. It exhibits exponential cell survival at high dose and a finite gradient of cell survival at vanishing dose, which is in agreement with experimental cell studies. The model fits the experimental data nearly as well as the three-parameter formula of Hug-Kellerer and is only based on two free parameters. It is shown that the LQ formalism is an approximation of the model derived in this work. It could be also shown that the derived model predicts a fractionated cell survival experiment better than the LQ-model. It was shown that cell survival can be described with a simple analytical formula on the basis of Poisson statistics. This solution represents in the limit of large dose the typical exponential behavior and predicts cell survival after fractionated dose application better than the LQ-model.

  7. Nanomedicine for Cancer Immunotherapy: Tracking Cancer-Specific T-Cells in Vivo with Gold Nanoparticles and CT Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meir, Rinat; Shamalov, Katerina; Betzer, Oshra; Motiei, Menachem; Horovitz-Fried, Miryam; Yehuda, Ronen; Popovtzer, Aron; Popovtzer, Rachela; Cohen, Cyrille J

    2015-06-23

    Application of immune cell-based therapy in routine clinical practice is challenging due to the poorly understood mechanisms underlying success or failure of treatment. Development of accurate and quantitative imaging techniques for noninvasive cell tracking can provide essential knowledge for elucidating these mechanisms. We designed a novel method for longitudinal and quantitative in vivo cell tracking, based on the superior visualization abilities of classical X-ray computed tomography (CT), combined with state-of-the-art nanotechnology. Herein, T-cells were transduced to express a melanoma-specific T-cell receptor and then labeled with gold nanoparticles (GNPs) as a CT contrast agent. The GNP-labeled T-cells were injected intravenously to mice bearing human melanoma xenografts, and whole-body CT imaging allowed examination of the distribution, migration, and kinetics of T-cells. Using CT, we found that transduced T-cells accumulated at the tumor site, as opposed to nontransduced cells. Labeling with gold nanoparticles did not affect T-cell function, as demonstrated both in vitro, by cytokine release and proliferation assays, and in vivo, as tumor regression was observed. Moreover, to validate the accuracy and reliability of the proposed cell tracking technique, T-cells were labeled both with green fluorescent protein for fluorescence imaging, and with GNPs for CT imaging. A remarkable correlation in signal intensity at the tumor site was observed between the two imaging modalities, at all time points examined, providing evidence for the accuracy of our CT cell tracking abilities. This new method for cell tracking with CT offers a valuable tool for research, and more importantly for clinical applications, to study the fate of immune cells in cancer immunotherapy. PMID:26039633

  8. Large scale tracking of stem cells using sparse coding and coupled graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Dahl, Anders Lindbjerg; Holm, Peter;

    Stem cell tracking is an inherently large scale problem. The challenge is to identify and track hundreds or thousands of cells over a time period of several weeks. This requires robust methods that can leverage the knowledge of specialists on the field. The tracking pipeline presented here consists...... of a dictionary learning method for segmentation of phase contrast microscopy images. Linking of the cells between two images is solved by a graph formulation of the tracking problem....

  9. TRACKING STEM CELLS IN AN INHERENTLY REGENRATIVE ENVIRONMENT

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Hagensen, Mette;

    2012-01-01

    vertebrates mastering the ability to replace most tissues in addition to whole limbs, tail, jaw, etc. following damage or amputation. Regeneration in this species is taking place by dedifferentiation of cells to form a collection of stem cells, the regenerative blastema, that proliferate and regenerate lost...... tissue without scar formation. Modern regenerative medicine seeks way to adopt these capacities to regenerative therapies in humans. Though much effort is put into the development of stem cell therapies, there exists currently no satisfying technique for non-invasive follow up examinations of such...... therapies. The objective of this study was to non-invasively evaluate regeneration over time in a truly regenerative process, the regeneration of an axolotl limb, employing superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIO) contrast agents for stem cell tracking in MRI. Materials and Methods: Amputation of one...

  10. Tracking the mechanical dynamics of human embryonic stem cell chromatin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinde Elizabeth

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background A plastic chromatin structure has emerged as fundamental to the self-renewal and pluripotent capacity of embryonic stem (ES cells. Direct measurement of chromatin dynamics in vivo is, however, challenging as high spatiotemporal resolution is required. Here, we present a new tracking-based method which can detect high frequency chromatin movement and quantify the mechanical dynamics of chromatin in live cells. Results We use this method to study how the mechanical properties of chromatin movement in human embryonic stem cells (hESCs are modulated spatiotemporally during differentiation into cardiomyocytes (CM. Notably, we find that pluripotency is associated with a highly discrete, energy-dependent frequency of chromatin movement that we refer to as a ‘breathing’ state. We find that this ‘breathing’ state is strictly dependent on the metabolic state of the cell and is progressively silenced during differentiation. Conclusions We thus propose that the measured chromatin high frequency movements in hESCs may represent a hallmark of pluripotency and serve as a mechanism to maintain the genome in a transcriptionally accessible state. This is a result that could not have been observed without the high spatial and temporal resolution provided by this novel tracking method.

  11. Paramagnetic particles carried by cell-penetrating peptide tracking of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells, a research in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ability to track the distribution and differentiation of stem cells by high-resolution imaging techniques would have significant clinical and research implications. In this study, a model cell-penetrating peptide was used to carry gadolinium particles for magnetic resonance imaging of the mesenchymal stem cells. The mesenchymal stem cells were isolated from rat bone marrow by Percoll and identified by osteogenic differentiation in vitro. The cell-penetrating peptides labeled with fluorescein-5-isothiocyanate and gadolinium were synthesized by a solid-phase peptide synthesis method and the relaxivity of cell-penetrating peptide-gadolinium paramagnetic conjugate on 400 MHz nuclear magnetic resonance was 5.7311 ± 0.0122 mmol-1 s-1, higher than that of diethylenetriamine pentaacetic acid gadolinium (p < 0.05). Fluorescein imaging confirmed that this new peptide could internalize into the cytoplasm and nucleus. Gadolinium was efficiently internalized into mesenchymal stem cells by the peptide in a time- or concentration-dependent fashion, resulting in intercellular T1 relaxation enhancement, which was obviously detected by 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging. Cytotoxicity assay and flow cytometric analysis showed the intercellular contrast medium incorporation did not affect cell viability and membrane potential gradient. The research in vitro suggests that the newly constructed peptides could be a vector for tracking mesenchymal stem cells

  12. Dissecting the Cell Entry Pathway of Dengue Virus by Single-Particle Tracking in Living Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schaar, Hilde M.; Rust, Michael J.; Chen, Chen; van der Ende-Metselaar, Heidi; Wilschut, Jan; Zhuang, Xiaowei; Smit, Jolanda M.

    2008-01-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is an enveloped RNA virus that causes the most common arthropod-borne infection worldwide. The mechanism by which DENV infects the host cell remains unclear. In this work, we used live-cell imaging and single-virus tracking to investigate the cell entry, endocytic trafficking, an

  13. Can eye-tracking technology improve situational awareness in paramedic clinical education?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Williams B

    2013-11-01

    Full Text Available Brett Williams,1 Andrew Quested,1 Simon Cooper21Department of Community Emergency Health and Paramedic Practice, 2School of Nursing and Midwifery, Berwick, Monash University, Frankston, VIC, AustraliaAbstract: Human factors play a significant part in clinical error. Situational awareness (SA means being aware of one's surroundings, comprehending the present situation, and being able to predict outcomes. It is a key human skill that, when properly applied, is associated with reducing medical error: eye-tracking technology can be used to provide an objective and qualitative measure of the initial perception component of SA. Feedback from eye-tracking technology can be used to improve the understanding and teaching of SA in clinical contexts, and consequently, has potential for reducing clinician error and the concomitant adverse events.Keywords: eye-tracking, paramedic, situational awareness, medical error, pre hospital

  14. Strain Imaging: The Emergence of Speckle Tracking Echocardiography into Clinical Pediatric Cardiology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colquitt, John L; Pignatelli, Ricardo H

    2016-01-01

    Speckle tracking echocardiography measures myocardial strain and allows for the quantification of regional and global left and right ventricular function. A growing body of literature is supporting its transition from research into clinical practice. This article aims to provide a practical review of strain imaging as it applies to congenital and pediatric heart disease, with the goals of increasing literacy and advocating for greater clinical integration. PMID:26879728

  15. 19F magnetic resonance imaging for stem/progenitor cell tracking with multiple unique perfluorocarbon nanobeacons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partlow, Kathryn C; Chen, Junjie; Brant, Jason A; Neubauer, Anne M; Meyerrose, Todd E; Creer, Michael H; Nolta, Jan A; Caruthers, Shelton D; Lanza, Gregory M; Wickline, Samuel A

    2007-06-01

    MRI has been employed to elucidate the migratory behavior of stem/progenitor cells noninvasively in vivo with traditional proton (1H) imaging of iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells. Alternatively, we demonstrate that fluorine (19F) MRI of cells labeled with different types of liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticles produces unique and sensitive cell markers distinct from any tissue background signal. To define the utility for cell tracking, mononuclear cells harvested from human umbilical cord blood were grown under proendothelial conditions and labeled with nanoparticles composed of two distinct PFC cores (perfluorooctylbromide and perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether). The sensitivity for detecting and imaging labeled cells was defined on 11.7T (research) and 1.5T (clinical) scanners. Stem/progenitor cells (CD34+ CD133+ CD31+) readily internalized PFC nanoparticles without aid of adjunctive labeling techniques, and cells remained functional in vivo. PFC-labeled cells exhibited distinct 19F signals and were readily detected after both local and intravenous injection. PFC nanoparticles provide an unequivocal and unique signature for stem/progenitor cells, enable spatial cell localization with 19F MRI, and permit quantification and detection of multiple fluorine signatures via 19F MR spectroscopy. This method should facilitate longitudinal investigation of cellular events in vivo for multiple cell types simultaneously. PMID:17284484

  16. 19F magnetic resonance imaging for stem/progenitor cell tracking with multiple unique perfluorocarbon nanobeacons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Partlow KC; Chen J; Brant JA; Neubauer AM; Meyerrose TE; Creer MH; Nolta JA; Caruthers SD; Lanza GM; Wickline SA

    2007-06-01

    MRI has been employed to elucidate the migratory behavior of stem/progenitor cells noninvasively in vivo with traditional proton (1H) imaging of iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells. Alternatively, we demonstrate that fluorine (19F) MRI of cells labeled with different types of liquid perfluorocarbon (PFC) nanoparticles produces unique and sensitive cell markers distinct from any tissue background signal. To define the utility for cell tracking, mononuclear cells harvested from human umbilical cord blood were grown under proendothelial conditions and labeled with nanoparticles composed of two distinct PFC cores (perfluorooctylbromide and perfluoro-15-crown-5 ether). The sensitivity for detecting and imaging labeled cells was defined on 11.7T (research) and 1.5T (clinical) scanners. Stem/progenitor cells (CD34+ CD133+ CD31+) readily internalized PFC nanoparticles without aid of adjunctive labeling techniques, and cells remained functional in vivo. PFC-labeled cells exhibited distinct 19F signals and were readily detected after both local and intravenous injection. PFC nanoparticles provide an unequivocal and unique signature for stem/progenitor cells, enable spatial cell localization with 19F MRI, and permit quantification and detection of multiple fluorine signatures via 19F MR spectroscopy. This method should facilitate longitudinal investigation of cellular events in vivo for multiple cell types simultaneously.

  17. Concurrent SPECT/PET-CT imaging as a method for tracking adoptively transferred T-cells in vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Stanton, Sasha E; Eary, Janet F; Marzbani, Edmond A.; Mankoff, David; Salazar, Lupe G; Higgins, Doreen; Childs, Jennifer; Reichow, Jessica; Dang, Yushe; Disis, Mary L

    2016-01-01

    Background The ability of T-cells to traffic to and penetrate tumors impacts the clinical efficacy of T-cell therapy therefore methods to track transferred T-cells in vivo are needed. In this preliminary report, we evaluated the use of concurrent SPECT/PET-CT imaging to monitor the egress of HER-2/neu specific T-cells in a breast cancer patient with extensive bone-only metastatic disease. Findings Indium (In-111) labeled T-cells demonstrated similar or greater viability than unlabeled T-cells...

  18. Mesenchymal stem cell in vitro labeling by hybrid fluorescent magnetic polymeric particles for application in cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Supokawej, Aungkura; Nimsanor, Natakarn; Sanvoranart, Tanwarat; Kaewsaneha, Chariya; Hongeng, Suradej; Tangboriboonrat, Pramuan; Jangpatarapongsa, Kulachart

    2015-12-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are a type of adult stem cell that contains multi-differentiation and proliferative properties and that shows high treatment implications for many clinical problems. The outcome of stem cell transplantation is still limited due to many factors, especially their survival and their interaction with the microenvironment after transplantation. Molecular imaging is a challenging technique that has been used to overcome this limitation and is based on the concept of labeling cells with tractable, visible, and non-toxic materials to track the cells after transplantation. In this study, magnetic polymeric nanoparticles (MPNPs) were used to directly label Wharton's jelly-derived MSCs (WJ-MSCs). After labeling, the growth rate and the viability of the MSCs as well as the time of exposure were determined. The 3D images of WJ-MSCs labeled with MPNPs for 24 h were created using confocal microscopy. The results showed that, after incubation with fluorescent MPNPs for over 8 h, the growth rate and cell viability of the WJ-MSCs was similar to those of the control. Three-dimensional imaging revealed that the fluorescent MPNPs could infiltrate into the cells and spread into the cytoplasm, which suggests that the synthesized fluorescent MPNPs could possibly label MSCs for cell tracking study and be further developed for in vivo applications. PMID:25893425

  19. Live cell tracking based on cellular state recognition from microscopic images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Y-N; Lin, C-H; Kuo, C-C; Ho, C-L; Lin, C-J

    2009-07-01

    The analysis of cell motion is an essential process in fundamental medical studies because most active cellular functions involve motion. In this paper, a computer-assisted motion analysis system is proposed for cell tracking. In the proposed tracking process, unlike in conventional tracking methods, cellular states referring to the cellular life cycle are defined and appropriate strategies are adopted for cells at different states. The use of cellular state recognition allows detection of possible cell division and hence can improve the robustness of cell tracking. Experimental results show that cells can be successfully segmented and tracked over a long period of time, and the proposed system is found to be as accurate as manual tracking. Various quantitative analyses and visualizations are used to represent cell motion, which demonstrates the usefulness of the proposed system in the study of cell dynamics. PMID:19566631

  20. Uptake of magnetic nanoparticles into cells for cell tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A challenge for future applications in nanotechnology is the functional integration of nano-sized materials into cellular structures. Here we investigated superparamagnetic Fe3O4 iron oxide nanoparticles coated with a lipid bilayer for uptake into cells and for targeting subcellular compartments. It was found that magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) are effectively taken up into cells and make cells acquire magnetic activity. Biotin-conjugated MNPs were further functionalized by binding of the fluorescent tag streptavidin-fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) and, following uptake into cells, shown to confer magnetic activity and fluorescence labeling. Such FITC-MNPs were localized in the lysosomal compartment of cells which suggests a receptor-mediated uptake mechanism

  1. Verification of wind fields by means of rain cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbort, F.

    2009-09-01

    VERIFICATION OF WIND FIELDS BY MEANS OF RAIN CELL TRACKING Herbort, F., Knigge, C. and Etling, D, Institute of Meteorology and Climatology, Leibniz University Hannover,Germany herbort@muk.uni-hannover.de The regional weather forecast model COSMO-DE of the German weather service is run at a spatial resolution of 2.8 km. This results in rather detailed simulations of meteorological fields like pressure, temperature and wind. In contrast, for verification of those NWP products outside the atmospheric surface layer, only a few radiosonde stations can provide the necessary observations. In order to improve the spatial and temporal resolution of observed wind fields we propose a new method based on the motion of rain cells as observed by the German rain radar network. The radar product consist of the radar reflectivity over Germany caused by hydrometeors with a spatial resolution of about 1 km and a temporal resolution of 5 minutes. The tracking of localised radar echoes caused by post frontal showers has been used for statistical analysis of rain showers in earlier work at our institute (Weusthoff and Hauf,2008). The fields of radar reflectivity are analysed in our work by the so-called PIV (Particle Image Velocimetry) method as used in experimental fluid mechanics for obtaining velocity fields of flow phenomena. Instead of solid particles as used as tracking objects in laboratory flows we use the localised radar reflectivities caused by the rain showers as tracer particles for the PIV method. The PIV algorithm provides two dimensional wind fields in the area of Germany with a few kilometres spatial resolution. The observed wind fields are compared to the wind fields obtained by the COSMO-DE model at several vertical levels in the lowest 4 kilometres of the atmosphere. By this way we could not only obtain some estimates for the skill of the wind field forecasts of the model but also could provide information on the most suitable model level for wind forecast

  2. Al adjuvants can be tracked in viable cells by lumogallion staining.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mile, Irene; Svensson, Andreas; Darabi, Anna; Mold, Matthew; Siesjö, Peter; Eriksson, Håkan

    2015-07-01

    The mechanism behind the adjuvant effect of aluminum salts is poorly understood notwithstanding that aluminum salts have been used for decades in clinical vaccines. In an aqueous environment and at a nearly neutral pH, the aluminum salts form particulate aggregates, and one plausible explanation of the lack of information regarding the mechanisms could be the absence of an efficient method of tracking phagocytosed aluminum adjuvants and thereby the intracellular location of the adjuvant. In this paper, we want to report upon the use of lumogallion staining enabling the detection of phagocytosed aluminum adjuvants inside viable cells. Including micromolar concentrations of lumogallion in the culture medium resulted in a strong fluorescence signal from cells that had phagocytosed the aluminum adjuvant. The fluorescence appeared as spots in the cytoplasm and by confocal microscopy and co-staining with probes presenting fluorescence in the far-red region of the spectrum, aluminum adjuvants could to a certain extent be identified as localized in acidic vesicles, i.e., lysosomes. Staining and detection of intracellular aluminum adjuvants was achieved not only by diffusion of lumogallion into the cytoplasm, thereby highlighting the presence of the adjuvant, but also by pre-staining the aluminum adjuvant prior to incubation with cells. Pre-staining of aluminum adjuvants resulted in bright fluorescent particulate aggregates that remained fluorescent for weeks and with only a minor reduction of fluorescence upon extensive washing or incubation with cells. Both aluminum oxyhydroxide and aluminum hydroxyphosphate, two of the most commonly used aluminum adjuvants in clinical vaccines, could be pre-stained with lumogallion and were easily tracked intracellularly after incubation with phagocytosing cells. Staining of viable cells using lumogallion will be a useful method in investigations of the mechanisms behind aluminum adjuvants' differentiation of antigen-presenting cells

  3. Registration of clinical volumes to beams-eye-view images for real-time tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bryant, Jonathan H.; Rottmann, Joerg; Lewis, John H.; Mishra, Pankaj; Berbeco, Ross I., E-mail: rberbeco@lroc.harvard.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana-Farber Cancer Institute and Harvard Medical School, Boston, Massachusetts 02115 (United States); Keall, Paul J. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, Sydney Medical School, University of Sydney, Sydney, New South Wales 2006 (Australia)

    2014-12-15

    Purpose: The authors combine the registration of 2D beam’s eye view (BEV) images and 3D planning computed tomography (CT) images, with relative, markerless tumor tracking to provide automatic absolute tracking of physician defined volumes such as the gross tumor volume (GTV). Methods: During treatment of lung SBRT cases, BEV images were continuously acquired with an electronic portal imaging device (EPID) operating in cine mode. For absolute registration of physician-defined volumes, an intensity based 2D/3D registration to the planning CT was performed using the end-of-exhale (EoE) phase of the four dimensional computed tomography (4DCT). The volume was converted from Hounsfield units into electron density by a calibration curve and digitally reconstructed radiographs (DRRs) were generated for each beam geometry. Using normalized cross correlation between the DRR and an EoE BEV image, the best in-plane rigid transformation was found. The transformation was applied to physician-defined contours in the planning CT, mapping them into the EPID image domain. A robust multiregion method of relative markerless lung tumor tracking quantified deviations from the EoE position. Results: The success of 2D/3D registration was demonstrated at the EoE breathing phase. By registering at this phase and then employing a separate technique for relative tracking, the authors are able to successfully track target volumes in the BEV images throughout the entire treatment delivery. Conclusions: Through the combination of EPID/4DCT registration and relative tracking, a necessary step toward the clinical implementation of BEV tracking has been completed. The knowledge of tumor volumes relative to the treatment field is important for future applications like real-time motion management, adaptive radiotherapy, and delivered dose calculations.

  4. A novel validation algorithm allows for automated cell tracking and the extraction of biologically meaningful parameters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rapoport, Daniel H; Becker, Tim; Madany Mamlouk, Amir; Schicktanz, Simone; Kruse, Charli

    2011-01-01

    Automated microscopy is currently the only method to non-invasively and label-free observe complex multi-cellular processes, such as cell migration, cell cycle, and cell differentiation. Extracting biological information from a time-series of micrographs requires each cell to be recognized and followed through sequential microscopic snapshots. Although recent attempts to automatize this process resulted in ever improving cell detection rates, manual identification of identical cells is still the most reliable technique. However, its tedious and subjective nature prevented tracking from becoming a standardized tool for the investigation of cell cultures. Here, we present a novel method to accomplish automated cell tracking with a reliability comparable to manual tracking. Previously, automated cell tracking could not rival the reliability of manual tracking because, in contrast to the human way of solving this task, none of the algorithms had an independent quality control mechanism; they missed validation. Thus, instead of trying to improve the cell detection or tracking rates, we proceeded from the idea to automatically inspect the tracking results and accept only those of high trustworthiness, while rejecting all other results. This validation algorithm works independently of the quality of cell detection and tracking through a systematic search for tracking errors. It is based only on very general assumptions about the spatiotemporal contiguity of cell paths. While traditional tracking often aims to yield genealogic information about single cells, the natural outcome of a validated cell tracking algorithm turns out to be a set of complete, but often unconnected cell paths, i.e. records of cells from mitosis to mitosis. This is a consequence of the fact that the validation algorithm takes complete paths as the unit of rejection/acceptance. The resulting set of complete paths can be used to automatically extract important biological parameters with high

  5. A novel validation algorithm allows for automated cell tracking and the extraction of biologically meaningful parameters.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel H Rapoport

    Full Text Available Automated microscopy is currently the only method to non-invasively and label-free observe complex multi-cellular processes, such as cell migration, cell cycle, and cell differentiation. Extracting biological information from a time-series of micrographs requires each cell to be recognized and followed through sequential microscopic snapshots. Although recent attempts to automatize this process resulted in ever improving cell detection rates, manual identification of identical cells is still the most reliable technique. However, its tedious and subjective nature prevented tracking from becoming a standardized tool for the investigation of cell cultures. Here, we present a novel method to accomplish automated cell tracking with a reliability comparable to manual tracking. Previously, automated cell tracking could not rival the reliability of manual tracking because, in contrast to the human way of solving this task, none of the algorithms had an independent quality control mechanism; they missed validation. Thus, instead of trying to improve the cell detection or tracking rates, we proceeded from the idea to automatically inspect the tracking results and accept only those of high trustworthiness, while rejecting all other results. This validation algorithm works independently of the quality of cell detection and tracking through a systematic search for tracking errors. It is based only on very general assumptions about the spatiotemporal contiguity of cell paths. While traditional tracking often aims to yield genealogic information about single cells, the natural outcome of a validated cell tracking algorithm turns out to be a set of complete, but often unconnected cell paths, i.e. records of cells from mitosis to mitosis. This is a consequence of the fact that the validation algorithm takes complete paths as the unit of rejection/acceptance. The resulting set of complete paths can be used to automatically extract important biological parameters

  6. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. → We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. → We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  7. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Toshikazu; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Pack, Chan-Gi [Cellular Informatics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Terajima, Hideki [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Yajima, Junichiro; Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Kinjo, Masataka [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Dynamics, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Taguchi, Hideki, E-mail: taguchi@bio.titech.ac.jp [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. {yields} We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. {yields} We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  8. Antimicrobial peptides and cell processes tracking endosymbiont dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masson, Florent; Zaidman-Rémy, Anna; Heddi, Abdelaziz

    2016-05-26

    Many insects sustain long-term relationships with intracellular symbiotic bacteria that provide them with essential nutrients. Such endosymbiotic relationships likely emerged from ancestral infections of the host by free-living bacteria, the genomes of which experience drastic gene losses and rearrangements during the host-symbiont coevolution. While it is well documented that endosymbiont genome shrinkage results in the loss of bacterial virulence genes, whether and how the host immune system evolves towards the tolerance and control of bacterial partners remains elusive. Remarkably, many insects rely on a 'compartmentalization strategy' that consists in secluding endosymbionts within specialized host cells, the bacteriocytes, thus preventing direct symbiont contact with the host systemic immune system. In this review, we compile recent advances in the understanding of the bacteriocyte immune and cellular regulators involved in endosymbiont maintenance and control. We focus on the cereal weevils Sitophilus spp., in which bacteriocytes form bacteriome organs that strikingly evolve in structure and number according to insect development and physiological needs. We discuss how weevils track endosymbiont dynamics through at least two mechanisms: (i) a bacteriome local antimicrobial peptide synthesis that regulates endosymbiont cell cytokinesis and helps to maintain a homeostatic state within bacteriocytes and (ii) some cellular processes such as apoptosis and autophagy which adjust endosymbiont load to the host developmental requirements, hence ensuring a fine-tuned integration of symbiosis costs and benefits.This article is part of the themed issue 'Evolutionary ecology of arthropod antimicrobial peptides'. PMID:27160600

  9. Clinical grade adult stem cell banking

    OpenAIRE

    Thirumala, Sreedhar; Goebel, W. Scott; Woods, Erik J

    2009-01-01

    There has been a great deal of scientific interest recently generated by the potential therapeutic applications of adult stem cells in human care but there are several challenges regarding quality and safety in clinical applications and a number of these challenges relate to the processing and banking of these cells ex-vivo. As the number of clinical trials and the variety of adult cells used in regenerative therapy increases, safety remains a primary concern. This has inspired many nations t...

  10. In vivo tracking of human neural stem cells with 19F magnetic resonance imaging.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Philipp Boehm-Sturm

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI is a promising tool for monitoring stem cell-based therapy. Conventionally, cells loaded with ironoxide nanoparticles appear hypointense on MR images. However, the contrast generated by ironoxide labeled cells is neither specific due to ambiguous background nor quantitative. A strategy to overcome these drawbacks is (19F MRI of cells labeled with perfluorocarbons. We show here for the first time that human neural stem cells (NSCs, a promising candidate for clinical translation of stem cell-based therapy of the brain, can be labeled with (19F as well as detected and quantified in vitro and after brain implantation. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Human NSCs were labeled with perfluoropolyether (PFPE. Labeling efficacy was assessed with (19F MR spectroscopy, influence of the label on cell phenotypes studied by immunocytochemistry. For in vitro MRI, NSCs were suspended in gelatin at varying densities. For in vivo experiments, labeled NSCs were implanted into the striatum of mice. A decrease of cell viability was observed directly after incubation with PFPE, which re-normalized after 7 days in culture of the replated cells. No label-related changes in the numbers of Ki67, nestin, GFAP, or βIII-tubulin+ cells were detected, both in vitro and on histological sections. We found that 1,000 NSCs were needed to accumulate in one image voxel to generate significant signal-to-noise ratio in vitro. A detection limit of ∼10,000 cells was found in vivo. The location and density of human cells (hunu+ on histological sections correlated well with observations in the (19F MR images. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: Our results show that NSCs can be efficiently labeled with (19F with little effects on viability or proliferation and differentiation capacity. We show for the first time that (19F MRI can be utilized for tracking human NSCs in brain implantation studies, which ultimately aim for restoring loss of function after

  11. Imaging retinal ganglion cells: enabling experimental technology for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Corey A; Chauhan, Balwantray C

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in clinical ophthalmic imaging have enhanced patient care. However, the ability to differentiate retinal neurons, such as retinal ganglion cells (RGCs), would advance many areas within ophthalmology, including the screening and monitoring of glaucoma and other optic neuropathies. Imaging at the single cell level would take diagnostics to the next level. Experimental methods have provided techniques and insight into imaging RGCs, however no method has yet to be translated to clinical application. This review provides an overview of the importance of non-invasive imaging of RGCs and the clinically relevant capabilities. In addition, we report on experimental data from wild-type mice that received an in vivo intravitreal injection of a neuronal tracer that labelled RGCs, which in turn were monitored for up to 100 days post-injection with confocal scanning laser ophthalmoscopy. We were able to demonstrate efficient and consistent RGC labelling with this delivery method and discuss the issue of cell specificity. This type of experimental work is important in progressing towards clinically applicable methods for monitoring loss of RGCs in glaucoma and other optic neuropathies. We discuss the challenges to translating these findings to clinical application and how this method of tracking RGCs in vivo could provide valuable structural and functional information to clinicians. PMID:25448921

  12. Adaptive Cell Segmentation and Tracking for Volumetric Confocal Microscopy Images of a Developing Plant Meristem

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Min Liu; Anirban Chakraborty; Damanpreet Singh; Ram Kishor Yadav; Gopi Meenakshisundaram; G. Venugopala Reddy; Amit Roy-Chowdhury

    2011-01-01

    Automated segmentation and tracking of cells in actively developing tissues can provide high-throughput and quantitative spatiotemporal measurements of a range of cell behaviors; cell expansion and cell-division kinetics leading to a better understanding of the underlying dynamics of morphogenesis.Here,we have studied the problem of constructing cell lineages in time-lapse volumetric image stacks obtained using Confocal Laser Scanning Microscopy (CLSM).The novel contribution of the work lies in its ability to segment and track cells in densely packed tissue,the shoot apical meristem (SAM),through the use of a close-loop,adaptive segmentation,and tracking approach.The tracking output acts as an indicator of the quality of segmentation and,in turn,the segmentation can be improved to obtain better tracking results.We construct an optimization function that minimizes the segmentation error,which is,in turn,estimated from the tracking results.This adaptive approach significantly improves both tracking and segmentation when compared to an open loop framework in which segmentation and tracking modules operate separately.

  13. Local pH tracking in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsou, Chieh-Jui; Hsia, Chih-Hao; Chu, Jia-Yin; Hung, Yann; Chen, Yi-Ping; Chien, Fan-Ching; Chou, Keng C; Chen, Peilin; Mou, Chung-Yuan

    2015-03-01

    Continuous and simultaneous 3D single-particle movement and local pH detection in HeLa cells were demonstrated for the first time by combining fluorescent mesoporous silica nanoparticles (FMSNs) and a single-particle tracking (SPT) technique with a precision of ∼10 nm. FMSNs, synthesized by the co-condensation of both pH-sensitive and reference dyes with a silica/surfactant source, allow long-term reliable ratiometric pH measurements with a precision better than 0.3 pH unit because of their excellent brightness and stability. pH variation in the surrounding area of FMSNs during endocytosis was monitored in real-time. Acidification and low mobility of FMSNs were observed at the early endocytic stage, whereas basification and high mobility of FMSNs were observed at the late stage. Our results indicate that it is possible to monitor local pH changes in the environments surrounding nanoparticles during the cellular uptake process of FMSNs, which provides much needed information for designing an efficient drug delivery nanosystem. PMID:25672786

  14. Automated cell tracking and analysis in phase-contrast videos (iTrack4U): development of Java software based on combined mean-shift processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordelières, Fabrice P; Petit, Valérie; Kumasaka, Mayuko; Debeir, Olivier; Letort, Véronique; Gallagher, Stuart J; Larue, Lionel

    2013-01-01

    Cell migration is a key biological process with a role in both physiological and pathological conditions. Locomotion of cells during embryonic development is essential for their correct positioning in the organism; immune cells have to migrate and circulate in response to injury. Failure of cells to migrate or an inappropriate acquisition of migratory capacities can result in severe defects such as altered pigmentation, skull and limb abnormalities during development, and defective wound repair, immunosuppression or tumor dissemination. The ability to accurately analyze and quantify cell migration is important for our understanding of development, homeostasis and disease. In vitro cell tracking experiments, using primary or established cell cultures, are often used to study migration as cells can quickly and easily be genetically or chemically manipulated. Images of the cells are acquired at regular time intervals over several hours using microscopes equipped with CCD camera. The locations (x,y,t) of each cell on the recorded sequence of frames then need to be tracked. Manual computer-assisted tracking is the traditional method for analyzing the migratory behavior of cells. However, this processing is extremely tedious and time-consuming. Most existing tracking algorithms require experience in programming languages that are unfamiliar to most biologists. We therefore developed an automated cell tracking program, written in Java, which uses a mean-shift algorithm and ImageJ as a library. iTrack4U is a user-friendly software. Compared to manual tracking, it saves considerable amount of time to generate and analyze the variables characterizing cell migration, since they are automatically computed with iTrack4U. Another major interest of iTrack4U is the standardization and the lack of inter-experimenter differences. Finally, iTrack4U is adapted for phase contrast and fluorescent cells. PMID:24312283

  15. Automated cell tracking and analysis in phase-contrast videos (iTrack4U: development of Java software based on combined mean-shift processes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fabrice P Cordelières

    Full Text Available Cell migration is a key biological process with a role in both physiological and pathological conditions. Locomotion of cells during embryonic development is essential for their correct positioning in the organism; immune cells have to migrate and circulate in response to injury. Failure of cells to migrate or an inappropriate acquisition of migratory capacities can result in severe defects such as altered pigmentation, skull and limb abnormalities during development, and defective wound repair, immunosuppression or tumor dissemination. The ability to accurately analyze and quantify cell migration is important for our understanding of development, homeostasis and disease. In vitro cell tracking experiments, using primary or established cell cultures, are often used to study migration as cells can quickly and easily be genetically or chemically manipulated. Images of the cells are acquired at regular time intervals over several hours using microscopes equipped with CCD camera. The locations (x,y,t of each cell on the recorded sequence of frames then need to be tracked. Manual computer-assisted tracking is the traditional method for analyzing the migratory behavior of cells. However, this processing is extremely tedious and time-consuming. Most existing tracking algorithms require experience in programming languages that are unfamiliar to most biologists. We therefore developed an automated cell tracking program, written in Java, which uses a mean-shift algorithm and ImageJ as a library. iTrack4U is a user-friendly software. Compared to manual tracking, it saves considerable amount of time to generate and analyze the variables characterizing cell migration, since they are automatically computed with iTrack4U. Another major interest of iTrack4U is the standardization and the lack of inter-experimenter differences. Finally, iTrack4U is adapted for phase contrast and fluorescent cells.

  16. Validation of a track repeating algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy: clinical cases study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yepes, Pablo P.; Eley, John G.; Liu, Amy; Mirkovic, Dragan; Randeniya, Sharmalee; Titt, Uwe; Mohan, Radhe

    2016-04-01

    Monte Carlo (MC) methods are acknowledged as the most accurate technique to calculate dose distributions. However, due its lengthy calculation times, they are difficult to utilize in the clinic or for large retrospective studies. Track-repeating algorithms, based on MC-generated particle track data in water, accelerate dose calculations substantially, while essentially preserving the accuracy of MC. In this study, we present the validation of an efficient dose calculation algorithm for intensity modulated proton therapy, the fast dose calculator (FDC), based on a track-repeating technique. We validated the FDC algorithm for 23 patients, which included 7 brain, 6 head-and-neck, 5 lung, 1 spine, 1 pelvis and 3 prostate cases. For validation, we compared FDC-generated dose distributions with those from a full-fledged Monte Carlo based on GEANT4 (G4). We compared dose-volume-histograms, 3D-gamma-indices and analyzed a series of dosimetric indices. More than 99% of the voxels in the voxelized phantoms describing the patients have a gamma-index smaller than unity for the 2%/2 mm criteria. In addition the difference relative to the prescribed dose between the dosimetric indices calculated with FDC and G4 is less than 1%. FDC reduces the calculation times from 5 ms per proton to around 5 μs.

  17. Tracking of iron-labeled human neural stem cells by magnetic resonance imaging in cell replacement therapy for Parkinson’s disease

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Milagros Ramos-Gmez; Alberto Martnez-Serrano

    2016-01-01

    Human neural stem cells (hNSCs) derived from the ventral mesencephalon are powerful research tools and candidates for cell therapies in Parkinson’s disease. However, their clinical translation has not been fully realized due, in part, to the limited ability to track stem cell regional localization and survival over long periods of time afterin vivo transplantation. Magnetic resonance imaging provides an excellent non-invasive method to study the fate of transplanted cellsin vivo. For magnetic resonance imaging cell tracking, cells need to be labeled with a contrast agent, such as magnetic nanoparticles, at a concentration high enough to be easily detected by magnetic resonance imaging. Grafting of human neural stem cells labeled with magnetic nanoparticles allows cell tracking by magnetic resonance imaging without impairment of cell survival, prolif-eration, self-renewal, and multipotency. However, the results reviewed here suggest that in long term grafting, activated microglia and macrophages could contribute to magnetic resonance imaging signal by engulifng dead labeled cells or iron nanoparticles dispersed freely in the brain parenchyma over time.

  18. Characterization and Classification of Adherent Cells in Monolayer Culture using Automated Tracking and Evolutionary Algorithms

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Z.; Bedder, M; Smith, S L; Walker, D; Shabir, S.; Southgate, J

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a novel method for tracking and characterizing adherent cells in monolayer culture. A system of cell tracking employing computer vision techniques was applied to time-lapse videos of replicate normal human uro-epithelial cell cultures exposed to different concentrations of adenosine triphosphate (ATP) and a selective purinergic P2X antagonist (PPADS), acquired over a 24hour period. Subsequent analysis following feature extraction demonstrated the ability of the technique t...

  19. Automated Cell Identification and Tracking Using Nanoparticle Moving-Light-Displays

    OpenAIRE

    Tonkin, James A.; Rees, Paul; Brown, Martyn R.; Errington, Rachel J.; Smith, Paul J; Sally C Chappell; Summers, Huw D.

    2012-01-01

    An automated technique for the identification, tracking and analysis of biological cells is presented. It is based on the use of nanoparticles, enclosed within intra-cellular vesicles, to produce clusters of discrete, point-like fluorescent, light sources within the cells. Computational analysis of these light ensembles in successive time frames of a movie sequence, using k-means clustering and particle tracking algorithms, provides robust and automated discrimination of live cells and their ...

  20. Clinical Strategies to Enhance T cell Reconstitution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldberg, Gabrielle L; Zakrzewski, Johannes L; Perales, Miguel A; van den Brink, Marcel R.M.

    2009-01-01

    Strategies to enhance T cell recovery are of increasing clinical importance to overcome long lasting T cell deficiencies, which occur in association with infections, autoimmunity and chemo/radiotherapy as well as aging of the immune system. In this review we discuss those strategies that are close to or in the clinic. Interleukin-7, sex steroid modulation, keratinocyte growth factor, growth hormone and cellular therapies using ex vivo generated T cell precursors are currently being tested in recipients of a hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and patients with malignancies or HIV/AIDS. PMID:17964803

  1. In-vivo cell tracking to quantify endothelial cell migration during zebrafish angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Menon, Prahlad G.; Rochon, Elizabeth R.; Roman, Beth L.

    2016-03-01

    The mechanism of endothelial cell migration as individual cells or collectively while remaining an integral component of a functional blood vessel has not been well characterized. In this study, our overarching goal is to define an image processing workflow to facilitate quantification of how endothelial cells within the first aortic arch and are proximal to the zebrafish heart behave in response to the onset of flow (i.e. onset of heart beating). Endothelial cell imaging was conducted at this developmental time-point i.e. ~24-28 hours post fertilization (hpf) when flow first begins, using 3D+time two-photon confocal microscopy of a live, wild-type, transgenic, zebrafish expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP) in endothelial cell nuclei. An image processing pipeline comprised of image signal enhancement, median filtering for speckle noise reduction, automated identification of the nuclei positions, extraction of the relative movement of nuclei between consecutive time instances, and finally tracking of nuclei, was designed for achieving the tracking of endothelial cell nuclei and the identification of their movement towards or away from the heart. Pilot results lead to a hypothesis that upon the onset of heart beat and blood flow, endothelial cells migrate collectively towards the heart (by 21.51+/-10.35 μm) in opposition to blood flow (i.e. subtending 142.170+/-21.170 with the flow direction).

  2. Deformable Graph Model for Tracking Epithelial Cell Sheets in Fluorescence Microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Roger S; Tomasi, Carlo

    2016-07-01

    We propose a novel method for tracking cells that are connected through a visible network of membrane junctions. Tissues of this form are common in epithelial cell sheets and resemble planar graphs where each face corresponds to a cell. We leverage this structure and develop a method to track the entire tissue as a deformable graph. This coupled model in which vertices inform the optimal placement of edges and vice versa captures global relationships between tissue components and leads to accurate and robust cell tracking. We compare the performance of our method with that of four reference tracking algorithms on four data sets that present unique tracking challenges. Our method exhibits consistently superior performance in tracking all cells accurately over all image frames, and is robust over a wide range of image intensity and cell shape profiles. This may be an important tool for characterizing tissues of this type especially in the field of developmental biology where automated cell analysis can help elucidate the mechanisms behind controlled cell-shape changes. PMID:26829784

  3. A New Method for Preparing Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Labeling with Ferumoxytol for Cell Tracking by MRI

    OpenAIRE

    Li Liu; Lanya Tseng; Qing Ye; Wu, Yijen L.; Bain, Daniel J.; Chien Ho

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are among the major stem cells used for cell therapy and regenerative medicine. In-vivo cell-tracking by magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is crucial for regenerative medicine, allowing verification that the transplanted cells reach the targeted sites. Cellular MRI combined with superparamagnetic iron-oxide (SPIO) contrast agents is an effective cell-tracking method. Here, we are reporting a new “bio-mimicry” method by making use of the “in-vivo environment” of MS...

  4. Light sheet microscopy for tracking single molecules on the apical surface of living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yu; Hu, Ying; Cang, Hu

    2013-12-12

    Single particle tracking is a powerful tool to study single molecule dynamics in living biological samples. However, current tracking techniques, which are based mainly on epifluorescence, confocal, or TIRF microscopy, have difficulties in tracking single molecules on the apical surface of a cell. We present here a three-dimensional (3D) single particle tracking technique that is based on prism coupled light-sheet microscopy (PCLSM). This novel design provides a signal-to-noise ratio comparable to confocal microscopy while it has the capability of illuminating at arbitrary depth. We demonstrate tracking of single EGF molcules on the apical surface of live cell membranes from their binding to EGF receptors until they are internalized or photobleached. We found that EGF exhibits multiple diffusion behaviors on live A549 cell membranes. At room temperature, the average diffusion coefficient of EGF on A549 cells was measured to be 0.13 μm(2)/s. Depletion of cellular cholesterol with methyl-β-cyclodextrin leads to a broader distribution of diffusion coefficients and an increase of the average diffusion coefficient at room temperature. This light-sheet based 3D single particle tracking technique solves the technique difficulty of tracking single particles on apical membranes and is able to document the whole "lifetime" of a particle from binding till photobleaching or internalization. PMID:23895420

  5. Comparison of RFID Systems for Tracking Clinical Interventions at the Bedside

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Kumiko; Ota, Sakiko; Ohno-Machado, Lucila; Tanaka, Hiroshi

    2008-01-01

    In recent years, there have been high expectations for RFID technologies applied in the medical field, particularly for automatic identification and location of patients and medical supplies. However, few studies have measured the applicability of currently available RFID technologies in a medical environment. To determine the technical factors that affect the performance of RFID systems, we examined the performance of different types of tags for medications, medical equipment, nurses, and patients under different experimental conditions. Three kinds of passive RFID tags and one active RFID tag were used in our study. Passive tags were affected by materials such as liquid and metal. Tags based on 13.56MHz were most suited for identifying medications. Tag placement was one of the main factors involved in correct identification of nurses, patients, and medical equipment. The results of this study may help decision makers decide whether (which) RFID technologies are useful for tracking clinical workflow. PMID:18998888

  6. No Monkeying Around : Clonal Tracking of Stem Cells and Progenitors in the Macaque

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dykstra, Brad; Bystrykh, Leonid V.

    2014-01-01

    Clonal tracking of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPCs) has proven valuable for studying their behavior in murine recipients. Now in Cell Stem Cell, Kim et al. (2014) and Wu et al. (2014) extend these analyses to nonhuman primates, providing insights into dynamics of HSPC expansion and li

  7. A computational framework for particle and whole cell tracking applied to a real biological dataset.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Feng Wei; Venkataraman, Chandrasekhar; Styles, Vanessa; Kuttenberger, Verena; Horn, Elias; von Guttenberg, Zeno; Madzvamuse, Anotida

    2016-05-24

    Cell tracking is becoming increasingly important in cell biology as it provides a valuable tool for analysing experimental data and hence furthering our understanding of dynamic cellular phenomena. The advent of high-throughput, high-resolution microscopy and imaging techniques means that a wealth of large data is routinely generated in many laboratories. Due to the sheer magnitude of the data involved manual tracking is often cumbersome and the development of computer algorithms for automated cell tracking is thus highly desirable. In this work, we describe two approaches for automated cell tracking. Firstly, we consider particle tracking. We propose a few segmentation techniques for the detection of cells migrating in a non-uniform background, centroids of the segmented cells are then calculated and linked from frame to frame via a nearest-neighbour approach. Secondly, we consider the problem of whole cell tracking in which one wishes to reconstruct in time whole cell morphologies. Our approach is based on fitting a mathematical model to the experimental imaging data with the goal being that the physics encoded in the model is reflected in the reconstructed data. The resulting mathematical problem involves the optimal control of a phase-field formulation of a geometric evolution law. Efficient approximation of this challenging optimal control problem is achieved via advanced numerical methods for the solution of semilinear parabolic partial differential equations (PDEs) coupled with parallelisation and adaptive resolution techniques. Along with a detailed description of our algorithms, a number of simulation results are reported on. We focus on illustrating the effectivity of our approaches by applying the algorithms to the tracking of migrating cells in a dataset which reflects many of the challenges typically encountered in microscopy data. PMID:26948574

  8. Clinical presentation of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Most common malignant tumour of the kidney is Renal Cell Carcinoma (RCC) and is known for its unpredictable clinical behaviour. Aetiology and risk factors are not completely understood. Extensive workup is being done in the understanding of the disease, especially to diagnose early and to treat promptly. The objective of this study was to determine the clinical presentation and pathological pattern of RCC. Methods: After approval from ethical committee a retrospective review of records was conducted extending from January 2012 to January 2014 to identify clinical characteristics of renal cell carcinomas. The study included all renal cancer patients presented to Sheikh Zayed Hospital Lahore with in this specified period. The data was retrieved regarding, history, physical examination and necessary investigations such as ultrasonography of abdomen and pelvis and CT scan of abdomen and pelvis. Results: There were total of 50 cases. The male to female ratio was 3:2. Mean age of patients were 52.38 (18-93) years old. Most common clinical presentation was gross haematuria(66%).The mean tumour size was 8.34 (3-24) cm. Tumour histology were clear cell (84%), papillary transitional cell carcinoma (12%) and oncosytoma contributed 4%. Conclusion: We observed that large number of the patients with RCC presented with haematuria and most of them were male. Common pathological type was clear cell carcinoma. (author)

  9. Use of trimetasphere metallofullerene MRI contrast agent for the non-invasive longitudinal tracking of stem cells in the lung.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murphy, Sean V; Hale, Austin; Reid, Tanya; Olson, John; Kidiyoor, Amritha; Tan, Josh; Zhou, Zhiguo; Jackson, John; Atala, Anthony

    2016-04-15

    Magnetic Resonance Imaging (MRI) is a commonly used, non-invasive imaging technique that provides visualization of soft tissues with high spatial resolution. In both a research and clinical setting, the major challenge has been identifying a non-invasive and safe method for longitudinal tracking of delivered cells in vivo. The labeling and tracking of contrast agent labeled cells using MRI has the potential to fulfill this need. Contrast agents are often used to enhance the image contrast between the tissue of interest and surrounding tissues with MRI. The most commonly used MRI contrast agents contain Gd(III) ions. However, Gd(III) ions are highly toxic in their ionic form, as they tend to accumulate in the liver, spleen, kidney and bones and block calcium channels. Endohedral metallofullerenes such as trimetallic nitride endohedral metallofullerenes (Trimetasphere®) are one unique class of fullerene molecules where a Gd3N cluster is encapsulated inside a C80 carbon cage referred to as Gd3N@C80. These endohedral metallofullerenes have several advantages over small chelated Gd(III) complexes such as increased stability of the Gd(III) ion, minimal toxic effects, high solubility in water and high proton relativity. In this study, we describe the evaluation of gadolinium-based Trimetasphere® positive contrast agent for the ​in vitro labeling and in vivo tracking of human amniotic fluid-derived stem cells within lung tissue. In addition, we conducted a 'proof-of-concept' experiment demonstrating that this methodology can be used to track the homing of stem cells to injured lung tissue and provide longitudinal analysis of cell localization over an extended time course. PMID:26546729

  10. Biomarkers in T cell therapy clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kalos Michael

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract T cell therapy represents an emerging and promising modality for the treatment of both infectious disease and cancer. Data from recent clinical trials have highlighted the potential for this therapeutic modality to effect potent anti-tumor activity. Biomarkers, operationally defined as biological parameters measured from patients that provide information about treatment impact, play a central role in the development of novel therapeutic agents. In the absence of information about primary clinical endpoints, biomarkers can provide critical insights that allow investigators to guide the clinical development of the candidate product. In the context of cell therapy trials, the definition of biomarkers can be extended to include a description of parameters of the cell product that are important for product bioactivity. This review will focus on biomarker studies as they relate to T cell therapy trials, and more specifically: i. An overview and description of categories and classes of biomarkers that are specifically relevant to T cell therapy trials, and ii. Insights into future directions and challenges for the appropriate development of biomarkers to evaluate both product bioactivity and treatment efficacy of T cell therapy trials.

  11. Tracking the 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium: bridging cancer biology to clinical gastrointestinal oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aprile G

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Giuseppe Aprile,1 Francesco Leone,2,3 Riccardo Giampieri,4 Mariaelena Casagrande,1 Donatella Marino,2,3 Luca Faloppi,4 Stefano Cascinu,4 Gianpiero Fasola,1 Mario Scartozzi5,6 1Department of Oncology, University and General Hospital, Udine, Italy; 2Medical Oncology Department, University of Turin, 3Institute for Cancer Research and Treatment, Candiolo, Turin, Italy; 4Medical Oncology Unit, Azienda Ospedaliero-Universitaria Ospedali Riuniti, Universita Politecnica delle Marche, Ancona, Italy; 5Medical Oncology Department, University of Cagliari, 6General Hospital, Cagliari, Italy Abstract: The 2015 Gastrointestinal Cancers Symposium (San Francisco, CA, USA; January 15–17 is the world-class conference co-sponsored by the American Society of Clinical Oncology, the American Society for Radiation Oncology, the American Gastroenterological Association Institute, and the Society of Surgical Oncology, in which the most innovative research results in digestive tract oncology are presented and discussed. In its twelfth edition, the meeting has provided new insights focusing on the underpinning biology and clinical management of gastrointestinal malignancies. More than 3,400 health care professionals gathered from all over the world to share their experiences on how to bridge the recent novelties in cancer biology with everyday medical practice. In this article, the authors report on the most significant advances, didactically moving on three different anatomic tracks: gastroesophageal malignancies, pancreatic and biliary cancers, and colorectal adenocarcinomas. Keywords: colorectal cancer, gastric cancer, ramucirumab, pembrolizumab, target therapy, onartuzumab, AMG 337

  12. Cell survival in carbon beams - comparison of amorphous track model predictions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, L.; Greilich, S.; Korcyl, M.;

    Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under i....... Amorphous track modelling of luminescence detector efficiency in proton and carbon beams. 4.Tsuruoka C, Suzuki M, Kanai T, et al. LET and ion species dependence for cell killing in normal human skin fibroblasts. Radiat Res. 2005;163:494-500.......Introduction: Predictions of the radiobiological effectiveness (RBE) play an essential role in treatment planning with heavy charged particles. Amorphous track models ( [1] , [2] , also referred to as track structure models) provide currently the most suitable description of cell survival under ion...... factors is the normalization of the energy distribution around the particle tracks to the actual LET value. Later on we check what is the effect of radial dose distribution choice on kappa parameter for different types and energy of ions. Outline References 1.Katz R, Sharma SC.Response of cells to fast...

  13. Traxtile: Interactive editing of cell tracks in time-lapse images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, Benjamin S

    2015-08-01

    Time-lapse imaging can be used to quantify how cells move, divide, and die over time and under defined culture conditions. Open source software packages such as CellProfiler, Icy, and Fiji provide robust and convenient interfaces for performing such analyses. However, object tracking algorithms are imperfect, and validation of significant events is often required. This is challenging, as CellProfiler produces only tabular data for object tracking, and the graphical tools in Icy and Fiji are not optimal for manual review of these events. Here we describe Traxtile, a program that allows interactive graphical review and revision of object tracking assignments. Traxtile imports initial assignments and automatically identifies events needing review (i.e., apparent creation of new objects, splits, merges, and losses). For each such event, the object track is displayed on a montage of images centered on the event and spanning the preceding and subsequent frames. Links between cells in successive frames can be reviewed and edited, yielding validated tracks for the image series. Reports summarize events from the validated tracks. Traxtile is implemented in Python version 2.7 using standard distribution libraries (available at www.python.org) and is freely available at https://github.com/braunb/traxtile-public. PMID:26260086

  14. Clinical translation of human neural stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsukamoto, Ann; Uchida, Nobuko; Capela, Alexandra; Gorba, Thorsten; Huhn, Stephen

    2013-01-01

    Human neural stem cell transplants have potential as therapeutic candidates to treat a vast number of disorders of the central nervous system (CNS). StemCells, Inc. has purified human neural stem cells and developed culture conditions for expansion and banking that preserve their unique biological properties. The biological activity of these human central nervous system stem cells (HuCNS-SC®) has been analyzed extensively in vitro and in vivo. When formulated for transplantation, the expanded and cryopreserved banked cells maintain their stem cell phenotype, self-renew and generate mature oligodendrocytes, neurons and astrocytes, cells normally found in the CNS. In this overview, the rationale and supporting data for pursuing neuroprotective strategies and clinical translation in the three components of the CNS (brain, spinal cord and eye) are described. A phase I trial for a rare myelin disorder and phase I/II trial for spinal cord injury are providing intriguing data relevant to the biological properties of neural stem cells, and the early clinical outcomes compel further development. PMID:23987648

  15. Substrates for clinical applicability of stem cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sanjar Enam; Sha Jin

    2015-01-01

    The capability of human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs)to differentiate into a variety of cells in the human bodyholds great promise for regenerative medicine. Manysubstrates exist on which hPSCs can be self-renewed,maintained and expanded to further the goal of clinicalapplication of stem cells. In this review, we highlightnumerous extracellular matrix proteins, peptide andpolymer based substrates, scaffolds and hydrogelsthat have been pioneered. We discuss their benefitsand shortcomings and offer future directions as well asemphasize commercially available synthetic peptidesas a type of substrate that can bring the benefits ofregenerative medicine to clinical settings.

  16. Computational Graph Model for 3D Cells Tracking in Zebra Fish Datasets

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Lelin; Xiong, Hongkai; Zhao, Yang; Zhang, Kai; Zhou, Xiaobo

    2007-11-01

    This paper leads to a novel technique for tracking and identification of zebra-fish cells in 3D image sequences, extending graph-based multi-objects tracking algorithm to 3D applications. As raised in previous work of 2D graph-based method, separated cells are modeled as vertices that connected by edges. Then the tracking work is simplified to that of vertices matching between graphs generated from consecutive frames. Graph-based tracking is composed of three steps: graph generation, initial source vertices selection and graph saturation. To satisfy demands in this work separated cell records are segmented from original datasets using 3D level-set algorithms. Besides, advancements are achieved in each of the step including graph regulations, multi restrictions on source vertices and enhanced flow quantifications. Those strategies make a good compensation for graph-based multi-objects tracking method in 2D space. Experiments are carried out in 3D datasets sampled from zebra fish, results of which shows that this enhanced method could be potentially applied to tracking of objects with diverse features.

  17. Tracking mesenchymal stromal cells using an ultra-bright TAT-functionalized plasmonic-active nanoplatform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Hsiangkuo; Gomez, Jose A; Chien, Jennifer S; Zhang, Lunan; Wilson, Christy M; Li, Shuqin; Fales, Andrew M; Liu, Yang; Grant, Gerald A; Mirotsou, Maria; Dzau, Victor J; Vo-Dinh, Tuan

    2016-04-01

    High-resolution tracking of stem cells remains a challenging task. An ultra-bright contrast agent with extended intracellular retention is suitable for in vivo high-resolution tracking of stem cells following the implantation. Here, a plasmonic-active nanoplatform was developed for tracking mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in mice. The nanoplatform consisted of TAT peptide-functionalized gold nanostars (TAT-GNS) that emit ultra-bright two-photon photoluminescence capable of tracking MSCs under high-resolution optical imaging. In vitro experiment showed TAT-GNS-labeled MSCs retained a similar differentiability to that of non-labeled MSCs controls. Due to their star shape, TAT-GNS exhibited greater intracellular retention than that of commercial Q-Tracker. In vivo imaging of TAT-GNS-labeled MSCs five days following intra-arterial injections in mice kidneys showed possible MSCs implantation in juxta-glomerular (JG) regions, but non-specifically in glomeruli and afferent arterioles as well. With future design to optimize GNS labeling specificity and clearance, plasmonic-active nanoplatforms may be a useful intracellular tracking tool for stem cell research. An ultra-bright intracellular contrast agent is developed using TAT peptide-functionalized gold nanostars (TAT-GNS). It poses minimal influence on the stem cell differentiability. It exhibits stronger two-photon photoluminescence and superior labeling efficiency than commercial Q-Tracker. Following renal implantation, some TAT-GNS-labeled MSCs permeate blood vessels and migrate to the juxta-glomerular region. PMID:27095616

  18. In vitro detection of circulating tumor cells compared by the CytoTrack and CellSearch methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hillig, T.; Horn, P.; Nygaard, Ann-Britt;

    2015-01-01

    Comparison of two methods to detect circulating tumor cells (CTC) CytoTrack and CellSearch through recovery of MCF-7 breast cancer cells, spiked into blood collected from healthy donors. Spiking of a fixed number of EpCAM and pan-cytokeratin positive MCF-7 cells into 7.5 mL donor blood was...... were determined. The average numbers of MCF-7 cells/cells in clusters/clusters recovered from blood by the CytoTrack and CellSearch methods were 103 +/- 5.9/27 +/- 7.9/11 +/- 3.5 (95 % CI) and 107 +/- 4.4/20 +/- 7.1/10 +/- 3.5, respectively, with no difference between the two methods (p = 0.37/p = 0.......23/p = 0.09). Overall, the recovery of CytoTrack and CellSearch was 68.8 +/- 3.9 %/71.1 +/- 2.9 %, respectively (p = 0.58). In spite of different methodologies, CytoTrack and CellSearch found similar number of CTCs, when spiking was performed with the EpCAM and pan cytokeratin-positive cell line MCF-7...

  19. Adenovirus-mediated expression of human sodium-iodide symporter gene permits in vivo tracking of adipose tissue-derived stem cells in a canine myocardial infarction model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: In vivo tracking of the transplanted stem cells is important in pre-clinical research of stem cell therapy for myocardial infarction. We examined the feasibility of adenovirus-mediated sodium iodide symporter (NIS) gene to cell tracking imaging of transplanted stem cells in a canine infarcted myocardium by clinical single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Methods: Beagle dogs were injected intramyocardially with NIS-expressing adenovirus-transfected canine stem cells (Ad-hNIS-canine ADSCs) a week after myocardial infarction (MI) development. 99mTc-methoxyisobutylisonitrile (99mTc-MIBI) and 99mTc-pertechnetate (99mTcO4−) SPECT imaging were performed for assessment of infarcted myocardium and viable stem cell tracking. Transthoracic echocardiography was performed to monitor any functional cardiac changes. Results: Left ventricular ejection fraction (LVEF) was decreased after LAD ligation. There was no significant difference in EF between the groups with the stem cell or saline injection. 125I uptake was higher in Ad-hNIS-canine ADSCs than in non-transfected ADSCs. Cell proliferation and differentiation were not affected by hNIS-carrying adenovirus transfection. 99mTc-MIBI myocardial SPECT imaging showed decreased radiotracer uptake in the infarcted apex and mid-anterolateral regions. Ad-hNIS-canine ADSCs were identified as a region of focally increased 99mTcO4− uptake at the lateral wall and around the apex of the left ventricle, peaked at 2 days and was observed until day 9. Conclusions: Combination of adenovirus-mediated NIS gene transfection and clinical nuclear imaging modalities enables to trace the fate of transplanted stem cells in infarcted myocardium for translational in vivo cell tracking study for prolonged duration

  20. A survey of head movement during clinical brain SPECT using an optical tracking system

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Full text: The aim of this study was to survey patient motion during clinical brain SPECT using a commercial motion detection system called Polaris. Polaris is an optical tracker that remotely tracks head position and orientation via a small target attached to the patient. Its accuracy for position measurement is 1mm or 1 degree (deg), 33% moved > 2mm or 2deg and 10% moved > 4mm or 4deg. 65% of subjects moved 3 or more times. Motion in the D and P groups was equally likely to be small (<3mm or <3deg) or large and equally likely to occur early or late during acquisition. Motion in the N, F and C groups was less likely to be large and for N and F more likely to occur late in the acquisition suggesting fatigue was the main cause. The most common large movements were anterior-posterior translations and axial (Z) rotations. Significant head movement is common in brain SPECT, particularly in dementia and psychiatric subjects, and accurate motion correction is desirable to maintain image quality. Copyright (2002) The Australian and New Zealand Society of Nuclear Medicine Inc

  1. Validation of clinical activity tracking system in Intensive Care Unit to assess nurse workload distribution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng Guo; Yeong Shiong Chiew; Shaw, Geoff; Chase, Geoff

    2015-08-01

    Therapeutic Intervention Score System (TISS-28) and the Nursing Activities Score (NAS) are common used to evaluate nursing workload in the Intensive Care Unit (ICU). However, they require experienced researchers to perform, are subject to user bias and experience, and are labor intensive, which all exclude regular use. A Clinical Activities Tracking System (CATS) was developed to evaluate bedside nursing activities automatically. This paper presents the validation of this system in quantifying bedside nursing activities. A total of 30 hours (1 hour/day) of nursing activities were manually recorded by trained researcher. The manually recorded total time spent on bedside nursing activities (Atime) was compared with time recorded using CATS (Ctime). A high correlation was found between Atime and Ctime with R = 0.882, and thus the actual time spent in nursing activity can be estimated using a first order polynomial function. In this study, it was found that the median Atime between 7 am-10 pm is 1.4-1.5 times higher than nursing activities at 10 pm-7 am. Results showed that CATS was able to provide unique and high information on patient bedside nursing activities. PMID:26736298

  2. Representations of stem cell clinics on Twitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamenova, Kalina; Reshef, Amir; Caulfield, Timothy

    2014-12-01

    The practice of travelling abroad to receive unproven and unregulated stem cell treatments has become an increasingly problematic global phenomenon known as 'stem cell tourism'. In this paper, we examine representations of nine major clinics and providers of such treatments on the microblogging network Twitter. We collected and conducted a content analysis of Twitter posts (n = 363) by these establishments and by other users mentioning them, focusing specifically on marketing claims about treatment procedures and outcomes, discussions of safety and efficacy of stem cell transplants, and specific representations of patients' experiences. Our analysis has shown that there were explicit claims or suggestions of benefits associated with unproven stem cell treatments in approximately one third of the tweets and that patients' experiences, whenever referenced, were presented as invariably positive and as testimonials about the efficacy of stem cell transplants. Furthermore, the results indicated that the tone of most tweets (60.2 %) was overwhelmingly positive and there were rarely critical discussions about significant health risks associated with unproven stem cell therapies. When placed in the context of past research on the problems associated with the marketing of unproven stem cell therapies, this analysis of representations on Twitter suggests that discussions in social media have also remained largely uncritical of the stem cell tourism phenomenon, with inaccurate representations of risks and benefits for patients. PMID:24970380

  3. Long-term MRI tracking of dual-labeled adipose-derived stem cells homing into mouse carotid artery injury

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qin JB

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available Jin-Bao Qin,1,5,* Kang-An Li,2,* Xiang-Xiang Li,1,5 Qing-Song Xie,3 Jia-Ying Lin,4 Kai-Chuang Ye,1,5 Mi-Er Jiang,1,5 Gui-Xiang Zhang,2 Xin-Wu Lu1,51Department of Vascular Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, 2Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, 3Department of Neurosurgery, Cixi Municipal People's Hospital, Zhejiang Province, China; 4Clinic for Gynecology, Charite-Universitatsmedizin Berlin, Berlin, Germany; 5Vascular Center, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai, China*These two authors contributed equally to this workBackground: Stem cell therapy has shown great promise for regenerative repair of injured or diseased tissues. Adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs have become increasingly attractive candidates for cellular therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging has been proven to be effective in tracking magnetic-labeled cells and evaluating their clinical relevance after cell transplantation. This study investigated the feasibility of imaging green fluorescent protein-expressing ADSCs (GFP-ADSCs labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles, and tracked them in vivo with noninvasive magnetic resonance imaging after cell transplantation in a model of mouse carotid artery injury.Methods: GFP-ADSCs were isolated from the adipose tissues of GFP mice and labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide particles. Intracellular stability, proliferation, and viability of the labeled cells were evaluated in vitro. Next, the cells were transplanted into a mouse carotid artery injury model. Clinical 3 T magnetic resonance imaging was performed immediately before and 1, 3, 7, 14, 21, and 30 days after cell transplantation. Prussian blue staining and histological analysis were performed 7 and 30 days after transplantation.Results: GFP-ADSCs were found to be efficiently labeled with superparamagnetic iron oxide

  4. Effects of Paclitaxel on EGFR Endocytic Trafficking Revealed Using Quantum Dot Tracking in Single Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Hui; Duan, Zhao-Wen; Xie, Ping; Liu, Yu-Ru; Wang, Wei-Chi; Dou, Shuo-Xing; Wang, Peng-Ye

    2012-01-01

    Paclitaxel (PTX), a chemotherapeutic drug, affects microtubule dynamics and influences endocytic trafficking. However, the mechanism and the dynamics of altered endocytic trafficking by paclitaxel treatment in single living cells still remain elusive. By labeling quantum dots (QDs) to the epidermal growth factor (EGF), we continuously tracked the endocytosis and post-endocytic trafficking of EGF receptors (EGFRs) in A549 cells for a long time interval. A single-cell analysis method was introd...

  5. Investigation of Dendrimer-based nanoparticles cellular uptake and cell tracking in a semiautomated microfluidic platform

    OpenAIRE

    Carvalho, Mariana Rodrigues; Maia, Fátima Raquel; Reis, R. L.; Oliveira, J. M.

    2016-01-01

    A microfluidic device such as Kima Pump and Vena8 biochip is able to realize functions that are not easily imaginable in conventional biological analysis, such as highly parallel, sophisticated high-throughput analysis and single-cell analysis in a well-defined manner [1]. Cancer cell tracking within the microfluidic model will be achieved by grafting fluorescent label probe Fluorescein-5(6)-isothiocyanate (FITC) to dendrimer nanoparticles allowing cell visualization by immunofluorescen...

  6. Optical cell tracking analysis using a straight-forward approach to minimize processing time for high frame rate data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seeto, Wen Jun; Lipke, Elizabeth Ann

    2016-03-01

    Tracking of rolling cells via in vitro experiment is now commonly performed using customized computer programs. In most cases, two critical challenges continue to limit analysis of cell rolling data: long computation times due to the complexity of tracking algorithms and difficulty in accurately correlating a given cell with itself from one frame to the next, which is typically due to errors caused by cells that either come close in proximity to each other or come in contact with each other. In this paper, we have developed a sophisticated, yet simple and highly effective, rolling cell tracking system to address these two critical problems. This optical cell tracking analysis (OCTA) system first employs ImageJ for cell identification in each frame of a cell rolling video. A custom MATLAB code was written to use the geometric and positional information of all cells as the primary parameters for matching each individual cell with itself between consecutive frames and to avoid errors when tracking cells that come within close proximity to one another. Once the cells are matched, rolling velocity can be obtained for further analysis. The use of ImageJ for cell identification eliminates the need for high level MATLAB image processing knowledge. As a result, only fundamental MATLAB syntax is necessary for cell matching. OCTA has been implemented in the tracking of endothelial colony forming cell (ECFC) rolling under shear. The processing time needed to obtain tracked cell data from a 2 min ECFC rolling video recorded at 70 frames per second with a total of over 8000 frames is less than 6 min using a computer with an Intel® Core™ i7 CPU 2.80 GHz (8 CPUs). This cell tracking system benefits cell rolling analysis by substantially reducing the time required for post-acquisition data processing of high frame rate video recordings and preventing tracking errors when individual cells come in close proximity to one another.

  7. Mesenchymal stem cells: from experiment to clinic

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Otto William R

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract There is currently much interest in adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs and their ability to differentiate into other cell types, and to partake in the anatomy and physiology of remote organs. It is now clear these cells may be purified from several organs in the body besides bone marrow. MSCs take part in wound healing by contributing to myofibroblast and possibly fibroblast populations, and may be involved in epithelial tissue regeneration in certain organs, although this remains more controversial. In this review, we examine the ability of MSCs to modulate liver, kidney, heart and intestinal repair, and we update their opposing qualities of being less immunogenic and therefore tolerated in a transplant situation, yet being able to contribute to xenograft models of human tumour formation in other contexts. However, such observations have not been replicated in the clinic. Recent studies showing the clinical safety of MSC in several pathologies are discussed. The possible opposing powers of MSC need careful understanding and control if their clinical potential is to be realised with long-term safety for patients.

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells: characteristics and clinical applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sylwia Bobis

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are bone marrow populating cells, different from hematopoietic stem cells, which possess an extensive proliferative potential and ability to differentiate into various cell types, including: osteocytes, adipocytes, chondrocytes, myocytes, cardiomyocytes and neurons. MSCs play a key role in the maintenance of bone marrow homeostasis and regulate the maturation of both hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. The cells are characterized by the expression of numerous surface antigens, but none of them appears to be exclusively expressed on MSCs. Apart from bone marrow, MSCs are located in other tissues, like: adipose tissue, peripheral blood, cord blood, liver and fetal tissues. MSCs have been shown to be powerful tools in gene therapies, and can be effectively transduced with viral vectors containing a therapeutic gene, as well as with cDNA for specific proteins, expression of which is desired in a patient. Due to such characteristics, the number of clinical trials based on the use of MSCs increase. These cells have been successfully employed in graft versus host disease (GvHD treatment, heart regeneration after infarct, cartilage and bone repair, skin wounds healing, neuronal regeneration and many others. Of special importance is their use in the treatment of osteogenesis imperfecta (OI, which appeared to be the only reasonable therapeutic strategy. MSCs seem to represent a future powerful tool in regenerative medicine, therefore they are particularly important in medical research.

  9. Synchrotron-based in vivo tracking of implanted mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed an X-ray imaging protocol that permits 3D visualisation of a small number of implanted cells within bulk tissue. The cells are marked using natural endocytosis of inert gold nano-particles. The resulting local increase in electron density allows high imaging contrast to be obtained from small clusters of these marked cells. Using this technique we have imaged C6 glioma cells within the brain of a model animal. The cells were marked by exposing them to colloidal gold incorporated in the growth media. Gold-loaded glioma cells were implanted into the brains of adult male Wistar rats. After tumours had been allowed to develop for up to 2 weeks, the animals were sacrificed and images of the intact cranium were acquired at the SYRMEP imaging station on the Elettra synchrotron in Italy. Computed tomography was performed using mixed absorption and phase contrast techniques at an X-ray energy of 24 keV. In the resulting volume datasets the tumour bulk is clearly visible and the infiltrating nature of the malignant growth is well demonstrated. Although the protocol was developed using this particular model of malignant brain tumour, it is believed that it will be possible to use it with other cell lines

  10. Design of a galvanotaxic track for cells, using polymer electrodes.

    OpenAIRE

    Bengtsson, Katarina

    2011-01-01

    Galvanotaxis is the movement of cells in an applied electric field. The first steps to design a chip for observations of galvanotaxic behavior of cells were done in this work. The chip is a miniaturised system of previous larger galvanotaxis systems and uses materials which are thought to be biocompatible. The system was constructed on microscope slides with a channel in PDMS with adjacent polymer electrodes. The polymer electrodes were made from poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) poly(styrenes...

  11. Lightning Jump Algorithm and Relation to Thunderstorm Cell Tracking, GLM Proxy and Other Meteorological Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schultz, Christopher J.; Carey, Lawrence D.; Cecil, Daniel J.; Bateman, Monte

    2012-01-01

    The lightning jump algorithm has a robust history in correlating upward trends in lightning to severe and hazardous weather occurrence. The algorithm uses the correlation between the physical principles that govern an updraft's ability to produce microphysical and kinematic conditions conducive for electrification and its role in the development of severe weather conditions. Recent work has demonstrated that the lightning jump algorithm concept holds significant promise in the operational realm, aiding in the identification of thunderstorms that have potential to produce severe or hazardous weather. However, a large amount of work still needs to be completed in spite of these positive results. The total lightning jump algorithm is not a stand-alone concept that can be used independent of other meteorological measurements, parameters, and techniques. For example, the algorithm is highly dependent upon thunderstorm tracking to build lightning histories on convective cells. Current tracking methods show that thunderstorm cell tracking is most reliable and cell histories are most accurate when radar information is incorporated with lightning data. In the absence of radar data, the cell tracking is a bit less reliable but the value added by the lightning information is much greater. For optimal application, the algorithm should be integrated with other measurements that assess storm scale properties (e.g., satellite, radar). Therefore, the recent focus of this research effort has been assessing the lightning jump's relation to thunderstorm tracking, meteorological parameters, and its potential uses in operational meteorology. Furthermore, the algorithm must be tailored for the optically-based GOES-R Geostationary Lightning Mapper (GLM), as what has been observed using Very High Frequency Lightning Mapping Array (VHF LMA) measurements will not exactly translate to what will be observed by GLM due to resolution and other instrument differences. Herein, we present some of

  12. Silica-porphyrin hybrid nanotubes for in vivo cell tracking by near-infrared fluorescence imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayashi, Koichiro; Nakamura, Michihiro; Ishimura, Kazunori

    2012-04-21

    Near-infrared fluorescent silica-porphyrin hybrid nanotubes (HNTs) were successfully synthesized by π-π stacking, electrostatic interaction and a sol-gel reaction. The HNTs-labeled macrophages were detected in vivo, and the minimum detectable number of cells was 200. Furthermore, the biodistribution of HNTs-labeled macrophages was tracked by fluorescence imaging. PMID:22437325

  13. Automatic tracking of red blood cells in micro channels using OpenCV

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodrigues, Vânia; Rodrigues, Pedro J.; Pereira, Ana I.; Lima, Rui

    2013-10-01

    The present study aims to developan automatic method able to track red blood cells (RBCs) trajectories flowing through a microchannel using the Open Source Computer Vision (OpenCV). The developed method is based on optical flux calculation assisted by the maximization of the template-matching product. The experimental results show a good functional performance of this method.

  14. Multiphoton luminescent graphene quantum dots for in vivo tracking of human adipose-derived stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin; Song, Sung Ho; Jin, Yoonhee; Park, Hyun-Ji; Yoon, Hyewon; Jeon, Seokwoo; Cho, Seung-Woo

    2016-04-01

    The applicability of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) for the in vitro and in vivo live imaging and tracking of different types of human stem cells is investigated. GQDs synthesized by the modified graphite intercalated compound method show efficient cellular uptake with improved biocompatibility and highly sensitive optical properties, indicating their feasibility as a bio-imaging probe for stem cell therapy.The applicability of graphene quantum dots (GQDs) for the in vitro and in vivo live imaging and tracking of different types of human stem cells is investigated. GQDs synthesized by the modified graphite intercalated compound method show efficient cellular uptake with improved biocompatibility and highly sensitive optical properties, indicating their feasibility as a bio-imaging probe for stem cell therapy. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available: Additional results. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02143c

  15. The smart IV stand design through human tracking mobile robot system by CDS cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jo, Seong-Hyeon; Choe, Jong-Hun; Seo, Suk-Hyun; Kim, Won-Hoe; Lee, Hong-Kyu; Park, Se-Ho

    2015-03-01

    Vision-based recognition of the object as a general interface gives us high cost and complicated problem. This research suggests human tracking system by Arduino, and Laser-CdS cell system track wire that pass laser line. In this paper, we review existing literature on application systems of recognition which involves many interdisciplinary studies. We conclude that our method can only reduce cost, but is easy way to trace people's location with the use of wire. Furthermore, we apply several recognition systems including CdS-based mobile robot that is applied IV stand used at the hospital effectively.

  16. Cancer cell imaging by stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope with resonance tracking method

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Kyoung-Duck [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Doo-Jae; Jeong, Mun-Seok [Sungkyunkwan University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Geun-Chang [Seoul National University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Seung-Gol [Inha University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of); Byeon, Clare-Chisu [Kyungpook National University, Daegu (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Soo-Bong [Incheon National University, Incheon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    We report on a successful topographical and optical imaging of various cancer cells in liquid and in air by using a stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope that utilizes a resonance tracking method. We observed a clear dehydration which gives rise to a decrease in the cell volume down to 51%. In addition, a micro-ball lens effect due to the round-shaped young cancer cells was observed from near-field imaging, where the refractive index of young cancer cells was deduced.

  17. Cancer cell imaging by stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope with resonance tracking method

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We report on a successful topographical and optical imaging of various cancer cells in liquid and in air by using a stable wet near-field scanning optical microscope that utilizes a resonance tracking method. We observed a clear dehydration which gives rise to a decrease in the cell volume down to 51%. In addition, a micro-ball lens effect due to the round-shaped young cancer cells was observed from near-field imaging, where the refractive index of young cancer cells was deduced.

  18. Maximum power point tracking control of direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Mingbo; Yan, Ting; Gu, Jinguang

    2014-02-01

    The performance of a direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is closely related to its operating conditions, and there is a specific combination of operating conditions at which the DMFC produces maximum power. Working at the maximum power point (MPP) can lower the methanol crossover rate and ancillary power consumption, improving the global efficiency of the system. The fuzzy controller proposed in this paper provides a simple and robust way to keep the DMFC working at the MPP by adjusting the operating conditions followed by the variation of the driven load in real time. Simulation shows that the fuzzy control approach can yield satisfactory results.

  19. Guard cell zeaxanthin tracks photosynthetically active radiation and stomatal apertures in Vicia faba leaves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zeaxanthin, antheraxanthin and violaxanthin concentrations in guard cells from sonicated abaxial epidermal peels of Vicia faba were measured from dawn to dusk, and compared with concentrations in mesophyll tissue of the same leaves. Measured changes in guard cell zeaxanthin and violaxanthin concentrations indicate that guard cells operate the xanthophyll cycle throughout the day. Mesophyll tissue had no detectable zeaxanthin at dawn, whereas guard cells had 30–50 mmol mol−1 chlorophyll a+b. On a chlorophyll basis, maximal zeaxanthin levels were 3–4 fold higher in guard cells than in mesophyll cells. Zeaxanthin concentrations tracked levels of photosynthetically active radiation (PAR) in both mesophyll and guard cells. In the mesophyll, most of the zeaxanthin changes occurred in mid-morning and mid-afternoon. In guard cells, zeaxanthin concentrations changed nearly linearly with PAR in the early morning and late afternoon, and closely tracked PAR levels throughout the day. Guard cell zeaxanthin concentrations were also closely correlated with stomatal apertures. The close relationship between zeaxanthin concentrations and PAR levels in guard cells indicates that zeaxanthin is well suited to function as a molecular photosensor in stomatal movements. (author)

  20. Development of an Integrated Chip for Automatic Tracking and Positioning Manipulation for Single Cell Lysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chao-Wang Young

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available This study adopted a microelectromechanical fabrication process to design a chip integrated with electroosmotic flow and dielectrophoresis force for single cell lysis. Human histiocytic lymphoma U937 cells were driven rapidly by electroosmotic flow and precisely moved to a specific area for cell lysis. By varying the frequency of AC power, 15 V AC at 1 MHz of frequency configuration achieved 100% cell lysing at the specific area. The integrated chip could successfully manipulate single cells to a specific position and lysis. The overall successful rate of cell tracking, positioning, and cell lysis is 80%. The average speed of cell driving was 17.74 μm/s. This technique will be developed for DNA extraction in biomolecular detection. It can simplify pre-treatment procedures for biotechnological analysis of samples.

  1. Innovative molecular-based fluorescent nanoparticles for multicolor single particle tracking in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniel, Jonathan; Godin, Antoine G.; Palayret, Matthieu; Lounis, Brahim; Cognet, Laurent; Blanchard-Desce, Mireille

    2016-03-01

    Based on an original molecular-based design, we present bright and photostable fluorescent organic nanoparticles (FONs) showing excellent colloidal stability in various aqueous environments. Complementary near-infrared emitting and green emitting FONs were prepared using a simple, fast and robust protocol. Both types of FONs could be simultaneously imaged at the single-particle level in solution as well as in biological environments using a monochromatic excitation and a dual-color fluorescence microscope. No evidence of acute cytotoxicity was found upon incubation of live cells with mixed solutions of FONs, and both types of nanoparticles were found internalized in the cells where their motion could be simultaneously tracked at video-rate up to minutes. These fluorescent organic nanoparticles open a novel non-toxic alternative to existing nanoparticles for imaging biological structures, compatible with live-cell experiments and specially fitted for multicolor single particle tracking.

  2. Effects of track structure and cell inactivation on the calculation of heavy ion mutation rates in mammalian cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cucinotta, F. A.; Wilson, J. W.; Shavers, M. R.; Katz, R.

    1996-01-01

    It has long been suggested that inactivation severely effects the probability of mutation by heavy ions in mammalian cells. Heavy ions have observed cross sections of inactivation that approach and sometimes exceed the geometric size of the cell nucleus in mammalian cells. In the track structure model of Katz the inactivation cross section is found by summing an inactivation probability over all impact parameters from the ion to the sensitive sites within the cell nucleus. The inactivation probability is evaluated using the dose-response of the system to gamma-rays and the radial dose of the ions and may be equal to unity at small impact parameters for some ions. We show how the effects of inactivation may be taken into account in the evaluation of the mutation cross sections from heavy ions in the track structure model through correlation of sites for gene mutation and cell inactivation. The model is fit to available data for HPRT mutations in Chinese hamster cells and good agreement is found. The resulting calculations qualitatively show that mutation cross sections for heavy ions display minima at velocities where inactivation cross sections display maxima. Also, calculations show the high probability of mutation by relativistic heavy ions due to the radial extension of ions track from delta-rays in agreement with the microlesion concept. The effects of inactivation on mutations rates make it very unlikely that a single parameter such as LET or Z*2/beta(2) can be used to specify radiation quality for heavy ion bombardment.

  3. Detection of space radiation-induced double strand breaks as a track in cell nucleus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To identify DNA damage induced by space radiations such as the high linear energy transfer (LET) particles, phospho-H2AX (γH2AX) foci formation was analyzed in human cells frozen in an International Space Station freezer for 133 days. After recovering the frozen sample to the earth, the cells were cultured for 30 min, and then fixed. Here we show a track of γH2AX positive foci in them by immuno-cytochemical methods. It is suggested that space radiations, especially high LET particles, induced DSBs as a track. From the formation of the tracks in nuclei, exposure dose rate was calculated to be 0.7 mSv per day as relatively high-energy space radiations of Fe-ions (500 MeV/u, 200 keV/μm). From the physical dosimetry with CR-39 plastic nuclear track detectors and thermo-luminescent dosimeters, dose rate was 0.5 mSv per day. These values the exposed dose rate were similar between biological and physical dosimetries.

  4. [Eye tracking and desire: new scientific and clinical perspectives in sexual medicine].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolmont, Mylène; Bianchi-Demicheli, Francesco

    2016-03-16

    There is a growing interest in the field of neurobiology of sexual function. With the advent of advanced technologies such as fMRI or EEG, it was possible to investigate the neuronal and psychobiological bases of the various phases of sexual response and sexual desire. Recently, a new technique debuted in sexual medicine, eye tracking. Thus through this article, we will leave the definition of sexual desire, through various neuropsychological studies in this field to finish on the unique and very recent eye tracking study that highlighted the visual patterns of desire sexual. PMID:27149718

  5. Calculation of response of Chinese hamster cells to ions based on track structure theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuXiao-Wei; ZhangChun-Xiang

    1997-01-01

    Considering biological cells as single target two-hit detectors,an analytic formula to calculate the response of cells to ions is developed based on track structure theory.In the calculation,the splitting deposition energy between ion kill mode and γ kill mode is not used.The results of calculation are in agreement with the experimental data for response of Chinese hamster cells,whose response to γ rays can be described by the response function of single target two hit detector to ions.

  6. Single-cell lineage tracking analysis reveals that an established cell line comprises putative cancer stem cells and their heterogeneous progeny

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Sachiko; Rancourt, Ann; Sato, Yukiko; Satoh, Masahiko S.

    2016-01-01

    Mammalian cell culture has been used in many biological studies on the assumption that a cell line comprises putatively homogeneous clonal cells, thereby sharing similar phenotypic features. This fundamental assumption has not yet been fully tested; therefore, we developed a method for the chronological analysis of individual HeLa cells. The analysis was performed by live cell imaging, tracking of every single cell recorded on imaging videos, and determining the fates of individual cells. We found that cell fate varied significantly, indicating that, in contrast to the assumption, the HeLa cell line is composed of highly heterogeneous cells. Furthermore, our results reveal that only a limited number of cells are immortal and renew themselves, giving rise to the remaining cells. These cells have reduced reproductive ability, creating a functionally heterogeneous cell population. Hence, the HeLa cell line is maintained by the limited number of immortal cells, which could be putative cancer stem cells. PMID:27003384

  7. User Resistance and Trust in a Clinical RFID Employee Location Tracking Information System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Wilson

    2013-01-01

    User resistance has been identified as a factor in information systems implementation failures in the health care industry. RFID, radio frequency identification, is being incorporated into new health care information systems in order to effect cost reductions by tracking, identifying and monitoring individuals and medical items. This is the first…

  8. Noninvasive Tracking of Quiescent and Activated Muscle Stem Cell (MuSC) Engraftment Dynamics In Vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Andrew T V; Blau, Helen M

    2016-01-01

    Muscle stem cells play a central role in muscle regeneration. Most studies in the field of muscle regeneration focus on the unraveling of muscle stem cell biology to devise strategies for treating failing muscles as seen in aging and muscle-related diseases. However, the common method used in assessing stem cell function in vivo is laborious, as it involves time-consuming immunohistological analyses by microscopy on serial cryo-sections of the muscle post stem cell transplantation. Here we describe an alternative method, which adapts the bioluminescence imaging (BLI) technique to allow noninvasive tracking of engrafted stem-cell function in vivo in real-time. This assay system enables longitudinal studies in the same mice over time and reveals parameters, not feasible by traditional analysis, such as the magnitude and dynamics of engrafted muscle stem cell expansion in vivo in response to a particular drug treatment or muscle injury. PMID:27492173

  9. Enhanced stem cell tracking via electrostatically assembled fluorescent SPION-peptide complexes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    For cellular MRI there is a need to label cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) that have multiple imaging moieties that are nontoxic and have increased NMR relaxation properties to improve the detection and tracking of therapeutic cells. Although increases in the relaxation properties of SPION have been accomplished, detection of tagged cells is limited by either poor cell labeling efficiency or low intracellular iron content. A strategy via a complex formation with transfection agents to overcome these obstacles has been reported. In this paper, we report a complex formation between negatively charged fluorescent monodisperse SPION and positively charged peptides and use the complex formation to improve the MR properties of labeled stem cells. As a result, labeled stem cells exhibited a strong fluorescent signal and enhanced T 2*-weighted MR imaging in vitro and in vivo in a flank tumor model.

  10. Enhanced stem cell tracking via electrostatically assembled fluorescent SPION-peptide complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jae-Ho; Smith, Melissa A.; Liu, Wei; Gold, Eric M.; Lewis, Bobbi; Song, Ho-Taek; Frank, Joseph A.

    2009-09-01

    For cellular MRI there is a need to label cells with superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) that have multiple imaging moieties that are nontoxic and have increased NMR relaxation properties to improve the detection and tracking of therapeutic cells. Although increases in the relaxation properties of SPION have been accomplished, detection of tagged cells is limited by either poor cell labeling efficiency or low intracellular iron content. A strategy via a complex formation with transfection agents to overcome these obstacles has been reported. In this paper, we report a complex formation between negatively charged fluorescent monodisperse SPION and positively charged peptides and use the complex formation to improve the MR properties of labeled stem cells. As a result, labeled stem cells exhibited a strong fluorescent signal and enhanced T 2*-weighted MR imaging in vitro and in vivo in a flank tumor model.

  11. Clinical application of stem cells: An update 2015

    OpenAIRE

    Van, Phuc Pham

    2016-01-01

    Stem cell transplantation has the long history of more than 50 years from the first bone marrow transplantation in 1957. From the 2000s, clinical applications of stem cells significantly increased with more diseases and more patients treated with stem cells. Both autologous stem cells and allogenic stem cells as well as adult stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), and both in vitro non-expanded stem cells and in vitro expanded stem cells were clinically applied. For adult stem...

  12. Hybrid Automatic Solar Tracking System for Different Types of Solar Cells: A review.

    OpenAIRE

    Neha Sonkar; Pankaj J Edla; Dr. Bhupendra Gupta

    2013-01-01

    The objective of this paper is to present review on the use of different material of Solar panel in a solar tracking system at Stationary, Single Axis, Dual Axis & Hybrid Axis solar tracker to have better performance with minimum losses to the surroundings, as the solar tracker ensures maximum intensity of sun rays hitting the surface of the panel from sunrise to sunset. Solar cells are playing a role of increasing importance in household and other areas of electricity consumption. Due to the...

  13. Novel Serial Positive Enrichment Technology Enables Clinical Multiparameter Cell Sorting

    OpenAIRE

    Christian Stemberger; Stefan Dreher; Claudia Tschulik; Christine Piossek; Jeannette Bet; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Matthias Schiemann; Michael Neuenhahn; Klaus Martin; Martin Schlapschy; Arne Skerra; Thomas Schmidt; Matthias Edinger; Riddell, Stanley R.; Lothar Germeroth

    2012-01-01

    A general obstacle for clinical cell preparations is limited purity, which causes variability in the quality and potency of cell products and might be responsible for negative side effects due to unwanted contaminants. Highly pure populations can be obtained best using positive selection techniques. However, in many cases target cell populations need to be segregated from other cells by combinations of multiple markers, which is still difficult to achieve--especially for clinical cell product...

  14. Tracking Cells in GFP-transgenic Zebrafish Using the Photoconvertible PSmOrange System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beretta, Carlo A; Dross, Nicolas; Engel, Ulrike; Carl, Matthias

    2016-01-01

    The rapid development of transparent zebrafish embryos (Danio rerio) in combination with fluorescent labelings of cells and tissues allows visualizing developmental processes as they happen in the living animal. Cells of interest can be labeled by using a tissue specific promoter to drive the expression of a fluorescent protein (FP) for the generation of transgenic lines. Using fluorescent photoconvertible proteins for this purpose additionally allows to precisely follow defined structures within the expression domain. Illuminating the protein in the region of interest, changes its emission spectrum and highlights a particular cell or cell cluster leaving other transgenic cells in their original color. A major limitation is the lack of known promoters for a large number of tissues in the zebrafish. Conversely, gene- and enhancer trap screens have generated enormous transgenic resources discretely labeling literally all embryonic structures mostly with GFP or to a lesser extend red or yellow FPs. An approach to follow defined structures in such transgenic backgrounds would be to additionally introduce a ubiquitous photoconvertible protein, which could be converted in the cell(s) of interest. However, the photoconvertible proteins available involve a green and/or less frequently a red emission state(1) and can therefore often not be used to track cells in the FP-background of existing transgenic lines. To circumvent this problem, we have established the PSmOrange system for the zebrafish(2,3). Simple microinjection of synthetic mRNA encoding a nuclear form of this protein labels all cell nuclei with orange/red fluorescence. Upon targeted photoconversion of the protein, it switches its emission spectrum to far red. The quantum efficiency and stability of the protein makes PSmOrange a superb cell-tracking tool for zebrafish and possibly other teleost species. PMID:26891031

  15. Automated cell identification and tracking using nanoparticle moving-light-displays.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James A Tonkin

    Full Text Available An automated technique for the identification, tracking and analysis of biological cells is presented. It is based on the use of nanoparticles, enclosed within intra-cellular vesicles, to produce clusters of discrete, point-like fluorescent, light sources within the cells. Computational analysis of these light ensembles in successive time frames of a movie sequence, using k-means clustering and particle tracking algorithms, provides robust and automated discrimination of live cells and their motion and a quantitative measure of their proliferation. This approach is a cytometric version of the moving light display technique which is widely used for analyzing the biological motion of humans and animals. We use the endocytosis of CdTe/ZnS, core-shell quantum dots to produce the light displays within an A549, epithelial, lung cancer cell line, using time-lapse imaging with frame acquisition every 5 minutes over a 40 hour time period. The nanoparticle moving light displays provide simultaneous collection of cell motility data, resolution of mitotic traversal dynamics and identification of familial relationships allowing construction of multi-parameter lineage trees.

  16. SU-E-J-59: Feasibility of Markerless Tumor Tracking by Sequential Dual-Energy Fluoroscopy On a Clinical Tumor Tracking System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhont, J; Poels, K; Verellen, D; Tournel, K; Gevaert, T; Steenbeke, F; Burghelea, M; De Ridder, M [Department of Radiotherapy, Universitair Ziekenhuis Brussel, Brussels (Belgium)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of markerless tumor tracking through the implementation of a novel dual-energy imaging approach into the clinical dynamic tracking (DT) workflow of the Vero SBRT system. Methods: Two sequential 20 s (11 Hz) fluoroscopy sequences were acquired at the start of one fraction for 7 patients treated for primary and metastatic lung cancer with DT on the Vero system. Sequences were acquired using 2 on-board kV imaging systems located at ±45° from the MV beam axis, at respectively 60 kVp (3.2 mAs) and 120 kVp (2.0 mAs). Offline, a normalized cross-correlation algorithm was applied to match the high (HE) and low energy (LE) images. Per breathing phase (inhale, exhale, maximum inhale and maximum exhale), the 5 best-matching HE and LE couples were extracted for DE subtraction. A contrast analysis according to gross tumor volume was conducted based on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Improved tumor visibility was quantified using an improvement ratio. Results: Using the implanted fiducial as a benchmark, HE-LE sequence matching was effective for 13 out of 14 imaging angles. Overlying bony anatomy was removed on all DE images. With the exception of two imaging angles, the DE images showed no significantly improved tumor visibility compared to HE images, with an improvement ratio averaged over all patients of 1.46 ± 1.64. Qualitatively, it was observed that for those imaging angles that showed no significantly improved CNR, the tumor tissue could not be reliably visualized on neither HE nor DE images due to a total or partial overlap with other soft tissue. Conclusion: Dual-energy subtraction imaging by sequential orthogonal fluoroscopy was shown feasible by implementing an additional LE fluoroscopy sequence. However, for most imaging angles, DE images did not provide improved tumor visibility over single-energy images. Optimizing imaging angles is likely to improve tumor visibility and the efficacy of dual-energy imaging. This work was in

  17. SU-E-J-59: Feasibility of Markerless Tumor Tracking by Sequential Dual-Energy Fluoroscopy On a Clinical Tumor Tracking System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To evaluate the feasibility of markerless tumor tracking through the implementation of a novel dual-energy imaging approach into the clinical dynamic tracking (DT) workflow of the Vero SBRT system. Methods: Two sequential 20 s (11 Hz) fluoroscopy sequences were acquired at the start of one fraction for 7 patients treated for primary and metastatic lung cancer with DT on the Vero system. Sequences were acquired using 2 on-board kV imaging systems located at ±45° from the MV beam axis, at respectively 60 kVp (3.2 mAs) and 120 kVp (2.0 mAs). Offline, a normalized cross-correlation algorithm was applied to match the high (HE) and low energy (LE) images. Per breathing phase (inhale, exhale, maximum inhale and maximum exhale), the 5 best-matching HE and LE couples were extracted for DE subtraction. A contrast analysis according to gross tumor volume was conducted based on contrast-to-noise ratio (CNR). Improved tumor visibility was quantified using an improvement ratio. Results: Using the implanted fiducial as a benchmark, HE-LE sequence matching was effective for 13 out of 14 imaging angles. Overlying bony anatomy was removed on all DE images. With the exception of two imaging angles, the DE images showed no significantly improved tumor visibility compared to HE images, with an improvement ratio averaged over all patients of 1.46 ± 1.64. Qualitatively, it was observed that for those imaging angles that showed no significantly improved CNR, the tumor tissue could not be reliably visualized on neither HE nor DE images due to a total or partial overlap with other soft tissue. Conclusion: Dual-energy subtraction imaging by sequential orthogonal fluoroscopy was shown feasible by implementing an additional LE fluoroscopy sequence. However, for most imaging angles, DE images did not provide improved tumor visibility over single-energy images. Optimizing imaging angles is likely to improve tumor visibility and the efficacy of dual-energy imaging. This work was in

  18. Quantum dots do not affect the behaviour of mouse embryonic stem cells and kidney stem cells and are suitable for short-term tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aleksandra Rak-Raszewska

    Full Text Available Quantum dots (QDs are small nanocrystals widely used for labelling cells in order to enable cell tracking in complex environments in vitro, ex vivo and in vivo. They present many advantages over traditional fluorescent markers as they are resistant to photobleaching and have narrow emission spectra. Although QDs have been used effectively in cell tracking applications, their suitability has been questioned by reports showing they can affect stem cell behaviour and can be transferred to neighbouring cells. Using a variety of cellular and molecular biology techniques, we have investigated the effect of QDs on the proliferation and differentiation potential of two stem cell types: mouse embryonic stem cells and tissue-specific stem cells derived from mouse kidney. We have also tested if QDs released from living or dead cells can be taken up by neighbouring cells, and we have determined if QDs affect the degree of cell-cell fusion; this information is critical in order to assess the suitability of QDs for stem cell tracking. We show here that QDs have no effect on the viability, proliferation or differentiation potential of the two stem cell types. Furthermore, we show that the extent of transfer of QDs to neighbouring cells is 85%, they are rapidly depleted from both stem cell populations. Taken together, our results suggest that QDs are effective cell labelling probes that are suitable for short-term stem cell tracking.

  19. Cell tracking and therapy evaluation of bone marrow monocytes and stromal cells using SPECT and CMR in a canine model of myocardial infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Merrifield Peter

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The clinical application of stem cell therapy for myocardial infarction will require the development of methods to monitor treatment and pre-clinical assessment in a large animal model, to determine its effectiveness and the optimum cell population, route of delivery, timing, and flow milieu. Objectives To establish a model for a in vivo tracking to monitor cell engraftment after autologous transplantation and b concurrent measurement of infarct evolution and remodeling. Methods We evaluated 22 dogs (8 sham controls, 7 treated with autologous bone marrow monocytes, and 7 with stromal cells using both imaging of 111Indium-tropolone labeled cells and late gadolinium enhancement CMR for up to12 weeks after a 3 hour coronary occlusion. Hearts were also examined using immunohistochemistry for capillary density and presence of PKH26 labeled cells. Results In vivo Indium imaging demonstrated an effective biological clearance half-life from the injection site of ~5 days. CMR demonstrated a pattern of progressive infarct shrinkage over 12 weeks, ranging from 67–88% of baseline values with monocytes producing a significant treatment effect. Relative infarct shrinkage was similar through to 6 weeks in all groups, following which the treatment effect was manifest. There was a trend towards an increase in capillary density with cell treatment. Conclusion This multi-modality approach will allow determination of the success and persistence of engraftment, and a correlation of this with infarct size shrinkage, regional function, and left ventricular remodeling. There were overall no major treatment effects with this particular model of transplantation immediately post-infarct.

  20. Organic nanoparticles with aggregation-induced emission for tracking bone marrow stromal cells in the rat ischemic stroke model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kai; Yamamoto, Mie; Chan, Su Jing; Chiam, Mun Yee; Qin, Wei; Wong, Peter Tsun Hon; Yim, Evelyn King Fai; Tang, Ben Zhong; Liu, Bin

    2014-12-14

    Organic nanoparticles (NPs) with aggregation-induced emission (AIE) have been successfully used for tracking bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs) in rats with ischemic stroke, highlighting the great potential of such fluorescent NPs in understanding the fate of transplanted stem cells for cell-based therapies. PMID:25267167

  1. Clinical decision-making tools for exam selection, reporting and dose tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Although many efforts have been made to reduce the radiation dose associated with individual medical imaging examinations to ''as low as reasonably achievable,'' efforts to ensure such examinations are performed only when medically indicated and appropriate are equally if not more important. Variations in the use of ionizing radiation for medical imaging are concerning, regardless of whether they occur on a local, regional or national basis. Such variations among practices can be reduced with the use of decision support tools at the time of order entry. These tools help reduce radiation exposure among practices through the appropriate use of medical imaging. Similarly, adoption of best practices among imaging facilities can be promoted through tracking the radiation exposure among imaging patients. Practices can benchmark their aggregate radiation exposures for medical imaging through the use of dose index registries. However several variables must be considered when contemplating individual patient dose tracking. The specific dose measures and the variation among them introduced by variations in body habitus must be understood. Moreover the uncertainties in risk estimation from dose metrics related to age, gender and life expectancy must also be taken into account. (orig.)

  2. Clinical decision-making tools for exam selection, reporting and dose tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brink, James A. [Massachusetts General Hospital, Harvard Medical School, Department of Radiology, Boston, MA (United States)

    2014-10-15

    Although many efforts have been made to reduce the radiation dose associated with individual medical imaging examinations to ''as low as reasonably achievable,'' efforts to ensure such examinations are performed only when medically indicated and appropriate are equally if not more important. Variations in the use of ionizing radiation for medical imaging are concerning, regardless of whether they occur on a local, regional or national basis. Such variations among practices can be reduced with the use of decision support tools at the time of order entry. These tools help reduce radiation exposure among practices through the appropriate use of medical imaging. Similarly, adoption of best practices among imaging facilities can be promoted through tracking the radiation exposure among imaging patients. Practices can benchmark their aggregate radiation exposures for medical imaging through the use of dose index registries. However several variables must be considered when contemplating individual patient dose tracking. The specific dose measures and the variation among them introduced by variations in body habitus must be understood. Moreover the uncertainties in risk estimation from dose metrics related to age, gender and life expectancy must also be taken into account. (orig.)

  3. Systematic investigations of intense convective precipitation events on European scale based on radar- and lightning-cell tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tüchler, Lukas; Meyer, Vera

    2013-04-01

    The new radar-data and lightning-data based automatic cell identification, tracking and nowcasting tool A-TNT (Austrian Thunderstorm Nowcasting Tool), which has been developed at ZAMG, has been applied to investigate the appearance of thunderstorms at Europe scale. Based on the ec-TRAM-method [1], the algorithm identifies and monitors regions of intense precipitation and lightning activity separately by analyzing sequential two-dimensional intensity maps of radar precipitation rate or lightning densities, respectively. Each data source is processed by a stand-alone identification, tracking and nowcasting procedure. The two tracking results are combined to a "main" cell in a final step. This approach allows that the output derived from the two data sources complement each other giving a more comprehensive picture about the current storm situation. So it is possible to distinguish between pure precipitation cells and thunderstorms, to observe regions, where one data source is not or poorly available, and to compensate for occasional data failures. Consequently, the combined cell-tracks are expected to be more consistent and the cell-tracking more robust. Input data for radar-cell tracking on European Scale is the OPERA radar-composite, which is provided every 15 minutes on a 2 km x 2 km grid, indicating the location and intensity of precipitation over Europe. For the lightning-cell tracking, the lightning-detection data of the EUCLID network is mapped on the OPERA grid. Every five minutes, flash density maps with recorded strokes are created and analyzed. This study will present a detailed investigation of the quality of the identification and tracking results using radar and lightning data. The improvements concerning the robustness and reliability of the cell tracking achieved by combining both data sources will be shown. Analyses about cell tracks and selected storm parameters like frequency, longevity and area will give insight into occurrence, appearance and

  4. Registration procedure for spatial correlation of physical energy deposition of particle irradiation and cellular response utilizing cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, M.; Zimmermann, F.; Schlegel, J.; Schwager, C.; Debus, J.; Jäkel, O.; Abdollahi, A.; Greilich, S.

    2016-09-01

    The hybrid technology cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detector (Cell-Fit-HD) enables the investigation of radiation-related cellular events along single ion tracks on the subcellular scale in clinical ion beams. The Cell-Fit-HD comprises a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD, the physical compartment), a device for individual particle detection and a substrate for viable cell-coating, i.e. the biological compartment. To date both compartments have been imaged sequentially in situ by confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). This is yet in conflict with a functional read-out of the Cell-Fit-HD utilizing a fast live-cell imaging of the biological compartment with low phototoxicity on greater time scales. The read-out of the biological from the physical compartment was uncoupled. A read-out procedure was developed to image the cell layer by conventional widefield microscopy whereas the FNTD was imaged by CLSM. Point mapping registration of the confocal and widefield imaging data was performed. Non-fluorescent crystal defects (spinels) visible in both read-outs were used as control point pairs. The accuracy achieved was on the sub-µm scale. The read-out procedure by widefield microscopy does not impair the unique ability of spatial correlation by the Cell-Fit-HD. The uncoupling will enlarge the application potential of the hybrid technology significantly. The registration allows for an ultimate correlation of microscopic physical beam parameters and cell kinetics on greater time scales. The method reported herein will be instrumental for the introduction of a novel generation of compact detectors facilitating biodosimetric research towards high-throughput analysis.

  5. Dynamic in vivo imaging and cell tracking using a histone fluorescent protein fusion in mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Papaioannou Virginia E

    2004-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Advances in optical imaging modalities and the continued evolution of genetically-encoded fluorescent proteins are coming together to facilitate the study of cell behavior at high resolution in living organisms. As a result, imaging using autofluorescent protein reporters is gaining popularity in mouse transgenic and targeted mutagenesis applications. Results We have used embryonic stem cell-mediated transgenesis to label cells at sub-cellular resolution in vivo, and to evaluate fusion of a human histone protein to green fluorescent protein for ubiquitous fluorescent labeling of nucleosomes in mice. To this end we have generated embryonic stem cells and a corresponding strain of mice that is viable and fertile and exhibits widespread chromatin-localized reporter expression. High levels of transgene expression are maintained in a constitutive manner. Viability and fertility of homozygous transgenic animals demonstrates that this reporter is developmentally neutral and does not interfere with mitosis or meiosis. Conclusions Using various optical imaging modalities including wide-field, spinning disc confocal, and laser scanning confocal and multiphoton excitation microscopy, we can identify cells in various stages of the cell cycle. We can identify cells in interphase, cells undergoing mitosis or cell death. We demonstrate that this histone fusion reporter allows the direct visualization of active chromatin in situ. Since this reporter segments three-dimensional space, it permits the visualization of individual cells within a population, and so facilitates tracking cell position over time. It is therefore attractive for use in multidimensional studies of in vivo cell behavior and cell fate.

  6. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasten, Annika; Siegmund, Birte J.; Grüttner, Cordula; Kühn, Jens-Peter; Frerich, Bernhard

    2015-04-01

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time.

  7. Viability of adhered bacterial cells: tracking MinD protein oscillations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrett, Matt; Colville, Keegan; Schultz-Nielsen, Chris; Jericho, Manfred; Dutcher, John

    2010-03-01

    To study bacterial cells using atomic force microscopy, it is necessary to immobilize the cells on a substrate. Because bacterial cells and common substrates such as glass and mica have a net negative charge, positively charged polymers such as poly-L-lysine (PLL) and polyethyleneimine (PEI) are commonly used as adhesion layers. However, the use of adhesion polymers could stress the cell and even render it inviable. Viable E. coli cells use oscillations of Min proteins along the axis of the rod-shaped cells to ensure accurate cell division. By tagging MinD proteins with GFP, oscillations can be observed using fluorescence microscopy. For a healthy cell in an ideal environment, the oscillation period is measured to be ˜40 s. Prior experiments have shown that PLL increases the oscillation period significantly (up to 80%). In the present study, we have used epifluorescence and total internal reflection fluorescence (TIRF) to track MinD protein oscillations in E. coli bacteria adhered to a variety of positively charged polymers on mica as a function of polymer surface coverage.

  8. Label free cell tracking in 3D tissue engineering constructs with high resolution imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, W. A.; Lam, K.-P.; Dempsey, K. P.; Mazzocchi-Jones, D.; Richardson, J. B.; Yang, Y.

    2014-02-01

    Within the field of tissue engineering there is an emphasis on studying 3-D live tissue structures. Consequently, to investigate and identify cellular activities and phenotypes in a 3-D environment for all in vitro experiments, including shape, migration/proliferation and axon projection, it is necessary to adopt an optical imaging system that enables monitoring 3-D cellular activities and morphology through the thickness of the construct for an extended culture period without cell labeling. This paper describes a new 3-D tracking algorithm developed for Cell-IQ®, an automated cell imaging platform, which has been equipped with an environmental chamber optimized to enable capturing time-lapse sequences of live cell images over a long-term period without cell labeling. As an integral part of the algorithm, a novel auto-focusing procedure was developed for phase contrast microscopy equipped with 20x and 40x objectives, to provide a more accurate estimation of cell growth/trajectories by allowing 3-D voxels to be computed at high spatiotemporal resolution and cell density. A pilot study was carried out in a phantom system consisting of horizontally aligned nanofiber layers (with precise spacing between them), to mimic features well exemplified in cellular activities of neuronal growth in a 3-D environment. This was followed by detailed investigations concerning axonal projections and dendritic circuitry formation in a 3-D tissue engineering construct. Preliminary work on primary animal neuronal cells in response to chemoattractant and topographic cue within the scaffolds has produced encouraging results.

  9. Adult Stromal (Skeletal, Mesenchymal) Stem Cells: Advances Towards Clinical Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kermani, Abbas Jafari; Harkness, Linda; Zaher, Walid;

    2014-01-01

    are under intensive investigation worldwide. Several challenges with regard to the proper source of clinical-grade MSC and the efficacy of MSC-based treatment strategies need to be addressed before MSC can be routinely used in the clinic. Here, we discuss three areas that can potentially facilitate...... the translation of MSC into clinic: Generation of MSC-like cells from human pluripotent stem cells, strategies to enhance homing of MSC to injured tissues, and targeting of MSC in vivo....

  10. Operationalizing Civilian Protection in Mali: The Case for a Civilian Casualty Tracking, Analysis, and Response Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marla B. Keenan

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available This practice note details an emerging best practice of civilian harm mitigation in armed conflict: namely, the creation of civilian casualty tracking, analysis and response processes by a warring party or peace operation force. It asserts that in Iraq, Afghanistan and soon Somalia, these processes to better understand civilian harm and address consequences have positively shaped mission tactics, training, and overall operations. In both Iraq and Afghanistan, tracking and analysis has lead to a marked decrease in civilian casualties and facilitated the making of amends for any civilian losses. The paper argues that for warring parties to achieve their mission—particularly one with a protection of civilians mandate as with the United Nations Multidimensional Integrated Stabilization Mission in Mali (MINUSMA—they must fully understand the impact of their actions on the civilian population, positive or negative. For this reason, a Civilian Casualty Tracking, Analysis, and Response Cell should be created for MINUSMA to improve its ability mitigate risk to civilians as required by its Security Council mandate.

  11. In vivo tracking of stem cells labeled with a nanoparticle in Alzheimer's disease animal model

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ha, Sungji; Suh, Yoo-Hun; Chang, Keun-A.

    2013-05-01

    Stem cell therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of diverse conditions including neurodegenerative diseases. To understand transplanted stem cell biology, in vivo imaging is necessary. Nano material has great potential for in vivo imaging and several noninvasive methods are used such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), positron emission tomography (PET), Fluorescence imaging (FI) and Near-infrared fluorescence imaging (NIRFI). However, each method has limitations for in vivo imaging. To overcome these limitations, multimodal nanoprobes have been developed. In the present study, we intravenously injected human adipose derived stem cells (hASCs) that labeled with multimodal nano particle, LEO-LIVETM-Magnoxide 797 or 675, into the Tg2576 mice, Alzheimer's disease (AD) mouse model. Sequential in vivo tracking was performed with mice injected with hASCs. We could found fluorescence signals until 10 days after injection.

  12. CORRELATION OF MRI GRADING OF BONE STRESS INJURIES WITH CLINICAL RISK FACTORS AND RETURN TO PLAY: A 5-YEAR PROSPECTIVE STUDY IN COLLEGIATE TRACK AND FIELD ATHLETES

    OpenAIRE

    Nattiv, A; Kennedy, G; Barrack, MT; Abdelkerim, A; Goolsby, MA; Arends, JC; Seeger, LL

    2013-01-01

    Background: Bone stress injuries are common in track and field athletes. Knowledge of risk factors and correlation of these to magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) grading could be helpful in determining recovery time. Purpose: To examine the relationships between MRI grading of bone stress injuries with clinical risk factors and time to return to sport in collegiate track and field athletes. Study Design: Cohort study (prognosis); Level of evidence, 2. Methods: A total of 211 male and female col...

  13. Interconnecting smartphone, image analysis server, and case report forms in clinical trials for automatic skin lesion tracking in clinical trials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haak, Daniel; Doma, Aliaa; Gombert, Alexander; Deserno, Thomas M.

    2016-03-01

    Today, subject's medical data in controlled clinical trials is captured digitally in electronic case report forms (eCRFs). However, eCRFs only insufficiently support integration of subject's image data, although medical imaging is looming large in studies today. For bed-side image integration, we present a mobile application (App) that utilizes the smartphone-integrated camera. To ensure high image quality with this inexpensive consumer hardware, color reference cards are placed in the camera's field of view next to the lesion. The cards are used for automatic calibration of geometry, color, and contrast. In addition, a personalized code is read from the cards that allows subject identification. For data integration, the App is connected to an communication and image analysis server that also holds the code-study-subject relation. In a second system interconnection, web services are used to connect the smartphone with OpenClinica, an open-source, Food and Drug Administration (FDA)-approved electronic data capture (EDC) system in clinical trials. Once the photographs have been securely stored on the server, they are released automatically from the mobile device. The workflow of the system is demonstrated by an ongoing clinical trial, in which photographic documentation is frequently performed to measure the effect of wound incision management systems. All 205 images, which have been collected in the study so far, have been correctly identified and successfully integrated into the corresponding subject's eCRF. Using this system, manual steps for the study personnel are reduced, and, therefore, errors, latency and costs decreased. Our approach also increases data security and privacy.

  14. SpatTrack: an imaging toolbox for analysis of vesicle motility and distribution in living cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lund, Frederik Wendelboe; Jensen, Marie Louise; Christensen, Tanja;

    2014-01-01

    The endocytic pathway is a complex network of highly dynamic organelles, which has been traditionally studied by quantitative fluorescence microscopy. The data generated by this method can be overwhelming and its analysis, even for the skilled microscopist, is tedious and error-prone. We develope...... subpopulation of late endosomes/lysosomes (LE/LYSs). This was paralleled by repositioning and active transport of NPC2-containing vesicles to the cell surface. The potential of SpatTrack for other applications in intracellular transport studies will be discussed....

  15. PIGMENTED BASAL CELL CARCINOMA: A RARE CLINICAL AND HISTOPATHOLOGICAL VARIANT

    OpenAIRE

    Chandralekha; Vijaya Bhaskar; Bhagyalakshmi; Sudhakar; Sumanlatha

    2015-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is a common malignant tumour of skin , commonly referred to as „rodent ulcer‟. It is common in the head and neck region. Exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a clinical and histological variant of basal cell carcinoma that exhibits inc reased pigmentation. It is a rare variant that can clinically mimic malignant melanoma. It is more common in males than females. Herein , we are...

  16. Towards a digital model of zebrafish embryogenesis. Integration of cell tracking and gene expression quantification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Castro-Gonzalez, Carlos; Luengo-Oroz, Miguel Angel; Douloquin, Louise; Savy, Thierry; Melani, Camilo; Desnoulez, Sophie; Ledesma-Carbayo, Maria Jesus; Bourginey, Paul; Peyrieras, Nadine; Santos, Andres

    2010-01-01

    We elaborate on a general framework composed of a set of computational tools to accurately quantificate cellular position and gene expression levels throughout early zebrafish embryogenesis captured over a time-lapse series of in vivo 3D images. Our modeling strategy involves nuclei detection, cell geometries extraction, automatic gene levels quantification and cell tracking to reconstruct cell trajectories and lineage tree which describe the animal development. Each cell in the embryo is then precisely described at each given time t by a vector composed of the cell 3D spatial coordinates (x; y; z) along with its gene expression level g. This comprehensive description of the embryo development is used to assess the general connection between genetic expression and cell movement. We also investigate genetic expression propagation between a cell and its progeny in the lineage tree. More to the point, this paper focuses on the evolution of the expression pattern of transcriptional factor goosecoid (gsc) through the gastrulation process between 6 and 9 hours post fertilization (hpf). PMID:21096468

  17. Synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles for tracking of stem cells and dendritic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Accurate delivery of cells to target organs is critical for success of cell-based therapies with stem cells or immune cells such as antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DC). Labeling with contrast agents before implantation provides a powerful means for monitoring cellular migration using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we investigated the uptake of fully synthesized or bacterial magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into hematopoietic Flt3+ stem cells and DC from mouse bone marrow. We show that (i) uptake of both synthetic and biogenic nanoparticles into cells endow magnetic activity and (ii) low numbers of MNP-loaded cells are readily detected by MRI.

  18. Synthetic and biogenic magnetite nanoparticles for tracking of stem cells and dendritic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwarz, Sebastian [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Medical School, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Fernandes, Fabiana [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Medical School, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Department of Biological Engineering, University of Minho, Campus de Gualtar, 4710-057 Braga (Portugal); Sanroman, Laura [Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen University Medical School, Pauwelsstrasse 30, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Cell Biology, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Hodenius, Michael [Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Applied Medical Engineering, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Lang, Claus [Department of Microbiology, Ludwig-Maximillians-University of Munich, Maria-Ward-Str. 1a, 80638 Munich (Germany); Himmelreich, Uwe [In-vivo-NMR-Laboratory, Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleueler Str. 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany); Biomedical NMR Unit, MoSAIC, Faculty of Medicine, KU Leuven, Onderwijs en Navorsing 1, bus 505, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Schmitz-Rode, Thomas [Institute for Biomedical Engineering and Helmholtz Institute for Biomedical Engineering, Department of Applied Medical Engineering, RWTH Aachen, Pauwelsstrasse 20, 52074 Aachen (Germany); Schueler, Dirk [Department of Microbiology, Ludwig-Maximillians-University of Munich, Maria-Ward-Str. 1a, 80638 Munich (Germany); Hoehn, Mathias [In-vivo-NMR-Laboratory, Max-Planck-Institute for Neurological Research, Gleueler Str. 50, 50931 Cologne (Germany)] (and others)

    2009-05-15

    Accurate delivery of cells to target organs is critical for success of cell-based therapies with stem cells or immune cells such as antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DC). Labeling with contrast agents before implantation provides a powerful means for monitoring cellular migration using magnetic resonance imaging (MRI). In this study, we investigated the uptake of fully synthesized or bacterial magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) into hematopoietic Flt3{sup +} stem cells and DC from mouse bone marrow. We show that (i) uptake of both synthetic and biogenic nanoparticles into cells endow magnetic activity and (ii) low numbers of MNP-loaded cells are readily detected by MRI.

  19. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kasten, Annika; Siegmund, Birte J. [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 35 D-18057 Rostock (Germany); Grüttner, Cordula [Micromod Partikeltechnologie GmbH, Warnemünde, D-18115 Rostock (Germany); Kühn, Jens-Peter [Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Greifswald University Medical Center, D-17475 Greifswald (Germany); Frerich, Bernhard, E-mail: bernhard.frerich@med.uni-rostock.de [Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, Facial Plastic Surgery, Rostock University Medical Center, Schillingallee 35 D-18057 Rostock (Germany)

    2015-04-15

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time. - Highlights: • Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) were labeled with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. • Nanoparticles influenced the adipogenic differentiation of ASC. • Labeled cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and implanted in SCID mice. • Nanoparticle-labeled cells were visualized in vivo using T2-weighted sequences. • Volume of collagen scaffolds was decreased over time after implantation.

  20. Tracking of adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells using two magnetic nanoparticle types

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) is to be considered as an emerging detection technique for cell tracking experiments to evaluate the fate of transplanted progenitor cells and develop successful cell therapies for tissue engineering. Adipose tissue engineering using adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells has been advocated for the cure of soft tissue defects or for persistent soft tissue augmentation. Adipose tissue-derived progenitor cells were differentiated into the adipogenic lineage and labeled with two different types of magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles in varying concentrations which resulted in a concentration-dependent reduction of gene expression of adipogenic differentiation markers, adiponectin and fatty acid-binding protein 4 (FABP4), whereas the metabolic activity was not altered. As a result, only low nanoparticle concentrations for labeling were used for in vivo experiments. Cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and subcutaneously implanted into severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. At 24 h as well as 28 days after implantation, MRI analyses were performed visualizing nanoparticle-labeled cells using T2-weighted sequences. The quantification of absolute volume of the scaffolds revealed a decrease of volume over time in all experimental groups. The distribution of nanoparticle-labeled cells within the scaffolds varied likewise over time. - Highlights: • Adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ASC) were labeled with magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles. • Nanoparticles influenced the adipogenic differentiation of ASC. • Labeled cells were seeded onto collagen scaffolds and implanted in SCID mice. • Nanoparticle-labeled cells were visualized in vivo using T2-weighted sequences. • Volume of collagen scaffolds was decreased over time after implantation

  1. Tracking virus-specific CD4+ T cells during and after acute hepatitis C virus infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michaela Lucas

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD4+ T cell help is critical in maintaining antiviral immune responses and such help has been shown to be sustained in acute resolving hepatitis C. In contrast, in evolving chronic hepatitis C CD4+ T cell helper responses appear to be absent or short-lived, using functional assays. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we used a novel HLA-DR1 tetramer containing a highly targeted CD4+ T cell epitope from the hepatitis C virus non-structural protein 4 to track number and phenotype of hepatitis C virus specific CD4+ T cells in a cohort of seven HLA-DR1 positive patients with acute hepatitis C in comparison to patients with chronic or resolved hepatitis C. We observed peptide-specific T cells in all seven patients with acute hepatitis C regardless of outcome at frequencies up to 0.65% of CD4+ T cells. Among patients who transiently controlled virus replication we observed loss of function, and/or physical deletion of tetramer+ CD4+ T cells before viral recrudescence. In some patients with chronic hepatitis C very low numbers of tetramer+ cells were detectable in peripheral blood, compared to robust responses detected in spontaneous resolvers. Importantly we did not observe escape mutations in this key CD4+ T cell epitope in patients with evolving chronic hepatitis C. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: During acute hepatitis C a CD4+ T cell response against this epitope is readily induced in most, if not all, HLA-DR1+ patients. This antiviral T cell population becomes functionally impaired or is deleted early in the course of disease in those where viremia persists.

  2. Informatics in radiology: improving clinical work flow through an AIM database: a sample web-based lesion tracking application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abajian, Aaron C; Levy, Mia; Rubin, Daniel L

    2012-01-01

    Quantitative assessments on images are crucial to clinical decision making, especially in cancer patients, in whom measurements of lesions are tracked over time. However, the potential value of quantitative approaches to imaging is impeded by the difficulty and time-intensive nature of compiling this information from prior studies and reporting corresponding information on current studies. The authors believe that the quantitative imaging work flow can be automated by making temporal data computationally accessible. In this article, they demonstrate the utility of the Annotation and Image Markup standard in a World Wide Web-based application that was developed to automatically summarize prior and current quantitative imaging measurements. The system calculates the Response Evaluation Criteria in Solid Tumors metric, along with several alternative indicators of cancer treatment response, by using the data stored in the annotation files. The application also allows the user to overlay the recorded metrics on the original images for visual inspection. Clinical evaluation of the system demonstrates its potential utility in accelerating the standard radiology work flow and in providing a means to evaluate alternative response metrics that are difficult to compute by hand. The system, which illustrates the utility of capturing quantitative information in a standard format and linking it to the image from which it was derived, could enhance quantitative imaging in clinical practice without adversely affecting the current work flow. PMID:22745220

  3. Human mesenchymal stem cells: from basic biology to clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abdallah, B M; Kassem, M

    2008-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are a group of clonogenic cells present among the bone marrow stroma and capable of multilineage differentiation into mesoderm-type cells such as osteoblasts, adipocytes and chondrocytes. Due to their ease of isolation and their differentiation potential, MSC are being...... introduced into clinical medicine in variety of applications and through different ways of administration. Here, we discuss approaches for isolation, characterization and directing differentiation of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC). An update of the current clinical use of the cells is also provided....

  4. Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holman, Hoi-Ying N.; Martin, Michael C.; McKinney, Wayne R.

    2002-07-25

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05 - 0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolism in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (< 0.5 degrees C). We will then present several examples demonstrating the application potentials of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biomedical research. These will include monitoring living cells progressing through the cell cycle, including death, and cells reacting to dilute concentrations of toxins.

  5. Uncovering homo-and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane using single particle tracking approaches

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torreno-Pina, Juan A.; Manzo, Carlo; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F.

    2016-03-01

    The plasma membrane of eukaryotic cells is responsible for a myriad of functions that regulate cell physiology and plays a crucial role in a multitude of processes that include adhesion, migration, signaling recognition and cell-cell communication. This is accomplished by specific interactions between different membrane components such as lipids and proteins on the lipid bilayer but also through interactions with the underlying cortical actin cytoskeleton on the intracellular side and the glycocalyx matrix in close proximity to the extracellular side. Advanced biophysical techniques, including single particle tracking (SPT) have revealed that the lateral diffusion of molecular components on the plasma membrane represents a landmark manifestation of such interactions. Indeed, by studying changes in the diffusivity of individual membrane molecules, including sub-diffusion, confined diffusion and/or transient arrest of molecules in membrane compartments, it has been possible to gain insight on the nature of molecular interactions and to infer on its functional role for cell response. In this review, we will revise some exciting results where SPT has been crucial to reveal homo- and hetero-interactions on the cell membrane.

  6. Tracking chemical changes in a live cell: Biomedical applications of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Synchrotron radiation-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectromicroscopy is a newly emerging bioanalytical and imaging tool. This unique technique provides mid-infrared (IR) spectra, hence chemical information, with high signal-to-noise at spatial resolutions as fine as 3 to 10 microns. Thus it enables researchers to locate, identify, and track specific chemical events within an individual living mammalian cell. Mid-IR photons are too low in energy (0.05 - 0.5 eV) to either break bonds or to cause ionization. In this review, we show that the synchrotron IR beam has no detectable effects on the short- and long-term viability, reproductive integrity, cell-cycle progression, and mitochondrial metabolism in living human cells, and produces only minimal sample heating (< 0.5 degrees C). We will then present several examples demonstrating the application potentials of SR-FTIR spectromicroscopy in biomedical research. These will include monitoring living cells progressing through the cell cycle, including death, and cells reacting to dilute concentrations of toxins

  7. In vivo tracking of neuronal-like cells by magnetic resonance in rabbit models of spinal cord injury

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Ruiping; Zhang, Kun; Li, Jianding; Liu, Qiang; Xie, Jun

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experiments have demonstrated that neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can survive, migrate, integrate and help to restore the function and behaviors of spinal cord injury models, and that they may serve as a suitable approach to treating spinal cord injury. However, it is very difficult to track transplanted cells in vivo. In this study, we injected superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled neuronal-like cells into the subarachnoid space in a rabbit model ...

  8. Swarming and complex pattern formation in Paenibacillus vortex studied by imaging and tracking cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacob Eshel

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Swarming motility allows microorganisms to move rapidly over surfaces. The Gram-positive bacterium Paenibacillus vortex exhibits advanced cooperative motility on agar plates resulting in intricate colonial patterns with geometries that are highly sensitive to the environment. The cellular mechanisms that underpin the complex multicellular organization of such a simple organism are not well understood. Results Swarming by P. vortex was studied by real-time light microscopy, by in situ scanning electron microscopy and by tracking the spread of antibiotic-resistant cells within antibiotic-sensitive colonies. When swarming, P. vortex was found to be peritrichously flagellated. Swarming by the curved cells of P. vortex occurred on an extremely wide range of media and agar concentrations (0.3 to 2.2% w/v. At high agar concentrations (> 1% w/v rotating colonies formed that could be detached from the main mass of cells by withdrawal of cells into the latter. On lower percentage agars, cells moved in an extended network composed of interconnected "snakes" with short-term collision avoidance and sensitivity to extracts from swarming cells. P. vortex formed single Petri dish-wide "supercolonies" with a colony-wide exchange of motile cells. Swarming cells were coupled by rapidly forming, reversible and non-rigid connections to form a loose raft, apparently connected via flagella. Inhibitors of swarming (p-Nitrophenylglycerol and Congo Red were identified. Mitomycin C was used to trigger filamentation without inhibiting growth or swarming; this facilitated dissection of the detail of swarming. Mitomycin C treatment resulted in malcoordinated swarming and abortive side branch formation and a strong tendency by a subpopulation of the cells to form minimal rotating aggregates of only a few cells. Conclusion P. vortex creates complex macroscopic colonies within which there is considerable reflux and movement and interaction of cells. Cell

  9. Biocompatible fluorescent supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel for long-term cell tracking and tumor imaging applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Huaimin; Mao, Duo; Wang, Youzhi; Wang, Kai; Yi, Xiaoyong; Kong, Deling; Yang, Zhimou; Liu, Qian; Ding, Dan

    2015-11-01

    Biocompatible peptide-based supramolecular hydrogel has recently emerged as a new and promising system for biomedical applications. In this work, Rhodamine B is employed as a new capping group of self-assembling peptide, which not only provides the driving force for supramolecular nanofibrous hydrogel formation, but also endows the hydrogel with intrinsic fluroescence signal, allowing for various bioimaging applications. The fluorescent peptide nanofibrous hydrogel can be formed via disulfide bond reduction. After dilution of the hydrogel with aqueous solution, the fluorescent nanofiber suspension can be obtained. The resultant nanofibers are able to be internalized by the cancer cells and effectively track the HeLa cells for as long as 7 passages. Using a tumor-bearing mouse model, it is also demonstrated that the fluorescent supramolecular nanofibers can serve as an efficient probe for tumor imaging in a high-contrast manner.

  10. In Vivo Tracking of Systemically Administered Allogeneic Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Normal Rats through Bioluminescence Imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Juan; Hou, Shike; Ding, Hui; Liu, Ziquan; Song, Meijuan; Qin, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Yu, Mengyang; Sun, Zhiguang; Liu, Jinyang; Sun, Shuli; Xiao, Peixin

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are increasingly used as a panacea for multiple types of disease short of effective treatment. Dozens of clinical trials published demonstrated strikingly positive therapeutic effects of MSCs. However, as a specific agent, little research has focused on the dynamic distribution of MSCs after in vivo administration. In this study, we track systemically transplanted allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in normal rats through bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in real time. Ex vivo organ imaging, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and RT-PCR were conducted to verify the histological distribution of BMSCs. Our results showed that BMSCs home to the dorsal skin apart from the lungs and kidneys after tail vein injection and could not be detected 14 days later. Allogeneic BMSCs mainly appeared not at the parenchymatous organs but at the subepidermal connective tissue and adipose tissue in healthy rats. There were no significant MSCs-related adverse effects except for transient decrease in neutrophils. These findings will provide experimental evidences for a better understanding of the biocharacteristics of BMSCs.

  11. In Vivo Tracking of Systemically Administered Allogeneic Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Normal Rats through Bioluminescence Imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cao, Juan; Hou, Shike; Ding, Hui; Liu, Ziquan; Song, Meijuan; Qin, Xiaojing; Wang, Xue; Yu, Mengyang; Sun, Zhiguang; Liu, Jinyang; Sun, Shuli; Xiao, Peixin; Lv, Qi; Fan, Haojun

    2016-01-01

    Recently, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are increasingly used as a panacea for multiple types of disease short of effective treatment. Dozens of clinical trials published demonstrated strikingly positive therapeutic effects of MSCs. However, as a specific agent, little research has focused on the dynamic distribution of MSCs after in vivo administration. In this study, we track systemically transplanted allogeneic bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in normal rats through bioluminescence imaging (BLI) in real time. Ex vivo organ imaging, immunohistochemistry (IHC), and RT-PCR were conducted to verify the histological distribution of BMSCs. Our results showed that BMSCs home to the dorsal skin apart from the lungs and kidneys after tail vein injection and could not be detected 14 days later. Allogeneic BMSCs mainly appeared not at the parenchymatous organs but at the subepidermal connective tissue and adipose tissue in healthy rats. There were no significant MSCs-related adverse effects except for transient decrease in neutrophils. These findings will provide experimental evidences for a better understanding of the biocharacteristics of BMSCs. PMID:27610137

  12. System for tracking transplanted limbal epithelial stem cells in the treatment of corneal stem cell deficiency (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boadi, Joseph; Matcher, Stephen; MacNeil, Sheila; Sangwan, Virender S.

    2016-04-01

    The prevailing hypothesis for the existence and healing of the avascular corneal epithelium is that this layer of cells are continually produced by stem cells in the limbus and transported onto the cornea to mature into corneal epithelium. In the event that the cornea is damaged and the limbal stem cell population is severely reduced, this condition known as Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency and can lead to blindness. There are numerous treatments but most have high long term failure rates. Most treatment methods include the transplantation of limbal stem cells into damaged limbus with hope of repopulating the region and regenerating at healthy corneal epithelium. Optical Coherence Tomography (OCT) is well known for its high resolution in vivo images. A bespoke OCT has been built to investigate the trajectories of these limbal stem cells after transplantation to see whether if they do repopulate the damaged limbus or not. In the experimentation magneto-labelling was used to track the limbal stem cells. For the magneto-labelling a mixture of limbal stem cells and cornea epithelium are cultured with super paramagnetic iron (Fe3O4) nanoparticles (20-30nm in size) for 24hours, to allow for uptake. The cells are then transplanted onto the denuded cornea. The transplanted cell mixture with the encapsulated magnetic nanoparticles is actuated with an external magnetic field 0.08T leading to a phase modulation on the signal. A Phase sensitive Magneto-motive OCT is used to locate the transplanted cells. The location of the cells with embed SPIOs were located both in 2D and 3D.

  13. Adeno associated viral-mediated intraosseous labeling of bone marrow derived cells for CNS tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selenica, Maj-Linda B; Reid, Patrick; Pena, Gabriela; Alvarez, Jennifer; Hunt, Jerry B; Nash, Kevin R; Morgan, Dave; Gordon, Marcia N; Lee, Daniel C

    2016-05-01

    Inflammation, including microglial activation in the CNS, is an important hallmark in many neurodegenerative diseases. Microglial stimuli not only impact the brain microenvironment by production and release of cytokines and chemokines, but also influence the activity of bone marrow derived cells and blood born macrophage populations. In many diseases including brain disorders and spinal cord injury, researchers have tried to harbor the neuroprotective and repair properties of these subpopulations. Hematopoietic bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) are of great interest, especially during gene therapy because certain hematopoietic cell subpopulations traffic to the sites of injury and inflammation. The aim of this study was to develop a method of labeling endogenous bone marrow derived cells through intraosseous impregnation of recombinant adeno-associated virus (rAAV) or lentivirus. We utilized rAAV serotype 9 (rAAV-9) or lentivirus for gene delivery of green florescence protein (GFP) to the mouse bone marrow cells. Flow cytometry showed that both viruses were able to efficiently transduce mouse bone marrow cells in vivo. However, the rAAV9-GFP viral construct transduced BMDCs more efficiently than the lentivirus (11.2% vs. 6.8%), as indicated by cellular GFP expression. We also demonstrate that GFP labeled cells correspond to bone marrow cells of myeloid origin using CD11b as a marker. Additionally, we characterized the ability of bone marrow derived, GFP labeled cells to extravasate into the brain parenchyma upon acute and subchronic neuroinflammatory stimuli in the mouse CNS. Viral mediated over expression of chemokine (C-C motif) ligand 2 (CCL2) or intracranial injection of lipopolysaccharide (LPS) recruited GFP labeled BMDCs from the periphery into the brain parenchyma compared to vehicle treated mice. Altogether our findings demonstrate a useful method of labeling endogenous BMDCs via viral transduction and the ability to track subpopulations throughout the body

  14. Potential role of stem cells in severe spinal cord injury: current perspectives and clinical data

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paspala SA

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Syed AB Paspala,1,2 Sandeep K Vishwakarma,1 Tenneti VRK Murthy,2 Thiriveedi N Rao,2 Aleem A Khan11PAN Research Foundation, CARE, 2The Institute of Medical Sciences, Hyderabad, IndiaAbstract: Stem cell transplantation for spinal cord injury (SCI along with new pharmacotherapy research offers the potential to restore function and ease the associated social and economic burden in the years ahead. Various sources of stem cells have been used in the treatment of SCI, but the most convincing results have been obtained with neural progenitor cells in preclinical models. Although the use of cell-based transplantation strategies for the repair of chronic SCI remains the long sought after holy grail, these approaches have been to date the most successful when applied in the subacute phase of injury. Application of cell-based strategies for the repair and regeneration of the chronically injured spinal cord will require a combinational strategy that may need to include approaches to overcome the effects of the glial scar, inhibitory molecules, and use of tissue engineering strategies to bridge the lesion. Nonetheless, cell transplantation strategies are promising, and it is anticipated that the Phase I clinical trials of some form of neural stem cell-based approach in SCI will commence very soon.Keywords: stem cell therapy, regeneration, spinal cord injury, cell dosing, cell tracking

  15. Tracking transplanted bone marrow stem cells and their effects in the rat MCAO stroke model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregory V Goldmacher

    Full Text Available In this study, rat bone marrow stromal stem cells (BMSCs were tracked after IV administration to rats with experimental stroke caused by middle cerebral artery occlusion (MCAO. In addition, the effects of BMSC treatment on blood cell composition, brain glia and sensorimotor behavior was studied and compared to that which occurred spontaneously during the normal recovery process after stroke. We found that the vast majority of radiolabeled or fluorescently labeled BMSCs traveled to and remained in peripheral organs (lungs, spleen, liver 3 days after IV injection in the MCAO rat. Once in the circulation, BMSCs also produced rapid alterations in host blood cell composition, increasing both neutrophil and total white blood cell count by 6 hours post-injection. In contrast, few injected BMSCs traveled to the brain and almost none endured there long term. Nonetheless, BMSC treatment produced dramatic changes in the number and activation of brain astroglia and microglia, particularly in the region of the infarct. These cellular changes were correlated with a marked improvement in performance on tests of sensory and motor function as compared to the partial recovery of function seen in PBS-injected control rats. We conclude that the notable recovery in function observed after systemic administration of BMSCs to MCAO rats is likely due to the cellular changes in blood and/or brain cell number, activation state and their cytokine/growth factor products.

  16. Tracking of plus-ends reveals microtubule functional diversity in different cell types

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaebani, M. Reza; Pasula, Aravind; Ott, Albrecht; Santen, Ludger

    2016-07-01

    Many cellular processes are tightly connected to the dynamics of microtubules (MTs). While in neuronal axons MTs mainly regulate intracellular trafficking, they participate in cytoskeleton reorganization in many other eukaryotic cells, enabling the cell to efficiently adapt to changes in the environment. We show that the functional differences of MTs in different cell types and regions is reflected in the dynamic properties of MT tips. Using plus-end tracking proteins EB1 to monitor growing MT plus-ends, we show that MT dynamics and life cycle in axons of human neurons significantly differ from that of fibroblast cells. The density of plus-ends, as well as the rescue and catastrophe frequencies increase while the growth rate decreases toward the fibroblast cell margin. This results in a rather stable filamentous network structure and maintains the connection between nucleus and membrane. In contrast, plus-ends are uniformly distributed along the axons and exhibit diverse polymerization run times and spatially homogeneous rescue and catastrophe frequencies, leading to MT segments of various lengths. The probability distributions of the excursion length of polymerization and the MT length both follow nearly exponential tails, in agreement with the analytical predictions of a two-state model of MT dynamics.

  17. Femur Window Chamber Model for In Vivo Cell Tracking in the Murine Bone Marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yonghong; Maeda, Azusa; Bu, Jiachuan; DaCosta, Ralph

    2016-01-01

    Bone marrow is a complex organ that contains various hematopoietic and non-hematopoietic cells. These cells are involved in many biological processes, including hematopoiesis, immune regulation and tumor regulation. Commonly used methods for understanding cellular actions in the bone marrow, such as histology and blood counts, provide static information rather than capturing the dynamic action of multiple cellular components in vivo. To complement the standard methods, a window chamber (WC)-based model was developed to enable serial in vivo imaging of cells and structures in the murine bone marrow. This protocol describes a surgical procedure for installing the WC in the femur, in order to facilitate long-term optical access to the femoral bone marrow. In particular, to demonstrate its experimental utility, this WC approach was used to image and track neutrophils within the vascular network of the femur, thereby providing a novel method to visualize and quantify immune cell trafficking and regulation in the bone marrow. This method can be applied to study various biological processes in the murine bone marrow, such as hematopoiesis, stem cell transplantation, and immune responses in pathological conditions, including cancer. PMID:27500928

  18. Tracking of plus-ends reveals microtubule functional diversity in different cell types.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaebani, M Reza; Pasula, Aravind; Ott, Albrecht; Santen, Ludger

    2016-01-01

    Many cellular processes are tightly connected to the dynamics of microtubules (MTs). While in neuronal axons MTs mainly regulate intracellular trafficking, they participate in cytoskeleton reorganization in many other eukaryotic cells, enabling the cell to efficiently adapt to changes in the environment. We show that the functional differences of MTs in different cell types and regions is reflected in the dynamic properties of MT tips. Using plus-end tracking proteins EB1 to monitor growing MT plus-ends, we show that MT dynamics and life cycle in axons of human neurons significantly differ from that of fibroblast cells. The density of plus-ends, as well as the rescue and catastrophe frequencies increase while the growth rate decreases toward the fibroblast cell margin. This results in a rather stable filamentous network structure and maintains the connection between nucleus and membrane. In contrast, plus-ends are uniformly distributed along the axons and exhibit diverse polymerization run times and spatially homogeneous rescue and catastrophe frequencies, leading to MT segments of various lengths. The probability distributions of the excursion length of polymerization and the MT length both follow nearly exponential tails, in agreement with the analytical predictions of a two-state model of MT dynamics. PMID:27461361

  19. Particle tracking carboxyl and transferrin conjugated quantum dots diffusion at living cell surface

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Tian; Zhu, Zhaoqi; Xiao, Zhongdang

    2009-08-01

    Nanotechnologies and nanomaterials have gained much success in the fields of biological applications. In particular, quantum dots (QDs) are emerging as a revolutionary means for imaging and optical detection in opposition to conventional organic dyes. For their robust photostability, large extinction coefficients, and relatively small size, QDs present superior advantages in single molecules monitoring over long time period in living cell. The interaction between functionalized QDs and living cell is the primary problem of the QDs application in living cell. In this work, carboxyl and transferrin conjugated CdS QDs were evaluated using total internal reflect fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy and single particle tracking (SPT) techniques at living cell surface. The diffusion and binding were quantitively measured by mean square displacement (MSD) versus time plotting. To study the influence of different QDs surface on interaction between QDs and cell, dynamic characters of carboxyl and transferrin conjugated QDs were calculated respectively. The photonic characters of QDs were also investigated, considering that functionalized surface can lead to behavior altering of QDs under illuminating. Simultaneous imaging of several QDs with frame rates of up to 30 frames/s and localization accuracy of ~10 nm was present.

  20. Real-time imaging and tracking of ultrastable organic dye nanoparticles in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Ruirui; Huang, Liming; Wei, Weijia; Chen, Xianfeng; Zhang, Xiaohong; Zhang, Xiujuan

    2016-07-01

    Semiconductor quantum dots and upconversion nanoparticles have been broadly used for live cell imaging due to their color tunability and photostability etc. However, these inorganic materials often contain heavy metals and potentially have metabolism problems. To overcome these issues, herein, we report a type of organic dye nanoparticles (NPs) with coating of a thin silica layer and folic acid targeting molecules on the surface for live cell imaging. These organic NPs possess superior characteristics of high fluorescence intensity, large Stokes shift, good photostability, emission in the NIR range, and targeted delivery, enabling them to be a powerful fluorescent probe for living cell imaging. In our study, we successfully demonstrate their applications in investigating cell division, exploring the cellular uptake kinetics and pathway of NPs, observing the distribution of NPs, and live-time tracking the trajectory of specific NPs. Considering the excellent properties and unique clathrin- and caveollae-independent intracellular uptake pathway, we expect that this type of organic dye NPs will play an important role in live cell imaging. PMID:27064960

  1. Natural killer cells: Biology, functions and clinical relevance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Natural Killer cells (NK cells represent the subset of peripheral lymphocytes that play critical role in the innate immune response to virus-infected and tumor transformed cells. Lysis of NK sensitive target cells could be mediated independently of antigen stimulation and without requirement of peptide presentation by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. NK cell activity and functions are controlled by a considerable number of cell surface receptors, which exist in both inhibitory and activating isoforms. There are several groups of NK cell surface receptors: 1 killer immunoglobulin like receptors-KIR, 2 C-type lectin receptors,3natural citotoxicity receptors-NCR and 4 Toll-like receptors-TLR. Functions of NK receptors. Defining the biology of NK cell surface receptors has contributed to the concept of the manner how NK cells selectively recognize and lyse tumor and virally infected cells while sparing normal cells. Further, identification of NK receptor ligands and their expression on the normal and transformed cells has led to the development of clinical approaches to manipulating receptor/ligand interactions that showed clinical benefit. NK cells are the first lymphocyte subset that reconstitute the peripheral blood following allogeneic HSCT and multiple roles for alloreactive donor NK cells have been demonstrated, in diminishing Graft vs. Host Disease (GvHD through selective killing recipient dendritic cells, prevention of graft rejection by killing recipient T cells and participation in Graft vs. Leukaemia (GvL effect through destruction of residual host tumor cells. Conclusion. Besides their role in HSCT, NK cell receptors have an important clinical relevance that reflects from the fact that they play a crucial role in the development of some diseases as well as in possibilities of managing all NK receptors through selective expansion and usage of NK cells in cancer immunotherapy.

  2. Targeting the schizophrenia genome: a fast track strategy from GWAS to clinic

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lencz, T; Malhotra, A K

    2015-01-01

    The Psychiatric Genomics Consortium–Schizophrenia Workgroup (PGC–SCZ) has recently published a genomewide association study (GWAS) identifying >100 genetic loci, encompassing a total of 341 protein-coding genes, attaining genomewide significance for susceptibility to schizophrenia. Given the extremely long time (12–15 years) and expense (>$1 billion) associated with the development of novel drug targets, repurposing of drugs with known and validated targets may be the most expeditious path toward deriving clinical utility from these GWAS findings. In the present study, we examined all genes within loci implicated by the PGC–SCZ GWAS against databases of targets of both approved and registered pharmaceutical compounds. We identified 20 potential schizophrenia susceptibility genes that encode proteins that are the targets of approved drugs. Of these, we prioritized genes/targets that are of clear neuropsychiatric interest and that are also sole members of the linkage disequilibrium block surrounding a PGC–SCZ GWAS hit. In addition to DRD2, 5 genes meet these criteria: CACNA1C, CACNB2, CACNA1I, GRIN2A and HCN1. An additional 20 genes coding for proteins that are the targets of drugs in registered clinical trials, but without approved indications, were also identified. Although considerable work is still required to fully explicate the biological implications of the PGC–SCZ GWAS results, pathways related to these known, druggable targets may represent a promising starting point. PMID:25869805

  3. Novel serial positive enrichment technology enables clinical multiparameter cell sorting.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian Stemberger

    Full Text Available A general obstacle for clinical cell preparations is limited purity, which causes variability in the quality and potency of cell products and might be responsible for negative side effects due to unwanted contaminants. Highly pure populations can be obtained best using positive selection techniques. However, in many cases target cell populations need to be segregated from other cells by combinations of multiple markers, which is still difficult to achieve--especially for clinical cell products. Therefore, we have generated low-affinity antibody-derived Fab-fragments, which stain like parental antibodies when multimerized via Strep-tag and Strep-Tactin, but can subsequently be removed entirely from the target cell population. Such reagents can be generated for virtually any antigen and can be used for sequential positive enrichment steps via paramagnetic beads. First protocols for multiparameter enrichment of two clinically relevant cell populations, CD4(high/CD25(high/CD45RA(high 'regulatory T cells' and CD8(high/CD62L(high/CD45RA(neg 'central memory T cells', have been established to determine quality and efficacy parameters of this novel technology, which should have broad applicability for clinical cell sorting as well as basic research.

  4. Canine pluripotent stem cells: Are they ready for clinical applications?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dean Harvey Betts

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The derivation of canine embryonic stem cells and generation of canine induced pluripotent stem cells are significant achievements that have unlocked the potential for developing novel cell-based disease models, drug discovery platforms and transplantation therapies in the dog. A progression from concept to cure in this clinically relevant companion animal will not only help our canine patients but also help advance human regenerative medicine. Nevertheless, many issues remain to be resolved before pluripotent cells can be used clinically in a safe and reproducible manner.

  5. Natural Killer Cells: Biology and Clinical Use in Cancer Therapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William H. D. Hallett; William J. Murphy

    2004-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have the ability to mediate both bone marrow rejection and promote engraftment, as well as the ability to elicit potent anti-tumor effects. However the clinical results for these processes are still elusive. Greater understanding of NK cell biology, from activating and inhibitory receptor functions to the role of NK cells in allogeneic transplantation, needs to be appreciated in order to draw out the clinical potential of NK cells. Mechanisms of bone marrow cell (BMC) rejection are known to be dependant on inhibitory receptors specific for major histocompatibility complex (MHC) molecules and on activating receptors that have many potential ligands. The modulation of activating and inhibitory receptors may hold the key to clinical success involving NK cells. Pre-clinical studies in mice have shown that different combinations of activating and inhibitory receptors on NK cells can reduce graft-versus-host disease (GVHD), promote engraftment, and provide superior graft-versus-tumor (GVT) responses. Recent clinical data have shown that the use of KIR-ligand incompatibility produces tremendous graft-versus-leukemia effect in patients with acute myeloid leukemia at high risk of relapse. This review will attempt to be a synthesis of current knowledge concerning NK cells, their involvement in BMT, and their use as an immunotherapy for cancer and other hematologic malignancies. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2004;1(1):12-21.

  6. Tracking Fusion of Human Mesenchymal Stem Cells After Transplantation to the Heart

    Science.gov (United States)

    Freeman, Brian T.; Kouris, Nicholas A.

    2015-01-01

    Evidence suggests that transplanted mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) can aid recovery of damaged myocardium caused by myocardial infarction. One possible mechanism for MSC-mediated recovery is reprogramming after cell fusion between transplanted MSCs and recipient cardiac cells. We used a Cre/LoxP-based luciferase reporter system coupled to biophotonic imaging to detect fusion of transplanted human pluripotent stem cell-derived MSCs to cells of organs of living mice. Human MSCs, with transient expression of a viral fusogen, were delivered to the murine heart via a collagen patch. At 2 days and 1 week later, living mice were probed for bioluminescence indicative of cell fusion. Cell fusion was detected at the site of delivery (heart) and in distal tissues (i.e., stomach, small intestine, liver). Fusion was confirmed at the cellular scale via fluorescence in situ hybridization for human-specific and mouse-specific centromeres. Human cells in organs distal to the heart were typically located near the vasculature, suggesting MSCs and perhaps MSC fusion products have the ability to migrate via the circulatory system to distal organs and engraft with local cells. The present study reveals previously unknown migratory patterns of delivered human MSCs and associated fusion products in the healthy murine heart. The study also sets the stage for follow-on studies to determine the functional effects of cell fusion in a model of myocardial damage or disease. Significance Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are transplanted to the heart, cartilage, and other tissues to recover lost function or at least limit overactive immune responses. Analysis of tissues after MSC transplantation shows evidence of fusion between MSCs and the cells of the recipient. To date, the biologic implications of cell fusion remain unclear. A newly developed in vivo tracking system was used to identify MSC fusion products in living mice. The migratory patterns of fusion products were determined both in the

  7. Familial renal cell carcinoma: clinical and molecular genetic aspects

    OpenAIRE

    Maher, E. R.; Yates, J. R. W.

    1991-01-01

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) accounts for 2% of all human cancer, but familial cases are infrequent. Riches (1963) and Griffin et al. (1984) in a population-based case-control study found a family history of renal cell carcinoma in 2.4% of affected patients compared to 1.4% of controls. Nevertheless the importance of inherited tumours in clinical practice and medical research is disproportionate to their frequency. In clinical practice recognition of familial RCC can provide opportunities to pr...

  8. Angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma:clinical analysis of 42 cases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张晨

    2014-01-01

    Objective To explore the clinical characteristics and prognosis of patients with angioimmunoblastic T cell lymphoma(AITL).Methods The clinical features and prognostic factors of 42 cases newly diagnosed as AITL at Peking University Cancer Hospital from January 2007 to August 2012 were retrospectively analyzed.Results Their median age was 59(34-76)

  9. Clinical Application of Stem Cells in the Cardiovascular System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stamm, Christof; Klose, Kristin; Choi, Yeong-Hoon

    Regenerative medicine encompasses "tissue engineering" - the in vitro fabrication of tissues and/or organs using scaffold material and viable cells - and "cell therapy" - the transplantation or manipulation of cells in diseased tissue in vivo. In the cardiovascular system, tissue engineering strategies are being pursued for the development of viable replacement blood vessels, heart valves, patch material, cardiac pacemakers and contractile myocardium. Anecdotal clinical applications of such vessels, valves and patches have been described, but information on systematic studies of the performance of such implants is not available, yet. Cell therapy for cardiovascular regeneration, however, has been performed in large series of patients, and numerous clinical studies have produced sometimes conflicting results. The purpose of this chapter is to summarize the clinical experience with cell therapy for diseases of the cardiovascular system, and to analyse possible factors that may influence its outcome.

  10. Automated tracking of gene expression in individual cells and cell compartments

    OpenAIRE

    Shen, Hailin; Nelson, Glyn; Nelson, David E.; Kennedy, Stephnie; Spiller, David G.; Griffiths, Tony; Paton, Norman; Stephen G. Oliver; White, Michael R. H.; Kell, Douglas B.

    2006-01-01

    Many intracellular signal transduction processes involve the reversible translocation from the cytoplasm to the nucleus of transcription factors. The advent of fluorescently tagged protein derivatives has revolutionized cell biology, such that it is now possible to follow the location of such protein molecules in individual cells in real time. However, the quantitative analysis of the location of such proteins in microscopic images is very time consuming. We describe CellTracker, a software t...

  11. Quantitation of photochromism of sensory rhodopsin-I by computerized tracking of Halobacterium halobium cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marwan, W; Oesterhelt, D

    1990-09-20

    The swimming behavior of Halobacterium halobium is controlled by light which acts through retinal photoreceptor proteins. The sensing of near-ultraviolet (u.v.) was proposed to be mediated by the thermally metastable intermediate SR-I373 that is formed upon orange light absorption by sensory rhodopsin-I (SR-I). In order to test the validity of this proposal, we analyzed the photochromic behavior of the functional near-u.v. receptor in situ by use of an automated cell tracking system. The system was specifically designed for detection of swimming reversals in individual cells and calibrated with a straight-swimming mutant of H. halobium. Quantitative analysis of the response of the cells to near-u.v. revealed that orange background light increased the number of active near-u.v. receptor molecules. The intensity-dependence of this effect fitted into the kinetic scheme of a photochromic receptor pigment. The half-life of the functional near-u.v. receptor species was determined under continuous orange background light and found to be similar to that of the SR-I373 intermediate of sensory rhodopsin-I in intact cells. These results clearly support the assignment of the near-u.v. receptor to SR-I373. The kind of kinetic analysis described here, might be a useful tool in assigning spectroscopic data of pigments to photoreceptor function also in other organisms. PMID:2213884

  12. Magnetic poly(lactide-co-glycolide) and cellulose particles for MRI-based cell tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nkansah, Michael K; Thakral, Durga; Shapiro, Erik M

    2011-06-01

    Biodegradable, superparamagnetic microparticles and nanoparticles of poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and cellulose were designed, fabricated, and characterized for magnetic cell labeling. Monodisperse nanocrystals of magnetite were incorporated into microparticles and nanoparticles of PLGA and cellulose with high efficiency using an oil-in-water single emulsion technique. Superparamagnetic cores had high magnetization (72.1 emu/g). The resulting polymeric particles had smooth surface morphology and high magnetite content (43.3 wt % for PLGA and 69.6 wt % for cellulose). While PLGA and cellulose nanoparticles displayed highest r 2* values per millimole of iron (399 sec(-1) mM(-1) for cellulose and 505 sec(-1) mM(-1) for PLGA), micron-sized PLGA particles had a much higher r 2* per particle than either. After incubation for a month in citrate buffer (pH 5.5), magnetic PLGA particles lost close to 50% of their initial r 2* molar relaxivity, while magnetic cellulose particles remained intact, preserving over 85% of their initial r 2* molar relaxivity. Lastly, mesenchymal stem cells and human breast adenocarcinoma cells were magnetically labeled using these particles with no detectable cytotoxicity. These particles are ideally suited for noninvasive cell tracking in vivo via MRI and due to their vastly different degradation properties, offer unique potential for dedicated use for either short (PLGA-based particles) or long-term (cellulose-based particles) experiments. PMID:21404328

  13. Measuring the viscous and elastic properties of single cells using video particle tracking microrheology

    CERN Document Server

    Warren, Rebecca Louisa; Li, Xiang; Glidle, Andrew; Carlsson, Allan; Cooper, Jonathan M

    2011-01-01

    We present a simple and \\emph{non-invasive} experimental procedure to measure the linear viscoelastic properties of cells by passive video particle tracking microrheology. In order to do this, a generalised Langevin equation is adopted to relate the time-dependent thermal fluctuations of a bead, chemically bound to the cell's \\emph{exterior}, to the frequency-dependent viscoelastic moduli of the cell. It is shown that these moduli are related to the cell's cytoskeletal structure, which in this work is changed by varying the solution osmolarity from iso- to hypo-osmotic conditions. At high frequencies, the viscoelastic moduli frequency dependence changes from $\\propto \\omega^{3/4}$ found in iso-osmotic solutions to $\\propto \\omega^{1/2}$ in hypo--osmotic solutions; the first situation is typical of bending modes in isotropic \\textit{in vitro} reconstituted F--actin networks, and the second could indicate that the restructured cytoskeleton behaves as a gel with "\\textit{dangling branches}". The insights gained ...

  14. Stem cells in clinical practice: applications and warnings

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palmieri Beniamino

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stem cells are a relevant source of information about cellular differentiation, molecular processes and tissue homeostasis, but also one of the most putative biological tools to treat degenerative diseases. This review focuses on human stem cells clinical and experimental applications. Our aim is to take a correct view of the available stem cell subtypes and their rational use in the medical area, with a specific focus on their therapeutic benefits and side effects. We have reviewed the main clinical trials dividing them basing on their clinical applications, and taking into account the ethical issue associated with the stem cell therapy. Methods We have searched Pubmed/Medline for clinical trials, involving the use of human stem cells, using the key words "stem cells" combined with the key words "transplantation", "pathology", "guidelines", "properties" and "risks". All the relevant clinical trials have been included. The results have been divided into different categories, basing on the way stem cells have been employed in different pathological conditions.

  15. Molecular Imaging of Stem Cells: Tracking Survival, Biodistribution, Tumorigenicity, and Immunogenicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugene Gu, Wen-Yi Chen, Jay Gu, Paul Burridge, Joseph C. Wu

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Being able to self-renew and differentiate into virtually all cell types, both human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs have exciting therapeutic implications for myocardial infarction, neurodegenerative disease, diabetes, and other disorders involving irreversible cell loss. However, stem cell biology remains incompletely understood despite significant advances in the field. Inefficient stem cell differentiation, difficulty in verifying successful delivery to the target organ, and problems with engraftment all hamper the transition from laboratory animal studies to human clinical trials. Although traditional histopathological techniques have been the primary approach for ex vivo analysis of stem cell behavior, these postmortem examinations are unable to further elucidate the underlying mechanisms in real time and in vivo. Fortunately, the advent of molecular imaging has led to unprecedented progress in understanding the fundamental behavior of stem cells, including their survival, biodistribution, immunogenicity, and tumorigenicity in the targeted tissues of interest. This review summarizes various molecular imaging technologies and how they have advanced the current understanding of stem cell survival, biodistribution, immunogenicity, and tumorigenicity.

  16. Developing new optical imaging techniques for single particle and molecule tracking in live cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun, Wei [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Differential interference contrast (DIC) microscopy is a far-field as well as wide-field optical imaging technique. Since it is non-invasive and requires no sample staining, DIC microscopy is suitable for tracking the motion of target molecules in live cells without interfering their functions. In addition, high numerical aperture objectives and condensers can be used in DIC microscopy. The depth of focus of DIC is shallow, which gives DIC much better optical sectioning ability than those of phase contrast and dark field microscopies. In this work, DIC was utilized to study dynamic biological processes including endocytosis and intracellular transport in live cells. The suitability of DIC microscopy for single particle tracking in live cells was first demonstrated by using DIC to monitor the entire endocytosis process of one mesoporous silica nanoparticle (MSN) into a live mammalian cell. By taking advantage of the optical sectioning ability of DIC, we recorded the depth profile of the MSN during the endocytosis process. The shape change around the nanoparticle due to the formation of a vesicle was also captured. DIC microscopy was further modified that the sample can be illuminated and imaged at two wavelengths simultaneously. By using the new technique, noble metal nanoparticles with different shapes and sizes were selectively imaged. Among all the examined metal nanoparticles, gold nanoparticles in rod shapes were found to be especially useful. Due to their anisotropic optical properties, gold nanorods showed as diffraction-limited spots with disproportionate bright and dark parts that are strongly dependent on their orientation in the 3D space. Gold nanorods were developed as orientation nanoprobes and were successfully used to report the self-rotation of gliding microtubules on kinesin coated substrates. Gold nanorods were further used to study the rotational motions of cargoes during the endocytosis and intracellular transport processes in live mammalian

  17. Novel Serial Positive Enrichment Technology Enables Clinical Multiparameter Cell Sorting

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tschulik, Claudia; Piossek, Christine; Bet, Jeannette; Yamamoto, Tori N.; Schiemann, Matthias; Neuenhahn, Michael; Martin, Klaus; Schlapschy, Martin; Skerra, Arne; Schmidt, Thomas; Edinger, Matthias; Riddell, Stanley R.; Germeroth, Lothar; Busch, Dirk H.

    2012-01-01

    A general obstacle for clinical cell preparations is limited purity, which causes variability in the quality and potency of cell products and might be responsible for negative side effects due to unwanted contaminants. Highly pure populations can be obtained best using positive selection techniques. However, in many cases target cell populations need to be segregated from other cells by combinations of multiple markers, which is still difficult to achieve – especially for clinical cell products. Therefore, we have generated low-affinity antibody-derived Fab-fragments, which stain like parental antibodies when multimerized via Strep-tag and Strep-Tactin, but can subsequently be removed entirely from the target cell population. Such reagents can be generated for virtually any antigen and can be used for sequential positive enrichment steps via paramagnetic beads. First protocols for multiparameter enrichment of two clinically relevant cell populations, CD4high/CD25high/CD45RAhigh ‘regulatory T cells’ and CD8high/CD62Lhigh/CD45RAneg ‘central memory T cells’, have been established to determine quality and efficacy parameters of this novel technology, which should have broad applicability for clinical cell sorting as well as basic research. PMID:22545138

  18. Clinical application of dendritic cells in cancer vaccination therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svane, Inge Marie; Soot, Mette Line; Buus, Søren;

    2003-01-01

    for large-scale generation of dendritic cells for clinical applications has made possible phase I/II studies designed to analyze the toxicity, feasibility and efficacy of this approach. In clinical trials, DC-based vaccination of patients with advanced cancer has in many cases led to immunity......During the last decade use of dendritic cells (DC) has moved from murine and in vitro studies to clinical trials as adjuvant in cancer immunotherapy. Here they function as delivery vehicles for exogenous tumor antigens, promoting an efficient antigen presentation. The development of protocols...... and in selected patients to tumor regression. However, the majority of clinical trials are still in phase I, and interpretations are hampered by pronounced variation in study design related to technical aspects of DC preparation, treatment and schedule, monitoring of immune response, and clinically relevant...

  19. Motion tracking to enable pre-surgical margin mapping in basal cell carcinoma using optical imaging modalities: initial feasibility study using optical coherence tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duffy, M.; Richardson, T. J.; Craythorne, E.; Mallipeddi, R.; Coleman, A. J.

    2014-02-01

    A system has been developed to assess the feasibility of using motion tracking to enable pre-surgical margin mapping of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) in the clinic using optical coherence tomography (OCT). This system consists of a commercial OCT imaging system (the VivoSight 1500, MDL Ltd., Orpington, UK), which has been adapted to incorporate a webcam and a single-sensor electromagnetic positional tracking module (the Flock of Birds, Ascension Technology Corp, Vermont, USA). A supporting software interface has also been developed which allows positional data to be captured and projected onto a 2D dermoscopic image in real-time. Initial results using a stationary test phantom are encouraging, with maximum errors in the projected map in the order of 1-2mm. Initial clinical results were poor due to motion artefact, despite attempts to stabilise the patient. However, the authors present several suggested modifications that are expected to reduce the effects of motion artefact and improve the overall accuracy and clinical usability of the system.

  20. A microfluidic cell-trapping device for single-cell tracking of host-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delincé, Matthieu J; Bureau, Jean-Baptiste; López-Jiménez, Ana Teresa; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; McKinney, John D

    2016-08-16

    The impact of cellular individuality on host-microbe interactions is increasingly appreciated but studying the temporal dynamics of single-cell behavior in this context remains technically challenging. Here we present a microfluidic platform, InfectChip, to trap motile infected cells for high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This approach allows the direct visualization of all stages of infection, from bacterial uptake to death of the bacterium or host cell, over extended periods of time. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by co-culturing an established host-cell model, Dictyostelium discoideum, with the extracellular pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae or the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium marinum. We show that the outcome of such infections is surprisingly heterogeneous, ranging from abortive infection to death of the bacterium or host cell. InfectChip thus provides a simple method to dissect the time-course of host-microbe interactions at the single-cell level, yielding new insights that could not be gleaned from conventional population-based measurements. PMID:27425421

  1. Cardiac Stem Cells: Biology and Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Goichberg, Polina; Chang, Jerway; Liao, Ronglih; Leri, Annarosa

    2014-01-01

    Significance: Heart disease is the primary cause of death in the industrialized world. Cardiac failure is dictated by an uncompensated reduction in the number of viable and fully functional cardiomyocytes. While current pharmacological therapies alleviate the symptoms associated with cardiac deterioration, heart transplantation remains the only therapy for advanced heart failure. Therefore, there is a pressing need for novel therapeutic modalities. Cell-based therapies involving cardiac stem ...

  2. In vivo tracking of neuronal-like cells by magnetic resonance in rabbit models of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ruiping Zhang; Kun Zhang; Jianding Li; Qiang Liu; Jun Xie

    2013-01-01

    In vitro experiments have demonstrated that neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can survive, migrate, integrate and help to restore the function and be-haviors of spinal cord injury models, and that they may serve as a suitable approach to treating spinal cord injury. However, it is very difficult to track transplanted cells in vivo. In this study, we in-jected superparamagnetic iron oxide-labeled neuronal-like cells into the subarachnoid space in a rabbit model of spinal cord injury. At 7 days after celltransplantation, a smal number of dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows were observed in the spinal cord injury region, and at 14 days, the number of these shadows increased on T2-weighted imaging. Perl’s Prussian blue staining de-tected dot-shaped low signal intensity shadows in the spinal cord injury region, indicative of superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled cells. These findings suggest that transplanted neuronal-like cells derived from bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells can migrate to the spinal cord injury region and can be tracked by magnetic resonance in vivo. Magnetic resonance imaging represents an efficient noninvasive technique for visual y tracking transplanted cells in vivo.

  3. Development and clinical evaluation of automatic fiducial detection for tumor tracking in cine megavoltage images during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Azcona, Juan Diego [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 and Department of Oncology, Division of Radiation Physics, Clinica Universidad de Navarra, Pamplona, Navarra 31008 (Spain); Li Ruijiang; Mok, Edward; Hancock, Steven; Xing Lei [Department of Radiation Oncology, Stanford University, Stanford, California 94305 (United States)

    2013-03-15

    Purpose: Real-time tracking of implanted fiducials in cine megavoltage (MV) imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery is complicated due to the inherent low contrast of MV images and potential blockage of dynamic leaves configurations. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically practical autodetection algorithm for motion management during VMAT. Methods: The expected field-specific segments and the planned fiducial position from the Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system were projected onto the MV images. The fiducials were enhanced by applying a Laplacian of Gaussian filter in the spatial domain for each image, with a blob-shaped object as the impulse response. The search of implanted fiducials was then performed on a region of interest centered on the projection of the fiducial when it was within an open field including the case when it was close to the field edge or partially occluded by the leaves. A universal template formula was proposed for template matching and normalized cross correlation was employed for its simplicity and computational efficiency. The search region for every image was adaptively updated through a prediction model that employed the 3D position of the fiducial estimated from the localized positions in previous images. This prediction model allowed the actual fiducial position to be tracked dynamically and was used to initialize the search region. The artifacts caused by electronic interference during the acquisition were effectively removed. A score map was computed by combining both morphological information and image intensity. The pixel location with the highest score was selected as the detected fiducial position. The sets of cine MV images taken during treatment were analyzed with in-house developed software written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA). Five prostate patients were analyzed to assess the algorithm performance by measuring their positioning

  4. Development and clinical evaluation of automatic fiducial detection for tumor tracking in cine megavoltage images during volumetric modulated arc therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Real-time tracking of implanted fiducials in cine megavoltage (MV) imaging during volumetric modulated arc therapy (VMAT) delivery is complicated due to the inherent low contrast of MV images and potential blockage of dynamic leaves configurations. The purpose of this work is to develop a clinically practical autodetection algorithm for motion management during VMAT. Methods: The expected field-specific segments and the planned fiducial position from the Eclipse (Varian Medical Systems, Palo Alto, CA) treatment planning system were projected onto the MV images. The fiducials were enhanced by applying a Laplacian of Gaussian filter in the spatial domain for each image, with a blob-shaped object as the impulse response. The search of implanted fiducials was then performed on a region of interest centered on the projection of the fiducial when it was within an open field including the case when it was close to the field edge or partially occluded by the leaves. A universal template formula was proposed for template matching and normalized cross correlation was employed for its simplicity and computational efficiency. The search region for every image was adaptively updated through a prediction model that employed the 3D position of the fiducial estimated from the localized positions in previous images. This prediction model allowed the actual fiducial position to be tracked dynamically and was used to initialize the search region. The artifacts caused by electronic interference during the acquisition were effectively removed. A score map was computed by combining both morphological information and image intensity. The pixel location with the highest score was selected as the detected fiducial position. The sets of cine MV images taken during treatment were analyzed with in-house developed software written in MATLAB (The Mathworks, Inc., Natick, MA). Five prostate patients were analyzed to assess the algorithm performance by measuring their positioning

  5. Advancing cell wall inhibitors towards clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maffioli, Sonia I; Cruz, João C S; Monciardini, Paolo; Sosio, Margherita; Donadio, Stefano

    2016-03-01

    Natural products represent a major source of approved drugs and still play an important role in supplying chemical diversity. Consistently, 2014 has seen new, natural product-derived antibiotics approved for human use by the US Food and Drug Administration. One of the recently approved second-generation glycopeptides is dalbavancin, a semi-synthetic derivative of the natural product A40,926. This compound inhibits bacterial growth by binding to lipid intermediate II (Lipid II), a key intermediate in peptidoglycan biosynthesis. Like other recently approved antibiotics, dalbavancin has a complex history of preclinical and clinical development, with several companies contributing to different steps in different years. While our work on dalbavancin development stopped at the previous company, intriguingly our current pipeline includes two more Lipid II-binding natural products or derivatives thereof. In particular, we will focus on the properties of NAI-107 and related lantibiotics, which originated from recent screening and characterization efforts. PMID:26515981

  6. MRI tracking of transplanted stem cells used for brain and spinal cord injury repair

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva

    Košice : Univerzita Pavla Jozefa Šafárika v Košicích, 2005. s. 116-116. ISBN 80-7097-607-1. [International Symposium on Experimental and Clinical Neurobiology /5./. 19.09.2005-22.09.2005, Tatranská Lomnica - Stará Lesná] R&D Projects: GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : stem cells Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. Histological, Immunohistological, and Clinical Features of Merkel Cell Carcinoma in Correlation to Merkel Cell Polyomavirus Status

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. Jaeger

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Merkel cell carcinoma is a rare, but highly malignant tumor of the skin with high rates of metastasis and poor survival. Its incidence rate rises and is currently about 0.6/100000/year. Clinical differential diagnoses include basal cell carcinoma, cyst, amelanotic melanoma, lymphoma and atypical fibroxanthoma. In this review article clinical, histopathological and immunhistochemical features of Merkel cell carcinoma are reported. In addition, the role of Merkel cell polyomavirus is discussed.

  8. Enhancing endothelial progenitor cell for clinical use

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2015-01-01

    Circulating endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) havebeen demonstrated to correlate negatively with vascularendothelial dysfunction and cardiovascular risk factors.However, translation of basic research into the clinicalpractice has been limited by the lack of unambiguousand consistent definitions of EPCs and reduced EPCcell number and function in subjects requiring them forclinical use. This article critically reviews the definitionof EPCs based on commonly used protocols, their valueas a biomarker of cardiovascular risk factor in subjectswith cardiovascular disease, and strategies to enhanceEPCs for treatment of ischemic diseases.

  9. Clinical Trials With Mesenchymal Stem Cells: An Update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Squillaro, Tiziana; Peluso, Gianfranco; Galderisi, Umberto

    2016-01-01

    In the last year, the promising features of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), including their regenerative properties and ability to differentiate into diverse cell lineages, have generated great interest among researchers whose work has offered intriguing perspectives on cell-based therapies for various diseases. Currently the most commonly used adult stem cells in regenerative medicine, MSCs, can be isolated from several tissues, exhibit a strong capacity for replication in vitro, and can differentiate into osteoblasts, chondrocytes, and adipocytes. However, heterogeneous procedures for isolating and cultivating MSCs among laboratories have prompted the International Society for Cellular Therapy (ISCT) to issue criteria for identifying unique populations of these cells. Consequently, the isolation of MSCs according to ISCT criteria has produced heterogeneous, nonclonal cultures of stromal cells containing stem cells with different multipotent properties, committed progenitors, and differentiated cells. Though the nature and functions of MSCs remain unclear, nonclonal stromal cultures obtained from bone marrow and other tissues currently serve as sources of putative MSCs for therapeutic purposes, and several findings underscore their effectiveness in treating different diseases. To date, 493 MSC-based clinical trials, either complete or ongoing, appear in the database of the US National Institutes of Health. In the present article, we provide a comprehensive review of MSC-based clinical trials conducted worldwide that scrutinizes biological properties of MSCs, elucidates recent clinical findings and clinical trial phases of investigation, highlights therapeutic effects of MSCs, and identifies principal criticisms of the use of these cells. In particular, we analyze clinical trials using MSCs for representative diseases, including hematological disease, graft-versus-host disease, organ transplantation, diabetes, inflammatory diseases, and diseases in the liver, kidney

  10. Surface Plasmon Resonance for Cell-Based Clinical Diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuhki Yanase

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Non-invasive real-time observations and the evaluation of living cell conditions and functions are increasingly demanded in life sciences. Surface plasmon resonance (SPR sensors detect the refractive index (RI changes on the surface of sensor chips in label-free and on a real-time basis. Using SPR sensors, we and other groups have developed techniques to evaluate living cells’ reactions in response to stimuli without any labeling in a real-time manner. The SPR imaging (SPRI system for living cells may visualize single cell reactions and has the potential to expand application of SPR cell sensing for clinical diagnosis, such as multi-array cell diagnostic systems and detection of malignant cells among normal cells in combination with rapid cell isolation techniques.

  11. "Sickle Cell Anemia: Tracking down a Mutation": An Interactive Learning Laboratory That Communicates Basic Principles of Genetics and Cellular Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jarrett, Kevin; Williams, Mary; Horn, Spencer; Radford, David; Wyss, J. Michael

    2016-01-01

    "Sickle cell anemia: tracking down a mutation" is a full-day, inquiry-based, biology experience for high school students enrolled in genetics or advanced biology courses. In the experience, students use restriction endonuclease digestion, cellulose acetate gel electrophoresis, and microscopy to discover which of three putative patients…

  12. SPECT Imaging for in vivo tracking of NIS containing stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Zhenghong

    2013-04-02

    The proposed study contains two groups of imaging experiments: 1) human mesenchymal stem cells supporting in vivo survival of unrelated donor hematopoietic stem cells; 2) gene transduction and selection of mutant MGMT genes on human hematopoietic stem cells conferring resistance to BC+BCNU. There is increasing evidence that adult human tissues harbor stem and progenitor cells that can be used for therapeutic purposes. We had focused on the Mesenchymal Stem Cells (MSCs) found in human bone marrow and investigated these cells in the context of autologous and allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation to a) facilitate rapid hematopoietic engraftment in cancer patients receiving high dose chemotherapy and b) to modulate the graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). We have demonstrated that culture-expanded autologous and allogeneic MSCs can be safely infused into humans and the preliminary results showed that MSCs facilitate hematopoietic engraftment and reduce GVHD. On the other hand, studies of gene transfer with drug resistant selection suggest major perturbations to the process of hematopoietic reconstitution and the confounding issue of organ toxicity and recovery that takes place in the host. We have found that limiting numbers of hematopoietic stem cells transduced with MGMT repopulate the bone marrow of primary and secondary recipient mice. We are also particularly interested in the dynamics of engraftment and selection in regions of bones, liver, spleen and lung, where we have previously seen marked evidence of engraftment. All the measurements have required animal sacrifice and single point determinations of engraftment in individual and cohorts of mice. Heretofore it has not been possible to study the dynamics of engraftment and enrichment. In the upcoming application, we propose to develop an imaging method to track intravenously infused stem cells in vivo at preset time points to understand their homing and proliferation. Specifically, we propose to use

  13. Labeling human embryonic stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes for tracking with MR imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) can generate cardiomyocytes (CM), which offer promising treatments for cardiomyopathies in children. However, challenges for clinical translation result from loss of transplanted cell from target sites and high cell death. An imaging technique that noninvasively and repetitively monitors transplanted hESC-CM could guide improvements in transplantation techniques and advance therapies. To develop a clinically applicable labeling technique for hESC-CM with FDA-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) by examining labeling before and after CM differentiation. Triplicates of hESC were labeled by simple incubation with 50 μg/ml of ferumoxides before or after differentiation into CM, then imaged on a 7T MR scanner using a T2-weighted multi-echo spin-echo sequence. Viability, iron uptake and T2-relaxation times were compared between groups using t-tests. hESC-CM labeled before differentiation demonstrated significant MR effects, iron uptake and preserved function. hESC-CM labeled after differentiation showed no significant iron uptake or change in MR signal (P < 0.05). Morphology, differentiation and viability were consistent between experimental groups. hESC-CM should be labeled prior to CM differentiation to achieve a significant MR signal. This technique permits monitoring delivery and engraftment of hESC-CM for potential advancements of stem cell-based therapies in the reconstitution of damaged myocardium. (orig.)

  14. Labeling human embryonic stem-cell-derived cardiomyocytes for tracking with MR imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Castaneda, Rosalinda T.; Daldrup-Link, Heike [Lucile Packard Children' s Hospital, Stanford School of Medicine, Pediatric Radiology, Stanford, CA (United States); Boddington, Sophie; Wendland, Mike; Mandrussow, Lydia [University of California, Department of Radiology and Biomedical Imaging, UCSF Medical Center, San Francisco, CA (United States); Henning, Tobias D. [University Hospital of Cologne, Department of Radiology and Neuroradiology, Cologne (Germany); Liu, Siyuan [National Institutes of Health, Language Section, Voice, Speech and Language Branch, National Institute on Deafness and Other Communication Disorders, Bethesda, MD (United States)

    2011-11-15

    Human embryonic stem cells (hESC) can generate cardiomyocytes (CM), which offer promising treatments for cardiomyopathies in children. However, challenges for clinical translation result from loss of transplanted cell from target sites and high cell death. An imaging technique that noninvasively and repetitively monitors transplanted hESC-CM could guide improvements in transplantation techniques and advance therapies. To develop a clinically applicable labeling technique for hESC-CM with FDA-approved superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIO) by examining labeling before and after CM differentiation. Triplicates of hESC were labeled by simple incubation with 50 {mu}g/ml of ferumoxides before or after differentiation into CM, then imaged on a 7T MR scanner using a T2-weighted multi-echo spin-echo sequence. Viability, iron uptake and T2-relaxation times were compared between groups using t-tests. hESC-CM labeled before differentiation demonstrated significant MR effects, iron uptake and preserved function. hESC-CM labeled after differentiation showed no significant iron uptake or change in MR signal (P < 0.05). Morphology, differentiation and viability were consistent between experimental groups. hESC-CM should be labeled prior to CM differentiation to achieve a significant MR signal. This technique permits monitoring delivery and engraftment of hESC-CM for potential advancements of stem cell-based therapies in the reconstitution of damaged myocardium. (orig.)

  15. Transplantation of autologous bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC for CNS disorders – Strategy and tactics for clinical application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Satoshi Kuroda

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Background – There is increasing evidence that the transplanted bone marrow stromal cells (BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after central nervous system (CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, brain contusion and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with neurological disorders. In this paper, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose.Methods and Results – The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. Using optical imaging and MRI techniques, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. Functional imaging such as PET scan may have the potential to assess the beneficial effects of BMSC transplantation. The BMSC can be expanded using the animal protein-free culture medium, which would maintain their potential of proliferation, migration, and neural differentiation.Conclusion – It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future

  16. A new 3D tracking method for cell mechanics investigation exploiting the capabilities of digital holography in microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miccio, L.; Memmolo, P.; Merola, F.; Fusco, S.; Netti, P. A.; Ferraro, P.

    2014-03-01

    A method for 3D tracking has been developed exploiting Digital Holography features in Microscopy (DHM). In the framework of self-consistent platform for manipulation and measurement of biological specimen we use DHM for quantitative and completely label free analysis of samples with low amplitude contrast. Tracking capability extend the potentiality of DHM allowing to monitor the motion of appropriate probes and correlate it with sample properties. Complete 3D tracking has been obtained for the probes avoiding the amplitude refocusing in traditional tracking processes. Moreover, in biology and biomedical research fields one of the main topic is the understanding of morphology and mechanics of cells and microorganisms. Biological samples present low amplitude contrast that limits the information that can be retrieved through optical bright-field microscope measurements. The main effect on light propagating in such objects is in phase. This is known as phase-retardation or phase-shift. DHM is an innovative and alternative approach in microscopy, it's a good candidate for no-invasive and complete specimen analysis because its main characteristic is the possibility to discern between intensity and phase information performing quantitative mapping of the Optical Path Length. In this paper, the flexibility of DH is employed to analyze cell mechanics of unstained cells subjected to appropriate stimuli. DHM is used to measure all the parameters useful to understand the deformations induced by external and controlled stresses on in-vitro cells. Our configuration allows 3D tracking of micro-particles and, simultaneously, furnish quantitative phase-contrast maps. Experimental results are presented and discussed for in vitro cells.

  17. Clinical perspectives of cancer stem cell research in radiation oncology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiotherapy has a proven potential to eradicate cancer stem cells which is reflected by its curative potential in many cancer types. Considerable progress has been made in identification and biological characterisation of cancer stem cells during the past years. Recent biological findings indicate significant inter- and intratumoural and functional heterogeneity of cancer stem cells and lead to more complex models which have potential implications for radiobiology and radiotherapy. Clinical evidence is emerging that biomarkers of cancer stem cells may be prognostic for the outcome of radiotherapy in some tumour entities. Perspectives of cancer stem cell based research for radiotherapy reviewed here include their radioresistance compared to the mass of non-cancer stem cells which form the bulk of all tumour cells, implications for image- and non-image based predictive bio-assays of the outcome of radiotherapy and a combination of novel systemic treatments with radiotherapy

  18. Non-invasive tracking of human haemopoietic CD34+ stem cells in vivo in immunodeficient mice by using magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To assess migration of CD34+ human stem cells to the bone marrow of athymic mice by using magnetic resonance (MR) imaging and Resovist, a contrast agent containing superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) particles. All animal and human procedures were approved by our institution's ethics committee, and women had given consent to donate umbilical cord blood (UCB). Balb/c-AnN Foxn1nu/Crl mice received intravenous injection of 1 x 106 (n = 3), 5 x 106 (n = 3) or 1 x 107 (n = 3) human Resovist-labelled CD34+ cells; control mice received Resovist (n = 3). MR imaging was performed before, 2 and 24 h after transplantation. Signal intensities of liver, muscle and bone marrow were measured and analysed by ANOVA and post hoc Student's t tests. MR imaging data were verified by histological and immunological detection of both human cell surface markers and carboxydextran-coating of the contrast agent. CD34+ cells were efficiently labelled by Resovist without impairment of functionality. Twenty-four hours after administration of labelled cells, MR imaging revealed a significant signal decline in the bone marrow, and histological and immunological analyses confirmed the presence of transplanted human CD34+ cells. Intravenously administered Resovist-labelled CD34+ cells home to bone marrow of mice. Homing can be tracked in vivo by using clinical 1.5-T MR imaging technology. (orig.)

  19. Radiolabelled Autologous Cells: Methods and Standardization for Clinical Use

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This publication serves as a useful resource for nuclear medicine physicians, radiologists, radiopharmacists, pharmacologists and other researchers engaged with radiolabelling of autologous products for clinical application. It provides practical guidelines towards clinical work with radiolabelled autologous products and aims to streamline the variety of strategies that have evolved, for example, in the handling of radiolabelled red and white blood cells. The publication highlights the importance of the quality of radiolabelling services, provides advice on safety issues, and also addresses the use of other radiolabelled autologous products and their translation into the clinical environment

  20. Dendritic Cell Responses to Surface Properties of Clinical Titanium Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Kou, Peng Meng; Schwartz, Zvi; Boyan, Barbara D; Babensee, Julia E.

    2010-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) play pivotal roles in responding to foreign entities during an innate immune response and initiating effective adaptive immunity as well as maintaining immune tolerance. The sensitivity of DCs to foreign stimuli also makes them useful cells to assess the inflammatory response to biomaterials. Elucidating the material property-DC phenotype relationships using a well-defined biomaterial system is expected to provide criteria for immuno-modulatory biomaterial design. Clinic...

  1. Clinical enigma: A rare case of clear cell odontogenic carcinoma

    OpenAIRE

    Cheshta Walia; Rudra Prasad Chatterjee; Sanchita Kundu; Sudip Roy

    2015-01-01

    Clear cell odontogenic carcinoma is a rare, aggressive neoplasm of the jaw with only 74 reported cases. It occurs predominantly in the mandibular anterior region during fifth to seventh decades of life. Clinically it manifests as intra-bony swelling with a variable degree of pain. Microscopically, it reveals nests of cells with clear cytoplasm in connective tissue stroma arranged in different patterns. It is often misdiagnosed due to the rarity of lesion and confusing histopathology. Immunohi...

  2. A Maximum Power Point Tracking Control Method of a Photovoltaic Power Generator with Consideration of Dynamic Characteristics of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Takashi; Yoshida, Toshiya; Ohniwa, Katsumi

    This paper discusses a new control strategy for photovoltaic power generation systems with consideration of dynamic characteristics of the photovoltaic cells. The controller estimates internal currents of an equivalent circuit for the cells. This estimated, or the virtual current and the actual voltage of the cells are fed to a conventional Maximum-Power-Point-Tracking (MPPT) controller. Consequently, this MPPT controller still tracks the optimum point even though it is so designed that the seeking speed of the operating point is extremely high. This system may suit for applications, which are installed in rapidly changeable insolation and temperature-conditions e.g. automobiles, trains, and airplanes. The proposed method is verified by experiment with a combination of this estimating function and the modified Boehringer's MPPT algorithm.

  3. Clinical application of mesenchymal stem cells for aseptic bone necrosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tomoki Aoyama

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Since 2007, we had started clinical trial using mesenchymal stem cell (MSCs for the treatment of aseptic bone necrosis as a first clinical trial permitted by Japanese Health, Labour and Welfare Ministry.Aseptic bone necrosis of the femoral head commonly occurs in patients with two to four decades, causing severe musculoskeletal disability. Although its diagnosis is easy with X-ray and MRI, there has been no gold standard invented for treatment of this disease. MSCs represent a stem cell population in adult tissues that can be isolated and expanded in culture, and differentiate into cells with different nature. Combination with β-tri-calcium phosphate and vascularized bone graft, we succeeded to treat bone necrosis of the femoral head.Regenerative medicine using stem cells is hopeful and shed a light on intractable disease. To become widespread, Basic, Translational, Application, and Developmental study is needed.? From an experience of cell therapy using MSCs, we started to research induced pluripotent stem cell (iPS for clinical application.

  4. Simultaneous Observation of Cells and Nuclear Tracks from the Boron Neutron Capture Reaction by UV-C Sensitization of Polycarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Portu, Agustina; Rossini, Andrés Eugenio; Thorp, Silvia Inés; Curotto, Paula; Pozzi, Emiliano César Cayetano; Granell, Pablo; Golmar, Federico; Cabrini, Rómulo Luis; Martin, Gisela Saint

    2015-08-01

    The distribution of boron in tissue samples coming from boron neutron capture therapy protocols can be determined through the analysis of its autoradiography image on a nuclear track detector. A more precise knowledge of boron atom location on the microscopic scale can be attained by the observation of nuclear tracks superimposed on the sample image on the detector. A method to produce an "imprint" of cells cultivated on a polycarbonate detector was developed, based on the photodegradation properties of UV-C radiation on this material. Optimal conditions to generate an appropriate monolayer of Mel-J cells incubated with boronophenylalanine were found. The best images of both cells and nuclear tracks were obtained for a neutron fluence of 1013 cm-2, 6 h UV-C (254 nm) exposure, and 4 min etching time with a KOH solution. The imprint morphology was analyzed by both light and scanning electron microscopy. Similar samples, exposed to UV-A (360 nm) revealed no cellular imprinting. Etch pits were present only inside the cell imprints, indicating a preferential boron uptake (about threefold the incubation concentration). Comparative studies of boron absorption in different cell lines and in vitro evaluation of the effect of diverse boron compounds are feasible with this methodology. PMID:26155721

  5. Mesenchymal stem cells: biological characteristics and potential clinical applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kassem, Moustapha

    2004-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) are clonogenic, non-hematpoietic stem cells present in the bone marrow and are able to differentiate into multiple mesoderm-type cell lineages, for example, osteoblasts, chondrocytes, endothelial-cells and also non-mesoderm-type lineages, for example, neuronal...... among the first stem cell types to be introduced in the clinic. Several studies have demonstrated the possible use of MSC in systemic transplantation for systemic diseases, local implantation for local tissue defects, as a vehicle for genes in gene therapy protocols or to generate transplantable tissues......-like cells. Several methods are currently available for isolation of the MSC based on their physical and physico-chemical characteristics, for example, adherence to plastics or other extracellular matrix components. Because of the ease of their isolation and their extensive differentiation potential, MSC are...

  6. In Vivo Tracking of Human Neural Progenitor Cells in the Rat Brain Using Magnetic Resonance Imaging Is Not Enhanced by Ferritin Expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernau, Ksenija; Lewis, Christina M; Petelinsek, Anna M; Reagan, Matthew S; Niles, David J; Mattis, Virginia B; Meyerand, M Elizabeth; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Svendsen, Clive N

    2016-01-01

    Rapid growth in the field of stem cell research has generated a lot of interest in their therapeutic use, especially in the treatment of neurodegenerative diseases. Specifically, human neural progenitor cells (hNPCs), unique in their capability to differentiate into cells of the neural lineage, have been widely investigated due to their ability to survive, thrive, and migrate toward injured tissues. Still, one of the major roadblocks for clinical applicability arises from the inability to monitor these cells following transplantation. Molecular imaging techniques, such as magnetic resonance imaging (MRI), have been explored to assess hNPC transplant location, migration, and survival. Here we investigated whether inducing hNPCs to overexpress ferritin (hNPCs(Fer)), an iron storage protein, is sufficient to track these cells long term in the rat striatum using MRI. We found that increased hypointensity on MRI images could establish hNPC(Fer) location. Unexpectedly, however, wild-type hNPC transplants were detected in a similar manner, which is likely due to increased iron accumulation following transplantation-induced damage. Hence, we labeled hNPCs with superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles to further increase iron content in an attempt to enhance cell contrast in MRI. SPIO-labeling of hNPCs (hNPCs-SPIO) achieved increased hypointensity, with significantly greater area of decreased T2* compared to hNPC(Fer) (p < 0.0001) and all other controls used. However, none of the techniques could be used to determine graft rejection in vivo, which is imperative for understanding cell behavior following transplantation. We conclude that in order for cell survival to be monitored in preclinical and clinical settings, another molecular imaging technique must be employed, including perhaps multimodal imaging, which would utilize MRI along with another imaging modality. PMID:26160767

  7. Somatic cell count distributions during lactation predict clinical mastitis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Green, M.J.; Green, L.E.; Schukken, Y.H.; Bradley, A.J.; Peeler, E.J.; Barkema, H.W.; Haas, de Y.; Collis, V.J.; Medley, G.F.

    2004-01-01

    This research investigated somatic cell count (SCC) records during lactation, with the purpose of identifying distribution characteristics (mean and measures of variation) that were most closely associated with clinical mastitis. Three separate data sets were used, one containing quarter SCC (n = 14

  8. Red blood cell antibodies in pregnancy and their clinical consequences

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nordvall, Maria; Dziegiel, Morten Hanefeld; Hegaard, Hanne Kristine;

    2009-01-01

    The objective was to determine clinical consequences of various specificities for the infant/fetus. The population was patients referred between 1998 and 2005 to the tertiary center because of detected red blood cell (RBC) alloimmunization. Altogether 455 infants were delivered by 390 alloimmunized...

  9. Tracking objects, Tracking agents

    OpenAIRE

    Bullot, Nicolas J.; Rysiew, Patrick

    2005-01-01

    Animals and humans have to keep track of individuals in their environment, both in perception (sensorimotor tracking) and in cognition (e.g., spatio-temporal localization and linguistic reference via memory, communication and reasoning). Items that are typical targets for tracking are things such as stationary physical objects (e.g., rocks, plants, trees, buildings, or attached artifacts), moving physical objects (e.g., animals, certain artifacts) and human beings. All such items are located ...

  10. Stem cells: progressions and applications in clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Hosseini Bereshneh

    2016-05-01

    of them in transferring gene into different cells. Today, this method have had considerable progress in the treatment of many disease. In this review study, some aspect of stem cells like types and characteristic, origin, derivation techniques, storage conditions and differentiation to target tissues, current clinical usage and their therapeutic capabilities will be discussed.

  11. Co-visualization of DNA damage and ion traversals in live mammalian cells using a fluorescent nuclear track detector

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The geometric locations of ion traversals in mammalian cells constitute important information in the study of heavy ion-induced biological effect. Single ion traversal through a cellular nucleus produces complex and massive DNA damage at a nanometer level, leading to cell inactivation, mutations and transformation. We present a novel approach that uses a fluorescent nuclear track detector (FNTD) for the simultaneous detection of the geometrical images of ion traversals and DNA damage in single cells using confocal microscopy. HT1080 or HT1080–53BP1-GFP cells were cultured on the surface of a FNTD and exposed to 5.1-MeV/n neon ions. The positions of the ion traversals were obtained as fluorescent images of a FNTD. Localized DNA damage in cells was identified as fluorescent spots of γ-H2AX or 53BP1-GFP. These track images and images of damaged DNA were obtained in a short time using a confocal laser scanning microscope. The geometrical distribution of DNA damage indicated by fluorescent γ-H2AX spots in fixed cells or fluorescent 53BP1-GFP spots in living cells was found to correlate well with the distribution of the ion traversals. This method will be useful for evaluating the number of ion hits on individual cells, not only for micro-beam but also for random-beam experiments. (author)

  12. Autologous Bone Marrow Stromal Cell Transplantation for Central Nervous System Disorders – Recent Progress and Perspective for Clinical Application

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kuroda S

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available There is increasing evidence that the transplanted BMSC significantly promote functional recovery after CNS damage in the animal models of various kinds of CNS disorders, including cerebral infarct, traumatic brain injury and spinal cord injury. However, there are several shortages of information when considering clinical application of BMSC transplantation for patients with CNS disorders. In this review, therefore, we discuss what we should clarify to establish cell transplantation therapy as the scientifically proven entity in clinical situation and describe our recent works for this purpose. The BMSC have the ability to alter their gene expression profile and phenotype in response to the surrounding circumstances and to protect the neurons by producing some neurotrophic factors. They also promote neurite extension and rebuild the neural circuits in the injured CNS. The BMSC can be expanded in vitro using the animal serum-free medium. Pharmacological modulation may accelerate the in vitro proliferation of the BMSC. Using in vivo optical imaging technique, the transplanted BMSC can non-invasively be tracked in the living animals for at least 8 weeks after transplantation. It is urgent issues to develop clinical imaging technique to track the transplanted cells in the CNS and evaluate the therapeutic significance of BMSC transplantation in order to establish it as a definite therapeutic strategy in clinical situation in the future.

  13. Establishing a stem cell culture laboratory for clinical trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elíseo Joji Sekiya

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Adult stem/progenitor cells are found in different human tissues. An in vitro cell culture is needed for their isolation or for their expansion when they are not available in a sufficient quantity to regenerate damaged organs and tissues. The level of complexity of these new technologies requires adequate facilities, qualified personnel with experience in cell culture techniques, assessment of quality and clear protocols for cell production. The rules for the implementation of cell therapy centers involve national and international standards of good manufacturing practices. However, such standards are not uniform, reflecting the diversity of technical and scientific development. Here standards from the United States, the European Union and Brazil are analyzed. Moreover, practical solutions encountered for the implementation of a cell therapy center appropriate for the preparation and supply of cultured cells for clinical studies are described. Development stages involved the planning and preparation of the project, the construction of the facility, standardization of laboratory procedures and development of systems to prevent cross contamination. Combining the theoretical knowledge of research centers involved in the study of cells with the practical experience of blood therapy services that manage structures for cell transplantation is presented as the best potential for synergy to meet the demands to implement cell therapy centers.

  14. Clinical significance of T cell metabolic reprogramming in cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herbel, Christoph; Patsoukis, Nikolaos; Bardhan, Kankana; Seth, Pankaj; Weaver, Jessica D; Boussiotis, Vassiliki A

    2016-12-01

    Conversion of normal cells to cancer is accompanied with changes in their metabolism. During this conversion, cell metabolism undergoes a shift from oxidative phosphorylation to aerobic glycolysis, also known as Warburg effect, which is a hallmark for cancer cell metabolism. In cancer cells, glycolysis functions in parallel with the TCA cycle and other metabolic pathways to enhance biosynthetic processes and thus support proliferation and growth. Similar metabolic features are observed in T cells during activation but, in contrast to cancer, metabolic transitions in T cells are part of a physiological process. Currently, there is intense interest in understanding the cause and effect relationship between metabolic reprogramming and T cell differentiation. After the recent success of cancer immunotherapy, the crosstalk between immune system and cancer has come to the forefront of clinical and basic research. One of the key goals is to delineate how metabolic alterations of cancer influence metabolism-regulated function and differentiation of tumor resident T cells and how such effects might be altered by immunotherapy. Here, we review the unique metabolic features of cancer, the implications of cancer metabolism on T cell metabolic reprogramming during antigen encounters, and the translational prospective of harnessing metabolism in cancer and T cells for cancer therapy. PMID:27510264

  15. A systematic investigation of differential effects of cell culture substrates on the extent of artifacts in single-molecule tracking.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura C Zanetti-Domingues

    Full Text Available Single-molecule techniques are being increasingly applied to biomedical investigation, notwithstanding the numerous challenges they pose in terms of signal-to-noise ratio issues. Non-specific binding of probes to glass substrates, in particular, can produce experimental artifacts due to spurious molecules on glass, which can be particularly deleterious in live-cell tracking experiments. In order to resolve the issue of non-specific probe binding to substrates, we performed systematic testing of a range of available surface coatings, using three different proteins, and then extended our assessment to the ability of these coatings to foster cell growth and retain non-adhesive properties. Linear PEG, a passivating agent commonly used both in immobilized-molecule single-molecule techniques and in tissue engineering, is able to both successfully repel non-specific adhesion of fluorescent probes and to foster cell growth when functionalized with appropriate adhesive peptides. Linear PEG treatment results in a significant reduction of tracking artifacts in EGFR tracking with Affibody ligands on a cell line expressing EGFR-eGFP. The findings reported herein could be beneficial to a large number of experimental situations where single-molecule or single-particle precision is required.

  16. Multileaf Collimator Tracking Improves Dose Delivery for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy: Results of the First Clinical Trial

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colvill, Emma [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia); Booth, Jeremy T. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia); School of Physics, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); O' Brien, Ricky T. [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia); Eade, Thomas N.; Kneebone, Andrew B. [Northern Sydney Cancer Centre, Royal North Shore Hospital, St. Leonards, NSW (Australia); Poulsen, Per R. [Aarhus University Hospital, Aarhus (Denmark); Keall, Paul J., E-mail: paul.keall@sydney.edu.au [Radiation Physics Laboratory, University of Sydney, Sydney, NSW (Australia)

    2015-08-01

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered dose compared with the dose without MLC tracking, in the setting of a prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy trial. Methods and Materials: Multileaf collimator tracking was implemented for 15 patients in a prostate cancer radiation therapy trial; in total, 513 treatment fractions were delivered. During each treatment fraction, the prostate trajectory and treatment MLC positions were collected. These data were used as input for dose reconstruction (multiple isocenter shift method) to calculate the treated dose (with MLC tracking) and the dose that would have been delivered had MLC tracking not been applied (without MLC tracking). The percentage difference from planned for target and normal tissue dose-volume points were calculated. The hypothesis was tested for each dose-volume value via analysis of variance using the F test. Results: Of the 513 fractions delivered, 475 (93%) were suitable for analysis. The mean difference and standard deviation between the planned and treated MLC tracking doses and the planned and without-MLC tracking doses for all 475 fractions were, respectively, PTV D{sub 99%} −0.8% ± 1.1% versus −2.1% ± 2.7%; CTV D{sub 99%} −0.6% ± 0.8% versus −0.6% ± 1.1%; rectum V{sub 65%} 1.6% ± 7.9% versus −1.2% ± 18%; and bladder V{sub 65%} 0.5% ± 4.4% versus −0.0% ± 9.2% (P<.001 for all dose-volume results). Conclusion: This study shows that MLC tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered doses compared with the modeled doses without MLC tracking. The implications of this finding are potentially improved patient outcomes, as well as more reliable dose-volume data for radiobiological parameter determination.

  17. Multileaf Collimator Tracking Improves Dose Delivery for Prostate Cancer Radiation Therapy: Results of the First Clinical Trial

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To test the hypothesis that multileaf collimator (MLC) tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered dose compared with the dose without MLC tracking, in the setting of a prostate cancer volumetric modulated arc therapy trial. Methods and Materials: Multileaf collimator tracking was implemented for 15 patients in a prostate cancer radiation therapy trial; in total, 513 treatment fractions were delivered. During each treatment fraction, the prostate trajectory and treatment MLC positions were collected. These data were used as input for dose reconstruction (multiple isocenter shift method) to calculate the treated dose (with MLC tracking) and the dose that would have been delivered had MLC tracking not been applied (without MLC tracking). The percentage difference from planned for target and normal tissue dose-volume points were calculated. The hypothesis was tested for each dose-volume value via analysis of variance using the F test. Results: Of the 513 fractions delivered, 475 (93%) were suitable for analysis. The mean difference and standard deviation between the planned and treated MLC tracking doses and the planned and without-MLC tracking doses for all 475 fractions were, respectively, PTV D99% −0.8% ± 1.1% versus −2.1% ± 2.7%; CTV D99% −0.6% ± 0.8% versus −0.6% ± 1.1%; rectum V65% 1.6% ± 7.9% versus −1.2% ± 18%; and bladder V65% 0.5% ± 4.4% versus −0.0% ± 9.2% (P<.001 for all dose-volume results). Conclusion: This study shows that MLC tracking improves the consistency between the planned and delivered doses compared with the modeled doses without MLC tracking. The implications of this finding are potentially improved patient outcomes, as well as more reliable dose-volume data for radiobiological parameter determination

  18. Potential and clinical utility of stem cells in cardiovascular disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Korff Krause

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Korff Krause, Carsten Schneider, Kai Jaquet, Karl-Heinz KuckHanseatic Heart Center Hamburg, Department of Cardiology, Asklepios Hospital St. Georg, Hamburg, GermanyAbstract: The recent identification of bone marrow-derived adult stem cells and other types of stem cells that could improve heart function after transplantation have raised high expectations. The basic mechanisms have been studied mostly in murine models. However, these experiments revealed controversial results on transdifferentiation vs transfusion of adult stem cells vs paracrine effects of these cells, which is still being debated. Moreover, the reproducibility of these results in precisely translated large animal models is still less well investigated. Despite these weaknesses results of several clinical trials including several hundreds of patients with ischemic heart disease have been published. However, there are no solid data showing that any of these approaches can regenerate human myocardium. Even the effectiveness of cell therapy in these approaches is doubtful. In future we need in this important field of regenerative medicine: i more experimental data in large animals that are closer to the anatomy and physiology of humans, including data on dose effects, comparison of different cell types and different delivery routes; ii a better understanding of the molecular mechanisms involved in the fate of transplanted cells; iii more intensive research on genuine regenerative medicine, applying genetic regulation and cell engineering.Keywords: stem cells, cardiovascular disease

  19. In vivo MR tracking of magnetically labeled mesenchymal stem cells in rat liver after intrasplenic transplantation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the 1.5-T magnetic resonance imaging system to depict and track in vivo of magnetically labeled bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in rat liver after intrasplenic transplantation. Methods: Rat BMSCs were isolated, purified, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe2O3-PLL. Prussian blue stain was performed for showing intracellular irons. Acute liver damage was induced by subcutaneous injection of carbon tetrachloride in 12 recipient rats. The cells allotransplantation was performed by intrasplenic injection with magnetically labeled (experimental group, n=6) or unlabeled BMSCs (control group, n=6). Serial MRI were performed before and 3 hours, 3, 7, 14 days after transplantation. Signal-to-noise ratio (SNR) of liver on T2*-weighted MR imaging obtained before and after injection were measured and compared. MR imaging findings were compared histologically with histology. Results: Rats BMSCs could be effectively labeled and the labeling efficiency was almost 100%. Iron-containing intracytoplasmatic vesicles could be observed clearly with prussian blue staining. SNR of rat livers in experimental group and control group before and 3 hours, 3, 7, 14 days after transplantation were 19.53±2.30, 3.28±1.06, 7.34±2.10, 10.25±3.96, 15.50±3.73; 20.20±4.35, 21.20±4.43, 19.13±2.80, 21.43±5.45, 19.07±4.80, respectively. SNR decreased significantly in the experimental group liver 3 hours, 3, 7 days after injection of BMSCs (Dunnett test, P0.05). In control group, SNR demonstrated no significant differences among different time points (ANOVA, P>0.05). Results of histological analysis confirmed homing of labeled BMSCs in liver, primarily distributing in areas around centrolobular vein. Conclusion: The BMSCs can be effectively labeled with Fe2O3-PLL. 1.5-T MR imaging can monitor in vivo of magnetically labeled BMSCs in liver after intrasplenic transplantation. It potentially opens a new area of investigation for delivering stem cells

  20. Tracking the elusive fibrocyte: identification and characterization of collagen-producing hematopoietic lineage cells during murine wound healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suga, Hirotaka; Rennert, Robert C; Rodrigues, Melanie; Sorkin, Michael; Glotzbach, Jason P; Januszyk, Michael; Fujiwara, Toshihiro; Longaker, Michael T; Gurtner, Geoffrey C

    2014-05-01

    Fibrocytes are a unique population of circulating cells reported to exhibit characteristics of both hematopoietic and mesenchymal cells, and play an important role in wound healing. However, putative fibrocytes have been found to lose expression of hematopoietic surface markers such as CD45 during differentiation, making it difficult to track these cells in vivo with conventional methodologies. In this study, to distinguish hematopoietic and nonhematopoietic cells without surface markers, we took advantage of the gene vav 1, which is expressed solely on hematopoietic cells but not on other cell types, and established a novel transgenic mouse, in which hematopoietic cells are irreversibly labeled with green fluorescent protein and nonhematopoietic cells with red fluorescent protein. Use of single-cell transcriptional analysis in this mouse model revealed two discrete types of collagen I (Col I) expressing cells of hematopoietic lineage recruited into excisional skin wounds. We confirmed this finding on a protein level, with one subset of these Col I synthesizing cells being CD45+ and CD11b+, consistent with the traditional definition of a fibrocyte, while another was CD45- and Cd11b-, representing a previously unidentified population. Both cell types were found to initially peak, then reduce posthealing, consistent with a disappearance from the wound site and not a loss of identifying surface marker expression. Taken together, we have unambiguously identified two cells of hematopoietic origin that are recruited to the wound site and deposit collagen, definitively confirming the existence and natural time course of fibrocytes in cutaneous healing. PMID:24446236

  1. [{sup 89}Zr]Oxinate{sub 4} for long-term in vivo cell tracking by positron emission tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Charoenphun, Putthiporn; Meszaros, Levente K.; Chuamsaamarkkee, Krisanat; Sharif-Paghaleh, Ehsan; Ballinger, James R.; Mullen, Gregory E.D. [St Thomas' Hospital, King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); Ferris, Trevor J.; Went, Michael J. [University of Kent, School of Physical Sciences, Canterbury (United Kingdom); Blower, Philip J. [St Thomas' Hospital, King' s College London, Division of Imaging Sciences and Biomedical Engineering, London (United Kingdom); King' s College London, Division of Chemistry, London (United Kingdom)

    2014-10-31

    {sup 111}In (typically as [{sup 111}In]oxinate{sub 3}) is a gold standard radiolabel for cell tracking in humans by scintigraphy. A long half-life positron-emitting radiolabel to serve the same purpose using positron emission tomography (PET) has long been sought. We aimed to develop an {sup 89}Zr PET tracer for cell labelling and compare it with [{sup 111}In]oxinate{sub 3} single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). [{sup 89}Zr]Oxinate{sub 4} was synthesised and its uptake and efflux were measured in vitro in three cell lines and in human leukocytes. The in vivo biodistribution of eGFP-5T33 murine myeloma cells labelled using [{sup 89}Zr]oxinate{sub 4} or [{sup 111}In]oxinate{sub 3} was monitored for up to 14 days. {sup 89}Zr retention by living radiolabelled eGFP-positive cells in vivo was monitored by FACS sorting of liver, spleen and bone marrow cells followed by gamma counting. Zr labelling was effective in all cell types with yields comparable with {sup 111}In labelling. Retention of {sup 89}Zr in cells in vitro after 24 h was significantly better (range 71 to >90 %) than {sup 111}In (43-52 %). eGFP-5T33 cells in vivo showed the same early biodistribution whether labelled with {sup 111}In or {sup 89}Zr (initial pulmonary accumulation followed by migration to liver, spleen and bone marrow), but later translocation of radioactivity to kidneys was much greater for {sup 111}In. In liver, spleen and bone marrow at least 92 % of {sup 89}Zr remained associated with eGFP-positive cells after 7 days in vivo. [{sup 89}Zr]Oxinate{sub 4} offers a potential solution to the emerging need for a long half-life PET tracer for cell tracking in vivo and deserves further evaluation of its effects on survival and behaviour of different cell types. (orig.)

  2. The clinical and mammographic features of plasma cell mastitis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To investigate the clinical and mammographic features of plasma cell mastitis. Methods: Twenty-five patients (28 lesions) with histologically confirmed plasma cell mastitis, aged from 26 to 70 years (mean age 41 years), were examined with X-ray mammography. The clinical manifestations and imaging features were retrospectively reviewed. Results: No case was in lactation. The painful irregular masses, ranged from 1.3 to 8cm in size, were found in 22 patients, while 3 patients with acute episode. Recurrent episodes of breast masses were noted in 4 patients. Based on the mammographic appearances, the plasma cell mastitis were classified as the following four types: inflammation-like type (2/28), ductal ectasia type (3/28), focal infiltration type (10/28) and nodular type (13/28). The valuable radiographic signs: (1) An asymmetrically increased density along the lactiferous duct with a flame-like appearance, inhomogeneous low density tubular structures and scattered stick-shape calcifications. (2) Architectural distortion and oil cysts formation in adjacent area, (3) Subareolar ductal ectasia. Conclusions: The clinical and mammographic characteristics of plasma cell mastitis are critical to avoiding unnecessary surgery. Histopathological result is needed for the diagnosis in patients highly suspected of malignancy. (authors)

  3. Tracking erythroid progenitor cells in times of need and times of plenty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koury, Mark J

    2016-08-01

    Red blood cell production rates increase rapidly following blood loss or hemolysis, but the expansion of erythropoiesis in these anemic states is tightly regulated such that rebound polycythemia does not occur. The erythroid cells that respond to erythropoietic stimulation or suppression are the progenitor stages of burst-forming units-erythroid (BFU-Es) and colony-forming units-erythroid (CFU-Es). Results from an early study of the changes in the size, location, and cell cycling status of BFU-E and CFU-E populations in mice under normal conditions, erythropoietic stimulation, and erythropoietic suppression are used as reference points to review subsequent developments related to erythroid progenitor populations and regulation of their size. The review concerns development of erythroid progenitor populations mainly in mice and humans, with a focus on the mechanisms related to the rapid but highly regulated expansion of erythropoiesis in spleens of erythropoietically stimulated mice. Current knowledge is used as a model of erythroid progenitor populations in mice under normal, erythropoietically suppressed, and erythropoietically stimulated conditions. Clinical applications of information learned from studies of erythropoietic expansion, in terms of current therapies for anemia, are reviewed. PMID:26646992

  4. Data assimilation for convective-cell tracking on meteorological image sequences

    OpenAIRE

    Thomas, Claire; Corpetti, Thomas; Memin, Etienne

    2010-01-01

    International audience This paper focuses on the tracking and analysis of convective cloud systems from Meteosat Second Generation images. The highly deformable nature of convective clouds, the complexity of the physical processes involved, and also the partially hidden measurements available from image data make difficult the direct use of conventional image-analysis techniques for tasks of detection, tracking, and characterization. In this paper, we face these issues using variational-da...

  5. Automated systems for the de-identification of longitudinal clinical narratives: Overview of 2014 i2b2/UTHealth shared task Track 1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Amber; Kotfila, Christopher; Uzuner, Özlem

    2015-12-01

    The 2014 i2b2/UTHealth Natural Language Processing (NLP) shared task featured four tracks. The first of these was the de-identification track focused on identifying protected health information (PHI) in longitudinal clinical narratives. The longitudinal nature of clinical narratives calls particular attention to details of information that, while benign on their own in separate records, can lead to identification of patients in combination in longitudinal records. Accordingly, the 2014 de-identification track addressed a broader set of entities and PHI than covered by the Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act - the focus of the de-identification shared task that was organized in 2006. Ten teams tackled the 2014 de-identification task and submitted 22 system outputs for evaluation. Each team was evaluated on their best performing system output. Three of the 10 systems achieved F1 scores over .90, and seven of the top 10 scored over .75. The most successful systems combined conditional random fields and hand-written rules. Our findings indicate that automated systems can be very effective for this task, but that de-identification is not yet a solved problem. PMID:26225918

  6. Induced pluripotent stem cells: from Nobel Prizes to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, S Tamir; Alexander, Graeme J M

    2013-03-01

    Advances in basic hepatology have been constrained for many years by the inability to culture primary hepatocytes in vitro, until just over five years ago when the scientific playing field was changed beyond recognition with the demonstration that human skin fibroblasts could be reprogrammed to resemble embryonic cells. The reprogrammed cells, known as induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs), were then shown to have the capacity to re-differentiate into almost any human cell type, including hepatocytes. The unlimited number and isogenic nature of the cells that can be generated from tiny fragments of tissue have massive implications for the study of human liver diseases in vitro. Of more immediate clinical importance were recent data demonstrating precision gene therapy on patient specific iPSCs, which opens up the real and exciting possibility of autologous hepatocyte transplantation as a substitute for allogeneic whole liver transplantation, which has been an effective approach to end-stage liver disease, but one that has now been outstripped by demand. In this review, we describe the historical development, current technology and potential clinical applications of induced pluripotency, concluding with a perspective on possible future directions in this dynamic field. PMID:23131523

  7. Circulating mesenchymal stem cells and their clinical implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Xu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Circulating mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs is a new cell source for tissue regeneration and tissue engineering. The characteristics of circulating MSCs are similar to those of bone marrow-derived MSCs (BM-MSCs, but they exist at a very low level in healthy individuals. It has been demonstrated that MSCs are able to migrate to the sites of injury and that they have some distinct genetic profiles compared to BM-MSCs. The current review summaries the basic knowledge of circulating MSCs and their potential clinical applications, such as mobilizing the BM-MSCs into circulation for therapy. The application of MSCs to cure a broad spectrum of diseases is promising, such as spinal cord injury, cardiovascular repair, bone and cartilage repair. The current review also discusses the issues of using of allogeneic MSCs for clinical therapy.

  8. Characteristics of liver cancer stem cells and clinical correlations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Zhuo; Li, Xiaofeng; Ding, Jin

    2016-09-01

    Liver cancer is an aggressive malignant disease with a poor prognosis. Patients with liver cancer are usually diagnosed at an advanced stage and thus miss the opportunity for surgical resection. Chemotherapy and radiofrequency ablation, which target tumor bulk, have exhibited limited therapeutic efficacy to date. Liver cancer stem cells (CSCs) are a small subset of undifferentiated cells existed in liver cancer, which are considered to be responsible for liver cancer initiation, metastasis, relapse and chemoresistance. Elucidating liver CSC characteristics and disclosing their regulatory mechanism might not only deepen our understanding of the pathogenesis of liver cancer but also facilitate the development of diagnostic, prognostic and therapeutic approaches to improve the clinical management of liver cancer. In this review, we will summarize the recent advances in liver CSC research in terms of the origin, identification, regulation and clinical correlation. PMID:26272183

  9. Impact of fMRI-guided advanced DTI fiber tracking techniques on their clinical applications in patients with brain tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    White matter tractography based on diffusion tensor imaging has become a well-accepted non-invasive tool for exploring the white matter architecture of the human brain in vivo. There exist two main key obstacles for reconstructing white matter fibers: firstly, the implementation and application of a suitable tracking algorithm, which is capable of reconstructing anatomically complex fascicular pathways correctly, as, e.g., areas of fiber crossing or branching; secondly, the definition of an appropriate tracking seed area for starting the reconstruction process. Large intersubject, anatomical variations make it difficult to define tracking seed areas based on reliable anatomical landmarks. An accurate definition of seed regions for the reconstruction of a specific neuronal pathway becomes even more challenging in patients suffering from space occupying pathological processes as, e.g., tumors due to the displacement of the tissue and the distortion of anatomical landmarks around the lesion. To resolve the first problem, an advanced tracking algorithm, called advanced fast marching, was applied in this study. The second challenge was overcome by combining functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) and diffusion tensor imaging (DTI) in order to perform fMRI-guided accurate definition of appropriate seed areas for the DTI fiber tracking. In addition, the performance of the tasks was controlled by a MR-compatible power device. Application of this combined approach to eight healthy volunteers and exemplary to three tumor patients showed that it is feasible to accurately reconstruct relevant fiber tracts belonging to a specific functional system. fMRI-guided advanced DTI fiber tracking has the potential to provide accurate anatomical and functional information for a more informed therapeutic decision making. (orig.)

  10. Clinical Relevance of Natural Killer Cells Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeanne M Palmer, Kamalakannan Rajasekaran, Monica S Thakar, Subramaniam Malarkannan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cells are one of the first cells to recover following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT, and are believed to play an important role in facilitating engraftment or preventing post-transplant infection and tumor recurrence. Recent studies have provided novel insights into the mechanisms by which NK cells mediate these highly clinically relevant immunological functions. In particular, the ability of NK cells to reduce the risk of graft versus host disease (GVHD and increase the graft versus leukemia effect (GVL in the setting of human leukocyte antigen (HLA-haploidentical HSCT highlights their clinical potentials. NK cells also mediate anti-viral protection, in particular against cytomegalovirus (CMV, an infection that causes significant morbidity and mortality following transplant. Another crucial function of NK cells is providing protection against bacterial infections at the mucosal barriers. NK cells achieve this by promoting anti-microbial defenses and regeneration of epithelial cells. These recent exciting findings provide a strong basis for the formulation of novel NK cell-based immunotherapies. In this review, we summarize the recent advances related to the mechanisms, functions, and future clinical prospects of NK cells that can impact post-transplant outcomes.

  11. Automated segmentation and tracking of coronary arteries in cardiac CT scans: comparison of performance with a clinically used commercial software

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chuan; Chan, Heang-Ping; Chughtai, Aamer; Patel, Smita; Hadjiiski, Lubomir M.; Sahiner, Berkman; Wei, Jun; Kazerooni, Ella A.

    2010-03-01

    Coronary CT angiography (cCTA) has been reported to be an effective means for diagnosis of coronary artery disease. We are investigating the feasibility of developing a computer-aided detection (CADe) system to assist radiologists in detection of non-calcified plaques in coronary arteries in ECG-gated cCTA scans. In this study, we developed a prototype vessel segmentation and tracking method to extract the coronary arterial trees which will define the search space for plaque detection. Vascular structures are first enhanced by 3D multi-scale filtering and analysis of the eigenvalues of Hessian matrices using a vessel enhancement response function specifically designed for coronary arteries. The enhanced vascular structures are then segmented by an EM estimation method. The segmented coronary arteries are tracked using a 3D dynamic balloon tracking (DBT) method. For this preliminary study, two starting seed points were manually identified at the origins of the left and right coronary artery (LCA and RCA). The DBT method automatically moves a sphere along the vessel whose diameter is adjusted dynamically based on the local vessel size, tracks the vessels, and identifies its branches to generate the left and right coronary arterial trees. The algorithm was applied to 20 cCTA scans that contained various degrees of coronary artery diseases. To evaluate the performance of vessel segmentation and tracking, the rendered volume of coronary arteries tracked by our algorithm was displayed on a PC, placed next to a GE Advantage workstation on which the coronary arterial trees tracked by the GE software and the original cCTA scan were displayed. Two experienced thoracic radiologists visually examined the coronary arteries on the cCTA scan and the segmented vessels to count untracked false-negative (FN) segments and false positives (FPs). The comparison was made by radiologists' visual judgment because the digital files for the segmented vessels were not accessible on the

  12. In vivo tracking of genetically engineered, anti-HER2/neu directed natural killer cells to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance imaging

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [UCSF Medical Center, Department of Radiology, San Francisco, CA (United States); Meier, Reinhardt; Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Technical University Munich, Department of Radiology, Munich (Germany); Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen [Technical University Munich, Institute of Pathology, Division of Neuropathology, Munich (Germany); Piert, Morand [Technical University Munich, Department of Nuclear Medicine, Munich (Germany); Uherek, Christoph; Wels, Winfried [University of Frankfurt, Georg Speyer House, Frankfurt (Germany)

    2005-01-01

    labeled with clinically applicable iron-oxide contrast agents, and the accumulation of these labeled cells in murine tumors can be monitored in vivo with MR imaging. This MR cell tracking technique may be applied to monitor NK-cell based immunotherapies in patients in order to assess the presence and extent of NK-cell tumor accumulations and, thus, to determine therapy response early and non-invasively. (orig.)

  13. In vivo tracking of genetically engineered, anti-HER2/neu directed natural killer cells to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study is to optimize labeling of the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with iron-oxide-based contrast agents and to monitor the in vivo distribution of genetically engineered NK-92 cells, which are directed against HER2/neu receptors, to HER2/neu positive mammary tumors with magnetic resonance (MR) imaging. Parental NK-92 cells and genetically modified HER2/neu specific NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, expressing a chimeric antigen receptor specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen, were labeled with ferumoxides and ferucarbotran using simple incubation, lipofection and electroporation techniques. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by MR imaging, Prussian blue stains and spectrometry. Subsequently, ferucarbotran-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta (n=3) or parental NK-92 cells were intravenously injected into the tail vein of six mice with HER2/neu-positive NIH 3T3 mammary tumors, implanted in the mammary fat pad. The accumulation of the cells in the tumors was monitored by MR imaging before and 12 and 24 h after cell injection (p.i.). MR data were correlated with histopathology. Both the parental NK-92 and the genetically modified NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be labeled with ferucarbotran and ferumoxides by lipofection and electroporation, but not by simple incubation. The intracellular cytoplasmatic iron-oxide uptake was significantly higher after labeling with ferucarbotran than ferumoxides (P6 NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, MR showed a progressive signal decline in HER2/neu-positive mammary tumors at 12 and 24 h (p.i.). Conversely, injection of 5 x 106 parental NK-92 control cells, not directed against HER2/neu receptors, did not cause significant signal intensity changes of the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the former, but not the latter cells in tumor tissue. The human natural killer cell line NK-92 can be efficiently labeled with clinically applicable iron-oxide contrast agents

  14. Clinical characteristics and survival of children with Langerhans cell hystiocytosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Krstovski Nada

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available INTRODUCTION Langerhans cell histiocytosis is a rare disease in children, initial presentation is variable, clinical course, prognosis and survival are mostly unpredictable. OBJECTIVE To summarise clinical characteristics and treatment results in children with Langerhans cell histiocytosis. METHOD Retrospectively there were analyzed patients with LCH diagnosed and treated at Hematology Department of University Children's Hospital in Belgrade from 1990 to 2006. Clinical presentation, therapy and survival according to Kaplan-Meier's statistical test was analysed. RESULTS 30 patients were treated, aged from 4 months to 14 years, mean 3.9 years, median 2.3 years, 18 (60% males, 12 (40% females. A single system disease was diagnosed in 16 (53% patients, of whom 6 patients with multifocal bone disease. All patients were in complete remission averagely following162 and 82 months respectively. Multisystem disease was found in 14 (47% patients. The lymph nodes and skin were more frequently involved organs than the central nervous system (diabetes insipidus, lung, liver and spleen. The number of involved organs ranged from 2 to 8, mean 4.2. Four patients died due to disease progression 3, 16, 36 and 66 months after diagnosis. Nine patents with multisystem disease were in remission with 117 months of follow-up. One patient was lost on follow-up. CONCLUSION The clinical course of patients with a single system disease is usually benign while a multisystem disease has to be aggressively treated with precise initial evaluation and staging before therapy.

  15. High-resolution live-cell imaging and time-lapse microscopy of invadopodium dynamics and tracking analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Ved P; Entenberg, David; Condeelis, John

    2013-01-01

    Invadopodia are specialized structures of cancer cells which aid in cancer cell invasion and metastasis. Therefore, studying the early steps of invadopodium assembly and its life cycle at the subcellular level by using high spatiotemporal resolution imaging provides an opportunity for understanding the signaling mechanisms involved in this very important process. In this chapter, we describe the design of a custom-built high-resolution fluorescence microscope which makes this challenging imaging possible. We also describe an ImageJ plugin that we have developed for tracking of invadopodia and lifetime analysis. PMID:23868599

  16. Generation of immunogenic and tolerogenic clinical-grade dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantari, Tahereh; Kamali-Sarvestani, Eskandar; Ciric, Bogoljub; Karimi, Mohamad H; Kalantari, Mohsen; Faridar, Alireza; Xu, Hui; Rostami, Abdolmohamad

    2011-12-01

    Immunotherapy with dendritic cells (DCs), which have been manipulated ex vivo to become immunogenic or tolerogenic, has been tested in clinical trials for disease therapy. DCs are sentinels of the immune system, which after exposure to antigenic or inflammatory signals and crosstalk with effector CD4(+) T cells express high levels of costimulatory molecules and cytokines. Upregulation of either costimulatory molecules or cytokines promotes immunologic DCs, whereas their downregulation generates tolerogenic DCs (TDCs), which induce T regulatory cells (Tregs) and a state of tolerance. Immunogenic DCs are used for the therapy of infectious diseases such as HIV-1 and cancer, whereas tolerogenic DCs are used in treating various autoimmune diseases and in transplantation. DC vaccination is still at an early stage, and improvements are mainly needed in quality control of monitoring assays to generate clinical-grade DC products and to assess the effect of DC vaccination in future clinical trials. Here, we review the recent work in DC generation and monitoring approaches for DC-based trials with immunogenic or tolerogenic DCs. PMID:22105838

  17. Regulations and guidelines governing stem cell based products: Clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bobby George

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of stem cells as medicines is a promising and upcoming area of research as they may be able to help the body to regenerate damaged or lost tissue in a host of diseases like Parkinson′s, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, liver disease, spinal cord damage, cancer and many more. Translating basic stem cell research into routine therapies is a complex multi-step process which entails the challenge related to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks while complying with the existing regulations and guidelines. While in the United States (US and European Union (EU regulations are in place, in India, we do not have a well-defined regulatory framework for "stem cell based products (SCBP". There are several areas that need to be addressed as it is quite different from that of pharmaceuticals. These range from establishing batch consistency, product stability to product safety and efficacy through pre-clinical, clinical studies and marketing authorization. This review summarizes the existing regulations/guidelines in US, EU, India, and the associated challenges in developing SCBP with emphasis on clinical aspects.

  18. Juvenile granulosa cell tumour: a rare clinical entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaliki Hymavathi Reddy

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Ovarian cancer is the third most common neoplasm of the female genital tract. Based on the cell type of origin, primary ovarian malignancies are classified into surface epithelium, germ cell, and sex cord tumors. Sex cord tumors account for 1% to 2% of ovarian malignancies. They may contain granulosa cells, theca cells, sertoli cells, or fibroblasts of gonadal stromal origin. Granulosa Cell Tumours (GCTs account for approximately 2-5% of all ovarian tumors and can be divided into adult (95% and juvenile (5% types based on histologic findings. GCTs secrete estrogen thus resulting in menstrual irregularities in the affected individual. More serious estrogen effects can occur in various end organs such as uterus resulting in endometrial hyperplasia, endometrial adenocarcinomas and increased risk of breast cancers. Androgen production is also reported but rare and produces virilization in the affected women. Juvenile Granulosa Cell Tumours (JGCTs are clinically and histopathologically distinct from the GCTs. They are rarely encountered but mostly in youngsters. Surgery is the primary modality of treatment with chemotherapy being reserved for advanced or recurrent disease states. We herewith report an interesting case of JGCT in a young teenage girl. [Int J Reprod Contracept Obstet Gynecol 2014; 3(4.000: 1150-1154

  19. Clinical applications of circulating tumor cells in lung cancer patients by CellSearch system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AnnaTruini

    2014-09-01

    In the present review the significance of CTC detection in lung cancer is examined through the analysis of the published studies in both non-small cell and small cell lung cancers; additionally the prognostic and the clinical role of CTC enumeration in treatment monitoring will be reported and discussed.

  20. Clinical Significance of Langerhans Cells in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esteban, Francisco; Ruiz-Cabello, Francisco; Gonzalez-Moles, Miguel Angel; Lopez-Gonzalez, Miguel Angel; Funez, Rafael; Redondo, Maximino

    2012-01-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) may be involved in the immunosurveillance against tumors as antigen-presenting cells. Our objective has been to determine the relevance of LC in progression of larynx squamous cell carcinomas and their relationship with different subpopulations of tumor-infiltrating cells. LCs were investigated by immunohistochemical methods using anti-CD1 antibody. LCs were detected in most of the primary tumors studied (44 out of 50) and also in metastases (6 out of 10) and recurrences (2 out of 3), but we did not find any statistical association between number of LCs and clinical-pathological parameters or survival. However, the number of LCs was increased in patients with evident infiltration of lymphocytes, mainly cytotoxic T cells. We can conclude that although LCs did not show clinical utility as prognostic marker, they may play a role in releasing an active immune response in larynx carcinomas, according to their ability to present antigens to sensitized T cells. PMID:22481933

  1. Clinical Significance of Langerhans Cells in Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Larynx

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Esteban

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Langerhans cells (LCs may be involved in the immunosurveillance against tumors as antigen-presenting cells. Our objective has been to determine the relevance of LC in progression of larynx squamous cell carcinomas and their relationship with different subpopulations of tumor-infiltrating cells. LCs were investigated by immunohistochemical methods using anti-CD1 antibody. LCs were detected in most of the primary tumors studied (44 out of 50 and also in metastases (6 out of 10 and recurrences (2 out of 3, but we did not find any statistical association between number of LCs and clinical-pathological parameters or survival. However, the number of LCs was increased in patients with evident infiltration of lymphocytes, mainly cytotoxic T cells. We can conclude that although LCs did not show clinical utility as prognostic marker, they may play a role in releasing an active immune response in larynx carcinomas, according to their ability to present antigens to sensitized T cells.

  2. Translating Research into Clinical Scale Manufacturing of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen Bieback

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available It sounds simple to obtain sufficient numbers of cells derived from fetal or adult human tissues, isolate and/or expand the stem cells, and then transplant an appropriate number of these cells into the patient at the correct location. However, translating basic research into routine therapies is a complex multistep process which necessitates product regulation. The challenge relates to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks and to balance the fast move to clinical trials with time-consuming cautious risk assessment. This paper will focus on the definition of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs, and challenges and achievements in the manufacturing process enabling their use in clinical studies. It will allude to different cellular sources, special capacities of MSCs, but also to current regulations, with a special focus on accessory material of human or animal origin, like media supplements. As cellular integrity and purity, formulation and lot release testing of the final product, validation of all procedures, and quality assurance are of utmost necessity, these topics will be addressed.

  3. Slab track

    OpenAIRE

    Golob, Tina

    2014-01-01

    The last 160 years has been mostly used conventional track with ballasted bed, sleepers and steel rail. Ensuring the high speed rail traffic, increasing railway track capacities, providing comfortable and safe ride as well as high reliability and availability railway track, has led to development of innovative systems for railway track. The so-called slab track was first built in 1972 and since then, they have developed many different slab track systems around the world. Slab track was also b...

  4. Pre-Clinical Cell-Based Therapy for Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sehic, Amer; Utheim, Øygunn Aass; Ommundsen, Kristoffer; Utheim, Tor Paaske

    2015-01-01

    The cornea is essential for normal vision by maintaining transparency for light transmission. Limbal stem cells, which reside in the corneal periphery, contribute to the homeostasis of the corneal epithelium. Any damage or disease affecting the function of these cells may result in limbal stem cell deficiency (LSCD). The condition may result in both severe pain and blindness. Transplantation of ex vivo cultured cells onto the cornea is most often an effective therapeutic strategy for LSCD. The use of ex vivo cultured limbal epithelial cells (LEC), oral mucosal epithelial cells, and conjunctival epithelial cells to treat LSCD has been explored in humans. The present review focuses on the current state of knowledge of the many other cell-based therapies of LSCD that have so far exclusively been explored in animal models as there is currently no consensus on the best cell type for treating LSCD. Major findings of all these studies with special emphasis on substrates for culture and transplantation are systematically presented and discussed. Among the many potential cell types that still have not been used clinically, we conclude that two easily accessible autologous sources, epidermal stem cells and hair follicle-derived stem cells, are particularly strong candidates for future clinical trials. PMID:26343740

  5. In Vivo Tracking of Murine Adipose Tissue-Derived Multipotent Adult Stem Cells and Ex Vivo Cross-Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chiara Garrovo

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are characterized by the ability to renew themselves and to differentiate into specialized cell types, while stem cell therapy is believed to treat a number of different human diseases through either cell regeneration or paracrine effects. Herein, an in vivo and ex vivo near infrared time domain (NIR TD optical imaging study was undertaken to evaluate the migratory ability of murine adipose tissue-derived multipotent adult stem cells [mAT-MASC] after intramuscular injection in mice. In vivo NIR TD optical imaging data analysis showed a migration of DiD-labelled mAT-MASC in the leg opposite the injection site, which was confirmed by a fibered confocal microendoscopy system. Ex vivo NIR TD optical imaging results showed a systemic distribution of labelled cells. Considering a potential microenvironmental contamination, a cross-validation study by multimodality approaches was followed: mAT-MASC were isolated from male mice expressing constitutively eGFP, which was detectable using techniques of immunofluorescence and qPCR. Y-chromosome positive cells, injected into wild-type female recipients, were detected by FISH. Cross-validation confirmed the data obtained by in vivo/ex vivo TD optical imaging analysis. In summary, our data demonstrates the usefulness of NIR TD optical imaging in tracking delivered cells, giving insights into the migratory properties of the injected cells.

  6. Evaluation of gold nanotracers to track adipose-derived stem cells in a PEGylated fibrin gel for dermal tissue engineering applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chung E

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eunna Chung,1 Seung Yun Nam,1,2 Laura M Ricles,1 Stanislav Y Emelianov,1,2 Laura J Suggs11Department of Biomedical Engineering, 2Department of Electrical and Computer Engineering, The University of Texas at Austin, Austin, TX, USAAbstract: Evaluating the regenerative capacity of a tissue-engineered device in a noninvasive and synchronous manner is critical to determining the mechanisms for success in clinical applications. In particular, directly tracking implanted cells in a three-dimensional (3D scaffold is desirable in that it enables the monitoring of cellular activity in a specific and localized manner. The authors' group has previously demonstrated that the PEGylation of fibrin results in a 3D scaffold that supports morphologic and phenotypic changes in mesenchymal stem cells that may be advantageous in wound healing applications. Recently, the authors have evaluated adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs as a mesenchymal cell source to regenerate skin and blood vessels due to their potential for proliferation, differentiation, and production of growth factors. However, tracking and monitoring ASCs in a 3D scaffold, such as a PEGylated fibrin gel, have not yet been fully investigated. In the current paper, nanoscale gold spheres (20 nm as cell tracers for ASCs cultured in a PEGylated fibrin gel were evaluated. An advanced dual-imaging modality combining ultrasound and photoacoustic imaging was utilized to monitor rat ASCs over time. The ASCs took up gold nanotracers and could be detected up to day 16 with high sensitivity using photoacoustic imaging. There were no detrimental effects on ASC morphology, network formation, proliferation, and protein expression/secretion (ie, smooth muscle α-actin, vascular endothelial growth factor, matrix metalloproteinase-2, and matrix metalloproteinase-9 associated with gold nanotracers. Therefore, utilization of gold nanotracers can be an effective strategy to monitor the regenerative process of a stem cell

  7. In vivo near-infrared imaging for the tracking of systemically delivered mesenchymal stem cells: tropism for brain tumors and biodistribution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim SM

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Seong Muk Kim,1 Chang Hyun Jeong,2 Ji Sun Woo,2 Chung Heon Ryu,1 Jeong-Hwa Lee,3 Sin-Soo Jeun1,21Postech-Catholic Biomedical Engineering Institute, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; 2Department of Neurosurgery, Seoul St Mary’s Hospital, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, South Korea; 3Department of Biochemistry, College of Medicine, The Catholic University of Korea, Seoul, KoreaAbstract: Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based gene therapy is a promising tool for the treatment of various neurological diseases, including brain tumors. However, the tracking of in vivo stem cell migration, distribution, and survival need to be defined for their clinical application. The systemic routes of stem cell delivery must be determined because direct intracerebral injection as a cure for brain tumors is an invasive method. In this study, we show for the first time that near-infrared (NIR imaging can reveal the distribution and tumor tropism of intravenously injected MSCs in an intracranial xenograft glioma model. MSCs were labeled with NIR fluorescent nanoparticles, and the effects of the NIR dye on cell proliferation and migratory capacity were evaluated in vitro. We investigated the tumor-targeting properties and tissue distribution of labeled MSCs introduced by intravenous injection and followed by in vivo imaging analysis, histological analysis, and real-time quantitative polymerase chain reaction. We observed no cytotoxicity or change in the overall growth rate and characteristics of labeled MSCs compared with control MSCs. NIR fluorescent imaging showed the organ distribution and targeted tumor tropism of systemically injected human MSCs. A significant number of MSCs accumulated specifically at the tumor site in the mouse brain. These results suggest that NIR-based cell tracking is a potentially useful imaging technique to visualize cell survival, migration, and distribution for the application of MSC

  8. Advances in clinical NK cell studies: Donor selection, manufacturing and quality control

    OpenAIRE

    Koehl, U; Kalberer, C.; Spanholtz, J.; Lee, D.A.; Miller, J. S.; Cooley, S.; Lowdell, M.; Uharek, L.; Klingemann, H.; Curti, A.; Leung, W; Alici, E.

    2015-01-01

    ABSTRACT Natural killer (NK) cells are increasingly used in clinical studies in order to treat patients with various malignancies. The following review summarizes platform lectures and 2013–2015 consortium meetings on manufacturing and clinical use of NK cells in Europe and United States. A broad overview of recent pre-clinical and clinical results in NK cell therapies is provided based on unstimulated, cytokine-activated, as well as genetically engineered NK cells using chimeric antigen rece...

  9. 75 FR 54351 - Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations; Public Workshop

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-09-07

    ... HUMAN SERVICES Food and Drug Administration Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric... public workshop entitled ``Cell and Gene Therapy Clinical Trials in Pediatric Populations.'' The purpose... therapy clinical researchers, and other stakeholders regarding best practices related to cell and...

  10. Islet and stem cell encapsulation for clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Rahul; Alexander, Michael; Robles, Lourdes; Foster, Clarence E; Lakey, Jonathan R T

    2014-01-01

    Over the last decade, improvements in islet isolation techniques have made islet transplantation an option for a certain subset of patients with long-standing diabetes. Although islet transplants have shown improved graft function, adequate function beyond the second year has not yet been demonstrated, and patients still require immunosuppression to prevent rejection. Since allogeneic islet transplants have experienced some success, the next step is to improve graft function while eliminating the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Biomaterial encapsulation offers a strategy to avoid the need for toxic immunosuppression while increasing the chances of graft function and survival. Encapsulation entails coating cells or tissue in a semipermeable biocompatible material that allows for the passage of nutrients, oxygen, and hormones while blocking immune cells and regulatory substances from recognizing and destroying the cell, thus avoiding the need for systemic immunosuppressive therapy. Despite advances in encapsulation technology, these developments have not yet been meaningfully translated into clinical islet transplantation, for which several factors are to blame, including graft hypoxia, host inflammatory response, fibrosis, improper choice of biomaterial type, lack of standard guidelines, and post-transplantation device failure. Several new approaches, such as the use of porcine islets, stem cells, development of prevascularized implants, islet nanocoating, and multilayer encapsulation, continue to generate intense scientific interest in this rapidly expanding field. This review provides a comprehensive update on islet and stem cell encapsulation as a treatment modality in type 1 diabetes, including a historical outlook as well as current and future research avenues. PMID:25148368

  11. Clinical Applications of Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Chronic Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrea Farini

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Extraordinary progress in understanding several key features of stem cells has been made in the last ten years, including definition of the niche, and identification of signals regulating mobilization and homing as well as partial understanding of the mechanisms controlling self-renewal, commitment, and differentiation. This progress produced invaluable tools for the development of rational cell therapy protocols that have yielded positive results in preclinical models of genetic and acquired diseases and, in several cases, have entered clinical experimentation with positive outcome. Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are nonhematopoietic cells with multilineage potential to differentiate into various tissues of mesodermal origin. They can be isolated from bone marrow and other tissues and have the capacity to extensively proliferate in vitro. Moreover, MSCs have also been shown to produce anti-inflammatory molecules which can modulate humoral and cellular immune responses. Considering their regenerative potential and immunoregulatory effect, MSC therapy is a promising tool in the treatment of degenerative, inflammatory, and autoimmune diseases. It is obvious that much work remains to be done to increase our knowledge of the mechanisms regulating development, homeostasis, and tissue repair and thus to provide new tools to implement the efficacy of cell therapy trials.

  12. Comparative study of clinical grade human tolerogenic dendritic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martínez-Cáceres E

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The use of tolerogenic DCs is a promising therapeutic strategy for transplantation and autoimmune disorders. Immunomodulatory DCs are primarily generated from monocytes (MDDCs for in vitro experiments following protocols that fail to fulfil the strict regulatory rules of clinically applicable products. Here, we compared the efficacy of three different tolerance-inducing agents, dexamethasone, rapamycin and vitamin D3, on DC biology using GMP (Good Manufacturing Practice or clinical grade reagents with the aim of defining their use for human cell therapy. Methods Tolerogenic MDDCs were generated by adding tolerogenic agents prior to the induction of maturation using TNF-α, IL-β and PGE2. We evaluated the effects of each agent on viability, efficiency of differentiation, phenotype, cytokine secretion and stability, the stimulatory capacity of tol-DCs and the T-cell profiles induced. Results Differences relevant to therapeutic applicability were observed with the cellular products that were obtained. VitD3-induced tol-DCs exhibited a slightly reduced viability and yield compared to Dexa-and Rapa-tol-DCs. Phenotypically, while Dexa-and VitD3-tol-DCs were similar to immature DCs, Rapa-tol-DCs were not distinguishable from mature DCs. In addition, only Dexa-and moderately VitD3-tol-DCs exhibited IL-10 production. Interestingly, in all cases, the cytokine secretion profiles of tol-DCs were not modified by a subsequent TLR stimulation with LPS, indicating that all products had stable phenotypes. Functionally, clearly reduced alloantigen T cell proliferation was induced by tol-DCs obtained using any of these agent. Also, total interferon-gamma (IFN-γ secretion by T cells stimulated with allogeneic tol-DCs was reduced in all three cases, but only T cells co-cultured with Rapa-tol-DCs showed impaired intracellular IFN-γ production. In addition, Rapa-DCs promoted CD4+ CD127 low/negative CD25high and Foxp3+ T cells. Conclusions Our

  13. Iron labeling and pre-clinical MRI visualization of therapeutic human neural stem cells in a murine glioma model.

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    Mya S Thu

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Treatment strategies for the highly invasive brain tumor, glioblastoma multiforme, require that cells which have invaded into the surrounding brain be specifically targeted. The inherent tumor-tropism of neural stem cells (NSCs to primary and invasive tumor foci can be exploited to deliver therapeutics to invasive brain tumor cells in humans. Use of the strategy of converting prodrug to drug via therapeutic transgenes delivered by immortalized therapeutic NSC lines have shown efficacy in animal models. Thus therapeutic NSCs are being proposed for use in human brain tumor clinical trials. In the context of NSC-based therapies, MRI can be used both to non-invasively follow dynamic spatio-temporal patterns of the NSC tumor targeting allowing for the optimization of treatment strategies and to assess efficacy of the therapy. Iron-labeling of cells allows their presence to be visualized and tracked by MRI. Thus we aimed to iron-label therapeutic NSCs without affecting their cellular physiology using a method likely to gain United States Federal Drug Administration (FDA approval. METHODOLOGY: For human use, the characteristics of therapeutic Neural Stem Cells must be clearly defined with any pertubation to the cell including iron labeling requiring reanalysis of cellular physiology. Here, we studied the effect of iron-loading of the therapeutic NSCs, with ferumoxide-protamine sulfate complex (FE-Pro on viability, proliferation, migratory properties and transgene expression, when compared to non-labeled cells. FE-Pro labeled NSCs were imaged by MRI at tumor sites, after intracranial administration into the hemisphere contralateral to the tumor, in an orthotopic human glioma xenograft mouse model. CONCLUSION: FE-Pro labeled NSCs retain their proliferative status, tumor tropism, and maintain stem cell character, while allowing in vivo cellular MRI tracking at 7 Tesla, to monitor their real-time migration and distribution at brain tumor sites

  14. MRI tracking of SPIO labelled stem cells in a true regenerative environment, the regenerating limb of the axolotl

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lauridsen, Henrik; Foldager, Casper Bindzus; Hagensen, Mette;

    Introduction: Regeneration is a widespread phenomenon functioning to maintain and restore normal form and function of cells, tissues, and in some cases organs or appendages. While mammals like mice and rats are typically employed as experimental models in regenerative research, these animals are...... generally restricted by their limited regenerative potential. Conversely, excellent animal models for regenerative studies exist in lower vertebrates such as the urodele amphibians (salamanders and newts), exemplified in the iconic Mexican axolotl (Ambystoma mexicanum) capable of regenerating whole limbs...... regenerating axolotl limb model. Superparamagnetic iron oxide particles (SPIOs) sensitive to MRI were used to track cells, and cell viability and regenerative capacity was investigated. Materials and Methods: Limb regeneration was induced by amputation of one hind limb of anaesthetised axolotls. The potential...

  15. History of Neural Stem Cell Research and Its Clinical Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Yasushi

    2016-03-15

    "Once development was ended…in the adult centers, the nerve paths are something fixed and immutable. Everything may die, nothing may be regenerated," wrote Santiago Ramón y Cajal, a Spanish neuroanatomist and Nobel Prize winner and the father of modern neuroscience. This statement was the central dogma in neuroscience for a long time. However, in the 1960s, neural stem cells (NSCs) were discovered. Since then, our knowledge about NSCs has continued to grow. This review focuses on our current knowledge about NSCs and their surrounding microenvironment. In addition, the clinical application of NSCs for the treatment of various central nervous system diseases is also summarized. PMID:26888043

  16. Simulation of DNA Damage in Human Cells from Space Radiation Using a Physical Model of Stochastic Particle Tracks and Chromosomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; Hada, Megumi; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2015-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a recently developed model, in which chromosomes simulated by NASARTI (NASA Radiation Tracks Image) is combined with nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) in a voxelized space. The model produces the number of DSBs, as a function of dose for high-energy iron, oxygen, and carbon ions, and He ions. The combined model calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The merged computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The merged model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation.

  17. Design of Quantum Dot-Conjugated Lipids for Long-Term, High-Speed Tracking Experiments on Cell Surfaces

    OpenAIRE

    Murcia, Michael J.; Minner, Daniel. E.; Mustata, Gina-Mirela; Ritchie, Kenneth; Naumann, Christoph A.

    2008-01-01

    The current study reports the facile design of quantum dot (QD)-conjugated lipids and their application to high-speed tracking experiments on cell surfaces. CdSe/ZnS core/shell QDs with two types of hydrophilic coatings, 2-(2-aminoethoxy)ethanol (AEE-coating) and a 60:40 molar mixture of 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphocholine and 1,2-dipalmitoyl-sn-glycero-3-phosphoethanolamine-N-[methoxy(polyethyleneglycol-2000] (LIPO-coating), are conjugated to sulfhydryl lipids via maleimide reactive ...

  18. Infrared fluorescent protein 1.4 genetic labeling tracks engrafted cardiac progenitor cells in mouse ischemic hearts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lijuan Chen

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapy has a potential for regenerating damaged myocardium. However, a key obstacle to cell therapy's success is the loss of engrafted cells due to apoptosis or necrosis in the ischemic myocardium. While many strategies have been developed to improve engrafted cell survival, tools to evaluate cell efficacy within the body are limited. Traditional genetic labeling tools, such as GFP-like fluorescent proteins (eGFP, DsRed, mCherry, have limited penetration depths in vivo due to tissue scattering and absorption. To circumvent these limitations, a near-infrared fluorescent mutant of the DrBphP bacteriophytochrome from Deinococcus radiodurans, IFP1.4, was developed for in vivo imaging, but it has yet to be used for in vivo stem/progenitor cell tracking. In this study, we incorporated IFP1.4 into mouse cardiac progenitor cells (CPCs by a lentiviral vector. Live IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were imaged by their near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF using an Odyssey scanner following overnight incubation with biliverdin. A significant linear correlation was observed between the amount of cells and NIRF signal intensity in in vitro studies. Lentiviral mediated IFP1.4 gene labeling is stable, and does not impact the apoptosis and cardiac differentiation of CPC. To assess efficacy of our model for engrafted cells in vivo, IFP1.4-labeled CPCs were intramyocardially injected into infarcted hearts. NIRF signals were collected at 1-day, 7-days, and 14-days post-injection using the Kodak in vivo multispectral imaging system. Strong NIRF signals from engrafted cells were imaged 1 day after injection. At 1 week after injection, 70% of the NIRF signal was lost when compared to the intensity of the day 1 signal. The data collected 2 weeks following transplantation showed an 88% decrease when compared to day 1. Our studies have shown that IFP1.4 gene labeling can be used to track the viability of transplanted cells in vivo.

  19. Progress and challenges with clinical cell therapy in neurorestoratology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang H

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Hongyun Huang,1–3 Gengsheng Mao,1 Lin Chen,4,5 Aibing Liu11General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces,2Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, 3Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 4Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, 5Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Cell therapies in the treatment of central nervous system disease and injury, such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, sequelae of stroke, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, and cerebral palsy, have been studied in the clinic for the last 10–20 years. Excitingly, many studies have demonstrated that most patients appear to have some functional improvement following administration of different types of cells by different routes with relatively low risk and good tolerability. However, there are some misconceptions that hinder the development of cell-based neurorestorative strategies. It is a considerable challenge but also an opportunity for physicians in neurorestoratology to face these issues. This review briefly outlines the progress made in neurorestoratology, discusses the relevant issues, and attempts to correct the misconceptions.Keywords: neurorestorative strategies, cell therapy, progress, challenges, neurorestoratology

  20. Cell tracking with gadophrin-2: a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, optical imaging, and fluorescence microscopy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of use of gadophrin-2 to trace intravenously injected human hematopoietic cells in athymic mice, employing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (OI), and fluorescence microscopy. Mononuclear peripheral blood cells from GCSF-primed patients were labeled with gadophrin-2 (Schering AG, Berlin, Germany), a paramagnetic and fluorescent metalloporphyrin, using established transfection techniques with cationic liposomes. The labeled cells were evaluated in vitro with electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Then, 1 x 106-3 x 108 labeled cells were injected into 14 nude Balb/c mice and the in vivo cell distribution was evaluated with MR imaging and OI before and 4, 24, and 48 h after intravenous injection (p.i.). Five additional mice served as controls: three mice were untreated controls and two mice were investigated after injection of unlabeled cells. The contrast agent effect was determined quantitatively for MR imaging by calculating signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) data. After completion of in vivo imaging studies, fluorescence microscopy of excised organs was performed. Intracellular cytoplasmatic uptake of gadophrin-2 was confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectrometry determined an uptake of 31.56 nmol Gd per 106 cells. After intravenous injection, the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells in nude mice could be visualized by MR, OI, and fluorescence microscopy. At 4 h p.i., the transplanted cells mainly distributed to lung, liver, and spleen, and 24 h p.i. they also distributed to the bone marrow. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells to these target organs. Gadophrin-2 is suited as a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, OI, and fluorescence microscopy and may be used to combine the advantages of each individual imaging modality for in vivo tracking of intravenously injected hematopoietic cells. (orig.)

  1. Cell tracking with gadophrin-2: a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, optical imaging, and fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Daldrup-Link, Heike E. [Department of Radiology, UCSF Medical Center, University of California in San Francisco, 513 Parnassus Ave, CA 94143, San Francisco (United States); Rudelius, Martina; Piontek, Guido; Schlegel, Juergen [Institute of Pathology, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Metz, Stephan; Settles, Marcus; Rummeny, Ernst J. [Department of Radiology, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Pichler, Bernd [Department of Biomedical Engineering, University of California Davis, Davis (United States); Heinzmann, Ulrich [National Research Center for Environment and Health, Technical University, Munich (Germany); Oostendorp, Robert A.J. [3. Clinic of Internal Medicine, Laboratory of Stem Cell Physiology, Technical University, Munich (Germany)

    2004-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to assess the feasibility of use of gadophrin-2 to trace intravenously injected human hematopoietic cells in athymic mice, employing magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, optical imaging (OI), and fluorescence microscopy. Mononuclear peripheral blood cells from GCSF-primed patients were labeled with gadophrin-2 (Schering AG, Berlin, Germany), a paramagnetic and fluorescent metalloporphyrin, using established transfection techniques with cationic liposomes. The labeled cells were evaluated in vitro with electron microscopy and inductively coupled plasma atomic emission spectrometry. Then, 1 x 10{sup 6}-3 x 10{sup 8} labeled cells were injected into 14 nude Balb/c mice and the in vivo cell distribution was evaluated with MR imaging and OI before and 4, 24, and 48 h after intravenous injection (p.i.). Five additional mice served as controls: three mice were untreated controls and two mice were investigated after injection of unlabeled cells. The contrast agent effect was determined quantitatively for MR imaging by calculating signal-to-noise-ratio (SNR) data. After completion of in vivo imaging studies, fluorescence microscopy of excised organs was performed. Intracellular cytoplasmatic uptake of gadophrin-2 was confirmed by electron microscopy. Spectrometry determined an uptake of 31.56 nmol Gd per 10{sup 6} cells. After intravenous injection, the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells in nude mice could be visualized by MR, OI, and fluorescence microscopy. At 4 h p.i., the transplanted cells mainly distributed to lung, liver, and spleen, and 24 h p.i. they also distributed to the bone marrow. Fluorescence microscopy confirmed the distribution of gadophrin-2 labeled cells to these target organs. Gadophrin-2 is suited as a bifunctional contrast agent for MR imaging, OI, and fluorescence microscopy and may be used to combine the advantages of each individual imaging modality for in vivo tracking of intravenously injected hematopoietic cells

  2. Comparison of different culture conditions for human mesenchymal stromal cells for clinical stem cell therapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haack-Sorensen, M.; Friis, T.; Bindslev, L.;

    2008-01-01

    used for MSC cultivation in animal studies simulating clinical stem cell therapy. MATERIAL AND METHODS: Human mononuclear cells (MNCs) were isolated from BM aspirates by density gradient centrifugation and cultivated in a GMP-accepted medium (EMEA medium) or in one of four other media. RESULTS: FACS...... compliant medium for MSC cultivation, expansion and differentiation. The expanded and differentiated MSCs can be used in autologous mesenchymal stromal cell therapy in patients with ischaemic heart disease Udgivelsesdato: 2008......OBJECTIVE: Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) from adult bone marrow (BM) are considered potential candidates for therapeutic neovascularization in cardiovascular disease. When implementing results from animal trials in clinical treatment, it is essential to isolate and expand the MSCs under...

  3. Cellular size as a means of tracking mTOR activity and cell fate of CD4+ T cells upon antigen recognition.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kristen N Pollizzi

    Full Text Available mTOR is a central integrator of metabolic and immunological stimuli, dictating immune cell activation, proliferation and differentiation. In this study, we demonstrate that within a clonal population of activated T cells, there exist both mTORhi and mTORlo cells exhibiting highly divergent metabolic and immunologic functions. By taking advantage of the role of mTOR activation in controlling cellular size, we demonstrate that upon antigen recognition, mTORhi CD4+ T cells are destined to become highly glycolytic effector cells. Conversely, mTORlo T cells preferentially develop into long-lived cells that express high levels of Bcl-2, CD25, and CD62L. Furthermore, mTORlo T cells have a greater propensity to differentiate into suppressive Foxp3+ T regulatory cells, and this paradigm was also observed in human CD4+ T cells. Overall, these studies provide the opportunity to track the development of effector and memory T cells from naïve precursors, as well as facilitate the interrogation of immunologic and metabolic programs that inform these fates.

  4. Tracking in anatomic pathology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pantanowitz, Liron; Mackinnon, Alexander C; Sinard, John H

    2013-12-01

    Bar code-based tracking solutions, long present in clinical pathology laboratories, have recently made an appearance in anatomic pathology (AP) laboratories. Tracking of AP "assets" (specimens, blocks, slides) can enhance laboratory efficiency, promote patient safety, and improve patient care. Routing of excess clinical material into research laboratories and biorepositories are other avenues that can benefit from tracking of AP assets. Implementing tracking is not as simple as installing software and turning it on. Not all tracking solutions are alike. Careful analysis of laboratory workflow is needed before implementing tracking to assure that this solution will meet the needs of the laboratory. Such analysis will likely uncover practices that may need to be modified before a tracking system can be deployed. Costs that go beyond simply that of purchasing software will be incurred and need to be considered in the budgeting process. Finally, people, not technology, are the key to assuring quality. Tracking will require significant changes in workflow and an overall change in the culture of the laboratory. Preparation, training, buy-in, and accountability of the people involved are crucial to the success of this process. This article reviews the benefits, available technology, underlying principles, and implementation of tracking solutions for the AP and research laboratory. PMID:23634908

  5. Clinical significance of metallothioneins in cell therapy and nanomedicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharma S

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Sushil Sharma,1 Afsha Rais,1 Ranbir Sandhu,1 Wynand Nel,1 Manuchair Ebadi21Saint James School of Medicine, Bonaire, The Netherlands; 2Department of Pharmacology, Physiology, and Therapeutics, Center of Excellence in Neuroscience, University of North Dakota School of Medicine and Health Sciences, Grand Forks, ND, USAAbstract: Mammalian metallothioneins (MTs are low molecular weight (6–7 kDa cysteine-rich proteins that are specifically induced by metal nanoparticles (NPs. MT induction in cell therapy may provide better protection by serving as antioxidant, anti-inflammatory, antiapoptotic agents, and by augmenting zinc-mediated transcriptional regulation of genes involved in cell proliferation and differentiation. Liposome-encapsulated MT-1 promoter has been used extensively to induce growth hormone or other genes in culture and gene-manipulated animals. MTs are induced as a defensive mechanism in chronic inflammatory conditions including neurodegenerative diseases, cardiovascular diseases, cancer, and infections, hence can serve as early and sensitive biomarkers of environmental safety and effectiveness of newly developed NPs for clinical applications. Microarray analysis has indicated that MTs are significantly induced in drug resistant cancers and during radiation treatment. Nutritional stress and environmental toxins (eg, kainic acid and domoic acid induce MTs and aggregation of multilamellar electron-dense membrane stacks (Charnoly body due to mitochondrial degeneration. MTs enhance mitochondrial bioenergetics of reduced nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide–ubiquinone oxidoreductase (complex-1, a rate-limiting enzyme complex involved in the oxidative phosphorylation. Monoamine oxidase-B inhibitors (eg, selegiline inhibit α-synuclein nitration, implicated in Lewy body formation, and inhibit 1-methyl 4-phenylpyridinium and 3-morpholinosydnonimine-induced apoptosis in cultured human dopaminergic neurons and mesencephalic fetal stem cells. MTs

  6. Clinical scale rapid expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell transfer therapy in the WAVE® bioreactor

    OpenAIRE

    Somerville Robert PT; Devillier Laura; Parkhurst Maria R; Rosenberg Steven A; Dudley Mark E

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background To simplify clinical scale lymphocyte expansions, we investigated the use of the WAVE®, a closed system bioreactor that utilizes active perfusion to generate high cell numbers in minimal volumes. Methods We have developed an optimized rapid expansion protocol for the WAVE bioreactor that produces clinically relevant numbers of cells for our adoptive cell transfer clinical protocols. Results TIL and genetically modified PBL were rapidly expanded to clinically relevant scale...

  7. Simulations of DSB Yields and Radiation-induced Chromosomal Aberrations in Human Cells Based on the Stochastic Track Structure iIduced by HZE Particles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ponomarev, Artem; Plante, Ianik; George, Kerry; Wu, Honglu

    2014-01-01

    The formation of double-strand breaks (DSBs) and chromosomal aberrations (CAs) is of great importance in radiation research and, specifically, in space applications. We are presenting a new particle track and DNA damage model, in which the particle stochastic track structure is combined with the random walk (RW) structure of chromosomes in a cell nucleus. The motivation for this effort stems from the fact that the model with the RW chromosomes, NASARTI (NASA radiation track image) previously relied on amorphous track structure, while the stochastic track structure model RITRACKS (Relativistic Ion Tracks) was focused on more microscopic targets than the entire genome. We have combined chromosomes simulated by RWs with stochastic track structure, which uses nanoscopic dose calculations performed with the Monte-Carlo simulation by RITRACKS in a voxelized space. The new simulations produce the number of DSBs as function of dose and particle fluence for high-energy particles, including iron, carbon and protons, using voxels of 20 nm dimension. The combined model also calculates yields of radiation-induced CAs and unrejoined chromosome breaks in normal and repair deficient cells. The joined computational model is calibrated using the relative frequencies and distributions of chromosomal aberrations reported in the literature. The model considers fractionated deposition of energy to approximate dose rates of the space flight environment. The joined model also predicts of the yields and sizes of translocations, dicentrics, rings, and more complex-type aberrations formed in the G0/G1 cell cycle phase during the first cell division after irradiation. We found that the main advantage of the joined model is our ability to simulate small doses: 0.05-0.5 Gy. At such low doses, the stochastic track structure proved to be indispensable, as the action of individual delta-rays becomes more important.

  8. Tracking Traction Force Changes of Single Cells on the Liquid Crystal Surface

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chin Fhong Soon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Cell migration is a key contributor to wound repair. This study presents findings indicating that the liquid crystal based cell traction force transducer (LCTFT system can be used in conjunction with a bespoke cell traction force mapping (CTFM software to monitor cell/surface traction forces from quiescent state in real time. In this study, time-lapse photo microscopy allowed cell induced deformations in liquid crystal coated substrates to be monitored and analyzed. The results indicated that the system could be used to monitor the generation of cell/surface forces in an initially quiescent cell, as it migrated over the culture substrate, via multiple points of contact between the cell and the surface. Future application of this system is the real-time assaying of the pharmacological effects of cytokines on the mechanics of cell migration.

  9. A fusion tag enabling optical marking and tracking of proteins and cells by FRET-acceptor photobleaching.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuppig, S; Nitschke, R

    2006-04-01

    Combined time-lapse imaging with optical marking of fluorescent proteins (FPs) is a widely used method in studies of the dynamic behaviour of proteins, organelles and cell populations. Most of the approaches have specific limitations as they do not permit simultaneous observation of marked and non-marked molecules, require co-expression of two FP-tagged proteins or rely on oligomerizing FPs. Here we provide a strategy to overcome such limitations with a fluorescence resonance energy transfer-competent tandem fusion tag composed of two FPs. We combine optical marking by acceptor photobleaching with spectral imaging to discriminate between marked and non-marked molecules. Such 'bleach-labelling' may be employed in a broad range of studies for robust real-time tracking of proteins, organelles and cells. PMID:16734709

  10. Quantitative tracking of tumor cells in phase-contrast microscopy exploiting halo artifact pattern

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Mi-Sun; Song, Soo-Min; Lee, Hana; Kim, Myoung-Hee

    2012-03-01

    Tumor cell morphology is closely related to its invasiveness characteristics and migratory behaviors. An invasive tumor cell has a highly irregular shape, whereas a spherical cell is non-metastatic. Thus, quantitative analysis of cell features is crucial to determine tumor malignancy or to test the efficacy of anticancer treatment. We use phase-contrast microscopy to analyze single cell morphology and to monitor its change because it enables observation of long-term activity of living cells without photobleaching and phototoxicity, which is common in other fluorescence-labeled microscopy. Despite this advantage, there are image-level drawbacks to phase-contrast microscopy, such as local light effect and contrast interference ring, among others. Thus, we first applied a local filter to compensate for non-uniform illumination. Then, we used intensity distribution information to detect the cell boundary. In phase-contrast microscopy images, the cell normally appears as a dark region surrounded by a bright halo. As the halo artifact around the cell body is minimal and has an asymmetric diffusion pattern, we calculated the cross-sectional plane that intersected the center of each cell and was orthogonal to the first principal axis. Then, we extracted the dark cell region by level set. However, a dense population of cultured cells still rendered single-cell analysis difficult. Finally, we measured roundness and size to classify tumor cells into malignant and benign groups. We validated segmentation accuracy by comparing our findings with manually obtained results.

  11. Monitoring cancer stem cells: insights into clinical oncology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin SC

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available ShuChen Lin,1,* YingChun Xu,2,* ZhiHua Gan,1 Kun Han,1 HaiYan Hu,3 Yang Yao,3 MingZhu Huang,4 DaLiu Min1 1Department of Oncology, Shanghai Sixth People’s Hospital East Campus, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 2Department of Oncology, Renji Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 3Department of Oncology, The Sixth People’s Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, 4Department of Medical Oncology, Cancer Hospital of Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: Cancer stem cells (CSCs are a small, characteristically distinctive subset of tumor cells responsible for tumor initiation and progression. Several treatment modalities, such as surgery, glycolytic inhibition, driving CSC proliferation, immunotherapy, and hypofractionated radiotherapy, may have the potential to eradicate CSCs. We propose that monitoring CSCs is important in clinical oncology as CSC populations may reflect true treatment response and assist with managing treatment strategies, such as defining optimal chemotherapy cycles, permitting pretreatment cancer surveillance, conducting a comprehensive treatment plan, modifying radiation treatment, and deploying rechallenge chemotherapy. Then, we describe methods for monitoring CSCs. Keywords: cancer stem cells, glycolytic inhibition, watchful waiting, rechallenge, immunotherapy

  12. Quantitative Label-Free Cell Proliferation Tracking with a Versatile Electrochemical Impedance Detection Platform

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Caviglia, Claudia; Carminati, M; Heiskanen, Arto;

    2012-01-01

    Since the use of impedance measurements for label-free monitoring of cells has become widespread but still the choice of sensing configuration is not unique though crucial for a quantitative interpretation of data, we demonstrate the application of a novel custom multipotentiostat platform to study...... optimal detection strategies. Electrochemical Impedance Spectroscopy (EIS) has been used to monitor and compare adhesion of different cell lines. HeLa cells and 3T3 fibroblasts have been cultured for 12 hours on interdigitated electrode arrays integrated into a tailor-made cell culture platform. Both...... vertical and coplanar interdigitated sensing configuration approaches have been used and compared on the same cell populations....

  13. In vivo tracking of 111In-oxine labeled mesenchymal stem cells following infusion in patients with advanced cirrhosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: Several animal and few human studies suggest the beneficial role of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) in liver cirrhosis. However, little is known about the fate of MSCs after infusion in cirrhotic patients. We evaluated stem cell biodistribution after peripheral infusion of MSCs in four cirrhotic patients. Methods: After three passages of MSCs, the patients received a total of 250-400x106 cells, of which only 50% of the cells were labeled. Specific activities of 0.21-0.67 MBq/106 cells were maintained for the injected labeled MSCs. Planar whole-body acquisitions (anterior/posterior projections) were acquired immediately following infusion as well as at 2 h, 4 h, 6 h, 24 h, 48 h, 7th and 10th days after cell infusion. Results: After intravenous infusion, the radioactivity was first observed to accumulate in the lungs. During the following hours to days, the radioactivity gradually increased in the liver and spleen, with spleen uptake exceeding that in the liver in all patients. Region-of-interest analysis showed that the percentage of cells homing to the liver (following decay and background corrections and geometric mean calculation) increased from 0.0%-2.8% at immediately post-infusion images to 13.0-17.4% in 10th-day post-infusion. Similarly, the residual activities in the spleen increased from 2.0%-10.2% at immediately post-infusion images to 30.1%-42.2% in 10th-day post-infusion. During the same period, the residual activities in the lungs decreased from 27.0-33.5% to 2.0-5.4%. Conclusion: The infusion of MSCs labeled with 111In-oxine through a peripheral vein is safe in cirrhosis. Cell labeling with 111In-oxine is a suitable method for tracking MSC distribution after infusion.

  14. Scintigraphic tracking of mesenchymal stem cells after portal, systemic intravenous and splenic administration in healthy beagle dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spriet, Mathieu; Hunt, Geraldine B; Walker, Naomi J; Borjesson, Dori L

    2015-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells have been proposed to treat liver disease in the dog. The objective of this study was to compare portal, systemic intravenous and splenic injections for administration of mesenchymal stem cells to target the liver in healthy beagle dogs. Four healthy beagle dogs were included in the study. Each dog received mesenchymal stem cells via all three delivery methods in randomized order, 1 week apart. Ten million fat-derived allogeneic mesenchymal stem cells labeled with Technetium-99m (99mTc)-hexamethyl-propylene amine oxime(HMPAO) were used for each injection. Right lateral, left lateral, ventral, and dorsal scintigraphic images were obtained with a gamma camera equipped with a low-energy all-purpose collimator immediately after injection and 1, 6, and 24 h later. Mesenchymal stem cells distribution was assessed subjectively using all four views. Pulmonary, hepatic, and splenic uptake was quantified from the right lateral view, at each time point. Portal injection resulted in diffuse homogeneous high uptake through the liver, whereas the systemic intravenous injection led to mesenchymal stem cell trapping in the lungs. After splenic injection, mild splenic retention and high homogeneous diffuse hepatic uptake were observed. Systemic injection of mesenchymal stem cells may not be a desirable technique for liver therapy due to pulmonary trapping. Splenic injection represents a good alternative to portal injection. Scintigraphic tracking with 99mTc-HMPAO is a valuable technique for assessing mesenchymal stem cells distribution and quantification shortly after administration. Data obtained at 24 h should be interpreted cautiously due to suboptimal labeling persistence. PMID:25582730

  15. Detection, staging and clinical implications of renal cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To compare the epidemiologic, clinical and pathologic characteristics of symptomatic and incidental renal cell carcinoma (RCC)in Jordan.Results were compared with published Western figure. Records of 119 patients with renal tumors diagnosed during the period January1992 to December 2001at Jordan University of Science and Technology, Irbid, Jordan were reviewed. Age,gender, radiologic and biologic workup, treatment,features of tumor were reviewed. The mean patient age was 54 and the male to female ratio was 3.4:1. 26% of tumors were discoverd accidentlly.The incidental detction group had significantly small size of tumor.,lower stage and lower histological grading.In symptomatic group woman have significantly lower mean size of tumor than men. A radical nephrectomy was performed in 92% of the cases, and in 8% of the cases, conservative mangement was adopted. The present study showed that the incidence rate of RCC in Jordan is less than Western countries. Significant number of RCC were detected incidently with lower pathological stage and grade. Subsequently these clinically and histologically less aggressive lesions lead to better survival. These data efforts should be directed to the devlopment of screening protocol to detect these lesions early. (author)

  16. Tracking of [18F]FDG-labeled natural killer cells to HER2/neu-positive tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Introduction: The objective of this study was to label the human natural killer (NK) cell line NK-92 with [18F]fluoro-deoxy-glucose (FDG) for subsequent in vivo tracking to HER2/neu-positive tumors. Methods: NK-92 cells were genetically modified to NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, which express a chimeric antigen receptor that is specific to the tumor-associated ErbB2 (HER2/neu) antigen. NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were labeled with [18F]FDG by simple incubation at different settings. Labeling efficiency was evaluated by a gamma counter. Subsequently, [18F]FDG-labeled parental NK-92 or NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells were intravenously injected into mice with implanted HER2/neu-positive NIH/3T3 tumors. Radioactivity in tumors was quantified by digital autoradiography and correlated with histopathology. Results: The NK-92 and NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells could be efficiently labeled with [18F]FDG by simple incubation. Optimal labeling efficiencies (80%) were achieved using an incubation period of 60 min and additional insulin (10 IU/ml). After injection of 5x106 [18F]FDG-labeled NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells into tumor-bearing mice, digital autoradiography showed an increased uptake of radioactivity in HER2/neu-positive tumors at 60 min postinjection. Conversely, injection of 5x106 NK-92 cells not directed against HER2/neu receptors did not result in increased uptake of radioactivity in the tumors. Histopathology confirmed an accumulation of the NK-92-scFv(FRP5)-zeta cells, but not the parental NK cells, in tumor tissues. Conclusion: The human NK cell line NK-92 can be directed against HER2/neu antigens by genetic modification. The genetically modified NK cells can be efficiently labeled with [18F]FDG, and the accumulation of these labeled NK cells in HER2/neu-positive tumors can be monitored with autoradiography

  17. Cell therapy for intervertebral disc repair: advancing cell therapy from bench to clinics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LM Benneker

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Intervertebral disc (IVD degeneration is a major cause of pain and disability; yet therapeutic options are limited and treatment often remains unsatisfactory. In recent years, research activities have intensified in tissue engineering and regenerative medicine, and pre-clinical studies have demonstrated encouraging results. Nonetheless, the translation of new biological therapies into clinical practice faces substantial barriers. During the symposium "Where Science meets Clinics", sponsored by the AO Foundation and held in Davos, Switzerland, from September 5-7, 2013, hurdles for translation were outlined, and ways to overcome them were discussed. With respect to cell therapy for IVD repair, it is obvious that regenerative treatment is indicated at early stages of disc degeneration, before structural changes have occurred. It is envisaged that in the near future, screening techniques and non-invasive imaging methods will be available to detect early degenerative changes. The promises of cell therapy include a sustained effect on matrix synthesis, inflammation control, and prevention of angio- and neuro-genesis. Discogenic pain, originating from "black discs" or annular injury, prevention of adjacent segment disease, and prevention of post-discectomy syndrome were identified as prospective indications for cell therapy. Before such therapy can safely and effectively be introduced into clinics, the identification of the patient population and proper standardisation of diagnostic parameters and outcome measurements are indispensable. Furthermore, open questions regarding the optimal cell type and delivery method need to be resolved in order to overcome the safety concerns implied with certain procedures. Finally, appropriate large animal models and well-designed clinical studies will be required, particularly addressing safety aspects.

  18. In vivo tracking of magnetically labeled mesenchmal stem cells injected via renal arteries in kidney failure rat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate in vivo depiction and tracking for magnetically labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stern cells (MSCs) in a renal failure rat model injected intravascularly using a 1.5 T magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) system. Methods: Rat MSCs were isolated, purified, expanded and then incubated with home synthesized Fe2O3-PLL. Prussian blue stain was employed for identifying intracellular irons. An acute renal failure in rat was induced by intramuscular injection of glycerol and MSCs were injected into renal arteries of 11 recipients (labeled cells in six, unlabeled cells in five). MR images of kidneys were obtained respectively before injection of MSCs, and immediately, 1, 3, 5, and 8 clays after transplantation. MR imaging findings were analyzed, which were correlated with histological findings. Results: Rat MSCs were successfully labeled, and labeling efficiency was almost 100%. Prussian blue staining of Fe2O3-PLL labeled cells revealed the presence of iron-containing vesicles or endosomes in the cytoplasm. In the renal failure model of rats, the labeled MSCs were demonstrated as signal intensity loss in renal cortex on T2*-weighted MR images. The signal intensity decrease was visualized up to days 8 after transplantation. Histological analyses showed that most Prussian blue staining-positive cells were well correlated with the area where a signal intensity loss was observed in MRI. Signal intensity decrease was not detected after transplantation of unlabeled cells. Conclusion: The rat MSCs can be effectively labeled with Fe2O3-PLL. 1.5-T MR imaging seems to be a good technique to monitor the magnetically labeled MSCs in vivo in renal failure rat model intravascularly administered, which may have much more potential values for studying the engraftment of stem cells in kidneys. (authors)

  19. Clinical Implementation of Dynamic Tumour Tracking Radiotherapy with Real-time Monitoring Using a Gimbal Mounted Linac

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Respiratory motion is one of the factors causing uncertainties during beam delivery, particularly for thoracic and addominal tumors. Several techniques, including forced shallow-breathing, breath-hold, respiratory gating, and dynamic tumour tracking (DTT), have been proposed to reduce the uncertainties without a burden on the respiration of patients or prolongation of treatment time. We have developed an innovative four-mensional (4D) image-guided radiotherapy system, the Vero4DRT (MHI-TM2000; Mitsubishi Heay Industries, Ltd., Japan, and Brainlab, Feldkirchen, Germany). The Vero4DRT has two special features that allow DTT with real-time monitoring. One is two sets of kilovoltage (KV) X-ray imagers, that can monitor the three-dimensional position of the tumor in real-time via implanted fiducial markers, and the other is a gimbal mounted linac, enabling DTT. DTT stereotactic body radiotherapy was realizered for a patient with lung tumor in September 11 2011 and for a pateint with liver tumor in 2012. Therreafter,DTT IMRT was realized for a patien with pancreatic cancer in June 2013. The presentation

  20. Noninvasive Optical Tracking of Red Fluorescent Protein-Expressing Cancer Cells in a Model of Metastatic Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul T. Winnard, Jr.

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We have evaluated the use of the Xenogen IVIS 200 imaging system for real-time fluorescence protein- based optical imaging of metastatic progression in live animals. We found that green fluorescent protein- expressing cells (100 × 106 were not detectable in a mouse cadaver phantom experiment. However, a 10-fold lower number of tdTomato-expressing cells were easily detected. Mammary fat pad xenografts of stable MDA-MB-231-tdTomato cells were generated for the imaging of metastatic progression. At 2 weeks postinjection, barely palpable tumor burdens were easily detected at the sites of injection. At 8 weeks, a small contralateral mammary fat pad metastasis was imaged and, by 13 weeks, metastases to lymph nodes were detectable. Metastases with nodular composition were detectable within the rib cage region at 15 weeks. 3-D image reconstructions indicated that the detection of fluorescence extended to approximately 1 cm below the surface. A combination of intense tdTomato fluorescence, imaging at ≥ 620 nm (where autofluorescence is minimized, the sensitivity of the Xenogen imager made this possible. This study demonstrates the utility of the noninvasive optical tracking of cancer cells during metastatic progression with endogenously expressed fluorescence protein reporters using detection wavelengths of ≥ 620 nm.

  1. Clinical Grade of Gerneration of Dendritic Cells for Immunotherapy

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TANG Duozhuang; TAO Si; CAO Yang; ZHOU Jianfeng; MA Ding; HUANG Wei

    2007-01-01

    In order to develop a protocol for clinical grade generation of dendritic cells (DCs) for cancer immumotherapy, aphereses were performed with the continuous flow cell separator and materials were derived from 10 leukemia patients that had achieved complete remission. Peripheral blood monocytes were cultured in vitro with GM-CSF, IL-4 for 6 days, then TNF-α (the TNF-α group) or TNF-α, IL-1β, IL-6, PGE2 (the cytokine mixture group) were added to promote maturation. Cell number was counted by hematology analyzer, and phenotype study (CD1a, CD14, CD83) was carried out by flow cytometry, and the function of DCs was examined by mixed lymphocyte reaction. The results showed that (0.70±0.13)×107/mL (the TNF-α group) and (0.79±0.04)×107/mL (the cytokine mixture group) DCs were generated respectively in peripheral blood obtained by leucapheresis. The phenotypes were as follows: CD1a+ (74.65±4.45)%, CD83+(39.50±4.16)%, CD14+(2.90±1.76)% in TNF-α group, and CD1a+ (81.86±5.87)%, CD83+ (81.65±6.36)%, CD14+ (2.46±1.68)% in the cytokine mixture group. It was concluded that leucapheresis may be a feasible way to provide large number of peripheral blood monocytes for DC generation, and combined administration of TNF-α, IL-1β,IL-6, and PGE2 may greatly promote maturity.

  2. Chronic spinal cord injury treated with transplanted autologous bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells tracked by magnetic resonance imaging: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Chotivichit, Areesak; Ruangchainikom, Monchai; Chiewvit, Pipat; Wongkajornsilp, Adisak; Sujirattanawimol, Kittipong

    2015-01-01

    Introduction Intrathecal transplantation is a minimally invasive method for the delivery of stem cells, however, whether the cells migrate from the lumbar to the injured cervical spinal cord has not been proved in humans. We describe an attempt to track bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells in a patient with a chronic cervical spinal cord injury. Case presentation A 33-year-old Thai man who sustained an incomplete spinal cord injury from the atlanto-axial subluxation was enrolled into a ...

  3. Genome-wide tracking of unmethylated DNA Alu repeats in normal and cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rodriguez, Jairo; Vives, Laura; Jordà, Mireia;

    2008-01-01

    . Normal colon epithelial cells contain in average 25 486 +/- 10 157 unmethylated Alu's per haploid genome, while in tumor cells this figure is 41 995 +/- 17 187 (P = 0.004). There is an inverse relationship in Alu families with respect to their age and methylation status: the youngest elements exhibit the...

  4. Expression Patterns of Cancer-Testis Antigens in Human Embryonic Stem Cells and Their Cell Derivatives Indicate Lineage Tracks

    OpenAIRE

    Olga Gordeeva; Tatyana Yakovleva; Galina Poljanskaya; Tatyana Krylova; Anna Koltsova; Nadya Lifantseva

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotent stem cells can differentiate into various lineages but undergo genetic and epigenetic changes during long-term cultivation and, therefore, require regular monitoring. The expression patterns of cancer-testis antigens (CTAs) MAGE-A2, -A3, -A4, -A6, -A8, -B2, and GAGE were examined in undifferentiated human embryonic stem (hES) cells, their differentiated derivatives, teratocarcinoma (hEC) cells, and cancer cell lines of neuroectodermal and mesodermal origin. Undifferentiated hES ce...

  5. In Vivo Imaging and Tracking of Technetium-99m Labeled Bone Marrow Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Equine Tendinopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dudhia, Jayesh; Becerra, Patricia; Valdés, Miguel A; Neves, Francisco; Hartman, Neil G; Smith, Roger K W

    2015-01-01

    Recent advances in the application of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSC) for the treatment of tendon and ligament injuries in the horse suggest improved outcome measures in both experimental and clinical studies. Although the BMMSC are implanted into the tendon lesion in large numbers (usually 10 - 20 million cells), only a relatively small number survive (horses. Tc-99m is a short-lived (t1/2 of 6.01 hr) isotope that emits gamma rays and can be internalized by cells in the presence of the lipophilic compound hexamethylpropyleneamine oxime (HMPAO). These properties make it ideal for use in nuclear medicine clinics for the diagnosis of many different diseases. The fate of the labeled cells can be followed in the short term (up to 36 hr) by gamma scintigraphy to quantify both the number of cells retained in the lesion and distribution of the cells into lungs, thyroid and other organs. This technique is adapted from the labeling of blood leukocytes and could be utilized to image implanted BMMSC in other organs. PMID:26709915

  6. Fluidity evaluation of cell membrane model formed on graphene oxide with single particle tracking using quantum dot

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Yoshiaki; Motegi, Toshinori; Iwasa, Seiji; Sandhu, Adarsh; Tero, Ryugo

    2015-04-01

    The lipid bilayer is the fundamental structure of plasma membranes, and artificial lipid bilayer membranes are used as model systems of cell membranes. Recently we reported the formation of a supported lipid bilayer (SLB) on graphene oxide (GO) by the vesicle fusion method. In this study, we conjugated a quantum dot (Qdot) on the SLB surface as a fluorescence probe brighter than dye-labeled lipid molecules, to qualitatively evaluate the fluidity of the SLB on GO by the single particle tracking method. We obtained the diffusion coefficient of the Qdot-conjugated lipids in the SLB on GO. We also performed the Qdot conjugation on the SLB containing a lipid conjugated with polyethylene glycol, to prevent the nonspecific adsorption of Qdots. The difference in the diffusion coefficients between the SLBs on the GO and the bare SiO2 regions was evaluated from the trajectory of single Qdot-conjugated lipid diffusing between the two regions.

  7. Tracking and back-tracking

    OpenAIRE

    Lorenzo Pigueiras, Eduardo; Narvarte Fernandez, Luis; Muñoz Cano, Javier

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a review of back-tracking geometry not only for single axis but also for two-axis tracking and analyses the corresponding energy gains. It compares the different back-tracking strategies with the ideal tracking in terms of energy yield concluding, on the one hand, that back-tracking is more useful for single horizontal axis than for the single vertical one, and on the other hand, that back-tracking is more efficient when applied in the primary axis of a two-axis tracker

  8. Tracking neuronal marker expression inside living differentiating cells using molecular beacons

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilieva, Mirolyuba; Della Vedova, Paolo; Hansen, Ole;

    2013-01-01

    Monitoring gene expression is an important tool for elucidating mechanisms of cellular function. In order to monitor gene expression during nerve cell development, molecular beacon (MB) probes targeting markers representing different stages of neuronal differentiation were designed and synthesized...

  9. Live cell tracking of symmetry break in actin cytoskeleton triggered by abrupt changes in micromechanical environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inoue, S; Frank, V; Hörning, M; Kaufmann, S; Yoshikawa, H Y; Madsen, J P; Lewis, A L; Armes, S P; Tanaka, M

    2015-12-01

    With the aid of stimulus-responsive hydrogel substrates composed of ABA triblock copolymer micelles, we monitored the morphological dynamics of myoblast (C2C12) cells in response to an abrupt change in the substrate elasticity by live cell imaging. The remodeling of actin cytoskeletons could be monitored by means of transient transfection with LifeAct-GFP. Dynamic changes in the orientational order of actin filaments were characterized by an order parameter, which enables one to generalize the mechanically induced actin cytoskeletons as a break of symmetry. The critical role that acto-myosin complexes play in the morphological transition was verified by the treatment of cells with myosin II inhibitor (blebbistatin) and the fluorescence localization of focal adhesion contacts. Such dynamically tunable hydrogels can be utilized as in vitro cellular micro-environments that can exert time-dependent stimuli to mechanically regulate target cells. PMID:26347909

  10. MR tracking of stem cells labeled with superparamagnetic nanoparticles in ischemic brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jendelová, Pavla; Glogarová, Kateřina; Urdzíková, Lucia; Kroupová, Jana; Herynek, V.; Dvořák, Petr; Hájek, M.; Syková, Eva

    č. 2 (2003), s. 35. ISSN 0894-1491. [European Meeting on Glial Cell Function in Health and Disease /6./. Berlín, 03.09.2003-06.09.2003] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA ČR GA304/03/1189 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906; CEZ:MSM 111300004 Keywords : Stem cells * Nanoparticles Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 4.677, year: 2003

  11. Chimeric Mouse model to track the migration of bone marrow derived cells in glioblastoma following anti-angiogenic treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Achyut, B R; Shankar, Adarsh; Iskander, A S M; Ara, Roxan; Knight, Robert A; Scicli, Alfonso G; Arbab, Ali S

    2016-03-01

    Bone marrow derived cells (BMDCs) have been shown to contribute in the tumor development. In vivo animal models to investigate the role of BMDCs in tumor development are poorly explored. We established a novel chimeric mouse model using as low as 5 × 10(6) GFP+ BM cells in athymic nude mice, which resulted in >70% engraftment within 14 d. In addition, chimera was established in NOD-SCID mice, which displayed >70% with in 28 d. Since anti-angiogenic therapies (AAT) were used as an adjuvant against VEGF-VEGFR pathway to normalize blood vessels in glioblastoma (GBM), which resulted into marked hypoxia and recruited BMDCs to the tumor microenvironment (TME). We exploited chimeric mice in athymic nude background to develop orthotopic U251 tumor and tested receptor tyrosine kinase inhibitors and CXCR4 antagonist against GBM. We were able to track GFP+ BMDCs in the tumor brain using highly sensitive multispectral optical imaging instrument. Increased tumor growth associated with the infiltration of GFP+ BMDCs acquiring suppressive myeloid and endothelial phenotypes was seen in TME following treatments. Immunofluorescence study showed GFP+ cells accumulated at the site of VEGF, SDF1 and PDGF expression, and at the periphery of the tumors following treatments. In conclusion, we developed a preclinical chimeric model of GBM and phenotypes of tumor infiltrated BMDCs were investigated in context of AATs. Chimeric mouse model could be used to study detailed cellular and molecular mechanisms of interaction of BMDCs and TME in cancer. PMID:26797476

  12. Objective evaluation of methods to track motion from clinical cardiac-gated tagged MRI without the use of a gold standard

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parages, Felipe M.; Denney, Thomas S.; Brankov, Jovan G.

    2015-03-01

    Cardiac-gated MRI is widely used for the task of measuring parameters related to heart motion. More specifically, gated tagged MRI is the preferred modality to estimate local deformation (strain) and rotational motion (twist) of myocardial tissue. Many methods have been proposed to estimate cardiac motion from gated MRI sequences. However, when dealing with clinical data, evaluation of these methods is problematic due to the absence of gold-standards for cardiac motion. To overcome that, a linear regression scheme known as regression-without-truth (RWT) was proposed in the past. RWT uses priors to model the distribution of true values, thus enabling us to assess image-analysis algorithms without knowledge of the ground-truth. Furthermore, it allows one to rank methods by means of an objective figure-of-merit γ (i.e. precision). In this work we apply RWT to compare the performance of several gated MRI motion-tracking methods (e.g. non-rigid registration, feature based, harmonic phase) at the task of estimating myocardial strain and left-ventricle (LV) twist, from a population of 18 clinical human cardiac-gated tagged MRI studies.

  13. In vivo MRI tracking of iron oxide nanoparticle-labeled human mesenchymal stem cells in limb ischemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li XX

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Xiang-Xiang Li,1,2,* Kang-An Li,3,* Jin-Bao Qin,1,2 Kai-Chuang Ye,1,2 Xin-Rui Yang,1,2 Wei-Min Li,1,2 Qing-Song Xie,4 Mi-Er Jiang,1,2 Gui-Xiang Zhang,3 Xin-Wu Lu1,21Department of Vascular Surgery, Shanghai Ninth People's Hospital Affiliated to Shanghai Jiao Tong University, School of Medicine, 2Vascular Center, Shanghai JiaoTong University, 3Department of Radiology, Shanghai First People's Hospital, Shanghai Jiao Tong University School of Medicine, Shanghai, People's Republic of China; 4Department of Neurosurgery, Cixi Municipal People's Hospital, Zhejiang Province, People's Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Background: Stem cell transplantation has been investigated for repairing damaged tissues in various injury models. Monitoring the safety and fate of transplanted cells using noninvasive methods is important to advance this technique into clinical applications. Methods: In this study, lower-limb ischemia models were generated in nude mice by femoral artery ligation. As negative-contrast agents, positively charged magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (aminopropyltriethoxysilane-coated Fe2O3 were investigated in terms of in vitro labeling efficiency, effects on human mesenchymal stromal cell (hMSC proliferation, and in vivo magnetic resonance imaging (MRI visualization. Ultimately, the mice were sacrificed for histological analysis three weeks after transplantation. Results: With efficient labeling, aminopropyltriethoxysilane-modified magnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (APTS-MNPs did not significantly affect hMSC proliferation. In vivo, APTS-MNP-labeled hMSCs could be monitored by clinical 3 Tesla MRI for at least three weeks. Histological examination detected numerous migrated Prussian blue-positive cells, which was consistent with the magnetic resonance images. Some migrated Prussian blue-positive cells were positive for mature endothelial cell markers of von Willebrand factor and anti-human proliferating cell

  14. Klotho plays a critical role in clear cell renal cell carcinoma progression and clinical outcome.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Hee; Hwang, Kyu-Hee; Lkhagvadorj, Sayamaa; Jung, Jae Hung; Chung, Hyun Chul; Park, Kyu-Sang; Kong, In Deok; Eom, Minseob; Cha, Seung-Kuy

    2016-05-01

    Klotho functions as a tumor suppressor predominantly expressed in renal tubular cells, the origin of clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC). Altered expression and/or activity of growth factor receptor have been implicated in ccRCC development. Although Klotho suppresses a tumor progression through growth factor receptor signaling including insulin-like growth factor-1 receptor (IGF-1R), the role of Klotho acting on IGF-1R in ccRCC and its clinical relevance remains obscure. Here, we show that Klotho is favorable prognostic factor for ccRCC and exerts tumor suppressive role for ccRCC through inhibiting IGF-1R signaling. Our data shows the following key findings. First, in tumor tissues, the level of Klotho and IGF-1R expression are low or high, respectively, compared to that of adjacent non-neoplastic parenchyma. Second, the Klotho expression is clearly low in higher grade of ccRCC and is closely associated with clinical outcomes in tumor progression. Third, Klotho suppresses IGF-1-stimulated cell proliferation and migration by inhibiting PI3K/Akt pathway. These results provide compelling evidence supporting that Klotho acting on IGF-1R signaling functions as tumor suppressor in ccRCC and suggest that Klotho is a potential carcinostatis substance for ccRCC. PMID:27162484

  15. Giant cell arteritis. Part I. Terminology, classification, clinical manifestations, diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is a vasculitis affecting mainly large and medium-sized arteries, which the classification of systemic vasculitides refers to as those mainly involving the large vessels. GCA is typified by the involvement of extracranial aortic branches and intracranial vessels, the aorta and its large vessels are being affected most frequently. The paper considers the terminology, classification, prevalence, major pathogenic mechanisms, and morphology of GCA. A broad spectrum of its clinical subtypes is due to target vessel stenosis caused by intimal hyperplasia. In 40% of cases, GCA is shown to be accompanied by polymyalgia rheumatica that may either precede or manifest simultaneously with GCA, or follow this disease. The menacing complications of GCA may be visual loss or ischemic strokes at various sites depending on the location of the occluded vessel. Along with the gold standard verification of the diagnosis of GCA, namely temporal artery biopsy, the author indicates other (noninvasive methods for detection of vascular lesions: color Doppler ultrasonography of the temporal arteries, fluorescein angiography of the retina, mag-netic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography to rule out aortic aneurysm. Dynamic 18F positron emission tomography is demonstrated to play a role in the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness.

  16. Giant cell arteritis. Part I. Terminology, classification, clinical manifestations, diagnosis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Azamat Makhmudovich Satybaldyev

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell arteritis (GCA is a vasculitis affecting mainly large and medium-sized arteries, which the classification of systemic vasculitides refers to as those mainly involving the large vessels. GCA is typified by the involvement of extracranial aortic branches and intracranial vessels, the aorta and its large vessels are being affected most frequently. The paper considers the terminology, classification, prevalence, major pathogenic mechanisms, and morphology of GCA. A broad spectrum of its clinical subtypes is due to target vessel stenosis caused by intimal hyperplasia. In 40% of cases, GCA is shown to be accompanied by polymyalgia rheumatica that may either precede or manifest simultaneously with GCA, or follow this disease. The menacing complications of GCA may be visual loss or ischemic strokes at various sites depending on the location of the occluded vessel. Along with the gold standard verification of the diagnosis of GCA, namely temporal artery biopsy, the author indicates other (noninvasive methods for detection of vascular lesions: color Doppler ultrasonography of the temporal arteries, fluorescein angiography of the retina, mag-netic resonance angiography, magnetic resonance imaging, and computed tomography to rule out aortic aneurysm. Dynamic 18F positron emission tomography is demonstrated to play a role in the evaluation of therapeutic effectiveness.

  17. LMNA cardiomyopathy: cell biology and genetics meet clinical medicine

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan T. Lu

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Mutations in the LMNA gene, which encodes A-type nuclear lamins (intermediate filament proteins expressed in most differentiated somatic cells, cause a diverse range of diseases, called laminopathies, that selectively affect different tissues and organ systems. The most prevalent laminopathy is cardiomyopathy with or without different types of skeletal muscular dystrophy. LMNA cardiomyopathy has an aggressive clinical course with higher rates of deadly arrhythmias and heart failure than most other heart diseases. As awareness among physicians increases, and advances in DNA sequencing methods make the genetic diagnosis of LMNA cardiomyopathy more common, cardiologists are being faced with difficult questions regarding patient management. These questions concern the optimal use of intracardiac cardioverter defibrillators to prevent sudden death from arrhythmias, and medical interventions to prevent heart damage and ameliorate heart failure symptoms. Data from a mouse model of LMNA cardiomyopathy suggest that inhibitors of mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathways are beneficial in preventing and treating cardiac dysfunction; this basic research discovery needs to be translated to human patients.

  18. Acute neuroinflammation in a clinically relevant focal cortical ischemic stroke model in rat: longitudinal positron emission tomography and immunofluorescent tracking.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tóth, Miklós; Little, Philip; Arnberg, Fabian; Häggkvist, Jenny; Mulder, Jan; Halldin, Christer; Gulyás, Balázs; Holmin, Staffan

    2016-04-01

    Adequate estimation of neuroinflammatory processes following ischemic stroke is essential for better understanding of disease mechanisms, and for the development of treatment strategies. With the TSPO (18 kDa translocator protein) positron emission tomography (PET) radioligand [(11)C]PBR28, we monitored longitudinally the inflammatory response post-transient cerebral ischemia in rats, using a recently developed rat stroke model that produces isolated focal cortical infarcts with clinical relevance in size and pathophysiology. Six Sprague-Dawley rats were subjected to 90 min transient endovascular occlusion of the M2 segment of the middle cerebral artery (M2CAO). Animals were imaged with a nanoScan(®) PET/MRI system at 1, 4, 7 and 14 days after M2CAO with a bolus injection of [(11)C]PBR28. In the infarct region, we found a significantly increased uptake of [(11)C]PBR28 on day 4, 7 and 14 compared to day 1 as well as compared to the contralateral cortex. No significant increase was detected in the contralateral cortex during the 14 days of imaging. The activation in the infarct region gradually decreased between day 4 and day 14. In an additional group of animals (n = 26), immunofluorescence studies were performed with antibodies for activated microglia/monocytes (Cd11b), phagocytes (Cd68), astrocytes (glial fibrillary acidic protein) and TSPO. The TSPO immunofluorescence signal indicated reactive microgliosis post injury, corresponding to PET findings. The present clinically relevant animal model and TSPO PET ligand appear to be well suited for studies on neuroinflammation after ischemic stroke. PMID:25601153

  19. Germline transgenic methods for tracking cells and testing gene function during regeneration in the axolotl.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khattak, Shahryar; Schuez, Maritta; Richter, Tobias; Knapp, Dunja; Haigo, Saori L; Sandoval-Guzmán, Tatiana; Hradlikova, Kristyna; Duemmler, Annett; Kerney, Ryan; Tanaka, Elly M

    2013-01-01

    The salamander is the only tetrapod that regenerates complex body structures throughout life. Deciphering the underlying molecular processes of regeneration is fundamental for regenerative medicine and developmental biology, but the model organism had limited tools for molecular analysis. We describe a comprehensive set of germline transgenic strains in the laboratory-bred salamander Ambystoma mexicanum (axolotl) that open up the cellular and molecular genetic dissection of regeneration. We demonstrate tissue-dependent control of gene expression in nerve, Schwann cells, oligodendrocytes, muscle, epidermis, and cartilage. Furthermore, we demonstrate the use of tamoxifen-induced Cre/loxP-mediated recombination to indelibly mark different cell types. Finally, we inducibly overexpress the cell-cycle inhibitor p16 (INK4a) , which negatively regulates spinal cord regeneration. These tissue-specific germline axolotl lines and tightly inducible Cre drivers and LoxP reporter lines render this classical regeneration model molecularly accessible. PMID:24052945

  20. 3D tracking of single nanoparticles and quantum dots in living cells by out-of-focus imaging with diffraction pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gardini, Lucia; Capitanio, Marco; Pavone, Francesco S.

    2015-11-01

    Live cells are three-dimensional environments where biological molecules move to find their targets and accomplish their functions. However, up to now, most single molecule investigations have been limited to bi-dimensional studies owing to the complexity of 3d-tracking techniques. Here, we present a novel method for three-dimensional localization of single nano-emitters based on automatic recognition of out-of-focus diffraction patterns. Our technique can be applied to track the movements of single molecules in living cells using a conventional epifluorescence microscope. We first demonstrate three-dimensional localization of fluorescent nanobeads over 4 microns depth with accuracy below 2 nm in vitro. Remarkably, we also establish three-dimensional tracking of Quantum Dots, overcoming their anisotropic emission, by adopting a ligation strategy that allows rotational freedom of the emitter combined with proper pattern recognition. We localize commercially available Quantum Dots in living cells with accuracy better than 7 nm over 2 microns depth. We validate our technique by tracking the three-dimensional movements of single protein-conjugated Quantum Dots in living cell. Moreover, we find that important localization errors can occur in off-focus imaging when improperly calibrated and we give indications to avoid them. Finally, we share a Matlab script that allows readily application of our technique by other laboratories.

  1. Poly (dopamine) coated superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocluster for noninvasive labeling, tracking, and targeted delivery of adipose tissue-derived stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liao, Naishun; Wu, Ming; Pan, Fan; Lin, Jiumao; Li, Zuanfang; Zhang, Da; Wang, Yingchao; Zheng, Youshi; Peng, Jun; Liu, Xiaolong; Liu, Jingfeng

    2016-01-01

    Tracking and monitoring of cells in vivo after transplantation can provide crucial information for stem cell therapy. Magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) combined with contrast agents is believed to be an effective and non-invasive technique for cell tracking in living bodies. However, commercial superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPIONs) applied to label cells suffer from shortages such as potential toxicity, low labeling efficiency, and low contrast enhancing. Herein, the adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs) were efficiently labeled with SPIONs coated with poly (dopamine) (SPIONs cluster@PDA), without affecting their viability, proliferation, apoptosis, surface marker expression, as well as their self-renew ability and multi-differentiation potential. The labeled cells transplanted into the mice through tail intravenous injection exhibited a negative enhancement of the MRI signal in the damaged liver-induced by carbon tetrachloride, and subsequently these homed ADSCs with SPIONs cluster@PDA labeling exhibited excellent repair effects to the damaged liver. Moreover, the enhanced target-homing to tissue of interest and repair effects of SPIONs cluster@PDA-labeled ADSCs could be achieved by use of external magnetic field in the excisional skin wound mice model. Therefore, we provide a facile, safe, noninvasive and sensitive method for external magnetic field targeted delivery and MRI based tracking of transplanted cells in vivo.

  2. Evaluation of poly(l-lysine)-coated maghemite nanoparticles for neural stem cell labeling and tracking

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dobrivojevic, M.; Pongrac, I.; Babič, Michal; Brkic, L.; Manescu, A.; Giuliani, A.; Horák, Daniel; Gajovic, S.

    Zagreb: University of Zagreb School of Medicine , 2015. s. 71-72. [GlowBrain Final Conference "Stem cell and biomaterial applications for brain repair". 27.05.2015-31.05.2015, Zagreb] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316120 - GLOWBRAIN Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanoparticles * biomedicine Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  3. Simultaneous Multi-Species Tracking in Live Cells with Quantum Dot Conjugates

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Clausen, M. P.; Christensen, Eva Arnspang; Ballou, B.;

    2014-01-01

    simultaneous investigation of the lateral dynamics in the plasma membrane of i) the transmembrane epidermal growth factor receptor, ii) the glucosylphospatidylinositol-anchored protein CD59, and iii) ganglioside G(M1)-cholera toxin subunit B clusters in a single cell. We show that a large number of the...

  4. Molecular beacon nanosensors for live cell detection and tracking differentiation and reprogramming

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ilieva, Mirolyuba

    2013-01-01

    cell level is molecular beacons (MBs). They are stem-loop structured antisense oligonucleotide probes labelled with a reporter fluorophore at one end and with quencher at the other end. Upon hybridization with complementary target, hydrogen bonds between stem nucleotide bases brake, resulting...

  5. Understanding epigenetic regulation: Tracking protein levels across multiple generations of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rowat, A. C.; Weitz, D. A.

    2009-11-01

    Cells and organisms are remarkably robust: they alter the variety and levels of expressed genes and proteins in response to environmental stimuli, including temperature, chemicals, and the stiffness of their surroundings. Ultimately changes in gene and protein expression can result in a distinct phenotypic state, which in some cases is maintained over multiple generations; the ability to pass on a particular phenotypic state to progeny cells is critical for differentiation. Moreover, epigenetic regulation of phenotype is also thought to provide an evolutionary advantage for a population of cells adapting to a fluctuating environment on faster timescales than the occurrence of genetic mutations. However, simple methods to study patterns of gene and protein expression on multi-generational timescales are sparse. Here we describe a technique to study lineages of single cells over multiple generations using a microfluidic device; this reveals patterns of expression where protein levels are correlated across multiple generations. Such quantitative information of protein expression in the context of pedigree remains hidden when studying the population as an ensemble.

  6. Magnetic resonance tracking of transplanted stem cells in rat brain and spinal cord

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2006-01-01

    Roč. 3, - (2006), s. 62-67. ISSN 1660-2854 R&D Projects: GA ČR(CZ) GA309/06/1594; GA MŠk LC554; GA MŠk 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Keywords : Cell transplantation * Nanoparticles * Photochemical lesio Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  7. Cell tracking in cardiac repair: What to image and how to image

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Ruggiero (Alessandro); D.L.J. Thorek (Daniel L.J.); J. Guenoun (Jamal); G.P. Krestin (Gabriel); M.R. Bernsen (Monique)

    2012-01-01

    textabstractStem cell therapies hold the great promise and interest for cardiac regeneration among scientists, clinicians and patients. However, advancement and distillation of a standard treatment regimen are not yet finalised. Into this breach step recent developments in the imaging biosciences. T

  8. Magnetic resonance tracking of implanted adult and embryonic stem cells in injured brain and spinal cord

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2005-01-01

    Roč. 1049, - (2005), s. 146-160. ISSN 0077-8923 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA304/03/1189; GA MŠk(CZ) 1M0538 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5039906 Keywords : cell transplantation * magnetic resonance Subject RIV: FJ - Surgery incl. Transplants Impact factor: 1.971, year: 2005

  9. ZnO nanoparticle tracking from uptake to genotoxic damage in human colon carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Condello, Maria; De Berardis, Barbara; Ammendolia, Maria Grazia; Barone, Flavia; Condello, Giancarlo; Degan, Paolo; Meschini, Stefania

    2016-09-01

    Zinc Oxide (ZnO) nanoparticles are widely used both in the industry and in biomedical applications for their chemical and physical nanomaterial properties. It is therefore essential to go in depth into the cytotoxicity mechanisms and interactions between nanomaterials and cells. The aim of this work was to evaluate the dissolution of ZnO nanoparticles and their uptake, from a few minutes after treatments up to 24h. ZnO nanoparticles routes of entry into the human colon carcinoma cells (LoVo) were followed at different times by a thorough ultrastructural investigation and semiquantitative analysis. The intracellular release of Zn(2+) ions by Zinquin fluorescent dye, and phosphorylated histone H2AX (γ-H2AX) expression were evaluated. The genotoxic potential of ZnO nanoparticles was also investigated by determining the levels of 8-hydroxyl-2'-deoxyguanosine (8-oxodG). The experimental data show that ZnO nanoparticles entered LoVo cells by either passive diffusion or endocytosis or both, depending on the agglomeration state of the nanomaterial. ZnO nanoparticles coming into contact with acid pH of lysosomes altered organelles structure, resulting in the release of Zn(2+) ions. The simultaneous presence of ZnO nanoparticles and Zn(2+) ions in the LoVo cells determined the formation of reactive oxygen species at the mitochondrial and nuclear level, inducing severe DNA damage. PMID:27317967

  10. Markers of stem cells in human ovarian granulosa cells: is there a clinical significance in ART?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Varras Michail

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The purpose of the study was to determine the incidence of gene expression of Oct-4 and DAZL, which are typical markers for stem cells, in human granulosa cells during ovarian stimulation in women with normal FSH levels undergoing IVF or ICSI and to discover any clinical significance of such expression in ART. Methods Twenty one women underwent ovulation induction for IVF or ICSI and ET with standard GnRH analogue-recombinant FSH protocol. Infertility causes were male and tubal factor. Cumulus–mature oocyte complexes were denuded separately and granulosa cells were analyzed for each patient separately using quantitative reverse-transcription–polymerase chain reaction analysis for Oct-4 and DAZL gene expression with G6PD gene as internal standard. Results G6PD and Oct-4 mRNA was detected in the granulosa cells in 47.6% (10/21. The median of Oct-4 mRNA/G6PD mRNA was 1.75 with intra-quarteral range from 0.10 to 98.21. The OCT-4 mRNA expression was statistically significantly correlated with the number of oocytes retrieved; when the Oct-4 mRNA expression was higher, then more than six oocytes were retrieved (p=0.037, Wilcoxon rank-sum. No detection of DAZL mRNA was found in granulosa cells. There was no additional statistically significant correlation between the levels of Oct-4 expression and FSH basal levels or estradiol peak levels or dosage of FSH for ovulation induction. No association was found between the presence or absence of Oct-4 mRNA expression in granulosa cells and ovarian response to gonadotropin stimulation. Also, no influence on pregnancy was observed between the presence or absence of Oct-4 mRNA expression in granulosa cells or to its expression levels accordingly. Conclusions Expression of OCT-4 mRNA, which is a typical stem cell marker and absence of expression of DAZL mRNA, which is a typical germ cell marker, suggest that a subpopulation of luteinized granulosa cells in healthy ovarian follicles (47

  11. Precise and long-term tracking of adipose-derived stem cells and their regenerative capacity via superb bright and stable organic nanodots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Dan; Mao, Duo; Li, Kai; Wang, Xiaomin; Qin, Wei; Liu, Rongrong; Chiam, David Shunzhong; Tomczak, Nikodem; Yang, Zhimou; Tang, Ben Zhong; Kong, Deling; Liu, Bin

    2014-12-23

    Monitoring and understanding long-term fate and regenerative therapy of administrated stem cells in vivo is of great importance. Herein we report organic nanodots with aggregation-induced emission characteristics (AIE dots) for long-term tracking of adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) and their regenerative capacity in living mice. The AIE dots possess high fluorescence (with a high quantum yield of 25±1%), excellent biological and photophysical stabilities, low in vivo toxicity, and superb retention in living ADSCs with negligible interference on their pluripotency and secretome. These AIE dots also exhibit superior in vitro cell tracking capability compared to the most popular commercial cell trackers, PKH26 and Qtracker 655. In vivo quantitative studies with bioluminescence and GFP labeling as the controls reveal that the AIE dots can precisely and quantitatively report the fate of ADSCs and their regenerative capacity for 42 days in an ischemic hind limb bearing mouse model. PMID:25427294

  12. Nanoparticle Labeling of Bone Marrow-Derived Rat Mesenchymal Stem Cells: Their Use in Differentiation and Tracking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ece Akhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are promising candidates for cellular therapies due to their ability to migrate to damaged tissue without inducing immune reaction. Many techniques have been developed to trace MSCs and their differentiation efficacy; however, all of these methods have limitations. Conjugated polymer based water-dispersible nanoparticles (CPN represent a new class of probes because they offer high brightness, improved photostability, high fluorescent quantum yield, and noncytotoxicity comparing to conventional dyes and quantum dots. We aimed to use this tool for tracing MSCs’ fate in vitro and in vivo. MSC marker expression, survival, and differentiation capacity were assessed upon CPN treatment. Our results showed that after CPN labeling, MSC markers did not change and significant number of cells were found to be viable as revealed by MTT. Fluorescent signals were retained for 3 weeks after they were differentiated into osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes in vitro. We also showed that the labeled MSCs migrated to the site of injury and retained their labels in an in vivo liver regeneration model. The utilization of nanoparticle could be a promising tool for the tracking of MSCs in vivo and in vitro and therefore can be a useful tool to understand differentiation and homing mechanisms of MSCs.

  13. Fast characterisation of cell-derived extracellular vesicles by nanoparticles tracking analysis, cryo-electron microscopy, and Raman tweezers microspectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irène Tatischeff

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available The joint use of 3 complementary techniques, namely, nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA, cryo-electron microscopy (Cryo-EM and Raman tweezers microspectroscopy (RTM, is proposed for a rapid characterisation of extracellular vesicles (EVs of various origins. NTA is valuable for studying the size distribution and concentration, Cryo-EM is outstanding for the morphological characterisation, including observation of vesicle heterogeneity, while RTM provides the global chemical composition without using any exogenous label. The capabilities of this approach are evaluated on the example of cell-derived vesicles of Dictyostelium discoideum, a convenient general model for eukaryotic EVs. At least 2 separate species differing in chemical composition (relative amounts of DNA, lipids and proteins, presence of carotenoids were found for each of the 2 physiological states of this non-pathogenic microorganism, that is, cell growth and starvation-induced aggregation. These findings demonstrate the specific potency of RTM. In addition, the first Raman spectra of human urinary exosomes are reported, presumably constituting the primary step towards Raman characterisation of EVs for the purpose of human diseases diagnoses.

  14. Tracking Cell Fate with Synthetic Memory and Pulse Detecting Transcriptional Circuits

    OpenAIRE

    Inniss, Mara Christine

    2014-01-01

    Synthetic biology aims to engineer biological systems to meet new challenges and teach us more about natural biological systems. These pursuits range from the building of relatively simple transcriptional circuits, to engineering the metabolism of an organism, to reconstructing entire genomes. While we are still emerging from the foundational stages of this new field, we are already using engineered cells to discover underlying biological mechanisms, develop new therapeutics, and produce natu...

  15. Tracking Intravenous Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in a Model of Elastase-Induced Emphysema

    OpenAIRE

    Kim, You-sun; Kim, Ji-Young; Shin, Dong-Myung; Huh, Jin Won; Lee, Sei Won; Oh, Yeon-Mok

    2014-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) obtained from bone marrow or adipose tissue can successfully repair emphysematous animal lungs, which is a characteristic of chronic obstructive pulmonary disease. Here, we describe the cellular distribution of MSCs that were intravenously injected into mice with elastase-induced emphysema. The distributions were also compared to the distributions in control mice without emphysema. Methods We used fluorescence optical imaging with quantum dots (QDs) to...

  16. In vivo tracking of stem cells in brain and spinal cord injury

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Syková, Eva; Jendelová, Pavla

    2007-01-01

    Roč. 161, - (2007), s. 367-383. ISSN 0079-6123 R&D Projects: GA MŠk 1M0538; GA ČR(CZ) GA309/06/1594 Grant ostatní: EU(DE) 512146 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50390512 Source of funding: R - rámcový projekt EK Keywords : Cell transplantation * Iron oxide nanoparticles * Magnetic resonance Subject RIV: FH - Neurology Impact factor: 2.014, year: 2007

  17. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  18. Perineural Infiltration of Cutaneous Squamous Cell Carcinoma and Basal Cell Carcinoma Without Clinical Features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lin, Charles, E-mail: Charles_Lin@health.qld.gov.au [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Tripcony, Lee; Keller, Jacqui [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Poulsen, Michael [Mater Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia); Martin, Jarad [St. Andrews Hospital, Toowoomba, Queensland (Australia); Jackson, James; Dickie, Graeme [Cancer Care Services, Royal Brisbane and Women' s Hospital, Brisbane, Queensland (Australia)

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To review the factors that influence outcome and patterns of relapse in patients with cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and basal cell carcinoma (BCC) with perineural infiltration (PNI) without clinical or radiologic features, treated with surgery and radiotherapy. Methods and Materials: Between 1991 and 2004, 222 patients with SCC or BCC with PNI on pathologic examination but without clinical or radiologic PNI features were identified. Charts were reviewed retrospectively and relevant data collected. All patients were treated with curative intent; all had radiotherapy, and most had surgery. The primary endpoint was 5-year relapse-free survival from the time of diagnosis. Results: Patients with SCC did significantly worse than those with BCC (5-year relapse-free survival, 78% vs. 91%; p < 0.01). Squamous cell carcinoma with PNI at recurrence did significantly worse than de novo in terms of 5-year local failure (40% vs. 19%; p < 0.01) and regional relapse (29% vs. 5%; p < 0.01). Depth of invasion was also a significant factor. Of the PNI-specific factors for SCC, focal PNI did significantly better than more-extensive PNI, but involved nerve diameter or presence of PNI at the periphery of the tumor were not significant factors. Conclusions: Radiotherapy in conjunction with surgery offers an acceptable outcome for cutaneous SCC and BCC with PNI. This study suggests that focal PNI is not an adverse feature.

  19. Analysis of Vδ1 T cells in clinical grade melanoma-infiltrating lymphocytes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Donia, Marco; Ellebaek, Eva; Andersen, Mads Hald;

    2012-01-01

    . In this study, we have detected low frequencies of Vδ1 T cells among tumor-infiltrating lymphocyte (TIL) products for adoptive cell transfer generated from melanoma metastases. An increased frequency of Vδ1 T cells was found among the cell products from patients with an advanced disease stage. Vδ1 T cells...... displayed in vitro antitumor activities and sufficient proliferative potential to generate over 1 × 10(9) cells using current protocols for T cell transfer. Infusion of Vδ1 T cells together with high numbers of αβ TILs in a clinical trial was safe and well tolerated. These data suggest that Vδ1 T cells...

  20. SU-D-210-04: Using Radiotherapy Biomaterials to Brand and Track Deadly Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altundal, Y; Sajo, E [Univ Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Ngwa, W [Univ Massachusetts Lowell, Lowell, MA (United States); Brigham and Women’s Hospital, Dana Farber Cancer Institute, Harvard Medical, Boston, MA (United States)

    2015-06-15

    Purpose: Metastasis accounts for over 90% of all cancer associated suffering and death and arguably presents the most formidable challenges in cancer management. The detection of metastatic or rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood or lymph nodes remains a formidable technological challenge. In this study, we investigated the time needed to label each cancer cell in-situ (right at the source tumor) with sufficient number of GNPs that will allow enhanced non-invasive detection via photoacoustic imaging in the lymph nodes. Such in-situ labeling can be achieved via sustained release of the GNPs from Radiotherapy (RT) biomaterials (e.g. fiducials, spacers) coated/loaded with the GNP. Methods: The minimum concentration (1000 GNPs/cell for 50nm GNPs) to detect GNPs with photoacoustic imaging method was experimentally measured by Mallidi et al. and fixed at the tumor sub-volume periphery. In this work, the GNPs were assumed to diffuse from a point source, placed in the middle of a 2–3cm tumor, with an initial concentration of 7–30 mg/g. The time required to label the cells with GNPs was calculated by solving the three dimensional diffusion-reaction equation analytically. The diffusion coefficient of 10nm GNPs was experimentally determined previously. Stokes-Einstein equation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for other sizes (2–50nm) of GNPs. The cellular uptake rate constants for several sizes of GNPs were experimentally measured by Jin et al. Results: The time required to label the cells was found 0.635–15.91 days for 2–50nm GNPs with an initial concentration of 7 mg/g GNPs in a 2 cm tumor; 1.379–34.633 days for 2–50nm GNPs with an initial concentration of 30 mg/g GNPs in a 3cm tumor. Conclusion: Our results highlight new potential for labeling CTCs with GNPs released from smart RT biomaterials (i.e. fiducials or spacers loaded with the GNP) towards enhanced non-invasive imaging/detection via photoacoustic imaging.

  1. SU-D-210-04: Using Radiotherapy Biomaterials to Brand and Track Deadly Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Purpose: Metastasis accounts for over 90% of all cancer associated suffering and death and arguably presents the most formidable challenges in cancer management. The detection of metastatic or rare circulating tumor cells (CTCs) in blood or lymph nodes remains a formidable technological challenge. In this study, we investigated the time needed to label each cancer cell in-situ (right at the source tumor) with sufficient number of GNPs that will allow enhanced non-invasive detection via photoacoustic imaging in the lymph nodes. Such in-situ labeling can be achieved via sustained release of the GNPs from Radiotherapy (RT) biomaterials (e.g. fiducials, spacers) coated/loaded with the GNP. Methods: The minimum concentration (1000 GNPs/cell for 50nm GNPs) to detect GNPs with photoacoustic imaging method was experimentally measured by Mallidi et al. and fixed at the tumor sub-volume periphery. In this work, the GNPs were assumed to diffuse from a point source, placed in the middle of a 2–3cm tumor, with an initial concentration of 7–30 mg/g. The time required to label the cells with GNPs was calculated by solving the three dimensional diffusion-reaction equation analytically. The diffusion coefficient of 10nm GNPs was experimentally determined previously. Stokes-Einstein equation was used to calculate the diffusion coefficients for other sizes (2–50nm) of GNPs. The cellular uptake rate constants for several sizes of GNPs were experimentally measured by Jin et al. Results: The time required to label the cells was found 0.635–15.91 days for 2–50nm GNPs with an initial concentration of 7 mg/g GNPs in a 2 cm tumor; 1.379–34.633 days for 2–50nm GNPs with an initial concentration of 30 mg/g GNPs in a 3cm tumor. Conclusion: Our results highlight new potential for labeling CTCs with GNPs released from smart RT biomaterials (i.e. fiducials or spacers loaded with the GNP) towards enhanced non-invasive imaging/detection via photoacoustic imaging

  2. Thyroid cell irradiation by radioiodines: a new Monte Carlo electron track-structure code

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christophe Champion

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available The most significant impact of the Chernobyl accident is the increased incidence of thyroid cancer among children who were exposed to short-lived radioiodines and 131-iodine. In order to accurately estimate the radiation dose provided by these radioiodines, it is necessary to know where iodine is incorporated. To do that, the distribution at the cellular level of newly organified iodine in the immature rat thyroid was performed using secondary ion mass microscopy (NanoSIMS50. Actual dosimetric models take only into account the averaged energy and range of beta particles of the radio-elements and may, therefore, imperfectly describe the real distribution of dose deposit at the microscopic level around the point sources. Our approach is radically different since based on a track-structure Monte Carlo code allowing following-up of electrons down to low energies (~ 10eV what permits a nanometric description of the irradiation physics. The numerical simulations were then performed by modelling the complete disintegrations of the short-lived iodine isotopes as well as of 131I in new born rat thyroids in order to take into account accurate histological and biological data for the thyroid gland.O impacto mais significante do acidente de Chernobyl é o crescimento da incidência de câncer de tireóide em crianças que foram expostas a radioiodos de vida curta e ao Iodo-131. Na estimativa precisa da dose de radiação fornecida por esses radioiodos, é necessário conhecer onde o iodo está incorporado. Para obtermos esse resultado, a distribuição em nível celular de iodo recentemente organificado na tireóde de ratos imaturos foi realizada usando microscopia de massa iônica secundária (NanoSIMS50. Modelos dosimétricos atuais consideram apenas a energia média das partículas beta dos radioelementos e pode, imperfeitamente descrever a distribuição real de dose ao nível microscópico em torno dos pontos pesquisados. Nossa abordagem

  3. Tracking antigen-specific CD8+ T cells in the rat using MHC class I multimers.

    OpenAIRE

    Duplan, Valérie; Suberbielle, Elsa; Napper, Catherine,; Joly, Etienne; Saoudi, Abdelhadi; Gonzalez-Dunia, Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Studies of the quantitative and qualitative aspects of anti-microbial, anti-tumoral or autoreactive immune responses have been greatly facilitated by the possibility to stain antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells using fluorescently labeled multimeric major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I/peptide complexes. So far, this technology has been developed for human and mouse, but not yet in the rat. Here, we describe the generation of the first rat MHC multimer. We produced a rat RT1(l) Pro5 MHC...

  4. Cell detection in phase-contrast images used for alpha-particle track-etch dosimetry: a semi-automated approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Altman, Michael B.; Wang, Steven J.; Whitlock, Jenny L.; Roeske, John C.

    2005-01-01

    A novel alpha-particle irradiator has recently been developed that provides the ability to characterize cell response. The irradiator is comprised of a collimated, planar alpha-particle source which, from below, irradiates cells cultured on a track-etch material. Cells are imaged using phase-contrast microscopy before and following irradiation to obtain geometric information and survival rates; these can be used with data from alpha-particle track images to assess cell response. A key step in this process is determining cell location within the pre-irradiation images. Although this can be done completely by a human observer, the number of images requiring analysis makes the process time-consuming and tedious. To reduce the potential human error and decrease user interaction time, a semi-automated, computer-aided method of cell detection has been developed. The method employs a two-level adaptive thresholding technique to obtain size and position information about potential cell cytoplasms and nuclei. Proximity and geometry-based thresholds are then used to mark structures as cells. False-positive detections from the automated algorithm are due mostly to imperfections in the track-etch background, camera effects and cellular residue. To correct for these, a human observer reviews all detected structures, discarding false positives. When analysing two randomly selected cell dish image databases, the semi-automated method detected 92-94% of all cells and 94-97% of cells with a well-defined cytoplasm and nucleus while reducing human workload by 32-83%.

  5. In vivo tracking of {sup 111}In-labeled bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in acute brain trauma model

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yoon, Joon-Kee [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Institute for Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Research, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Park, Bok-Nam [Department of Nuclear Medicine and Molecular Imaging, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shim, Woo-Young [Institute for Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Research, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Shin, Jin Young [Institute for Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Research, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Gwang [Institute for Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Research, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Molecular Science and Technology, Ajou University, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Brain Disease Research Center, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Ahn, Young Hwan [Institute for Neuroregeneration and Stem Cell Research, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of); Department of Neurosurgery, Ajou University School of Medicine, Suwon (Korea, Republic of)], E-mail: yhahn@ajou.ac.kr

    2010-04-15

    Introduction: This study was to evaluate the in vivo distribution of intravenously transplanted bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in an acute brain trauma model by {sup 111}In-tropolone labeling. Methods: Rat BMSCs were labeled with 37 MBq {sup 111}In-tropolone. Their labeling efficiency and in vitro retention rate were measured. The viability and proliferation of labeled BMSCs were evaluated for 14 days after labeling. The biodistribution of {sup 111}In-labeled BMSCs in trauma models was compared with those of sham-operated rats and normal rats on gamma camera images. The migration of {sup 111}In-BMSCs to the traumatic brain was evaluated using confocal microscope. Results: The labeling efficiency of {sup 111}In-BMSCs was 66{+-}5%, and their retention rate was 85.3% at 1 h after labeling. There was no difference in the number of viable cells between {sup 111}In-BMSCs and controls at 48 h after labeling. However, the proliferation of {sup 111}In-BMSCs was inhibited after the third day of labeling, and it did not reach confluency. On gamma camera images, most of the {sup 111}In-BMSCs uptake was observed in the liver and spleen at the second day of injection. The brain uptake of {sup 111}In-BMSCs was detected prominently in trauma models (1.4%) than in sham-operated (0.5%) or normal rats (0.3%). Radiolabeled BMSCs were observed at the traumatic brain on the confocal microscope as they have a homing capacity, although its proliferation capacity was suppressed. Conclusion: Although growth inhibition by {sup 111}In-labeling need to be evaluated further prior to use in humans, {sup 111}In-labeled BMSCs are useful for the tracking of intravenously transplanted mesenchymal stem cells in brain disease models.

  6. Clinical scale rapid expansion of lymphocytes for adoptive cell transfer therapy in the WAVE® bioreactor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Somerville Robert PT

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To simplify clinical scale lymphocyte expansions, we investigated the use of the WAVE®, a closed system bioreactor that utilizes active perfusion to generate high cell numbers in minimal volumes. Methods We have developed an optimized rapid expansion protocol for the WAVE bioreactor that produces clinically relevant numbers of cells for our adoptive cell transfer clinical protocols. Results TIL and genetically modified PBL were rapidly expanded to clinically relevant scales in both static bags and the WAVE bioreactor. Both bioreactors produced comparable numbers of cells; however the cultures generated in the WAVE bioreactor had a higher percentage of CD4+ cells and had a less activated phenotype. Conclusions The WAVE bioreactor simplifies the process of rapidly expanding tumor reactive lymphocytes under GMP conditions, and provides an alternate approach to cell generation for ACT protocols.

  7. Clinical relevance of KIRs in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vojvodić Svetlana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Natural Killer cells (NK cells represent the subset of peripheral lymphocytes that play critical role in the innate immune response to virus-infected and tumor transformed cells. Lysis of NK sensitived target cells could be mediated independently of antigen stimulation, and unlike cytotoxic T-lymphocytes, they do not require peptide presentation by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC molecules. NK cell cytotoxic activity is controlled by considerable number of cell surface Killer cell Immunoglobulin like Receptors (KIRs, which can exist in both inhibitory and activating isoforms. The inhibitory KIRs are mostly specific for HLA class I ligands and I HLA class like molecules, while the specificity of activating receptors is regarded to lectine-like superfamily. The role of NK cells in allogeneic haematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT: NK cells are the first lymphocyte subset that reconstitute the peripheral blood following allogeneic HSCT. By selecting donors mismatched for relevant HLA ligands in the context of recipients KIR genotype, multiple roles for alloreactive donor NK cells have been demonstrated, in diminishing Graft vs. Host Disease (GvHD through selective killing of recipient dendritic cells, prevention of graft rejection by killing recipient T cells and participation in Graft vs. Leukaemia (GvL effect through destruction of residual host tumor cells. Conclusion Investigation of KIRs heterogenity play an important role in the field of HSCT, because it is useful for the early diagnosis of post transplant complications and can serve as a predictive risk factor for GvHD development.

  8. Advanced cardiac chemical exchange saturation transfer (cardioCEST) MRI for in vivo cell tracking and metabolic imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pumphrey, Ashley; Yang, Zhengshi; Ye, Shaojing; Powell, David K.; Thalman, Scott; Watt, David S.; Abdel-Latif, Ahmed; Unrine, Jason; Thompson, Katherine; Fornwalt, Brandon; Ferrauto, Giuseppe; Vandsburger, Moriel

    2016-01-01

    An improved pre-clinical cardiac chemical exchange saturation transfer (CEST) pulse sequence (cardioCEST) was used to selectively visualize paramagnetic CEST (paraCEST)-labeled cells following intramyocardial implantation. In addition, cardioCEST was used to examine the effect of diet-induced obesity upon myocardial creatine CEST contrast. CEST pulse sequences were designed from standard turbo-spin-echo and gradient-echo sequences, and a cardiorespiratory-gated steady-state cine gradient-echo sequence. In vitro validation studies performed in phantoms composed of 20mM Eu-HPDO3A, 20mM Yb-HPDO3A, or saline demonstrated similar CEST contrast by spin-echo and gradient-echo pulse sequences. Skeletal myoblast cells (C2C12) were labeled with either Eu-HPDO3A or saline using a hypotonic swelling procedure and implanted into the myocardium of C57B6/J mice. Inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry confirmed cellular levels of Eu of 2.1 × 10−3 ng/cell in Eu-HPDO3A-labeled cells and 2.3 × 10−5 ng/cell in saline-labeled cells. In vivo cardioCEST imaging of labeled cells at ±15ppm was performed 24 h after implantation and revealed significantly elevated asymmetric magnetization transfer ratio values in regions of Eu-HPDO3A-labeled cells when compared with surrounding myocardium or saline-labeled cells. We further utilized the cardioCEST pulse sequence to examine changes in myocardial creatine in response to diet-induced obesity by acquiring pairs of cardioCEST images at ±1.8 ppm. While ventricular geometry and function were unchanged between mice fed either a high-fat diet or a corresponding control low-fat diet for 14 weeks, myocardial creatine CEST contrast was significantly reduced in mice fed the high-fat diet. The selective visualization of paraCEST-labeled cells using cardioCEST imaging can enable investigation of cell fate processes in cardioregenerative medicine, or multiplex imaging of cell survival with imaging of cardiac structure and function and

  9. Determination of left ventricular short-axis views torsion in patients with heart failure by speckle tracking imaging and its clinical significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Objective: To evaluate the clinical value of speckle tracking imaging (STI) for the measurement of left ventricular short-axis views regional rotation in patients with heart failure (HF). Methods: High frame rate two-dimensional images from the left ventricular short-axis views in 31 patients with CHF (CHF group) and 32 healthy controls (control group) were recorded. The regional rotation (Rot) was measured in the left ventricular short-axis views; the peak endocardium rotation (endo-rot), peak epicardium rotation (epi-rot), peak bulk rotation (bulk-rot), and peak mural torsion (mural-tor) were measured separately. Results: Compared with control group, the regional Rot of each segment in patients with CHF was significantly decreased (all P<0.01), the peak endo-rot, peak epi-rot,peak bulk-rot, and peak mural-tor were aslo significantly decreased (all P<0.05) in patients with CHF. The left ventricular torsion of patients with CHF was significantly lower than that in control group (P<0.01). Conclusion: STI can exactly evaluate the characteristics of left ventricular rotation and the heart function in patients with CHF. (authors)

  10. Coating maghemite nanoparticles with D-mannose enhances their potential for labeling neural stem cells for in vivo cell tracking

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Pongrac, I.; Dobrivojevic, M.; Brkic, L.; Regul, J.; Babič, Michal; Horák, Daniel; Gajovic, S.

    Zagreb : University of Zagreb School of Medicine, 2015. s. 89-90. [GlowBrain Final Conference "Stem cell and biomaterial applications for brain repair". 27.05.2015-31.05.2015, Zagreb] EU Projects: European Commission(XE) 316120 - GLOWBRAIN Institutional support: RVO:61389013 Keywords : nanoparticles * biomedicine Subject RIV: CD - Macromolecular Chemistry

  11. Clinical Allogeneic and Autologous Islet Cell Transplantation: Update

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinichi Matsumoto

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Islet cell transplantation is categorized as a β-cell replacement therapy for diabetic patients who lack the ability to secrete insulin. Allogeneic islet cell transplantation is for the treatment of type 1 diabetes, and autologous islet cell transplantation is for the prevention of surgical diabetes after a total pancreatectomy. The issues of allogeneic islet cell transplantation include poor efficacy of islet isolation, the need for multiple donor pancreata, difficulty maintaining insulin independence and undesirable side effects of immunosuppressive drugs. Those issues have been solved step by step and allogeneic islet cell transplantation is almost ready to be the standard therapy. The donor shortage will be the next issue and marginal and/or living donor islet cell transplantation might alleviate the issue. Xeno-islet cell transplantation, β-cell regeneration from human stem cells and gene induction of the naïve pancreas represent the next generation of β-cell replacement therapy. Autologous islet cell transplantation after total pancreatectomy for the treatment of chronic pancreatitis with severe abdominal pain is the standard therapy, even though only limited centers are able to perform this treatment. Remote center autologous islet cell transplantation is an attractive option for hospitals performing total pancreatectomies without the proper islet isolation facilities.

  12. Tras la huella de las células madre On the track of stem cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porfirio Hernández Ramírez

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available En los últimos años ha surgido un gran interés en conocer la biodistribución de las células madre en el organismo después que son infundidas o inyectadas directamente en una parte del cuerpo. Para esto se han usado diferentes procederes, entre ellos, el marcaje de las células con diferentes fluorocromos, tales como la proteína con fluorescencia verde y la proteína con fluorescencia roja; o bien se les hace una transfección con plasmidos que codifican proteínas fluorescentes o se emplean sondas moleculares fluorescentes para la identificación de cromosomas. Recientemente se han introducido técnicas imagenológicas de avanzada no invasivas, entre las que tenemos la resonancia magnético nuclear, así como procederes basados en el marcaje con radionúclidos para la obtención de imágenes detectadas por tomografía por emisión de positrones (PET, del inglés positron emission tomography, o por tomografía computarizada por emisión de fotón único (SPECT, del inglés single- photon emission computed tomography.In past years there was an increasing interest by to know about the biodistribution of stem cells in organism after its perfusion or direct injection in a part of the body. Thus, we used different procedures including the cell labeling with distinct fluorochromes, such as the green fluorescence protein and the red fluorescence protein or a plasmid transfection codifying the fluorescent proteins of fluorescent molecular stents to identify the chromosomes. Recently non-invasive leading imaging techniques have been introduced including nuclear magnetic resonance. As well as procedures based on radionuclide labeling to obtain the positron emission tomography (PET images or by photon-emission computed tomography (SPECT.

  13. Pigmented Basal Cell Carcinoma: A Clinical Variant, Report of Two Cases

    OpenAIRE

    K., Deepadarshan; M., Mallikarjun; N. Abdu, Noshin

    2013-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant tumour of skin, comprising 80% of non-melanoma cancers. Intermittent exposure to ultraviolet radiation is an important risk factor. Pigmented basal cell carcinoma is a clinical and histological variant of basal cell carcinoma that exhibits increased pigmentation. It is a very rare variant, although its frequency can reach upto 6% of total basal cell carcinomas in Hispanics. Herein, we are reporting 2 cases of pigmented basal cell carcinoma.

  14. Stem Cell Therapy for Cardiovascular Disorders - Our Clinical Experience

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayakrishnan AG

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autologous Bone Marrow stem Cell transplantation is a viable therapeutic option for patients with end stage heart failure due to cardiomyopathy of varied etiology as there are only limited treatment options other than cardiac transplantation. The rationale behind the application of stem cells in these patients include • Stem cells directly replace the affected cells by differentiation into the damaged cell type • Stem cells also exert Paracrine effects by secre tion of growth factors (VGEF,FGF-1to stimu late local cell growth•In addition to the above, stem cells release signaling factors which recruit stem cells from elsewhere by modulating the immune system.Materials and Methods: In this presentation we describe our study on a series of 13 patients who received isolated and expanded CD 34 cells from the bone marrow. Seven had ischemic dysfunction, three had dilated cardiomyopathy and three had primary pulmonary hypertension. Five patients received the stem cells via intracoronary injection, three directly into the myocardium and three intrapulmonary. Results: All patients showed functional improvement of the myocardium recorded by non-invasive investigations and improvement in the quality of life. Follow up period ranged from 6 months to 2 years. Conclusion: Our experience with bone marrow derived stem cells in patients with cardiomyopathy has been encouraging. More studies are planned in the future.

  15. Mesenchymal Stem Cells Isolated from Adipose and Other Tissues: Basic Biological Properties and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hakan Orbay

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are adult stem cells that were initially isolated from bone marrow. However, subsequent research has shown that other adult tissues also contain MSCs. MSCs originate from mesenchyme, which is embryonic tissue derived from the mesoderm. These cells actively proliferate, giving rise to new cells in some tissues, but remain quiescent in others. MSCs are capable of differentiating into multiple cell types including adipocytes, chondrocytes, osteocytes, and cardiomyocytes. Isolation and induction of these cells could provide a new therapeutic tool for replacing damaged or lost adult tissues. However, the biological properties and use of stem cells in a clinical setting must be well established before significant clinical benefits are obtained. This paper summarizes data on the biological properties of MSCs and discusses current and potential clinical applications.

  16. Hierarchical Load Tracking Control of a Grid-Connected Solid Oxide Fuel Cell for Maximum Electrical Efficiency Operation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yonghui Li

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Based on the benchmark solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC dynamic model for power system studies and the analysis of the SOFC operating conditions, the nonlinear programming (NLP optimization method was used to determine the maximum electrical efficiency of the grid-connected SOFC subject to the constraints of fuel utilization factor, stack temperature and output active power. The optimal operating conditions of the grid-connected SOFC were obtained by solving the NLP problem considering the power consumed by the air compressor. With the optimal operating conditions of the SOFC for the maximum efficiency operation obtained at different active power output levels, a hierarchical load tracking control scheme for the grid-connected SOFC was proposed to realize the maximum electrical efficiency operation with the stack temperature bounded. The hierarchical control scheme consists of a fast active power control and a slower stack temperature control. The active power control was developed by using a decentralized control method. The efficiency of the proposed hierarchical control scheme was demonstrated by case studies using the benchmark SOFC dynamic model.

  17. Ion track reconstruction in 3D using alumina-based fluorescent nuclear track detectors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niklas, M.; Bartz, J. A.; Akselrod, M. S.; Abollahi, A.; Jäkel, O.; Greilich, S.

    2013-09-01

    Fluorescent nuclear track detectors (FNTDs) based on Al2O3: C, Mg single crystal combined with confocal microscopy provide 3D information on ion tracks with a resolution only limited by light diffraction. FNTDs are also ideal substrates to be coated with cells to engineer cell-fluorescent ion track hybrid detectors (Cell-Fit-HD). This radiobiological tool enables a novel platform linking cell responses to physical dose deposition on a sub-cellular level in proton and heavy ion therapies. To achieve spatial correlation between single ion hits in the cell coating and its biological response the ion traversals have to be reconstructed in 3D using the depth information gained by the FNTD read-out. FNTDs were coated with a confluent human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial (A549) cell layer. Carbon ion irradiation of the hybrid detector was performed perpendicular and angular to the detector surface. In situ imaging of the fluorescently labeled cell layer and the FNTD was performed in a sequential read-out. Making use of the trajectory information provided by the FNTD the accuracy of 3D track reconstruction of single particles traversing the hybrid detector was studied. The accuracy is strongly influenced by the irradiation angle and therefore by complexity of the FNTD signal. Perpendicular irradiation results in highest accuracy with error of smaller than 0.10°. The ability of FNTD technology to provide accurate 3D ion track reconstruction makes it a powerful tool for radiobiological investigations in clinical ion beams, either being used as a substrate to be coated with living tissue or being implanted in vivo.

  18. CLINICAL VALUE OF DETECTING T LYMPHOCYTE SUBSET AND NK CELL ACTIVITY IN PATIENTS WITH COLORECTAL CANCER

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    刘长安; 管增伟; 孙武; 邵玉霞; 李卓; 贾廷珍

    2001-01-01

    Objective To study on the expression and clinical significance of T lymphocyte subset and NK cell activity (NKA) in patients with colorectal cancer. Methods Fifty-seven cancer patients and 33 healthy controls were enrolled in this study. T lymphocyte subset was measured by SAP technique and NKA by LDH release assay based on K562 cells, which served as target cells.

  19. Human adipose-derived stromal cells in a clinically applicable injectable alginate hydrogel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Bjarke Follin; Juhl, Morten; Cohen, Smadar;

    2015-01-01

    BACKGROUND AIMS: Clinical trials have documented beneficial effects of mesenchymal stromal cells from bone marrow and adipose tissue (ASCs) as treatment in patients with ischemic heart disease. However, retention of transplanted cells is poor. One potential way to increase cell retention is to in...... and alginate is non-immunogenic and, in fact, immunosuppressive....

  20. Combination of Circulating Tumor Cells with Serum Carcinoembryonic Antigen Enhances Clinical Prediction of Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Xi Chen; Xu Wang; Hua He; Ziling Liu; Ji-Fan Hu; Wei Li

    2015-01-01

    Circulating tumor cells (CTCs) have emerged as a potential biomarker in the diagnosis, prognosis, treatment, and surveillance of lung cancer. However, CTC detection is not only costly, but its sensitivity is also low, thus limiting its usage and the collection of robust data regarding the significance of CTCs in lung cancer. We aimed to seek clinical variables that enhance the prediction of CTCs in patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Clinical samples and pathological data were c...

  1. Isolation and Manufacture of Clinical-Grade Bone Marrow-Derived Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Renuka P; Hanley, Patrick J

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent cells with both regenerative and immunomodulatory capacities. These unique properties make them appealing as a biologic, with multiple phase 1-3 clinical trials currently testing their safety and efficacy. Although expanding MSCs does not require extensive manipulation, expanding MSCs for use in clinical trials does require the knowledge and safety that are delineated in current good manufacturing practices (GMPs). Here we briefly detail the characteristics of MSCs and considerations for expanding them for clinical use. We then include a step-by-step protocol for expanding MSCs for early phase clinical trials, with important notes to consider during the expansion of these MSCs. PMID:27236680

  2. Stereotactic body radiotherapy using gated radiotherapy with real-time tumor-tracking for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To clarify the clinical outcomes of two dose schedule of stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) for stage I non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) using a real-time tumor-tracking radiation therapy (RTRT) system in single institution. Using a superposition algorithm, we administered 48 Gy in 4 fractions at the isocenter in 2005–2006 and 40 Gy in 4 fractions to the 95% volume of PTV in 2007–2010 with a treatment period of 4 to 7 days. Target volume margins were fixed irrespective of the tumor amplitude. In total, 109 patients (79 T1N0M0 and 30 T2N0M0). With a median follow-up period of 25 months (range, 4 to 72 months), the 5-year local control rate (LC) was 78% and the 5-year overall survival rate (OS) was 64%. Grade 2, 3, 4, and 5 radiation pneumonitis (RP) was experienced by 15 (13.8%), 3 (2.8%), 0, and 0 patients, respectively. The mean lung dose (MLD) and the volume of lung receiving 20 Gy (V20) were significantly higher in patients with RP Grade 2/3 than in those with RP Grade 0/1 (MLD p = 0.002, V20 p = 0.003). There was no correlation between larger maximum amplitude of marker movement and larger PTV (r = 0.137), MLD (r = 0.046), or V20 (r = 0.158). SBRT using the RTRT system achieved LC and OS comparable to other SBRT studies with very low incidence of RP, which was consistent with the small MLD and V20 irrespective of tumor amplitude. For stage I NSCLC, SBRT using RTRT was suggested to be reliable and effective, especially for patients with large amplitude of tumor movement

  3. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular abnormalities is complicated by the difficulty in obtaining sufficient tumor material, in terms of quantity and quality, from a biopsy. Here, we described how circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can have a clinical utility in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC patients to diagnose ALK-EML4 gene rearrangement and to guide therapeutic management of these patients. The ability to detect genetic abnormalities such ALK rearrangement in CTCs shows that these cells could offer new perspectives both for the diagnosis and the monitoring of ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with ALK inhibitors. PMID:25414829

  4. Clinical Utility of Circulating Tumor Cells in ALK-Positive Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Faugeroux, Vincent; Pailler, Emma; Auger, Nathalie; Taylor, Melissa; Farace, Françoise

    2014-01-01

    The advent of rationally targeted therapies such as small-molecule tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) has considerably transformed the therapeutic management of a subset of patients with non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC) harboring defined molecular abnormalities. When such genetic molecular alterations are detected the use of specific TKI has demonstrated better results (overall response rate, progression free survival) compared to systemic therapy. However, the detection of such molecular abnormalities is complicated by the difficulty in obtaining sufficient tumor material, in terms of quantity and quality, from a biopsy. Here, we described how circulating tumor cells (CTCs) can have a clinical utility in anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK) positive NSCLC patients to diagnose ALK-EML4 gene rearrangement and to guide therapeutic management of these patients. The ability to detect genetic abnormalities such ALK rearrangement in CTCs shows that these cells could offer new perspectives both for the diagnosis and the monitoring of ALK-positive patients eligible for treatment with ALK inhibitors. PMID:25414829

  5. Clinical research of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with cytokine-induced killer cell treatment in advanced renal cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renal cell carcinoma (RCC) is a malignant disease that demonstrates resistance to standard chemotherapeutic agents. Yet Active immunization using genetically modified dendritic cells holds promise for the adjuvant treatment of malignancies to eradicate or control residual disease. Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells are a heterogeneous population of effector CD8+ T cells with diverse TCR specificities, possessing non-MHC-restricted cytolytic activities against tumor cells. Clinical studies have confirmed benefit and safety of CIK cell-based therapy for patients with malignancies. This clinical trial was conducted to evaluate efficacy and safety of genetically modified dendritic cells in combination with Cytokine-Induced Killer Cell (gmDCs-CIK) treatment of patients with RCC. 28 patients with advanced renal cancer were admitted to Affiliated Hospital of Academy of Military Medical Sciences from December 2010 to March 2012 and treated by gmDCs-CIK. Clinical efficacy and safety between pre- and post-treatment were compared. This analysis showed an objective response rate (ORR) of 39% and a disease control rate (DCR) of as 75%. There is no significant relationship between clinical efficacy and whether metastasis occurred or not (P > 0.05). There is no significant relationship between ORR and cycles of treatment (P > 0.05), but DCR was significantly related with cycles of treatment (P < 0.05). No clinically significant side effects were observed. There were no significant changes of T cell subsets including CD3+, CD4+, CD8+, CD4+ CD25+ Treg cells except Th1 in peripheral blood between day 30 after immunotherapy and 1 day before immunotherapy in 11 patients. DC-CIK is feasible and effective in treating advanced renal cancer and thus provides a new approach. ClinicalTrials.gov Identifier: http://clinicaltrials.gov/ct2/show/NCT01924156. Registration date: August 14, 2013

  6. Stem cells and the pancreas: from discovery to clinical approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Angelica Dessì

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available The existence of stem cells within the adult pancreas is supported by the ability of this organ to regenerate its endocrine component in various conditions such as pregnancy and following partial pancreatectomy. Several studies have shown that progenitor or adult stem cells may reside within the pancreas and particularly in the pancreatic ducts, including acinar cells and islets of Langerhans. The discovery of human pluripotent stem cells in the pancreas, and the possibility of development of strategies for generating these, represented a turning point for the therapeutic interventions of type 1 diabetes.Proceedings of the 2nd International Course on Perinatal Pathology (part of the 11th International Workshop on Neonatology · October 26th-31st, 2015 · Cagliari (Italy · October 31st, 2015 · Stem cells: present and future Guest Editors: Gavino Faa, Vassilios Fanos, Antonio Giordano

  7. Analyses of Endothelial Cells and Endothelial Progenitor Cells Released Microvesicles by Using Microbead and Q-dot Based Nanoparticle Tracking Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinju; Zhong, Yun; Ma, Xiaotang; Xiao, Xiang; Cheng, Chuanfang; Chen, Yusen; Iwuchukwu, Ifeanyi; Gaines, Kenneth J.; Bin Zhao; Liu, Shiming; Travers, Jeffrey B.; Bihl, Ji C.; Chen, Yanfang

    2016-01-01

    Accurate analysis of specific microvesicles (MVs) from biofluids is critical and challenging. Here we described novel methods to purify and detect MVs shed from endothelial cells (ECs) and endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs) by combining microbeads with fluorescence quantum dots (Q-dots) coupled nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). In the in vitro screening systems, we demonstrated that 1) anti-CD105 (EC marker) and anti-CD34 (EPC marker) conjugated-microbeads had the highest sensitivity and specificity for isolating respective MVs, which were confirmed with negative controls, CD41 and CD235a; 2) anti-CD144 (EC marker) and anti-KDR (EPC marker) conjugated-Q-dots exhibited the best sensitivity and specificity for their respective MV NTA detection, which were confirmed with positive control, anti-Annexin V (MV universal marker). The methods were further validated by their ability to efficiently recover the known amount of EC-MVs and EPC-MVs from particle-depleted plasma, and to detect the dynamical changes of plasma MVs in ischemic stroke patients, as compared with traditional flow cytometry. These novel methods provide ideal approaches for functional analysis and biomarker discovery of ECs- and EPCs- derived MVs. PMID:27094208

  8. Breast cancer stem cell markers – the rocky road to clinical applications

    OpenAIRE

    Dontu, Gabriela

    2008-01-01

    Lately, understanding the role of cancer stem cells in tumor initiation and progression became a major focus in stem cell biology and in cancer research. Considerable efforts, such as the recent studies by Honeth and colleagues, published in the June issue of Breast Cancer Research, are directed towards developing clinical applications of the cancer stem cell concepts. This work shows that the previously described CD44+CD24- stem cell phenotype is associated with basal-type breast cancers in ...

  9. Engineering a clinically-useful matrix for cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prestwich, Glenn D

    2008-01-01

    The design criteria for matrices for encapsulation of cells for cell therapy include chemical, biological, engineering, marketing, regulatory, and financial constraints. What is required is a biocompatible material for culture of cells in three-dimensions (3-D) that offers ease of use, experimental flexibility to alter composition and compliance, and a composition that would permit a seamless transition from in vitro to in vivo use. The challenge is to replicate the complexity of the native extracellular matrix (ECM) environment with the minimum number of components necessary to allow cells to rebuild a given tissue. Our approach is to deconstruct the ECM to a few modular components that can be reassembled into biomimetic materials that meet these criteria. These semi-synthetic ECMs (sECMs) employ thiol-modified derivatives of hyaluronic acid (HA) that can form covalently crosslinked, biodegradable hydrogels. These sECMs are "living" biopolymers, meaning that they can be crosslinked in the presence of cells or tissues to enable cell therapy and tissue engineering. Moreover, the sECMs allow inclusion of the appropriate biological cues needed to simulate the complexity of the ECM of a given tissue. Taken together, the sECM technology offers a manufacturable, highly reproducible, flexible, FDA-approvable, and affordable vehicle for cell expansion and differentiation in 3-D. PMID:19279714

  10. Evaluation of a BGO-Based PET System for Single-Cell Tracking Performance by Simulation and Phantom Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Yu; Kim, Tae Jin; Pratx, Guillem

    2016-01-01

    A recent method based on positron emission was reported for tracking moving point sources using the Inveon PET system. However, the effect of scanner background noise was not further explored. Here, we evaluate tracking with the Genisys4, a bismuth germanate-based PET system, which has no significant intrinsic background and may be better suited to tracking lower and/or faster activity sources. Position-dependent sensitivity of the Genisys4 was simulated in Geant4 Application for Tomographic Emission (GATE) using a static (18)F point source. Trajectories of helically moving point sources with varying activity and rotation speed were reconstructed from list-mode data as described previously. Simulations showed that the Inveon's ability to track sources within 2 mm of localization error is limited to objects with a velocity-to-activity ratio like objects with this system. PMID:27175009

  11. TOPICAL REVIEW: Stem cell technology using bioceramics: hard tissue regeneration towards clinical application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnishi, Hiroe; Oda, Yasuaki; Ohgushi, Hajime

    2010-02-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult stem cells which show differentiation capabilities toward various cell lineages. We have already used MSCs for treatments of osteoarthritis, bone necrosis and bone tumor. For this purpose, culture expanded MSCs were combined with various ceramics and then implanted. Because of rejection response to allogeneic MSC implantation, we have utilized patients' own MSCs for the treatment. Bone marrow is a good cell source of MSCs, although the MSCs also exist in adipose tissue. When comparing osteogenic differentiation of these MSCs, bone marrow MSCs show more extensive bone forming capability than adipose MSCs. Thus, the bone marrow MSCs are useful for bone tissue regeneration. However, the MSCs show limited proliferation and differentiation capabilities that hindered clinical applications in some cases. Recent advances reveal that transduction of plural transcription factors into human adult cells results in generation of new type of stem cells called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPS cells). A drawback of the iPS cells for clinical applications is tumor formation after their in vivo implantation; therefore it is difficult to use iPS cells for the treatment. To circumvent the problem, we transduced a single factor of either SOX2 or NANOG into the MSCs and found high proliferation as well as osteogenic differentiation capabilities of the MSCs. The stem cells could be combined with bioceramics for clinical applications. Here, we summarize our recent technologies using adult stem cells in viewpoints of bone tissue regeneration.

  12. Culture bag systems for clinical applications of adult human neural crest-derived stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Greiner, Johannes F. W.; Grunwald, Lena-Marie; Müller, Janine; Sudhoff, Holger; Widera, Darius; Kaltschmidt, Christian; Kaltschmidt, Barbara

    2014-01-01

    Introduction Facing the challenging treatment of neurodegenerative diseases as well as complex craniofacial injuries such as those common after cancer therapy, the field of regenerative medicine increasingly relies on stem cell transplantation strategies. Here, neural crest-derived stem cells (NCSCs) offer many promising applications, although scale up of clinical-grade processes prior to potential transplantations is currently limiting. In this study, we aimed to establish a clinical-grad...

  13. Closed system generation of dendritic cells from a single blood volume for clinical application in immunotherapy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Elias, M; van Zanten, J; Hospers, GAP; Setroikromo, A; de Jong, MA; de Leij, LFMH; Mulder, NH

    2005-01-01

    Dendritic cells (DC) used for clinical trials should be processed oil a large scale conforming to current good manufacturing practice (cGM P) guidelines. The aim of this study was to develop a protocol for clinical grade generation of immature DC in a closed-systern. Aphereses were performed with th

  14. Process Engineering of Stem Cells for Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Serra, Maria Margarida de Carvalho Negrão

    2011-01-01

    Over the last decade, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) have garnered a lot of attention owing to their inherent self-renewal ability and pluripotency. These characteristics have opened opportunities for potential stem cell-based regenerative medicines, for development of drug discovery platforms and as unique in vitro models for the study of early human development.(...) Fundação para a Ciência e a Tecnologia

  15. Langerhans cell histiocytosis : A clinical and immunological study

    OpenAIRE

    Bernstrand, Cecilia

    2003-01-01

    Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), previously known as histiocytosis X, eosinophilic granuloma, Hand-Schüller-Christian or Letterer-Siwe disease, is a rare disease with a reported incidence in childhood of 5.4 cases per million children per year. The disease can present at any age but young children are most often affected. It is characterized by an accumulation of abnormal and clonal Langerhans cells in various organs such as the skin, bone, lymph nodes, lungs, liver, spl...

  16. Manufacturing Mesenchymal Stromal Cells for Phase I Clinical Trials

    OpenAIRE

    Hanley, Patrick J.; Mei, Zhuyong; Cabreira-Hansen, Maria da Graca; Klis, Mariola; Li, Wei; Zhao, Yali; Durett, April G.; Zheng, Xingwu; Wang, Yongping; Gee, Adrian P.; Horwitz, Edwin M.

    2013-01-01

    Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) are multipotent progenitor cells capable of differentiating into adipocytes, osteoblasts, and chondroblasts as well as secreting a vast array of soluble mediators. This potentially makes MSCs important mediators of a variety of therapeutic applications. They are actively under evaluation for immunomodulatory purposes such as graft-versus host disease (GvHD) and Crohn’s disease, as well as regenerative applications such as stroke and congestive heart failure. H...

  17. Current protocols in the generation of pluripotent stem cells: theoretical, methodological and clinical considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brad B Swelstad

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Brad B Swelstad, Candace L KerrInstitute for Cell Engineering, Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Johns Hopkins University, Baltimore, MA, USAAbstract: Pluripotent stem cells have been derived from various embryonic, fetal and adult sources. Embryonic stem cells (ESCs and parthenogenic ESCs (pESCs are derived from the embryo proper while embryonic germ cells (EGCs, embryonal carcinoma cells (ECCs, and germ-line stem cells (GSC are produced from germ cells. ECCs were the first pluripotent stem cell lines established from adult testicular tumors while EGCs are generated in vitro from primordial germ cells (PGCs isolated in late embryonic development. More recently, studies have also demonstrated the ability to produce GSCs from adult germ cells, known as spermatogonial stem cells. Unlike ECCs, the source of GSCs are normal, non-cancerous adult tissue. The study of these unique cell lines has provided information that has led to the ability to reprogram somatic cells into an ESC-like state. These cells, called induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs, have been derived from a number of human fetal and adult origins. With the promises pluripotent stem cells bring to cell-based therapies there remain several considerations that need to be carefully studied prior to their clinical use. Many of these issues involve understanding key factors regulating their generation, including those which define pluripotency. In this regard, the following article discusses critical aspects of pluripotent stem cell derivation and current issues about their therapeutic potential.Keywords: pluripotency, stem cells, derivation, human

  18. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy M Butler

    Full Text Available The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient's resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor.

  19. Exome Sequencing of Cell-Free DNA from Metastatic Cancer Patients Identifies Clinically Actionable Mutations Distinct from Primary Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Butler, Timothy M.; Johnson-Camacho, Katherine; Peto, Myron; Wang, Nicholas J.; Macey, Tara A.; Korkola, James E.; Koppie, Theresa M.; Corless, Christopher L.; Gray, Joe W.; Spellman, Paul T.

    2015-01-01

    The identification of the molecular drivers of cancer by sequencing is the backbone of precision medicine and the basis of personalized therapy; however, biopsies of primary tumors provide only a snapshot of the evolution of the disease and may miss potential therapeutic targets, especially in the metastatic setting. A liquid biopsy, in the form of cell-free DNA (cfDNA) sequencing, has the potential to capture the inter- and intra-tumoral heterogeneity present in metastatic disease, and, through serial blood draws, track the evolution of the tumor genome. In order to determine the clinical utility of cfDNA sequencing we performed whole-exome sequencing on cfDNA and tumor DNA from two patients with metastatic disease; only minor modifications to our sequencing and analysis pipelines were required for sequencing and mutation calling of cfDNA. The first patient had metastatic sarcoma and 47 of 48 mutations present in the primary tumor were also found in the cell-free DNA. The second patient had metastatic breast cancer and sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation in the cfDNA and metastatic site, but not in the primary tumor. This likely explains tumor progression on Anastrozole. Significant heterogeneity between the primary and metastatic tumors, with cfDNA reflecting the metastases, suggested separation from the primary lesion early in tumor evolution. This is best illustrated by an activating PIK3CA mutation (H1047R) which was clonal in the primary tumor, but completely absent from either the metastasis or cfDNA. Here we show that cfDNA sequencing supplies clinically actionable information with minimal risks compared to metastatic biopsies. This study demonstrates the utility of whole-exome sequencing of cell-free DNA from patients with metastatic disease. cfDNA sequencing identified an ESR1 mutation, potentially explaining a patient’s resistance to aromatase inhibition, and gave insight into how metastatic lesions differ from the primary tumor. PMID:26317216

  20. CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics for hematologic malignancies: interpreting clinical outcomes to date.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Jae H; Geyer, Mark B; Brentjens, Renier J

    2016-06-30

    Adoptive transfer of T cells genetically modified to express chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) targeting CD19 has produced impressive results in treating patients with B-cell malignancies. Although these CAR-modified T cells target the same antigen, the designs of CARs vary as well as several key aspects of the clinical trials in which these CARs have been studied. It is unclear whether these differences have any impact on clinical outcome and treatment-related toxicities. Herein, we review clinical results reflecting the investigational use of CD19-targeted CAR T-cell therapeutics in patients with B-cell hematologic malignancies, in light of differences in CAR design and production, and outline the limitations inherent in comparing outcomes between studies. PMID:27207800

  1. Regulations in the United States for cell transplantation clinical trials in neurological diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhu; Yuanqing Tan; Qi Gu; Weifang Han; Zhongwen Li; Jason S Meyer; Baoyang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a systematic approach to evaluate the current utilization, safety, and effectiveness of cell therapies for neurological diseases in human. And review the present regulations, considering United States (US) as a representative country, for cell transplantation in neurological disease and discuss the challenges facing the field of neurology in the coming decades. Methods:A detailed search was performed in systematic literature reviews of cellular‐based therapies in neurological diseases, using PubMed, web of science, and clinical trials. Regulations of cell therapy products used for clinical trials were searched from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Results: Seven most common types of cell therapies for neurological diseases have been reported to be relatively safe with varying degrees of neurological recovery. And a series of regulations in US for cellular therapy was summarized including preclinical evaluations, sourcing material, stem cell manufacturing and characterization, cell therapy product, and clinical trials. Conclusions:Stem cell‐based therapy holds great promise for a cure of such diseases and will value a growing population of patients. However, regulatory permitting activity of the US in the sphere of stem cells, technologies of regenerative medicine and substitutive cell therapy are selective, theoretical and does not fit the existing norm and rules. Compiled well‐defined regulations to guide the application of stem cell products for clinical trials should be formulated.

  2. Managing the potential and pitfalls during clinical translation of emerging stem cell therapies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Main, Heather; Munsie, Megan; O'Connor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    We are moving into a new era of stem cell research where many possibilities for treatment of degenerative, chronic and/or fatal diseases and injuries are becoming primed for clinical trial. These reports have led millions of people worldwide to hope that regenerative medicine is about to revolutionise biomedicine: either through transplantation of cells grown in the laboratory, or by finding ways to stimulate a patient's intrinsic stem cells to repair diseased and damaged organs. While major contributions of stem cells to drug discovery, safety and efficacy testing, as well as modelling 'diseases in a dish' are also expected, it is the in vivo use of stem cells that has captured the general public's attention. However, public misconceptions of stem cell potential and applications can leave patients vulnerable to the influences of profit driven entities selling unproven treatments without solid scientific basis or appropriate clinical testing or follow up. This review provides a brief history of stem cell clinical translation together with an overview of the properties, potential, and current clinical application of various stem cell types. In doing so it presents a clearer picture of the inherent risks and opportunities associated with stem cell research translation, and thus offers a framework to help realise invested expectations more quickly, safely and effectively. PMID:24949190

  3. Tracking of Neural Stem Cells in Rats with Intracerebral Hemorrhage by the Use of 3T MRI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chang, Nam Kyu; Jeong, Yong Yeon; Park, Jong Seong [Chonnam National University Medical School, Gwangju (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-06-15

    To access the feasibility of clinically available 3T MRI to detect the migration of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a rat model. The ethics committee of our institution approved this study. ICH was induced by the injection of collagenase type IV into the right striatum of ten Sprague-Dawley rats. Human NSCs conjugated with Feridex (superparamagnetic iron oxide: SPIO) were transplanted into the left striatum one week after ICH induction. MRI was performed on a 3T scanner during the first, second, third, fourth, and sixth weeks post-transplantation. MRI was obtained using coronal T2- and T2{sup *}-weighted sequences. Two rats were sacrificed every week after in vivo MRI in order to analyze the histological findings. ICH in the right striatum was detected by MRI one and two weeks after transplantation without migration of the NSCs. There was no migration of the NSCs as seen on the histological findings one week after transplantation. The histological findings two weeks after transplantation showed a small number of NSCs along the corpus callosum. On MRI three weeks after transplantation, there was a hypointense line along the corpus callosum and decreased signal intensity in the right periventricular region. Histological findings three weeks after transplantation confirmed the presence of the hypointense line representing SPIO-labeled NSCs. MRI four and six weeks after transplantation showed a hypointense spot in the right periventricular region. The histological findings four and six weeks after transplantation showed the presence of prominent NSCs in the right periventricular region. 3T MRI can detect the migration of NSCs in rats with ICH along the corpus callosum. Therefore, 3T MRI could be feasible for detecting the migration of NSCs in the clinical setting of stem cell therapy

  4. Tracking of Neural Stem Cells in Rats with Intracerebral Hemorrhage by the Use of 3T MRI

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To access the feasibility of clinically available 3T MRI to detect the migration of labeled neural stem cells (NSCs) in intracerebral hemorrhage (ICH) in a rat model. The ethics committee of our institution approved this study. ICH was induced by the injection of collagenase type IV into the right striatum of ten Sprague-Dawley rats. Human NSCs conjugated with Feridex (superparamagnetic iron oxide: SPIO) were transplanted into the left striatum one week after ICH induction. MRI was performed on a 3T scanner during the first, second, third, fourth, and sixth weeks post-transplantation. MRI was obtained using coronal T2- and T2*-weighted sequences. Two rats were sacrificed every week after in vivo MRI in order to analyze the histological findings. ICH in the right striatum was detected by MRI one and two weeks after transplantation without migration of the NSCs. There was no migration of the NSCs as seen on the histological findings one week after transplantation. The histological findings two weeks after transplantation showed a small number of NSCs along the corpus callosum. On MRI three weeks after transplantation, there was a hypointense line along the corpus callosum and decreased signal intensity in the right periventricular region. Histological findings three weeks after transplantation confirmed the presence of the hypointense line representing SPIO-labeled NSCs. MRI four and six weeks after transplantation showed a hypointense spot in the right periventricular region. The histological findings four and six weeks after transplantation showed the presence of prominent NSCs in the right periventricular region. 3T MRI can detect the migration of NSCs in rats with ICH along the corpus callosum. Therefore, 3T MRI could be feasible for detecting the migration of NSCs in the clinical setting of stem cell therapy

  5. Clinical applications of indium-111-acetylacetone-labelled blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method permitting red-cell labelling with 111In-acetylacetone was reported in 1974 for evaluating intestinal blood loss, the liver-spleen ratio and the red-cell volume. White blood cells can be tagged similarly. In white-cell labelling, simultaneous red-cell or platelet tagging is avoided. Several procedures (dextran separation and gradient centrifugations) have been combined, to develop a highly selective cell separation. In osteomyelitis it may not be as advantageous to use 67Ga-citrate, as in inflammatory soft tissue processes. The detection of inflammatory processes with labelled leukocytes could be of great importance for the scintigraphic diagnosis of osteomyelitidies. A group of 97 patients with suspected osteomyelitis have been examined using 111In-acetylacetone-labelled leukocytes (111In-AAL) immediately following positive routine skeletal scintigraphy. Images obtained 24 h post injection usually were the most satisfactory. In the followup group of 70 patients 21 true positives, 43 true negatives, 21 false negatives and 3 false positives were observed. These findings result in a specificity of 92%, sensitivity of 50% and accuracy of 70% with 111In-AAL for osteomyelitis. Preliminary investigations using 111In-acetylacetone-labelled thrombocytes (111In-AAT) were carried out to detect rejection of transplanted kidneys. The platelets were separated by means of additional special density gradient centrifugations but no dextran from 15-20 ml of autologous whole blood. Scans have been obtained 15 min, 2.5 h and 24 h post injection in an initial group of 10 patients. In acute rejection, a high transplant uptake has been detected, whereas patients without acute rejection showed no or only a minimum activity accumulation. Patients with chronic rejection have intermediate uptakes

  6. Regulations and guidelines governing stem cell based products: Clinical considerations

    OpenAIRE

    Bobby George

    2011-01-01

    The use of stem cells as medicines is a promising and upcoming area of research as they may be able to help the body to regenerate damaged or lost tissue in a host of diseases like Parkinson′s, multiple sclerosis, heart disease, liver disease, spinal cord damage, cancer and many more. Translating basic stem cell research into routine therapies is a complex multi-step process which entails the challenge related to managing the expected therapeutic benefits with the potential risks while comply...

  7. Toward clinical application of stem cells for cardiac regeneration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stubbs, Samantha L; Crook, Jeremy M; Morrison, Wayne A; Newcomb, Andrew E

    2011-03-01

    Heart failure affects more than 10% of the Australian population over age 65, and the ageing population will ensure continued growth of this significant problem. There are various treatment options available, but the growing field of regenerative therapy offers promise to restore or replace tissue lost in those with either congenital or acquired cardiac defects. Stem cells have many potential properties, but they need multiple discussed qualities to succeed in this field such as ease of harvest and multiplication, and most importantly minimal ethical concerns. There are multiple cell types available and one of the challenges will be to find the most appropriate cell type for cardiac regeneration. Cardiac tissue engineering is being explored using both in vitro and in vivo techniques. In vitro methods are primarily limited in terms of the vascularisation and size of the construct. In vivo engineered constructs overcome these limitations in early models, but they are still not ready for human trials. This review aims to provide the reader with an outline of the cell-based and tissue engineering therapies currently being used and developed for cardiac regeneration, as well as some insight into the potential problems that may hamper its progress in the future. PMID:20650685

  8. Clinical Implications of Intestinal Stem Cell Markers in Colorectal Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Espersen, Maiken Lise Marcker; Olsen, Jesper; Linnemann, Dorte;

    2015-01-01

    Colorectal cancer (CRC) still has one of the highest incidence and mortality rate among cancers. Therefore, improved differential diagnostics and personalized treatment are still needed. Several intestinal stem cell markers have been found to be associated with CRC and might have a prognostic and...

  9. Effects of Saponins against Clinical E. coli Strains and Eukaryotic Cell Line

    OpenAIRE

    Michał Arabski; Aneta Węgierek-Ciuk; Grzegorz Czerwonka; Anna Lankoff; Wiesław Kaca

    2012-01-01

    Saponins are detergent-like substances showing antibacterial as well as anticancer potential. In this study, the effects of saponins from Quillaja saponaria were analyzed against prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells. Multidrug-resistant clinical E. coli strains were isolated from human urine. As eukaryotic cells, the CHO-K1 cell lines were applied. Antibacterial effect of ampicillin, streptomycin, and ciprofloxacin in the presence of saponins was measured by cultivation methods. Properties of sap...

  10. T cell transcriptional factors in allergic rhinitis and its association with clinical features

    OpenAIRE

    Mo, Ji-Hun; Chung, Young-Jun; Kim, Ji Hye

    2013-01-01

    Background Th2 cells are crucially important in allergic disease and the possible involvement of Treg and Th17 cells has not been clearly identified. Objective To identify the mRNA expression of T cell transcription factors in nasal mucosa in patients with allergic rhinitis (AR) and to reveal their correlations with clinical features. Methods Eighteen patients with AR and 12 controls with turbinate hypertrophy were included. mRNA expression of the following transcriptional factors in nasal mu...

  11. Managing the potential and pitfalls during clinical translation of emerging stem cell therapies

    OpenAIRE

    Main, Heather; Munsie, Megan; O’Connor, Michael D

    2014-01-01

    We are moving into a new era of stem cell research where many possibilities for treatment of degenerative, chronic and/or fatal diseases and injuries are becoming primed for clinical trial. These reports have led millions of people worldwide to hope that regenerative medicine is about to revolutionise biomedicine: either through transplantation of cells grown in the laboratory, or by finding ways to stimulate a patient’s intrinsic stem cells to repair diseased and damaged organs. While major ...

  12. Mesenchymal Stem Cell-Derived Extracellular Vesicles Promote Angiogenesis: Potencial Clinical Application

    OpenAIRE

    Merino-González, Consuelo; Zuñiga, Felipe A.; Escudero, Carlos; Ormazabal, Valeska; Reyes, Camila; Nova-Lamperti, Estefanía; Salomón, Carlos; Aguayo, Claudio

    2016-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are adult multipotent stem cells that are able to differentiate into multiple specialized cell types including osteocytes, adipocytes, and chondrocytes. MSCs exert different functions in the body and have recently been predicted to have a major clinical/therapeutic potential. However, the mechanisms of self-renewal and tissue regeneration are not completely understood. It has been shown that the biological effect depends mainly on its paracrine action. Furthermor...

  13. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation: clinical use and perspectives

    OpenAIRE

    Francisco Barriga; Pablo Ramírez; Angélica Wietstruck; Nicolás Rojas

    2012-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation is the accepted therapy of choice for a variety of malignant and non-malignant diseases in children and adults. Initially developed as rescue therapy for a patient with cancer after high doses of chemotherapy and radiation as well as the correction of severe deficiencies in the hematopoietic system, it has evolved into an adoptive immune therapy for malignancies and autoimmune disorders. The procedure has helped to obtain key information about the bone ...

  14. Adoptive cell transfer: a clinical path to effective cancer immunotherapy

    OpenAIRE

    Rosenberg, Steven A.; Restifo, Nicholas P; Yang, James C.; Morgan, Richard A.; Dudley, Mark E.

    2008-01-01

    Adoptive cell therapy (ACT) using autologous tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes has emerged as the most effective treatment for patients with metastatic melanoma and can mediate objective cancer regression in approximately 50% of patients. The use of donor lymphocytes for ACT is an effective treatment for immunosuppressed patients who develop post-transplant lymphomas. The ability to genetically engineer human lymphocytes and use them to mediate cancer regression in patients, which has recently ...

  15. Progress and challenges with clinical cell therapy in neurorestoratology

    OpenAIRE

    Huang H; Mao G; Chen L; Liu A

    2015-01-01

    Hongyun Huang,1–3 Gengsheng Mao,1 Lin Chen,4,5 Aibing Liu11General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces,2Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, 3Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 4Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, 5Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Cell therapies in the treatment of central nervous system disease and injury, such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, sequelae of st...

  16. Progress and challenges with clinical cell therapy in neurorestoratology

    OpenAIRE

    Huang, Hongyun

    2015-01-01

    Hongyun Huang,1–3 Gengsheng Mao,1 Lin Chen,4,5 Aibing Liu11General Hospital of Chinese People's Armed Police Forces,2Beijing Rehabilitation Hospital of Capital Medical University, 3Beijing Hongtianji Neuroscience Academy, 4Tsinghua University Yuquan Hospital, 5Medical Center, Tsinghua University, Beijing, People's Republic of ChinaAbstract: Cell therapies in the treatment of central nervous system disease and injury, such as spinal cord injury, multiple sclerosis, se...

  17. Self-assembled dual-modality contrast agents for non-invasive stem cell tracking via near-infrared fluorescence and magnetic resonance imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hong; Tan, Yan; Xie, Lisi; Yang, Lei; Zhao, Jing; Bai, Jingxuan; Huang, Ping; Zhan, Wugen; Wan, Qian; Zou, Chao; Han, Yali; Wang, Zhiyong

    2016-09-15

    Stem cells hold great promise for treating various diseases. However, one of the main drawbacks of stem cell therapy is the lack of non-invasive image-tracking technologies. Although magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and near-infrared fluorescence (NIRF) imaging have been employed to analyse cellular and subcellular events via the assistance of contrast agents, the sensitivity and temporal resolution of MRI and the spatial resolution of NIRF are still shortcomings. In this study, superparamagnetic iron oxide nanocrystals and IR-780 dyes were co-encapsulated in stearic acid-modified polyethylenimine to form a dual-modality contrast agent with nano-size and positive charge. These resulting agents efficiently labelled stem cells and did not influence the cellular viability and differentiation. Moreover, the labelled cells showed the advantages of dual-modality imaging in vivo. PMID:27299677

  18. Mesenchymal Progenitor Cells and Their Orthopedic Applications: Forging a Path towards Clinical Trials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Deana S. Shenaq

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal progenitor cells (MPCs are nonhematopoietic multipotent cells capable of differentiating into mesenchymal and nonmesenchymal lineages. While they can be isolated from various tissues, MPCs isolated from the bone marrow are best characterized. These cells represent a subset of bone marrow stromal cells (BMSCs which, in addition to their differentiation potential, are critical in supporting proliferation and differentiation of hematopoietic cells. They are of clinical interest because they can be easily isolated from bone marrow aspirates and expanded in vitro with minimal donor site morbidity. The BMSCs are also capable of altering disease pathophysiology by secreting modulating factors in a paracrine manner. Thus, engineering such cells to maximize therapeutic potential has been the focus of cell/gene therapy to date. Here, we discuss the path towards the development of clinical trials utilizing BMSCs for orthopaedic applications. Specifically, we will review the use of BMSCs in repairing critical-sized defects, fracture nonunions, cartilage and tendon injuries, as well as in metabolic bone diseases and osteonecrosis. A review of www.ClinicalTrials.gov of the United States National Institute of Health was performed, and ongoing clinical trials will be discussed in addition to the sentinel preclinical studies that paved the way for human investigations.

  19. Simple front tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glimm, J.; Grove, J.W.; Li, X.; Zhao, N.

    1999-04-01

    A new and simplified front tracking algorithm has been developed as an aspect of the extension of this algorithm to three dimensions. Here the authors emphasize two main results: (1) a simplified description of the microtopology of the interface, based on interface crossings with cell block edges, and (2) an improved algorithm for the interaction of a tracked contact discontinuity with an untracked shock wave. For the latter question, they focus on the post interaction jump at the contact, which is a purely 1D issue. Comparisons to other methods, including the level set method, are included.

  20. Computationally efficient Bayesian tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aughenbaugh, Jason; La Cour, Brian

    2012-06-01

    In this paper, we describe the progress we have achieved in developing a computationally efficient, grid-based Bayesian fusion tracking system. In our approach, the probability surface is represented by a collection of multidimensional polynomials, each computed adaptively on a grid of cells representing state space. Time evolution is performed using a hybrid particle/grid approach and knowledge of the grid structure, while sensor updates use a measurement-based sampling method with a Delaunay triangulation. We present an application of this system to the problem of tracking a submarine target using a field of active and passive sonar buoys.

  1. Radiation Therapy Oncology Group Translational Research Program Stem Cell Symposium: Incorporating Stem Cell Hypotheses into Clinical Trials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease sites. This report summarizes the major topics discussed and the future directions that research should take. Major conclusions of the symposium were that the flow cytometry of multiple markers in fresh tissue would remain the standard technique of evaluating cancer-initiating cells and that surrogates need to be developed for both experimental and clinical use.

  2. Green-to-red photoconvertible fluorescent proteins: tracking cell and protein dynamics on standard wide-field mercury arc-based microscopes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Buckheit Robert W

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Green fluorescent protein (GFP and other FP fusions have been extensively utilized to track protein dynamics in living cells. Recently, development of photoactivatable, photoswitchable and photoconvertible fluorescent proteins (PAFPs has made it possible to investigate the fate of discrete subpopulations of tagged proteins. Initial limitations to their use (due to their tetrameric nature were overcome when monomeric variants, such as Dendra, mEos, and mKikGR were cloned/engineered. Results Here, we report that by closing the field diaphragm, selective, precise and irreversible green-to-red photoconversion (330-380 nm illumination of discrete subcellular protein pools was achieved on a wide-field fluorescence microscope equipped with standard DAPI, Fluorescein, and Rhodamine filter sets and mercury arc illumination within 5-10 seconds. Use of a DAPI-filter cube with long-pass emission filter (LP420 allowed the observation and control of the photoconversion process in real time. Following photoconversion, living cells were imaged for up to 5 hours often without detectable phototoxicity or photobleaching. Conclusions We demonstrate the practicability of this technique using Dendra2 and mEos2 as monomeric, photoconvertible PAFP representatives fused to proteins with low (histone H2B, medium (gap junction channel protein connexin 43, and high (α-tubulin; clathrin light chain dynamic cellular mobility as examples. Comparable efficient, irreversible green-to-red photoconversion of selected portions of cell nuclei, gap junctions, microtubules and clathrin-coated vesicles was achieved. Tracking over time allowed elucidation of the dynamic live-cycle of these subcellular structures. The advantage of this technique is that it can be performed on a standard, relatively inexpensive wide-field fluorescence microscope with mercury arc illumination. Together with previously described laser scanning confocal microscope-based photoconversion

  3. Dextran-coated fluorapatite crystals doped with Yb3+/Ho3+ for labeling and tracking chondrogenic differentiation of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Xiaoqing; Zhu, Jingxian; Li, Xiyu; Zhang, Xin; Meng, Qingyang; Yuan, Lan; Zhang, Jiying; Fu, Xin; Duan, Xiaoning; Chen, Haifeng; Ao, Yingfang

    2015-06-01

    Upconversion fluorescent nanoparticles are becoming more widely used as imaging contrast agents, owing to their high resolution and penetration depth, and avoidance of tissue auto-fluorescence and photodamage to cells. Here, we synthesized upconversion fluorescent crystals from rare-earth Yb3+ and Ho3+ co-doped fluorapatite (FA:Yb3+/Ho3+) suitable for long-term tracking and monitoring cartilage development (chondrogenesis) in bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs) in vitro and in vivo. We initially determined the structure, morphology and luminescence of the products using X-ray powder diffraction, transmission electron microscopy and two-photon confocal microscopy. When excited at 980 nm, FA:Yb3+/Ho3+ crystals exhibited distinct upconversion fluorescence peaks at 543 nm and 654 nm. We then conjugated FA:Yb3+/Ho3+ crystals with dextran to enhance hydrophilicity, biocompatibility and cell penetration. Next, we employed the dextran-coated FA:Yb3+/Ho3+ crystals in labeling and tracking chondrogenic differentiation processes in BMSCs stably expressing green fluorescent protein (BMSCsGFP) in vitro and in vivo. Labeled BMSCsGFP were shown to reproducibly exhibit chondrogenic differentiation potential in RT-PCR analysis, histological assessment and immunohistochemistry. We observed continuous luminescence from the FA:Yb3+/Ho3+ upconversion crystals at 4 weeks and 12 weeks post transplantation in BMSCsGFP, while GFP fluorescence in both control and crystal-treated groups significantly decreased at 12 weeks after BMSCsGFP transplantation. We therefore demonstrate the high biocompatibility and stability of FA:Yb3+/Ho3+ crystals in tracking and monitoring BMSCs chondrogenesis in vitro and in vivo, highlighting their excellent cell labeling potential in cartilage tissue engineering. PMID:25818450

  4. Ovarian stem cells: From basic to clinical applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ozakpinar, Ozlem Bingol; Maurer, Anne-Marie; Ozsavci, Derya

    2015-05-26

    The field of reproductive biology has undergone significant developments in the last decade. The notion that there is a fixed reserve pool of oocytes before birth was established by Zuckerman in 1951. However, in 2004, an article published in nature challenged this central dogma of mammalian reproductive biology. Tilly's group reported the existence of ovarian germline stem cells (GSCs) in postnatal ovaries of mice and suggested that the bone marrow could be an extragonadal source of ovarian GSCs. These findings were strongly criticized; however, several independent groups have since successfully isolated and characterized ovarian GSCs in postnatal mice. The ovarian GSCs are located in the ovarian surface epithelium and express markers of undifferentiated GSCs. When transplanted into mouse ovaries, mouse ovarian GSCs could differentiate and produce embryos and offspring. Similarly, in a recent study, ovarian GSCs were found to be present in the ovaries of women of reproductive age. Conversely, there is increasing evidence that stem cells responsible for maintaining a healthy state in normal tissue may be a source of some cancers, including ovarian cancer. Cancer stem cells (CSCs) have been found in many tissues, including ovaries. Some researchers have suggested that ovarian cancer may be a result of the transformation and dysfunction of ovarian GSCs with self-renewal properties. Drug resistant and metastasis-generating CSCs are responsible for many important problems affecting ovarian cancer patients. Therefore, the identification of CSCs will provide opportunities for the development of new therapeutic strategies for treatments for infertility and ovarian cancer. In this article, we summarize the current understanding of ovarian GSCs in adult mammals, and we also discuss whether there is a relationship between GSCs and CSCs. PMID:26029346

  5. Clinical analysis of lateral oropharyngeal-wall squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We retrospectively reviewed 98 cases of lateral-oropharyngeal wall squamous cell carcinoma seen from January 1999 to March 2011. The majority-75 cases-involeved advanced cancer. For these, we conducted concurrent chemoradiotherapy (CCRT) with cisplatin, docetaxel, and 5-FU from 2007. Five-year overall survival was 64.4%. In advanced cases, three-year overall survival was 77.8% in surgery, 71.2% in radiation therapy, and 84.6% in CCRT. While no statistically significant difference was seen, CCRT, appeared to provide more curative effectiveness. (author)

  6. Clinical variants, stages, and management of basal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lyubomir A Dourmishev

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC is the most common paraneoplastic disease among human neoplasms. The tumor affects mainly photoexposed areas, most often in the head and seldom appears on genitalia and perigenital region. BCC progresses slowly and metastases are found in less than 0.5% of the cases; however, a considerable local destruction and mutilation could be observed when treatment is neglected or inadequate. Different variants as nodular, cystic, micronodular, superficial, pigment BCC are described in literature and the differential diagnosis in some cases could be difficult. The staging of BCC is made according to Tumor, Node, Metastasis (TNM classification and is essential for performing the adequate treatment. Numerous therapeutic methods established for treatment of BCC, having their advantages or disadvantages, do not absolutely dissolve the risk of relapses. The early diagnostics based on the good knowledge and timely organized and adequate treatment is a precondition for better prognosis. Despite the slow progress and numerous therapeutic methods, the basal cell carcinoma should not be underestimated.

  7. Analysis of antigen specific T cells in diabetes - Lessons from pre-clinical studies and early clinical trials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnamurthy, Balasubramanian; Selck, Claudia; Chee, Jonathan; Jhala, Guarang; Kay, Thomas W H

    2016-07-01

    Antigen-specific immune tolerance promises to provide safe and effective therapies to prevent type 1 diabetes (T1D). Antigen-specific therapy requires two components: well-defined, clinically relevant autoantigens; and safe approaches to inducing tolerance in T cells specific for these antigens. Proinsulin is a critical autoantigen in both NOD mice, based on knockout mouse studies and induction of immune tolerance to proinsulin preventing disease whereas most antigens cannot, and also in human T1D based on proinsulin-specific T cells being found in the islets of affected individuals and the early appearance of insulin autoantibodies. Effective antigen-specific therapies that prevent T1D in humans have not yet been developed although doubt remains about the best molecular form of the antigen, the dose and the route of administration. Preclinical studies suggest that antigen specific therapy is most useful when administered before onset of autoimmunity but this time-window has not been tested in humans until the recent "pre-point" study. There may be a 'window of opportunity' during the neonatal period when 'vaccine' like administration of proinsulin for a short period may be sufficient to prevent diabetes. After the onset of autoimmunity, naive antigen-specific T cells have differentiated into antigen-experienced memory cells and the immune responses have spread to multiple antigens. Induction of tolerance at this stage becomes more difficult although recent studies have suggested generation of antigen-specific TR1 cells can inhibit memory T cells. Preclinical studies are required to identify additional 'help' that is required to induce tolerance to memory T cells and develop protocols for effective therapy in individuals with established autoimmunity. PMID:27083395

  8. MR tracking of CD34+ progenitor cells separated by means of immunomagnetic selection and transplanted into injured rat brain

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Jendelová, Pavla; Herynek, V.; Glogarová, Kateřina; Urdzíková, Lucia; Rahmatová, S.; Fales, I.; Kobylka, P.; Hájek, M.; Syková, Eva

    Londýn: Elsevier, 2004. s. 210-211. ISSN 0014-4886. [Annual Conference American Society for Neural Transplantation and Repair /11./. 05.05.2004-10.05.2004, Clearwater] R&D Projects: GA MŠk LN00A065; GA ČR GA304/03/1189 Keywords : MR tracking * immunomagnetic selection Subject RIV: FH - Neurology

  9. The clinical relevance of cell-based therapy for the treatment of stress urinary incontinence

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gräs, Søren; Lose, Gunnar

    2011-01-01

    Stress urinary incontinence is a common disorder affecting the quality of life for millions of women worldwide. Effective surgical procedures involving synthetic permanent meshes exist, but significant short- and long-term complications occur. Cell-based therapy using autologous stem cells or...... provided proof of concept for the idea. An initial enthusiasm caused by positive results from early clinical trials has been dampened by the recognition of scientific irregularities. At the same time, the safety issue for cell-based therapy has been highlighted by the appearance of new and comprehensive...... progenitor cells presents an alternative approach, which aims at repairing the anatomical components of the urethral continence mechanism. In vitro expanded progenitor cells isolated from muscle biopsies have been most intensely investigated, and both preclinical trials and a few clinical trials have...

  10. Adipose Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells In Wound Healing: A Clinical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunalp Uzun

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this article is to review clinical studies on the use of adipose derived mesenchymal stem cells in the treatment of chronic wounds. A search on PubMed was performed on April 30th, 2014 to identify the relevant clinical studies. We reviewed 13 articles that reported the use adipose derived stem cells in the treatment of different types of wounds. Adipose derived stem cells have the potential to be used in the treatment of chronic wounds. However, standard methods for isolation, storage and application of these cells are needed. New materials to transfer these stem cells to injured tissues should be investigated. [Dis Mol Med 2014; 2(4.000: 57-64

  11. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Cell Therapy: Safety and Feasibility in Different "Hospital Exemption" Clinical Applications

    OpenAIRE

    Vériter, Sophie; André, Wivine; Aouassar, Najima; Poirel, Hélène Antoine; Lafosse, Aurore; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Dufrane, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Based on immunomodulatory, osteogenic, and pro-angiogenic properties of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), this study aims to assess the safety and efficacy of ASC-derived cell therapies for clinical indications. Two autologous ASC-derived products were proposed to 17 patients who had not experienced any success with conventional therapies: (1) a scaffold-free osteogenic three-dimensional graft for the treatment of bone non-union and (2) a biological dressing for dermal reconstruction of non-...

  12. Human Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Cell Therapy: Safety and Feasibility in Different "Hospital Exemption" Clinical Applications.

    OpenAIRE

    Veriter, Sophie; André, Wivine; Aouassar, Najima; Poirel, Hélène; Lafosse, Aurore; Docquier, Pierre-Louis; Dufrane, Denis

    2015-01-01

    Based on immunomodulatory, osteogenic, and pro-angiogenic properties of adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), this study aims to assess the safety and efficacy of ASC-derived cell therapies for clinical indications. Two autologous ASC-derived products were proposed to 17 patients who had not experienced any success with conventional therapies: (1) a scaffold-free osteogenic three-dimensional graft for the treatment of bone non-union and (2) a biological dressing for dermal reconstruction of non-...

  13. Superconvergent tracking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper we develop a new technique (superconvergent tracking) for tracking particles through a circular accelerator or a transport line with nonlinear elements. We use the superconvergent perturbation theory of Kolmogorov to solve the Hamilton-Jacobi equation (approximately) over a finite time interval. This transformation defines a map from the initial conditions to the state of the system at some later time. This technique can be iterated to examine long-term stability in betatron phase space in a circular accelerator, or it can be used to calculate the trajectory in betatron phase space of particles in a transport line. We verify the algorithm with two test cases in one degree of freedom and then develop the technique to track the two transverse degrees of freedom in a general accelerator lattice with sextupoles. As an example we track a section of the Superconducting Super Collider (SSC) arcs with and without sextupole errors in the bending magnets. (author) 14 refs., 15 figs., 1 tab

  14. PARP Inhibitors in Clinical Use Induce Genomic Instability in Normal Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Shuhei; Murphy, Conleth G.; Doubrovina, Ekaterina; Jasin, Maria; Moynahan, Mary Ellen

    2016-01-01

    Poly(ADP-ribose) polymerases (PARPs) are the first proteins involved in cellular DNA repair pathways to be targeted by specific inhibitors for clinical benefit. Tumors harboring genetic defects in homologous recombination (HR), a DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair pathway, are hypersensitive to PARP inhibitors (PARPi). Early phase clinical trials with PARPi have been promising in patients with advanced BRCA1 or BRCA2-associated breast, ovary and prostate cancer and have led to limited approval for treatment of BRCA-deficient ovary cancer. Unlike HR-defective cells, HR-proficient cells manifest very low cytotoxicity when exposed to PARPi, although they mount a DNA damage response. However, the genotoxic effects on normal human cells when agents including PARPi disturb proficient cellular repair processes have not been substantially investigated. We quantified cytogenetic alterations of human cells, including primary lymphoid cells and non-tumorigenic and tumorigenic epithelial cell lines, exposed to PARPi at clinically relevant doses by both sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assays and chromosome spreading. As expected, both olaparib and veliparib effectively inhibited poly-ADP-ribosylation (PAR), and caused marked hypersensitivity in HR-deficient cells. Significant dose-dependent increases in SCEs were observed in normal and non-tumorigenic cells with minimal residual PAR activity. Clinically relevant doses of the FDA-approved olaparib led to a marked increase of SCEs (5-10-fold) and chromatid aberrations (2-6-fold). Furthermore, olaparib potentiated SCE induction by cisplatin in normal human cells. Our data have important implications for therapies with regard to sustained genotoxicity to normal cells. Genomic instability arising from PARPi warrants consideration, especially if these agents will be used in people with early stage cancers, in prevention strategies or for non-oncologic indications. PMID:27428646

  15. The prognostic value of clinical factors and cancer stem cell-related markers in gliomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahlrot, Rikke Hedegaard

    2014-01-01

    -renewal, proliferation, and differentiation during development of different (normal) tissues. The same characteristics were identified in cancer cells, and recently a major part of the glioma research has focused on the cancer stem cell (CSC) hypothesis, suggesting that only CSCs posses the ability of initiating new...... on experiences from clinical trials, with the risk that the results obtained are restricted to highly selected patients only. Moreover, these studies provided only little knowledge of the clinical behaviour of the tumours. For some time, it has been believed that somatic stem cells are responsible for self...... knowledge about the biological but also about the clinical presentation of gliomas and of glioma patients in an entire population was needed. Identification of patients who would benefit from standard treatment as well as identification of patients who need more aggressive treatment at the time of diagnosis...

  16. In utero stem cell transplantation and gene therapy: Recent progress and the potential for clinical application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClain, Lauren E; Flake, Alan W

    2016-02-01

    Advances in prenatal diagnosis have led to the prenatal management and treatment of a variety of congenital diseases. Although surgical treatment has been successfully applied to specific anatomic defects that place the fetus at a risk of death or life-long disability, the indications for fetal surgical intervention have remained relatively limited. By contrast, prenatal stem cell and gene therapy await clinical application, but they have tremendous potential to treat a broad range of genetic disorders. If there are biological advantages unique to fetal development that favor fetal stem cell or gene therapy over postnatal treatment, prenatal therapy may become the preferred approach to the treatment of any disease that can be prenatally diagnosed and cured by stem cell or gene therapy. Here, we review the field including recent progress toward clinical application and imminent clinical trials for cellular and gene therapy. PMID:26483174

  17. Clinical, ultrasonographic, and laboratory findings in 12 llamas and 12 alpacas with malignant round cell tumors

    OpenAIRE

    Martin, Jeanne M.; Valentine, Beth A.; Cebra, Christopher K.

    2010-01-01

    Clinical signs, duration of illness, clinicopathologic findings, and ultrasonographic findings were evaluated in 12 llamas and 12 alpacas with malignant round cell tumors (MRCT). All but 1 animal died or was euthanized. Common clinical findings were anorexia, recumbency or weakness, and weight loss or poor growth. Peripheral lymphadenomegaly occurred in only 7 animals and was detected more often at necropsy than during physical examination. Common clinicopathologic abnormalities were hypoalbu...

  18. Multi-Target Tracking With Time-Varying Clutter Rate and Detection Profile: Application to Time-Lapse Cell Microscopy Sequences.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezatofighi, Seyed Hamid; Gould, Stephen; Vo, Ba Tuong; Vo, Ba-Ngu; Mele, Katarina; Hartley, Richard

    2015-06-01

    Quantitative analysis of the dynamics of tiny cellular and sub-cellular structures, known as particles, in time-lapse cell microscopy sequences requires the development of a reliable multi-target tracking method capable of tracking numerous similar targets in the presence of high levels of noise, high target density, complex motion patterns and intricate interactions. In this paper, we propose a framework for tracking these structures based on the random finite set Bayesian filtering framework. We focus on challenging biological applications where image characteristics such as noise and background intensity change during the acquisition process. Under these conditions, detection methods usually fail to detect all particles and are often followed by missed detections and many spurious measurements with unknown and time-varying rates. To deal with this, we propose a bootstrap filter composed of an estimator and a tracker. The estimator adaptively estimates the required meta parameters for the tracker such as clutter rate and the detection probability of the targets, while the tracker estimates the state of the targets. Our results show that the proposed approach can outperform state-of-the-art particle trackers on both synthetic and real data in this regime. PMID:25594963

  19. Ocular Stem Cell Research from Basic Science to Clinical Application: A Report from Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Ouyang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells hold promise for treating a wide variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders of the eye. The eye is an ideal organ for stem cell therapy because of its relative immunological privilege, surgical accessibility, and its being a self-contained system. The eye also has many potential target diseases amenable to stem cell-based treatment, such as corneal limbal stem cell deficiency, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD, and retinitis pigmentosa (RP. Among them, AMD and glaucoma are the two most common diseases, affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Recent results on the clinical trial of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs in treating dry AMD and Stargardt’s disease in the US, Japan, England, and China have generated great excitement and hope. This marks the beginning of the ocular stem cell therapy era. The recent Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium discussed the potential applications of various stem cell types in stem cell-based therapies, drug discoveries and tissue engineering for treating ocular diseases.

  20. Ocular Stem Cell Research from Basic Science to Clinical Application: A Report from Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ouyang, Hong; Goldberg, Jeffrey L.; Chen, Shuyi; Li, Wei; Xu, Guo-Tong; Li, Wei; Zhang, Kang; Nussenblatt, Robert B.; Liu, Yizhi; Xie, Ting; Chan, Chi-Chao; Zack, Donald J.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells hold promise for treating a wide variety of diseases, including degenerative disorders of the eye. The eye is an ideal organ for stem cell therapy because of its relative immunological privilege, surgical accessibility, and its being a self-contained system. The eye also has many potential target diseases amenable to stem cell-based treatment, such as corneal limbal stem cell deficiency, glaucoma, age-related macular degeneration (AMD), and retinitis pigmentosa (RP). Among them, AMD and glaucoma are the two most common diseases, affecting over 200 million people worldwide. Recent results on the clinical trial of retinal pigment epithelial (RPE) cells from human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) in treating dry AMD and Stargardt’s disease in the US, Japan, England, and China have generated great excitement and hope. This marks the beginning of the ocular stem cell therapy era. The recent Zhongshan Ophthalmic Center Ocular Stem Cell Symposium discussed the potential applications of various stem cell types in stem cell-based therapies, drug discoveries and tissue engineering for treating ocular diseases. PMID:27102165

  1. RADIATION THERAPY ONCOLOGY GROUP TRANSLATIONAL RESEARCH PROGRAM STEM CELL SYMPOSIUM : INCORPORATING STEM CELL HYPOTHESES INTO CLINICAL TRIALS

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Woodward, Wendy A.; Bristow, Robert G.; Clarke, Michael F.; Coppes, Robert P.; Cristofanilli, Massimo; Duda, Dan G.; Fike, John R.; Hambardzumyan, Dolores; Hill, Richard P.; Jordan, Craig T.; Milas, Luka; Pajonk, Frank; Curran, Walter J.; Dicker, Adam P.; Chen, Yuhchyau

    2009-01-01

    At a meeting of the Translation Research Program of the Radiation Therapy Oncology Group held in early 2008, attendees focused on updating the current state of knowledge in cancer stem cell research and discussing ways in which this knowledge can be translated into clinical use across all disease si

  2. Primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphoma, unspecified with an indolent clinical course: a distinct peripheral T-cell lymphoma?

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ryan, A J A

    2012-02-01

    Primary cutaneous peripheral T-cell lymphomas (PTL), unspecified, are rare lymphomas, with a poor prognosis. They grow and disseminate rapidly, leading to widespread disease. We report a case of PTL, unspecified occurring on the nose. Despite its aggressive histology, this tumour behaved indolently. It is remarkably similar, clinically and histologically, to four recently described cases that occurred on the ear.

  3. Cystitis: From Urothelial Cell Biology to Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gilho Lee

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystitis is a urinary bladder disease with many causes and symptoms. The severity of cystitis ranges from mild lower abdominal discomfort to life-threatening haemorrhagic cystitis. The course of disease is often chronic or recurrent. Although cystitis represents huge economical and medical burden throughout the world and in many cases treatments are ineffective, the mechanisms of its origin and development as well as measures for effective treatment are still poorly understood. However, many studies have demonstrated that urothelial dysfunction plays a crucial role. In the present review we first discuss fundamental issues of urothelial cell biology, which is the core for comprehension of cystitis. Then we focus on many forms of cystitis, its current treatments, and advances in its research. Additionally we review haemorrhagic cystitis with one of the leading causative agents being chemotherapeutic drug cyclophosphamide and summarise its management strategies. At the end we describe an excellent and widely used animal model of cyclophosphamide induced cystitis, which gives researches the opportunity to get a better insight into the mechanisms involved and possibility to develop new therapy approaches.

  4. Extracellular microvesicle microRNAs in children with sickle cell anaemia with divergent clinical phenotypes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khalyfa, Abdelnaby; Khalyfa, Ahamed A; Akbarpour, Mahzad; Connes, Phillippe; Romana, Marc; Lapping-Carr, Gabrielle; Zhang, Chunling; Andrade, Jorge; Gozal, David

    2016-09-01

    Sickle cell anaemia (SCA) is the most frequent genetic haemoglobinopathy, which exhibits a highly variable clinical course characterized by hyper-coagulable and pro-inflammatory states, as well as endothelial dysfunction. Extracellular microvesicles are released into biological fluids and play a role in modifying the functional phenotype of target cells. We hypothesized that potential differences in plasma-derived extracellular microvesicles (EV) function and cargo from SCA patients may underlie divergent clinical trajectories. Plasma EV from SCA patients with mild, intermediate and severe clinical disease course were isolated, and primary endothelial cell cultures were exposed. Endothelial cell activation, monocyte adhesion, barrier disruption and exosome cargo (microRNA microarrays) were assessed. EV disrupted the endothelial barrier and induced expression of adhesion molecules and monocyte adhesion in a SCA severity-dependent manner compared to healthy children. Microarray approaches identified a restricted signature of exosomal microRNAs that readily distinguished severe from mild SCA, as well as from healthy children. The microRNA candidates were further validated using quantitative real time polymerase chain reaction assays, and revealed putative gene targets. Circulating exosomal microRNAs may play important roles in predicting the clinical course of SCA, and in delineation of individually tailored, mechanistically-based clinical treatment approaches of SCA patients in the near future. PMID:27161653

  5. Clinical Perspectives on Targeting of Myeloid Derived Suppressor Cells in the Treatment of Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yana George Najjar

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumors escape immune recognition by several mechanisms, and induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC is thought to play a major role in tumor mediated immune evasion. MDSC arise from myeloid progenitor cells that do not differentiate into mature dendritic cells, granulocytes or macrophages, and are characterized by the ability to suppress T cell and natural killer (NK cell function. They are increased in patients with cancer including renal cell carcinoma (RCC, and their levels have been shown to correlate with prognosis and overall survival. Multiple methods of inhibiting MDSCs are currently under investigation. These can broadly be categorized into methods that a promote differentiation of MDSC into mature, non-suppressive cells (all trans retinoic acid, vitamin D, b decrease MDSC levels (sunitinib, gemcitabine, 5-FU, CDDO-Me, or c functionally inhibit MDSC (PDE-5 inhibitors, COX-2 inhibitors. Recently, several pre-clinical tumor models of combination therapy involving sunitinib plus vaccines and/or adoptive therapy have shown promise in MDSC inhibition and improved outcomes in the tumor bearing host. Current clinical trials are underway in RCC patients to assess not only the impact on clinical outcome, but how this combination can enhance anti-tumor immunity and reduce immune suppression. Decreasing immune suppression by MDSC in the cancer host may improve outcomes and prolong survival in this patient population.

  6. Clinical perspectives on targeting of myeloid derived suppressor cells in the treatment of cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Najjar, Yana G; Finke, James H

    2013-01-01

    Tumors escape immune recognition by several mechanisms, and induction of myeloid derived suppressor cells (MDSC) is thought to play a major role in tumor mediated immune evasion. MDSC arise from myeloid progenitor cells that do not differentiate into mature dendritic cells, granulocytes, or macrophages, and are characterized by the ability to suppress T cell and natural killer cell function. They are increased in patients with cancer including renal cell carcinoma (RCC), and their levels have been shown to correlate with prognosis and overall survival. Multiple methods of inhibiting MDSCs are currently under investigation. These can broadly be categorized into methods that (a) promote differentiation of MDSC into mature, non-suppressive cells (all trans retinoic acid, vitamin D), (b) decrease MDSC levels (sunitinib, gemcitabine, 5-FU, CDDO-Me), or (c) functionally inhibit MDSC (PDE-5 inhibitors, cyclooxygenase 2 inhibitors). Recently, several pre-clinical tumor models of combination therapy involving sunitinib plus vaccines and/or adoptive therapy have shown promise in MDSC inhibition and improved outcomes in the tumor bearing host. Current clinical trials are underway in RCC patients to assess not only the impact on clinical outcome, but how this combination can enhance anti-tumor immunity and reduce immune suppression. Decreasing immune suppression by MDSC in the cancer host may improve outcomes and prolong survival in this patient population. PMID:23508517

  7. Overcoming challenges to initiating cell therapy clinical trials in rapidly developing countries: India as a model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viswanathan, Sowmya; Rao, Mahendra; Keating, Armand; Srivastava, Alok

    2013-08-01

    Increasingly, a number of rapidly developing countries, including India, China, Brazil, and others, are becoming global hot spots for the development of regenerative medicine applications, including stem cell-based therapies. Identifying and overcoming regulatory and translational research challenges and promoting scientific and ethical clinical trials with cells will help curb the growth of stem cell tourism for unproven therapies. It will also enable academic investigators, local regulators, and national and international biotechnology and biopharmaceutical companies to accelerate stem cell-based clinical research that could lead to effective innovative treatments in these regions. Using India as a model system and obtaining input from regulators, clinicians, academics, and industry representatives across the stem cell field in India, we reviewed the role of key agencies and processes involved in this field. We have identified areas that need attention and here provide solutions from other established and functioning models in the world to streamline and unify the regulatory and ethics approval processes for cell-based therapies. We also make recommendations to check the growth and functioning of clinics offering unproven treatments. Addressing these issues will remove considerable hurdles to both local and international investigators, accelerate the pace of research and development, and create a quality environment for reliable products to emerge. By doing so, these countries would have taken one important step to move to the forefront of stem cell-based therapeutics. PMID:23836804

  8. Considerations in the development of circulating tumor cell technology for clinical use

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parkinson David R

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This manuscript summarizes current thinking on the value and promise of evolving circulating tumor cell (CTC technologies for cancer patient diagnosis, prognosis, and response to therapy, as well as accelerating oncologic drug development. Moving forward requires the application of the classic steps in biomarker development–analytical and clinical validation and clinical qualification for specific contexts of use. To that end, this review describes methods for interactive comparisons of proprietary new technologies, clinical trial designs, a clinical validation qualification strategy, and an approach for effectively carrying out this work through a public-private partnership that includes test developers, drug developers, clinical trialists, the US Food & Drug Administration (FDA and the US National Cancer Institute (NCI.

  9. Human Mesenchymal Stromal Cell-Mediated Immunoregulation: Mechanisms of Action and Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akaitz Dorronsoro

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are multipotent cells found in connective tissues that can differentiate into bone, cartilage, and adipose tissue. Interestingly, they can regulate immune responses in a paracrine way and allogeneic MSCs do not elicit immune response. These properties have encouraged a number of clinical trials in a broad range of regenerative therapies. Although these trials were first focused on their differentiation properties, in the last years, the immunosuppressive features have gained most of the attention. In this review, we will summarize the up-to-date knowledge about the immunosuppressive mechanisms of MSCs in vivo and in vitro and the most promising approaches in clinical investigation.

  10. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Banys, Malgorzata, E-mail: maggybanys@yahoo.de [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany); Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, Marienkrankenhaus Hamburg, Hamburg D-22087 (Germany); Krawczyk, Natalia; Fehm, Tanja [Department of Obstetrics and Gynecology, University of Duesseldorf, Duesseldorf D-40225 (Germany)

    2014-01-15

    Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs) in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  11. The Role and Clinical Relevance of Disseminated Tumor Cells in Breast Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Malgorzata Banys

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell dissemination is a common phenomenon observed in most cancers of epithelial origin. One-third of breast cancer patients present with disseminated tumor cells (DTCs in bone marrow at time of diagnosis; these patients, as well as patients with persistent DTCs, have significantly worse clinical outcome than DTC-negative patients. Since DTC phenotype may differ from the primary tumor with regard to ER and HER2 status, reevaluation of predictive markers on DTCs may optimize treatment choices. In the present review, we report on the clinical relevance of DTC detection in breast cancer.

  12. Clinical Analysis of 22 Cases of Pulmonary Large Cell Neuroendocrine Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe QIAN

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma (LCNEC is a rare primary malignant tumor. Due to poor understanding of its biologic behaviors, pathological features, image manifestations and clinical effects, clinical study is urgent. Analysis of clinical data of pulmonary LCNEC, in order to improve the clinical diagnosis and treatment. Methods Retrospective analysis of 22 pulmonary LCNEC cases of clinical features, diagnosis, treatments and prognosis. Results Pulmonary large cell neuroendocrine carcinoma occurs in older men with heavy smoking history., clinical symptoms are cough, sputum, hemoptysis, and chest pain. Computed tomography (CT features are peripheral mass mainly, accompanied by heterogeneous density and necrosis. Immunohistochemical neuroendocrine differentiation markers Syn, CgA and CD56 positive expression rates were: 72.7%, 68.2% and 68.2%, respectively. 17 patients underwent surgical treatment, 10 patients received adjuvant therapy, 5 underwent palliative chemotherapy. Univariate analysis indicated that smoking index (P=0.029, lymph node metastasis (P=0.034, tumor-node-metastasis (TNM stage (P=0.005, treatment (P=0.047, postoperative chemotherapy (P=0.014 are prognostic factors. Multivariate analysis showed that lymph node metastasis (P=0.045 and postoperative chemotherapy (P=0.024 are prognostic factors. Conclusion Pulmonary LCNEC is lack of specific clinical symptoms, and its pathological diagnosis depends on postoperative specimens, poor efficacy of various treatments is its current situation. Lymph node metastasis and postoperative chemotherapy are important prognostic factors.

  13. Regulations and ethical codes for clinical cell therapy trials in Iran

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hooshang Saberi; Nazi Derakhshanrad; Babak Arjmand; Jafar Ai; Masoud Soleymani; Amir Ali Hamidieh; Mohammad Taghi Joghataei; Zahid Hussain Khan; Seyed Hassan Emami Razavi

    2015-01-01

    Objective:The local regulations for conducting experimental and clinical cell therapy studies are dependent on the national and cultural approach to the issue, and may have many common aspects as well as differences with the regulations in other countries. The study reflects the latest national aspects of cell therapy in Iran and relevant regulations. Methods:The following topics are discussed in the article including sources of cell harvest, regulations for cell disposal, stem cell manufacturing, and economic aspects of stem cell, based on current practice in Iran. Results:All cell therapy trials in Iran are required to strictly abide with the ethical codes, national and local regulations, and safety requirements, as well as considering human rights and respect. Adherence to these standards has facilitated the conduct of human cell therapy trials for research, academic advancement, and therapy. Conclusions:The cell therapy trials based on the aforementioned regulations may be assumed to be ethical and they are candidates for clinical translations based on safety and efficacy issues.

  14. Angioimmunoblastic T-Cell lymphoma: A critical analysis of clinical, morphologic and immunophenotypic features

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bal Munita

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Angioimmunoblastic T-cell lymphoma (AITL, a subtype of peripheral T-cell lymphoma (PTCL, is characterized by unique clinical and biological features. Its diagnosis remains a challenge as clinical presentation as well as pathologic findings are frequently misleading. Material and Methods: We retrospectively analyzed the clinical, morphological and immunophenotypic spectrum of 17 cases of histologically proven AITL. Result: The mean age was 54 years and male to female ratio was 2.4. Common clinical features included generalized lymphadenopathy (60%, hepatomegaly (70%, splenomegaly (50%, anemia (80% and polyclonal hypergammaglobulinemia (100%. Microscopically, three architectural patterns; pattern I (6%, pattern II (41% and pattern III (53% were observed. Bone marrow infiltration was seen in 60% cases and 30% cases revealed plasmacytosis. Absence of follicles, polymorphous infiltrate, extra-follicular follicular dendritic cell (FDC proliferation, high endothelial venules (HEV prominence and neoplastic T-cells were the diagnostic features of AITL. CD10 positivity (47%, clear cells in the background (59% admixture with large size CD20+ B-immunoblasts (35% and bone marrow plasmacytosis (50% were common observations. Conclusion: Awareness of various morphological and immunophenotypic complexities of AITL and distinction from reactive adenopathies and other types of lymphomas that mimic AITL is underscored in this study.

  15. Design, Construction and Effectiveness Analysis of Hybrid Automatic Solar Tracking System for Amorphous and Crystalline Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhupendra Gupta

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available - This paper concerns the design and construction of a Hybrid solar tracking system. The constructed device was implemented by integrating it with Amorphous & Crystalline Solar Panel, three dimensional freedom mechanism and microcontroller. The amount of power available from a photovoltaic panel is determined by three parameters, the type of solar tracker, materials of solar panel and the intensity of the sunlight. The objective of this paper is to present analysis on the use of two different material of Solar panel like Amorphous & Crystalline in a Solar tracking system at Stationary, Single Axis, Dual Axis & Hybrid Axis solar tracker to have better performance with minimum losses to the surroundings, as this device ensures maximum intensity of sun rays hitting the surface of the panel from sunrise to sunset

  16. Design, Construction and Effectiveness Analysis of Hybrid Automatic Solar Tracking System for Amorphous and Crystalline Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Bhupendra Gupta

    2013-01-01

    - This paper concerns the design and construction of a Hybrid solar tracking system. The constructed device was implemented by integrating it with Amorphous & Crystalline Solar Panel, three dimensional freedom mechanism and microcontroller. The amount of power available from a photovoltaic panel is determined by three parameters, the type of solar tracker, materials of solar panel and the intensity of the sunlight. The objective of this paper is to present analysis on the use of two differ...

  17. Doppler tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thomas, Christopher Jacob

    This study addresses the development of a methodology using the Doppler Effect for high-resolution, short-range tracking of small projectiles and vehicles. Minimal impact on the design of the moving object is achieved by incorporating only a transmitter in it and using ground stations for all other components. This is particularly useful for tracking objects such as sports balls that have configurations and materials that are not conducive to housing onboard instrumentation. The methodology developed here uses four or more receivers to monitor a constant frequency signal emitted by the object. Efficient and accurate schemes for filtering the raw signals, determining the instantaneous frequencies, time synching the frequencies from each receiver, smoothing the synced frequencies, determining the relative velocity and radius of the object and solving the nonlinear system of equations for object position in three dimensions as a function of time are developed and described here.

  18. Setting Global Standards for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation: The 2016 ISSCR Guidelines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daley, George Q; Hyun, Insoo; Apperley, Jane F; Barker, Roger A; Benvenisty, Nissim; Bredenoord, Annelien L; Breuer, Christopher K; Caulfield, Timothy; Cedars, Marcelle I; Frey-Vasconcells, Joyce; Heslop, Helen E; Jin, Ying; Lee, Richard T; McCabe, Christopher; Munsie, Megan; Murry, Charles E; Piantadosi, Steven; Rao, Mahendra; Rooke, Heather M; Sipp, Douglas; Studer, Lorenz; Sugarman, Jeremy; Takahashi, Masayo; Zimmerman, Mark; Kimmelman, Jonathan

    2016-06-14

    The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR) presents its 2016 Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation (ISSCR, 2016). The 2016 guidelines reflect the revision and extension of two past sets of guidelines (ISSCR, 2006; ISSCR, 2008) to address new and emerging areas of stem cell discovery and application and evolving ethical, social, and policy challenges. These guidelines provide an integrated set of principles and best practices to drive progress in basic, translational, and clinical research. The guidelines demand rigor, oversight, and transparency in all aspects of practice, providing confidence to practitioners and public alike that stem cell science can proceed efficiently and remain responsive to public and patient interests. Here, we highlight key elements and recommendations in the guidelines and summarize the recommendations and deliberations behind them. PMID:27185282

  19. Setting Global Standards for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation: The 2016 ISSCR Guidelines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George Q. Daley

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The International Society for Stem Cell Research (ISSCR presents its 2016 Guidelines for Stem Cell Research and Clinical Translation (ISSCR, 2016. The 2016 guidelines reflect the revision and extension of two past sets of guidelines (ISSCR, 2006; ISSCR, 2008 to address new and emerging areas of stem cell discovery and application and evolving ethical, social, and policy challenges. These guidelines provide an integrated set of principles and best practices to drive progress in basic, translational, and clinical research. The guidelines demand rigor, oversight, and transparency in all aspects of practice, providing confidence to practitioners and public alike that stem cell science can proceed efficiently and remain responsive to public and patient interests. Here, we highlight key elements and recommendations in the guidelines and summarize the recommendations and deliberations behind them.

  20. Tracking Porters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bruun, Maja Hojer; Krause-Jensen, Jakob; Nielsen, Margit Saltofte

    2015-01-01

    Anthropology attempts to gain insight into people's experiential life-worlds through long-term fieldwork. The quality of anthropological knowledge production, however, does not depend solely on the duration of the stay in the field, but also on a particular way of seeing social situations. The...... two weeks the students followed the work of a group of porters. Drawing on anthropological concepts and research strategies the students gained crucial insights about the potential effects of using tracking technologies in the hospital....

  1. Local weighting of nanometric track structure properties in macroscopic voxel geometries for particle beam treatment planning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, F.; Villagrasa, C.; Rabus, H.; Wilkens, J. J.

    2015-12-01

    The research project BioQuaRT within the European Metrology Research Programme aimed at correlating ion track structure characteristics with the biological effects of radiation and developed measurement and simulation techniques for determining ion track structure on different length scales from about 2 nm to about 10 μm. Within this framework, we investigated methods to translate track-structure quantities derived on a nanometre scale to macroscopic dimensions. Here we make use of parameterizations that link the energy of the projectile to the ionization pattern of the track using nanodosimetric ionization cluster size distributions. They were defined with data generated by simulations of ion tracks in liquid water using the Geant4 Monte Carlo toolkit with the Geant4-DNA processes. For the clinical situation with a mixed radiation field, where particles of various energies hit a cell from several directions, we have to find macroscopic relevant mean values. They can be determined by appropriate local weighting functions for the identified parameterization. We show that a stopping power weighted mean value of the mentioned track structure properties can describe the overall track structure in a cell exposed to a mixed radiation field. The parameterization, together with the presented stopping power weighting approach, show how nanometric track structure properties could be integrated into treatment planning systems without the need to perform time consuming simulations on the nanometer level for each individual patient.

  2. TNFRSF14 aberrations in follicular lymphoma increase clinically significant allogeneic T-cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kotsiou, Eleni; Okosun, Jessica; Besley, Caroline; Iqbal, Sameena; Matthews, Janet; Fitzgibbon, Jude; Gribben, John G.

    2016-01-01

    Donor T-cell immune responses can eradicate lymphomas after allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (AHSCT), but can also damage healthy tissues resulting in harmful graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). Next-generation sequencing has recently identified many new genetic lesions in follicular lymphoma (FL). One such gene, tumor necrosis factor receptor superfamily 14 (TNFRSF14), abnormal in 40% of FL patients, encodes the herpes virus entry mediator (HVEM) which limits T-cell activation via ligation of the B- and T-lymphocyte attenuator. As lymphoma B cells can act as antigen-presenting cells, we hypothesized that TNFRSF14 aberrations that reduce HVEM expression could alter the capacity of FL B cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell responses and impact the outcome of AHSCT. In an in vitro model of alloreactivity, human lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had reduced HVEM expression and greater alloantigen-presenting capacity than wild-type lymphoma B cells. The increased immune-stimulatory capacity of lymphoma B cells with TNFRSF14 aberrations had clinical relevance, associating with higher incidence of acute GVHD in patients undergoing AHSCT. FL patients with TNFRSF14 aberrations may benefit from more aggressive immunosuppression to reduce harmful GVHD after transplantation. Importantly, this study is the first to demonstrate the impact of an acquired genetic lesion on the capacity of tumor cells to stimulate allogeneic T-cell immune responses which may have wider consequences for adoptive immunotherapy strategies. PMID:27103745

  3. Clinical and pharmacologic aspects of blinatumomab in the treatment of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Portell CA

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Craig A Portell, Candice M Wenzell, Anjali S Advani Leukemia Program, Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic, Cleveland, OH, USA Abstract: Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL in adults remains a challenging disease to treat, and novel therapies are needed. Precursor-B ALL comprises 80% of cases, and the CD19 antigen is expressed in nearly all precursor-B ALL patients. Bispecific T-cell-engaging antibodies are novel bioengineered proteins. The bispecific T-cell-engaging antibody blinatumomab engages polyclonal T cells to CD19-expressing B cells. By binding to both CD3 and CD19, blinatumomab physically brings these T cells in close proximity to malignant B cells and potentiates T-cell-induced cytotoxic cell kill. Blinatumomab requires continuous intravenous infusion due to its short half-life, the need for continuous exposure for the drug to exert sufficient efficacy, and lessened toxicity. A phase II trial of B-cell ALL patients with persistent or relapsed minimal residual disease demonstrated an 80% rate of complete molecular remission. Cytokine-release syndrome and central nervous system events, such as seizures and encephalopathy, are reversible toxicities. Promising results in B-cell ALL with minimal residual disease have led to further evaluation of this drug in newly diagnosed and relapsed B-cell ALL. Keywords: blinatumomab, B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia, CD19, BiTE antibodies

  4. Regulatory T Cells Phenotype in Different Clinical Forms of Chagas' Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teixeira-Carvalho, Andréa; Renato Zuquim Antas, Paulo; Assis Silva Gomes, Juliana; Sathler-Avelar, Renato; Otávio Costa Rocha, Manoel; Elói-Santos, Silvana Maria; Pinho, Rosa Teixeira; Correa-Oliveira, Rodrigo; Martins-Filho, Olindo Assis

    2011-01-01

    CD25High CD4+ regulatory T cells (Treg cells) have been described as key players in immune regulation, preventing infection-induced immune pathology and limiting collateral tissue damage caused by vigorous anti-parasite immune response. In this review, we summarize data obtained by the investigation of Treg cells in different clinical forms of Chagas' disease. Ex vivo immunophenotyping of whole blood, as well as after stimulation with Trypanosoma cruzi antigens, demonstrated that individuals in the indeterminate (IND) clinical form of the disease have a higher frequency of Treg cells, suggesting that an expansion of those cells could be beneficial, possibly by limiting strong cytotoxic activity and tissue damage. Additional analysis demonstrated an activated status of Treg cells based on low expression of CD62L and high expression of CD40L, CD69, and CD54 by cells from all chagasic patients after T. cruzi antigenic stimulation. Moreover, there was an increase in the frequency of the population of Foxp3+ CD25HighCD4+ cells that was also IL-10+ in the IND group, whereas in the cardiac (CARD) group, there was an increase in the percentage of Foxp3+ CD25High CD4+ cells that expressed CTLA-4. These data suggest that IL-10 produced by Treg cells is effective in controlling disease development in IND patients. However, in CARD patients, the same regulatory mechanism, mediated by IL-10 and CTLA-4 expression is unlikely to be sufficient to control the progression of the disease. These data suggest that Treg cells may play an important role in controlling the immune response in Chagas' disease and the balance between regulatory and effector T cells may be important for the progression and development of the disease. Additional detailed analysis of the mechanisms on how these cells are activated and exert their function will certainly give insights for the rational design of procedure to achieve the appropriate balance between protection and pathology during parasite

  5. Concise Review: Clinical Translation of Wound Healing Therapies Based on Mesenchymal Stem Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jackson, Wesley M.; Nesti, Leon J.; Tuan, Rocky S.

    2011-01-01

    There is enormous worldwide demand for therapies to promote the efficient resolution of hard-to-heal wounds with minimal appearance of scarring. Recent in vitro studies with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have identified numerous mechanisms by which these cells can promote the process of wound healing, and there is significant interest in the clinical translation of an MSC-based therapy to promote dermal regeneration. This review provides a systematic analysis of recent preclinical and clinica...

  6. Clinical-scale expansion of mesenchymal stromal cells: a large banking experience

    OpenAIRE

    Lechanteur, Chantal; Briquet, Alexandra; Giet, Olivier; Delloye, Olivier; Baudoux, Etienne; Beguin, Yves

    2016-01-01

    Background Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSC) are largely investigated in clinical trials aiming to control inappropriate immune reactions (GVHD, Crohn’s disease, solid organ transplantation). As the percentage of MSC precursors in bone marrow is very low, these must be expanded in vitro to obtain therapeutic cell doses. We describe here the constitution of an allogeneic human third-party MSC bank from screened healthy volunteer donors in compliance with quality specifications and ISCT-release c...

  7. Localisation pattern of Foxp3+ regulatory T cells is associated with clinical behaviour in gastric cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Mizukami, Y.; Kono, K; Kawaguchi, Y; Akaike, H.; Kamimura, K.; Sugai, H.; Fujii, H.

    2007-01-01

    It has been reported that the population of regulatory T cells (T regs) is increased in tumour-infiltrating lymphocytes in cancer-bearing hosts. Recently, forkhead/winged helix transcription factor p3, Foxp3, is thought to be the most reliable marker of T regs. In the present study, we investigated the prevalence and localisation pattern of Foxp3+ cells in gastric cancer (n=80) by immunohistochemistry, in relation to the clinical outcome of gastric cancer patients. Immunohistochemical stainin...

  8. Clinical and Radiologic Signs of Relapsed Ovarian Germ Cell Tumor: Tissue Is the Issue

    OpenAIRE

    Homs, M Y V; Schreuder, H. W. R.; Jonges, G. N.; Witteveen, P. O.

    2013-01-01

    Malignant ovarian germ cell tumor is a rare disease, but with current treatment strategies including surgery and platinum based chemotherapy survival is excellent. After treatment, intensive followup is indicated to encounter tumor relapse at an early stage. This case describes a 22-year-old female with a history of common variable immune deficiency (CVID) who underwent a resection of a large ovarian germ cell tumor followed by 4 cycles of cisplatin and etoposide resulting in clinical complet...

  9. Clinical and Immunological Effects in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung-Cancer after Vaccination with Dendritic Cells Exposed to an Allogeneic Tumor Cell Lysate

    OpenAIRE

    Mogens H. Claesson; Ayako W. Pedersen; Pia Kvistborg; Mai-Britt Zocca; Lotte Engell-Noerregaard; Anders Mellemgaard

    2013-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the clinical and immunological effects of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of patients with NSCLC. Autologous DCs were pulsed with a MAGE containing allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MelCancerVac&174, Dandrit Biotech,Copenhagen,Denmark). Imiquimod cream, proleukin and celecoxib were used as adjuvants to the vaccines. The objective of the study was to evaluate specific T cell response in vitro by IFNg EliSpot. Secondary objectives were overall survival, response and qua...

  10. Ambivalent journeys of hope: embryonic stem cell therapy in a clinic in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prasad, Amit

    2015-03-01

    Stem cell therapy in non-Western countries such as India has received a lot of attention. Apart from media reports, there are a number of social science analyses of stem cell policy, therapy, and research, their ethical implications, and impact of advertising on patients. Nevertheless, in the media reports as well as in academic studies, experiences of patients, who undertake overseas journeys for stem cell therapy, have largely been either ignored or presented reductively, often as a "false hope." In this article, I analyze the experiences of patients and their "journeys of hope" to NuTech Mediworld, an embryonic stem cell therapy clinic in New Delhi, India. My analysis, which draws on my observations in the clinic and patients' experiences, instead of seeking to adjudicate whether embryonic stem cell therapy in clinics such as NuTech is right or wrong, true or false, focuses on how patients navigate and contest these concerns. I utilize Gilles Deleuze and Felix Guattari's "concepts," lines of flight and deterritorialization, to highlight how embryonic stem cell therapy's "political economy of hope" embodies deterritorialization of several "regimes of truth" and how these deterritorializations impact patients' experiences. PMID:25394653

  11. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples

  12. Clinical Trial Design for Testing the Stem Cell Model for the Prevention and Treatment of Cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reddy, Rishindra M., E-mail: reddyrm@med.umich.edu [Medical Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, 2120 Taubman Center, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States); Kakarala, Madhuri; Wicha, Max S. [Comprehensive Cancer Center, University of Michigan, 1500 E. Medical Center Drive, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2011-06-20

    The cancer stem cell model introduces new strategies for the prevention and treatment of cancers. In cancers that appear to follow the stem cell model, pathways such as Wnt, Notch and Hedgehog may be targeted with natural compounds such as curcumin or drugs to reduce the risk of initiation of new tumors. Disease progression of established tumors could also potentially be inhibited by targeting the tumorigenic stem cells alone, rather than aiming to reduce overall tumor size. These new approaches mandate a change in the design of clinical trials and biomarkers chosen for efficacy assessment for preventative, neoadjuvant, adjuvant, and palliative treatments. Cancer treatments could be evaluated by assessing stem cell markers before and after treatment. Targeted stem cell specific treatment of cancers may not result in “complete” or “partial” responses radiologically, as stem cell targeting may not reduce the tumor bulk, but eliminate further tumorigenic potential. These changes are discussed using breast, pancreatic, and lung cancer as examples.

  13. Amniotic fluid as a source of multipotent cells for clinical use.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Bruce K; Chan, Michael K; Liu, Li; Basch, Ross S

    2016-04-01

    Amniotic fluid cells (AFC) from 2nd trimester amniocentesis have been found to be a source of multipotent stem cells which might overcome the limitations of expansion, histocompatibility, tumorigenesis, and ethical issues associated with using human embryonic cells, umbilical cord, cord blood, bone marrow, and induced pluripotent cells. Previous work by our group and others demonstrated multipotency and the ability to grow well in culture. However, all these studies were done in media containing fetal calf serum. We sought to observe the properties of AFC grown in serum-free media as that would be required for clinical transplantation in humans. Fresh samples were obtained from three patients, and each sample divided into a culture whose cells were not exposed to fetal calf serum, and the other half into a standard culture medium containing fetal calf serum. Doubling time and stem cell marker expression by flow cytometry were assessed. Differentiation to neural, osteoid, and chondrogenic lineages was induced using appropriate media and confirmed by fluorescent microscopy, histology, and immunohistochemistry. There were no statistically significant differences between cells grown serum-free and in standard media in any of these parameters. The data supports the possibility of clinical use of AFC in stem cell transplantation. PMID:26115489

  14. Advances in the Use of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markoski, Melissa Medeiros

    2016-01-01

    Today, several veterinary diseases may be treated with the administration of stem cells. This is possible because these cells present a high therapeutic potential and may be injected as autologous or allogenic, freshly isolated, or previously cultured. The literature supports that the process is safe and brings considerable benefits to animal health. Knowledge about how adult stem cells modulate the molecular signals to activate cell homing has also been increasingly determined, evidencing the mechanisms which enable cells to repair and regenerate injured tissues. Preclinical studies were designed for many animal models and they have contributed to the translation to the human clinic. This review shows the most commonly used stem cell types, with emphasis on mesenchymal stem cells and their mechanistic potential to repair, as well as the experimental protocols, studied diseases, and species with the highest amount of studies and applications. The relationship between stem cell protocols utilized on clinics, molecular mechanisms, and the physiological responses may offer subsidies to new studies and therefore improve the therapeutic outcome for both humans and animals. PMID:27379197

  15. Advances in the Use of Stem Cells in Veterinary Medicine: From Basic Research to Clinical Practice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Medeiros Markoski

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, several veterinary diseases may be treated with the administration of stem cells. This is possible because these cells present a high therapeutic potential and may be injected as autologous or allogenic, freshly isolated, or previously cultured. The literature supports that the process is safe and brings considerable benefits to animal health. Knowledge about how adult stem cells modulate the molecular signals to activate cell homing has also been increasingly determined, evidencing the mechanisms which enable cells to repair and regenerate injured tissues. Preclinical studies were designed for many animal models and they have contributed to the translation to the human clinic. This review shows the most commonly used stem cell types, with emphasis on mesenchymal stem cells and their mechanistic potential to repair, as well as the experimental protocols, studied diseases, and species with the highest amount of studies and applications. The relationship between stem cell protocols utilized on clinics, molecular mechanisms, and the physiological responses may offer subsidies to new studies and therefore improve the therapeutic outcome for both humans and animals.

  16. Animal experiments and clinical application of olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation for treatment of spinal cord injury

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nan Liu; Wei Liu; Baiyu Zhou; Jing Wang; Bing Li

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The olfactory epithelium can still generate new neurons after arresting its growth and development in the human body. Axons can still be generated and pass through peripheral tissue to reach the olfactory bulb. Thus, olfactory cells have been widely used in the repair of spinal cord injury.OBJECTIVE: Using animal experiments in conjunction with a clinical study of olfactory ensheathing cells, this paper was designed to clarify the function and application prospects of olfactory ensheathing cells, as well as the existing problems with their application. RETRIEVAL STRATEGY: Using the terms "olfactory ensheathing cells, spinal cord injury", we retrieved manuscripts published from January 1990 to June 2007. The languages were limited to English and Chinese. Inclusion criteria: studies addressing the characteristics, basic study, clinical application and prospects of olfactory ensheathing cells; studies that were recently published or were published in high-impact journals. Exclusion criteria: repetitive studies.LITERATURE EVALUATION: The included 29 manuscripts were primarily clinical or basic experimental studies. DATA SYNTHESIS: Following spinal cord injury, spinal neurons die, neurotrophic factors are lacking, and the existing glial scar and cavities hinder axonal growth. One method to repair spinal cord injury is to interfere with the above-mentioned factors based on animal experiments. Myelination and axonal regeneration are the keys to spinal cord injury therapy. Olfactory ensheathing cells can secrete several neurotrophic factors, inhibit horizontal cell reactions, have noticeable neuroprotective effects, and possess a very strong reproductive activity, so they have many advantages in the fields of cell transplantation and gene therapy. However, there still exist many questions and uncertainties, such as the best time window and dose, as well as complications of olfactory ensheathing cell transplantation; precise mechanism of action after olfactory

  17. Clinical utility of circulating tumor cell counting through CellSearch®: the dilemma of a concept suspended in Limbo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Raimondi C

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available Cristina Raimondi,1 Angela Gradilone,1 Giuseppe Naso,2 Enrico Cortesi,2 Paola Gazzaniga1 1Dipartimento Medicina Molecolare, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy; 2Dipartimento di Scienze Radiologiche, Oncologiche e Anatomopatologiche, Sapienza Università di Roma, Rome, Italy Abstract: To date, 10 years after the first demonstration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs, prognostic significance in metastatic breast cancer using the US Food and Drug Administration–cleared system CellSearch®, the potential utility of CTCs in early clinical development of drugs, their role as a surrogate marker of response to therapy, and their molecular analysis for patient stratification for targeted therapies are still major unsolved questions. Great expectations are pinned on the ongoing interventional trials aimed to demonstrate that CTCs might be of value for guiding treatment of patients and predicting cancer progression. To fill the gap between theory and practice with regard to the clinical utility of CTCs, a bridge is needed, taking into account innovative design for clinical trials, a revised definition of traditional CTCs, next-generation CTC technology, the potential clinical application of CTC analysis in non-validated settings of disease, and finally, expanding the number of patients enrolled in the studies. In this regard, the results of the first European pooled analysis definitely validated the independent prognostic value of CTC counting in metastatic breast cancer patients. Keywords: CTC, clinical trials, prognosis

  18. In vivo tracking of human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol in rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion by magnetic resonance imaging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Yin

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Ferumoxytol, an iron replacement product, is a new type of superparamagnetic iron oxide approved by the US Food and Drug Administration. Herein, we assessed the feasibility of tracking transplanted human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol in middle cerebral artery occlusion-injured rats by 3.0 T MRI in vivo. 1 × 10 4 human adipose-derived stem cells labeled with ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine were transplanted into the brains of rats with middle cerebral artery occlusion. Neurologic impairment was scored at 1, 7, 14, and 28 days after transplantation. T2-weighted imaging and enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography were used to observe transplanted cells. Results of imaging tests were compared with results of Prussian blue staining. The modified neurologic impairment scores were significantly lower in rats transplanted with cells at all time points except 1 day post-transplantation compared with rats without transplantation. Regions with hypointense signals on T2-weighted and enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography images corresponded with areas stained by Prussian blue, suggesting the presence of superparamagnetic iron oxide particles within the engrafted cells. Enhanced susceptibility-weighted angiography image exhibited better sensitivity and contrast in tracing ferumoxytol-heparin-protamine-labeled human adipose-derived stem cells compared with T2-weighted imaging in routine MRI.

  19. Magentic Cell labeling of primary and stem cell-derived pig hepatocytes for MRI-based cell tracking of heptocytes transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pig hepatocytes are an important investigational tool for optimizing hepatocyte transplantation schemes in both allogeneic and xenogeneic transplant scenarios. MRI can be used to serially monitor the transplanted cells, but only if the hepatocytes can be labeled with a magnetic particle. In this wo...

  20. Relationship between somatic cell count status and subsequent clinical mastitis in Dutch dairy cows

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borne, van den B.H.P.; Vernooij, J.C.M.; Lupindu, A.M.; Schaik, van G.; Frankena, K.; Lam, T.J.G.M.; Nielen, M.

    2011-01-01

    High composite somatic cell counts (CSCC) in dairy cows may develop into clinical mastitis (CM), suggesting that prevention or intervention of high CSCC may prevent CM later in lactation. The objective of this study was to quantify the relationship between high CSCC in dairy cows and the first subse

  1. An update of human mesenchymal stem cell biology and their clinical uses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zaher, Walid; Harkness, Linda; Kermani, Abbas Jafari;

    2014-01-01

    in vivo. Consequently, stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells (MSCs) are being introduced into many clinical trials due to their ease of isolation and efficacy in treating a number of disease conditions in animal preclinical disease models. The aim of this review is to revise MSC biology, their potential...

  2. Magnetic resonance hypointensive signal primarily originates from extracellular iron particles in the long-term tracking of mesenchymal stem cells transplanted in the infarcted myocardium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huang Z

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Zheyong Huang,1,* Chenguang Li,1,* Shan Yang,2 Jianfeng Xu,1 Yunli Shen,3 Xinxing Xie,4 Yuxiang Dai,1 Hao Lu,1 Hui Gong,5 Aijun Sun,1 Juying Qian,1 Junbo Ge1 1Shanghai Institute of Cardiovascular Diseases, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 2Department of Radiology, Zhongshan Hospital, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 3Department of Cardiology, Shanghai East Hospital, Tongji University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China; 4Department of Cardiology, Qianfoshan Hospital, Shandong University, Jinan, Shandong Province, People’s Republic of China; 5Institute of Biomedical Science, Fudan University, Shanghai, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Purpose: The long-lasting hypointensities in cardiac magnetic resonance (CMR were believed to originate from superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO-engulfed macrophages during long-term stem cell tracking. However, the iron clearance capacity of the ischemic heart was limited. Therefore, we speculated that the extracellular SPIO particles may also be involved in the generation of false-positive signals.Methods and results: Male swine mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were incubated with SPIO for 24 hours, and SPIO labeling had no significant effects on either cell viability or differentiation. In vitro studies showed that magnetic resonance failed to distinguish SPIO from living SPIO-MSCs or dead SPIO-MSCs. Two hours after the establishment of the female swine acute myocardial infarction model, 2×107 male SPIO-labeled MSCs (n=5 or unlabeled MSCs (n=5 were transextracardially injected into the infarcted myocardium at ten distinct sites. In vivo CMR with T2 star weighted imaging-flash-2D sequence revealed a signal void corresponding to the initial SPIO-MSC injection sites. At 6 months after transplantation, CMR identified 32 (64% of the 50 injection sites, where massive Prussian blue-positive iron

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells in Lipogems, a Reverse Story: from Clinical Practice to Basic Science.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tremolada, Carlo; Ricordi, Camillo; Caplan, Arnold I; Ventura, Carlo

    2016-01-01

    The idea that basic science should be the starting point for modern clinical approaches has been consolidated over the years, and emerged as the cornerstone of Molecular Medicine. Nevertheless, there is increasing concern over the low efficiency and inherent costs related to the translation of achievements from the bench to the bedside. These burdens are also perceived with respect to the effectiveness of translating basic discoveries in stem cell biology to the newly developing field of advanced cell therapy or Regenerative Medicine. As an alternative paradigm, past and recent history in Medical Science provides remarkable reverse stories in which clinical observations at the patient's bedside have fed major advances in basic research which, in turn, led to consistent progression in clinical practice. Within this context, we discuss our recently developed method and device, which forms the core of a system (Lipogems) for processing of human adipose tissue solely with the aid of mild mechanical forces to yield a microfractured tissue product. PMID:27236668

  4. A study of V79 cell survival after for proton and carbon ion beams as represented by the parameters of Katz' track structure model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grzanka, Leszek; Waligórski, M. P. R.; Bassler, Niels

    Katz’s theory of cellular track structure (1) is an amorphous analytical model which applies a set of four cellular parameters representing survival of a given cell line after ion irradiation. Usually the values of these parameters are best fitted to a full set of experimentally measured survival...... curves available for a variety of ions. Once fitted, using these parameter values and the analytical formulae of the model calculations, cellular survival curves and RBE may be predicted for that cell line after irradiation by any ion, including mixed ion fields. While it is known that the Katz model...... parameters fitted to heavier ion data may yield unsatisfactory predictions of proton response, to our knowledge, no comprehensive data set which includes proton and heavier ion irradiations, measured in one laboratory, has been published. To study the consistency of evaluating parameters of this model from...

  5. Clinical significance of mast cells and IL-9 in B-NHL

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    封丽丽

    2013-01-01

    Objective To investigate the role of mast cells and interleukin-9 (IL-9) in B-cell non-Hodgkin lymphoma (B-NHL) development and its clinical significance.Methods The expression level of CD117 in tumor tissues of 32 B-NHL patients was determined by Western blot.The infiltration of CD117+mast cells (MCs) in human B-NHL tumor tissues was observed by immunohistochemistry staining.To evaluate the correlations between the data from CD117+MCs and biological markers of human B-NHL,a Spearman correlation coefficient (rs) was cal-

  6. Clinical outcome of fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    To evaluate the treatment results in early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients who have undergone fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS). From June 2011 to November 2013, 58 patients underwent CKRS at Asan Medical Center for stage I lung cancer. After excluding 14 patients, we retrospectively reviewed the records of the remaining 44 patients. All analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 21. The median age at diagnosis was 75 years. Most patients had inoperable primary lung cancer with a poor pulmonary function test with comorbidity or old age. The clinical stage was IA in 30 patients (68.2%), IB in 14 (31.8%). The mean tumor size was 2.6 cm (range, 1.2 to 4.8 cm), and the tumor was smaller than 2 cm in 12 patients (27.3%). The radiation dose given was 48-60 Gy in 3-4 fractions. In a median follow-up of 23.1 months, local recurrence occurred in three patients (2-year local recurrence-free survival rate, 90.4%) and distant metastasis occurred in 13 patients. All patients tolerated the radiosurgery well, only two patients developing grade 3 dyspnea. The most common complications were radiation-induced fibrosis and pneumonitis. Eight patients died due to cancer progression. The results showed that fiducial-less CKRS shows comparable local tumor control and survival rates to those of LINAC-based SABR or CKRS with a fiducial marker. Thus, fiducial-less CKRS using Xsight lung tracking system can be effectively and safely performed for patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer without any risk of procedure-related complication

  7. Clinical outcome of fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery for stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jung, In Hye; Song, Si Yeol; Cho, Byung Chul; Kwak, Jung Won; Jung, Nuri Hyun; Kim, Su Ssan; Choi, Eun Kyung [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jung, Jin Hong [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Kyung Hee University Medical Center, Kyung Hee University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Je, Hyoung Uk [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Won Sik [Dept. of Radiation Oncology, Gangneung Asan Hospital, Uiversity of Ulsan College of Medicine, Gangneung (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-06-15

    To evaluate the treatment results in early stage non-small cell lung cancer patients who have undergone fiducial-less CyberKnife radiosurgery (CKRS). From June 2011 to November 2013, 58 patients underwent CKRS at Asan Medical Center for stage I lung cancer. After excluding 14 patients, we retrospectively reviewed the records of the remaining 44 patients. All analyses were performed using SPSS ver. 21. The median age at diagnosis was 75 years. Most patients had inoperable primary lung cancer with a poor pulmonary function test with comorbidity or old age. The clinical stage was IA in 30 patients (68.2%), IB in 14 (31.8%). The mean tumor size was 2.6 cm (range, 1.2 to 4.8 cm), and the tumor was smaller than 2 cm in 12 patients (27.3%). The radiation dose given was 48-60 Gy in 3-4 fractions. In a median follow-up of 23.1 months, local recurrence occurred in three patients (2-year local recurrence-free survival rate, 90.4%) and distant metastasis occurred in 13 patients. All patients tolerated the radiosurgery well, only two patients developing grade 3 dyspnea. The most common complications were radiation-induced fibrosis and pneumonitis. Eight patients died due to cancer progression. The results showed that fiducial-less CKRS shows comparable local tumor control and survival rates to those of LINAC-based SABR or CKRS with a fiducial marker. Thus, fiducial-less CKRS using Xsight lung tracking system can be effectively and safely performed for patients with medically inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer without any risk of procedure-related complication.

  8. Cell-assisted lipotransfer in the clinical treatment of facial soft tissue deformity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Li; Wen, Huicai; Jian, Xueping; Liao, Huaiwei; Sui, Yunpeng; Liu, Yanping; Xu, Guizhen

    2015-01-01

    Cosmetic surgeons have experimented with a variety of substances to improve soft tissue deformities of the face. Autologous fat grafting provides significant advantages over other modalities because it leaves no scar, is easy to use and is well tolerated by most patients. Autologous fat grafting has become one of the most popular techniques in the field of facial plastic surgery. Unfortunately, there are still two major problems affecting survival rate and development: revascularization after transplantion; and cell reservation proliferation and survival. Since Zuk and Yosra developed a technology based on adipose-derived stem cells and cell-assisted lipotrophy, researchers have hoped that this technology would promote the survival and reduce the absorption of grafted fat cells. Autologous adipose-derived stem cells may have great potential in skin repair applications, aged skin rejuvenation and other aging-related skin lesion treatments. Recently, the study of adipose-derived stem cells has gained increased attention. More researchers have started to adopt this technology in the clinical treatment of facial soft tissue deformity. The present article reviews the history of facial soft tissue augmentation and the advent of adipose-derived stem cells in the area of the clinical treatment of facial soft tissue deformity. PMID:26361629

  9. Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells from Basic Research to Potential Clinical Applications in Cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Teresa de Souza Fernandez

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs are derived from a direct reprogramming of human somatic cells to a pluripotent stage through ectopic expression of specific transcription factors. These cells have two important properties, which are the self-renewal capacity and the ability to differentiate into any cell type of the human body. So, the discovery of hiPSCs opens new opportunities in biomedical sciences, since these cells may be useful for understanding the mechanisms of diseases in the production of new diseases models, in drug development/drug toxicity tests, gene therapies, and cell replacement therapies. However, the hiPSCs technology has limitations including the potential for the development of genetic and epigenetic abnormalities leading to tumorigenicity. Nowadays, basic research in the hiPSCs field has made progress in the application of new strategies with the aim to enable an efficient production of high-quality of hiPSCs for safety and efficacy, necessary to the future application for clinical practice. In this review, we show the recent advances in hiPSCs’ basic research and some potential clinical applications focusing on cancer. We also present the importance of the use of statistical methods to evaluate the possible validation for the hiPSCs for future therapeutic use toward personalized cell therapies.

  10. Stem cell therapy for joint problems using the horse as a clinically relevant animal model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Koch, Thomas Gadegaard; Betts, Dean H.

    2007-01-01

    of the developmental biology of synovial joints and their pathologies. Before human clinical trials are undertaken, stem cell-based therapies for non-life-threatening disorders should be evaluated for their safety and efficacy using animal models of spontaneous disease and not solely by the existing laboratory models...... of experimentally induced lesions. The horse lends itself as a good animal model of spontaneous joint disorders that are clinically relevant to similar human disorders. Equine stem cell and tissue engineering studies may be financially feasible to principal investigators and small biotechnology companies......Research into articular cartilage is a surprisingly recent endeavour and much remains to be learned about the normal development of the synovial joint and its components that interplay in osteoarthritis and focal cartilage defects. Stem cell research is likely to contribute to the understanding...

  11. Clinical manufacturing of CAR T cells: foundation of a promising therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiuyan; Rivière, Isabelle

    2016-01-01

    The treatment of cancer patients with autologous T cells expressing a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) is one of the most promising adoptive cellular therapy approaches. Reproducible manufacturing of high-quality, clinical-grade CAR-T cell products is a prerequisite for the wide application of this technology. Product quality needs to be built-in within every step of the manufacturing process. We summarize herein the requirements and logistics to be considered, as well as the state of the art manufacturing platforms available. CAR-T cell therapy may be on the verge of becoming standard of care for a few clinical indications. Yet, many challenges pertaining to manufacturing standardization and product characterization remain to be overcome in order to achieve broad usage and eventual commercialization of this therapeutic modality. PMID:27347557

  12. Clinical-scale cultures of cord blood CD34(+) cells to amplify committed progenitors and maintain stem cell activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanovic, Zoran; Duchez, Pascale; Chevaleyre, Jean; Vlaski, Marija; Lafarge, Xavier; Dazey, Bernard; Robert-Richard, Elodie; Mazurier, Frédéric; Boiron, Jean-Michel

    2011-01-01

    We developed a clinical-scale cord blood (CB) cell ex vivo procedure to enable an extensive expansion of committed progenitors--colony-forming cells (CFCs) without impairing very primitive hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). CD34(++) cells, selected from previously cryopreserved and thawed CB units, were cultured in two steps (diluted 1:4 after 6 days) in the presence of stem cell factor (SCF), fms-related tyrosine kinase 3 ligand (Flt-3L), megakaryocyte growth and development factor (MGDF) (100 ng/ml each), granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF) (10 ng/ml) in HP01 serum-free medium. HSC activity was evaluated in a serial transplantation assay, by detection of human cells (CD45, CD33, CD19 and CFC of human origin) in bone marrow (BM) of primary and secondary recipient NOD/SCID mice 6-8 weeks after transplantation. A wide amplification of total cells (∼350-fold), CD34(+) cells (∼100-fold), and CFC (∼130-fold) without impairing the HSC activity was obtained. The activity of a particular HSC subpopulation (SRC(CFC)) was even enhanced.Thus, an extensive ex vivo expansion of CFCs is feasible without impairing the activity of HSCs. This result was enabled by associating antioxidant power of medium with an appropriate cytokine cocktail (i.e., mimicking physiologic effects of a weak oxygenation in hematopoietic environment). PMID:21294956

  13. Real-Time Tracking of BODIPY-C12 Long-Chain Fatty Acid in Human Term Placenta Reveals Unique Lipid Dynamics in Cytotrophoblast Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Kolahi

    Full Text Available While the human placenta must provide selected long-chain fatty acids to support the developing fetal brain, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the transport process. We tracked the movement of the fluorescently labeled long-chain fatty acid analogue, BODIPY-C12, across the cell layers of living explants of human term placenta. Although all layers took up the fatty acid, rapid esterification of long-chain fatty acids and incorporation into lipid droplets was exclusive to the inner layer cytotrophoblast cells rather than the expected outer syncytiotrophoblast layer. Cytotrophoblast is a progenitor cell layer previously relegated to a repair role. As isolated cytotrophoblasts differentiated into syncytialized cells in culture, they weakened their lipid processing capacity. Syncytializing cells suppress previously active genes that regulate fatty-acid uptake (SLC27A2/FATP2, FABP4, ACSL5 and lipid metabolism (GPAT3, LPCAT3. We speculate that cytotrophoblast performs a previously unrecognized role in regulating placental fatty acid uptake and metabolism.

  14. Real-Time Tracking of BODIPY-C12 Long-Chain Fatty Acid in Human Term Placenta Reveals Unique Lipid Dynamics in Cytotrophoblast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Louey, Samantha; Varlamov, Oleg; Thornburg, Kent

    2016-01-01

    While the human placenta must provide selected long-chain fatty acids to support the developing fetal brain, little is known about the mechanisms underlying the transport process. We tracked the movement of the fluorescently labeled long-chain fatty acid analogue, BODIPY-C12, across the cell layers of living explants of human term placenta. Although all layers took up the fatty acid, rapid esterification of long-chain fatty acids and incorporation into lipid droplets was exclusive to the inner layer cytotrophoblast cells rather than the expected outer syncytiotrophoblast layer. Cytotrophoblast is a progenitor cell layer previously relegated to a repair role. As isolated cytotrophoblasts differentiated into syncytialized cells in culture, they weakened their lipid processing capacity. Syncytializing cells suppress previously active genes that regulate fatty-acid uptake (SLC27A2/FATP2, FABP4, ACSL5) and lipid metabolism (GPAT3, LPCAT3). We speculate that cytotrophoblast performs a previously unrecognized role in regulating placental fatty acid uptake and metabolism. PMID:27124483

  15. Single-Cell Sequencing Technology in Oncology: Applications for Clinical Therapies and Research

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baixin Ye

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular heterogeneity is a fundamental characteristic of many cancers. A lack of cellular homogeneity contributes to difficulty in designing targeted oncological therapies. Therefore, the development of novel methods to determine and characterize oncologic cellular heterogeneity is a critical next step in the development of novel cancer therapies. Single-cell sequencing (SCS technology has been recently employed for analyzing the genetic polymorphisms of individual cells at the genome-wide level. SCS requires (1 precise isolation of the single cell of interest; (2 isolation and amplification of genetic material; and (3 descriptive analysis of genomic, transcriptomic, and epigenomic data. In addition to targeted analysis of single cells isolated from tumor biopsies, SCS technology may be applied to circulating tumor cells, which may aid in predicting tumor progression and metastasis. In this paper, we provide an overview of SCS technology and review the current literature on the potential application of SCS to clinical oncology and research.

  16. Tracking of In-111-labeled human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) in a rat model of cerebral ischemia using SPECT imaging

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to increase understanding of how infused cells work, it becomes important to track their initial movement, localization, and engraftment efficiency following transplantation. However, the available in vivo cell tracking techniques are suboptimal. The study objective was to determine the biodistribution of intravenously administered Indium-111 (In-111) oxine labeled human umbilical tissue-derived cells (hUTC) in a rat model of transient middle cerebral occlusion (tMCAo) using single photon emission computed tomography (SPECT). Rats received 3 million In-111 labeled hUTC (i.v.) 48 hrs after tMCAo. Following the administration of either hUTC or equivalent dose of In-111-oxine (18.5 MBq), animals underwent SPECT imaging on days 0, 1, and 3. Radioactivity in various organs as well as in the stroke area and contralateral hemisphere was determined, decay corrected and normalized to the total (whole body including head) radioactivity on day 0. Immunohistochemical analysis was also performed to confirm the beneficial effects of hUTC on vascular and synaptic density, and apoptosis. Most of the radioactivity (43.36±23.07% on day 0) trafficked to the lungs immediately following IV administration of In-111 labeled hUTC (day 0) and decreased drastically to 8.81±7.75 and 4.01±4.52% on days 1 and 3 post-injection, respectively. In contrast, radioactivity measured in the lung of animals that received In-111-oxine alone remained relatively unchanged from day 0 to day 1 (18.38±5.45% at day 0 to 12.59±5.94%) and decreased to 8.34±4.25% on day 3. Significantly higher radioactivity was observed in stroke areas of animals that received In-111 labeled hUTC indicating the presence of cells at the site of injury representing approximately 1% of total administered dose. In addition, there was significant increase in vascular and synaptophysin immunoreactivity in stroke areas of rats that received In-111 labeled hUTC. The present studies showed the tracking of In-111 labeled h

  17. Identification of stem-like cells and clinical significance of candidate stem cell markers in gastric cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiaofeng; Huang, Mingzhu; Gan, Lu; Wu, Zhenhua; Zhang, Jiejun; Wang, Hongqiang; Cheng, Yufan; Li, Jin; Guo, Weijian

    2016-01-01

    The existence of gastric cancer stem cells (CSCs) has not been definitively proven and specific cell surface markers for identifying gastric CSCs have largely not been identified. Our research aimed to isolate potential gastric CSCs and clarify their clinical significance, while defining markers for GCSC identification and verification. Here, we report that spheroid cells possess stem cell-like properties, and overexpress certain stem cell markers. CD133 or CD44-positive cells also exhibit properties of CSCs. The expression of Oct4, Sox2, Gli1, CD44, CD133, p-AKT, and p-ERK was significantly higher in metastatic lesions compared to that in primary lesions. Elevated expression of some of these proteins was correlated with a more aggressive phenotype and poorer prognosis, including Oct4, Sox2, Gli1, CD44, and p-ERK. Multivariate Cox proportional hazards model analysis showed that only CD44 is an independent factor. Knockdown of CD44 down-regulated the stem cell-like properties, which was accompanied by the down-regulation of p-ERK and Oct4. Oct4 overexpression could reverse the decreased CSCs properties induced by CD44 knockdown. Taken together, our research revealed that spheroid cell culture, and CD133 or CD44-labeled FACS methods can be used to isolate gastric CSCs. Some CSC markers have clinical significance in predicting the prognosis. CD44 is an independent prognostic factor and maintains the properties of CSCs in CD44-p-ERK-Oct4 positive feedback loop. PMID:26769843

  18. Tracking of peptide-specific CD4+ T-cell responses after an acute resolving viral infection: a study of parvovirus B19

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprowicz, Victoria; Isa, Adiba; Tolfvenstam, Thomas;

    2006-01-01

    The evolution of peptide-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses to acute viral infections of humans is poorly understood. We analyzed the response to parvovirus B19 (B19), a ubiquitous and clinically significant pathogen with a compact and conserved genome. The magnitude and breadth of the CD4(+) T...

  19. INNER TRACKING

    CERN Multimedia

    P. Sharp

    The CMS Inner Tracking Detector continues to make good progress. The Objective for 2006 was to complete all of the CMS Tracker sub-detectors and to start the integration of the sub-detectors into the Tracker Support Tube (TST). The Objective for 2007 is to deliver to CMS a completed, installed, commissioned and calibrated Tracking System (Silicon Strip and Pixels) aligned to < 100µ in April 2008 ready for the first physics collisions at LHC. In November 2006 all of the sub-detectors had been delivered to the Tracker Integration facility (TIF) at CERN and the tests and QA procedures to be carried out on each sub-detector before integration had been established. In December 2006, TIB/TID+ was integrated into TOB+, TIB/TID- was being prepared for integration, and TEC+ was undergoing tests at the final tracker operating temperature (-100 C) in the Lyon cold room. In February 2007, TIB/TID- has been integrated into TOB-, and the installation of the pixel support tube and the services for TI...

  20. Expression and clinical role of NF45 as a novel cell cycle protein in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma (ESCC).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Sujie; Zhu, Junya; Zhang, Jianguo; Zhang, Shu; Li, Mei; Ni, Runzhou; Liu, Jinxia; Qiu, Huiyuan; Chen, Wenjuan; Wang, Huijie; Guo, Weijian

    2015-02-01

    NF45 (also known as ILF2), as one subunit of NF-AT (nuclear factor of activated T cells), repairs DNA breaks, inhibits viral replication, and also functions as a negative regulator in the microRNA processing pathway in combination with NF90. Recently, it was found that implicated in the mitotic control of HeLa cells and deletion of endogenous NF45 decreases growth of HeLa cells. While the role of NF45 in cancer biology remains under debate. In this study, we analyzed the expression and clinical significance of NF45 in esophageal squamous cell carcinoma ESCC. The expression of NF45 was evaluated by Western blot in 8 paired fresh ESCC tissues and immunohistochemistry on 105 paraffin-embedded slices. NF45 was highly expressed in ESCC and significantly associated with ESCC cells tumor stage and Ki-67. Besides, high NF45 expression was an independent prognostic factor for ESCC patients' poor survival. To determine whether NF45 could regulate the proliferation of ESCC cells, we increased endogenous NF45 and analyzed the proliferation of TE1 ESCC cells using Western blot, CCK8, flow cytometry assays and colony formation analyses, which together indicated that overexpression of NF45 favors cell cycle progress of TE1 ESCC cells. While knockdown of NF45 resulted in cell cycle arrest at G0/G1-phase and thus abolished the cell growth. These findings suggested that NF45 might play an important role in promoting the tumorigenesis of ESCC, and thus be a promising therapeutic target to prevent ESCC progression. PMID:25286760

  1. New model for gastroenteropancreatic large-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma: establishment of two clinically relevant cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Krieg

    Full Text Available Recently, a novel WHO-classification has been introduced that divided gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (GEP-NEN according to their proliferation index into G1- or G2-neuroendocrine tumors (NET and poorly differentiated small-cell or large-cell G3-neuroendocrine carcinomas (NEC. Our knowledge on primary NECs of the GEP-system is limited due to the rarity of these tumors and chemotherapeutic concepts of highly aggressive NEC do not provide convincing results. The aim of this study was to establish a reliable cell line model for NEC that could be helpful in identifying novel druggable molecular targets. Cell lines were established from liver (NEC-DUE1 or lymph node metastases (NEC-DUE2 from large cell NECs of the gastroesophageal junction and the large intestine, respectively. Morphological characteristics and expression of neuroendocrine markers were extensively analyzed. Chromosomal aberrations were mapped by array comparative genomic hybridization and DNA profiling was analyzed by DNA fingerprinting. In vitro and in vivo tumorigenicity was evaluated and the sensitivity against chemotherapeutic agents assessed. Both cell lines exhibited typical morphological and molecular features of large cell NEC. In vitro and in vivo experiments demonstrated that both cell lines retained their malignant properties. Whereas NEC-DUE1 and -DUE2 were resistant to chemotherapeutic drugs such as cisplatin, etoposide and oxaliplatin, a high sensitivity to 5-fluorouracil was observed for the NEC-DUE1 cell line. Taken together, we established and characterized the first GEP large-cell NEC cell lines that might serve as a helpful tool not only to understand the biology of these tumors, but also to establish novel targeted therapies in a preclinical setup.

  2. Differentiation of Equine Mesenchymal Stromal Cells into Cells of Neural Lineage: Potential for Clinical Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claudia Cruz Villagrán

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs are able to differentiate into extramesodermal lineages, including neurons. Positive outcomes were obtained after transplantation of neurally induced MSCs in laboratory animals after nerve injury, but this is unknown in horses. Our objectives were to test the ability of equine MSCs to differentiate into cells of neural lineage in vitro, to assess differences in morphology and lineage-specific protein expression, and to investigate if horse age and cell passage number affected the ability to achieve differentiation. Bone marrow-derived MSCs were obtained from young and adult horses. Following demonstration of stemness, MSCs were neurally induced and microscopically assessed at different time points. Results showed that commercially available nitrogen-coated tissue culture plates supported proliferation and differentiation. Morphological changes were immediate and all the cells displayed a neural crest-like cell phenotype. Expression of neural progenitor proteins, was assessed via western blot or immunofluorescence. In our study, MSCs generated from young and middle-aged horses did not show differences in their ability to undergo differentiation. The effect of cell passage number, however, is inconsistent and further experiments are needed. Ongoing work is aimed at transdifferentiating these cells into Schwann cells for transplantation into a peripheral nerve injury model in horses.

  3. Cartilage Regeneration in Human with Adipose Tissue-Derived Stem Cells: Current Status in Clinical Implications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaewoo Pak

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Osteoarthritis (OA is one of the most common debilitating disorders among the elderly population. At present, there is no definite cure for the underlying causes of OA. However, adipose tissue-derived stem cells (ADSCs in the form of stromal vascular fraction (SVF may offer an alternative at this time. ADSCs are one type of mesenchymal stem cells that have been utilized and have demonstrated an ability to regenerate cartilage. ADSCs have been shown to regenerate cartilage in a variety of animal models also. Non-culture-expanded ADSCs, in the form of SVF along with platelet rich plasma (PRP, have recently been used in humans to treat OA and other cartilage abnormalities. These ADSCs have demonstrated effectiveness without any serious side effects. However, due to regulatory issues, only ADSCs in the form of SVF are currently allowed for clinical uses in humans. Culture-expanded ADSCs, although more convenient, require clinical trials for a regulatory approval prior to uses in clinical settings. Here we present a systematic review of currently available clinical studies involving ADSCs in the form of SVF and in the culture-expanded form, with or without PRP, highlighting the clinical effectiveness and safety in treating OA.

  4. Clinical Application of Mesenchymal Stem Cells and Novel Supportive Therapies for Oral Bone Regeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miguel Padial-Molina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Bone regeneration is often needed prior to dental implant treatment due to the lack of adequate quantity and quality of the bone after infectious diseases, trauma, tumor, or congenital conditions. In these situations, cell transplantation technologies may help to overcome the limitations of autografts, xenografts, allografts, and alloplastic materials. A database search was conducted to include human clinical trials (randomized or controlled and case reports/series describing the clinical use of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs in the oral cavity for bone regeneration only specifically excluding periodontal regeneration. Additionally, novel advances in related technologies are also described. 190 records were identified. 51 articles were selected for full-text assessment, and only 28 met the inclusion criteria: 9 case series, 10 case reports, and 9 randomized controlled clinical trials. Collectively, they evaluate the use of MSCs in a total of 290 patients in 342 interventions. The current published literature is very diverse in methodology and measurement of outcomes. Moreover, the clinical significance is limited. Therefore, the use of these techniques should be further studied in more challenging clinical scenarios with well-designed and standardized RCTs, potentially in combination with new scaffolding techniques and bioactive molecules to improve the final outcomes.

  5. Deterministic and Stochastic Approaches in the Clinical Application of Mesenchymal Stromal Cells (MSCs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone ePacini

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs have enormous intrinsic clinical value due to their multi-lineage differentiation capacity, support of hemopoiesis, immunoregulation and growth factors/cytokines secretion. MSCs have thus been the object of extensive research for decades. After completion of many pre-clinical and clinical trials, MSC-based therapy is now facing a challenging phase. Several clinical trials have reported moderate, non-durable benefits, which caused initial enthusiasm to wane, and indicated an urgent need to optimize the efficacy of therapeutic, platform-enhancing MSC-based treatment. Recent investigations suggest the presence of multiple in vivo MSC ancestors in a wide range of tissues, which contribute to the heterogeneity of the starting material for the expansion of MSCs. This variability in the MSC culture-initiating cell population, together with the different types of enrichment/isolation and cultivation protocols applied, are hampering progress in the definition of MSC-based therapies. International regulatory statements require a precise risk/benefit analysis, ensuring the safety and efficacy of treatments. GMP validation allows for quality certification, but the prediction of a clinical outcome after MSC-based therapy is correlated not only to the possible morbidity derived by cell production process, but also to the biology of the MSCs themselves, which is highly sensible to unpredictable fluctuation of isolating and culture conditions.Risk exposure and efficacy of MSC-based therapies should be evaluated by pre-clinical studies, but the batch-to-batch variability of the final medicinal product could significantly limit the predictability of these studies. The future success of MSC-based therapies could lie not only in rational optimization of therapeutic strategies, but also in a stochastic approach during the assessment of benefit and risk factors.

  6. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as 51Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer

  7. A high-throughput assay of NK cell activity in whole blood and its clinical application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Saet-byul [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Junhoe [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Im-kyung [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Yoon, Joo Chun [Department of Microbiology, Ewha Womans University School of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Hyo Joon [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Park, Sang Woo; Cho, Sunjung; Youn, Dong-Ye; Lee, Heyja; Lee, Choong Hwan [ATGen Co. Ltd., Sungnam (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Jae Myun [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Kang Young, E-mail: kylee117@yuhs.ac [Department of Surgery, Gangnam Severance Hospital, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jongsun, E-mail: jkim63@yuhs.ac [Department of Microbiology and Brain Korea 21 Project for Medical Sciences, Yonsei University College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-03-14

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • We demonstrated a simple assay of NK cell activity from whole blood. • The measurement of secreted IFN-γ from NK cell enables high-throughput screening. • The NKA assay was validated by clinical results of colorectal cancer patients. - Abstract: Natural killer (NK) cells are lymphocytes of the innate immune system and have the ability to kill tumor cells and virus-infected cells without prior sensitization. Malignant tumors and viruses have developed, however, strategies to suppress NK cells to escape from their responses. Thus, the evaluation of NK cell activity (NKA) could be invaluable to estimate the status and the outcome of cancers, viral infections, and immune-mediated diseases. Established methods that measure NKA, such as {sup 51}Cr release assay and CD107a degranulation assay, may be used to determine NK cell function, but they are complicated and time-consuming because they require isolation of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) or NK cells. In some cases these assays require hazardous material such as radioactive isotopes. To overcome these difficulties, we developed a simple assay that uses whole blood instead of PBMC or isolated NK cells. This novel assay is suitable for high-throughput screening and the monitoring of diseases, because it employs serum of ex vivo stimulated whole blood to detect interferon (IFN)-γ secreted from NK cells as an indicator of NKA. After the stimulation of NK cells, the determination of IFNγ concentration in serum samples by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) provided a swift, uncomplicated, and high-throughput assay of NKA ex vivo. The NKA results microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer patients was showed significantly lower NKA, 263.6 ± 54.5 pg/mL compared with healthy subjects, 867.5 ± 50.2 pg/mL (p value <0.0001). Therefore, the NKA could be utilized as a supportive diagnostic marker for microsatellite stable (MSS) colorectal cancer.

  8. Immunosuppression by hypoxic cell radiosensitizers: a phenomenon of potential clinical importance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nitroimidazoles metronidazole, misonidazol, and desmethyl misonidazole are currently undergoing clinical trials as possible adjuncts to radiotherapy. Ongoing clinical trials are evaluating the effectiveness of these agents and also documenting the pharmacokinetics and toxicities of radiosensitizing doses of these drugs in man. A variety of toxic effects have been noted in man, including anorexia, nausea and vomiting, peripheral neuropathy, central nervous system symptoms, ototoxicity, allergy, and fear. Laboratory studies have also suggested that these agents have potential to be mutagenic, carcinogenic, and teratogenic. In the editorial presented, the author attempts to draw attention to an additional toxic effect of nitroimidazoles - the inhibition of cell-mediated immune responses

  9. A prototype of a novel cell phone application for tracking the vaccination coverage of children in rural communities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katib, Anas; Rao, Deepthi; Rao, Praveen; Williams, Karen; Grant, Jim

    2015-11-01

    Immunization saves millions of lives against vaccine-preventable diseases. Yet, 24 million children born every year do not receive proper immunization during their first year. UNICEF and WHO have emphasized the need to strengthen the immunization surveillance and monitoring in developing countries to reduce childhood deaths. In this regard, we present a software application called Jeev to track the vaccination coverage of children in rural communities. Jeev synergistically combines the power of smartphones and the ubiquity of cellular infrastructure, QR codes, and national identification cards. We present the design of Jeev and highlight its unique features along with a detailed evaluation of its performance and power consumption using the National Immunization Survey datasets. We are in discussion with a non-profit organization in Haiti to pilot test Jeev in order to study its effectiveness and identify socio-cultural issues that may arise in a large-scale deployment. PMID:26363678

  10. Tracking the cell hierarchy in the human intestine using biochemical signatures derived by mid-infrared microspectroscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Walsh, Michael J; Hammiche, Azzedine; Fellous, Tariq G; Nicholson, James M; Cotte, Marine; Susini, Jean; Fullwood, Nigel J; Martin-Hirsch, Pierre L; Alison, Malcolm R; Martin, Francis L

    2009-07-01

    Markers of gastrointestinal (GI) stem cells remain elusive. We employed synchrotron Fourier-transform infrared (FTIR) microspectroscopy to derive mid-infrared (IR) spectra along the length of human GI crypts. Tissue sections (10-μm thick) were floated onto BaF2 windows and image maps were acquired of small intestine and large bowel crypts in transmission mode with an aperture of ≤10 μm×10 μm. Counting upwards in a step-size (≤10 μm) fashion from the crypt base, IR spectra were extracted from the image maps and each spectrum corresponding to a particular location was identified. Spectra were analyzed using principal component analysis plus linear discriminant analysis. Compared to putative crypt base columnar/Paneth cells, those assigned as label-retaining cells were chemically more similar to putative large bowel stem cells and, the small intestine transit-amplifying cells were closest to large bowel transit-amplifying cells; interestingly, the base of small intestine crypts was the most chemically-distinct. This study suggests that in the complex cell lineage of human GI crypts, chemical similarities as revealed by FTIR microspectroscopy between regions putatively assigned as stem cell, transit-amplifying and terminally-differentiated facilitates identification of cell function. PMID:19393589

  11. Clinical and Immunological Effects in Patients with Advanced Non-Small Cell Lung-Cancer after Vaccination with Dendritic Cells Exposed to an Allogeneic Tumor Cell Lysate*

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engell-Noerregaard, Lotte; Kvistborg, Pia; Zocca, Mai-Britt;

    2013-01-01

    Background: We evaluated the clinical and immunological effects of dendritic cell (DC) vaccination of patients with NSCLC. Autologous DCs were pulsed with a MAGE containing allogeneic melanoma cell lysate (MelCancerVac®, Dandrit Biotech, Copenhagen, Denmark). Imiquimod cream, proleukin and......-layed effect of DC vaccination after completion of the treatment. A prospective randomized phase-IIb or -III is needed to further evaluate the use of MelCancerVac® vaccine treatment in patients with progressive NSCLC....

  12. Advances in inducing adaptive immunity using cell-based cancer vaccines: Clinical applications in pancreatic cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kajihara, Mikio; Takakura, Kazuki; Kanai, Tomoya; Ito, Zensho; Matsumoto, Yoshihiro; Shimodaira, Shigetaka; Okamoto, Masato; Ohkusa, Toshifumi; Koido, Shigeo

    2016-05-14

    The incidence of pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDA) is on the rise, and the prognosis is extremely poor because PDA is highly aggressive and notoriously difficult to treat. Although gemcitabine- or 5-fluorouracil-based chemotherapy is typically offered as a standard of care, most patients do not survive longer than 1 year. Therefore, the development of alternative therapeutic approaches for patients with PDA is imperative. As PDA cells express numerous tumor-associated antigens that are suitable vaccine targets, one promising treatment approach is cancer vaccines. During the last few decades, cell-based cancer vaccines have offered encouraging results in preclinical studies. Cell-based cancer vaccines are mainly generated by presenting whole tumor cells or dendritic cells to cells of the immune system. In particular, several clinical trials have explored cell-based cancer vaccines as a promising therapeutic approach for patients with PDA. Moreover, chemotherapy and cancer vaccines can synergize to result in increased efficacies in patients with PDA. In this review, we will discuss both the effect of cell-based cancer vaccines and advances in terms of future strategies of cancer vaccines for the treatment of PDA patients. PMID:27182156

  13. Comparison of clinical grade type 1 polarized and standard matured dendritic cells for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Morten; Hjortø, Gertrud Malene; Donia, Marco;

    2013-01-01

    induction of type 1 effector T cells. Standard matured clinical grade DCs “sDCs” were compared with DCs matured with either of two type 1 polarizing maturation cocktails; the alpha-type-1 DCs “αDC1s” (TNF-α, IL-1β, IFN-γ, IFN-α, Poly(I:C)) and “mDCs” (monophosphoryl lipid A (MPL), IFN-γ) or a mixed cocktail...... – “mpDCs”, containing MPL, IFN-γ and PGE2. αDC1s and mDCs secreted IL-12 directly and following re-stimulation with CD40L-expressing cells and they mainly secreted the T effector cell attracting chemokines CXCL10 and CCL5 as opposed to sDCs that mainly secreted CCL22, known to attract regulatory T cells...

  14. Therapeutic dendritic cell vaccination of patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma: a clinical phase 1/2 trial

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berntsen, Annika; Trepiakas, Redas; Wenandy, Lynn;

    2008-01-01

    Therapeutic dendritic cell (DC) vaccination against cancer is a strategy aimed at activating the immune system to recognize and destroy tumor cells. In this nonrandomized phase 1/2 trial, we investigated the safety, feasibility, induction of T-cell response, and clinical response after treatment....../27 patients obtained disease stabilization (SD) for more than 8 weeks. An antigen-specific immune response was demonstrated in 6/6 patients tested. Furthermore, significant alterations in serum YKL-40 and IL-6 were found during treatment. In conclusion, DC vaccination in our setting is feasible and without...... haplotype, and low-dose IL-2 was administered concomitantly. Tumor response, immune response, and serum IL-6 and YKL-40 were measured during treatment. Vaccine generation was successful in all patients and no serious adverse events were observed. None of the patients had an objective response but 13...

  15. GTSE1 is a microtubule plus-end tracking protein that regulates EB1-dependent cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Massimilano Scolz

    Full Text Available The regulation of cell migration is a highly complex process that is often compromised when cancer cells become metastatic. The microtubule cytoskeleton is necessary for cell migration, but how microtubules and microtubule-associated proteins regulate multiple pathways promoting cell migration remains unclear. Microtubule plus-end binding proteins (+TIPs are emerging as important players in many cellular functions, including cell migration. Here we identify a +TIP, GTSE1, that promotes cell migration. GTSE1 accumulates at growing microtubule plus ends through interaction with the EB1+TIP. The EB1-dependent +TIP activity of GTSE1 is required for cell migration, as well as for microtubule-dependent disassembly of focal adhesions. GTSE1 protein levels determine the migratory capacity of both nontransformed and breast cancer cell lines. In breast cancers, increased GTSE1 expression correlates with invasive potential, tumor stage, and time to distant metastasis, suggesting that misregulation of GTSE1 expression could be associated with increased invasive potential.

  16. Fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Husted, Henrik

    2012-01-01

    Fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty aims at giving the patients the best available treatment at all times, being a dynamic entity. Fast-track combines evidence-based, clinical features with organizational optimization including a revision of traditions resulting in a streamlined pathway from...... clinical and organizational aspects of fast-track hip and knee arthroplasty (I–IX). A detailed description of the fast-track set-up and its components is provided. Major results include identification of patient characteristics to predict length of stay and satisfaction with different aspects of the...... hospital stay (I); how to optimize analgesia by using a compression bandage in total knee arthroplasty (II); the clinical and organizational set-up facilitating or acting as barriers for early discharge (III); safety aspects following fast-track in the form of few readmissions in general (IV) and few...

  17. Locally-Delivered T-Cell-Derived Cellular Vehicles Efficiently Track and Deliver Adenovirus Delta24-RGD to Infiltrating Glioma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutger K. Balvers

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Oncolytic adenoviral vectors are a promising alternative for the treatment of glioblastoma. Recent publications have demonstrated the advantages of shielding viral particles within cellular vehicles (CVs, which can be targeted towards the tumor microenvironment. Here, we studied T-cells, often having a natural capacity to target tumors, for their feasibility as a CV to deliver the oncolytic adenovirus, Delta24-RGD, to glioblastoma. The Jurkat T-cell line was assessed in co-culture with the glioblastoma stem cell (GSC line, MGG8, for the optimal transfer conditions of Delta24-RGD in vitro. The effect of intraparenchymal and tail vein injections on intratumoral virus distribution and overall survival was addressed in an orthotopic glioma stem cell (GSC-based xenograft model. Jurkat T-cells were demonstrated to facilitate the amplification and transfer of Delta24-RGD onto GSCs. Delta24-RGD dosing and incubation time were found to influence the migratory ability of T-cells towards GSCs. Injection of Delta24-RGD-loaded T-cells into the brains of GSC-bearing mice led to migration towards the tumor and dispersion of the virus within the tumor core and infiltrative zones. This occurred after injection into the ipsilateral hemisphere, as well as into the non-tumor-bearing hemisphere. We found that T-cell-mediated delivery of Delta24-RGD led to the inhibition of tumor growth compared to non-treated controls, resulting in prolonged survival (p = 0.007. Systemic administration of virus-loaded T-cells resulted in intratumoral viral delivery, albeit at low levels. Based on these findings, we conclude that T-cell-based CVs are a feasible approach to local Delta24-RGD delivery in glioblastoma, although efficient systemic targeting requires further improvement.

  18. Transition of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma clones during clinical progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Sakura; Firouzi, Sanaz; López, Yosvany; Yamochi, Tadanori; Nakano, Kazumi; Uchimaru, Kaoru; Utusnomiya, Atae; Iwanaga, Masako; Watanabe, Toshiki

    2016-09-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a peripheral T-cell neoplasm caused by the transformation of HTLV-1-infected T cells. ATLL, especially its aggressive form, is known for its poor prognosis, even with intensive chemotherapy. ATLL cells are considered to be monoclonal; however, multiclonal proliferation or emergence of a new clone over time has been reported based on Southern blot analysis, although direct molecular evidence remains elusive. Furthermore, it is thought that clonal change may be a cause of early drug resistance in ATLL. To directly analyze potential clonal changes in ATLL during its clinical course, we used inverse PCR to detect integration sites in combination with a newly developed method using next-generation sequencing, and compared ATLL cell clonality at different time points. The results of inverse PCR indicated that the major clone was altered in three of 19 patients. Together with results from five patients, using this new method, we found direct evidence of clonal change occurring during the clinical course or in response to chemotherapy in ATLL. These results also highlight the importance of clonality analysis for understanding the mechanisms of ATLL development and drug resistance. PMID:27383637

  19. Oral squamous cell carcinoma misdiagnosed as a denture-related traumatic ulcer: A clinical report.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valente, Vitor Bonetti; Takamiya, Aline Satie; Ferreira, Lígia Lavezo; Felipini, Renata Callestini; Biasoli, Éder Ricardo; Miyahara, Glauco Issamu; Bernabé, Daniel Galera

    2016-03-01

    A 65-year-old woman presented with an ulcerated lesion in the alveolar ridge mucosa, which appeared after new dentures had been inserted. Despite many treatment attempts, the lesion did not recede, even with the interruption of denture wearing. A biopsy was performed, and histopathologic examination revealed an ulcerated, invasive, poorly differentiated oral squamous cell carcinoma. The time from the patient's first contact with the prosthodontist because of the lesion until the appropriate diagnosis was established was approximately 6 months. This clinical report documents a significant delay in the oral squamous cell carcinoma diagnosis and treatment because of a clinical misdiagnosis of a traumatic ulcer resulting from complete dentures. Prosthodontists should be aware of the importance of early diagnosis of oral cancer among elderly prosthesis wearers. PMID:26581660

  20. Stem Cell Transplantation As A Dynamical System: Are Clinical Outcomes Deterministic?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amir A Toor

    2014-12-01

    Full Text Available Outcomes in stem cel