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Sample records for cell testbed facility

  1. Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed: A Facility for Space Calibration and Measurement of Solar Cells on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.; Jenkins, Phillip; Sexton, J. Andrew; Scheiman, David; Christie, Robert; Charpie, James; Gerber, Scott S.; Johnson, D. Bruce

    2001-01-01

    The Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed ("PET") is a facility to be flown on the International Space Station to perform calibration, measurement, and qualification of solar cells in the space environment and then returning the cells to Earth for laboratory use. PET will allow rapid turnaround testing of new photovoltaic technology under AM0 conditions.

  2. NN-SITE: A remote monitoring testbed facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    DOE, Aquila Technologies, LANL and SNL recently launched collaborative efforts to create a Non-Proliferation Network Systems Integration and Test (NN-Site, pronounced N-Site) facility. NN-Site will focus on wide area, local area, and local operating level network connectivity including Internet access. This facility will provide thorough and cost-effective integration, testing and development of information connectivity among diverse operating systems and network topologies prior to full-scale deployment. In concentrating on instrument interconnectivity, tamper indication, and data collection and review, NN-Site will facilitate efforts of equipment providers and system integrators in deploying systems that will meet nuclear non-proliferation and safeguards objectives. The following will discuss the objectives of ongoing remote monitoring efforts, as well as the prevalent policy concerns. An in-depth discussion of the Non-Proliferation Network Systems Integration and Test facility (NN-Site) will illuminate the role that this testbed facility can perform in meeting the objectives of remote monitoring efforts, and its potential contribution in promoting eventual acceptance of remote monitoring systems in facilities worldwide

  3. Attitude Control on the Pico Satellite Solar Cell Testbed-2

    OpenAIRE

    Janson, Siegfried; Hardy, Brian; Chin, Andrew; Rumsey, Daniel; Ehrlich, Daniel; Hinkley, David

    2012-01-01

    The Pico Satellite Solar Cell Testbed-2 (PSSCT-2) was a 5” x 5” x 10”, 3.7-kg mass nanosatellite ejected from the Space Shuttle Atlantis during the final STS-135 mission on July 20, 2011. PSSCT-2 had a three-axis attitude control system to enable firing of solid rockets for orbit raising, pointing of solar cells normal to the sun for on-orbit performance monitoring, and pointing of a GPS antenna in the anti-flight direction for radio-occultation measurements. Attitude determination and contro...

  4. Human Engineering Operations and Habitability Assessment: A Process for Advanced Life Support Ground Facility Testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Connolly, Janis H.; Arch, M.; Elfezouaty, Eileen Schultz; Novak, Jennifer Blume; Bond, Robert L. (Technical Monitor)

    1999-01-01

    Design and Human Engineering (HE) processes strive to ensure that the human-machine interface is designed for optimal performance throughout the system life cycle. Each component can be tested and assessed independently to assure optimal performance, but it is not until full integration that the system and the inherent interactions between the system components can be assessed as a whole. HE processes (which are defining/app lying requirements for human interaction with missions/systems) are included in space flight activities, but also need to be included in ground activities and specifically, ground facility testbeds such as Bio-Plex. A unique aspect of the Bio-Plex Facility is the integral issue of Habitability which includes qualities of the environment that allow humans to work and live. HE is a process by which Habitability and system performance can be assessed.

  5. Virtual Factory Testbed

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Virtual Factory Testbed (VFT) is comprised of three physical facilities linked by a standalone network (VFNet). The three facilities are the Smart and Wireless...

  6. Particle-In-Cell Multi-Algorithm Numerical Test-Bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyers, M. D.; Yu, P.; Tableman, A.; Decyk, V. K.; Mori, W. B.

    2015-11-01

    We describe a numerical test-bed that allows for the direct comparison of different numerical simulation schemes using only a single code. It is built from the UPIC Framework, which is a set of codes and modules for constructing parallel PIC codes. In this test-bed code, Maxwell's equations are solved in Fourier space in two dimensions. One can readily examine the numerical properties of a real space finite difference scheme by including its operators' Fourier space representations in the Maxwell solver. The fields can be defined at the same location in a simulation cell or can be offset appropriately by half-cells, as in the Yee finite difference time domain scheme. This allows for the accurate comparison of numerical properties (dispersion relations, numerical stability, etc.) across finite difference schemes, or against the original spectral scheme. We have also included different options for the charge and current deposits, including a strict charge conserving current deposit. The test-bed also includes options for studying the analytic time domain scheme, which eliminates numerical dispersion errors in vacuum. We will show examples from the test-bed that illustrate how the properties of some numerical instabilities vary between different PIC algorithms. Work supported by the NSF grant ACI 1339893 and DOE grant DE-SC0008491.

  7. Antarctic Planetary Testbed (APT): A facility in the Antarctic for research, planning and simulation of manned planetary missions and to provide a testbed for technological development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahmadi, Mashid; Bottelli, Alejandro Horacio; Brave, Fernando Luis; Siddiqui, Muhammad Ali

    1988-01-01

    The notion of using Antarctica as a planetary analog is not new. Ever since the manned space program gained serious respect in the 1950's, futurists have envisioned manned exploration and ultimate colonization of the moon and other extraterrestrial bodies. In recent years, much attention has been focused on a permanently manned U.S. space station, a manned Lunar outpost and a manned mission to Mars and its vicinity. When such lofty goals are set, it is only prudent to research, plan and rehearse as many aspects of such a mission as possible. The concept of the Antarctic Planetary Testbed (APT) project is intended to be a facility that will provide a location to train and observe potential mission crews under conditions of isolation and severity, attempting to simulate an extraterrestrial environment. Antarctica has been considered as an analog by NASA for Lunar missions and has also been considered by many experts to be an excellent Mars analog. Antarctica contains areas where the environment and terrain are more similar to regions on the Moon and Mars than any other place on Earth. These features offer opportunities for simulations to determine performance capabilities of people and machines in harsh, isolated environments. The initial APT facility, conceived to be operational by the year 1991, will be constructed during the summer months by a crew of approximately twelve. Between six and eight of these people will remain through the winter. As in space, structures and equipment systems will be modular to facilitate efficient transport to the site, assembly, and evolutionary expansion. State of the art waste recovery/recycling systems are also emphasized due to their importance in space.

  8. A Space Testbed for Photovoltaics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landis, Geoffrey A.; Bailey, Sheila G.

    1998-01-01

    The Ohio Aerospace Institute and the NASA Lewis Research Center are designing and building a solar-cell calibration facility, the Photovoltaic Engineering Testbed (PET) to fly on the International Space Station to test advanced solar cell types in the space environment. A wide variety of advanced solar cell types have become available in the last decade. Some of these solar cells offer more than twice the power per unit area of the silicon cells used for the space station power system. They also offer the possibilities of lower cost, lighter weight, and longer lifetime. The purpose of the PET facility is to reduce the cost of validating new technologies and bringing them to spaceflight readiness. The facility will be used for three primary functions: calibration, measurement, and qualification. It is scheduled to be launched in June of 2002.

  9. Development of a Radiative-Hydrodynamics Testbed Using the Petawatt Laser Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the conditions believed to underlie astrophysical phenomena have been difficult to achieve in a laboratory setting. For example, models of supernova remnant evolution rely on a detailed understanding of the propagation of shock waves with gigabar pressures at temperatures of 1 keV or more, at which radiative effects can be important. Current models of gamma-ray bursts posit a relativistically expanding plasma fireball with copious production of electron-positron pairs, a difficult scenario to verify experimentally. However, a new class of lasers, such as the Petawatt Laser, is capable of producing focused intensities greater than 1020 W cm-2, at which such relativistic effects can be observed and even dominate the laser-target interaction. We report here on the development of a testbed using the Petawatt Laser to study the evolution of strong, radiative shock waves. There is ample evidence in observational data from supernova remnants of the aftermath of the passage of radiative shock or blast waves. In the early phases of supernova remnant evolution, the radially expanding shock wave expands nearly adiabatically since it is traveling at a very high velocity as it begins to sweep up the surrounding interstellar gas. A Sedov-Taylor blast wave solution can be applied to this phase when the mass of interstellar gas swept up by the blast greatly exceeds the mass of the stellar ejecta, or a self-similar driven wave model can be applied if the ejecta play a significant role. As the mass of the swept-up material begins to greatly exceed the mass of the stellar ejecta, the evolution transitions to a radiative phase wherein the remnant can be modeled as an interior region of low-density, high-pressure gas surrounded by a thin, spherical shell of cooled, dense gas with a radiative shock as its outer boundary, the pressure-driven snowplow. Until recently it has not been feasible to devise laboratory experiments wherein shock waves with initial pressures in excess of

  10. Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fang; Basinger, Scott A.; Diaz, Rosemary T.; Gappinger, Robert O.; Tang, Hong; Lam, Raymond K.; Sidick, Erkin; Hein, Randall C.; Rud, Mayer; Troy, Mitchell

    2010-01-01

    The Advanced Wavefront Sensing and Control Testbed (AWCT) is built as a versatile facility for developing and demonstrating, in hardware, the future technologies of wave front sensing and control algorithms for active optical systems. The testbed includes a source projector for a broadband point-source and a suite of extended scene targets, a dispersed fringe sensor, a Shack-Hartmann camera, and an imaging camera capable of phase retrieval wavefront sensing. The testbed also provides two easily accessible conjugated pupil planes which can accommodate the active optical devices such as fast steering mirror, deformable mirror, and segmented mirrors. In this paper, we describe the testbed optical design, testbed configurations and capabilities, as well as the initial results from the testbed hardware integrations and tests.

  11. Design and development of cell queuing, processing, and scheduling modules for the iPOINT input-buffered ATM testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duan, Haoran

    1997-12-01

    This dissertation presents the concepts, principles, performance, and implementation of input queuing and cell-scheduling modules for the Illinois Pulsar-based Optical INTerconnect (iPOINT) input-buffered Asynchronous Transfer Mode (ATM) testbed. Input queuing (IQ) ATM switches are well suited to meet the requirements of current and future ultra-broadband ATM networks. The IQ structure imposes minimum memory bandwidth requirements for cell buffering, tolerates bursty traffic, and utilizes memory efficiently for multicast traffic. The lack of efficient cell queuing and scheduling solutions has been a major barrier to build high-performance, scalable IQ-based ATM switches. This dissertation proposes a new Three-Dimensional Queue (3DQ) and a novel Matrix Unit Cell Scheduler (MUCS) to remove this barrier. 3DQ uses a linked-list architecture based on Synchronous Random Access Memory (SRAM) to combine the individual advantages of per-virtual-circuit (per-VC) queuing, priority queuing, and N-destination queuing. It avoids Head of Line (HOL) blocking and provides per-VC Quality of Service (QoS) enforcement mechanisms. Computer simulation results verify the QoS capabilities of 3DQ. For multicast traffic, 3DQ provides efficient usage of cell buffering memory by storing multicast cells only once. Further, the multicast mechanism of 3DQ prevents a congested destination port from blocking other less- loaded ports. The 3DQ principle has been prototyped in the Illinois Input Queue (iiQueue) module. Using Field Programmable Gate Array (FPGA) devices, SRAM modules, and integrated on a Printed Circuit Board (PCB), iiQueue can process incoming traffic at 800 Mb/s. Using faster circuit technology, the same design is expected to operate at the OC-48 rate (2.5 Gb/s). MUCS resolves the output contention by evaluating the weight index of each candidate and selecting the heaviest. It achieves near-optimal scheduling and has a very short response time. The algorithm originates from a

  12. Hot cell verification facility update

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hot Cell Verification Facility (HCVF) is operated by the Westinghouse Hanford Co. in the 300 Area of Hanford. The HCVF provides a prototype hot cell mock-up for use in checking equipment and operations for functional and remote operation. The facility can also be used for hands-on training of operating personnel prior to actual hot operation of the equipment. A broad spectrum of testing and development functions is performed in HCVF, including: equipment operability testing, maintainability and compatibility testing, system integration, and remote maintenance capability testing. An updated description of the HCVF is presented in this paper

  13. Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed Lab

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frost, Chad R.; Sorgenfrei, Matthew C.; Nehrenz, Matt

    2015-01-01

    The Generalized Nanosatellite Avionics Testbed (G-NAT) lab at NASA Ames Research Center provides a flexible, easily accessible platform for developing hardware and software for advanced small spacecraft. A collaboration between the Mission Design Division and the Intelligent Systems Division, the objective of the lab is to provide testing data and general test protocols for advanced sensors, actuators, and processors for CubeSat-class spacecraft. By developing test schemes for advanced components outside of the standard mission lifecycle, the lab is able to help reduce the risk carried by advanced nanosatellite or CubeSat missions. Such missions are often allocated very little time for testing, and too often the test facilities must be custom-built for the needs of the mission at hand. The G-NAT lab helps to eliminate these problems by providing an existing suite of testbeds that combines easily accessible, commercial-offthe- shelf (COTS) processors with a collection of existing sensors and actuators.

  14. Terrestrial Plume Impingement Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Masten Space Systems proposes to create a terrestrial plume impingement testbed for generating novel datasets for extraterrestrial robotic missions. This testbed...

  15. Design elements of hot cell facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, D. K.; Lee, K. S.; Baek, S. Y.; Ahn, Y. S.; Choo, Y. S

    1997-06-01

    Hot cell facility is necessary for the post-irradiation examinations of nuclear fuels and materials. Therefore many hot cell facilities have been constructed and operating to support the research and development on the nuclear technology. In this report, the design elements of the hot cell facility is reviewed and discussed. (author). 3 tabs., 12 figs

  16. Nuclear Instrumentation and Control Cyber Testbed Considerations – Lessons Learned

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jonathan Gray; Robert Anderson; Julio G. Rodriguez; Cheol-Kwon Lee

    2014-08-01

    Abstract: Identifying and understanding digital instrumentation and control (I&C) cyber vulnerabilities within nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities, is critical if nation states desire to operate nuclear facilities safely, reliably, and securely. In order to demonstrate objective evidence that cyber vulnerabilities have been adequately identified and mitigated, a testbed representing a facility’s critical nuclear equipment must be replicated. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has built and operated similar testbeds for common critical infrastructure I&C for over ten years. This experience developing, operating, and maintaining an I&C testbed in support of research identifying cyber vulnerabilities has led the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute of the Republic of Korea to solicit the experiences of INL to help mitigate problems early in the design, development, operation, and maintenance of a similar testbed. The following information will discuss I&C testbed lessons learned and the impact of these experiences to KAERI.

  17. Research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated in a test-bed bus. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1996-05-30

    This project, the research and development of a phosphoric acid fuel cell/battery power source integrated into test-bed buses, began as a multi-phase U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) project in 1989. Phase I had a goal of developing two competing half-scale (25 kW) brassboard phosphoric acid fuel cell systems. An air-cooled and a liquid-cooled fuel cell system were developed and tested to verify the concept of using a fuel cell and a battery in a hybrid configuration wherein the fuel cell supplies the average power required for operating the vehicle and a battery supplies the `surge` or excess power required for acceleration and hill-climbing. Work done in Phase I determined that the liquid-cooled system offered higher efficiency.

  18. Decommissioning of the Risoe hot cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concise descriptions of actions taken in relation to the decommissioning of the hot cell facility at Risoe National Laboratory are presented. The removal of fissile material, of large contaminated equipment from the concrete cell line and a separate shielded storage facility, and the removal of large contaminated facilities such as out cell parts of a tube transport system between a concrete cell and a lead shielded steel box and a remotely operated Reichert Telatom microscope housed in a lead shielded glove box is described in addition to the initial mapping of radiation levels related to the decontamination of concrete cells. The dose commitment of 17.7 mSv was ascribed to 12 persons in the 2nd half of 1991. The work resulting in these doses was mainly handling of waste together with the frogman entrances in order to repair the in-cell crane and power manipulator. The overall time schedule for the project still appears to be applicable. (AB)

  19. The Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Colavita, M. M.; Wallace, J. K.; Hines, B. E.; Gursel, Y.; Malbet, F.; Palmer, D. L.; Pan, X. P.; Shao, M.; Yu, J. W.; Boden, A. F.

    1999-01-01

    The Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) is a long-baseline infrared interferometer located at Palomar Observatory, California. It was built as a testbed for interferometric techniques applicable to the Keck Interferometer. First fringes were obtained in 1995 July. PTI implements a dual-star architecture, tracking two stars simultaneously for phase referencing and narrow-angle astrometry. The three fixed 40 cm apertures can be combined pairwise to provide baselines to 110 m. The interferometer actively tracks the white-light fringe using an array detector at 2.2 microns and active delay lines with a range of +/-38 m. Laser metrology of the delay lines allows for servo control, and laser metrology of the complete optical path enables narrow-angle astrometric measurements. The instrument is highly automated, using a multiprocessing computer system for instrument control and sequencing.

  20. The Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    CERN Document Server

    Colavita, M M

    1999-01-01

    The Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) is a long-baseline infrared interferometer located at Palomar Observatory, California. It was built as a testbed for interferometric techniques applicable to the Keck Interferometer. First fringes were obtained in July 1995. PTI implements a dual-star architecture, tracking two stars simultaneously for phase referencing and narrow-angle astrometry. The three fixed 40-cm apertures can be combined pair-wise to provide baselines to 110~m. The interferometer actively tracks the white-light fringe using an array detector at 2.2 um and active delay lines with a range of +/- 38 m. Laser metrology of the delay lines allows for servo control, and laser metrology of the complete optical path enables narrow-angle astrometric measurements. The instrument is highly automated, using a multiprocessing computer system for instrument control and sequencing.

  1. Rover Attitude and Pointing System Simulation Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanelli, Charles A.; Grinblat, Jonathan F.; Sirlin, Samuel W.; Pfister, Sam

    2009-01-01

    The MER (Mars Exploration Rover) Attitude and Pointing System Simulation Testbed Environment (RAPSSTER) provides a simulation platform used for the development and test of GNC (guidance, navigation, and control) flight algorithm designs for the Mars rovers, which was specifically tailored to the MERs, but has since been used in the development of rover algorithms for the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL) as well. The software provides an integrated simulation and software testbed environment for the development of Mars rover attitude and pointing flight software. It provides an environment that is able to run the MER GNC flight software directly (as opposed to running an algorithmic model of the MER GNC flight code). This improves simulation fidelity and confidence in the results. Further more, the simulation environment allows the user to single step through its execution, pausing, and restarting at will. The system also provides for the introduction of simulated faults specific to Mars rover environments that cannot be replicated in other testbed platforms, to stress test the GNC flight algorithms under examination. The software provides facilities to do these stress tests in ways that cannot be done in the real-time flight system testbeds, such as time-jumping (both forwards and backwards), and introduction of simulated actuator faults that would be difficult, expensive, and/or destructive to implement in the real-time testbeds. Actual flight-quality codes can be incorporated back into the development-test suite of GNC developers, closing the loop between the GNC developers and the flight software developers. The software provides fully automated scripting, allowing multiple tests to be run with varying parameters, without human supervision.

  2. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concise description of the current status (December 31st, 1992) regarding the decommissioning of the hot cell facility at Risoe National Laboratory is given in this periodic report. During the second half of the year 1992, all remaining fissile material and a large amount of contaminated material were removed, major repair work was carried out on the in-cell crane, the shielded storage facility was decontaminated and sealed, iodine filters in the cell ventilation system were removed, remote cleaning was carried out on three concrete cells to radiation levels acceptable for final cleaning by frogmen, and the remaining work schedule was planned. These processes are briefly described. Some breakdowns of older, but vital equipment (i.e. the in-cell crane and the power manipulator) that was taken into extensive use led to a certain amount of delay. The collective radiation doses during this half-year were no higher than under normal operation of the facility, and amounted to 12 man-mSv ascribed to 14 persons. It was concluded that, when removing old epoxy paint in the cells using paint strippers applied by hand, personnel can wear polythene oversuits, although a technique for remote handling has been developed. Tables illustrate measured radiation levels in cells number 1,4,5 and 6, and a diagram describes the shielded storage facility. (AB)

  3. Adjustable Autonomy Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Schrenkenghost, Debra K.

    2001-01-01

    The Adjustable Autonomy Testbed (AAT) is a simulation-based testbed located in the Intelligent Systems Laboratory in the Automation, Robotics and Simulation Division at NASA Johnson Space Center. The purpose of the testbed is to support evaluation and validation of prototypes of adjustable autonomous agent software for control and fault management for complex systems. The AA T project has developed prototype adjustable autonomous agent software and human interfaces for cooperative fault management. This software builds on current autonomous agent technology by altering the architecture, components and interfaces for effective teamwork between autonomous systems and human experts. Autonomous agents include a planner, flexible executive, low level control and deductive model-based fault isolation. Adjustable autonomy is intended to increase the flexibility and effectiveness of fault management with an autonomous system. The test domain for this work is control of advanced life support systems for habitats for planetary exploration. The CONFIG hybrid discrete event simulation environment provides flexible and dynamically reconfigurable models of the behavior of components and fluids in the life support systems. Both discrete event and continuous (discrete time) simulation are supported, and flows and pressures are computed globally. This provides fast dynamic simulations of interacting hardware systems in closed loops that can be reconfigured during operations scenarios, producing complex cascading effects of operations and failures. Current object-oriented model libraries support modeling of fluid systems, and models have been developed of physico-chemical and biological subsystems for processing advanced life support gases. In FY01, water recovery system models will be developed.

  4. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nuclear fuels have been handled and examined after irradiation by physical and chemical techniques, and radiotherapy sources, mainly 60Co, have been produced at Risoe National Laboratory since 1964. The aims of decommissioning (during 1990-94, at IAEA Stage 2 level for reactors) were to obtain safe conditions for the remaining parts of the facility and to produce clean space areas for new projects. The facility comprises 6 concrete cells, several lead-shielded steel cells, glove boxes, shielded storage for waste, a remotely operated optical microscope, a frogman area for personnel access to the concrete cells, a decontamination facility, workshops and safety installations. All steel cells, glove boxes and the microscope were emptied and removed. The concrete cells were emptied of fissile material, scientific equipment, general tools and scrap. Decontamination should facilitate waste packing and reduce amount of waste to be stored temporarily at the Risoe waste treatment facility together with highly active waste. The concrete cells were cleaned remotely by wiping, hot spot removal, by mechanical means and vacuum cleaning. The interiors of 2 cells were decontaminated by high pressure water jetting. All master-slave manipulators and part of the contaminated ventilation system at the cells were removed. The cells are left in a non-ventilated state, connected to the atmosphere by an absolute filter. The main contaminants measured before cell closure were 60Co, 137Cs and alpha-emitters. Dismantling, decontamination waste disposal and received doses are described. Simple techniques involving low doses were found to be very effective. (AB)

  5. LISA Optical Bench Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lieser, M.; d'Arcio, L.; Barke, S.; Bogenstahl, J.; Diekmann, C.; Diepholz, I.; Fitzsimons, E. D.; Gerberding, O.; Henning, J.-S.; Hewitson, M.; Hey, F. G.; Hogenhuis, H.; Killow, C. J.; Lucarelli, S.; Nikolov, S.; Perreur-Lloyd, M.; Pijnenburg, J.; Robertson, D. I.; Sohmer, A.; Taylor, A.; Tröbs, M.; Ward, H.; Weise, D.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2013-01-01

    The optical bench (OB) is a part of the LISA spacecraft, situated between the telescope and the testmass. For measuring the inter-spacecraft distances there are several interferometers on the OB. The elegant breadboard of the OB for LISA is developed for the European Space Agency (ESA) by EADS Astrium, TNO Science & Industry, University of Glasgow and the Albert Einstein Intitute (AEI), the performance tests then will be done at the AEI. Here we present the testbed that will be used for the performance tests with the focus on the thermal environment and the laser infrastructure.

  6. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Concise description of progress in hot cell facility decommissioning at Risoe National Laboratory is presented. Removal of the large contaminated equipment has been completed, all the concrete cells have been finally cleaned. The total contamination left on the concrete walls is of the order of 1850 GBq. Preliminary smear tests proved the stack to be probably clean. The delay in project completion seems to be around 7 months, the remaining work being of rather conventional character. (EG)

  7. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hot Cell facility at Risoe has been in active use since 1964. During the years several types of nuclear fuels have been handled and examined: test reactor fuel pins from the Danish reactor DR3, the Norwegian Halden reactor, etc; power reactor fuel pins from several foreign reactors, including plutonium enriched pins; HTGR fuel from the Dragon reactor. All kinds of physical and chemical non-destructive and destructive post irradiation examinations have been performed. Besides, different radiotherapy sources have been produced, mainly cobalt sources. The general object of the decommissioning programme for the Hot Cell facility was to obtain a safe condition for the total building that does not require the special safety provisions. The hot cell building will be usable for other purposes after decommissioning. The facilicy comprised six concrete cells, lead cells, glove boxes, a shielded unit for temporary storage of waste, frogman area, decontamination areas, workshops, various installations of importance for safe operation of the plant, offices, etc. The tasks comprised e.g. removal of all irradiated fuel items, removal of other radioactive items, removal of contaminated equipment, and decontamination of all the cells and rooms. The goal was to decontaminate all the concrete cells to a degree where no loose contamination exists in the cells, and where the radiation level is so low, that total removal of the cell structures can be done at any time in the future without significant dose commitments. (AB)

  8. Holodeck Testbed Project

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arias, Adriel (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    The main objective of the Holodeck Testbed is to create a cost effective, realistic, and highly immersive environment that can be used to train astronauts, carry out engineering analysis, develop procedures, and support various operations tasks. Currently, the Holodeck testbed allows to step into a simulated ISS (International Space Station) and interact with objects; as well as, perform Extra Vehicular Activities (EVA) on the surface of the Moon or Mars. The Holodeck Testbed is using the products being developed in the Hybrid Reality Lab (HRL). The HRL is combining technologies related to merging physical models with photo-realistic visuals to create a realistic and highly immersive environment. The lab also investigates technologies and concepts that are needed to allow it to be integrated with other testbeds; such as, the gravity offload capability provided by the Active Response Gravity Offload System (ARGOS). My main two duties were to develop and animate models for use in the HRL environments and work on a new way to interface with computers using Brain Computer Interface (BCI) technology. On my first task, I was able to create precise computer virtual tool models (accurate down to the thousandths or hundredths of an inch). To make these tools even more realistic, I produced animations for these tools so they would have the same mechanical features as the tools in real life. The computer models were also used to create 3D printed replicas that will be outfitted with tracking sensors. The sensor will allow the 3D printed models to align precisely with the computer models in the physical world and provide people with haptic/tactile feedback while wearing a VR (Virtual Reality) headset and interacting with the tools. Getting close to the end of my internship the lab bought a professional grade 3D Scanner. With this, I was able to replicate more intricate tools at a much more time-effective rate. The second task was to investigate the use of BCI to control

  9. Optical Network Testbeds Workshop

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joe Mambretti

    2007-06-01

    This is the summary report of the third annual Optical Networking Testbed Workshop (ONT3), which brought together leading members of the international advanced research community to address major challenges in creating next generation communication services and technologies. Networking research and development (R&D) communities throughout the world continue to discover new methods and technologies that are enabling breakthroughs in advanced communications. These discoveries are keystones for building the foundation of the future economy, which requires the sophisticated management of extremely large qualities of digital information through high performance communications. This innovation is made possible by basic research and experiments within laboratories and on specialized testbeds. Initial network research and development initiatives are driven by diverse motives, including attempts to solve existing complex problems, the desire to create powerful new technologies that do not exist using traditional methods, and the need to create tools to address specific challenges, including those mandated by large scale science or government agency mission agendas. Many new discoveries related to communications technologies transition to wide-spread deployment through standards organizations and commercialization. These transition paths allow for new communications capabilities that drive many sectors of the digital economy. In the last few years, networking R&D has increasingly focused on advancing multiple new capabilities enabled by next generation optical networking. Both US Federal networking R&D and other national R&D initiatives, such as those organized by the National Institute of Information and Communications Technology (NICT) of Japan are creating optical networking technologies that allow for new, powerful communication services. Among the most promising services are those based on new types of multi-service or hybrid networks, which use new optical networking

  10. Autonomous Flying Controls Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Mark A.

    2005-01-01

    The Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis,Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights.

  11. Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Safety Analysis Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    MITCHELL,GERRY W.; LONGLEY,SUSAN W.; PHILBIN,JEFFREY S.; MAHN,JEFFREY A.; BERRY,DONALD T.; SCHWERS,NORMAN F.; VANDERBEEK,THOMAS E.; NAEGELI,ROBERT E.

    2000-11-01

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is prepared in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, and has been written to the format and content guide of DOE-STD-3009-94 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The Hot Cell Facility is a Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facility, and is operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy. This SAR provides a description of the HCF and its operations, an assessment of the hazards and potential accidents which may occur in the facility. The potential consequences and likelihood of these accidents are analyzed and described. Using the process and criteria described in DOE-STD-3009-94, safety-related structures, systems and components are identified, and the important safety functions of each SSC are described. Additionally, information which describes the safety management programs at SNL are described in ancillary chapters of the SAR.

  12. Hot Cell Facility (HCF) Safety Analysis Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Safety Analysis Report (SAR) is prepared in compliance with the requirements of DOE Order 5480.23, Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports, and has been written to the format and content guide of DOE-STD-3009-94 Preparation Guide for U. S. Department of Energy Nonreactor Nuclear Safety Analysis Reports. The Hot Cell Facility is a Hazard Category 2 nonreactor nuclear facility, and is operated by Sandia National Laboratories for the Department of Energy. This SAR provides a description of the HCF and its operations, an assessment of the hazards and potential accidents which may occur in the facility. The potential consequences and likelihood of these accidents are analyzed and described. Using the process and criteria described in DOE-STD-3009-94, safety-related structures, systems and components are identified, and the important safety functions of each SSC are described. Additionally, information which describes the safety management programs at SNL are described in ancillary chapters of the SAR

  13. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main activities described in the 4th periodic report on the decommissioning of the hot cell facility at Risoe National Laboratory are the start of the transfer of the last fissile material, the removal of a large amount of highly contaminated material, the reclassification of a minor ''red'' contaminated area to ''blue'', and a minor ''blue'' contaminated area to a clean area, and a survey of the contamination and radiation levels on the shutters and the shutter housings. The main contaminant was Cs137, and the highest level of contamination was found on top of the shutters. The contamination levels appeared to be rather scattered. Work was begun on collecting information on the condition of the concrete cell line. Tables illustrate the contamination on shutters and shutter housings, and β/γ maximum dose rates on the inner surface of the shutter housings. A diagram illustrates the location of smear tests on the shutter arrangement, and ''three-dimensional'' graphs illustrate the suppressed maximum values of the shutter contamination. A plan of the hot cell facility at floor level is also given. A collective dose of 6 man-mSv was ascribed to 10 persons in the first half of 1992, arising mainly from work on the shielded storage facility and handling of wastes. (AB)

  14. Near infrared testbed sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, R. B.; McCalmont, J. F.; Montgomery, J. B.; Johnson, R. S.; McDermott, D. J.

    2007-04-01

    A new tactical airborne multicolor missile warning testbed was developed and fielded as part of an Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) initiative focusing on clutter and missile signature measurements for algorithm development. Multicolor discrimination is one of the most effective ways of improving the performance of infrared missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. Its utility has been demonstrated in multiple fielded sensors. Traditionally, multicolor discrimination has been performed in the mid-infrared, 3-5 μm band, where the molecular emission of CO and CO2 characteristic of a combustion process is readily distinguished from the continuum of a black body radiator. Current infrared warning sensor development is focused on near infrared (NIR) staring mosaic detector arrays that provide similar spectral discrimination in different bands to provide a cost effective and mechanically simpler system. This, in turn, has required that multicolor clutter data be collected for both analysis and algorithm development. The developed sensor test bed is a multi-camera system 1004x1004 FPA coupled with optimized filters integrated with the optics. The collection portion includes a ruggedized field-programmable gate array processor coupled with with an integrated controller/tracker and fast disk array capable of real-time processing and collection of up to 60 full frames per second. This configuration allowed the collection and real-time processing of temporally correlated, radiometrically calibrated data in multiple spectral bands that was then compared to background and target imagery taken previously

  15. NASA Robotic Neurosurgery Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mah, Robert

    1997-01-01

    The detection of tissue interface (e.g., normal tissue, cancer, tumor) has been limited clinically to tactile feedback, temperature monitoring, and the use of a miniature ultrasound probe for tissue differentiation during surgical operations, In neurosurgery, the needle used in the standard stereotactic CT or MRI guided brain biopsy provides no information about the tissue being sampled. The tissue sampled depends entirely upon the accuracy with which the localization provided by the preoperative CT or MRI scan is translated to the intracranial biopsy site. In addition, no information about the tissue being traversed by the needle (e.g., a blood vessel) is provided. Hemorrhage due to the biopsy needle tearing a blood vessel within the brain is the most devastating complication of stereotactic CT/MRI guided brain biopsy. A robotic neurosurgery testbed has been developed at NASA Ames Research Center as a spin-off of technologies from space, aeronautics and medical programs. The invention entitled "Robotic Neurosurgery Leading to Multimodality Devices for Tissue Identification" is nearing a state ready for commercialization. The devices will: 1) improve diagnostic accuracy and precision of general surgery, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, 2) automate tissue identification, with near term emphasis on stereotactic brain biopsy, to permit remote control of the procedure, and 3) reduce morbidity for stereotactic brain biopsy. The commercial impact from this work is the potential development of a whole new generation of smart surgical tools to increase the safety, accuracy and efficiency of surgical procedures. Other potential markets include smart surgical tools for tumor ablation in neurosurgery, general exploratory surgery, prostate cancer surgery, and breast cancer surgery.

  16. New facilities of the ECN hot cell laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A description is given of two recent expansions of the ECN Hot Cell Laboratory in Petten; a production facility for molybdenum-99 and an actinide laboratory, a special facility to investigate unirradiated alpha- and beta-active samples. (orig.)

  17. Framework Architecture for WLAN Testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Jansang, Aphirak

    2011-01-01

    There has been a tremendous effort in improving wireless LAN for supporting the demanding multimedia application. Many new protocols or ideas have been proposed and proved by using a mathematical model or running a simulation program. That is satisfactory but these proposed designs might not work in the real world situation. Testbed is an option to alleviate this gap and present the opportunity to see the real problem and ensure that the design works. A framework architecture for building a testbed to test a new concept or design is presented in this paper. The framework is designed in the modularity style in such a way that can be easily exchanged or modified. A testbed based on the framework that implements the polling based mechanism has been created and the results have shown that the QoS of the real time traffic can be maintained in the presence of the high non-real time traffic.

  18. Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anken, Craig S.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Artificial Intelligence Technology Testbed (AAITT) is a laboratory testbed for the design, analysis, integration, evaluation, and exercising of large-scale, complex, software systems, composed of both knowledge-based and conventional components. The AAITT assists its users in the following ways: configuring various problem-solving application suites; observing and measuring the behavior of these applications and the interactions between their constituent modules; gathering and analyzing statistics about the occurrence of key events; and flexibly and quickly altering the interaction of modules within the applications for further study.

  19. Environment Emulation For Wsn Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosław Kapłoniak

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of applications for wireless sensor networks is a challenging task. For this reason, several testbed platforms have been created. They simplify the manageability of nodes by offering easy ways of programming and debugging sensor nodes. These platforms, sometimes composed of dozens of sensors, provide a convenient way for carrying out research on medium access control and data exchange between nodes. In this article, we propose the extension of the WSN testbed, which could be used for evaluating and testing the functionality of sensor networks applications by emulating a real-world environment.

  20. A Turbine-powered UAV Controls Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Mark A.; High, James W.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.; Chambers, Ryan S.; Howard, Keith D.

    2007-01-01

    The latest version of the NASA Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) integrates commercial-off-the-shelf components including airframe, autopilot, and a small turbine engine to provide a low cost experimental flight controls testbed capable of sustained speeds up to 200 mph. The series of flight tests leading up to the demonstrated performance of the vehicle in sustained, autopiloted 200 mph flight at NASA Wallops Flight Facility's UAV runway in August 2006 will be described. Earlier versions of the FLiC were based on a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate at Fort Eustis, Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. The newer turbine powered platform (J-FLiC) builds on the successes using the relatively smaller, slower and less expensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches with the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers. Tracking video was taken during the test flights at Wallops and will be available for presentation at the conference. Analysis of flight data from both remotely piloted and autopiloted flights will be presented. Candidate experimental controllers for implementation will be discussed. It is anticipated that flight testing will resume in Spring 2007 and those results will be included, if possible.

  1. Human Centered Autonomous and Assistant Systems Testbed for Exploration Operations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malin, Jane T.; Mount, Frances; Carreon, Patricia; Torney, Susan E.

    2001-01-01

    The Engineering and Mission Operations Directorates at NASA Johnson Space Center are combining laboratories and expertise to establish the Human Centered Autonomous and Assistant Systems Testbed for Exploration Operations. This is a testbed for human centered design, development and evaluation of intelligent autonomous and assistant systems that will be needed for human exploration and development of space. This project will improve human-centered analysis, design and evaluation methods for developing intelligent software. This software will support human-machine cognitive and collaborative activities in future interplanetary work environments where distributed computer and human agents cooperate. We are developing and evaluating prototype intelligent systems for distributed multi-agent mixed-initiative operations. The primary target domain is control of life support systems in a planetary base. Technical approaches will be evaluated for use during extended manned tests in the target domain, the Bioregenerative Advanced Life Support Systems Test Complex (BIO-Plex). A spinoff target domain is the International Space Station (ISS) Mission Control Center (MCC). Prodl}cts of this project include human-centered intelligent software technology, innovative human interface designs, and human-centered software development processes, methods and products. The testbed uses adjustable autonomy software and life support systems simulation models from the Adjustable Autonomy Testbed, to represent operations on the remote planet. Ground operations prototypes and concepts will be evaluated in the Exploration Planning and Operations Center (ExPOC) and Jupiter Facility.

  2. High-contrast imaging testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Baker, K; Silva, D; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Bauman, B; Palmer, D; Remington, T; Delgadillo-Lariz, M

    2008-01-23

    Several high-contrast imaging systems are currently under construction to enable the detection of extra-solar planets. In order for these systems to achieve their objectives, however, there is considerable developmental work and testing which must take place. Given the need to perform these tests, a spatially-filtered Shack-Hartmann adaptive optics system has been assembled to evaluate new algorithms and hardware configurations which will be implemented in these future high-contrast imaging systems. In this article, construction and phase measurements of a membrane 'woofer' mirror are presented. In addition, results from closed-loop operation of the assembled testbed with static phase plates are presented. The testbed is currently being upgraded to enable operation at speeds approaching 500 hz and to enable studies of the interactions between the woofer and tweeter deformable mirrors.

  3. Upgrades of Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory hot cell facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Hanford Engineering Development Laboratory operates the 327 Postirradiation Testing Laboratory (PITL) and the 324 Shielded Materials Facility (SMF). These hot cell facilities provide diverse capabilities for the postirradiation examination and testing of irradiated reactor fuels and materials. The primary function of these facilities is to determine failure mechanisms and effects of irradiation on physical and mechanical properties of reactor components. The purpose of this paper is to review major equipment and facility upgrades that enhance customer satisfaction and broaden the engineering capabilities for more diversified programs. These facility and system upgrades are providing higher quality remote nondestructive and destructive examination services with increased productivity, operator comfort, and customer satisfaction

  4. A remote integrated testbed for cooperating objects

    CERN Document Server

    Dios, Jose Ramiro Martinez-de; Bernabe, Alberto de San; Ollero, Anibal

    2013-01-01

    Testbeds are gaining increasing relevance in research domains and also in industrial applications. However, very few books devoted to testbeds have been published. To the best of my knowledge no book on this topic has been published. This book is particularly interesting for the growing community of testbed developers. I believe the book is also very interesting for researchers in robot-WSN cooperation.This book provides detailed description of a system that can be considered the first testbed that allows full peer-to-peer interoperability between heterogeneous robots and ubiquitous systems su

  5. NASA's telemedicine testbeds: Commercial benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doarn, Charles R.; Whitten, Raymond

    1998-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has been developing and applying telemedicine to support space flight since the Agency's beginning. Telemetry of physiological parameters from spacecraft to ground controllers is critical to assess the health status of humans in extreme and remote environments. Requisite systems to support medical care and maintain readiness will evolve as mission duration and complexity increase. Developing appropriate protocols and procedures to support multinational, multicultural missions is a key objective of this activity. NASA has created an Agency-wide strategic plan that focuses on the development and integration of technology into the health care delivery systems for space flight to meet these challenges. In order to evaluate technology and systems that can enhance inflight medical care and medical education, NASA has established and conducted several testbeds. Additionally, in June of 1997, NASA established a Commercial Space Center (CSC) for Medical Informatics and Technology Applications at Yale University School of Medicine. These testbeds and the CSC foster the leveraging of technology and resources between government, academia and industry to enhance health care. This commercial endeavor will influence both the delivery of health care in space and on the ground. To date, NASA's activities in telemedicine have provided new ideas in the application of telecommunications and information systems to health care. NASA's Spacebridge to Russia, an Internet-based telemedicine testbed, is one example of how telemedicine and medical education can be conducted using the Internet and its associated tools. Other NASA activities, including the development of a portable telemedicine workstation, which has been demonstrated on the Crow Indian Reservation and in the Texas Prison System, show promise in serving as significant adjuncts to the delivery of health care. As NASA continues to meet the challenges of space flight, the

  6. Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility (CTC-REF) to enable radiobiologists to investigate the real-time radiation effects on...

  7. Refurbishment of an Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell (ALHC) Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) was in service for nearly thirty years. In order to comply with DOE regulations governing such facilities and meet ANL-W programmatic requirements, a major refurbishment effort was undertaken. To place the facility in compliance with current regulations, all penetrations within the facility were sealed, the ventilation system was redesigned, upgraded and replaced, the master-slave manipulators were replaced, the hot cell windows were removed, refurbished, and reinstalled, all hot cell utilities were replaced, a lead-shielded glovebox housing an Inductive Coupled Plasma - Atomic Emission Spectrometer (ICP-AES) System was interfaced with the hot cells, and a new CO2 fire suppression system and other ALHC support equipment were installed

  8. Ames life science telescience testbed evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haines, Richard F.; Johnson, Vicki; Vogelsong, Kristofer H.; Froloff, Walt

    1989-01-01

    Eight surrogate spaceflight mission specialists participated in a real-time evaluation of remote coaching using the Ames Life Science Telescience Testbed facility. This facility consisted of three remotely located nodes: (1) a prototype Space Station glovebox; (2) a ground control station; and (3) a principal investigator's (PI) work area. The major objective of this project was to evaluate the effectiveness of telescience techniques and hardware to support three realistic remote coaching science procedures: plant seed germinator charging, plant sample acquisition and preservation, and remote plant observation with ground coaching. Each scenario was performed by a subject acting as flight mission specialist, interacting with a payload operations manager and a principal investigator expert. All three groups were physically isolated from each other yet linked by duplex audio and color video communication channels and networked computer workstations. Workload ratings were made by the flight and ground crewpersons immediately after completing their assigned tasks. Time to complete each scientific procedural step was recorded automatically. Two expert observers also made performance ratings and various error assessments. The results are presented and discussed.

  9. A Test-Bed for Emergency Management Simulations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anu Vaidyanathan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract— We present a test-bed for Emergency ManagementSimulations by contrasting two prototypes we have built, CAVIARand Reverse 111. We outline the desirable design principles thatguide our choices for simulating emergencies and implement theseideas in a modular system, which utilizes proactive crowd-sourcingto enable emergency response centers to contact civilians co-locatedwith an emergency, to provide more information about the events.This aspect of proactive crowd-sourcing enables Emergencyresponse centers to take into account that an emergency situation’sinherent nature is dynamic and that initial assumptions whiledeploying resources to the emergency may not hold, as theemergency unfolds. A number of independent entities,governmental and non-governmental are known to interact whilemitigating emergencies. Our test-bed utilizes a number of agents tosimulate various resource sharing policies amongst differentadministrative domains and non-profit civilian organizations thatmight pool their resources at the time of an emergency. A commonproblem amongst first responders is the lack of interoperabilityamongst their devices. In our test-bed, we integrate live caller dataobtained from traces generated by Telecom New Zealand, whichtracks cell-phone users and their voice and data calls across thenetwork, to identify co-located crowds. The test-bed has fiveimportant components including means to select and simulateEvents, Resources and Crowds and additionally provide a visualinterface as part of a massive online multi-player game to simulateEmergencies in any part of the world. We also present our initialevaluation of some resource sharing policies in our intelligentagents, which are part of our test-bed.

  10. Overview of hot cell facilities in South Africa

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot facilities were developed at the South African Nuclear Energy Corporation (Necsa) as part of its former PWR fuel development and reactor surveillance programme. Specific technical results are highlighted. At present the hot cells are employed in medical and industrial isotope production. The current leading role being taken in PBMR development in South Africa necessitates planning for a new national hot cell facility tailored to the needs of High Temperature Reactor development programmes. Although terminated before full implementation, the PWR post-irradiation examination programme at Necsa managed to provide a good overall picture of locally produced PWR fuel behaviour through the judicious application of NDE and DE techniques. Confidence in the results obtained is high due to thorough preparatory literature studies and the quality processes implemented. In all, very few surprises came to the fore, rather points of interest for further investigation. Highly productive use could be made of the hot cell facilities developed for PIE by converting it to a radioisotope production facility. Now, at the dawn of the nuclear energy renaissance, the expertise base in hot cell facility construction and operation at Necsa will facilitate the development of Hot Cell Facilities for a new generation of reactors. (authors)

  11. Decommissioning of the Risoe Hot Cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A concise description of the current status of the decommissioning of the hot cell capacity at Risoe National Laboratory is given in this 6th periodic report covering January 1st to June 30th, 1993. All registered and safeguarded fissile material has been removed and the task of cutting and packing scrap material and experimental equipment from the concrete cell line has been completed. Concrete cells 5 and 6 have been finally cleaned and the master slave manipulators removed from them. The major part of the contamination on the shutters and shutter houses were on their horizontal planes and the main contaminant was 137Cs. Here the surfaces were cleaned by wiping with wet cloths. The method is described. Tables illustrating the resulting contamination levels are included, the density is now low on the shutters. The method of final inn-cell cleaning is explained, and here again tables represent the resulting contamination levels. The work on ''hot spot'' removal and remote cleaning by vacuuming continues on the remaining cells. A collective dose of ca. 16.3 man-mSv was ascribed to 18 persons in the first half of 1993, arising mainly from in-cell work and waste handling. To sum up, the main results from this period are successful removal of last waste from the cells, remote cleaning of cells 2 and 3, final condition for all shutters and shutter housings and final condition for cells 5 and 6. Tables illustrate measured dose rates in detail. (AB)

  12. Testbed for an autonomous system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikshit, Piyush; Guimaraes, Katia; Ramamurthy, Maya; Agrawala, Ashok K.; Larsen, Ronald L.

    1989-01-01

    In previous works we have defined a general architectural model for autonomous systems, which can easily be mapped to describe the functions of any automated system (SDAG-86-01), and we illustrated that model by applying it to the thermal management system of a space station (SDAG-87-01). In this note, we will further develop that application and design the detail of the implementation of such a model. First we present the environment of our application by describing the thermal management problem and an abstraction, which was called TESTBED, that includes a specific function for each module in the architecture, and the nature of the interfaces between each pair of blocks.

  13. Development of Liquid Propulsion Systems Testbed at MSFC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alexander, Reginald; Nelson, Graham

    2016-01-01

    As NASA, the Department of Defense and the aerospace industry in general strive to develop capabilities to explore near-Earth, Cis-lunar and deep space, the need to create more cost effective techniques of propulsion system design, manufacturing and test is imperative in the current budget constrained environment. The physics of space exploration have not changed, but the manner in which systems are developed and certified needs to change if there is going to be any hope of designing and building the high performance liquid propulsion systems necessary to deliver crew and cargo to the further reaches of space. To further the objective of developing these systems, the Marshall Space Flight Center is currently in the process of formulating a Liquid Propulsion Systems testbed, which will enable rapid integration of components to be tested and assessed for performance in integrated systems. The manifestation of this testbed is a breadboard engine configuration (BBE) with facility support for consumables and/or other components as needed. The goal of the facility is to test NASA developed elements, but can be used to test articles developed by other government agencies, industry or academia. Joint government/private partnership is likely the approach that will be required to enable efficient propulsion system development. MSFC has recently tested its own additively manufactured liquid hydrogen pump, injector, and valves in a BBE hot firing. It is rapidly building toward testing the pump and a new CH4 injector in the BBE configuration to demonstrate a 22,000 lbf, pump-fed LO2/LCH4 engine for the Mars lander or in-space transportation. The value of having this BBE testbed is that as components are developed they may be easily integrated in the testbed and tested. MSFC is striving to enhance its liquid propulsion system development capability. Rapid design, analysis, build and test will be critical to fielding the next high thrust rocket engine. With the maturity of the

  14. Current status of JAERI Tokai hot cell facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    JAERI has 4 hot cell facilities in order to examine high radioactive materials. Three of them, the Research Hot Laboratory, the Reactor Fuel Examination Facility and the Waste Safety Testing Facility are located in the JAERI Tokai site, and the rest is the JMTR Hot Laboratory in the Oarai site. The Research Hot Laboratory (RHL) was constructed for post-irradiation examination (PIE), especially nuclear related basic research experiment, such as metallurgical, chemical and mechanical examination on fuels and materials irradiated in research and test reactors. This facility has 10 large dimension concrete and 38 lead cells. At present the RHL is used for various kinds of examinations of high radioactive samples such as fuels of research and test reactors, power reactors and high temperature testing reactor (HTTR), and structural materials. The Reactor Fuel Examination Facility (RFEF) was designed and constructed for carrying out PIE of irradiated full-size fuel assemblies of light water reactors (LWRs). This facility has a storage pool, 8 concrete and 5 lead cells. They are currently used for safety evaluation on high burnup and advanced lWR fuels as part of the national program. The Waste Safety Testing Facility (WASTEF) was designed and constructed for safety research on long-term storage and disposal of high level radioactive wastes, generated by fuel reprocessing. The WASTEF has 5 concrete cells and 1 lead cell. Examinations on the behavior of various long-lived fission products in a glass form and in a canister and, releasing behavior of them out of a canister are carrying out under the condition at storage. (author)

  15. Distributed computing testbed for a remote experimental environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Collaboration is increasing as physics research becomes concentrated on a few large, expensive facilities, particularly in magnetic fusion energy research, with national and international participation. These facilities are designed for steady state operation and interactive, real-time experimentation. We are developing tools to provide for the establishment of geographically distant centers for interactive operations; such centers would allow scientists to participate in experiments from their home institutions. A testbed is being developed for a Remote Experimental Environment (REE), a ''Collaboratory.'' The testbed will be used to evaluate the ability of a remotely located group of scientists to conduct research on the DIII-D Tokamak at General Atomics. The REE will serve as a testing environment for advanced control and collaboration concepts applicable to future experiments. Process-to-process communications over high speed wide area networks provide real-time synchronization and exchange of data among multiple computer networks, while the ability to conduct research is enhanced by adding audio/video communication capabilities. The Open Software Foundation's Distributed Computing Environment is being used to test concepts in distributed control, security, naming, remote procedure calls and distributed file access using the Distributed File Services. We are exploring the technology and sociology of remotely participating in the operation of a large scale experimental facility

  16. Introduction of hot cell facility in research center Rez - Poster

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This poster presents the hot cell facility which is being constructed as part of the SUSEN project at the Rez research center (Czech Republic). Within this project a new complex of 10 hot cells and one semi-hot cell will be built. There will be 8 gamma hot cells and 2 alpha hot cells. In each hot cell a hermetic, removable box made of stainless steel will home different type of devices. The hot cells and semi hot cell will be equipped with devices for processing samples (cutting, welding, drilling, machining) as well as equipment for testing (sample preparation area, stress testing machine, fatigue machine, electromechanical creep machine, high frequency resonance pulsator...) and equipment for studying material microstructure (nano-indenter with nano-scratch tester and scanning electron microscope). An autoclave with water loop, installed in a cell will allow mechanical testing in control environment of water, pressure and temperature. A scheme shows the equipment of each cell. This hot laboratory will be able to cover all the process to study radioactive materials: receiving the material, the preparation of the samples, mechanical testing and microstructure observation. Our hot cells will be close to the research nuclear reactor LVR-15 and new irradiation facility (high irradiation by cobalt source) is planned to be built within the SUSEN project

  17. Mars Sample Transfer Testbed (MSTT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The task will assess the requirements for a testbed to study the retrieval of a Mars sample cache from the Martian surface, or from a Mars caching rover, and...

  18. Habitat Testbed (HaT) Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Goals of the DSH Testbed include:Function as a habitat systems integrator and technology pull across many domainsDevelop and integrate software-based models of...

  19. Versatile Electric Propulsion Aircraft Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — An all-electric aircraft testbed is proposed to provide a dedicated development environment for the rigorous study and advancement of electrically powered aircraft....

  20. Software defined networking for community network testbeds

    OpenAIRE

    Dimogerontakis, Emmanouil; Vilalta, Ivan; Navarro Moldes, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Community Networks have received increasing attention the latest years. In an effort to set the cornerstone for an internet without central authorities and monopolies, network engineers throughout the world have started creating community networks. To enhance this effort, Community-lab, a wireless community networks testbed, was created which allows researchers to experiment with new protocols and applications in a realistic environment. Nevertheless, this testbed does not offer the ...

  1. Daidalos Framework for Successful Testbed Integration

    OpenAIRE

    Ponce de Leon, Miguel; Cleary, Frances; GARCÍA MORENO, Marta; ROMERO VICENTE, Antonio; Roddy, Mark; Jedrzejek, Czeslaw

    2007-01-01

    Daidalos Testbed integration framework required detailed planning and implementation, constantly adapting to the demanding changes of a research project as it advances from development phase to integration phase. This paper describes the various integration and validaton efforts required to deploy an operational Daidalos Testbed infrastructure, demonstrating the effort required to achieve a successful overall integration process. With such a large scale project as Daidalos with a consort...

  2. Analytical chemistry in a new analytical hot cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Remote Analytical Laboratory is a new facility at the Idaho Chemical Processing Plant designed to handle samples from the processing of spent nuclear fuel. It consists of a cold laboratory for analyzing process make-up samples, a warm laboratory for analyzing low-level (<100 mR/h) radioactive samples, and a hot cell for analyzing high-level radioactive samples. The hot cell is built in an L shape and contains six work stations, each equipped with a viewing window and two master/slave manipulators. The cell interfaces with a waste handling cell and maintenance area on one end and a glove box complex that interfaces with the warm laboratory on the other end. This paper discusses the remote analytical techniques and equipment developed for use in this facility

  3. The CMS integration grid testbed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distribution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuous two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. In this paper, we describe the process that led to one of the world's first continuously available, functioning grids

  4. The CMS integration grid testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Graham, Gregory E.

    2004-08-26

    The CMS Integration Grid Testbed (IGT) comprises USCMS Tier-1 and Tier-2 hardware at the following sites: the California Institute of Technology, Fermi National Accelerator Laboratory, the University of California at San Diego, and the University of Florida at Gainesville. The IGT runs jobs using the Globus Toolkit with a DAGMan and Condor-G front end. The virtual organization (VO) is managed using VO management scripts from the European Data Grid (EDG). Gridwide monitoring is accomplished using local tools such as Ganglia interfaced into the Globus Metadata Directory Service (MDS) and the agent based Mona Lisa. Domain specific software is packaged and installed using the Distribution After Release (DAR) tool of CMS, while middleware under the auspices of the Virtual Data Toolkit (VDT) is distributed using Pacman. During a continuous two month span in Fall of 2002, over 1 million official CMS GEANT based Monte Carlo events were generated and returned to CERN for analysis while being demonstrated at SC2002. In this paper, we describe the process that led to one of the world's first continuously available, functioning grids.

  5. Decontamination of an Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An Analytical Laboratory Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) had been in service for nearly thirty years. In order to comply with current DOE regulations governing such facilities and meet programmatic requirements, a major refurbishment effort was mandated. Due to the high levels of radiation and contamination within the cells, a decontamination effort was necessary to provide an environment that permitted workers to enter the cells to perform refurbishment activities without receiving high doses of radiation and to minimize the potential for the spread of contamination. State-of-the-art decontamination methods, as well as time-proven methods were utilized to minimize personnel exposure as well as maximize results

  6. SPHERES tethered formation flight testbed: advancements in enabling NASA's SPECS mission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chung, Soon-Jo; Adams, Danielle; Saenz-Otero, Alvar; Kong, Edmund; Miller, David W.; Leisawitz, David; Lorenzini, Enrico; Sell, Steve

    2006-06-01

    This paper reports on efforts to control a tethered formation flight spacecraft array for NASA's SPECS mission using the SPHERES test-bed developed by the MIT Space Systems Laboratory. Specifically, advances in methodology and experimental results realized since the 2005 SPIE paper are emphasized. These include a new test-bed setup with a reaction wheel assembly, a novel relative attitude measurement system using force torque sensors, and modeling of non-ideal tethers to account for tether vibration modes. The nonlinear equations of motion of multi-vehicle tethered spacecraft with elastic flexible tethers are derived from Lagrange's equations. The controllability analysis indicates that both array resizing and spin-up are fully controllable by the reaction wheels and the tether motor, thereby saving thruster fuel consumption. Based upon this analysis, linear and nonlinear controllers have been successfully implemented on the tethered SPHERES testbed, and tested at the NASA MSFC's flat floor facility using two and three SPHERES configurations.

  7. The DataTAG transatlantic testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Martin, O; Martin-Flatin, J P; Moroni, P; Nae, D; Newman, H; Ravot, S

    2005-01-01

    Wide area network testbeds allow researchers and engineers to test out new equipment, protocols and services in real-life situations, without jeopardizing the stability and reliability of production networks. The Data TransAtlantic Grid (DataTAG) testbed, deployed in 2002 between CERN, Geneva, Switzerland and StarLight, Chicago, IL, USA, is probably the largest testbed built to date. Jointly managed by CERN and Caltech, it is funded by the European Commission, the U.S. Department of Energy and the U.S. National Science Foundation. The main objectives of this testbed are to improve the Grid community's understanding of the networking issues posed by data- intensive Grid applications over transoceanic gigabit networks, design and develop new Grid middleware services, and improve the interoperability of European and U.S. Grid applications in High- Energy and Nuclear Physics. In this paper, we give an overview of this testbed, describe its various topologies over time, and summarize the main lessons learned after...

  8. The Planets Testbed: Science for Digital Preservation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seamus Ross

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available The preservation of digital objects requires specific software tools or services. These can be characterisation tools that abstract the essential characteristics of a digital object from a file, migration tools that convert digital objects to different formats, or emulation tools that render digital objects in their original context on a new infrastructure. Until recently digital preservation has been characterised by practices and processes that could best be described as more art and craft than science. The Planets Testbed provides a controlled environment where preservation tools can be tested and evaluated, and where experiment results can be empirically compared. This paper presents an overview of the Testbed application, an analysis of the experiment methodology and a description of the Testbed's web service approach.

  9. Introduction of hot cell facility in research center Rez

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the paper is to present the hot cell facility which is being constructed as part of the project SUSEN at the Rez research center (Czech Republic). The Sustainable Energy Project (SUSEN) is implemented as a regional Research/Development center in Priority Axis 2 and its objective is to act as a relevant research partner for cooperation with other European research centers. The project is fully funded by the European Union. Within this project a new complex of 10 hot cells and one semi-hot cell will be built. There will be 8 gamma hot cells and 2 alpha hot cells. In each hot cell a hermetic, removable box made of stainless steel will home different type of devices. The hot cells and semi hot cell will be equipped with devices for processing samples (cutting, welding, drilling, machining) as well as equipment for testing (sample preparation area, stress testing machine, fatigue machine, electromechanical creep machine, high frequency resonance pulsator...) and equipment for studying material microstructure (micro-hardness and nano-hardness probes, scanning electron microscope). An autoclave with water loop, installed in a cell will allow mechanical testing in control environment of water, pressure and temperature. The transportation system for samples and materials is based on a mobile cask with an airtight connection and vertical access. The installation is designed to work with an activity level up to 300 TBq and to receive materials from decommissioned power reactors as well as highly irradiated materials for fusion applications

  10. Development of a Tethered Formation Flight Testbed for ISS Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The development of a testbed for the development and demonstration of technologies needed by tethered formation flying satellites is proposed. Such a testbed would...

  11. Digital libraries: A testbed for multimedia technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHUANG Yue-ting

    2005-01-01

    A distinguishing feature of a digital library is that it has Terabyte volumes of multimedia resources. One challenge for researchers in the field of multimedia is to find a testbed for showing the potentials of multimedia technologies such as video summarization, semantic annotation, multimedia cross indexing and retrieval, and etc. Deeper research and wider applications of digital libraries revealed their indispensable role as testbed for multimedia technologies. This paper presents challenging issues of some key techniques used in digital libraries and their specific needs for multimedia technologies.

  12. ACS air bearing test-bed design

    OpenAIRE

    Glitt, Sascha

    2010-01-01

    This thesis is about the construction and design of a new air bearing test-bed to verify the programmed ACS attitude control algorithm and to validate the ACS MATLAB/SimuLink¬ model of NPSAT1, the second small satellite currently under development at the Naval Postgraduate School Space Systems Academic Group. The software was already verified and validated using a comparable air bearing test-bed. But due to changes in hardware from commercial magnetic torque rods to custom, NPS-built, magneti...

  13. CLOSEOUT REPORT FOR HYBRID SULFUR PRESSURIZED BUTTON CELL TEST FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steeper, T.

    2010-09-15

    This document is the Close-Out Report for design and partial fabrication of the Pressurized Button Cell Test Facility at Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL). This facility was planned to help develop the sulfur dioxide depolarized electrolyzer (SDE) that is a key component of the Hybrid Sulfur Cycle for generating hydrogen. The purpose of this report is to provide as much information as possible in case the decision is made to resume research. This report satisfies DOE Milestone M3GSR10VH030107.0. The HyS Cycle is a hybrid thermochemical cycle that may be used in conjunction with advanced nuclear reactors or centralized solar receivers to produce hydrogen by watersplitting. The HyS Cycle utilizes the high temperature (>800 C) thermal decomposition of sulfuric acid to produce oxygen and regenerate sulfur dioxide. The unique aspect of HyS is the generation of hydrogen in a water electrolyzer that is operated under conditions where dissolved sulfur dioxide depolarizes the anodic reaction, resulting in substantial voltage reduction. Low cell voltage is essential for both high thermodynamic efficiency and low hydrogen cost. Sulfur dioxide is oxidized at the anode, producing sulfuric acid that is sent to the high temperature acid decomposition portion of the cycle. Sulfur dioxide from the decomposer is cycled back to electrolyzers. The electrolyzer cell uses the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) concept. Anode and cathode are formed by spraying a catalyst, typically platinized carbon, on both sides of a Proton Exchange Membrane (PEM). SRNL has been testing SDEs for several years including an atmospheric pressure Button Cell electrolyzer (2 cm{sup 2} active area) and an elevated temperature/pressure Single Cell electrolyzer (54.8 cm{sup 2} active area). SRNL tested 37 MEAs in the Single Cell electrolyzer facility from June 2005 until June 2009, when funding was discontinued. An important result of the final months of testing was the development of a method that

  14. Construction of examination cell in fuel monitoring facility (FMF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many research and development programs for fast breeder reactors are in progress by Power Reactor and Nuclear Fuel Development Corporation with the cooperation from many establishments in Japan. One of which, Fuel Monitoring Facility, is now under construction next to Joyo at Oarai Engineering Center. The quantity of radioactive materials to be processed will be as much as that of HFEF in US and ADAC in France. Therefore advanced knowhow was required through basic planning, precise designing and construction stages. The specification of FMF building is as follows, (i) structure: reinforced concrete type with four stories and two basements, (ii) building area: 1,920.01m2, (iii) floor area: 7,617.72m2. The functional features of the facility are as follows; (1) storage of fuel assembly, (2) removing of sodium from fuel assembly, (3) outer view and dimensional inspection, (4) weighing of fuel assembly, (5) dismembering of fuel assembly, (6) weighing of fuel pin, (7) outer view and dimensional inspection of fuel pin, (8) gamma scanning of fuel pin, (9) pacture test of fuel pin, (10) cutting off of fuel pin, (11) dismeating of fuel pin, (12) storage of cut-off pins. These functional sequences are processed in a test cell, and decontaminating cell, clean cell, hot repairing cell and contact-repairing cell are arranged around it. This facility is to be operated with consideration of safe handling of plutonium, maximum radioactivity of 1,000,000 curies and carry-over of sodium contaminating fuel pins. Now final construction is in progress, and reliable operation will be commenced in very near future. (Iwase, T.)

  15. Multi-agent testbed for distributed space systems

    OpenAIRE

    Osuman, A.; Guo, J.; Gill, E.K.A.

    2010-01-01

    Several industries are involved in the development of distributed systems, testbeds are needed to simulate the real world challenges that face the distributed systems. Presently, there are a number of testbeds in the world with very distinctive characteristics. Delft University of Technology is involved in the development of distributed space systems, a testbed will be build to aid this development. It is required that the robots in this testbed imitate a miniature spacecraft as closely as po...

  16. SCaN Testbed Software Development and Lessons Learned

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kacpura, Thomas J.; Varga, Denise M.

    2012-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) has developed an on-orbit, adaptable, Software Defined Radio (SDR)Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS)-based testbed facility to conduct a suite of experiments to advance technologies, reduce risk, and enable future mission capabilities on the International Space Station (ISS). The SCAN Testbed Project will provide NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop and field communications, navigation, and networking technologies in the laboratory and space environment based on reconfigurable, SDR platforms and the STRS Architecture.The SDRs are a new technology for NASA, and the support infrastructure they require is different from legacy, fixed function radios. SDRs offer the ability to reconfigure on-orbit communications by changing software for new waveforms and operating systems to enable new capabilities or fix any anomalies, which was not a previous option. They are not stand alone devices, but required a new approach to effectively control them and flow data. This requires extensive software to be developed to utilize the full potential of these reconfigurable platforms. The paper focuses on development, integration and testing as related to the avionics processor system, and the software required to command, control, monitor, and interact with the SDRs, as well as the other communication payload elements. An extensive effort was required to develop the flight software and meet the NASA requirements for software quality and safety. The flight avionics must be radiation tolerant, and these processors have limited capability in comparison to terrestrial counterparts. A big challenge was that there are three SDRs onboard, and interfacing with multiple SDRs simultaneously complicatesd the effort. The effort also includes ground software, which is a key element for both the command of the payload, and displaying data created by the payload. The verification of

  17. The design and implementation of the LLNL gigabit testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Garcia, D. [Lawrence Livermore National Labs., CA (United States)

    1994-12-01

    This paper will look at the design and implementation of the LLNL Gigabit testbed (LGTB), where various high speed networking products, can be tested in one environment. The paper will discuss the philosophy behind the design of and the need for the testbed, the tests that are performed in the testbed, and the tools used to implement those tests.

  18. A Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srivastava, S.; Sukumar, V.; Bhasin, P. S.; Arun Kumar, D.

    2011-01-01

    This paper presents a novel scheme called "Laboratory Testbed for Embedded Fuzzy Control of a Real Time Nonlinear System." The idea is based upon the fact that project-based learning motivates students to learn actively and to use their engineering skills acquired in their previous years of study. It also fosters initiative and focuses students'…

  19. Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alena, Richard; Liu, Yuan-Kwei; Goforth, Andre; Fernquist, Alan R.

    1993-01-01

    Attention is given to current activities in the Embedded Data Processor and Portable Computer Technology testbed configurations that are part of the Advanced Data Systems Architectures Testbed at the Information Sciences Division at NASA Ames Research Center. The Embedded Data Processor Testbed evaluates advanced microprocessors for potential use in mission and payload applications within the Space Station Freedom Program. The Portable Computer Technology (PCT) Testbed integrates and demonstrates advanced portable computing devices and data system architectures. The PCT Testbed uses both commercial and custom-developed devices to demonstrate the feasibility of functional expansion and networking for portable computers in flight missions.

  20. Cognitive Optical Network Testbed: EU Project CHRON

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Borkowski, Robert; Duran, Ramon J.; Kachris, Christoforos;

    2015-01-01

    Network (CHRON) architecture. In this experiment, an intelligent control plane, enabled by a cognitive decision system (CDS), was successfully combined with a flexible data plane. The testbed was used to test and validate different scenarios, demonstrating benefits obtained by network cognition......The aim of cognition in optical networks is to introduce intelligence into the control plane that allows for autonomous end-to-end performance optimization and minimization of required human intervention, particularly targeted at heterogeneous network scenarios. A cognitive network observes, learns......, and makes informed decisions based on its current status and knowledge about past decisions and their results. To test the operation of cognitive algorithms in real time, we created the first operational testbed of a cognitive optical network based on the Cognitive Heterogeneous Reconfigurable Optical...

  1. Testbed for Information Extraction from Deep Web

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Yasuhiro; Nakatoh, Tetsuya; Hirokawa, Sachio

    2004-01-01

    Search results generated by searchable databases are served dynamically and far larger than the static documents on the Web. These results pages have been referred to as the Deep Web [1]. We need to extract the target data in results pages to integrate them on different searchable databases. We propose a testbed for information extraction from search results. We chose 100 databases randomly from 114,540 pages with search forms. Therefore, these databases have a good variety. We selected 51 da...

  2. A Testbed for Transiently Powered Computers

    OpenAIRE

    Aantjes, Henko; Majid, Amjad Y.; Pawełczak, Przemysław

    2016-01-01

    Transiently Powered Computers (TPCs) are novel devices that are battery-less and operate using only ambient energy. Therefore TPCs are prone to frequent power interruptions, and such the need for developing TPC-centric algorithms is a necessity. We advocate that only through a common experimental environment, accessible to everyone, a proper comparison of newly developed algorithms for TPCs can be realized. Moreover, only through access to various TPC testbeds---distributed geographically thr...

  3. Running CMS software on GRID Testbeds

    OpenAIRE

    Bonacorsi, D; Capiluppi, P; Fanfani, A.; Grandi, C.; Corvo, M.; Fanzago, F.; Sgaravatto, M.; Verlato, M.; Charlot., C; Semeniuok, I.; D. Colling; MacEvoy, B; Tallini, H.; Biasotto, M.; Fantinel, S

    2003-01-01

    Starting in the middle of November 2002, the CMS experiment undertook an evaluation of the European DataGrid Project (EDG) middleware using its event simulation programs. A joint CMS-EDG task force performed a "stress test" by submitting a large number of jobs to many distributed sites. The EDG testbed was complemented with additional CMS-dedicated resources. A total of ~ 10000 jobs consisting of two different computational types were submitted from four different locations in Europe over a p...

  4. Smart Grid Testbed using SCADA Software and Xbee Wireless Communication

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aryuanto Soetedjo

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the development of Smart Grid testbed using SCADA software and Xbee wireless communication. The proposed testbed combines both the software simulation and the hardware simulation. The Winlog SCADA software is employed to implement the algorithm in the Smart Grid system. To communicate between nodes and the Smart Grid Center, the Xbee wireless communication is employed. The testbed is useful to test and verify the developed algorithms in the Smart Grid system. By using the hardware testbed, the more realistic simulation could be performed. While by using the software testbed, the complex model and algorithm could be implemented easily. The experimental results show that the proposed testbed works properly in simulating the continuous supply algorithm implemented in the Smart Grid system.

  5. Nuclear criticality safety evaluation -- DWPF Late Wash Facility, Salt Process Cell and Chemical Process Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site (SRS) High Level Nuclear Waste will be vitrified in the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) for long term storage and disposal. This is a nuclear criticality safety evaluation for the Late Wash Facility (LWF), the Salt Processing Cell (SPC) and the Chemical Processing Cell (CPC). of the DWPF. Waste salt solution is processed in the Tank Farm In-Tank Precipitation (ITP) process and is then further washed in the DWPF Late Wash Facility (LWF) before it is fed to the DWPF Salt Processing Cell. In the Salt Processing Cell the precipitate slurry is processed in the Precipitate Reactor (PR) and the resultant Precipitate Hydrolysis Aqueous (PHA) produce is combined with the sludge feed and frit in the DWPF Chemical Process Cell to produce a melter feed. The waste is finally immobilized in the Melt Cell. Material in the Tank Farm and the ITP and Extended Sludge processes have been shown to be safe against a nuclear criticality by others. The precipitate slurry feed from ITP and the first six batches of sludge feed are safe against a nuclear criticality and this evaluation demonstrates that the processes in the LWF, the SPC and the CPC do not alter the characteristics of the materials to compromise safety

  6. Development of a Scalable Testbed for Mobile Olfaction Verification

    OpenAIRE

    Syed Muhammad Mamduh Syed Zakaria; Retnam Visvanathan; Kamarulzaman Kamarudin; Ahmad Shakaff Ali Yeon; Ali Yeon Md. Shakaff; Ammar Zakaria; Latifah Munirah Kamarudin

    2015-01-01

    The lack of information on ground truth gas dispersion and experiment verification information has impeded the development of mobile olfaction systems, especially for real-world conditions. In this paper, an integrated testbed for mobile gas sensing experiments is presented. The integrated 3 m × 6 m testbed was built to provide real-time ground truth information for mobile olfaction system development. The testbed consists of a 72-gas-sensor array, namely Large Gas Sensor Array (LGSA), a loca...

  7. The PLUTO reactor at Harwell, U.K. and ancillary hot cell facilities. Information sheets

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Technical information is given on the PLUTO reactor and associated hot cell facilities, with the main emphasis on experimental irradiation facilities and specialized irradiation devices (loops and capsules). The information is presented in the form of five information sheets under the headings; main characteristics of the reactor; utilization and specialization of the reactor; experimental facilities; neutron spectra; main characteristics of specialized irradiation devices

  8. Construction Report of Hot Cell Facility for Demonstration of Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process(ACP) was proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel. The hot cell facilities for demonstration of ACP(ACPF) was consisted of α-γ type heavy concrete hot cell, the auxiliary equipment for hot cell operation, and process equipment. A existing β-γ type hot cell, located in IMEF, was refurbished to minimize construction expenditures for utilization as ACPF. The detail design of hot cell facilities and process was completed, and the safety analysis was performed to substantiate secure of conservative safety. And also, the construction of ACPF and installation of process equipment were completed, and government license for hot cell operation was acquired. In this report, the construction outline and the detail information of hot cell facilities and process equipment s are summarized to utilize for operation and maintenance of hot cell facility and process

  9. Characterization report for Building 301 Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During the period from October, 1997, through March, 1998, ANL-E Health Physics conducted a pre-D and D characterization of Building 301, referred to as the Hot Cell Facility. While primary emphasis was placed on radiological evaluation, the presence of non-nuclear hazardous and toxic material was also included in the scope of the characterization. This is one of the early buildings on the ANL-E site, and was heavily used in the 1950's and 1960's for various nuclear reaction and reactor design studies. Some degree of cleanup and contamination fixation was done in the 1970's, so that the building could be used with a minimum of risk of personnel contamination. Work records are largely nonexistent for the early history of the building, so that any assumptions about extent and type of contamination had to be kept very open in the survey planning process. The primary contaminant was found to be painted-over Cs-137 embedded in the concrete floors, although a variety of other nuclides consistent with the work said to have been performed were found in smaller quantities. Due to leaks and drips through the floor, a relatively modest amount of soil contamination was found in the service trench under the building, not penetrating deeply. Two contaminated, disconnected drain lines leaving the building could not be traced by site records, and remain a problem for remediation. The D and D Characterization Plan was fulfilled

  10. Gemini Planet Imager Coronagraph Testbed Results

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Gemini Planet Imager (GPI) is an extreme AO coronagraphic integral field unit YJHK spectrograph destined for first light on the 8m Gemini South telescope in 2011. GPI fields a 1500 channel AO system feeding an apodized pupil Lyot coronagraph, and a nIR non-common-path slow wavefront sensor. It targets detection and characterizion of relatively young (<2GYr), self luminous planets up to 10 million times as faint as their primary star. We present the coronagraph subsystem's in-lab performance, and describe the studies required to specify and fabricate the coronagraph. Coronagraphic pupil apodization is implemented with metallic half-tone screens on glass, and the focal plane occulters are deep reactive ion etched holes in optically polished silicon mirrors. Our JH testbed achieves H-band contrast below a million at separations above 5 resolution elements, without using an AO system. We present an overview of the coronagraphic masks and our testbed coronagraphic data. We also demonstrate the performance of an astrometric and photometric grid that enables coronagraphic astrometry relative to the primary star in every exposure, a proven technique that has yielded on-sky precision of the order of a milliarsecond.

  11. Near infrared missile warning testbed sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    McDermott, D. J.; Johnson, R. S.; Montgomery, J. B.; Sanderson, R. B.; McCalmont, J. F.; Taylor, M. J.

    2008-04-01

    Multicolor discrimination is one of the most effective ways of improving the performance of infrared missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. A new tactical airborne multicolor missile warning testbed was developed and fielded as part of a continuing Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) initiative focusing on clutter and missile signature measurements for effective missile warning algorithms. The developed sensor test bed is a multi-camera system 1004x1004 FPA coupled with optimized spectral filters integrated with the optics; a reduced form factor microprocessor-based video data recording system operating at 48 Hz; and a real time field programmable gate array processor for algorithm and video data processing capable of 800B Multiply/Accumulates operations per second. A detailed radiometric calibration procedure was developed to overcome severe photon-limited operating conditions due to the sub-nanometer bandwidth of the spectral filters. This configuration allows the collection and real-time processing of temporally correlated, radiometrically calibrated video data in multiple spectral bands. The testbed was utilized to collect false alarm sources spectra and Man-Portable Air Defense System (MANPADS) signatures under a variety of atmospheric and solar illuminating conditions. Signatures of approximately 100 missiles have been recorded.

  12. Design Report of Hot Cell Facilities for Demonstration of Advanced Spent Fuel Conditioning Process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The advanced spent fuel conditioning process(ACP) was proposed to reduce the overall volume of the PWR spent fuel and improve safety and economy of the long-term storage of spent fuel. The hot test will be carried out for verification of the ACP in a laboratory scale. For the hot test, the hot cell facilities of α-γ type and auxiliary facilities are required essentially for safe handling of high radioactive materials. As the hot cell facilities for demonstration of the ACP, a existing hot cell of β-γ type will be refurbished to minimize construction expenditures of hot cell facility. The detail design of hot cell facilities and process were completed, and the safety analysis was performed to substantiate secure of conservative safety. This results were utilized for refurbishment of IMEF future hot cell and installation of process equipments, and manufacturing and procurement of hot cell auxiliary equipments. The safety analysis report were submitted to KINS through MOST for license acquisition, the government issued license for construction and operation. And, the hot test for demonstration of the ACP is performing in this hot cell facilities. In this report, the detail design and safety analysis data are summarized to utilize for operation of hot cell facility and process

  13. Direct Connect Supersonic Combustion Facility (Research Cell 22)

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Description: RC22 is a continuous-flow, direct-connect supersonic-combustion research facility that is capable of simulating flight conditions from Mach 3.0 to Mach...

  14. A land-surface Testbed for EOSDIS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emery, William; Kelley, Tim

    1994-01-01

    The main objective of the Testbed project was to deliver satellite images via the Internet to scientific and educational users free of charge. The main method of operations was to store satellite images on a low cost tape library system, visually browse the raw satellite data, access the raw data filed, navigate the imagery through 'C' programming and X-Windows interface software, and deliver the finished image to the end user over the Internet by means of file transfer protocol methods. The conclusion is that the distribution of satellite imagery by means of the Internet is feasible, and the archiving of large data sets can be accomplished with low cost storage systems allowing multiple users.

  15. Running CMS software on GRID Testbeds

    CERN Document Server

    Bonacorsi, D; Biasotto, M; Blaising, J J; Burke, S; Capiluppi, P; Charlot, C; Colling, D J; Corvo, M; Fantinel, S; Fanzago, F; Grandi, C; Laure, E; Lefébure, V; Leonardi, E; Loomis, C; MacEvoy, B; Maroney, O; Prelz, F; Reale, M; Schulz, M; Sciabà, A; Semeniouk, I N; Sgaravatto, M; Stockinger, H E; Tallini, H; Templon, J; Tortone, G; Verlato, M

    2003-01-01

    Starting in the middle of November 2002, the CMS experiment undertook an evaluation of the European DataGrid Project (EDG) middleware using its event simulation programs. A joint CMS-EDG task force performed a "stress test" by submitting a large number of jobs to many distributed sites. The EDG testbed was complemented with additional CMS-dedicated resources. A total of ~ 10000 jobs consisting of two different computational types were submitted from four different locations in Europe over a period of about one month. Nine sites were active, providing integrated resources of more than 500 CPUs and about 5 TB of disk space (with the additional use of two Mass Storage Systems). Descriptions of the adopted procedures, the problems encountered and the corresponding solutions are reported. Results and evaluations of the test, both from the CMS and the EDG perspectives, are described.

  16. The Palomar Testbed Interferometer Calibrator Catalog

    CERN Document Server

    Van Belle, G T; Creech-Eakman, M J; Coyne, J; Boden, A F; Akeson, R L; Ciardi, D R; Rykoski, K M; Thompson, R R; Lane, B F

    2007-01-01

    The Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI) archive of observations between 1998 and 2005 is examined for objects appropriate for calibration of optical long-baseline interferometer observations - stars that are predictably point-like and single. Approximately 1,400 nights of data on 1,800 objects were examined for this investigation. We compare those observations to an intensively studied object that is a suitable calibrator, HD217014, and statistically compare each candidate calibrator to that object by computing both a Mahalanobis distance and a Principal Component Analysis. Our hypothesis is that the frequency distribution of visibility data associated with calibrator stars differs from non-calibrator stars such as binary stars. Spectroscopic binaries resolved by PTI, objects known to be unsuitable for calibrator use, are similarly tested to establish detection limits of this approach. From this investigation, we find more than 350 observed stars suitable for use as calibrators (with an additional $\\approx 1...

  17. Development of a Scalable Testbed for Mobile Olfaction Verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Syed Zakaria, Syed Muhammad Mamduh; Visvanathan, Retnam; Kamarudin, Kamarulzaman; Ali Yeon, Ahmad Shakaff; Md. Shakaff, Ali Yeon; Zakaria, Ammar; Kamarudin, Latifah Munirah

    2015-01-01

    The lack of information on ground truth gas dispersion and experiment verification information has impeded the development of mobile olfaction systems, especially for real-world conditions. In this paper, an integrated testbed for mobile gas sensing experiments is presented. The integrated 3 m × 6 m testbed was built to provide real-time ground truth information for mobile olfaction system development. The testbed consists of a 72-gas-sensor array, namely Large Gas Sensor Array (LGSA), a localization system based on cameras and a wireless communication backbone for robot communication and integration into the testbed system. Furthermore, the data collected from the testbed may be streamed into a simulation environment to expedite development. Calibration results using ethanol have shown that using a large number of gas sensor in the LGSA is feasible and can produce coherent signals when exposed to the same concentrations. The results have shown that the testbed was able to capture the time varying characteristics and the variability of gas plume in a 2 h experiment thus providing time dependent ground truth concentration maps. The authors have demonstrated the ability of the mobile olfaction testbed to monitor, verify and thus, provide insight to gas distribution mapping experiment. PMID:26690175

  18. Technology Developments Integrating a Space Network Communications Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwong, Winston; Jennings, Esther; Clare, Loren; Leang, Dee

    2006-01-01

    As future manned and robotic space explorations missions involve more complex systems, it is essential to verify, validate, and optimize such systems through simulation and emulation in a low cost testbed environment. The goal of such a testbed is to perform detailed testing of advanced space and ground communications networks, technologies, and client applications that are essential for future space exploration missions. We describe the development of new technologies enhancing our Multi-mission Advanced Communications Hybrid Environment for Test and Evaluation (MACHETE) that enable its integration in a distributed space communications testbed. MACHETE combines orbital modeling, link analysis, and protocol and service modeling to quantify system performance based on comprehensive considerations of different aspects of space missions. It can simulate entire networks and can interface with external (testbed) systems. The key technology developments enabling the integration of MACHETE into a distributed testbed are the Monitor and Control module and the QualNet IP Network Emulator module. Specifically, the Monitor and Control module establishes a standard interface mechanism to centralize the management of each testbed component. The QualNet IP Network Emulator module allows externally generated network traffic to be passed through MACHETE to experience simulated network behaviors such as propagation delay, data loss, orbital effects and other communications characteristics, including entire network behaviors. We report a successful integration of MACHETE with a space communication testbed modeling a lunar exploration scenario. This document is the viewgraph slides of the presentation.

  19. Development of a Scalable Testbed for Mobile Olfaction Verification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Syed Muhammad Mamduh Syed Zakaria

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The lack of information on ground truth gas dispersion and experiment verification information has impeded the development of mobile olfaction systems, especially for real-world conditions. In this paper, an integrated testbed for mobile gas sensing experiments is presented. The integrated 3 m × 6 m testbed was built to provide real-time ground truth information for mobile olfaction system development. The testbed consists of a 72-gas-sensor array, namely Large Gas Sensor Array (LGSA, a localization system based on cameras and a wireless communication backbone for robot communication and integration into the testbed system. Furthermore, the data collected from the testbed may be streamed into a simulation environment to expedite development. Calibration results using ethanol have shown that using a large number of gas sensor in the LGSA is feasible and can produce coherent signals when exposed to the same concentrations. The results have shown that the testbed was able to capture the time varying characteristics and the variability of gas plume in a 2 h experiment thus providing time dependent ground truth concentration maps. The authors have demonstrated the ability of the mobile olfaction testbed to monitor, verify and thus, provide insight to gas distribution mapping experiment.

  20. Development of a Scalable Testbed for Mobile Olfaction Verification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zakaria, Syed Muhammad Mamduh Syed; Visvanathan, Retnam; Kamarudin, Kamarulzaman; Yeon, Ahmad Shakaff Ali; Md Shakaff, Ali Yeon; Zakaria, Ammar; Kamarudin, Latifah Munirah

    2015-01-01

    The lack of information on ground truth gas dispersion and experiment verification information has impeded the development of mobile olfaction systems, especially for real-world conditions. In this paper, an integrated testbed for mobile gas sensing experiments is presented. The integrated 3 m × 6 m testbed was built to provide real-time ground truth information for mobile olfaction system development. The testbed consists of a 72-gas-sensor array, namely Large Gas Sensor Array (LGSA), a localization system based on cameras and a wireless communication backbone for robot communication and integration into the testbed system. Furthermore, the data collected from the testbed may be streamed into a simulation environment to expedite development. Calibration results using ethanol have shown that using a large number of gas sensor in the LGSA is feasible and can produce coherent signals when exposed to the same concentrations. The results have shown that the testbed was able to capture the time varying characteristics and the variability of gas plume in a 2 h experiment thus providing time dependent ground truth concentration maps. The authors have demonstrated the ability of the mobile olfaction testbed to monitor, verify and thus, provide insight to gas distribution mapping experiment. PMID:26690175

  1. Testbed model and data assimilation for ARM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this contract are to further develop and test the ALFA (AER Local Forecast and Assimilation) model originally designed at AER for local weather prediction and apply it to three distinct but related purposes in connection with the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) program: (a) to provide a testbed that simulates a global climate model in order to facilitate the development and testing of new cloud parametrizations and radiation models; (b) to assimilate the ARM data continuously at the scale of a climate model, using the adjoint method, thus providing the initial conditions and verification data for testing parameumtions; (c) to study the sensitivity of a radiation scheme to cloud parameters, again using the adjoint method, thus demonstrating the usefulness of the testbed model. The data assimilation will use a variational technique that minimizes the difference between the model results and the observation during the analysis period. The adjoint model is used to compute the gradient of a measure of the model errors with respect to nudging terms that are added to the equations to force the model output closer to the data. The radiation scheme that will be included in the basic ALFA model makes use of a gen two-stream approximation, and is designed for vertically inhonogeneous, multiple-scattering atmospheres. The sensitivity of this model to the definition of cloud parameters will be studied. The adjoint technique will also be used to compute the sensitivities. This project is designed to provide the Science Team members with the appropriate tools and modeling environment for proper testing and tuning of new radiation models and cloud parametrization schemes

  2. Virtual Testbed Aerospace Operations Center (VT-AOC)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunaway, Bradley; Broadstock, Tom

    2003-09-01

    The Air Force is conducting research in new technologies for next-generation Aerospace Operations Centers (AOCs). The Virtual Testbed Aerospace Operations Center (VT-AOC) will support advanced research in information technologies that operate in or are closely tied to AOCs. The VT-AOC will provide a context for developing, demonstrating, and testing new processes and tools in a realistic environment. To generate the environment, the VT-AOC will incorporate multiple mixed-resolution simulations that are capable of driving existing and future AOC command and control (C2) systems. The VT-AOC will provide the capability to capture existing or proposed C2 processes and then evaluate them operating in conjunction with new technologies. The VT-AOC will also be capable of connecting with other facilities to support increasingly more complex experiments and demonstrations. Together, these capabilities support key initiatives such as Agile Research and Development/Science and Technology (R&D/S&T), Predictive Battlespace Awareness, and Effects-Based Operations.

  3. Preliminary Feasibility Study on the Construction of Steel Hot Cell Facility for Precise Manipulated Examinations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hot laboratory is essential facility to research and develop in the nuclear industries to examine radioactive materials. The post irradiation examinations for irradiated fuels and materials should be mainly conducted in the hot cell facility to protect radiations to operators. Hot cells are divided into a concrete hot cell and a steel hot cell according to the wall materials. Usually a concrete hot cell is applied to test for high level radioactive materials like as a fuel assembly, rods, and large structure specimens, and a steel hot cell for comparatively lower level activity materials in fuel fragments, and small structural materials. A steel hot cell has many benefits in a specimen manipulation, construction and maintenance costs. In recent the test for the irradiated materials is more frequently required a small and precise manipulating examination for higher degree tests of research and developments. Unfortunately hot laboratory facilities in domestics have mainly constituted of concrete hot cells, and not ready for techniques in steel hot cells. In this paper the construction feasibility of steel hot cell facility is preliminary reviewed in the points of the status of domestic facilities, the test demand prospect and detailed plans

  4. WiBed, a platform for commodity wireless testbeds

    OpenAIRE

    Escrich Garcia, Pau

    2014-01-01

    This paper presents WiBed, a FOSS platform for WiFi testbeds based on OpenWRT Linux made to run on commodity IEEE802.11 WiFi routers part of the Community-lab.net project, a global testbed for Community networks. WiBed has been designed to support realistic low layer network experiments (according to the OSI model). This work recolects the details of the architecture, design and implementation of WiBed consolidated during its operation as a testbed.

  5. Installing a copy of the ARPA/DMA image understanding testbed at the US Army Engineer Topographic Laboratories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanson, A. J.

    1985-06-01

    The principal objective of this effort was to establish a functional copy of the SRI Image Understanding Testbed system of hardware and software at the U.S. Army Engineer Topographic Laboratories (ETL) Research Institute at Fort Belvoir, Virginia. Representative tasks included advising on the preparation of the ETL site for the Testbed system installation, purchasing the required hardware for installation at ETL, and arranging for availability of Testbed software systems. Other major tasks included supplementary hardware acquisition, installing Testbed software systems, and developing support software to enhance the overall capabilities of the system. We also assisted in establishing the ETL site as a node on the DDN ARPANET/MILNET network. Final tasks included installation of Lisp Machine software and associated consultation, as well as other general assistance and troubleshooting. The main beneficial results of this effort were the establishment at ETL of a state of the art research facility and the transfer to ETL of a large body of research technology carried out by SRI, as well as by other contributors to the DARPA Image Understanding research program. This project has provided essential elements of the foundation required to support the mission of the newly formed ETL Center for Artificial Intelligence.

  6. Development of an Experimental Testbed for Research in Lithium-Ion Battery Management Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehdi Ferdowsi

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Advanced electrochemical batteries are becoming an integral part of a wide range of applications from household and commercial to smart grid, transportation, and aerospace applications. Among different battery technologies, lithium-ion (Li-ion batteries are growing more and more popular due to their high energy density, high galvanic potential, low self-discharge, low weight, and the fact that they have almost no memory effect. However, one of the main obstacles facing the widespread commercialization of Li-ion batteries is the design of reliable battery management systems (BMSs. An efficient BMS ensures electrical safety during operation, while increasing battery lifetime, capacity and thermal stability. Despite the need for extensive research in this field, the majority of research conducted on Li-ion battery packs and BMS are proprietary works conducted by manufacturers. The available literature, however, provides either general descriptions or detailed analysis of individual components of the battery system, and ignores addressing details of the overall system development. This paper addresses the development of an experimental research testbed for studying Li-ion batteries and their BMS design. The testbed can be configured in a variety of cell and pack architectures, allowing for a wide range of BMS monitoring, diagnostics, and control technologies to be tested and analyzed. General considerations that should be taken into account while designing Li-ion battery systems are reviewed and different technologies and challenges commonly encountered in Li-ion battery systems are investigated. This testbed facilitates future development of more practical and improved BMS technologies with the aim of increasing the safety, reliability, and efficiency of existing Li-ion battery systems. Experimental results of initial tests performed on the system are used to demonstrate some of the capabilities of the developed research testbed. To the authors

  7. Prognostics-Enabled Power Supply for ADAPT Testbed Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ridgetop's role is to develop electronic prognostics for sensing power systems in support of NASA/Ames ADAPT testbed. The prognostic enabled power systems from...

  8. CloudFridge: A Testbed for Smart Fridge Interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Sandholm, Thomas; Lee, Dongman; Tegelund, Bjorn; Han, Seonyeong; Shin, Byoungheon; Kim, Byoungoh

    2014-01-01

    We present a testbed for exploring novel smart refrigerator interactions, and identify three key adoption-limiting interaction shortcomings of state-of-the-art smart fridges: lack of 1) user experience focus, 2) low-intrusion object recognition and 2) automatic item position detection. Our testbed system addresses these limitations by a combination of sensors, software filters, architectural components and a RESTful API to track interaction events in real-time, and retrieve current state and ...

  9. Cybersecurity Test-Bed for IEC 61850 based Smart Substations

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Y.; Jiang, H.T.; McLaughlin, K.; Gao, L.; Y. B. Yuan; Huang, W.; Sezer, S

    2015-01-01

    With the development and deployment of IEC 61850 based smart substations, cybersecurity vulnerabilities of supervisory control and data acquisition (SCADA) systems are increasingly emerging. In response to the emergence of cybersecurity vulnerabilities in smart substations, a test-bed is indispensable to enable cybersecurity experimentation. In this paper, a comprehensive and realistic cyber-physical test-bed has been built to investigate potential cybersecurity vulnerabilities and the impact...

  10. Situational descriptions of behavioral procedures: the in situ testbed.

    OpenAIRE

    Kemp, S M; Eckerman, D A

    2001-01-01

    We demonstrate the In Situ testbed, a system that aids in evaluating computational models of learning, including artificial neural networks. The testbed models contingencies of reinforcement rising an extension of Mechner's (1959) notational system for the description of behavioral procedures. These contingencies are input to the model under test. The model's output is displayed as cumulative records. The cumulative record can then be compared to one produced by a pigeon exposed to the same c...

  11. Termite: Emulation Testbed for Encounter Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rodrigo Bruno

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Cutting-edge mobile devices like smartphones and tablets are equipped with various infrastructureless wireless interfaces, such as WiFi Direct and Bluetooth. Such technologies allow for novel mobile applications that take advantage of casual encounters between co-located users. However, the need to mimic the behavior of real-world encounter networks makes testing and debugging of such applications hard tasks. We present Termite, an emulation testbed for encounter networks. Our system allows developers to run their applications on a virtual encounter network emulated by software. Developers can model arbitrary encounter networks and specify user interactions on the emulated virtual devices. To facilitate testing and debugging, developers can place breakpoints, inspect the runtime state of virtual nodes, and run experiments in a stepwise fashion. Termite defines its own Petri Net variant to model the dynamically changing topology and synthesize user interactions with virtual devices. The system is designed to efficiently multiplex an underlying emulation hosting infrastructure across multiple developers, and to support heterogeneous mobile platforms. Our current system implementation supports virtual Android devices communicating over WiFi Direct networks and runs on top of a local cloud infrastructure. We evaluated our system using emulator network traces, and found that Termite is expressive and performs well.

  12. A knowledge based software engineering environment testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gill, C.; Reedy, A.; Baker, L.

    1985-01-01

    The Carnegie Group Incorporated and Boeing Computer Services Company are developing a testbed which will provide a framework for integrating conventional software engineering tools with Artifical Intelligence (AI) tools to promote automation and productivity. The emphasis is on the transfer of AI technology to the software development process. Experiments relate to AI issues such as scaling up, inference, and knowledge representation. In its first year, the project has created a model of software development by representing software activities; developed a module representation formalism to specify the behavior and structure of software objects; integrated the model with the formalism to identify shared representation and inheritance mechanisms; demonstrated object programming by writing procedures and applying them to software objects; used data-directed and goal-directed reasoning to, respectively, infer the cause of bugs and evaluate the appropriateness of a configuration; and demonstrated knowledge-based graphics. Future plans include introduction of knowledge-based systems for rapid prototyping or rescheduling; natural language interfaces; blackboard architecture; and distributed processing

  13. Further progress in watermark evaluation testbed (WET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Hyung C.; Lin, Eugene T.; Guitart, Oriol; Delp, Edward J., III

    2005-03-01

    While Digital Watermarking has received much attention in recent years, it is still a relatively young technology. There are few accepted tools/metrics that can be used to evaluate the suitability of a watermarking technique for a specific application. This lack of a universally adopted set of metrics/methods has motivated us to develop a web-based digital watermark evaluation system called the Watermark Evaluation Testbed or WET. There have been more improvements over the first version of WET. We implemented batch mode with a queue that allows for user submitted jobs. In addition to StirMark 3.1 as an attack module, we added attack modules based on StirMark 4.0. For a new image fidelity measure, we evaluate conditional entropy as an image fidelity measure for different watermarking algorithms and different attacks. Also, we show the results of curve fitting the Receiver Operating Characteristic (ROC) analysis data using the Parzen window density estimation. The curve fits the data closely while having only two parameters to estimate.

  14. Optical testbed for the LISA phasemeter

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwarze, T. S.; Fernández Barranco, G.; Penkert, D.; Gerberding, O.; Heinzel, G.; Danzmann, K.

    2016-05-01

    The planned spaceborne gravitational wave detector LISA will allow the detection of gravitational waves at frequencies between 0.1 mHz and 1 Hz. A breadboard model for the metrology system aka the phasemeter was developed in the scope of an ESA technology development project by a collaboration between the Albert Einstein Institute, the Technical University of Denmark and the Danish industry partner Axcon Aps. It in particular provides the electronic readout of the main interferometer phases besides auxiliary functions. These include clock noise transfer, ADC pilot tone correction, inter-satellite ranging and data transfer. Besides in LISA, the phasemeter can also be applied in future satellite geodesy missions. Here we show the planning and advances in the implementation of an optical testbed for the full metrology chain. It is based on an ultra-stable hexagonal optical bench. This bench allows the generation of three unequal heterodyne beatnotes with a zero phase combination, thus providing the possibility to probe the phase readout for non-linearities in an optical three signal test. Additionally, the utilization of three independent phasemeters will allow the testing of the auxiliary functions. Once working, components can individually be replaced with flight-qualified hardware in this setup.

  15. HANARO Neutron Radiography Facility and Fuel Cell Research

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fuel cell which generates electric energy from hydrogen and oxygen is one of noticed renewable energy system because this has high efficiency and free from CO2. Especially, PEMFC (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell) is focused by automotive companies because PEMFC, which has high power rate per volume and low operating temperature (60∼80), is suited due to the compact design and short start-up time. The water management is one of the most critical issues for fuel cell commercialization. In order to make a proper scheme for water management, thein formation of water distribution and behavior is very important. Neutron imaging is the best method to visualize the water at fuel cell and has been applied worldwide with qualitative and quantitative results. Because the NRF has large beam size (350Χ450mm2) and relatively high neutron flux (2Χ107 n/cm2sec), it is suitable for large scale fuel cell research. Neutron imaging technique was used to investigate the water distribution and behavior in PEMFC under different operating conditions. The NRF has contributed the improvement of fuel cell performance and is one of the best choices for fuel cell study

  16. HANARO Neutron Radiography Facility and Fuel Cell Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Taejoo [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-07-01

    Fuel cell which generates electric energy from hydrogen and oxygen is one of noticed renewable energy system because this has high efficiency and free from CO{sub 2}. Especially, PEMFC (Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cell) is focused by automotive companies because PEMFC, which has high power rate per volume and low operating temperature (60∼80), is suited due to the compact design and short start-up time. The water management is one of the most critical issues for fuel cell commercialization. In order to make a proper scheme for water management, thein formation of water distribution and behavior is very important. Neutron imaging is the best method to visualize the water at fuel cell and has been applied worldwide with qualitative and quantitative results. Because the NRF has large beam size (350Χ450mm{sup 2}) and relatively high neutron flux (2Χ107 n/cm{sup 2}sec), it is suitable for large scale fuel cell research. Neutron imaging technique was used to investigate the water distribution and behavior in PEMFC under different operating conditions. The NRF has contributed the improvement of fuel cell performance and is one of the best choices for fuel cell study.

  17. 324 Facility B-cell quality process plan

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    B-Cell is currently being cleaned out (i.e., removal of equipment, fixtures and residual radioactive materials) and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/99. The following sections describe the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone. These include: Size Reduce Tank 119 and Miscellaneous Equipment; Load and Ship Low-Level Waste; Remove and Size Reduce the 1B Rack; Collect Dispersible Material from Cell Floor; Remove and Size Reduce the 2A Rack; Size Reduce the 1A Rack; Load and Ship Mixed Waste to PUREX Tunnels; and Move Spent Fuel to A-Cell;

  18. 324 Facility B-cell quality process plan

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, J.L.

    1998-07-29

    B-Cell is currently being cleaned out (i.e., removal of equipment, fixtures and residual radioactive materials) and deactivated. TPA Milestone M-89-02 dictates that all mixed waste and equipment be removed from B-Cell by 5/31/99. The following sections describe the major activities that remain for completion of the TPA milestone. These include: Size Reduce Tank 119 and Miscellaneous Equipment; Load and Ship Low-Level Waste; Remove and Size Reduce the 1B Rack; Collect Dispersible Material from Cell Floor; Remove and Size Reduce the 2A Rack; Size Reduce the 1A Rack; Load and Ship Mixed Waste to PUREX Tunnels; and Move Spent Fuel to A-Cell;

  19. Optimization Testbed Cometboards Extended into Stochastic Domain

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patnaik, Surya N.; Pai, Shantaram S.; Coroneos, Rula M.; Patnaik, Surya N.

    2010-01-01

    COMparative Evaluation Testbed of Optimization and Analysis Routines for the Design of Structures (CometBoards) is a multidisciplinary design optimization software. It was originally developed for deterministic calculation. It has now been extended into the stochastic domain for structural design problems. For deterministic problems, CometBoards is introduced through its subproblem solution strategy as well as the approximation concept in optimization. In the stochastic domain, a design is formulated as a function of the risk or reliability. Optimum solution including the weight of a structure, is also obtained as a function of reliability. Weight versus reliability traced out an inverted-S-shaped graph. The center of the graph corresponded to 50 percent probability of success, or one failure in two samples. A heavy design with weight approaching infinity could be produced for a near-zero rate of failure that corresponded to unity for reliability. Weight can be reduced to a small value for the most failure-prone design with a compromised reliability approaching zero. The stochastic design optimization (SDO) capability for an industrial problem was obtained by combining three codes: MSC/Nastran code was the deterministic analysis tool, fast probabilistic integrator, or the FPI module of the NESSUS software, was the probabilistic calculator, and CometBoards became the optimizer. The SDO capability requires a finite element structural model, a material model, a load model, and a design model. The stochastic optimization concept is illustrated considering an academic example and a real-life airframe component made of metallic and composite materials.

  20. The use of power gyrator structures as energy processing cells in photovoltaic solar facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez García, Herminio

    2014-01-01

    This paper will provide a classification of high efficiency switching power-gyrator structures and their use as cells for energy processing in photovoltaic solar facilities. Having into account the properties of these topologies presented in the article, their inclusion in solar facilities allows increasing the performance of the whole installation. Thus, the design, simulation and implementation of a G-type power gyrator are carried out throughout the text. In addition, in order to obtain th...

  1. Power gyrator structures and their use as cells for energy-processing in photovoltaic solar facilities

    OpenAIRE

    Martínez García, Herminio; Grau Saldes, Antoni; Bolea Monte, Yolanda

    2012-01-01

    This paper provides a classification of high efficiency switching power-gyrator structures and their use as cells for energy processing in photovoltaic solar facilities. Having into account the properties of these topologies presented in the article, their inclusion in solar facilities allows increasing the performance of the whole installation. Thus, the design, simulation and implementation of a G-type power gyrator are carried out throughout the text. In addition, in order to obtain ...

  2. Passive Thermal Design Approach for the Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed Experiment on the International Space Station (ISS)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siamidis, John; Yuko, Jim

    2014-01-01

    The Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Program Office at NASA Headquarters oversees all of NASAs space communications activities. SCaN manages and directs the ground-based facilities and services provided by the Deep Space Network (DSN), Near Earth Network (NEN), and the Space Network (SN). Through the SCaN Program Office, NASA GRC developed a Software Defined Radio (SDR) testbed experiment (SCaN testbed experiment) for use on the International Space Station (ISS). It is comprised of three different SDR radios, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL) radio, Harris Corporation radio, and the General Dynamics Corporation radio. The SCaN testbed experiment provides an on-orbit, adaptable, SDR Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) - based facility to conduct a suite of experiments to advance the Software Defined Radio, Space Telecommunications Radio Systems (STRS) standards, reduce risk (Technology Readiness Level (TRL) advancement) for candidate Constellation future space flight hardware software, and demonstrate space communication links critical to future NASA exploration missions. The SCaN testbed project provides NASA, industry, other Government agencies, and academic partners the opportunity to develop and field communications, navigation, and networking technologies in the laboratory and space environment based on reconfigurable, software defined radio platforms and the STRS Architecture.The SCaN testbed is resident on the P3 Express Logistics Carrier (ELC) on the exterior truss of the International Space Station (ISS). The SCaN testbed payload launched on the Japanese Aerospace Exploration Agency (JAXA) H-II Transfer Vehicle (HTV) and was installed on the ISS P3 ELC located on the inboard RAM P3 site. The daily operations and testing are managed out of NASA GRC in the Telescience Support Center (TSC).

  3. A Testbed for Evaluating Lunar Habitat Autonomy Architectures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kortenkamp, David; Izygon, Michel; Lawler, Dennis; Schreckenghost, Debra; Bonasso, R. Peter; Wang, Lui; Kennedy, Kriss

    2008-01-01

    A lunar outpost will involve a habitat with an integrated set of hardware and software that will maintain a safe environment for human activities. There is a desire for a paradigm shift whereby crew will be the primary mission operators, not ground controllers. There will also be significant periods when the outpost is uncrewed. This will require that significant automation software be resident in the habitat to maintain all system functions and respond to faults. JSC is developing a testbed to allow for early testing and evaluation of different autonomy architectures. This will allow evaluation of different software configurations in order to: 1) understand different operational concepts; 2) assess the impact of failures and perturbations on the system; and 3) mitigate software and hardware integration risks. The testbed will provide an environment in which habitat hardware simulations can interact with autonomous control software. Faults can be injected into the simulations and different mission scenarios can be scripted. The testbed allows for logging, replaying and re-initializing mission scenarios. An initial testbed configuration has been developed by combining an existing life support simulation and an existing simulation of the space station power distribution system. Results from this initial configuration will be presented along with suggested requirements and designs for the incremental development of a more sophisticated lunar habitat testbed.

  4. The implementation of tissue banking experiences for setting up a cGMP cell manufacturing facility.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arjmand, Babak; Emami-Razavi, Seyed Hassan; Larijani, Bagher; Norouzi-Javidan, Abbas; Aghayan, Hamid Reza

    2012-12-01

    Cell manufacturing for clinical applications is a unique form of biologics manufacturing that relies on maintenance of stringent work practices designed to ensure product consistency and prevent contamination by microorganisms or by another patient's cells. More extensive, prolonged laboratory processes involve greater risk of complications and possibly adverse events for the recipient, and so the need for control is correspondingly greater. To minimize the associate risks of cell manufacturing adhering to international quality standards is critical. Current good tissue practice (cGTP) and current good manufacturing practice (cGMP) are examples of general standards that draw a baseline for cell manufacturing facilities. In recent years, stem cell researches have found great public interest in Iran and different cell therapy projects have been started in country. In this review we described the role of our tissue banking experiences in establishing a new cGMP cell manufacturing facility. The authors concluded that, tissue banks and tissue banking experts can broaden their roles from preparing tissue grafts to manufacturing cell and tissue engineered products for translational researches and phase I clinical trials. Also they can collaborate with cell processing laboratories to develop SOPs, implement quality management system, and design cGMP facilities. PMID:21870140

  5. Fast Flux Test Facility interim examination and maintenance cell: Past, present, and future

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Fast Flux Test Facility Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell was designed to perform interim examination and/or disassembly of experimental core components for final analysis elsewhere, as well as maintenance of sodium-wetted or neutron-activated internal reactor parts and plant support hardware. The Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell equipment developed and used for the first ten years of operation has been primarily devoted to the disassembly and examination of core component test assemblies. While no major reactor equipment has required remote repair or maintenance, the Interim Examina Examination and Maintenance Cell has served as the remote repair facility for its own in-cell equipment, and several innovative remote repairs have been accomplished. The Interim Examination and Maintenance Cell's demonstrated versatility has shown its capability to support a challenging future. 12 refs., 9 figs

  6. Progress on an external occulter testbed at flight Fresnel numbers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yunjong; Sirbu, Dan; Galvin, Michael; Kasdin, N. Jeremy; Vanderbei, Robert J.

    2016-01-01

    An external occulter is a spacecraft flown along the line-of-sight of a space telescope to suppress starlight and enable high-contrast direct imaging of exoplanets. Laboratory verification of occulter designs is necessary to validate the optical models used to design and predict occulter performance. At Princeton, we have designed and built a testbed that allows verification of scaled occulter designs whose suppressed shadow is mathematically identical to that of space occulters. The occulter testbed uses 78 m optical propagation distance to realize the flight Fresnel numbers. We will use an etched silicon mask as the occulter. The occulter is illuminated by a diverging laser beam to reduce the aberrations from the optics before the occulter. Here, we present first light result of a sample design operating at a flight Fresnel number and the mechanical design of the testbed. We compare the experimental results with simulations that predict the ultimate contrast performance.

  7. Experimental Test-Bed for Intelligent Passive Array Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solano, Wanda M.; Torres, Miguel; David, Sunil; Isom, Adam; Cotto, Jose; Sharaiha, Samer

    2004-01-01

    This document describes the test-bed designed for the investigation of passive direction finding, recognition, and classification of speech and sound sources using sensor arrays. The test-bed forms the experimental basis of the Intelligent Small-Scale Spatial Direction Finder (ISS-SDF) project, aimed at furthering digital signal processing and intelligent sensor capabilities of sensor array technology in applications such as rocket engine diagnostics, sensor health prognostics, and structural anomaly detection. This form of intelligent sensor technology has potential for significant impact on NASA exploration, earth science and propulsion test capabilities. The test-bed consists of microphone arrays, power and signal distribution modules, web-based data acquisition, wireless Ethernet, modeling, simulation and visualization software tools. The Acoustic Sensor Array Modeler I (ASAM I) is used for studying steering capabilities of acoustic arrays and testing DSP techniques. Spatial sound distribution visualization is modeled using the Acoustic Sphere Analysis and Visualization (ASAV-I) tool.

  8. RADIATION DOSE CALCULATION FOR FUEL HANDLING FACILITY CLOSURE CELL EQUIPMENT

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This calculation evaluates the energy deposition rates in silicon, gamma and neutron flux spectra at various locations of interest throughout FHF closure cell. The physical configuration features a complex geometry, with particle flux attenuation of many orders of magnitude that cannot be modeled by computer codes that use deterministic methods. Therefore, in this calculation the Monte Carlo method was used to solve the photon and neutron transport. In contrast with the deterministic methods, Monte Carlo does not solve an explicit transport equation, but rather obtain answers by simulating individual particles, recording the aspects of interest of their average behavior, and estimates the statistical precision of the results

  9. Testbeds for Assessing Critical Scenarios in Power Control Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dondossola, Giovanna; Deconinck, Geert; Garrone, Fabrizio; Beitollahi, Hakem

    The paper presents a set of control system scenarios implemented in two testbeds developed in the context of the European Project CRUTIAL - CRitical UTility InfrastructurAL Resilience. The selected scenarios refer to power control systems encompassing information and communication security of SCADA systems for grid teleoperation, impact of attacks on inter-operator communications in power emergency conditions, impact of intentional faults on the secondary and tertiary control in power grids with distributed generators. Two testbeds have been developed for assessing the effect of the attacks and prototyping resilient architectures.

  10. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Recent Progress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.

    2010-01-01

    The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center was designed to demonstrate the practicality and application of techniques for wide-field spatial-spectral ("double Fourier") interferometry. WIIT is an automated system, and it is now producing substantial amounts of high-quality data from its state-of-the-art operating environment, Goddard's Advanced Interferometry and Metrology Lab. In this paper, we discuss the characterization and operation of the testbed and present the most recent results. We also outline future research directions. A companion paper within this conference discusses the development of new wide-field double Fourier data analysis algorithms.

  11. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Janet; LaBel, Kenneth; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA has initiated the Living with a Star (LWS) Program to develop the scientific understanding to address the aspects of the Connected Sun-Earth system that affects life and society. The Program Architecture includes science missions, theory and modeling and Space Environment Testbeds (SET). This current paper discusses the Space Environment Testbeds. The goal of the SET program is to improve the engineering approach to accomodate and/or mitigate the effects of solar variability on spacecraft design and operations. The SET Program will infuse new technologies into the space programs through collection of data in space and subsequent design and validation of technologies. Examples of these technologies are cited and discussed.

  12. Manufacturing facility of solar cell. Taiyo denchi no seizo hoho

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Takahashi, Makoto; Takagi, Akira; Ban, Noriji; Ishihara, Mikiji.

    1990-01-09

    When a p-n junction type CdTe solar cell is manufactured by the metal-organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) , dislocation of the position of its p-n junction interface from the specified position and dislocation of the distribution of impurities in the direction of depth at the p layer and the n layer occur, inhibiting the manufacture of the p-n junction. In order to eliminate the above problem and manufacture a p-n junction type CdTe solar cell with high energy conversion efficiency by the MOCVD, this invention proposes to form a n type CdTe layer as the first layer on a substrate at the first substrate temperature, form a non-dope CdTe layer as the second layer at the second substrate temperature lower than the first substrate temperature, form a p type CdTe layer as the third layer at the third substrate temperature lower than the first substrate temperature and from the thickness that the second layer does not remain as an i layer due to diffusion of the impurities from the first and third layers and yet mutual diffusion of the impurities between the first and third layers is controlled. 2 figs., 1 tab.

  13. New electron beam facility for irradiated plasma facing materials testing in hot cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sakamoto, N.; Kawamura, H. [Oarai Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan); Akiba, M. [Naka Research Establishment, Ibaraki-ken (Japan)

    1995-09-01

    Since plasma facing components such as the first wall and the divertor for the next step fusion reactors are exposed to high heat loads and high energy neutron flux generated by the plasma, it is urgent to develop of plasma facing components which can resist these. Then, we have established electron beam heat facility ({open_quotes}OHBIS{close_quotes}, Oarai Hot-cell electron Beam Irradiating System) at a hot cell in JMTR (Japan Materials Testing Reactor) hot laboratory in order to estimate thermal shock resistivity of plasma facing materials and heat removal capabilities of divertor elements under steady state heating. In this facility, irradiated plasma facing materials (beryllium, carbon based materials and so on) and divertor elements can be treated. This facility consists of an electron beam unit with the maximum beam power of 50kW and the vacuum vessel. The acceleration voltage and the maximum beam current are 30kV (constant) and 1.7A, respectively. The loading time of electron beam is more than 0.1ms. The shape of vacuum vessel is cylindrical, and the mainly dimensions are 500mm in inner diameter, 1000mm in height. The ultimate vacuum of this vessel is 1 x 10{sup -4}Pa. At present, the facility for thermal shock test has been established in a hot cell. And performance estimation on the electron beam is being conducted. Presently, the devices for heat loading tests under steady state will be added to this facility.

  14. Investigation of Asymmetric Thrust Detection with Demonstration in a Real-Time Simulation Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chicatelli, Amy K.; Rinehart, Aidan W.; Sowers, T. Shane; Simon, Donald L.

    2016-01-01

    The purpose of this effort is to develop, demonstrate, and evaluate three asymmetric thrust detection approaches to aid in the reduction of asymmetric thrust-induced aviation accidents. This paper presents the results from that effort and their evaluation in simulation studies, including those from a real-time flight simulation testbed. Asymmetric thrust is recognized as a contributing factor in several Propulsion System Malfunction plus Inappropriate Crew Response (PSM+ICR) aviation accidents. As an improvement over the state-of-the-art, providing annunciation of asymmetric thrust to alert the crew may hold safety benefits. For this, the reliable detection and confirmation of asymmetric thrust conditions is required. For this work, three asymmetric thrust detection methods are presented along with their results obtained through simulation studies. Representative asymmetric thrust conditions are modeled in simulation based on failure scenarios similar to those reported in aviation incident and accident descriptions. These simulated asymmetric thrust scenarios, combined with actual aircraft operational flight data, are then used to conduct a sensitivity study regarding the detection capabilities of the three methods. Additional evaluation results are presented based on pilot-in-the-loop simulation studies conducted in the NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) flight simulation testbed. Data obtained from this flight simulation facility are used to further evaluate the effectiveness and accuracy of the asymmetric thrust detection approaches. Generally, the asymmetric thrust conditions are correctly detected and confirmed.

  15. A technical description of the FlexHouse Project Testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Jens Otto

    2000-01-01

    This paper describes the FlexHouse project testbed; a server dedicated to experiments within the FlexHouse project. The FlexHouse project is a project originating from The Business Computing Research Group at The Aarhus School of Business. The purpose of the project is to identify and develop...

  16. ASE-BAN, a Wireless Body Area Network Testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens Kargaard; Karstoft, Henrik; Toftegaard, Thomas Skjødeberg;

    2010-01-01

    /actuators attached to the body and a host server application. The gateway uses the BlackFin BF533 processor from Analog Devices, and uses Bluetooth for wireless communication. Two types of sensors are attached to the network: an electro-cardio-gram sensor and an oximeter sensor. The testbed has been successfully...

  17. Towards a Perpetual Sensor Network Testbed without Backchannel

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Aslak; Bonnet, Philippe; Sørensen, Thomas

    2012-01-01

    The sensor network testbeds available today rely on a communication channel different from the mote radio - a backchannel - to facilitate mote reprogramming, health monitoring and performance analysis. Such backchannels are either supported as wired communication channels (USB or Ethernet), or via...

  18. Efficient handling of high-level radioactive cell waste in a vitrification facility analytical laboratory

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Savannah River Site''s (SRS) Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) near Aiken, South Carolina, is the world''s largest and the United State''s first high level waste vitrification facility. For the past 1.5 years, DWPF has been vitrifying high level radioactive liquid waste left over from the Cold War. The vitrification process involves the stabilization of high level radioactive liquid waste into borosilicate glass. The glass is contained in stainless steel canisters. DWPF has filled more than 200 canisters 3.05 meters (10 feet) long and 0.61 meters (2 foot) diameter. Since operations began at DWPF in March of 1996, high level radioactive solid waste continues to be generated due to operating the facility''s analytical laboratory. The waste is referred to as cell waste and is routinely removed from the analytical laboratories. Through facility design, engineering controls, and administrative controls, DWPF has established efficient methods of handling the high level waste generated in its laboratory facility. These methods have resulted in the prevention of undue radiation exposure, wasted man-hours, expenses due to waste disposal, and the spread of contamination. This level of efficiency was not reached overnight, but it involved the collaboration of Radiological Control Operations and Laboratory personnel working together to devise methods that best benefited the facility. This paper discusses the methods that have been incorporated at DWPF for the handling of cell waste. The objective of this paper is to provide insight to good radiological and safety practices that were incorporated to handle high level radioactive waste in a laboratory setting

  19. Introduction of radiation protection and dosimetry in new hot cell facility in research center Rez

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the poster is to present radiation protection and dosimetry in the new hot cell facility being constructed as part of the SUSEN project. The hot cell facility is composed of 10 hot cells and 1 semi-hot cell. All shielding is made from steel, the outer wall shielding has thickness of 500 mm, internal wall between hot cells 300 mm with the possibility to extension to 500 mm. The ceiling shielding has a thickness of 400 mm and the floor shielding is 300 mm wide. Shielded windows allow direct view into the hot cells. Their shielding effect is equivalent to 500 mm of steel. The dimension of the window in the control room is 800 mm x 600 mm with a thickness of 900 mm. All important operating data are collected in the central system of hot cells. The system monitors under-pressure level and temperature in each chamber. If necessary it can directly control the ventilation system. Each hot cell is equipped with dose rate probes. The system also measures and evaluates airborne radioactivity in the building

  20. Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    OSCAR,DEBBY S.; WALKER,SHARON ANN; HUNTER,REGINA LEE; WALKER,CHERYL A.

    1999-12-01

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2.

  1. Preliminary safety analysis report for the Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility, Sandia National Laboratories, Albuquerque, New Mexico

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Auxiliary Hot Cell Facility (AHCF) at Sandia National Laboratories, New Mexico (SNL/NM) will be a Hazard Category 3 nuclear facility used to characterize, treat, and repackage radioactive and mixed material and waste for reuse, recycling, or ultimate disposal. A significant upgrade to a previous facility, the Temporary Hot Cell, will be implemented to perform this mission. The following major features will be added: a permanent shield wall; eight floor silos; new roof portals in the hot-cell roof; an upgraded ventilation system; and upgraded hot-cell jib crane; and video cameras to record operations and facilitate remote-handled operations. No safety-class systems, structures, and components will be present in the AHCF. There will be five safety-significant SSCs: hot cell structure, permanent shield wall, shield plugs, ventilation system, and HEPA filters. The type and quantity of radionuclides that could be located in the AHCF are defined primarily by SNL/NM's legacy materials, which include radioactive, transuranic, and mixed waste. The risk to the public or the environment presented by the AHCF is minor due to the inventory limitations of the Hazard Category 3 classification. Potential doses at the exclusion boundary are well below the evaluation guidelines of 25 rem. Potential for worker exposure is limited by the passive design features incorporated in the AHCF and by SNL's radiation protection program. There is no potential for exposure of the public to chemical hazards above the Emergency Response Protection Guidelines Level 2

  2. Development of special seals and systems for a leaktight hot cell facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A hot cell facility has been recently commissioned in the Radiochemistry Laboratory, Indira Gandhi Centre for Atomic Research (IGCAR), Kalpakkam with the objective of carrying out post - irradiation studies on fast reactor fuels as well as PHWR fuels. The hot cell facility has several novel features such as a double containment system with high purity argon atmosphere in the containment box, low probabilities of contamination or radiation exposure to operating personnel and economy in both capital and operating costs. This report describes the different concepts used to achieve a high degree of leaktightness in the stainless steel containment boxes as well as in the cells and the development of special gaskets and O-rings like formed gaskets and co-seals. (author)

  3. PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL SUBSYSTEM PERFORMANCE IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) subsystem is a key component of the National Ignition Facility, enabling the laser to employ an efficient four-pass main amplifier architecture. PEPC relies on a pulsed power technology to initiate and maintain plasma within the cells and to provide the necessary high voltage bias to the cells nonlinear crystals. Ultimately, nearly 300 high-voltage, high-current pulse generators will be deployed in the NIF in support of PEPC. Production of solid-state plasma pulse generators and thyratron-switched pulse generators is now complete, with the majority of the hardware deployed in the facility. An entire cluster (one-fourth of a complete NIF) has been commissioned and is operating on a routine basis, supporting laser shot operations. Another cluster has been deployed, awaiting final commissioning. Activation and commissioning of new hardware continues to progress in parallel, driving toward a goal of completing the PEPC subsystem in late 2007

  4. PLASMA ELECTRODE POCKELS CELL SUBSYSTEM PERFORMANCE IN THE NATIONAL IGNITION FACILITY

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Barbosa, F; Arnold, P; Hinz, A; Zacharias, R; Ollis, C; Fulkerson, E; Mchale, B; Runtal, A; Bishop, C

    2007-07-27

    The Plasma Electrode Pockels Cell (PEPC) subsystem is a key component of the National Ignition Facility, enabling the laser to employ an efficient four-pass main amplifier architecture. PEPC relies on a pulsed power technology to initiate and maintain plasma within the cells and to provide the necessary high voltage bias to the cells nonlinear crystals. Ultimately, nearly 300 high-voltage, high-current pulse generators will be deployed in the NIF in support of PEPC. Production of solid-state plasma pulse generators and thyratron-switched pulse generators is now complete, with the majority of the hardware deployed in the facility. An entire cluster (one-fourth of a complete NIF) has been commissioned and is operating on a routine basis, supporting laser shot operations. Another cluster has been deployed, awaiting final commissioning. Activation and commissioning of new hardware continues to progress in parallel, driving toward a goal of completing the PEPC subsystem in late 2007.

  5. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA's hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R ampersand D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required

  6. Environmental Assessment for decontaminating and decommissioning the General Atomics Hot Cell Facility. Final [report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1995-08-01

    This EA evaluates the proposed action to decontaminate and decommission GA`s hot cell facility in northern San Diego, CA. This facility has been used for DOE and commercial nuclear R&D for > 30 years. About 30,000 cubic feet of decontamination debris and up to 50,000 cubic feet of contaminated soil are to be removed. Low-level radioactive waste would be shipped for disposal. It was determined that the proposal does not constitute a major federal action significantly affecting the human environment according to NEPA; therefore, a finding of no significant impact is made, and an environmental impact statement is not required.

  7. Experience of Hot Cell Renovation Work in CPF (Chemical Processing Facility)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Renovation work for operation room A of the Chemical Processing Facility (CPF) was carried out. Cell renovation work involved disassembly, removal and installation of new equipment for the CA-3 cell of operation room A and the crane renovation work involved the repair of the in-cell crane for the CA-5 cell of operation room A. There were not many examples of renovation work performed on cells under high radiation environment and alpha contamination in Japan. Lessons learnt: With respect to the cell renovation work and crane repair work, a method that gave full consideration to safety was employed and the work was performed without accidents or disaster. Moreover, through improvement of the method, reduction of radioactive exposure of the workers was achieved and a melt reduction device was designed to deal with the radioactive waste material that was generated in the renovation work to achieve significant melt reduction of waste material

  8. Final cleansing of the PIVER prototype vitrification facility -Decontamination of the hot-cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dismantling of the PIVER pilot vitrification facility began in 1984. Under a first contract FI 1D - 0057 with the European Community, all the process equipment was removed from the cell and decontamination was undertaken. The residual in-cell irradiation level was less than 10 mGy.h-1 by the beginning of 1990, allowing brief access of operators to the cell for specific tasks. The cell cleanup work was completed in 1990; the telemanipulators were dismantled, and biological shielding was set up around a few remaining localized hot spots. By the end of the year, the in-cell dose rate had dropped to below 0.2 mGy.h-1. Research and development work on final decontamination processes was conducted from January to July 1991. Four already developed processes (electrolytic, shotpeening, cryogenic and gel) were tested under hostile radioactive conditions on a representative facility to assess their advantages and drawbacks, their effectiveness, and any points requiring special attention for large-scale application. The final decontamination operations were carried out on only a portion of the cell wall ; they did not significantly reduce the overall ambient irradiation level in the cell. (author). 1 ref., 6 figs., 2 tabs., 5 appendices

  9. The GNEP Coupled End-to-End (CETE) Research, Development, and Demonstration Project: Overview of the CETE Test-bed Capabilities and Operations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The U.S. Department of Energy is conducting a complete, coupled end-to-end demonstration of advanced nuclear fuel reprocessing at Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) in support of the Global Nuclear Energy Partnership (GNEP). The test-bed consists of a set of small-scale reprocessing operations that incorporate spent fuel receipt, characterization, head-end processing (fuel shearing and voloxidation), aqueous separations, conversion of fission product wastes to solid forms and conversion of actinides to solid forms for fuel fabrication. The test-bed is configured to process multi-kilogram quantities of light water reactor spent fuel. The processing equipment is located within two facilities that are specially designed to handle highly radioactive materials, the Irradiated Fuels Examination Laboratory (IFEL) and the Radiochemical Engineering Development Center (REDC). This paper provides descriptions of facility capabilities used to perform spent fuel reprocessing activities. (authors)

  10. Reliable Wireless Data Acquisition and Control Techniques within Nuclear Hot Cell Facilities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.L.; Tulenko, J.

    2000-09-20

    On this NEER project the University of Florida has investigated and applied advanced communications techniques to address data acquisition and control problems within the Fuel Conditioning Facility (FCF) of Argonne National Laboratory-West (ANL-W) in Idaho Falls. The goals of this project have been to investigate and apply wireless communications techniques to solve the problem of communicating with and controlling equipment and systems within a nuclear hot cell facility with its attendant high radiation levels. Different wireless techniques, including radio frequency, infrared and power line communications were reviewed. For each technique, the challenges of radiation-hardened implementation were addressed. In addition, it has been a project goal to achieve the highest level of system reliability to ensure safe nuclear operations. Achievement of these goals would allow the eventual elimination of through-the-wall, hardwired cabling that is currently employed in the hot cell, along wit h all of the attendant problems that limit measurement mobility and flexibility.

  11. AECL hot-cell facilities and post-irradiation examination services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) services available at AECL's hot-cell facilities (HCF). The HCFs are used primarily to provide PIE support for operating CANDU power reactors in Canada and abroad, and for the examination of experimental fuel bundles and core components irradiated in research reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) and off-shore. A variety of examinations and analyses are performed ranging from non-destructive visual and dimensional inspections to detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations. Several hot cells are dedicated to mechanical property testing of structural materials and to determine the fitness-for-service of reactor core components. Facility upgrades and the development of innovative examination techniques continue to improve AECL's PIE capabilities. (author)

  12. AECL hot-cell facilities and post-irradiation examination services

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents an overview of the post-irradiation examination (PIE) services available at AECL's hot-cell facilities (HCF). The HCFs are used primarily to provide PIE support for operating CANDU power reactors in Canada and abroad, and for the examination of experimental fuel bundles and core components irradiated in research reactors at the Chalk River Laboratories (CRL) and off-shore. A variety of examinations and analysis are performed ranging from non-destructive visual and dimensional inspections to detailed optical and scanning electron microscopic examinations. Several hot cells are dedicated to mechanical property testing of structural materials and to determine the fitness-for-service of reactor core components. Facility upgrades and the development of innovative examination techniques continue to improve AECL's PIE capabilities. (author)

  13. Radionuclide buildup in FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] heat transport system cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The purpose of the work reported in this paper was to measure the radionuclide buildup in primary heat transport system cell No. 3 at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) and to compare the results with predicted values from a model based on experimental studies and experience at similar reactors. The information obtained is used for maintenance planning and to enhance ability to assess radionuclide buildup in the future at FFTF and in other reactors

  14. RCN4GSC Workshop Report: Modeling a Testbed for Managing Data at the Interface of Biodiversity and (Meta)Genomics, April 2011

    OpenAIRE

    Robbins, Robert J.; Cochrane, Guy; Davies, Neil; Dawyndt, Peter; Kottmann, Renzo; Krishtalka, Leonard; Morrison, Norman; Tuama, Éamonn Ó; San Gil, Inigo; Wooley, John

    2012-01-01

    At the GSC11 meeting (4-6 April 2011, Hinxton, England, the GSC’s genomic biodiversity working group (GBWG) developed an initial model for a data management testbed at the interface of biodiversity with genomics and metagenomics. With representatives of the Global Biodiversity Information Facility (GBIF) participating, it was agreed that the most useful course of action would be for GBIF to collaborate with the GSC in its ongoing GBWG workshops to achieve common goals around interoperability/...

  15. Amplitude variations on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J; Thomas, S; Dillon, D; Gavel, D; Phillion, D; Macintosh, B

    2007-08-14

    High-contrast adaptive optics systems, such as those needed to image extrasolar planets, are known to require excellent wavefront control and diffraction suppression. At the Laboratory for Adaptive Optics on the Extreme Adaptive Optics testbed, we have already demonstrated wavefront control of better than 1 nm rms within controllable spatial frequencies. Corresponding contrast measurements, however, are limited by amplitude variations, including those introduced by the micro-electrical-mechanical-systems (MEMS) deformable mirror. Results from experimental measurements and wave optic simulations of amplitude variations on the ExAO testbed are presented. We find systematic intensity variations of about 2% rms, and intensity variations with the MEMS to be 6%. Some errors are introduced by phase and amplitude mixing because the MEMS is not conjugate to the pupil, but independent measurements of MEMS reflectivity suggest that some error is introduced by small non-uniformities in the reflectivity.

  16. "WBC over DVB-H" Testbed Design, Development and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji Zhanlin

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The wireless billboard channels (WBCs are integral part of the ubiquitous consumer wireless world (UCWW—a wireless next generation network proposal. The WBCs are used by the service providers to broadcast advertisements of their (wireless services to the mobile terminals so that the mobile users may discover and associate with the "best" services following the user-driven ''always best connected and best served'' paradigm. A three-layer system architecture of WBCs established over the digital video broadcasting-handheld (DVB-H standard is presented. The design and development of a corresponding ''WBC over DVB-H'' experimental testbed are described. Various results obtained from the testbed are presented and explained.

  17. A single-axis testbed for slewing control experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamilton, Jonathan; Lee, Gordon K. F.; Juang, Jer-Nan

    1990-01-01

    A simple single-axis testbed is described, and initial experimental results are presented to illustrate collocated and noncollocated control for this structure. The testbed is made up of a pair of single-axis flexible beams attached to a DC servo motor. An optical encoder and strain gauges provide hub and beam position information, respectively. The system is driven by an IBM PC system; with a motor controller, a programmable digital filter processes position error information through user-selected gains and pole-zero configurations. A 25-kHz data acquisition system provides the necessary interface between processor and motor. The control approaches currently being investigated include collocated PD control and noncollocated phase compensation.

  18. Development of a Testbed for Wireless Underground Sensor Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mehmet C. Vuran

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Wireless Underground Sensor Networks (WUSNs constitute one of the promising application areas of the recently developed wireless sensor networking techniques. WUSN is a specialized kind of Wireless Sensor Network (WSN that mainly focuses on the use of sensors that communicate through soil. Recent models for the wireless underground communication channel are proposed but few field experiments were realized to verify the accuracy of the models. The realization of field WUSN experiments proved to be extremely complex and time-consuming in comparison with the traditional wireless environment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first work that proposes guidelines for the development of an outdoor WUSN testbed with the goals of improving the accuracy and reducing of time for WUSN experiments. Although the work mainly aims WUSNs, many of the presented practices can also be applied to generic WSN testbeds.

  19. Development of the IFJ single ion hit facility for cells irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In recent years a single ion hit facility (SIHF) has been constructed at the IFJ ion microprobe. The setup is used for the precise irradiations of living cells by a controlled number of ions. The facility allows investigations in various aspects of biomedical research, such as adaptive response, bystander effect, inverse dose-rate effect, low-dose hypersensitivity, etc. Those investigations have two very important requirements: (i) cells must be examined in their natural state and environment, i.e. without previously being killed, and preferentially, neither fixed nor stained, and (ii) a possibility of automatic irradiation of large number of cells with a computer recognition of their positions must be provided. This work presents some of the crucial features of the off-line and on-line optical systems, including self-developed software responsible for the automatic cell recognition. We also show several tests carried out to determine the efficiency of the whole setup and some segments. In conclusion, the results of our first irradiation measurements performed with living cells are demonstrated. (author)

  20. Remotely Accessible Testbed for Software Defined Radio Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lux, James P.; Lang, Minh; Peters, Kenneth J.; Taylor, Gregory H.

    2012-01-01

    Previous development testbeds have assumed that the developer was physically present in front of the hardware being used. No provision for remote operation of basic functions (power on/off or reset) was made, because the developer/operator was sitting in front of the hardware, and could just push the button manually. In this innovation, a completely remotely accessible testbed has been created, with all diagnostic equipment and tools set up for remote access, and using standardized interfaces so that failed equipment can be quickly replaced. In this testbed, over 95% of the operating hours were used for testing without the developer being physically present. The testbed includes a pair of personal computers, one running Linux and one running Windows. A variety of peripherals is connected via Ethernet and USB (universal serial bus) interfaces. A private internal Ethernet is used to connect to test instruments and other devices, so that the sole connection to the outside world is via the two PCs. An important design consideration was that all of the instruments and interfaces used stable, long-lived industry standards, such as Ethernet, USB, and GPIB (general purpose interface bus). There are no plug-in cards for the two PCs, so there are no problems with finding replacement computers with matching interfaces, device drivers, and installation. The only thing unique to the two PCs is the locally developed software, which is not specific to computer or operating system version. If a device (including one of the computers) were to fail or become unavailable (e.g., a test instrument needed to be recalibrated), replacing it is a straightforward process with a standard, off-the-shelf device.

  1. Building An Information System for a Distributed Testbed

    OpenAIRE

    Smith, Warren; Smallen, Shava

    2013-01-01

    This paper describes an information system designed to support the large volume of monitoring information generated by a distributed testbed. This monitoring information is produced by several subsystems and consists of status and performance data that needs to be federated, distributed, and stored in a timely and easy to use manner. Our approach differs from existing approaches because it federates and distributes information at a low architectural level via messaging; a natural match to man...

  2. Development and experimentation of an eye/brain/task testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harrington, Nora; Villarreal, James

    1987-01-01

    The principal objective is to develop a laboratory testbed that will provide a unique capability to elicit, control, record, and analyze the relationship of operator task loading, operator eye movement, and operator brain wave data in a computer system environment. The ramifications of an integrated eye/brain monitor to the man machine interface are staggering. The success of such a system would benefit users of space and defense, paraplegics, and the monitoring of boring screens (nuclear power plants, air defense, etc.)

  3. Software Defined Networking for CommunityNetwork Testbeds

    OpenAIRE

    Dimogerontakis, Emmanouil; Vilata, Ivan; Navarro, Leandro

    2013-01-01

    Wireless Community Networks have received increasing attention the latest years. In an effort to set the cornerstone for an internet without central authorities and  monopolies, network engineers throughout the world have started creating community networks. To enhance this effort, Community-lab, a wireless community networks testbed, was created allowing researchers to experiment with new protocols and applications in a realistic environment. Nevertheless, this ...

  4. Data management in the cell therapy production facility: the batch process record (BPR).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janssen, We

    2008-01-01

    The activities of cell therapy establishments are associated with substantial amounts of information. For reasons of best practice, regulation and adherence to prevailing standards, the data generated in the course of cell therapy product processing must be recorded and retained in an organized manner. Because cell therapy products are functionally pharmaceuticals, the paradigm of the pharmaceutical manufacturing batch process record (BPR) is proposed as a unit for collecting the data resulting from processing. Considerations for cell-processing facilities for the design of BPR and possible selection of electronic data-recording tools are reviewed, including data to collect in response to regulatory or accreditation mandates and different types of electronic data management tools that may be employed. Additionally, considerations for selection, qualification and validation of computer software for maintenance of the BPR are addressed. PMID:18418768

  5. Radiation shielding test for hot cells of Irradiated Material Examination Facility(IMEF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation shielding test for IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility) hot cell walls was executed using two Co 60 sources with the activities of 1,600 Ci and 30 Ci respectively. The tested walls are made of heavy concrete or lead, with the maximum thickness of 1,200 mm for concrete cell and 200 mm for lead cell. At first, we measured the dose rates for several standard walls and the result was used as standard reference. We also measured dose rates for hot cell walls by the same method and compared with reference. The number of testing points are 6,000 and we found out defect for several points which are mostly located in boundaries between embedded material and concrete. The defective areas were re tested after repaired and results for the areas were acceptable

  6. Bejing synchrotron radiation TXRF facility and its applications on trace element study of cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, Beijing synchrotron radiation TXRF facility and experimental method were described. The minimum detection limits of some elements were tested by using several kinds of standard reference materials. The feasibility of using TXRF in biomedical field is discussed. With this technique small intestine cells of both normal and radiated white mice were analyzed, and the elemental average contents of each single cell are also given. The results indicated that the contents of some trace elements for normal and radiated white mice are greatly different, which may be used to provide valuable reference for clinic medicine. On the other hand, the trace elements of cells of lung and cervix cancer before and after apoptosis were determined by SRTXRF and the changes of trace elements in these cells were discussed. (author)

  7. Procuring Stationary Fuel Cells For CHP: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stinton, David P [ORNL; McGervey, Joseph [SRA International, Inc.; Curran, Scott [ORNL

    2011-11-01

    Federal agency leaders are expressing growing interest in using innovative fuel cell combined heat and power (CHP) technology at their sites, motivated by both executive branch sustainability targets and a desire to lead by example in the transition to a clean energy economy. Fuel cell CHP can deliver reliable electricity and heat with 70% to 85% efficiency. Implementing this technology can be a high efficiency, clean energy solution for agencies striving to meet ambitious sustainability requirements with limited budgets. Fuel cell CHP systems can use natural gas or renewable fuels, such as biogas. Procuring Stationary Fuel Cells for CHP: A Guide for Federal Facility Decision Makers presents an overview of the process for planning and implementing a fuel cell CHP project in a concise, step-by-step format. This guide is designed to help agency leaders turn their interest in fuel cell technology into successful installations. This guide concentrates on larger (100 kW and greater) fuel cell CHP systems and does not consider other fuel cell applications such as cars, forklifts, backup power supplies or small generators (<100 kW). Because fuel cell technologies are rapidly evolving and have high up front costs, their deployment poses unique challenges. The electrical and thermal output of the CHP system must be integrated with the building s energy systems. Innovative financing mechanisms allow agencies to make a make versus buy decision to maximize savings. This guide outlines methods that federal agencies may use to procure fuel cell CHP systems with little or no capital investment. Each agency and division, however, has its own set of procurement procedures. This guide was written as a starting point, and it defers to the reader s set of rules if differences exist. The fuel cell industry is maturing, and project developers are gaining experience in working with federal agencies. Technology improvements, cost reductions, and experienced project developers are making

  8. ATLAS and CMS applications on the WorldGrid testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Ciaschini, V; Fanzago, F; Verlato, M; Vaccarossa, L; Donno, F; Garbellotto, V

    2003-01-01

    WorldGrid is an intercontinental testbed spanning Europe and the US integrating architecturally different Grid implementations based on the Globus toolkit. It has been developed in the context of the DataTAG and iVDGL projects, and successfully demonstrated during the WorldGrid demos at IST2002 (Copenhagen) and SC2002 (Baltimore). Two HEP experiments, ATLAS and CMS, successful exploited the WorldGrid testbed for executing jobs simulating the response of their detectors to physics eve nts produced by real collisions expected at the LHC accelerator starting from 2007. This data intensive activity has been run since many years on local dedicated computing farms consisting of hundreds of nodes and Terabytes of disk and tape storage. Within the WorldGrid testbed, for the first time HEP simulation jobs were submitted and run indifferently on US and European resources, despite of their underlying different Grid implementations, and produced data which could be retrieved and further analysed on the submitting machine...

  9. Planning, Management and Organizational Aspects of the Decommissioning of a Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This CRP project document ''Planning, Management and Organizational Aspects in Decommissioning of a Hot Cell Facility'' aims to describe the establishment of a management organization that ensures that the DD Hot Cell Project is properly and safely conducted and that staff members, who are seconded to the project, have a strong feeling of ownership and being an integral part of the project. The objectives of the decommissioning project of the hot cell facility is to decontaminate the facility and to remove items that cannot be decontaminated on site, in order for the entire hot cell building to become useable for other purposes without any radiological restrictions. The project requires proper communication and coordination with all stakeholders on-site, comprehensive work plans and strict control of the individual working areas and operations. A project of this type obviously requires a strong and well managed and coordinated project organization. DD has established a management system - KMS. The purposes of the KMS are twofold. The system aims to secure the fulfilment of the conditions and requirements of quality set by the nuclear authorities. The system also aims to provide the basis for a rational and economically feasible operation with a high level of safety. One of the main lessons learned in this project is clear that is to ensure that the necessary resources are available and the required expertise is allocated timely for the performance of the project(s) a strong coordination and great flexibility within the DD organization is required. This document describes the approach and considerations from the project management point of view. The document initially gives an introduction to the hot cell decommissioning project followed by issues of the general considerations and planning of the project within the DD, including aspects on organisation, quality assurance and coordination. (author)

  10. Operating experience and radiation protection problems in the working of the radio-metallurgy hot cell facilities at BARC

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Bhabha Atomic Research Centre at Bombay has six hot cell facilities for radiometallurgical investigations of irradiated/failed fuel elements. The hot cell facilities have been provided with certain built-in safety features, a ventilation system, radiation monitoring instruments for various purposes, a centralised air monitoring system and a central panel for display of various alarms. Procedures adopted for radiation protection and contamination control include : (1) radiation leak test for cells and filter efficiency evaluation before cell activation, (2) practices to be followed by frog suit personnel while working in hot cell areas, (3) receipt and handling of irradiated fuel elements, (4) cell filter change operation, (5) checks on high level drains and (6) effluent discharge and waste shipments. Operating experience in the working of these facilities along with radiation accident incidents is described. Data regarding release of activity during normal cell operations, dose rates during various metallurgical operations and personnel exposures are presented. (M.G.B.)

  11. A Dynamic Testbed for Supercavitating Vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanabria, David; Balas, Gary; Arndt, Roger

    2014-11-01

    Underwater vehicles that travel inside a gas cavity offer possibilities for high-speed transportation as a result of reduced contact area with the fluid and drag reduction. Validation and testing of mathematical models and control systems for these vehicles is a challenge due to the cost and complexity of experimental facilities and procedures. In particular, planing forces generated when the vehicle back end pierces the supercavity, can lead to instability and are challenging for validation and testing. A cost efficient approach to the experimental validation of control systems for a supercavitating vehicle is presented in this talk. The test method uses a small scale supercavitating vehicle, free to rotate in a high-speed water tunnel, to evaluate control systems designed for stabilization and tracking of attack angle commands. The vehicle is equipped with a disk cavitator and two lateral fins used for control. The key feature of the validation approach is that planing forces and their effects are captured in the high-speed water tunnel. The proposed validation method is uniquely suitable to validate the robustness of control strategies in the presence of realistic flow conditions and planing. Sponsored by Office of Naval Research.

  12. Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banker, Brian F.; Robinson, Travis

    2016-01-01

    The proposed paper will cover ongoing effort named HESTIA (Human Exploration Spacecraft Testbed for Integration and Advancement), led at the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Johnson Space Center (JSC) to promote a cross-subsystem approach to developing Mars-enabling technologies with the ultimate goal of integrated system optimization. HESTIA also aims to develop the infrastructure required to rapidly test these highly integrated systems at a low cost. The initial focus is on the common fluids architecture required to enable human exploration of mars, specifically between life support and in-situ resource utilization (ISRU) subsystems. An overview of the advancements in both integrated technologies, in infrastructure, in simulation, and in modeling capabilities will be presented, as well as the results and findings of integrated testing,. Due to the enormous mass gear-ratio required for human exploration beyond low-earth orbit, (for every 1 kg of payload landed on Mars, 226 kg will be required on Earth), minimization of surface hardware and commodities is paramount. Hardware requirements can be minimized by reduction of equipment performing similar functions though for different subsystems. If hardware could be developed which meets the requirements of both life support and ISRU it could result in the reduction of primary hardware and/or reduction in spares. Minimization of commodities to the surface of mars can be achieved through the creation of higher efficiency systems producing little to no undesired waste, such as a closed-loop life support subsystem. Where complete efficiency is impossible or impractical, makeup commodities could be manufactured via ISRU. Although, utilization of ISRU products (oxygen and water) for crew consumption holds great promise of reducing demands on life support hardware, there exist concerns as to the purity and transportation of commodities. To date, ISRU has been focused on production rates and purities for

  13. A numerical testbed for remote sensing of aerosols, and its demonstration for evaluating retrieval synergy from a geostationary satellite constellation of GEO-CAPE and GOES-R

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a numerical testbed for remote sensing of aerosols, together with a demonstration for evaluating retrieval synergy from a geostationary satellite constellation. The testbed combines inverse (optimal-estimation) software with a forward model containing linearized code for computing particle scattering (for both spherical and non-spherical particles), a kernel-based (land and ocean) surface bi-directional reflectance facility, and a linearized radiative transfer model for polarized radiance. Calculation of gas absorption spectra uses the HITRAN (HIgh-resolution TRANsmission molecular absorption) database of spectroscopic line parameters and other trace species cross-sections. The outputs of the testbed include not only the Stokes 4-vector elements and their sensitivities (Jacobians) with respect to the aerosol single scattering and physical parameters (such as size and shape parameters, refractive index, and plume height), but also DFS (Degree of Freedom for Signal) values for retrieval of these parameters. This testbed can be used as a tool to provide an objective assessment of aerosol information content that can be retrieved for any constellation of (planned or real) satellite sensors and for any combination of algorithm design factors (in terms of wavelengths, viewing angles, radiance and/or polarization to be measured or used). We summarize the components of the testbed, including the derivation and validation of analytical formulae for Jacobian calculations. Benchmark calculations from the forward model are documented. In the context of NASA's Decadal Survey Mission GEO-CAPE (GEOstationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events), we demonstrate the use of the testbed to conduct a feasibility study of using polarization measurements in and around the O2A band for the retrieval of aerosol height information from space, as well as an to assess potential improvement in the retrieval of aerosol fine and coarse mode aerosol optical depth (AOD) through the

  14. Wavefront Amplitude Variation of TPF's High Contrast Imaging Testbed: Modeling and Experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Fang; Lowman, Andrew E.; Moody, Dwight C.; Niessner, Albert F.; Trauger, John T.

    2005-01-01

    Knowledge of wavefront amplitude is as important as the knowledge of phase for a coronagraphic high contrast imaging system. Efforts have been made to understand various contributions of the amplitude variation in Terrestrial Planet Finder's (TPF) High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT). Modeling of HCIT with as-built mirror surfaces has shown an amplitude variation of 1.3% due to the phase-amplitude mixing for the testbed's front-end optics. Experimental measurements on the testbed have shown the amplitude variation is about 2.5% with the testbed's illumination pattern has a major contribution as the low order amplitude variation.

  15. Cryogenic stopping cell for photofission fragments at the ELI-NP facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Constantin, P., E-mail: paul.constantin@eli-np.ro; Balabanski, D. L. [ELI-NP, IFIN-HH, Str. Reactorului 30, 077125 Bucharest Magurele (Romania); Cuong, P. V. [Centre of Nuclear Physics, Institute of Physics, No. 10, Daotan, Thu le, Badinh, Hanoi (Viet Nam)

    2015-10-15

    The brilliant gamma beam at the future Extreme Light Infrastructure - Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility will be used to generate a beam of exotic neutron-rich isotopes via photofission of actinide targets. We present simulations with the Geant4 toolkit of the photofission process for the design and optimization of the expected performance parameters of the Cryogenic Stopping Cell (CSC). The CSC will be used to extract the photofission fragments into the secondary beam of about 10{sup 6} ions/s. We propose an experimental program to study refractory neutron-rich isotopes.

  16. Metallographic examination of irradiated nuclear fuel elements at Radiometallurgy Hot Cell Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiometallurgy Hot Cells at the Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Bombay, are fully equipped to carry out detailed metallographic examination of irradiated fuel elements. Procedures have been standardi.sed for the various steps needed in the preparation of samples suitable for metallographic observation. Existing facilities afford estimation of various parameters, like grain size and other structural changes in fuel and cladding materials, corrosion aspects and the various types of hydride formation in zircaloy clad, pellet clad interaction between fuel and clad which will help in assessing the actual behaviour of fuel elements during operation. (author)

  17. Automatic Integration Testbeds validation on Open Science Grid

    Science.gov (United States)

    Caballero, J.; Thapa, S.; Gardner, R.; Potekhin, M.

    2011-12-01

    A recurring challenge in deploying high quality production middleware is the extent to which realistic testing occurs before release of the software into the production environment. We describe here an automated system for validating releases of the Open Science Grid software stack that leverages the (pilot-based) PanDA job management system developed and used by the ATLAS experiment. The system was motivated by a desire to subject the OSG Integration Testbed to more realistic validation tests. In particular those which resemble to every extent possible actual job workflows used by the experiments thus utilizing job scheduling at the compute element (CE), use of the worker node execution environment, transfer of data to/from the local storage element (SE), etc. The context is that candidate releases of OSG compute and storage elements can be tested by injecting large numbers of synthetic jobs varying in complexity and coverage of services tested. The native capabilities of the PanDA system can thus be used to define jobs, monitor their execution, and archive the resulting run statistics including success and failure modes. A repository of generic workflows and job types to measure various metrics of interest has been created. A command-line toolset has been developed so that testbed managers can quickly submit "VO-like" jobs into the system when newly deployed services are ready for testing. A system for automatic submission has been crafted to send jobs to integration testbed sites, collecting the results in a central service and generating regular reports for performance and reliability.

  18. Automatic Integration Testbeds validation on Open Science Grid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A recurring challenge in deploying high quality production middleware is the extent to which realistic testing occurs before release of the software into the production environment. We describe here an automated system for validating releases of the Open Science Grid software stack that leverages the (pilot-based) PanDA job management system developed and used by the ATLAS experiment. The system was motivated by a desire to subject the OSG Integration Testbed to more realistic validation tests. In particular those which resemble to every extent possible actual job workflows used by the experiments thus utilizing job scheduling at the compute element (CE), use of the worker node execution environment, transfer of data to/from the local storage element (SE), etc. The context is that candidate releases of OSG compute and storage elements can be tested by injecting large numbers of synthetic jobs varying in complexity and coverage of services tested. The native capabilities of the PanDA system can thus be used to define jobs, monitor their execution, and archive the resulting run statistics including success and failure modes. A repository of generic workflows and job types to measure various metrics of interest has been created. A command-line toolset has been developed so that testbed managers can quickly submit 'VO-like' jobs into the system when newly deployed services are ready for testing. A system for automatic submission has been crafted to send jobs to integration testbed sites, collecting the results in a central service and generating regular reports for performance and reliability.

  19. Benchmarking federated SPARQL query engines: Are existing testbeds enough?

    OpenAIRE

    Montoya, Gabriela; Vidal, María Esther; Corcho, Oscar; Ruckhaus, Edna; Buil-Aranda, C.

    2012-01-01

    Testbeds proposed so far to evaluate, compare, and eventually improve SPARQL query federation systems have still some limitations. Some variables and con�gurations that may have an impact on the behavior of these systems (e.g., network latency, data partitioning and query properties) are not su�ciently de�ned; this a�ects the results and repeatability of independent evaluation studies, and hence the insights that can be obtained from them. In this paper we evaluate FedBench, the most comprehe...

  20. EMERGE - ESnet/MREN Regional Science Grid Experimental NGI Testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mambretti, Joe; DeFanti, Tom; Brown, Maxine

    2001-07-31

    This document is the final report on the EMERGE Science Grid testbed research project from the perspective of the International Center for Advanced Internet Research (iCAIR) at Northwestern University, which was a subcontractor to this UIC project. This report is a compilation of information gathered from a variety of materials related to this project produced by multiple EMERGE participants, especially those at Electronic Visualization Lab (EVL) at the University of Illinois at Chicago (UIC), Argonne National Lab and iCAIR. The EMERGE Science Grid project was managed by Tom DeFanti, PI from EVL at UIC.

  1. Software Testbed for Developing and Evaluating Integrated Autonomous Subsystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ong, James; Remolina, Emilio; Prompt, Axel; Robinson, Peter; Sweet, Adam; Nishikawa, David

    2015-01-01

    To implement fault tolerant autonomy in future space systems, it will be necessary to integrate planning, adaptive control, and state estimation subsystems. However, integrating these subsystems is difficult, time-consuming, and error-prone. This paper describes Intelliface/ADAPT, a software testbed that helps researchers develop and test alternative strategies for integrating planning, execution, and diagnosis subsystems more quickly and easily. The testbed's architecture, graphical data displays, and implementations of the integrated subsystems support easy plug and play of alternate components to support research and development in fault-tolerant control of autonomous vehicles and operations support systems. Intelliface/ADAPT controls NASA's Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT), which comprises batteries, electrical loads (fans, pumps, and lights), relays, circuit breakers, invertors, and sensors. During plan execution, an experimentor can inject faults into the ADAPT testbed by tripping circuit breakers, changing fan speed settings, and closing valves to restrict fluid flow. The diagnostic subsystem, based on NASA's Hybrid Diagnosis Engine (HyDE), detects and isolates these faults to determine the new state of the plant, ADAPT. Intelliface/ADAPT then updates its model of the ADAPT system's resources and determines whether the current plan can be executed using the reduced resources. If not, the planning subsystem generates a new plan that reschedules tasks, reconfigures ADAPT, and reassigns the use of ADAPT resources as needed to work around the fault. The resource model, planning domain model, and planning goals are expressed using NASA's Action Notation Modeling Language (ANML). Parts of the ANML model are generated automatically, and other parts are constructed by hand using the Planning Model Integrated Development Environment, a visual Eclipse-based IDE that accelerates ANML model development. Because native ANML planners are currently

  2. Phoenix Missile Hypersonic Testbed (PMHT): Project Concept Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Thomas P.

    2007-01-01

    An over view of research into a low cost hypersonic research flight test capability to increase the amount of hypersonic flight data to help bridge the large developmental gap between ground testing/analysis and major flight demonstrator Xplanes is provided. The major objectives included: develop an air launched missile booster research testbed; accurately deliver research payloads through programmable guidance to hypersonic test conditions; low cost; a high flight rate minimum of two flights per year and utilize surplus air launched missiles and NASA aircraft.

  3. Smart Grid: Network simulator for smart grid test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smart Grid become more popular, a smaller scale of smart grid test-bed is set up at UNITEN to investigate the performance and to find out future enhancement of smart grid in Malaysia. The fundamental requirement in this project is design a network with low delay, no packet drop and with high data rate. Different type of traffic has its own characteristic and is suitable for different type of network and requirement. However no one understands the natural of traffic in smart grid. This paper presents the comparison between different types of traffic to find out the most suitable traffic for the optimal network performance.

  4. The Living With a Star Program Space Environment Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Janet; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation describes the objective, approach, and scope of the Living With a Star (LWS) program at the Marshall Space Flight Center. Scientists involved in the project seek to refine the understanding of space weather and the role of solar variability in terrestrial climate change. Research and the development of improved analytic methods have led to increased predictive capabilities and the improvement of environment specification models. Specifically, the Space Environment Testbed (SET) project of LWS is responsible for the implementation of improved engineering approaches to observing solar effects on climate change. This responsibility includes technology development, ground test protocol development, and the development of a technology application model/engineering tool.

  5. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed Experiments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xapsos, Michael A.

    2014-01-01

    The focus of the Living With a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbed (SET) program is to improve the performance of hardware in the space radiation environment. The program has developed a payload for the Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) Demonstration and Science Experiments (DSX) spacecraft that is scheduled for launch in August 2015 on the SpaceX Falcon Heavy rocket. The primary structure of DSX is an Evolved Expendable Launch Vehicle (EELV) Secondary Payload Adapter (ESPA) ring. DSX will be in a Medium Earth Orbit (MEO). This oral presentation will describe the SET payload.

  6. Conceptual design of the hot cell facility universal docking station at ITER

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Between main shutdowns of the ITER machine, in-vessel components and Iter Remote Maintenance System (IRMS) are transferred between the Tokamak complex and the Hot Cell Facility using different types of sealed casks. Transfer Casks have different physical interfaces with the Vacuum Vessel, which need to be the same at the docking stations of the HCF. It means that in-vessel components and IRMS are cleaned in the same cells, which is in fact not convenient. Furthermore, logistic studies showed that the use rate of the cells is very inhomogeneous. In order to have dedicated cell for decontamination of Remote Handling tools, in order to increase the operability efficiency and to removes the hot cell docking operation from the critical path, the concept of a universal docking station has been investigated. Based on an existing design, the work was focused on a review of requirements, the re-design and the integration within the HCF layout. The universal docking station has been proposed and is now integrated in HCF design.

  7. Conceptual design of the hot cell facility universal docking station at ITER

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dammann, A., E-mail: alexis.dammann@iter.org [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Benchikhoune, M.; Friconneau, J.P.; Ivanov, V. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Lemee, A. [SOGETI High Tech, 180 Rue Rene Descartes, 13851 Aix en Provence (France); Martins, J.P. [ITER Organization, CS 90 046, 13067 St Paul Lez Durance Cedex (France); Tamassy, G. [SOGETI High Tech, 180 Rue Rene Descartes, 13851 Aix en Provence (France)

    2011-10-15

    Between main shutdowns of the ITER machine, in-vessel components and Iter Remote Maintenance System (IRMS) are transferred between the Tokamak complex and the Hot Cell Facility using different types of sealed casks. Transfer Casks have different physical interfaces with the Vacuum Vessel, which need to be the same at the docking stations of the HCF. It means that in-vessel components and IRMS are cleaned in the same cells, which is in fact not convenient. Furthermore, logistic studies showed that the use rate of the cells is very inhomogeneous. In order to have dedicated cell for decontamination of Remote Handling tools, in order to increase the operability efficiency and to removes the hot cell docking operation from the critical path, the concept of a universal docking station has been investigated. Based on an existing design, the work was focused on a review of requirements, the re-design and the integration within the HCF layout. The universal docking station has been proposed and is now integrated in HCF design.

  8. Radioiodine speciation in the hot cell effluent gases of a radiopharmaceutical production facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to characterize the various chemical forms of airborne radioiodine species, grab-sampling measurements were conducted at the hot cell laboratory of a radiopharmaceutical production facility, using a selective-adsorbent-iodine filter system. Volatile radioiodine species were produced in the hot cell process which extracted the fission product 99Mo from the irradiated uranium target. The effluent gases were then released through the hot cell filter bank and the main filter bank. Two samplings were made, one at the inlet and one at the outlet of the hot cell filter bank. In comparison with other radioiodine isotopes detected, higher than expected concentrations of 132I were found, primarily in the form of organic iodide--an observation that could be explained by the beta decay of 132Te, the precursor of 132I, in the hot cell waste solution. The relative distribution of airborne 132I was considerably different from that of other iodine radioisotopes. An unexpected component of these distributions was radioiodine penetrating the silver zeolite filter and adsorbed on a triethylenediamine (TEDA) impregnated charcoal filter

  9. One-Step Facile Synthesis of a Simple Hole Transport Material for Efficient Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chen, Hu

    2016-04-04

    A hole transporting material was designed for use in perovskite solar cells, with a facile one-step synthesis from inexpensive, com-mercially available reagents. The molecule comprises a central fluorinated phenyl core with pendant aryl amines, namely, 3,6-difluoro-N1,N1,N2,N2,N4,N4,N5,N5-octakis(4-methoxyphenyl)benzene-1,2,4,5-tetraamine (DFTAB). A power conversion efficiency of up to 10.4% was achieved in a mesoporous perovskite device architecture. The merits of a simple and potentially low cost syn-thetic route as well as promising performance in perovskite devices, encourages further development of this materials class as new low-cost hole transporting materials for the scale up of perovskite solar cells.

  10. Software architecture design for a dynamic spectrum allocation-enabled cognitive radio testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tonelli, Oscar; Berardinelli, Gilberto; Cattoni, Andrea Fabio;

    2011-01-01

    for the definition of a CR-based, local area-oriented testbed platform is introduced. In particular, the testbed design in relation to the selected scenario and the architecture of the developed software framework are presented. An analysis of the performance of key software functionalities is also provided......: preliminary results show a computational load compatible with nowadays Commercial-Off-The-Shelf computers....

  11. Contrast analysis and stability on the ExAO testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J; Thomas, S; Gavel, D; Dillon, D; Macintosh, B

    2008-06-10

    High-contrast adaptive optics systems, such as those needed to image extrasolar planets, are known to require excellent wavefront control and diffraction suppression. The Laboratory for Adaptive Optics at UC Santa Cruz is investigating limits to high-contrast imaging in support of the Gemini Planet Imager. Previous contrast measurements were made with a simple single-opening prolate spheroid shaped pupil that produced a limited region of high-contrast, particularly when wavefront errors were corrected with the 1024-actuator Boston Micromachines MEMS deformable mirror currently in use on the testbed. A more sophisticated shaped pupil is now being used that has a much larger region of interest facilitating a better understanding of high-contrast measurements. In particular we examine the effect of heat sources in the testbed on PSF stability. We find that rms image motion scales as 0.02 {lambda}/D per watt when the heat source is near the pupil plane. As a result heat sources of greater than 5 watts should be avoided near pupil planes for GPI. The safest place to introduce heat is near a focal plane. Heat also can effect the standard deviation of the high-contrast region but in the final instrument other sources of error should be more significant.

  12. STRS Radio Service Software for NASA's SCaN Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mortensen, Dale J.; Bishop, Daniel Wayne; Chelmins, David T.

    2013-01-01

    NASA's Space Communication and Navigation(SCaN) Testbed was launched to the International Space Station in 2012. The objective is to promote new software defined radio technologies and associated software application reuse, enabled by this first flight of NASA's Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) architecture standard. Pre-launch testing with the testbed's software defined radios was performed as part of system integration. Radio services for the JPL SDR were developed during system integration to allow the waveform application to operate properly in the space environment, especially considering thermal effects. These services include receiver gain control, frequency offset, IQ modulator balance, and transmit level control. Development, integration, and environmental testing of the radio services will be described. The added software allows the waveform application to operate properly in the space environment, and can be reused by future experimenters testing different waveform applications. Integrating such services with the platform provided STRS operating environment will attract more users, and these services are candidates for interface standardization via STRS.

  13. Benchmarking Diagnostic Algorithms on an Electrical Power System Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurtoglu, Tolga; Narasimhan, Sriram; Poll, Scott; Garcia, David; Wright, Stephanie

    2009-01-01

    Diagnostic algorithms (DAs) are key to enabling automated health management. These algorithms are designed to detect and isolate anomalies of either a component or the whole system based on observations received from sensors. In recent years a wide range of algorithms, both model-based and data-driven, have been developed to increase autonomy and improve system reliability and affordability. However, the lack of support to perform systematic benchmarking of these algorithms continues to create barriers for effective development and deployment of diagnostic technologies. In this paper, we present our efforts to benchmark a set of DAs on a common platform using a framework that was developed to evaluate and compare various performance metrics for diagnostic technologies. The diagnosed system is an electrical power system, namely the Advanced Diagnostics and Prognostics Testbed (ADAPT) developed and located at the NASA Ames Research Center. The paper presents the fundamentals of the benchmarking framework, the ADAPT system, description of faults and data sets, the metrics used for evaluation, and an in-depth analysis of benchmarking results obtained from testing ten diagnostic algorithms on the ADAPT electrical power system testbed.

  14. Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed: Results and Future Work

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J W; Sommargren, G; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Severson, S; Dillon, D; Sheinis, A; Palmer, D; Kasdin, J; Olivier, S

    2004-07-15

    'Extreme' adaptive optics systems are optimized for ultra-high-contrast applications, such as ground-based extrasolar planet detection. The Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed at UC Santa Cruz is being used to investigate and develop technologies for high-contrast imaging, especially wavefront control. A simple optical design allows us to minimize wavefront error and maximize the experimentally achievable contrast before progressing to a more complex set-up. A phase shifting diffraction interferometer is used to measure wavefront errors with sub-nm precision and accuracy. We have demonstrated RMS wavefront errors of <1.3 nm and a contrast of >10{sup -7} over a substantial region using a shaped pupil. Current work includes the installation and characterization of a 1024-actuator Micro-Electro-Mechanical- Systems (MEMS) deformable mirror, manufactured by Boston Micro-Machines, which will be used for wavefront control. In our initial experiments we can flatten the deformable mirror to 1.8-nm RMS wavefront error within a control radius of 5-13 cycles per aperture. Ultimately this testbed will be used to test all aspects of the system architecture for an extrasolar planet-finding AO system.

  15. HEP Applications Evaluation of the EDG Testbed and Middleware

    CERN Document Server

    Augustin, I; Closier, J; van Herwijnen, E; Blaising, J J; Boutigny, D; Charlot, C; Garonne, V; Tsaregorodtsev, A; Bos, K; Templon, J; Capiluppi, P; Fanfani, A; Barbera, R; Negri, G; Perini, L; Resconi, S; Sitta, M; Reale, M; Vicinanza, D; Bagnasco, S; Cerello, P; Sciaba, A; Smirnova, O; Colling, D; Harris, F; Burke, Stephen

    2003-01-01

    Workpackage 8 of the European Datagrid project was formed in January 2001 with representatives from the four LHC experiments, and with experiment independent people from five of the six main EDG partners. In September 2002 WP8 was strengthened by the addition of effort from BaBar and D0. The original mandate of WP8 was, following the definition of short- and long-term requirements, to port experiment software to the EDG middleware and testbed environment. A major additional activity has been testing the basic functionality and performance of this environment. This paper reviews experiences and evaluations in the areas of job submission, data management, mass storage handling, information systems and monitoring. It also comments on the problems of remote debugging, the portability of code, and scaling problems with increasing numbers of jobs, sites and nodes. Reference is made to the pioneeering work of Atlas and CMS in integrating the use of the EDG Testbed into their data challenges. A forward look is made t...

  16. Off-road perception testbed vehicle design and evaluation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spofford, John R.; Herron, Jennifer B.; Anhalt, David J.; Morgenthaler, Matthew K.; DeHerrera, Clinton

    2003-09-01

    Off-road robotics efforts such as DARPA"s PerceptOR program have motivated the development of testbed vehicles capable of sustained operation in a variety of terrain and environments. This paper describes the retrofitting of a minimally-modified ATV chassis into such a testbed which has been used by multiple programs for autonomous mobility development and sensor characterization. Modular mechanical interfaces for sensors and equipment enclosures enabled integration of multiple payload configurations. The electric power subsystem was capable of short-term operation on batteries with refueled generation for continuous operation. Processing subsystems were mounted in sealed, shock-dampened enclosures with heat exchangers for internal cooling to protect against external dust and moisture. The computational architecture was divided into a real-time vehicle control layer and an expandable high level processing and perception layer. The navigation subsystem integrated real time kinematic GPS with a three-axis IMU for accurate vehicle localization and sensor registration. The vehicle software system was based on the MarsScape architecture developed under DARPA"s MARS program. Vehicle mobility software capabilities included route planning, waypoint navigation, teleoperation, and obstacle detection and avoidance. The paper describes the vehicle design in detail and summarizes its performance during field testing.

  17. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed: Enabling Techniques for High Angular Resolution Astronomy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, S. A.; Armstrong, T.; Frey, Bradley J.; Jung, J.; Kirk, J.; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Lyon, R.; Maher, Stephen; Martino, Anthony J.; Pauls, T.

    2007-01-01

    The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) was designed to develop techniques for wide-field of view imaging interferometry, using "double-Fourier" methods. These techniques will be important for a wide range of future spacebased interferometry missions. We have provided simple demonstrations of the methodology already, and continuing development of the testbed will lead to higher data rates, improved data quality, and refined algorithms for image reconstruction. At present, the testbed effort includes five lines of development; automation of the testbed, operation in an improved environment, acquisition of large high-quality datasets, development of image reconstruction algorithms, and analytical modeling of the testbed. We discuss the progress made towards the first four of these goals; the analytical modeling is discussed in a separate paper within this conference.

  18. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of Hot Cell Facilities in the United States and Comparison with the Studsvik Facility for Solid and Liquid Waste

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Varley, Geoff; Rusch, Chris [NAC International, Atlanta, GA (United States)

    2006-07-15

    This report presents the plans, processes and results of the decontamination and decommissioning of the Hot Cell Facility in Building 23 at the General Atomics Torrey Pines Mesa Facility (HCF) and compares the program and cost of decommissioning HCF with the Swedish cost estimate for decontamination and decommissioning of the HM hot cell and wastes treatment facility at Studsvik in Sweden. The HCF had three main hot cells and was licensed to: Receive, handle and ship radioactive materials; Remotely handle, examine and store irradiated fuel materials; Extract tritium (engineering scale); Support new reactor production development; Develop, fabricate and inspect UO{sub 2} - BeO fuel materials. The HM facility in Studsvik was constructed to handle and package medium-active solid and liquid wastes, prior to disposal. Central to the facility is a conventional hot cell including three work stations, serviced by master slave manipulators. Other parts of the facility include holding tanks for liquid wastes and slurries, a centrifuge room, as well as an encapsulation station where drummed wastes can be encapsulated in cement, offices, laboratories and workshops and so on, as well as building and cell ventilation systems. Decontamination and decommissioning of the HCF took place during 1993 through 2001. The objective was to obtain regulatory release of the site so that it could be used on an unrestricted basis. Based on data from extensive hazardous and radiological materials characterization, GA evaluated four decommissioning options and selected dismantling as the only option that would satisfy the decommissioning objective. The decontamination and decommissioning scope included the following actions. 1. Remove the legacy waste that consisted of radioactive wastes stored at the HCF consisting of 21,434 kg of irradiated fuel material (IFM) that was owned by the US DoE and store the waste in temporary storage set up at the GA site. 2. Actual Decontamination and

  19. An Applied Study on the Decontamination and Decommissioning of Hot Cell Facilities in the United States and Comparison with the Studsvik Facility for Solid and Liquid Waste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report presents the plans, processes and results of the decontamination and decommissioning of the Hot Cell Facility in Building 23 at the General Atomics Torrey Pines Mesa Facility (HCF) and compares the program and cost of decommissioning HCF with the Swedish cost estimate for decontamination and decommissioning of the HM hot cell and wastes treatment facility at Studsvik in Sweden. The HCF had three main hot cells and was licensed to: Receive, handle and ship radioactive materials; Remotely handle, examine and store irradiated fuel materials; Extract tritium (engineering scale); Support new reactor production development; Develop, fabricate and inspect UO2 - BeO fuel materials. The HM facility in Studsvik was constructed to handle and package medium-active solid and liquid wastes, prior to disposal. Central to the facility is a conventional hot cell including three work stations, serviced by master slave manipulators. Other parts of the facility include holding tanks for liquid wastes and slurries, a centrifuge room, as well as an encapsulation station where drummed wastes can be encapsulated in cement, offices, laboratories and workshops and so on, as well as building and cell ventilation systems. Decontamination and decommissioning of the HCF took place during 1993 through 2001. The objective was to obtain regulatory release of the site so that it could be used on an unrestricted basis. Based on data from extensive hazardous and radiological materials characterization, GA evaluated four decommissioning options and selected dismantling as the only option that would satisfy the decommissioning objective. The decontamination and decommissioning scope included the following actions. 1. Remove the legacy waste that consisted of radioactive wastes stored at the HCF consisting of 21,434 kg of irradiated fuel material (IFM) that was owned by the US DoE and store the waste in temporary storage set up at the GA site. 2. Actual Decontamination and Dismantlement

  20. Deployment, Commissioning and Operation of Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells in the National Ignition Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnold, P A; Ollis, C W; Hinz, A; Robb, C; Primdahl, K A; Watson, J J; O' Brien, M D; Funkhouser, W G; Biltoft, P J; Shelton, R T; Tapley, W C; DeHope, W J

    2003-12-01

    Large aperture Plasma Electrode Pockels Cells (PEPCs) are an enabling technology in the National Ignition Facility (NIF) at the Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The Pockels cells allow the NIF laser to take advantage of multipass main amplifier architecture, thus reducing costs and physical size of the facility. Each Pockels cell comprises four 40-cm x 40-cm apertures arranged in a 4 x 1 array. The combination of the Pockels cell and a thin-film polarizer, also configured in a 4 x 1 array, forms an optical switch that is key to achieving the required multi-pass operation. The operation of the PEPC is a follows: Before the arrival of the laser pulse, optically transparent, low-density helium plasmas are initiated to serve as electrodes for the KDP crystals mounted in the Pockels cell. During beam propagation through the main laser cavity a longitudinal electric field is impressed on the electro-optic crystals. The polarization of the propagating beams is rotated by 90{sup o} on each of two passes, thereby allowing the beam to be trapped in the main laser amplifier cavity for a total of four passes before being switched out into the cavity spatial filter. The physics aspects of the PEPC are well documented. Consequently, this paper will emphasize the PEPC subsystem in the context of its role and relevance within the broader NIF laser system, provide a view of the complexity of the subsystem and give an overview of PEPC's interactions with other elements of NIF, including interfaces to the Beamline Infrastructure, the NIF Timing Subsystem, and the Integrated Computer Control System (ICCS); along with dependence on the Optics Production, Transport and Handling (T&H), and Assembly, Integration and Refurbishment (AIR) and Operations organizations. Further, we will discuss implementation details related to the functional blocks and individual components that comprise PEPC, with particular emphasis on the unique constraints placed on the elements and the

  1. REMOTE IN-CELL SAMPLING IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM AT THESAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Marzolf, A

    2007-11-26

    Remote Systems Engineering (RSE) of the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) in combination with the Defense Waste Processing Facility(DWPF) Engineering and Operations has evaluated the existing equipment and processes used in the facility sample cells for 'pulling' samples from the radioactive waste stream and performing equipment in-cell repairs/replacements. RSE has designed and tested equipment for improving remote in-cell sampling evolutions and reducing the time required for in-cell maintenance of existing equipment. The equipment within the present process tank sampling system has been in constant use since the facility start-up over 17 years ago. At present, the method for taking samples within the sample cells produces excessive maintenance and downtime due to frequent failures relative to the sampling station equipment and manipulator. Location and orientation of many sampling stations within the sample cells is not conducive to manipulator operation. The overextension of manipulators required to perform many in-cell operations is a major cause of manipulator failures. To improve sampling operations and reduce downtime due to equipment maintenance, a Portable Sampling Station (PSS), wireless in-cell cameras, and new commercially available sampling technology has been designed, developed and/or adapted and tested. The uniqueness of the design(s), the results of the scoping tests, and the benefits relative to in-cell operation and reduction of waste are presented.

  2. REMOTE IN-CELL SAMPLING IMPROVEMENTS PROGRAM AT THESAVANNAH RIVER SITE (SRS) DEFENSE WASTE PROCESSING FACILITY (DWPF)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Remote Systems Engineering (RSE) of the Savannah River National Lab (SRNL) in combination with the Defense Waste Processing Facility(DWPF) Engineering and Operations has evaluated the existing equipment and processes used in the facility sample cells for 'pulling' samples from the radioactive waste stream and performing equipment in-cell repairs/replacements. RSE has designed and tested equipment for improving remote in-cell sampling evolutions and reducing the time required for in-cell maintenance of existing equipment. The equipment within the present process tank sampling system has been in constant use since the facility start-up over 17 years ago. At present, the method for taking samples within the sample cells produces excessive maintenance and downtime due to frequent failures relative to the sampling station equipment and manipulator. Location and orientation of many sampling stations within the sample cells is not conducive to manipulator operation. The overextension of manipulators required to perform many in-cell operations is a major cause of manipulator failures. To improve sampling operations and reduce downtime due to equipment maintenance, a Portable Sampling Station (PSS), wireless in-cell cameras, and new commercially available sampling technology has been designed, developed and/or adapted and tested. The uniqueness of the design(s), the results of the scoping tests, and the benefits relative to in-cell operation and reduction of waste are presented

  3. A Numerical Testbed for Remote Sensing of Aerosols, and its Demonstration for Evaluating Retrieval Synergy from a Geostationary Satellite Constellation of GEO-CAPE and GOES-R

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jun; Xu, Xiaoguang; Ding, Shouguo; Zeng, Jing; Spurr, Robert; Liu, Xiong; Chance, Kelly; Mishchenko, Michael I.

    2014-01-01

    We present a numerical testbed for remote sensing of aerosols, together with a demonstration for evaluating retrieval synergy from a geostationary satellite constellation. The testbed combines inverse (optimal-estimation) software with a forward model containing linearized code for computing particle scattering (for both spherical and non-spherical particles), a kernel-based (land and ocean) surface bi-directional reflectance facility, and a linearized radiative transfer model for polarized radiance. Calculation of gas absorption spectra uses the HITRAN (HIgh-resolution TRANsmission molecular absorption) database of spectroscopic line parameters and other trace species cross-sections. The outputs of the testbed include not only the Stokes 4-vector elements and their sensitivities (Jacobians) with respect to the aerosol single scattering and physical parameters (such as size and shape parameters, refractive index, and plume height), but also DFS (Degree of Freedom for Signal) values for retrieval of these parameters. This testbed can be used as a tool to provide an objective assessment of aerosol information content that can be retrieved for any constellation of (planned or real) satellite sensors and for any combination of algorithm design factors (in terms of wavelengths, viewing angles, radiance and/or polarization to be measured or used). We summarize the components of the testbed, including the derivation and validation of analytical formulae for Jacobian calculations. Benchmark calculations from the forward model are documented. In the context of NASA's Decadal Survey Mission GEOCAPE (GEOstationary Coastal and Air Pollution Events), we demonstrate the use of the testbed to conduct a feasibility study of using polarization measurements in and around the O2 A band for the retrieval of aerosol height information from space, as well as an to assess potential improvement in the retrieval of aerosol fine and coarse mode aerosol optical depth (AOD) through the

  4. Performance of the Fuel Conditioning Facility electronic in-cell mass balances

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An approach to error estimation and measurement control in the analysis of the balance measurements of mass standards on the in-cell electronic mass balances of the Fuel Conditioning Facility is presented. In light of measurement data from one year of operation, the algorithms proposed are evaluated. The need to take into account the effects of facility operations on the estimates of measurement uncertainty is demonstrated. In the case of a newly installed balance, where no historical data exists, an ad hoc procedure of adding a term which takes into account the operational variability is proposed. This procedure allows a sufficiently long operation so as to collect data for the estimate of the contribution of operational effects to the uncertainty estimate. An algorithm for systematically taking into account historical data is developed and demonstrated for two balances over two calibration periods. The algorithm, both asymptotically and in the two samples cases, has the necessary desirable properties for estimating the uncertainty in the measurements of the balances

  5. Decontamination Project for Cell G of the Metal Recovery Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of the decontamination effort in Cell G at the Metal Recovery Facility, Building 3505, located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was two-fold: to determine the effectiveness of the dry decontamination technique employed and to provide data required to assess whether additional decontamination using this method would be beneficial in the eventual decommissioning of the facility. Allied Technology Group (ATG) was contracted to remove a portion of the concrete surface in Cell G by a technique known as scabbling. Some metallic cell components were also scabbled to remove paint and other surface debris. Generally, the scabbling operation was a success. Levels of contamination were greatly reduced. The depth of contaminant penetration into the concrete surfaces of certain areas was much greater than had been anticipated, necessitating the removal of additional concrete and extending ATG's period of performance. Scabbling and other related techniques will be extremely useful in the decontamination and decommissioning of other nuclear facilities with similar radiological profiles

  6. Membrane-based electrolyte sheets for facile fabrication of flexible dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: → A new electrolyte sheet was developed for flexible dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs). → It is composed of a porous polyethylene membranes and ionic liquid electrolytes. → The electrochemical properties of the electrolyte sheets were evaluated. → High-performance flexible DSCs with the electrolyte sheets were facilely fabricated. - Abstract: New electrolyte sheets based on porous polyethylene membranes for flexible dye-sensitized solar cells have been developed. Ionic liquid electrolytes are accommodated in commercial polyethylene membranes to form the electrolyte sheets. The morphology of membranes and iodine concentrations in ionic liquid are varied. The electrochemical measurement results show that the morphology, pore structure, and iodine concentration affect mass transport in electrolyte sheet, as well as charge transfer between platinum electrode and electrolyte sheet greatly. Based on these electrolyte sheets, lamination method instead of conventional vacuum injection of electrolyte is used to fabricate flexible dye-sensitized solar cells. Optimal device with an open-circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.63 V, a fill factor of 0.58, and a short-circuit current density (Jsc) of 6.17 mA cm-2 at an incident light intensity of 100 mW cm-2 is obtained, which yields a light-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 2.25%.

  7. Space Station technology testbed: 2010 deep space transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Alan C.

    1993-12-01

    A space station in a crew-tended or permanently crewed configuration will provide major R&D opportunities for innovative, technology and materials development and advanced space systems testing. A space station should be designed with the basic infrastructure elements required to grow into a major systems technology testbed. This space-based technology testbed can and should be used to support the development of technologies required to expand our utilization of near-Earth space, the Moon and the Earth-to-Jupiter region of the Solar System. Space station support of advanced technology and materials development will result in new techniques for high priority scientific research and the knowledge and R&D base needed for the development of major, new commercial product thrusts. To illustrate the technology testbed potential of a space station and to point the way to a bold, innovative approach to advanced space systems' development, a hypothetical deep space transport development and test plan is described. Key deep space transport R&D activities are described would lead to the readiness certification of an advanced, reusable interplanetary transport capable of supporting eight crewmembers or more. With the support of a focused and highly motivated, multi-agency ground R&D program, a deep space transport of this type could be assembled and tested by 2010. Key R&D activities on a space station would include: (1) experimental research investigating the microgravity assisted, restructuring of micro-engineered, materials (to develop and verify the in-space and in-situ 'tuning' of materials for use in debris and radiation shielding and other protective systems), (2) exposure of microengineered materials to the space environment for passive and operational performance tests (to develop in-situ maintenance and repair techniques and to support the development, enhancement, and implementation of protective systems, data and bio-processing systems, and virtual reality and

  8. SPHERES: Design of a Formation Flying Testbed for ISS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sell, S. W.; Chen, S. E.

    2002-01-01

    The SPHERES (Synchronized Position Hold Engage and Reorient Experimental Satellites) payload is an innovative formation-flying spacecraft testbed currently being developed for use internally aboard the International Space Station (ISS). The purpose of the testbed is to provide a cost-effective, long duration, replenishable, and easily reconfigurable platform with representative dynamics for the development and validation of metrology, formation flying, and autonomy algorithms. The testbed components consist of three 8-inch diameter free-flying "satellites," five ultrasound beacons, and an ISS laptop workstation. Each satellite is self-contained with on-board battery power, cold-gas propulsion (CO2), and processing systems. Satellites use two packs of eight standard AA batteries for approximately 90 minutes of lifetime while beacons last the duration of the mission powered by a single AA battery. The propulsion system uses pressurized carbon dioxide gas, stored in replaceable tanks, distributed through an adjustable regulator and associated tubing to twelve thrusters located on the faces of the satellites. A Texas Instruments C6701 DSP handles control algorithm data while an FPGA manages all sensor data, timing, and communication processes on the satellite. All three satellites communicate with each other and with the controlling laptop via a wireless RF link. Five ultrasound beacons, located around a predetermined work area, transmit ultrasound signals that are received by each satellite. The system effectively acts as a pseudo-GPS system, allowing the satellites to determine position and attitude and to navigate within the test arena. The payload hardware are predominantly Commercial Off The Shelf (COTS) products with the exception of custom electronics boards, selected propulsion system adaptors, and beacon and satellite structural elements. Operationally, SPHERES will run in short duration test sessions with approximately two weeks between each session. During

  9. Space Station technology testbed: 2010 deep space transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holt, Alan C.

    1993-01-01

    A space station in a crew-tended or permanently crewed configuration will provide major R&D opportunities for innovative, technology and materials development and advanced space systems testing. A space station should be designed with the basic infrastructure elements required to grow into a major systems technology testbed. This space-based technology testbed can and should be used to support the development of technologies required to expand our utilization of near-Earth space, the Moon and the Earth-to-Jupiter region of the Solar System. Space station support of advanced technology and materials development will result in new techniques for high priority scientific research and the knowledge and R&D base needed for the development of major, new commercial product thrusts. To illustrate the technology testbed potential of a space station and to point the way to a bold, innovative approach to advanced space systems' development, a hypothetical deep space transport development and test plan is described. Key deep space transport R&D activities are described would lead to the readiness certification of an advanced, reusable interplanetary transport capable of supporting eight crewmembers or more. With the support of a focused and highly motivated, multi-agency ground R&D program, a deep space transport of this type could be assembled and tested by 2010. Key R&D activities on a space station would include: (1) experimental research investigating the microgravity assisted, restructuring of micro-engineered, materials (to develop and verify the in-space and in-situ 'tuning' of materials for use in debris and radiation shielding and other protective systems), (2) exposure of microengineered materials to the space environment for passive and operational performance tests (to develop in-situ maintenance and repair techniques and to support the development, enhancement, and implementation of protective systems, data and bio-processing systems, and virtual reality and

  10. Cell Locating with the Image Analysis System of the CAS-LIBB Single-Particle Microbeam Facility

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang Xiaohua; Wang Shaohu; Yu Zengliang

    2005-01-01

    A single-particle microbeam facility has been constructed at the Key Laboratory of Ion Beam Bioengineering (LIBB), Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS). At the CAS-LIBB microbeam facility, we have developed protocols to place exact numbers of charged particles through nuclear centroids of cells, at defined positions in the cytoplasm relative to the nucleus, and through defined fractions of cells in a population. In this paper, we address the methods for nucleus, cytoplasm and bystander (either a single or an exact number of ions is delivered to a certain percentage of cells in a population to study the bystander effects of radiation) irradiation in detail from the precision of target finding and cell locating in the image analysis system. Moreover, for cells touching slightly in an image, a watershed method is used to separate these touching objects;after that, the number of objects in an image is counted accurately and the irradiation points are located precisely.

  11. X-ray Pulsar Navigation Algorithms and Testbed for SEXTANT

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winternitz, Luke M. B.; Hasouneh, Monther A.; Mitchell, Jason W.; Valdez, Jennifer E.; Price, Samuel R.; Semper, Sean R.; Yu, Wayne H.; Ray, Paul S.; Wood, Kent S.; Arzoumanian, Zaven; Grendreau, Keith C.

    2015-01-01

    The Station Explorer for X-ray Timing and Navigation Technology (SEXTANT) is a NASA funded technologydemonstration. SEXTANT will, for the first time, demonstrate real-time, on-board X-ray Pulsar-based Navigation (XNAV), a significant milestone in the quest to establish a GPS-like navigation capability available throughout our Solar System and beyond. This paper describes the basic design of the SEXTANT system with a focus on core models and algorithms, and the design and continued development of the GSFC X-ray Navigation Laboratory Testbed (GXLT) with its dynamic pulsar emulation capability. We also present early results from GXLT modeling of the combined NICER X-ray timing instrument hardware and SEXTANT flight software algorithms.

  12. Test applications for heterogeneous real-time network testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mines, R.F.; Knightly, E.W.

    1994-07-01

    This paper investigates several applications for a heterogeneous real-time network testbed. The network is heterogeneous in terms of network devices, technologies, protocols, and algorithms. The network is real-time in that its services can provide per-connection end-to-end performance guarantees. Although different parts of the network use different algorithms, all components have the necessary mechanisms to provide performance guarantees: admission control and priority scheduling. Three applications for this network are described in this paper: a video conferencing tool, a tool for combustion modeling using distributed computing, and an MPEG video archival system. Each has minimum performance requirements that must be provided by the network. By analyzing these applications, we provide insights to the traffic characteristics and performance requirements of practical real-time loads.

  13. The Benchmark Extensible Tractable Testbed Engineering Resource (BETTER)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Siranosian, Antranik Antonio [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Schembri, Philip Edward [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States); Miller, Nathan Andrew [Los Alamos National Lab. (LANL), Los Alamos, NM (United States)

    2016-06-02

    The Benchmark Extensible Tractable Testbed Engineering Resource (BETTER) is proposed as a family of modular test bodies that are intended to support engineering capability development by helping to identify weaknesses and needs. Weapon systems, subassemblies, and components are often complex and difficult to test and analyze, resulting in low confidence and high uncertainties in experimental and simulated results. The complexities make it difficult to distinguish between inherent uncertainties and errors due to insufficient capabilities. BETTER test bodies will first use simplified geometries and materials such that testing, data collection, modeling and simulation can be accomplished with high confidence and low uncertainty. Modifications and combinations of simple and well-characterized BETTER test bodies can then be used to increase complexity in order to reproduce relevant mechanics and identify weaknesses. BETTER can provide both immediate and long-term improvements in testing and simulation capabilities. This document presents the motivation, concept, benefits and examples for BETTER.

  14. Experimental validation of docking and capture using space robotics testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spofford, John; Schmitz, Eric; Hoff, William

    1991-01-01

    This presentation describes the application of robotic and computer vision systems to validate docking and capture operations for space cargo transfer vehicles. Three applications are discussed: (1) air bearing systems in two dimensions that yield high quality free-flying, flexible, and contact dynamics; (2) validation of docking mechanisms with misalignment and target dynamics; and (3) computer vision technology for target location and real-time tracking. All the testbeds are supported by a network of engineering workstations for dynamic and controls analyses. Dynamic simulation of multibody rigid and elastic systems are performed with the TREETOPS code. MATRIXx/System-Build and PRO-MATLAB/Simulab are the tools for control design and analysis using classical and modern techniques such as H-infinity and LQG/LTR. SANDY is a general design tool to optimize numerically a multivariable robust compensator with a user-defined structure. Mathematica and Macsyma are used to derive symbolically dynamic and kinematic equations.

  15. Designing, Implementing and Documenting the Atlas Networking Test-bed.

    CERN Document Server

    Martinsen, Hans Åge

    The A Toroidal LHC ApparatuS (Atlas) experiment at the Large Hadron Colider (LHC) in European Organization for Nuclear Research (CERN), Geneva is a production environment. To develop new architectures, test new equipment and evaluate new technologies a well supported test bench is needed. A new one is now being commissioned and I will take a leading role in its development, commissioning and operation. This thesis will cover the requirements, the implementation, the documentation and the approach to the different challenges in implementing the testbed. I will be joining the project in the early stages and start by following the work that my colleagues are doing and then, as I get a better understanding, more responsibility will be given to me. To be able to suggest and implement solutions I will have to understand what the requirements are and how to achieve these requirements with the given resources.

  16. Experimental Testbed for the Study of Hydrodynamic Issues in Supernovae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Robey, H F; Kane, J O; Remington, B A; Drake, R P; Hurricane, O A; Louis, H; Wallace, R J; Knauer, J; Keiter, P; Arnett, D

    2000-10-09

    More than a decade after the explosion of SN 1987A, unresolved discrepancies still remain in attempts to numerically simulate the mixing processes initiated by the passage of a very strong shock through the layered structure of the progenitor star. Numerically computed velocities of the radioactive {sup 56}Ni and {sup 56}CO, produced by shock-induced explosive burning within the silicon layer for example, are still more than 50% too low as compared with the measured velocities. In order to resolve such discrepancies between observation and simulation, an experimental testbed has been designed on the Omega Laser for the study of hydrodynamic issues of importance to supernovae (SNe). In this paper, we present results from a series of scaled laboratory experiments designed to isolate and explore several issues in the hydrodynamics of SN explosions. The results of the experiments are compared with numerical simulations and are generally found to be in reasonable agreement.

  17. Modular, Rapid Propellant Loading System/Cryogenic Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hatfield, Walter, Sr.; Jumper, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    The Cryogenic Test Laboratory (CTL) at Kennedy Space Center (KSC) has designed, fabricated, and installed a modular, rapid propellant-loading system to simulate rapid loading of a launch-vehicle composite or standard cryogenic tank. The system will also function as a cryogenic testbed for testing and validating cryogenic innovations and ground support equipment (GSE) components. The modular skid-mounted system is capable of flow rates of liquid nitrogen from 1 to 900 gpm (approx equals 3.8 to 3,400 L/min), of pressures from ambient to 225 psig (approx equals 1.5 MPa), and of temperatures to -320 F (approx equals -195 C). The system can be easily validated to flow liquid oxygen at a different location, and could be easily scaled to any particular vehicle interface requirements

  18. SIM Interferometer Testbed (SCDU) Status and Recent Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nemati, Bijan; An, Xin; Goullioud, Renaud; Shao, Michael; Shen, Tsae-Pyng; Wehmeier, Udo J.; Weilert, Mark A.; Wang, Xu; Werne, Thomas A.; Wu, Janet P.; Zhai, Chengxing

    2010-01-01

    SIM Lite is a space-borne stellar interferometer capable of searching for Earth-size planets in the habitable zones of nearby stars. This search will require measurement of astrometric angles with sub micro-arcsecond accuracy and optical pathlength differences to 1 picometer by the end of the five-year mission. One of the most significant technical risks in achieving this level of accuracy is from systematic errors that arise from spectral differences between candidate stars and nearby reference stars. The Spectral Calibration Development Unit (SCDU), in operation since 2007, has been used to explore this effect and demonstrate performance meeting SIM goals. In this paper we present the status of this testbed and recent results.

  19. MIT-KSC space life sciences telescience testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    1989-01-01

    A Telescience Life Sciences Testbed is being developed. The first phase of this effort consisted of defining the experiments to be performed, investigating the various possible means of communication between KSC and MIT, and developing software and hardware support. The experiments chosen were two vestibular sled experiments: a study of ocular torsion produced by Y axis linear acceleration, based on the Spacelab D-1 072 Vestibular Experiment performed pre- and post-flight at KSC; and an optokinetic nystagmus (OKN)/linear acceleration interaction experiment. These two experiments were meant to simulate actual experiments that might be performed on the Space Station and to be representative of space life sciences experiments in general in their use of crew time and communications resources.

  20. CMS Test of the European DataGrid Testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Biasotto, Massimo; Capiluppi, Paolo; Charlot, Claude; Colling, David; MacEvoy, Barry C; Tallini, Hugh; Corvo, Marco; Fanzago, Federica; Verlato, Marco; Fanfani, Alessandra; Fantinel, Sergio; Gaillac, Anne-Marie; Grandi, Claudio; Augustin, I; Lefébure, Véronique; Stockinger, Heinz; Maroney, Owen; Nebrensky, H; Semeniouk, Igor; Blaising, J J; Burke, Samuel; Chierici, A; Cavalli, A; Ciaschini, V; Field, L; Groep, D; Hernández, F; Italiano, A; Kunszt, Peter Z; Lajili, N; Laure, Erwin; Leonardi, Emanuele; Loomis, C; Prelz, F; Reale, M; Schulz, M; Sciabà, Andrea; Sgaravatto, Massimo; Templon, J A; Tortone, G

    2003-01-01

    Starting in the middle of November 2002, the CMS experiment undertook an evaluation of the European, DataGrid Project (EDG) middleware using its event simulation programs. A joint CMS-EDG task force performed a iestress testle by submitting a large number of jobs to many distributed sites. The EDG testbed was complemented with additional CMS-dedicated resources. A total of ~ 10000 jobs consisting of two different computational types were submitted from four different locations in Europe over a period of about one month. Nine sites were active, providing integrated resources of more than 500 CPUs and about 5 TB of disk space (with the additional use of two Mass Storage Systems). Detailed descriptions of the adopted procedures, the problems encountered and the corresponding solutions are reported. Results and evaluations of the test, both from the CMS and the EDG perspectives, are described (Version 2).

  1. Simulation to Flight Test for a UAV Controls Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motter, Mark A.; Logan, Michael J.; French, Michael L.; Guerreiro, Nelson M.

    2006-01-01

    The NASA Flying Controls Testbed (FLiC) is a relatively small and inexpensive unmanned aerial vehicle developed specifically to test highly experimental flight control approaches. The most recent version of the FLiC is configured with 16 independent aileron segments, supports the implementation of C-coded experimental controllers, and is capable of fully autonomous flight from takeoff roll to landing, including flight test maneuvers. The test vehicle is basically a modified Army target drone, AN/FQM-117B, developed as part of a collaboration between the Aviation Applied Technology Directorate (AATD) at Fort Eustis, Virginia and NASA Langley Research Center. Several vehicles have been constructed and collectively have flown over 600 successful test flights, including a fully autonomous demonstration at the Association of Unmanned Vehicle Systems International (AUVSI) UAV Demo 2005. Simulations based on wind tunnel data are being used to further develop advanced controllers for implementation and flight test.

  2. Demo III: Department of Defense testbed for unmanned ground mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shoemaker, Chuck M.; Bornstein, Jonathan A.; Myers, Scott D.; Brendle, Bruce E., Jr.

    1999-07-01

    Robotics has been identified by numerous recent Department of Defense (DOD) studies as a key enabling technology for future military operational concepts. The Demo III Program is a multiyear effort encompassing technology development and demonstration on testbed platforms, together with modeling simulation and experimentation directed toward optimization of operational concepts to employ this technology. Primary program focus is the advancement of capabilities for autonomous mobility through unstructured environments, concentrating on both perception and intelligent control technology. The scout mission will provide the military operational context for demonstration of this technology, although a significant emphasis is being placed upon both hardware and software modularity to permit rapid extension to other military missions. The Experimental Unmanned Vehicle (XUV) is a small (approximately 1150 kg, V-22 transportable) technology testbed vehicle designed for experimentation with multiple military operational concepts. Currently under development, the XUV is scheduled for roll-out in Summer 1999, with an initial troop experimentation to be conducted in September 1999. Though small, and relatively lightweight, modeling has shown the chassis capable of automotive mobility comparable to the current Army lightweight high-mobility, multipurpose, wheeled vehicle (HMMWV). The XUV design couples multisensor perception with intelligent control to permit autonomous cross-country navigation at speeds of up to 32 kph during daylight and 16 kph during hours of darkness. A small, lightweight, highly capable user interface will permit intuitive control of the XUV by troops from current-generation tactical vehicles. When it concludes in 2002, Demo III will provide the military with both the technology and the initial experience required to develop and field the first generation of semi-autonomous tactical ground vehicles for combat, combat support, and logistics applications.

  3. Reference Architecture Test-Bed for Avionics (RASTA): A Software Building Blocks Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    Viana Sanchez, Aitor; Taylor, Chris

    2010-08-01

    This paper presents an overview of the Reference Architecture System Test-bed for Avionics (RASTA) being developed within the ESA Estec Data Systems Division. This activity aims to benefit from interface standardization to provide a hardware/software reference infrastructure into which incoming R&D activities can be integrated, thus providing a generic but standardized test and development environment rather than dedicated facilities for each activity. Rasta is composed of by both HW and SW building blocks constituting the main elements of a typical Data Handling System. This includes a core processor (LEON2), Telemetry and Telecommand links, digital interfaces, and mass memory. The range of digital serial interfaces includes CAN bus, MIL-STD-1553 and SpaceWire. The paper will focus on the Software aspects of RASTA and in particular the software building blocks provided to ease development activities and allow hardware independency. To support the take-up of RASTA by European Industry, all RASTA software developed internally by ESA is provided free under license. Significant outputs are already available and include: Basic SW and SW drivers (CAN/1553/SpW, TT&C), OS abstraction layer, CFDP flight implementation, highly portable and independent file system for space, ground segment telecommand/telemetry router. In the future, additional SW building blocks are planned (e.g. ECSS CAN library). The present focus of RASTA is related to a prototype implementation of the SOIS services and protocols under development by the CCSDS (Consultative committee for Space Data Standards)

  4. Precise Pointing and Stabilization Performance for the Balloon-borne Imaging Testbed (BIT): 2015 Test Flight

    CERN Document Server

    Romualdez, L J; Damaren, C J; Galloway, M N; Hartley, J W; Li, L; Massey, R J; Netterfield, C B

    2016-01-01

    Balloon-borne astronomy offers an attractive option for experiments that require precise pointing and attitude stabilization, due to a large reduction in the atmospheric interference observed by ground-based systems as well as the low-cost and short development time-scale compared to space-borne systems. The Balloon-borne Imaging Testbed (BIT) is an instrument designed to meet the technological requirements of high precision astronomical missions and is a precursor to the development of a facility class instrument with capabilities similar to the Hubble Space Telescope. The attitude determination and control systems (ADCS) for BIT, the design, implementation, and analysis of which are the focus of this paper, compensate for compound pendulation effects and other sub-orbital disturbances in the stratosphere to within 1-2$^{\\prime\\prime}$ (rms), while back-end optics provide further image stabilization down to 0.05$^{\\prime\\prime}$ (not discussed here). During the inaugural test flight from Timmins, Canada in S...

  5. Phase Retrieval Using a Genetic Algorithm on the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jaime R.

    2003-01-01

    NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center s Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) Testbed was developed to test phase retrieval algorithms and hardware techniques. Individuals working with the facility developed the idea of implementing phase retrieval by breaking the determination of the tip/tilt of each mirror apart from the piston motion (or translation) of each mirror. Presented in this report is an algorithm that determines the optimal phase correction associated only with the piston motion of the mirrors. A description of the Phase Retrieval problem is first presented. The Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) Testbeb is then described. A Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) is necessary to transfer the incoming wavefront (or estimate of phase error) into the spatial frequency domain to compare it with the image. A method for reducing the DFT to seven scalar/matrix multiplications is presented. A genetic algorithm is then used to search for the phase error. The results of this new algorithm on a test problem are presented.

  6. CHARACTERIZING DOE HANFORD SITE WASTE ENCAPSULATION STORAGE FACILITY CELLS USING RADBALL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farfan, E.; Coleman, R.

    2011-03-31

    RadBall{trademark} is a novel technology that can locate and quantify unknown radioactive hazards within contaminated areas, hot cells, and gloveboxes. The device consists of a colander-like outer tungsten collimator that houses a radiation-sensitive polymer semi-sphere. The collimator has a number of small holes with tungsten inserts; as a result, specific areas of the polymer are exposed to radiation becoming increasingly more opaque in proportion to the absorbed dose. The polymer semi-sphere is imaged in an optical computed tomography scanner that produces a high resolution 3D map of optical attenuation coefficients. A subsequent analysis of the optical attenuation data using a reverse ray tracing or backprojection technique provides information on the spatial distribution of gamma-ray sources in a given area forming a 3D characterization of the area of interest. RadBall{trademark} was originally designed for dry deployments and several tests, completed at Savannah River National Laboratory and Oak Ridge National Laboratory, substantiate its modeled capabilities. This study involves the investigation of the RadBall{trademark} technology during four submerged deployments in two water filled cells at the DOE Hanford Site's Waste Encapsulation Storage Facility.

  7. Facile modification of gelatin-based microcarriers with multiporous surface and proliferative growth factors delivery to enhance cell growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The design of microcarriers plays an important role in the success of cell expansion. The present article provides a facile approach to modify the gelatin-based particles and investigates the feasibility of their acting as microcarriers for cell attachment and growth. Gelatin particles (150-320 μm) were modified by cryogenic treatment and lyophilization to develop the surface with the features of multiporous morphology and were incorporated with proliferative growth factors (bFGF) by adsorption during the post-preparation, which enables them to serve as microcarriers for cells amplification, together with the advantages of larger cell-surface contact area and capability of promoting cell propagation. The microstructure and release assay of the modified microcarriers demonstrated that the pores on surface were uniform and bFGF was released in a controlled manner. Through in vitro fibroblast culture, these features resulted in a prominent increase in the cell attachment rate and cell growth rate relative to the conditions without modification. Although the scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy analysis results indicated that cells attached, spread, and proliferated on all the microcarriers, cell growth clearly showed a significant correlation with the multiporous structure of microcarriers, in particular on bFGF combined ones. These results validate our previous assumption that the facile modification could improve cell growth on the gelatin-based microcarriers obviously and the novel microcarriers may be a promising candidate in tissue engineering

  8. Facile modification of gelatin-based microcarriers with multiporous surface and proliferative growth factors delivery to enhance cell growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang Sha [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Wang Yijuan [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Deng, Tianzheng [Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Department of Oral and Maxillofacial Surgery, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Jin Fang [Department of Orthodontics, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an, 710032 (China); Liu Shouxin [Key Laboratory for Macromolecular Science of Shaanxi Province, Shaanxi Normal University, Xi' an 710062 (China); Zhang Yongjie [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Feng Feng [Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Department of Dermatology, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710038 (China); Jin Yan [Department of Oral Histology and Pathology, School of Stomatology, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China); Research and Development Center for Tissue Engineering, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi' an 710032 (China)], E-mail: yanjin@fmmu.edu.cn

    2008-07-28

    The design of microcarriers plays an important role in the success of cell expansion. The present article provides a facile approach to modify the gelatin-based particles and investigates the feasibility of their acting as microcarriers for cell attachment and growth. Gelatin particles (150-320 {mu}m) were modified by cryogenic treatment and lyophilization to develop the surface with the features of multiporous morphology and were incorporated with proliferative growth factors (bFGF) by adsorption during the post-preparation, which enables them to serve as microcarriers for cells amplification, together with the advantages of larger cell-surface contact area and capability of promoting cell propagation. The microstructure and release assay of the modified microcarriers demonstrated that the pores on surface were uniform and bFGF was released in a controlled manner. Through in vitro fibroblast culture, these features resulted in a prominent increase in the cell attachment rate and cell growth rate relative to the conditions without modification. Although the scanning electron microscopy and optical microscopy analysis results indicated that cells attached, spread, and proliferated on all the microcarriers, cell growth clearly showed a significant correlation with the multiporous structure of microcarriers, in particular on bFGF combined ones. These results validate our previous assumption that the facile modification could improve cell growth on the gelatin-based microcarriers obviously and the novel microcarriers may be a promising candidate in tissue engineering.

  9. The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT): Recent Progress and Results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rinehart, Stephen A.; Frey, Bradley J.; Leisawitz, David T.; Lyon, Richard G.; Maher, Stephen F.; Martino, Anthony J.

    2008-01-01

    Continued research with the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) has achieved several important milestones. We have moved WIIT into the Advanced Interferometry and Metrology (AIM) Laboratory at Goddard, and have characterized the testbed in this well-controlled environment. The system is now completely automated and we are in the process of acquiring large data sets for analysis. In this paper, we discuss these new developments and outline our future research directions. The WIIT testbed, combined with new data analysis techniques and algorithms, provides a demonstration of the technique of wide-field interferometric imaging, a powerful tool for future space-borne interferometers.

  10. Animal facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The animal facilities in the Division are described. They consist of kennels, animal rooms, service areas, and technical areas (examining rooms, operating rooms, pathology labs, x-ray rooms, and 60Co exposure facilities). The computer support facility is also described. The advent of the Conversational Monitor System at Argonne has launched a new effort to set up conversational computing and graphics software for users. The existing LS-11 data acquisition systems have been further enhanced and expanded. The divisional radiation facilities include a number of gamma, neutron, and x-ray radiation sources with accompanying areas for related equipment. There are five 60Co irradiation facilities; a research reactor, Janus, is a source for fission-spectrum neutrons; two other neutron sources in the Chicago area are also available to the staff for cell biology studies. The electron microscope facilities are also described

  11. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth's atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy's Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described

  12. Environmental assessment for the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: Southern Great Plains Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Policastro, A.J.; Pfingston, J.M.; Maloney, D.M.; Wasmer, F.; Pentecost, E.D.

    1992-03-01

    The Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program is aimed at supplying improved predictive capability of climate change, particularly the prediction of cloud-climate feedback. The objective will be achieved by measuring the atmospheric radiation and physical and meteorological quantities that control solar radiation in the earth`s atmosphere and using this information to test global climate and related models. The proposed action is to construct and operate a Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) research site in the southern Great Plains as part of the Department of Energy`s Atmospheric Radiation Measurement Program whose objective is to develop an improved predictive capability of global climate change. The purpose of this CART research site in southern Kansas and northern Oklahoma would be to collect meteorological and other scientific information to better characterize the processes controlling radiation transfer on a global scale. Impacts which could result from this facility are described.

  13. PIE in Hot Cells and Poolside: Facilities and Techniques applied in Argentina. A brief overview

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    . Metallurgical specimens' preparation according to ASTM standards Universal tensile machine for tensile and fracture testing and Charpy (impact) tests; - Gamma Scanning. Discrete gamma-ray spectrum analysis for the characterization of the existed radio nuclides and its activity profiles in the sample performed with high and medium resolution detectors with different types of collimators; - NDT, Eddy Current Technique. Volumetric inspection of rod, tubes and plates for defects and Oxide layer thickness on non-ferrous metal; - Visual Examination, Metrology and density determination. Inspection by optical instruments, measurement of length, inner and outer diameter, thickness and gap with precision calipers and LVDT The density determination is performed by immersion method and digital balance; - DT, Metallography. Samples preparation by cut-off wheel for rod specimens and punching device for plate specimens; Specimen impregnation and semiautomatic grinding and polishing equipments. The Radiochemical Hot Cells Facility (LFR) consists of three alpha tight boxes with four simple tele manipulators working positions. The sample dissolution is performed for radiochemical analysis and burn-up determination of fuel material by means of ICP mass spectrometer attached to the hot cells line The main works being performed up to now are: Metallurgical test of steel specimens from the Pressure Vessel of C.N.ATUCHA 1 reactor; Characterization test of C.N.ATUCHA 1 internal reactor components: control rod, fuel channels, tubing and foils; Metallurgical test of C.N.Embalse Pressure Tubes; PIE of FE irradiated at the RA-3 RR. Some of the ongoing works are: PIE of High Density Uranium compound (UMo and silicide), mini-plates and FE for RR; Assessment of failure in Fuel Elements from NPP

  14. Decision Support Tool and Simulation Testbed for Airborne Spacing and Merging in Super Dense Operations Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation in this effort is the development of a decision support tool and simulation testbed for Airborne Spacing and Merging (ASM). We focus on concepts...

  15. TPF Planet Detection Testbed: demonstrating deep, stable nulling and planet detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stefan

    2005-01-01

    The design of a testbed being built at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory is described. Simulatiung a dual chopped Bracewell interferometer, the testbed comprises a four beam star and planet source and nulling beam combiner. Since achieving a stable null is of great concern the testbed has many control systems designed to achieve stability of alignment and optical path difference over long periods of time. Comparisons between the testbed and the flight system are drawn and key performance parameters are discussed. The interaction between designs for phaseplate systems that achromatically invert the electric field of one of each pair of the incoming beams to achieve the null and the choice of fringe tracking schemes is also discussed.

  16. Optical Network Testbed-Key Enabler in Developing Current and Future Network Solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vukovic, Alex; Wu, Jing; Savoie, Michel; Hua, Heng; Campbell, Scott; Zhang, Hanxi

    2005-10-01

    The all-optical network (AON) demonstrator is a trial system-level testbed for the validation and verification of key network building blocks, scalable architectures, as well as control and management solutions for next-generation wavelength division multiplexing (WDM) networks. Developed at the Communications Research Centre (CRC) in Ottawa, ON, Canada, the AON testbed has already validated certain system-level concepts at the physical and upper layers. The paper describes the crucial role of the AON testbed in research, development, and "proof of concept" for both emerging optical technologies at the physical layer (performance characterization) and customer-managed networks at the upper layer (network management). Moreover, it is expected that the AON testbed will continue to be a valuable playground for future developments of emerging technologies, solutions, and applications.

  17. A Simulation Testbed for Dynamic Air Corridors within the Next Generation Air Transportation System Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation in this effort is the development of a simulation testbed for identifying dynamic air corridors that can increase aircraft throughput in and...

  18. Integrated Testbed for Environmental Analysis of NextGen Concepts using ACES Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — The key innovation in this effort is the development of an industrial-grade analysis testbed to integrate simulation tools, such as ACES, with aviation...

  19. Integrated Testbed for Environmental Analysis of NextGen Concepts using ACES Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose the development of an analysis testbed to integrate simulation tools, such as ACES, with aviation environmental effects models, such as the Aviation...

  20. Independent Technology Assessment within the Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burgess, A. B.; Robinson, E.; Graybeal, J.

    2015-12-01

    The Federation of Earth Science Information Partners (ESIP) is a community of science, data and information technology practitioners. ESIP's mission is to support the networking and data dissemination needs of our members and the global community. We do this by linking the functional sectors of education, observation, research and application with the ultimate use of Earth science. Amongst the services provided to ESIP members is the Testbed; a collaborative forum for the development of technology standards, services, protocols and best practices. ESIP has partnered with the NASA Advanced Information Systems Technology (AIST) program to integrate independent assessment of Testing Readiness Level (TRL) into the ESIP Testbed. In this presentation we will 1) demonstrate TRL assessment in the ESIP Testbed using three AIST projects, 2) discuss challenges and insights into creating an independent validation/verification framework and 3) outline the versatility of the ESIP Testbed as applied to other technology projects.

  1. STREAMLINED APPROACH FOR ENVIRONMENTAL RESTORATION PLAN FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 116: AREA 25 TEST CELL C FACILITY NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan identifies the activities required for the closure of Corrective Action Unit 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. The Test Cell C Facility is located in Area 25 of the Nevada Test Site approximately 25 miles northwest of Mercury, Nevada

  2. Rationalization design on large equipment dismantling facility. The cell fire-extinguishing examination. 1. Technical report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In order to rationalize for Large Equipment Dismantling Facility (LEDF), the plan of removing vaporizer belong to Cell-fire-extinguishing-system was investigated. In this test, in order to study the behavior of pressure in cell, when the liquefaction carbon dioxide (liq-CO2) is emitted, and the performance of extinguishing fires, the test of behavior. of pressure and the extinguishing fires take effect. Also the extinguishing fires test used water-mist take effect for complement liq-CO2. The results as follows; (1) In the test of behavior of pressure, Liq-CO2 was emitted test room under -40 mmAq negative pressure. Room pressure was increase about 0.8 mmAq/sec at first. After 20 sec, the pressure was increase slowly about 0.1 mmAq/sec. After 120 sec,the increase was drastic about 1.5 mmAq/s. (2) In the test of extinguishing fires by liq-CO2, under -40 mmAq, Polyethylene and wooden chips + cotton (crib) was burn. Polyethylene was extinguished perfectly, but the embers remained in cribs. While the room pressure was increase about 1.3 mmAq/sec for 10 sec at first. After 30 sec, the pressure was increase about 1 mmAq/sec. On the other hand, the drastic increase of pressure disappeared between 100 sec to 120 sec by change the nozzle size from 14 mm2 to 10 mm2. (3) In the test of extinguishing fires by water-mist, Cribs was extinguished perfectly, but Polyethylene was extinguished difficulty under the same condition of liq-CO2 test. (4) Therefore the results, It's coped with the fire extinguishing and the keeping negative 2 pressure for LEDF cells. Therefore nozzle size is fitted cell volume as changing 14 mm2 to 10 mm2 (5) As the performance of extinguishing fires by liq-CO2, It is necessity the concentration of above 50% CO2 for combustibles as cribs, remaining the embers. (6) On the other hand, It is necessity most study for the adoption of water-mist. Therefore water-mist was not effective for polyethylene, and it needed water for fire in great volume. (author)

  3. A testbed combining visual perception models for geographic gaze contingent displays

    OpenAIRE

    Bektaş, Kenan; Coltekin, Arzu; Krüger, Jens; Duchowski, Andrew T.

    2015-01-01

    We present a testbed featuring gaze-contingent displays (GCDs), in which we combined multiple models of the human visual system (HVS) to manage the visual level of detail. GCDs respond to the viewer’s gaze in real-time, rendering a space-variant visualization. Our testbed is optimized for testing mathematical models of the human visual perception utilized in GCDs. Specifically, we combined models of contrast sensitivity, color perception and depth of field; and customized our implementation f...

  4. Facile Multiscale Patterning by Creep-Assisted Sequential Imprinting and Fuel Cell Application.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, Segeun; Kim, Minhyoung; Kang, Yun Sik; Choi, Yong Whan; Kim, Sang Moon; Sung, Yung-Eun; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-05-11

    The capability of fabricating multiscale structures with desired morphology and incorporating them into engineering applications is key to realizing technological breakthroughs by employing the benefits from both microscale and nanoscale morphology simultaneously. Here, we developed a facile patterning method to fabricate multiscale hierarchical structures by a novel approach called creep-assisted sequential imprinting. In this work, nanopatterning was first carried out by thermal imprint lithography above the glass transition temperature (Tg) of a polymer film, and then followed by creep-assisted imprinting with micropatterns based on the mechanical deformation of the polymer film under the relatively long-term exposure to mechanical stress at temperatures below the Tg of the polymer. The fabricated multiscale arrays exhibited excellent pattern uniformity over large areas. To demonstrate the usage of multiscale architectures, we incorporated the multiscale Nafion films into polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell, and this device showed more than 10% higher performance than the conventional one. The enhancement was attributed to the decrease in mass transport resistance because of unique cone-shape morphology by creep-recovery effects and the increase in interfacial surface area between Nafion film and electrocatalyst layer. PMID:27116979

  5. Aspects of the quality of data from the Southern Great Plains (SGP) cloud and radiation testbed (CART) site broadband radiation sensors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Splitt, M.E. [Univ. of Oklahoma, Norman, OK (United States); Wesely, M.L. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States)

    1996-04-01

    A systmatic evaluation of the performance of broadband radiometers at the Radiation Testbed (CART) site is needed to estimate the uncertainties of the irradiance observations. Here, net radiation observed with the net radiometer in the enrgy balance Bowen ratio station at the Central facility is compared with the net radiation computed as the sum of component irradiances recorded by nearby pyranameters and pyrgeometers. In addition, data obtained from the central facility pyranometers, pyrgeometers, and pyrheliometers are examined for April 1994, when intensive operations periods were being carried out. The data used in this study are from central facility radiometers in a solar and infrared observation station, and EBBR station, the so-called `BSRN` set of upward pointing radiometers, and a set of radiometers pointed down at the 25-m level of a 60-m tower.

  6. Infrastructure Development of Single Cell Testing Capability at A0 Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dhanaraj, Nandhini; Padilla, R.; Reid, J.; Khabiboulline, T.; Ge, M.; Mukherjee, A.; Rakhnov, I.; Ginsburg, C.; Wu, G.; Harms, E.; Carter, H.; /Fermilab

    2009-09-01

    The objective of this technical note is to document the details of the infrastructure development process that was realized at the A0 photo injector facility to establish RF cold testing capability for 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium single cell cavities. The activity began the last quarter of CY 2006 and ended the first quarter of CY 2009. The whole process involved addressing various aspects such as design of vertical insert and lifting fixture, modification of existing RF test station and design of new couplers, development of a Temperature Mapping (T-Map) system, radiation considerations for the test location (north cave), update of existing High Pressure Rinse (HPR) system, preparation of necessary safety documents and eventually obtaining an Operational Readiness Clearance (ORC). Figure 1 illustrates the various components of the development process. In the past, the north cave test station at A0 has supported the cold testing 3.9 GHz nine cell and single cell cavities, thus some of the components were available for use and some needed modification. The test dewar had the capacity to accommodate 1.3 GHz single cells although a new vertical insert that could handle both cavity types (1.3 and 3.9 GHz) had to be designed. The existing cryogenic system with an average capacity of {approx} 0.5 g/sec was deemed sufficient. The RF system was updated with broadband components and an additional amplifier with higher power capacity to handle higher gradients usually achieved in 1.3 GHz cavities. The initial testing phase was arbitrated to proceed with fixed power coupling. A new temperature mapping system was developed to provide the diagnostic tool for hot spot studies, quench characterization and field emission studies. The defining feature of this system was the use of diode sensors instead of the traditional carbon resistors as sensing elements. The unidirectional current carrying capacity (forward bias) of the diodes provided for the ease of multiplexing of the

  7. Infrastructure Development of Single Cell Testing Capability at A0 Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this technical note is to document the details of the infrastructure development process that was realized at the A0 photo injector facility to establish RF cold testing capability for 1.3 GHz superconducting niobium single cell cavities. The activity began the last quarter of CY 2006 and ended the first quarter of CY 2009. The whole process involved addressing various aspects such as design of vertical insert and lifting fixture, modification of existing RF test station and design of new couplers, development of a Temperature Mapping (T-Map) system, radiation considerations for the test location (north cave), update of existing High Pressure Rinse (HPR) system, preparation of necessary safety documents and eventually obtaining an Operational Readiness Clearance (ORC). Figure 1 illustrates the various components of the development process. In the past, the north cave test station at A0 has supported the cold testing 3.9 GHz nine cell and single cell cavities, thus some of the components were available for use and some needed modification. The test dewar had the capacity to accommodate 1.3 GHz single cells although a new vertical insert that could handle both cavity types (1.3 and 3.9 GHz) had to be designed. The existing cryogenic system with an average capacity of ∼ 0.5 g/sec was deemed sufficient. The RF system was updated with broadband components and an additional amplifier with higher power capacity to handle higher gradients usually achieved in 1.3 GHz cavities. The initial testing phase was arbitrated to proceed with fixed power coupling. A new temperature mapping system was developed to provide the diagnostic tool for hot spot studies, quench characterization and field emission studies. The defining feature of this system was the use of diode sensors instead of the traditional carbon resistors as sensing elements. The unidirectional current carrying capacity (forward bias) of the diodes provided for the ease of multiplexing of the system

  8. Mounted Smartphones as Measurement and Control Platforms for Motor-Based Laboratory Test-Beds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frank, Jared A; Brill, Anthony; Kapila, Vikram

    2016-01-01

    Laboratory education in science and engineering often entails the use of test-beds equipped with costly peripherals for sensing, acquisition, storage, processing, and control of physical behavior. However, costly peripherals are no longer necessary to obtain precise measurements and achieve stable feedback control of test-beds. With smartphones performing diverse sensing and processing tasks, this study examines the feasibility of mounting smartphones directly to test-beds to exploit their embedded hardware and software in the measurement and control of the test-beds. This approach is a first step towards replacing laboratory-grade peripherals with more compact and affordable smartphone-based platforms, whose interactive user interfaces can engender wider participation and engagement from learners. Demonstrative cases are presented in which the sensing, computation, control, and user interaction with three motor-based test-beds are handled by a mounted smartphone. Results of experiments and simulations are used to validate the feasibility of mounted smartphones as measurement and feedback control platforms for motor-based laboratory test-beds, report the measurement precision and closed-loop performance achieved with such platforms, and address challenges in the development of platforms to maintain system stability. PMID:27556464

  9. New Air-Launched Small Missile (ALSM) Flight Testbed for Hypersonic Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bui, Trong T.; Lux, David P.; Stenger, Michael T.; Munson, Michael J.; Teate, George F.

    2007-01-01

    The Phoenix Air-Launched Small Missile (ALSM) flight testbed was conceived and is proposed to help address the lack of quick-turnaround and cost-effective hypersonic flight research capabilities. The Phoenix ALSM testbed results from utilization of the United States Navy Phoenix AIM-54 (Hughes Aircraft Company, now Raytheon Company, Waltham, Massachusetts) long-range, guided air-to-air missile and the National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Dryden Flight Research Center (Edwards, California) F-15B (McDonnell Douglas, now the Boeing Company, Chicago, Illinois) testbed airplane. The retirement of the Phoenix AIM-54 missiles from fleet operation has presented an opportunity for converting this flight asset into a new flight testbed. This cost-effective new platform will fill the gap in the test and evaluation of hypersonic systems for flight Mach numbers ranging from 3 to 5. Preliminary studies indicate that the Phoenix missile is a highly capable platform; when launched from a high-performance airplane, the guided Phoenix missile can boost research payloads to low hypersonic Mach numbers, enabling flight research in the supersonic-to-hypersonic transitional flight envelope. Experience gained from developing and operating the Phoenix ALSM testbed will assist the development and operation of future higher-performance ALSM flight testbeds as well as responsive microsatellite-small-payload air-launched space boosters.

  10. TORCH Computational Reference Kernels - A Testbed for Computer Science Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Alex; Williams, Samuel Webb; Madduri, Kamesh; Ibrahim, Khaled; Bailey, David H.; Demmel, James W.; Strohmaier, Erich

    2010-12-02

    For decades, computer scientists have sought guidance on how to evolve architectures, languages, and programming models in order to improve application performance, efficiency, and productivity. Unfortunately, without overarching advice about future directions in these areas, individual guidance is inferred from the existing software/hardware ecosystem, and each discipline often conducts their research independently assuming all other technologies remain fixed. In today's rapidly evolving world of on-chip parallelism, isolated and iterative improvements to performance may miss superior solutions in the same way gradient descent optimization techniques may get stuck in local minima. To combat this, we present TORCH: A Testbed for Optimization ResearCH. These computational reference kernels define the core problems of interest in scientific computing without mandating a specific language, algorithm, programming model, or implementation. To compliment the kernel (problem) definitions, we provide a set of algorithmically-expressed verification tests that can be used to verify a hardware/software co-designed solution produces an acceptable answer. Finally, to provide some illumination as to how researchers have implemented solutions to these problems in the past, we provide a set of reference implementations in C and MATLAB.

  11. Event metadata records as a testbed for scalable data mining

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    At a data rate of 200 hertz, event metadata records ('TAGs,' in ATLAS parlance) provide fertile grounds for development and evaluation of tools for scalable data mining. It is easy, of course, to apply HEP-specific selection or classification rules to event records and to label such an exercise 'data mining,' but our interest is different. Advanced statistical methods and tools such as classification, association rule mining, and cluster analysis are common outside the high energy physics community. These tools can prove useful, not for discovery physics, but for learning about our data, our detector, and our software. A fixed and relatively simple schema makes TAG export to other storage technologies such as HDF5 straightforward. This simplifies the task of exploiting very-large-scale parallel platforms such as Argonne National Laboratory's BlueGene/P, currently the largest supercomputer in the world for open science, in the development of scalable tools for data mining. Using a domain-neutral scientific data format may also enable us to take advantage of existing data mining components from other communities. There is, further, a substantial literature on the topic of one-pass algorithms and stream mining techniques, and such tools may be inserted naturally at various points in the event data processing and distribution chain. This paper describes early experience with event metadata records from ATLAS simulation and commissioning as a testbed for scalable data mining tool development and evaluation.

  12. An integrated dexterous robotic testbed for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Larry C.; Nguyen, Hai; Sauer, Edward

    1992-01-01

    An integrated dexterous robotic system was developed as a testbed to evaluate various robotics technologies for advanced space applications. The system configuration consisted of a Utah/MIT Dexterous Hand, a PUMA 562 arm, a stereo vision system, and a multiprocessing computer control system. In addition to these major subsystems, a proximity sensing system was integrated with the Utah/MIT Hand to provide capability for non-contact sensing of a nearby object. A high-speed fiber-optic link was used to transmit digitized proximity sensor signals back to the multiprocessing control system. The hardware system was designed to satisfy the requirements for both teleoperated and autonomous operations. The software system was designed to exploit parallel processing capability, pursue functional modularity, incorporate artificial intelligence for robot control, allow high-level symbolic robot commands, maximize reusable code, minimize compilation requirements, and provide an interactive application development and debugging environment for the end users. An overview is presented of the system hardware and software configurations, and implementation is discussed of subsystem functions.

  13. The Living With a Star Space Environment Testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brewer, D.; Barth, J.; Label, K.

    The Living With a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbeds (SET) are a series of projects that contain investigations that collect data in space and use it to provide products that improve the engineering approach to accommodate and/or mitigate the effects of solar variability on spacecraft design and operations. The improvements reduce requirements for design and operations margins to account for the uncertainties in the space environment and its effects. Reducing the requirements will increase the payload fraction, permit the use of a smaller launch vehicle (thereby reducing mission cost), and/or enable routine operations in new segments of the environment (such as middle Earth orbit, the region from 2000 km to 10,000 km) at costs similar to those for operations below 2000 km. A new SET project starts about very two years when investigations are selected. Five categories of investigations included in SET projects are: (1) Characterization of the space environment in the presence of a spacecraft; (2) Definition of the mechanisms for materials' degradation and the performance characterization of materials designed for shielding from ionizing radiation; (3) Accommodation and/or mitigation of space environment effects for detectors/sensors; (4) Performance improvement methodology for microelectronics used in space; and, (5) Accommodation and/or mitigation of charging/discharging effects on spacecraft and spacecraft components. All SET projects use secondary access to space and partnering to leverage resources. An overview of the SET segment of the LWS program will be presented.

  14. Finite Element Modeling of the NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grosveld, Ferdinand W.; Pritchard, Joselyn I.; Buehrle, Ralph D.; Pappa, Richard S.

    2002-01-01

    The NASA Langley Aluminum Testbed Cylinder (ATC) was designed to serve as a universal structure for evaluating structural acoustic codes, modeling techniques and optimization methods used in the prediction of aircraft interior noise. Finite element models were developed for the components of the ATC based on the geometric, structural and material properties of the physical test structure. Numerically predicted modal frequencies for the longitudinal stringer, ring frame and dome component models, and six assembled ATC configurations were compared with experimental modal survey data. The finite element models were updated and refined, using physical parameters, to increase correlation with the measured modal data. Excellent agreement, within an average 1.5% to 2.9%, was obtained between the predicted and measured modal frequencies of the stringer, frame and dome components. The predictions for the modal frequencies of the assembled component Configurations I through V were within an average 2.9% and 9.1%. Finite element modal analyses were performed for comparison with 3 psi and 6 psi internal pressurization conditions in Configuration VI. The modal frequencies were predicted by applying differential stiffness to the elements with pressure loading and creating reduced matrices for beam elements with offsets inside external superelements. The average disagreement between the measured and predicted differences for the 0 psi and 6 psi internal pressure conditions was less than 0.5%. Comparably good agreement was obtained for the differences between the 0 psi and 3 psi measured and predicted internal pressure conditions.

  15. A Test-Bed Configuration: Toward an Autonomous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ocaña, F.; Castillo, M.; Uranga, E.; Ponz, J. D.; TBT Consortium

    2015-09-01

    In the context of the Space Situational Awareness (SSA) program of ESA, it is foreseen to deploy several large robotic telescopes in remote locations to provide surveillance and tracking services for man-made as well as natural near-Earth objects (NEOs). The present project, termed Telescope Test Bed (TBT) is being developed under ESA's General Studies and Technology Programme, and shall implement a test-bed for the validation of an autonomous optical observing system in a realistic scenario, consisting of two telescopes located in Spain and Australia, to collect representative test data for precursor NEO services. In order to fulfill all the security requirements for the TBT project, the use of a autonomous emergency system (AES) is foreseen to monitor the control system. The AES will monitor remotely the health of the observing system and the internal and external environment. It will incorporate both autonomous and interactive actuators to force the protection of the system (i.e., emergency dome close out).

  16. Digital Preservation Theory and Application: Transcontinental Persistent Archives Testbed Activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Watry

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available The National Archives and Records Administration (NARA and EU SHAMAN projects are working with multiple research institutions on tools and technologies that will supply a comprehensive, systematic, and dynamic means for preserving virtually any type of electronic record, free from dependence on any specific hardware or software. This paper describes the joint development work between the University of Liverpool and the San Diego Supercomputer Center (SDSC at the University of California, San Diego on the NARA and SHAMAN prototypes. The aim is to provide technologies in support of the required generic data management infrastructure. We describe a Theory of Preservation that quantifies how communication can be accomplished when future technologies are different from those available at present. This includes not only different hardware and software, but also different standards for encoding information. We describe the concept of a “digital ontology” to characterize preservation processes; this is an advance on the current OAIS Reference Model of providing representation information about records. To realize a comprehensive Theory of Preservation, we describe the ongoing integration of distributed shared collection management technologies, digital library browsing, and presentation technologies for the NARA and SHAMAN Persistent Archive Testbeds.

  17. Development of a Testbed for Distributed Satellite Command and Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zetocha, Paul; Brito, Margarita

    2002-01-01

    At the Air Force Research Laboratory's Space Vehicles Directorate we are investigating and developing architectures for commanding and controlling a cluster of cooperating satellites through prototype development for the TechSat-21 program. The objective of this paper is to describe a distributed satellite testbed that is currently under development and to summarize near term prototypes being implemented for cluster command and control. To design, develop, and test our architecture we are using eight PowerPC 750 VME-based single board computers, representing eight satellites. Each of these computers is hosting the OSE(TM) real-time operating system from Enea Systems. At the core of our on-board cluster manager is ObjectAgent. ObjectAgent is an agent-based object-oriented framework for flight systems, which is particularly suitable for distributed applications. In order to handle communication with the ground as well as to assist with the cluster management we are using the Spacecraft Command Language (SCL). SCL is also at the centerpiece of our ground control station and handles cluster commanding, telemetry decommutation, state-of-health monitoring, and Fault Detection, Isolation, and Resolution (FDIR). For planning and scheduling activities we are currently using ASPEN from NASA/JPL. This paper will describe each of the above components in detail and then present the prototypes being implemented.

  18. Articulated navigation testbed (ANT): an example of adaptable intrinsic mobility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosinsky, Chris A.; Hanna, Doug M.; Penzes, Steven G.

    2000-07-01

    An important but oft overlooked aspect of any robotic system is the synergistic benefit of designing the chassis to have high intrinsic mobility which complements rather than limits, its system capabilities. This novel concept continues to be investigated by the Defence Research Establishment Suffield (DRES) with the Articulated Navigation Testbed (ANT) Unmanned Ground Vehicle (UGV). The ANT demonstrates high mobility through the combination of articulated steering and a hybrid locomotion scheme which utilizes individually powered wheels on the edge of rigid legs; legs which are capable of approximately 450 degrees of rotation. The configuration can be minimally configured as a 4x4 and modularly expanded to 6x6, 8x8, and so on. This enhanced mobility configuration permits pose control and novel maneuvers such as stepping, bridging, crawling, etc. Resultant mobility improvements, particularly in unstructured and off-road environments, will reduce the resolution with which the UGV sensor systems must perceive its surroundings and decreases the computational requirements of the UGV's perception systems1 for successful semi-autonomous or autonomous terrain negotiation. This paper reviews critical vehicle developments leading up to the ANT concept, describes the basis for its configuration and speculates on the impact of the intrinsic mobility concept for UGV effectiveness.

  19. Clutter and signatures from near infrared testbed sensor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanderson, R. B.; McCalmont, J. F.; Montgomery, J. B.; Johnson, R. S.; McDermott, D. J.

    2008-04-01

    A new tactical airborne multicolor missile warning testbed was developed as part of an Air Force Research Laboratory (AFRL) initiative focusing on the development of sensors operating in the near infrared where commercially available silicon detectors can be used. At these wavelengths, the rejection of solar induced false alarms is a critical issue. Multicolor discrimination provides one of the most promising techniques for improving the performance of missile warning sensors, particularly for heavy clutter situations. This, in turn, requires that multicolor clutter data be collected for both analysis and algorithm development. The developed sensor test bed, as described in previous papers1, is a two-camera system with 1004x1004 FPA coupled with optimized filters integrated with the optics. The collection portion includes a high speed processor coupled with a high capacity disk array capable of collecting up to 48 full frames per second. This configuration allows the collection of temporally correlated, radiometrically calibrated data in two spectral bands that provide a basis for evaluating the performance of spectral discrimination algorithms. The presentation will describe background and clutter data collected from ground and flight locations in both detection and guard bands and the statistical analysis to provide a basis for evaluation of sensor performance. In addition, measurements have been made of discrete targets, both threats and false alarms. The results of these measurements have shown the capability of these sensors to provide a useful discrimination capability to distinguish threats from false alarms.

  20. Development of a Smart MicroGrid Testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Wei-Jen; Wetz, David

    2013-04-25

    Demand for electricity is rapidly increasing thereby applying pressure to expand generation and distribution capacity worldwide. The expansion of traditional services not only imposes burdens on financial resources but also encounters many challenges from community residents who oppose the construction of new power generation plants or transmission facilities in their backyard. From the integrated resource planning point of view, a feasible and economical remedy is, therefore, to utilize existing dispersed generation capacity known as distributed generation (DG) and/or renewable energy resources that may exist in the vicinity of the load centers. The main criteria for selecting the type of fuel source for a DG is its local availability, conversion system technological advancement, impact on the environment, and operating cost. DG’s have existed in the market for many years. Large diesel or gas powered generation sets are used in stand-by mode to power up vital services such as hospitals, financial and commercial compounds, telecommunication centers and industrial premises. Wind turbines, photovoltaic energy sources, and fuel cells are new comers that are now competing in size and efficiency with many standard generating sets. With this in mind, they are being used in many places not only as stand-by units but as the prime source of power particularly when the $/kWhr rate is high[1-5].

  1. Facile and Gram-scale Synthesis of Metal-free Catalysts: Toward Realistic Applications for Fuel Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ok-Hee; Cho, Yong-Hun; Chung, Dong Young; Kim, Min Jeong; Yoo, Ji Mun; Park, Ji Eun; Choe, Heeman; Sung, Yung-Eun

    2015-03-01

    Although numerous reports on nonprecious metal catalysts for replacing expensive Pt-based catalysts have been published, few of these studies have demonstrated their practical application in fuel cells. In this work, we report graphitic carbon nitride and carbon nanofiber hybrid materials synthesized by a facile and gram-scale method via liquid-based reactions, without the use of toxic materials or a high pressure-high temperature reactor, for use as fuel cell cathodes. The resulting materials exhibited remarkable methanol tolerance, selectivity, and stability even without a metal dopant. Furthermore, these completely metal-free catalysts exhibited outstanding performance as cathode materials in an actual fuel cell device: a membrane electrode assembly with both acidic and alkaline polymer electrolytes. The fabrication method and remarkable performance of the single cell produced in this study represent progressive steps toward the realistic application of metal-free cathode electrocatalysts in fuel cells.

  2. Closure Report for Corrective Action Unit 116: Area 25 Test Cell C Facility, Nevada National Security Site, Nevada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NSTec Environmental Restoration

    2011-09-29

    This Closure Report (CR) presents information supporting closure of Corrective Action Unit (CAU) 116, Area 25 Test Cell C Facility. This CR complies with the requirements of the Federal Facility Agreement and Consent Order (FFACO) that was agreed to by the State of Nevada; the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE), Environmental Management; the U.S. Department of Defense; and DOE, Legacy Management (FFACO, 1996 [as amended March 2010]). CAU 116 consists of the following two Corrective Action Sites (CASs), located in Area 25 of the Nevada National Security Site: (1) CAS 25-23-20, Nuclear Furnace Piping and (2) CAS 25-41-05, Test Cell C Facility. CAS 25-41-05 consisted of Building 3210 and the attached concrete shield wall. CAS 25-23-20 consisted of the nuclear furnace piping and tanks. Closure activities began in January 2007 and were completed in August 2011. Activities were conducted according to Revision 1 of the Streamlined Approach for Environmental Restoration Plan for CAU 116 (U.S. Department of Energy, National Nuclear Security Administration Nevada Site Office [NNSA/NSO], 2008). This CR provides documentation supporting the completed corrective actions and provides data confirming that closure objectives for CAU 116 were met. Site characterization data and process knowledge indicated that surface areas were radiologically contaminated above release limits and that regulated and/or hazardous wastes were present in the facility.

  3. Defense Waste Processing Facility Simulant Chemical Processing Cell Studies for Sludge Batch 9

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Smith, Tara E. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Newell, J. David [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Woodham, Wesley H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-08-10

    The Savannah River National Laboratory (SRNL) received a technical task request from Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) and Saltstone Engineering to perform simulant tests to support the qualification of Sludge Batch 9 (SB9) and to develop the flowsheet for SB9 in the DWPF. These efforts pertained to the DWPF Chemical Process Cell (CPC). CPC experiments were performed using SB9 simulant (SB9A) to qualify SB9 for sludge-only and coupled processing using the nitric-formic flowsheet in the DWPF. Two simulant batches were prepared, one representing SB8 Tank 40H and another representing SB9 Tank 51H. The simulant used for SB9 qualification testing was prepared by blending the SB8 Tank 40H and SB9 Tank 51H simulants. The blended simulant is referred to as SB9A. Eleven CPC experiments were run with an acid stoichiometry ranging between 105% and 145% of the Koopman minimum acid equation (KMA), which is equivalent to 109.7% and 151.5% of the Hsu minimum acid factor. Three runs were performed in the 1L laboratory scale setup, whereas the remainder were in the 4L laboratory scale setup. Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) cycles were performed on nine of the eleven. The other two were SRAT cycles only. One coupled flowsheet and one extended run were performed for SRAT and SME processing. Samples of the condensate, sludge, and off-gas were taken to monitor the chemistry of the CPC experiments.

  4. Decontamination Project for Cell G of the Metal Recovery Facility at Oak Ridge National Laboratory, Oak Ridge, Tennessee

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mandry, G.J. [Oak Ridge National Lab., TN (United States); Grisham, R.W. [Allied Technology Group, Inc., Fremont, CA (United States)

    1994-02-01

    The goal of the decontamination effort in Cell G at the Metal Recovery Facility, Building 3505, located at the Oak Ridge National Laboratory, was two-fold: to determine the effectiveness of the dry decontamination technique employed and to provide data required to assess whether additional decontamination using this method would be beneficial in the eventual decommissioning of the facility. Allied Technology Group (ATG) was contracted to remove a portion of the concrete surface in Cell G by a technique known as scabbling. Some metallic cell components were also scabbled to remove paint and other surface debris. Generally, the scabbling operation was a success. Levels of contamination were greatly reduced. The depth of contaminant penetration into the concrete surfaces of certain areas was much greater than had been anticipated, necessitating the removal of additional concrete and extending ATG`s period of performance. Scabbling and other related techniques will be extremely useful in the decontamination and decommissioning of other nuclear facilities with similar radiological profiles.

  5. The development of a mobile hot cell facility for the conditioning of spent high activity radioactive sources

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Waste Technology Section with additional support from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Administration (NNSA) through the IAEA Nuclear Security Fund has funded the design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of a portable hot cell intended to address the problem of disused Spent High Activity Radioactive Sources (SHARS) in obsolete irradiation devices such as teletherapy heads and dry irradiators. The project is initially targeting the African continent but expected soon to expand to Latin America and Asia. This hot cell allows source removal, characterization, consolidation, repackaging in modern storage shields, and secure storage of high risk SHARS at national radioactive waste storage facilities. (authors)

  6. Laboratory Spacecraft Data Processing and Instrument Autonomy: AOSAT as Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lightholder, Jack; Asphaug, Erik; Thangavelautham, Jekan

    2015-11-01

    Recent advances in small spacecraft allow for their use as orbiting microgravity laboratories (e.g. Asphaug and Thangavelautham LPSC 2014) that will produce substantial amounts of data. Power, bandwidth and processing constraints impose limitations on the number of operations which can be performed on this data as well as the data volume the spacecraft can downlink. We show that instrument autonomy and machine learning techniques can intelligently conduct data reduction and downlink queueing to meet data storage and downlink limitations. As small spacecraft laboratory capabilities increase, we must find techniques to increase instrument autonomy and spacecraft scientific decision making. The Asteroid Origins Satellite (AOSAT) CubeSat centrifuge will act as a testbed for further proving these techniques. Lightweight algorithms, such as connected components analysis, centroid tracking, K-means clustering, edge detection, convex hull analysis and intelligent cropping routines can be coupled with the tradition packet compression routines to reduce data transfer per image as well as provide a first order filtering of what data is most relevant to downlink. This intelligent queueing provides timelier downlink of scientifically relevant data while reducing the amount of irrelevant downlinked data. Resulting algorithms allow for scientists to throttle the amount of data downlinked based on initial experimental results. The data downlink pipeline, prioritized for scientific relevance based on incorporated scientific objectives, can continue from the spacecraft until the data is no longer fruitful. Coupled with data compression and cropping strategies at the data packet level, bandwidth reductions exceeding 40% can be achieved while still downlinking data deemed to be most relevant in a double blind study between scientist and algorithm. Applications of this technology allow for the incorporation of instrumentation which produces significant data volumes on small spacecraft

  7. Earthbound Unmanned Autonomous Vehicles (UAVS) As Planetary Science Testbeds

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pieri, D. C.; Bland, G.; Diaz, J. A.; Fladeland, M. M.

    2014-12-01

    Recent advances in the technology of unmanned vehicles have greatly expanded the range of contemplated terrestrial operational environments for their use, including aerial, surface, and submarine. The advances have been most pronounced in the areas of autonomy, miniaturization, durability, standardization, and ease of operation, most notably (especially in the popular press) for airborne vehicles. Of course, for a wide range of planetary venues, autonomy at high cost of both money and risk, has always been a requirement. Most recently, missions to Mars have also featured an unprecedented degree of mobility. Combining the traditional planetary surface deployment operational and science imperatives with emerging, very accessible, and relatively economical small UAV platforms on Earth can provide flexible, rugged, self-directed, test-bed platforms for landed instruments and strategies that will ultimately be directed elsewhere, and, in the process, provide valuable earth science data. While the most direct transfer of technology from terrestrial to planetary venues is perhaps for bodies with atmospheres (and oceans), with appropriate technology and strategy accommodations, single and networked UAVs can be designed to operate on even airless bodies, under a variety of gravities. In this presentation, we present and use results and lessons learned from our recent earth-bound UAV volcano deployments, as well as our future plans for such, to conceptualize a range of planetary and small-body missions. We gratefully acknowledge the assistance of students and colleagues at our home institutions, and the government of Costa Rica, without which our UAV deployments would not have been possible. This work was carried out, in part, at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory of the California Institute of Technology under contract to NASA.

  8. Facile Synthesis and High performance of a New Carbazole-Based Hole Transporting Material for Hybrid Perovskite Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Wang, Hong

    2015-06-26

    Perovskite solar cells are very promising for practical applications owing to their rapidly rising power conversion efficiency and low cost of solution-based processing. 2,2’,7,7’-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine) 9,9’-spirobifluorene (Spiro-OMeTAD) is most widely used as hole transporting material (HTM) in perovskite solar cells. However, the tedious synthesis and high cost of Spiro-OMeTAD inhibit its commercial-scale application in the photovoltaic industry. In this article, we report a carbazole-based compound (R01) as a new HTM in efficient perovskite solar cells. R01 is synthesized via a facile route consisting of only two steps from inexpensive commercially available materials. Furthermore, R01 exhibits higher hole mobility and conductivity than the state-of-the-art Spiro-OMeTAD. Perovskite solar cells fabricated with R01 produce a power conversion efficiency of 12.03%, comparable to that obtained in devices using Spiro-OMeTAD in this study. Our findings underscore R01 as a highly promising HTM with high performance, and its facile synthesis and low cost may facilitate the large-scale applications of perovskite solar cells.

  9. The Development of a Smart Distribution Grid Testbed for Integrated Information Management Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ning; Du, Pengwei; Paulson, Patrick R.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Guo, Xinxin; Hadley, Mark D.

    2011-07-28

    This paper presents a smart distribution grid testbed to test or compare designs of integrated information management systems (I2MSs). An I2MS extracts and synthesizes information from a wide range of data sources to detect abnormal system behaviors, identify possible causes, assess the system status, and provide grid operators with response suggestions. The objective of the testbed is to provide a modeling environment with sufficient data sources for the I2MS design. The testbed includes five information layers and a physical layer; it generates multi-layer chronological data based on actual measurement playbacks or simulated data sets produced by the physical layer. The testbed models random hardware failures, human errors, extreme weather events, and deliberate tampering attempts to allow users to evaluate the performance of different I2MS designs. Initial results of I2MS performance tests showed that the testbed created a close-to-real-world environment that allowed key performance metrics of the I2MS to be evaluated.

  10. The Development of a Smart Distribution Grid Testbed for Integrated Information Management Systems

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lu, Ning; Du, Pengwei; Paulson, Patrick R.; Greitzer, Frank L.; Guo, Xinxin; Hadley, Mark D.

    2011-01-31

    This paper presents a smart distribution grid testbed to test or compare designs of integrated information management systems (I2MSs). An I2MS extracts and synthesizes information from a wide range of data sources to detect abnormal system behaviors, identify possible causes, assess the system status, and provide grid operators with response suggestions. The objective of the testbed is to provide a modeling environment with sufficient data sources for the I2MS design. The testbed includes five information layers and a physical layer; it generates multi-layer chronological data based on actual measurement playbacks or simulated data sets produced by the physical layer. The testbed models random hardware failures, human errors, extreme weather events, and deliberate tampering attempts to allow users to evaluate the performance of different I2MS designs. Initial results of I2MS performance tests showed that the testbed created a close-to-real-world environment that allowed key performance metrics of the I2MS to be evaluated

  11. Conceptual Design and Cost Estimate of a Subsonic NASA Testbed Vehicle (NTV) for Aeronautics Research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nickol, Craig L.; Frederic, Peter

    2013-01-01

    A conceptual design and cost estimate for a subsonic flight research vehicle designed to support NASA's Environmentally Responsible Aviation (ERA) project goals is presented. To investigate the technical and economic feasibility of modifying an existing aircraft, a highly modified Boeing 717 was developed for maturation of technologies supporting the three ERA project goals of reduced fuel burn, noise, and emissions. This modified 717 utilizes midfuselage mounted modern high bypass ratio engines in conjunction with engine exhaust shielding structures to provide a low noise testbed. The testbed also integrates a natural laminar flow wing section and active flow control for the vertical tail. An eight year program plan was created to incrementally modify and test the vehicle, enabling the suite of technology benefits to be isolated and quantified. Based on the conceptual design and programmatic plan for this testbed vehicle, a full cost estimate of $526M was developed, representing then-year dollars at a 50% confidence level.

  12. High-contrast imager for Complex Aperture Telescopes (HiCAT): 1. Testbed design

    CERN Document Server

    N'Diaye, Mamadou; Pueyo, Laurent; Elliot, Erin; Perrin, Marshall D; Wallace, J Kent; Groff, Tyler; Carlotti, Alexis; Mawet, Dimitri; Sheckells, Matt; Shaklan, Stuart; Macintosh, Bruce; Kasdin, N Jeremy; Soummer, Rémi

    2014-01-01

    Searching for nearby habitable worlds with direct imaging and spectroscopy will require a telescope large enough to provide angular resolution and sensitivity to planets around a significant sample of stars. Segmented telescopes are a compelling option to obtain such large apertures. However, these telescope designs have a complex geometry (central obstruction, support structures, segmentation) that makes high-contrast imaging more challenging. We are developing a new high-contrast imaging testbed at STScI to provide an integrated solution for wavefront control and starlight suppression on complex aperture geometries. We present our approach for the testbed optical design, which defines the surface requirements for each mirror to minimize the amplitude-induced errors from the propagation of out-of-pupil surfaces. Our approach guarantees that the testbed will not be limited by these Fresnel propagation effects, but only by the aperture geometry. This approach involves iterations between classical ray-tracing o...

  13. Model-based beam control for illumination of remote objects, part II: laboratory testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Basu, Santasri; Voelz, David; Chandler, Susan M.; Lukesh, Gordon W.; Sjogren, Jon

    2004-10-01

    When a laser beam propagates through the atmosphere, it is subject to corrupting influences including mechanical vibrations, turbulence and tracker limitations. As a result, pointing errors can occur, causing loss of energy or signal at the target. Nukove Scientific Consulting has developed algorithms to estimate these pointing errors from the statistics of the return photons from the target. To prove the feasibility of this approach for real-time estimation, an analysis tool called RHINO was developed by Nukove. Associated with this effort, New Mexico State University developed a laboratory testbed, the ultimate objective being to test the estimation algorithms under controlled conditions and to stream data into RHINO to prove the feasibility of real-time operation. The present paper outlines the description of this testbed and the results obtained through RHINO when the testbed was used to test the estimation approach.

  14. Testbed System of Inter-Radio System Switching for Cognitive Radio

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanaoka, Seishi; Yano, Masashi; Hirata, Tetsuhiko

    The cognitive radio system consists of multiple wireless access systems that cover overlapping areas and cognitive terminals that use one or more of the wireless accesses simultaneously. In this paper, we describe the architecture of the cognitive radio system and the inter-system handover protocols. In the architecture, each cognitive terminal, which can access multiple radio systems, operates with a single local IP address. The control sequence and packet format are designed to achieve fast handover among the radio systems. Based on the architecture, we have developed a testbed system. On this system, we demonstrate that data can be delivered continuously and radio systems can be switched correctly without any packet loss. In addition, we present the result of the evaluation of the end-to-end latency on the testbed system. These testbed results demonstrate the system architecture described in the paper can achieve a cognitive radio system.

  15. James Webb Space Telescope Optical Simulation Testbed I: Overview and First Results

    CERN Document Server

    Perrin, Marshall D; Choquet, Élodie; N'Diaye, Mamadou; Levecq, Olivier; Lajoie, Charles-Phillipe; Ygouf, Marie; Leboulleux, Lucie; Egron, Sylvain; Anderson, Rachel; Long, Chris; Elliott, Erin; Hartig, George; Pueyo, Laurent; van der Marel, Roeland; Mountain, Matt

    2014-01-01

    The James Webb Space Telescope (JWST) Optical Simulation Testbed (JOST) is a tabletop workbench to study aspects of wavefront sensing and control for a segmented space telescope, including both commissioning and maintenance activities. JOST is complementary to existing optomechanical testbeds for JWST (e.g. the Ball Aerospace Testbed Telescope, TBT) given its compact scale and flexibility, ease of use, and colocation at the JWST Science & Operations Center. We have developed an optical design that reproduces the physics of JWST's three-mirror anastigmat using three aspheric lenses; it provides similar image quality as JWST (80% Strehl ratio) over a field equivalent to a NIRCam module, but at HeNe wavelength. A segmented deformable mirror stands in for the segmented primary mirror and allows control of the 18 segments in piston, tip, and tilt, while the secondary can be controlled in tip, tilt and x, y, z position. This will be sufficient to model many commissioning activities, to investigate field depende...

  16. Human Exploration System Test-Bed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) Support of Future NASA Deep-Space Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marmolejo, Jose; Ewert, Michael

    2016-01-01

    The Engineering Directorate at the NASA - Johnson Space Center is outfitting a 20-Foot diameter hypobaric chamber in Building 7 to support future deep-space Environmental Control & Life Support System (ECLSS) research as part of the Human Exploration System Test-bed for Integration and Advancement (HESTIA) Project. This human-rated chamber is the only NASA facility that has the unique experience, chamber geometry, infrastructure, and support systems capable of conducting this research. The chamber was used to support Gemini, Apollo, and SkyLab Missions. More recently, it was used to conduct 30-, 60-, and 90-day human ECLSS closed-loop testing in the 1990s to support the International Space Station and life support technology development. NASA studies show that both planetary surface and deep-space transit crew habitats will be 3-4 story cylindrical structures driven by human occupancy volumetric needs and launch vehicle constraints. The HESTIA facility offers a 3-story, 20-foot diameter habitat consistent with the studies' recommendations. HESTIA operations follow stringent processes by a certified test team that including human testing. Project management, analysis, design, acquisition, fabrication, assembly and certification of facility build-ups are available to support this research. HESTIA offers close proximity to key stakeholders including astronauts, Human Research Program (who direct space human research for the agency), Mission Operations, Safety & Mission Assurance, and Engineering Directorate. The HESTIA chamber can operate at reduced pressure and elevated oxygen environments including those proposed for deep-space exploration. Data acquisition, power, fluids and other facility resources are available to support a wide range of research. Recently completed HESTIA research consisted of unmanned testing of ECLSS technologies. Eventually, the HESTIA research will include humans for extended durations at reduced pressure and elevated oxygen to demonstrate

  17. A facile, branched DNA assay to quantitatively measure glucocorticoid receptor auto-regulation in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jason R. Schwartz; Purvaba J. Sarvaiya; Lily E. Leiva; Maria C. Velez; Tammuella C. Singleton; Lolie C. Yu; Wayne V. Vedeckis

    2012-01-01

    Glucocorticoid (GC) steroid hormones are used to treat acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) because of their pro-apoptotic effects in hematopoietic cells.However,not all leukemia cells are sensitive to GC,and no assay to stratify patients is available.In the GC-sensitive T-cell ALL cell line CEM-C7,auto-up-regulation of RNA transcripts for the glucocorticoid receptor (GR) correlates with increased apoptotic response.This study aimed to determine if a facile assay of GR transcript levels might be promising for stratifying ALL patients into hormone-sensitive and hormone-resistant populations.The GR transcript profiles of various lymphoid cell lines and 4 bone marrow samples from patients with T-cell ALL were analyzed using both an optimized branched DNA (bDNA) assay and a real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction assay.There were significant correlations between both assay platforms when measuring total GR (exon 5/6) transcripts in various cell lines and patient samples,but not for a probe set that detects a specific,low abundance GR transcript (exon 1A3).Our results suggest that the bDNA platform is reproducible and precise when measuring total GR transcripts and,with further development,may ultimately offer a simple clinical assay to aid in the prediction of GC-sensitivity in ALL patients.

  18. Towards Autonomous Operations of the Robonaut 2 Humanoid Robotic Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badger, Julia; Nguyen, Vienny; Mehling, Joshua; Hambuchen, Kimberly; Diftler, Myron; Luna, Ryan; Baker, William; Joyce, Charles

    2016-01-01

    The Robonaut project has been conducting research in robotics technology on board the International Space Station (ISS) since 2012. Recently, the original upper body humanoid robot was upgraded by the addition of two climbing manipulators ("legs"), more capable processors, and new sensors, as shown in Figure 1. While Robonaut 2 (R2) has been working through checkout exercises on orbit following the upgrade, technology development on the ground has continued to advance. Through the Active Reduced Gravity Offload System (ARGOS), the Robonaut team has been able to develop technologies that will enable full operation of the robotic testbed on orbit using similar robots located at the Johnson Space Center. Once these technologies have been vetted in this way, they will be implemented and tested on the R2 unit on board the ISS. The goal of this work is to create a fully-featured robotics research platform on board the ISS to increase the technology readiness level of technologies that will aid in future exploration missions. Technology development has thus far followed two main paths, autonomous climbing and efficient tool manipulation. Central to both technologies has been the incorporation of a human robotic interaction paradigm that involves the visualization of sensory and pre-planned command data with models of the robot and its environment. Figure 2 shows screenshots of these interactive tools, built in rviz, that are used to develop and implement these technologies on R2. Robonaut 2 is designed to move along the handrails and seat track around the US lab inside the ISS. This is difficult for many reasons, namely the environment is cluttered and constrained, the robot has many degrees of freedom (DOF) it can utilize for climbing, and remote commanding for precision tasks such as grasping handrails is time-consuming and difficult. Because of this, it is important to develop the technologies needed to allow the robot to reach operator-specified positions as

  19. Fast Flux Test Facility interim examination and maintenance cell contaminated sodium recovery system: Remote handling design consideration

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Westinghouse Hanford Company is installing a remotely operated Contaminated Sodium Recovery System (CSRS) at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF) located in Richland, Washington. The CSRS will recover activated sodium that accumulates in fuel transfer machines during core component transfer operations. Drip pots from the FFTF fuel handling machines will be delivered to the shielded, argon-inerted Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell, a hot cell located in the FFTF containment structure. Installation of the CSRS replaces a previously manual operation that required disposal of radioactive sodium with a completely remote operation that will return sodium to service in the plant. The CSRS will minimize the accumulation of hazardous waste and reduce personnel exposure to radioactive materials. Equipment for the CSRS is currently being fabricated and tested before installation in the IEM Cell. 6 figs

  20. Progress in testing exo-planet signal extraction on the TPF-I Planet Detection Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Stefan R.; Szwaykowski, Piotr; Loya, Frank M.; Liewer, Kurt

    2006-01-01

    The TPF Interferometer (TPF-I) concept is being studied at the Jet Propulsion Laboratory and the TPF-I Planet Detection Testbed has been developed to simulate the detection process for an earthlike planet orbiting a star within about 15 pc. The testbed combines four beams of infrared light simulating the operation of a dual chopped Bracewell interferometer observing a star and a faint planet. This paper describes the results obtained this year including nulling of the starlight on four input beams at contrast ratios up to 250,000 to 1, and detection of faint planet signals at contrast ratios with the star of 2 million to 1.

  1. SAVA 3: A testbed for integration and control of visual processes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crowley, James L.; Christensen, Henrik

    1994-01-01

    The development of an experimental test-bed to investigate the integration and control of perception in a continuously operating vision system is described. The test-bed integrates a 12 axis robotic stereo camera head mounted on a mobile robot, dedicated computer boards for real-time image acquisition and processing, and a distributed system for image description. The architecture was designed to: (1) be continuously operating, (2) integrate software contributions from geographically dispersed laboratories, (3) integrate description of the environment with 2D measurements, 3D models, and recognition of objects, (4) capable of supporting diverse experiments in gaze control, visual servoing, navigation, and object surveillance, and (5) dynamically reconfiguarable.

  2. The Design of Impact Test-Bed for High-Flow Water Medium Relief Valve

    OpenAIRE

    Junliang Chang; Lei Liu; Jiyun Zhao; Haigang Ding; Gaoliang Shi

    2014-01-01

    Water medium hydraulic systems are widely used in coal mining machinery. As the power of hydraulic system becomes higher, the flow and pressure of water medium relief valve are also higher, and the flow may reach 2000 L/min. However, there is no relevant test-bed which could provide instantaneous high-pressure and high-flow to support the experiment for high-flow relief valve; consequently, this impact test-bed for high-flow water medium relief valve is designed to satisfy fast loading demand...

  3. An Active helideck testbed for floating structures based on a Stewart-Gough platform

    OpenAIRE

    Campos Bonilla, Aníbal Alexandre; Quintero Ruiz, Jacqueline; Saltaren Pazmiño, Roque Jacinto; Ferre Perez, Manuel; Aracil Santonja, Rafael

    2008-01-01

    A parallel robot testbed based on Stewart-Gough platform called Active-helideck is designed, developed and tested as a helicopter floating helideck. The objective of this testbed is to show the advantages of helicopters that use an active helideck upon landing on and taking off from ships or from offshore structures. Active-helideck compensates simulated movements of a ship at sea. The main goal of this study is to maintain the robot’s end effector (helideck) in a quasi-static position in acc...

  4. Deploying SIP-based Mobile Exam Application onto Next Generation Network testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Barnawi, Ahmed; Emran, Muhammad; Khan, Asif Irshad; 10.1109/SIECPC.2011.5876936

    2012-01-01

    Over the past few years, mobile operators are faced with enormous challenges. Of such challenges, evolved user demands on personalized applications. Telecommunications industry as well as research community have paid enormous attention to Next Generation Networks (NGN) to address this challenge. NGN is perceived as a sophisticated platform where both application developers and mobile operators cooperate to develop user applications with enhanced quality of experience. The objective of this paper is twofold: first we present an introduction to state-of-the-art NGN testbed to be developed at KAU, and second we provide initial analysis for deploying a mobile application on top of the testbed.

  5. Virtual Pipeline System Testbed to Optimize the U.S. Natural Gas Transmission Pipeline System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kirby S. Chapman; Prakash Krishniswami; Virg Wallentine; Mohammed Abbaspour; Revathi Ranganathan; Ravi Addanki; Jeet Sengupta; Liubo Chen

    2005-06-01

    The goal of this project is to develop a Virtual Pipeline System Testbed (VPST) for natural gas transmission. This study uses a fully implicit finite difference method to analyze transient, nonisothermal compressible gas flow through a gas pipeline system. The inertia term of the momentum equation is included in the analysis. The testbed simulate compressor stations, the pipe that connects these compressor stations, the supply sources, and the end-user demand markets. The compressor station is described by identifying the make, model, and number of engines, gas turbines, and compressors. System operators and engineers can analyze the impact of system changes on the dynamic deliverability of gas and on the environment.

  6. Nuclear Instrumentation and Control Cyber Testbed Considerations - Lessons Learned

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Identifying and understanding digital instrumentation and control (I and C) cyber vulnerabilities within nuclear power plants and other nuclear facilities is critical if nation states desire to operate nuclear facilities safely, reliably, and securely. To demonstrate objective evidence that cyber vulnerabilities have been adequately identified and mitigated, a test bed representing a facility's critical nuclear equipment must be replicated. Idaho National Laboratory (INL) has built and operated similar test beds for common critical infrastructure I and C for over 10 years. This experience developing, operating, and maintaining an I and C test bed in support of research identifying cyber vulnerabilities has led the Korean Atomic Energy Research Institute of the Republic of Korea to solicit the experiences of INL to help mitigate problems early in the design, development, operation, and maintenance of a similar test bed. The following information will discuss I and C test bed lessons learned and the impact of these experiences to KAERI

  7. Implementation of a virtual link between power system testbeds at Marshall Spaceflight Center and Lewis Research Center

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doreswamy, Rajiv

    1990-01-01

    The Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC) owns and operates a space station module power management and distribution (SSM-PMAD) testbed. This system, managed by expert systems, is used to analyze and develop power system automation techniques for Space Station Freedom. The Lewis Research Center (LeRC), Cleveland, Ohio, has developed and implemented a space station electrical power system (EPS) testbed. This system and its power management controller are representative of the overall Space Station Freedom power system. A virtual link is being implemented between the testbeds at MSFC and LeRC. This link would enable configuration of SSM-PMAD as a load center for the EPS testbed at LeRC. This connection will add to the versatility of both systems, and provide an environment of enhanced realism for operation of both testbeds.

  8. Simple and facile approach to synthesize magnetite nanoparticles and assessment of their effects on blood cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cotica, Luiz F., E-mail: lfcotica@pq.cnpq.br [Department of Physics, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Maringa, PR 87020900 (Brazil); Freitas, Valdirlei F.; Dias, Gustavo S.; Santos, Ivair A. [Department of Physics, Universidade Estadual de Maringa, Maringa, PR 87020900 (Brazil); Vendrame, Sheila C.; Khalil, Najeh M.; Mainardes, Rubiana M. [Department of Pharmacy, Universidade Estadual do Centro-Oeste, Guarapuava, PR 85040080 (Brazil); Staruch, Margo; Jain, Menka [Department of Physics, University of Connecticut, Storrs, CT 06269 (United States)

    2012-02-15

    In this paper, a very simple and facile approach for the large scale synthesis of uniform and size-controllable single-domain magnetite nanoparticles is reported. These magnetite nanoparticles were synthesized via thermal decomposition of a ferric nitrate/ethylene glycol solution. The structural and morphological properties of the synthesized nanoparticles were carefully studied. Nearly spherical nanoparticles with inverted spinel structure and average particle and crystallite sizes smaller than 20 nm were obtained. The magnetic measurements revealed that magnetite nanoparticles have a magnetic saturation value near that of the bulk magnetite. The erythrocyte cytotoxicity assays showed no hemolytic potential of the samples containing magnetite nanoparticles, indicating no cytotoxic activity on human erythrocytes, which makes these interesting for biotechnological applications. - Highlights: > Simple and facile approach to large scale synthesis of magnetite nanoparticles. > Erythrocyte cytotoxicity assays showed no hemolytic potential of nanoparticles. > Saturation magnetization of nanoparticles reached near that of the bulk magnetite.

  9. Dismantling of the 904 Cell at the HAO/Sud Facility - 13466

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Vaudey, C.E.; Crosnier, S. [AREVA Clean-Up BU, 1 route de la Noue 91196 - Gif-sur-Yvette (France); Renouf, M.; Gaspard, N. [AREVA Clean-Up BU, Site de La Hague - BV 35 - 50444 Beaumont Hague (France); Pinot, L. [AREVA D and D BU, Site de La Hague - 50444 Beaumont Hague (France)

    2013-07-01

    La Hague facility, in France, is the spent fuel recycling plant wherein a part of the fuel coming from some of the French, German, Belgian, Swiss, Dutch and Japanese nuclear reactors is reprocessed before being recycled in order to separate certain radioactive elements. The facility has been successively handled by the CEA (1962-1978), Cogema (1978-2006), and AREVA NC (since 2006). La Hague facility is composed of 3 production units: The UP2-400 production unit started to be operated in 1966 for the reprocessing of UNGG metal fuel. In 1976, following the dropout of the graphite-gas technology by EDF, an HAO workshop to reprocess the fuel from the light water reactors is affiliated and then stopped in 2003. - UP2-400 is partially stopped in 2002 and then definitely the 1 January 2004 and is being dismantled - UP2-800, with the same capacity than UP3, started to be operated in 1994 and is still in operation. And UP3 - UP3 was implemented in 1990 with an annual reprocessing capacity of 800 tons of fuel and is still in operation The combined licensed capacity of UP2-800 and UP3 is 1,700 tons of used fuel. (authors)

  10. Incident at university research facility - pressure testing of gas hydrate cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Niels; Jørgensen, Sten Bay

    A master student designed a cell for observing the development of gas hydrates as conditions in the cell were changed. The supervisor asked for a pressure test of the cell before the experiments started. The student chose-to perform the pressure test using compressed air and this resulted in one of...... the two windows on the cell breaking during the pressure test, resulting in glass fragments showering the laboratory. Luckily no one was hurt. Following this, and other incidents, the university implemented a requirement for a process hazard analysis (PHA) of any new or modified experimental set...

  11. Software-Defined Radio Testbed for the Physical Layer of Wireless LANs

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schiphorst, R.; Moseley, N.A.; Slump, C.H.

    2005-01-01

    This paper presents a software-defined radio testbed for the physical layer of wireless LAN standards. All baseband physical layer functions have been successfully mapped on a Pentium~4 processor that performs these functions in real-time. This has been tested in combination with a CMOS integrated w

  12. Data Distribution Service-Based Interoperability Framework for Smart Grid Testbed Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tarek A. Youssef

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents the design and implementation of a communication and control infrastructure for smart grid operation. The proposed infrastructure enhances the reliability of the measurements and control network. The advantages of utilizing the data-centric over message-centric communication approach are discussed in the context of smart grid applications. The data distribution service (DDS is used to implement a data-centric common data bus for the smart grid. This common data bus improves the communication reliability, enabling distributed control and smart load management. These enhancements are achieved by avoiding a single point of failure while enabling peer-to-peer communication and an automatic discovery feature for dynamic participating nodes. The infrastructure and ideas presented in this paper were implemented and tested on the smart grid testbed. A toolbox and application programing interface for the testbed infrastructure are developed in order to facilitate interoperability and remote access to the testbed. This interface allows control, monitoring, and performing of experiments remotely. Furthermore, it could be used to integrate multidisciplinary testbeds to study complex cyber-physical systems (CPS.

  13. ASE-BAN, a Wireless Body Area Network Testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Jens Kargaard; Karstoft, Henrik; Hansen, Finn Overgaard;

    2010-01-01

    /actuators attached to the body and a host server application. The gateway uses the BlackFin BF533 processor from Analog Devices, and uses Bluetooth for wireless communication. Two types of sensors are attached to the network: an electro-cardio-gram sensor and an oximeter sensor. The testbed has been successfully...

  14. System identification and structural control on the JPL Phase B testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chu, Cheng-Chih; Obrien, John F.; Lurie, Boris J.

    1993-01-01

    The primary objective of NASA's CSI program at JPL is to develop and demonstrate the CSI technology required to achieve high precision structural stability on large complex optical class spacecraft. The focus mission for this work is an orbiting interferometer telescope. Toward the realization of such a mission, a series of evolutionary testbed structures are being constructed. The JPL's CSI Phase B testbed is the second structure constructed in this series which is designed to study the pathlength control problem of the optical train of a stellar interferometer telescope mounted on a large flexible structure. A detailed description of this testbed can be found. This paper describes our efforts in the first phase of active structural control experiments of Phase B testbed using the active control approach where a single piezoelectric active member is used as an actuation device and the measurements include both colocated and noncolocated sensors. Our goal for this experiment is to demonstrate the feasibility of active structural control using both colocated and noncolocated measurements by means of successive control design and loop closing. More specifically, the colocated control loop was designed and closed first to provide good damping improvement over the frequency range of interest. The noncolocated controller was then designed with respect to a partially controlled structure to further improve the performance. Based on our approach, experimental closed-loop results have demonstrated significant performance improvement with excellent stability margins.

  15. INFORM Lab: a testbed for high-level information fusion and resource management

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valin, Pierre; Guitouni, Adel; Bossé, Eloi; Wehn, Hans; Happe, Jens

    2011-05-01

    DRDC Valcartier and MDA have created an advanced simulation testbed for the purpose of evaluating the effectiveness of Network Enabled Operations in a Coastal Wide Area Surveillance situation, with algorithms provided by several universities. This INFORM Lab testbed allows experimenting with high-level distributed information fusion, dynamic resource management and configuration management, given multiple constraints on the resources and their communications networks. This paper describes the architecture of INFORM Lab, the essential concepts of goals and situation evidence, a selected set of algorithms for distributed information fusion and dynamic resource management, as well as auto-configurable information fusion architectures. The testbed provides general services which include a multilayer plug-and-play architecture, and a general multi-agent framework based on John Boyd's OODA loop. The testbed's performance is demonstrated on 2 types of scenarios/vignettes for 1) cooperative search-and-rescue efforts, and 2) a noncooperative smuggling scenario involving many target ships and various methods of deceit. For each mission, an appropriate subset of Canadian airborne and naval platforms are dispatched to collect situation evidence, which is fused, and then used to modify the platform trajectories for the most efficient collection of further situation evidence. These platforms are fusion nodes which obey a Command and Control node hierarchy.

  16. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability -- Bench-scale Testbed Design Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Melin, Alexander M. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Kisner, Roger A. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Drira, Anis [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States); Reed, Frederick K. [Oak Ridge National Lab. (ORNL), Oak Ridge, TN (United States)

    2015-09-01

    Embedded instrumentation and control systems that can operate in extreme environments are challenging due to restrictions on sensors and materials. As a part of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology cross-cutting technology development programs Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation topic, this report details the design of a bench-scale embedded instrumentation and control testbed. The design goal of the bench-scale testbed is to build a re-configurable system that can rapidly deploy and test advanced control algorithms in a hardware in the loop setup. The bench-scale testbed will be designed as a fluid pump analog that uses active magnetic bearings to support the shaft. The testbed represents an application that would improve the efficiency and performance of high temperature (700 C) pumps for liquid salt reactors that operate in an extreme environment and provide many engineering challenges that can be overcome with embedded instrumentation and control. This report will give details of the mechanical design, electromagnetic design, geometry optimization, power electronics design, and initial control system design.

  17. Infiniband Event-Builder Architecture Test-beds for Full Rate Data Acquisition in LHCb

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LHCb Data Acquisition system will be upgraded to address the requirements of a 40 MHz readout of the detector. It is not obvious that a simple scale-up of the current system will be able to meet these requirements. In this work we are therefore re-evaluating various architectures and technologies using a uniform test-bed and software framework. Infiniband is a rather uncommon technology in the domain of High Energy Physics data acquisition. It is currently mainly used in cluster based architectures. It has however interesting features which justify our interest : large bandwidth with low latency, a minimal overhead and a rich protocol suite. An InfiniBand test-bed has been and set-up, and the purpose is to have a software interface between the core software of the event-builder and the software related to the communication protocol. This allows us to run the same event-builder over different technologies for comparisons. We will present the test-bed architectures, and the performance of the different entities of the system, sources and destinations, according to their implementation. These results will be compared with 10 Gigabit Ethernet testbed results.

  18. Embedded Sensors and Controls to Improve Component Performance and Reliability -- Bench-scale Testbed Design Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Embedded instrumentation and control systems that can operate in extreme environments are challenging due to restrictions on sensors and materials. As a part of the Department of Energy's Nuclear Energy Enabling Technology cross-cutting technology development programs Advanced Sensors and Instrumentation topic, this report details the design of a bench-scale embedded instrumentation and control testbed. The design goal of the bench-scale testbed is to build a re-configurable system that can rapidly deploy and test advanced control algorithms in a hardware in the loop setup. The bench-scale testbed will be designed as a fluid pump analog that uses active magnetic bearings to support the shaft. The testbed represents an application that would improve the efficiency and performance of high temperature (700 C) pumps for liquid salt reactors that operate in an extreme environment and provide many engineering challenges that can be overcome with embedded instrumentation and control. This report will give details of the mechanical design, electromagnetic design, geometry optimization, power electronics design, and initial control system design.

  19. Description of New Inflatable/Rigidizable Hexapod Structure Testbed for Shape and Vibration Control

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adetona, O.; Keel, L. H.; Horta, L. G.; Cadogan, D. P.; Sapna, G. H.; Scarborough, S. E.

    2002-01-01

    Larger and more powerful space based instruments are needed to meet increasingly sophisticated scientific demand. To support this need, concepts for telescopes with apertures of 100 meters are being investigated, but the required technologies are not in hand today. Due to the capacity limits of launch vehicles, the idea of deploying, erecting, or inflating large structures in space is being considered. Recently, rigidization concepts of large inflatable structures have demonstrated the capability of weight reductions of up to 50% from current concepts with packaging efficiencies near 80%. One of the important aspects of inflatable structures is vibration mitigation and line-of-sight control. Such control tasks are possible only after actuators/sensors are properly integrated into a rigidizable concept. To study these issues, we have developed an inflatable/rigidizable hexapod structure testbed. The testbed integrates state of the art piezo-electric self-sensing actuators into an inflatable/rigidizable structure and a flat membrane reflector. Using this testbed, we plan to experimentally demonstrate achievable vibration and line-of-sight control. This paper contains a description of the testbed and an outline of the test plan.

  20. Facile synthesis of fluorescent porous zinc sulfide nanospheres and their application for potential drug delivery and live cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Ruimin; Liu, Shanhu

    2012-05-01

    Fabrication of intrinsically fluorescent porous nanocarriers that are simultaneously stable in aqueous solutions and photostable is critical for their application in drug delivery and optical imaging but remains a challenge. In this study, fluorescent porous zinc sulfide nanospheres were synthesized by a facile gum arabic-assisted hydrothermal procedure. The morphology, composition and properties of the nanospheres have been characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, fourier transform infrared spectrograph, optical measurement, dynamic light scattering, and cytotoxicity assay. They exhibit larger surface area, excellent colloidal stability, photostable fluorescent signals, and good biocompatibility, which makes them promising hosts for drug delivery and cellular imaging. The fluorescent dye safranine-T was employed as a drug model and loaded into the porous nanospheres, which were delivered to human cervical cancer HeLa cells in vitro for live cell imaging.Fabrication of intrinsically fluorescent porous nanocarriers that are simultaneously stable in aqueous solutions and photostable is critical for their application in drug delivery and optical imaging but remains a challenge. In this study, fluorescent porous zinc sulfide nanospheres were synthesized by a facile gum arabic-assisted hydrothermal procedure. The morphology, composition and properties of the nanospheres have been characterized by field-emission scanning electron microscopy, transmission electron microscopy, X-ray powder diffraction, N2 adsorption-desorption analysis, thermal gravimetric analysis, fourier transform infrared spectrograph, optical measurement, dynamic light scattering, and cytotoxicity assay. They exhibit larger surface area, excellent colloidal stability, photostable fluorescent signals, and good biocompatibility, which makes them promising

  1. Neutron Therapy Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Neutron Therapy Facility provides a moderate intensity, broad energy spectrum neutron beam that can be used for short term irradiations for radiobiology (cells)...

  2. Knowledge-based image data management - An expert front-end for the BROWSE facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoms, David M.; Star, Jeffrey L.; Estes, John E.

    1988-01-01

    An intelligent user interface being added to the NASA-sponsored BROWSE testbed facility is described. BROWSE is a prototype system designed to explore issues involved in locating image data in distributed archives and displaying low-resolution versions of that imagery at a local terminal. For prototyping, the initial application is the remote sensing of forest and range land.

  3. Evaluation of the First Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT 1) Full-Scale Crash Test

    Science.gov (United States)

    Annett, Martin S.; Littell, Justin D.; Jackson, Karen E.; Bark, Lindley W.; DeWeese, Rick L.; McEntire, B. Joseph

    2014-01-01

    In 2012, the NASA Rotary Wing Crashworthiness Program initiated the Transport Rotorcraft Airframe Crash Testbed (TRACT) research program by obtaining two CH-46E helicopters from the Navy CH-46E Program Office (PMA-226) at the Navy Flight Readiness Center in Cherry Point, North Carolina. Full-scale crash tests were planned to assess dynamic responses of transport-category rotorcraft under combined horizontal and vertical impact loading. The first crash test (TRACT 1) was performed at NASA Langley Research Center's Landing and Impact Research Facility (LandIR), which enables the study of critical interactions between the airframe, seat, and occupant during a controlled crash environment. The CH-46E fuselage is categorized as a medium-lift rotorcraft with fuselage dimensions comparable to a regional jet or business jet. The first TRACT test (TRACT 1) was conducted in August 2013. The primary objectives for TRACT 1 were to: (1) assess improvements to occupant loads and displacement with the use of crashworthy features such as pre-tensioning active restraints and energy absorbing seats, (2) develop novel techniques for photogrammetric data acquisition to measure occupant and airframe kinematics, and (3) provide baseline data for future comparison with a retrofitted airframe configuration. Crash test conditions for TRACT 1 were 33-ft/s forward and 25-ft/s vertical combined velocity onto soft soil, which represent a severe, but potentially survivable impact scenario. The extraordinary value of the TRACT 1 test was reflected by the breadth of meaningful experiments. A total of 8 unique experiments were conducted to evaluate ATD responses, seat and restraint performance, cargo restraint effectiveness, patient litter behavior, and photogrammetric techniques. A combination of Hybrid II, Hybrid III, and ES-2 Anthropomorphic Test Devices (ATDs) were placed in forward and side facing seats and occupant results were compared against injury criteria. Loads from ATDs in energy

  4. A Large Lunar Surface Testbed from Low Cost Material

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rickman, Douglas

    2014-01-01

    For users needing to simulate the lunar surface, several distinct avenues have been used. Numerous volcanic areas, including Hawaii, have been used. While providing very large areas and scenic interest, field parties to such an area is expensive and limits testing time. An alternative is to build test facilities locally. This has been done many ways, contrast GRC-1, GSC-1, BP-1 and the KSC Morpheus facility [1-4]. GRC-1 is a mixture of sand and clay; GSC-1 and BP-1 are waste materials created in the process of crushing basaltic rock. The Morpheus field used salvaged concrete and crushed quartz rock [5]. Here I report about a 30 m X 30 m test area at MSFC which was both low cost and relatively high fidelity [6].

  5. SCDU Testbed Automated In-Situ Alignment, Data Acquisition and Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werne, Thomas A.; Wehmeier, Udo J.; Wu, Janet P.; An, Xin; Goullioud, Renaud; Nemati, Bijan; Shao, Michael; Shen, Tsae-Pyng J.; Wang, Xu; Weilert, Mark A.; Zhai, Chengxing

    2010-01-01

    In the course of fulfilling its mandate, the Spectral Calibration Development Unit (SCDU) testbed for SIM-Lite produces copious amounts of raw data. To effectively spend time attempting to understand the science driving the data, the team devised computerized automations to limit the time spent bringing the testbed to a healthy state and commanding it, and instead focus on analyzing the processed results. We developed a multi-layered scripting language that emphasized the scientific experiments we conducted, which drastically shortened our experiment scripts, improved their readability, and all-but-eliminated testbed operator errors. In addition to scientific experiment functions, we also developed a set of automated alignments that bring the testbed up to a well-aligned state with little more than the push of a button. These scripts were written in the scripting language, and in Matlab via an interface library, allowing all members of the team to augment the existing scripting language with complex analysis scripts. To keep track of these results, we created an easily-parseable state log in which we logged both the state of the testbed and relevant metadata. Finally, we designed a distributed processing system that allowed us to farm lengthy analyses to a collection of client computers which reported their results in a central log. Since these logs were parseable, we wrote query scripts that gave us an effortless way to compare results collected under different conditions. This paper serves as a case-study, detailing the motivating requirements for the decisions we made and explaining the implementation process.

  6. Microbeam facility extension for single-cell irradiation experiments. Investigations about bystander effect and reactive oxygen species impact

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The LPS microbeam facility is based on a KN3750 Van de Graaff accelerator devoted to microbeam analysis [1]. It is equipped with two horizontal microbeam lines used in various fields such as material science, geological science, nuclear material science and biology. Since two years, a single ion hit device is being developed at the LPS. The setup is dedicated to the study of ionizing radiation effects on living cells by performing single ion irradiation at controlled doses and locations. This study will complete current researches conducted on uranium chemical toxicity on renal an d osteoblastic cells. After ingestion, most uranium is excreted from the body within a few days except small fraction that is absorbed into the blood-stream (0.2 to 5%) and then deposit and preferentially in kidneys and bones, where it can remain for many years. Uranium is a heavy metal and a primarily alpha emitter. It can lead to bone cancer as a result of the ionizing radiation associated with the radioactive decay products. The study of the response to an exposure to alpha particles will permit to distinguish radiotoxicity and chemical toxicity of uranium bone cells with a special emphasis or the bystander effect at low dose.All the beam lines at the LPS nuclear microprobe are horizontal and under vacuum. A dedicated deflecting magnet was inserted in one of the two available beam lines of the facility. The ion beam is extracted to air using a 100 nm thick silicon nitride membrane, thin enough to induce negligible effects on the ions in terms of energy loss and spatial resolution. By this way, we believe that we minimize the experimental setup impact on the living cells easing the detection of low irradiation dose impact. The atmosphere around the samples is also important to guaranty low stressed cell culture conditions. A temperature, hygrometry and CO2 controlled atmosphere device will be implanted in the future. The irradiation microbeam is produced using a fused silica capillary

  7. Modelling of multiphase flow in concrete cells of the radioactive waste storage facility at El Cabril (Spain)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El Cabril is the low and intermediate level radioactive waste disposal facility for Spain. After sealing the cells that stored the radioactive waste, water was collected from a drainpipe, indicating the flow of water within the cell. A hypothesis had been proposed to explain this phenomenon which consists of capillary rise from groundwater and evaporation and condensation within the cell produced by temperature gradients caused by seasonal temperature fluctuations outside. To corroborate this hypothesis a 2D numerical model was made taking into account all relevant processes such as multiphase flow and heat transport. Data were used measured by sensors in the cells and data from laboratory test. There is a good agreement between the temperature measured by the sensors and the ones calculated by the model. The model shows a drying of the concrete at the hot side (that is the wall during summer and the container during winter). The concrete is saturated with water at the cold side (that is the container during summer and the wall in winter), leading to runoff of water to the drainpipe. The flux at this drainpipe occurred in the two yearly periods, being higher in winter than in summer. (authors)

  8. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the west cell line in the 235-F plutonium fuel form facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Couture, A. H. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States); Diprete, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2014-09-01

    On August 29th, 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 6-9 on the west line of the PuFF facility using an uncollimated, highpurity germanium detector. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the West Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table below along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are given as 1σ. The total holdup in the West Cell Line was 2.4 ± 0.7 grams. This result is 0.6 g higher than the previous estimate, a 0.4σ difference.

  9. Facile method to stain the bacterial cell surface for super-resolution fluorescence microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunsolus, Ian L.; Hu, Dehong; Mihai, Cosmin; Lohse, Samuel E.; Lee, Chang-Soo; Torelli, Marco; Hamers, Robert J.; Murphy, Catherine; Orr, Galya; Haynes, Christy L.

    2014-01-01

    A method to fluorescently stain the surfaces of both Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacterial cells compatible with super-resolution fluorescence microscopy is presented. This method utilizes a commercially-available fluorescent probe to label primary amines at the surface of the cell. We demonstrate efficient staining of two bacterial strains, the Gram-negative Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 and the Gram-positive Bacillus subtilis 168. Using structured illumination microscopy and stochastic optical reconstruction microscopy, which require high quantum yield or specialized dyes, we show that this staining method may be used to resolve the bacterial cell surface with sub-diffraction-limited resolution. We further use this method to identify localization patterns of nanomaterials, specifically cadmium selenide quantum dots, following interaction with bacterial cells.

  10. The development of a mobile hot cell facility for the conditioning of spent high activity radioactive sources (SHARS)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) Waste Technology Section with additional support from the U.S. National Nuclear Security Agency (NNSA) through the IAEA Nuclear Security Fund has funded the design, fabrication, evaluation, and testing of a portable hot cell intended to address the problem of disused SHARS in obsolete irradiation devices such as teletherapy heads and dry irradiators. The project is initially targeting the African continent but expected soon to expand to Latin America and Asia. This hot cell would allow source removal, characterization, consolidation, repackaging in modern storage shields, and secure storage of high risk SHARS at single sites in each IAEA Member State. The mobile hot cell and related equipment is transported in two shipping containers to a specific country where the following process takes place: 1-) Assembly of hot cell; 2-) Removal of SHARS from working shields, encapsulation into a stainless steel capsule and placement into a long term storage shield; 3-) Conditioning of any other spent sources the country may require; 4-) Dismantling of the hot cell; 5-) Shipping equipment out of country. The operation in a specific country is planned to be executed over a three week period. This presentation will discuss the development of the mobile hot cell facility as well as the demonstration of the state of readiness of the system for manipulation of SHARS and the planned execution of the conditioning operations. As a result of this project, excess SHARS could be managed safely and securely and possibly be more easily repatriated to their country of origin for appropriate final disposition. (author)

  11. Waste reduction efforts through the evaluation and procurement of a digital camera system for the Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility at Argonne National Laboratory-East

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Alpha-Gamma Hot Cell Facility (AGHCF) at Argonne National Laboratory-East is a research facility where sample examinations involve traditional photography. The AGHCF documents samples with photographs (both Polaroid self-developing and negative film). Wastes generated include developing chemicals. The AGHCF evaluated, procured, and installed a digital camera system for the Leitz metallograph to significantly reduce labor, supplies, and wastes associated with traditional photography with a return on investment of less than two years

  12. Laboratory validation of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph in broadband light at the high-contrast imaging THD-testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Delorme, J R; Galicher, R; Dohlen, K; Baudoz, P; Caillat, A; Rousset, G; Soummer, R; Dupuis, O

    2016-01-01

    Specific high contrast imaging instruments are mandatory to characterize circumstellar disks and exoplanets around nearby stars. Coronagraphs are commonly used in these facilities to reject the diffracted light of an observed star and enable the direct imaging and spectroscopy of its circumstellar environment. One important property of the coronagraph is to be able to work in broadband light. Among several proposed coronagraphs, the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph is a promising solution for starlight rejection in broadband light. In this paper, we perform the first validation of this concept in laboratory. First, we recall the principle of the dual-zone phase mask coronagraph. Then, we describe the high-contrast imaging THD testbed, the manufacturing of the components and the quality-control procedures. Finally, we study the sensitivity of our coronagraph to low-order aberrations (inner working angle and defocus) and estimate its contrast performance. Our experimental broadband light results are compared wi...

  13. In-situ gamma-ray assay of the east cell line in the 235-F Plutonium fuel form facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diprete, D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States)

    2015-08-21

    On September 17th -19th , 2013, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements in the maintenance trench beneath Cells 1-5 on the east line of the PuFF facility using a well-collimated, high-purity germanium detector. The cell interiors were assayed along with the furnaces and storage coolers that protrude beneath the cells. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Data analysis was performed using three gamma-rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells. The weighted mean of these three results was used as the best estimate of Pu-238 holdup in the East Cell Line of PuFF. The results of the assay measurements are found in the table on the following page along with the results from the scoping assay performed in 2006. All uncertainties in this table (as well as the rest of the report) are reported at 1σ. Summing the assay results and treating MDAs as M238Pu= 0 ± MDA, the total holdup in the East Cell Line was 240 ± 40 grams. This result is 100 grams lower than the previous estimate, a 0.55σ difference. The uncertainty in the Pu-238 holdup is also reduced substantially relative to the 2006 scoping assay. However, the current assay results are in agreement with the 2006 scoping assay results due to the large uncertainty associated with the 2006 scoping assays. The current assay results support the conclusion that the 2006 results bound the Pu-238 mass in Cells 1-5. These results should be considered preliminary since additional measurements of the East Cell line are scheduled for 2017 and 2018. Those measurements will provide detailed information about the distribution of Pu-238 in the cells to be used to refine the results of the current assay.

  14. Fully 3D Particle-in-Cell Simulation of Double Post-Hole Convolute on PTS Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hailong; Dong, Ye; Zhou, Haijing; Zou, Wenkang; Institute of Fluid Physics Collaboration; Institute of Applied Physics; Computational Mathematics Collaboration

    2015-11-01

    In order to get better understand of energy transforming and converging process during High Energy Density Physics (HEDP) experiments, fully 3D particle-in-cell (PIC) simulation code NEPTUNE3D was used to provide numerical approach towards parameters which could hardly be acquired through diagnostics. Cubic region (34cm × 34cm × 18cm) including the double post-hole convolute (DPHC) on the primary test stand (PTS) facility was chosen to perform a series of fully 3D PIC simulations, calculating ability of codes were tested and preliminary simulation results about DPHC on PTS facility were discussed. Taking advantages of 3D simulation codes and large-scale parallel computation, massive data (~ 250GB) could be acquired in less than 5 hours and clear process of current transforming and electron emission in DPHC were demonstrated with the help of visualization tools. Cold-chamber tests were performed during which only cathode electron emission was considered without temperature rise or ion emission, current loss efficiency was estimated to be 0.46% ~ 0.48% by comparisons between output magnetic field profiles with or without electron emission. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Grant No. 11205145, 11305015, 11475155).

  15. Pore-filled electrolyte membranes for facile fabrication of long-term stable dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted -- Highlights: •Pore-filled film electrolytes (PFEMs) were investigated for facile DSSC fabrication. •Optimal mixed solvent was suggested to enhance the long-term stability of DSSCs. •The PFEMs promised both the excellent thermal stability and energy efficiency. •Thephotovoltaic efficiency was well correlated with porous structure of substrates. -- ABSTRACT: Pore-filled electrolyte membranes (PFEMs) have been prepared by employing an optimized porous substrate and stable electrolyte composition for a facile manufacturing process of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The PFEMs could be easily loaded into a photovoltaic device without adding a traditional electrolyte injection through a hole. In order to meet the requirements of both high energy conversion efficiency and proper long-term stability, three different solvents with high boiling point, i.e. valeronitrile, dimethyl sulfoxide, and dimethylacetamide, were appropriately mixed as a volumetric ratio of 7:2:1, respectively. As a result, similar conductivity and viscosity as well as better chemical stability were obtained compared to those of conventional 3-methoxypropionitrile-based electrolyte. In addition, linear relations were observed between the photovoltaic efficiency and porous film properties (i.e. porosity and tortuosity). The DSSC employing the PFEM doped with the mixed solvent based electrolyte exhibited the photon-to-current conversion efficiency of 6.30% at one sun condition. Moreover, the long-term stability test fixed at an elevated temperature of 85 °C exhibited outstanding durability of DSSC for 500 h

  16. Facile Conversion Synthesis of Densely-Formed Branched ZnO-Nanowire Arrays for Quantum-Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •3-D hierarchically branched ZnO nanowires by a facile synthesis with seed nucleation. •Nanobranching enhances the efficiency by a factor of two compared with the bare QDSC. •Attributed to the increased sensitizer by ∼80% and decreased transmittance by ∼17%. •Optimized nanostructures correlate with the light-harvesting and carrier-collection efficiencies. -- Abstract: An effective way of synthesizing densely-formed branched ZnO-nanowire arrays was developed by a straightforward conversion reaction of ZnS into ZnO. Hierarchically structured ZnO nanowires are utilized for quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSCs), having resulted in the conversion-efficiency enhancement by a factor of two compared to the bare ZnO nanowires. This is attributed to the increased CdS-quantum-dot sensitizer by ∼80% and decreased diffused transmittance by ∼17%, induced by the densely-formed branched nanowires. The correlations between the branched nanostructures and photovoltaic performances are systematically investigated in terms of light absorption, charge-transfer resistance, and carrier lifetime. This facile and controllable branched nanowire synthesis is anticipated to be applicable to other semiconductor photoanodes for efficient light harvesting and charge collecting properties

  17. Remote tool applications at the FFTF [Fast Flux Test Facility] and the FFTF IEM [Interim Examination and Maintenance] Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many types of maintenance activities are performed on contaminated (radioactive) machines and components at the Fast Flux Test Facility (FFTF). When personnel dose levels are within permissible limits, maintenance is performed in contaminated work areas or in gloveboxes. Otherwise, maintenance is performed in the Interim Examination and Maintenance (IEM) Cell, a hot cell that is used to perform tasks that require remote operation. Maintenance is often a combination of manual and remote operation. One such operation was the cleaning of the closed loop ex-vessel machine (CLEM) core component grapple (CCG). The CLEM is used to transfer core components in and out of the reactor vessel. The CCG had not been operating properly due to buildups of metallic sodium and sodium compounds on the outside surface and internal moving parts. This paper tells how the CCG was disassembled and cleaned. Part of this task was done in a glovebox and part in the IEM Cell. Therefore, special attention was given to the design of the tools necessary to perform this operation so they would provide adequate flexibility for either manual or remote operation. To help minimize cost, off-the-shelf tools were modified and incorporated into the process where practical. 2 refs., 7 figs

  18. Facile microwave synthesis, characterization, and solar cell application of selenium nanoparticles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panahi-Kalamuei, Mokhtar [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317-51167, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Salavati-Niasari, Masoud, E-mail: salavati@kashanu.ac.ir [Institute of Nano Science and Nano Technology, University of Kashan, P.O. Box. 87317-51167, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of); Hosseinpour-Mashkani, S. Mostafa [Young Researchers and Elites Club, Kashan Branch, Islamic Azad University, Kashan (Iran, Islamic Republic of)

    2014-12-25

    Highlights: • Selenium (Se) nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple microwave method. • The effects of preparation parameters were investigated. • A preliminary study on the possibility of developing a solar cell having FTO/TiO{sub 2}/Se/Pt-FTO. - Abstract: In the current study, selenium (Se) nanoparticles with hexagonal phase were synthesized by applying microwave irradiation using selenium tetrachloride as a starting reagent in distilled water at various conditions. Se nanoparticles were formed using hydrazine in short reaction time (4 min). The effects of reaction time, irradiation power, and types of surfactant including sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), polyethylene glycol 600 (PEG 600), and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on the particle size of the product were investigated. To fabricate a FTO/TiO{sub 2}/Se/Pt-FTO and FTO/Se/CdS/Pt-FTO solar cell, selenium film was directly deposited on top of the TiO{sub 2} and FTO glass prepared by Doctor’s blade method, respectively. Solar cell results indicate that an inexpensive solar cell could be developed by synthesis of Se nanoparticles through microwave method.

  19. Groundwater Modeling Of Mercury Pollution At A Former Mercury Cell Chlor Alkali Facility In Pavoldar, Kazakhstan

    Science.gov (United States)

    In Kazakhstan, there is a serious case of mercury pollution near the city of Pavlodar from an old mercury cell chlor-alkali plant. The soil, sediment, and water is severly contaminated with mercury and mercury compounds as a result of the industrial activity of this chemical pla...

  20. Facile microwave synthesis, characterization, and solar cell application of selenium nanoparticles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: • Selenium (Se) nanoparticles were synthesized via a simple microwave method. • The effects of preparation parameters were investigated. • A preliminary study on the possibility of developing a solar cell having FTO/TiO2/Se/Pt-FTO. - Abstract: In the current study, selenium (Se) nanoparticles with hexagonal phase were synthesized by applying microwave irradiation using selenium tetrachloride as a starting reagent in distilled water at various conditions. Se nanoparticles were formed using hydrazine in short reaction time (4 min). The effects of reaction time, irradiation power, and types of surfactant including sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS), polyethylene glycol 600 (PEG 600), and cetyltrimethylammonium bromide (CTAB) on the particle size of the product were investigated. To fabricate a FTO/TiO2/Se/Pt-FTO and FTO/Se/CdS/Pt-FTO solar cell, selenium film was directly deposited on top of the TiO2 and FTO glass prepared by Doctor’s blade method, respectively. Solar cell results indicate that an inexpensive solar cell could be developed by synthesis of Se nanoparticles through microwave method

  1. Facile moldless fabrication of disk-shaped and reed blood cell-like microparticles using photopolymerization of tripropylene glycol diacrylate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jongchul; Won, June; Song, Simon

    2014-12-01

    A facile method for the moldless fabrication of 2- or 3-dimensional microparticles is proposed by using a photopolymerization technique. Using only a monomer solution of tripropylene glycol diacrylate, a film mask and standard UV lithography equipment, we were able to fabricate microparticles of various shapes, such as disks, dimpled disks similar in shape to red blood cells, and slender gourd shapes, unlike previous moldless fabrication techniques requiring expensive and/or sophisticated equipment. The simple method could produce more than one million particles in a single batch, indicating that it can be applied to the mass production of polymer microparticles. Analyses of scanning electron micrographs and optical micrographs of the microparticles indicated that their size distribution was highly monodisperse. Detailed fabrication processes and statistics on the microparticle sizes are given in this paper.

  2. Facile moldless fabrication of disk-shaped and reed blood cell-like microparticles using photopolymerization of tripropylene glycol diacrylate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A facile method for the moldless fabrication of 2- or 3-dimensional microparticles is proposed by using a photopolymerization technique. Using only a monomer solution of tripropylene glycol diacrylate, a film mask and standard UV lithography equipment, we were able to fabricate microparticles of various shapes, such as disks, dimpled disks similar in shape to red blood cells, and slender gourd shapes, unlike previous moldless fabrication techniques requiring expensive and/or sophisticated equipment. The simple method could produce more than one million particles in a single batch, indicating that it can be applied to the mass production of polymer microparticles. Analyses of scanning electron micrographs and optical micrographs of the microparticles indicated that their size distribution was highly monodisperse. Detailed fabrication processes and statistics on the microparticle sizes are given in this paper. (technical note)

  3. Scope and dissolution studies and characterization of irradiated nuclear fuel in Atalante Hot Cell Facilities (abstract and presentation slides)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dancausse, Jean-Philippe; Reynier Tronche, Nathalie; Ferlay, Gilles; Herlet, Nathalie; Eysseric, Cathrine; Esbelin, Eric

    2005-01-01

    Since 1999, several studies on nuclear fuels were realised in C11/C12 Atalante Hot Cell. This paper presents firstly an overview of the apparatus used for fuel dissolution and characterisation like reactor design, gas trapping flask and solid/liquid separation. Then, the general methodology is described as a function of fuel, temperature, reagents, showing for each step, the reachable experimental data: Dissolution rate, chemical and radiochemical fuel composition including volatile LLRN, insoluble mass, composition, morphology, cladding chemical, radiochemical and physical characterisation using SIMS (made in Cadarache/LECA facilities), MEB. To conclude, some of the obtained results on 129I and 14C composition of oxide fuels, rate of dissolution and first results on dissolution studies of RERTR UMo fuel will be detailed. (Author)

  4. Facile preparation of titanium dioxide nano-capsule arrays used as photo-anode for dye sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Su, Penglei; Li, Hongyi, E-mail: lhy06@bjut.edu.cn; Wang, Jinshu, E-mail: wangjsh@bjut.edu.cn; Wu, Junshu; Zhao, Bingxin; Wang, Fei

    2015-08-30

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles have been introduced into TiO{sub 2} nanotube using a facile liquid phase deposition method at low temperature in atmosphere. • Dye solar cells have been assembled on flexible titanium substrate. • The incident photo-electron conversion efficiency has been improved 76% compared with pure TiO{sub 2} nanotube arrays. - Abstract: To improve titanium dioxide (TiO{sub 2}) nanotube arrays’ performance on dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), TiO{sub 2} nano-capsule arrays (TNCP) have been designed and prepared by planting TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles into TiO{sub 2} nanotube (TNT) using a facile liquid phase deposition (LPD) route which does not require any special equipment and both improve the specific surface area and surface energy of TNT at low temperature. It has been found that TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles are homogeneously distributed along the wall of TNT and their crystal size is calculated to be 5–10 nm. The obtained TNCP's specific surface area and surface energy have been increased from 27.1 (for pure TNT) to 33.4 m{sup 2}/g and from 67.7 (for pure TNT) to 76.4 mJ/m{sup 2}, respectively. When used as photo-anodes of DSSCs, TNCP shows higher energy conversion efficiency, which is 1.7 times that of pure TNT. Therefore, the present work provides one effective strategy to better TNT's performance on DSSCs, which can be assembled on metal substrate in large scale.

  5. Facile preparation of titanium dioxide nano-capsule arrays used as photo-anode for dye sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: - Highlights: • TiO2 nanoparticles have been introduced into TiO2 nanotube using a facile liquid phase deposition method at low temperature in atmosphere. • Dye solar cells have been assembled on flexible titanium substrate. • The incident photo-electron conversion efficiency has been improved 76% compared with pure TiO2 nanotube arrays. - Abstract: To improve titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube arrays’ performance on dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), TiO2 nano-capsule arrays (TNCP) have been designed and prepared by planting TiO2 nanoparticles into TiO2 nanotube (TNT) using a facile liquid phase deposition (LPD) route which does not require any special equipment and both improve the specific surface area and surface energy of TNT at low temperature. It has been found that TiO2 nanoparticles are homogeneously distributed along the wall of TNT and their crystal size is calculated to be 5–10 nm. The obtained TNCP's specific surface area and surface energy have been increased from 27.1 (for pure TNT) to 33.4 m2/g and from 67.7 (for pure TNT) to 76.4 mJ/m2, respectively. When used as photo-anodes of DSSCs, TNCP shows higher energy conversion efficiency, which is 1.7 times that of pure TNT. Therefore, the present work provides one effective strategy to better TNT's performance on DSSCs, which can be assembled on metal substrate in large scale

  6. Toward the Facile and Ecofriendly Fabrication of Quantum Dot-Sensitized Solar Cells via Thiol Coadsorbent Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Jia-Yaw; Li, Chen-Hei; Chiang, Ya-Han; Chen, Chia-Hung; Li, Pei-Ni

    2016-07-27

    This paper reports a facile and environmentally friendly approach to the preparation of highly efficient quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) based on a combination of aqueous CuInS2 quantum dots (QDs) and thiol coadsorbents. The photovoltaic properties of the QDSSCs were found to be dependent on the type and concentration of the thiol coadsorbent. The incorporation of thiol coadsorbents results in improved JSC and VOC because (1) they provide disulfide reductants during the QD sensitization process and (2) the coadsorbent molecules are anchored on the TiO2 surface, thus affecting the movement of the conduction band of TiO2. To the best of the our knowledge, this is the first demonstrated use of various thiol coadsorbents as reducing agents in the fabrication of high-efficiency QDSSCs. CuInS2 QDSSCs fabricated with the assistance of thioglycolic acid coadsorbents exhibited efficiencies as high as 5.90%, which is 20 times higher than that of the control device without thiol coadsorbents (0.29%). In addition, the photovoltaic properties of a device fabricated using the colloidal CuInS2 QDs coated with different bifunctional linkers were investigated for comparison. The versatility of this facile fabrication process was demonstrated in the preparation of solar cells sensitized with aqueous AgInS2 or CdSeTe QDs. The AgInS2 QDSSC showed a conversion efficiency of 2.72%, which is the highest reported for Ag-based metal sulfides QDSSCs thus far. PMID:27405921

  7. A novel and facile synthesis of porous SiO2-coated ultrasmall Se particles as a drug delivery nanoplatform for efficient synergistic treatment of cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xijian; Deng, Guoying; Wang, Yeying; Wang, Qian; Gao, Zhifang; Sun, Yangang; Zhang, Wenlong; Lu, Jie; Hu, Junqing

    2016-04-01

    A novel and facile synthetic route has been developed to fabricate porous SiO2-coated ultrasmall Se particles (Se@SiO2 nanospheres) as a drug delivery nanoplatform which combines Se quantum dots and doxorubicin (DOX) for efficient synergistic treatment of cancer cells.A novel and facile synthetic route has been developed to fabricate porous SiO2-coated ultrasmall Se particles (Se@SiO2 nanospheres) as a drug delivery nanoplatform which combines Se quantum dots and doxorubicin (DOX) for efficient synergistic treatment of cancer cells. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr02298g

  8. Facile synthesis of superparamagnetic Fe3O4@Au nanoparticles for photothermal destruction of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, Jinfeng; Shen, Shun; Pang, Zhiqing; Lu, Xiaohui; Deng, Chunhui; Jiang, Xinguo

    2011-11-14

    Superparamagnetic Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles with positive surface ξ-potential were synthesized via a solvothermal route. After Fe(3)O(4) was mixed with HAuCl(4) and NaBH(4), the reduced Au nanoparticles could be directly adsorbed onto the surface of Fe(3)O(4) nanoparticles. The as-synthesized nanocomposites were successfully applied to photothermal destruction of cancer cells. PMID:21952492

  9. Analysis and design recommendation on rabbeted capping plate of equipment cell in nuclear chemical facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbeted capping plates are widely used in the roof of equipment cells in order to meet the requirements of nuclear radiation protection. The key considerations in the design include vertical load, seismic load and repair load. This article establishes T shaped and Z-shaped plate model via FEM software (ANSYS), analyzes the bearing capacity and displacement distribution in different load cases, and provides recommendations to the design and construction accordingly. (authors)

  10. Development of a single ion micro-irradiation facility for experimental radiobiology at cell level

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A micro-irradiation device has been developed for radiobiology applications at the scale of the cell. This device is based on an upgrade of an existing micro-beam line that was already able to deliver a 1 to 3 MeV proton or alpha beam of low intensity and whose space resolution is lower than 1 micrometer in vacuum. The important part of this work has been the development of an irradiation stage designed to fit on the micro-probe and able to deliver ions in the air with an absolute accuracy of a few micrometers. A program has been set up to monitor the complete irradiation line in testing and in automatic irradiation operating phases. Simulation tools based on Monte-Carlo calculations have been validated through comparisons with experimental data particularly in the field of spatial resolution and of the number of ions delivered. The promising results show the possibility in a near future to use this tool to study the response of cells to very low irradiation doses down to the extreme limit of one ion per cell

  11. Testbed for development of a DSP-based signal processing subsystem for an Earth-orbiting radar scatterometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clark, Douglas J.; Lux, James P.; Shirbacheh, Mike

    2002-01-01

    A testbed for evaluation of general-purpose digital signal processors in earth-orbiting radar scatterometers is discussed. Because general purpose DSP represents a departure from previous radar signal processing techniques used on scatterometers, there was a need to demonstrate key elements of the system to verify feasibility for potential future scatterometer instruments. Construction of the testbed also facilitated identification of an appropriate software development environment and the skills mix necessary to perform the work.

  12. A High-voltage Reference Testbed for the Evaluation of High-voltage Dividers for Pulsed Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Bastos, M Cerqueira; Bergman, A; 10.1109/CPEM.2010.5543408

    2010-01-01

    The design, evaluation and commissioning of a high voltage reference testbed for pulsed applications to be used in the precision testing of high voltage dividers is described. The testbed is composed of a pulsed power supply, a reference divider based on compressed gas capacitor technology and an acquisition system which makes use of the fast measurement capabilities of the HP 3458 DVM. Results of the evaluation of the reference system are presented.

  13. A Testbed of Magnetic Induction-based Communication System for Underground Applications

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, Xin; Akyildiz, Ian F

    2015-01-01

    Wireless underground sensor networks (WUSNs) can enable many important applications such as intelligent agriculture, pipeline fault diagnosis, mine disaster rescue, concealed border patrol, crude oil exploration, among others. The key challenge to realize WUSNs is the wireless communication in underground environments. Most existing wireless communication systems utilize the dipole antenna to transmit and receive propagating electromagnetic (EM) waves, which do not work well in underground environments due to the very high material absorption loss. The Magnetic Induction (MI) technique provides a promising alternative solution that could address the current problem in underground. Although the MI-based underground communication has been intensively investigated theoretically, to date, seldom effort has been made in developing a testbed for the MI-based underground communication that can validate the theoretical results. In this paper, a testbed of MI-based communication system is designed and implemented in a...

  14. “WBC over DVB-H” Testbed Design, Development and Results

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhanlin Ji

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available The wireless billboard channels (WBCs are integral part of the ubiquitous consumer wireless world (UCWW—a wireless next generation network proposal. The WBCs are used by the service providers to broadcast advertisements of their (wireless services to the mobile terminals so that the mobile users may discover and associate with the “best” services following the user-driven ‘‘always best connected and best served’’ paradigm. A three-layer system architecture of WBCs established over the digital video broadcasting-handheld (DVB-H standard is presented. The design and development of a corresponding ‘‘WBC over DVB-H’’ experimental testbed are described. Various results obtained from the testbed are presented and explained.

  15. Managing autonomy levels in the SSM/PMAD testbed. [Space Station Power Management and Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashworth, Barry R.

    1990-01-01

    It is pointed out that when autonomous operations are mixed with those of a manual nature, concepts concerning the boundary of operations and responsibility become clouded. The space station module power management and distribution (SSM/PMAD) automation testbed has the need for such mixed-mode capabilities. The concept of managing the SSM/PMAD testbed in the presence of changing levels of autonomy is examined. A knowledge-based approach to implementing autonomy management in the distributed SSM/PMAD utilizing a centralized planning system is presented. Its knowledge relations and system-wide interactions are discussed, along with the operational nature of the currently functioning SSM/PMAD knowledge-based systems.

  16. Genetic Algorithm Phase Retrieval for the Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taylor, Jaime; Rakoczy, John; Steincamp, James

    2003-01-01

    Phase retrieval requires calculation of the real-valued phase of the pupil fimction from the image intensity distribution and characteristics of an optical system. Genetic 'algorithms were used to solve two one-dimensional phase retrieval problem. A GA successfully estimated the coefficients of a polynomial expansion of the phase when the number of coefficients was correctly specified. A GA also successfully estimated the multiple p h e s of a segmented optical system analogous to the seven-mirror Systematic Image-Based Optical Alignment (SIBOA) testbed located at NASA s Marshall Space Flight Center. The SIBOA testbed was developed to investigate phase retrieval techniques. Tiphilt and piston motions of the mirrors accomplish phase corrections. A constant phase over each mirror can be achieved by an independent tip/tilt correction: the phase Conection term can then be factored out of the Discrete Fourier Tranform (DFT), greatly reducing computations.

  17. The Langley Research Center CSI phase-0 evolutionary model testbed-design and experimental results

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belvin, W. K.; Horta, Lucas G.; Elliott, K. B.

    1991-01-01

    A testbed for the development of Controls Structures Interaction (CSI) technology is described. The design philosophy, capabilities, and early experimental results are presented to introduce some of the ongoing CSI research at NASA-Langley. The testbed, referred to as the Phase 0 version of the CSI Evolutionary model (CEM), is the first stage of model complexity designed to show the benefits of CSI technology and to identify weaknesses in current capabilities. Early closed loop test results have shown non-model based controllers can provide an order of magnitude increase in damping in the first few flexible vibration modes. Model based controllers for higher performance will need to be robust to model uncertainty as verified by System ID tests. Data are presented that show finite element model predictions of frequency differ from those obtained from tests. Plans are also presented for evolution of the CEM to study integrated controller and structure design as well as multiple payload dynamics.

  18. NASA's flight-technological development program - A 650 Mbps laser communications testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayden, W. L.; Fitzmaurice, M. W.; Nace, D. A.; Lokerson, D. C.; Minott, P. O.; Chapman, W. W.

    1991-01-01

    A 650 Mbps laser communications testbed under construction for the development of flight qualifiable hardware suitable for near-term operation on geosynchronous-to-geosynchronous crosslink missions is presented. The program's primary purpose is to develop and optimize laser communications unique subsystems. Requirements for the testbed experiments are to optimize the acquisition processes, to fully simulate the long range (up to 21,000 km) and the fine tracking characteristics of two narrow-beam laser communications terminals, and to fully test communications performance which will include average and burst bit error rates, effects of laser diode coalignment, degradation due to internal and external stray light, and the impact of drifts in the optical components.

  19. TEXSYS. [a knowledge based system for the Space Station Freedom thermal control system test-bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bull, John

    1990-01-01

    The Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project has recently completed a major test and evaluation of TEXSYS, a knowledge-based system (KBS) which demonstrates real-time control and FDIR for the Space Station Freedom thermal control system test-bed. TEXSYS is the largest KBS ever developed by NASA and offers a unique opportunity for the study of technical issues associated with the use of advanced KBS concepts including: model-based reasoning and diagnosis, quantitative and qualitative reasoning, integrated use of model-based and rule-based representations, temporal reasoning, and scale-up performance issues. TEXSYS represents a major achievement in advanced automation that has the potential to significantly influence Space Station Freedom's design for the thermal control system. An overview of the Systems Autonomy Demonstration Project, the thermal control system test-bed, the TEXSYS architecture, preliminary test results, and thermal domain expert feedback are presented.

  20. Test-bed development & measurement plan for evaluating transmit diversity in DVB networks

    OpenAIRE

    H Shirazi; Di Bari, R; Cosmas, J; Nilavalan, R; Y. Zhang; Bard, M.; Loo, J.

    2007-01-01

    This paper presents a test-bed development and measurement plan for evaluating transmit diversity in the DVB network. Transmit diversity reduces the complexity and improves the power consumption of the personal receiving devices by improving the transmission of signals in NLOS cluttered environments. Also, it is more practical than receive diversity due to the difficulty of locating two receive antennas far enough apart in a small mobile device. Test service scenarios were developed to illust...

  1. On the sustainability of large-scale computer science testbeds: the Grid'5000 case

    OpenAIRE

    Margery, David; Desprez, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    In this position paper, we look at the financial sustainability of Grid'5000. The duration of the project (over 12 years) owesmore to successive investment decisions and continued support rather than from a wellunderstood and operated business model generating enough revenue tocovers costs and investments.In this paper, we will give an overview of a typical coststructure for a large-scale testbed, wesummarize with a few statements our views and develop pros and cons of a few funding sources. ...

  2. Organic molecule fluorescence as an experimental test-bed for quantum jumps in thermodynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Browne, Cormac; Farrow, Tristan; Dahlsten, Oscar C. O.; Vedral, Vlatko

    2016-01-01

    We demonstrate with an experiment how molecules are a natural test-bed for probing fundamental quantum thermodynamics. Single-molecule spectroscopy has undergone transformative change in the past decade with the advent of techniques permitting individual molecules to be distinguished and probed. By considering the time-resolved emission spectrum of organic molecules as arising from quantum jumps between states, we demonstrate that the quantum Jarzynski equality is satisfied in this set-up. Th...

  3. Voice over Internet Protocol testbed design for non-intrusive, objective voice quality assessment

    OpenAIRE

    Manka, David L.

    2007-01-01

    Voice over Internet Protocol (VoIP) is an emerging technology with the potential to assist the United States Marine Corps in solving communication challenges stemming from modern operational concepts. This thesis conducts a review of VoIP standards and develops an H.323-based testbed for the study of tactical wireless VoIP performance. Methods of collecting and presenting voice quality parameters in packet-based networks are explored. Incorporation of an Adtech SX/14 Data Channel Simulato...

  4. UB-ANC: An Open Platform Testbed for Software-Defined Airborne Networking and Communications

    OpenAIRE

    Najafabadi, SayedJalil Modares; Mastronarde, Nicholas; Medley, Michael J.; Matyjas, John D.

    2015-01-01

    We present the University at Buffalo's Software-Defined Airborne Networking and Communications Testbed (UB-ANC). UB-ANC is an open software/hardware platform that aims to facilitate rapid testing and repeatable comparative evaluation of various airborne networking and communications protocols at different layers of the network protocol stack. In particular, it combines quadcopters capable of autonomous flight with USRP E310 embedded software-defined radios (SDRs), which enable flexible deploy...

  5. Creating a multilingual test-bed for a cross-language system evaluation

    OpenAIRE

    Peters, Carol; Braschler, Martin

    2002-01-01

    The aim of the Cross-Language Evaluation Forum (CLEF) is to develop and maintain an infrastructure for the evaluation of information retrieval system operating on European languages in both monolingual and cross-language contexts, and to create test-suites of reusable data that can be employed by system developers for benchmarking purposes. The paper discusses the criteria that have been followed in the creation of the multilingual test-bed and provides information on the evaluation methodolo...

  6. A demonstration of remote survey and characterization of a buried waste site using the SRIP [Soldier Robot Interface Project] testbed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    During FY 1990, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) supported the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER ampersand WM) Office of Technology Development through several projects including the development of a semiautonomous survey of a buried waste site using a remotely operated all-terrain robotic testbed borrowed from the US Army. The testbed was developed for the US Army's Human Engineering Laboratory (HEL) for the US Army's Soldier Robot Interface Project (SRIP). Initial development of the SRIP testbed was performed by a team including ORNL, HEL, Tooele Army Depot, and Odetics, Inc., as an experimental testbed for a variety of human factors issues related to military applications of robotics. The SRIP testbed was made available to the DOE and ORNL for the further development required for a remote landfill survey. The robot was modified extensively, equipped with environmental sensors, and used to demonstrate an automated remote survey of Solid Waste Storage Area No. 3 (SWSA 3) at ORNL on Tuesday, September 18, 1990. Burial trenches in this area containing contaminated materials were covered with soil nearly twenty years ago. This paper describes the SRIP testbed and work performed in FY 1990 to demonstrate a semiautonomous landfill survey at ORNL. 5 refs

  7. A demonstration of remote survey and characterization of a buried waste site using the SRIP (Soldier Robot Interface Project) testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burks, B.L.; Richardson, B.S.; Armstrong, G.A.; Hamel, W.R.; Jansen, J.F.; Killough, S.M.; Thompson, D.H.; Emery, M.S.

    1990-01-01

    During FY 1990, the Oak Ridge National Laboratory (ORNL) supported the Department of Energy (DOE) Environmental Restoration and Waste Management (ER WM) Office of Technology Development through several projects including the development of a semiautonomous survey of a buried waste site using a remotely operated all-terrain robotic testbed borrowed from the US Army. The testbed was developed for the US Army's Human Engineering Laboratory (HEL) for the US Army's Soldier Robot Interface Project (SRIP). Initial development of the SRIP testbed was performed by a team including ORNL, HEL, Tooele Army Depot, and Odetics, Inc., as an experimental testbed for a variety of human factors issues related to military applications of robotics. The SRIP testbed was made available to the DOE and ORNL for the further development required for a remote landfill survey. The robot was modified extensively, equipped with environmental sensors, and used to demonstrate an automated remote survey of Solid Waste Storage Area No. 3 (SWSA 3) at ORNL on Tuesday, September 18, 1990. Burial trenches in this area containing contaminated materials were covered with soil nearly twenty years ago. This paper describes the SRIP testbed and work performed in FY 1990 to demonstrate a semiautonomous landfill survey at ORNL. 5 refs.

  8. The new electron beam facility for materials testing in hot cells - design and preliminary experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Testing of materials which have been subjected to neutron irradiation will be carried out for the fusion reactor research programme at the KFA. An electron beam test apparatus Juelich Divertor Test Equipment in Hot Cells (JUDITH) has been installed in the Hot Cells of the Institute for Materials in Energy Systems, complementing the test equipment available in Japan, USA, France and RF [1-3]. Gamma ray emitting specimens are to be tested under thermal shock, thermal cycling and long-term loading conditions. The apparatus, built in cooperation with the PTR (Praezisionstechnik Remagen), consists of a electron beam unit with a beam power of 60 kW. The max. acceleration voltage is 150 kV, the max. beam current 400 mA. The beam can be deflected with a frequency of 100 kHz in x-y-direction with an amplitude of ±50 mm. Short pulses between 1 and 10 ms for the simulation of disruptions are possible, also longtime pulses on actively cooled samples. The samples are positioned in a vacuum chamber by remote handling. The sample holder is mounted on a cross-table, allowing the appropriate beam position for each specimen to be defined. A flange on the side of the chamber can be used for introducing an actively cooled divertor element. The cooling circuit has a flow rate of 5 m3/h and a pressure of 4 MPa, enabling a high thermal power to be used under continuous operation. (orig.)

  9. Design and construction of the magnetic driving vehicle in a two-dimensional testbed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A two-dimensional testbed that aims to demonstrate the feasibility of magnetically driving several spacecrafts was successfully constructed. The testbed has two vehicles, each of which consists of two Bi2223 coils placed in an orthogonal way. The magnetic force between the two vehicles with a 1 m separation distance is less than 1 N, which is big enough to attract, repel and rotate two 50 kg vehicles in a 1.2 m x 2 m platform. The hardware for the testbed, which includes the coils, a cryostat and an air pressured system, is introduced. A parallel power supply circuit was specifically designed for the high temperature superconductor (HTS) coil operating in space, for the purpose of reducing the Joule heat and providing redundancy. Two key questions relating to the HTS coil used in the magnetic driving are discussed. First, the magnetic force between the two coils, a preliminary index directing the coil parameters, is concisely expressed as an arithmetical equation. The accuracy of the equation is checked by a more accurate model based on the Biot-Savart law and a FEA calculation. Second, the interaction between the orthogonal coils with respect to the Ic(B) characteristic of the Bi2223 tape is discussed. A minimum safe distance between the two coils is defined and numerically calculated. Two coils whose separation distance is larger than the minimum safe distance can be regarded as having no magnetic interaction.

  10. Variable Coding and Modulation Experiment Using NASA's Space Communication and Navigation Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Downey, Joseph A.; Mortensen, Dale J.; Evans, Michael A.; Tollis, Nicholas S.

    2016-01-01

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA)'s Space Communication and Navigation Testbed on the International Space Station provides a unique opportunity to evaluate advanced communication techniques in an operational system. The experimental nature of the Testbed allows for rapid demonstrations while using flight hardware in a deployed system within NASA's networks. One example is variable coding and modulation, which is a method to increase data-throughput in a communication link. This paper describes recent flight testing with variable coding and modulation over S-band using a direct-to-earth link between the SCaN Testbed and the Glenn Research Center. The testing leverages the established Digital Video Broadcasting Second Generation (DVB-S2) standard to provide various modulation and coding options. The experiment was conducted in a challenging environment due to the multipath and shadowing caused by the International Space Station structure. Performance of the variable coding and modulation system is evaluated and compared to the capacity of the link, as well as standard NASA waveforms.

  11. Control structural interaction testbed: A model for multiple flexible body verification

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chory, M. A.; Cohen, A. L.; Manning, R. A.; Narigon, M. L.; Spector, V. A.

    1993-01-01

    Conventional end-to-end ground tests for verification of control system performance become increasingly complicated with the development of large, multiple flexible body spacecraft structures. The expense of accurately reproducing the on-orbit dynamic environment and the attendant difficulties in reducing and accounting for ground test effects limits the value of these tests. TRW has developed a building block approach whereby a combination of analysis, simulation, and test has replaced end-to-end performance verification by ground test. Tests are performed at the component, subsystem, and system level on engineering testbeds. These tests are aimed at authenticating models to be used in end-to-end performance verification simulations: component and subassembly engineering tests and analyses establish models and critical parameters, unit level engineering and acceptance tests refine models, and subsystem level tests confirm the models' overall behavior. The Precision Control of Agile Spacecraft (PCAS) project has developed a control structural interaction testbed with a multibody flexible structure to investigate new methods of precision control. This testbed is a model for TRW's approach to verifying control system performance. This approach has several advantages: (1) no allocation for test measurement errors is required, increasing flight hardware design allocations; (2) the approach permits greater latitude in investigating off-nominal conditions and parametric sensitivities; and (3) the simulation approach is cost effective, because the investment is in understanding the root behavior of the flight hardware and not in the ground test equipment and environment.

  12. Large Scale Data Mining to Improve Usability of Data: An Intelligent Archive Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramapriyan, Hampapuram; Isaac, David; Yang, Wenli; Morse, Steve

    2005-01-01

    Research in certain scientific disciplines - including Earth science, particle physics, and astrophysics - continually faces the challenge that the volume of data needed to perform valid scientific research can at times overwhelm even a sizable research community. The desire to improve utilization of this data gave rise to the Intelligent Archives project, which seeks to make data archives active participants in a knowledge building system capable of discovering events or patterns that represent new information or knowledge. Data mining can automatically discover patterns and events, but it is generally viewed as unsuited for large-scale use in disciplines like Earth science that routinely involve very high data volumes. Dozens of research projects have shown promising uses of data mining in Earth science, but all of these are based on experiments with data subsets of a few gigabytes or less, rather than the terabytes or petabytes typically encountered in operational systems. To bridge this gap, the Intelligent Archives project is establishing a testbed with the goal of demonstrating the use of data mining techniques in an operationally-relevant environment. This paper discusses the goals of the testbed and the design choices surrounding critical issues that arose during testbed implementation.

  13. Advanced Test-beds to Validate Physical Estimators in Heterogeneous Long Haul Transparent Optical Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annalisa Morea

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available The capacity growth driven by increasing traffic and the introduction of new devices and technologies has resulted in new functionalities in optical networks. The property of transparency enables compatibility between different system generations and the coexistence of multiple bit-rates without raising the global network cost. In a transparent network, the signals travel through many links and nodes without the need for opto-electronic regeneration, accumulating physical impairments. Therefore, standard point-to-point test-bed set-ups are no longer adequate to emulate signals propagating in transparent optical networks. New test-beds integrating the different heterogeneity cases due to the use of transparent cross-connects becomes necessary. In this paper, we present various test-bed realizations accounting for the following network heterogeneities: fiber link heterogeneity and neighbor changes while a signal propagates in the fiber. To be able to emulate such network heterogeneity, we present a double-loop set-up. Such a set-up is then used to assess the propagation results obtained by simulation and validate the quality of transmission (QoT estimators.

  14. Facile fabrication of three-dimensional TiO2 structures for highly efficient perovskite solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jang, Segeun; Yoon, Jungjin; Ha, Kyungyeon; Kim, Min-cheol; Kim, Dong Hoe; Kim, Sang Moon; Kang, Seong Min; Park, Sei Jin; Jung, Hyun Suk; Choi, Mansoo

    2016-04-01

    The capability of fabricating three dimensional (3-D) nanostructures with desired morphology is a key to realizing effective light-harvesting strategy in optical applications. In this work, we report a novel 3-D nanopatterning technique that combines ion-assisted aerosol lithography (IAAL) and soft lithography that serves as a facile method to fabricate 3-D nanostructures. Aerosol nanoparticles can be assembled into desired 3-D nanostructures via ion-induced electrostatic focusing and antenna effects from charged nanoparticle structures. Replication of the structures with a polymeric mold allows high throughput fabrication of 3-D nanostructures with various liquid-soluble materials. 3-D flower-patterned polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) stamp was prepared using the reported technique and utilized for fabricating 3-D nanopatterned mesoporous TiO2 layer, which was employed as the electron transport layer in perovskite solar cells. By incorporating the 3-D nanostructures, absorbed photon-to-current efficiency of >95% at 650 nm wavelength and overall power conversion efficiency of 15.96% were achieved. The enhancement can be attributed to an increase in light harvesting efficiency in a broad wavelength range from 400 to 800 nm and more efficient charge collection from enlarged interfacial area between TiO2 and perovskite layers. This hybrid nanopatterning technique has demonstrated to be an effective method to create textures that increase light harvesting and charge collection with 3-D nanostructures in solar cells.

  15. Facile Fabrication of Graphene-Containing Foam as a High-Performance Anode for Microbial Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lu; Wang, Shuqin; Peng, Shuqin; Jiang, Hongmei; Zhang, Youming; Deng, Wenfang; Tan, Yueming; Ma, Ming; Xie, Qingji

    2015-07-20

    Facile fabrication of novel three-dimensional anode materials to increase the bacterial loading capacity and improve substrate transport in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) is of great interest and importance. Herein, a novel graphene-containing foam (GCF) was fabricated easily by freeze-drying and pyrolysis of a graphene oxide-agarose gel. Owing to the involvement of graphene and stainless-steel mesh in the GCF, the GCF shows high electrical conductivity, enabling the GCF to be a conductive electrode for MFC applications. With the aid of agarose, the GCF electrode possesses a supermacroporous structure with pore sizes ranging from 100-200 μm and a high surface area, which greatly increase the bacterial loading capacity. Cell viability measurements indicate that the GCF possesses excellent biocompatibility. The MFC, equipped with a 0.4 mm-thick GCF anode, shows a maximum area power density of 786 mW m(-2) , which is 4.1 times that of a MFC equipped with a commercial carbon cloth anode. The simple fabrication route in combination with the outstanding electrochemical performance of the GCF indicates a promising anode for MFC applications. PMID:26095648

  16. A facile inexpensive route for SnS thin film solar cells with SnS2 buffer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gedi, Sreedevi; Minna Reddy, Vasudeva Reddy; Pejjai, Babu; Jeon, Chan-Wook; Park, Chinho; K. T., Ramakrishna Reddy

    2016-05-01

    Environment-friendly SnS based thin film solar cells with SnS2 as buffer layer were successfully fabricated from a facile inexpensive route, chemical bath deposition (CBD). Layer studies revealed that as-grown SnS and SnS2 films were polycrystalline; (1 1 1)/(0 0 1) peaks as the preferred orientation; 1.3 eV/2.8 eV as optical band gaps; and showed homogeneous microstructure with densely packed grains respectively. Ionization energy and electron affinity values were found by applying photoemission yield spectroscopy (PYS) to the CBD deposited SnS and SnS2 films for the first time. These values obtained as 5.3 eV and 4.0 eV for SnS films; 6.9 eV and 4.1 eV for SnS2 films. The band alignment of SnS/SnS2 junction showed TYPE-II heterostructure. The estimated conduction and valance band offsets were 0.1 eV and 1.6 eV respectively. The current density-voltage (J-V) measurements of the cell showed open circuit voltage (Voc) of 0.12 V, short circuit current density (Jsc) of 10.87 mA cm-2, fill factor (FF) of 39% and conversion efficiency of 0.51%.

  17. First experimental results on the IShTAR testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    D’Inca, R.; Jacquot, J.; Ochoukov, R.; Morgal, I.; Fünfgelder, H.; Faugel, H. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Crombe, K.; Louche, F.; Van Eester, D. [LPP-ERM-KMS, TEC partner, Brussels (Belgium); Heuraux, S.; Devaux, S.; Moritz, J.; Faudot, E. [Institut Jean Lamour UMR 7198 CNRS-Université de Lorraine, Nancy (France); Noterdaeme, J.-M. [Max-Planck-Institut für Plasmaphysik, Garching (Germany); Department of Applied Physics, Ghent University (Belgium)

    2015-12-10

    IShTAR (Ion cyclotron Sheath Test ARrangement) is a linear magnetized plasma test facility dedicated to the investigation of RF wave/plasma interaction [1] in the Ion Cyclotron Range of Frequencies (ICRF). It provides a better accessibility for the instrumentation than tokamaks while being representative of the neighboring region of the wave emitter. It is equipped with a magnetized plasma source (1 m long, 0.4 m diameter) powered by a helical antenna up to 3 kW at 11 MHz. We present the results of the first analysis of the plasma characteristics (plasma density, electron temperature) in function of the operating parameters (injected power, neutral pressure and magnetic field) as measured with fixed and movable Langmuir probes, spectrometer and cameras. The plasma is presently produced only by the helical antenna (no ICRF). We show that the plasma exists in three regime depending on the power level: the first two ones are stable and separated by a jump in density; a first spatial profile of the plasma density has been established for these modes; The third mode is unstable, characterized by strong oscillations of the plasma tube position.

  18. Management of hot cell waste in Atalante Facilities (abstract and presentation slides)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dancausse, Jean-Philippe; Ferlay, Gilles; Eysseric, Catherine

    2005-01-01

    In solution R and D experiments on nuclear fuel from dissolution to liquid extraction lead to produce a large set of wastes. This paper present how these highly contaminated solid and liquid wastes is managed in Hot Cells and in Atalante. Firstly, an inventory of several types of generated wastes is made: 1) Solid wastes. 2) Glass reactors and liquid solution containers. 3) Plastic and Teflon materials for sampling, Highly corrosive solutions. 4) Metallic containers for solid storage like fuels, crucibles. 5) Miscellaneous mixed solid materials. 6) Liquid wastes. 7) Rinsing liquids. 8) Highly corrosive waste containing fluorhydric acid. 9) Analytical solution with sulphate ions. 10) Organic solvent coming from liquid-liquid extraction. A focus will be made on optimised treatment of 1) solid wastes: Mechanically and chemically 2) liquid wastes containing sulphate ions and hydrogen fluoride, 3) organic liquid waste: to remove activity before hydrothermal oxidation. (Author)

  19. Neutron and gamma dose rates determined in a cell phantom at the Finnish BNCT facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Radiation dosimetry studies have played an essential role in the Finnish BNCT (Boron Neutron Capture Therapy) project. Various phantom studies have been carried out in the FiR I epithermal neutron beam to characterise the gamma and the neutron dose distributions involved in the patient treatment circumstances and to evaluate the beam model used for dose planning. During the summer 1999 cell-line phantom irradiations were done. Dose calculations and measurements were required to determine the dose delivered to the cells at the different locations in the phantom. A cylindrical water-filled polyethylene phantom was used in contact with the 14 cm diameter circular beam aperture. The phantom was modelled by deterministic DORT code. Activation detectors (MT-AI wires), twin (Mg and TE) ionisations chambers (IC) and TL detectors were used to establish the measured dose and 55Mn(n,γ) reaction rates compared to the calculated values. The measured (IC) and calculated gamma and neutron dose rates at three depths in the phantom will be presented. The measured gamma dose rates were about 10 % lower, and the neutron dose rates about 35% lower than the calculations. The difference between the measured 55Mn reaction rates and the calculations was insignificant (= 1%). During the measurements the reactor was operated at the nominal power of 250 kW. The measured (IC) gamma dose rates were in fair agreement with the calculated values but the neutron dose rates displayed considerable discrepancy. However, the activation results, having the best accuracy, were very consistent with the calculated 55Mn reaction rates and therefore the dose determination could be based on the simulated results (author)

  20. Chitosan conjugation: a facile approach to enhance the cell viability of LaF₃:Yb,Er upconverting nanotransducers in human breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gayathri, Sethuraman; Ghosh, Oriparambil Sivaraman Nirmal; Sudhakara, P; Viswanath, Annamraju Kasi

    2015-05-01

    In this study, chitosan functionalized LaF3:Yb,Er upconverting nanotransducers (UCNTs) with controlled size and shape have been successfully synthesized by a facile one pot precipitation method. The chitosan encapsulated UCNTs show bright upconversion fluorescence upon excitation with 974 nm NIR region. The average crystallite size of UCNTs about 7.6 nm was achieved using chitosan mediated synthesis. The FTIR result confirms the chitosan coating over the LaF3:Yb,Er nanoparticles. Due to the surface modification using natural biopolymer chitosan, the as-prepared nanocrystals show excellent biocompatibility even at high dose at 200 μg/ml. To the best of our knowledge the presented work is the first report on in vitro analysis of chitosan conjugated LaF3:Yb,Er upconverting nanocrystals in human breast (MCF-7) cancer cells. These nanotransducers can be used as luminescent probes for bioimaging and deep tissue cancer therapeutic applications. PMID:25659702

  1. Roll-to-Roll Inkjet Printing and Photonic Sintering of Electrodes for ITO Free Polymer Solar Cell Modules and Facile Product Integration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Angmo, Dechan; Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Jørgensen, Mikkel;

    2013-01-01

    Small polymer solar cell modules that are manufactured without indium-tin-oxide using only roll-to-roll printing and coating techniques under ambient conditions enable facile integration into a simple demonstrator (for example a laser pointer). Semitransparent front electrode grid structures...

  2. TiO2 nanowires for potential facile integration of solar cells and electrochromic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-powered systems usually consist of energy-acquisition components, energy-storage components and functional components. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology has greatly improved the performance of all the components of self-powered systems. However, huge differences in the materials and configurations in the components cause large difficulties for integration and miniaturization of self-powered systems. Design and fabrication of different components in a self-powered system with the same or similar materials/configurations should be able to make the above goal easier. In this work, a proof-of-concept experiment involving an integrated self-powered color-changing system consisting of TiO2 nanowire based sandwich dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and electrochromic devices (ECDs) is designed and demonstrated. When sunlight illuminates the entire system, the DSSCs generate electrical power and turn the ECD to a darker color, dimming the light; by switching the connection polarity of the DSSCs, the lighter color can be regained, implying the potential application of this self-powered color-changing system for next generation sun glasses and smart windows. (paper)

  3. Standard guide for mechanical drive systems for remote operation in hot cell facilities

    CERN Document Server

    American Society for Testing and Materials. Philadelphia

    2010-01-01

    1.1 Intent: 1.1.1 The intent of this standard is to provide general guidelines for the design, selection, quality assurance, installation, operation, and maintenance of mechanical drive systems used in remote hot cell environments. The term mechanical drive systems used herein, encompasses all individual components used for imparting motion to equipment systems, subsystems, assemblies, and other components. It also includes complete positioning systems and individual units that provide motive power and any position indicators necessary to monitor the motion. 1.2 Applicability: 1.2.1 This standard is intended to be applicable to equipment used under one or more of the following conditions: 1.2.1.1 The materials handled or processed constitute a significant radiation hazard to man or to the environment. 1.2.1.2 The equipment will generally be used over a long-term life cycle (for example, in excess of two years), but equipment intended for use over a shorter life cycle is not excluded. 1.2.1.3 The ...

  4. R and D needs assessment for the Engineering Test Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Engineering Test Facility (ETF), planned to be the next major US magnetic fusion device, has its mission (1) to provide the capability for moving into the engineering phase of fusion development and (2) to provide a test-bed for reactor components in a fusion environment. The design, construction, and operation of the ETF requires an increasing emphasis on certain key research and development (R and D) programs in magnetic fusion in order to provide the necessary facility design base. This report identifies these needs and discusses the apparent inadequacies of the presently planned US program to meet them, commensurate with the ETF schedule

  5. Facilities & Leadership

    Data.gov (United States)

    Department of Veterans Affairs — The facilities web service provides VA facility information. The VA facilities locator is a feature that is available across the enterprise, on any webpage, for the...

  6. Facile preparation of titanium dioxide nano-capsule arrays used as photo-anode for dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Penglei; Li, Hongyi; Wang, Jinshu; Wu, Junshu; Zhao, Bingxin; Wang, Fei

    2015-08-01

    To improve titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanotube arrays' performance on dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs), TiO2 nano-capsule arrays (TNCP) have been designed and prepared by planting TiO2 nanoparticles into TiO2 nanotube (TNT) using a facile liquid phase deposition (LPD) route which does not require any special equipment and both improve the specific surface area and surface energy of TNT at low temperature. It has been found that TiO2 nanoparticles are homogeneously distributed along the wall of TNT and their crystal size is calculated to be 5-10 nm. The obtained TNCP's specific surface area and surface energy have been increased from 27.1 (for pure TNT) to 33.4 m2/g and from 67.7 (for pure TNT) to 76.4 mJ/m2, respectively. When used as photo-anodes of DSSCs, TNCP shows higher energy conversion efficiency, which is 1.7 times that of pure TNT. Therefore, the present work provides one effective strategy to better TNT's performance on DSSCs, which can be assembled on metal substrate in large scale.

  7. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NA

    2006-03-01

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos.

  8. CLOSURE REPORT FOR CORRECTIVE ACTION UNIT 115: AREA 25 TEST CELL A FACILITY, NEVADA TEST SITE, NEVADA

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This Closure Report (CR) describes the activities performed to close CAU 115, Area 25 Test Cell A Facility, as presented in the NDEP-approved SAFER Plan (NNSA/NSO, 2004). The SAFER Plan includes a summary of the site history, process knowledge, and closure standards. This CR provides a summary of the completed closure activities, documentation of waste disposal, and analytical and radiological data to confirm that the remediation goals were met and to document final site conditions. The approved closure alternative as presented in the SAFER Plan for CAU 115 (NNSA/NSO, 2004) was clean closure; however, closure in place was implemented under a Record of Technical Change (ROTC) to the SAFER Plan when radiological surveys indicated that the concrete reactor pad was radiologically activated and could not be decontaminated to meet free release levels. The ROTC is included as Appendix G of this report. The objectives of closure were to remove any trapped residual liquids and gases, dispose regulated and hazardous waste, decontaminate removable radiological contamination, demolish and dispose aboveground structures, remove the dewar as a best management practice (BMP), and characterize and restrict access to all remaining radiological contamination. Radiological contaminants of concern (COCs) included cobalt-60, cesium-137, strontium-90, uranium-234/235/236/238, and plutonium-239/240. Additional COCs included Resource Conservation and Recovery Act (RCRA) metals, polychlorinated biphenyls (PCBs), and asbestos

  9. A Facile Approach to Fabricate Water-soluble Au-Fe3O4 Nanoparticle for Liver Cancer Cells Imaging

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梁重时; 吴献荣; 谢叶归; 刘顺英

    2012-01-01

    Au-Fe3O4 nanoparticles were widely used as nanoplatforms for biologic applications through readily further functionalization. Dopamine (DA)-coated superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO) nanoparticles (DA@Fe3O4) have been successfully synthesized using a one-step process by modified coprecipitation method. Then 2--3 nm gold nanoparticles were easily conjugated to DA@Fe3O4 nanoparticles by the electrostatic force between gold nanoparti- cles and amino groups of dopamine to afford water-soluble Au-Fe3O4 hybrid nanoparticles. A detailed investigation by dynamic light scatting (DLS), transmission electron microscopy (TEM), fourier transform infrared (FT-IR) and X-ray diffraction (XRD) were performed in order to characterize the physicochemical properties of the hybrid nanoparticles. The hybrid nanoparticles were easily functionalized with a targeted small peptide A54 (AGKGTPSLETTP) and fluorescence probe fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC) for liver cancer cell BEL-7402 imaging. This simple approach to prepare hybrid nanoparticles provides a facile nanoplatform for muti-functional derivations and may be extended to the immobilization of other metals or bimolecular on SPIO surface.

  10. Confirmation Run of the DWPF SRAT Cycle Using the Sludge-Only Flowsheet with Tank 40 Radioactive Sludge and Frit 200 in the Shielded Cells Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fellinger, T.L.

    2002-08-29

    Several basic data reports have been issued concerning the recent demonstration of the Defense Waste Processing Facility (DWPF) Sludge Receipt and Adjustment Tank (SRAT) Cycle and Slurry Mix Evaporator (SME) Cycle, conducted at the Savannah River Technology Center (SRTC). The SRTC demonstration was completed using the DWPF ''Sludge-Only'' flowsheet with washed Tank 40 sludge slurry (Sludge Batch 2 or Macrobatch 3) in the Shielded Cells facility. The DWPF ''Sludge-Only'' flowsheet calls for processing radioactive sludge slurry using nitric acid, concentrated formic acid, and frit 200.

  11. Biochemistry Facility

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — The Biochemistry Facility provides expert services and consultation in biochemical enzyme assays and protein purification. The facility currently features 1) Liquid...

  12. An ODMG-compatible testbed architecture for scalable management and analysis of physics data

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper describes a testbed architecture for the investigation and development of scalable approaches to the management and analysis of massive amounts of high energy physics data. The architecture has two components: an interface layer that is compliant with a substantial subset of the ODMG-93 Version 1.2 specification, and a lightweight object persistence manager that provides flexible storage and retrieval services on a variety of single- and multi-level storage architectures, and on a range of parallel and distributed computing platforms

  13. TCP/IP Jumbo Frames Network Performance Evaluation on A Testbed Infrastructure

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paula Raymond Lutui

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Enhancing network performance has been studied by a number of researchers. The need to provide greater throughput on network infrastructure has been the key driver for these studies. The use of jumbo frames is considered one of the methodologies that can be employed to increase data throughput on networks. In this research undertaking, the authors implement jumbo frames on a test-bed implemented with Windows Server 2003/2008 networks and performance related metrics are measured for both IPv4 and IPv6 implementations. The results obtained in this empirical study shows that performance metrics values are different in various scenarios.

  14. Deployment of a Testbed in a Brazilian Research Network using IPv6 and Optical Access Technologies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martins, Luciano; Ferramola Pozzuto, João; Olimpio Tognolli, João; Chaves, Niudomar Siqueira De A.; Reggiani, Atilio Eduardo; Hortêncio, Claudio Antonio

    2012-04-01

    This article presents the implementation of a testbed and the experimental results obtained with it on the Brazilian Experimental Network of the government-sponsored "GIGA Project." The use of IPv6 integrated to current and emerging optical architectures and technologies, such as dense wavelength division multiplexing and 10-gigabit Ethernet on the core and gigabit capable passive optical network and optical distribution network on access, were tested. These protocols, architectures, and optical technologies are promising and part of a brand new worldwide technological scenario that has being fairly adopted in the networks of enterprises and providers of the world.

  15. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, J. J.; Lee, H. H.; Kim, K. H. and others

    2000-03-01

    The objectives of this study are (1) the refurbishment for PIEF(Post Irradiation Examination Facility) and M6 hot-cell in IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility), (2) the establishment of the compatible facility for DUPIC fuel fabrication experiments which is licensed by government organization, and (3) the establishment of the transportation system and transportation cask for nuclear material between facilities. The report for this project describes following contents, such as objectives, necessities, scope, contents, results of current step, R and D plan in future and etc.

  16. DUPIC facility engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objectives of this study are 1) the refurbishment for PIEF(Post Irradiation Examination Facility) and M6 hot-cell in IMEF(Irradiated Material Examination Facility), 2) the establishment of the compatible facility for DUPIC fuel fabrication experiments which is licensed by government organization, and 3) the establishment of the transportation system and transportation cask for nuclear material between facilities. The report for this project describes following contents, such as objectives, necessities, scope, contents, results of current step, R and D plan in future and etc

  17. Application of the Semi-Empirical Force-Limiting Approach for the CoNNeCT SCAN Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staab, Lucas D.; McNelis, Mark E.; Akers, James C.; Suarez, Vicente J.; Jones, Trevor M.

    2012-01-01

    The semi-empirical force-limiting vibration method was developed and implemented for payload testing to limit the structural impedance mismatch (high force) that occurs during shaker vibration testing. The method has since been extended for use in analytical models. The Space Communications and Navigation Testbed (SCAN Testbed), known at NASA as, the Communications, Navigation, and Networking re-Configurable Testbed (CoNNeCT), project utilized force-limiting testing and analysis following the semi-empirical approach. This paper presents the steps in performing a force-limiting analysis and then compares the results to test data recovered during the CoNNeCT force-limiting random vibration qualification test that took place at NASA Glenn Research Center (GRC) in the Structural Dynamics Laboratory (SDL) December 19, 2010 to January 7, 2011. A compilation of lessons learned and considerations for future force-limiting tests is also included.

  18. Giving cell phones to pregnant women and improving services may increase primary health facility utilization: a case-control study of a Nigerian project

    OpenAIRE

    Oyeyemi, Sunday Oluwafemi; Wynn, Rolf

    2014-01-01

    Background: Worldwide, about 287 000 women die each year from mostly preventable complications related to pregnancy and childbirth. A disproportionately high number of these deaths occur in sub-Saharan Africa. The Abiye (‘Safe Motherhood’) project in the Ifedore Local Government Area (LGA) of Ondo-State of Nigeria aimed at improving facility utilization and maternal health through the use of cell phones and generally improved health care services for pregnant women, including Health Rangers, ...

  19. DUPIC facility engineering

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs

  20. DUPIC facility engineering

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, J. S.; Choi, J. W.; Go, W. I.; Kim, H. D.; Song, K. C.; Jeong, I. H.; Park, H. S.; Im, C. S.; Lee, H. M.; Moon, K. H.; Hong, K. P.; Lee, K. S.; Suh, K. S.; Kim, E. K.; Min, D. K.; Lee, J. C.; Chun, Y. B.; Paik, S. Y.; Lee, E. P.; Yoo, G. S.; Kim, Y. S.; Park, J. C.

    1997-09-01

    In the early stage of the project, a comprehensive survey was conducted to identify the feasibility of using available facilities and of interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 interface between those facilities. It was found out that the shielded cell M6 of IMEF could be used for the main process experiments of DUPIC fuel fabrication in regard to space adequacy, material flow, equipment layout, etc. Based on such examination, a suitable adapter system for material transfer around the M6 cell was engineered. Regarding the PIEF facility, where spent PWR fuel assemblies are stored in an annex pool, disassembly devices in the pool are retrofitted and spent fuel rod cutting and shipping system to the IMEF are designed and built. For acquisition of casks for radioactive material transport between the facilities, some adaptive refurbishment was applied to the available cask (Padirac) based on extensive analysis on safety requirements. A mockup test facility was newly acquired for remote test of DUPIC fuel fabrication process equipment prior to installation in the M6 cell of the IMEF facility. (author). 157 refs., 57 tabs., 65 figs.

  1. Real-Time Sensor Validation, Signal Reconstruction, and Feature Detection for an RLV Propulsion Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovsky, Amy L.; Fulton, Christopher E.; Binder, Michael P.; Maul, William A., III; Meyer, Claudia M.

    1998-01-01

    A real-time system for validating sensor health has been developed in support of the reusable launch vehicle program. This system was designed for use in a propulsion testbed as part of an overall effort to improve the safety, diagnostic capability, and cost of operation of the testbed. The sensor validation system was designed and developed at the NASA Lewis Research Center and integrated into a propulsion checkout and control system as part of an industry-NASA partnership, led by Rockwell International for the Marshall Space Flight Center. The system includes modules for sensor validation, signal reconstruction, and feature detection and was designed to maximize portability to other applications. Review of test data from initial integration testing verified real-time operation and showed the system to perform correctly on both hard and soft sensor failure test cases. This paper discusses the design of the sensor validation and supporting modules developed at LeRC and reviews results obtained from initial test cases.

  2. Design and Development of a 200-kW Turbo-Electric Distributed Propulsion Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papathakis, Kurt V.; Kloesel, Kurt J.; Lin, Yohan; Clarke, Sean; Ediger, Jacob J.; Ginn, Starr

    2016-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Armstrong Flight Research Center (AFRC) (Edwards, California) is developing a Hybrid-Electric Integrated Systems Testbed (HEIST) Testbed as part of the HEIST Project, to study power management and transition complexities, modular architectures, and flight control laws for turbo-electric distributed propulsion technologies using representative hardware and piloted simulations. Capabilities are being developed to assess the flight readiness of hybrid electric and distributed electric vehicle architectures. Additionally, NASA will leverage experience gained and assets developed from HEIST to assist in flight-test proposal development, flight-test vehicle design, and evaluation of hybrid electric and distributed electric concept vehicles for flight safety. The HEIST test equipment will include three trailers supporting a distributed electric propulsion wing, a battery system and turbogenerator, dynamometers, and supporting power and communication infrastructure, all connected to the AFRC Core simulation. Plans call for 18 high performance electric motors that will be powered by batteries and the turbogenerator, and commanded by a piloted simulation. Flight control algorithms will be developed on the turbo-electric distributed propulsion system.

  3. An integrated testbed for cooperative perception with heterogeneous mobile and static sensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez-González, Adrián; Martínez-De Dios, José Ramiro; Ollero, Aníbal

    2011-01-01

    Cooperation among devices with different sensing, computing and communication capabilities provides interesting possibilities in a growing number of problems and applications including domotics (domestic robotics), environmental monitoring or intelligent cities, among others. Despite the increasing interest in academic and industrial communities, experimental tools for evaluation and comparison of cooperative algorithms for such heterogeneous technologies are still very scarce. This paper presents a remote testbed with mobile robots and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN) equipped with a set of low-cost off-the-shelf sensors, commonly used in cooperative perception research and applications, that present high degree of heterogeneity in their technology, sensed magnitudes, features, output bandwidth, interfaces and power consumption, among others. Its open and modular architecture allows tight integration and interoperability between mobile robots and WSN through a bidirectional protocol that enables full interaction. Moreover, the integration of standard tools and interfaces increases usability, allowing an easy extension to new hardware and software components and the reuse of code. Different levels of decentralization are considered, supporting from totally distributed to centralized approaches. Developed for the EU-funded Cooperating Objects Network of Excellence (CONET) and currently available at the School of Engineering of Seville (Spain), the testbed provides full remote control through the Internet. Numerous experiments have been performed, some of which are described in the paper. PMID:22247679

  4. Development of research reactor simulator and its application to dynamic test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed a real-time simulator for 'High-flux Advanced Neutron Application ReactOr (HANARO), and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR). The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator into a dynamic test-bed (DTB) to test the functions and dynamic control performance of reactor regulating system (RRS) in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The software includes a mathematical model that implements plant dynamics in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface module. The developed research reactor simulators are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by actual RRS cabinet, and was interfaced using a hard-wired and network-based interface. RRS cabinet generates control signals for reactor power control based on the various feedback signals from DTB, and the DTB runs plant dynamics based on the RRS control signals. Thus the Hardware-In-the-Loop Simulation between RRS and the emulated plant (DTB) has been implemented and tested in this configuration. The test result shows that the developed DTB and actual RRS cabinet works together simultaneously resulting in quite good dynamic control performances. (author)

  5. Recent progress in the simulation and synthesis of Wide Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Juanola-Parramon, Roser; Leisawitz, David; Bolcar, Matthew R.; Iacchetta, Alexander; Maher, Stephen F.; Rinehart, Stephen

    2016-06-01

    The Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) is a double Fourier interferometer (DF) operating at optical wavelengths, and provides data that are highly representative of those from a space-based far-infrared interferometer like the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT). Developed at NASA’s Goddard Space Flight Center, this testbed produces high-quality interferometric data and is capable of observing spatially and spectrally complex hyperspectral test scenes, from geometrically simple to astronomically representative test scenes.Here we present the simulation of recent WIIT measurements using the Far-infrared Interferometer Instrument Simulator (FIInS). This simulation enables us to compare a synthesized spatial-spectral data cube based on FIInS-generated DF data with the input hyperspectral test scene. FIInS has been modified to perform the calculations at optical wavelengths and to include an extended field of view due to the presence of a detector array. The results from FIInS are compared with the results obtained from recent measurements with WIIT. For this current study, the test scene under consideration spatially consists of four reference point sources intended for spectral and spatial calibration, and six science sources, comprised of binary systems. Each binary pair member has a unique spectrum. Our results demonstrate that FIInS accurately describes the performance of a real double Fourier interferometer, and that the expected hyperspectral data cube can be reconstructed from synthetic or real interferometric data.

  6. A low-cost test-bed for real-time landmark tracking

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csaszar, Ambrus; Hanan, Jay C.; Moreels, Pierre; Assad, Christopher

    2007-04-01

    A low-cost vehicle test-bed system was developed to iteratively test, refine and demonstrate navigation algorithms before attempting to transfer the algorithms to more advanced rover prototypes. The platform used here was a modified radio controlled (RC) car. A microcontroller board and onboard laptop computer allow for either autonomous or remote operation via a computer workstation. The sensors onboard the vehicle represent the types currently used on NASA-JPL rover prototypes. For dead-reckoning navigation, optical wheel encoders, a single axis gyroscope, and 2-axis accelerometer were used. An ultrasound ranger is available to calculate distance as a substitute for the stereo vision systems presently used on rovers. The prototype also carries a small laptop computer with a USB camera and wireless transmitter to send real time video to an off-board computer. A real-time user interface was implemented that combines an automatic image feature selector, tracking parameter controls, streaming video viewer, and user generated or autonomous driving commands. Using the test-bed, real-time landmark tracking was demonstrated by autonomously driving the vehicle through the JPL Mars yard. The algorithms tracked rocks as waypoints. This generated coordinates calculating relative motion and visually servoing to science targets. A limitation for the current system is serial computing-each additional landmark is tracked in order-but since each landmark is tracked independently, if transferred to appropriate parallel hardware, adding targets would not significantly diminish system speed.

  7. An Integrated Testbed for Cooperative Perception with Heterogeneous Mobile and Static Sensors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal Ollero

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Cooperation among devices with different sensing, computing and communication capabilities provides interesting possibilities in a growing number of problems and applications including domotics (domestic robotics, environmental monitoring or intelligent cities, among others. Despite the increasing interest in academic and industrial communities, experimental tools for evaluation and comparison of cooperative algorithms for such heterogeneous technologies are still very scarce. This paper presents a remote testbed with mobile robots and Wireless Sensor Networks (WSN equipped with a set of low-cost off-the-shelf sensors, commonly used in cooperative perception research and applications, that present high degree of heterogeneity in their technology, sensed magnitudes, features, output bandwidth, interfaces and power consumption, among others. Its open and modular architecture allows tight integration and interoperability between mobile robots and WSN through a bidirectional protocol that enables full interaction. Moreover, the integration of standard tools and interfaces increases usability, allowing an easy extension to new hardware and software components and the reuse of code. Different levels of decentralization are considered, supporting from totally distributed to centralized approaches. Developed for the EU-funded Cooperating Objects Network of Excellence (CONET and currently available at the School of Engineering of Seville (Spain, the testbed provides full remote control through the Internet. Numerous experiments have been performed, some of which are described in the paper.

  8. Metrology calibration and very high accuracy centroiding with the NEAT testbed

    CERN Document Server

    Crouzier, A; Preis, O; Henault, F; Kern, P; Martin, G; Feautrier, P; Stadler, E; Lafrasse, S; Delboulbe, A; Behar, E; Saint-Pe, M; Dupont, J; Potin, S; Cara, C; Donati, M; Doumayrou, E; Lagage, P O; Léger, A; LeDuigou, J M; Shao, M; Goullioud, R

    2014-01-01

    NEAT is an astrometric mission proposed to ESA with the objectives of detecting Earth-like exoplanets in the habitable zone of nearby solar-type stars. NEAT requires the capability to measure stellar centroids at the precision of 5e-6 pixel. Current state-of-the-art methods for centroid estimation have reached a precision of about 2e-5 pixel at two times Nyquist sampling, this was shown at the JPL by the VESTA experiment. A metrology system was used to calibrate intra and inter pixel quantum efficiency variations in order to correct pixelation errors. The European part of the NEAT consortium is building a testbed in vacuum in order to achieve 5e-6 pixel precision for the centroid estimation. The goal is to provide a proof of concept for the precision requirement of the NEAT spacecraft. The testbed consists of two main sub-systems. The first one produces pseudo stars: a blackbody source is fed into a large core fiber and lights-up a pinhole mask in the object plane, which is imaged by a mirror on the CCD. The ...

  9. Development of Research Reactor Simulator and Its Application to Dynamic Test-bed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kwon, Kee Choon; Park, Jae Chang; Lee, Seung Wook; Bang, Dane; Bae, Sung Won [KAERI, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-08-15

    We developed HANARO and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) real-time simulator for operating staff training. The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator as a dynamic test-bed to test the reactor regulating system in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator configuration is divided into hardware and software. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The simulator software is divided into three major parts: a mathematical modeling module, which executes the plant dynamic modeling program in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface (HMI) module. The developed research reactors are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by a hardware controller and the simulator and target controller were interfaced with a hard-wired and network-based interface.

  10. Carrier Plus: A sensor payload for Living With a Star Space Environment Testbed (LWS/SET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Cheryl J.; Moss, Steven; Howard, Regan; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Grycewicz, Tom; Barth, Janet L.; Brewer, Dana

    2003-01-01

    The Defense Threat Reduction Agency (DTR4) and National Aeronautics and Space Administration (NASA) Goddard Space Flight Center are collaborating to develop the Carrier Plus sensor experiment platform as a capability of the Space Environments Testbed (SET). The Space Environment Testbed (SET) provides flight opportunities for technology experiments as part of NASA's Living With a Star (LWS) program. The Carrier Plus will provide new capability to characterize sensor technologies such as state-of-the-art visible focal plane arrays (FPAs) in a natural space radiation environment. The technical objectives include on-orbit validation of recently developed FPA technologies and performance prediction methodologies, as well as characterization of the FPA radiation response to total ionizing dose damage, displacement damage and transients. It is expected that the sensor experiment will carry 4-6 FPAs and associated radiation correlative environment monitors (CEMs) for a 2006-2007 launch. Sensor technology candidates may include n- and p-charge coupled devices (CCDs), active pixel sensors (APS), and hybrid CMOS arrays. The presentation will describe the Carrier Plus goals and objectives, as well as provide details about the architecture and design. More information on the LWS program can be found at http://lws.gsfc.nasa.gov/. Business announcements for LWS/SET and program briefings are posted at http://lws-set.gsfc.nasa.gov

  11. The Objectives of NASA's Living with a Star Space Environment Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barth, Janet L.; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Brewer, Dana; Kauffman, Billy; Howard, Regan; Griffin, Geoff; Day, John H. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    NASA is planning to fly a series of Space Environment Testbeds (SET) as part of the Living With A Star (LWS) Program. The goal of the testbeds is to improve and develop capabilities to mitigate and/or accommodate the affects of solar variability in spacecraft and avionics design and operation. This will be accomplished by performing technology validation in space to enable routine operations, characterize technology performance in space, and improve and develop models, guidelines and databases. The anticipated result of the LWS/SET program is improved spacecraft performance, design, and operation for survival of the radiation, spacecraft charging, meteoroid, orbital debris and thermosphere/ionosphere environments. The program calls for a series of NASA Research Announcements (NRAs) to be issued to solicit flight validation experiments, improvement in environment effects models and guidelines, and collateral environment measurements. The selected flight experiments may fly on the SET experiment carriers and flights of opportunity on other commercial and technology missions. This paper presents the status of the project so far, including a description of the types of experiments that are intended to fly on SET-1 and a description of the SET-1 carrier parameters.

  12. Development of Research Reactor Simulator and Its Application to Dynamic Test-bed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We developed HANARO and the Jordan Research and Training Reactor (JRTR) real-time simulator for operating staff training. The main purpose of this simulator is operator training, but we modified this simulator as a dynamic test-bed to test the reactor regulating system in HANARO or JRTR before installation. The simulator configuration is divided into hardware and software. The simulator hardware consists of a host computer, 6 operator stations, a network switch, and a large display panel. The simulator software is divided into three major parts: a mathematical modeling module, which executes the plant dynamic modeling program in real-time, an instructor station module that manages user instructions, and a human machine interface (HMI) module. The developed research reactors are installed in the Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute nuclear training center for reactor operator training. To use the simulator as a dynamic test-bed, the reactor regulating system modeling software of the simulator was replaced by a hardware controller and the simulator and target controller were interfaced with a hard-wired and network-based interface

  13. Thermal analysis of the unloading cell of the Spanish centralized interim storage facility (CISF); Analisis termico de la celda de desarga del almacen temporal centralizado (ATC)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perez Dominguez, J. R.; Perez Vara, R.; Huelamo Martinez, E.

    2016-08-01

    This article deals with the thermal analysis performed for the Untoading Cell of Spain Centralized Interim Storage Facility, CISF (ATC, in Spanish). The analyses are done using computational fluid dynamics (CFD) simulation, with the aim of obtaining the air flow required to remove the residual heat of the elements stored in the cell. Compliance with the admissible heat limits is checked with the results obtained in the various operation and accident modes. The calculation model is flexible enough to allow carrying out a number of sensitivity analyses with the different parameters involved in the process. (Author)

  14. Investigations using Laboratory Testbeds to Interpret Flight Instrument Datasets from Mars Robotic Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Sutter, B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Achilles, C.

    2012-12-01

    The Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has laboratory instrumentation that mimic the capabilities of corresponding flight instruments to enable interpretation of datasets returned from Mars robotic missions. The lab instruments have been and continue to be applied to datasets for the Mössbauer Spectrometer (MB) on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER), the Thermal & Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the Mars Phoenix Scout, the CRISM instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter and will be applied to datasets for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) and Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) instruments onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The laboratory instruments can analyze analog samples at costs that are substantially lower than engineering models of flight instruments, but their success to enable interpretation of flight data depends on how closely their capabilities mimic those of the flight instrument. The JSC lab MB instruments are equivalent to the MER instruments except without flight qualified components and no reference channel Co-57 source. Data from analog samples were critical for identification of Mg-Fe carbonate at Gusev crater. Fiber-optic VNIR spectrometers are used to obtain CRISM-like spectral data over the range 350-2500 nm, and data for Fe-phyllosilicates show irreversible behavior in the electronic transition region upon dessication. The MB and VNIR instruments can be operated within chambers where, for example, the absolute H2O concentration can be measured and controlled. Phoenix's TEGA consisted of a calorimeter coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS). The JSC laboratory testbed instrument consisted of a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) coupled to a MS configured to operate under total pressure (12 mbar), heating rate (20 °C/min), and purge gas composition (N2) analogous to the flight TEGA. TEGA detected CO2 release at both low (400-680 °C) and

  15. Investigations Using Laboratory Testbeds to Interpret Flight Instrument Datasets from Mars Robotic Missions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ming, D. W.; Morris, R. V.; Sutter, B.; Archer, P. D., Jr.; Achilles, C. N.

    2012-01-01

    The Astromaterials Research and Exploration Science Directorate at the NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC) has laboratory instrumentation that mimic the capabilities of corresponding flight instruments to enable interpretation of datasets returned from Mars robotic missions. The lab instruments have been and continue to be applied to datasets for the Moessbauer Spectrometer (MB) on the Mars Exploration Rovers (MER), the Thermal & Evolved Gas Analyzer (TEGA) on the Mars Phoenix Scout, the CRISM instrument on the Mars Reconnaissance Orbiter Missions and will be applied to datasets for the Sample Analysis at Mars (SAM), Chemistry and Mineralogy (CheMin) and Chemistry & Camera (ChemCam) instruments onboard the Mars Science Laboratory (MSL). The laboratory instruments can analyze analog samples at costs that are substantially lower than engineering models of flight instruments, but their success to enable interpretation of flight data depends on how closely their capabilities mimic those of the flight instrument. The JSC lab MB instruments are equivalent to the MER instruments except without flight qualified components and no reference channel Co-57 source. Data from analog samples were critical for identification of Mg-Fe carbonate at Gusev crater. Fiber-optic VNIR spectrometers are used to obtain CRISM-like spectral data over the range 350-2500 nm, and data for Fephyllosilicates show irreversible behavior in the electronic transition region upon dessication. The MB and VNIR instruments can be operated within chambers where, for example, the absolute H2O concentration can be measured and controlled. Phoenix's TEGA consisted of a calorimeter coupled to a mass spectrometer (MS). The JSC laboratory testbed instrument consisted of a differential scanning calorimeter (DSC) coupled to a MS configured to operate under total pressure (12 mbar), heating rate (20 C/min), and purge gas composition (N2) analogous to the flight TEGA. TEGA detected CO2 release at both low (400-680 C

  16. 2015 In-Situ Gamma-Ray Assay of the West Cell Line in the 235-F Plutonium Fuel Form Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brand, A. D. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); Aucott, T. J. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL); DiPrete, D. P. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2016-02-01

    In November and December 2015, scientists from SRNL took a series of in-situ gamma-ray measurements through the windows in front of Cells 6-9 on the west line of the PuFF facility using a shielded, 120% high-purity germanium detector. The detector efficiency was estimated using a combination of MCNP simulations and empirical measurements. Where possible, the distribution of the Pu-238 in the cells was determined using the Germanium Gamma-ray Imager (GeGI). This distribution was then fed into the MCNP model to quantify the Pu-238 in each cell. Data analysis was performed using three gamma rays emitted by Pu-238 (99.85 keV, 152.7 keV, and 766.4 keV) providing three independent estimates of the mass of Pu-238 holdup in each of the cells.

  17. Beijing synchrotron radiation total—reflection X—ray fluorescence analysis facility and its applications on trace element study of cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HuangYuying; WuYingrong; ZhaoLimin; LiGuangcheng; HeWei; YuanLizhen

    2001-01-01

    The feasibility of total-reflection X-ray fluorescence(TXRF) analysis excited by synchrotron radiation applied to trace element analysis of biological cells is investigated.The Beijing synchrotron radiation TXRF facility and the related xperimental method are also described.The elemental mininum detection limits of some standard reference materials are determined.The elemental compositions of a cluster of small intestine cells of a small white mouse are given,and hence the average trace element contents of the single small intestine cell are also obtained.With this technique,the changes of some trace elements in the cells of lung and cervix cancer before and after apoptosis are also preliminarily studied.2001 Elsevier Science B.V.All rights Reserved.

  18. Commissioning experience and beam physics measurements at the SwissFEL Injector Test Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Schietinger, T.; Pedrozzi, M.; Aiba, M.; Arsov, V.; Bettoni, S; Beutner, B.; Calvi, M.; Craievich, P.; Dehler, M.; Frei, F; Ganter, R.; C. P. Hauri; Ischebeck, R.; Ivanisenko, Y.; Janousch, M.

    2016-01-01

    The SwissFEL Injector Test Facility operated at the Paul Scherrer Institute between 2010 and 2014, serving as a pilot plant and testbed for the development and realization of SwissFEL, the X-ray Free-Electron Laser facility under construction at the same institute. The test facility consisted of a laser-driven rf electron gun followed by an S-band booster linac, a magnetic bunch compression chicane and a diagnostic section including a transverse deflecting rf cavity. It delivered electron bun...

  19. Experimental facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have completed an engineering feasibility study of a major modification of the HFIR facility and are now beginning a similar study of an entirely new facility. The design of the reactor itself is common to both options. In this paper, a general description of the modified HFIR is presented with some indications of the additional facilities that might be available in an entirely new facility

  20. Empirical assessment of a prismatic daylight-redirecting window film in a full-scale office testbed

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thanachareonkit, Anothai; Lee, Eleanor S.; McNeil, Andrew

    2013-08-31

    Daylight redirecting systems with vertical windows have the potential to offset lighting energy use in deep perimeter zones. Microstructured prismatic window films can be manufactured using low-cost, roll-to-roll fabrication methods and adhered to the inside surface of existing windows as a retrofit measure or installed as a replacement insulating glass unit in the clerestory portion of the window wall. A clear film patterned with linear, 50-250 micrometer high, four-sided asymmetrical prisms was fabricated and installed in the south-facing, clerestory low-e, clear glazed windows of a full-scale testbed facility. Views through the film were distorted. The film was evaluated in a sunny climate over a two-year period to gauge daylighting and visual comfort performance. The daylighting aperture was small (window-towall ratio of 0.18) and the lower windows were blocked off to isolate the evaluation to the window film. Workplane illuminance measurements were made in the 4.6 m (15 ft) deep room furnished as a private office. Analysis of discomfort glare was conducted using high dynamic range imaging coupled with the evalglare software tool, which computes the daylight glare probability and other metrics used to evaluate visual discomfort. The window film was found to result in perceptible levels of discomfort glare on clear sunny days from the most conservative view point in the rear of the room looking toward the window. Daylight illuminance levels at the rear of the room were significantly increased above the reference window condition, which was defined as the same glazed clerestory window but with an interior Venetian blind (slat angle set to the cut-off angle), for the equinox to winter solstice period on clear sunny days. For partly cloudy and overcast sky conditions, daylight levels were improved slightly. To reduce glare, the daylighting film was coupled with a diffusing film in an insulating glazing unit. The diffusing film retained the directionality of the

  1. Recent Successes and Future Plans for NASA's Space Communications and Navigation Testbed on the International Space Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinhart, Richard C.; Sankovic, John M.; Johnson, Sandra K.; Lux, James P.; Chelmins, David T.

    2014-01-01

    Flexible and extensible space communications architectures and technology are essential to enable future space exploration and science activities. NASA has championed the development of the Space Telecommunications Radio System (STRS) software defined radio (SDR) standard and the application of SDR technology to reduce the costs and risks of using SDRs for space missions, and has developed an on-orbit testbed to validate these capabilities. The Space Communications and Navigation (SCaN) Testbed (previously known as the Communications, Navigation, and Networking reConfigurable Testbed (CoNNeCT)) is advancing SDR, on-board networking, and navigation technologies by conducting space experiments aboard the International Space Station. During its first year(s) on-orbit, the SCaN Testbed has achieved considerable accomplishments to better understand SDRs and their applications. The SDR platforms and software waveforms on each SDR have over 1500 hours of operation and are performing as designed. The Ka-band SDR on the SCaN Testbed is NASAs first space Ka-band transceiver and is NASA's first Ka-band mission using the Space Network. This has provided exciting opportunities to operate at Ka-band and assist with on-orbit tests of NASA newest Tracking and Data Relay Satellites (TDRS). During its first year, SCaN Testbed completed its first on-orbit SDR reconfigurations. SDR reconfigurations occur when implementing new waveforms on an SDR. SDR reconfigurations allow a radio to change minor parameters, such as data rate, or complete functionality. New waveforms which provide new capability and are reusable across different missions provide long term value for reconfigurable platforms such as SDRs. The STRS Standard provides guidelines for new waveform development by third parties. Waveform development by organizations other than the platform provider offers NASA the ability to develop waveforms itself and reduce its dependence and costs on the platform developer. Each of these

  2. Stereotactic body radiotherapy and treatment at a high volume facility is associated with improved survival in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Background: This study examined the comparative effectiveness of no treatment (NoTx), conventional fractionated radiotherapy (ConvRT), and stereotactic body radiotherapy (SBRT) in patients with inoperable stage I non-small cell lung cancer. This population based cohort also allowed us to examine what facility level characteristics contributed to improved outcomes. Methods: We included patients in the National Cancer Database from 2003 to 2006 with T1-T2N0M0 inoperable lung cancer (n = 13,036). Overall survival (OS) was estimated using Kaplan–Meier methods and Cox proportional hazard regression. Results: The median follow up was 68 months (interquartile range: 35–83 months) in surviving patients. Among the cohort, 52% received NoTx, 41% received ConvRT and 6% received SBRT. The 3-year OS was 28% for NoTx, 36% for ConvRT radiotherapy, and 48% for the SBRT cohort (p < 0.0001). On multivariate analysis, the hazard ratio for SBRT and ConvRT were 0.67 and 0.77, respectively, as compared to NoTx (1.0 ref) (p < 0.0001). Patients treated at a high volume facility vs. low volume facility had a hazard ratio of 0.94 vs. 1.0 (p = 0.01). Conclusions: Patients with early stage inoperable lung cancer treated with SBRT and at a high volume facility had a survival benefit compared to patients treated with ConvRT or NoTx or to those treated at a low volume facility

  3. Test plan for the pilot cell test of inert anodes: Report on the June 1991 meeting at the Reynolds Metals Company facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Windisch, C.F. Jr. (Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States)); Alcorn, T.R.; Tabereaux, A.T. (Reynolds Metals Co., Muscle Shoals, AL (United States). Mfg. Technology Lab.)

    1991-09-01

    The Inert Electrodes Program at the Pacific Northwest Laboratory (PNL) is supported by the Office of Industrial Processes (OIP) of the US Department of Energy (DOE) and is aimed at improving the energy efficiency of Hall-Heroult cells through the development of inert anodes. The inert anodes currently under study are composed of a cermet material of the general composition NiO-NiFe{sub 2}O{sub 4}-Cu. The program has three primary objectives: (1) evaluate the anode material in a pilot cell facility, (2) investigate the mechanisms of the electrochemical reactions at the anodes surface, and (3) develop sensors for monitoring various anode and/or electrolyte conditions. This report discusses a test plan that has been developed for the pilot cell test of the inert anodes. 6 refs., 7 figs., 4 tabs.

  4. OPNET/Simulink Based Testbed for Disturbance Detection in the Smart Grid

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sadi, Mohammad A. H. [University of Memphis; Dasgupta, Dipankar [ORNL; Ali, Mohammad Hassan [University of Memphis; Abercrombie, Robert K [ORNL

    2015-01-01

    The important backbone of the smart grid is the cyber/information infrastructure, which is primarily used to communicate with different grid components. A smart grid is a complex cyber physical system containing a numerous and variety number of sources, devices, controllers and loads. Therefore, the smart grid is vulnerable to grid related disturbances. For such dynamic system, disturbance and intrusion detection is a paramount issue. This paper presents a Simulink and Opnet based co-simulated platform to carry out a cyber-intrusion in cyber network for modern power systems and the smart grid. The IEEE 30 bus power system model is used to demonstrate the effectiveness of the simulated testbed. The experiments were performed by disturbing the circuit breakers reclosing time through a cyber-attack. Different disturbance situations in the considered test system are considered and the results indicate the effectiveness of the proposed co-simulated scheme.

  5. Break junction under electrochemical gating: testbed for single-molecule electronics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cancan; Rudnev, Alexander V; Hong, Wenjing; Wandlowski, Thomas

    2015-02-21

    Molecular electronics aims to construct functional molecular devices at the single-molecule scale. One of the major challenges is to construct a single-molecule junction and to further manipulate the charge transport through the molecular junction. Break junction techniques, including STM break junctions and mechanically controllable break junctions are considered as testbed to investigate and control the charge transport on a single-molecule scale. Moreover, additional electrochemical gating provides a unique opportunity to manipulate the energy alignment and molecular redox processes for a single-molecule junction. In this review, we start from the technical aspects of the break junction technique, then discuss the molecular structure-conductance correlation derived from break junction studies, and, finally, emphasize electrochemical gating as a promising method for the functional molecular devices. PMID:25560965

  6. An interactive testbed for development of expert tools for pattern recognition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wharton, Stephen W.

    1988-01-01

    The initial implementation of an interactive testbed for development of expert system applications in image processing, i.e., a toolbox of procedures designed to facilitate the capture of expert knowledge for region grouping and analysis is described. The user can elect to interactively enter commands (via a command interpreter) for region manipulation to, in effect, simulate the actions of a hypothetical expert system. The user can then incorporate any rules and procedures as derived from interactive experimentation into customized region processing procedures using the library of utility functions. An iterative technique based on image pyramids is used to compute the initial region segmentation without the use of process parameters. These regions can then be interactively examined and manipulated using the command interpreter.

  7. Wide-field Imaging Interferometry Testbed II Implementation, Performance, and Plans

    CERN Document Server

    Rinehart, S A; Leisawitz, D T; Leviton, D B; Martino, A J; Maynard, W L; Mundy, L G; Teng, S H; Zhang, X; Frey, Bradley J.; Leisawitz, David T.; Leviton, Douglas B.; Martino, Anthony J.; Maynard, William L.; Mundy, Lee G.; Teng, Stacy H.; Zhang, Xiaolei

    2002-01-01

    The Wide-Field Imaging Interferometry Testbed (WIIT) will provide valuable information for the development of space-based interferometers. This laboratory instrument operates at optical wavelengths and provides the ability to test operational algorithms and techniques for data reduction of interferometric data. Here we present some details of the system design and implementation, discuss the overall performance of the system to date, and present our plans for future development of WIIT. In order to make best use of the interferometric data obtained with this system, it is critical to limit uncertainties within the system and to accurately understand possible sources of error. The WIIT design addresses these criteria through a number of ancillary systems. The use of redundant metrology systems is one of the most important features of WIIT, and provides knowledge of the delay line position to better than 10 nm. A light power detector is used to monitor the brightness of our light sources to ensure that small fl...

  8. High-Resolution Adaptive Optics Test-Bed for Vision Science

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilks, S C; Thomspon, C A; Olivier, S S; Bauman, B J; Barnes, T; Werner, J S

    2001-09-27

    We discuss the design and implementation of a low-cost, high-resolution adaptive optics test-bed for vision research. It is well known that high-order aberrations in the human eye reduce optical resolution and limit visual acuity. However, the effects of aberration-free eyesight on vision are only now beginning to be studied using adaptive optics to sense and correct the aberrations in the eye. We are developing a high-resolution adaptive optics system for this purpose using a Hamamatsu Parallel Aligned Nematic Liquid Crystal Spatial Light Modulator. Phase-wrapping is used to extend the effective stroke of the device, and the wavefront sensing and wavefront correction are done at different wavelengths. Issues associated with these techniques will be discussed.

  9. Thermal and Fluid Modeling of the CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed (CRYOTE) Ground Test Article (GTA)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Piryk, David; Schallhorn, Paul; Walls, Laurie; Stopnitzky, Benny; Rhys, Noah; Wollen, Mark

    2012-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to anchor thermal and fluid system models to data acquired from a ground test article (GTA) for the CRYogenic Orbital TEstbed - CRYOTE. To accomplish this analysis, it was broken into four primary tasks. These included model development, pre-test predictions, testing support at Marshall Space Flight Center (MSFC} and post-test correlations. Information from MSFC facilitated the task of refining and correlating the initial models. The primary goal of the modeling/testing/correlating efforts was to characterize heat loads throughout the ground test article. Significant factors impacting the heat loads included radiative environments, multi-layer insulation (MLI) performance, tank fill levels, tank pressures, and even contact conductance coefficients. This paper demonstrates how analytical thermal/fluid networks were established, and it includes supporting rationale for specific thermal responses seen during testing.

  10. The computational structural mechanics testbed architecture. Volume 5: The Input-Output Manager DMGASP

    Science.gov (United States)

    Felippa, Carlos A.

    1989-01-01

    This is the fifth of a set of five volumes which describe the software architecture for the Computational Structural Mechanics Testbed. Derived from NICE, an integrated software system developed at Lockheed Palo Alto Research Laboratory, the architecture is composed of the command language (CLAMP), the command language interpreter (CLIP), and the data manager (GAL). Volumes 1, 2, and 3 (NASA CR's 178384, 178385, and 178386, respectively) describe CLAMP and CLIP and the CLIP-processor interface. Volumes 4 and 5 (NASA CR's 178387 and 178388, respectively) describe GAL and its low-level I/O. CLAMP, an acronym for Command Language for Applied Mechanics Processors, is designed to control the flow of execution of processors written for NICE. Volume 5 describes the low-level data management component of the NICE software. It is intended only for advanced programmers involved in maintenance of the software.

  11. Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed: Performance and Characterization of a 1024 Deformable Mirror

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, J W; Morzinski, K; Severson, S; Poyneer, L; Macintosh, B; Dillon, D; REza, L; Gavel, D; Palmer, D

    2005-10-30

    We have demonstrated that a microelectrical mechanical systems (MEMS) deformable mirror can be flattened to < 1 nm RMS within controllable spatial frequencies over a 9.2-mm aperture making it a viable option for high-contrast adaptive optics systems (also known as Extreme Adaptive Optics). The Extreme Adaptive Optics Testbed at UC Santa Cruz is being used to investigate and develop technologies for high-contrast imaging, especially wavefront control. A phase shifting diffraction interferometer (PSDI) measures wavefront errors with sub-nm precision and accuracy for metrology and wavefront control. Consistent flattening, required testing and characterization of the individual actuator response, including the effects of dead and low-response actuators. Stability and repeatability of the MEMS devices was also tested. An error budget for MEMS closed loop performance will summarize MEMS characterization.

  12. Recent developments and near term directions for Navy laser weapons system (LaWS) testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pawlak, Robert J.

    2012-11-01

    The Laser Weapons System (LaWS) testbed has been a demonstrator of many High Energy Laser (HEL)-related technologies for the Navy. LaWS employs a sharedaperture design with incoherent beam combining, and makes extensive use of Commercial Off-The-Shelf (COTS) technologies in the areas of inertial sensing, fiber lasers, sensors, and video trackers. Since the system has demonstrated the art of the possible with COTS elements, it is useful to examine where performance can be increased with the greatest possible effect, as well as which modifications are necessary to support better integration with ships' systems. A review of past test events, architectures, and further plans will be provided, while emphasizing the past and future evolution of the LaWS system. These evolutions will relate within the context of technical drivers that most affected system development.

  13. Automated tools and techniques for distributed Grid Software Development of the testbed infrastructure

    CERN Document Server

    Aguado Sanchez, C

    2007-01-01

    Grid technology is becoming more and more important as the new paradigm for sharing computational resources across different organizations in a secure way. The great powerfulness of this solution, requires the definition of a generic stack of services and protocols and this is the scope of the different Grid initiatives. As a result of international collaborations for its development, the Open Grid Forum created the Open Grid Services Architecture (OGSA) which aims to define the common set of services that will enable interoperability across the different implementations. This master thesis has been developed in this framework, as part of the two European-funded projects ETICS and OMII-Europe. The main objective is to contribute to the design and maintenance of large distributed development projects with the automated tool that enables to implement Software Engineering techniques oriented to achieve an acceptable level of quality at the release process. Specifically, this thesis develops the testbed concept a...

  14. Modeling Circumstellar Disks of B-Type Stars with Observations from the Palomar Testbed Interferometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzenia, B. J.; Tycner, C.; Jones, C. E.; Rinehart, S. A.; vanBelle, G. T.; Sigut, T. A. A.

    2013-01-01

    Geometrical (uniform disk) and numerical models were calculated for a set of B-emission (Be) stars observed with the Palomar Testbed Interferometer (PTI). Physical extents have been estimated for the disks of a total of15 stars via uniform disk models. Our numerical non-LTE models used parameters for the B0, B2, B5, and B8spectral classes and following the framework laid by previous studies, we have compared them to infrared K-band interferometric observations taken at PTI. This is the first time such an extensive set of Be stars observed with long-baseline interferometry has been analyzed with self-consistent non-LTE numerical disk models.

  15. Living with a Star (LWS) Space Environment Testbeds (SET), Mission Carrier Overview and Capabilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patschke, Robert; Barth, Janet; Label, Ken; Mariano, Carolyn; Pham, Karen; Brewer, Dana; Cuviello, Michael; Kobe, David; Wu, Carl; Jarosz, Donald

    2004-01-01

    NASA has initiated the Living With a Star (LWS) Program to develop the scientific understanding to address the aspects of the Connected Sun-Earth system that affect life and society. A goal of the program is to bridge the gap between science, engineering, and user application communities. This will enable future science, operational, and commercial objectives in space and atmospheric environments by improving engineering approaches to the accommodation and/or mitigation of the effects of solar variability on technological systems. The three program elements of the LWS Program are Science Missions; Targeted Research and Technology; and Space Environment Testbeds (SETS). SET is an ideal platform for small experiments performing research on space environment effects on technologies and on the mitigation of space weather effects. A short description of the LWS Program will be given, and the SET will be described in detail, giving the mission objectives, available carrier services, and upcoming flight opportunities.

  16. Neutron-antineutron transition as a test-bed for dynamical CPT violations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Addazi, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    We show a simple mechanism for a dynamical CPT violation in the neutron sector. In particular, we show a CPT-violating see-saw mechanism, generating a Majorana mass and a CPT-violating mass for the neutron. CPT-violating see-saw involves a sterile partner of the neutron, living in a hidden sector, in which CPT is spontaneously broken. In particular, neutrons (antineutrons) can communicate with the hidden sector through nonperturbative quantum gravity effects called exotic instantons. Exotic instantons dynamically break R-parity, generating one effective vertex between the neutron and its sterile partner. In this way, we show how a small CPT-violating mass term for the neutron is naturally generated. This model can be tested in the next generation of experiments in neutron-antineutron physics. This strongly motivates researches of CPT-violating effects in neutron-antineutron physics as a test-bed for dynamical CPT-violations in SM.

  17. Neutron-antineutron transition as a test-bed for dynamical CPT violations

    CERN Document Server

    Addazi, Andrea

    2015-01-01

    We show a simple mechanism for a dynamical CPT violation in the neutron sector. In particular, we show a {\\it CPT-violating see-saw mechanism}, generating a Majorana mass and a CPT violating mass for the neutron. CPT-violating see-saw involves a sterile partner of the neutron, living in a hidden sector, in which CPT is spontaneously broken. In particular, neutrons (antineutrons) can communicate with the hidden sector through non-perturbative quantum gravity effects called {\\it exotic instantons}. Exotic instantons dynamically break R-parity, generating one effective vertex between the neutron and its sterile partner. In this way, we show how a small CPT violating mass term for the neutron is naturally generated. This model can be tested in the next generation of experiments in neutron-antineutron physics. This strongly motivates researches of CPT-violating effects in neutron-antineutron physics, as a test-bed for dynamical CPT-violations in SM.

  18. On-line Configuration of Network Emulator for Intelligent Energy System Testbed Applications

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kemal, Mohammed Seifu; Iov, Florin; Olsen, Rasmus Løvenstein;

    2015-01-01

    Intelligent energy networks (or Smart Grids) provide efficient solutions for a grid integrated with near-real-time communication technologies between various grid assets in power generation, transmission and distribution systems. The design of a communication network associated with intelligent...... power system involves detailed analysis of its communication requirements, a proposal of the appropriate protocol architecture, the choice of appropriate communication technologies for each case study, and a means to support heterogeneous communication technology management system. This paper discuses a...... mechanism for on-line configuration and monitoring of heterogeneous communication technologies implemented at smart energy system testbed of Aal-borg university. It proposes a model with three main components, a network emulator used to emulate the communication scenarios using KauNet, graphical user...

  19. Development of a composite UAV wing test-bed for structural health monitoring research

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliver, J. A.; Kosmatka, J. B.; Farrar, Charles R.; Park, Gyuhae

    2007-04-01

    In order to facilitate damage detection and structural health monitoring (SHM) research for composite unmanned aerial vehicles (UAV) a specialized test-bed has been developed. This test-bed consists of four 2.61 m all-composite test-pieces emulating composite UAV wings, a series of detailed finite element models of the test-pieces and their components, and a dynamic testing setup including a mount for simulating the cantilevered operation configuration of real wings. Two of the wings will have bondline damage built in; one undamaged and one damaged wing will also be fitted with a range of embedded and attached sensors-piezoelectric patches, fiber-optics, and accelerometers. These sensors will allow collection of realistic data; combined with further modal testing they will allow comparison of the physical impact of the sensors on the structure compared to the damage-induced variation, evaluation of the sensors for implementation in an operational structure, and damage detection algorithm validation. At the present time the pieces for four wings have been fabricated and modally tested and one wing has been fully assembled and re-tested in a cantilever configuration. The component part and assembled wing finite element models, created for MSC.Nastran, have been correlated to their respective structures using the modal information. This paper details the design and manufacturing of the test-pieces, the finite element model construction, and the dynamic testing setup. Measured natural frequencies and mode shapes for the assembled cantilevered wing are reported, along with finite element model undamaged modal response, and response with a small disbond at the root of the top main spar-skin bondline.

  20. The ISS as a Testbed for Future Large Astronomical Observatories: The OpTIIX Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burdick, G.; Callen, P.; Ess, K.; Liu, F.; Postman, M.; Sparks, W.; Seery, B.; Thronson, H.

    2012-01-01

    Future large (diameters in excess of approx. 10 m) astronomical observatories in space will need to employ advanced technologies if they are to be affordable. Many of these technologies are ready to be validated on orbit and the International Space Station (ISS) provides a suitable platform for such demonstrations. These technologies include low-cost, low-density, highly deformable mirror segments, coupled with advanced sensing and control methods. In addition, the ISS offers available telerobotic assembly techniques to build an optical testbed that embodies this new cost-effective approach to assemble and achieve diffraction-limited optical performance for very large space telescopes. Given the importance that NASA attaches to the recommendations of the National Academy of Sciences "Decadal Survey" process, essential capabilities and technologies will be demonstrated well in advance of the next Survey, which commences in 2019. To achieve this objective, the Jet Propulsion Laboratory (JPL), NASA Johnson Space Center (JSC), NASA Goddard Space Flight Center (GSFC), and the Space Telescope Science Institute (STScI) are carrying out a Phase A/B study of the Optical Testbed and Integration on ISS eXperiment (OpTIIX). The overarching goal is to demonstrate well before the end of this decade key capabilities intended to enable very large optical systems in the decade of the 2020s. Such a demonstration will retire technical risk in the assembly, alignment, calibration, and operation of future space observatories. The OpTIIX system, as currently designed, is a six-hexagon element, segmented visual-wavelength telescope with an edge-to-edge aperture of 1.4 m, operating at its diffraction limit,

  1. Real-time remote diagnostic monitoring test-bed in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the remote experimentation concept oriented to long pulse shots, a test-bed system has been implemented in JET. Its main functionality is the real-time monitoring, on remote, of a reflectometer diagnostic, to visualize different data outputs and status information. The architecture of the system is formed by: the data generator components, the data distribution system, an access control service, and the client applications. In the test-bed there is one data generator, which is the acquisition equipment associated with the reflectometer diagnostic that generates data and status information. The data distribution system has been implemented using a publishing-subscribing technology that receives data from data generators and redistributes them to client applications. And finally, for monitoring, a client application based on JAVA Web Start technology has been used. There are three interesting results from this project. The first one is the analysis of different aspects (data formats, data frame rate, data resolution, etc) related with remote real-time diagnostic monitoring oriented to long pulse experiments. The second one is the definition and implementation of an architecture, flexible enough to be applied to different types of data generated from other diagnostics, and that fits with remote access requirements. Finally, the third result is a secure system, taking into account internal networks and firewalls aspects of JET, and securing the access from remote users. For this last issue, PAPI technology has been used, enabling access control based on user attributes, enabling mobile users to monitor diagnostics in real-time, and enabling the integration of this service into the EFDA Federation (Castro et al., 2008 ).

  2. Production of exotic fragments by photofission process combined with stopping gas cell at ELI-NP facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Extreme Light Infrastructure Nuclear Physics (ELI-NP) facility is being built at Bucharest-Magurele, which then allow to do research about nuclear physics using new set of research tools: high power laser system and high brilliance gamma beams. One of day-one experiments proposed at this facility is to study the photofission of actinide by the high-intensity gamma beam through measurement of mass and beta decay. In addition, ternary fission will be also studied. In particular, the measurements of exotic neutron-rich nuclei produced by photofission, especially isotopes of refractory elements, is of great interest and requires the development of an IGISOL-type. In this report, we will present benchmark simulation of photofission rate and rates of related background processes. (author)

  3. Effects of Cardiotonic Steroids on Trabecular Meshwork Cells: Search for Mediator of Ouabain-Enhanced Outflow Facility

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Ang; Banerjee, Juni; Peterson-Yantorno, Kim; Stamer, W. Daniel; Leung, Chi Ting; Civan, Mortimer M.

    2012-01-01

    Lowering intraocular pressure (IOP) is currently the only strategy documented to slow the onset and progression of glaucomatous blindness. Ouabain, a cardiotonic glycoside inhibitor of Na+, K+-activated ATPase, was recently reported to enhance outflow facility in porcine anterior segments at concentrations as low as 30 nM for ≥ 4 hrs, suggesting a novel approach to lowering IOP. The underlying mechanism is unknown, but associated cytoskeletal changes were observed in porcine trabecular meshwo...

  4. The Utilization of Plant Facilities on the International Space Station—The Composition, Growth, and Development of Plant Cell Walls under Microgravity Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ann-Iren Kittang Jost

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the preparation for missions to Mars, basic knowledge of the mechanisms of growth and development of living plants under microgravity (micro-g conditions is essential. Focus has centered on the g-effects on rigidity, including mechanisms of signal perception, transduction, and response in gravity resistance. These components of gravity resistance are linked to the evolution and acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses. An overview is given both on the basic effect of hypergravity as well as of micro-g conditions in the cell wall changes. The review includes plant experiments in the US Space Shuttle and the effect of short space stays (8–14 days on single cells (plant protoplasts. Regeneration of protoplasts is dependent on cortical microtubules to orient the nascent cellulose microfibrils in the cell wall. The space protoplast experiments demonstrated that the regeneration capacity of protoplasts was retarded. Two critical factors are the basis for longer space experiments: a. the effects of gravity on the molecular mechanisms for cell wall development, b. the availability of facilities and hardware for performing cell wall experiments in space and return of RNA/DNA back to the Earth. Linked to these aspects is a description of existing hardware functioning on the International Space Station.

  5. DeBeNe Test Facilities for Fast Breeder Development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This report gives an overview and a short description of the test facilities constructed and operated within the collaboration for fast breeder development in Germany, Belgium and the Netherlands. The facilities are grouped into Sodium Loops (Large Facilities and Laboratory Loops), Special Equipment including Hot Cells and Reprocessing, Test Facilities without Sodium, Zero Power Facilities and In-pile Loops including Irradiation Facilities

  6. A novel facility for 3D micro-irradiation of living cells in a controlled environment by MeV ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mäckel, V., E-mail: maeckel@riken.jp; Meissl, W.; Ikeda, T.; Meissl, E.; Kobayashi, T.; Kojima, T. M.; Ogiwara, K.; Yamazaki, Y. [Atomic Physics Laboratory, RIKEN, 351-0198 Wako-shi, Saitama (Japan); Clever, M.; Imamoto, N. [Cellular Dynamics Laboratory, RIKEN, 351-0198 Wako-shi, Saitama (Japan)

    2014-01-15

    We present a novel facility for micro-irradiation of living targets with ions from a 1.7 MV tandem accelerator. We show results using 1 MeV protons and 2 MeV He{sup 2+}. In contrast to common micro-irradiation facilities, which use electromagnetic or electrostatic focusing and specially designed vacuum windows, we employ a tapered glass capillary with a thin end window, made from polystyrene with a thickness of 1–2 μm, for ion focusing and extraction. The capillary is connected to a beamline tilted vertically by 45°, which allows for easy immersion of the extracted ions into liquid environment within a standard cell culture dish. An inverted microscope is used for simultaneously observing the samples as well as the capillary tip, while a stage-top incubator provides an appropriate environment for the samples. Furthermore, our setup allows to target volumes in cells within a μm{sup 3} resolution, while monitoring the target in real time during and after irradiation.

  7. A novel facility for 3D micro-irradiation of living cells in a controlled environment by MeV ions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a novel facility for micro-irradiation of living targets with ions from a 1.7 MV tandem accelerator. We show results using 1 MeV protons and 2 MeV He2+. In contrast to common micro-irradiation facilities, which use electromagnetic or electrostatic focusing and specially designed vacuum windows, we employ a tapered glass capillary with a thin end window, made from polystyrene with a thickness of 1–2 μm, for ion focusing and extraction. The capillary is connected to a beamline tilted vertically by 45°, which allows for easy immersion of the extracted ions into liquid environment within a standard cell culture dish. An inverted microscope is used for simultaneously observing the samples as well as the capillary tip, while a stage-top incubator provides an appropriate environment for the samples. Furthermore, our setup allows to target volumes in cells within a μm3 resolution, while monitoring the target in real time during and after irradiation

  8. The Soil Moisture Active Passive Mission (SMAP) Science Data Products: Results of Testing with Field Experiment and Algorithm Testbed Simulation Environment Data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Entekhabi, Dara; Njoku, Eni E.; O'Neill, Peggy E.; Kellogg, Kent H.; Entin, Jared K.

    2010-01-01

    Talk outline 1. Derivation of SMAP basic and applied science requirements from the NRC Earth Science Decadal Survey applications 2. Data products and latencies 3. Algorithm highlights 4. SMAP Algorithm Testbed 5. SMAP Working Groups and community engagement

  9. A facile route to inverted polymer solar cells using a precursor based zinc oxide electron transport layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bruyn, P. de; Moet, D.J.D.; Blom, P.W.M.

    2010-01-01

    Inverted polymer:fullerene solar cells with ZnO and MoO3 transport layers are demonstrated. ZnO films are prepared through spin casting of a zinc acetylacetonate hydrate solution, followed by low temperature annealing under ambient conditions. The performance of solar cells with an inverted structur

  10. A facile route to inverted polymer solar cells using a precursor based zinc oxide electron transport layer

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Bruyn, P.; Moet, D. J. D.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2010-01-01

    Inverted polymer: fullerene solar cells with ZnO and MoO(3) transport layers are demonstrated. ZnO films are prepared through spin casting of a zinc acetylacetonate hydrate solution, followed by low temperature annealing under ambient conditions. The performance of solar cells with an inverted struc

  11. Detonation cell size measurements in high-temperature hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at the BNL high-temperature combustion facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The High-Temperature Combustion Facility (HTCF) was designed and constructed with the objective of studying detonation phenomena in mixtures of hydrogen-air-steam at initially high temperatures. The central element of the HTCF is a 27-cm inner-diameter, 21.3-m long cylindrical test vessel capable of being heating to 700K ± 14K. A unique feature of the HTCF is the 'diaphragmless' acetylene-oxygen gas driver which is used to initiate the detonation in the test gas. Cell size measurements have shown that for any hydrogen-air-steam mixture, increasing the initial mixture temperature, in the range of 300K to 650K, while maintaining the initial pressure of 0.1 MPa, decreases the cell size and thus makes the mixture more detonable. The effect of steam dilution on cell size was tested in stoichiometric and off-stoichiometric (e.g., equivalence ratio of 0.5) hydrogen-air mixtures. Increasing the steam dilution in hydrogen-air mixtures at 0.1 MPa initial pressure increases the cell size, irrespective of initial temperature. It is also observed that the desensitizing effect of steam diminished with increased initial temperature. A 1-dimensional, steady-state Zel'dovich, von Neumann, Doring (ZND) model, with full chemical kinetics, has been used to predict cell size for hydrogen-air-steam mixtures at different initial conditions. Qualitatively the model predicts the overall trends observed in the measured cell size versus mixture composition and initial temperature and pressure. It was found that the proportionality constant used to predict detonation cell size from the calculated ZND model reaction zone varies between 10 and 100 depending on the mixture composition and initial temperature. 32 refs., 35 figs

  12. Evaluasi Kinerja Layanan IPTV pada Jaringan Testbed WiMAX Berbasis Standar IEEE 802.16-2004

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prasetiyono Hari Mukti

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, a performance evaluation for IPTV Services over WiMAX testbed based on IEEE Standard 802.16-2004 will be described. The performance of the proposed system is evaluated in terms of delay, jitter, throughput and packet loss. Service performance evaluations are conducted on network topology of point-to-point in the variation of background traffic with different scheduling types. Background traffic is injected into the system to give the sense that the proposed system has variation traffic load. Scheduling type which are used in this paper are Best Effort (BE, Non-Real-Time Polling Service (nrtPS, Real-Time Polling Service (rtPS and Unsolicited Grant Service (UGS. The expemerintal results of IPTV service performance over the testbed network show that the maximum average of delay, jitter, packet loss and jitter are 16.581 ms, 58.515 ms, 0.67 Mbps dan 10.96%, respectively.

  13. A Testbed based on Multi-Agent Systems%一种基于MAS的Robocup测试床

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张双民; 李毅; 石纯一

    2001-01-01

    Robocup is one of the hot topic in the field of Artificial Intelligence and Automatic Control.In order for a robot to play a soccer game reasonably well,many technologies need to be integrated and a number of technical breakthroughs must be accomplished. The range of technologies spans the gamut of intelligent robotics research,including design principles of autonomous Agents,multi-Agent collaboration, strategy acquisition, real-time reasoning, and sensor-fusion, etc. Just stand by the multi-Agent systems,building a test-bed for problem solving of Robocup can improve multi-Agent system research.This paper introduces the competition mode,two typical Robocup systems and the test-bed based on MAS we designed.

  14. PNNL Strategic Goods Testbed: A Data Library for Illicit Nuclear Trafficking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Webster, Jennifer B.; Erikson, Luke E.; Toomey, Christopher M.; Lewis, Valerie A.

    2014-05-12

    Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) has put significant effort into nonproliferation activities as an institution, both in terms of the classical nuclear material focused approach and in the examination of other strategic goods necessary to implement a nuclear program. To assist in these efforts, several projects in the Analysis in Motion (AIM) and Signature Discovery (SDI) Initiatives at PNNL are developing machine learning methodology for human-computer interaction in real time environments to assist analysts in this domain. All of these technical projects require access to data – whether it is in terms of detector data, shipping records, financial information, company relations, or other communications. The first question that mathematical and computational researchers come up with when asked to build analyst assist or automated tools is “What does the data look like? ” They become frustrated when basic questions like this can not be easily answered and this can have the effect of pushing researchers away from the nuclear trafficking domain, especially in strategic commodity and export control areas where data sets can not easily be generated through standard experimental techniques. For small projects that are building a proof of concept for their methodology, obtaining this data can be arduous and expensive. To relieve the burden of data collection from these projects and grow a lab-wide capability, the Strategic Goods Testbed Team has taken over data collection and placed subscriptions and access to flat data files in a centralized location so that all projects can benefit from these items. We have collected shipping data in the form of PIERS records, judicial information about export control cases, NAC data on the nuclear fuel industry, and financial data from Dun and Bradstreet and our data sets are continuing to expand. With a single access agreement, researchers in data-mining and other fields can utilize all of the records that have been

  15. Real-Time Remote Diagnostic Monitoring Test-bed in JET

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Based on the remote experimentation concept oriented to long pulse shots, a test-bed system has been implemented in JET. It integrates 2 functionalities. The first one is the real-time monitoring, on remote, of a reflectometer diagnostic, to visualize different data outputs and status information. The second one is the integration of dotJET (Diagnostic Overview Tool for JET), which internally provides at JET an overview about the current diagnostic systems state, in order to monitor, on remote, JET diagnostics status. The architecture of the system is formed by: the data generator components, the data distribution system, an access control service, and the client applications. In the test-bed there are two data generators: the acquisition equipment associated with the reflectometer diagnostic that generates data and status information, and dotJET server that centralize the access to the status information of JET diagnostics. The data distribution system has been implemented using a publishing-subscribing technology that receives data from data generators and redistributes them to client applications. And finally, for monitoring, a client application based on Java Web Start technology, and a dotJET client application have been used. There are 3 interesting results from this project. The first one is the analysis of different aspects (data formats, data frame rate, data resolution, etc) related with remote real-time diagnostic monitoring oriented to long pulse experiments. The second one is the definition and implementation of a flexible enough architecture, to be applied to different types of data generated from other diagnostics, and that fits with remote access requirements; and the third one is to have achieved a secure system, taking into account internal networks and firewalls aspects in JET, and securing the access from remote users. For this last issue, PAPI technology has been used, enabling access control based on user attributes, enabling mobile users to

  16. Fabrication of Fe2O3 nanoflakes-based electrochemical solar cells prepared by facile thermal oxidation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rashid, Norhana Mohamed; Kishi, Naoki; Soga, Tetsuo

    2016-06-01

    A Fe2O3 nanoflakes-based solar cell was successfully prepared by thermal oxidation of iron film on FTO glass. The short circuit current density (Jsc) of the cell increased with annealing time while the open circuit voltage was saturated after 1 h. This enhancement was caused by the increased surface area of the nanoflakes and improved electron transfer through the (110) crystal plane in the Fe2O3-based electrochemical solar cell. The overall photovoltaic performance significantly increased with ruthenium dye, which likely suppressed carrier recombination on the Fe2O3 surface.

  17. A Method to Derive Monitoring Variables for a Cyber Security Test-bed of I and C System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In the IT field, monitoring techniques have been developed to protect the systems connected by networks from cyber attacks and incidents. For the development of monitoring systems for I and C cyber security, it is necessary to review the monitoring systems in the IT field and derive cyber security-related monitoring variables among the proprietary operating information about the I and C systems. Tests for the development and application of these monitoring systems may cause adverse effects on the I and C systems. To analyze influences on the system and safely intended variables, the construction of an I and C system Test-bed should be preceded. This article proposes a method of deriving variables that should be monitored through a monitoring system for cyber security as a part of I and C Test-bed. The surveillance features and the monitored variables of NMS(Network Management System), a monitoring technique in the IT field, were reviewed in section 2. In Section 3, the monitoring variables for an I and C cyber security were derived by the of NMS and the investigation for information used for hacking techniques that can be practiced against I and C systems. The monitoring variables of NMS in the IT field and the information about the malicious behaviors used for hacking were derived as expected variables to be monitored for an I and C cyber security research. The derived monitoring variables were classified into the five functions of NMS for efficient management. For the cyber security of I and C systems, the vulnerabilities should be understood through a penetration test etc. and an assessment of influences on the actual system should be carried out. Thus, constructing a test-bed of I and C systems is necessary for the safety system in operation. In the future, it will be necessary to develop a logging and monitoring system for studies on the vulnerabilities of I and C systems with test-beds

  18. Recent Developments in the Design, Capabilities and Autonomous Operations of a Lightweight Surface Manipulation System and Test-bed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorsey, John T.; Jones, Thomas C.; Doggett, W. R.; Brady, Jeffrey S.; Berry, Felecia C.; Ganoe, George G.; Anderson, Eric; King, Bruce D.; Mercer, David C.

    2011-01-01

    The first generation of a versatile high performance device for performing payload handling and assembly operations on planetary surfaces, the Lightweight Surface Manipulation System (LSMS), has been designed and built. Over the course of its development, conventional crane type payload handling configurations and operations have been successfully demonstrated and the range of motion, types of operations and the versatility greatly expanded. This enhanced set of 1st generation LSMS hardware is now serving as a laboratory test-bed allowing the continuing development of end effectors, operational techniques and remotely controlled and automated operations. This paper describes the most recent LSMS and test-bed development activities, that have focused on two major efforts. The first effort was to complete a preliminary design of the 2nd generation LSMS that has the capability for limited mobility and can reposition itself between lander decks, mobility chassis, and fixed base locations. A major portion of this effort involved conducting a study to establish the feasibility of, and define, the specifications for a lightweight cable-drive waist joint. The second effort was to continue expanding the versatility and autonomy of large planetary surface manipulators using the 1st generation LSMS as a test-bed. This has been accomplished by increasing manipulator capabilities and efficiencies through both design changes and tool and end effector development. A software development effort has expanded the operational capabilities of the LSMS test-bed to include; autonomous operations based on stored paths, use of a vision system for target acquisition and tracking, and remote command and control over a communications bridge.

  19. A Method to Derive Monitoring Variables for a Cyber Security Test-bed of I and C System

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Han, Kyung Soo; Song, Jae Gu; Lee, Joung Woon; Lee, Cheol Kwon [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2013-10-15

    In the IT field, monitoring techniques have been developed to protect the systems connected by networks from cyber attacks and incidents. For the development of monitoring systems for I and C cyber security, it is necessary to review the monitoring systems in the IT field and derive cyber security-related monitoring variables among the proprietary operating information about the I and C systems. Tests for the development and application of these monitoring systems may cause adverse effects on the I and C systems. To analyze influences on the system and safely intended variables, the construction of an I and C system Test-bed should be preceded. This article proposes a method of deriving variables that should be monitored through a monitoring system for cyber security as a part of I and C Test-bed. The surveillance features and the monitored variables of NMS(Network Management System), a monitoring technique in the IT field, were reviewed in section 2. In Section 3, the monitoring variables for an I and C cyber security were derived by the of NMS and the investigation for information used for hacking techniques that can be practiced against I and C systems. The monitoring variables of NMS in the IT field and the information about the malicious behaviors used for hacking were derived as expected variables to be monitored for an I and C cyber security research. The derived monitoring variables were classified into the five functions of NMS for efficient management. For the cyber security of I and C systems, the vulnerabilities should be understood through a penetration test etc. and an assessment of influences on the actual system should be carried out. Thus, constructing a test-bed of I and C systems is necessary for the safety system in operation. In the future, it will be necessary to develop a logging and monitoring system for studies on the vulnerabilities of I and C systems with test-beds.

  20. Real-Time Signal Processing for Multiantenna Systems: Algorithms, Optimization, and Implementation on an Experimental Test-Bed

    OpenAIRE

    Haustein Thomas; Forck Andreas; Gäbler Holger; Jungnickel Volker; Schiffermüller Stefan

    2006-01-01

    A recently realized concept of a reconfigurable hardware test-bed suitable for real-time mobile communication with multiple antennas is presented in this paper. We discuss the reasons and prerequisites for real-time capable MIMO transmission systems which may allow channel adaptive transmission to increase link stability and data throughput. We describe a concept of an efficient implementation of MIMO signal processing using FPGAs and DSPs. We focus on some basic linear and nonlinear MIMO de...

  1. As-prepared MoS2 quantum dot as a facile fluorescent probe for long-term tracing of live cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai; Zhang, Yue; Xia, Zhining; Wei, Weili

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the newly emerged two-dimensional nanomaterials, layered transition metal dichalcogenide (e.g. MoS2) nanosheets, have drawn tremendous attentions due to their extraordinary electronic and optical properties, and MoS2 quantum dots (MoS2 QDs) with lateral sizes less than 10 nm have been found to be highly luminescent. In the present study, a facile approach for large-scale preparation of MoS2 QDs by Na intercalation reaction without using any toxic organic reagents is proposed. MoS2 QDs were carefully characterized by various techniques including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, spectroscopy, in vitro cytotoxicology, and capillary electrophoresis. The as-prepared MoS2 QDs were strongly fluorescent, highly photo-stable, low in cytotoxicity, and readily reactive to thiols. These inherent properties of MoS2 QDs make them excellent fluorescent probes for long-term live cell tracing. The results of live cells imaging indicated that MoS2 QD stained cells remained highly fluorescent after long-term culture, and could be easily traced from other co-cultured cell lines.

  2. As-prepared MoS2 quantum dot as a facile fluorescent probe for long-term tracing of live cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Kai; Zhang, Yue; Xia, Zhining; Wei, Weili

    2016-07-01

    Recently, the newly emerged two-dimensional nanomaterials, layered transition metal dichalcogenide (e.g. MoS2) nanosheets, have drawn tremendous attentions due to their extraordinary electronic and optical properties, and MoS2 quantum dots (MoS2 QDs) with lateral sizes less than 10 nm have been found to be highly luminescent. In the present study, a facile approach for large-scale preparation of MoS2 QDs by Na intercalation reaction without using any toxic organic reagents is proposed. MoS2 QDs were carefully characterized by various techniques including transmission electron microscopy, atomic force microscopy, dynamic light scattering, spectroscopy, in vitro cytotoxicology, and capillary electrophoresis. The as-prepared MoS2 QDs were strongly fluorescent, highly photo-stable, low in cytotoxicity, and readily reactive to thiols. These inherent properties of MoS2 QDs make them excellent fluorescent probes for long-term live cell tracing. The results of live cells imaging indicated that MoS2 QD stained cells remained highly fluorescent after long-term culture, and could be easily traced from other co-cultured cell lines. PMID:27242334

  3. An interactive visual testbed system for dimension reduction and clustering of large-scale high-dimensional data

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choo, Jaegul; Lee, Hanseung; Liu, Zhicheng; Stasko, John; Park, Haesun

    2013-01-01

    Many of the modern data sets such as text and image data can be represented in high-dimensional vector spaces and have benefited from computational methods that utilize advanced computational methods. Visual analytics approaches have contributed greatly to data understanding and analysis due to their capability of leveraging humans' ability for quick visual perception. However, visual analytics targeting large-scale data such as text and image data has been challenging due to the limited screen space in terms of both the numbers of data points and features to represent. Among various computational methods supporting visual analytics, dimension reduction and clustering have played essential roles by reducing these numbers in an intelligent way to visually manageable sizes. Given numerous dimension reduction and clustering methods available, however, the decision on the choice of algorithms and their parameters becomes difficult. In this paper, we present an interactive visual testbed system for dimension reduction and clustering in a large-scale high-dimensional data analysis. The testbed system enables users to apply various dimension reduction and clustering methods with different settings, visually compare the results from different algorithmic methods to obtain rich knowledge for the data and tasks at hand, and eventually choose the most appropriate path for a collection of algorithms and parameters. Using various data sets such as documents, images, and others that are already encoded in vectors, we demonstrate how the testbed system can support these tasks.

  4. Real-Time Emulation of Heterogeneous Wireless Networks with End-to-Edge Quality of Service Guarantees: The AROMA Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Umbert

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available This work presents and describes the real-time testbed for all-IP Beyond 3G (B3G heterogeneous wireless networks that has been developed in the framework of the European IST AROMA project. The main objective of the AROMA testbed is to provide a highly accurate and realistic framework where the performance of algorithms, policies, protocols, services, and applications for a complete heterogeneous wireless network can be fully assessed and evaluated before bringing them to a real system. The complexity of the interaction between all-IP B3G systems and user applications, while dealing with the Quality of Service (QoS concept, motivates the development of this kind of emulation platform where different solutions can be tested in realistic conditions that could not be achieved by means of simple offline simulations. This work provides an in-depth description of the AROMA testbed, emphasizing many interesting implementation details and lessons learned during the development of the tool that may result helpful to other researchers and system engineers in the development of similar emulation platforms. Several case studies are also presented in order to illustrate the full potential and capabilities of the presented emulation platform.

  5. International symposium on seismic evaluation of existing nuclear facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Below are summarized the works of Mrs N. Orbovic and M. Bouchon; B. Stojadinovic, N. Orbovic, M.Bouchon and J.T. Wiley; M. Bouchon, N. Orbovic and B. Foure; T. Gelain, F. Gensdarmes, R. Sestier-Carlin, J. Vendel and M. Bouchon dealing respectively with: 1) seismic assessment of existing nuclear facility: a case study position of the IRSN 2) static and dynamic evaluation of an existing nuclear facility reinforced concrete frame structure 3) experimental study of cracking of low-rise reinforced concrete shear walls 4) aeraulics study of crack networks on low-rise reinforced concrete walls subject to static cycling loading. The summaries are followed: 1) The Institute for Radioprotection and Nuclear Safety (IRSN) has the task of evaluating the seismic safety of existing building inventory in French nuclear facilities. Some of the existing structures are reinforced concrete frame buildings with masonry or reinforced concrete in-fill walls built during the 1960's, 70's and 80's following different building codes and seismic input data applicable at the time of construction. The studied building is a laboratory that was built in 1962. The building is composed of three different and independent blocks. The structure is a reinforced concrete frame with masonry in-fills and few stiff concrete elements. Moreover, the building contains an independent massive concrete cell. Structurally, the building has a number of irregularities. From the detailing standpoint, well known deficiencies of low-ductile reinforced concrete structures are evident especially, a lack of transverse reinforcement in the structural joints of the frame. A number of sensitivity studies were conducted using 2D and 3D linear models to evaluate seismic demand. Ambient vibration and regional earthquake records were used to check the soil nature and the existence or not of a possible site effect around the installation as well as to characterize the dynamic behavior of the building. 3D models revealed a

  6. Mammography Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Department of Health & Human Services — The Mammography Facility Database is updated periodically based on information received from the four FDA-approved accreditation bodies: the American College of...

  7. Health Facilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Health facilities are places that provide health care. They include hospitals, clinics, outpatient care centers, and specialized care centers, such as birthing centers and psychiatric care centers. When you ...

  8. Canyon Facilities

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — B Plant, T Plant, U Plant, PUREX, and REDOX (see their links) are the five facilities at Hanford where the original objective was plutonium removal from the uranium...

  9. A boundary-layer cloud study using Southern Great Plains Cloud and radiation testbed (CART) data

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Albrecht, B.; Mace, G.; Dong, X.; Syrett, W. [Pennsylvania State Univ., University Park, PA (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Boundary layer clouds-stratus and fairweather cumulus - are closely coupled involves the radiative impact of the clouds on the surface energy budget and the strong dependence of cloud formation and maintenance on the turbulent fluxes of heat and moisture in the boundary layer. The continuous data collection at the Southern Great Plains (SGP) Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site provides a unique opportunity to study components of the coupling processes associated with boundary layer clouds and to provide descriptions of cloud and boundary layer structure that can be used to test parameterizations used in climate models. But before the CART data can be used for process studies and parameterization testing, it is necessary to evaluate and validate data and to develop techniques for effectively combining the data to provide meaningful descriptions of cloud and boundary layer characteristics. In this study we use measurements made during an intensive observing period we consider a case where low-level stratus were observed at the site for about 18 hours. This case is being used to examine the temporal evolution of cloud base, cloud top, cloud liquid water content, surface radiative fluxes, and boundary layer structure. A method for inferring cloud microphysics from these parameters is currently being evaluated.

  10. The CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT): Where Climate Simulation Meets Weather Prediction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phillips, T J; Potter, G L; Williamson, D L; Cederwall, R T; Boyle, J S; Fiorino, M; Hnilo, J J; Olson, J G; Xie, S; Yio, J J

    2003-11-21

    To significantly improve the simulation of climate by general circulation models (GCMs), systematic errors in representations of relevant processes must first be identified, and then reduced. This endeavor demands, in particular, that the GCM parameterizations of unresolved processes should be tested over a wide range of time scales, not just in climate simulations. Thus, a numerical weather prediction (NWP) methodology for evaluating model parameterizations and gaining insights into their behavior may prove useful, provied that suitable adaptations are made for implementation in climate GCMs. This method entails the generation of short-range weather forecasts by realistically initialized climate GCM, and the application of six-hourly NWP analyses and observations of parameterized variables to evaluate these forecasts. The behavior of the parameterizations in such a weather-forecasting framework can provide insights on how these schemes might be improved, and modified parameterizations then can be similarly tested. In order to further this method for evaluating and analyzing parameterizations in climate GCMs, the USDOE is funding a joint venture of its Climate Change Prediction Program (CCPP) and Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program: the CCPP-ARM Parameterization Testbed (CAPT). This article elaborates the scientific rationale for CAPT, discusses technical aspects of its methodology, and presents examples of its implementation in a representative climate GCM. Numerical weather prediction methods show promise for improving parameterizations in climate GCMs.

  11. Post-processing images from the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmerman, Neil T.; Ygouf, Marie; Pueyo, Laurent; Soummer, Remi; Perrin, Marshall D.; Mennesson, Bertrand; Cady, Eric; Mejia Prada, Camilo

    2016-01-01

    The concept for the exoplanet imaging instrument on WFIRST-AFTA relies on the development of mission-specific data processing tools to reduce the speckle noise floor. No instruments have yet functioned on the sky in the planet-to-star contrast regime of the proposed coronagraph (1E-8). Therefore, starlight subtraction algorithms must be tested on a combination of simulated and laboratory data sets to give confidence that the scientific goals can be reached. The High Contrast Imaging Testbed (HCIT) at Jet Propulsion Lab has carried out several technology demonstrations for the instrument concept, demonstrating 1E-8 raw (absolute) contrast. Here, we have applied a mock reference differential imaging strategy to HCIT data sets, treating one subset of images as a reference star observation and another subset as a science target observation. We show that algorithms like KLIP (Karhunen-Loève Image Projection), by suppressing residual speckles, enable the recovery of exoplanet signals at contrast of order 2E-9.

  12. Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed: VME-based DSP board market survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingram, Rick E.

    1992-04-01

    The Adaptive Signal Processing Testbed (ASPT) is a real-time multiprocessor system utilizing digital signal processor technology on VMEbus based printed circuit boards installed on a Sun workstation. The ASPT has specific requirements, particularly as regards to the signal excision application, with respect to interfacing with current and planned data generation equipment, processing of the data, storage to disk of final and intermediate results, and the development tools for applications development and integration into the overall EW/COM computing environment. A prototype ASPT was implemented using three VME-C-30 boards from Applied Silicon. Experience gained during the prototype development led to the conclusions that interprocessor communications capability is the most significant contributor to overall ASPT performance. In addition, the host involvement should be minimized. Boards using different processors were evaluated with respect to the ASPT system requirements, pricing, and availability. Specific recommendations based on various priorities are made as well as recommendations concerning the integration and interaction of various tools developed during the prototype implementation.

  13. A Rural Next Generation Network (R-NGN and Its Testbed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armein Z. R. Langi

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Rural Next Generation Networks (R-NGN technology allows Internet protocol (IP based systems to be used in rural areas. This paper reports a testbed of R-NGN that uses low cost Ethernet radio links, combined with media gateways and a softswitch. The network consists of point-to-point IP Ethernet 2.4 GHz wireless link, IP switches and gateways in each community, standard copper wires and telephone sets for users. It uses low power consumption, and suitable for low density users. This combination allows low cost systems as well as multiservices (voice, data, and multimedia for rural communications. An infrastructure has been deployed in two communities in Cipicung Girang, a village 10 km outside Bandung city, Indonesia. Two towers link the communities with a network of Institut Teknologi Bandung (ITB campus. In addition, local wirelines connect community houses to the network. Currently there are four houses connected to each community node (for a total of eight house, upon which we can perform various tests and measurements.

  14. A Principled Kernel Testbed for Hardware/Software Co-Design Research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaiser, Alex; Williams, Samuel; Madduri, Kamesh; Ibrahim, Khaled; Bailey, David; Demmel, James; Strohmaier, Erich

    2010-04-01

    Recently, advances in processor architecture have become the driving force for new programming models in the computing industry, as ever newer multicore processor designs with increasing number of cores are introduced on schedules regimented by marketing demands. As a result, collaborative parallel (rather than simply concurrent) implementations of important applications, programming languages, models, and even algorithms have been forced to adapt to these architectures to exploit the available raw performance. We believe that this optimization regime is flawed. In this paper, we present an alternate approach that, rather than starting with an existing hardware/software solution laced with hidden assumptions, defines the computational problems of interest and invites architects, researchers and programmers to implement novel hardware/software co-designed solutions. Our work builds on the previous ideas of computational dwarfs, motifs, and parallel patterns by selecting a representative set of essential problems for which we provide: An algorithmic description; scalable problem definition; illustrative reference implementations; verification schemes. This testbed will enable comparative research in areas such as parallel programming models, languages, auto-tuning, and hardware/software codesign. For simplicity, we focus initially on the computational problems of interest to the scientific computing community but proclaim the methodology (and perhaps a subset of the problems) as applicable to other communities. We intend to broaden the coverage of this problem space through stronger community involvement.

  15. Design and Validation of a Software Defined Radio Testbed for DVB-T Transmission

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Baruffa

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper describes the design and validation of a Software Defined Radio (SDR testbed, which can be used for Digital Television transmission using the Digital Video Broadcasting - Terrestrial (DVB-T standard. In order to generate a DVB-T-compliant signal with low computational complexity, we design an SDR architecture that uses the C/C++ language and exploits multithreading and vectorized instructions. Then, we transmit the generated DVB-T signal in real time, using a common PC equipped with multicore central processing units (CPUs and a commercially available SDR modem board. The proposed SDR architecture has been validated using fixed TV sets, and portable receivers. Our results show that the proposed SDR architecture for DVB-T transmission is a low-cost low-complexity solution that, in the worst case, only requires less than 22% of CPU load and less than 170 MB of memory usage, on a 3.0 GHz Core i7 processor. In addition, using the same SDR modem board, we design an off-line software receiver that also performs time synchronization and carrier frequency offset estimation and compensation.

  16. Computer graphics testbed to simulate and test vision systems for space applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheatham, John B.; Wu, Chris K.; Lin, Y. H.

    1991-01-01

    A system was developed for displaying computer graphics images of space objects and the use of the system was demonstrated as a testbed for evaluating vision systems for space applications. In order to evaluate vision systems, it is desirable to be able to control all factors involved in creating the images used for processing by the vision system. Considerable time and expense is involved in building accurate physical models of space objects. Also, precise location of the model relative to the viewer and accurate location of the light source require additional effort. As part of this project, graphics models of space objects such as the Solarmax satellite are created that the user can control the light direction and the relative position of the object and the viewer. The work is also aimed at providing control of hue, shading, noise and shadows for use in demonstrating and testing imaging processing techniques. The simulated camera data can provide XYZ coordinates, pitch, yaw, and roll for the models. A physical model is also being used to provide comparison of camera images with the graphics images.

  17. Introduction to special section on The U.S. IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luettich, Richard A.; Wright, L. Donelson; Signell, Richard; Friedrichs, Carl; Friedrichs, Marjy; Harding, John; Fennel, Katja; Howlett, Eoin; Graves, Sara; Smith, Elizabeth; Crane, Gary; Baltes, Rebecca

    2013-12-01

    Strong and strategic collaborations among experts from academia, federal operational centers, and industry have been forged to create a U.S. IOOS Coastal and Ocean Modeling Testbed (COMT). The COMT mission is to accelerate the transition of scientific and technical advances from the coastal and ocean modeling research community to improved operational ocean products and services. This is achieved via the evaluation of existing technology or the development of new technology depending on the status of technology within the research community. The initial phase of the COMT has addressed three coastal and ocean prediction challenges of great societal importance: estuarine hypoxia, shelf hypoxia, and coastal inundation. A fourth effort concentrated on providing and refining the cyberinfrastructure and cyber tools to support the modeling work and to advance interoperability and community access to the COMT archive. This paper presents an overview of the initiation of the COMT, the findings of each team and a discussion of the role of the COMT in research to operations and its interface with the coastal and ocean modeling community in general. Detailed technical results are presented in the accompanying series of 16 technical papers in this special issue.

  18. Range resolution improvement of eyesafe ladar testbed (ELT) measurements using sparse signal deconvolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budge, Scott E.; Gunther, Jacob H.

    2014-06-01

    The Eyesafe Ladar Test-bed (ELT) is an experimental ladar system with the capability of digitizing return laser pulse waveforms at 2 GHz. These waveforms can then be exploited off-line in the laboratory to develop signal processing techniques for noise reduction, range resolution improvement, and range discrimination between two surfaces of similar range interrogated by a single laser pulse. This paper presents the results of experiments with new deconvolution algorithms with the hoped-for gains of improving the range discrimination of the ladar system. The sparsity of ladar returns is exploited to solve the deconvolution problem in two steps. The first step is to estimate a point target response using a database of measured calibration data. This basic target response is used to construct a dictionary of target responses with different delays/ranges. Using this dictionary ladar returns from a wide variety of surface configurations can be synthesized by taking linear combinations. A sparse linear combination matches the physical reality that ladar returns consist of the overlapping of only a few pulses. The dictionary construction process is a pre-processing step that is performed only once. The deconvolution step is performed by minimizing the error between the measured ladar return and the dictionary model while constraining the coefficient vector to be sparse. Other constraints such as the non-negativity of the coefficients are also applied. The results of the proposed technique are presented in the paper and are shown to compare favorably with previously investigated deconvolution techniques.

  19. Demonstration of the Wide-Field Imaging Interferometer Testbed Using a Calibrated Hyperspectral Image Projector

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolcar, Matthew R.; Leisawitz, David; Maher, Steve; Rinehart, Stephen

    2012-01-01

    The Wide-field Imaging Interferometer testbed (WIIT) at NASA's Goddard Space Flight Center uses a dual-Michelson interferometric technique. The WIIT combines stellar interferometry with Fourier-transform interferometry to produce high-resolution spatial-spectral data over a large field-of-view. This combined technique could be employed on future NASA missions such as the Space Infrared Interferometric Telescope (SPIRIT) and the Sub-millimeter Probe of the Evolution of Cosmic Structure (SPECS). While both SPIRIT and SPECS would operate at far-infrared wavelengths, the WIIT demonstrates the dual-interferometry technique at visible wavelengths. The WIIT will produce hyperspectral image data, so a true hyperspectral object is necessary. A calibrated hyperspectral image projector (CHIP) has been constructed to provide such an object. The CHIP uses Digital Light Processing (DLP) technology to produce customized, spectrally-diverse scenes. CHIP scenes will have approximately 1.6-micron spatial resolution and the capability of . producing arbitrary spectra in the band between 380 nm and 1.6 microns, with approximately 5-nm spectral resolution. Each pixel in the scene can take on a unique spectrum. Spectral calibration is achieved with an onboard fiber-coupled spectrometer. In this paper we describe the operation of the CHIP. Results from the WIIT observations of CHIP scenes will also be presented.

  20. Evaluation of Five Control Algorithms for Addressing CMG Induced Jitter on a Spacecraft Testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Edwin S.; Longman, Richard W.; Kim, Jae J.; Agrawal, Brij N.

    2013-12-01

    Spacecraft often experience jitter from reaction wheels, control moment gyros (CMGs), or from motion of other internal parts. One may isolate fine pointing equipment by passive techniques, but active vibration control employing knowledge of the periodic nature of jitter can improve performance. Previous work by the authors and co-workers tested active isolation using a 6 degree-of-freedom Stewart platform. A new class of applications is laser communication relay satellites, which replaces radio frequencies communication by laser communications. Laser beam jitter can be corrected by control of tip and tilt in fast steering mirrors. This paper develops experiments testing five candidate jitter cancellation algorithms on the Bifocal Relay Mirror Spacecraft, Three Axis Simulator 2 testbed at the Naval Postgraduate School. Jitter results from the CMGs. Multiple period repetitive control (MPRC) and matched basis function repetitive control (MBFRC) are tested. Both use disturbance period information from Hall effect sensors for the CMG three phase brushless DC motors. Filtered-X LMS, adaptive linear model predictive control, and the Clear Box algorithm with Adaptive Basis Method are also tested. The best disturbance rejection resulted from the last of these choices, with a 66 % overall amplitude reduction. Concerning MPRC it was discovered that repeating an addressed period can be used as a technique to decrease sensitivity to accurate knowledge of the disturbance period.

  1. Backward air mass trajectory analysis for the first cloud and radiation testbed site at Lamont, Oklahoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The size distribution and composition of aerosols measured at a specific location depend on the origin and the trajectory of the air mass passing over it. Backward air mass trajectory analysis can be used to (1) identify the characteristics of an air mass and (2) help to determine which aerosol model should be used in LOWTRAN 7 for radiation calculations. Examining the trajectory is not sufficient to characterize the aerosol composition of the air mass at the site. Additional analyses must be performed along the trajectory to understand how the original air mass has or has not been modified. Height analyses, precipitation events, the vertical temperature structure of the atmosphere, and the relative humidity field, as well as other physical parameters, are important for classifying an air mass after it has traveled for a few days. The primary objective of this research is to characterize a climatology of air masses that pass over the Atmospheric Radiation Measurement (ARM) Program's Cloud and Radiation Testbed (CART) site at Lamont, Oklahoma. A three-dimensional air mass trajectory model and a method of analysis were developed at the Environmental Measurements Laboratory (EML). The classification of the air mass types (rural, marine, urban or desert) is used to decide which aerosol model is appropriate for calculations in a radiation model, such as LOWTRAN 7

  2. PAPI based federation as a test-bed for a common security infrastructure in EFDA sites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Federated authentication and authorization systems provide several advantages to collaborative environments, for example, easy authentication integration, simpler user management, easier security policy implementation and quicker implementation of access control elements for new type of resources. A federation integrates different aspects that have to be coordinated by all the organizations involved. The most relevant are: definition of common schemas and attributes, definition of common policies and procedures, management of keys and certificates, management of common repositories and implementation of a home location service. A federation enabling collaboration of European sites has been put into operation. Four laboratories have been integrated and two more organizations (EFDA and KFKI/HAS) are finishing their integration. The federation infrastructure is based on Point of Access to Providers of Information (PAPI), a distributed authentication and authorization system. PAPI technology gives some important features, such as, single sign on for accessing to different resources, mobility for users, and compatibility with open and standard technologies: Java, JNLP protocol, XML-RPC and web technologies among others. In this article, the test-bed of EFDA federation is presented. Some examples of resources, securely shared inside the federation, are shown. Specific issues and experience gained in deploying federated collaboration systems will be addressed as well

  3. Results from the CDE phase activity on neutron dosimetry for the international fusion materials irradiation facility test cell

    CERN Document Server

    Esposito, B; Maruccia, G; Petrizzi, L; Bignon, G; Blandin, C; Chauffriat, S; Lebrun, A; Recroix, H; Trapp, J P; Kaschuck, Y

    2000-01-01

    The international fusion materials irradiation facility (IFMIF) project deals with the study of an accelerator-based, deuterium-lithium source, producing high energy neutrons at sufficient intensity and irradiation volume to test samples of candidate materials for fusion energy reactors. IFMIF would also provide calibration and validation of data from fission reactor and other accelerator based irradiation tests. This paper describes the activity on neutron/gamma dosimetry (necessary for the characterization of the specimens' irradiation) performed in the frame of the IFMIF conceptual design evaluation (CDE) neutronics tasks. During the previous phase (conceptual design activity (CDA)) the multifoil activation method was proposed for the measurement of the neutron fluence and spectrum and a set of suitable foils was defined. The cross section variances and covariances of this set of foils have now been used for tests on the sensitivity of the IFMIF neutron spectrum determination to cross section uncertainties...

  4. Green fabrication of composite cathode with attractive performance for solid oxide fuel cells through facile inkjet printing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Chao; Chen, Huili; Shi, Huangang; Tade, Moses O.; Shao, Zongping

    2015-01-01

    The inkjet printing technique has numerous advantages and is attractive in solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) fabrication, especially for the dense thin electrolyte layer because of its ultrafine powder size. In this study, we exploited the technique for the fabrication of a porous SDC/SSC composite cathode layer using environmentally friendly water-based ink. An optimized powder synthesis method was applied to the preparation of the well-dispersed suspension. In view of the easy sintering of the thin film layer prepared by inkjet printing, 10 wt.% pore former was introduced to the ink. The results indicate that the cell with the inkjet printing cathode layer exhibits a fantastic electrochemical performance, with a PPD as high as 940 mW cm-2 at 750 °C, which is comparable to that of a cell prepared using the conventional wet powder spraying method, suggesting a promising application of inkjet printing on electrode layer fabrication.

  5. Facile internalization of paclitaxel on titania nanoparticles in human lung carcinoma cells after adsorption of serum proteins

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Ji Hye; Dembereldorj, Uuriintuya; Park, Jin; Kim, Mira; Kim, Semi; Joo, Sang-Woo, E-mail: sjoo@ssu.ac.kr [Soongsil University, Department of Chemistry (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-15

    The enhanced damage of human carcinoma cells was achieved using paclitaxel (PTX)-assembled TiO{sub 2} nanoparticles (NPs). The crystalline structures and light absorption properties of the TiO{sub 2} NPs were examined by X-ray diffraction patterns and ultraviolet-visible absorption spectroscopic tools. The fabrication of PTX and serum proteins on TiO{sub 2} NPs via self-assembly was checked by diffuse reflectance infrared Fourier transform spectroscopy and dynamic light scattering measurements. The PTX-coated TiO{sub 2} NPs appeared to be well adsorbed by serum proteins. The PTX-coated TiO{sub 2} NPs were found to be well internalized in cancer cells as indicated by transmission electron microscopy. The intracellular aggregation of PTX-coated TiO{sub 2} NPs was assumed to occur after endocytosis leading to an entrapment of NPs in an endosomal or a lysosomal structure. Human lung carcinoma A549 cancer cells were chosen to examine their viability after the cellular uptake of the PTX-coated TiO{sub 2} NPs. A 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide cell viability assay test indicated that the cell viability should be affected by the concentration of TiO{sub 2} NPs. After applying PTX-coated TiO{sub 2} NPs (50 ppm ({mu}g/mL)) incubating for 24 h, we observed a 30 % further decrease of cell viability for PTX alone in the low concentration range of 0.1-10 nM.Graphical Abstract.

  6. Glycerol-regulated facile synthesis and targeted cell imaging of highly luminescent Ag2Te quantum dots with tunable near-infrared emission.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Hui; Gui, Rijun; Sun, Jie; Wang, Yanfeng

    2016-07-01

    In this work, highly luminescent and emission tunable Ag2Te quantum dots (QDs) were facilely prepared by using water-dispersed glycerol as viscous solvent and CH3COOAg/Na2TeO3 as Ag/Te precursors. Viscous glycerol was utilized to slow the nucleation and growth of QDs at 200°C, and enabled the isolation of QDs with different emission wavelengths. Experimental results revealed that the as-prepared Ag2Te QDs exhibited tunable near-infrared emission from 930 to 1084nm, high photoluminescence (PL) quantum yields (QYs, more than 20%), good photostability and low cytotoxicity. After surface coating of a thin silica shell (∼1.4nm), the resulting NH2 terminated Ag2Te@SiO2-NH2 displayed enhanced PL QYs, higher photostability and biocompatibility when compared with the original Ag2Te QDs. Through a facile carboxy-amine coupling, folic acid (FA) was grafted with Ag2Te@SiO2-NH2 to form Ag2Te@SiO2-FA nanocomposites, which were used for targeted PL imaging of folate receptor over-expressed tumor cells. PMID:26998873

  7. Power Systems Development Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of the PSDF would be to provide a modular facility which would support the development of advanced, pilot-scale, coal-based power systems and hot gas clean-up components. These pilot-scale components would be designed to be large enough so that the results can be related and projected to commercial systems. The facility would use a modular approach to enhance the flexibility and capability for testing; consequently, overall capital and operating costs when compared with stand-alone facilities would be reduced by sharing resources common to different modules. The facility would identify and resolve technical barrier, as well as-provide a structure for long-term testing and performance assessment. It is also intended that the facility would evaluate the operational and performance characteristics of the advanced power systems with both bituminous and subbituminous coals. Five technology-based experimental modules are proposed for the PSDF: (1) an advanced gasifier module, (2) a fuel cell test module, (3) a PFBC module, (4) a combustion gas turbine module, and (5) a module comprised of five hot gas cleanup particulate control devices. The final module, the PCD, would capture coal-derived ash and particles from both the PFBC and advanced gasifier gas streams to provide for overall particulate emission control, as well as to protect the combustion turbine and the fuel cell

  8. Facile realization of efficient blocking from ZnO/TiO2 mismatch interface in dye-sensitized solar cells and precise microscopic modeling adapted by circuit analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ameri, Mohsen; Samavat, Feridoun; Mohajerani, Ezeddin; Fathollahi, Mohammad-Reza

    2016-06-01

    In the present research, the effect of \\text{ZnO} -based blocking layers on the operational features of \\text{Ti}{{\\text{O}}2} -based dye-sensitized solar cells is investigated. A facile solution-based coating method is applied to prepare an interfacial highly transparent \\text{ZnO} compact blocking layer (CBL) to enhance the efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells. Different precursor molar concentration were tested to find the optimum concentration. Optical and electrical measurements were carried out to confirm the operation of the CBLs. Morphological characterizations were performed by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM) to investigate the structure of the compact layers. We have also developed a set of modeling procedures to extract the effective electrical parameters including the parasitic resistances and charged carrier profiles to investigate the effect of CBLs on the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) performance. The adopted modeling approach should establish a versatile framework for diagnosis of DSSCs and facilitates the exploration of critical factors influencing device performance.

  9. Polymer Solar Cells with Efficiency >10% Enabled via a Facile Solution-Processed Al-Doped ZnO Electron Transporting Layer

    KAUST Repository

    Jagadamma, Lethy Krishnan

    2015-04-22

    A facile and low-temperature (125 °C) solution-processed Al-doped ZnO (AZO) buffer layer functioning very effectively as electron accepting/hole blocking layer for a wide range of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction systems, yielding power conversion efficiency in excess of 10% (8%) on glass (plastic) substrates is described. The ammonia-treatment of the aqueous AZO nanoparticle solution produces compact, crystalline, and smooth thin films, which retain the aluminum doping, and eliminates/reduces the native defects by nitrogen incorporation, making them good electron transporters and energetically matched with the fullerene acceptor. It is demonstrated that highly efficient solar cells can be achieved without the need for additional surface chemical modifications of the buffer layer, which is a common requirement for many metal oxide buffer layers to yield efficient solar cells. Also highly efficient solar cells are achieved with thick AZO films (>50 nm), highlighting the suitability of this material for roll-to-roll coating. Preliminary results on the applicability of AZO as electron injection layer in F8BT-based polymer light emitting diode are also presented. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Facile synthesis of porous CuS film as a high efficient counter electrode for quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yibing; Lin, Yu; Wu, Jihuai; Zhang, Xiaolong; Fang, Biaopeng

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, porous CuS film has been successfully prepared by a facile method and employed as a counter electrode (CE) in quantum-dot-sensitized solar cells (QDSSCs) for its highest catalytic activity. This CuS thin film was deposited on FTO substrate via spin coating process which is simple to operate, and its electrochemical properties were further studied by EIS and Tafel measurement. With the cycling time of depositing CuS up to 8, it displays high electrocatalytic activity toward polysulfide reduction, rationalizing the improved QDSSCs performance. Using the CdS/CdSe-sensitized QDSSCs, the cells exhibit improved short-circuit photocurrent density ( J sc) and fill factor (FF), achieving solar cell conversion efficiency ( η) as high as 5.60 % under AM 1.5 illumination of 100 mW cm-2. This work provides a novel and simple method for the preparation of CEs, which could be utilized in other metal sulfides CEs for QDSSCs.

  11. A facile, covalent modification of single-wall carbon nanotubes by thiophene for use in organic photovoltaic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stylianakis, Minas M.; Mikroyannidis, John A. [Chemical Technology Laboratory, Department of Chemistry, University of Patras, GR-26500, Patras (Greece); Kymakis, Emmanuel [Electrical Engineering Department, Technological Educational Institute (TEI) of Crete, School of Applied Technology, Estavromenos, PB 1939, Heraklion, GR-71004, Crete (Greece)

    2010-02-15

    Thiophene was nitrated to afford 2-nitrothiophene. The hydrogenation of the latter gave 2-aminothiophene that was used for amidation of single-wall carbon nanotubes functionalized with carboxylic acid groups (SWCNT-COOH). The modified carbon nanotubes (SWCNT-CONHTh) were fully characterized by FT-IR, {sup 1}H NMR, UV-vis absorption, photoluminescence (PL) emission, Raman spectroscopy, X-ray, and TGA. The properties of the modified nanotubes were compared with those of the pristine SWCNT, indicating that the thiophenes were covalently attached to the SWCNTs via amide linkages. The modified SWCNT showed enhanced solubility, and thus better dispersion in common organic solvents. Furthermore, the SWCNT-CONHTh was used as dopant in polymer-fullerene photovoltaic cells. The power conversion efficiency (1.78%) of the polymer-fullerene cell with the SWCNT-CONHTh was superior to both the pristine cell without nanotubes (1.00%) and the cell with the unmodified SWCNTs (1.41%). The device takes advantage of the electron accepting feature of fullerenes and the high electron transport capability of the SWCNTs. The enhancement of the photovoltaic response with the use of the SWCNTs modified by thiophene compared with the as-prepared SWCNTs is believed to be due to more efficient dispersion of the modified SWCNTs resulting in a more homogenous photoactive layer. (author)

  12. Electro-Mechanical Manipulator for Use in the Remote Equipment Decontamination Cell at the Defense Waste Processing Facility, Savannah River Site - 12454

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    One of the legacies of the cold war is millions of liters of radioactive waste. One of the locations where this waste is stored is at the Savannah River Site (SRS) in South Carolina. A major effort to clean up this waste is on-going at the defense waste processing facility (DWPF) at SRS. A piece of this effort is decontamination of the equipment used in the DWPF to process the waste. The remote equipment decontamination cell (REDC) in the DWPF uses electro-mechanical manipulators (EMM) arms manufactured and supplied by PaR Systems to decontaminate DWPF process equipment. The decontamination fluid creates a highly corrosive environment. After 25 years of operational use the original EMM arms are aging and need replacement. To support continued operation of the DWPF, two direct replacement EMM arms were delivered to the REDC in the summer of 2011. (authors)

  13. Facile and green approach to prepare fluorescent carbon dots: Emergent nanomaterial for cell imaging and detection of vitamin B2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kundu, Aniruddha; Nandi, Sudipta; Das, Pradip; Nandi, Arun K

    2016-04-15

    Carbon dots (CDs) are a new representative in carbonaceous family and have initiated remarkable research interests over the past one decade in a large variety of fields. Herein, we have utilized a facile, one-step carbonization method to prepare fluorescent carbon dots using poly(vinyl alcohol) (PVA) both as a carbon source and as a surface passivating agent. The as prepared CDs emit bright blue fluorescence under ultraviolet illumination. The structure and optical properties of the CDs are thoroughly investigated by several methods such as high-resolution transmission electron microscopy; dynamic light scattering; UV-vis, fluorescence and Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy. The CDs exhibit excellent water solubility and demonstrate average hydrodynamic diameter of 11.3 nm, holding great promise for biological applications. The biocompatibility evaluation and in vitro imaging study reveals that the synthesized CDs can be used as effective fluorescent probes in bio-imaging without noticeable cytotoxicity. In addition, a unique sensor for the detection of vitamin B2 in aqueous solution is proposed on the basis of spontaneous fluorescence resonance energy transfer from CD to vitamin B2. These findings therefore suggest that the CDs can find potential applications in cellular imaging along with sensing of vitamin B2. PMID:26852351

  14. CubeSub - A CubeSat Based Submersible Testbed for Space Technology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slettebo, Christian

    2016-01-01

    This report is a Master's Thesis in Aerospace Engineering, performed at the NASA Ames Research Center. It describes the development of the CubeSub, a submersible testbed compatible with the CubeSat form factor. The CubeSub will be used to mature technology and operational procedures to be used in space exploration, and possibly also as a tool for exploration of Earthly environments. CubeSats are carried as payloads, either containing technology to be tested or experiments and sensors for scientific use. The CubeSub is designed to be built up by modules, which can be assembled in different configurations to fulfill different needs. Each module is powered individually and intermodular communication is wireless, reducing the need for wiring. The inside of the hull is flooded with ambient water to simplify the interaction between payloads and surrounding environment. The overall shape is similar to that of a conventional AUV, slender and smooth. This is to make for a low drag, reduce the risk of snagging on surrounding objects and make it possible to deploy through an ice sheet via a narrow borehole. Rapid prototyping is utilized to a large extent, with full-scale prototypes being constructed through 3D-printing and with COTS (Commercial Off-The-Shelf) components. Arduino boards are used for control and internal communication. Modules required for basic operation have been designed, manufactured and tested. Each module is described with regards to its function, design and manufacturability. By performing tests in a pool it was found that the basic concept is sound and that future improvements include better controllability, course stability and waterproofing of electrical components. Further development is needed to make the CubeSub usable for its intended purposes. The largest gains are expected to be found by developing the software and improving controllability.

  15. Broadband Performance of TPF's High-contrast Imaging Testbed: Modeling and Simulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidick, Erkin; Kuhnert, Andreas C.; Trauger, John T.

    2006-01-01

    The broadband performance of the high-contrast imaging testbed (HCIT) at JPL is investigated through optical modeling and simulations. The analytical tool is an optical simulation algorithm developed by combining the HCIT's optical model with a speckle-nulling algorithm that operates directly on coronagraphic images, an algorithm identical to the one currently being used on the HCIT to actively suppress scattered light via a deformable mirror. It is capable of performing full three-dimensional end-to-end near-field diffraction analysis on the HCIT's optical system. By conducting speckle-nulling optimization, we clarify the HCIT's capability and limitations in terms of its broadband contrast performance under various realistic conditions. Considered cases include non-ideal occulting masks, such as a mask with optical density and wavelength dependent parasitic phase-delay errors (i.e., a not band-limited occulting mask) and the one with an optical-density profile corresponding to a measured, non-standard profile, as well as the independently measured phase errors of all optics. Most of the information gathered on the HCIT's optical components through measurement and characterization over the last several years at JPL has been used in this analysis to make the predictions as accurate as possible. The best contrast values predicted so far by our simulations obtainable on the HCIT illuminated with a broadband light having a bandwidth of 80nm and centered at 800nm wavelength are Cm=1.1x10-8 (mean) and C4=4.9x10-8 (at 4(lamda)/D), respectively. In this paper we report our preliminary findings about the broadband light performance of the HCIT.

  16. Photovoltaic Shading Testbed for Module-Level Power Electronics: 2014 Update

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Deline, C.; Meydbray, J.; Donovan, M.

    2014-08-01

    The 2012 NREL report 'Photovoltaic Shading Testbed for Module-Level Power Electronics' provides a standard methodology for estimating the performance benefit of distributed power electronics under partial shading conditions. Since the release of the report, experiments have been conducted for a number of products and for different system configurations. Drawing from these experiences, updates to the test and analysis methods are recommended. Proposed changes in data processing have the benefit of reducing the sensitivity to measurement errors and weather variability, as well as bringing the updated performance score in line with measured and simulated values of the shade recovery benefit of distributed PV power electronics. Also, due to the emergence of new technologies including sub-module embedded power electronics, the shading method has been extended to include power electronics that operate at a finer granularity than the module level. An update to the method is proposed to account for these emerging technologies that respond to shading differently than module-level devices. The partial shading test remains a repeatable test procedure that attempts to simulate shading situations as would be experienced by typical residential or commercial rooftop photovoltaic (PV) systems. Performance data for multiple products tested using this method are discussed, based on equipment from Enphase, Solar Edge, Maxim Integrated and SMA. In general, the annual recovery of shading losses from the module-level electronics evaluated is 25-35%, with the major difference between different trials being related to the number of parallel strings in the test installation rather than differences between the equipment tested.

  17. Route Optimization via RSSI APPs in Indoor Proxy Mobile IPv6 Test-bed

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nur Haliza Abdul Wahab

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Traditionally IP mobility support mechanisms, Mobile IPv4 or Mobile IPv6 are based on the host-based solution to keep on going sessions despite the movement. The current trend is towards networks-based solutions where mobility support is based on network operation. Proxy Mobile IPv6 (PMIPv6 has been developed by the Internet Engineering Task Force (IETF as a network-based mobility management protocol. The development is aimed to guarantee and support mobility for IP devices or called as Mobile Node (MN without the MN involving in any IP layer mobility related to signaling as stated in RFC5213. PMIPv6 in RFC5213 address the needed to enable Localized Routing (LR but it not specify a complete procedure to establish Route Optimization (RO. Data packets belong to MN need to travel to Local Mobility Anchor (LMA via bidirectional tunnel between Mobile Access Gateway (MAG and LMA. This result to long end to end delay. This un-optimized route result in increasing signaling data delay, huge handover latency, large transport cost and many more. Therefore, it important to optimized the data path so that the data destined to MN will be traverse using the shorter path or directly change traffic tunnel between MAG. As for this, the aims of this study are to reduce the handover latency and optimized data route by the illustration of development the PMIPv6 test-bed with implementation of RO via RSSI APPs. Several experiment will be discuss to see the performance of RO algorithm via RSSI APPs with non-optimized RO.

  18. Marina Facilities

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    The CIRPAS main facility and headquarters are at Marina Municipal Airport (formerly Fritchie Field, Fort Ord) in Marina, California. CIRPAS has a 30,000 sq. ft. maintenance hanger there, which houses staff offices, an instrument and calibration laboratory, maintenance and payload integration shops, conference rooms, and flight planning and operations control center.

  19. A facile fabrication of chemically converted graphene oxide thin films and their uses as absorber materials for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adelifard, Mehdi; Darudi, Hosein

    2016-07-01

    There is a great interest in the use of graphene sheets in thin film solar cells with low-cost and good-optoelectronic properties. Here, the production of absorbent conductive reduced graphene oxide (RGO) thin films was investigated. RGO thin films were prepared from spray-coated graphene oxide (GO) layers at various substrate temperature followed by a simple hydrazine-reducing method. The structural, morphological, optical, and electrical characterizations of graphene oxide (GO) and RGO thin films were investigated. X-ray diffraction analysis showed a phase shift from GO to RGO due to hydrazine treatment, in agreement with the FTIR spectra of the layers. FESEM images clearly exhibited continuous films resulting from the overlap of graphene nanosheets. The produced low-cost thin films had high absorption coefficient up to 1.0 × 105 cm-1, electrical resistance as low as 0.9 kΩ/sq, and effective optical band gap of about 1.50 eV, close to the optimum value for solar conversion. The conductive absorbent properties of the reduced graphene oxide thin films would be useful to develop photovoltaic cells.

  20. Facile synthesis of TiO2 hierarchical microspheres assembled by ultrathin nanosheets for dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: •TiO2 hierarchical spheres were prepared via one-pot solvothermal route. •TiO2 hierarchical spheres based DSSCs shows a conversion efficiency of 5.56%. •The performance of DSSC is dependence of the thickness of photoanode. -- Abstract: TiO2 hierarchical microspheres assembled by ultrathin nanosheets were prepared via solvothermal route for dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The performance of cells was investigated by diffuse and reflectance spectra, photocurrent–voltage measurement, incident-photon-to-current conversion efficiency and electrochemical impedance spectra. Photoanodes with different thickness of TiO2 hierarchical spheres were studied, which proves that the photoanode with thickness of 15.9 μm exhibits higher performance (short-circuit current density of 12.36 mA cm−2, open-circuit voltage of 0.73 mV, fill factor of 61.95, and conversion efficiency of 5.56%) than that of P25-based DSSC due to the excellent particle interconnections, low electron recombination and high specific surface area (78 m2 g−1)

  1. Facile Preparation of TiO2 Nanobranch/Nanoparticle Hybrid Architecture with Enhanced Light Harvesting Properties for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ju Seong Kim

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available We report TiO2 nanobranches/nanoparticles (NBN hybrid architectures that can be synthesized by a facile solution phase method. The hybrid architecture simultaneously improves light harvesting and charge collection performances for a dye-sensitized solar cell. First, TiO2 nanorods with a trunk length of 2 μm were grown on a fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO/glass substrate, and then nanobranches and nanoparticles were deposited on the nanorods’ trunks through a solution method using an aqueous TiCl3 solution at 80°C. The relative amount of nanobranches and nanoparticles can be controlled by multiplying the number of TiCl3 treatments to maximize the amount of surface area. We found that the resultant TiO2 NBN hybrid architecture greatly improves the amount of dye adsorption (five times compared to bare nanorods due to the enhanced surface area, while maintaining a fast charge collection, leading to a three times higher current density and thus tripling the maximum power conversion efficiency for a dye-sensitized solar cell.

  2. Polymer solar cells with efficiency >10% enabled via a facile solution-processed Al-doped ZnO electron transporting layer

    KAUST Repository

    Jagadamma, Lethy Krishnan

    2015-10-05

    The present work details a facile and low-temperature (125C) solution-processed Al-doped ZnO (AZO) buffer layer functioning very effectively as electron accepting/hole blocking layer for a wide range of polymer:fullerene bulk heterojunction systems, and yielding power conversion efficiency in excess of 10% (8%) on glass (plastic) substrates. We show that ammonia addition to the aqueous AZO nanoparticle solution is a critically important step toward producing compact and smooth thin films which partially retain the aluminum doping and crystalline order of the starting AZO nanocrystals. The ammonia treatment appears to reduce the native defects via nitrogen incorporation, making the AZO film a very good electron transporter and energetically matched with the fullerene acceptor. Importantly, highly efficient solar cells are achieved without the need for additional surface chemical passivation or modification, which has become an increasingly common route to improving the performance of evaporated or solution-processed ZnO ETLs in solar cells.

  3. Facile Synthesis of ZnO@TiO2 Core-Shell Nanorod Thin Films for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaoxu Ji

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available ZnO nanorod thin films grown on fluorine-doped tin oxide (FTO glasses have been synthesized via facile thermal evaporation. To optimize the performance of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs, we fabricated ZnO@TiO2 core-shell composite by a simple dip-coating method immersed in the mixed solution of Ti(OC4H9 and ethanol. Results of solar cell testing showed that ZnO@TiO2 core-shell nanorod thin films on FTO significantly increased open circuit voltage (from 0.47 V to 0.53 V, short circuit current (from 10.78 mA/cm2 to 13.98 mA/cm2, and fill factor (from 51% to 55%. The photoelectric conversion efficiency (PEC increased from 3.3% for bare ZnO DSSCs to 4.85% for ZnO@TiO2 core-shell structured DSSCs. This is mainly ascribed to the improvement in light harvesting efficiency, electron transfer, and the effective suppression of charge recombination.

  4. Facile and Scalable Fabrication of Highly Efficient Lead Iodide Perovskite Thin-Film Solar Cells in Air Using Gas Pump Method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, Bin; Gao, Lili; Liang, Lusheng; Chu, Qianqian; Song, Xiaoxuan; Li, Yan; Yang, Guanjun; Fan, Bin; Wang, Mingkui; Li, Chengxin; Li, Changjiu

    2016-08-10

    Control of the perovskite film formation process to produce high-quality organic-inorganic metal halide perovskite thin films with uniform morphology, high surface coverage, and minimum pinholes is of great importance to highly efficient solar cells. Herein, we report on large-area light-absorbing perovskite films fabrication with a new facile and scalable gas pump method. By decreasing the total pressure in the evaporation environment, the gas pump method can significantly enhance the solvent evaporation rate by 8 times faster and thereby produce an extremely dense, uniform, and full-coverage perovskite thin film. The resulting planar perovskite solar cells can achieve an impressive power conversion efficiency up to 19.00% with an average efficiency of 17.38 ± 0.70% for 32 devices with an area of 5 × 2 mm, 13.91% for devices with a large area up to 1.13 cm(2). The perovskite films can be easily fabricated in air conditions with a relative humidity of 45-55%, which definitely has a promising prospect in industrial application of large-area perovskite solar panels. PMID:27428311

  5. Full-Scaled Advanced Systems Testbed: Ensuring Success of Adaptive Control Research Through Project Lifecycle Risk Mitigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pavlock, Kate M.

    2011-01-01

    The National Aeronautics and Space Administration's Dryden Flight Research Center completed flight testing of adaptive controls research on the Full-Scale Advance Systems Testbed (FAST) in January of 2011. The research addressed technical challenges involved with reducing risk in an increasingly complex and dynamic national airspace. Specific challenges lie with the development of validated, multidisciplinary, integrated aircraft control design tools and techniques to enable safe flight in the presence of adverse conditions such as structural damage, control surface failures, or aerodynamic upsets. The testbed is an F-18 aircraft serving as a full-scale vehicle to test and validate adaptive flight control research and lends a significant confidence to the development, maturation, and acceptance process of incorporating adaptive control laws into follow-on research and the operational environment. The experimental systems integrated into FAST were designed to allow for flexible yet safe flight test evaluation and validation of modern adaptive control technologies and revolve around two major hardware upgrades: the modification of Production Support Flight Control Computers (PSFCC) and integration of two, fourth-generation Airborne Research Test Systems (ARTS). Post-hardware integration verification and validation provided the foundation for safe flight test of Nonlinear Dynamic Inversion and Model Reference Aircraft Control adaptive control law experiments. To ensure success of flight in terms of cost, schedule, and test results, emphasis on risk management was incorporated into early stages of design and flight test planning and continued through the execution of each flight test mission. Specific consideration was made to incorporate safety features within the hardware and software to alleviate user demands as well as into test processes and training to reduce human factor impacts to safe and successful flight test. This paper describes the research configuration

  6. A Proof-of-Concept for Semantically Interoperable Federation of IoT Experimentation Facilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, Jorge; Sanchez, Luis; Gomez, David; Elsaleh, Tarek; Steinke, Ronald; Cirillo, Flavio

    2016-01-01

    The Internet-of-Things (IoT) is unanimously identified as one of the main pillars of future smart scenarios. The potential of IoT technologies and deployments has been already demonstrated in a number of different application areas, including transport, energy, safety and healthcare. However, despite the growing number of IoT deployments, the majority of IoT applications tend to be self-contained, thereby forming application silos. A lightweight data centric integration and combination of these silos presents several challenges that still need to be addressed. Indeed, the ability to combine and synthesize data streams and services from diverse IoT platforms and testbeds, holds the promise to increase the potentiality of smart applications in terms of size, scope and targeted business context. In this article, a proof-of-concept implementation that federates two different IoT experimentation facilities by means of semantic-based technologies will be described. The specification and design of the implemented system and information models will be described together with the practical details of the developments carried out and its integration with the existing IoT platforms supporting the aforementioned testbeds. Overall, the system described in this paper demonstrates that it is possible to open new horizons in the development of IoT applications and experiments at a global scale, that transcend the (silo) boundaries of individual deployments, based on the semantic interconnection and interoperability of diverse IoT platforms and testbeds. PMID:27367695

  7. Spatio-temporal Facility Utilization Analysis from Exhaustive WiFi Monitoring

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Prentow, Thor Siiger; Ruiz-Ruiz, Antonio; Blunck, Henrik;

    2015-01-01

    realistic data to inform facility planning. In this paper, we propose analysis methods to extract knowledge from large sets of network collected WiFi traces to better inform facility management and planning in large building complexes. The analysis methods, which build on a rich set of temporal and spatial...... to inform facility-planning activities. To evaluate the proposed methods and visualization tools, we present facility utilization analysis results for a large hospital complex covering more than 10 hectares. The evaluation is based on WiFi traces collected in the hospital’s WiFi infrastructure over two...... weeks observing around 18000 different devices recording more than a billion individual WiFi measurements. We highlight the tools’ ability to deduce people’s presences and movements and how they can provide respective insights into the test-bed hospital by investigating utilization patterns globally...

  8. Optimizing Electric Vehicle Coordination Over a Heterogeneous Mesh Network in a Scaled-Down Smart Grid Testbed

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bhattarai, Bishnu Prasad; Lévesque, Martin; Maier, Martin;

    2015-01-01

    High penetration of renewable energy sources and electric vehicles (EVs) create power imbalance and congestion in the existing power network, and hence causes significant problems in the control and operation. Despite investing huge efforts from the electric utilities, governments, and researchers......, smart grid (SG) is still at the developmental stage to address those issues. In this regard, a smart grid testbed (SGT) is desirable to develop, analyze, and demonstrate various novel SG solutions, namely demand response, real-time pricing, and congestion management. In this paper, a novel SGT is...

  9. Implementation strategies for load center automation on the space station module/power management and distribution testbed

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watson, Karen

    1990-01-01

    The Space Station Module/Power Management and Distribution (SSM/PMAD) testbed was developed to study the tertiary power management on modules in large spacecraft. The main goal was to study automation techniques, not necessarily develop flight ready systems. Because of the confidence gained in many of automation strategies investigated, it is appropriate to study, in more detail, implementation strategies in order to find better trade-offs for nearer to flight ready systems. These trade-offs particularly concern the weight, volume, power consumption, and performance of the automation system. These systems, in their present implementation are described.

  10. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements

  11. Facility effluent monitoring plan for the 325 Facility

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1998-12-31

    The Applied Chemistry Laboratory (325 Facility) houses radiochemistry research, radioanalytical service, radiochemical process development, and hazardous and mixed hazardous waste treatment activities. The laboratories and specialized facilities enable work ranging from that with nonradioactive materials to work with picogram to kilogram quantities of fissionable materials and up to megacurie quantities of other radionuclides. The special facilities include two shielded hot-cell areas that provide for process development or analytical chemistry work with highly radioactive materials, and a waste treatment facility for processing hazardous, mixed, low-level, and transuranic wastes generated by Pacific Northwest Laboratory. Radioactive material storage and usage occur throughout the facility and include a large number of isotopes. This material is in several forms, including solid, liquid, particulate, and gas. Some of these materials are also heated during testing which can produce vapors. The research activities have been assigned to the following activity designations: High-Level Hot Cell, Hazardous Waste Treatment Unit, Waste Form Development, Special Testing Projects, Chemical Process Development, Analytical Hot Cell, and Analytical Chemistry. The following summarizes the airborne and liquid effluents and the results of the Facility Effluent Monitoring Plan (FEMP) determination for the facility. The complete monitoring plan includes characterization of effluent streams, monitoring/sampling design criteria, a description of the monitoring systems and sample analysis, and quality assurance requirements.

  12. Biotechnology Facility: An ISS Microgravity Research Facility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonda, Steve R.; Tsao, Yow-Min

    2000-01-01

    The International Space Station (ISS) will support several facilities dedicated to scientific research. One such facility, the Biotechnology Facility (BTF), is sponsored by the Microgravity Sciences and Applications Division (MSAD) and developed at NASA's Johnson Space Center. The BTF is scheduled for delivery to the ISS via Space Shuttle in April 2005. The purpose of the BTF is to provide: (1) the support structure and integration capabilities for the individual modules in which biotechnology experiments will be performed, (2) the capability for human-tended, repetitive, long-duration biotechnology experiments, and (3) opportunities to perform repetitive experiments in a short period by allowing continuous access to microgravity. The MSAD has identified cell culture and tissue engineering, protein crystal growth, and fundamentals of biotechnology as areas that contain promising opportunities for significant advancements through low-gravity experiments. The focus of this coordinated ground- and space-based research program is the use of the low-gravity environment of space to conduct fundamental investigations leading to major advances in the understanding of basic and applied biotechnology. Results from planned investigations can be used in applications ranging from rational drug design and testing, cancer diagnosis and treatments and tissue engineering leading to replacement tissues.

  13. Facile electrochemical polymerization of polypyrrole film applied as cathode material in dual rotating disk photo fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Kan; Zhang, Hongbo; Tang, Tiantian; Tang, Yanping; Wang, Yalin; Jia, Jinping

    2016-08-01

    Polypyrrole (PPy) film is synthesized on Ti substrate through electrochemical polymerization method and is applied as cathode material in a TiO2 NTs-PPy dual rotating disk photo fuel cell (PFC). The optimized PPy electrochemical polymerization is carried out using linear sweep voltammetry from 0 V to 1.2 V (vs. SCE) with scan rate of 0.1 V s-1, 100 circles. Sixty milliliter real textile wastewater with the initial COD and conductivity of 408 ± 6 mgO2 L-1 and 20180 μS cm-1 is treated in this PFC under UV irradiation. About 0.46 V open-circuit voltage (VOC) and 1.8-2.2 mA short-circuit current (JSC) are obtained. Due to the effective electron-hole separation effect, the COD removal rate is as high as 0.0055 min-1. Stable current and COD removal can be obtained at different output voltage. Two influence factors including rotating speed and pH are investigated. Better electricity generation performance and COD removal activity are achieved at high rotating speed and in acidic condition. In comparison with platinized cathode, though VOC is lower, similar JSC is measured. Considering the high cost of Pt, PPy is a promising alternative cathode material in PFC that can also generate electricity efficiently and stably.

  14. Facile synthesis of Pt-Pd@Silicon nanostructure as an advanced electrocatalyst for direct methanol fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ensafi, Ali A.; Jafari-Asl, M.; Rezaei, B.; Abarghoui, M. Mokhtari; Farrokhpour, H.

    2015-05-01

    In this work, platinum-palladium (Pt-Pd) is assembled in-situ on the surface of porous silicon flour (PSiF) through chemical reduction of PtCl62-/PdCl42- and oxidation of the precursor solution SiF64-. The components and the morphological properties of the Pt-Pd on PSiF is investigated by means of transmission electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and X-ray diffraction techniques. In the next stage, screen printed graphene electrode (SPGE) is prepared by electro-reduction of exfoliated graphene oxide at the surface of a screen printed carbon electrode (SPCE), which is subsequently characterized by FT-IR, Raman spectroscopy, FE-SEM, and electrochemical methods. Finally, a combination of Pt-Pd@PSi nanostructure and SPGE is used for the electro-oxidation of methanol in direct methanol fuel cell. The electrochemical results demonstrate that the Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE exhibits an excellent electrocatalytic activity for methanol oxidation. In addition, the electron transfer kinetic of methanol oxidation on Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE is investigated by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy. The results showed that the surface of Pt-Pd@PSiF-SPGE is not affected (poisoned) by intermediate products such as CO.

  15. Facile synthesis of ultrafine Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals by hydrothermal method for use in solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We introduce a hydrothermal method for synthesizing ultrafine earth abundant Cu2ZnSnS4 (CZTS) nanocrystals with an average size of 5–6 nm using simple Cu(II), Zn(II), Sn(II) inorganic salt and thiourea as precursor. X-ray diffraction, Raman spectrum and transmission electron microscopy studies indicate that CZTS nanocrystals with pure kesterite structure have been synthesized at temperature as low as 180 °C. The band-gap energy determined from the absorbance spectrum is 1.47 eV, suggesting that as-synthesized CZTS nanocrystals are very suitable for photovoltaic applications. - Highlights: ► We developed a hydrothermal method for synthesizing ultrafine Cu2ZnSnS4 nanocrystals. ► The as synthesized CZTS nanocrystals have an average size of ∼ 5 nm. ► The band-gap energy determined from the absorbance spectrum is 1.47 eV. ► The CZTS nanocrystals are suitable to be used to fabricate CZTS ‘ink’-based solar cells

  16. Main Facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This chapter discuss on main nuclear facilities available in the Malaysian Institute for Nuclear Technology Research (MINT). As a national research institute whose core activities are nuclear science and technology, MINT are made up of main commercializable radiation irradiators, pilot plant and fully equipped laboratories. Well elaboration on its characteristics and functions explain for RTP (PUPSPATI TRIGA reactors), Cobalt-60 gamma irradiator, electron beam accelerators, and radioactive waste management center

  17. Nuclear facility

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In nuclear facilities with a fuel storage pool in a spent fuel pit building there is a filter to each pool through which the fuel pit water is pumped. According to the invention the filter is provided with an independently movable housing placed beneath the surface of the pool water and fixed to the lateral side of the pool by means of detachable fixtures. (orig./RW)

  18. Support facilities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Computer support is centered on the Remote Access Data Station (RADS), which is equipped with a 1000 lpm printer, 1000 cpm reader, and a 300 cps paper tape reader with 500-foot spools. The RADS is located in a data preparation room with four 029 key punches (two of which interpret), a storage vault for archival magnetic tapes, card files, and a 30 cps interactive terminal principally used for job inquiry and routing. An adjacent room provides work space for users, with a documentation library and a consultant's office, plus file storage for programs and their documentations. The facility has approximately 2,600 square feet of working laboratory space, and includes two fully equipped photographic darkrooms, sectioning and autoradiographic facilities, six microscope cubicles, and five transmission electron microscopes and one Cambridge scanning electron microscope equipped with an x-ray energy dispersive analytical system. Ancillary specimen preparative equipment includes vacuum evaporators, freeze-drying and freeze-etching equipment, ultramicrotomes, and assorted photographic and light microscopic equipment. The extensive physical plant of the animal facilities includes provisions for holding all species of laboratory animals under controlled conditions of temperature, humidity, and lighting. More than forty rooms are available for studies of the smaller species. These have a potential capacity of more than 75,000 mice, or smaller numbers of larger species and those requiring special housing arrangements. There are also six dog kennels to accommodate approximately 750 dogs housed in runs that consist of heated indoor compartments and outdoor exercise areas

  19. Hybrid Lyot coronagraph for wide-field infrared survey telescope-astrophysics focused telescope assets: occulter fabrication and high contrast narrowband testbed demonstration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Byoung-Joon; Gordon, Brian; Kern, Brian; Kuhnert, Andy; Moody, Dwight; Muller, Richard; Poberezhskiy, Ilya; Trauger, John; Wilson, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Hybrid Lyot coronagraph (HLC) is one of the two operating modes of the WFIRST-AFTA coronagraph instrument. It produces starlight suppression over the full 360-deg annular region and thus is particularly suitable to improve the discovery space around WFIRST-AFTA targets. Since being selected by the National Aeronautics and Space Administration in December 2013, the coronagraph technology is being matured to technology readiness level 5 by September 2016. We present the progress of HLC key component fabrication and testbed demonstrations with the WFIRST-AFTA pupil. For the first time, a circular HLC occulter mask consisting of metal and dielectric layers is fabricated and characterized. Wavefront control using two deformable mirrors is successfully demonstrated in a vacuum testbed with narrowband light (polarization. We detail the hardware and software used in the testbed, the results, and the associated analysis.

  20. A Testbed to Evaluate Simulations of Binary Mass Transfer and Merger

    Science.gov (United States)

    Motl, Patrick M.; Tohline, J. E.; Even, W. P.; Clayton, G. C.; Fryer, C.

    2013-01-01

    Stellar mergers arise in a variety of interesting astrophysical contexts. As an example, the merger of two white dwarf stars appears to be one evolutionary channel leading to R Corona Borealis variable stars or possibly to a type Ia supernova explosions depending on the initial mass and composition of the precursor components. The complex flows that arise during such a merger suggests that direct numerical simulation of the merger process over a limited number of orbital periods may yield crucial insight into understanding these objects. However, care is warranted in applying simulations of complex phenomena to real objects. In this work we present simulations of stable and unstable binary mass transfer episodes conducted with both an Eulerian code and an SPH code. The comparison of techniques is based on a testbed of more than 20 different evolutions where we have varied the initial mass ratio, depth of contact, equation of state and numerical resolution but where we proceed from the same equilibrium structures to initialize runs with both codes. We highlight features common to evolutions with both codes as evidence that the Eulerian and SPH techniques are capturing the same underlying solution to the equations. The initial mass transfer rate that can be resolved in a given evolution may, for example, result in a trivial change in the phase of merger for each technique though both clearly track the same solution. We will also analyze the differences that appear in our code comparison. Of particular interest are the regions of parameter space where the two techniques predict different gross structures or disagree about the long-term stability of mass transfer once it ensues, as these are regions where caution appears most warranted. This work has been supported by grants AST-0708551 and DGE-0504507 from the U.S. National Science Foundation; by grants NNX07AG84G and NNX10AC72G from NASA's ATP program; and by grants of high-performance computing time on the Tera