WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell testbed facility

  1. Operation of the 25 kW NASA Lewis Solar Regenerative Fuel Cell Testbed Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Voecks, G.E.; Rohatgi, N.K.; Moore, S.H. [Jet Propulsion Lab., Pasadena, CA (United States)] [and others

    1996-12-31

    Assembly of the NASA Lewis Research Center Solar Regenerative Fuel Cell Testbed Facility has recently been completed and system testing is in progress. This facility includes the integration of 50 kW photovoltaic solar cell arrays, a 25 kW proton exchange membrane (PEM) electrolysis unit, four 5 kW PEM fuel cells, high pressure hydrogen and oxygen storage vessels, high purity water storage containers, and computer monitoring, control and data acquisition. The purpose of this facility is multi-faceted, but was originally intended to serve as a testbed for evaluating a closed-loop powerplant for future NASA extended life support operations, such as a Lunar outpost, and also as a terrestrial powerplant example for remote or continuous back-up support operations. The fuel cell and electrolyzer subsystems design and assembly were conducted by the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), the photovoltaic arrays and electrical interconnect to the electrolyzer were provided by the US Navy/China Lake Naval Weapons Center, and testing and operations are being carried out by JPL.

  2. Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed: A Facility for Space Calibration and Measurement of Solar Cells on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Jenkins, Phillip; Sexton, J. Andrew; Scheiman, David; Christie, Robert; Charpie, James; Gerber, Scott S.; Johnson, D. Bruce

    2001-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed ("PET") is a facility to be flown on the International Space Station to perform calibration, measurement, and qualification of solar cells in the space environment and then returning the cells to Earth for laboratory use. PET will allow rapid turnaround testing of new photovoltaic technology under AM0 conditions.

  3. SSERVI Analog Regolith Simulant Testbed Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minafra, Joseph; Schmidt, Gregory; Bailey, Brad; Gibbs, Kristina

    2016-10-01

    The Solar System Exploration Research Virtual Institute (SSERVI) at NASA's Ames Research Center in California's Silicon Valley was founded in 2013 to act as a virtual institute that provides interdisciplinary research centered on the goals of its supporting directorates: NASA Science Mission Directorate (SMD) and the Human Exploration & Operations Mission Directorate (HEOMD).Primary research goals of the Institute revolve around the integration of science and exploration to gain knowledge required for the future of human space exploration beyond low Earth orbit. SSERVI intends to leverage existing JSC1A regolith simulant resources into the creation of a regolith simulant testbed facility. The purpose of this testbed concept is to provide the planetary exploration community with a readily available capability to test hardware and conduct research in a large simulant environment.SSERVI's goals include supporting planetary researchers within NASA, other government agencies; private sector and hardware developers; competitors in focused prize design competitions; and academic sector researchers.SSERVI provides opportunities for research scientists and engineers to study the effects of regolith analog testbed research in the planetary exploration field. This capability is essential to help to understand the basic effects of continued long-term exposure to a simulated analog test environment.The current facility houses approximately eight tons of JSC-1A lunar regolith simulant in a test bin consisting of a 4 meter by 4 meter area, including dust mitigation and safety oversight.Facility hardware and environment testing scenarios could include, Lunar surface mobility, Dust exposure and mitigation, Regolith handling and excavation, Solar-like illumination, Lunar surface compaction profile, Lofted dust, Mechanical properties of lunar regolith, Surface features (i.e. grades and rocks)Numerous benefits vary from easy access to a controlled analog regolith simulant testbed, and

  4. Towards an Experimental Testbed Facility for Cyber-Physical Security Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edgar, Thomas W.; Manz, David O.; Carroll, Thomas E.

    2012-01-07

    Cyber-Physical Systems (CPSs) are under great scrutiny due to large Smart Grid investments and recent high profile security vulnerabilities and attacks. Research into improved security technologies, communication models, and emergent behavior is necessary to protect these systems from sophisticated adversaries and new risks posed by the convergence of CPSs with IT equipment. However, cyber-physical security research is limited by the lack of access to universal cyber-physical testbed facilities that permit flexible, high-fidelity experiments. This paper presents a remotely-configurable and community-accessible testbed design that integrates elements from the virtual, simulated, and physical environments. Fusing data between the three environments enables the creation of realistic and scalable environments where new functionality and ideas can be exercised. This novel design will enable the research community to analyze and evaluate the security of current environments and design future, secure, cyber-physical technologies.

  5. Virtual Factory Testbed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Factory Testbed (VFT) is comprised of three physical facilities linked by a standalone network (VFNet). The three facilities are the Smart and Wireless...

  6. A Space Testbed for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio Aerospace Institute and the NASA Lewis Research Center are designing and building a solar-cell calibration facility, the Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed (PET) to fly on the International Space Station to test advanced solar cell types in the space environment. A wide variety of advanced solar cell types have become available in the last decade. Some of these solar cells offer more than twice the power per unit area of the silicon cells used for the space station power system. They also offer the possibilities of lower cost, lighter weight, and longer lifetime. The purpose of the PET facility is to reduce the cost of validating new technologies and bringing them to spaceflight readiness. The facility will be used for three primary functions: calibration, measurement, and qualification. It is scheduled to be launched in June of 2002.

  7. Fuel Cell Balance-of-Plant Reliability Testbed Project

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sproat, Vern [Stark State College of Technology, North Canton, OH (United States); LaHurd, Debbie [Lockheed Martin Corp., Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-10-29

    Reliability of the fuel cell system balance-of-plant (BoP) components is a critical factor that needs to be addressed prior to fuel cells becoming fully commercialized. Failure or performance degradation of BoP components has been identified as a life-limiting factor in fuel cell systems.1 The goal of this project is to develop a series of test beds that will test system components such as pumps, valves, sensors, fittings, etc., under operating conditions anticipated in real Polymer Electrolyte Membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems. Results will be made generally available to begin removing reliability as a roadblock to the growth of the PEM fuel cell industry. Stark State College students participating in the project, in conjunction with their coursework, have been exposed to technical knowledge and training in the handling and maintenance of hydrogen, fuel cells and system components as well as component failure modes and mechanisms. Three test beds were constructed. Testing was completed on gas flow pumps, tubing, and pressure and temperature sensors and valves.

  8. SAVANT analysis of the microelectronics and photonics testbed solar cell data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walters, Robert J.; Summers, G.P. [Naval Research Lab., Code 6818, Washington, DC (United States); Messenger, S.R. [SFA, Inc., Largo, MD (United States); Morton, T.L. [Ohio Aerospace Inst., Cleveland, OH (United States)

    2005-07-01

    An analysis of solar array data from the Microelectronic and Photonic Testbed (MPTB) space experiment is presented. The data are analyzed using the displacement damage dose (D{sub d}) methodology developed by the US Naval Research Laboratory (NRL) as implemented in the Solar Array Verification and Analysis Tool (SAVANT). SAVANT is a WindowsTM-based computer code that predicts the on-orbit performance of a solar cell in a specified Earth orbit. The predicted solar cell performance produced by the SAVANT code are compared with the measured on-orbit data. In addition, the calculated data are compared with onboard dosimeter measurements. The results allow both a validation of the SAVANT code and a comparison of the space environment models with measured on-orbit data. The results show the models to match the measured data within a factor of 2. (Author)

  9. Design and development of cell queuing, processing, and scheduling modules for the iPOINT input-buffered ATM testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Haoran

    1997-12-01

    This dissertation presents the concepts, principles, performance, and implementation of input queuing and cell-scheduling modules for the Illinois Pulsar-based Optical INTerconnect (iPOINT) input-buffered Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) testbed. Input queuing (IQ) ATM switches are well suited to meet the requirements of current and future ultra-broadband ATM networks. The IQ structure imposes minimum memory bandwidth requirements for cell buffering, tolerates bursty traffic, and utilizes memory efficiently for multicast traffic. The lack of efficient cell queuing and scheduling solutions has been a major barrier to build high-performance, scalable IQ-based ATM switches. This dissertation proposes a new Three-Dimensional Queue (3DQ) and a novel Matrix Unit Cell Scheduler (MUCS) to remove this barrier. 3DQ uses a linked-list architecture based on Synchronous Random Access Memory (SRAM) to combine the individual advantages of per-virtual-circuit (per-VC) queuing, priority queuing, and N-destination queuing. It avoids Head of Line (HOL) blocking and provides per-VC Quality of Service (QoS) enforcement mechanisms. Computer simulation results verify the QoS capabilities of 3DQ. For multicast traffic, 3DQ provides efficient usage of cell buffering memory by storing multicast cells only once. Further, the multicast mechanism of 3DQ prevents a congested destination port from blocking other less- loaded ports. The 3DQ principle has been prototyped in the Illinois Input Queue (iiQueue) module. Using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices, SRAM modules, and integrated on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), iiQueue can process incoming traffic at 800 Mb/s. Using faster circuit technology, the same design is expected to operate at the OC-48 rate (2.5 Gb/s). MUCS resolves the output contention by evaluating the weight index of each candidate and selecting the heaviest. It achieves near-optimal scheduling and has a very short response time. The algorithm originates from a

  10. Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Chad R.; Sorgenfrei, Matthew C.; Nehrenz, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed (G-NAT) lab at NASA Ames Research Center provides a flexible, easily accessible platform for developing hardware and software for advanced small spacecraft. A collaboration between the Mission Design Division and the Intelligent Systems Division, the objective of the lab is to provide testing data and general test protocols for advanced sensors, actuators, and processors for CubeSat-class spacecraft. By developing test schemes for advanced components outside of the standard mission lifecycle, the lab is able to help reduce the risk carried by advanced nanosatellite or CubeSat missions. Such missions are often allocated very little time for testing, and too often the test facilities must be custom-built for the needs of the mission at hand. The G-NAT lab helps to eliminate these problems by providing an existing suite of testbeds that combines easily accessible, commercial-offthe- shelf (COTS) processors with a collection of existing sensors and actuators.

  11. Terrestrial Plume Impingement Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Masten Space Systems proposes to create a terrestrial plume impingement testbed for generating novel datasets for extraterrestrial robotic missions. This testbed...

  12. Nuclear Instrumentation and Control Cyber Testbed Considerations – Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan Gray; Robert Anderson; Julio G. Rodriguez; Cheol-Kwon Lee

    2014-08-01

    Abstract: Identifying and understanding digital instrumentation and control (I&C) cyber vulnerabilities within nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities, is critical if nation states desire to operate nuclear facilities safely, reliably, and securely. In order to demonstrate objective evidence that cyber vulnerabilities have been adequately identified and mitigated, a testbed representing a facility’s critical nuclear equipment must be replicated. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has built and operated similar testbeds for common critical infrastructure I&C for over ten years. This experience developing, operating, and maintaining an I&C testbed in support of research identifying cyber vulnerabilities has led the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute of the Republic of Korea to solicit the experiences of INL to help mitigate problems early in the design, development, operation, and maintenance of a similar testbed. The following information will discuss I&C testbed lessons learned and the impact of these experiences to KAERI.

  13. The Fizeau Interferometer Testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, X; Lyon, R G; Huet, H; Marzouk, J; Solyar, G; Zhang, Xiaolei; Carpenter, Kenneth G.; Lyon, Richard G.; Huet, Hubert; Marzouk, Joe; Solyar, Gregory

    2002-01-01

    The Fizeau Interferometer Testbed (FIT) is a collaborative effort between NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center, the Naval Research Laboratory, Sigma Space Corporation, and the University of Maryland. The testbed will be used to explore the principles of and the requirements for the full, as well as the pathfinder, Stellar Imager mission concept. It has a long term goal of demonstrating closed-loop control of a sparse array of numerous articulated mirrors to keep optical beams in phase and optimize interferometric synthesis imaging. In this paper we present the optical and data acquisition system design of the testbed, and discuss the wavefront sensing and control algorithms to be used. Currently we have completed the initial design and hardware procurement for the FIT. The assembly and testing of the Testbed will be underway at Goddard's Instrument Development Lab in the coming months.

  14. The Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    OpenAIRE

    Colavita, M. M.; Wallace, J. K.

    1998-01-01

    The Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) is a long-baseline infrared interferometer located at Palomar Observatory, California. It was built as a testbed for interferometric techniques applicable to the Keck Interferometer. First fringes were obtained in July 1995. PTI implements a dual-star architecture, tracking two stars simultaneously for phase referencing and narrow-angle astrometry. The three fixed 40-cm apertures can be combined pair-wise to provide baselines to 110 m. The interferomet...

  15. Research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated in a test-bed bus. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-30

    This project, the research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated into test-bed buses, began as a multi-phase U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project in 1989. Phase I had a goal of developing two competing half-scale (25 kW) brassboard phosphoric acid fuel cell systems. An air-cooled and a liquid-cooled fuel cell system were developed and tested to verify the concept of using a fuel cell and a battery in a hybrid configuration wherein the fuel cell supplies the average power required for operating the vehicle and a battery supplies the `surge` or excess power required for acceleration and hill-climbing. Work done in Phase I determined that the liquid-cooled system offered higher efficiency.

  16. MIT's interferometer CST testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hyde, Tupper; Kim, Ed; Anderson, Eric; Blackwood, Gary; Lublin, Leonard

    1990-12-01

    The MIT Space Engineering Research Center (SERC) has developed a controlled structures technology (CST) testbed based on one design for a space-based optical interferometer. The role of the testbed is to provide a versatile platform for experimental investigation and discovery of CST approaches. In particular, it will serve as the focus for experimental verification of CSI methodologies and control strategies at SERC. The testbed program has an emphasis on experimental CST--incorporating a broad suite of actuators and sensors, active struts, system identification, passive damping, active mirror mounts, and precision component characterization. The SERC testbed represents a one-tenth scaled version of an optical interferometer concept based on an inherently rigid tetrahedral configuration with collecting apertures on one face. The testbed consists of six 3.5 meter long truss legs joined at four vertices and is suspended with attachment points at three vertices. Each aluminum leg has a 0.2 m by 0.2 m by 0.25 m triangular cross-section. The structure has a first flexible mode at 31 Hz and has over 50 global modes below 200 Hz. The stiff tetrahedral design differs from similar testbeds (such as the JPL Phase B) in that the structural topology is closed. The tetrahedral design minimizes structural deflections at the vertices (site of optical components for maximum baseline) resulting in reduced stroke requirements for isolation and pointing of optics. Typical total light path length stability goals are on the order of lambda/20, with a wavelength of light, lambda, of roughly 500 nanometers. It is expected that active structural control will be necessary to achieve this goal in the presence of disturbances.

  17. Testbed for Advanced Mobile Solutions

    OpenAIRE

    Apell, Maria; Erman, David; Popescu, Adrian

    2010-01-01

    This paper describes the implementation of an IMS testbed, based on open source technologies and operating systems. The testbed provides rich communication services, i.e., Instant Messaging, Network Address Book and Presence as well as VoIP and PSTN interconnectivity. Our validation tests indicate that the performance of the testbed is comparable to similar testbeds, but that operating system virtualization signi ficantly aff ects signalling delays.

  18. Mini-mast CSI testbed user's guide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanner, Sharon E.; Pappa, Richard S.; Sulla, Jeffrey L.; Elliott, Kenny B.; Miserentino, Robert; Bailey, James P.; Cooper, Paul A.; Williams, Boyd L., Jr.; Bruner, Anne M.

    1992-01-01

    The Mini-Mast testbed is a 20 m generic truss highly representative of future deployable trusses for space applications. It is fully instrumented for system identification and active vibrations control experiments and is used as a ground testbed at NASA-Langley. The facility has actuators and feedback sensors linked via fiber optic cables to the Advanced Real Time Simulation (ARTS) system, where user defined control laws are incorporated into generic controls software. The object of the facility is to conduct comprehensive active vibration control experiments on a dynamically realistic large space structure. A primary goal is to understand the practical effects of simplifying theoretical assumptions. This User's Guide describes the hardware and its primary components, the dynamic characteristics of the test article, the control law implementation process, and the necessary safeguards employed to protect the test article. Suggestions for a strawman controls experiment are also included.

  19. Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Safety Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MITCHELL,GERRY W.; LONGLEY,SUSAN W.; PHILBIN,JEFFREY S.; MAHN,JEFFREY A.; BERRY,DONALD T.; SCHWERS,NORMAN F.; VANDERBEEK,THOMAS E.; NAEGELI,ROBERT E.

    2000-11-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is prepared in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, and has been written to the format and content guide of DOE-STD-3009-94 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The Hot Cell Facility is a Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facility, and is operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy. This SAR provides a description of the HCF and its operations, an assessment of the hazards and potential accidents which may occur in the facility. The potential consequences and likelihood of these accidents are analyzed and described. Using the process and criteria described in DOE-STD-3009-94, safety-related structures, systems and components are identified, and the important safety functions of each SSC are described. Additionally, information which describes the safety management programs at SNL are described in ancillary chapters of the SAR.

  20. Network testbed creation and validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thai, Tan Q.; Urias, Vincent; Van Leeuwen, Brian P.; Watts, Kristopher K.; Sweeney, Andrew John

    2017-03-21

    Embodiments of network testbed creation and validation processes are described herein. A "network testbed" is a replicated environment used to validate a target network or an aspect of its design. Embodiments describe a network testbed that comprises virtual testbed nodes executed via a plurality of physical infrastructure nodes. The virtual testbed nodes utilize these hardware resources as a network "fabric," thereby enabling rapid configuration and reconfiguration of the virtual testbed nodes without requiring reconfiguration of the physical infrastructure nodes. Thus, in contrast to prior art solutions which require a tester manually build an emulated environment of physically connected network devices, embodiments receive or derive a target network description and build out a replica of this description using virtual testbed nodes executed via the physical infrastructure nodes. This process allows for the creation of very large (e.g., tens of thousands of network elements) and/or very topologically complex test networks.

  1. Rover Attitude and Pointing System Simulation Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanelli, Charles A.; Grinblat, Jonathan F.; Sirlin, Samuel W.; Pfister, Sam

    2009-01-01

    The MER (Mars Exploration Rover) Attitude and Pointing System Simulation Testbed Environment (RAPSSTER) provides a simulation platform used for the development and test of GNC (guidance, navigation, and control) flight algorithm designs for the Mars rovers, which was specifically tailored to the MERs, but has since been used in the development of rover algorithms for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) as well. The software provides an integrated simulation and software testbed environment for the development of Mars rover attitude and pointing flight software. It provides an environment that is able to run the MER GNC flight software directly (as opposed to running an algorithmic model of the MER GNC flight code). This improves simulation fidelity and confidence in the results. Further more, the simulation environment allows the user to single step through its execution, pausing, and restarting at will. The system also provides for the introduction of simulated faults specific to Mars rover environments that cannot be replicated in other testbed platforms, to stress test the GNC flight algorithms under examination. The software provides facilities to do these stress tests in ways that cannot be done in the real-time flight system testbeds, such as time-jumping (both forwards and backwards), and introduction of simulated actuator faults that would be difficult, expensive, and/or destructive to implement in the real-time testbeds. Actual flight-quality codes can be incorporated back into the development-test suite of GNC developers, closing the loop between the GNC developers and the flight software developers. The software provides fully automated scripting, allowing multiple tests to be run with varying parameters, without human supervision.

  2. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking

  3. Holodeck Testbed Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Adriel (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the Holodeck Testbed is to create a cost effective, realistic, and highly immersive environment that can be used to train astronauts, carry out engineering analysis, develop procedures, and support various operations tasks. Currently, the Holodeck testbed allows to step into a simulated ISS (International Space Station) and interact with objects; as well as, perform Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) on the surface of the Moon or Mars. The Holodeck Testbed is using the products being developed in the Hybrid Reality Lab (HRL). The HRL is combining technologies related to merging physical models with photo-realistic visuals to create a realistic and highly immersive environment. The lab also investigates technologies and concepts that are needed to allow it to be integrated with other testbeds; such as, the gravity offload capability provided by the Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS). My main two duties were to develop and animate models for use in the HRL environments and work on a new way to interface with computers using Brain Computer Interface (BCI) technology. On my first task, I was able to create precise computer virtual tool models (accurate down to the thousandths or hundredths of an inch). To make these tools even more realistic, I produced animations for these tools so they would have the same mechanical features as the tools in real life. The computer models were also used to create 3D printed replicas that will be outfitted with tracking sensors. The sensor will allow the 3D printed models to align precisely with the computer models in the physical world and provide people with haptic/tactile feedback while wearing a VR (Virtual Reality) headset and interacting with the tools. Getting close to the end of my internship the lab bought a professional grade 3D Scanner. With this, I was able to replicate more intricate tools at a much more time-effective rate. The second task was to investigate the use of BCI to control

  4. Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliament, Hugh A.

    1991-09-01

    The design and implementation of a system for the acquisition, processing, and analysis of signal data is described. The initial application for the system is the development and analysis of algorithms for excision of interfering tones from direct sequence spread spectrum communication systems. The system is called the Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) and is an integrated hardware and software system built around the TMS320C30 chip. The hardware consists of a radio frequency data source, digital receiver, and an adaptive signal processor implemented on a Sun workstation. The software components of the ASPT consists of a number of packages including the Sun driver package; UNIX programs that support software development on the TMS320C30 boards; UNIX programs that provide the control, user interaction, and display capabilities for the data acquisition, processing, and analysis components of the ASPT; and programs that perform the ASPT functions including data acquisition, despreading, and adaptive filtering. The performance of the ASPT system is evaluated by comparing actual data rates against their desired values. A number of system limitations are identified and recommendations are made for improvements.

  5. NASA Robotic Neurosurgery Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The detection of tissue interface (e.g., normal tissue, cancer, tumor) has been limited clinically to tactile feedback, temperature monitoring, and the use of a miniature ultrasound probe for tissue differentiation during surgical operations, In neurosurgery, the needle used in the standard stereotactic CT or MRI guided brain biopsy provides no information about the tissue being sampled. The tissue sampled depends entirely upon the accuracy with which the localization provided by the preoperative CT or MRI scan is translated to the intracranial biopsy site. In addition, no information about the tissue being traversed by the needle (e.g., a blood vessel) is provided. Hemorrhage due to the biopsy needle tearing a blood vessel within the brain is the most devastating complication of stereotactic CT/MRI guided brain biopsy. A robotic neurosurgery testbed has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a spin-off of technologies from space, aeronautics and medical programs. The invention entitled "Robotic Neurosurgery Leading to Multimodality Devices for Tissue Identification" is nearing a state ready for commercialization. The devices will: 1) improve diagnostic accuracy and precision of general surgery, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, 2) automate tissue identification, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, to permit remote control of the procedure, and 3) reduce morbidity for stereotactic brain biopsy. The commercial impact from this work is the potential development of a whole new generation of smart surgical tools to increase the safety, accuracy and efficiency of surgical procedures. Other potential markets include smart surgical tools for tumor ablation in neurosurgery, general exploratory surgery, prostate cancer surgery, and breast cancer surgery.

  6. A Turbine-powered UAV Controls Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Mark A.; High, James W.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Chambers, Ryan S.; Howard, Keith D.

    2007-01-01

    The latest version of the NASA Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) integrates commercial-off-the-shelf components including airframe, autopilot, and a small turbine engine to provide a low cost experimental flight controls testbed capable of sustained speeds up to 200 mph. The series of flight tests leading up to the demonstrated performance of the vehicle in sustained, autopiloted 200 mph flight at NASA Wallops Flight Facility's UAV runway in August 2006 will be described. Earlier versions of the FLiC were based on a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate at Fort Eustis, Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. The newer turbine powered platform (J-FLiC) builds on the successes using the relatively smaller, slower and less expensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches with the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers. Tracking video was taken during the test flights at Wallops and will be available for presentation at the conference. Analysis of flight data from both remotely piloted and autopiloted flights will be presented. Candidate experimental controllers for implementation will be discussed. It is anticipated that flight testing will resume in Spring 2007 and those results will be included, if possible.

  7. Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility (CTC-REF) to enable radiobiologists to investigate the real-time radiation effects on...

  8. Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Craig S.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed (AAITT) is a laboratory testbed for the design, analysis, integration, evaluation, and exercising of large-scale, complex, software systems, composed of both knowledge-based and conventional components. The AAITT assists its users in the following ways: configuring various problem-solving application suites; observing and measuring the behavior of these applications and the interactions between their constituent modules; gathering and analyzing statistics about the occurrence of key events; and flexibly and quickly altering the interaction of modules within the applications for further study.

  9. Environment Emulation For Wsn Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Kapłoniak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of applications for wireless sensor networks is a challenging task. For this reason, several testbed platforms have been created. They simplify the manageability of nodes by offering easy ways of programming and debugging sensor nodes. These platforms, sometimes composed of dozens of sensors, provide a convenient way for carrying out research on medium access control and data exchange between nodes. In this article, we propose the extension of the WSN testbed, which could be used for evaluating and testing the functionality of sensor networks applications by emulating a real-world environment.

  10. Aerodynamic design of the National Rotor Testbed.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kelley, Christopher Lee [Sandia National Lab. (SNL-NM), Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    2015-10-01

    A new wind turbine blade has been designed for the National Rotor Testbed (NRT) project and for future experiments at the Scaled Wind Farm Technology (SWiFT) facility with a specific focus on scaled wakes. This report shows the aerodynamic design of new blades that can produce a wake that has similitude to utility scale blades despite the difference in size and location in the atmospheric boundary layer. Dimensionless quantities circulation, induction, thrust coefficient, and tip-speed-ratio were kept equal between rotor scales in region 2 of operation. The new NRT design matched the aerodynamic quantities of the most common wind turbine in the United States, the GE 1.5sle turbine with 37c model blades. The NRT blade design is presented along with its performance subject to the winds at SWiFT. The design requirements determined by the SWiFT experimental test campaign are shown to be met.

  11. Human Centered Autonomous and Assistant Systems Testbed for Exploration Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Mount, Frances; Carreon, Patricia; Torney, Susan E.

    2001-01-01

    The Engineering and Mission Operations Directorates at NASA Johnson Space Center are combining laboratories and expertise to establish the Human Centered Autonomous and Assistant Systems Testbed for Exploration Operations. This is a testbed for human centered design, development and evaluation of intelligent autonomous and assistant systems that will be needed for human exploration and development of space. This project will improve human-centered analysis, design and evaluation methods for developing intelligent software. This software will support human-machine cognitive and collaborative activities in future interplanetary work environments where distributed computer and human agents cooperate. We are developing and evaluating prototype intelligent systems for distributed multi-agent mixed-initiative operations. The primary target domain is control of life support systems in a planetary base. Technical approaches will be evaluated for use during extended manned tests in the target domain, the Bioregenerative Advanced Life Support Systems Test Complex (BIO-Plex). A spinoff target domain is the International Space Station (ISS) Mission Control Center (MCC). Prodl}cts of this project include human-centered intelligent software technology, innovative human interface designs, and human-centered software development processes, methods and products. The testbed uses adjustable autonomy software and life support systems simulation models from the Adjustable Autonomy Testbed, to represent operations on the remote planet. Ground operations prototypes and concepts will be evaluated in the Exploration Planning and Operations Center (ExPOC) and Jupiter Facility.

  12. 324 Facility B-Cell quality process plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-03-12

    This report documents the quality process plan for the restart of a hot cell in the B Plant, originally a bismuth phosphate processing facility, but later converted to a waste fractionation plant. B-Cell is currently being cleaned out and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/1999. This report describes the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone.

  13. Conceptual layout design of CFETR Hot Cell Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gong, Zheng, E-mail: gongz@mail.ustc.edu.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Qi, Minzhong, E-mail: qiminzhong@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Cheng, Yong, E-mail: chengyong@ipp.ac.cn [Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China); Song, Yuntao, E-mail: songyt@ipp.ac.cn [University of Science and Technology of China, Hefei 230026 (China); Institute of Plasma Physics, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China)

    2015-11-15

    Highlights: • This article proposed a conceptual layout design for CFETR. • The design principles are to support efficient maintenance to ensure the realization of high duty time. • The preliminary maintenance process and logistics are described in detail. • Life cycle management, maneuverability, risk and safety are in the consideration of design. - Abstract: CFETR (China Fusion Engineering Test Reactor) is new generation of Tokomak device beyond EAST in China. An overview of hot cell layout design for CFETR has been proposed by ASIPP&USTC. Hot Cell, as major auxiliary facility, not only plays a pivotal role in supporting maintenance to meet the requirements of high duty time 0.3–0.5 but also supports installation and decommissioning. Almost all of the Tokomak devices are lateral handling internal components like ITER and JET, but CFETR maintain the blanket module from 4 vertical ports, which is quite a big challenge for the hot cell layout design. The activated in-vessel components and several diagnosis instruments will be repaired and refurbished in the Hot Cell Facility, so the appropriate layout is very important to the Hot Cell Facility to ensure the high duty time, it is divided into different parts equipped with a variety of RH equipment and diagnosis devices based on the functional requirements. The layout of the Hot Cell Facility should make maintenance process more efficient and reliable, and easy to service and rescue when a sudden events taking place, that is the capital importance issue considered in design.

  14. Mobile Testbeds with an Attitude

    CERN Document Server

    Moon, Sungwook

    2010-01-01

    There have been significant recent advances in mobile networks, specifically in multi-hop wireless networks including DTNs and sensor networks. It is critical to have a testing environment to realistically evaluate such networks and their protocols and services. Towards this goal, we propose a novel, mobile testbed of two main components. The first consists of a network of robots with personality- mimicking, human-encounter behaviors, which will be the focus of this demo. The personality is build upon behavioral profiling of mobile users based on extensive wireless-network measurements and analysis. The second component combines the testbed with the human society using a new concept that we refer to as participatory testing utilizing crowd sourcing.

  15. Comparison of two matrix data structures for advanced CSM testbed applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regelbrugge, M. E.; Brogan, F. A.; Nour-Omid, B.; Rankin, C. C.; Wright, M. A.

    1989-01-01

    The first section describes data storage schemes presently used by the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) testbed sparse matrix facilities and similar skyline (profile) matrix facilities. The second section contains a discussion of certain features required for the implementation of particular advanced CSM algorithms, and how these features might be incorporated into the data storage schemes described previously. The third section presents recommendations, based on the discussions of the prior sections, for directing future CSM testbed development to provide necessary matrix facilities for advanced algorithm implementation and use. The objective is to lend insight into the matrix structures discussed and to help explain the process of evaluating alternative matrix data structures and utilities for subsequent use in the CSM testbed.

  16. A remote integrated testbed for cooperating objects

    CERN Document Server

    Dios, Jose Ramiro Martinez-de; Bernabe, Alberto de San; Ollero, Anibal

    2013-01-01

    Testbeds are gaining increasing relevance in research domains and also in industrial applications. However, very few books devoted to testbeds have been published. To the best of my knowledge no book on this topic has been published. This book is particularly interesting for the growing community of testbed developers. I believe the book is also very interesting for researchers in robot-WSN cooperation.This book provides detailed description of a system that can be considered the first testbed that allows full peer-to-peer interoperability between heterogeneous robots and ubiquitous systems su

  17. Testing hot cell shielding in the fuel conditioning facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Courtney, J C; Klann, R T

    1997-01-01

    A comprehensive shield test program for a hot cell complex, the Fuel Conditioning Facility at Argonne National Laboratory, has been completed with minimum radiation exposure to participants. The recently modified shielding design for two hot cells and their associated transfer paths for irradiated materials was analyzed and tested for attenuating gamma rays from mixed fission product sources. Testing was accomplished using 0.37 TBq (10 Ci) and 518 TBq (14,000 Ci) 60Co sources. Of specific concern were radiation levels around wall penetrations and the interface between transport casks and the cell floor. Detailed measurements were made for surfaces that bound the hot cells, a transfer tunnel between the two cells, and storage pits that extend below the floors of both cells. In addition to surface measurements, dose equivalent rates in adjacent corridors were determined when the larger source was exposed. Results indicate that with some administrative controls, the facility shields are adequate to meet the design criterion that limits annual dose to less than 10 mSv (1 rem) for facility workers.

  18. NASA's telemedicine testbeds: Commercial benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doarn, Charles R.; Whitten, Raymond

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been developing and applying telemedicine to support space flight since the Agency's beginning. Telemetry of physiological parameters from spacecraft to ground controllers is critical to assess the health status of humans in extreme and remote environments. Requisite systems to support medical care and maintain readiness will evolve as mission duration and complexity increase. Developing appropriate protocols and procedures to support multinational, multicultural missions is a key objective of this activity. NASA has created an Agency-wide strategic plan that focuses on the development and integration of technology into the health care delivery systems for space flight to meet these challenges. In order to evaluate technology and systems that can enhance inflight medical care and medical education, NASA has established and conducted several testbeds. Additionally, in June of 1997, NASA established a Commercial Space Center (CSC) for Medical Informatics and Technology Applications at Yale University School of Medicine. These testbeds and the CSC foster the leveraging of technology and resources between government, academia and industry to enhance health care. This commercial endeavor will influence both the delivery of health care in space and on the ground. To date, NASA's activities in telemedicine have provided new ideas in the application of telecommunications and information systems to health care. NASA's Spacebridge to Russia, an Internet-based telemedicine testbed, is one example of how telemedicine and medical education can be conducted using the Internet and its associated tools. Other NASA activities, including the development of a portable telemedicine workstation, which has been demonstrated on the Crow Indian Reservation and in the Texas Prison System, show promise in serving as significant adjuncts to the delivery of health care. As NASA continues to meet the challenges of space flight, the

  19. Radiological shielding design of a hot cell facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeo, I. J.; Kook, D. H.; Koo, J. H.; Jeong, W. M.; Ryu, K. S.; Lee, E. P.; Park, S. W. [KAERI, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    2003-10-01

    The hot cell facility, which is designed to permit safe handling of source materials with radioactivity levels up to 1,385 TBq, is planned for research activities related to the reduction of spent fuel in a high temperature molten salts. To meet this goal, the facility is designed to keep gamma and neutron radiation to the recommended dose-rate in normally occupied areas. The calculations performed with QAD-CGGP and MCNP-4C are used to evaluate the proposed engineering design concepts that would provide acceptable dose-rates during a normal operation in hot cell facility. In the present QAD-CGGP and MCNP-4C calculation, the effective dose-rates (gamma only) on the surfaces of the facility are estimated to be 2.10x10{sup -3}, 2.97x10{sup -3} (at operation area) and 1.01x10{sup -1} mSv/h (at service area) by QAD-CGGP and 1.60x10{sup -3}, 2.99x10{sup -3} and 7.88 10{sup -2} mSv/h by MCNP-4C, respectively. And the dose-rates contributed by neutrons are one order of magnitude less than the dose-rate by gamma sources. Therefore, it is confirmed that the radiological design for hot cell facility satisfies the Korean criterion of 0.01 mSv/h for an operation area and 0.15 mSv/h for a service (maintenance) area.

  20. The SMART-NAS Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aquilina, Rudolph A.

    2015-01-01

    The SMART-NAS Testbed for Safe Trajectory Based Operations Project will deliver an evaluation capability, critical to the ATM community, allowing full NextGen and beyond-NextGen concepts to be assessed and developed. To meet this objective a strong focus will be placed on concept integration and validation to enable a gate-to-gate trajectory-based system capability that satisfies a full vision for NextGen. The SMART-NAS for Safe TBO Project consists of six sub-projects. Three of the sub-projects are focused on exploring and developing technologies, concepts and models for evolving and transforming air traffic management operations in the ATM+2 time horizon, while the remaining three sub-projects are focused on developing the tools and capabilities needed for testing these advanced concepts. Function Allocation, Networked Air Traffic Management and Trajectory Based Operations are developing concepts and models. SMART-NAS Test-bed, System Assurance Technologies and Real-time Safety Modeling are developing the tools and capabilities to test these concepts. Simulation and modeling capabilities will include the ability to assess multiple operational scenarios of the national airspace system, accept data feeds, allowing shadowing of actual operations in either real-time, fast-time and/or hybrid modes of operations in distributed environments, and enable integrated examinations of concepts, algorithms, technologies, and NAS architectures. An important focus within this project is to enable the development of a real-time, system-wide safety assurance system. The basis of such a system is a continuum of information acquisition, analysis, and assessment that enables awareness and corrective action to detect and mitigate potential threats to continuous system-wide safety at all levels. This process, which currently can only be done post operations, will be driven towards "real-time" assessments in the 2035 time frame.

  1. Habitat Testbed (HaT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Goals of the DSH Testbed include:Function as a habitat systems integrator and technology pull across many domainsDevelop and integrate software-based models of...

  2. Mars Sample Transfer Testbed (MSTT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The task will assess the requirements for a testbed to study the retrieval of a Mars sample cache from the Martian surface, or from a Mars caching rover, and...

  3. Versatile Electric Propulsion Aircraft Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An all-electric aircraft testbed is proposed to provide a dedicated development environment for the rigorous study and advancement of electrically powered aircraft....

  4. A fuel cell balance of plant test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dicks, A. L.; Martin, P. A.

    Much attention is focused in the fuel cell community on the development of reliable stack technology, but to successfully exploit fuel cells, they must form part of integrated power generation systems. No universal test facilities exist to evaluate SOFC stacks and comparatively little research has been undertaken concerning the issues of the rest of the system, or balance of plant (BOP). BG, in collaboration with Eniricerche, has therefore recently designed and built a test facility to evaluate different configurations of the BOP equipment for a 1-5 kWe solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) stack. Within this BOP project, integrated, dynamic models have been developed. These have shown that three characteristic response times exist when the stack load is changed and that three independent control loops are required to manage the almost instantaneous change in power output from an SOFC stack, maintain the fuel utilisation and control the stack temperature. Control strategies and plant simplifications, arising from the dynamic modelling, have also been implemented in the BOP test facility. An SOFC simulator was designed and integrated into the control system of the test rig to behave as a real SOFC stack, allowing the development of control strategies without the need for a real stack. A novel combustor has been specifically designed, built and demonstrated to be capable of burning the low calorific anode exhaust gas from an SOFC using the oxygen depleted cathode stream. High temperature, low cost, shell and tube heat exchangers have been shown to be suitable for SOFC systems. Sealing of high temperature anode recirculation fans has, however, been shown to be a major issue and identified as a key area for further investigation.

  5. Multivesicular Assemblies as Real-World Testbeds for Embryogenic Evolutionary Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadorn, Maik; Eggenberger Hotz, Peter

    Embryogenic evolution emulates in silico cell-like entities to get more powerful methods for complex evolutionary tasks. As simulations have to abstract from the biological model, implicit information hidden in its physics is lost. Here, we propose to use cell-like entities as a real-world in vitro testbed. In analogy to evolutionary robotics, where solutions evolved in simulations may be tested in real-world on macroscale, the proposed vesicular testbed would do the same for the embryogenic evolutionary tasks on mesoscale. As a first step towards a vesicular testbed emulating growth, cell division, and cell differentiation, we present a modified vesicle production method, providing custom-tailored chemical cargo, and present a novel self-assembly procedure to provide vesicle aggregates of programmable composition.

  6. The CMS Integration Grid Testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Graham, G E; Aziz, Shafqat; Bauerdick, L.A.T.; Ernst, Michael; Kaiser, Joseph; Ratnikova, Natalia; Wenzel, Hans; Wu, Yu-jun; Aslakson, Erik; Bunn, Julian; Iqbal, Saima; Legrand, Iosif; Newman, Harvey; Singh, Suresh; Steenberg, Conrad; Branson, James; Fisk, Ian; Letts, James; Arbree, Adam; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Cavanaugh, Richard; Rodriguez, Jorge Luis; Kategari, Suchindra; Couvares, Peter; DeSmet, Alan; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; Tannenbaum, Todd; Graham, Gregory E.; Aziz, Shafqat; Ernst, Michael; Kaiser, Joseph; Ratnikova, Natalia; Wenzel, Hans; Wu, Yujun; Aslakson, Erik; Bunn, Julian; Iqbal, Saima; Legrand, Iosif; Newman, Harvey; Singh, Suresh; Steenberg, Conrad; Branson, James; Fisk, Ian; Letts, James; Arbree, Adam; Avery, Paul; Bourilkov, Dimitri; Cavanaugh, Richard; Rodriguez, Jorge; Kategari, Suchindra; Couvares, Peter; Smet, Alan De; Livny, Miron; Roy, Alain; Tannenbaum, Todd

    2003-01-01

    The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distrib ution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuo us two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. ...

  7. The Open Cloud Testbed: A Wide Area Testbed for Cloud Computing Utilizing High Performance Network Services

    CERN Document Server

    Grossman, Robert; Sabala, Michal; Bennet, Collin; Seidman, Jonathan; Mambratti, Joe

    2009-01-01

    Recently, a number of cloud platforms and services have been developed for data intensive computing, including Hadoop, Sector, CloudStore (formerly KFS), HBase, and Thrift. In order to benchmark the performance of these systems, to investigate their interoperability, and to experiment with new services based on flexible compute node and network provisioning capabilities, we have designed and implemented a large scale testbed called the Open Cloud Testbed (OCT). Currently the OCT has 120 nodes in four data centers: Baltimore, Chicago (two locations), and San Diego. In contrast to other cloud testbeds, which are in small geographic areas and which are based on commodity Internet services, the OCT is a wide area testbed and the four data centers are connected with a high performance 10Gb/s network, based on a foundation of dedicated lightpaths. This testbed can address the requirements of extremely large data streams that challenge other types of distributed infrastructure. We have also developed several utiliti...

  8. Experimental nowcasting and short-range forecasting of severe storms at the ESSL Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Groenemeijer, Pieter; Holzer, Alois M.; Pistotnik, Georg; Riemann-Campe, Kathrin

    2013-04-01

    From 4 June to 6 July 2012, the first ESSL Testbed has taken place at the Research and Training Centre of the European Severe Storms Laboratory in Wiener Neustadt, Austria. During this time, researchers and forecasters worked closely together putting new forecast supporting products to the test. The Testbed's main activity is to prepare experimental forecasts for severe weather, of which short-range forecasts and nowcasts for the following 2 hours form an important part. These nowcasts are made using new tools based on NWP, radar and satellite, as well as surface and upper-air observations. Subsequently, a verification of the forecasts is performed using the European Severe Weather Database, followed by an evaluation of forecasting tools and techniques. Inspired by the annual Spring Program at NOAA's Hazardous Weather Testbed (HWT), the ESSL Testbed has a stronger focus on forecaster training than the HWT. Given the various backgrounds of the participants, an important Testbed goal is to acquaint its participants with severe weather forecasting methods and techniques that work universally. Among the tools that were evaluated at the 2012 Testbed were visualizations of high-resolution ensemble NWP (DWD's COSMO-DE-EPS), satellite-based cloud top cooling and overshooting top detection algorithms, lightning detection, and satellite and radar-based cell-tracking algorithms (DLR's Cb-TRAM and RadTRAM, and DWD's NowcastMix). In daily "Expert Lectures", that were broadcast online to remote participants, researchers provided background information on their products and internationally renowned experts in forecasting presented their viewpoints on storm forecasting and its scientific roots. Organized by ESSL in close cooperation with the Austrian Central Institute for Meteorology and Geodynamics (ZAMG), the Testbed was supported - among others - by the German Weather Service (DWD), EUMETSAT, WMO, ECMWF, VAISALA, and the GOES-R programme, providing products for evaluation and

  9. Development of a Tethered Formation Flight Testbed for ISS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a testbed for the development and demonstration of technologies needed by tethered formation flying satellites is proposed. Such a testbed would...

  10. The Planets Testbed: Science for Digital Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seamus Ross

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The preservation of digital objects requires specific software tools or services. These can be characterisation tools that abstract the essential characteristics of a digital object from a file, migration tools that convert digital objects to different formats, or emulation tools that render digital objects in their original context on a new infrastructure. Until recently digital preservation has been characterised by practices and processes that could best be described as more art and craft than science. The Planets Testbed provides a controlled environment where preservation tools can be tested and evaluated, and where experiment results can be empirically compared. This paper presents an overview of the Testbed application, an analysis of the experiment methodology and a description of the Testbed's web service approach.

  11. SCaN Testbed Software Development and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.; Varga, Denise M.

    2012-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed an on-orbit, adaptable, Software Defined Radio (SDR)Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS)-based testbed facility to conduct a suite of experiments to advance technologies, reduce risk, and enable future mission capabilities on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCAN Testbed Project will provide NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop and field communications, navigation, and networking technologies in the laboratory and space environment based on reconfigurable, SDR platforms and the STRS Architecture.The SDRs are a new technology for NASA, and the support infrastructure they require is different from legacy, fixed function radios. SDRs offer the ability to reconfigure on-orbit communications by changing software for new waveforms and operating systems to enable new capabilities or fix any anomalies, which was not a previous option. They are not stand alone devices, but required a new approach to effectively control them and flow data. This requires extensive software to be developed to utilize the full potential of these reconfigurable platforms. The paper focuses on development, integration and testing as related to the avionics processor system, and the software required to command, control, monitor, and interact with the SDRs, as well as the other communication payload elements. An extensive effort was required to develop the flight software and meet the NASA requirements for software quality and safety. The flight avionics must be radiation tolerant, and these processors have limited capability in comparison to terrestrial counterparts. A big challenge was that there are three SDRs onboard, and interfacing with multiple SDRs simultaneously complicatesd the effort. The effort also includes ground software, which is a key element for both the command of the payload, and displaying data created by the payload. The verification of

  12. Digital libraries: A testbed for multimedia technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Yue-ting

    2005-01-01

    A distinguishing feature of a digital library is that it has Terabyte volumes of multimedia resources. One challenge for researchers in the field of multimedia is to find a testbed for showing the potentials of multimedia technologies such as video summarization, semantic annotation, multimedia cross indexing and retrieval, and etc. Deeper research and wider applications of digital libraries revealed their indispensable role as testbed for multimedia technologies. This paper presents challenging issues of some key techniques used in digital libraries and their specific needs for multimedia technologies.

  13. The design and implementation of the LLNL gigabit testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Labs., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper will look at the design and implementation of the LLNL Gigabit testbed (LGTB), where various high speed networking products, can be tested in one environment. The paper will discuss the philosophy behind the design of and the need for the testbed, the tests that are performed in the testbed, and the tools used to implement those tests.

  14. A Battery Certification Testbed for Small Satellite Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cameron, Zachary; Kulkarni, Chetan S.; Luna, Ali Guarneros; Goebel, Kai; Poll, Scott

    2015-01-01

    A battery pack consisting of standard cylindrical 18650 lithium-ion cells has been chosen for small satellite missions based on previous flight heritage and compliance with NASA battery safety requirements. However, for batteries that transit through the International Space Station (ISS), additional certification tests are required for individual cells as well as the battery packs. In this manuscript, we discuss the development of generalized testbeds for testing and certifying different types of batteries critical to small satellite missions. Test procedures developed and executed for this certification effort include: a detailed physical inspection before and after experiments; electrical cycling characterization at the cell and pack levels; battery-pack overcharge, over-discharge, external short testing; battery-pack vacuum leak and vibration testing. The overall goals of these certification procedures are to conform to requirements set forth by the agency and identify unique safety hazards. The testbeds, procedures, and experimental results are discussed for batteries chosen for small satellite missions to be launched from the ISS.

  15. A Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S.; Sukumar, V.; Bhasin, P. S.; Arun Kumar, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel scheme called "Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control of a Real Time Nonlinear System." The idea is based upon the fact that project-based learning motivates students to learn actively and to use their engineering skills acquired in their previous years of study. It also fosters initiative and focuses…

  16. Cognitive nonlinear radar test-bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedden, Abigail S.; Wikner, David A.; Martone, Anthony; McNamara, David

    2013-05-01

    Providing situational awareness to the warfighter requires radar, communications, and other electronic systems that operate in increasingly cluttered and dynamic electromagnetic environments. There is a growing need for cognitive RF systems that are capable of monitoring, adapting to, and learning from their environments in order to maintain their effectiveness and functionality. Additionally, radar systems are needed that are capable of adapting to an increased number of targets of interest. Cognitive nonlinear radar may offer critical solutions to these growing problems. This work focuses on ongoing efforts at the U.S. Army Research Laboratory (ARL) to develop a cognitive nonlinear radar test-bed. ARL is working toward developing a test-bed that uses spectrum sensing to monitor the RF environment and dynamically change the transmit waveforms to achieve detection of nonlinear targets with high confidence. This work presents the architecture of the test-bed system along with a discussion of its current capabilities and limitations. A brief outlook is presented for the project along with a discussion of a future cognitive nonlinear radar test-bed.

  17. A Business-to-Business Interoperability Testbed: An Overview

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kulvatunyou, Boonserm [ORNL; Ivezic, Nenad [ORNL; Monica, Martin [Sun Microsystems, Inc.; Jones, Albert [National Institute of Standards and Technology (NIST)

    2003-10-01

    In this paper, we describe a business-to-business (B2B) testbed co-sponsored by the Open Applications Group, Inc. (OAGI) and the National Institute of Standard and Technology (NIST) to advance enterprise e-commerce standards. We describe the business and technical objectives and initial activities within the B2B Testbed. We summarize our initial lessons learned to form the requirements that drive the next generation testbed development. We also give an overview of a promising testing framework architecture in which to drive the testbed developments. We outline the future plans for the testbed development.

  18. Characterization report for Building 301 Hot Cell Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-07-01

    During the period from October, 1997, through March, 1998, ANL-E Health Physics conducted a pre-D and D characterization of Building 301, referred to as the Hot Cell Facility. While primary emphasis was placed on radiological evaluation, the presence of non-nuclear hazardous and toxic material was also included in the scope of the characterization. This is one of the early buildings on the ANL-E site, and was heavily used in the 1950`s and 1960`s for various nuclear reaction and reactor design studies. Some degree of cleanup and contamination fixation was done in the 1970`s, so that the building could be used with a minimum of risk of personnel contamination. Work records are largely nonexistent for the early history of the building, so that any assumptions about extent and type of contamination had to be kept very open in the survey planning process. The primary contaminant was found to be painted-over Cs-137 embedded in the concrete floors, although a variety of other nuclides consistent with the work said to have been performed were found in smaller quantities. Due to leaks and drips through the floor, a relatively modest amount of soil contamination was found in the service trench under the building, not penetrating deeply. Two contaminated, disconnected drain lines leaving the building could not be traced by site records, and remain a problem for remediation. The D and D Characterization Plan was fulfilled.

  19. Sparse matrix methods research using the CSM testbed software system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Eleanor; George, J. Alan

    1989-01-01

    Research is described on sparse matrix techniques for the Computational Structural Mechanics (CSM) Testbed. The primary objective was to compare the performance of state-of-the-art techniques for solving sparse systems with those that are currently available in the CSM Testbed. Thus, one of the first tasks was to become familiar with the structure of the testbed, and to install some or all of the SPARSPAK package in the testbed. A suite of subroutines to extract from the data base the relevant structural and numerical information about the matrix equations was written, and all the demonstration problems distributed with the testbed were successfully solved. These codes were documented, and performance studies comparing the SPARSPAK technology to the methods currently in the testbed were completed. In addition, some preliminary studies were done comparing some recently developed out-of-core techniques with the performance of the testbed processor INV.

  20. Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Facility (Research Cell 22)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: RC22 is a continuous-flow, direct-connect supersonic-combustion research facility that is capable of simulating flight conditions from Mach 3.0 to Mach...

  1. Function-based integration strategy for an agile manufacturing testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Hisup

    1997-01-01

    This paper describes an integration strategy for plug-and- play software based on functional descriptions of the software modules. The functional descriptions identify explicitly the role of each module with respect to the overall systems. They define the critical dependencies that affect the individual modules and thus affect the behavior of the system. The specified roles, dependencies and behavioral constraints are then incorporated in a group of shared objects that are distributed over a network. These objects may be interchanged with others without disrupting the system so long as the replacements meet the interface and functional requirements. In this paper, we propose a framework for modeling the behavior of plug-and-play software modules that will be used to (1) design and predict the outcome of the integration, (2) generate the interface and functional requirements of individual modules, and (3) form a dynamic foundation for applying interchangeable software modules. I describe this strategy in the context of the development of an agile manufacturing testbed. The testbed represents a collection of production cells for machining operations, supported by a network of software modules or agents for planning, fabrication, and inspection. A process definition layer holds the functional description of the software modules. A network of distributed objects interact with one another over the Internet and comprise the plug-compatible software nodes that execute these functions. This paper will explore the technical and operational ramifications of using the functional description framework to organize and coordinate the distributed object modules.

  2. A Survey of Cyber Ranges and Testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-10-01

    and GENI in the US. These projects currently link testbed resources to assist sharing and reuse among researchers. The review also identified...Defense DPI Deep packet inspection EW Electronic warfare FIRE Future internet research and experimentation (EU) GENI Global environment for...shared by researchers across the globe. An example of this in the US is the current Global Environment for Network Innovations ( GENI ) project sponsored

  3. Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle: Dynamics Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, A. Y.; Le, N. T.; Marriott, A. T.

    1997-01-01

    The Variable Dynamic Testbed Vehicle (VDTV) concept has been proposed as a tool to evaluate collision avoidance systems and to perform driving-related human factors research. The goal of this study is to analytically investigate to what extent a VDTV with adjustable front and rear anti-roll bar stiffnesses, programmable damping rates, and four-wheel-steering can emulate the lateral dynamics of a broad range of passenger vehicles.

  4. Scanning measurement testbed for advanced nondestructive evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Horne, Michael R

    1990-01-01

    New materials and manufacturing processes, and the quest for economy and user safety, have necessitated the development of nondestructive testing methods to quantify the life and reliability of a product during manufacture and service. Described herein, is a testbed to be used in the research and development of these testing methods. A brief motivation for using ultrasonics applied to nondestructive evaluation is followed by a chapter on the feasibility of using a unique testing method and an...

  5. A novel testbed structure for nanoshell based devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Mohammad A [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Geiger, Richard T [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pittsburgh, PA (United States); Kim, Jaekyun [Department of Electrical Engineering, Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pittsburgh, PA (United States)

    2007-06-27

    The design and the fabrication of a novel testbed for nanoshell based devices is reported. We have identified six criteria for an ideal resistive nanodevice and show that our testbed satisfies most of these criteria. We describe how the unique design of the testbed minimizes most of the resilient problems in the current nanodevices, like non-uniformity, assembly, stray nanocomponents and cost. We have tested the testbed by using gold nanoshell coated silica spheres as the active device element. We discuss the nature and the implications of the contact resistance between a flat electrode and a spherical nanoshell. We suggest various applications of the testbed, from nanofuses to ultrafast oxide sensors and to bio-sensors. We describe methods and steps for miniaturization of the testbed.

  6. Cognitive Optical Network Testbed: EU Project CHRON

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Robert; Duran, Ramon J.; Kachris, Christoforos;

    2015-01-01

    The aim of cognition in optical networks is to introduce intelligence into the control plane that allows for autonomous end-to-end performance optimization and minimization of required human intervention, particularly targeted at heterogeneous network scenarios. A cognitive network observes, learns......, and makes informed decisions based on its current status and knowledge about past decisions and their results. To test the operation of cognitive algorithms in real time, we created the first operational testbed of a cognitive optical network based on the Cognitive Heterogeneous Reconfigurable Optical...

  7. Easy as Pi: A Network Coding Raspberry Pi Testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Chres Wiant; Hernandez, Nestor; Cabrera Guerrero, Juan A.

    2016-01-01

    of the hardware, but also due to maintenance challenges. In this paper, we present the required key steps to design, setup and maintain an inexpensive testbed using Raspberry Pi devices for communications and storage networks with network coding capabilities. This testbed can be utilized for any applications...

  8. Multi-agent testbed for distributed space systems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Osuman, A.; Guo, J.; Gill, E.K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Several industries are involved in the development of distributed systems, testbeds are needed to simulate the real world challenges that face the distributed systems. Presently, there are a number of testbeds in the world with very distinctive characteristics. Delft University of Technology is invo

  9. Application developer's tutorial for the CSM testbed architecture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Underwood, Phillip; Felippa, Carlos A.

    1988-01-01

    This tutorial serves as an illustration of the use of the programmer interface on the CSM Testbed Architecture (NICE). It presents a complete, but simple, introduction to using both the GAL-DBM (Global Access Library-Database Manager) and CLIP (Command Language Interface Program) to write a NICE processor. Familiarity with the CSM Testbed architecture is required.

  10. Standard practice for cell sorting in a BSL-3 facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perfetto, Stephen P; Ambrozak, David R; Nguyen, Richard; Roederer, Mario; Koup, Richard A; Holmes, Kevin L

    2011-01-01

    Over the past decade, there has been a rapid growth in the number of BSL-3 and BSL-4 laboratories in the USA and an increase in demand for infectious cell sorting in BSL-3 laboratories. In 2007, the International Society for Advancement of Cytometry (ISAC) Biosafety Committee published standards for the sorting of unfixed cells and is an important resource for biosafety procedures when performing infectious cell sorting. Following a careful risk assessment, if it is determined that a cell sorter must be located within a BSL-3 laboratory, there are a variety of factors to be considered prior to the establishment of the laboratory. This chapter outlines procedures for infectious cell sorting in a BSL-3 environment to facilitate the establishment and safe operation of a BSL-3 cell sorting laboratory. Subjects covered include containment verification, remote operation, disinfection, personal protective equipment (PPE), and instrument-specific modifications for enhanced aerosol evacuation.

  11. PSA Solar furnace: A facility for testing PV cells under concentrated solar radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fernandez-Reche, J.; Canadas, I.; Sanchez, M.; Ballestrin, J.; Yebra, L.; Monterreal, R.; Rodriguez, J.; Garcia, G. [Concentration Solar Technologies, Plataforma Solar de Almeria-CIEMAT P.O. Box 22, Tabernas, E-04200 (Almeria) (Spain); Alonso, M.; Chenlo, F. [Photovoltaic Components and Systems, Renewable Energies Department-CIEMAT Avda. Complutense, 22, Madrid, E-28040 (Spain)

    2006-09-22

    The Plataforma Solar de Almeria (PSA), the largest centre for research, development and testing of concentration solar thermal technologies in Europe, has started to apply its knowledge, facilities and resources to development of the Concentration PV technology in an EU-funded project HiConPV. A facility for testing PV cells under solar radiation concentrated up to 2000x has recently been completed. The advantages of this facility are that, since it is illuminated by solar radiation, it is possible to obtain the appropriate cell spectral response directly, and the flash tests can be combined with prolonged PV-cell irradiation on large surfaces (up to 150cm{sup 2}), so the thermal response of the PV cell can be evaluated simultaneously. (author)

  12. Gemini Planet Imager Coronagraph Testbed Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sivaranmakrishnan, A.; Carr, G.; Soummer, R.; Oppenheimer, B.R.; Mey, J.L.; Brenner, D.; Mandeville, C.W.; Zimmerman, N. Macintosh, B.A.; Graham, J.R.; Saddlemyer, L.; Bauman, B.; Carlotti, A.; Pueyo, L.; Tuthill, P.G.; Dorrer, C.; Roberts, R.; Greenbaum, A.

    2010-12-08

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is an extreme AO coronagraphic integral field unit YJHK spectrograph destined for first light on the 8m Gemini South telescope in 2011. GPI fields a 1500 channel AO system feeding an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph, and a nIR non-common-path slow wavefront sensor. It targets detection and characterizion of relatively young (<2GYr), self luminous planets up to 10 million times as faint as their primary star. We present the coronagraph subsystem's in-lab performance, and describe the studies required to specify and fabricate the coronagraph. Coronagraphic pupil apodization is implemented with metallic half-tone screens on glass, and the focal plane occulters are deep reactive ion etched holes in optically polished silicon mirrors. Our JH testbed achieves H-band contrast below a million at separations above 5 resolution elements, without using an AO system. We present an overview of the coronagraphic masks and our testbed coronagraphic data. We also demonstrate the performance of an astrometric and photometric grid that enables coronagraphic astrometry relative to the primary star in every exposure, a proven technique that has yielded on-sky precision of the order of a milliarsecond.

  13. Study on distributed energy options in Skaftkaerr testbed. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pesola, A.; Hagstroem, M.; Vanhanen, J. (Gaia Consulting Oy, Helsinki (Finland))

    2011-07-01

    In the distributed energy production model electricity or heat is produced near the end-user in relatively small units - using very often local renewable energy sources. These are e.g. solar thermal or photovoltaic applications, wind power, fuel cells or other small-scale CHP technologies using e.g. bio-based fuels. Locally produced intermittent renewable electricity can be optimized by storing produced electricity and using it when electricity price is high. Electricity storage is an important part of smart grid development from the perspective of supply-demand flexibility. Heat can be stored as well using e.g. water tank placed either under or above the ground. Distributed energy production technologies are already utilized in domestic residential areas and the trend is emerging. Designing and planning needs to be emphasized in order to build and maintain technically and economically sustainable energy system. The objective of this study is to present the possibilities of distributed energy production and storage technologies. The study highlights available technologies and services of distributed energy production and helps to build up a testbed solution that could lead to demonstration-scale application in near future. This testbed is a part of developing process of Skaftkaerr area where energy efficiency and environmental issues are emphasized. In this report, feasible production and storage technologies are presented in Chapter 2. Chapter 3 introduces economical characteristics of studied technologies. Chapter 4 points out suitable technologies for Skaftkaerr area and presents profitability analysis of these technologies via two cases. Domestic actors in technology value chains are also presented in Chapter 4. Chapter 5 summarizes the study and its findings

  14. Implementation of a RPS Cyber Security Test-bed with Two PLCs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shin, Jinsoo; Heo, Gyunyoung [Kyung Hee Univ., Yongin (Korea, Republic of); Son, Hanseong [Joongbu Univ., Geumsan (Korea, Republic of); An, Yongkyu; Rizwan, Uddin [University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, Urbana (United States)

    2015-10-15

    Our research team proposed the methodology to evaluate cyber security with Bayesian network (BN) as a cyber security evaluation model and help operator, licensee, licensor or regulator in granting evaluation priorities. The methodology allowed for overall evaluation of cyber security by considering architectural aspect of facility and management aspect of cyber security at the same time. In order to emphasize reality of this model by inserting true data, it is necessary to conduct a penetration test that pretends an actual cyber-attack. Through the collaboration with University of Illinois at Urbana-Champaign, which possesses the Tricon a safety programmable logic controller (PLC) used at nuclear power plants and develops a test-bed for nuclear power plant, a test-bed for reactor protection system (RPS) is being developed with the PLCs. Two PLCs are used to construct a simple test-bed for RPS, bi-stable processor (BP) and coincidence processor (CP). By using two PLCs, it is possible to examine cyber-attack against devices such as PLC, cyber-attack against communication between devices, and the effects of a PLC on the other PLC. Two PLCs were used to construct a test-bed for penetration test in this study. Advantages of using two or more PLCs instead of single PLC are as follows. 1) Results of cyber-attack reflecting characteristics among PLCs can be obtained. 2) Cyber-attack can be attempted using a method of attacking communication between PLCs. True data obtained can be applied to existing cyber security evaluation model to emphasize reality of the model.

  15. Development of a Scalable Testbed for Mobile Olfaction Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Syed Muhammad Mamduh Syed; Visvanathan, Retnam; Kamarudin, Kamarulzaman; Yeon, Ahmad Shakaff Ali; Md Shakaff, Ali Yeon; Zakaria, Ammar; Kamarudin, Latifah Munirah

    2015-12-09

    The lack of information on ground truth gas dispersion and experiment verification information has impeded the development of mobile olfaction systems, especially for real-world conditions. In this paper, an integrated testbed for mobile gas sensing experiments is presented. The integrated 3 m × 6 m testbed was built to provide real-time ground truth information for mobile olfaction system development. The testbed consists of a 72-gas-sensor array, namely Large Gas Sensor Array (LGSA), a localization system based on cameras and a wireless communication backbone for robot communication and integration into the testbed system. Furthermore, the data collected from the testbed may be streamed into a simulation environment to expedite development. Calibration results using ethanol have shown that using a large number of gas sensor in the LGSA is feasible and can produce coherent signals when exposed to the same concentrations. The results have shown that the testbed was able to capture the time varying characteristics and the variability of gas plume in a 2 h experiment thus providing time dependent ground truth concentration maps. The authors have demonstrated the ability of the mobile olfaction testbed to monitor, verify and thus, provide insight to gas distribution mapping experiment.

  16. Development of a Scalable Testbed for Mobile Olfaction Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Muhammad Mamduh Syed Zakaria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The lack of information on ground truth gas dispersion and experiment verification information has impeded the development of mobile olfaction systems, especially for real-world conditions. In this paper, an integrated testbed for mobile gas sensing experiments is presented. The integrated 3 m × 6 m testbed was built to provide real-time ground truth information for mobile olfaction system development. The testbed consists of a 72-gas-sensor array, namely Large Gas Sensor Array (LGSA, a localization system based on cameras and a wireless communication backbone for robot communication and integration into the testbed system. Furthermore, the data collected from the testbed may be streamed into a simulation environment to expedite development. Calibration results using ethanol have shown that using a large number of gas sensor in the LGSA is feasible and can produce coherent signals when exposed to the same concentrations. The results have shown that the testbed was able to capture the time varying characteristics and the variability of gas plume in a 2 h experiment thus providing time dependent ground truth concentration maps. The authors have demonstrated the ability of the mobile olfaction testbed to monitor, verify and thus, provide insight to gas distribution mapping experiment.

  17. Supersonic combustion engine testbed, heat lightning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoying, D.; Kelble, C.; Langenbahn, A.; Stahl, M.; Tincher, M.; Walsh, M.; Wisler, S.

    1990-01-01

    The design of a supersonic combustion engine testbed (SCET) aircraft is presented. The hypersonic waverider will utilize both supersonic combustion ramjet (SCRAMjet) and turbofan-ramjet engines. The waverider concept, system integration, electrical power, weight analysis, cockpit, landing skids, and configuration modeling are addressed in the configuration considerations. The subsonic, supersonic and hypersonic aerodynamics are presented along with the aerodynamic stability and landing analysis of the aircraft. The propulsion design considerations include: engine selection, turbofan ramjet inlets, SCRAMjet inlets and the SCRAMjet diffuser. The cooling requirements and system are covered along with the topics of materials and the hydrogen fuel tanks and insulation system. A cost analysis is presented and the appendices include: information about the subsonic wind tunnel test, shock expansion calculations, and an aerodynamic heat flux program.

  18. The Wide Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Zhang, X; Leisawitz, D T; Leviton, D B; Martino, A J; Mather, J C; Zhang, Xiaolei; Feinberg, Lee; Leisawitz, Dave; Leviton, Douglas B.; Martino, Anthony J.; Mather, John C.

    2001-01-01

    We are developing a Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) in support of design studies for NASA's future space interferometry missions, in particular the SPIRIT and SPECS far-infrared/submillimeter interferometers. WIIT operates at optical wavelengths and uses Michelson beam combination to achieve both wide-field imaging and high-resolution spectroscopy. It will be used chiefly to test the feasibility of using a large-format detector array at the image plane of the sky to obtain wide-field interferometry images through mosaicing techniques. In this setup each detector pixel records interferograms corresponding to averaging a particular pointing range on the sky as the optical path length is scanned and as the baseline separation and orientation is varied. The final image is constructed through spatial and spectral Fourier transforms of the recorded interferograms for each pixel, followed by a mosaic/joint-deconvolution procedure of all the pixels. In this manner the image within the pointing range ...

  19. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H. [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Akiba, M. [Naka Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  20. Development of Hardware-in-the-loop Microgrid Testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiao, Bailu [ORNL; Prabakar, Kumaraguru [ORNL; Starke, Michael R [ORNL; Liu, Guodong [ORNL; Dowling, Kevin [University of Tennessee, Knoxville (UTK); Ollis, T Ben [ORNL; Irminger, Philip [ORNL; Xu, Yan [ORNL; Dimitrovski, Aleksandar D [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    A hardware-in-the-loop (HIL) microgrid testbed for the evaluation and assessment of microgrid operation and control system has been presented in this paper. The HIL testbed is composed of a real-time digital simulator (RTDS) for modeling of the microgrid, multiple NI CompactRIOs for device level control, a prototype microgrid energy management system (MicroEMS), and a relay protection system. The applied communication-assisted hybrid control system has been also discussed. Results of function testing of HIL controller, communication, and the relay protection system are presented to show the effectiveness of the proposed HIL microgrid testbed.

  1. Development of an Experimental Testbed for Research in Lithium-Ion Battery Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ferdowsi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced electrochemical batteries are becoming an integral part of a wide range of applications from household and commercial to smart grid, transportation, and aerospace applications. Among different battery technologies, lithium-ion (Li-ion batteries are growing more and more popular due to their high energy density, high galvanic potential, low self-discharge, low weight, and the fact that they have almost no memory effect. However, one of the main obstacles facing the widespread commercialization of Li-ion batteries is the design of reliable battery management systems (BMSs. An efficient BMS ensures electrical safety during operation, while increasing battery lifetime, capacity and thermal stability. Despite the need for extensive research in this field, the majority of research conducted on Li-ion battery packs and BMS are proprietary works conducted by manufacturers. The available literature, however, provides either general descriptions or detailed analysis of individual components of the battery system, and ignores addressing details of the overall system development. This paper addresses the development of an experimental research testbed for studying Li-ion batteries and their BMS design. The testbed can be configured in a variety of cell and pack architectures, allowing for a wide range of BMS monitoring, diagnostics, and control technologies to be tested and analyzed. General considerations that should be taken into account while designing Li-ion battery systems are reviewed and different technologies and challenges commonly encountered in Li-ion battery systems are investigated. This testbed facilitates future development of more practical and improved BMS technologies with the aim of increasing the safety, reliability, and efficiency of existing Li-ion battery systems. Experimental results of initial tests performed on the system are used to demonstrate some of the capabilities of the developed research testbed. To the authors

  2. Los Alamos Hot-Cell-Facility modifications for examining FFTF fuel pins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Campbell, B.M.; Ledbetter, J.M.

    1982-01-01

    Commissioned in 1960, the Wing 9 Hot Cell Facility at Los Alamos was recently modified to meet the needs of the 1980s. Because fuel pins from the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) at the Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory (HEDL) are too long for examination in the original hot cells, we modified cells to accommodate longer fuel pins and to provide other capabilities as well. For instance, the T-3 shipping cask now can be opened in an inert atmosphere that can be maintained for all nondestructive and destructive examinations of the fuel pins. The full-length pins are visually examined and photographed, the wire wrap is removed, and fission gas is sampled. After the fuel pin is cropped, a cap is seal-welded on the section containing the fuel column. This section is then transferred to other cells for gamma-scanning, radiography, profilometry, sectioning for metallography, and chemical analysis.

  3. Development of Platform Device in 02B Hot Cell in CRARL Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHANG; Shang-wen; ZHU; Li-yang; LIU; Fang; LI; Gao-liang; LI; Hui-rong; GUO; Jian-hua; LUO; Fang-xiang; YAN; Tai-hong; HE; Hui; ZHENG; Wei-fang

    2015-01-01

    After examination to the former dissolving system device built in the 02Bhot cell in CRARL facility,there are some trouble including:1)The crowded space lead to the invalidated operation for the valves and fast connectors by the manipulator and the absence of partial equipment.2)In case of plugging up,the experiment would be

  4. Prognostics-Enabled Power Supply for ADAPT Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ridgetop's role is to develop electronic prognostics for sensing power systems in support of NASA/Ames ADAPT testbed. The prognostic enabled power systems from...

  5. Performance of the optical communication adaptive optics testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Troy, Mitchell; Roberts, Jennifer; Guiwits, Steve; Azevedo, Steve; Bikkannavar, Siddarayappa; Brack, Gary; Garkanian, Vachik; Palmer, Dean; Platt, Benjamin; Truong, Tuan; Wilson, Keith; Wallace, Kent

    2005-01-01

    We describe the current performance of an adaptive optics testbed for optical communication. This adaptive optics system allows for simulation of night and day-time observing on a 1 meter telescope with a 97 actuator deformable mirror.

  6. DTDWS-DESIGN OF TESTBED FOR DISTRIBUTED WEB SERVICE ENVIRONMENT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.CHANDRAMOHAN,

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Designing and developing a testbed to evaluate the features of web service properties and their service interfaces in a distributed web service environment. This testbed interface helps the clients and their tools to build automatically with the corresponding web services and to identify its related issues in which it can communicate and cooperate among services in a distributed environment. By establishing set of policy and preferences for relevant supporting tools to evaluate the semantic technology of service and enhancing the tuning features by avoiding interoperability among web services. A light weighted application having unique and specific structure for designing testbed for istributed web service environment (DTDWS with a build in concepts encoded with XML (Extensible Mark-up Language. This proposal breed a trustful zone in a distributed environment by an automated simulation,composition and testing techniques are put into service. Many service conflicts are resolved in a timely and consistent approach all the way through our proposed testbed .

  7. ATLAS and CMS applications on the WorldGrid testbed

    OpenAIRE

    Ciaschini, V.; Donno, F.; Fanfani, A.; Fanzago, F.; Garbellotto, V.; Verlato, M.; Vaccarossa, L.

    2003-01-01

    WorldGrid is an intercontinental testbed spanning Europe and the US integrating architecturally different Grid implementations based on the Globus toolkit. It has been developed in the context of the DataTAG and iVDGL projects, and successfully demonstrated during the WorldGrid demos at IST2002 (Copenhagen) and SC2002 (Baltimore). Two HEP experiments, ATLAS and CMS, successful exploited the WorldGrid testbed for executing jobs simulating the response of their detectors to physics eve nts prod...

  8. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  9. Design of the gas cell for the IGISOL facility at ELI-NP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Constantin, P.; Balabanski, D. L.; Anh, L. T.; Cuong, P. V.; Mei, B.

    2017-04-01

    One of the experimental programs that will be carried out at the Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility is the production of exotic neutron-rich ion beams in an IGISOL facility via photofission in a stack of actinide targets placed at the center of a cell filled with He gas. Simulations with the Geant4 toolkit were done for the optimization of the target configuration that maximizes the rate of released photofission fragments. The cell geometry is established based on the stopping properties of these fragments. Studies, based on simulations with Geant4 and SIMION 8.1, of the space charge effect and its induced electric field in the gas cell are presented. Estimates of the extraction time and efficiency of the photofission fragments are derived.

  10. PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL SUBSYSTEM PERFORMANCE IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, F; Arnold, P; Hinz, A; Zacharias, R; Ollis, C; Fulkerson, E; Mchale, B; Runtal, A; Bishop, C

    2007-07-27

    The Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) subsystem is a key component of the National Ignition Facility, enabling the laser to employ an efficient four-pass main amplifier architecture. PEPC relies on a pulsed power technology to initiate and maintain plasma within the cells and to provide the necessary high voltage bias to the cells nonlinear crystals. Ultimately, nearly 300 high-voltage, high-current pulse generators will be deployed in the NIF in support of PEPC. Production of solid-state plasma pulse generators and thyratron-switched pulse generators is now complete, with the majority of the hardware deployed in the facility. An entire cluster (one-fourth of a complete NIF) has been commissioned and is operating on a routine basis, supporting laser shot operations. Another cluster has been deployed, awaiting final commissioning. Activation and commissioning of new hardware continues to progress in parallel, driving toward a goal of completing the PEPC subsystem in late 2007.

  11. Passive Thermal Design Approach for the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed Experiment on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamidis, John; Yuko, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Program Office at NASA Headquarters oversees all of NASAs space communications activities. SCaN manages and directs the ground-based facilities and services provided by the Deep Space Network (DSN), Near Earth Network (NEN), and the Space Network (SN). Through the SCaN Program Office, NASA GRC developed a Software Defined Radio (SDR) testbed experiment (SCaN testbed experiment) for use on the International Space Station (ISS). It is comprised of three different SDR radios, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) radio, Harris Corporation radio, and the General Dynamics Corporation radio. The SCaN testbed experiment provides an on-orbit, adaptable, SDR Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) - based facility to conduct a suite of experiments to advance the Software Defined Radio, Space Telecommunications Radio Systems (STRS) standards, reduce risk (Technology Readiness Level (TRL) advancement) for candidate Constellation future space flight hardware software, and demonstrate space communication links critical to future NASA exploration missions. The SCaN testbed project provides NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop and field communications, navigation, and networking technologies in the laboratory and space environment based on reconfigurable, software defined radio platforms and the STRS Architecture.The SCaN testbed is resident on the P3 Express Logistics Carrier (ELC) on the exterior truss of the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN testbed payload launched on the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and was installed on the ISS P3 ELC located on the inboard RAM P3 site. The daily operations and testing are managed out of NASA GRC in the Telescience Support Center (TSC).

  12. Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

    1999-12-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

  13. Optical testbed for the LISA phasemeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, T. S.; Fernández Barranco, G.; Penkert, D.; Gerberding, O.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2016-05-01

    The planned spaceborne gravitational wave detector LISA will allow the detection of gravitational waves at frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 1 Hz. A breadboard model for the metrology system aka the phasemeter was developed in the scope of an ESA technology development project by a collaboration between the Albert Einstein Institute, the Technical University of Denmark and the Danish industry partner Axcon Aps. It in particular provides the electronic readout of the main interferometer phases besides auxiliary functions. These include clock noise transfer, ADC pilot tone correction, inter-satellite ranging and data transfer. Besides in LISA, the phasemeter can also be applied in future satellite geodesy missions. Here we show the planning and advances in the implementation of an optical testbed for the full metrology chain. It is based on an ultra-stable hexagonal optical bench. This bench allows the generation of three unequal heterodyne beatnotes with a zero phase combination, thus providing the possibility to probe the phase readout for non-linearities in an optical three signal test. Additionally, the utilization of three independent phasemeters will allow the testing of the auxiliary functions. Once working, components can individually be replaced with flight-qualified hardware in this setup.

  14. NASA Langley's AirSTAR Testbed: A Subscale Flight Test Capability for Flight Dynamics and Control System Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Thomas L.; Bailey, Roger M.

    2008-01-01

    As part of the Airborne Subscale Transport Aircraft Research (AirSTAR) project, NASA Langley Research Center (LaRC) has developed a subscaled flying testbed in order to conduct research experiments in support of the goals of NASA s Aviation Safety Program. This research capability consists of three distinct components. The first of these is the research aircraft, of which there are several in the AirSTAR stable. These aircraft range from a dynamically-scaled, twin turbine vehicle to a propeller driven, off-the-shelf airframe. Each of these airframes carves out its own niche in the research test program. All of the airplanes have sophisticated on-board data acquisition and actuation systems, recording, telemetering, processing, and/or receiving data from research control systems. The second piece of the testbed is the ground facilities, which encompass the hardware and software infrastructure necessary to provide comprehensive support services for conducting flight research using the subscale aircraft, including: subsystem development, integrated testing, remote piloting of the subscale aircraft, telemetry processing, experimental flight control law implementation and evaluation, flight simulation, data recording/archiving, and communications. The ground facilities are comprised of two major components: (1) The Base Research Station (BRS), a LaRC laboratory facility for system development, testing and data analysis, and (2) The Mobile Operations Station (MOS), a self-contained, motorized vehicle serving as a mobile research command/operations center, functionally equivalent to the BRS, capable of deployment to remote sites for supporting flight tests. The third piece of the testbed is the test facility itself. Research flights carried out by the AirSTAR team are conducted at NASA Wallops Flight Facility (WFF) on the Eastern Shore of Virginia. The UAV Island runway is a 50 x 1500 paved runway that lies within restricted airspace at Wallops Flight Facility. The

  15. Advanced turboprop testbed systems study. Volume 1: Testbed program objectives and priorities, drive system and aircraft design studies, evaluation and recommendations and wind tunnel test plans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradley, E. S.; Little, B. H.; Warnock, W.; Jenness, C. M.; Wilson, J. M.; Powell, C. W.; Shoaf, L.

    1982-01-01

    The establishment of propfan technology readiness was determined and candidate drive systems for propfan application were identified. Candidate testbed aircraft were investigated for testbed aircraft suitability and four aircraft selected as possible propfan testbed vehicles. An evaluation of the four candidates was performed and the Boeing KC-135A and the Gulfstream American Gulfstream II recommended as the most suitable aircraft for test application. Conceptual designs of the two recommended aircraft were performed and cost and schedule data for the entire testbed program were generated. The program total cost was estimated and a wind tunnel program cost and schedule is generated in support of the testbed program.

  16. AECL hot-cell facilities and post-irradiation examination services

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schankula, M.H.; Plaice, E.L. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Chalk River, Ontario (Canada); Woodworth, L.G. [Atomic Energy of Canada Limited, Pinawa, Manitoba (Canada)

    1998-04-01

    This paper presents an overview of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) services available at AECL's hot-cell facilities (HCF). The HCFs are used primarily to provide PIE support for operating CANDU power reactors in Canada and abroad, and for the examination of experimental fuel bundles and core components irradiated in research reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) and off-shore. A variety of examinations and analyses are performed ranging from non-destructive visual and dimensional inspections to detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations. Several hot cells are dedicated to mechanical property testing of structural materials and to determine the fitness-for-service of reactor core components. Facility upgrades and the development of innovative examination techniques continue to improve AECL's PIE capabilities. (author)

  17. Reliable Wireless Data Acquisition and Control Techniques within Nuclear Hot Cell Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.L.; Tulenko, J.

    2000-09-20

    On this NEER project the University of Florida has investigated and applied advanced communications techniques to address data acquisition and control problems within the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) of Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho Falls. The goals of this project have been to investigate and apply wireless communications techniques to solve the problem of communicating with and controlling equipment and systems within a nuclear hot cell facility with its attendant high radiation levels. Different wireless techniques, including radio frequency, infrared and power line communications were reviewed. For each technique, the challenges of radiation-hardened implementation were addressed. In addition, it has been a project goal to achieve the highest level of system reliability to ensure safe nuclear operations. Achievement of these goals would allow the eventual elimination of through-the-wall, hardwired cabling that is currently employed in the hot cell, along wit h all of the attendant problems that limit measurement mobility and flexibility.

  18. Research and Development of a PEM Fuel Cell, Hydrogen Reformer, and Vehicle Refueling Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Edward F. Kiczek

    2007-08-31

    Air Products and Chemicals, Inc. has teamed with Plug Power, Inc. of Latham, NY, and the City of Las Vegas, NV, to develop, design, procure, install and operate an on-site hydrogen generation system, an alternative vehicle refueling system, and a stationary hydrogen fuel cell power plant, located in Las Vegas. The facility will become the benchmark for validating new natural gas-based hydrogen systems, PEM fuel cell power generation systems, and numerous new technologies for the safe and reliable delivery of hydrogen as a fuel to vehicles. Most important, this facility will serve as a demonstration of hydrogen as a safe and clean energy alternative. Las Vegas provides an excellent real-world performance and durability testing environment.

  19. Enhancing Stability of Perovskite Solar Cells to Moisture by the Facile Hydrophobic Passivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, Insung; Jeong, Inyoung; Lee, Jinwoo; Ko, Min Jae; Yong, Kijung

    2015-08-12

    In this study, a novel and facile passivation process for a perovskite solar cell is reported. Poor stability in ambient atmosphere, which is the most critical demerit of a perovskite solar cell, is overcome by a simple passivation process using a hydrophobic polymer layer. Teflon, the hydrophobic polymer, is deposited on the top of a perovskite solar cell by a spin-coating method. With the hydrophobic passivation, the perovskite solar cell shows negligible degradation after a 30 day storage in ambient atmosphere. Suppressed degradation of the perovskite film is proved in various ways: X-ray diffraction, light absorption spectrum, and quartz crystal microbalance. This simple but effective passivation process suggests new kind of approach to enhance stability of perovskite solar cells to moisture.

  20. Optimization Testbed Cometboards Extended into Stochastic Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Patnaik, Surya N.

    2010-01-01

    COMparative Evaluation Testbed of Optimization and Analysis Routines for the Design of Structures (CometBoards) is a multidisciplinary design optimization software. It was originally developed for deterministic calculation. It has now been extended into the stochastic domain for structural design problems. For deterministic problems, CometBoards is introduced through its subproblem solution strategy as well as the approximation concept in optimization. In the stochastic domain, a design is formulated as a function of the risk or reliability. Optimum solution including the weight of a structure, is also obtained as a function of reliability. Weight versus reliability traced out an inverted-S-shaped graph. The center of the graph corresponded to 50 percent probability of success, or one failure in two samples. A heavy design with weight approaching infinity could be produced for a near-zero rate of failure that corresponded to unity for reliability. Weight can be reduced to a small value for the most failure-prone design with a compromised reliability approaching zero. The stochastic design optimization (SDO) capability for an industrial problem was obtained by combining three codes: MSC/Nastran code was the deterministic analysis tool, fast probabilistic integrator, or the FPI module of the NESSUS software, was the probabilistic calculator, and CometBoards became the optimizer. The SDO capability requires a finite element structural model, a material model, a load model, and a design model. The stochastic optimization concept is illustrated considering an academic example and a real-life airframe component made of metallic and composite materials.

  1. A Testbed for Evaluating Lunar Habitat Autonomy Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lawler, Dennis G.

    2008-01-01

    A lunar outpost will involve a habitat with an integrated set of hardware and software that will maintain a safe environment for human activities. There is a desire for a paradigm shift whereby crew will be the primary mission operators, not ground controllers. There will also be significant periods when the outpost is uncrewed. This will require that significant automation software be resident in the habitat to maintain all system functions and respond to faults. JSC is developing a testbed to allow for early testing and evaluation of different autonomy architectures. This will allow evaluation of different software configurations in order to: 1) understand different operational concepts; 2) assess the impact of failures and perturbations on the system; and 3) mitigate software and hardware integration risks. The testbed will provide an environment in which habitat hardware simulations can interact with autonomous control software. Faults can be injected into the simulations and different mission scenarios can be scripted. The testbed allows for logging, replaying and re-initializing mission scenarios. An initial testbed configuration has been developed by combining an existing life support simulation and an existing simulation of the space station power distribution system. Results from this initial configuration will be presented along with suggested requirements and designs for the incremental development of a more sophisticated lunar habitat testbed.

  2. X-ray microbeam stand-alone facility for cultured cells irradiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bożek, Sebastian; Bielecki, Jakub; Wiecheć, Anna; Lekki, Janusz; Stachura, Zbigniew; Pogoda, Katarzyna; Lipiec, Ewelina; Tkocz, Konrad; Kwiatek, Wojciech M.

    2017-03-01

    The article describes an X-ray microbeam standalone facility dedicated for irradiation of living cultured cells. The article can serve as an advice for such facilities construction, as it begins from engineering details, through mathematical modeling and experimental procedures, ending up with preliminary experimental results and conclusions. The presented system consists of an open type X-ray tube with microfocusing down to about 2 μm, an X-ray focusing system with optical elements arranged in the nested Kirckpatrick-Baez (or Montel) geometry, a sample stand and an optical microscope with a scientific digital CCD camera. For the beam visualisation an X-ray sensitive CCD camera and a spectral detector are used, as well as a scintillator screen combined with the microscope. A method of precise one by one irradiation of previously chosen cells is presented, as well as a fast method of uniform irradiation of a chosen sample area. Mathematical models of beam and cell with calculations of kerma and dose are presented. The experiments on dose-effect relationship, kinetics of DNA double strand breaks repair, as well as micronuclei observation were performed on PC-3 (Prostate Cancer) cultured cells. The cells were seeded and irradiated on Mylar foil, which covered a hole drilled in the Petri dish. DNA lesions were visualised with γ-H2AX marker combined with Alexa Fluor 488 fluorescent dye.

  3. High Contrast Imaging Testbed for the Terrestrial Planet Finder Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowmman, Andrew E.; Trauger, John T.; Gordon, Brian; Green, Joseph J.; Moody, Dwight; Niessner, Albert F.; Shi, Fang

    2004-01-01

    The Terrestrial Planet Finder (TPF) mission is planning to launch a visible coronagraphic space telescope in 2014. To achieve TPF science goals, the coronagraph must have extreme levels of wavefront correction (less than 1 Angstrom rms over controllable spatial frequencies) and stability to get the necessary suppression of diffracted starlight (approximately l0(exp -10)) contrast at an angular separation approximately 4 (lamda)/D). TPF Coronagraph's primary platform for experimentation is the High Contrast Imaging Testbed, which will provide laboratory validation of key technologies as well as demonstration of a flight-traceable approach to implementation. Precision wavefront control in the testbed is provided by a high actuator density deformable mirror. Diffracted light control is achieved through use of occulting or apodizing masks and stops. Contrast measurements will establish the technical feasibility of TPF requirements, while model and error budget validation will demonstrate implementation viability. This paper describes the current testbed design, development approach, and recent experimental results.

  4. Laser Metrology in the Micro-Arcsecond Metrology Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    An, Xin; Marx, D.; Goullioud, Renaud; Zhao, Feng

    2004-01-01

    The Space Interferometer Mission (SIM), scheduled for launch in 2009, is a space-born visible light stellar interferometer capable of micro-arcsecond-level astrometry. The Micro-Arcsecond Metrology testbed (MAM) is the ground-based testbed that incorporates all the functionalities of SIM minus the telescope, for mission-enabling technology development and verification. MAM employs a laser heterodyne metrology system using the Sub-Aperture Vertex-to-Vertex (SAVV) concept. In this paper, we describe the development and modification of the SAVV metrology launchers and the metrology instrument electronics, precision alignments and pointing control, locating cyclic error sources in the MAM testbed and methods to mitigate the cyclic errors, as well as the performance under the MAM performance metrics.

  5. Power system monitoring and source control of the Space Station Freedom DC power system testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kimnach, Greg L.; Baez, Anastacio N.

    1992-01-01

    Unlike a terrestrial electric utility which can purchase power from a neighboring utility, the Space Station Freedom (SSF) has strictly limited energy resources; as a result, source control, system monitoring, system protection, and load management are essential to the safe and efficient operation of the SSF Electric Power System (EPS). These functions are being evaluated in the DC Power Management and Distribution (PMAD) Testbed which NASA LeRC has developed at the Power System Facility (PSF) located in Cleveland, Ohio. The testbed is an ideal platform to develop, integrate, and verify power system monitoring and control algorithms. State Estimation (SE) is a monitoring tool used extensively in terrestrial electric utilities to ensure safe power system operation. It uses redundant system information to calculate the actual state of the EPS, to isolate faulty sensors, to determine source operating points, to verify faults detected by subsidiary controllers, and to identify high impedance faults. Source control and monitoring safeguard the power generation and storage subsystems and ensure that the power system operates within safe limits while satisfying user demands with minimal interruptions. System monitoring functions, in coordination with hardware implemented schemes, provide for a complete fault protection system. The objective of this paper is to overview the development and integration of the state estimator and the source control algorithms.

  6. Transient Modeling of the NETL Hybrid Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Facility and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ferrari, M.L. (Università di Genova, Genova, Italy); Liese, E.A.; Tucker, D.A.; Lawson, L.O.; Traverso, A. (Università di Genova, Genova, Italy); Massardo, A.F. (Università di Genova, Genova, Italy)

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the experimental validation of two different transient models of the hybrid fuel cell/gas turbine facility of the U.S. DOE-NETL at Morgantown. The first part of this work is devoted to the description of the facility, designed to experimentally investigate these plants with real components, except the fuel cell. The behavior of the SOFC is obtained with apt volumes (for the stack and the off-gas burner) and using a combustor to generate similar thermal effects. The second part of this paper shows the facility real-time transient model developed at the U.S. DOE-NETL and the detailed transient modeling activity using the TRANSEO program developed at TPG. The results obtained with both models are successfully compared with the experimental data of two different load step decreases. The more detailed model agrees more closely with the experimental data, which, of course, is more time consuming than the real-time model (the detailed model operates with a calculation over calculated time ratio around 6). Finally, the TPG model has been used to discuss the importance of performance map precision for both compressor and turbine. This is an important analysis to better understand the steady-state difference between the two models

  7. Transient Modeling of the NETL Hybrid Fuel Cell/Gas Turbine Facility and Experimental Validation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mario L. Ferrari; Eric Liese; David Tucker; Larry Lawson; Alberto Traverso; Aristide F. Massardo

    2007-10-01

    This paper describes the experimental validation of two different transient models of the hybrid fuel cell/gas turbine facility of the U.S. DOE-NETL at Morgantown. The first part of this work is devoted to the description of the facility, designed to experimentally investigate these plants with real components, except the fuel cell. The behavior of the SOFC is obtained with apt volumes (for the stack and the off-gas burner) and using a combustor to generate similar thermal effects. The second part of this paper shows the facility real-time transient model developed at the U.S. DOE-NETL and the detailed transient modeling activity using the TRANSEO program developed at TPG. The results obtained with both models are successfully compared with the experimental data of two different load step decreases. The more detailed model agrees more closely with the experimental data, which, of course, is more time consuming than the real-time model (the detailed model operates with a calculation over calculated time ratio around 6). Finally, the TPG model has been used to discuss the importance of performance map precision for both compressor and turbine. This is an important analysis to better understand the steady-state difference between the two models.

  8. Procuring Stationary Fuel Cells For CHP: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, David P [ORNL; McGervey, Joseph [SRA International, Inc.; Curran, Scott [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    Federal agency leaders are expressing growing interest in using innovative fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) technology at their sites, motivated by both executive branch sustainability targets and a desire to lead by example in the transition to a clean energy economy. Fuel cell CHP can deliver reliable electricity and heat with 70% to 85% efficiency. Implementing this technology can be a high efficiency, clean energy solution for agencies striving to meet ambitious sustainability requirements with limited budgets. Fuel cell CHP systems can use natural gas or renewable fuels, such as biogas. Procuring Stationary Fuel Cells for CHP: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers presents an overview of the process for planning and implementing a fuel cell CHP project in a concise, step-by-step format. This guide is designed to help agency leaders turn their interest in fuel cell technology into successful installations. This guide concentrates on larger (100 kW and greater) fuel cell CHP systems and does not consider other fuel cell applications such as cars, forklifts, backup power supplies or small generators (<100 kW). Because fuel cell technologies are rapidly evolving and have high up front costs, their deployment poses unique challenges. The electrical and thermal output of the CHP system must be integrated with the building s energy systems. Innovative financing mechanisms allow agencies to make a make versus buy decision to maximize savings. This guide outlines methods that federal agencies may use to procure fuel cell CHP systems with little or no capital investment. Each agency and division, however, has its own set of procurement procedures. This guide was written as a starting point, and it defers to the reader s set of rules if differences exist. The fuel cell industry is maturing, and project developers are gaining experience in working with federal agencies. Technology improvements, cost reductions, and experienced project developers are making

  9. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of Hot Cell Facilities in the United States and Comparison with the Studsvik Facility for Solid and Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Geoff; Rusch, Chris [NAC International, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2006-07-15

    This report presents the plans, processes and results of the decontamination and decommissioning of the Hot Cell Facility in Building 23 at the General Atomics Torrey Pines Mesa Facility (HCF) and compares the program and cost of decommissioning HCF with the Swedish cost estimate for decontamination and decommissioning of the HM hot cell and wastes treatment facility at Studsvik in Sweden. The HCF had three main hot cells and was licensed to: Receive, handle and ship radioactive materials; Remotely handle, examine and store irradiated fuel materials; Extract tritium (engineering scale); Support new reactor production development; Develop, fabricate and inspect UO{sub 2} - BeO fuel materials. The HM facility in Studsvik was constructed to handle and package medium-active solid and liquid wastes, prior to disposal. Central to the facility is a conventional hot cell including three work stations, serviced by master slave manipulators. Other parts of the facility include holding tanks for liquid wastes and slurries, a centrifuge room, as well as an encapsulation station where drummed wastes can be encapsulated in cement, offices, laboratories and workshops and so on, as well as building and cell ventilation systems. Decontamination and decommissioning of the HCF took place during 1993 through 2001. The objective was to obtain regulatory release of the site so that it could be used on an unrestricted basis. Based on data from extensive hazardous and radiological materials characterization, GA evaluated four decommissioning options and selected dismantling as the only option that would satisfy the decommissioning objective. The decontamination and decommissioning scope included the following actions. 1. Remove the legacy waste that consisted of radioactive wastes stored at the HCF consisting of 21,434 kg of irradiated fuel material (IFM) that was owned by the US DoE and store the waste in temporary storage set up at the GA site. 2. Actual Decontamination and

  10. Facile Synthesis of Biocompatible Fluorescent Nanoparticles for Cellular Imaging and Targeted Detection of Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Fu; Wang, Chun; Wang, Xiaoyu; Li, Lidong

    2015-11-18

    In this work, we report the facile synthesis of functional core-shell structured nanoparticles with fluorescence enhancement, which show specific targeting of cancer cells. Biopolymer poly-l-lysine was used to coat the silver core with various shell thicknesses. Then, the nanoparticles were functionalized with folic acid as a targeting agent for folic acid receptor. The metal-enhanced fluorescence effect was observed when the fluorophore (5-(and-6)-carboxyfluorescein-succinimidyl ester) was conjugated to the modified nanoparticle surface. Cellular imaging assay of the nanoparticles in folic acid receptor-positive cancer cells showed their excellent biocompatibility and selectivity. The as-prepared functional nanoparticles demonstrate the efficiency of the metal-enhanced fluorescence effect and provide an alternative approach for the cellular imaging and targeting of cancer cells.

  11. Cryogenic stopping cell for photofission fragments at the ELI-NP facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, P., E-mail: paul.constantin@eli-np.ro; Balabanski, D. L. [ELI-NP, IFIN-HH, Str. Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Cuong, P. V. [Centre of Nuclear Physics, Institute of Physics, No. 10, Daotan, Thu le, Badinh, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2015-10-15

    The brilliant gamma beam at the future Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility will be used to generate a beam of exotic neutron-rich isotopes via photofission of actinide targets. We present simulations with the Geant4 toolkit of the photofission process for the design and optimization of the expected performance parameters of the Cryogenic Stopping Cell (CSC). The CSC will be used to extract the photofission fragments into the secondary beam of about 10{sup 6} ions/s. We propose an experimental program to study refractory neutron-rich isotopes.

  12. Development and application of PIE apparatuses in Tokai hot cell facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amano, Hidetoshi; Kodaira, Tsuneo; Sukegawa, Tomohide [Department of Hot Laboratories, Tokai Research Establishment, Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-08-01

    The Department of Hot Laboratories (DHL) operates three hot cell facilities, which are the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF), the Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) and the Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF). The RFEF is especially examining the reliability of actual power reactor fuel assemblies for PWR and BWR. The RHL is established to perform post irradiation examinations (PIEs) for fuels and materials irradiated in research and test reactors. In the WASTEF, Synroc and new ceramic waste forms were prepared and investigated for the safety disposal of high level radioactive waste. At present, one of concentrated works is the PIE of high burnup fuels, for which the RFEF improved and developed several apparatuses such as thermal properties measurement and microscopic analysis. The other is the PIE concerning with studies of component aging and structural reliability, for which the charpy impact-testing machine is instrumented and a low-cycle and high-cycle fatigue test apparatus is now under developing in the RHL. This paper describes these development and application of PIE apparatuses in DHL. (author)

  13. ASE-BAN, a Wireless Body Area Network Testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens Kargaard; Karstoft, Henrik; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg;

    2010-01-01

    /actuators attached to the body and a host server application. The gateway uses the BlackFin BF533 processor from Analog Devices, and uses Bluetooth for wireless communication. Two types of sensors are attached to the network: an electro-cardio-gram sensor and an oximeter sensor. The testbed has been successfully...

  14. Smart Antenna UKM Testbed for Digital Beamforming System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Islam, Mohammad Tariqul; Misran, Norbahiah; Yatim, Baharudin

    2009-12-01

    A new design of smart antenna testbed developed at UKM for digital beamforming purpose is proposed. The smart antenna UKM testbed developed based on modular design employing two novel designs of L-probe fed inverted hybrid E-H (LIEH) array antenna and software reconfigurable digital beamforming system (DBS). The antenna is developed based on using the novel LIEH microstrip patch element design arranged into [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] uniform linear array antenna. An interface board is designed to interface to the ADC board with the RF front-end receiver. The modular concept of the system provides the capability to test the antenna hardware, beamforming unit, and beamforming algorithm in an independent manner, thus allowing the smart antenna system to be developed and tested in parallel, hence reduces the design time. The DBS was developed using a high-performance [InlineEquation not available: see fulltext.] floating-point DSP board and a 4-channel RF front-end receiver developed in-house. An interface board is designed to interface to the ADC board with the RF front-end receiver. A four-element receiving array testbed at 1.88-2.22 GHz frequency is constructed, and digital beamforming on this testbed is successfully demonstrated.

  15. Design and Prototyping of a Satellite Antenna Slew Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-12-01

    curriculum and Dr. Frank Giraldo, which wholly provided the knowledge that culminated in a masterpiece thesis; specifically Dr. Jennifer Rhatigan...Lagrange Equation • Step 3: Construct the Adjoint Equation • Step 4: Establish the Transversality Condition 62 The above steps frame the testbed

  16. END-TO-END INDIA-UK TRANSNATIONAL WIRELESS TESTBED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rohit Budhiraja

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Communication is a fast growing technology area where tremendous amount of research is ongoing. It is also an area where the use of technology in the market has seen wide and far-reaching impact. The India-UK Advanced Technology Centre initiative is a collaborative research project between various institutes and companies across UK and India, which envisages, apart from several research outcomes, putting in place of a support infrastructure for facilitating R&D of Next Generation networks, Systems and Services. As part of this project, an end-to-end trans-national advanced wireless testbed is being developed which will facilitate and support research and implementation of new ideas, concepts and technologies. The testbed will provide a framework which can be used to rapidly prototype and evaluate emerging concepts and technologies, and enables researchers to investigate/demonstrate the feasibility of new ideas in a realistic test environment. The testbed complements analytical and simulation based studies undertaken as part of the initial study when new ideas are proposed. This paper gives the details of the testbed and shows how a 4G technology like LTE has been implemented as one of the realisations of the test bed.

  17. Towards a Perpetual Sensor Network Testbed without Backchannel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Aslak; Bonnet, Philippe; Sørensen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The sensor network testbeds available today rely on a communication channel different from the mote radio - a backchannel - to facilitate mote reprogramming, health monitoring and performance analysis. Such backchannels are either supported as wired communication channels (USB or Ethernet), or vi...

  18. Smart Antenna UKM Testbed for Digital Beamforming System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available A new design of smart antenna testbed developed at UKM for digital beamforming purpose is proposed. The smart antenna UKM testbed developed based on modular design employing two novel designs of L-probe fed inverted hybrid E-H (LIEH array antenna and software reconfigurable digital beamforming system (DBS. The antenna is developed based on using the novel LIEH microstrip patch element design arranged into 4×1 uniform linear array antenna. An interface board is designed to interface to the ADC board with the RF front-end receiver. The modular concept of the system provides the capability to test the antenna hardware, beamforming unit, and beamforming algorithm in an independent manner, thus allowing the smart antenna system to be developed and tested in parallel, hence reduces the design time. The DBS was developed using a high-performance TMS320C6711TM floating-point DSP board and a 4-channel RF front-end receiver developed in-house. An interface board is designed to interface to the ADC board with the RF front-end receiver. A four-element receiving array testbed at 1.88–2.22 GHz frequency is constructed, and digital beamforming on this testbed is successfully demonstrated.

  19. One-Step Facile Synthesis of a Simple Hole Transport Material for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hu

    2016-04-04

    A hole transporting material was designed for use in perovskite solar cells, with a facile one-step synthesis from inexpensive, com-mercially available reagents. The molecule comprises a central fluorinated phenyl core with pendant aryl amines, namely, 3,6-difluoro-N1,N1,N2,N2,N4,N4,N5,N5-octakis(4-methoxyphenyl)benzene-1,2,4,5-tetraamine (DFTAB). A power conversion efficiency of up to 10.4% was achieved in a mesoporous perovskite device architecture. The merits of a simple and potentially low cost syn-thetic route as well as promising performance in perovskite devices, encourages further development of this materials class as new low-cost hole transporting materials for the scale up of perovskite solar cells.

  20. A recoverable gas-cell diagnostic for the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratkiewicz, A.; Berzak Hopkins, L.; Bleuel, D. L.; Bernstein, L. A.; van Bibber, K.; Cassata, W. S.; Goldblum, B. L.; Siem, S.; Velsko, C. A.; Wiedeking, M.; Yeamans, C. B.

    2016-11-01

    The high-fluence neutron spectrum produced by the National Ignition Facility (NIF) provides an opportunity to measure the activation of materials by fast-spectrum neutrons. A new large-volume gas-cell diagnostic has been designed and qualified to measure the activation of gaseous substances at the NIF. This in-chamber diagnostic is recoverable, reusable and has been successfully fielded. Data from the qualification of the diagnostic have been used to benchmark an Monte Carlo N-Particle Transport Code simulation describing the downscattered neutron spectrum seen by the gas cell. We present early results from the use of this diagnostic to measure the activation of natXe and discuss future work to study the strength of interactions between plasma and nuclei.

  1. Conceptual design of the hot cell facility universal docking station at ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, A., E-mail: alexis.dammann@iter.org [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Benchikhoune, M.; Friconneau, J.P.; Ivanov, V. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lemee, A. [SOGETI High Tech, 180 Rue Rene Descartes, 13851 Aix en Provence (France); Martins, J.P. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Tamassy, G. [SOGETI High Tech, 180 Rue Rene Descartes, 13851 Aix en Provence (France)

    2011-10-15

    Between main shutdowns of the ITER machine, in-vessel components and Iter Remote Maintenance System (IRMS) are transferred between the Tokamak complex and the Hot Cell Facility using different types of sealed casks. Transfer Casks have different physical interfaces with the Vacuum Vessel, which need to be the same at the docking stations of the HCF. It means that in-vessel components and IRMS are cleaned in the same cells, which is in fact not convenient. Furthermore, logistic studies showed that the use rate of the cells is very inhomogeneous. In order to have dedicated cell for decontamination of Remote Handling tools, in order to increase the operability efficiency and to removes the hot cell docking operation from the critical path, the concept of a universal docking station has been investigated. Based on an existing design, the work was focused on a review of requirements, the re-design and the integration within the HCF layout. The universal docking station has been proposed and is now integrated in HCF design.

  2. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of Hot Cell Facilities in the United States and Comparison with the Studsvik Facility for Solid and Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Geoff; Rusch, Chris [NAC International, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2006-07-15

    This report presents the plans, processes and results of the decontamination and decommissioning of the Hot Cell Facility in Building 23 at the General Atomics Torrey Pines Mesa Facility (HCF) and compares the program and cost of decommissioning HCF with the Swedish cost estimate for decontamination and decommissioning of the HM hot cell and wastes treatment facility at Studsvik in Sweden. The HCF had three main hot cells and was licensed to: Receive, handle and ship radioactive materials; Remotely handle, examine and store irradiated fuel materials; Extract tritium (engineering scale); Support new reactor production development; Develop, fabricate and inspect UO{sub 2} - BeO fuel materials. The HM facility in Studsvik was constructed to handle and package medium-active solid and liquid wastes, prior to disposal. Central to the facility is a conventional hot cell including three work stations, serviced by master slave manipulators. Other parts of the facility include holding tanks for liquid wastes and slurries, a centrifuge room, as well as an encapsulation station where drummed wastes can be encapsulated in cement, offices, laboratories and workshops and so on, as well as building and cell ventilation systems. Decontamination and decommissioning of the HCF took place during 1993 through 2001. The objective was to obtain regulatory release of the site so that it could be used on an unrestricted basis. Based on data from extensive hazardous and radiological materials characterization, GA evaluated four decommissioning options and selected dismantling as the only option that would satisfy the decommissioning objective. The decontamination and decommissioning scope included the following actions. 1. Remove the legacy waste that consisted of radioactive wastes stored at the HCF consisting of 21,434 kg of irradiated fuel material (IFM) that was owned by the US DoE and store the waste in temporary storage set up at the GA site. 2. Actual Decontamination and

  3. A hot-cell facility for waste management studies at the J. R. C. Ispra establishment (Italy)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hunt, B.A.; Dworschak, H.; Bertelli, S.; Magni, G.; Girardi, F.; Nannicini, R.

    1989-06-01

    The hot-cell facility, constructed and commissioned at the Joint Research Centre of the European Communities, Ispra (Italy), will be utilised for research on radioactive waste management with emphasis on verification, demonstration and optimization of concepts already under study. The facility will produce various types of fully active waste in order to verify potentially suitable process modes to minimize waste production and improve waste quality in function of both effectiveness and safety of final disposal.

  4. Development of a facility for high-precision irradiation of cells with carbon ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goethem, Marc-Jan van; Niemantsverdriet, Maarten; Brandenburg, Sytze; Langendijk, Johannes A.; Coppes, Robert P.; Luijk, Peter van [Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, A. Deusinglaan 1, 9713AV Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands); Kernfysisch Versneller Instituut, University of Groningen, Zernikelaan 25, 9747AA Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Cell Biology, Section of Radiation and Stress Cell Biology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, A. Deusinglaan 1, 9713AV Groningen (Netherlands); Department of Radiation Oncology, University Medical Center Groningen, University of Groningen, P.O. Box 30001, 9700RB Groningen (Netherlands)

    2011-01-15

    Purpose: Compared to photons, using particle radiation in radiotherapy reduces the dose and irradiated volume of normal tissues, potentially reducing side effects. The biological effect of dose deposited by particles such as carbon ions, however, differs from that of dose deposited by photons. The inaccuracy in models to estimate the biological effects of particle radiation remains the most important source of uncertainties in particle therapy. Improving this requires high-precision studies on biological effects of particle radiation. Therefore, the authors aimed to develop a facility for reproducible and high-precision carbon-ion irradiation of cells in culture. The combined dose nonuniformity in the lateral and longitudinal direction should not exceed {+-}1.5%. Dose to the cells from particles than other carbon ions should not exceed 5%. Methods: A uniform lateral dose distribution was realized using a single scatter foil and quadrupole magnets. A modulator wheel was used to create a uniform longitudinal dose distribution. The choice of beam energy and the optimal design of these components was determined using GEANT4 and SRIM Monte Carlo simulations. Verification of the uniformity of the dose distribution was performed using a scintillating screen (lateral) and a water phantom (longitudinal). The reproducibility of dose delivery between experiments was assessed by repeated measurements of the spatial dose distribution. Moreover, the reproducibility of dose-response measurements was tested by measuring the survival of irradiated HEK293 cells in three independent experiments. Results: The relative contribution of dose from nuclear reaction fragments to the sample was found to be <5% when using 90 MeV/u carbon ions. This energy still allows accurate dosimetry conforming to the IAEA Report TRS-398, facilitating comparison to dose-effect data obtained with other radiation qualities. A 1.3 mm long spread-out Bragg peak with a diameter of 30 mm was created, allowing

  5. Deployment, Commissioning and Operation of Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells in the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, P A; Ollis, C W; Hinz, A; Robb, C; Primdahl, K A; Watson, J J; O' Brien, M D; Funkhouser, W G; Biltoft, P J; Shelton, R T; Tapley, W C; DeHope, W J

    2003-12-01

    Large aperture Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPCs) are an enabling technology in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Pockels cells allow the NIF laser to take advantage of multipass main amplifier architecture, thus reducing costs and physical size of the facility. Each Pockels cell comprises four 40-cm x 40-cm apertures arranged in a 4 x 1 array. The combination of the Pockels cell and a thin-film polarizer, also configured in a 4 x 1 array, forms an optical switch that is key to achieving the required multi-pass operation. The operation of the PEPC is a follows: Before the arrival of the laser pulse, optically transparent, low-density helium plasmas are initiated to serve as electrodes for the KDP crystals mounted in the Pockels cell. During beam propagation through the main laser cavity a longitudinal electric field is impressed on the electro-optic crystals. The polarization of the propagating beams is rotated by 90{sup o} on each of two passes, thereby allowing the beam to be trapped in the main laser amplifier cavity for a total of four passes before being switched out into the cavity spatial filter. The physics aspects of the PEPC are well documented. Consequently, this paper will emphasize the PEPC subsystem in the context of its role and relevance within the broader NIF laser system, provide a view of the complexity of the subsystem and give an overview of PEPC's interactions with other elements of NIF, including interfaces to the Beamline Infrastructure, the NIF Timing Subsystem, and the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS); along with dependence on the Optics Production, Transport and Handling (T&H), and Assembly, Integration and Refurbishment (AIR) and Operations organizations. Further, we will discuss implementation details related to the functional blocks and individual components that comprise PEPC, with particular emphasis on the unique constraints placed on the elements and the

  6. Facile Discovery of Cell-Surface Protein Targets of Cancer Cell Aptamers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bing, Tao; Shangguan, Dihua; Wang, Yinsheng

    2015-10-01

    Cancer biomarker discovery constitutes a frontier in cancer research. In recent years, cell-binding aptamers have become useful molecular probes for biomarker discovery. However, there are few successful examples, and the critical barrier resides in the identification of the cell-surface protein targets for the aptamers, where only a limited number of aptamer targets have been identified so far. Herein, we developed a universal SILAC-based quantitative proteomic method for target discovery of cell-binding aptamers. The method allowed for distinguishing specific aptamer-binding proteins from nonspecific proteins based on abundance ratios of proteins bound to aptamer-carrying bait and control bait. In addition, we employed fluorescently labeled aptamers for monitoring and optimizing the binding conditions. We were able to identify and validate selectin L and integrin α4 as the protein targets for two previously reported aptamers, Sgc-3b and Sgc-4e, respectively. This strategy should be generally applicable for the discovery of protein targets for other cell-binding aptamers, which will promote the applications of these aptamers.

  7. "WBC over DVB-H" Testbed Design, Development and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhanlin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The wireless billboard channels (WBCs are integral part of the ubiquitous consumer wireless world (UCWW—a wireless next generation network proposal. The WBCs are used by the service providers to broadcast advertisements of their (wireless services to the mobile terminals so that the mobile users may discover and associate with the "best" services following the user-driven ''always best connected and best served'' paradigm. A three-layer system architecture of WBCs established over the digital video broadcasting-handheld (DVB-H standard is presented. The design and development of a corresponding ''WBC over DVB-H'' experimental testbed are described. Various results obtained from the testbed are presented and explained.

  8. Collaboration in a Wireless Grid Innovation Testbed by Virtual Consortium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Treglia, Joseph; Ramnarine-Rieks, Angela; McKnight, Lee

    This paper describes the formation of the Wireless Grid Innovation Testbed (WGiT) coordinated by a virtual consortium involving academic and non-academic entities. Syracuse University and Virginia Tech are primary university partners with several other academic, government, and corporate partners. Objectives include: 1) coordinating knowledge sharing, 2) defining key parameters for wireless grids network applications, 3) dynamically connecting wired and wireless devices, content and users, 4) linking to VT-CORNET, Virginia Tech Cognitive Radio Network Testbed, 5) forming ad hoc networks or grids of mobile and fixed devices without a dedicated server, 6) deepening understanding of wireless grid application, device, network, user and market behavior through academic, trade and popular publications including online media, 7) identifying policy that may enable evaluated innovations to enter US and international markets and 8) implementation and evaluation of the international virtual collaborative process.

  9. A MIMO-OFDM Testbed for Wireless Local Area Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Conrat Jean-Marc

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe the design steps and final implementation of a MIMO OFDM prototype platform developed to enhance the performance of wireless LAN standards such as HiperLAN/2 and 802.11, using multiple transmit and multiple receive antennas. We first describe the channel measurement campaign used to characterize the indoor operational propagation environment, and analyze the influence of the channel on code design through a ray-tracing channel simulator. We also comment on some antenna and RF issues which are of importance for the final realization of the testbed. Multiple coding, decoding, and channel estimation strategies are discussed and their respective performance-complexity trade-offs are evaluated over the realistic channel obtained from the propagation studies. Finally, we present the design methodology, including cross-validation of the Matlab, C++, and VHDL components, and the final demonstrator architecture. We highlight the increased measured performance of the MIMO testbed over the single-antenna system.

  10. A MIMO-OFDM Testbed for Wireless Local Area Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fàbregas, Albert Guilléni; Guillaud, Maxime; Slock, Dirk TM; Caire, Giuseppe; Gosse, Karine; Rouquette, Stéphanie; Dias, Alexandre Ribeiro; Bernardin, Philippe; Miet, Xavier; Conrat, Jean-Marc; Toutain, Yann; Peden, Alain; Li, Zaiqing

    2006-12-01

    We describe the design steps and final implementation of a MIMO OFDM prototype platform developed to enhance the performance of wireless LAN standards such as HiperLAN/2 and 802.11, using multiple transmit and multiple receive antennas. We first describe the channel measurement campaign used to characterize the indoor operational propagation environment, and analyze the influence of the channel on code design through a ray-tracing channel simulator. We also comment on some antenna and RF issues which are of importance for the final realization of the testbed. Multiple coding, decoding, and channel estimation strategies are discussed and their respective performance-complexity trade-offs are evaluated over the realistic channel obtained from the propagation studies. Finally, we present the design methodology, including cross-validation of the Matlab, C++, and VHDL components, and the final demonstrator architecture. We highlight the increased measured performance of the MIMO testbed over the single-antenna system.

  11. Development of a Testbed for Wireless Underground Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet C. Vuran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Underground Sensor Networks (WUSNs constitute one of the promising application areas of the recently developed wireless sensor networking techniques. WUSN is a specialized kind of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN that mainly focuses on the use of sensors that communicate through soil. Recent models for the wireless underground communication channel are proposed but few field experiments were realized to verify the accuracy of the models. The realization of field WUSN experiments proved to be extremely complex and time-consuming in comparison with the traditional wireless environment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that proposes guidelines for the development of an outdoor WUSN testbed with the goals of improving the accuracy and reducing of time for WUSN experiments. Although the work mainly aims WUSNs, many of the presented practices can also be applied to generic WSN testbeds.

  12. Injectable, Biomolecule-Responsive Polypeptide Hydrogels for Cell Encapsulation and Facile Cell Recovery through Triggered Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinghua; He, Chaoliang; Zhang, Zhen; Ren, Kaixuan; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-11-16

    Injectable hydrogels have been widely investigated in biomedical applications, and increasing demand has been proposed to achieve dynamic regulation of physiological properties of hydrogels. Herein, a new type of injectable and biomolecule-responsive hydrogel based on poly(l-glutamic acid) (PLG) grafted with disulfide bond-modified phloretic acid (denoted as PLG-g-CPA) was developed. The hydrogels formed in situ via enzymatic cross-linking under physiological conditions in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide. The physiochemical properties of the hydrogels, including gelation time and the rheological property, were measured. Particularly, the triggered degradation of the hydrogel in response to a reductive biomolecule, glutathione (GSH), was investigated in detail. The mechanical strength and inner porous structure of the hydrogel were influenced by the addition of GSH. The polypeptide hydrogel was used as a three-dimensional (3D) platform for cell encapsulation, which could release the cells through triggered disruption of the hydrogel in response to the addition of GSH. The cells released from the hydrogel were found to maintain high viability. Moreover, after subcutaneous injection into rats, the PLG-g-CPA hydrogels with disulfide-containing cross-links exhibited a markedly faster degradation behavior in vivo compared to that of the PLG hydrogels without disulfide cross-links, implying an interesting accelerated degradation process of the disulfide-containing polypeptide hydrogels in the physiological environment in vivo. Overall, the injectable and biomolecule-responsive polypeptide hydrogels may serve as a potential platform for 3D cell culture and easy cell collection.

  13. Remotely Accessible Testbed for Software Defined Radio Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, James P.; Lang, Minh; Peters, Kenneth J.; Taylor, Gregory H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous development testbeds have assumed that the developer was physically present in front of the hardware being used. No provision for remote operation of basic functions (power on/off or reset) was made, because the developer/operator was sitting in front of the hardware, and could just push the button manually. In this innovation, a completely remotely accessible testbed has been created, with all diagnostic equipment and tools set up for remote access, and using standardized interfaces so that failed equipment can be quickly replaced. In this testbed, over 95% of the operating hours were used for testing without the developer being physically present. The testbed includes a pair of personal computers, one running Linux and one running Windows. A variety of peripherals is connected via Ethernet and USB (universal serial bus) interfaces. A private internal Ethernet is used to connect to test instruments and other devices, so that the sole connection to the outside world is via the two PCs. An important design consideration was that all of the instruments and interfaces used stable, long-lived industry standards, such as Ethernet, USB, and GPIB (general purpose interface bus). There are no plug-in cards for the two PCs, so there are no problems with finding replacement computers with matching interfaces, device drivers, and installation. The only thing unique to the two PCs is the locally developed software, which is not specific to computer or operating system version. If a device (including one of the computers) were to fail or become unavailable (e.g., a test instrument needed to be recalibrated), replacing it is a straightforward process with a standard, off-the-shelf device.

  14. Induction cell breakdown experiments for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Earley, L.M.; Barnes, G.A.; Eversole, S.A.; Kauppila, T.J.; Keel, G.; Liska, D.J.; Moir, D.C.; Parsons, W.M.; Rader, D.C.

    1991-01-01

    Linear induction cells for the Dual-Axis Radiographic Hydrotest (DARHT) Facility have been tested to determine their high-voltage breakdown characteristics. A variety of full scale insulators were tested both in actual cells and in fixtures simulating induction cells. All insulators were constructed using cross-linked polystyrene (Rexolite). High-voltage pulses up to 550 kV were applied to the insulators using both a 60-ns pulse Blumlein and a 200-ns pulse cable Marx. Two different vacuum gaps were used in these tests, 1.46 and 1.91 cm. The tests were performed at various vacuum levels ranging from 1 {times} 10{sup {minus}6} to 5 {times} 10{sup {minus}8} torr. Breakdown tests of the insulators were also performed with an electron beam generated in the vacuum gap through the use of a velvet emitter. The gap voltage and current were measured using calibrated E-dot and B-dot probes. 15 refs., 7 figs.

  15. Easy as Pi: A Network Coding Raspberry Pi Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chres W. Sørensen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available In the near future, upcoming communications and storage networks are expected to tolerate major difficulties produced by huge amounts of data being generated from the Internet of Things (IoT. For these types of networks, strategies and mechanisms based on network coding have appeared as an alternative to overcome these difficulties in a holistic manner, e.g., without sacrificing the benefit of a given network metric when improving another. There has been recurrent issues on: (i making large-scale deployments akin to the Internet of Things; (ii assessing and (iii replicating the obtained results in preliminary studies. Therefore, finding testbeds that can deal with large-scale deployments and not lose historic data in order to evaluate these mechanisms are greatly needed and desirable from a research perspective. However, this can be hard to manage, not only due to the inherent costs of the hardware, but also due to maintenance challenges. In this paper, we present the required key steps to design, setup and maintain an inexpensive testbed using Raspberry Pi devices for communications and storage networks with network coding capabilities. This testbed can be utilized for any applications requiring results replicability.

  16. Fading testbed for free-space optical communications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shrestha, Amita; Giggenbach, Dirk; Mustafa, Ahmad; Pacheco-Labrador, Jorge; Ramirez, Julio; Rein, Fabian

    2016-10-01

    Free-space optical (FSO) communication is a very attractive technology offering very high throughput without spectral regulation constraints, yet allowing small antennas (telescopes) and tap-proof communication. However, the transmitted signal has to travel through the atmosphere where it gets influenced by atmospheric turbulence, causing scintillation of the received signal. In addition, climatic effects like fogs, clouds and rain also affect the signal significantly. Moreover, FSO being a line of sight communication requires precise pointing and tracking of the telescopes, which otherwise also causes fading. To achieve error-free transmission, various mitigation techniques like aperture averaging, adaptive optics, transmitter diversity, sophisticated coding and modulation schemes are being investigated and implemented. Evaluating the performance of such systems under controlled conditions is very difficult in field trials since the atmospheric situation constantly changes, and the target scenario (e.g. on aircraft or satellites) is not easily accessible for test purposes. Therefore, with the motivation to be able to test and verify a system under laboratory conditions, DLR has developed a fading testbed that can emulate most realistic channel conditions. The main principle of the fading testbed is to control the input current of a variable optical attenuator such that it attenuates the incoming signal according to the loaded power vector. The sampling frequency and mean power of the vector can be optionally changed according to requirements. This paper provides a brief introduction to software and hardware development of the fading testbed and measurement results showing its accuracy and application scenarios.

  17. ATLAS and CMS applications on the WorldGrid testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Ciaschini, V; Fanzago, F; Verlato, M; Vaccarossa, L; Donno, F; Garbellotto, V

    2003-01-01

    WorldGrid is an intercontinental testbed spanning Europe and the US integrating architecturally different Grid implementations based on the Globus toolkit. It has been developed in the context of the DataTAG and iVDGL projects, and successfully demonstrated during the WorldGrid demos at IST2002 (Copenhagen) and SC2002 (Baltimore). Two HEP experiments, ATLAS and CMS, successful exploited the WorldGrid testbed for executing jobs simulating the response of their detectors to physics eve nts produced by real collisions expected at the LHC accelerator starting from 2007. This data intensive activity has been run since many years on local dedicated computing farms consisting of hundreds of nodes and Terabytes of disk and tape storage. Within the WorldGrid testbed, for the first time HEP simulation jobs were submitted and run indifferently on US and European resources, despite of their underlying different Grid implementations, and produced data which could be retrieved and further analysed on the submitting machine...

  18. Visible Nulling Coronagraphy Testbed Development for Exoplanet Detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Woodruff, Robert A.; Vasudevan, Gopal; Thompson, Patrick; Chen, Andrew; Petrone, Peter; Booth, Andrew; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Melnick, Gary; Tolls, Volker

    2010-01-01

    Three of the recently completed NASA Astrophysics Strategic Mission Concept (ASMC) studies addressed the feasibility of using a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) as the prime instrument for exoplanet science. The VNC approach is one of the few approaches that works with filled, segmented and sparse or diluted aperture telescope systems and thus spans the space of potential ASMC exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance the this approach and the technologies associated with it. Herein we report on the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). The VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under high bandwidth closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible light nulling milestones of sequentially higher contrasts of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D and ultimately culminate in spectrally broadband (>20%) high contrast imaging. Each of the milestones, one per year, is traceable to one or more of the ASMC studies. The VNT uses a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, modified with a modified "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. Discussed will be the optical configuration laboratory results, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  19. Cell Locating with the Image Analysis System of the CAS-LIBB Single-Particle Microbeam Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiaohua; Wang Shaohu; Yu Zengliang

    2005-01-01

    A single-particle microbeam facility has been constructed at the Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering (LIBB), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). At the CAS-LIBB microbeam facility, we have developed protocols to place exact numbers of charged particles through nuclear centroids of cells, at defined positions in the cytoplasm relative to the nucleus, and through defined fractions of cells in a population. In this paper, we address the methods for nucleus, cytoplasm and bystander (either a single or an exact number of ions is delivered to a certain percentage of cells in a population to study the bystander effects of radiation) irradiation in detail from the precision of target finding and cell locating in the image analysis system. Moreover, for cells touching slightly in an image, a watershed method is used to separate these touching objects;after that, the number of objects in an image is counted accurately and the irradiation points are located precisely.

  20. Testbed for Wireless Vehicle Communication: a Simulation Approach based on Three-Phase Traffic Theory

    OpenAIRE

    Kerner, B. S.; Klenov, S. L.; Brakemeier, A.

    2007-01-01

    A testbed for wireless vehicle communication based on a microscopic model in the framework of three-phase traffic theory is presented. In this testbed, vehicle motion in traffic flow and analyses of a vehicle communication channel access based on IEEE 802.11e mechanisms, radio propagation modeling, message reception characteristics as well as all other effects associated with ad-hoc networks are integrated into a three-phase traffic flow model. Based on simulations of this testbed, some stati...

  1. CHARACTERIZING DOE HANFORD SITE WASTE ENCAPSULATION STORAGE FACILITY CELLS USING RADBALL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Coleman, R.

    2011-03-31

    RadBall{trademark} is a novel technology that can locate and quantify unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semi-sphere. The collimator has a number of small holes with tungsten inserts; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semi-sphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data using a reverse ray tracing or backprojection technique provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} was originally designed for dry deployments and several tests, completed at Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, substantiate its modeled capabilities. This study involves the investigation of the RadBall{trademark} technology during four submerged deployments in two water filled cells at the DOE Hanford Site's Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility.

  2. Hot cell renovation in the spent fuel conditioning process facility at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Seung Nam; Lee, Jong Kwang; Park, Byung Suk; Cho, Il Je; Kim, Ki Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-10-15

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process facility (ACPF) of the irradiated materials examination facility (IMEF) at the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute (KAERI) has been renovated to implement a lab scale electrolytic reduction process for pyroprocessing. The interior and exterior structures of the ACPF hot cell have been modified under the current renovation project for the experimentation of the electrolytic reduction process using spent nuclear fuel. The most important aspect of this renovation was the installation of the argon compartment within the hot cell. For the design and system implementation of the argon compartment system, a full-scale mock-up test and a three-dimensional (3D) simulation test were conducted in advance. The remodeling and repairing of the process cell (M8a), the maintenance cell (M8b), the isolation room, and their utilities were also planned through this simulation to accommodate the designed argon compartment system. Based on the considered refurbishment workflow, previous equipment in the M8 cell, including vessels and pipes, were removed and disposed of successfully after a zoning smear survey and decontamination, and new equipment with advanced functions and specifications were installed in the hot cell. Finally, the operating area and isolation room were also refurbished to meet the requirements of the improved hot cell facility.

  3. Communications, Navigation, and Network Reconfigurable Test-bed Flight Hardware Compatibility Test S

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Communications, Navigation, and Network Reconfigurable Test-bed Flight Hardware Compatibility Test Sets and Networks Integration Management Office Testing for the Tracking and Data Relay Satellite System

  4. Facile modification of gelatin-based microcarriers with multiporous surface and proliferative growth factors delivery to enhance cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Sha [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang Yijuan [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Deng, Tianzheng [Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin Fang [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Liu Shouxin [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Zhang Yongjie [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Feng Feng [Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Jin Yan [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)], E-mail: yanjin@fmmu.edu.cn

    2008-07-28

    The design of microcarriers plays an important role in the success of cell expansion. The present article provides a facile approach to modify the gelatin-based particles and investigates the feasibility of their acting as microcarriers for cell attachment and growth. Gelatin particles (150-320 {mu}m) were modified by cryogenic treatment and lyophilization to develop the surface with the features of multiporous morphology and were incorporated with proliferative growth factors (bFGF) by adsorption during the post-preparation, which enables them to serve as microcarriers for cells amplification, together with the advantages of larger cell-surface contact area and capability of promoting cell propagation. The microstructure and release assay of the modified microcarriers demonstrated that the pores on surface were uniform and bFGF was released in a controlled manner. Through in vitro fibroblast culture, these features resulted in a prominent increase in the cell attachment rate and cell growth rate relative to the conditions without modification. Although the scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy analysis results indicated that cells attached, spread, and proliferated on all the microcarriers, cell growth clearly showed a significant correlation with the multiporous structure of microcarriers, in particular on bFGF combined ones. These results validate our previous assumption that the facile modification could improve cell growth on the gelatin-based microcarriers obviously and the novel microcarriers may be a promising candidate in tissue engineering.

  5. Automatic Integration Testbeds validation on Open Science Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J.; Thapa, S.; Gardner, R.; Potekhin, M.

    2011-12-01

    A recurring challenge in deploying high quality production middleware is the extent to which realistic testing occurs before release of the software into the production environment. We describe here an automated system for validating releases of the Open Science Grid software stack that leverages the (pilot-based) PanDA job management system developed and used by the ATLAS experiment. The system was motivated by a desire to subject the OSG Integration Testbed to more realistic validation tests. In particular those which resemble to every extent possible actual job workflows used by the experiments thus utilizing job scheduling at the compute element (CE), use of the worker node execution environment, transfer of data to/from the local storage element (SE), etc. The context is that candidate releases of OSG compute and storage elements can be tested by injecting large numbers of synthetic jobs varying in complexity and coverage of services tested. The native capabilities of the PanDA system can thus be used to define jobs, monitor their execution, and archive the resulting run statistics including success and failure modes. A repository of generic workflows and job types to measure various metrics of interest has been created. A command-line toolset has been developed so that testbed managers can quickly submit "VO-like" jobs into the system when newly deployed services are ready for testing. A system for automatic submission has been crafted to send jobs to integration testbed sites, collecting the results in a central service and generating regular reports for performance and reliability.

  6. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the Living With a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbed (SET) program is to improve the performance of hardware in the space radiation environment. The program has developed a payload for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) spacecraft that is scheduled for launch in August 2015 on the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The primary structure of DSX is an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA) ring. DSX will be in a Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). This oral presentation will describe the SET payload.

  7. EMERGE - ESnet/MREN Regional Science Grid Experimental NGI Testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mambretti, Joe; DeFanti, Tom; Brown, Maxine

    2001-07-31

    This document is the final report on the EMERGE Science Grid testbed research project from the perspective of the International Center for Advanced Internet Research (iCAIR) at Northwestern University, which was a subcontractor to this UIC project. This report is a compilation of information gathered from a variety of materials related to this project produced by multiple EMERGE participants, especially those at Electronic Visualization Lab (EVL) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Argonne National Lab and iCAIR. The EMERGE Science Grid project was managed by Tom DeFanti, PI from EVL at UIC.

  8. Software Testbed for Developing and Evaluating Integrated Autonomous Subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, James; Remolina, Emilio; Prompt, Axel; Robinson, Peter; Sweet, Adam; Nishikawa, David

    2015-01-01

    To implement fault tolerant autonomy in future space systems, it will be necessary to integrate planning, adaptive control, and state estimation subsystems. However, integrating these subsystems is difficult, time-consuming, and error-prone. This paper describes Intelliface/ADAPT, a software testbed that helps researchers develop and test alternative strategies for integrating planning, execution, and diagnosis subsystems more quickly and easily. The testbed's architecture, graphical data displays, and implementations of the integrated subsystems support easy plug and play of alternate components to support research and development in fault-tolerant control of autonomous vehicles and operations support systems. Intelliface/ADAPT controls NASA's Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT), which comprises batteries, electrical loads (fans, pumps, and lights), relays, circuit breakers, invertors, and sensors. During plan execution, an experimentor can inject faults into the ADAPT testbed by tripping circuit breakers, changing fan speed settings, and closing valves to restrict fluid flow. The diagnostic subsystem, based on NASA's Hybrid Diagnosis Engine (HyDE), detects and isolates these faults to determine the new state of the plant, ADAPT. Intelliface/ADAPT then updates its model of the ADAPT system's resources and determines whether the current plan can be executed using the reduced resources. If not, the planning subsystem generates a new plan that reschedules tasks, reconfigures ADAPT, and reassigns the use of ADAPT resources as needed to work around the fault. The resource model, planning domain model, and planning goals are expressed using NASA's Action Notation Modeling Language (ANML). Parts of the ANML model are generated automatically, and other parts are constructed by hand using the Planning Model Integrated Development Environment, a visual Eclipse-based IDE that accelerates ANML model development. Because native ANML planners are currently

  9. A Numerical Testbed for Remote Sensing of Aerosols, and its Demonstration for Evaluating Retrieval Synergy from a Geostationary Satellite Constellation of GEO-CAPE and GOES-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Ding, Shouguo; Zeng, Jing; Spurr, Robert; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical testbed for remote sensing of aerosols, together with a demonstration for evaluating retrieval synergy from a geostationary satellite constellation. The testbed combines inverse (optimal-estimation) software with a forward model containing linearized code for computing particle scattering (for both spherical and non-spherical particles), a kernel-based (land and ocean) surface bi-directional reflectance facility, and a linearized radiative transfer model for polarized radiance. Calculation of gas absorption spectra uses the HITRAN (HIgh-resolution TRANsmission molecular absorption) database of spectroscopic line parameters and other trace species cross-sections. The outputs of the testbed include not only the Stokes 4-vector elements and their sensitivities (Jacobians) with respect to the aerosol single scattering and physical parameters (such as size and shape parameters, refractive index, and plume height), but also DFS (Degree of Freedom for Signal) values for retrieval of these parameters. This testbed can be used as a tool to provide an objective assessment of aerosol information content that can be retrieved for any constellation of (planned or real) satellite sensors and for any combination of algorithm design factors (in terms of wavelengths, viewing angles, radiance and/or polarization to be measured or used). We summarize the components of the testbed, including the derivation and validation of analytical formulae for Jacobian calculations. Benchmark calculations from the forward model are documented. In the context of NASA's Decadal Survey Mission GEOCAPE (GEOstationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events), we demonstrate the use of the testbed to conduct a feasibility study of using polarization measurements in and around the O2 A band for the retrieval of aerosol height information from space, as well as an to assess potential improvement in the retrieval of aerosol fine and coarse mode aerosol optical depth (AOD) through the

  10. 77 FR 18793 - Spectrum Sharing Innovation Test-Bed Pilot Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-03-28

    ... Pilot Program, 73 FR 76,002 (Dec. 15, 2008). \\3\\ The final Phase I test plan and additional information... National Telecommunications and Information Administration Spectrum Sharing Innovation Test-Bed Pilot... conduct in Phase II/III of the Spectrum Sharing Innovation Test-Bed pilot program to assess...

  11. Development of a smart-antenna test-bed, demonstrating software defined digital beamforming

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluwer, T.; Slump, C.H.; Schiphorst, R.; Hoeksema, F.W.

    2001-01-01

    This paper describes a smart-antenna test-bed consisting of ‘common of the shelf’ (COTS) hardware and software defined radio components. The use of software radio components enables a flexible platform to implement and test mobile communication systems as a real-world system. The test-bed is configu

  12. Infrastructure Development of Single Cell Testing Capability at A0 Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Padilla, R.; Reid, J.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ge, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Rakhnov, I.; Ginsburg, C.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.; Carter, H.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this technical note is to document the details of the infrastructure development process that was realized at the A0 photo injector facility to establish RF cold testing capability for 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium single cell cavities. The activity began the last quarter of CY 2006 and ended the first quarter of CY 2009. The whole process involved addressing various aspects such as design of vertical insert and lifting fixture, modification of existing RF test station and design of new couplers, development of a Temperature Mapping (T-Map) system, radiation considerations for the test location (north cave), update of existing High Pressure Rinse (HPR) system, preparation of necessary safety documents and eventually obtaining an Operational Readiness Clearance (ORC). Figure 1 illustrates the various components of the development process. In the past, the north cave test station at A0 has supported the cold testing 3.9 GHz nine cell and single cell cavities, thus some of the components were available for use and some needed modification. The test dewar had the capacity to accommodate 1.3 GHz single cells although a new vertical insert that could handle both cavity types (1.3 and 3.9 GHz) had to be designed. The existing cryogenic system with an average capacity of {approx} 0.5 g/sec was deemed sufficient. The RF system was updated with broadband components and an additional amplifier with higher power capacity to handle higher gradients usually achieved in 1.3 GHz cavities. The initial testing phase was arbitrated to proceed with fixed power coupling. A new temperature mapping system was developed to provide the diagnostic tool for hot spot studies, quench characterization and field emission studies. The defining feature of this system was the use of diode sensors instead of the traditional carbon resistors as sensing elements. The unidirectional current carrying capacity (forward bias) of the diodes provided for the ease of multiplexing of the

  13. XUNET experimental high-speed network testbed CRADA 1136, DOE TTI No. 92-MULT-020-B2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Palmer, R.E.

    1996-04-01

    XUNET is a research program with AT&T and other partners to study high-speed wide area communication between local area networks over a backbone using Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) switches. Important goals of the project are to develop software techniques for network control and management, and applications for high-speed networks. The project entails building a testbed between member sites to explore performance issues for mixed network traffic such as congestion control, multimedia communications protocols, segmentation and reassembly of ATM cells, and overall data throughput rates.

  14. Nanoengineering Testbed for Nanosolar Cell and Piezoelectric Compounds

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-29

    surface work potential and transporting along the net field of two asymmetric Schottky barriers at both ends: Palladium (Pd) as P- type and Aluminum Al as...unloading the behavior was still similar but there were some more pronounced differences. Particularly the recovery of the material in the experiment

  15. High performance testbed for four-beam infrared interferometric nulling and exoplanet detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stefan; Booth, Andrew; Liewer, Kurt; Raouf, Nasrat; Loya, Frank; Tang, Hong

    2012-06-10

    Technology development for a space-based infrared nulling interferometer capable of earthlike exoplanet detection and characterization started in earnest in the last 10 years. At the Jet Propulsion Laboratory, the planet detection testbed was developed to demonstrate the principal components of the beam combiner train for a high performance four-beam nulling interferometer. Early in the development of the testbed, the importance of "instability noise" for nulling interferometer sensitivity was recognized, and the four-beam testbed would produce this noise, allowing investigation of methods for mitigating this noise source. The testbed contains the required features of a four-beam combiner for a space interferometer and performs at a level matching that needed for the space mission. This paper describes in detail the design, functions, and controls of the testbed.

  16. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-09-29

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). CAU 116 consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 consisted of Building 3210 and the attached concrete shield wall. CAS 25-23-20 consisted of the nuclear furnace piping and tanks. Closure activities began in January 2007 and were completed in August 2011. Activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 116 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2008). This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provides data confirming that closure objectives for CAU 116 were met. Site characterization data and process knowledge indicated that surface areas were radiologically contaminated above release limits and that regulated and/or hazardous wastes were present in the facility.

  17. Oceanic Platform of the Canary Islands: an ocean testbed for ocean energy converters

    Science.gov (United States)

    González, Javier; Hernández-Brito, Joaquín.; Llinás, Octavio

    2010-05-01

    not particularly powerful with values around 40-50 cm/s. However a detailed assessment, based on field measurements, will be conducted in the near future with the aim to identify specific areas close to the coast with stronger currents which make suitable the deployment of marine current turbines. Although the base Platform is not still available, PLOCAN has already started the activity as an ocean testbed providing services to a wave energy converter patented by the Spanish company PIPO Systems. A scaled 1:5 prototype will be deployed during January 2010 and monitored for several months. Current facilities available include some ODAS buoys (temperature, salinity, pH, oxygen, turbidity, wind, etc.), wave rider buoy, current meter profilers (ADCP and electromagnetic), system for data management, remote operated vehicles (ROV), autonomous underwater vehicles (AUV), and an oceanographic vessel. Future facilities include high frequency radar for wave and current measurements and submarine electro-optical cables to connect the Platform with the energy converters and with the shore station.

  18. Performance Analysis of Multilayer MIPv6 Architecture through Experimental Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nitul Dutta

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Mobility management is a key issue to achieve uninterrupted Internet services in IP based network. In IPv6, the mobility management is realized by its mobile version namely the Mobile IPv6 (MIPv6. The MIPv6 is further extended to Hierarchical MIPv6 (HMIPv6 to reduce handoff latency suffered by mobile nodes and signaling load incurred due to movement if nodes within the micro mobility region defined by HMIPv6. The HMIPv6 is considered as first widely accepted layered architecture for mobility management for IPv6 network. Influenced by the benefits of HMIPv6, many researchers have suggested extension of MIPv6 into multiple layers. However, there is very little work on finding optimal levels of hierarchy in such layered architecture. The focus of this paper is to evaluate the performance of a multilayer (N-layered with N as 5 MIPv6 architecture through experimental testbed. We have observed handoff latency, signaling overhead and tunneling cost and figured out the optimal levels of hierarchy that provides the best acceptable results for all the observed parameters. Since, HMIPv6 outperforms MIPv6 in terms of handoff latency and signaling cost, so we compare our results with HMIPv6. Testbed observation depicts that three levels of hierarchy in MIPv6 architecture provides optimal performance with 27% reduction in handoff latency and 67% reduction in signaling overhead compared to single layer architecture like Hierarchical MIPv6 (HMIPv6 protocol.

  19. Benchmarking Diagnostic Algorithms on an Electrical Power System Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtoglu, Tolga; Narasimhan, Sriram; Poll, Scott; Garcia, David; Wright, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic algorithms (DAs) are key to enabling automated health management. These algorithms are designed to detect and isolate anomalies of either a component or the whole system based on observations received from sensors. In recent years a wide range of algorithms, both model-based and data-driven, have been developed to increase autonomy and improve system reliability and affordability. However, the lack of support to perform systematic benchmarking of these algorithms continues to create barriers for effective development and deployment of diagnostic technologies. In this paper, we present our efforts to benchmark a set of DAs on a common platform using a framework that was developed to evaluate and compare various performance metrics for diagnostic technologies. The diagnosed system is an electrical power system, namely the Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT) developed and located at the NASA Ames Research Center. The paper presents the fundamentals of the benchmarking framework, the ADAPT system, description of faults and data sets, the metrics used for evaluation, and an in-depth analysis of benchmarking results obtained from testing ten diagnostic algorithms on the ADAPT electrical power system testbed.

  20. Off-road perception testbed vehicle design and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spofford, John R.; Herron, Jennifer B.; Anhalt, David J.; Morgenthaler, Matthew K.; DeHerrera, Clinton

    2003-09-01

    Off-road robotics efforts such as DARPA"s PerceptOR program have motivated the development of testbed vehicles capable of sustained operation in a variety of terrain and environments. This paper describes the retrofitting of a minimally-modified ATV chassis into such a testbed which has been used by multiple programs for autonomous mobility development and sensor characterization. Modular mechanical interfaces for sensors and equipment enclosures enabled integration of multiple payload configurations. The electric power subsystem was capable of short-term operation on batteries with refueled generation for continuous operation. Processing subsystems were mounted in sealed, shock-dampened enclosures with heat exchangers for internal cooling to protect against external dust and moisture. The computational architecture was divided into a real-time vehicle control layer and an expandable high level processing and perception layer. The navigation subsystem integrated real time kinematic GPS with a three-axis IMU for accurate vehicle localization and sensor registration. The vehicle software system was based on the MarsScape architecture developed under DARPA"s MARS program. Vehicle mobility software capabilities included route planning, waypoint navigation, teleoperation, and obstacle detection and avoidance. The paper describes the vehicle design in detail and summarizes its performance during field testing.

  1. Characterization of Vegetation using the UC Davis Remote Sensing Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falk, M.; Hart, Q. J.; Bowen, K. S.; Ustin, S. L.

    2006-12-01

    Remote sensing provides information about the dynamics of the terrestrial biosphere with continuous spatial and temporal coverage on many different scales. We present the design and construction of a suite of instrument modules and network infrastructure with size, weight and power constraints suitable for small scale vehicles, anticipating vigorous growth in unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) and other mobile platforms. Our approach provides the rapid deployment and low cost acquisition of high aerial imagery for applications requiring high spatial resolution and revisits. The testbed supports a wide range of applications, encourages remote sensing solutions in new disciplines and demonstrates the complete range of engineering knowledge required for the successful deployment of remote sensing instruments. The initial testbed is deployed on a Sig Kadet Senior remote controlled plane. It includes an onboard computer with wireless radio, GPS, inertia measurement unit, 3-axis electronic compass and digital cameras. The onboard camera is either a RGB digital camera or a modified digital camera with red and NIR channels. Cameras were calibrated using selective light sources, an integrating spheres and a spectrometer, allowing for the computation of vegetation indices such as the NDVI. Field tests to date have investigated technical challenges in wireless communication bandwidth limits, automated image geolocation, and user interfaces; as well as image applications such as environmental landscape mapping focusing on Sudden Oak Death and invasive species detection, studies on the impact of bird colonies on tree canopies, and precision agriculture.

  2. Propfan test assessment testbed aircraft flutter model test report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jenness, C. M. J.

    1987-01-01

    The PropFan Test Assessment (PTA) program includes flight tests of a propfan power plant mounted on the left wind of a modified Gulfstream II testbed aircraft. A static balance boom is mounted on the right wing tip for lateral balance. Flutter analyses indicate that these installations reduce the wing flutter stabilizing speed and that torsional stiffening and the installation of a flutter stabilizing tip boom are required on the left wing for adequate flutter safety margins. Wind tunnel tests of a 1/9th scale high speed flutter model of the testbed aircraft were conducted. The test program included the design, fabrication, and testing of the flutter model and the correlation of the flutter test data with analysis results. Excellent correlations with the test data were achieved in posttest flutter analysis using actual model properties. It was concluded that the flutter analysis method used was capable of accurate flutter predictions for both the (symmetric) twin propfan configuration and the (unsymmetric) single propfan configuration. The flutter analysis also revealed that the differences between the tested model configurations and the current aircraft design caused the (scaled) model flutter speed to be significantly higher than that of the aircraft, at least for the single propfan configuration without a flutter boom. Verification of the aircraft final design should, therefore, be based on flutter predictions made with the test validated analysis methods.

  3. Development of optical packet and circuit integrated ring network testbed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Hideaki; Harai, Hiroaki; Miyazawa, Takaya; Shinada, Satoshi; Kawasaki, Wataru; Wada, Naoya

    2011-12-12

    We developed novel integrated optical packet and circuit switch-node equipment. Compared with our previous equipment, a polarization-independent 4 × 4 semiconductor optical amplifier switch subsystem, gain-controlled optical amplifiers, and one 100 Gbps optical packet transponder and seven 10 Gbps optical path transponders with 10 Gigabit Ethernet (10GbE) client-interfaces were newly installed in the present system. The switch and amplifiers can provide more stable operation without equipment adjustments for the frequent polarization-rotations and dynamic packet-rate changes of optical packets. We constructed an optical packet and circuit integrated ring network testbed consisting of two switch nodes for accelerating network development, and we demonstrated 66 km fiber transmission and switching operation of multiplexed 14-wavelength 10 Gbps optical paths and 100 Gbps optical packets encapsulating 10GbE frames. Error-free (frame error rate < 1×10(-4)) operation was achieved with optical packets of various packet lengths and packet rates, and stable operation of the network testbed was confirmed. In addition, 4K uncompressed video streaming over OPS links was successfully demonstrated.

  4. The Hyperion Project: Partnership for an Advaned Technology Cluster Testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seager, M; Leininger, M

    2008-04-28

    The Hyperion project offers a unique opportunity to participate in a community-driven testing and development resource at a scale beyond what can be accomplished by one entity alone. Hyperion is a new strategic technology partnership intended to support the member-driven development and testing at scale. This partnership will allow commodity clusters to scale up to meet the growing demands of customers multi-core petascale simulation environments. Hyperion will tightly couple together the outstanding research and development capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory with leading technology companies, including Cisco, Data Direct Networks, Dell, Intel, LSI, Mellanox, Qlogic, RedHat, SuperMicro and Sun. The end goal of this project is to revolutionize cluster computing in fundamental ways by providing the critical software and hardware components for a highly scalable simulation environment. This environment will include support for high performance networking, parallel file systems, operating system, and cluster management. This goal will be achieved by building a scalable technology cluster testbed that will be fully dedicated to the partners and provide: (1) A scalable development testing and benchmarking environment for critical enabling Linux cluster technologies; (2) An evaluation testbed for new hardware and software technologies; and (3) A vehicle for forming long term collaborations.

  5. STRS Radio Service Software for NASA's SCaN Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Bishop, Daniel Wayne; Chelmins, David T.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Space Communication and Navigation(SCaN) Testbed was launched to the International Space Station in 2012. The objective is to promote new software defined radio technologies and associated software application reuse, enabled by this first flight of NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standard. Pre-launch testing with the testbed's software defined radios was performed as part of system integration. Radio services for the JPL SDR were developed during system integration to allow the waveform application to operate properly in the space environment, especially considering thermal effects. These services include receiver gain control, frequency offset, IQ modulator balance, and transmit level control. Development, integration, and environmental testing of the radio services will be described. The added software allows the waveform application to operate properly in the space environment, and can be reused by future experimenters testing different waveform applications. Integrating such services with the platform provided STRS operating environment will attract more users, and these services are candidates for interface standardization via STRS.

  6. Defense Waste Processing Facility Simulant Chemical Processing Cell Studies for Sludge Batch 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Tara E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, Wesley H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-10

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a technical task request from Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Saltstone Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) and to develop the flowsheet for SB9 in the DWPF. These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). CPC experiments were performed using SB9 simulant (SB9A) to qualify SB9 for sludge-only and coupled processing using the nitric-formic flowsheet in the DWPF. Two simulant batches were prepared, one representing SB8 Tank 40H and another representing SB9 Tank 51H. The simulant used for SB9 qualification testing was prepared by blending the SB8 Tank 40H and SB9 Tank 51H simulants. The blended simulant is referred to as SB9A. Eleven CPC experiments were run with an acid stoichiometry ranging between 105% and 145% of the Koopman minimum acid equation (KMA), which is equivalent to 109.7% and 151.5% of the Hsu minimum acid factor. Three runs were performed in the 1L laboratory scale setup, whereas the remainder were in the 4L laboratory scale setup. Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed on nine of the eleven. The other two were SRAT cycles only. One coupled flowsheet and one extended run were performed for SRAT and SME processing. Samples of the condensate, sludge, and off-gas were taken to monitor the chemistry of the CPC experiments.

  7. Radiation Beamline Testbeds for the Simulation of Planetary and Spacecraft Environments for Human and Robotic Mission Risk Assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Richard

    2010-01-01

    The Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas, USA, is establishing an integrated, multi-disciplinary research program on the scientific and engineering challenges faced by NASA and the international space community caused by space radiation. CRESSE focuses on space radiation research directly applicable to astronaut health and safety during future long term, deep space missions, including Martian, lunar, and other planetary body missions beyond low earth orbit. The research approach will consist of experimental and theoretical radiation modeling studies utilizing particle accelerator facilities including: 1. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory; 2. Proton Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Medical Center; and 3. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Specifically, CRESSE investigators are designing, developing, and building experimental test beds that simulate the lunar and Martian radiation environments for experiments focused on risk assessment for astronauts and instrumentation. The testbeds have been designated the Bioastronautics Experimental Research Testbeds for Environmental Radiation Nostrum Investigations and Education (BERT and ERNIE). The designs of BERT and ERNIE will allow for a high degree of flexibility and adaptability to modify experimental configurations to simulate planetary surface environments, planetary habitats, and spacecraft interiors. In the nominal configuration, BERT and ERIE will consist of a set of experimental zones that will simulate the planetary atmosphere (Solid CO2 in the case of the Martian surface.), the planetary surface, and sub-surface regions. These experimental zones can be used for dosimetry, shielding, biological, and electronic effects radiation studies in support of space exploration missions. BERT and ERNIE are designed to be compatible with the

  8. Radiation beamline testbeds for the simulation of planetary and spacecraft environments for human and robotic mission risk assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilkins, Richard

    The Center for Radiation Engineering and Science for Space Exploration (CRESSE) at Prairie View A&M University, Prairie View, Texas, USA, is establishing an integrated, multi-disciplinary research program on the scientific and engineering challenges faced by NASA and the inter-national space community caused by space radiation. CRESSE focuses on space radiation research directly applicable to astronaut health and safety during future long term, deep space missions, including Martian, lunar, and other planetary body missions beyond low earth orbit. The research approach will consist of experimental and theoretical radiation modeling studies utilizing particle accelerator facilities including: 1. NASA Space Radiation Laboratory (NSRL) at Brookhaven National Laboratory; 2. Proton Synchrotron at Loma Linda University Med-ical Center; and 3. Los Alamos Neutron Science Center (LANSCE) at Los Alamos National Laboratory. Specifically, CRESSE investigators are designing, developing, and building experimental test beds that simulate the lunar and Martian radiation environments for experiments focused on risk assessment for astronauts and instrumentation. The testbeds have been designated the Bioastronautics Experimental Research Testbeds for Environmental Radiation Nostrum Investigations and Education (BERT and ERNIE). The designs of BERT and ERNIE will allow for a high degree of flexibility and adaptability to modify experimental configurations to simulate planetary surface environments, planetary habitats, and spacecraft interiors. In the nominal configuration, BERT and ERIE will consist of a set of experimental zones that will simulate the planetary atmosphere (Solid CO2 in the case of the Martian surface.), the planetary surface, and sub-surface regions. These experimental zones can be used for dosimetry, shielding, biological, and electronic effects radiation studies in support of space exploration missions. BERT and ERNIE are designed to be compatible with the

  9. Sub-scale Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Facility (Research Cell 18)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: RC18 is a continuous-flow, direct-connect, supersonic-combustion research facility that is capable of simulating flight conditions from Mach 3.0 to Mach...

  10. Facile and Gram-scale Synthesis of Metal-free Catalysts: Toward Realistic Applications for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Ji Mun; Park, Ji Eun; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-03-01

    Although numerous reports on nonprecious metal catalysts for replacing expensive Pt-based catalysts have been published, few of these studies have demonstrated their practical application in fuel cells. In this work, we report graphitic carbon nitride and carbon nanofiber hybrid materials synthesized by a facile and gram-scale method via liquid-based reactions, without the use of toxic materials or a high pressure-high temperature reactor, for use as fuel cell cathodes. The resulting materials exhibited remarkable methanol tolerance, selectivity, and stability even without a metal dopant. Furthermore, these completely metal-free catalysts exhibited outstanding performance as cathode materials in an actual fuel cell device: a membrane electrode assembly with both acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The fabrication method and remarkable performance of the single cell produced in this study represent progressive steps toward the realistic application of metal-free cathode electrocatalysts in fuel cells.

  11. Facile and gram-scale synthesis of metal-free catalysts: toward realistic applications for fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Ji Mun; Park, Ji Eun; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-03-02

    Although numerous reports on nonprecious metal catalysts for replacing expensive Pt-based catalysts have been published, few of these studies have demonstrated their practical application in fuel cells. In this work, we report graphitic carbon nitride and carbon nanofiber hybrid materials synthesized by a facile and gram-scale method via liquid-based reactions, without the use of toxic materials or a high pressure-high temperature reactor, for use as fuel cell cathodes. The resulting materials exhibited remarkable methanol tolerance, selectivity, and stability even without a metal dopant. Furthermore, these completely metal-free catalysts exhibited outstanding performance as cathode materials in an actual fuel cell device: a membrane electrode assembly with both acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The fabrication method and remarkable performance of the single cell produced in this study represent progressive steps toward the realistic application of metal-free cathode electrocatalysts in fuel cells.

  12. Development of a facile droplet-based single-cell isolation platform for cultivation and genomic analysis in microorganisms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Qiang; Wang, Tingting; Zhou, Qian; Zhang, Peng; Gong, Yanhai; Gou, Honglei; Xu, Jian; Ma, Bo

    2017-01-01

    Wider application of single-cell analysis has been limited by the lack of an easy-to-use and low-cost strategy for single-cell isolation that can be directly coupled to single-cell sequencing and single-cell cultivation, especially for small-size microbes. Herein, a facile droplet microfluidic platform was developed to dispense individual microbial cells into conventional standard containers for downstream analysis. Functional parts for cell encapsulation, droplet inspection and sorting, as well as a chip-to-tube capillary interface were integrated on one single chip with simple architecture, and control of the droplet sorting was achieved by a low-cost solenoid microvalve. Using microalgal and yeast cells as models, single-cell isolation success rate of over 90% and single-cell cultivation success rate of 80% were demonstrated. We further showed that the individual cells isolated can be used in high-quality DNA and RNA analyses at both gene-specific and whole-genome levels (i.e. real-time quantitative PCR and genome sequencing). The simplicity and reliability of the method should improve accessibility of single-cell analysis and facilitate its wider application in microbiology researches. PMID:28112223

  13. Overview of the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) Full Scale Crash Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin; Littell, Justin

    2015-01-01

    The Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) full-scale tests were performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility in 2013 and 2014. Two CH-46E airframes were impacted at 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocities onto soft soil, which represents a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. TRACT 1 provided a baseline set of responses, while TRACT 2 included retrofits with composite subfloors and other crash system improvements based on TRACT 1. For TRACT 2, a total of 18 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATD) responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and activation of emergency locator transmitters and crash sensors. Combinations of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 ATDs were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. The structural response of the airframe was assessed based on accelerometers located throughout the airframe and using three-dimensional photogrammetric techniques. Analysis of the photogrammetric data indicated regions of maximum deflection and permanent deformation. The response of TRACT 2 was noticeably different in the horizontal direction due to changes in the cabin configuration and soil surface, with higher acceleration and damage occurring in the cabin. Loads from ATDs in energy absorbing seats and restraints were within injury limits. Severe injury was likely for ATDs in forward facing passenger seats.

  14. Precise Pointing and Stabilization Performance for the Balloon-borne Imaging Testbed (BIT): 2015 Test Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Romualdez, L J; Damaren, C J; Galloway, M N; Hartley, J W; Li, L; Massey, R J; Netterfield, C B

    2016-01-01

    Balloon-borne astronomy offers an attractive option for experiments that require precise pointing and attitude stabilization, due to a large reduction in the atmospheric interference observed by ground-based systems as well as the low-cost and short development time-scale compared to space-borne systems. The Balloon-borne Imaging Testbed (BIT) is an instrument designed to meet the technological requirements of high precision astronomical missions and is a precursor to the development of a facility class instrument with capabilities similar to the Hubble Space Telescope. The attitude determination and control systems (ADCS) for BIT, the design, implementation, and analysis of which are the focus of this paper, compensate for compound pendulation effects and other sub-orbital disturbances in the stratosphere to within 1-2$^{\\prime\\prime}$ (rms), while back-end optics provide further image stabilization down to 0.05$^{\\prime\\prime}$ (not discussed here). During the inaugural test flight from Timmins, Canada in S...

  15. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  16. Space Station technology testbed: 2010 deep space transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Alan C.

    1993-12-01

    A space station in a crew-tended or permanently crewed configuration will provide major R&D opportunities for innovative, technology and materials development and advanced space systems testing. A space station should be designed with the basic infrastructure elements required to grow into a major systems technology testbed. This space-based technology testbed can and should be used to support the development of technologies required to expand our utilization of near-Earth space, the Moon and the Earth-to-Jupiter region of the Solar System. Space station support of advanced technology and materials development will result in new techniques for high priority scientific research and the knowledge and R&D base needed for the development of major, new commercial product thrusts. To illustrate the technology testbed potential of a space station and to point the way to a bold, innovative approach to advanced space systems' development, a hypothetical deep space transport development and test plan is described. Key deep space transport R&D activities are described would lead to the readiness certification of an advanced, reusable interplanetary transport capable of supporting eight crewmembers or more. With the support of a focused and highly motivated, multi-agency ground R&D program, a deep space transport of this type could be assembled and tested by 2010. Key R&D activities on a space station would include: (1) experimental research investigating the microgravity assisted, restructuring of micro-engineered, materials (to develop and verify the in-space and in-situ 'tuning' of materials for use in debris and radiation shielding and other protective systems), (2) exposure of microengineered materials to the space environment for passive and operational performance tests (to develop in-situ maintenance and repair techniques and to support the development, enhancement, and implementation of protective systems, data and bio-processing systems, and virtual reality and

  17. Facile Synthesis and High performance of a New Carbazole-Based Hole Transporting Material for Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2015-06-26

    Perovskite solar cells are very promising for practical applications owing to their rapidly rising power conversion efficiency and low cost of solution-based processing. 2,2’,7,7’-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine) 9,9’-spirobifluorene (Spiro-OMeTAD) is most widely used as hole transporting material (HTM) in perovskite solar cells. However, the tedious synthesis and high cost of Spiro-OMeTAD inhibit its commercial-scale application in the photovoltaic industry. In this article, we report a carbazole-based compound (R01) as a new HTM in efficient perovskite solar cells. R01 is synthesized via a facile route consisting of only two steps from inexpensive commercially available materials. Furthermore, R01 exhibits higher hole mobility and conductivity than the state-of-the-art Spiro-OMeTAD. Perovskite solar cells fabricated with R01 produce a power conversion efficiency of 12.03%, comparable to that obtained in devices using Spiro-OMeTAD in this study. Our findings underscore R01 as a highly promising HTM with high performance, and its facile synthesis and low cost may facilitate the large-scale applications of perovskite solar cells.

  18. Aspects of the quality of data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) cloud and radiation testbed (CART) site broadband radiation sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splitt, M.E. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Wesely, M.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A systmatic evaluation of the performance of broadband radiometers at the Radiation Testbed (CART) site is needed to estimate the uncertainties of the irradiance observations. Here, net radiation observed with the net radiometer in the enrgy balance Bowen ratio station at the Central facility is compared with the net radiation computed as the sum of component irradiances recorded by nearby pyranameters and pyrgeometers. In addition, data obtained from the central facility pyranometers, pyrgeometers, and pyrheliometers are examined for April 1994, when intensive operations periods were being carried out. The data used in this study are from central facility radiometers in a solar and infrared observation station, and EBBR station, the so-called `BSRN` set of upward pointing radiometers, and a set of radiometers pointed down at the 25-m level of a 60-m tower.

  19. X-ray Pulsar Navigation Algorithms and Testbed for SEXTANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winternitz, Luke M. B.; Hasouneh, Monther A.; Mitchell, Jason W.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Price, Samuel R.; Semper, Sean R.; Yu, Wayne H.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Grendreau, Keith C.

    2015-01-01

    The Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) is a NASA funded technologydemonstration. SEXTANT will, for the first time, demonstrate real-time, on-board X-ray Pulsar-based Navigation (XNAV), a significant milestone in the quest to establish a GPS-like navigation capability available throughout our Solar System and beyond. This paper describes the basic design of the SEXTANT system with a focus on core models and algorithms, and the design and continued development of the GSFC X-ray Navigation Laboratory Testbed (GXLT) with its dynamic pulsar emulation capability. We also present early results from GXLT modeling of the combined NICER X-ray timing instrument hardware and SEXTANT flight software algorithms.

  20. Experimental Testbed for the Study of Hydrodynamic Issues in Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, H F; Kane, J O; Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Hurricane, O A; Louis, H; Wallace, R J; Knauer, J; Keiter, P; Arnett, D

    2000-10-09

    More than a decade after the explosion of SN 1987A, unresolved discrepancies still remain in attempts to numerically simulate the mixing processes initiated by the passage of a very strong shock through the layered structure of the progenitor star. Numerically computed velocities of the radioactive {sup 56}Ni and {sup 56}CO, produced by shock-induced explosive burning within the silicon layer for example, are still more than 50% too low as compared with the measured velocities. In order to resolve such discrepancies between observation and simulation, an experimental testbed has been designed on the Omega Laser for the study of hydrodynamic issues of importance to supernovae (SNe). In this paper, we present results from a series of scaled laboratory experiments designed to isolate and explore several issues in the hydrodynamics of SN explosions. The results of the experiments are compared with numerical simulations and are generally found to be in reasonable agreement.

  1. SABA: A Testbed for a Real-Time MIMO System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brühl Lars

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing demand for high data rates for wireless communication systems leads to the development of new technologies to increase the channel capacity thus increasing the data rate. MIMO (multiple-input multiple-output systems are best qualified for these applications. In this paper, we present a MIMO test environment for high data rate transmissions in frequency-selective environments. An overview of the testbed is given, including the analyzed algorithms, the digital signal processing with a new highly parallel processor to perform the algorithms in real time, as well as the analog front-ends. A brief overview of the influence of polarization on the channel capacity is given as well.

  2. The Benchmark Extensible Tractable Testbed Engineering Resource (BETTER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siranosian, Antranik Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schembri, Philip Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Nathan Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-02

    The Benchmark Extensible Tractable Testbed Engineering Resource (BETTER) is proposed as a family of modular test bodies that are intended to support engineering capability development by helping to identify weaknesses and needs. Weapon systems, subassemblies, and components are often complex and difficult to test and analyze, resulting in low confidence and high uncertainties in experimental and simulated results. The complexities make it difficult to distinguish between inherent uncertainties and errors due to insufficient capabilities. BETTER test bodies will first use simplified geometries and materials such that testing, data collection, modeling and simulation can be accomplished with high confidence and low uncertainty. Modifications and combinations of simple and well-characterized BETTER test bodies can then be used to increase complexity in order to reproduce relevant mechanics and identify weaknesses. BETTER can provide both immediate and long-term improvements in testing and simulation capabilities. This document presents the motivation, concept, benefits and examples for BETTER.

  3. Simulation to Flight Test for a UAV Controls Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Mark A.; Logan, Michael J.; French, Michael L.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis, Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights, including a fully autonomous demonstration at the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) UAV Demo 2005. Simulations based on wind tunnel data are being used to further develop advanced controllers for implementation and flight test.

  4. A Fully Reconfigurable Polarimetric Phased Array Antenna Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sudantha Perera

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The configurable phased array demonstrator (CPAD is a low-cost, reconfigurable, small-scale testbed for the dual-polarized array antenna and radar prototype. It is based on the concept that individual transmit and receive (TR modules and radiating elements can be configured in different ways to study the impact of various array manifolds on radiation pattern performance. For example, CPAD is configured as (a a 4 × 4 planar array, (b a planar array with mirror configuration, and (c a circular array to support the multifunctional phased array radar (MPAR system risk reduction studies. System descriptions are given in detail, and measurements are made and results are analyzed.

  5. High Energy Nuclear Database: A Testbed for Nuclear Data Information Technology

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, D A; Vogt, R; Beck, B; Pruet, J

    2007-04-18

    We describe the development of an on-line high-energy heavy-ion experimental database. When completed, the database will be searchable and cross-indexed with relevant publications, including published detector descriptions. While this effort is relatively new, it will eventually contain all published data from older heavy-ion programs as well as published data from current and future facilities. These data include all measured observables in proton-proton, proton-nucleus and nucleus-nucleus collisions. Once in general use, this database will have tremendous scientific payoff as it makes systematic studies easier and allows simpler benchmarking of theoretical models for a broad range of experiments. Furthermore, there is a growing need for compilations of high-energy nuclear data for applications including stockpile stewardship, technology development for inertial confinement fusion, target and source development for upcoming facilities such as the International Linear Collider and homeland security. This database is part of a larger proposal that includes the production of periodic data evaluations and topical reviews. These reviews would provide an alternative and impartial mechanism to resolve discrepancies between published data from rival experiments and between theory and experiment. Since this database will be a community resource, it requires the high-energy nuclear physics community's financial and manpower support. This project serves as a testbed for the further development of an object-oriented nuclear data format and database system. By using ''off-the-shelf'' software tools and techniques, the system is simple, robust, and extensible. Eventually we envision a ''Grand Unified Nuclear Format'' encapsulating data types used in the ENSDF, ENDF/B, EXFOR, NSR and other formats, including processed data formats.

  6. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  7. Engine Test Facility (ETF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Air Force Arnold Engineering Development Center's Engine Test Facility (ETF) test cells are used for development and evaluation testing of propulsion systems for...

  8. Use of Cultivation Data from the Algae Testbed Public Private Partnership as Utilized in NREL's Algae State of Technology Assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Knoshaug, Eric [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Laurens, Lieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Kinchin, Christopher [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Davis, Ryan [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2016-10-01

    The Algae Testbed Public Private Partnership (ATP3) conducted algal growth experiments over the course of 16 months termed the Unified Field Studies (UFS). These experiments were conducted at 5 different geographic locations in Arizona (ASU), California (CP), Florida (FA), Georgia (GT), and Hawaii (CELL). The UFS sought to evaluate different algal biomass harvesting strategies using identical ponds, media, and operational conditions through all four seasons across different geographic regions to isolate the effects on productivity attributed to locational climate and seasonal variability, overlaid by the differing harvest strategies. Set up as the baseline against which other experiments would build upon, it must be emphasized that as per the stated, approved experimental goals of the ATP3 UFS, no attempts at growth or lipid accumulation optimization were made; rather, the primary focus of the UFS work was to cultivate algal biomass under deliberate, consistent conditions, time periods, and harvesting protocols, to provide public data on year-round outdoor biomass production that could be directly compared between one site and another (with accompanying climate data for each site). Thus the resulting productivity numbers in effect represent a conservative baseline of non-optimized algal growth one may expect at these sites. Also clearly weather can vary dramatically from season to season and from year to year, and even within a given 'season' where an individual season's data was typically based on 4-6 week operating windows. Thus these numbers also only reflect a short snapshot in time, and must be interpreted carefully in projecting what may be expected over many years or decades (for example, a 30-year facility lifetime as evaluated in techno-economic models).

  9. Vacuum Nuller Testbed Performance, Characterization and Null Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, R. G.; Clampin, M.; Petrone, P.; Mallik, U.; Madison, T.; Bolcar, M.; Noecker, C.; Kendrick, S.; Helmbrecht, M. A.

    2011-01-01

    The Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) can detect and characterize exoplanets with filled, segmented and sparse aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the choice of future internal coronagraph exoplanet missions. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has developed a Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) to advance this approach, and assess and advance technologies needed to realize a VNC as a flight instrument. The VNT is an ultra-stable testbed operating at 15 Hz in vacuum. It consists of a MachZehnder nulling interferometer; modified with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hexpacked MEMS based deformable mirror (DM), coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. The 2-output channels are imaged with a vacuum photon counting camera and conventional camera. Error-sensing and feedback to DM and delay line with control algorithms are implemented in a real-time architecture. The inherent advantage of the VNC is that it is its own interferometer and directly controls its errors by exploiting images from bright and dark channels simultaneously. Conservation of energy requires the sum total of the photon counts be conserved independent of the VNC state. Thus sensing and control bandwidth is limited by the target stars throughput, with the net effect that the higher bandwidth offloads stressing stability tolerances within the telescope. We report our recent progress with the VNT towards achieving an incremental sequence of contrast milestones of 10(exp 8) , 10(exp 9) and 10(exp 10) respectively at inner working angles approaching 2A/D. Discussed will be the optics, lab results, technologies, and null control. Shown will be evidence that the milestones have been achieved.

  10. Demo III: Department of Defense testbed for unmanned ground mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Chuck M.; Bornstein, Jonathan A.; Myers, Scott D.; Brendle, Bruce E., Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Robotics has been identified by numerous recent Department of Defense (DOD) studies as a key enabling technology for future military operational concepts. The Demo III Program is a multiyear effort encompassing technology development and demonstration on testbed platforms, together with modeling simulation and experimentation directed toward optimization of operational concepts to employ this technology. Primary program focus is the advancement of capabilities for autonomous mobility through unstructured environments, concentrating on both perception and intelligent control technology. The scout mission will provide the military operational context for demonstration of this technology, although a significant emphasis is being placed upon both hardware and software modularity to permit rapid extension to other military missions. The Experimental Unmanned Vehicle (XUV) is a small (approximately 1150 kg, V-22 transportable) technology testbed vehicle designed for experimentation with multiple military operational concepts. Currently under development, the XUV is scheduled for roll-out in Summer 1999, with an initial troop experimentation to be conducted in September 1999. Though small, and relatively lightweight, modeling has shown the chassis capable of automotive mobility comparable to the current Army lightweight high-mobility, multipurpose, wheeled vehicle (HMMWV). The XUV design couples multisensor perception with intelligent control to permit autonomous cross-country navigation at speeds of up to 32 kph during daylight and 16 kph during hours of darkness. A small, lightweight, highly capable user interface will permit intuitive control of the XUV by troops from current-generation tactical vehicles. When it concludes in 2002, Demo III will provide the military with both the technology and the initial experience required to develop and field the first generation of semi-autonomous tactical ground vehicles for combat, combat support, and logistics applications.

  11. SPHERES National Lab Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benavides, Jose

    2014-01-01

    SPHERES is a facility of the ISS National Laboratory with three IVA nano-satellites designed and delivered by MIT to research estimation, control, and autonomy algorithms. Since Fall 2010, The SPHERES system is now operationally supported and managed by NASA Ames Research Center (ARC). A SPHERES Program Office was established and is located at NASA Ames Research Center. The SPHERES Program Office coordinates all SPHERES related research and STEM activities on-board the International Space Station (ISS), as well as, current and future payload development. By working aboard ISS under crew supervision, it provides a risk tolerant Test-bed Environment for Distributed Satellite Free-flying Control Algorithms. If anything goes wrong, reset and try again! NASA has made the capability available to other U.S. government agencies, schools, commercial companies and students to expand the pool of ideas for how to test and use these bowling ball-sized droids. For many of the researchers, SPHERES offers the only opportunity to do affordable on-orbit characterization of their technology in the microgravity environment. Future utilization of SPHERES as a facility will grow its capabilities as a platform for science, technology development, and education.

  12. A Simulation Testbed for Dynamic Air Corridors within the Next Generation Air Transportation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation in this effort is the development of a simulation testbed for identifying dynamic air corridors that can increase aircraft throughput in and...

  13. Decision Support Tool and Simulation Testbed for Airborne Spacing and Merging in Super Dense Operations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation in this effort is the development of a decision support tool and simulation testbed for Airborne Spacing and Merging (ASM). We focus on concepts...

  14. A Testbed For Validating the LHC Controls System Core Before Deployment

    CERN Document Server

    Nguyen Xuan, J

    2011-01-01

    Since the start-up of the LHC, it is crucial to carefully test core controls components before deploying them operationally. The Testbed of the CERN accelerator controls group was developed for this purpose. It contains different hardware (PPC, i386) running various operating systems (Linux and LynxOS) and core software components running on front-ends, communication middleware and client libraries. The Testbed first executes integration tests to verify that the components delivered by individual teams interoperate, and then system tests, which verify high-level, end-user functionality. It also verifies that different versions of components are compatible, which is vital, because not all parts of the operational LHC control system can be upgraded simultaneously. In addition, the Testbed can be used for performance and stress tests. Internally, the Testbed is driven by Atlassian Bamboo, a Continuous Integration server, which builds and deploys automatically new software versions into the Test...

  15. Integrated Testbed for Environmental Analysis of NextGen Concepts using ACES Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of an analysis testbed to integrate simulation tools, such as ACES, with aviation environmental effects models, such as the Aviation...

  16. Response of a 2-story test-bed structure for the seismic evaluation of nonstructural systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soroushian, Siavash; Maragakis, E. "Manos"; Zaghi, Arash E.; Rahmanishamsi, Esmaeel; Itani, Ahmad M.; Pekcan, Gokhan

    2016-03-01

    A full-scale, two-story, two-by-one bay, steel braced-frame was subjected to a number of unidirectional ground motions using three shake tables at the UNR-NEES site. The test-bed frame was designed to study the seismic performance of nonstructural systems including steel-framed gypsum partition walls, suspended ceilings and fire sprinkler systems. The frame can be configured to perform as an elastic or inelastic system to generate large floor accelerations or large inter story drift, respectively. In this study, the dynamic performance of the linear and nonlinear test-beds was comprehensively studied. The seismic performance of nonstructural systems installed in the linear and nonlinear test-beds were assessed during extreme excitations. In addition, the dynamic interactions of the test-bed and installed nonstructural systems are investigated.

  17. Independent Technology Assessment within the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, A. B.; Robinson, E.; Graybeal, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) is a community of science, data and information technology practitioners. ESIP's mission is to support the networking and data dissemination needs of our members and the global community. We do this by linking the functional sectors of education, observation, research and application with the ultimate use of Earth science. Amongst the services provided to ESIP members is the Testbed; a collaborative forum for the development of technology standards, services, protocols and best practices. ESIP has partnered with the NASA Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program to integrate independent assessment of Testing Readiness Level (TRL) into the ESIP Testbed. In this presentation we will 1) demonstrate TRL assessment in the ESIP Testbed using three AIST projects, 2) discuss challenges and insights into creating an independent validation/verification framework and 3) outline the versatility of the ESIP Testbed as applied to other technology projects.

  18. Integrated Testbed for Environmental Analysis of NextGen Concepts using ACES Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation in this effort is the development of an industrial-grade analysis testbed to integrate simulation tools, such as ACES, with aviation environmental...

  19. A facile, branched DNA assay to quantitatively measure glucocorticoid receptor auto-regulation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jason R. Schwartz; Purvaba J. Sarvaiya; Lily E. Leiva; Maria C. Velez; Tammuella C. Singleton; Lolie C. Yu; Wayne V. Vedeckis

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) steroid hormones are used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) because of their pro-apoptotic effects in hematopoietic cells.However,not all leukemia cells are sensitive to GC,and no assay to stratify patients is available.In the GC-sensitive T-cell ALL cell line CEM-C7,auto-up-regulation of RNA transcripts for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) correlates with increased apoptotic response.This study aimed to determine if a facile assay of GR transcript levels might be promising for stratifying ALL patients into hormone-sensitive and hormone-resistant populations.The GR transcript profiles of various lymphoid cell lines and 4 bone marrow samples from patients with T-cell ALL were analyzed using both an optimized branched DNA (bDNA) assay and a real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay.There were significant correlations between both assay platforms when measuring total GR (exon 5/6) transcripts in various cell lines and patient samples,but not for a probe set that detects a specific,low abundance GR transcript (exon 1A3).Our results suggest that the bDNA platform is reproducible and precise when measuring total GR transcripts and,with further development,may ultimately offer a simple clinical assay to aid in the prediction of GC-sensitivity in ALL patients.

  20. Development of a radiative-hydrodynamics testbed using the petawatt laser facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koch, J A; Bell, P M; Brown, C; Budil, K S; Estabrook, K G; Gold, D M; Hatchett, S P; Kane, J; Key, M H; Pennington, D M; Perry, M D; Remington, B A

    1998-08-27

    Many of the conditions believed to underlie astrophysical phenomena have been difficult to achieve in a laboratory setting. For example, models of supernova remnant evolution rely on a detailed understanding of the propagation of shock waves with gigabar pressures at temperatures of 1 keV or more where radiative effects can be important. Current models of gamma ray bursts posit a relativistically expanding plasma fireball with copious production of electron-positron pairs, a difficult scenario to experimentally verify. However, a new class of lasers, such as the Petawatt laser,Perry 1996 are capable of producing focused intensities greater than 1020 W/cm² where such relativistic effects can be observed and even dominate the laser-target interaction. There is ample evidence in observational data from supernova remnants of the aftermath of the passage of radiative shock or blast waves. In the early phases of supernova remnant evolution, the radially-expanding shock wave expands nearly adiabatically since it is traveling at a very high velocity as it begins to sweep up the surrounding interstellar gas. A Sedov-Taylor blast wave solution can be applied to this phase,Taylor 1950, Sedov 1959 when the mass of interstellar gas swept up by the blast greatly exceeds the mass of the stellar ejecta, or a self-similar driven wave model can be applied if the ejecta play a significant role.Chevalier 1982 As the mass of the swept up material begins to greatly exceed the mass of the stellar ejecta, the evolution transitions to a radiative phase wherein the remnant can be modeled as an interior region of ldw-density, high-pressure gas surrounded by a thin, spherical shell of cooled, dense gas with a radiative shock as its outer boundary, the pressure-driven snowplow.Blondin et al. 1998 Until recently it has not been feasible to devise laboratory experiments wherein shock waves with initial pressures in excess of several hundred Mbar and temperatures approaching 1 keV are achieved in order to validate the models of the expanding blast wave launched by a supernova in both of its phases of evolution. We report on a new experiment designed to follow the propagation of a strong blast wave launched by the interaction of an intense short pulse laser with a solid target. This blast wave is generated by the irradiation of the front surface of a layered, solid target with N 400 J of 1 pm laser radiation in a 20 ps pulse focused to a N 50 ,um diameter spot, which produces an intensity in excess of 1018 W/cm². These conditions approximate a point explosion and a blast wave is predicted to be generated with an initial pressure of several hundred megabars which decays as it travels approximately radially outward from the interaction region. We have utilized streaked optical pyrometry of the blast front to determine its time of arrival at the rear surface of the target. Applications of a self-similar Taylor-Sedov blast wave solution allows the amount of energy deposited to be estimated. By varying the parameters of the laser pulse which impinges on the target, pressures on the order of 1 Gbar with initial temperatures in excess of 1 kev are achievable. At these temperatures and densities radiative processes are coupled to the hydrodynamic evolution of the system. Short pulse lasers produce a unique environment for the study of coupled radiation-hydrodynamics in a laboratory setting.

  1. Facile linker free growth of CdS nanoshell on 1-D ZnO: Solar cell application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kamble, Archana; Sinha, Bhavesh; Chung, Kookchae; More, Anup; Vanalakar, Sharad; Hong, Chang Woo; Kim, Jin Hyeok; Patil, Pramod

    2015-03-01

    One dimensional type-II core/shell heterostructures are widely employed in solar cells because of their adventitious role in both light absorption and charge separation. Here we report a facile two step chemical approach to synthesizing ZnO/CdS core/shell nanorod arrays. ZnO nanorods (ZNR) with a high aspect ratio were grown using a hydrothermal technique where a uniform CdS shell was deposited using a facile, linker free, one pot, Hexamethylenetetramine (HMTA) based reflux technique for the first time. Though the reflux technique is quite similar to the chemical bath deposition technique (CBD), we obtained more uniform CdS coating and improved solar cell performance with the ZnO/CdS heterostructure compared to CBD-grown ZnO/CdS heterostructures. To obtain a conformal coating of CdS, we optimized the CdS deposition time. Formation of pure phase ZnO/CdS core/shell heterostructure was confirmed by high resolution transmission electron microscopy and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) depth analysis. Improved solar cell performance of 1.23% was obtained for ZnO/CdS core/shell structures with ZnS surface treatment. [Figure not available: see fulltext.

  2. A high-resolution, four-band SAR testbed with real-time image formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Walker, B.; Sander, G.; Thompson, M.; Burns, B.; Fellerhoff, R.; Dubbert, D.

    1996-03-01

    This paper describes the Twin-Otter SAR Testbed developed at Sandia National Laboratories. This SAR is a flexible, adaptable testbed capable of operation on four frequency bands: Ka, Ku, X, and VHF/UHF bands. The SAR features real-time image formation at fine resolution in spotlight and stripmap modes. High-quality images are formed in real time using the overlapped subaperture (OSA) image-formation and phase gradient autofocus (PGA) algorithms.

  3. International symposium on seismic evaluation of existing nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orbovic, N.; Bouchon, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Vendel, J.; Gelain, T. [IRSN/DPEA/SERAC, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-10-01

    Below are summarized the works of Mrs N. Orbovic and M. Bouchon; B. Stojadinovic, N. Orbovic, M.Bouchon and J.T. Wiley; M. Bouchon, N. Orbovic and B. Foure; T. Gelain, F. Gensdarmes, R. Sestier-Carlin, J. Vendel and M. Bouchon dealing respectively with: 1) seismic assessment of existing nuclear facility: a case study position of the IRSN 2) static and dynamic evaluation of an existing nuclear facility reinforced concrete frame structure 3) experimental study of cracking of low-rise reinforced concrete shear walls 4) aeraulics study of crack networks on low-rise reinforced concrete walls subject to static cycling loading. The summaries are followed: 1) The Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has the task of evaluating the seismic safety of existing building inventory in French nuclear facilities. Some of the existing structures are reinforced concrete frame buildings with masonry or reinforced concrete in-fill walls built during the 1960's, 70's and 80's following different building codes and seismic input data applicable at the time of construction. The studied building is a laboratory that was built in 1962. The building is composed of three different and independent blocks. The structure is a reinforced concrete frame with masonry in-fills and few stiff concrete elements. Moreover, the building contains an independent massive concrete cell. Structurally, the building has a number of irregularities. From the detailing standpoint, well known deficiencies of low-ductile reinforced concrete structures are evident especially, a lack of transverse reinforcement in the structural joints of the frame. A number of sensitivity studies were conducted using 2D and 3D linear models to evaluate seismic demand. Ambient vibration and regional earthquake records were used to check the soil nature and the existence or not of a possible site effect around the installation as well as to characterize the dynamic behavior of the building. 3D models

  4. Simple and facile approach to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles and assessment of their effects on blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotica, Luiz F., E-mail: lfcotica@pq.cnpq.br [Department of Physics, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Maringa, PR 87020900 (Brazil); Freitas, Valdirlei F.; Dias, Gustavo S.; Santos, Ivair A. [Department of Physics, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Maringa, PR 87020900 (Brazil); Vendrame, Sheila C.; Khalil, Najeh M.; Mainardes, Rubiana M. [Department of Pharmacy, Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste, Guarapuava, PR 85040080 (Brazil); Staruch, Margo; Jain, Menka [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, a very simple and facile approach for the large scale synthesis of uniform and size-controllable single-domain magnetite nanoparticles is reported. These magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via thermal decomposition of a ferric nitrate/ethylene glycol solution. The structural and morphological properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were carefully studied. Nearly spherical nanoparticles with inverted spinel structure and average particle and crystallite sizes smaller than 20 nm were obtained. The magnetic measurements revealed that magnetite nanoparticles have a magnetic saturation value near that of the bulk magnetite. The erythrocyte cytotoxicity assays showed no hemolytic potential of the samples containing magnetite nanoparticles, indicating no cytotoxic activity on human erythrocytes, which makes these interesting for biotechnological applications. - Highlights: > Simple and facile approach to large scale synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles. > Erythrocyte cytotoxicity assays showed no hemolytic potential of nanoparticles. > Saturation magnetization of nanoparticles reached near that of the bulk magnetite.

  5. Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell Subsystem Performance in the National Ignition Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-06-01

    6.25 Ω) pulse forming line (PFL) composed of eight sections of RG-217 configured in parallel, commutated by a thyratron (EEV Model CX-2282). The... thyratron -switched pulse generators is now complete, with the majority of the hardware deployed in the facility. An entire cluster (one-fourth of a...current pulse generators will be deployed in the NIF in support of PEPC. Production of solid-state plasma pulse generators and thyratron -switched pulse

  6. Dismantling of the 904 Cell at the HAO/Sud Facility - 13466

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudey, C.E.; Crosnier, S. [AREVA Clean-Up BU, 1 route de la Noue 91196 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Renouf, M.; Gaspard, N. [AREVA Clean-Up BU, Site de La Hague - BV 35 - 50444 Beaumont Hague (France); Pinot, L. [AREVA D and D BU, Site de La Hague - 50444 Beaumont Hague (France)

    2013-07-01

    La Hague facility, in France, is the spent fuel recycling plant wherein a part of the fuel coming from some of the French, German, Belgian, Swiss, Dutch and Japanese nuclear reactors is reprocessed before being recycled in order to separate certain radioactive elements. The facility has been successively handled by the CEA (1962-1978), Cogema (1978-2006), and AREVA NC (since 2006). La Hague facility is composed of 3 production units: The UP2-400 production unit started to be operated in 1966 for the reprocessing of UNGG metal fuel. In 1976, following the dropout of the graphite-gas technology by EDF, an HAO workshop to reprocess the fuel from the light water reactors is affiliated and then stopped in 2003. - UP2-400 is partially stopped in 2002 and then definitely the 1 January 2004 and is being dismantled - UP2-800, with the same capacity than UP3, started to be operated in 1994 and is still in operation. And UP3 - UP3 was implemented in 1990 with an annual reprocessing capacity of 800 tons of fuel and is still in operation The combined licensed capacity of UP2-800 and UP3 is 1,700 tons of used fuel. (authors)

  7. Antibody-membrane switch (AMS) technology for facile cell line development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Bo; Wages, John M; Larrick, James W

    2014-10-01

    Generation of high-productivity cell lines remains a major bottleneck in therapeutic antibody development. Conventional cell line development often depends on gene amplification methodologies using dihydrofolate reductase or glutamine synthetase. Higher productivity is associated with an increased gene copy number. However, lack of selection pressure under the conditions of large-scale manufacturing leads to clonal instability. We have developed a novel method for cell line development, antibody-membrane switch (AMS) technology, that does not rely on gene amplification. This fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS)-based, high-throughput method is facilitated by cell-surface antibody expression to rapidly and efficiently isolate high-producing cells. The switch between membrane expression and secretion is achieved by alternative splicing and specific DNA recombination. The antibody of interest is initially displayed on the cell surface to facilitate FACS. Isolated high-producing cells are then seamlessly transformed into production cells after removing the membrane-anchoring domain sequence with a DNA recombinase. AMS technology has been applied in a number of antibody cell line development projects, which typically last 2-3 months. The top production cell lines exhibit very high specific productivity of 40-60 pg/cell/day resulting in production titers of 2-4 g/l in 10-day batch culture.

  8. Development of a Smart MicroGrid Testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wei-Jen; Wetz, David

    2013-04-25

    Demand for electricity is rapidly increasing thereby applying pressure to expand generation and distribution capacity worldwide. The expansion of traditional services not only imposes burdens on financial resources but also encounters many challenges from community residents who oppose the construction of new power generation plants or transmission facilities in their backyard. From the integrated resource planning point of view, a feasible and economical remedy is, therefore, to utilize existing dispersed generation capacity known as distributed generation (DG) and/or renewable energy resources that may exist in the vicinity of the load centers. The main criteria for selecting the type of fuel source for a DG is its local availability, conversion system technological advancement, impact on the environment, and operating cost. DG’s have existed in the market for many years. Large diesel or gas powered generation sets are used in stand-by mode to power up vital services such as hospitals, financial and commercial compounds, telecommunication centers and industrial premises. Wind turbines, photovoltaic energy sources, and fuel cells are new comers that are now competing in size and efficiency with many standard generating sets. With this in mind, they are being used in many places not only as stand-by units but as the prime source of power particularly when the $/kWhr rate is high[1-5].

  9. TORCH Computational Reference Kernels - A Testbed for Computer Science Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Alex; Williams, Samuel Webb; Madduri, Kamesh; Ibrahim, Khaled; Bailey, David H.; Demmel, James W.; Strohmaier, Erich

    2010-12-02

    For decades, computer scientists have sought guidance on how to evolve architectures, languages, and programming models in order to improve application performance, efficiency, and productivity. Unfortunately, without overarching advice about future directions in these areas, individual guidance is inferred from the existing software/hardware ecosystem, and each discipline often conducts their research independently assuming all other technologies remain fixed. In today's rapidly evolving world of on-chip parallelism, isolated and iterative improvements to performance may miss superior solutions in the same way gradient descent optimization techniques may get stuck in local minima. To combat this, we present TORCH: A Testbed for Optimization ResearCH. These computational reference kernels define the core problems of interest in scientific computing without mandating a specific language, algorithm, programming model, or implementation. To compliment the kernel (problem) definitions, we provide a set of algorithmically-expressed verification tests that can be used to verify a hardware/software co-designed solution produces an acceptable answer. Finally, to provide some illumination as to how researchers have implemented solutions to these problems in the past, we provide a set of reference implementations in C and MATLAB.

  10. Articulated navigation testbed (ANT): an example of adaptable intrinsic mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosinsky, Chris A.; Hanna, Doug M.; Penzes, Steven G.

    2000-07-01

    An important but oft overlooked aspect of any robotic system is the synergistic benefit of designing the chassis to have high intrinsic mobility which complements rather than limits, its system capabilities. This novel concept continues to be investigated by the Defence Research Establishment Suffield (DRES) with the Articulated Navigation Testbed (ANT) Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV). The ANT demonstrates high mobility through the combination of articulated steering and a hybrid locomotion scheme which utilizes individually powered wheels on the edge of rigid legs; legs which are capable of approximately 450 degrees of rotation. The configuration can be minimally configured as a 4x4 and modularly expanded to 6x6, 8x8, and so on. This enhanced mobility configuration permits pose control and novel maneuvers such as stepping, bridging, crawling, etc. Resultant mobility improvements, particularly in unstructured and off-road environments, will reduce the resolution with which the UGV sensor systems must perceive its surroundings and decreases the computational requirements of the UGV's perception systems1 for successful semi-autonomous or autonomous terrain negotiation. This paper reviews critical vehicle developments leading up to the ANT concept, describes the basis for its configuration and speculates on the impact of the intrinsic mobility concept for UGV effectiveness.

  11. A satellite orbital testbed for SATCOM using mobile robots

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Dan; Lu, Wenjie; Wang, Zhonghai; Jia, Bin; Wang, Gang; Wang, Tao; Chen, Genshe; Blasch, Erik; Pham, Khanh

    2016-05-01

    This paper develops and evaluates a satellite orbital testbed (SOT) for satellite communications (SATCOM). SOT can emulate the 3D satellite orbit using the omni-wheeled robots and a robotic arm. The 3D motion of satellite is partitioned into the movements in the equatorial plane and the up-down motions in the vertical plane. The former actions are emulated by omni-wheeled robots while the up-down motions are performed by a stepped-motor-controlled-ball along a rod (robotic arm), which is attached to the robot. The emulated satellite positions will go to the measure model, whose results will be used to perform multiple space object tracking. Then the tracking results will go to the maneuver detection and collision alert. The satellite maneuver commands will be translated to robots commands and robotic arm commands. In SATCOM, the effects of jamming depend on the range and angles of the positions of satellite transponder relative to the jamming satellite. We extend the SOT to include USRP transceivers. In the extended SOT, the relative ranges and angles are implemented using omni-wheeled robots and robotic arms.

  12. Low frame rate video target localization and tracking testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Yu; Shen, Dan; Chen, Genshe; Liang, Pengpeng; Pham, Khanh; Blasch, Erik; Wang, Zhonghai; Ling, Haibin

    2013-05-01

    Traditional tracking frameworks are challenged by low video frame rate scenarios, because the appearances and locations of the target may change considerably in consecutive frames. Our paper presents a saliency-based temporal association dependency (STAD) framework to deal with such a low frame rate scenario and demonstrate good results in our robot testbed. We first use median filter to create a background of the scene, then apply background subtraction to every new frame to decide the rough position of the target. With the help of the markers on the robots, we use a gradient voting algorithm to detect the high responses of the directions of the robots. Finally, a template matching with branch pruning is used to obtain the finer estimation of the pose of the robots. To make the tracking-by-detection framework stable, we further introduce the temporal constraints using a previously detected result as well as an association technique. Our experiments show that our method can achieve a very stable tracking result and outperforms some state-of-the-art trackers such as Meanshift, Online-AdaBoosting, Mulitple-Instance-Learning, Tracking-Learning-Detection etc. Also. we demonstrate that our algorithm provides near real-time solutions given the low frame rate requirement.

  13. Priority scheme planning for the robust SSM/PMAD testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elges, Michael R.; Ashworth, Barry R.

    Whenever mixing priorities of manually controlled resources with those of autonomously controlled resources, the space station module power management and distribution (SSM/PMAD) environment requires cooperating expert system interaction between the planning function and the priority manager. The elements and interactions of the SSM/PMAD planning and priority management functions are presented. Their adherence to cooperating for common achievement are described. In the SSM/PMAD testbed these actions are guided by having a system planning function, KANT, which has insight to the executing system and its automated database. First, the user must be given access to all information which may have an effect on the desired outcome. Second, the fault manager element, FRAMES, must be informed as to the change so that correct diagnoses and operations take place if and when faults occur. Third, some element must engage as mediator for selection of resources and actions to be added or removed at the user's request. This is performed by the priority manager, LPLMS. Lastly, the scheduling mechanism, MAESTRO, must provide future schedules adhering to the user modified resource base.

  14. An integrated dexterous robotic testbed for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Larry C.; Nguyen, Hai; Sauer, Edward

    1992-01-01

    An integrated dexterous robotic system was developed as a testbed to evaluate various robotics technologies for advanced space applications. The system configuration consisted of a Utah/MIT Dexterous Hand, a PUMA 562 arm, a stereo vision system, and a multiprocessing computer control system. In addition to these major subsystems, a proximity sensing system was integrated with the Utah/MIT Hand to provide capability for non-contact sensing of a nearby object. A high-speed fiber-optic link was used to transmit digitized proximity sensor signals back to the multiprocessing control system. The hardware system was designed to satisfy the requirements for both teleoperated and autonomous operations. The software system was designed to exploit parallel processing capability, pursue functional modularity, incorporate artificial intelligence for robot control, allow high-level symbolic robot commands, maximize reusable code, minimize compilation requirements, and provide an interactive application development and debugging environment for the end users. An overview is presented of the system hardware and software configurations, and implementation is discussed of subsystem functions.

  15. Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed signal excision software: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliament, Hugh A.

    1992-05-01

    The Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) signal excision software is a set of programs that provide real-time processing functions for the excision of interfering tones from a live spread-spectrum signal as well as off-line functions for the analysis of the effectiveness of the excision technique. The processing functions provided by the ASPT signal excision software are real-time adaptive filtering of live data, storage to disk, and file sorting and conversion. The main off-line analysis function is bit error determination. The purpose of the software is to measure the effectiveness of an adaptive filtering algorithm to suppress interfering or jamming signals in a spread spectrum signal environment. A user manual for the software is provided, containing information on the different software components available to perform signal excision experiments: the real-time excision software, excision host program, file processing utilities, and despreading and bit error rate determination software. In addition, information is presented describing the excision algorithm implemented, the real-time processing framework, the steps required to add algorithms to the system, the processing functions used in despreading, and description of command sequences for post-run analysis of the data.

  16. Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed application software: User's manual

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parliament, Hugh A.

    1992-05-01

    The Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) application software is a set of programs that provide general data acquisition and minimal processing functions on live digital data. The data are obtained from a digital input interface whose data source is the DAR4000 digital quadrature receiver that receives a phase shift keying signal at 21.4 MHz intermediate frequency. The data acquisition software is used to acquire raw unprocessed data from the DAR4000 and store it on disk in the Sun workstation based ASPT. File processing utilities are available to convert the stored files for analysis. The data evaluation software is used for the following functions: acquisition of data from the DAR4000, conversion to IEEE format, and storage to disk; acquisition of data from the DAR4000, power spectrum estimation, and on-line plotting on the graphics screen; and processing of disk file data, power spectrum estimation, and display and/or storage to disk in the new format. A user's guide is provided that describes the acquisition and evaluation programs along with how to acquire, evaluate, and use the data.

  17. A Test-Bed Configuration: Toward an Autonomous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, F.; Castillo, M.; Uranga, E.; Ponz, J. D.; TBT Consortium

    2015-09-01

    In the context of the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) program of ESA, it is foreseen to deploy several large robotic telescopes in remote locations to provide surveillance and tracking services for man-made as well as natural near-Earth objects (NEOs). The present project, termed Telescope Test Bed (TBT) is being developed under ESA's General Studies and Technology Programme, and shall implement a test-bed for the validation of an autonomous optical observing system in a realistic scenario, consisting of two telescopes located in Spain and Australia, to collect representative test data for precursor NEO services. In order to fulfill all the security requirements for the TBT project, the use of a autonomous emergency system (AES) is foreseen to monitor the control system. The AES will monitor remotely the health of the observing system and the internal and external environment. It will incorporate both autonomous and interactive actuators to force the protection of the system (i.e., emergency dome close out).

  18. Digital Preservation Theory and Application: Transcontinental Persistent Archives Testbed Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Watry

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA and EU SHAMAN projects are working with multiple research institutions on tools and technologies that will supply a comprehensive, systematic, and dynamic means for preserving virtually any type of electronic record, free from dependence on any specific hardware or software. This paper describes the joint development work between the University of Liverpool and the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC at the University of California, San Diego on the NARA and SHAMAN prototypes. The aim is to provide technologies in support of the required generic data management infrastructure. We describe a Theory of Preservation that quantifies how communication can be accomplished when future technologies are different from those available at present. This includes not only different hardware and software, but also different standards for encoding information. We describe the concept of a “digital ontology” to characterize preservation processes; this is an advance on the current OAIS Reference Model of providing representation information about records. To realize a comprehensive Theory of Preservation, we describe the ongoing integration of distributed shared collection management technologies, digital library browsing, and presentation technologies for the NARA and SHAMAN Persistent Archive Testbeds.

  19. Waste to Watts and Water: Enabling Self-Contained Facilities Using Microbial Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2008-05-01

    Logan et al., "Microbial Fuel Cells: Methodology and Technology," Environmental Science & Technology 40, no. 17 (2006): 5189. 60 M. A. Rodrigo et al...348. 67 Bruce Logan et al., "Graphite Fiber Brush Anodes for Increased Power Production in Air-Cathode Microbial Fuel Cells," Environmental Science & Technology 41...34Diversifying Biological Fuel Cell Designs by Use of Nanoporous Filters," Environmental Science & Technology 41, no. 4 (2007). 76 Eliza M. Tsui and

  20. Facile fabrication of tissue-engineered constructs using nanopatterned cell sheets and magnetic levitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penland, Nisa; Choi, Eunpyo; Perla, Mikael; Park, Jungyul; Kim, Deok-Ho

    2017-02-01

    We report a simple and versatile method for in vitro fabrication of scaffold-free tissue-engineered constructs with predetermined cellular alignment, by combining magnetic cell levitation with thermoresponsive nanofabricated substratum (TNFS) based cell sheet engineering technique. The TNFS based nanotopography provides contact guidance cues for regulation of cellular alignment and enables cell sheet transfer, while magnetic nanoparticles facilitate the magnetic levitation of the cell sheet. The temperature-mediated change in surface wettability of the thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide), substratum enables the spontaneous detachment of cell monolayers, which can then be easily manipulated through use of a ring or disk shaped magnet. Our developed platform could be readily applicable to production of tissue-engineered constructs containing complex physiological structures for the study of tissue structure-function relationships, drug screening, and regenerative medicine.

  1. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  2. Human Exploration System Test-Bed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) Support of Future NASA Deep-Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmolejo, Jose; Ewert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Engineering Directorate at the NASA - Johnson Space Center is outfitting a 20-Foot diameter hypobaric chamber in Building 7 to support future deep-space Environmental Control & Life Support System (ECLSS) research as part of the Human Exploration System Test-bed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) Project. This human-rated chamber is the only NASA facility that has the unique experience, chamber geometry, infrastructure, and support systems capable of conducting this research. The chamber was used to support Gemini, Apollo, and SkyLab Missions. More recently, it was used to conduct 30-, 60-, and 90-day human ECLSS closed-loop testing in the 1990s to support the International Space Station and life support technology development. NASA studies show that both planetary surface and deep-space transit crew habitats will be 3-4 story cylindrical structures driven by human occupancy volumetric needs and launch vehicle constraints. The HESTIA facility offers a 3-story, 20-foot diameter habitat consistent with the studies' recommendations. HESTIA operations follow stringent processes by a certified test team that including human testing. Project management, analysis, design, acquisition, fabrication, assembly and certification of facility build-ups are available to support this research. HESTIA offers close proximity to key stakeholders including astronauts, Human Research Program (who direct space human research for the agency), Mission Operations, Safety & Mission Assurance, and Engineering Directorate. The HESTIA chamber can operate at reduced pressure and elevated oxygen environments including those proposed for deep-space exploration. Data acquisition, power, fluids and other facility resources are available to support a wide range of research. Recently completed HESTIA research consisted of unmanned testing of ECLSS technologies. Eventually, the HESTIA research will include humans for extended durations at reduced pressure and elevated oxygen to demonstrate

  3. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the west cell line in the 235-F plutonium fuel form facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, A. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Diprete, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-09-01

    On August 29th, 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 6-9 on the west line of the PuFF facility using an uncollimated, highpurity germanium detector. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the West Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table below along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are given as 1σ. The total holdup in the West Cell Line was 2.4 ± 0.7 grams. This result is 0.6 g higher than the previous estimate, a 0.4σ difference.

  4. A Facile Synthesis of Granular ZnO Nanostructures for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Mahbubur Rahman

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Granular ZnO nanostructures of single-crystalline wurtzite hexagonal phases were synthesized by a facile and low-cost chemical method in aqueous condition. The average size of ZnO nanograin increased with reflux time, and it significantly affected the open circuit potential (Voc while the short circuit current density (Jsc was not changed much. The overall energy conversion efficiency was 1.82% with the smaller grain size of ca. 250 nm when it was used as photoelectrode of DSSCs. The positive shifting of the Fermi energy (EF and low density of surface states (DOS were consistent with the reduction of the recombination of excited electron with electrolyte for smaller grains.

  5. Inactivation of stable viruses in cell culture facilities by peracetic acid fogging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gregersen, Jens-Peter; Roth, Bernhard

    2012-07-01

    Looking for a robust and simple method to replace formaldehyde fumigation for the disinfection of virus-handling laboratories and facilities, we tested peracetic acid fogging as a method to inactivate stable viruses under practical conditions. Peracetic acid/hydrogen peroxide (5.8%/27.5%, 2.0 mL/m³) was diluted in sufficient water to achieve ≥ 70% relative humidity and was vaporized as peracetic acid fog in various positions in the laboratory. After vaporization, a 60 min exposure time, and venting of the laboratory, no residual virus was detected on any of the carriers (detection limit <1 infectious unit/sample volume tested). The log reduction values were 9.0 for reovirus, 6.4 for MVM parvovirus, and 7.65 for the polyomavirus. After more than 10 disinfection runs within 12 months, no damage or functional impairment of electrical and electronic equipment was noted.

  6. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  7. Earthbound Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles (UAVS) As Planetary Science Testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, D. C.; Bland, G.; Diaz, J. A.; Fladeland, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the technology of unmanned vehicles have greatly expanded the range of contemplated terrestrial operational environments for their use, including aerial, surface, and submarine. The advances have been most pronounced in the areas of autonomy, miniaturization, durability, standardization, and ease of operation, most notably (especially in the popular press) for airborne vehicles. Of course, for a wide range of planetary venues, autonomy at high cost of both money and risk, has always been a requirement. Most recently, missions to Mars have also featured an unprecedented degree of mobility. Combining the traditional planetary surface deployment operational and science imperatives with emerging, very accessible, and relatively economical small UAV platforms on Earth can provide flexible, rugged, self-directed, test-bed platforms for landed instruments and strategies that will ultimately be directed elsewhere, and, in the process, provide valuable earth science data. While the most direct transfer of technology from terrestrial to planetary venues is perhaps for bodies with atmospheres (and oceans), with appropriate technology and strategy accommodations, single and networked UAVs can be designed to operate on even airless bodies, under a variety of gravities. In this presentation, we present and use results and lessons learned from our recent earth-bound UAV volcano deployments, as well as our future plans for such, to conceptualize a range of planetary and small-body missions. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of students and colleagues at our home institutions, and the government of Costa Rica, without which our UAV deployments would not have been possible. This work was carried out, in part, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology under contract to NASA.

  8. High-contrast imager for Complex Aperture Telescopes (HiCAT): testbed design and coronagraph developments

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, E.; Pueyo, L.; Elliot, E.; Perrin, M. D.; Wallace, J.; Anderson, R. E.; Carlotti, A.; Groff, T. D.; Hartig, G. F.; Kasdin, J.; Lajoie, C.; Levecq, O.; Long, C.; Macintosh, B.; Mawet, D.; Norman, C. A.; Shaklan, S.; Sheckells, M.; Sivaramakrishnan, A.; Soummer, R.

    2014-01-01

    We present a new high-contrast imaging testbed designed to provide complete solutions for wavefront sensing and control and starlight suppression with complex aperture telescopes (NASA APRA; Soummer PI). This includes geometries with central obstruction, support structures, and/or primary mirror segmentation. Complex aperture telescopes are often associated with large telescope designs, which are considered for future space missions. However, these designs makes high-contrast imaging challenging because of additional diffraction features in the point spread function. We present a novel optimization approach for the testbed optical and opto-mechanical design that minimizes the impact of both phase and amplitude errors from the wave propagation of testbed optics surface errors. This design approach allows us to define the specification for the bench optics, which we then compare to the manufactured parts. We discuss the testbed alignment and first results. We also present our coronagraph design for different testbed pupil shapes (AFTA or ATLAST), which involves a new method for the optimization of Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraphs (APLC).

  9. High-contrast imaging testbed for Complex Aperture Telescopes (HiCAT) for future space missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choquet, E.; N'Diaye, M.; Pueyo, L.; Elliot, E.; Perrin, M. D.; Wallace, J. K.; Anderson, R.; Carlotti, A.; Groff, T.; Hartig, G.; Kasdin, N. J.; Lajoie, C.; Levecq, O.; Long, C.; Mawet, D.; Macintosh, B.; Norman, C.; Shaklan, S.; Sheckells, M.; Sivaramakrishnan, An; Soummer, R.

    2014-03-01

    Searching for nearby habitable worlds with direct imaging and spectroscopy will require a telescope large enough to provide angular resolution and sensitivity to planets around a significant sample of stars. Segmented telescopes are a compelling option to obtain such large apertures. However, these designs have a complex geometry (central obstruction, support structures, segmentation) that makes high contrast imaging challenging. We are developing a new high-contrast imaging testbed at STScI to provide an integrated solution for wavefront control and starlight suppression on complex aperture geometries. We present a novel optimization approach for the testbed optical and opto-mechanical design that minimizes the impact of both phase and amplitude errors from the wave propagation of testbed optics surface errors. This design approach allows us to define the specification for the bench optics, which we then compare to the manufactured parts. We discuss the testbed alignment and first results. We also present our coronagraph design for different testbed pupil shapes (AFTA or ATLAST), which involves a new method for the optimization of Apodized Pupil Lyot Coronagraphs (APLC).

  10. Scope and dissolution studies and characterization of irradiated nuclear fuel in Atalante Hot Cell Facilities (abstract and presentation slides)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dancausse, Jean-Philippe; Reynier Tronche, Nathalie; Ferlay, Gilles; Herlet, Nathalie; Eysseric, Cathrine; Esbelin, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Since 1999, several studies on nuclear fuels were realised in C11/C12 Atalante Hot Cell. This paper presents firstly an overview of the apparatus used for fuel dissolution and characterisation like reactor design, gas trapping flask and solid/liquid separation. Then, the general methodology is described as a function of fuel, temperature, reagents, showing for each step, the reachable experimental data: Dissolution rate, chemical and radiochemical fuel composition including volatile LLRN, insoluble mass, composition, morphology, cladding chemical, radiochemical and physical characterisation using SIMS (made in Cadarache/LECA facilities), MEB. To conclude, some of the obtained results on 129I and 14C composition of oxide fuels, rate of dissolution and first results on dissolution studies of RERTR UMo fuel will be detailed. (Author)

  11. Toward the Facile and Ecofriendly Fabrication of Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells via Thiol Coadsorbent Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jia-Yaw; Li, Chen-Hei; Chiang, Ya-Han; Chen, Chia-Hung; Li, Pei-Ni

    2016-07-27

    This paper reports a facile and environmentally friendly approach to the preparation of highly efficient quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) based on a combination of aqueous CuInS2 quantum dots (QDs) and thiol coadsorbents. The photovoltaic properties of the QDSSCs were found to be dependent on the type and concentration of the thiol coadsorbent. The incorporation of thiol coadsorbents results in improved JSC and VOC because (1) they provide disulfide reductants during the QD sensitization process and (2) the coadsorbent molecules are anchored on the TiO2 surface, thus affecting the movement of the conduction band of TiO2. To the best of the our knowledge, this is the first demonstrated use of various thiol coadsorbents as reducing agents in the fabrication of high-efficiency QDSSCs. CuInS2 QDSSCs fabricated with the assistance of thioglycolic acid coadsorbents exhibited efficiencies as high as 5.90%, which is 20 times higher than that of the control device without thiol coadsorbents (0.29%). In addition, the photovoltaic properties of a device fabricated using the colloidal CuInS2 QDs coated with different bifunctional linkers were investigated for comparison. The versatility of this facile fabrication process was demonstrated in the preparation of solar cells sensitized with aqueous AgInS2 or CdSeTe QDs. The AgInS2 QDSSC showed a conversion efficiency of 2.72%, which is the highest reported for Ag-based metal sulfides QDSSCs thus far.

  12. Facile preparation of titanium dioxide nano-capsule arrays used as photo-anode for dye sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Penglei; Li, Hongyi, E-mail: lhy06@bjut.edu.cn; Wang, Jinshu, E-mail: wangjsh@bjut.edu.cn; Wu, Junshu; Zhao, Bingxin; Wang, Fei

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles have been introduced into TiO{sub 2} nanotube using a facile liquid phase deposition method at low temperature in atmosphere. • Dye solar cells have been assembled on flexible titanium substrate. • The incident photo-electron conversion efficiency has been improved 76% compared with pure TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays. - Abstract: To improve titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotube arrays’ performance on dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), TiO{sub 2} nano-capsule arrays (TNCP) have been designed and prepared by planting TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles into TiO{sub 2} nanotube (TNT) using a facile liquid phase deposition (LPD) route which does not require any special equipment and both improve the specific surface area and surface energy of TNT at low temperature. It has been found that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are homogeneously distributed along the wall of TNT and their crystal size is calculated to be 5–10 nm. The obtained TNCP's specific surface area and surface energy have been increased from 27.1 (for pure TNT) to 33.4 m{sup 2}/g and from 67.7 (for pure TNT) to 76.4 mJ/m{sup 2}, respectively. When used as photo-anodes of DSSCs, TNCP shows higher energy conversion efficiency, which is 1.7 times that of pure TNT. Therefore, the present work provides one effective strategy to better TNT's performance on DSSCs, which can be assembled on metal substrate in large scale.

  13. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the east cell line in the 235-F Plutonium fuel form facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diprete, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-08-21

    On September 17th -19th , 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 1-5 on the east line of the PuFF facility using a well-collimated, high-purity germanium detector. The cell interiors were assayed along with the furnaces and storage coolers that protrude beneath the cells. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the East Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table on the following page along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are reported at 1σ. Summing the assay results and treating MDAs as M238Pu= 0 ± MDA, the total holdup in the East Cell Line was 240 ± 40 grams. This result is 100 grams lower than the previous estimate, a 0.55σ difference. The uncertainty in the Pu-238 holdup is also reduced substantially relative to the 2006 scoping assay. However, the current assay results are in agreement with the 2006 scoping assay results due to the large uncertainty associated with the 2006 scoping assays. The current assay results support the conclusion that the 2006 results bound the Pu-238 mass in Cells 1-5. These results should be considered preliminary since additional measurements of the East Cell line are scheduled for 2017 and 2018. Those measurements will provide detailed information about the distribution of Pu-238 in the cells to be used to refine the results of the current assay.

  14. Facile microwave synthesis, characterization, and solar cell application of selenium nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panahi-Kalamuei, Mokhtar [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317-51167, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317-51167, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinpour-Mashkani, S. Mostafa [Young Researchers and Elites Club, Kashan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • Selenium (Se) nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple microwave method. • The effects of preparation parameters were investigated. • A preliminary study on the possibility of developing a solar cell having FTO/TiO{sub 2}/Se/Pt-FTO. - Abstract: In the current study, selenium (Se) nanoparticles with hexagonal phase were synthesized by applying microwave irradiation using selenium tetrachloride as a starting reagent in distilled water at various conditions. Se nanoparticles were formed using hydrazine in short reaction time (4 min). The effects of reaction time, irradiation power, and types of surfactant including sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), polyethylene glycol 600 (PEG 600), and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on the particle size of the product were investigated. To fabricate a FTO/TiO{sub 2}/Se/Pt-FTO and FTO/Se/CdS/Pt-FTO solar cell, selenium film was directly deposited on top of the TiO{sub 2} and FTO glass prepared by Doctor’s blade method, respectively. Solar cell results indicate that an inexpensive solar cell could be developed by synthesis of Se nanoparticles through microwave method.

  15. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Simulation Testbed I: Overview and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Perrin, Marshall D; Choquet, Élodie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Levecq, Olivier; Lajoie, Charles-Phillipe; Ygouf, Marie; Leboulleux, Lucie; Egron, Sylvain; Anderson, Rachel; Long, Chris; Elliott, Erin; Hartig, George; Pueyo, Laurent; van der Marel, Roeland; Mountain, Matt

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop workbench to study aspects of wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing optomechanical testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope, TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science & Operations Center. We have developed an optical design that reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat using three aspheric lenses; it provides similar image quality as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at HeNe wavelength. A segmented deformable mirror stands in for the segmented primary mirror and allows control of the 18 segments in piston, tip, and tilt, while the secondary can be controlled in tip, tilt and x, y, z position. This will be sufficient to model many commissioning activities, to investigate field depende...

  16. Conceptual Design and Cost Estimate of a Subsonic NASA Testbed Vehicle (NTV) for Aeronautics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickol, Craig L.; Frederic, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A conceptual design and cost estimate for a subsonic flight research vehicle designed to support NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project goals is presented. To investigate the technical and economic feasibility of modifying an existing aircraft, a highly modified Boeing 717 was developed for maturation of technologies supporting the three ERA project goals of reduced fuel burn, noise, and emissions. This modified 717 utilizes midfuselage mounted modern high bypass ratio engines in conjunction with engine exhaust shielding structures to provide a low noise testbed. The testbed also integrates a natural laminar flow wing section and active flow control for the vertical tail. An eight year program plan was created to incrementally modify and test the vehicle, enabling the suite of technology benefits to be isolated and quantified. Based on the conceptual design and programmatic plan for this testbed vehicle, a full cost estimate of $526M was developed, representing then-year dollars at a 50% confidence level.

  17. Flight Testing of Guidance, Navigation and Control Systems on the Mighty Eagle Robotic Lander Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hannan, Mike; Rickman, Doug; Chavers, Greg; Adam, Jason; Becker, Chris; Eliser, Joshua; Gunter, Dan; Kennedy, Logan; O'Leary, Patrick

    2015-01-01

    During 2011 a series of progressively more challenging flight tests of the Mighty Eagle autonomous terrestrial lander testbed were conducted primarily to validate the GNC system for a proposed lunar lander. With the successful completion of this GNC validation objective the opportunity existed to utilize the Mighty Eagle as a flying testbed for a variety of technologies. In 2012 an Autonomous Rendezvous and Capture (AR&C) algorithm was implemented in flight software and demonstrated in a series of flight tests. In 2012 a hazard avoidance system was developed and flight tested on the Mighty Eagle. Additionally, GNC algorithms from Moon Express and a MEMs IMU were tested in 2012. All of the testing described herein was above and beyond the original charter for the Mighty Eagle. In addition to being an excellent testbed for a wide variety of systems the Mighty Eagle also provided a great learning opportunity for many engineers and technicians to work a flight program.

  18. Model-based beam control for illumination of remote objects, part II: laboratory testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Santasri; Voelz, David; Chandler, Susan M.; Lukesh, Gordon W.; Sjogren, Jon

    2004-10-01

    When a laser beam propagates through the atmosphere, it is subject to corrupting influences including mechanical vibrations, turbulence and tracker limitations. As a result, pointing errors can occur, causing loss of energy or signal at the target. Nukove Scientific Consulting has developed algorithms to estimate these pointing errors from the statistics of the return photons from the target. To prove the feasibility of this approach for real-time estimation, an analysis tool called RHINO was developed by Nukove. Associated with this effort, New Mexico State University developed a laboratory testbed, the ultimate objective being to test the estimation algorithms under controlled conditions and to stream data into RHINO to prove the feasibility of real-time operation. The present paper outlines the description of this testbed and the results obtained through RHINO when the testbed was used to test the estimation approach.

  19. High-contrast imager for Complex Aperture Telescopes (HiCAT): 1. Testbed design

    CERN Document Server

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Elliot, Erin; Perrin, Marshall D; Wallace, J Kent; Groff, Tyler; Carlotti, Alexis; Mawet, Dimitri; Sheckells, Matt; Shaklan, Stuart; Macintosh, Bruce; Kasdin, N Jeremy; Soummer, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    Searching for nearby habitable worlds with direct imaging and spectroscopy will require a telescope large enough to provide angular resolution and sensitivity to planets around a significant sample of stars. Segmented telescopes are a compelling option to obtain such large apertures. However, these telescope designs have a complex geometry (central obstruction, support structures, segmentation) that makes high-contrast imaging more challenging. We are developing a new high-contrast imaging testbed at STScI to provide an integrated solution for wavefront control and starlight suppression on complex aperture geometries. We present our approach for the testbed optical design, which defines the surface requirements for each mirror to minimize the amplitude-induced errors from the propagation of out-of-pupil surfaces. Our approach guarantees that the testbed will not be limited by these Fresnel propagation effects, but only by the aperture geometry. This approach involves iterations between classical ray-tracing o...

  20. R and D needs assessment for the Engineering Test Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1980-10-01

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF), planned to be the next major US magnetic fusion device, has its mission (1) to provide the capability for moving into the engineering phase of fusion development and (2) to provide a test-bed for reactor components in a fusion environment. The design, construction, and operation of the ETF requires an increasing emphasis on certain key research and development (R and D) programs in magnetic fusion in order to provide the necessary facility design base. This report identifies these needs and discusses the apparent inadequacies of the presently planned US program to meet them, commensurate with the ETF schedule.

  1. Facile preparation of smooth perovskite films for efficient meso/planar hybrid structured perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Meng; Yu, Hua; Yun, Jung-Ho; Lyu, Miaoqiang; Wang, Qiong; Wang, Lianzhou

    2015-06-21

    Smooth organolead halide perovskite films for meso/planar hybrid structured perovskite solar cells were prepared by a simple compressed air blow-drying method under ambient conditions. The resultant perovskite films show high surface coverage, leading to a device power conversion efficiency of over 10% with an open circuit voltage up to 1.003 V merely using pristine poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT) as a hole transporter.

  2. [Academic cell therapy facilities are challenged by European regulation on advanced therapy medicinal products].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chabannon, Christian; Sabatier, Florence; Rial-Sebbag, Emmanuelle; Calmels, Boris; Veran, Julie; Magalon, Guy; Lemarie, Claude; Mahalatchimy, Aurélie

    2014-05-01

    Regulation (EC) n° 1394/2007 from the European Parliament and the Council describes a new category of health products termed « Advanced Therapy Medicinal Products » (ATMPs). ATMPs derive from cell engineering, tissue engineering or genetic manipulations, and can in some instances be combined with medical devices. ATMPs are distributed and administered to patients, after biotechnology or pharmaceutical companies have obtained a marketing authorization that is granted by the European Commission on the basis of the European Medicines Agency (EMA) assessment. Seven years after the publication of the regulation, few of these therapies have received a marketing authorization, and even fewer have met commercial success, suggesting that a number of medical and economic issues still need to be sorted out in order to achieve sustainability in this field. The coexistence of three sets of rules for three categories of health products that are biologically and medically related - ATMPs, ATMPs produced under the hospital exemption rule, and cell therapy products (CTPs) (a specific legal category in France) that have long been used in hematopoietic cell transplantation - constitutes a complex regulatory framework. This situation raises significant issues for historical as well as emerging operators in this moving field that are discussed thereafter.

  3. Deploying SIP-based Mobile Exam Application onto Next Generation Network testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Barnawi, Ahmed; Emran, Muhammad; Khan, Asif Irshad; 10.1109/SIECPC.2011.5876936

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, mobile operators are faced with enormous challenges. Of such challenges, evolved user demands on personalized applications. Telecommunications industry as well as research community have paid enormous attention to Next Generation Networks (NGN) to address this challenge. NGN is perceived as a sophisticated platform where both application developers and mobile operators cooperate to develop user applications with enhanced quality of experience. The objective of this paper is twofold: first we present an introduction to state-of-the-art NGN testbed to be developed at KAU, and second we provide initial analysis for deploying a mobile application on top of the testbed.

  4. Virtual Pipeline System Testbed to Optimize the U.S. Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby S. Chapman; Prakash Krishniswami; Virg Wallentine; Mohammed Abbaspour; Revathi Ranganathan; Ravi Addanki; Jeet Sengupta; Liubo Chen

    2005-06-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a Virtual Pipeline System Testbed (VPST) for natural gas transmission. This study uses a fully implicit finite difference method to analyze transient, nonisothermal compressible gas flow through a gas pipeline system. The inertia term of the momentum equation is included in the analysis. The testbed simulate compressor stations, the pipe that connects these compressor stations, the supply sources, and the end-user demand markets. The compressor station is described by identifying the make, model, and number of engines, gas turbines, and compressors. System operators and engineers can analyze the impact of system changes on the dynamic deliverability of gas and on the environment.

  5. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, K. H. and others

    2000-03-01

    The objectives of this study are (1) the refurbishment for PIEF(Post Irradiation Examination Facility) and M6 hot-cell in IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility), (2) the establishment of the compatible facility for DUPIC fuel fabrication experiments which is licensed by government organization, and (3) the establishment of the transportation system and transportation cask for nuclear material between facilities. The report for this project describes following contents, such as objectives, necessities, scope, contents, results of current step, R and D plan in future and etc.

  6. Towards Autonomous Operations of the Robonaut 2 Humanoid Robotic Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Julia; Nguyen, Vienny; Mehling, Joshua; Hambuchen, Kimberly; Diftler, Myron; Luna, Ryan; Baker, William; Joyce, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The Robonaut project has been conducting research in robotics technology on board the International Space Station (ISS) since 2012. Recently, the original upper body humanoid robot was upgraded by the addition of two climbing manipulators ("legs"), more capable processors, and new sensors, as shown in Figure 1. While Robonaut 2 (R2) has been working through checkout exercises on orbit following the upgrade, technology development on the ground has continued to advance. Through the Active Reduced Gravity Offload System (ARGOS), the Robonaut team has been able to develop technologies that will enable full operation of the robotic testbed on orbit using similar robots located at the Johnson Space Center. Once these technologies have been vetted in this way, they will be implemented and tested on the R2 unit on board the ISS. The goal of this work is to create a fully-featured robotics research platform on board the ISS to increase the technology readiness level of technologies that will aid in future exploration missions. Technology development has thus far followed two main paths, autonomous climbing and efficient tool manipulation. Central to both technologies has been the incorporation of a human robotic interaction paradigm that involves the visualization of sensory and pre-planned command data with models of the robot and its environment. Figure 2 shows screenshots of these interactive tools, built in rviz, that are used to develop and implement these technologies on R2. Robonaut 2 is designed to move along the handrails and seat track around the US lab inside the ISS. This is difficult for many reasons, namely the environment is cluttered and constrained, the robot has many degrees of freedom (DOF) it can utilize for climbing, and remote commanding for precision tasks such as grasping handrails is time-consuming and difficult. Because of this, it is important to develop the technologies needed to allow the robot to reach operator-specified positions as

  7. Prevalence and Correlates of Microalbuminuria in Children with Sickle Cell Anaemia: Experience in a Tertiary Health Facility in Enugu, Nigeria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Bismarck Eke

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Microalbuminuria is a pre-clinical marker of renal damage in children with sickle cell anaemia and can predict renal failure. Reported prevalence rates increased with age. In Nigeria, burden of disease and prevailing poor health facilities necessitate its screening, determination of prevalence and associated risk factors. It is a cross-sectional as well as descriptive study. Screening microalbuminuria used subjects’ early morning urine. Socio-demographic as well as clinical details were ascertained using semi-structured questionnaires and case files. Associations and statistical relationship of prevalence rates and clinical/epidemiological data were ascertained using chi-squared and multivariate analysis . Two hundred children with sickle cell anaemia (4–17 years in steady state and 200 age/gender-matched controls were enrolled. Prevalence of microalbuminuria was ,respectively, 18.5% and 2.5% for subjects and controls . Microalbuminuria was commoner in females (19.8% than males (17.4% , increased with age , significantly associated with haemoglobin level and hospitalizations (0.001. Subjects had normal renal function. Hospitalizations and haemoglobin levels showed statistical significance on multivariate analysis. Prevalence of microalbuminuria is 18.5%. Age, haemoglobin concentrations, and higher hospitalizations influenced microalbuminuria among subjects. Screening for microalbuminuria should be incorporated in the case management of subjects with identified risk factors.

  8. Facile fabrication of three-dimensional TiO2 structures for highly efficient perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Segeun; Yoon, Jungjin; Ha, Kyungyeon; Kim, Min-cheol; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kim, Sang Moon; Kang, Seong Min; Park, Sei Jin; Jung, Hyun Suk; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-04-01

    The capability of fabricating three dimensional (3-D) nanostructures with desired morphology is a key to realizing effective light-harvesting strategy in optical applications. In this work, we report a novel 3-D nanopatterning technique that combines ion-assisted aerosol lithography (IAAL) and soft lithography that serves as a facile method to fabricate 3-D nanostructures. Aerosol nanoparticles can be assembled into desired 3-D nanostructures via ion-induced electrostatic focusing and antenna effects from charged nanoparticle structures. Replication of the structures with a polymeric mold allows high throughput fabrication of 3-D nanostructures with various liquid-soluble materials. 3-D flower-patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp was prepared using the reported technique and utilized for fabricating 3-D nanopatterned mesoporous TiO2 layer, which was employed as the electron transport layer in perovskite solar cells. By incorporating the 3-D nanostructures, absorbed photon-to-current efficiency of >95% at 650 nm wavelength and overall power conversion efficiency of 15.96% were achieved. The enhancement can be attributed to an increase in light harvesting efficiency in a broad wavelength range from 400 to 800 nm and more efficient charge collection from enlarged interfacial area between TiO2 and perovskite layers. This hybrid nanopatterning technique has demonstrated to be an effective method to create textures that increase light harvesting and charge collection with 3-D nanostructures in solar cells.

  9. Roll-to-Roll Inkjet Printing and Photonic Sintering of Electrodes for ITO Free Polymer Solar Cell Modules and Facile Product Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angmo, Dechan; Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Jørgensen, Mikkel

    2013-01-01

    Small polymer solar cell modules that are manufactured without indium-tin-oxide using only roll-to-roll printing and coating techniques under ambient conditions enable facile integration into a simple demonstrator (for example a laser pointer). Semitransparent front electrode grid structures...

  10. Calculation Package for the Analysis of Performance of Cells 1-6, with Underdrain, of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gonzales D.

    2010-03-30

    This calculation package presents the results of an assessment of the performance of the 6 cell design of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The calculations show that the new cell 6 design at the EMWMF meets the current WAC requirement. QA/QC steps were taken to verify the input/output data for the risk model and data transfer from modeling output files to tables and calculation.

  11. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Choi, J. W.; Go, W. I.; Kim, H. D.; Song, K. C.; Jeong, I. H.; Park, H. S.; Im, C. S.; Lee, H. M.; Moon, K. H.; Hong, K. P.; Lee, K. S.; Suh, K. S.; Kim, E. K.; Min, D. K.; Lee, J. C.; Chun, Y. B.; Paik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.; Yoo, G. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, J. C.

    1997-09-01

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs.

  12. Review of Catalytic Hydrogen Generation in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Chemical Processing Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koopman, D. C.

    2004-12-31

    This report was prepared to fulfill the Phase I deliverable for HLW/DWPF/TTR-98-0018, Rev. 2, ''Hydrogen Generation in the DWPF Chemical Processing Cell'', 6/4/2001. The primary objective for the preliminary phase of the hydrogen generation study was to complete a review of past data on hydrogen generation and to prepare a summary of the findings. The understanding was that the focus should be on catalytic hydrogen generation, not on hydrogen generation by radiolysis. The secondary objective was to develop scope for follow-up experimental and analytical work. The majority of this report provides a summary of past hydrogen generation work with radioactive and simulated Savannah River Site (SRS) waste sludges. The report also includes some work done with Hanford waste sludges and simulants. The review extends to idealized systems containing no sludge, such as solutions of sodium formate and formic acid doped with a noble metal catalyst. This includes general information from the literature, as well as the focused study done by the University of Georgia for the SRS. The various studies had a number of points of universal agreement. For example, noble metals, such as Pd, Rh, and Ru, catalyze hydrogen generation from formic acid and formate ions, and more acid leads to more hydrogen generation. There were also some points of disagreement between different sources on a few topics such as the impact of mercury on the noble metal catalysts and the identity of the most active catalyst species. Finally, there were some issues of potential interest to SRS that apparently have not been systematically studied, e.g. the role of nitrite ion in catalyst activation and reactivity. The review includes studies covering the period from about 1924-2002, or from before the discovery of hydrogen generation during simulant sludge processing in 1988 through the Shielded Cells qualification testing for Sludge Batch 2. The review of prior studies is followed by a

  13. Evaluation of the First Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 1) Full-Scale Crash Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Littell, Justin D.; Jackson, Karen E.; Bark, Lindley W.; DeWeese, Rick L.; McEntire, B. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the NASA Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Program initiated the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program by obtaining two CH-46E helicopters from the Navy CH-46E Program Office (PMA-226) at the Navy Flight Readiness Center in Cherry Point, North Carolina. Full-scale crash tests were planned to assess dynamic responses of transport-category rotorcraft under combined horizontal and vertical impact loading. The first crash test (TRACT 1) was performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR), which enables the study of critical interactions between the airframe, seat, and occupant during a controlled crash environment. The CH-46E fuselage is categorized as a medium-lift rotorcraft with fuselage dimensions comparable to a regional jet or business jet. The first TRACT test (TRACT 1) was conducted in August 2013. The primary objectives for TRACT 1 were to: (1) assess improvements to occupant loads and displacement with the use of crashworthy features such as pre-tensioning active restraints and energy absorbing seats, (2) develop novel techniques for photogrammetric data acquisition to measure occupant and airframe kinematics, and (3) provide baseline data for future comparison with a retrofitted airframe configuration. Crash test conditions for TRACT 1 were 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocity onto soft soil, which represent a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. The extraordinary value of the TRACT 1 test was reflected by the breadth of meaningful experiments. A total of 8 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate ATD responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and photogrammetric techniques. A combination of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. Loads from ATDs in energy

  14. Microbeam facility extension for single-cell irradiation experiments. Investigations about bystander effect and reactive oxygen species impact

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanot, M.; Khodja, H.; Daudin, L.; Hoarau, J.; Carriere, M.; Gouget, B. [CEA Saclay, Lab. Pierre Sue (LPS), CEA-CNRS UMR9956, 91 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France)

    2006-07-01

    The LPS microbeam facility is based on a KN3750 Van de Graaff accelerator devoted to microbeam analysis [1]. It is equipped with two horizontal microbeam lines used in various fields such as material science, geological science, nuclear material science and biology. Since two years, a single ion hit device is being developed at the LPS. The setup is dedicated to the study of ionizing radiation effects on living cells by performing single ion irradiation at controlled doses and locations. This study will complete current researches conducted on uranium chemical toxicity on renal an d osteoblastic cells. After ingestion, most uranium is excreted from the body within a few days except small fraction that is absorbed into the blood-stream (0.2 to 5%) and then deposit and preferentially in kidneys and bones, where it can remain for many years. Uranium is a heavy metal and a primarily alpha emitter. It can lead to bone cancer as a result of the ionizing radiation associated with the radioactive decay products. The study of the response to an exposure to alpha particles will permit to distinguish radiotoxicity and chemical toxicity of uranium bone cells with a special emphasis or the bystander effect at low dose.All the beam lines at the LPS nuclear microprobe are horizontal and under vacuum. A dedicated deflecting magnet was inserted in one of the two available beam lines of the facility. The ion beam is extracted to air using a 100 nm thick silicon nitride membrane, thin enough to induce negligible effects on the ions in terms of energy loss and spatial resolution. By this way, we believe that we minimize the experimental setup impact on the living cells easing the detection of low irradiation dose impact. The atmosphere around the samples is also important to guaranty low stressed cell culture conditions. A temperature, hygrometry and CO{sub 2} controlled atmosphere device will be implanted in the future. The irradiation microbeam is produced using a fused silica

  15. Fabrication Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Fabrication Facilities are a direct result of years of testing support. Through years of experience, the three fabrication facilities (Fort Hood, Fort Lewis, and...

  16. Real-time video streaming using H.264 scalable video coding (SVC) in multihomed mobile networks: a testbed approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nightingale, James; Wang, Qi; Grecos, Christos

    2011-03-01

    Users of the next generation wireless paradigm known as multihomed mobile networks expect satisfactory quality of service (QoS) when accessing streamed multimedia content. The recent H.264 Scalable Video Coding (SVC) extension to the Advanced Video Coding standard (AVC), offers the facility to adapt real-time video streams in response to the dynamic conditions of multiple network paths encountered in multihomed wireless mobile networks. Nevertheless, preexisting streaming algorithms were mainly proposed for AVC delivery over multipath wired networks and were evaluated by software simulation. This paper introduces a practical, hardware-based testbed upon which we implement and evaluate real-time H.264 SVC streaming algorithms in a realistic multihomed wireless mobile networks environment. We propose an optimised streaming algorithm with multi-fold technical contributions. Firstly, we extended the AVC packet prioritisation schemes to reflect the three-dimensional granularity of SVC. Secondly, we designed a mechanism for evaluating the effects of different streamer 'read ahead window' sizes on real-time performance. Thirdly, we took account of the previously unconsidered path switching and mobile networks tunnelling overheads encountered in real-world deployments. Finally, we implemented a path condition monitoring and reporting scheme to facilitate the intelligent path switching. The proposed system has been experimentally shown to offer a significant improvement in PSNR of the received stream compared with representative existing algorithms.

  17. TiO2 nanowires for potential facile integration of solar cells and electrochromic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Pengfei; Chen, Zhongwei; Yang, Peihua; Cai, Xiang; Tan, Shaozao; Liu, Pengyi; Mai, Wenjie

    2013-11-01

    Self-powered systems usually consist of energy-acquisition components, energy-storage components and functional components. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology has greatly improved the performance of all the components of self-powered systems. However, huge differences in the materials and configurations in the components cause large difficulties for integration and miniaturization of self-powered systems. Design and fabrication of different components in a self-powered system with the same or similar materials/configurations should be able to make the above goal easier. In this work, a proof-of-concept experiment involving an integrated self-powered color-changing system consisting of TiO2 nanowire based sandwich dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and electrochromic devices (ECDs) is designed and demonstrated. When sunlight illuminates the entire system, the DSSCs generate electrical power and turn the ECD to a darker color, dimming the light; by switching the connection polarity of the DSSCs, the lighter color can be regained, implying the potential application of this self-powered color-changing system for next generation sun glasses and smart windows.

  18. TiO2 nanowires for potential facile integration of solar cells and electrochromic devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiang, Pengfei; Chen, Zhongwei; Yang, Peihua; Cai, Xiang; Tan, Shaozao; Liu, Pengyi; Mai, Wenjie

    2013-11-01

    Self-powered systems usually consist of energy-acquisition components, energy-storage components and functional components. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology has greatly improved the performance of all the components of self-powered systems. However, huge differences in the materials and configurations in the components cause large difficulties for integration and miniaturization of self-powered systems. Design and fabrication of different components in a self-powered system with the same or similar materials/configurations should be able to make the above goal easier. In this work, a proof-of-concept experiment involving an integrated self-powered color-changing system consisting of TiO2 nanowire based sandwich dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and electrochromic devices (ECDs) is designed and demonstrated. When sunlight illuminates the entire system, the DSSCs generate electrical power and turn the ECD to a darker color, dimming the light; by switching the connection polarity of the DSSCs, the lighter color can be regained, implying the potential application of this self-powered color-changing system for next generation sun glasses and smart windows.

  19. Standard guide for mechanical drive systems for remote operation in hot cell facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 Intent: 1.1.1 The intent of this standard is to provide general guidelines for the design, selection, quality assurance, installation, operation, and maintenance of mechanical drive systems used in remote hot cell environments. The term mechanical drive systems used herein, encompasses all individual components used for imparting motion to equipment systems, subsystems, assemblies, and other components. It also includes complete positioning systems and individual units that provide motive power and any position indicators necessary to monitor the motion. 1.2 Applicability: 1.2.1 This standard is intended to be applicable to equipment used under one or more of the following conditions: 1.2.1.1 The materials handled or processed constitute a significant radiation hazard to man or to the environment. 1.2.1.2 The equipment will generally be used over a long-term life cycle (for example, in excess of two years), but equipment intended for use over a shorter life cycle is not excluded. 1.2.1.3 The ...

  20. Laboratory validation of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph in broadband light at the high-contrast imaging THD-testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Delorme, J R; Galicher, R; Dohlen, K; Baudoz, P; Caillat, A; Rousset, G; Soummer, R; Dupuis, O

    2016-01-01

    Specific high contrast imaging instruments are mandatory to characterize circumstellar disks and exoplanets around nearby stars. Coronagraphs are commonly used in these facilities to reject the diffracted light of an observed star and enable the direct imaging and spectroscopy of its circumstellar environment. One important property of the coronagraph is to be able to work in broadband light. Among several proposed coronagraphs, the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph is a promising solution for starlight rejection in broadband light. In this paper, we perform the first validation of this concept in laboratory. First, we recall the principle of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph. Then, we describe the high-contrast imaging THD testbed, the manufacturing of the components and the quality-control procedures. Finally, we study the sensitivity of our coronagraph to low-order aberrations (inner working angle and defocus) and estimate its contrast performance. Our experimental broadband light results are compared wi...

  1. Facility Microgrids

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Z.; Walling, R.; Miller, N.; Du, P.; Nelson, K.

    2005-05-01

    Microgrids are receiving a considerable interest from the power industry, partly because their business and technical structure shows promise as a means of taking full advantage of distributed generation. This report investigates three issues associated with facility microgrids: (1) Multiple-distributed generation facility microgrids' unintentional islanding protection, (2) Facility microgrids' response to bulk grid disturbances, and (3) Facility microgrids' intentional islanding.

  2. An adaptable, low cost test-bed for unmanned vehicle systems research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goppert, James M.

    2011-12-01

    An unmanned vehicle systems test-bed has been developed. The test-bed has been designed to accommodate hardware changes and various vehicle types and algorithms. The creation of this test-bed allows research teams to focus on algorithm development and employ a common well-tested experimental framework. The ArduPilotOne autopilot was developed to provide the necessary level of abstraction for multiple vehicle types. The autopilot was also designed to be highly integrated with the Mavlink protocol for Micro Air Vehicle (MAV) communication. Mavlink is the native protocol for QGroundControl, a MAV ground control program. Features were added to QGroundControl to accommodate outdoor usage. Next, the Mavsim toolbox was developed for Scicoslab to allow hardware-in-the-loop testing, control design and analysis, and estimation algorithm testing and verification. In order to obtain linear models of aircraft dynamics, the JSBSim flight dynamics engine was extended to use a probabilistic Nelder-Mead simplex method. The JSBSim aircraft dynamics were compared with wind-tunnel data collected. Finally, a structured methodology for successive loop closure control design is proposed. This methodology is demonstrated along with the rest of the test-bed tools on a quadrotor, a fixed wing RC plane, and a ground vehicle. Test results for the ground vehicle are presented.

  3. Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) Performance, Characterization and Null Control: Progress Report

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Noecker, M. Charley; Kendrick, Stephen; Helmbrecht, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Herein we report on the development. sensing and control and our first results with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed to realize a Visible Nulling Coronagraph (VNC) for exoplanet coronagraphy. The VNC is one of the few approaches that works with filled. segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescope systems. It thus spans a range of potential future NASA telescopes and could be Hown as a separate instrument on such a future mission. NASA/Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop VNC technologies. and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and the enabling technologies associated with it. We discuss the continued development of the vacuum Visible Nulling Coronagraph testbed (VNT). Tbe VNT is an ultra-stable vibration isolated testbed that operates under closed-loop control within a vacuum chamber. It will be used to achieve an incremental sequence of three visible-light nulling milestones with sequentially higher contrasts of 10(sup 8), 10(sup 9) and ideally 10(sup 10) at an inner working angle of 2*lambda/D. The VNT is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a "W" configuration to accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters. We discuss the initial laboratory results, the optical configuration, critical technologies and the null sensing and control approach.

  4. The Design of Impact Test-Bed for High-Flow Water Medium Relief Valve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junliang Chang

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Water medium hydraulic systems are widely used in coal mining machinery. As the power of hydraulic system becomes higher, the flow and pressure of water medium relief valve are also higher, and the flow may reach 2000 L/min. However, there is no relevant test-bed which could provide instantaneous high-pressure and high-flow to support the experiment for high-flow relief valve; consequently, this impact test-bed for high-flow water medium relief valve is designed to satisfy fast loading demand. Through building model, simulation analysis, and construction of an impact test-bed of high-flow water medium relief valve, the dynamic performance of high-flow water medium relief valve is detected. The setting pressure of relief valve, the accumulator volume and the filling fluid pressure, and the damping of cartridge valve can be changed, and the dynamic performance of high-flow water medium relief valve under different impact loads is detected. The results show that the designed impact test-bed of high-flow water medium relief valve could provide required high-pressure and high-flow emulsion for the tested water medium relief valve, and it could control the strength of impact load, which is an energy saving, high efficiency, and low cost method.

  5. System identification and structural control on the JPL Phase B testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Cheng-Chih; Obrien, John F.; Lurie, Boris J.

    1993-02-01

    The primary objective of NASA's CSI program at JPL is to develop and demonstrate the CSI technology required to achieve high precision structural stability on large complex optical class spacecraft. The focus mission for this work is an orbiting interferometer telescope. Toward the realization of such a mission, a series of evolutionary testbed structures are being constructed. The JPL's CSI Phase B testbed is the second structure constructed in this series which is designed to study the pathlength control problem of the optical train of a stellar interferometer telescope mounted on a large flexible structure. A detailed description of this testbed can be found. This paper describes our efforts in the first phase of active structural control experiments of Phase B testbed using the active control approach where a single piezoelectric active member is used as an actuation device and the measurements include both colocated and noncolocated sensors. Our goal for this experiment is to demonstrate the feasibility of active structural control using both colocated and noncolocated measurements by means of successive control design and loop closing. More specifically, the colocated control loop was designed and closed first to provide good damping improvement over the frequency range of interest. The noncolocated controller was then designed with respect to a partially controlled structure to further improve the performance. Based on our approach, experimental closed-loop results have demonstrated significant performance improvement with excellent stability margins.

  6. Data Distribution Service-Based Interoperability Framework for Smart Grid Testbed Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek A. Youssef

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of a communication and control infrastructure for smart grid operation. The proposed infrastructure enhances the reliability of the measurements and control network. The advantages of utilizing the data-centric over message-centric communication approach are discussed in the context of smart grid applications. The data distribution service (DDS is used to implement a data-centric common data bus for the smart grid. This common data bus improves the communication reliability, enabling distributed control and smart load management. These enhancements are achieved by avoiding a single point of failure while enabling peer-to-peer communication and an automatic discovery feature for dynamic participating nodes. The infrastructure and ideas presented in this paper were implemented and tested on the smart grid testbed. A toolbox and application programing interface for the testbed infrastructure are developed in order to facilitate interoperability and remote access to the testbed. This interface allows control, monitoring, and performing of experiments remotely. Furthermore, it could be used to integrate multidisciplinary testbeds to study complex cyber-physical systems (CPS.

  7. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability -- Bench-scale Testbed Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melin, Alexander M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Drira, Anis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reed, Frederick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Embedded instrumentation and control systems that can operate in extreme environments are challenging due to restrictions on sensors and materials. As a part of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology cross-cutting technology development programs Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation topic, this report details the design of a bench-scale embedded instrumentation and control testbed. The design goal of the bench-scale testbed is to build a re-configurable system that can rapidly deploy and test advanced control algorithms in a hardware in the loop setup. The bench-scale testbed will be designed as a fluid pump analog that uses active magnetic bearings to support the shaft. The testbed represents an application that would improve the efficiency and performance of high temperature (700 C) pumps for liquid salt reactors that operate in an extreme environment and provide many engineering challenges that can be overcome with embedded instrumentation and control. This report will give details of the mechanical design, electromagnetic design, geometry optimization, power electronics design, and initial control system design.

  8. High-contrast imager for complex aperture telescopes (HiCAT): 1. testbed design

    Science.gov (United States)

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Choquet, Elodie; Pueyo, Laurent; Elliot, Erin; Perrin, Marshall D.; Wallace, J. Kent; Groff, Tyler; Carlotti, Alexis; Mawet, Dimitri; Sheckells, Matt; Shaklan, Stuart; Macintosh, Bruce; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Soummer, Rémi

    2013-09-01

    Searching for nearby habitable worlds with direct imaging and spectroscopy will require a telescope large enough to provide angular resolution and sensitivity to planets around a significant sample of stars. Segmented telescopes are a compelling option to obtain such large apertures. However, these telescope designs have a complex geometry (central obstruction, support structures, segmentation) that makes high-contrast imaging more challenging. We are developing a new high-contrast imaging testbed at STScI to provide an integrated solution for wavefront control and starlight suppression on complex aperture geometries. We present our approach for the testbed optical design, which defines the surface requirements for each mirror to minimize the amplitude-induced errors from the propagation of out-of-pupil surfaces. Our approach guarantees that the testbed will not be limited by these Fresnel propagation effects, but only by the aperture geometry. This approach involves iterations between classical ray-tracing optical design optimization, and end-to-end Fresnel propagation with wavefront control (e.g. Electric Field Conjugation / Stroke Minimization). The construction of the testbed is planned to start in late Fall 2013.

  9. A Facile Approach to Fabricate Water-soluble Au-Fe3O4 Nanoparticle for Liver Cancer Cells Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁重时; 吴献荣; 谢叶归; 刘顺英

    2012-01-01

    Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles were widely used as nanoplatforms for biologic applications through readily further functionalization. Dopamine (DA)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles (DA@Fe3O4) have been successfully synthesized using a one-step process by modified coprecipitation method. Then 2--3 nm gold nanoparticles were easily conjugated to DA@Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the electrostatic force between gold nanoparti- cles and amino groups of dopamine to afford water-soluble Au-Fe3O4 hybrid nanoparticles. A detailed investigation by dynamic light scatting (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were performed in order to characterize the physicochemical properties of the hybrid nanoparticles. The hybrid nanoparticles were easily functionalized with a targeted small peptide A54 (AGKGTPSLETTP) and fluorescence probe fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for liver cancer cell BEL-7402 imaging. This simple approach to prepare hybrid nanoparticles provides a facile nanoplatform for muti-functional derivations and may be extended to the immobilization of other metals or bimolecular on SPIO surface.

  10. Uncertainty and innovation: Understanding the role of cell-based manufacturing facilities in shaping regulatory and commercialization environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasi, Rosario; Rahimzadeh, Vasiliki; Charlebois, Kathleen

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study is to elucidate stakeholder perceptions of, and institutional practices related to cell-based therapies and products (CTP) regulation and commercialization in Canada. The development of reproducible, safe and effective CTPs is predicated on regulatory and commercialization environments that enable innovation. Manufacturing processes constitute a critical step for CTP development in this regard. The road from CTP manufacturing to translation in the clinic, however, has yet to be paved. This study aims to fill an empirical gap in the literature by exploring how CTP manufacturing facilities navigate Canadian regulatory and commercialization environments, which together drive the translation of novel CTPs from bench to bedside. Using the multi-level model of practice-driven institutional change proposed by Smets et al., we demonstrate how CTP manufacturing practices are governed by established standards, yet meaningfully shape higher-order regulatory and commercial norms in CTP research and development. We identify four key themes that undergird such processes of innovation: 1) managing regulatory uncertainty, which stems from an inability to classify CTPs within existing regulatory categories for approval and commercialization purposes; 2) building a 'business case' whereby a CTP's market potential is determined in large part by proving its safety and effectiveness; 3) standardizing manufacturing procedures that mobilize CTPs from a research and development phase to a commercialization one; and 4) networking between researchers and regulators to develop responsible commercialization processes that reflect the uniqueness of CTPs as distinct from other biologics and medical devices.

  11. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2006-03-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos.

  12. SCDU testbed automated in-situ alignment, data acquisition and analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werne, Thomas A.; Wehmeier, Udo J.; Wu, Janet P.; An, Xin; Goullioud, Renaud; Nemati, Bijan; Shao, Michael; Shen, Tsae-Pyng J.; Wang, Xu; Weilert, Mark A.; Zhai, Chengxing

    2010-07-01

    In the course of fulfilling its mandate, the Spectral Calibration Development Unit (SCDU) testbed for SIM-Lite produces copious amounts of raw data. To effectively spend time attempting to understand the science driving the data, the team devised computerized automations to limit the time spent bringing the testbed to a healthy state and commanding it, and instead focus on analyzing the processed results. We developed a multi-layered scripting language that emphasized the scientific experiments we conducted, which drastically shortened our experiment scripts, improved their readability, and all-but-eliminated testbed operator errors. In addition to scientific experiment functions, we also developed a set of automated alignments that bring the testbed up to a well-aligned state with little more than the push of a button. These scripts were written in the scripting language, and in Matlab via an interface library, allowing all members of the team to augment the existing scripting language with complex analysis scripts. To keep track of these results, we created an easilyparseable state log in which we logged both the state of the testbed and relevant metadata. Finally, we designed a distributed processing system that allowed us to farm lengthy analyses to a collection of client computers which reported their results in a central log. Since these logs were parseable, we wrote query scripts that gave us an effortless way to compare results collected under different conditions. This paper serves as a case-study, detailing the motivating requirements for the decisions we made and explaining the implementation process.

  13. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability -- Loop-scale Testbed Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melin, Alexander M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2016-09-01

    Embedded instrumentation and control systems that can operate in extreme environments are challenging to design and operate. Extreme environments limit the options for sensors and actuators and degrade their performance. Because sensors and actuators are necessary for feedback control these limitations mean that designing embedded instrumentation and control systems for the challenging environments of nuclear reactors requires advanced technical solutions that are not available commercially. This report details the development of testbed that will be used for cross-cutting embedded instrumentation and control research for nuclear power applications. This research is funded by the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology program's Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation topic. The design goal of the loop-scale testbed is to build a low temperature pump that utilizes magnetic bearing that will be incorporated into a water loop to test control system performance and self-sensing techniques. Specifically, this testbed will be used to analyze control system performance in response to nonlinear and cross-coupling fluid effects between the shaft axes of motion, rotordynamics and gyroscopic effects, and impeller disturbances. This testbed will also be used to characterize the performance losses when using self-sensing position measurement techniques. Active magnetic bearings are a technology that can reduce failures and maintenance costs in nuclear power plants. They are particularly relevant to liquid salt reactors that operate at high temperatures (700 C). Pumps used in the extreme environment of liquid salt reactors provide many engineering challenges that can be overcome with magnetic bearings and their associated embedded instrumentation and control. This report will give details of the mechanical design and electromagnetic design of the loop-scale embedded instrumentation and control testbed.

  14. A testbed for wide-field, high-resolution, gigapixel-class cameras.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kittle, David S; Marks, Daniel L; Son, Hui S; Kim, Jungsang; Brady, David J

    2013-05-01

    The high resolution and wide field of view (FOV) of the AWARE (Advanced Wide FOV Architectures for Image Reconstruction and Exploitation) gigapixel class cameras present new challenges in calibration, mechanical testing, and optical performance evaluation. The AWARE system integrates an array of micro-cameras in a multiscale design to achieve gigapixel sampling at video rates. Alignment and optical testing of the micro-cameras is vital in compositing engines, which require pixel-level accurate mappings over the entire array of cameras. A testbed has been developed to automatically calibrate and measure the optical performance of the entire camera array. This testbed utilizes translation and rotation stages to project a ray into any micro-camera of the AWARE system. A spatial light modulator is projected through a telescope to form an arbitrary object space pattern at infinity. This collimated source is then reflected by an elevation stage mirror for pointing through the aperture of the objective into the micro-optics and eventually the detector of the micro-camera. Different targets can be projected with the spatial light modulator for measuring the modulation transfer function (MTF) of the system, fiducials in the overlap regions for registration and compositing, distortion mapping, illumination profiles, thermal stability, and focus calibration. The mathematics of the testbed mechanics are derived for finding the positions of the stages to achieve a particular incident angle into the camera, along with calibration steps for alignment of the camera and testbed coordinate axes. Measurement results for the AWARE-2 gigapixel camera are presented for MTF, focus calibration, illumination profile, fiducial mapping across the micro-camera for registration and distortion correction, thermal stability, and alignment of the camera on the testbed.

  15. A3 Altitude Test Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dulreix, Lionel J.

    2009-01-01

    This slide presentation shows drawings, diagrams and photographs of the A3 Altitude Test Facility. It includes a review of the A3 Facility requirements, and drawings of the various sections of the facility including Engine Deck and Superstructure, Test Cell and Thrust Takeout, Structure and Altitude Support Systems, Chemical Steam generators, and the subscale diffuser. There are also pictures of the construction site, and the facility under construction. A Diagram of the A3 Steam system schematic is also shown

  16. ISS as testbed towards food production on the Moon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kuebler, Ulrich; Thallemer, Axel; Kern, Peter; Schwarzwaelder, Achim

    Almost all major space faring nations are presently investigating concepts for the exploration of extra terrestrial planetary bodies, including Earth's Moon and Mars. One major objective to sustain any human exploration plans will be the provision of fresh food. Even if a delivery from Earth to Moon is still possible with regular preservation techniques as for the international space station, there will be a big psychological impact from the ability to grow fresh food on a Moon Basis. Various architectural and agricultural concepts have been proposed. A comprehensive summary of the related requirements and constraints shall be presented as a baseline for further studies. One presently unknown constraint is the question of the gravity threshold for the genetic stability of plants or more specifically the level of gravity which is needed for normal growth and reproduction of plants. This paper shall focus on a roadmap towards a food production facility a planetary surface using the International Space Station as a test bed. Presented will be 1.) The concept of a Food Research Rotor for the artificial gravity facility EMCS. This Rotor shall allow the investigation into the gravity dependence of growth and reproduction of nutritionally relevant plants like radishes, tomatoes, bell peppers or lettuce. An important answer from this research could be if the Moon Gravity of 1/6g is sufficient for a vegetative food production or if additional artificial gravity is needed for a Moon Greenhouse. 2.) An inflatable demonstrator for ATV as scaled down version of a proposed planetary greenhouse

  17. Facile and selective synthesis of oligothiophene-based sensitizer isomers: an approach toward efficient dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Quanyou; Zhang, Qian; Lu, Xuefeng; Wang, Hong; Zhou, Gang; Wang, Zhong-Sheng

    2013-09-25

    Two sets of isomeric organic dyes with n-hexyl (DH and AH) or 2-ethylhexyl (DEH and AEH) groups substituted at the spacer part have been designed and straightforwardly synthesized via a facile and selective synthetic route. The structure difference between the isomers stands at the position of the incorporated alkyl chains which are introduced into the terthiophene spacer close to the donor (D) or anchor (A) side. The relationship between the isomeric structures and the optoelectronic properties are systematically investigated. It is found that, in the D series dyes, the alkyl group is much closer to the aromatic donor moiety, which brings about strong steric hindrance and therefore causes a remarkable twist in the molecular skeleton. In contrast, a more planar chemical structure and more effective π-conjugation are realized in the A series dye isomers. Consequently, the A series isomeric dyes demonstrate bathochromically shifted absorption bands, resulting in the improved light-harvesting capability and enhanced photo-generated current. However, the D series isomeric dyes with more twisted molecular skeleton have suppressed the intermolecular interactions and retarded the charge recombination more efficiently, which induces higher open-circuit photovoltage. Combining the two effects on the performance of the fabricated dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC), the influence from the short-circuit photocurrent plays a more significant role on the power conversion efficiency (η). As a result, isomer AEH-based DSSC with quasi-solid-state electrolyte displays the highest η of 7.10% which remained at 98% of the initial value after continuous light soaking for 1000 h. Promisingly, a η of 8.66% has been achieved for AEH-based DSSC with liquid electrolyte containing Co(II)/(III) redox couple. This work presents the crucial issue of molecular engineering and paves a way to design organic sensitizers for highly efficient and stable DSSCs.

  18. A High-voltage Reference Testbed for the Evaluation of High-voltage Dividers for Pulsed Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bastos, M Cerqueira; Bergman, A; 10.1109/CPEM.2010.5543408

    2010-01-01

    The design, evaluation and commissioning of a high voltage reference testbed for pulsed applications to be used in the precision testing of high voltage dividers is described. The testbed is composed of a pulsed power supply, a reference divider based on compressed gas capacitor technology and an acquisition system which makes use of the fast measurement capabilities of the HP 3458 DVM. Results of the evaluation of the reference system are presented.

  19. A Framework to Evaluate Unified Parameterizations for Seasonal Prediction: An LES/SCM Parameterization Test-Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-09-30

    Seasonal Prediction: An LES/ SCM Parameterization Test-Bed Joao Teixeira Jet Propulsion Laboratory California Institute of Technology, MS 169-237...a Single Column Model ( SCM ) version of the latest operational NAVGEM that can be used to simulate GEWEX Cloud Systems Study (GCSS) case-studies; ii...use the NAVGEM SCM and the LES model as a parameterization test-bed. APPROACH It is well accepted that sub-grid physical processes such as

  20. A demonstration of remote survey and characterization of a buried waste site using the SRIP (Soldier Robot Interface Project) testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, B.L.; Richardson, B.S.; Armstrong, G.A.; Hamel, W.R.; Jansen, J.F.; Killough, S.M.; Thompson, D.H.; Emery, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    During FY 1990, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) supported the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER WM) Office of Technology Development through several projects including the development of a semiautonomous survey of a buried waste site using a remotely operated all-terrain robotic testbed borrowed from the US Army. The testbed was developed for the US Army's Human Engineering Laboratory (HEL) for the US Army's Soldier Robot Interface Project (SRIP). Initial development of the SRIP testbed was performed by a team including ORNL, HEL, Tooele Army Depot, and Odetics, Inc., as an experimental testbed for a variety of human factors issues related to military applications of robotics. The SRIP testbed was made available to the DOE and ORNL for the further development required for a remote landfill survey. The robot was modified extensively, equipped with environmental sensors, and used to demonstrate an automated remote survey of Solid Waste Storage Area No. 3 (SWSA 3) at ORNL on Tuesday, September 18, 1990. Burial trenches in this area containing contaminated materials were covered with soil nearly twenty years ago. This paper describes the SRIP testbed and work performed in FY 1990 to demonstrate a semiautonomous landfill survey at ORNL. 5 refs.

  1. Utilizing the EUVE Innovative Technology Testbed to Reduce Operations Cost for Present and Future Orbiting Mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    1997-01-01

    This report summarizes work done under Cooperative Agreement (CA) on the following testbed projects: TERRIERS - The development of the ground systems to support the TERRIERS satellite mission at Boston University (BU). HSTS - The application of ARC's Heuristic Scheduling Testbed System (HSTS) to the EUVE satellite mission. SELMON - The application of NASA's Jet Propulsion Laboratory's (JPL) Selective Monitoring (SELMON) system to the EUVE satellite mission. EVE - The development of the EUVE Virtual Environment (EVE), a prototype three-dimensional (3-D) visualization environment for the EUVE satellite and its sensors, instruments, and communications antennae. FIDO - The development of the Fault-Induced Document Officer (FIDO) system, a prototype application to respond to anomalous conditions by automatically searching for, retrieving, and displaying relevant documentation for an operators use.

  2. Genetic Algorithm Phase Retrieval for the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jaime; Rakoczy, John; Steincamp, James

    2003-01-01

    Phase retrieval requires calculation of the real-valued phase of the pupil fimction from the image intensity distribution and characteristics of an optical system. Genetic 'algorithms were used to solve two one-dimensional phase retrieval problem. A GA successfully estimated the coefficients of a polynomial expansion of the phase when the number of coefficients was correctly specified. A GA also successfully estimated the multiple p h e s of a segmented optical system analogous to the seven-mirror Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) testbed located at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The SIBOA testbed was developed to investigate phase retrieval techniques. Tiphilt and piston motions of the mirrors accomplish phase corrections. A constant phase over each mirror can be achieved by an independent tip/tilt correction: the phase Conection term can then be factored out of the Discrete Fourier Tranform (DFT), greatly reducing computations.

  3. “WBC over DVB-H” Testbed Design, Development and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanlin Ji

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The wireless billboard channels (WBCs are integral part of the ubiquitous consumer wireless world (UCWW—a wireless next generation network proposal. The WBCs are used by the service providers to broadcast advertisements of their (wireless services to the mobile terminals so that the mobile users may discover and associate with the “best” services following the user-driven ‘‘always best connected and best served’’ paradigm. A three-layer system architecture of WBCs established over the digital video broadcasting-handheld (DVB-H standard is presented. The design and development of a corresponding ‘‘WBC over DVB-H’’ experimental testbed are described. Various results obtained from the testbed are presented and explained.

  4. Design and Implementation of a Testbed for IEEE 802.15.4 (Zigbee Performance Measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick R. Casey

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available IEEE 802.15.4, commonly known as ZigBee, is a Media Access Control (MAC and physical layer standard specifically designed for short range wireless communication where low rate, low power, and low bandwidth are required. This makes ZigBee an ideal choice when it comes to sensor networks for monitoring data collection and/or triggering process responses. However, these very characteristics bring into question ZigBee's ability to perform reliably in harsh environments. This paper thoroughly explains the experimental testbed setup and execution to demonstrate ZigBee's performance in several practical applications. This testbed is capable of measuring the minimum, maximum, and average received signal strength indicator (RSSI, bit error rate (BER, packet error rate (PER, packet loss rate (PLR, and the bit error locations. Results show that ZigBee has the potential capabilities to be used in all four tested environments.

  5. A Testbed of Magnetic Induction-based Communication System for Underground Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Xin; Akyildiz, Ian F

    2015-01-01

    Wireless underground sensor networks (WUSNs) can enable many important applications such as intelligent agriculture, pipeline fault diagnosis, mine disaster rescue, concealed border patrol, crude oil exploration, among others. The key challenge to realize WUSNs is the wireless communication in underground environments. Most existing wireless communication systems utilize the dipole antenna to transmit and receive propagating electromagnetic (EM) waves, which do not work well in underground environments due to the very high material absorption loss. The Magnetic Induction (MI) technique provides a promising alternative solution that could address the current problem in underground. Although the MI-based underground communication has been intensively investigated theoretically, to date, seldom effort has been made in developing a testbed for the MI-based underground communication that can validate the theoretical results. In this paper, a testbed of MI-based communication system is designed and implemented in a...

  6. Thermal analysis of the unloading cell of the Spanish centralized interim storage facility (CISF); Analisis termico de la celda de desarga del almacen temporal centralizado (ATC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Dominguez, J. R.; Perez Vara, R.; Huelamo Martinez, E.

    2016-08-01

    This article deals with the thermal analysis performed for the Untoading Cell of Spain Centralized Interim Storage Facility, CISF (ATC, in Spanish). The analyses are done using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, with the aim of obtaining the air flow required to remove the residual heat of the elements stored in the cell. Compliance with the admissible heat limits is checked with the results obtained in the various operation and accident modes. The calculation model is flexible enough to allow carrying out a number of sensitivity analyses with the different parameters involved in the process. (Author)

  7. Sharing the Pi:Testbed Description and Performance Evaluation of Network Coding on the Raspberry Pi

    OpenAIRE

    Paramanathan, Achuthan; Pahlevani, Peyman; Thorsteinsson, Simon; Hundebøll, Martin; Roetter, Daniel Enrique Lucani; Fitzek, Frank

    2014-01-01

    Abstract—This paper presents the design and performanceevaluation of an inexpensive testbed for network coding protocolscomposed of Raspberry Pis. First, we show the performance ofrandom linear network coding primitives on the Raspberry Piin terms of processing speed and energy consumption under avariety of configuration setups. Our measurements show thatprocessing rates of up to 230 Mbps are possible with theRaspberry Pi. Also, the energy consumption per bit can beas small as 3 nJ/bit, which ...

  8. ASE-BAN, a Wireless Body Area Network Testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens Kargaard; Karstoft, Henrik; Hansen, Finn Overgaard;

    2010-01-01

    /actuators attached to the body and a host server application. The gateway uses the BlackFin BF533 processor from Analog Devices, and uses Bluetooth for wireless communication. Two types of sensors are attached to the network: an electro-cardio-gram sensor and an oximeter sensor. The testbed has been successfully...... tested for electro-cardio-gram data collection, and using wireless communication in a battery powered configuration....

  9. A Wireless Sensor Network Testbed for the Evaluation of Energy-Aware Routing Schemes

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) are receiving a lot of research attention due to continual improvement in the technologies used by these networks. The energy efficiency of sensor nodes and the network as a whole is of specific importance. One possible area where energy savings can be made lies within the routing protocols employed; however, these protocols are typically only simulated. In this work we develop a WSN testbed and conduct investigations on the fidelity of simulated energy-aware W...

  10. Testbed-based Performance Evaluation of Attack Resilient Control for AGC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ashok, Aditya; Sridhar, Siddharth; McKinnon, Archibald D.; Wang, Pengyuan Wang; Govindarasu, Manimaran

    2016-09-22

    The modern electric power grid is a complex cyber-physical system whose reliable operation is enabled by a wide-area monitoring and control infrastructure. This infrastructure, supported by an extensive communication backbone, enables several control applications functioning at multiple time scales to ensure the grid is maintained within stable operating limits. Recent events have shown that vulnerabilities in this infrastructure may be exploited to manipulate the data being exchanged. Such a scenario could cause the associated control application to mis-operate, potentially causing system-wide instabilities. There is a growing emphasis on looking beyond traditional cybersecurity solutions to mitigate such threats. In this paper we perform a testbed-based validation of one such solution - Attack Resilient Control (ARC) - on Iowa State University's \\textit{PowerCyber} testbed. ARC is a cyber-physical security solution that combines domain-specific anomaly detection and model-based mitigation to detect stealthy attacks on Automatic Generation Control (AGC). In this paper, we first describe the implementation architecture of the experiment on the testbed. Next, we demonstrate the capability of stealthy attack templates to cause forced under-frequency load shedding in a 3-area test system. We then validate the performance of ARC by measuring its ability to detect and mitigate these attacks. Our results reveal that ARC is efficient in detecting stealthy attacks and enables AGC to maintain system operating frequency close to its nominal value during an attack. Our studies also highlight the importance of testbed-based experimentation for evaluating the performance of cyber-physical security and control applications.

  11. Multi-Vehicle Flight Testbed for Extended Mission Analysis, Fault Isolation, and Recovery

    Science.gov (United States)

    2007-11-01

    mounted to a quadrotor and a small radio- controlled truck, placed at (0,0) m, was used as a target [23]. During this test flight, the vision tracking ...13] Vladimerouy, V., Stubbs, A., Rubel, J., Fulford, A., Strick, J., & Dullerud, G., A Hovercraft Testbed for Decentralized and Cooperative Control ...indoor test ENvironment) that was constructed to enable investigations of long-duration missions in a controlled environment. RAVEN provides a

  12. James Webb Space Telescope optical simulation testbed III: first experimental results with linear-control alignment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Egron, Sylvain; Lajoie, Charles-Philippe; Leboulleux, Lucie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Choquet, Élodie; Perrin, Marshall D.; Ygouf, Marie; Michau, Vincent; Bonnefois, Aurélie; Fusco, Thierry; Escolle, Clément; Ferrari, Marc; Hugot, Emmanuel; Soummer, Rémi

    2016-07-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to study wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science and Operations Center. The design of JOST reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) using three custom aspheric lenses. It provides similar quality image as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at 633 nm. An Iris AO segmented mirror stands for the segmented primary mirror of JWST. Actuators allow us to control (1) the 18 segments of the segmented mirror in piston, tip, tilt and (2) the second lens, which stands for the secondary mirror, in tip, tilt and x, y, z positions. We present the full linear control alignment infrastructure developed for JOST, with an emphasis on multi-field wavefront sensing and control. Our implementation of the Wavefront Sensing (WFS) algorithms using phase diversity is experimentally tested. The wavefront control (WFC) algorithms, which rely on a linear model for optical aberrations induced by small misalignments of the three lenses, are tested and validated on simulations.

  13. Variable Coding and Modulation Experiment Using NASA's Space Communication and Navigation Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Joseph A.; Mortensen, Dale J.; Evans, Michael A.; Tollis, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s Space Communication and Navigation Testbed on the International Space Station provides a unique opportunity to evaluate advanced communication techniques in an operational system. The experimental nature of the Testbed allows for rapid demonstrations while using flight hardware in a deployed system within NASA's networks. One example is variable coding and modulation, which is a method to increase data-throughput in a communication link. This paper describes recent flight testing with variable coding and modulation over S-band using a direct-to-earth link between the SCaN Testbed and the Glenn Research Center. The testing leverages the established Digital Video Broadcasting Second Generation (DVB-S2) standard to provide various modulation and coding options. The experiment was conducted in a challenging environment due to the multipath and shadowing caused by the International Space Station structure. Performance of the variable coding and modulation system is evaluated and compared to the capacity of the link, as well as standard NASA waveforms.

  14. High Contrast Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) Contrast, Performance and Null Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lyon, Richard G.; Clampin, Mark; Petrone, Peter; Mallik, Udayan; Madison, Timothy; Bolcar, Matthew R.

    2012-01-01

    Herein we report on our Visible Nulling Coronagraph high-contrast result of 109 contrast averaged over a focal planeregion extending from 14 D with the Vacuum Nuller Testbed (VNT) in a vibration isolated vacuum chamber. TheVNC is a hybrid interferometriccoronagraphic approach for exoplanet science. It operates with high Lyot stopefficiency for filled, segmented and sparse or diluted-aperture telescopes, thereby spanning the range of potential futureNASA flight telescopes. NASAGoddard Space Flight Center (GSFC) has a well-established effort to develop the VNCand its technologies, and has developed an incremental sequence of VNC testbeds to advance this approach and itsenabling technologies. These testbeds have enabled advancement of high-contrast, visible light, nulling interferometry tounprecedented levels. The VNC is based on a modified Mach-Zehnder nulling interferometer, with a W configurationto accommodate a hex-packed MEMS based deformable mirror, a coherent fiber bundle and achromatic phase shifters.We give an overview of the VNT and discuss the high-contrast laboratory results, the optical configuration, criticaltechnologies and null sensing and control.

  15. Large Scale Data Mining to Improve Usability of Data: An Intelligent Archive Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram; Isaac, David; Yang, Wenli; Morse, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Research in certain scientific disciplines - including Earth science, particle physics, and astrophysics - continually faces the challenge that the volume of data needed to perform valid scientific research can at times overwhelm even a sizable research community. The desire to improve utilization of this data gave rise to the Intelligent Archives project, which seeks to make data archives active participants in a knowledge building system capable of discovering events or patterns that represent new information or knowledge. Data mining can automatically discover patterns and events, but it is generally viewed as unsuited for large-scale use in disciplines like Earth science that routinely involve very high data volumes. Dozens of research projects have shown promising uses of data mining in Earth science, but all of these are based on experiments with data subsets of a few gigabytes or less, rather than the terabytes or petabytes typically encountered in operational systems. To bridge this gap, the Intelligent Archives project is establishing a testbed with the goal of demonstrating the use of data mining techniques in an operationally-relevant environment. This paper discusses the goals of the testbed and the design choices surrounding critical issues that arose during testbed implementation.

  16. First experimental results on the IShTAR testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Inca, R.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Morgal, I.; Fünfgelder, H.; Faugel, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Crombe, K.; Louche, F.; Van Eester, D. [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Heuraux, S.; Devaux, S.; Moritz, J.; Faudot, E. [Institut Jean Lamour UMR 7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium)

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetized plasma test facility dedicated to the investigation of RF wave/plasma interaction [1] in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). It provides a better accessibility for the instrumentation than tokamaks while being representative of the neighboring region of the wave emitter. It is equipped with a magnetized plasma source (1 m long, 0.4 m diameter) powered by a helical antenna up to 3 kW at 11 MHz. We present the results of the first analysis of the plasma characteristics (plasma density, electron temperature) in function of the operating parameters (injected power, neutral pressure and magnetic field) as measured with fixed and movable Langmuir probes, spectrometer and cameras. The plasma is presently produced only by the helical antenna (no ICRF). We show that the plasma exists in three regime depending on the power level: the first two ones are stable and separated by a jump in density; a first spatial profile of the plasma density has been established for these modes; The third mode is unstable, characterized by strong oscillations of the plasma tube position.

  17. 2015 In-Situ Gamma-Ray Assay of the West Cell Line in the 235-F Plutonium Fuel Form Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Aucott, T. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiPrete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-01

    In November and December 2015, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements through the windows in front of Cells 6-9 on the west line of the PuFF facility using a shielded, 120% high-purity germanium detector. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Where possible, the distribution of the Pu-238 in the cells was determined using the Germanium Gamma-ray Imager (GeGI). This distribution was then fed into the MCNP model to quantify the Pu-238 in each cell. Data analysis was performed using three gamma rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells.

  18. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  19. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  20. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  1. Social media analytics and research testbed (SMART: Exploring spatiotemporal patterns of human dynamics with geo-targeted social media messages

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jiue-An Yang

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The multilevel model of meme diffusion conceptualizes how mediated messages diffuse over time and space. As a pilot application of implementing the meme diffusion, we developed the social media analytics and research testbed to monitor Twitter messages and track the diffusion of information in and across different cities and geographic regions. Social media analytics and research testbed is an online geo-targeted search and analytics tool, including an automatic data processing procedure at the backend and an interactive frontend user interface. Social media analytics and research testbed is initially designed to facilitate (1 searching and geo-locating tweet topics and terms in different cities and geographic regions; (2 filtering noise from raw data (such as removing redundant retweets and using machine learning methods to improve precision; (3 analyzing social media data from a spatiotemporal perspective; and (4 visualizing social media data in diagnostic ways (such as weekly and monthly trends, trend maps, top media, top retweets, top mentions, or top hashtags. Social media analytics and research testbed provides researchers and domain experts with a tool that can efficiently facilitate the refinement, formalization, and testing of research hypotheses or questions. Three case studies (flu outbreaks, Ebola epidemic, and marijuana legalization are introduced to illustrate how the predictions of meme diffusion can be examined and to demonstrate the potentials and key functions of social media analytics and research testbed.

  2. International symposium on seismic evaluation of existing nuclear facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Orbovic, N.; Bouchon, M. [Institut de Radioprotection et de Surete Nucleaire, IRSN, 92 - Fontenay aux Roses (France); Vendel, J.; Gelain, T. [IRSN/DPEA/SERAC, 91 - Gif sur Yvette (France)

    2003-10-01

    Below are summarized the works of Mrs N. Orbovic and M. Bouchon; B. Stojadinovic, N. Orbovic, M.Bouchon and J.T. Wiley; M. Bouchon, N. Orbovic and B. Foure; T. Gelain, F. Gensdarmes, R. Sestier-Carlin, J. Vendel and M. Bouchon dealing respectively with: 1) seismic assessment of existing nuclear facility: a case study position of the IRSN 2) static and dynamic evaluation of an existing nuclear facility reinforced concrete frame structure 3) experimental study of cracking of low-rise reinforced concrete shear walls 4) aeraulics study of crack networks on low-rise reinforced concrete walls subject to static cycling loading. The summaries are followed: 1) The Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has the task of evaluating the seismic safety of existing building inventory in French nuclear facilities. Some of the existing structures are reinforced concrete frame buildings with masonry or reinforced concrete in-fill walls built during the 1960's, 70's and 80's following different building codes and seismic input data applicable at the time of construction. The studied building is a laboratory that was built in 1962. The building is composed of three different and independent blocks. The structure is a reinforced concrete frame with masonry in-fills and few stiff concrete elements. Moreover, the building contains an independent massive concrete cell. Structurally, the building has a number of irregularities. From the detailing standpoint, well known deficiencies of low-ductile reinforced concrete structures are evident especially, a lack of transverse reinforcement in the structural joints of the frame. A number of sensitivity studies were conducted using 2D and 3D linear models to evaluate seismic demand. Ambient vibration and regional earthquake records were used to check the soil nature and the existence or not of a possible site effect around the installation as well as to characterize the dynamic behavior of the building. 3D models

  3. Reinforcement Learning in Large State Spaces Simulated Robotic Soccer as a Testbed

    OpenAIRE

    Tuyls, Karl; Maes, Sam; Manderick, Bernard

    2003-01-01

    Large state spaces and incomplete information are two problems that stand out in learning in multi-agent systems. In this paper we tackle them both by using a combination of decision trees and Bayesian networks (BNs) to model the environment and the Q-function. Simulated robotic soccer is used as a testbed, since there agents are faced with both large state spaces and incomplete information. The long-term goal of this research is to define generic techniques that allow agents to learn in larg...

  4. Deployment of a Testbed in a Brazilian Research Network using IPv6 and Optical Access Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luciano; Ferramola Pozzuto, João; Olimpio Tognolli, João; Chaves, Niudomar Siqueira De A.; Reggiani, Atilio Eduardo; Hortêncio, Claudio Antonio

    2012-04-01

    This article presents the implementation of a testbed and the experimental results obtained with it on the Brazilian Experimental Network of the government-sponsored "GIGA Project." The use of IPv6 integrated to current and emerging optical architectures and technologies, such as dense wavelength division multiplexing and 10-gigabit Ethernet on the core and gigabit capable passive optical network and optical distribution network on access, were tested. These protocols, architectures, and optical technologies are promising and part of a brand new worldwide technological scenario that has being fairly adopted in the networks of enterprises and providers of the world.

  5. Test-bed Assessment of Communication Technologies for a Power-Balancing Controller

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Findrik, Mislav; Pedersen, Rasmus; Hasenleithner, Eduard

    2016-01-01

    Due to growing need for sustainable energy, increasing number of different renewable energy resources are being connected into distribution grids. In order to efficiently manage a decentralized power generation units, the smart grid will rely on communication networks for information exchange...... and control. In this paper, we present a Smart Grid test-bed that integrates various communication technologies and deploys a power balancing controller for LV grids. Control performance of the introduced power balancing controller is subsequently investigated and its robustness to communication network cross......-traffic is evaluated. Various scenarios are demonstrated, assessing impact of communication network performance on quality of control....

  6. TCP/IP Jumbo Frames Network Performance Evaluation on A Testbed Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Raymond Lutui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing network performance has been studied by a number of researchers. The need to provide greater throughput on network infrastructure has been the key driver for these studies. The use of jumbo frames is considered one of the methodologies that can be employed to increase data throughput on networks. In this research undertaking, the authors implement jumbo frames on a test-bed implemented with Windows Server 2003/2008 networks and performance related metrics are measured for both IPv4 and IPv6 implementations. The results obtained in this empirical study shows that performance metrics values are different in various scenarios.

  7. CitySense: A Vision for an Urban-Scale Wireless Networking Testbed

    OpenAIRE

    Murty, Rohan; Gosain, Abhimanyu; Tierney, Matthew; Brody, Andrew; Fahad, Amal; Bers, Josh; Welsh, Matt

    2007-01-01

    In this paper, we present the vision for an open, urban-scale wireless networking testbed, called CitySense, with the goal of supporting the development and evaluation of novel wireless systems that span an entire city. CitySense is currently under development and will consist of about 100 Linux-based embedded PCs outfitted with dual 802.11a/b/g radios and various sensors, mounted on buildings and streetlights across the city of Cambridge. CitySense takes its cue from citywide urban mesh netw...

  8. Cooperative Search with Autonomous Vehicles in a 3D Aquatic Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-01-01

    and OpenCV [19]. Three cameras image the tank, as shown in Figure 1: two from the bottom, each of which view about half of the tank, and one from the...resulting image is dilated, smoothed and thresholded (c) to produce a subimage. Using the CvBlob library within OpenCV , the new subimage is located (d...R. Levy, “An economical micro-submarine testbed for validation of 3D cooperative control strategies for underwater robots,” 2010. [19] OpenCV , “Open

  9. Testbed of a novel robotic pitch-roll wrist parameter identification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ma, Xiao Qing; Chopra, Vikram; Angeles, Jorge;

    2010-01-01

    The paper reports work in progress on the development of an innovative gearless pitch-roll wrist (PRW)for robotic applications. The PRW bears the morphology of a bevel-gear differential, its novelty lying in the absence of gears. Indeed, the PRW motivating this study is based on cams and rollers...... to obtain the frequency response of the whole testbed, regarded as a multiple-input-multiple-output system, under the assumption that the parts of the spherical epicyclic train are rigid. The numerical values for the inertia parameters used in the model were taken from CAD models, those for stiffness...

  10. Technical scheme and corresponding experiment for the PAT performance of a lasercom using an integrated test-bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Jianfeng; Liu, Liren; Wang, Lijuan; Luan, Zhu; Liu, De'an; Xu, Nan; Zhong, Xianghong

    2007-09-01

    Recent successful demonstrations of laser communications have demonstrated the feasibility of some of the key aspects of this technology. The demonstrations can not success without the full-up ground test and validation. So an integrate test-bed was build in build to test the technical parameters and to verify the working performance for the optical pointing, acquisition and tracking (PAT) of various inter-satellite lasercom terminals. In this paper, we detail the test technical scheme (TTS) and the corresponding experiments. The integrate test-bed is a high quality optical system that will measure the key characteristics of lasercom terminals, such as point error, tracking error, acquisition possibility etc.. The test-bed can operate over the relative wavelength range. Through quantitative tests, the terminal could be optimized base on the test results.

  11. Application of the Semi-Empirical Force-Limiting Approach for the CoNNeCT SCAN Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, Lucas D.; McNelis, Mark E.; Akers, James C.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Jones, Trevor M.

    2012-01-01

    The semi-empirical force-limiting vibration method was developed and implemented for payload testing to limit the structural impedance mismatch (high force) that occurs during shaker vibration testing. The method has since been extended for use in analytical models. The Space Communications and Navigation Testbed (SCAN Testbed), known at NASA as, the Communications, Navigation, and Networking re-Configurable Testbed (CoNNeCT), project utilized force-limiting testing and analysis following the semi-empirical approach. This paper presents the steps in performing a force-limiting analysis and then compares the results to test data recovered during the CoNNeCT force-limiting random vibration qualification test that took place at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in the Structural Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) December 19, 2010 to January 7, 2011. A compilation of lessons learned and considerations for future force-limiting tests is also included.

  12. Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Hot Fuel Examination Facility (HFEF) is one of the largest hot cells dedicated to radioactive materials research at Idaho National Laboratory (INL). The nation's...

  13. The Utilization of Plant Facilities on the International Space Station—The Composition, Growth, and Development of Plant Cell Walls under Microgravity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Iren Kittang Jost

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the preparation for missions to Mars, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and development of living plants under microgravity (micro-g conditions is essential. Focus has centered on the g-effects on rigidity, including mechanisms of signal perception, transduction, and response in gravity resistance. These components of gravity resistance are linked to the evolution and acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses. An overview is given both on the basic effect of hypergravity as well as of micro-g conditions in the cell wall changes. The review includes plant experiments in the US Space Shuttle and the effect of short space stays (8–14 days on single cells (plant protoplasts. Regeneration of protoplasts is dependent on cortical microtubules to orient the nascent cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. The space protoplast experiments demonstrated that the regeneration capacity of protoplasts was retarded. Two critical factors are the basis for longer space experiments: a. the effects of gravity on the molecular mechanisms for cell wall development, b. the availability of facilities and hardware for performing cell wall experiments in space and return of RNA/DNA back to the Earth. Linked to these aspects is a description of existing hardware functioning on the International Space Station.

  14. The Utilization of Plant Facilities on the International Space Station—The Composition, Growth, and Development of Plant Cell Walls under Microgravity Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang; Hoson, Takayuki; Iversen, Tor-Henning

    2015-01-01

    In the preparation for missions to Mars, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and development of living plants under microgravity (micro-g) conditions is essential. Focus has centered on the g-effects on rigidity, including mechanisms of signal perception, transduction, and response in gravity resistance. These components of gravity resistance are linked to the evolution and acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses. An overview is given both on the basic effect of hypergravity as well as of micro-g conditions in the cell wall changes. The review includes plant experiments in the US Space Shuttle and the effect of short space stays (8–14 days) on single cells (plant protoplasts). Regeneration of protoplasts is dependent on cortical microtubules to orient the nascent cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. The space protoplast experiments demonstrated that the regeneration capacity of protoplasts was retarded. Two critical factors are the basis for longer space experiments: a. the effects of gravity on the molecular mechanisms for cell wall development, b. the availability of facilities and hardware for performing cell wall experiments in space and return of RNA/DNA back to the Earth. Linked to these aspects is a description of existing hardware functioning on the International Space Station. PMID:27135317

  15. The Utilization of Plant Facilities on the International Space Station-The Composition, Growth, and Development of Plant Cell Walls under Microgravity Conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jost, Ann-Iren Kittang; Hoson, Takayuki; Iversen, Tor-Henning

    2015-01-20

    In the preparation for missions to Mars, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and development of living plants under microgravity (micro-g) conditions is essential. Focus has centered on the g-effects on rigidity, including mechanisms of signal perception, transduction, and response in gravity resistance. These components of gravity resistance are linked to the evolution and acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses. An overview is given both on the basic effect of hypergravity as well as of micro-g conditions in the cell wall changes. The review includes plant experiments in the US Space Shuttle and the effect of short space stays (8-14 days) on single cells (plant protoplasts). Regeneration of protoplasts is dependent on cortical microtubules to orient the nascent cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. The space protoplast experiments demonstrated that the regeneration capacity of protoplasts was retarded. Two critical factors are the basis for longer space experiments: a. the effects of gravity on the molecular mechanisms for cell wall development, b. the availability of facilities and hardware for performing cell wall experiments in space and return of RNA/DNA back to the Earth. Linked to these aspects is a description of existing hardware functioning on the International Space Station.

  16. A subscale facility for liquid rocket propulsion diagnostics at Stennis Space Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raines, N. G.; Bircher, F. E.; Chenevert, D. J.

    1991-01-01

    The Diagnostics Testbed Facility (DTF) at NASA's John C. Stennis Space Center in Mississippi was designed to provide a testbed for the development of rocket engine exhaust plume diagnostics instrumentation. A 1200-lb thrust liquid oxygen/gaseous hydrogen thruster is used as the plume source for experimentation and instrument development. Theoretical comparative studies have been performed with aerothermodynamic codes to ensure that the DTF thruster (DTFT) has been optimized to produce a plume with pressure and temperature conditions as much like the plume of the Space Shuttle Main Engine as possible. Operation of the DTFT is controlled by an icon-driven software program using a series of soft switches. Data acquisition is performed using the same software program. A number of plume diagnostics experiments have utilized the unique capabilities of the DTF.

  17. An Integrated Testbed for Cooperative Perception with Heterogeneous Mobile and Static Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal Ollero

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cooperation among devices with different sensing, computing and communication capabilities provides interesting possibilities in a growing number of problems and applications including domotics (domestic robotics, environmental monitoring or intelligent cities, among others. Despite the increasing interest in academic and industrial communities, experimental tools for evaluation and comparison of cooperative algorithms for such heterogeneous technologies are still very scarce. This paper presents a remote testbed with mobile robots and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN equipped with a set of low-cost off-the-shelf sensors, commonly used in cooperative perception research and applications, that present high degree of heterogeneity in their technology, sensed magnitudes, features, output bandwidth, interfaces and power consumption, among others. Its open and modular architecture allows tight integration and interoperability between mobile robots and WSN through a bidirectional protocol that enables full interaction. Moreover, the integration of standard tools and interfaces increases usability, allowing an easy extension to new hardware and software components and the reuse of code. Different levels of decentralization are considered, supporting from totally distributed to centralized approaches. Developed for the EU-funded Cooperating Objects Network of Excellence (CONET and currently available at the School of Engineering of Seville (Spain, the testbed provides full remote control through the Internet. Numerous experiments have been performed, some of which are described in the paper.

  18. A low-cost test-bed for real-time landmark tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaszar, Ambrus; Hanan, Jay C.; Moreels, Pierre; Assad, Christopher

    2007-04-01

    A low-cost vehicle test-bed system was developed to iteratively test, refine and demonstrate navigation algorithms before attempting to transfer the algorithms to more advanced rover prototypes. The platform used here was a modified radio controlled (RC) car. A microcontroller board and onboard laptop computer allow for either autonomous or remote operation via a computer workstation. The sensors onboard the vehicle represent the types currently used on NASA-JPL rover prototypes. For dead-reckoning navigation, optical wheel encoders, a single axis gyroscope, and 2-axis accelerometer were used. An ultrasound ranger is available to calculate distance as a substitute for the stereo vision systems presently used on rovers. The prototype also carries a small laptop computer with a USB camera and wireless transmitter to send real time video to an off-board computer. A real-time user interface was implemented that combines an automatic image feature selector, tracking parameter controls, streaming video viewer, and user generated or autonomous driving commands. Using the test-bed, real-time landmark tracking was demonstrated by autonomously driving the vehicle through the JPL Mars yard. The algorithms tracked rocks as waypoints. This generated coordinates calculating relative motion and visually servoing to science targets. A limitation for the current system is serial computing-each additional landmark is tracked in order-but since each landmark is tracked independently, if transferred to appropriate parallel hardware, adding targets would not significantly diminish system speed.

  19. FloorNet: Deployment and Evaluation of a Multihop Wireless 802.11 Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zink Michael

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available A lot of attention has been given to multihop wireless networks lately, but further research—in particular, through experimentation—is needed. This attention has motivated an increase in the number of 802.11-based deployments, both indoor and outdoor. These testbeds, which require a significant amount of resources during both deployment and maintenance, are used to run measurements in order to analyze and understand the limitation and differences between analytical or simulation-based figures and the results from real-life experimentation. This paper makes two major contributions: (i first, we describe a novel wireless multihop testbed, which we name FloorNet, that is deployed and operated under the false floor of a lab in our Computer Science building. This false floor provides a strong physical protection that prevents disconnections or misplacements, as well as radio shielding (to some extent thanks to the false floor panels—this later feature is assessed through experimentation; (ii second, by running exhaustive and controlled experiments we are able to analyze the performance limits of commercial off-the-shelf hardware, as well as to derive practical design criteria for the deployment and configuration of mesh networks. These results both provide valuable insights of wireless multihop performance and prove that FloorNet constitutes a valuable asset to research on wireless mesh networks.

  20. The Orlando TDWR testbed and airborne wind shear date comparison results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Campbell, Steven; Berke, Anthony; Matthews, Michael

    1992-01-01

    The focus of this talk is on comparing terminal Doppler Weather Radar (TDWR) and airborne wind shear data in computing a microburst hazard index called the F factor. The TDWR is a ground-based system for detecting wind shear hazards to aviation in the terminal area. The Federal Aviation Administration will begin deploying TDWR units near 45 airports in late 1992. As part of this development effort, M.I.T. Lincoln Laboratory operates under F.A.A. support a TDWR testbed radar in Orlando, FL. During the past two years, a series of flight tests has been conducted with instrumented aircraft penetrating microburst events while under testbed radar surveillance. These tests were carried out with a Cessna Citation 2 aircraft operated by the University of North Dakota (UND) Center for Aerospace Sciences in 1990, and a Boeing 737 operated by NASA Langley Research Center in 1991. A large data base of approximately 60 instrumented microburst penetrations has been obtained from these flights.

  1. Design and experimental performance verification of a thermal property test-bed for lunar drilling exploration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhang Tao; Zhao Zeng; Liu Shuting; Li Jinglin; Ding Xilun; Yin Shen; Wang Guoxin; Lai Xiaoming

    2016-01-01

    Chinese Chang’e lunar exploration project aims to collect and return subsurface lunar soil samples at a minimum penetration depth of 2 m in 2017. However, in contrast to those on the Earth, automated drilling and sampling missions on the Moon raise the risk of burning bits. Test-beds are required for testing the thermal properties of drill tools in a lunar environment. In this paper, a novel temperature measuring method based on thermocouples and a slip ring was proposed. Furthermore, a data acquisition system for a drilling process was designed. A vacuous, cryogenic, and anhydrous soil environment simulating the lunar surface was established. A drilling test-bed that can reach a depth of 2.2 m was developed. A control strategy based on online monitoring signals was proposed to improve the drilling performance. Vacuum and non-vacuum experiments were performed to test the temperature rising effect on drill tools. When compared with the non-vacuum experiment, the vacuum temperature rise resulted in a 12 ?C increase. These experimental results provide significant support for Chinese lunar exploration missions.

  2. Metrology calibration and very high accuracy centroiding with the NEAT testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Crouzier, A; Preis, O; Henault, F; Kern, P; Martin, G; Feautrier, P; Stadler, E; Lafrasse, S; Delboulbe, A; Behar, E; Saint-Pe, M; Dupont, J; Potin, S; Cara, C; Donati, M; Doumayrou, E; Lagage, P O; Léger, A; LeDuigou, J M; Shao, M; Goullioud, R

    2014-01-01

    NEAT is an astrometric mission proposed to ESA with the objectives of detecting Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone of nearby solar-type stars. NEAT requires the capability to measure stellar centroids at the precision of 5e-6 pixel. Current state-of-the-art methods for centroid estimation have reached a precision of about 2e-5 pixel at two times Nyquist sampling, this was shown at the JPL by the VESTA experiment. A metrology system was used to calibrate intra and inter pixel quantum efficiency variations in order to correct pixelation errors. The European part of the NEAT consortium is building a testbed in vacuum in order to achieve 5e-6 pixel precision for the centroid estimation. The goal is to provide a proof of concept for the precision requirement of the NEAT spacecraft. The testbed consists of two main sub-systems. The first one produces pseudo stars: a blackbody source is fed into a large core fiber and lights-up a pinhole mask in the object plane, which is imaged by a mirror on the CCD. The ...

  3. An experimental testbed for NEAT to demonstrate micro-pixel accuracy

    CERN Document Server

    Crouzier, A; Preis, O; Henault, F; Kern, P; Guillermo, M; Feautrier, P; Cara, c; Lagage, P; Léger, A; LeDuigou, J M; Shao, M; Goullioud, R

    2012-01-01

    NEAT is an astrometric mission proposed to ESA with the objectives of detecting Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone of nearby solar-type stars. In NEAT, one fundamental aspect is the capability to measure stellar centroids at the precision of 5 {\\times} 10-6 pixel. Current state-of-the-art methods for centroid estimation have reached a precision of about 4 {\\times} 10-5 pixel at Nyquist sampling. Simulations showed that a precision of 2 {\\mu}-pixels can be reached, if intra and inter pixel quantum efficiency variations are calibrated and corrected for by a metrology system. The European part of the NEAT consortium is designing and building a testbed in vacuum in order to achieve 5 {\\times} 10-6 pixel precision for the centroid estimation. The goal is to provide a proof of concept for the precision requirement of the NEAT spacecraft. In this paper we give the basic relations and trade-offs that come into play for the design of a centroid testbed and its metrology system. We detail the different conditi...

  4. The end-to-end testbed of the Optical Metrology System on-board LISA Pathfinder

    CERN Document Server

    Steier, Frank; Marín, Antonio F García; Gerardi, Domenico; Heinzel, Gerhard; Danzmann, Karsten; 10.1088/0264-9381/26/9/094010

    2012-01-01

    LISA Pathfinder is a technology demonstration mission for the Laser Interferometer Space Antenna (LISA). The main experiment on-board LISA Pathfinder is the so-called LISA Technology Package (LTP) which has the aim to measure the differential acceleration between two free-falling test masses with an accuracy of 3x10^(-14) ms^(-2)/sqrt[Hz] between 1 mHz and 30 mHz. This measurement is performed interferometrically by the Optical Metrology System (OMS) on-board LISA Pathfinder. In this paper we present the development of an experimental end-to-end testbed of the entire OMS. It includes the interferometer and its sub-units, the interferometer back-end which is a phasemeter and the processing of the phasemeter output data. Furthermore, 3-axes piezo actuated mirrors are used instead of the free-falling test masses for the characterisation of the dynamic behaviour of the system and some parts of the Drag-free and Attitude Control System (DFACS) which controls the test masses and the satellite. The end-to-end testbe...

  5. A facile route to inverted polymer solar cells using a precursor based zinc oxide electron transport layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, P. de; Moet, D.J.D.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Inverted polymer:fullerene solar cells with ZnO and MoO3 transport layers are demonstrated. ZnO films are prepared through spin casting of a zinc acetylacetonate hydrate solution, followed by low temperature annealing under ambient conditions. The performance of solar cells with an inverted structur

  6. A facile route to inverted polymer solar cells using a precursor based zinc oxide electron transport layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruyn, P.; Moet, D. J. D.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2010-01-01

    Inverted polymer: fullerene solar cells with ZnO and MoO(3) transport layers are demonstrated. ZnO films are prepared through spin casting of a zinc acetylacetonate hydrate solution, followed by low temperature annealing under ambient conditions. The performance of solar cells with an inverted struc

  7. The 10m AEI prototype facility A brief overview

    CERN Document Server

    Westphal, Tobias; Bertolini, Alessandro; Born, Michael; Chen, Yanbei; Cumming, Alan V; Cunningham, Liam; Dahl, Katrin; Graef, Christian; Hammond, Giles; Heinzel, Gerhard; Hild, Stefan; Huttner, Sabina; Jones, Russel; Kawazoe, Fumiko; Koehlenbeck, Sina; Kuehn, Gerrit; Lueck, Harald; Mossavi, Kasem; Poeld, Jan H; Somiya, Kentaro; van Veggel, Marielle; Wanner, Alexander; Willke, Benno; Strain, Ken A; Gossler, Stefan; Danzmann, Karsten

    2011-01-01

    The AEI 10 m prototype interferometer facility is currently being constructed at the Albert Einstein Institute in Hannover, Germany. It aims to perform experiments for future gravitational wave detectors using advanced techniques. Seismically isolated benches are planned to be interferometrically interconnected and stabilized, forming a low-noise testbed inside a 100 m^3 ultra-high vacuum system. A well-stabilized high power laser will perform differential position readout of 100 g test masses in a 10 m suspended arm-cavity enhanced Michelson interferometer at the crossover of measurement (shot) noise and backaction (quantum radiation pressure) noise, the so-called Standard Quantum Limit (SQL). Such a sensitivity enables experiments in the highly topical field of macroscopic quantum mechanics. In this article we introduce the experimental facility and describe the methods employed, technical details of subsystems will be covered in future papers.

  8. Investigations using Laboratory Testbeds to Interpret Flight Instrument Datasets from Mars Robotic Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Sutter, B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Achilles, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has laboratory instrumentation that mimic the capabilities of corresponding flight instruments to enable interpretation of datasets returned from Mars robotic missions. The lab instruments have been and continue to be applied to datasets for the Mössbauer Spectrometer (MB) on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER), the Thermal & Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the Mars Phoenix Scout, the CRISM instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and will be applied to datasets for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) and Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) instruments onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The laboratory instruments can analyze analog samples at costs that are substantially lower than engineering models of flight instruments, but their success to enable interpretation of flight data depends on how closely their capabilities mimic those of the flight instrument. The JSC lab MB instruments are equivalent to the MER instruments except without flight qualified components and no reference channel Co-57 source. Data from analog samples were critical for identification of Mg-Fe carbonate at Gusev crater. Fiber-optic VNIR spectrometers are used to obtain CRISM-like spectral data over the range 350-2500 nm, and data for Fe-phyllosilicates show irreversible behavior in the electronic transition region upon dessication. The MB and VNIR instruments can be operated within chambers where, for example, the absolute H2O concentration can be measured and controlled. Phoenix's TEGA consisted of a calorimeter coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS). The JSC laboratory testbed instrument consisted of a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) coupled to a MS configured to operate under total pressure (12 mbar), heating rate (20 °C/min), and purge gas composition (N2) analogous to the flight TEGA. TEGA detected CO2 release at both low (400-680 °C) and

  9. Detonation cell size measurements in high-temperature hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at the BNL high-temperature combustion facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciccarelli, G.; Ginsberg, T.; Boccio, J.L. [and others

    1997-11-01

    The High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was designed and constructed with the objective of studying detonation phenomena in mixtures of hydrogen-air-steam at initially high temperatures. The central element of the HTCF is a 27-cm inner-diameter, 21.3-m long cylindrical test vessel capable of being heating to 700K {+-} 14K. A unique feature of the HTCF is the {open_quotes}diaphragmless{close_quotes} acetylene-oxygen gas driver which is used to initiate the detonation in the test gas. Cell size measurements have shown that for any hydrogen-air-steam mixture, increasing the initial mixture temperature, in the range of 300K to 650K, while maintaining the initial pressure of 0.1 MPa, decreases the cell size and thus makes the mixture more detonable. The effect of steam dilution on cell size was tested in stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric (e.g., equivalence ratio of 0.5) hydrogen-air mixtures. Increasing the steam dilution in hydrogen-air mixtures at 0.1 MPa initial pressure increases the cell size, irrespective of initial temperature. It is also observed that the desensitizing effect of steam diminished with increased initial temperature. A 1-dimensional, steady-state Zel`dovich, von Neumann, Doring (ZND) model, with full chemical kinetics, has been used to predict cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at different initial conditions. Qualitatively the model predicts the overall trends observed in the measured cell size versus mixture composition and initial temperature and pressure. It was found that the proportionality constant used to predict detonation cell size from the calculated ZND model reaction zone varies between 10 and 100 depending on the mixture composition and initial temperature. 32 refs., 35 figs.

  10. As-prepared MoS2 quantum dot as a facile fluorescent probe for long-term tracing of live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai; Zhang, Yue; Xia, Zhining; Wei, Weili

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the newly emerged two-dimensional nanomaterials, layered transition metal dichalcogenide (e.g. MoS2) nanosheets, have drawn tremendous attentions due to their extraordinary electronic and optical properties, and MoS2 quantum dots (MoS2 QDs) with lateral sizes less than 10 nm have been found to be highly luminescent. In the present study, a facile approach for large-scale preparation of MoS2 QDs by Na intercalation reaction without using any toxic organic reagents is proposed. MoS2 QDs were carefully characterized by various techniques including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, spectroscopy, in vitro cytotoxicology, and capillary electrophoresis. The as-prepared MoS2 QDs were strongly fluorescent, highly photo-stable, low in cytotoxicity, and readily reactive to thiols. These inherent properties of MoS2 QDs make them excellent fluorescent probes for long-term live cell tracing. The results of live cells imaging indicated that MoS2 QD stained cells remained highly fluorescent after long-term culture, and could be easily traced from other co-cultured cell lines.

  11. As-prepared MoS2 quantum dot as a facile fluorescent probe for long-term tracing of live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai; Zhang, Yue; Xia, Zhining; Wei, Weili

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the newly emerged two-dimensional nanomaterials, layered transition metal dichalcogenide (e.g. MoS2) nanosheets, have drawn tremendous attentions due to their extraordinary electronic and optical properties, and MoS2 quantum dots (MoS2 QDs) with lateral sizes less than 10 nm have been found to be highly luminescent. In the present study, a facile approach for large-scale preparation of MoS2 QDs by Na intercalation reaction without using any toxic organic reagents is proposed. MoS2 QDs were carefully characterized by various techniques including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, spectroscopy, in vitro cytotoxicology, and capillary electrophoresis. The as-prepared MoS2 QDs were strongly fluorescent, highly photo-stable, low in cytotoxicity, and readily reactive to thiols. These inherent properties of MoS2 QDs make them excellent fluorescent probes for long-term live cell tracing. The results of live cells imaging indicated that MoS2 QD stained cells remained highly fluorescent after long-term culture, and could be easily traced from other co-cultured cell lines.

  12. Results from the CDE phase activity on neutron dosimetry for the international fusion materials irradiation facility test cell

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, B; Maruccia, G; Petrizzi, L; Bignon, G; Blandin, C; Chauffriat, S; Lebrun, A; Recroix, H; Trapp, J P; Kaschuck, Y

    2000-01-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) project deals with the study of an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium source, producing high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials for fusion energy reactors. IFMIF would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator based irradiation tests. This paper describes the activity on neutron/gamma dosimetry (necessary for the characterization of the specimens' irradiation) performed in the frame of the IFMIF conceptual design evaluation (CDE) neutronics tasks. During the previous phase (conceptual design activity (CDA)) the multifoil activation method was proposed for the measurement of the neutron fluence and spectrum and a set of suitable foils was defined. The cross section variances and covariances of this set of foils have now been used for tests on the sensitivity of the IFMIF neutron spectrum determination to cross section uncertainties...

  13. Empirical assessment of a prismatic daylight-redirecting window film in a full-scale office testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanachareonkit, Anothai; Lee, Eleanor S.; McNeil, Andrew

    2013-08-31

    Daylight redirecting systems with vertical windows have the potential to offset lighting energy use in deep perimeter zones. Microstructured prismatic window films can be manufactured using low-cost, roll-to-roll fabrication methods and adhered to the inside surface of existing windows as a retrofit measure or installed as a replacement insulating glass unit in the clerestory portion of the window wall. A clear film patterned with linear, 50-250 micrometer high, four-sided asymmetrical prisms was fabricated and installed in the south-facing, clerestory low-e, clear glazed windows of a full-scale testbed facility. Views through the film were distorted. The film was evaluated in a sunny climate over a two-year period to gauge daylighting and visual comfort performance. The daylighting aperture was small (window-towall ratio of 0.18) and the lower windows were blocked off to isolate the evaluation to the window film. Workplane illuminance measurements were made in the 4.6 m (15 ft) deep room furnished as a private office. Analysis of discomfort glare was conducted using high dynamic range imaging coupled with the evalglare software tool, which computes the daylight glare probability and other metrics used to evaluate visual discomfort. The window film was found to result in perceptible levels of discomfort glare on clear sunny days from the most conservative view point in the rear of the room looking toward the window. Daylight illuminance levels at the rear of the room were significantly increased above the reference window condition, which was defined as the same glazed clerestory window but with an interior Venetian blind (slat angle set to the cut-off angle), for the equinox to winter solstice period on clear sunny days. For partly cloudy and overcast sky conditions, daylight levels were improved slightly. To reduce glare, the daylighting film was coupled with a diffusing film in an insulating glazing unit. The diffusing film retained the directionality of the

  14. The PSA Solar Furnace, A Test Facility Ready to Characterize High-ContrationSolar Devices from Solar Thermal Applications to PV Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rodriguez, J.; Canadas, I.; Fernandez, J.; Monterreal, R.

    2006-07-01

    The PSA solar furnace is mainly devoted to materials science research experiments. This is because, due to the high thermal flux delivered onto their focus, solar furnaces are able to obtain the maximum energy density attainable with solar devices and therefore, are very suitable tools for thermal surface treatment of materials, in which the specimens are subjected to thermal shock or high temperatures. This facility has recently been improved with the installation of new equipment and instrumentation, including a flux measuring system, spectro radiometer, high-pressure cooling system with speed regulation, high-speed circular shutter, a test bed for volumetric and rotating receivers and a new Control and Data Acquisition System. Moreover, replacement of the previous four heliostats by a single, larger one, has improved system performance. This paper presents the new PSA Solar Furnace capabilities with the new instrumentation and control, which broaden the fields of application of this facility, from materials treatments and thermal balance to solar thermal processes i.e. porous receivers with calorimetric calculus or solid waste treatments and concentrating PV cells. (Author)

  15. Integration of a Higher Plant Chamber into the European Space Agency's MELiSSA Pilot Plant: The Canadian Role in Advanced Life Support Test-Bed Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waters, Geoffrey; Lawson, Jamie; Gidzinski, Danuta; Stasiak, Michael; Dixon, Mike; Peiro, Enrique; Godia, Francesc; Paille, Christel; Fossen, Arnaud; Lamaze, Brigitte; Lasseur, Christophe

    The European Space Agency's Micro-Ecological Life Support System Alternative (MELiSSA) project has been conceived as a tool for developing the technology of future biological life support systems required for long-term human space exploration missions to the Moon or Mars. The main life support functions of MELiSSA are the recycling of waste (inedible plant biomass, human excrement), carbon dioxide and minerals and the production of food, fresh water and air revitalization. Based on the principle of an aquatic ecosystem, MELiSSA is comprised of four microbial compartments and a higher plant compartment integrated in a closed loop. Each compartment is studied, designed and demonstrated at laboratory scale before being scaled-up for subsequent integration into the MELISSA Pilot Plant (MPP) at the Universitat Aut`noma de Barcelona. Work related to higher plant cultivation systems, o which have been historically focussed at the University of Guelph's Controlled Environment Systems Research Facility (CESRF), has included design of the HPC for the MPP, the metabolic characterization of MELiSSA candidate crops and the validation of theoretical gas exchange and nutrient dynamic models, The presented paper will review some of the recent data and HPC design work of CESRF conducted as part of Canada's involvement in the MELiSSA program and its partnership in the development of the MPP terrestrial demonstration test-bed.

  16. The gyroscope testbed: A verification of the gravity probe B suspension system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brumley, Robert Willard

    The verification of precision control systems for use in space-based applications can be extremely challenging. Often, the presence of the 1-g field substantively changes the control problem, making it impossible to test directly on the Earth. This talk discusses a new approach to testing and verification of the gyroscope suspension system for the Gravity Probe B (GP-B) experimental test of General Relativity. The verification approach involves the creation of a new testbed that has the same input-output characteristics and dynamics as a GP-B gyroscope. This involves real physical hardware that moves like a real gyroscope, allowing the suspension system's performance to be measured directly without the need to break any internal connections or bypass internal subsystems. The user free to define any set of disturbances from a 1-g ground levitation to a 10-8 g science mission. The testbed has two main subsystems. The mechanical subsystem is comprised of six parallel plate capacitors whose spacing is controlled by precision actuators. These actuators are the physical interface to the suspension system and create the electrode-rotor capacitances present in a real gyroscope. The closed-loop positioning noise of the system is approximately 10 pm/√Hz, enabling the commanding of position variations a fraction the size of a single atom of Silicon. The control subsystem has a DSP-based high-speed nonlinear controller that forces the actuators to follow the dynamics of a gyroscope. The device has been shown to faithfully represent a gyroscope in 1-g levitation, and a robustness analysis has been performed to prove that it correctly tests the stability of the on-orbit system. The testbed is then used to measure directly suspension system performance in a variety of on-orbit scenarios. Gyroscope levitation in 10-8 g conditions is demonstrated. The robustness of gyroscope levitation to transient disturbances such as micrometeorite impacts on the space vehicle and transitions

  17. First light of an external occulter testbed at flight Fresnel numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjong; Sirbu, Dan; Hu, Mia; Kasdin, Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.; Harness, Anthony; Shaklan, Stuart

    2017-01-01

    Many approaches have been suggested over the last couple of decades for imaging Earth-like planets. One of the main candidates for creating high-contrast for future Earth-like planets detection is an external occulter. The external occulter is a spacecraft flown along the line-of-sight of a space telescope to suppress starlight and enable high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets. The occulter is typically tens of meters in diameter and the separation from the telescope is of the order of tens of thousands of kilometers. Optical testing of a full-scale external occulter on the ground is impossible because of the long separations. Therefore, laboratory verification of occulter designs is necessary to validate the optical models used to design and predict occulter performance. At Princeton, we have designed and built a testbed that allows verification of scaled occulter designs whose suppressed shadow is mathematically identical to that of space occulters. The goal of this experiment is to demonstrate a pupil plane suppression of better than 1e-9 with a corresponding image plane contrast of better than 1e-11. The occulter testbed uses a 77.2 m optical propagation distance to realize the flight Fresnel number of 14.5. The scaled mask is placed at 27.2 m from the artificial source and the camera is located 50.0 m from the scaled mask. We will use an etched silicon mask, manufactured by the Microdevices Lab(MDL) of the Jet Propulsion Laboratory(JPL), as the occulter. Based on conversations with MDL, we expect that 0.5 μm feature size is an achievable resolution in the mask manufacturing process and is therefore likely the indicator of the best possible performance. The occulter is illuminated by a diverging laser beam to reduce the aberrations from the optics before the occulter. Here, we present first light result of a sample design operating at a flight Fresnel number and the experimental setup of the testbed. We compare the experimental results with simulations

  18. Facile Diversity-Oriented Synthesis of Polycyclic Pyridines and Their Cytotoxicity Effects in Human Cancer Cell Lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goswami, Limi; Gogoi, Shyamalee; Gogoi, Junali; Boruah, Rajani K; Boruah, Romesh C; Gogoi, Pranjal

    2016-05-09

    A three-component cascade method has been developed for the direct synthesis of polysubstituted pyridines. This strategy provides a very convenient route to pyridines using a variety of β-bromo-α,β-unsaturated aldehydes, 1,3-diketones, and ammonium acetate without any additional catalyst or metal salt under mild conditions. A variety of β-ketoesters and 4-hydroxycoumarin were also used instead of 1,3-diketones for the diverse synthesis of polycyclic pyridines. One of the synthesized pyridines has been unambiguously established by a single crystal XRD study. All of the synthesized pyridine derivatives were evaluated for their antiproliferative properties in vitro against the human cancer cell lines HeLa, Me180, and ZR751. Compounds 4{4,1} and 4{2,4} showed significant cytotoxicity in the human breast cancer cell line ZR751 and cervical cancer cell line Me180, respectively, and a few other compounds were found to have moderate activities.

  19. Facile internalization of paclitaxel on titania nanoparticles in human lung carcinoma cells after adsorption of serum proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Hye; Dembereldorj, Uuriintuya; Park, Jin; Kim, Mira; Kim, Semi; Joo, Sang-Woo, E-mail: sjoo@ssu.ac.kr [Soongsil University, Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The enhanced damage of human carcinoma cells was achieved using paclitaxel (PTX)-assembled TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs). The crystalline structures and light absorption properties of the TiO{sub 2} NPs were examined by X-ray diffraction patterns and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopic tools. The fabrication of PTX and serum proteins on TiO{sub 2} NPs via self-assembly was checked by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements. The PTX-coated TiO{sub 2} NPs appeared to be well adsorbed by serum proteins. The PTX-coated TiO{sub 2} NPs were found to be well internalized in cancer cells as indicated by transmission electron microscopy. The intracellular aggregation of PTX-coated TiO{sub 2} NPs was assumed to occur after endocytosis leading to an entrapment of NPs in an endosomal or a lysosomal structure. Human lung carcinoma A549 cancer cells were chosen to examine their viability after the cellular uptake of the PTX-coated TiO{sub 2} NPs. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cell viability assay test indicated that the cell viability should be affected by the concentration of TiO{sub 2} NPs. After applying PTX-coated TiO{sub 2} NPs (50 ppm ({mu}g/mL)) incubating for 24 h, we observed a 30 % further decrease of cell viability for PTX alone in the low concentration range of 0.1-10 nM.Graphical Abstract.

  20. Polymer Solar Cells with Efficiency >10% Enabled via a Facile Solution-Processed Al-Doped ZnO Electron Transporting Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Jagadamma, Lethy Krishnan

    2015-04-22

    A facile and low-temperature (125 °C) solution-processed Al-doped ZnO (AZO) buffer layer functioning very effectively as electron accepting/hole blocking layer for a wide range of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction systems, yielding power conversion efficiency in excess of 10% (8%) on glass (plastic) substrates is described. The ammonia-treatment of the aqueous AZO nanoparticle solution produces compact, crystalline, and smooth thin films, which retain the aluminum doping, and eliminates/reduces the native defects by nitrogen incorporation, making them good electron transporters and energetically matched with the fullerene acceptor. It is demonstrated that highly efficient solar cells can be achieved without the need for additional surface chemical modifications of the buffer layer, which is a common requirement for many metal oxide buffer layers to yield efficient solar cells. Also highly efficient solar cells are achieved with thick AZO films (>50 nm), highlighting the suitability of this material for roll-to-roll coating. Preliminary results on the applicability of AZO as electron injection layer in F8BT-based polymer light emitting diode are also presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  1. Facile realization of efficient blocking from ZnO/TiO2 mismatch interface in dye-sensitized solar cells and precise microscopic modeling adapted by circuit analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Mohsen; Samavat, Feridoun; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Fathollahi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-06-01

    In the present research, the effect of \\text{ZnO} -based blocking layers on the operational features of \\text{Ti}{{\\text{O}}2} -based dye-sensitized solar cells is investigated. A facile solution-based coating method is applied to prepare an interfacial highly transparent \\text{ZnO} compact blocking layer (CBL) to enhance the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells. Different precursor molar concentration were tested to find the optimum concentration. Optical and electrical measurements were carried out to confirm the operation of the CBLs. Morphological characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the structure of the compact layers. We have also developed a set of modeling procedures to extract the effective electrical parameters including the parasitic resistances and charged carrier profiles to investigate the effect of CBLs on the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) performance. The adopted modeling approach should establish a versatile framework for diagnosis of DSSCs and facilitates the exploration of critical factors influencing device performance.

  2. Facile synthesis of porous CuS film as a high efficient counter electrode for quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yibing; Lin, Yu; Wu, Jihuai; Zhang, Xiaolong; Fang, Biaopeng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, porous CuS film has been successfully prepared by a facile method and employed as a counter electrode (CE) in quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) for its highest catalytic activity. This CuS thin film was deposited on FTO substrate via spin coating process which is simple to operate, and its electrochemical properties were further studied by EIS and Tafel measurement. With the cycling time of depositing CuS up to 8, it displays high electrocatalytic activity toward polysulfide reduction, rationalizing the improved QDSSCs performance. Using the CdS/CdSe-sensitized QDSSCs, the cells exhibit improved short-circuit photocurrent density ( J sc) and fill factor (FF), achieving solar cell conversion efficiency ( η) as high as 5.60 % under AM 1.5 illumination of 100 mW cm-2. This work provides a novel and simple method for the preparation of CEs, which could be utilized in other metal sulfides CEs for QDSSCs.

  3. A facile, solvent vapor-fumigation-induced, self-repair recrystallization of CH3NH3PbI3 films for high-performance perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Weidong; Yu, Tao; Li, Faming; Bao, Chunxiong; Gao, Hao; Yi, Yong; Yang, Jie; Fu, Gao; Zhou, Xiaoxin; Zou, Zhigang

    2015-03-12

    A high-quality CH3NH3PbI3 film is crucial in the manufacture of a high-performance perovskite solar cell. Here, a recrystallization process via facile fumigation with DMF vapor has been successfully introduced to self-repair of CH3NH3PbI3 films with poor coverage and low crystallinity prepared by the commonly used one-step spin-coating method. We found that the CH3NH3PbI3 films with dendritic structures can spontaneously transform to the uniform ones with full coverage and high crystallinity by adjusting the cycles of the recrystallization process. The mesostructured perovskite solar cells based on these repaired CH3NH3PbI3 films showed reproducible optimal power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 11.15% and average PCE of 10.25±0.90%, which are much better than that of devices based on the non-repaired CH3NH3PbI3 films. In addition, the hysteresis phenomenon in the current-voltage test can also be effectively alleviated due to the quality of the films being improved in the optimized devices. Our work proved that the fumigation of solvent vapor can modify metal organic perovskite films such as CH3NH3PbI3. It offers a novel and attractive way to fabricate high-performance perovskite solar cells.

  4. Facile and green approach to prepare fluorescent carbon dots: Emergent nanomaterial for cell imaging and detection of vitamin B2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Aniruddha; Nandi, Sudipta; Das, Pradip; Nandi, Arun K

    2016-04-15

    Carbon dots (CDs) are a new representative in carbonaceous family and have initiated remarkable research interests over the past one decade in a large variety of fields. Herein, we have utilized a facile, one-step carbonization method to prepare fluorescent carbon dots using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) both as a carbon source and as a surface passivating agent. The as prepared CDs emit bright blue fluorescence under ultraviolet illumination. The structure and optical properties of the CDs are thoroughly investigated by several methods such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy; dynamic light scattering; UV-vis, fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The CDs exhibit excellent water solubility and demonstrate average hydrodynamic diameter of 11.3 nm, holding great promise for biological applications. The biocompatibility evaluation and in vitro imaging study reveals that the synthesized CDs can be used as effective fluorescent probes in bio-imaging without noticeable cytotoxicity. In addition, a unique sensor for the detection of vitamin B2 in aqueous solution is proposed on the basis of spontaneous fluorescence resonance energy transfer from CD to vitamin B2. These findings therefore suggest that the CDs can find potential applications in cellular imaging along with sensing of vitamin B2.

  5. Air Quality Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research FacilityFacilities with operating permits for Title V of the Federal Clean Air Act, as well as facilities required to submit an air emissions inventory, and other facilities...

  6. Theme: Laboratory Facilities Improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Glen M.; And Others

    1993-01-01

    Includes "Laboratory Facilities Improvement" (Miller); "Remodeling Laboratories for Agriscience Instruction" (Newman, Johnson); "Planning for Change" (Mulcahy); "Laboratory Facilities Improvement for Technology Transfer" (Harper); "Facilities for Agriscience Instruction" (Agnew et al.); "Laboratory Facility Improvement" (Boren, Dwyer); and…

  7. Design, Development, and Testing of a UAV Hardware-in-the-Loop Testbed for Aviation and Airspace Prognostics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kulkarni, Chetan; Teubert, Chris; Gorospe, George; Burgett, Drew; Quach, Cuong C.; Hogge, Edward

    2016-01-01

    The airspace is becoming more and more complicated, and will continue to do so in the future with the integration of Unmanned Aerial Vehicles (UAVs), autonomy, spacecraft, other forms of aviation technology into the airspace. The new technology and complexity increases the importance and difficulty of safety assurance. Additionally, testing new technologies on complex aviation systems & systems of systems can be very difficult, expensive, and sometimes unsafe in real life scenarios. Prognostic methodology provides an estimate of the health and risks of a component, vehicle, or airspace and knowledge of how that will change over time. That measure is especially useful in safety determination, mission planning, and maintenance scheduling. The developed testbed will be used to validate prediction algorithms for the real-time safety monitoring of the National Airspace System (NAS) and the prediction of unsafe events. The framework injects flight related anomalies related to ground systems, routing, airport congestion, etc. to test and verify algorithms for NAS safety. In our research work, we develop a live, distributed, hardware-in-the-loop testbed for aviation and airspace prognostics along with exploring further research possibilities to verify and validate future algorithms for NAS safety. The testbed integrates virtual aircraft using the X-Plane simulator and X-PlaneConnect toolbox, UAVs using onboard sensors and cellular communications, and hardware in the loop components. In addition, the testbed includes an additional research framework to support and simplify future research activities. It enables safe, accurate, and inexpensive experimentation and research into airspace and vehicle prognosis that would not have been possible otherwise. This paper describes the design, development, and testing of this system. Software reliability, safety and latency are some of the critical design considerations in development of the testbed. Integration of HITL elements in

  8. Facile Synthesis of Highly Active and Robust Ni-Mo Bimetallic Electrocatalyst for Hydrocarbon Oxidation in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hua, B.; Li, M.; Zhang, Y.-Q.; Chen, J.; Sun, Y.-F.; Yan, N.; Li, J.; Luo, J.L.

    2016-01-01

    We report a novel Ni–Mo bimetallic alloy decorated with multimicrocrystals as an efficient anode catalyst for hydrocarbon-fueled solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). We show that these Ni–Mo bimetallic alloys are highly active, thermally stable, and sulfur/coke tolerant electrocatalysts for hydrocarbon o

  9. Thermal and Fluid Modeling of the CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed (CRYOTE) Ground Test Article (GTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piryk, David; Schallhorn, Paul; Walls, Laurie; Stopnitzky, Benny; Rhys, Noah; Wollen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to anchor thermal and fluid system models to data acquired from a ground test article (GTA) for the CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed - CRYOTE. To accomplish this analysis, it was broken into four primary tasks. These included model development, pre-test predictions, testing support at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC} and post-test correlations. Information from MSFC facilitated the task of refining and correlating the initial models. The primary goal of the modeling/testing/correlating efforts was to characterize heat loads throughout the ground test article. Significant factors impacting the heat loads included radiative environments, multi-layer insulation (MLI) performance, tank fill levels, tank pressures, and even contact conductance coefficients. This paper demonstrates how analytical thermal/fluid networks were established, and it includes supporting rationale for specific thermal responses seen during testing.

  10. Passification based simple adaptive control of quadrotor attitude: Algorithms and testbed results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomashevich, Stanislav; Belyavskyi, Andrey; Andrievsky, Boris

    2017-01-01

    In the paper, the results of the Passification Method with the Implicit Reference Model (IRM) approach are applied for designing the simple adaptive controller for quadrotor attitude. The IRM design technique makes it possible to relax the matching condition, known for habitual MRAC systems, and leads to simple adaptive controllers, ensuring fast tuning the controller gains, high robustness with respect to nonlinearities in the control loop, to the external disturbances and the unmodeled plant dynamics. For experimental evaluation of the adaptive systems performance, the 2DOF laboratory setup has been created. The testbed allows to safely test new control algorithms in the laboratory area with a small space and promptly make changes in cases of failure. The testing results of simple adaptive control of quadrotor attitude are presented, demonstrating efficacy of the applied simple adaptive control method. The experiments demonstrate good performance quality and high adaptation rate of the simple adaptive control system.

  11. Differential Astrometry of Sub-arcsecond Scale Binaries at the Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Lane, B F

    2004-01-01

    We have used the Palomar Testbed Interferometer to perform very high precision differential astrometry on the 0.25 arcsecond separation binary star HD 171779. In 70 minutes of observation we achieve a measurement uncertainty of approximately 9 micro-arcseconds in one axis, consistent with theoretical expectations. Night-to-night repeatability over four nights is at the level of 16 micro-arcseconds. This method of very-narrow-angle astrometry may be extremely useful for searching for planets with masses as small as 0.5 Jupiter Masses around a previously neglected class of stars -- so-called ``speckle binaries.'' It will also provide measurements of stellar parameters such as masses and distances, useful for constraining stellar models at the 10^-3 level.

  12. OPNET/Simulink Based Testbed for Disturbance Detection in the Smart Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadi, Mohammad A. H. [University of Memphis; Dasgupta, Dipankar [ORNL; Ali, Mohammad Hassan [University of Memphis; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The important backbone of the smart grid is the cyber/information infrastructure, which is primarily used to communicate with different grid components. A smart grid is a complex cyber physical system containing a numerous and variety number of sources, devices, controllers and loads. Therefore, the smart grid is vulnerable to grid related disturbances. For such dynamic system, disturbance and intrusion detection is a paramount issue. This paper presents a Simulink and Opnet based co-simulated platform to carry out a cyber-intrusion in cyber network for modern power systems and the smart grid. The IEEE 30 bus power system model is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the simulated testbed. The experiments were performed by disturbing the circuit breakers reclosing time through a cyber-attack. Different disturbance situations in the considered test system are considered and the results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed co-simulated scheme.

  13. Neutron-antineutron transition as a test-bed for dynamical CPT violations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addazi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    We show a simple mechanism for a dynamical CPT violation in the neutron sector. In particular, we show a CPT-violating see-saw mechanism, generating a Majorana mass and a CPT-violating mass for the neutron. CPT-violating see-saw involves a sterile partner of the neutron, living in a hidden sector, in which CPT is spontaneously broken. In particular, neutrons (antineutrons) can communicate with the hidden sector through nonperturbative quantum gravity effects called exotic instantons. Exotic instantons dynamically break R-parity, generating one effective vertex between the neutron and its sterile partner. In this way, we show how a small CPT-violating mass term for the neutron is naturally generated. This model can be tested in the next generation of experiments in neutron-antineutron physics. This strongly motivates researches of CPT-violating effects in neutron-antineutron physics as a test-bed for dynamical CPT-violations in SM.

  14. Low-signal, coronagraphic wavefront estimation with Kalman filtering in the high contrast imaging testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riggs, A. J. Eldorado; Cady, Eric J.; Prada, Camilo M.; Kern, Brian D.; Zhou, Hanying; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Groff, Tyler D.

    2016-07-01

    For direct imaging and spectral characterization of cold exoplanets in reflected light, the proposed Wide-Field Infrared Survey Telescope (WFIRST) Coronagraph Instrument (CGI) will carry two types of coronagraphs. The High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory has been testing both coronagraph types and demonstrated their abilities to achieve high contrast. Focal plane wavefront correction is used to estimate and mitigate aberrations. As the most time-consuming part of correction during a space mission, the acquisition of probed images for electric field estimation needs to be as short as possible. We present results from the HCIT of narrowband, low-signal wavefront estimation tests using a shaped pupil Lyot coronagraph (SPLC) designed for the WFIRST CGI. In the low-flux regime, the Kalman filter and iterated extended Kalman filter provide faster correction, better achievable contrast, and more accurate estimates than batch process estimation.

  15. Particle Swarm Optimization and gravitational wave data analysis: Performance on a binary inspiral testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Wang, Yan

    2010-01-01

    The detection and estimation of gravitational wave (GW) signals belonging to a parameterized family of waveforms requires, in general, the numerical maximization of a data-dependent function of the signal parameters. Due to noise in the data, the function to be maximized is often highly multi-modal with numerous local maxima. Searching for the global maximum then becomes computationally expensive, which in turn can limit the scientific scope of the search. Stochastic optimization is one possible approach to reducing computational costs in such applications. We report results from a first investigation of the Particle Swarm Optimization (PSO) method in this context. The method is applied to a testbed motivated by the problem of detection and estimation of a binary inspiral signal. Our results show that PSO works well in the presence of high multi-modality, making it a viable candidate method for further applications in GW data analysis.

  16. Designing and implementing an experimental wireless mobile ad hoc networks testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Lixin; Dai, Guanzhong; Mu, Dejun; Zhang, Huisheng

    2006-11-01

    A very large number of simulation models have been developed to study ad hoc network architectures and protocols under many network scenarios, number of nodes, mobility rates, etc. However, fidelity of simulation results has always been a concern, especially when the protocols being studied are affected by the propagation and interference characteristics of the radio channels. This paper describes our experience in designing and implementing a MANET prototype system, Experimental Wireless Mobile Ad hoc Networks Testbed (EWMANT), in order to perform largescale, reproducible experiments. EWMANT aims at assessing several different protocols in a real-world environment instead of by simulation. It assists us with finding and evaluating a proper solution, showing the clear advantage of realworld implementations compared to simulations.

  17. Nuclear Spins as Quantum Testbeds: Singlet States, Quantum Correlations, and Delayed-choice Experiments

    CERN Document Server

    Roy, Soumya Singha

    2012-01-01

    Nuclear Magnetic Resonance (NMR) forms a natural test-bed to perform quantum information processing (QIP) and has so far proven to be one of the most successful quantum information processors. The nuclear spins in a molecule treated as quantum bits or qubits which are the basic building blocks of a quantum computer. The development of NMR over half a century puts it in a platform where we can utilize its excellent control techniques over an ensemble of spin systems and perform quantum computation in a highly controlled way. Apart from a successful quantum information processor, NMR is also a highly powerful quantum platform where many of the potentially challenging quantum mechanical experiments can be performed.

  18. Modeling Circumstellar Disks of B-Type Stars with Observations from the Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzenia, B. J.; Tycner, C.; Jones, C. E.; Rinehart, S. A.; vanBelle, G. T.; Sigut, T. A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Geometrical (uniform disk) and numerical models were calculated for a set of B-emission (Be) stars observed with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI). Physical extents have been estimated for the disks of a total of15 stars via uniform disk models. Our numerical non-LTE models used parameters for the B0, B2, B5, and B8spectral classes and following the framework laid by previous studies, we have compared them to infrared K-band interferometric observations taken at PTI. This is the first time such an extensive set of Be stars observed with long-baseline interferometry has been analyzed with self-consistent non-LTE numerical disk models.

  19. Integration of Wi-Fi mobile nodes in a Web of Things Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luca Davoli

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The Internet of Things (IoT is supposed to connect billions of devices to the Internet through IP-based communications. The main goal is to foster a rapid deployment of Web-enabled everyday objects, allowing end users to manage and control smart things in a simple way, by using Web browsers. This paper focuses on the integration of Wi-Fi nodes, hosting HTTP resources, into a Web of Things Testbed (WoTT. The main novelty of the proposed approach is that the WoTT integrates new nodes by using only standard mechanisms, allowing end-users to interact with all Smart Objects without worrying about protocol-specific details.

  20. High-Resolution Adaptive Optics Test-Bed for Vision Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilks, S C; Thomspon, C A; Olivier, S S; Bauman, B J; Barnes, T; Werner, J S

    2001-09-27

    We discuss the design and implementation of a low-cost, high-resolution adaptive optics test-bed for vision research. It is well known that high-order aberrations in the human eye reduce optical resolution and limit visual acuity. However, the effects of aberration-free eyesight on vision are only now beginning to be studied using adaptive optics to sense and correct the aberrations in the eye. We are developing a high-resolution adaptive optics system for this purpose using a Hamamatsu Parallel Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator. Phase-wrapping is used to extend the effective stroke of the device, and the wavefront sensing and wavefront correction are done at different wavelengths. Issues associated with these techniques will be discussed.

  1. Corner cube model for Microarcsec Metrology (MAM) testbed in Space Interferometer Mission (SIM)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xu

    2005-02-01

    A corner cube model is developed to calculate the SIM internal metrology optical delay bias (with the accuracy of picometer) due to the component imperfections, such as vertex offset, coating index error, dihedral error, and gimbal offset. This physics-based and Matlab-implemented ray-trace model provides useful guidance on the flight system design, integration, and characterization. In this paper, the details of the corner cube model will be described first. Then the sub-nanometer level model validation through the MAM testbed will be presented. Finally several examples of the model application, such as the metrology delay bias minimization, design parameter error budget (or tolerance) allocation, and the metrology beam prints visualization, will be shown.

  2. Development of a testbed for flexible a-Si:H photodiode sensing arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dominguez, Alfonso; Kunnen, George; Vetrano, Michael; Smith, Joseph; Marrs, Michael; Allee, David R.

    2013-05-01

    Large area, flexible sensing arrays for imaging, biochemical sensing and radiation detection are now possible with the development of flexible active matrix display technology. In particular, large-area flexible imaging arrays can provide considerable advancement in defense and security industries because of their inherent low manufacturing costs and physical plasticity that allows for increased adaptability to non-planar mounting surfaces. For example, a flexible array of photodetectors and lenslets formed into a cylinder could image simultaneously with a 360 degree view without the need for expensive bulky optics or a gimbaled mount. Here we report the design and development of a scalable 16x16 pixel testbed for flexible sensor arrays using commercial-off-the-shelf (COTS) parts and demonstrate the capture of a shadow image with an array of photodiodes and active pixel sensors on a plastic substrate. The image capture system makes use of an array of low-noise, InGaZnO active pixel amplifiers to detect changes in current in 2.4 μm-thick reverse-biased a-Si:H PIN diodes. A thorough characterization of the responsivity, detectivity, and optical gain of an a- Si:H photodiode is also provided. At the back end, analog capture circuitry progressively scans the array and constructs an image based on the electrical activity in each pixel. The use of correlated-double-sampling to remove fixed pattern noise is shown to significantly improve spatial resolution due to process variations. The testbed can be readily adapted for the development of neutron, alpha-particle, or X-ray detection arrays given an appropriate conversion layer.

  3. Ice cloud modeling upgrade to GRC's Advanced Surveillance Test-bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Daniell, Anthony L.; Robbins, Howard M.

    1995-09-01

    The development and evaluation of signal and data processing algorithms for IR surveillance systems is critically dependent on realistic simulations of targets and background. The Advanced Surveillance Testbed has been developed by GRC to perform such simulations. It has recently been upgraded to include models for the scattering of sunlight from high-altitude clouds of ice-crystals. The ice cloud models in the Advanced Surveillance Testbed are designed primarily for the SWIR and MWIR bands. The ice clouds are assumed to have nominally flat upper surfaces, and to be composed of hexagonal crystals (plates, columns, or intermediates), with any of several alternative distributions of shapes and sizes. The ice- crystals are assumed to rotate randomly about their hexagonal axes, but the user can choose from several models for the orientation of this axis: random isotropic, random horizonal, or nominally vertical. A single scattering model is used, with the small-angle forward scattering removed by renormalization. The scattering is calculated by geometrical optics, using algorithms based on the papers published by Liou, Takano, Cai, and Coleman. However, the GRC implementation includes some innovations that greatly increase its computational efficiency. In the SWIR band, the refractive index is highly variable. Its imaginary part varies by orders of magnitude, and its real part can be less than unity, causing total external reflections. Therefore, it is necessary to perform the computations for multiple IR wavelengths and combine the results. The calculations include two-way atmospheric transmission for the relevant wavelengths and the assumed cloud altitude. The model and its utility will be discussed.

  4. Testbed Demonstration of Low Order Wavefront Sensing and Control Technology for WFIRST Coronagraph

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fang; Balasubramanian, K.; Cady, E.; Kern, B.; Lam, R.; Mandic, M.; Patterson, K.; Poberezhskiy, I.; Shields, J.; Seo, J.; Tang, H.; Truong, T.; Wilson, D.

    2017-01-01

    NASA’s WFIRST-AFTA Coronagraph will be capable of directly imaging and spectrally characterizing giant exoplanets similar to Neptune and Jupiter, and possibly even super-Earths, around nearby stars. To maintain the required coronagraph performance in a realistic space environment, a Low Order Wavefront Sensing and Control (LOWFS/C) subsystem is necessary. The LOWFS/C will use the rejected stellar light to sense and suppress the telescope pointing drift and jitter as well as low order wavefront errors due to the changes in thermal loading of the telescope and the rest of the observatory. The LOWFS/C uses a Zernike phase contrast wavefront sensor with the phase shifting disk combined with the stellar light rejecting occulting mask, a key concept to minimize the non-common path error. Developed as a part of the Dynamic High Contrast Imaging Testbed (DHCIT), the LOWFS/C subsystem also consists of an Optical Telescope Assembly Simulator (OTA-S) to generate the realistic line-of-sight (LoS) drift and jitter as well as low order wavefront error from WFIRST-AFTA telescope’s vibration and thermal drift. The entire LOWFS/C subsystem have been integrated, calibrated, and tested in the Dynamic High Contrast Imaging Testbed. In this presentation we will show the results of LOWFS/C performance during the dynamic coronagraph tests in which we have demonstrated that LOWFS/C is able to maintain the coronagraph contrast with the presence of WFIRST like line-of-sight drift and jitter as well as low order wavefront drifts.

  5. A Proof-of-Concept for Semantically Interoperable Federation of IoT Experimentation Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Jorge; Sanchez, Luis; Gomez, David; Elsaleh, Tarek; Steinke, Ronald; Cirillo, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is unanimously identified as one of the main pillars of future smart scenarios. The potential of IoT technologies and deployments has been already demonstrated in a number of different application areas, including transport, energy, safety and healthcare. However, despite the growing number of IoT deployments, the majority of IoT applications tend to be self-contained, thereby forming application silos. A lightweight data centric integration and combination of these silos presents several challenges that still need to be addressed. Indeed, the ability to combine and synthesize data streams and services from diverse IoT platforms and testbeds, holds the promise to increase the potentiality of smart applications in terms of size, scope and targeted business context. In this article, a proof-of-concept implementation that federates two different IoT experimentation facilities by means of semantic-based technologies will be described. The specification and design of the implemented system and information models will be described together with the practical details of the developments carried out and its integration with the existing IoT platforms supporting the aforementioned testbeds. Overall, the system described in this paper demonstrates that it is possible to open new horizons in the development of IoT applications and experiments at a global scale, that transcend the (silo) boundaries of individual deployments, based on the semantic interconnection and interoperability of diverse IoT platforms and testbeds. PMID:27367695

  6. A Proof-of-Concept for Semantically Interoperable Federation of IoT Experimentation Facilities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jorge Lanza

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available The Internet-of-Things (IoT is unanimously identified as one of the main pillars of future smart scenarios. The potential of IoT technologies and deployments has been already demonstrated in a number of different application areas, including transport, energy, safety and healthcare. However, despite the growing number of IoT deployments, the majority of IoT applications tend to be self-contained, thereby forming application silos. A lightweight data centric integration and combination of these silos presents several challenges that still need to be addressed. Indeed, the ability to combine and synthesize data streams and services from diverse IoT platforms and testbeds, holds the promise to increase the potentiality of smart applications in terms of size, scope and targeted business context. In this article, a proof-of-concept implementation that federates two different IoT experimentation facilities by means of semantic-based technologies will be described. The specification and design of the implemented system and information models will be described together with the practical details of the developments carried out and its integration with the existing IoT platforms supporting the aforementioned testbeds. Overall, the system described in this paper demonstrates that it is possible to open new horizons in the development of IoT applications and experiments at a global scale, that transcend the (silo boundaries of individual deployments, based on the semantic interconnection and interoperability of diverse IoT platforms and testbeds.

  7. A Proof-of-Concept for Semantically Interoperable Federation of IoT Experimentation Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Jorge; Sanchez, Luis; Gomez, David; Elsaleh, Tarek; Steinke, Ronald; Cirillo, Flavio

    2016-06-29

    The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is unanimously identified as one of the main pillars of future smart scenarios. The potential of IoT technologies and deployments has been already demonstrated in a number of different application areas, including transport, energy, safety and healthcare. However, despite the growing number of IoT deployments, the majority of IoT applications tend to be self-contained, thereby forming application silos. A lightweight data centric integration and combination of these silos presents several challenges that still need to be addressed. Indeed, the ability to combine and synthesize data streams and services from diverse IoT platforms and testbeds, holds the promise to increase the potentiality of smart applications in terms of size, scope and targeted business context. In this article, a proof-of-concept implementation that federates two different IoT experimentation facilities by means of semantic-based technologies will be described. The specification and design of the implemented system and information models will be described together with the practical details of the developments carried out and its integration with the existing IoT platforms supporting the aforementioned testbeds. Overall, the system described in this paper demonstrates that it is possible to open new horizons in the development of IoT applications and experiments at a global scale, that transcend the (silo) boundaries of individual deployments, based on the semantic interconnection and interoperability of diverse IoT platforms and testbeds.

  8. Facile Synthesis of ZnO@TiO2 Core-Shell Nanorod Thin Films for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxu Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanorod thin films grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO glasses have been synthesized via facile thermal evaporation. To optimize the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs, we fabricated ZnO@TiO2 core-shell composite by a simple dip-coating method immersed in the mixed solution of Ti(OC4H9 and ethanol. Results of solar cell testing showed that ZnO@TiO2 core-shell nanorod thin films on FTO significantly increased open circuit voltage (from 0.47 V to 0.53 V, short circuit current (from 10.78 mA/cm2 to 13.98 mA/cm2, and fill factor (from 51% to 55%. The photoelectric conversion efficiency (PEC increased from 3.3% for bare ZnO DSSCs to 4.85% for ZnO@TiO2 core-shell structured DSSCs. This is mainly ascribed to the improvement in light harvesting efficiency, electron transfer, and the effective suppression of charge recombination.

  9. Facile Preparation of TiO2 Nanobranch/Nanoparticle Hybrid Architecture with Enhanced Light Harvesting Properties for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Seong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report TiO2 nanobranches/nanoparticles (NBN hybrid architectures that can be synthesized by a facile solution phase method. The hybrid architecture simultaneously improves light harvesting and charge collection performances for a dye-sensitized solar cell. First, TiO2 nanorods with a trunk length of 2 μm were grown on a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO/glass substrate, and then nanobranches and nanoparticles were deposited on the nanorods’ trunks through a solution method using an aqueous TiCl3 solution at 80°C. The relative amount of nanobranches and nanoparticles can be controlled by multiplying the number of TiCl3 treatments to maximize the amount of surface area. We found that the resultant TiO2 NBN hybrid architecture greatly improves the amount of dye adsorption (five times compared to bare nanorods due to the enhanced surface area, while maintaining a fast charge collection, leading to a three times higher current density and thus tripling the maximum power conversion efficiency for a dye-sensitized solar cell.

  10. Facile and Scalable Fabrication of Highly Efficient Lead Iodide Perovskite Thin-Film Solar Cells in Air Using Gas Pump Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bin; Gao, Lili; Liang, Lusheng; Chu, Qianqian; Song, Xiaoxuan; Li, Yan; Yang, Guanjun; Fan, Bin; Wang, Mingkui; Li, Chengxin; Li, Changjiu

    2016-08-10

    Control of the perovskite film formation process to produce high-quality organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite thin films with uniform morphology, high surface coverage, and minimum pinholes is of great importance to highly efficient solar cells. Herein, we report on large-area light-absorbing perovskite films fabrication with a new facile and scalable gas pump method. By decreasing the total pressure in the evaporation environment, the gas pump method can significantly enhance the solvent evaporation rate by 8 times faster and thereby produce an extremely dense, uniform, and full-coverage perovskite thin film. The resulting planar perovskite solar cells can achieve an impressive power conversion efficiency up to 19.00% with an average efficiency of 17.38 ± 0.70% for 32 devices with an area of 5 × 2 mm, 13.91% for devices with a large area up to 1.13 cm(2). The perovskite films can be easily fabricated in air conditions with a relative humidity of 45-55%, which definitely has a promising prospect in industrial application of large-area perovskite solar panels.

  11. Polymer solar cells with efficiency >10% enabled via a facile solution-processed Al-doped ZnO electron transporting layer

    KAUST Repository

    Jagadamma, Lethy Krishnan

    2015-10-05

    The present work details a facile and low-temperature (125C) solution-processed Al-doped ZnO (AZO) buffer layer functioning very effectively as electron accepting/hole blocking layer for a wide range of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction systems, and yielding power conversion efficiency in excess of 10% (8%) on glass (plastic) substrates. We show that ammonia addition to the aqueous AZO nanoparticle solution is a critically important step toward producing compact and smooth thin films which partially retain the aluminum doping and crystalline order of the starting AZO nanocrystals. The ammonia treatment appears to reduce the native defects via nitrogen incorporation, making the AZO film a very good electron transporter and energetically matched with the fullerene acceptor. Importantly, highly efficient solar cells are achieved without the need for additional surface chemical passivation or modification, which has become an increasingly common route to improving the performance of evaporated or solution-processed ZnO ETLs in solar cells.

  12. Facile method for synthesis of TiO{sub 2} film and its application in high efficiency dye sensitized-solar cell (DSSC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Widiyandari, Hendri, E-mail: h.widiyandari@undip.ac.id; Gunawan, S. K.V.; Suseno, Jatmiko Endro [Department of Physics, Diponegoro University, Jl. Prof. H. Soedarto SH, Semarang, Central Java 50275 (Indonesia); Purwanto, Agus [Department of Chemical Engineering, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta (Indonesia); Diharjo, Kuncoro [Department of Mechanical Engineering, Sebelas Maret University, Jl. Ir. Sutami No. 36 A, Surakarta (Indonesia)

    2014-02-24

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSC) is a device which converts a solar energy to electrical energy. Different with semiconductor thin film based solar cell, DSSC utilize the sensitized-dye to absorb the photon and semiconductor such as titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) and zinc oxide (ZnO) as a working electrode photoanode. In this report, the preparation of TiO{sub 2} film using a facile method of spray deposition and its application in DSSC have been presented. TiO{sub 2} photoanode was synthesized by growing the droplet of titanium tetraisopropoxide diluted in acid solution on the substrate of conductive glass flourine-doped tin oxide (FTO) with variation of precursor volume. DSSC was assemblied by sandwiching both of photoanode electrode and platinum counter electrode subsequently filling the area between these electrodes with triodine/iodine electrolite solution as redox pairs. The characterization of the as prepared DSSC using solar simulator (AM 1.5G, 100 mW/cm{sup 2}) and I-V source meter Keithley 2400 showed that the performance of DSSC was affected by the precursor volume.. The overall conversion efficiency of DSSC using the optimum TiO{sub 2} film was about 1.97% with the open circuit voltage (V{sub oc}) of 0.73 V, short circuit current density (J{sub sc}) of 4.61 mA and fill factor (FF) of 0.58.

  13. Facile one-step synthesis of highly branched ZnO nanostructures on titanium foil for flexible dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Juntao; He, Meng; Fu, Nianqing; Li, Jianye; Yin, Xiong

    2014-04-21

    Highly branched ZnO (HBZ) nanostructures were prepared on titanium (Ti) foil using a facile, one-step vapor confined chemical vapor deposition technique. The as-prepared ZnO layer showed a good connection with the Ti foil even after 50 bending cycles, and the resultant HBZ/Ti electrode possessed high bendability. The HBZ/Ti electrode was composed of four different layers, including a highly branched ZnO layer, a ZnO compact layer, a Ti-Zn alloy layer and Ti foil. The good adhesion of the as-prepared ZnO layer to Ti foil was ascribed to the formation of a Ti-Zn alloy layer and a ZnO compact layer during the growth process. A flexible dye-sensitized solar cell was assembled using the D149-sensitized HBZ/Ti as a photoanode, and a power conversion efficiency (PCE) of 3.3% was achieved with an open-circuit photovoltage of 0.664 V, a short-circuit current density of 7.53 mA cm(-2), and a fill factor of 0.66 measured under rear-side illumination (AM 1.5, 100 mW cm(-2)). The power conversion efficiency of the device remained at 92% of the initial value even after 50 bending cycles. These results indicate that the vapor confined chemical vapor deposition method which does not necessarily use any catalyst or seed is a facile, one-step approach to obtain highly branched ZnO nanostructures with high bendability on Ti foil. The tight bonding between the highly branched ZnO layer and Ti substrate by a Ti-Zn alloy layer and a ZnO compact layer makes the vapor confined CVD method very attractive for the preparation of high-performance flexible photoanodes.

  14. Approximately 800-nm-Thick Pinhole-Free Perovskite Films via Facile Solvent Retarding Process for Efficient Planar Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yuan, Zhongcheng; Yang, Yingguo; Wu, Zhongwei; Bai, Sai; Xu, Weidong; Song, Tao; Gao, Xingyu; Gao, Feng; Sun, Baoquan

    2016-12-21

    Device performance of organometal halide perovskite solar cells significantly depends on the quality and thickness of perovskite absorber films. However, conventional deposition methods often generate pinholes within ∼300 nm-thick perovskite films, which are detrimental to the large area device manufacture. Here we demonstrated a simple solvent retarding process to deposit uniform pinhole free perovskite films with thicknesses up to ∼800 nm. Solvent evaporation during the retarding process facilitated the components separation in the mixed halide perovskite precursors, and hence the final films exhibited pinhole free morphology and large grain sizes. In addition, the increased precursor concentration after solvent-retarding process led to thick perovskite films. Based on the uniform and thick perovskite films prepared by this convenient process, a champion device efficiency up to 16.8% was achieved. We believe that this simple deposition procedure for high quality perovskite films around micrometer thickness has a great potential in the application of large area perovskite solar cells and other optoelectronic devices.

  15. The Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP) Science Data Products: Results of Testing with Field Experiment and Algorithm Testbed Simulation Environment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni E.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Kellogg, Kent H.; Entin, Jared K.

    2010-01-01

    Talk outline 1. Derivation of SMAP basic and applied science requirements from the NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey applications 2. Data products and latencies 3. Algorithm highlights 4. SMAP Algorithm Testbed 5. SMAP Working Groups and community engagement

  16. A facile synthesis of highly stable multiblock poly(arylene ether)s based alkaline membranes for fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jasti, Amaranadh; Shahi, Vinod K.

    2014-12-01

    Herein, we are disclosing simple route for the preparation of alkaline membranes (AMs) based on aminated multiblock poly(arylene ether)s (AMPEs) synthesized by nucleophilic substitution-poly condensation followed by quaternization and alkalization reactions. In this procedure, four quaternary ammonium groups are successfully introduced without use of carcinogenic reagents such as chloromethylmethyl ether (CMME). Hydrophilic/hydrophobic phase separation is responsible for their high hydroxide conductivity (∼150 mS cm-1 at 80 °C) due to development of interconnected ion transport pathway. AMs are exhibiting good alkaline stability due to the presence of two vicinal quaternary ammonium groups and avoid degradation such as Sommelet-Hauser rearrangement and Hofmann elimination. Vicinal quaternary ammonium groups also resist nucleophilic (OH-) attack and suppress the Stevens rearrangement as well as SN2 substitution reaction due to stearic hindrance. Optimized AM (AMPE-M20N15 (55% DCM)) exhibits about 0.95 V open circuit voltage (OCV) and 48.8 mW cm-2 power density at 65 °C in alkaline direct methanol fuel cell (ADMFC) operation. These results suggest promising begin for the preparation of stable and conductive AMs for ADMFC applications and useful for developing hydroxide conductive materials.

  17. Photo-irradiation paradigm: Mapping a remarkable facile technique used for advanced drug, gene and cell delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaker, Mohamed A; Younes, Husam M

    2015-11-10

    Undoubtedly, the progression of photo-irradiation technique has provided a smart engineering tool for the state-of-the-art biomaterials that guide the biomedical and therapeutic domains for promoting the modern pharmaceutical industry. Many investigators had exploited such a potential technique to create/ameliorate numerous pharmaceutical carriers. These carriers show promising applications that vary from small drug to therapeutic protein delivery and from gene to living cell encapsulation design. Harmony between the properties of precisely engineered precursors and the formed network structure broadens the investigator's intellect for both brilliant creations and effective applications. As well, controlling photo-curing at the formulation level, through manipulating the absorption of light stimuli, photoinitiator system and photo-responsive precursor, facilitates the exploration of novel distinctive biomaterials. Discussion of utilizing different photo-curing procedures in designing/formulation of different pharmaceutical carriers is the main emphasis of this review. In addition, recent applications of these intelligent techniques in targeted, controlled, and sustained drug delivery with understanding of photo-irradiation concept and mechanism are illustrated.

  18. Optimizing Electric Vehicle Coordination Over a Heterogeneous Mesh Network in a Scaled-Down Smart Grid Testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattarai, Bishnu Prasad; Lévesque, Martin; Maier, Martin

    2015-01-01

    High penetration of renewable energy sources and electric vehicles (EVs) create power imbalance and congestion in the existing power network, and hence causes significant problems in the control and operation. Despite investing huge efforts from the electric utilities, governments, and researchers......, smart grid (SG) is still at the developmental stage to address those issues. In this regard, a smart grid testbed (SGT) is desirable to develop, analyze, and demonstrate various novel SG solutions, namely demand response, real-time pricing, and congestion management. In this paper, a novel SGT...... is developed in a laboratory by scaling a 250 kVA, 0.4 kV real low-voltage distribution feeder down to 1 kVA, 0.22 kV. Information and communication technology is integrated in the scaled-down network to establish real-time monitoring and control. The novelty of the developed testbed is demonstrated...

  19. Evaluasi Kinerja Layanan IPTV pada Jaringan Testbed WiMAX Berbasis Standar IEEE 802.16-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasetiyono Hari Mukti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a performance evaluation for IPTV Services over WiMAX testbed based on IEEE Standard 802.16-2004 will be described. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated in terms of delay, jitter, throughput and packet loss. Service performance evaluations are conducted on network topology of point-to-point in the variation of background traffic with different scheduling types. Background traffic is injected into the system to give the sense that the proposed system has variation traffic load. Scheduling type which are used in this paper are Best Effort (BE, Non-Real-Time Polling Service (nrtPS, Real-Time Polling Service (rtPS and Unsolicited Grant Service (UGS. The expemerintal results of IPTV service performance over the testbed network show that the maximum average of delay, jitter, packet loss and jitter are 16.581 ms, 58.515 ms, 0.67 Mbps dan 10.96%, respectively.

  20. A Testbed based on Multi-Agent Systems%一种基于MAS的Robocup测试床

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张双民; 李毅; 石纯一

    2001-01-01

    Robocup is one of the hot topic in the field of Artificial Intelligence and Automatic Control.In order for a robot to play a soccer game reasonably well,many technologies need to be integrated and a number of technical breakthroughs must be accomplished. The range of technologies spans the gamut of intelligent robotics research,including design principles of autonomous Agents,multi-Agent collaboration, strategy acquisition, real-time reasoning, and sensor-fusion, etc. Just stand by the multi-Agent systems,building a test-bed for problem solving of Robocup can improve multi-Agent system research.This paper introduces the competition mode,two typical Robocup systems and the test-bed based on MAS we designed.

  1. Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada Test Site, Nevada, Revision 1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2008-12-01

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration (SAFER) Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C (TCC) Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site (NTS) approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada (Figure 1). CAU 116 is currently listed in Appendix III of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) of 1996 (as amended February 2008) and consists of two Corrective Action Sites (CASs): (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping; and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 is described in the FFACO as the TCC Facility but actually includes Building 3210 and attached concrete shield wall only. CAU 116 will be closed by demolishing Building 3210, the attached concrete shield wall, and the nuclear furnace piping. In addition, as a best management practice (BMP), Building 3211 (moveable shed) will be demolished due to its close proximity to Building 3210. This will aid in demolition and disposal operations. Radiological surveys will be performed on the demolition debris to determine the proper disposal pathway. As much of the demolition debris as space allows will be placed into the Building 3210 basement structure. After filling to capacity with demolition debris, the basement structure will be mounded or capped and closed with administrative controls. Prior to beginning demolition activities and according to an approved Sampling and Analysis Plan (SAP), representative sampling of surface areas that are known, suspected, or have the potential to contain hazardous constituents such as lead or polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs) will be performed throughout all buildings and structures. Sections 2.3.2, 4.2.2.2, 4.2.2.3, 4.3, and 6.2.6.1 address the methodologies employed that assure the solid debris placed in the basement structure will not contain contaminants of concern (COCs) above hazardous waste levels. The anticipated post

  2. North Slope, Alaska ESI: FACILITY (Facility Points)

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Oceanic and Atmospheric Administration, Department of Commerce — This data set contains data for oil field facilities for the North Slope of Alaska. Vector points in this data set represent oil field facility locations. This data...

  3. A Method to Derive Monitoring Variables for a Cyber Security Test-bed of I and C System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyung Soo; Song, Jae Gu; Lee, Joung Woon; Lee, Cheol Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In the IT field, monitoring techniques have been developed to protect the systems connected by networks from cyber attacks and incidents. For the development of monitoring systems for I and C cyber security, it is necessary to review the monitoring systems in the IT field and derive cyber security-related monitoring variables among the proprietary operating information about the I and C systems. Tests for the development and application of these monitoring systems may cause adverse effects on the I and C systems. To analyze influences on the system and safely intended variables, the construction of an I and C system Test-bed should be preceded. This article proposes a method of deriving variables that should be monitored through a monitoring system for cyber security as a part of I and C Test-bed. The surveillance features and the monitored variables of NMS(Network Management System), a monitoring technique in the IT field, were reviewed in section 2. In Section 3, the monitoring variables for an I and C cyber security were derived by the of NMS and the investigation for information used for hacking techniques that can be practiced against I and C systems. The monitoring variables of NMS in the IT field and the information about the malicious behaviors used for hacking were derived as expected variables to be monitored for an I and C cyber security research. The derived monitoring variables were classified into the five functions of NMS for efficient management. For the cyber security of I and C systems, the vulnerabilities should be understood through a penetration test etc. and an assessment of influences on the actual system should be carried out. Thus, constructing a test-bed of I and C systems is necessary for the safety system in operation. In the future, it will be necessary to develop a logging and monitoring system for studies on the vulnerabilities of I and C systems with test-beds.

  4. Recent Developments in the Design, Capabilities and Autonomous Operations of a Lightweight Surface Manipulation System and Test-bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, John T.; Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, W. R.; Brady, Jeffrey S.; Berry, Felecia C.; Ganoe, George G.; Anderson, Eric; King, Bruce D.; Mercer, David C.

    2011-01-01

    The first generation of a versatile high performance device for performing payload handling and assembly operations on planetary surfaces, the Lightweight Surface Manipulation System (LSMS), has been designed and built. Over the course of its development, conventional crane type payload handling configurations and operations have been successfully demonstrated and the range of motion, types of operations and the versatility greatly expanded. This enhanced set of 1st generation LSMS hardware is now serving as a laboratory test-bed allowing the continuing development of end effectors, operational techniques and remotely controlled and automated operations. This paper describes the most recent LSMS and test-bed development activities, that have focused on two major efforts. The first effort was to complete a preliminary design of the 2nd generation LSMS that has the capability for limited mobility and can reposition itself between lander decks, mobility chassis, and fixed base locations. A major portion of this effort involved conducting a study to establish the feasibility of, and define, the specifications for a lightweight cable-drive waist joint. The second effort was to continue expanding the versatility and autonomy of large planetary surface manipulators using the 1st generation LSMS as a test-bed. This has been accomplished by increasing manipulator capabilities and efficiencies through both design changes and tool and end effector development. A software development effort has expanded the operational capabilities of the LSMS test-bed to include; autonomous operations based on stored paths, use of a vision system for target acquisition and tracking, and remote command and control over a communications bridge.

  5. PNNL Strategic Goods Testbed: A Data Library for Illicit Nuclear Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, Jennifer B.; Erikson, Luke E.; Toomey, Christopher M.; Lewis, Valerie A.

    2014-05-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has put significant effort into nonproliferation activities as an institution, both in terms of the classical nuclear material focused approach and in the examination of other strategic goods necessary to implement a nuclear program. To assist in these efforts, several projects in the Analysis in Motion (AIM) and Signature Discovery (SDI) Initiatives at PNNL are developing machine learning methodology for human-computer interaction in real time environments to assist analysts in this domain. All of these technical projects require access to data – whether it is in terms of detector data, shipping records, financial information, company relations, or other communications. The first question that mathematical and computational researchers come up with when asked to build analyst assist or automated tools is “What does the data look like? ” They become frustrated when basic questions like this can not be easily answered and this can have the effect of pushing researchers away from the nuclear trafficking domain, especially in strategic commodity and export control areas where data sets can not easily be generated through standard experimental techniques. For small projects that are building a proof of concept for their methodology, obtaining this data can be arduous and expensive. To relieve the burden of data collection from these projects and grow a lab-wide capability, the Strategic Goods Testbed Team has taken over data collection and placed subscriptions and access to flat data files in a centralized location so that all projects can benefit from these items. We have collected shipping data in the form of PIERS records, judicial information about export control cases, NAC data on the nuclear fuel industry, and financial data from Dun and Bradstreet and our data sets are continuing to expand. With a single access agreement, researchers in data-mining and other fields can utilize all of the records that have been

  6. A testbed to explore the optimal electrical stimulation parameters for suppressing inter-ictal spikes in human hippocampal slices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Min-Chi Hsiao; Pen-Ning Yu; Dong Song; Liu, Charles Y; Heck, Christi N; Millett, David; Berger, Theodore W

    2014-01-01

    New interventions using neuromodulatory devices such as vagus nerve stimulation, deep brain stimulation and responsive neurostimulation are available or under study for the treatment of refractory epilepsy. Since the actual mechanisms of the onset and termination of the seizure are still unclear, most researchers or clinicians determine the optimal stimulation parameters through trial-and-error procedures. It is necessary to further explore what types of electrical stimulation parameters (these may include stimulation frequency, amplitude, duration, interval pattern, and location) constitute a set of optimal stimulation paradigms to suppress seizures. In a previous study, we developed an in vitro epilepsy model using hippocampal slices from patients suffering from mesial temporal lobe epilepsy. Using a planar multi-electrode array system, inter-ictal activity from human hippocampal slices was consistently recorded. In this study, we have further transferred this in vitro seizure model to a testbed for exploring the possible neurostimulation paradigms to inhibit inter-ictal spikes. The methodology used to collect the electrophysiological data, the approach to apply different electrical stimulation parameters to the slices are provided in this paper. The results show that this experimental testbed will provide a platform for testing the optimal stimulation parameters of seizure cessation. We expect this testbed will expedite the process for identifying the most effective parameters, and may ultimately be used to guide programming of new stimulating paradigms for neuromodulatory devices.

  7. An interactive visual testbed system for dimension reduction and clustering of large-scale high-dimensional data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jaegul; Lee, Hanseung; Liu, Zhicheng; Stasko, John; Park, Haesun

    2013-01-01

    Many of the modern data sets such as text and image data can be represented in high-dimensional vector spaces and have benefited from computational methods that utilize advanced computational methods. Visual analytics approaches have contributed greatly to data understanding and analysis due to their capability of leveraging humans' ability for quick visual perception. However, visual analytics targeting large-scale data such as text and image data has been challenging due to the limited screen space in terms of both the numbers of data points and features to represent. Among various computational methods supporting visual analytics, dimension reduction and clustering have played essential roles by reducing these numbers in an intelligent way to visually manageable sizes. Given numerous dimension reduction and clustering methods available, however, the decision on the choice of algorithms and their parameters becomes difficult. In this paper, we present an interactive visual testbed system for dimension reduction and clustering in a large-scale high-dimensional data analysis. The testbed system enables users to apply various dimension reduction and clustering methods with different settings, visually compare the results from different algorithmic methods to obtain rich knowledge for the data and tasks at hand, and eventually choose the most appropriate path for a collection of algorithms and parameters. Using various data sets such as documents, images, and others that are already encoded in vectors, we demonstrate how the testbed system can support these tasks.

  8. A Testbed to Evaluate the FIWARE-Based IoT Platform in the Domain of Precision Agriculture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Ramón; Pastor, Juan Ángel; Álvarez, Bárbara; Iborra, Andrés

    2016-11-23

    Wireless sensor networks (WSNs) represent one of the most promising technologies for precision farming. Over the next few years, a significant increase in the use of such systems on commercial farms is expected. WSNs present a number of problems, regarding scalability, interoperability, communications, connectivity with databases and data processing. Different Internet of Things middleware is appearing to overcome these challenges. This paper checks whether one of these middleware, FIWARE, is suitable for the development of agricultural applications. To the authors' knowledge, there are no works that show how to use FIWARE in precision agriculture and study its appropriateness, its scalability and its efficiency for this kind of applications. To do this, a testbed has been designed and implemented to simulate different deployments and load conditions. The testbed is a typical FIWARE application, complete, yet simple and comprehensible enough to show the main features and components of FIWARE, as well as the complexity of using this technology. Although the testbed has been deployed in a laboratory environment, its design is based on the analysis of an Internet of Things use case scenario in the domain of precision agriculture.

  9. Real-Time Emulation of Heterogeneous Wireless Networks with End-to-Edge Quality of Service Guarantees: The AROMA Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Umbert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents and describes the real-time testbed for all-IP Beyond 3G (B3G heterogeneous wireless networks that has been developed in the framework of the European IST AROMA project. The main objective of the AROMA testbed is to provide a highly accurate and realistic framework where the performance of algorithms, policies, protocols, services, and applications for a complete heterogeneous wireless network can be fully assessed and evaluated before bringing them to a real system. The complexity of the interaction between all-IP B3G systems and user applications, while dealing with the Quality of Service (QoS concept, motivates the development of this kind of emulation platform where different solutions can be tested in realistic conditions that could not be achieved by means of simple offline simulations. This work provides an in-depth description of the AROMA testbed, emphasizing many interesting implementation details and lessons learned during the development of the tool that may result helpful to other researchers and system engineers in the development of similar emulation platforms. Several case studies are also presented in order to illustrate the full potential and capabilities of the presented emulation platform.

  10. Facile synthesis of SnO2 coated urchin-like TiO2 hollow microspheres as efficient scattering layer for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Fengyan; Li, Yafeng; Dou, Jie; Wu, Junxiu; Wei, Mingdeng

    2016-12-01

    SnO2 coated urchin-like TiO2 hollow microspheres are prepared via a facile one-step hydrothermal method by using titanium tetrabutoxide (TBOT) as titanium source. The synthesized products are characterized by XRD, SEM and TEM measurements. It's found that the as-prepared microspheres with a diameter of 500-800 nm are consisted of densely interconnected nanowires and possessed a high specific surface area of 134.92 m2 g-1. Moreover, HRTEM and element mapping results show that the surface of urchin-like microsphere is coated by lots of SnO2 nanoparticles. When used as scattering layer for dye-sensitized solar cells, the microspheres show good dye adsorption capability, superior light scattering and electron diffusibility, leading to a higher photovoltaic conversion efficiency of 8.33%, which is a 28.4% enhancement comparable to that of bare nanocrystalline TiO2 (Dyesol 18NR-T, 6.49%).

  11. Basic Research Firing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Basic Research Firing Facility is an indoor ballistic test facility that has recently transitioned from a customer-based facility to a dedicated basic research...

  12. Jupiter Laser Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Jupiter Laser Facility is an institutional user facility in the Physical and Life Sciences Directorate at LLNL. The facility is designed to provide a high degree...

  13. The International Space University's variable gravity research facility design

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bailey, Sheila G.; Chiaramonte, Francis P.; Davidian, Kenneth J.

    1991-01-01

    A manned mission to Mars will require long travel times between Earth and Mars. However, exposure to long-duration zero gravity is known to be harmful to the human body. Some of the harmful effects are loss of heart and lung capacity, inability to stand upright, muscular weakness and loss of bone calcium. A variable gravity research facility (VGRF) that would be placed in low Earth orbit (LEO) was designed by students of the International Space University 1989 Summer Session held in Strasbourg, France, to provide a testbed for conducting experiments in the life and physical sciences in preparation for a mission to Mars. This design exercise was unique because it addressed all aspects concerning a large space project. The VGRF design was described which was developed by international participants specializing in the following areas: the politics of international cooperation, engineering, architecture, in-space physiology, material and life science experimentation, data communications, business, and management.

  14. Aperture area measurement facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST has established an absolute aperture area measurement facility for circular and near-circular apertures use in radiometric instruments. The facility consists of...

  15. Licensed Healthcare Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    California Department of Resources — The Licensed Healthcare Facilities point layer represents the locations of all healthcare facilities licensed by the State of California, Department of Health...

  16. Facility Registry Service (FRS)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — The Facility Registry Service (FRS) provides an integrated source of comprehensive (air, water, and waste) environmental information about facilities across EPA,...

  17. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology research The Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  18. High Throughput Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Argonne?s high throughput facility provides highly automated and parallel approaches to material and materials chemistry development. The facility allows scientists...

  19. Networked seduction: a test-bed for the study of strategic communication on the Internet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mantovani, F

    2001-02-01

    One of the emerging features of the Internet is its relational and communicative nature: the initial centrality of the information exchange is moving to the building of online relationships, from friendship to romantic and even sexual relationships. The main goal of this paper is to define a theoretical model for the study of seductive processes on the Internet. In particular, taking up the perspective of the user, a shift of focus is proposed: from the description of the development of interpersonal attraction to the investigation of seduction, considered as a strategic communication process. According to the presented model, the key effort of the subjects involved in a computer-mediated seductive interaction is the negotiation of the meaning of the situation they are involved in. This process usually requires two tasks: the analysis of the characteristics of the communicative environment in which the play of interpersonal attraction develops, and the exploitation of the affordances offered by the communicative environment according to specific strategic goals. The main features of the model are both the focus on the communicative tools employed by the users to reach their relational goals, and the ergonomic characteristics of the networked environment. This approach can be used as a test-bed for the definition of specific hypotheses concerning the development of seductive interaction online.

  20. First results of the Test-Bed Telescopes (TBT) project: Cebreros telescope commissioning

    CERN Document Server

    Ocaña, Francisco; Racero, Elena; Montero, Ángel; Doubek, Jirí; Ruiz, Vicente

    2016-01-01

    The TBT project is being developed under ESA's General Studies and Technology Programme (GSTP), and shall implement a test-bed for the validation of an autonomous optical observing system in a realistic scenario within the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The goal of the project is to provide two fully robotic telescopes, which will serve as prototypes for development of a future network. The system consists of two telescopes, one in Spain and the second one in the Southern Hemisphere. The telescope is a fast astrograph with a large Field of View of 2.5 x 2.5 square-degrees and a plate scale of 2.2 arcsec/pixel. The tube is mounted on a fast direct-drive mount moving with speed up to 20 degrees per second. The focal plane hosts a 2-port 4K x 4K back-illuminated CCD with readout speeds up to 1MHz per port. Detection software and hardware are optimised for the detection of NEOs and objects in high Earth orbits (objects moving from 0.1-40 arcsec/second). Every night...

  1. Computer graphics testbed to simulate and test vision systems for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, John B.; Wu, Chris K.; Lin, Y. H.

    1991-01-01

    A system was developed for displaying computer graphics images of space objects and the use of the system was demonstrated as a testbed for evaluating vision systems for space applications. In order to evaluate vision systems, it is desirable to be able to control all factors involved in creating the images used for processing by the vision system. Considerable time and expense is involved in building accurate physical models of space objects. Also, precise location of the model relative to the viewer and accurate location of the light source require additional effort. As part of this project, graphics models of space objects such as the Solarmax satellite are created that the user can control the light direction and the relative position of the object and the viewer. The work is also aimed at providing control of hue, shading, noise and shadows for use in demonstrating and testing imaging processing techniques. The simulated camera data can provide XYZ coordinates, pitch, yaw, and roll for the models. A physical model is also being used to provide comparison of camera images with the graphics images.

  2. A Principled Kernel Testbed for Hardware/Software Co-Design Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Alex; Williams, Samuel; Madduri, Kamesh; Ibrahim, Khaled; Bailey, David; Demmel, James; Strohmaier, Erich

    2010-04-01

    Recently, advances in processor architecture have become the driving force for new programming models in the computing industry, as ever newer multicore processor designs with increasing number of cores are introduced on schedules regimented by marketing demands. As a result, collaborative parallel (rather than simply concurrent) implementations of important applications, programming languages, models, and even algorithms have been forced to adapt to these architectures to exploit the available raw performance. We believe that this optimization regime is flawed. In this paper, we present an alternate approach that, rather than starting with an existing hardware/software solution laced with hidden assumptions, defines the computational problems of interest and invites architects, researchers and programmers to implement novel hardware/software co-designed solutions. Our work builds on the previous ideas of computational dwarfs, motifs, and parallel patterns by selecting a representative set of essential problems for which we provide: An algorithmic description; scalable problem definition; illustrative reference implementations; verification schemes. This testbed will enable comparative research in areas such as parallel programming models, languages, auto-tuning, and hardware/software codesign. For simplicity, we focus initially on the computational problems of interest to the scientific computing community but proclaim the methodology (and perhaps a subset of the problems) as applicable to other communities. We intend to broaden the coverage of this problem space through stronger community involvement.

  3. EXTENDED PHOTOMETRY FOR THE DEEP2 GALAXY REDSHIFT SURVEY: A TESTBED FOR PHOTOMETRIC REDSHIFT EXPERIMENTS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Daniel J.; Newman, Jeffrey A. [Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of Pittsburgh, 3941 O' Hara Street, Pittsburgh, PA 15260 (United States); Coil, Alison L. [Department of Physics, University of California San Diego, 9500 Gilman Drive, La Jolla, CA 92093 (United States); Cooper, Michael C. [Center for Galaxy Evolution, Department of Physics and Astronomy, University of California, Irvine, 4129 Frederick Reines Hall, Irvine, CA 92697 (United States); Gwyn, Stephen D. J., E-mail: djm70@pitt.edu, E-mail: janewman@pitt.edu, E-mail: acoil@ucsd.edu, E-mail: m.cooper@uci.edu, E-mail: Stephen.Gwyn@nrc-cnrc.gc.ca [Canadian Astronomical Data Centre, Herzberg Institute of Astrophysics, 5071 West Saanich Road, Victoria, British Columbia V9E 2E7 (Canada)

    2013-02-15

    This paper describes a new catalog that supplements the existing DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey photometric and spectroscopic catalogs with ugriz photometry from two other surveys: the Canada-France-Hawaii Legacy Survey (CFHTLS) and the Sloan Digital Sky Survey (SDSS). Each catalog is cross-matched by position on the sky in order to assign ugriz photometry to objects in the DEEP2 catalogs. We have recalibrated the CFHTLS photometry where it overlaps DEEP2 in order to provide a more uniform data set. We have also used this improved photometry to predict DEEP2 BRI photometry in regions where only poorer measurements were available previously. In addition, we have included improved astrometry tied to SDSS rather than USNO-A2.0 for all DEEP2 objects. In total this catalog contains {approx}27, 000 objects with full ugriz photometry as well as robust spectroscopic redshift measurements, 64% of which have r > 23. By combining the secure and accurate redshifts of the DEEP2 Galaxy Redshift Survey with ugriz photometry, we have created a catalog that can be used as an excellent testbed for future photo-z studies, including tests of algorithms for surveys such as LSST and DES.

  4. Demonstration of the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometer Testbed Using a Calibrated Hyperspectral Image Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Leisawitz, David; Maher, Steve; Rinehart, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-field Imaging Interferometer testbed (WIIT) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center uses a dual-Michelson interferometric technique. The WIIT combines stellar interferometry with Fourier-transform interferometry to produce high-resolution spatial-spectral data over a large field-of-view. This combined technique could be employed on future NASA missions such as the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and the Sub-millimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS). While both SPIRIT and SPECS would operate at far-infrared wavelengths, the WIIT demonstrates the dual-interferometry technique at visible wavelengths. The WIIT will produce hyperspectral image data, so a true hyperspectral object is necessary. A calibrated hyperspectral image projector (CHIP) has been constructed to provide such an object. The CHIP uses Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology to produce customized, spectrally-diverse scenes. CHIP scenes will have approximately 1.6-micron spatial resolution and the capability of . producing arbitrary spectra in the band between 380 nm and 1.6 microns, with approximately 5-nm spectral resolution. Each pixel in the scene can take on a unique spectrum. Spectral calibration is achieved with an onboard fiber-coupled spectrometer. In this paper we describe the operation of the CHIP. Results from the WIIT observations of CHIP scenes will also be presented.

  5. The Pathfinder Testbed: Exploring Techniques for Achieving Precision Radial Velocities in the Near-Infrared

    CERN Document Server

    Ramsey, Larry; Redman, Stephen; Bender, Chad; Roy, Arpita; Zonak, Stephanie; Sigurdsson, Steinn; Wolszczan, Alex

    2010-01-01

    The Penn State Pathfinder is a prototype warm fiber-fed Echelle spectrograph with a Hawaii-1 NIR detector that has already demonstrated 7-10 m/s radial velocity precision on integrated sunlight. The Pathfinder testbed was initially setup for the Gemini PRVS design study to enable a systematic exploration of the challenges of achieving high radial velocity precision in the near-infrared, as well as to test possible solutions to these calibration challenges. The current version of the Pathfinder has an R3 echelle grating, and delivers a resolution of R~50,000 in the Y, J or H bands of the spectrum. We will discuss the on sky-performance of the Pathfinder during an engineering test run at the Hobby Eberly Telescope as well the results of velocity observations of M dwarfs. We will also discuss the unique calibration techniques we have explored, like Uranium-Neon hollow cathode lamps, notch filter, and modal noise mitigation to enable high precision radial velocity observation in the NIR. The Pathfinder is a proto...

  6. Evaluation of Five Control Algorithms for Addressing CMG Induced Jitter on a Spacecraft Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Edwin S.; Longman, Richard W.; Kim, Jae J.; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2013-12-01

    Spacecraft often experience jitter from reaction wheels, control moment gyros (CMGs), or from motion of other internal parts. One may isolate fine pointing equipment by passive techniques, but active vibration control employing knowledge of the periodic nature of jitter can improve performance. Previous work by the authors and co-workers tested active isolation using a 6 degree-of-freedom Stewart platform. A new class of applications is laser communication relay satellites, which replaces radio frequencies communication by laser communications. Laser beam jitter can be corrected by control of tip and tilt in fast steering mirrors. This paper develops experiments testing five candidate jitter cancellation algorithms on the Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft, Three Axis Simulator 2 testbed at the Naval Postgraduate School. Jitter results from the CMGs. Multiple period repetitive control (MPRC) and matched basis function repetitive control (MBFRC) are tested. Both use disturbance period information from Hall effect sensors for the CMG three phase brushless DC motors. Filtered-X LMS, adaptive linear model predictive control, and the Clear Box algorithm with Adaptive Basis Method are also tested. The best disturbance rejection resulted from the last of these choices, with a 66 % overall amplitude reduction. Concerning MPRC it was discovered that repeating an addressed period can be used as a technique to decrease sensitivity to accurate knowledge of the disturbance period.

  7. GEO light imaging national testbed (GLINT) heliostat design and testing status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thornton, Marcia A.; Oldenettel, Jerry R.; Hult, Dane W.; Koski, Katrina; Depue, Tracy; Cuellar, Edward L.; Balfour, Jim; Roof, Morey; Yarger, Fred W.; Newlin, Greg; Ramzel, Lee; Buchanan, Peter; Mariam, Fesseha G.; Scotese, Lee

    2002-01-01

    The GEO Light Imaging National Testbed (GLINT) will use three laser beams producing simultaneous interference fringes to illuminate satellites in geosynchronous earth orbit (GEO). The reflected returns will be recorded using a large 4,000 m2 'light bucket' receiver. This imaging methodology is termed Fourier Telescopy. A major component of the 'light bucket' will be an array of 40 - 80 heliostats. Each heliostat will have a mirrored surface area of 100 m2 mounted on a rigid truss structure which is supported by an A-frame. The truss structure attaches to the torque tube elevation drive and the A-frame structure rests on an azimuth ring that could provide nearly full coverage of the sky. The heliostat is designed to operate in 15 mph winds with jitter of less than 500 microradians peak-to- peak. One objective of the design was to minimize receiver cost to the maximum extent possible while maintaining GLINT system performance specifications. The mechanical structure weights approximately seven tons and is a simple fabricated steel framework. A prototype heliostat has been assembled at Stallion Range Center, White Sands Missile Range, New Mexico and is being tested under a variety of weather and operational conditions. The preliminary results of that testing will be presented as well as some finite element model analyses that were performed to predict the performance of the structure.

  8. Design and Validation of a Software Defined Radio Testbed for DVB-T Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baruffa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and validation of a Software Defined Radio (SDR testbed, which can be used for Digital Television transmission using the Digital Video Broadcasting - Terrestrial (DVB-T standard. In order to generate a DVB-T-compliant signal with low computational complexity, we design an SDR architecture that uses the C/C++ language and exploits multithreading and vectorized instructions. Then, we transmit the generated DVB-T signal in real time, using a common PC equipped with multicore central processing units (CPUs and a commercially available SDR modem board. The proposed SDR architecture has been validated using fixed TV sets, and portable receivers. Our results show that the proposed SDR architecture for DVB-T transmission is a low-cost low-complexity solution that, in the worst case, only requires less than 22% of CPU load and less than 170 MB of memory usage, on a 3.0 GHz Core i7 processor. In addition, using the same SDR modem board, we design an off-line software receiver that also performs time synchronization and carrier frequency offset estimation and compensation.

  9. The GridEcon Platform: A Business Scenario Testbed for Commercial Cloud Services

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risch, Marcel; Altmann, Jörn; Guo, Li; Fleming, Alan; Courcoubetis, Costas

    Within this paper, we present the GridEcon Platform, a testbed for designing and evaluating economics-aware services in a commercial Cloud computing setting. The Platform is based on the idea that the exact working of such services is difficult to predict in the context of a market and, therefore, an environment for evaluating its behavior in an emulated market is needed. To identify the components of the GridEcon Platform, a number of economics-aware services and their interactions have been envisioned. The two most important components of the platform are the Marketplace and the Workflow Engine. The Workflow Engine allows the simple composition of a market environment by describing the service interactions between economics-aware services. The Marketplace allows trading goods using different market mechanisms. The capabilities of these components of the GridEcon Platform in conjunction with the economics-aware services are described in this paper in detail. The validation of an implemented market mechanism and a capacity planning service using the GridEcon Platform also demonstrated the usefulness of the GridEcon Platform.

  10. Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed: VME-based DSP board market survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Rick E.

    1992-04-01

    The Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) is a real-time multiprocessor system utilizing digital signal processor technology on VMEbus based printed circuit boards installed on a Sun workstation. The ASPT has specific requirements, particularly as regards to the signal excision application, with respect to interfacing with current and planned data generation equipment, processing of the data, storage to disk of final and intermediate results, and the development tools for applications development and integration into the overall EW/COM computing environment. A prototype ASPT was implemented using three VME-C-30 boards from Applied Silicon. Experience gained during the prototype development led to the conclusions that interprocessor communications capability is the most significant contributor to overall ASPT performance. In addition, the host involvement should be minimized. Boards using different processors were evaluated with respect to the ASPT system requirements, pricing, and availability. Specific recommendations based on various priorities are made as well as recommendations concerning the integration and interaction of various tools developed during the prototype implementation.

  11. Distributed Power Control Network and Green Building Test-Bed for Demand Response in Smart Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sakaguchi, Kei; Nguyen, Van Ky; Tao, Yu; Tran, Gia Khanh; Araki, Kiyomichi

    It is known that demand and supply power balancing is an essential method to operate power delivery system and prevent blackouts caused by power shortage. In this paper, we focus on the implementation of demand response strategy to save power during peak hours by using Smart Grid. It is obviously impractical with centralized power control network to realize the real-time control performance, where a single central controller measures the huge metering data and sends control command back to all customers. For that purpose, we propose a new architecture of hierarchical distributed power control network which is scalable regardless of the network size. The sub-controllers are introduced to partition the large system into smaller distributed clusters where low-latency local feedback power control loops are conducted to guarantee control stability. Furthermore, sub-controllers are stacked up in an hierarchical manner such that data are fed back layer-by-layer in the inbound while in the outbound control responses are decentralized in each local sub-controller for realizing the global objectives. Numerical simulations in a realistic scenario of up to 5000 consumers show the effectiveness of the proposed scheme to achieve a desired 10% peak power saving by using off-the-shelf wireless devices with IEEE802.15.4g standard. In addition, a small scale power control system for green building test-bed is implemented to demonstrate the potential use of the proposed scheme for power saving in real life.

  12. Telescience testbed for biomedical experiments in space morphological and physiological experiments of rat musculoskeletal system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Satoru; Tanaka, Masafumi; Wada, Yoshiro; Yanagihara, Dai; Tsujimoto, Naoya; Suzuki, Hideki; Kawai, Noriyo; Yamashita, Masamichi; Nagaoka, Shunji; Shoji, Takatoshi; Higashino, Shinichiro; Sudoh, Hideo

    As the second telescience testbed experiment we were examined sophisticated processes of biomedical experiment, such as an implantation of a transmitter into the hmster's abdominal cavity, non-stressful blood sampling, large amountof blood collection, muscle extirpation and biopsy from the hamsters on Feburay 6-8, 1990. To make clear the differences between successful results obtained by an experienced hand and by a non-experienced one, three operators wereselected for three successive experimental days; an engineer who had never experienced any biological experiment, a non-biology student, who experienced on biological experiments, and a veterinary surgeon. Surgical procedures need much experiences on maneuvering and understanding of theory to shorten the elapse time. Especially for a non-experienced hand, graphic instructions were much helpful to understand and to maneuver the procedures. Continuous recordings of ECG from a operator and PIs were of an advantage to grasp an extent of the mental strain, which was compared with their reports requested after end of each experimental day. The mental strain was not related to degrees of scientific achievement, but showed faithfully difficulty of each experimental procedure. Training effects on PIs in successive experimental days were found in their instructions for the operator to let understand the procedures.

  13. Optimum Vehicle Component Integration with InVeST (Integrated Vehicle Simulation Testbed)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ng, W; Paddack, E; Aceves, S

    2001-12-27

    We have developed an Integrated Vehicle Simulation Testbed (InVeST). InVeST is based on the concept of Co-simulation, and it allows the development of virtual vehicles that can be analyzed and optimized as an overall integrated system. The virtual vehicle is defined by selecting different vehicle components from a component library. Vehicle component models can be written in multiple programming languages running on different computer platforms. At the same time, InVeST provides full protection for proprietary models. Co-simulation is a cost-effective alternative to competing methodologies, such as developing a translator or selecting a single programming language for all vehicle components. InVeST has been recently demonstrated using a transmission model and a transmission controller model. The transmission model was written in SABER and ran on a Sun/Solaris workstation, while the transmission controller was written in MATRIXx and ran on a PC running Windows NT. The demonstration was successfully performed. Future plans include the applicability of Co-simulation and InVeST to analysis and optimization of multiple complex systems, including those of Intelligent Transportation Systems.

  14. A boundary-layer cloud study using Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation testbed (CART) data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, B.; Mace, G.; Dong, X.; Syrett, W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus - are closely coupled involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds and to provide descriptions of cloud and boundary layer structure that can be used to test parameterizations used in climate models. But before the CART data can be used for process studies and parameterization testing, it is necessary to evaluate and validate data and to develop techniques for effectively combining the data to provide meaningful descriptions of cloud and boundary layer characteristics. In this study we use measurements made during an intensive observing period we consider a case where low-level stratus were observed at the site for about 18 hours. This case is being used to examine the temporal evolution of cloud base, cloud top, cloud liquid water content, surface radiative fluxes, and boundary layer structure. A method for inferring cloud microphysics from these parameters is currently being evaluated.

  15. Introduction to special section on The U.S. IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luettich, Richard A.; Wright, L. Donelson; Signell, Richard; Friedrichs, Carl; Friedrichs, Marjy; Harding, John; Fennel, Katja; Howlett, Eoin; Graves, Sara; Smith, Elizabeth; Crane, Gary; Baltes, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Strong and strategic collaborations among experts from academia, federal operational centers, and industry have been forged to create a U.S. IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed (COMT). The COMT mission is to accelerate the transition of scientific and technical advances from the coastal and ocean modeling research community to improved operational ocean products and services. This is achieved via the evaluation of existing technology or the development of new technology depending on the status of technology within the research community. The initial phase of the COMT has addressed three coastal and ocean prediction challenges of great societal importance: estuarine hypoxia, shelf hypoxia, and coastal inundation. A fourth effort concentrated on providing and refining the cyberinfrastructure and cyber tools to support the modeling work and to advance interoperability and community access to the COMT archive. This paper presents an overview of the initiation of the COMT, the findings of each team and a discussion of the role of the COMT in research to operations and its interface with the coastal and ocean modeling community in general. Detailed technical results are presented in the accompanying series of 16 technical papers in this special issue.

  16. A Rural Next Generation Network (R-NGN and Its Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armein Z. R. Langi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Rural Next Generation Networks (R-NGN technology allows Internet protocol (IP based systems to be used in rural areas. This paper reports a testbed of R-NGN that uses low cost Ethernet radio links, combined with media gateways and a softswitch. The network consists of point-to-point IP Ethernet 2.4 GHz wireless link, IP switches and gateways in each community, standard copper wires and telephone sets for users. It uses low power consumption, and suitable for low density users. This combination allows low cost systems as well as multiservices (voice, data, and multimedia for rural communications. An infrastructure has been deployed in two communities in Cipicung Girang, a village 10 km outside Bandung city, Indonesia. Two towers link the communities with a network of Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB campus. In addition, local wirelines connect community houses to the network. Currently there are four houses connected to each community node (for a total of eight house, upon which we can perform various tests and measurements.

  17. Laboratory validation of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph in broadband light at the high-contrast imaging THD testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delorme, J. R.; N'Diaye, M.; Galicher, R.; Dohlen, K.; Baudoz, P.; Caillat, A.; Rousset, G.; Soummer, R.; Dupuis, O.

    2016-08-01

    Context. Specific high-contrast imaging instruments are mandatory to characterize circumstellar disks and exoplanets around nearby stars. Coronagraphs are commonly used in these facilities to reject the diffracted light of an observed star and enable direct imaging and spectroscopy of its circumstellar environment. One important property of the coronagraph is to be able to work in broadband light. Aims: Among several proposed coronagraphs, the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph is a promising solution for starlight rejection in broadband light. In this paper, we perform the first validation of this concept in laboratory. Methods: First, we consider the principle of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph. Then, we describe the high-contrast imaging THD testbed, the manufacturing of the components, and the quality control procedures. Finally, we study the sensitivity of our coronagraph to low-order aberrations (inner working angle and defocus) and estimate its contrast performance. Our experimental broadband light results are compared with numerical simulations to check agreement with the performance predictions. Results: With the manufactured prototype and using a dark hole technique based on the self-coherent camera, we obtain contrast levels down to 2 × 10-8 between 5 and 17λ0/D in monochromatic light (640 nm). We also reach contrast levels of 4 × 10-8 between 7 and 17λ0/D in broadband (λ0 = 675 nm, Δλ = 250 and Δλ/λ0 = 40%), which demonstrates the excellent chromatic performance of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph. Conclusions: The performance reached by the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph is promising for future high-contrast imaging instruments that aim to detect and spectrally characterize old or light gaseous planets.

  18. Key ecological challenges for closed systems facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nelson, Mark; Dempster, William F.; Allen, John P.

    2013-07-01

    Closed ecological systems are desirable for a number of purposes. In space life support systems, material closure allows precious life-supporting resources to be kept inside and recycled. Closure in small biospheric systems facilitates detailed measurement of global ecological processes and biogeochemical cycles. Closed testbeds facilitate research topics which require isolation from the outside (e.g. genetically modified organisms; radioisotopes) so their ecological interactions and fluxes can be studied separate from interactions with the outside environment. But to achieve and maintain closure entails solving complex ecological challenges. These challenges include being able to handle faster cycling rates and accentuated daily and seasonal fluxes of critical life elements such as carbon dioxide, oxygen, water, macro- and mico-nutrients. The problems of achieving sustainability in closed systems for life support include how to handle atmospheric dynamics including trace gases, producing a complete human diet, recycling nutrients and maintaining soil fertility, the maintenance of healthy air and water and preventing the loss of critical elements from active circulation. In biospheric facilities, the challenge is also to produce analogues to natural biomes and ecosystems, studying processes of self-organization and adaptation in systems that allow specification or determination of state variables and cycles which may be followed through all interactions from atmosphere to soils. Other challenges include the dynamics and genetics of small populations, the psychological challenges for small isolated human groups and backup technologies and strategic options which may be necessary to ensure long-term operation of closed ecological systems.

  19. Guide to research facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    1993-06-01

    This Guide provides information on facilities at US Department of Energy (DOE) and other government laboratories that focus on research and development of energy efficiency and renewable energy technologies. These laboratories have opened these facilities to outside users within the scientific community to encourage cooperation between the laboratories and the private sector. The Guide features two types of facilities: designated user facilities and other research facilities. Designated user facilities are one-of-a-kind DOE facilities that are staffed by personnel with unparalleled expertise and that contain sophisticated equipment. Other research facilities are facilities at DOE and other government laboratories that provide sophisticated equipment, testing areas, or processes that may not be available at private facilities. Each facility listing includes the name and phone number of someone you can call for more information.

  20. National Biomedical Tracer Facility: Project definition study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heaton, R.; Peterson, E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Smith, P. [Smith (P.A.) Concepts and Designs (United States)

    1995-05-31

    The Los Alamos National Laboratory is an ideal institution and New Mexico is an ideal location for siting the National Biomedical Tracer Facility (NBTF). The essence of the Los Alamos proposal is the development of two complementary irradiation facilities that combined with our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities and waste handling and disposal facilities provide a low cost alternative to other proposals that seek to satisfy the objectives of the NBTF. We propose the construction of a 30 MeV cyclotron facility at the site of the radiochemical facilities, and the construction of a 100 MeV target station at LAMPF to satisfy the requirements and objectives of the NBTF. We do not require any modifications to our existing radiochemical processing hot cell facilities or our waste treatment and disposal facilities to accomplish the objectives of the NBTF. The total capital cost for the facility defined by the project definition study is $15.2 M. This cost estimate includes $9.9 M for the cyclotron and associated facility, $2.0 M for the 100 MeV target station at LAMPF, and $3.3 M for design.

  1. Lan+1NinO3n+1 (n = 2 and 3) phases and composites for solid oxide fuel cell cathodes: Facile synthesis and electrochemical properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rakesh K.; Burriel, Mónica; Dessemond, Laurent; Bassat, Jean-Marc; Djurado, Elisabeth

    2016-09-01

    In this work we present a modified citrate-nitrate route using citric acid as a chelating agent as an effective and facile strategy to obtain nanocrystalline La3Ni2O7+δ (L3N2) and La4Ni3O10-δ (L4N3) powders for the preparation of solid oxide fuel cell cathodes. Both samples crystallize in a Fmmm orthorhombic layered Lan+1NinO3n+1 Ruddlesden-Popper structure, with n = 2 and 3, respectively. The oxygen non-stoichiometry, determined by TGA is equal to 0.05 and 0.06 for L3N2 and L4N3, respectively. The thermal expansion coefficient values of L3N2 and L4N3 are 11.0 × 10-6 K-1 and 11.5 × 10-6 K-1, respectively. This study focused on L3N2, L4N3 and on novel composite electrodes with CGO (Ce0.9Gd0.1O2-δ): L3N2-CGO and L4N3-CGO with a view to taking advantage of their complimentary properties, i.e. high ionic conductivity of CGO and high electronic conductivity of Lan+1NinO3n+1 (n = 2 and 3). A significant improvement of the polarization resistance, from 1.0 to 0.03 Ω cm2 and from 1.5 to 0.52 Ω cm2 at 700 °C, is obtained when 50 wt% CGO is added to L3N2 and L4N3, respectively. In addition, the L3N2-CGO composite shows good long-term stability at 900 °C for 2 weeks in air, confirming its suitability as a SOFC cathode.

  2. Reliable Facility Location Problem with Facility Protection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Luohao; Zhu, Cheng; Lin, Zaili; Shi, Jianmai; Zhang, Weiming

    2016-01-01

    This paper studies a reliable facility location problem with facility protection that aims to hedge against random facility disruptions by both strategically protecting some facilities and using backup facilities for the demands. An Integer Programming model is proposed for this problem, in which the failure probabilities of facilities are site-specific. A solution approach combining Lagrangian Relaxation and local search is proposed and is demonstrated to be both effective and efficient based on computational experiments on random numerical examples with 49, 88, 150 and 263 nodes in the network. A real case study for a 100-city network in Hunan province, China, is presented, based on which the properties of the model are discussed and some managerial insights are analyzed.

  3. CubeSub - A CubeSat Based Submersible Testbed for Space Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slettebo, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This report is a Master's Thesis in Aerospace Engineering, performed at the NASA Ames Research Center. It describes the development of the CubeSub, a submersible testbed compatible with the CubeSat form factor. The CubeSub will be used to mature technology and operational procedures to be used in space exploration, and possibly also as a tool for exploration of Earthly environments. CubeSats are carried as payloads, either containing technology to be tested or experiments and sensors for scientific use. The CubeSub is designed to be built up by modules, which can be assembled in different configurations to fulfill different needs. Each module is powered individually and intermodular communication is wireless, reducing the need for wiring. The inside of the hull is flooded with ambient water to simplify the interaction between payloads and surrounding environment. The overall shape is similar to that of a conventional AUV, slender and smooth. This is to make for a low drag, reduce the risk of snagging on surrounding objects and make it possible to deploy through an ice sheet via a narrow borehole. Rapid prototyping is utilized to a large extent, with full-scale prototypes being constructed through 3D-printing and with COTS (Commercial Off-The-Shelf) components. Arduino boards are used for control and internal communication. Modules required for basic operation have been designed, manufactured and tested. Each module is described with regards to its function, design and manufacturability. By performing tests in a pool it was found that the basic concept is sound and that future improvements include better controllability, course stability and waterproofing of electrical components. Further development is needed to make the CubeSub usable for its intended purposes. The largest gains are expected to be found by developing the software and improving controllability.

  4. Route Optimization via RSSI APPs in Indoor Proxy Mobile IPv6 Test-bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Haliza Abdul Wahab

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally IP mobility support mechanisms, Mobile IPv4 or Mobile IPv6 are based on the host-based solution to keep on going sessions despite the movement. The current trend is towards networks-based solutions where mobility support is based on network operation. Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6 has been developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF as a network-based mobility management protocol. The development is aimed to guarantee and support mobility for IP devices or called as Mobile Node (MN without the MN involving in any IP layer mobility related to signaling as stated in RFC5213. PMIPv6 in RFC5213 address the needed to enable Localized Routing (LR but it not specify a complete procedure to establish Route Optimization (RO. Data packets belong to MN need to travel to Local Mobility Anchor (LMA via bidirectional tunnel between Mobile Access Gateway (MAG and LMA. This result to long end to end delay. This un-optimized route result in increasing signaling data delay, huge handover latency, large transport cost and many more. Therefore, it important to optimized the data path so that the data destined to MN will be traverse using the shorter path or directly change traffic tunnel between MAG. As for this, the aims of this study are to reduce the handover latency and optimized data route by the illustration of development the PMIPv6 test-bed with implementation of RO via RSSI APPs. Several experiment will be discuss to see the performance of RO algorithm via RSSI APPs with non-optimized RO.

  5. A framework for computer model validation with a stochastic traffic microsimulators as test-bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sacks, J.; Rouphail, N. M.; Park, B. B.

    2001-07-01

    The validation of computer (simulation) models is a crucial element in assessing their utility for science and for policy-making. Often discussed and sometimes practiced informally, the process is straightforward conceptually: data are collected that represent both the inputs and the outputs of the model, the model is run at those inputs, and the output is compared to field data. In reality, complications abound, field data may be expensive, scarce or noisy, the model may be so complex that only a few runs are possible, and uncertainly enters the process at every turn. Even though is inherently a statistical issue, model validation lacks a unifying statistical framework. The need to develop such a framework is compelling, even urgent. The use of computer models by scientists and planners is growing, costs of poor decisions are escalating: and increasing computing power, for both computational and data collection, is magnifying the scale of the issues. Building a framework for validation of computer models requires an assortment of procedures and considerations and recognition of the multiple stages in the development and use of the models. Verification, which encompasses procedures to assure that the computer code is bug-free, is often seen as a predecessor of validation whereas, in fact, it may be enmeshed with validation. Feedback from outcomes of steps in the validation process can impact model development through detection of flaws or gaps- the result is an intertwining of validation with development. We will focus on (the) five essential characteristics of a validation: context, data uncertainty. feedback, and prediction and use a traffic microsimulator model applied to the planning of traffic signal timing as a test-bed. Our goal is to draw attention to the many complexities that need to be considered in order to achieve a successful validation. (Author) 3 refs.

  6. The 2012 status of the MCAO testbed for the GREGOR solar telescope

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Dirk; Berkefeld, Thomas; Heidecke, Frank

    2012-07-01

    We look back on two years of experience with the laboratory MCAO testbed for the GREGOR solar telescope. GREGOR’s MCAO features four adaptive mirrors, i. e. one tip-tilt mirror, and three DMs to compensate for turbulence around 0 km, 5 km, and 15.5 km above ground. Two different Hartmann-Shack wavefront sensor units are used for wavefront tomography. A sensor with a narrow field of view and smaller subapertures is dedicated to high-order aberrations on the optical axis. This sensor directly follows the pupil plane DM and does not see the high-altitude DMs. The second sensor features larger subapertures and 19 guide regions spread over a wide field of view for off-axis wavefront sensing. We show that high-altitude DMs cause rapidly changing pupil distortions and thus misregistration, which renders the interaction of a pupil-plane DM and a subsequent wavefront sensor non-linear. We rewrote the control software for cleaner and more flexible code, and we switched to modal wavefront reconstruction from direct reconstruction. The original digital interfacing of the DMs high-voltage electronics didn’t prove to be reliable. Thus, we developed a new interface board that is based on CameraLink/ChannelLink technology to transmit the DM commands from the control computer. In this paper we present the innovations and some of the first experimental performance measurements with two DMs. One DM failed before scientific grade data was recorded with three DMs. This DM will be replaced soon. We conclude that GREGOR’s MCAO system is now ready for first on-sky tests at the telescope.

  7. Photovoltaic Shading Testbed for Module-Level Power Electronics: 2016 Performance Data Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, Chris [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Meydbray, Jenya [PV Evolution Labs (PVEL), Davis, CA (United States); Donovan, Matt [PV Evolution Labs (PVEL), Davis, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    The 2012 NREL report 'Photovoltaic Shading Testbed for Module-Level Power Electronics' provides a standard methodology for estimating the performance benefit of distributed power electronics under partial shading conditions. Since the release of the report, experiments have been conducted for a number of products and for different system configurations. Drawing from these experiences, updates to the test and analysis methods are recommended. Proposed changes in data processing have the benefit of reducing the sensitivity to measurement errors and weather variability, as well as bringing the updated performance score in line with measured and simulated values of the shade recovery benefit of distributed PV power electronics. Also, due to the emergence of new technologies including sub-module embedded power electronics, the shading method has been extended to include power electronics that operate at a finer granularity than the module level. An update to the method is proposed to account for these emerging technologies that respond to shading differently than module-level devices. The partial shading test remains a repeatable test procedure that attempts to simulate shading situations as would be experienced by typical residential or commercial rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. Performance data for multiple products tested using this method are discussed, based on equipment from Enphase, Solar Edge, Maxim Integrated and SMA. In general, the annual recovery of shading losses from the module-level electronics evaluated is 25-35%, with the major difference between different trials being related to the number of parallel strings in the test installation rather than differences between the equipment tested. Appendix D data has been added in this update.

  8. Transmittal of the Calculation Package that Supports the Analysis of Performance of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility Oak Ridge, Tennessee (Based 5-Cell Design Issued 8/14/09)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Williams M.J.

    2009-09-14

    This document presents the results of an assessment of the performance of a build-out of the Environmental Management Waste Management Facility (EMWMF). The EMWMF configuration that was assessed includes the as-constructed Cells 1 through 4, with a groundwater underdrain that was installed beneath Cell 3 during the winter of 2003-2004, and Cell 5, whose proposed design is an Addendum to Remedial Design Report for the Disposal of Oak Ridge Reservation Comprehensive Environmental Response, Compensation, and Liability Act of 1980 Waste, Oak Ridge, Tennessee, DOE/OR/01-1873&D2/A5/R1. The total capacity of the EMWMF with 5 cells is about 1.7 million cubic yards. This assessment was conducted to determine the conditions under which the approved Waste Acceptance Criteria (WAC) for the EMWMF found in the Attainment Plan for Risk/Toxicity-Based Waste Acceptance Criteria at the Oak Ridge Reservation, Oak Ridge, Tennessee [U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) 2001a], as revised for constituents added up to October 2008, would remain protective of public health and safety for a five-cell disposal facility. For consistency, the methods of analyses and the exposure scenario used to predict the performance of a five-cell disposal facility were identical to those used in the Remedial Investigation and Feasibility Study (RI/FS) and its addendum (DOE 1998a, DOE 1998b) to develop the approved WAC. To take advantage of new information and design changes departing from the conceptual design, the modeling domain and model calibration were upaded from those used in the RI/FS and its addendum. It should be noted that this analysis is not intended to justify or propose a change in the approved WAC.

  9. TESLA Test Facility. Status

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aune, B. [Deutsches Elektronen-Synchrotron (DESY), Hamburg (Germany); TESLA Collaboration

    1996-01-01

    The TESLA Test Facility (TTF), under construction at DESY by an international collaboration, is an R and D test bed for the superconducting option for future linear e+/e-colliders. It consists of an infrastructure to process and test the cavities and of a 500 MeV linac. The infrastructure has been installed and is fully operational. It includes a complex of clean rooms, an ultra-clean water plant, a chemical etching installation and an ultra-high vacuum furnace. The linac will consist of four cryo-modules, each containing eight 1 meter long nine-cell cavities operated at 1.3 GHz. The base accelerating field is 15 MV/m. A first injector will deliver a low charge per bunch beam, with the full average current (8 mA in pulses of 800 {mu}s). A more powerful injector based on RF gun technology will ultimately deliver a beam with high charge and low emittance to allow measurements necessary to qualify the TESLA option and to demonstrate the possibility of operating a free electron laser based on the Self-Amplified-Spontaneous-Emission principle. Overview and status of the facility will be given. Plans for the future use of the linac are presented. (R.P.). 19 refs.

  10. A Bioinformatics Facility for NASA

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schweighofer, Karl; Pohorille, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    Building on an existing prototype, we have fielded a facility with bioinformatics technologies that will help NASA meet its unique requirements for biological research. This facility consists of a cluster of computers capable of performing computationally intensive tasks, software tools, databases and knowledge management systems. Novel computational technologies for analyzing and integrating new biological data and already existing knowledge have been developed. With continued development and support, the facility will fulfill strategic NASA s bioinformatics needs in astrobiology and space exploration. . As a demonstration of these capabilities, we will present a detailed analysis of how spaceflight factors impact gene expression in the liver and kidney for mice flown aboard shuttle flight STS-108. We have found that many genes involved in signal transduction, cell cycle, and development respond to changes in microgravity, but that most metabolic pathways appear unchanged.

  11. Materiel Evaluation Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — CRREL's Materiel Evaluation Facility (MEF) is a large cold-room facility that can be set up at temperatures ranging from −20°F to 120°F with a temperature change...

  12. Facilities for US Radioastronomy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thaddeus, Patrick

    1982-01-01

    Discusses major developments in radioastronomy since 1945. Topics include proposed facilities, very-long-baseline interferometric array, millimeter-wave telescope, submillimeter-wave telescope, and funding for radioastronomy facilities and projects. (JN)

  13. Integrated Disposal Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the center of the 586-square-mile Hanford Site is the Integrated Disposal Facility, also known as the IDF.This facility is a landfill similar in concept...

  14. Energetics Conditioning Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Energetics Conditioning Facility is used for long term and short term aging studies of energetic materials. The facility has 10 conditioning chambers of which 2...

  15. Financing Professional Sports Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Baade, Robert A.; Victor A. Matheson

    2011-01-01

    This paper examines public financing of professional sports facilities with a focus on both early and recent developments in taxpayer subsidization of spectator sports. The paper explores both the magnitude and the sources of public funding for professional sports facilities.

  16. Wastewater Treatment Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Iowa State University GIS Support and Research Facility — Individual permits for municipal, industrial, and semi-public wastewater treatment facilities in Iowa for the National Pollutant Discharge Elimination System (NPDES)...

  17. Facility Response Plan (FRP)

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — A Facility Response Plan (FRP) demonstrates a facility's preparedness to respond to a worst case oil discharge. Under the Clean Water Act, as amended by the Oil...

  18. Projectile Demilitarization Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Projectile Wash Out Facility is US Army Ammunition Peculiar Equipment (APE 1300). It is a pilot scale wash out facility that uses high pressure water and steam...

  19. Environmental Toxicology Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Fully-equipped facilities for environmental toxicology researchThe Environmental Toxicology Research Facility (ETRF) located in Vicksburg, MS provides over 8,200 ft...

  20. Armament Technology Facility (ATF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Armament Technology Facility is a 52,000 square foot, secure and environmentally-safe, integrated small arms and cannon caliber design and evaluation facility....

  1. Dialysis Facility Compare

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — Dialysis Facility Compare helps you find detailed information about Medicare-certified dialysis facilities. You can compare the services and the quality of care that...

  2. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to:Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  3. Cold Vacuum Drying Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Located near the K-Basins (see K-Basins link) in Hanford's 100 Area is a facility called the Cold Vacuum Drying Facility (CVDF).Between 2000 and 2004, workers at the...

  4. Explosive Components Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The 98,000 square foot Explosive Components Facility (ECF) is a state-of-the-art facility that provides a full-range of chemical, material, and performance analysis...

  5. Ouellette Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Thermal Test Facility is a joint Army/Navy state-of-the-art facility (8,100 ft2) that was designed to: Evaluate and characterize the effect of flame and thermal...

  6. First results of the Test-Bed Telescopes (TBT) project: Cebreros telescope commissioning

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, Francisco; Ibarra, Aitor; Racero, Elena; Montero, Ángel; Doubek, Jirí; Ruiz, Vicente

    2016-07-01

    The TBT project is being developed under ESA's General Studies and Technology Programme (GSTP), and shall implement a test-bed for the validation of an autonomous optical observing system in a realistic scenario within the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) programme of the European Space Agency (ESA). The goal of the project is to provide two fully robotic telescopes, which will serve as prototypes for development of a future network. The system consists of two telescopes, one in Spain and the second one in the Southern Hemisphere. The telescope is a fast astrograph with a large Field of View (FoV) of 2.5 x 2.5 square-degrees and a plate scale of 2.2 arcsec/pixel. The tube is mounted on a fast direct-drive mount moving with speed up to 20 degrees per second. The focal plane hosts a 2-port 4K x 4K back-illuminated CCD with readout speeds up to 1MHz per port. All these characteristics ensure good survey performance for transients and fast moving objects. Detection software and hardware are optimised for the detection of NEOs and objects in high Earth orbits (objects moving from 0.1-40 arcsec/second). Nominal exposures are in the range from 2 to 30 seconds, depending on the observational strategy. Part of the validation scenario involves the scheduling concept integrated in the robotic operations for both sensors. Every night it takes all the input needed and prepares a schedule following predefined rules allocating tasks for the telescopes. Telescopes are managed by RTS2 control software, that performs the real-time scheduling of the observation and manages all the devices at the observatory.1 At the end of the night the observing systems report astrometric positions and photometry of the objects detected. The first telescope was installed in Cebreros Satellite Tracking Station in mid-2015. It is currently in the commissioning phase and we present here the first results of the telescope. We evaluate the site characteristics and the performance of the TBT Cebreros

  7. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Simulation Testbed II. Design of a Three-Lens Anastigmat Telescope Simulator

    CERN Document Server

    Choquet, Élodie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Perrin, Marshall D; Soummer, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop experiment designed to reproduce the main aspects of wavefront sensing and control (WFSC) for JWST. To replicate the key optical physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat (TMA) design at optical wavelengths we have developed a three-lens anastigmat optical system. This design uses custom lenses (plano-convex, plano-concave, and bi-convex) with fourth-order aspheric terms on powered surfaces to deliver the equivalent image quality and sampling of JWST NIRCam at the WFSC wavelength (633~nm, versus JWST's 2.12~micron). For active control, in addition to the segmented primary mirror simulator, JOST reproduces the secondary mirror alignment modes with five degrees of freedom. We present the testbed requirements and its optical and optomechanical design. We study the linearity of the main aberration modes (focus, astigmatism, coma) both as a function of field point and level of misalignments of the secondary mirror. We find that t...

  8. Description of a MIL-STD-1553B Data Bus Ada Driver for the LeRC EPS Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mackin, Michael A.

    1995-01-01

    This document describes the software designed to provide communication between control computers in the NASA Lewis Research Center Electrical Power System Testbed using MIL-STD-1553B. The software drivers are coded in the Ada programming language and were developed on a MSDOS-based computer workstation. The Electrical Power System (EPS) Testbed is a reduced-scale prototype space station electrical power system. The power system manages and distributes electrical power from the sources (batteries or photovoltaic arrays) to the end-user loads. The electrical system primary operates at 120 volts DC, and the secondary system operates at 28 volts DC. The devices which direct the flow of electrical power are controlled by a network of six control computers. Data and control messages are passed between the computers using the MIL-STD-1553B network. One of the computers, the Power Management Controller (PMC), controls the primary power distribution and another, the Load Management Controller (LMC), controls the secondary power distribution. Each of these computers communicates with two other computers which act as subsidiary controllers. These subsidiary controllers are, in turn, connected to the devices which directly control the flow of electrical power.

  9. An SDR-Based Real-Time Testbed for GNSS Adaptive Array Anti-Jamming Algorithms Accelerated by GPU

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hailong Xu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Nowadays, software-defined radio (SDR has become a common approach to evaluate new algorithms. However, in the field of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS adaptive array anti-jamming, previous work has been limited due to the high computational power demanded by adaptive algorithms, and often lack flexibility and configurability. In this paper, the design and implementation of an SDR-based real-time testbed for GNSS adaptive array anti-jamming accelerated by a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU are documented. This testbed highlights itself as a feature-rich and extendible platform with great flexibility and configurability, as well as high computational performance. Both Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP and Space-Frequency Adaptive Processing (SFAP are implemented with a wide range of parameters. Raw data from as many as eight antenna elements can be processed in real-time in either an adaptive nulling or beamforming mode. To fully take advantage of the parallelism resource provided by the GPU, a batched method in programming is proposed. Tests and experiments are conducted to evaluate both the computational and anti-jamming performance. This platform can be used for research and prototyping, as well as a real product in certain applications.

  10. An SDR-Based Real-Time Testbed for GNSS Adaptive Array Anti-Jamming Algorithms Accelerated by GPU.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Hailong; Cui, Xiaowei; Lu, Mingquan

    2016-03-11

    Nowadays, software-defined radio (SDR) has become a common approach to evaluate new algorithms. However, in the field of Global Navigation Satellite System (GNSS) adaptive array anti-jamming, previous work has been limited due to the high computational power demanded by adaptive algorithms, and often lack flexibility and configurability. In this paper, the design and implementation of an SDR-based real-time testbed for GNSS adaptive array anti-jamming accelerated by a Graphics Processing Unit (GPU) are documented. This testbed highlights itself as a feature-rich and extendible platform with great flexibility and configurability, as well as high computational performance. Both Space-Time Adaptive Processing (STAP) and Space-Frequency Adaptive Processing (SFAP) are implemented with a wide range of parameters. Raw data from as many as eight antenna elements can be processed in real-time in either an adaptive nulling or beamforming mode. To fully take advantage of the parallelism resource provided by the GPU, a batched method in programming is proposed. Tests and experiments are conducted to evaluate both the computational and anti-jamming performance. This platform can be used for research and prototyping, as well as a real product in certain applications.

  11. Argonne to open new facility for advanced vehicle testing

    CERN Multimedia

    2002-01-01

    Argonne National Laboratory will open it's Advanced Powertrain Research Facility on Friday, Nov. 15. The facility is North America's only public testing facility for engines, fuel cells, electric drives and energy storage. State-of-the-art performance and emissions measurement equipment is available to support model development and technology validation (1 page).

  12. Report of the Interagency Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 September 12-14, 2006 NASA Ames Research Center

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Mambretti Richard desJardins

    2006-05-01

    A new generation of optical networking services and technologies is rapidly changing the world of communications. National and international networks are implementing optical services to supplement traditional packet routed services. On September 12-14, 2005, the Optical Network Testbeds Workshop 2 (ONT2), an invitation-only forum hosted by the NASA Research and Engineering Network (NREN) and co-sponsored by the Department of Energy (DOE), was held at NASA Ames Research Center in Mountain View, California. The aim of ONT2 was to help the Federal Large Scale Networking Coordination Group (LSN) and its Joint Engineering Team (JET) to coordinate testbed and network roadmaps describing agency and partner organization views and activities for moving toward next generation communication services based on leading edge optical networks in the 3-5 year time frame. ONT2 was conceived and organized as a sequel to the first Optical Network Testbeds Workshop (ONT1, August 2004, www.nren.nasa.gov/workshop7). ONT1 resulted in a series of recommendations to LSN. ONT2 was designed to move beyond recommendations to agree on a series of “actionable objectives” that would proactively help federal and partner optical network testbeds and advanced research and education (R&E) networks to begin incorporating technologies and services representing the next generation of advanced optical networks in the next 1-3 years. Participants in ONT2 included representatives from innovative prototype networks (Panel A), basic optical network research testbeds (Panel B), and production R&D networks (Panels C and D), including “JETnets,” selected regional optical networks (RONs), international R&D networks, commercial network technology and service providers (Panel F), and senior engineering and R&D managers from LSN agencies and partner organizations. The overall goal of ONT2 was to identify and coordinate short and medium term activities and milestones for researching, developing, identifying

  13. Central Facilities Area Sewage Lagoon Evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Giesbrecht, Alan [Idaho National Lab. (INL), Idaho Falls, ID (United States)

    2015-03-01

    The Central Facilities Area (CFA) located in Butte County, Idaho at Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has an existing wastewater system to collect and treat sanitary wastewater and non contact cooling water from the facility. The existing treatment facility consists of three cells: Cell 1 has a surface area of 1.7 acres, Cell 2 has a surface area of 10.3 acres, and Cell 3 has a surface area of 0.5 acres. If flows exceed the evaporative capacity of the cells, wastewater is discharged to a 73.5 acre land application site that utilizes a center pivot irrigation sprinkler system. The purpose of this current study is to update the analysis and conclusions of the December 2013 study. In this current study, the new seepage rate and influent flow rate data have been used to update the calculations, model, and analysis.

  14. Utilizing the ISS Mission as a Testbed to Develop Cognitive Communications Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Dan

    2016-01-01

    The ISS provides an excellent opportunity for pioneering artificial intelligence software to meet the challenges of real-time communications (comm) link management. This opportunity empowers the ISS Program to forge a testbed for developing cognitive communications systems for the benefit of the ISS mission, manned Low Earth Orbit (LEO) science programs and future planetary exploration programs. In November, 1998, the Flight Operations Directorate (FOD) started the ISS Antenna Manager (IAM) project to develop a single processor supporting multiple comm satellite tracking for two different antenna systems. Further, the processor was developed to be highly adaptable as it supported the ISS mission through all assembly stages. The ISS mission mandated communications specialists with complete knowledge of when the ISS was about to lose or gain comm link service. The current specialty mandated cognizance of large sun-tracking solar arrays and thermal management panels in addition to the highly-dynamic satellite service schedules and rise/set tables. This mission requirement makes the ISS the ideal communications management analogue for future LEO space station and long-duration planetary exploration missions. Future missions, with their precision-pointed, dynamic, laser-based comm links, require complete autonomy for managing high-data rate communications systems. Development of cognitive communications management systems that permit any crew member or payload science specialist, regardless of experience level, to control communications is one of the greater benefits the ISS can offer new space exploration programs. The IAM project met a new mission requirement never previously levied against US space-born communications systems management: process and display the orientation of large solar arrays and thermal control panels based on real-time joint angle telemetry. However, IAM leaves the actual communications availability assessment to human judgement, which introduces

  15. Full Scale Advanced Systems Testbed (FAST): Capabilities and Recent Flight Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Christopher

    2014-01-01

    At the NASA Armstrong Flight Research Center research is being conducted into flight control technologies that will enable the next generation of air and space vehicles. The Full Scale Advanced Systems Testbed (FAST) aircraft provides a laboratory for flight exploration of these technologies. In recent years novel but simple adaptive architectures for aircraft and rockets have been researched along with control technologies for improving aircraft fuel efficiency and control structural interaction. This presentation outlines the FAST capabilities and provides a snapshot of the research accomplishments to date. Flight experimentation allows a researcher to substantiate or invalidate their assumptions and intuition about a new technology or innovative approach Data early in a development cycle is invaluable for determining which technology barriers are real and which ones are imagined Data for a technology at a low TRL can be used to steer and focus the exploration and fuel rapid advances based on real world lessons learned It is important to identify technologies that are mature enough to benefit from flight research data and not be tempted to wait until we have solved all the potential issues prior to getting some data Sometimes a stagnated technology just needs a little real world data to get it going One trick to getting data for low TRL technologies is finding an environment where it is okay to take risks, where occasional failure is an expected outcome Learning how things fail is often as valuable as showing that they work FAST has been architected to facilitate this type of testing for control system technologies, specifically novel algorithms and sensors Rapid prototyping with a quick turnaround in a fly-fix-fly paradigm Sometimes it's easier and cheaper to just go fly it than to analyze the problem to death The goal is to find and test control technologies that would benefit from flight data and find solutions to the real barriers to innovation. The FAST

  16. A testbed for a unified teleoperated-autonomous dual-arm robotic system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayati, S.; Lee, T.; Tso, K.; Backes, P.; Lloyd, J.

    1990-01-01

    This paper describes a complete robot control facility built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory as part of NASA a telerobotics program to develop a state-of-the-art robot control environment for laboratory based space-like experiments. This system, which is now fully operational, has the following features: separation of the computing facilities into local and remote sites, autonomous motion generation in joint or Cartesian coordinates, dual-arm force reflecting teleoperation with voice interaction between the operator and the robots, shared control between the autonomously generated motions and operator controlled teleoperation, and dual-arm coordinated trajectory generation. The system has been used to carry out realistic experiments such as the exchange of an Orbital Replacement Unit (ORU), bolt turning, and door opening, using a mixture of autonomous actions and teleoperation, with either a single arm or two cooperating arms.

  17. Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations for the 600 Area facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nickels, J.M.

    1991-08-01

    This document determines the need for Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans for Westinghouse Hanford Company's 600 Area facilities on the Hanford Site. The Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan determinations were prepared in accordance with A Guide For Preparing Hanford Site Facility Effluent Monitoring Plans (WHC 1991). Five major Westinghouse Hanford Company facilities in the 600 Area were evaluated: the Purge Water Storage Facility, 212-N, -P, and -R Facilities, the 616 Facility, and the 213-J K Storage Vaults. Of the five major facilities evaluated in the 600 Area, none will require preparation of a Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan.

  18. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Schietinger, T; Aiba, M; Arsov, V; Bettoni, S; Beutner, B; Calvi, M; Craievich, P; Dehler, M; Frei, F; Ganter, R; Hauri, C P; Ischebeck, R; Ivanisenko, Y; Janousch, M; Kaiser, M; Keil, B; Löhl, F; Orlandi, G L; Loch, C Ozkan; Peier, P; Prat, E; Raguin, J -Y; Reiche, S; Schilcher, T; Wiegand, P; Zimoch, E; Anicic, D; Armstrong, D; Baldinger, M; Baldinger, R; Bertrand, A; Bitterli, K; Bopp, M; Brands, H; Braun, H H; Brönnimann, M; Brunnenkant, I; Chevtsov, P; Chrin, J; Citterio, A; Divall, M Csatari; Dach, M; Dax, A; Ditter, R; Divall, E; Falone, A; Fitze, H; Geiselhart, C; Guetg, M W; Hämmerli, F; Hauff, A; Heiniger, M; Higgs, C; Hugentobler, W; Hunziker, S; Janser, G; Kalantari, B; Kalt, R; Kim, Y; Koprek, W; Korhonen, T; Krempaska, R; Laznovsky, M; Lehner, S; Pimpec, F Le; Lippuner, T; Lutz, H; Mair, S; Marcellini, F; Marinkovic, G; Menzel, R; Milas, N; Pal, T; Pollet, P; Portmann, W; Rezaeizadeh, A; Ritt, S; Rohrer, M; Schär, M; Schebacher, L; Scherrer, St; Schmidt, V Schlott T; Schulz, L; Smit, B; Stadler, M; Steffen, B; Stingelin, L; Sturzenegger, W; Treyer, D M; Trisorio, A; Tron, W; Vicario, C; Zennaro, R; Zimoch, D

    2016-01-01

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and testbed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the X-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bunches of up to 200 pC charge and up to 250 MeV beam energy at a repetition rate of 10 Hz. The measurements performed at the test facility not only demonstrated the beam parameters required to drive the first stage of an FEL facility, but also led to significant advances in instrumentation technologies, beam characterization methods and the generation, transport and compression of ultra-low-emittance beams. We give a comprehensive overview of the commissioning experience of the principal subsystems and the beam physics meas...

  19. Thermal distortion test facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stapp, James L.

    1995-02-01

    The thermal distortion test facility (TDTF) at Phillips Laboratory provides precise measurements of the distortion of mirrors that occurs when their surfaces are heated. The TDTF has been used for several years to evaluate mirrors being developed for high-power lasers. The facility has recently undergone some significant upgrades to improve the accuracy with which mirrors can be heated and the resulting distortion measured. The facility and its associated instrumentation are discussed.

  20. Synchrotron radiation facilities

    CERN Multimedia

    1972-01-01

    Particularly in the past few years, interest in using the synchrotron radiation emanating from high energy, circular electron machines has grown considerably. In our February issue we included an article on the synchrotron radiation facility at Frascati. This month we are spreading the net wider — saying something about the properties of the radiation, listing the centres where synchrotron radiation facilities exist, adding a brief description of three of them and mentioning areas of physics in which the facilities are used.

  1. Flexible Electronics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Flexible Electronics Research Facility designs, synthesizes, tests, and fabricates materials and devices compatible with flexible substrates for Army information...

  2. High Combustion Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — At NETL's High-Pressure Combustion Research Facility in Morgantown, WV, researchers can investigate new high-pressure, high-temperature hydrogen turbine combustion...

  3. Magnetics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Magnetics Research Facility houses three Helmholtz coils that generate magnetic fields in three perpendicular directions to balance the earth's magnetic field....

  4. Facility Environmental Management System

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This is the Web site of the Federal Highway Administration's (FHWA's) Turner-Fairbank Highway Research Center (TFHRC) facility Environmental Management System (EMS)....

  5. Joint Computing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Raised Floor Computer Space for High Performance Computing The ERDC Information Technology Laboratory (ITL) provides a robust system of IT facilities to develop and...

  6. Geophysical Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Geophysical Research Facility (GRF) is a 60 ft long qaodmasdkwaspemas5ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdfls 22 ft wide qaodmasdkwaspemas4ajkqlsmdqpakldnzsdfls 7 ft deep concrete...

  7. Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The U.S. Department of Energy Manufacturing Demonstration Facility (MDF) at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) provides a collaborative, shared infrastructure to...

  8. GPS Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Global Positioning System (GPS) Test Facility Instrumentation Suite (GPSIS) provides great flexibility in testing receivers by providing operational control of...

  9. Imagery Data Base Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Imagery Data Base Facility supports AFRL and other government organizations by providing imagery interpretation and analysis to users for data selection, imagery...

  10. Nonlinear Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Nonlinear Materials Characterization Facility conducts photophysical research and development of nonlinear materials operating in the visible spectrum to protect...

  11. Transonic Experimental Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Transonic Experimental Research Facility evaluates aerodynamics and fluid dynamics of projectiles, smart munitions systems, and sub-munitions dispensing systems;...

  12. Target Assembly Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Target Assembly Facility integrates new armor concepts into actual armored vehicles. Featuring the capability ofmachining and cutting radioactive materials, it...

  13. Region 9 NPDES Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Environmental Protection Agency — Point geospatial dataset representing locations of NPDES Facilities. NPDES (National Pollution Discharge Elimination System) is an EPA permit program that regulates...

  14. Pavement Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Comprehensive Environmental and Structural AnalysesThe ERDC Pavement Testing Facility, located on the ERDC Vicksburg campus, was originally constructed to provide an...

  15. Textiles Performance Testing Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Textiles Performance Testing Facilities has the capabilities to perform all physical wet and dry performance testing, and visual and instrumental color analysis...

  16. Catalytic Fuel Conversion Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This facility enables unique catalysis research related to power and energy applications using military jet fuels and alternative fuels. It is equipped with research...

  17. Materials Characterization Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Materials Characterization Facility enables detailed measurements of the properties of ceramics, polymers, glasses, and composites. It features instrumentation...

  18. Heated Tube Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Heated Tube Facility at NASA GRC investigates cooling issues by simulating conditions characteristic of rocket engine thrust chambers and high speed airbreathing...

  19. Geodynamics Research Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This GSL facility has evolved over the last three decades to support survivability and protective structures research. Experimental devices include three gas-driven...

  20. Mobile Solar Tracker Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — NIST's mobile solar tracking facility is used to characterize the electrical performance of photovoltaic panels. It incorporates meteorological instruments, a solar...

  1. Pavement Testing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Comprehensive Environmental and Structural Analyses The ERDC Pavement Testing Facility, located on the ERDC Vicksburg campus, was originally constructed to provide...

  2. Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Composite Structures Manufacturing Facility specializes in the design, analysis, fabrication and testing of advanced composite structures and materials for both...

  3. Universal Drive Train Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — This vehicle drive train research facility is capable of evaluating helicopter and ground vehicle power transmission technologies in a system level environment. The...

  4. Geospatial Data Analysis Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Geospatial application development, location-based services, spatial modeling, and spatial analysis are examples of the many research applications that this facility...

  5. Proximal Probes Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Proximal Probes Facility consists of laboratories for microscopy, spectroscopy, and probing of nanostructured materials and their functional properties. At the...

  6. Results from a multi aperture Fizeau interferometer ground testbed: demonstrator for a future space-based interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baccichet, Nicola; Caillat, Amandine; Rakotonimbahy, Eddy; Dohlen, Kjetil; Savini, Giorgio; Marcos, Michel

    2016-08-01

    In the framework of the European FP7-FISICA (Far Infrared Space Interferometer Critical Assessment) program, we developed a miniaturized version of the hyper-telescope to demonstrate multi-aperture interferometry on ground. This setup would be ultimately integrated into a CubeSat platform, therefore providing the first real demonstrator of a multi aperture Fizeau interferometer in space. In this paper, we describe the optical design of the ground testbed and the data processing pipeline implemented to reconstruct the object image from interferometric data. As a scientific application, we measured the Sun diameter by fitting a limb-darkening model to our data. Finally, we present the design of a CubeSat platform carrying this miniature Fizeau interferometer, which could be used to monitor the Sun diameter over a long in-orbit period.

  7. The CELSS Antarctic Analog Project: An Advanced Life Support Testbed at the Amundsen-Scott South Pole Station, Antarctica

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straight, Christian L.; Bubenheim, David L.; Bates, Maynard E.; Flynn, Michael T.

    1994-01-01

    CELSS Antarctic Analog Project (CAAP) represents a logical solution to the multiple objectives of both the NASA and the National Science Foundation (NSF). CAAP will result in direct transfer of proven technologies and systems, proven under the most rigorous of conditions, to the NSF and to society at large. This project goes beyond, as it must, the generally accepted scope of CELSS and life support systems including the issues of power generation, human dynamics, community systems, and training. CAAP provides a vivid and starkly realistic testbed of Controlled Ecological Life Support System (CELSS) and life support systems and methods. CAAP will also be critical in the development and validation of performance parameters for future advanced life support systems.

  8. Power Systems Development Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2003-07-01

    This report discusses Test Campaign TC12 of the Kellogg Brown & Root, Inc. (KBR) Transport Gasifier train with a Siemens Westinghouse Power Corporation (SW) particle filter system at the Power Systems Development Facility (PSDF) located in Wilsonville, Alabama. The Transport Gasifier is an advanced circulating fluidized-bed reactor designed to operate as either a combustor or a gasifier using a particulate control device (PCD). While operating as a gasifier, either air or oxygen can be used as the oxidant. Test run TC12 began on May 16, 2003, with the startup of the main air compressor and the lighting of the gasifier start-up burner. The Transport Gasifier operated until May 24, 2003, when a scheduled outage occurred to allow maintenance crews to install the fuel cell test unit and modify the gas clean-up system. On June 18, 2003, the test run resumed when operations relit the start-up burner, and testing continued until the scheduled end of the run on July 14, 2003. TC12 had a total of 733 hours using Powder River Basin (PRB) subbituminous coal. Over the course of the entire test run, gasifier temperatures varied between 1,675 and 1,850 F at pressures from 130 to 210 psig.

  9. Facile synthesis of mercaptosuccinic acid-capped CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/double shell quantum dots with improved cell viability on different cancer cells and normal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parani, Sundararajan; Bupesh, Giridharan; Manikandan, Elayaperumal; Pandian, Kannaiyan; Oluwafemi, Oluwatobi Samuel

    2016-11-01

    Water-soluble, mercaptosuccinic acid (MSA)-capped CdTe/CdS/ZnS core/double shell quantum dots (QDs) were prepared by successive growth of CdS and ZnS shells on the as-synthesized CdTe/CdSthin core/shell quantum dots. The formation of core/double shell structured QDs was investigated by ultraviolet-visible (UV-Vis) absorption and photoluminescence (PL) spectroscopy, PL decay studies, X-ray diffraction (XRD), and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS). The core/double shell QDs exhibited good photoluminescence quantum yield (PLQY) which is 70% higher than that of the parent core/shell QDs, and they are stable for months. The average particle size of the core/double shell QDs was ˜3 nm as calculated from the transmission electron microscope (TEM) images. The cytotoxicity of the QDs was evaluated on a variety of cancer cells such as HeLa, MCF-7, A549, and normal Vero cells by 3-(4,5-dimethyl-2-thiazolyl)-2,5-diphenyl-2H-tetrazolium bromide (MTT) cell viability assay. The results showed that core/double shell QDs were less toxic to the cells when compared to the parent core/shell QDs. MCF-7 cells showed proliferation on incubation with QDs, and this is attributed to the metalloestrogenic activity of cadmium ions released from QDs. The core/double shell CdTe/CdS/ZnS (CSS) QDs were conjugated with transferrin and successfully employed for the biolabeling and fluorescent imaging of HeLa cells. These core/double shell QDs are highly promising fluorescent probe for cancer cell labeling and imaging applications.

  10. Realizing a facile and environmental-friendly fabrication of high-performance multi-crystalline silicon solar cells by employing ZnO nanostructures and an Al2O3 passivation layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hong-Yan; Lu, Hong-Liang; Sun, Long; Ren, Qing-Hua; Zhang, Hao; Ji, Xin-Ming; Liu, Wen-Jun; Ding, Shi-Jin; Yang, Xiao-Feng; Zhang, David Wei

    2016-12-01

    Nowadays, the multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells dominate the photovoltaic industry. However, the current acid etching method on mc-Si surface used by firms can hardly suppress the average reflectance value below 25% in the visible light spectrum. Meanwhile, the nitric acid and the hydrofluoric contained in the etching solution is both environmental unfriendly and highly toxic to human. Here, a mc-Si solar cell based on ZnO nanostructures and an Al2O3 spacer layer is demonstrated. The eco-friendly fabrication is realized by low temperature atomic layer deposition of Al2O3 layer as well as ZnO seed layer. Moreover, the ZnO nanostructures are prepared by nontoxic and low cost hydro-thermal growth process. Results show that the best passivation quality of the n+ -type mc-Si surface can be achieved by balancing the Si dangling bond saturation level and the negative charge concentration in the Al2O3 film. Moreover, the average reflectance on cell surface can be suppressed to 8.2% in 400-900 nm range by controlling the thickness of ZnO seed layer. With these two combined refinements, a maximum solar cell efficiency of 15.8% is obtained eventually. This work offer a facile way to realize the environmental friendly fabrication of high performance mc-Si solar cells.

  11. Samarbejdsformer og Facilities Management

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Storgaard, Kresten

    Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges.......Resultater fra en surveyundersøgelse om fordele og ulemper ved forskellige samarbejdsformer indenfor Facilities Management fremlægges....

  12. Japan Hadron Facility

    CERN Document Server

    Hayano, R S

    1999-01-01

    Japan Hadron Facility (JHF) is a high-intensity proton accelerator complex consisting of a 200 MeV linac, a 3 GeV booster and a 50 GeV main ring. Its status and future possibilities of realizing a versatile antiproton facility at JHF are presented.

  13. Surface-modified Nafion membranes with mesoporous SiO 2 layers via a facile dip-coating approach for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yuhan; Li, Haidong; Liu, Changpeng; Xing, Wei; Ji, Xiangling

    In this study, Nafion ® 117 membrane is surface-modified with mesoporous silica layers through in situ surfactant-templated sol-gel reaction. The reaction makes use of tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) under acidic condition via dip-coating technique on both sides. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM), Fourier transformation infrared (FTIR), and thermogravimetric analysis (TGA) are employed to characterize the resultant membranes. Proton conductivity and methanol permeability of the membranes are also studied. It is determined that the aging time, along with the number of the silicon dioxide (SiO 2) layer, influence both proton conductivity and methanol permeability. Specifically, double-side modified membrane with 5 min interval of the second layer (S (5)) exhibits optimal properties on the combined criterion of conductivity and permeability. However, the application of mesoporous silica layer in modifying commercial Nafion membranes through dip-coating is proven to be a facile route in improving the said criteria simultaneously.

  14. Physics and technology in the ion-cyclotron range of frequency on Tore Supra and TITAN test facility: implication for ITER

    Science.gov (United States)

    Litaudon, X.; Bernard, J. M.; Colas, L.; Dumont, R.; Argouarch, A.; Bottollier-Curtet, H.; Brémond, S.; Champeaux, S.; Corre, Y.; Dumortier, P.; Firdaouss, M.; Guilhem, D.; Gunn, J. P.; Gouard, Ph.; Hoang, G. T.; Jacquot, J.; Klepper, C. C.; Kubič, M.; Kyrytsya, V.; Lombard, G.; Milanesio, D.; Messiaen, A.; Mollard, P.; Meyer, O.; Zarzoso, D.

    2013-08-01

    To support the design of an ITER ion-cyclotron range of frequency heating (ICRH) system and to mitigate risks of operation in ITER, CEA has initiated an ambitious Research & Development program accompanied by experiments on Tore Supra or test-bed facility together with a significant modelling effort. The paper summarizes the recent results in the following areas: Comprehensive characterization (experiments and modelling) of a new Faraday screen concept tested on the Tore Supra antenna. A new model is developed for calculating the ICRH sheath rectification at the antenna vicinity. The model is applied to calculate the local heat flux on Tore Supra and ITER ICRH antennas. Full-wave modelling of ITER ICRH heating and current drive scenarios with the EVE code. With 20 MW of power, a current of ±400 kA could be driven on axis in the DT scenario. Comparison between DT and DT(3He) scenario is given for heating and current drive efficiencies. First operation of CW test-bed facility, TITAN, designed for ITER ICRH components testing and could host up to a quarter of an ITER antenna. R&D of high permittivity materials to improve load of test facilities to better simulate ITER plasma antenna loading conditions.

  15. Wind Energy Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Laurie, Carol

    2017-02-01

    This book takes readers inside the places where daily discoveries shape the next generation of wind power systems. Energy Department laboratory facilities span the United States and offer wind research capabilities to meet industry needs. The facilities described in this book make it possible for industry players to increase reliability, improve efficiency, and reduce the cost of wind energy -- one discovery at a time. Whether you require blade testing or resource characterization, grid integration or high-performance computing, Department of Energy laboratory facilities offer a variety of capabilities to meet your wind research needs.

  16. Nanostructured p-type CZTS thin films prepared by a facile solution process for 3D p-n junction solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Si-Nae; Sung, Shi-Joon; Sim, Jun-Hyoung; Yang, Kee-Jeong; Hwang, Dae-Kue; Kim, JunHo; Kim, Gee Yeong; Jo, William; Kim, Dae-Hwan; Kang, Jin-Kyu

    2015-07-07

    Nanoporous p-type semiconductor thin films prepared by a simple solution-based process with appropriate thermal treatment and three-dimensional (3D) p-n junction solar cells fabricated by depositing n-type semiconductor layers onto the nanoporous p-type thin films show considerable photovoltaic performance compared with conventional thin film p-n junction solar cells. Spin-coated p-type Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) thin films prepared using metal chlorides and thiourea show unique nanoporous thin film morphology, which is composed of a cluster of CZTS nanograins of 50-500 nm, and the obvious 3D p-n junction structure is fabricated by the deposition of n-type CdS on the nanoporous CZTS thin films by chemical bath deposition. The photovoltaic properties of 3D p-n junction CZTS solar cells are predominantly affected by the scale of CZTS nanograins, which is easily controlled by the sulfurization temperature of CZTS precursor films. The scale of CZTS nanograins determines the minority carrier transportation within the 3D p-n junction between CZTS and CdS, which are closely related with the photocurrent of series resistance of 3D p-n junction solar cells. 3D p-n junction CZTS solar cells with nanograins below 100 nm show power conversion efficiency of 5.02%, which is comparable with conventional CZTS thin film solar cells.

  17. National Solar Thermal Test Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The National Solar Thermal Test Facility (NSTTF) is the only test facility in the United States of its type. This unique facility provides experimental engineering...

  18. Hydrography - Water Pollution Control Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    NSGIC GIS Inventory (aka Ramona) — A Water Pollution Control Facility is a DEP primary facility type related to the Water Pollution Control Program. The sub-facility types related to Water Pollution...

  19. Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/patientinstructions/000435.htm Skilled nursing or rehabilitation facilities To use the sharing features ... facility. Who Needs to go to a Skilled Nursing or Rehabilitation Facility? Your health care provider may ...

  20. Lustre Distributed Name Space (DNE) Evaluation at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Simmons, James S. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences; Leverman, Dustin B. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences; Hanley, Jesse A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences; Oral, Sarp [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States). Center for Computational Sciences

    2016-08-22

    This document describes the Lustre Distributed Name Space (DNE) evaluation carried at the Oak Ridge Leadership Computing Facility (OLCF) between 2014 and 2015. DNE is a development project funded by the OpenSFS, to improve Lustre metadata performance and scalability. The development effort has been split into two parts, the first part (DNE P1) providing support for remote directories over remote Lustre Metadata Server (MDS) nodes and Metadata Target (MDT) devices, while the second phase (DNE P2) addressed split directories over multiple remote MDS nodes and MDT devices. The OLCF have been actively evaluating the performance, reliability, and the functionality of both DNE phases. For these tests, internal OLCF testbed were used. Results are promising and OLCF is planning on a full DNE deployment by mid-2016 timeframe on production systems.