WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell states spans

  1. A continuum of cell states spans pluripotency and lineage commitment in human embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shelley R Hough

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Commitment in embryonic stem cells is often depicted as a binary choice between alternate cell states, pluripotency and specification to a particular germ layer or extraembryonic lineage. However, close examination of human ES cell cultures has revealed significant heterogeneity in the stem cell compartment. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We isolated subpopulations of embryonic stem cells using surface markers, then examined their expression of pluripotency genes and lineage specific transcription factors at the single cell level, and tested their ability to regenerate colonies of stem cells. Transcript analysis of single embryonic stem cells showed that there is a gradient and a hierarchy of expression of pluripotency genes in the population. Even cells at the top of the hierarchy generally express only a subset of the stem cell genes studied. Many cells co-express pluripotency and lineage specific genes. Cells along the continuum show a progressively decreasing likelihood of self renewal as their expression of stem cell surface markers and pluripotency genes wanes. Most cells that are positive for stem cell surface markers express Oct-4, but only those towards the top of the hierarchy express the nodal receptor TDGF-1 and the growth factor GDF3. SIGNIFICANCE: These findings on gene expression in single embryonic stem cells are in concert with recent studies of early mammalian development, which reveal molecular heterogeneity and a stochasticity of gene expression in blastomeres. Our work indicates that only a small fraction of the population resides at the top of the hierarchy, that lineage priming (co-expression of stem cell and lineage specific genes characterizes pluripotent stem cell populations, and that extrinsic signaling pathways are upstream of transcription factor networks that control pluripotency.

  2. Quantifying yeast chronological life span by outgrowth of aged cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Christopher; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be an important model organism in the field of aging research. The replicative and chronological life spans are two established paradigms used to study aging in yeast. Replicative aging is defined as the number of daughter cells a single yeast mother cell produces before senescence; chronological aging is defined by the length of time cells can survive in a non-dividing, quiescence-like state. We have developed a high-throughput method for quantitative measurement of chronological life span. This method involves aging the cells in a defined medium under agitation and at constant temperature. At each age-point, a sub-population of cells is removed from the aging culture and inoculated into rich growth medium. A high-resolution growth curve is then obtained for this sub-population of aged cells using a Bioscreen C MBR machine. An algorithm is then applied to determine the relative proportion of viable cells in each sub-population based on the growth kinetics at each age-point. This method requires substantially less time and resources compared to other chronological lifespan assays while maintaining reproducibility and precision. The high-throughput nature of this assay should allow for large-scale genetic and chemical screens to identify novel longevity modifiers for further testing in more complex organisms. PMID:19421136

  3. State-of-the-art of long-span bridge engineering in China

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XIANG Haifan; GE Yaojun

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the state-of-the-art of long-span bridge engineering in China with emphases on recent long-span bridge projects,bridge deck configuration and material,design codes of long-span bridges and improvement of aerodynamic performance.The recent long-span bridge projects include thirty-eight completed suspension bridges,cable-stayed and arch bridges with a main span over 400 m,and eighteen major bridges are under construction.The bridge deck configuration and material,with prestressed concrete decks,steel-concrete composite decks and steel box decks together with several popular cross-sections,are presented.The third part briefly outlines four design codes,including static and dynamic design for highway long-span bridges,and the recent engineering experiences gained from several aerodynamic vibration control projects of long-span bridges are shared in the last part.

  4. Oxygen analyzers: failure rates and life spans of galvanic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, R M

    1990-07-01

    Competing technologies exist for measuring oxygen concentrations in breathing circuits. Over a 4-year period, two types of oxygen analyzers were studied prospectively in routine clinical use to determine the incidence and nature of malfunctions. Newer AC-powered galvanic analyzers (North American Dräger O2med) were compared with older, battery-powered polarographic analyzers (Ohmeda 201) by recording all failures and necessary repairs. The AC-powered galvanic analyzer had a significantly lower incidence of failures (0.12 +/- 0.04 failures per machine-month) than the battery-powered polarographic analyzer (4.0 +/- 0.3 failures per machine-month). Disposable capsules containing the active galvanic cells lasted 12 +/- 7 months. Although the galvanic analyzers tended to remain out of service longer, awaiting the arrival of costly parts, the polarographic analyzers were more expensive to keep operating when calculations included the cost of time spent on repairs. Stocking galvanic capsules would have decreased the amount of time the galvanic analyzers were out of service, while increasing costs. In conclusion, galvanic oxygen analyzers appear capable of delivering more reliable service at a lower overall cost. By keeping the galvanic capsules exposed to room air during periods of storage, it should be possible to prolong their life span, further decreasing the cost of using them. In addition, recognizing the aberrations in their performance that warn of the exhaustion of the galvanic cells should permit timely recording and minimize downtime.

  5. Native Americanspan>s and state and local governments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rusco, E.R. [Cultural Resources Consultants, Ltd. Reno, Nevada (United States)

    1991-10-01

    Native Americans` concerns arising from the possibility of establishment of a nuclear repository for high level wastes at Yucca Mountain fall principally into two main categories. First, the strongest objection to the repository comes from traditional Western Shoshones. Their objections are based on a claim that the Western Shoshones still own Yucca Mountain and also on the assertion that putting high level nuclear wastes into the ground is a violation of their religious views regarding nature. Second, there are several reservations around the Yucca Mountain site that might be affected in various ways by building of the repository. There is a question about how many such reservations there are, which can only be decided when more information is available. This report discusses two questions: the bearing of the continued vigorous assertion by traditionalist Western Shoshones of their land claim; and the extent to which Nevada state and local governments are able to understand and represent Indian viewpoints about Yucca Mountain.

  6. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R.; Garbe, James C.

    2016-06-28

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  7. Increasing cell culture population doublings for long-term growth of finite life span human cell cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stampfer, Martha R; Garbe, James C

    2015-02-24

    Cell culture media formulations for culturing human epithelial cells are herein described. Also described are methods of increasing population doublings in a cell culture of finite life span human epithelial cells and prolonging the life span of human cell cultures. Using the cell culture media disclosed alone and in combination with addition to the cell culture of a compound associated with anti-stress activity achieves extended growth of pre-stasis cells and increased population doublings and life span in human epithelial cell cultures.

  8. Role of human sec63 in modulating the steady-state levels of multi-spanning membrane proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andreas Mades

    Full Text Available The Sec61 translocon of the endoplasmic reticulum (ER membrane forms an aqueous pore, allowing polypeptides to be transferred across or integrated into membranes. Protein translocation into the ER can occur co- and posttranslationally. In yeast, posttranslational translocation involves the heptameric translocase complex including its Sec62p and Sec63p subunits. The mammalian ER membrane contains orthologs of yeast Sec62p and Sec63p, but their function is poorly understood. Here, we analyzed the effects of excess and deficit Sec63 on various ER cargoes using human cell culture systems. The overexpression of Sec63 reduces the steady-state levels of viral and cellular multi-spanning membrane proteins in a cotranslational mode, while soluble and single-spanning ER reporters are not affected. Consistent with this, the knock-down of Sec63 increases the steady-state pools of polytopic ER proteins, suggesting a substrate-specific and regulatory function of Sec63 in ER import. Overexpressed Sec63 exerts its down-regulating activity on polytopic protein levels independent of its Sec62-interacting motif, indicating that it may not act in conjunction with Sec62 in human cells. The specific action of Sec63 is further sustained by our observations that the up-regulation of either Sec62 or two other ER proteins with lumenal J domains, like ERdj1 and ERdj4, does not compromise the steady-state level of a multi-spanning membrane reporter. A J domain-specific mutation of Sec63, proposed to weaken its interaction with the ER resident BiP chaperone, reduces the down-regulating capacity of excess Sec63, suggesting an involvement of BiP in this process. Together, these results suggest that Sec63 may perform a substrate-selective quantity control function during cotranslational ER import.

  9. NAD⁺ repletion improves mitochondrial and stem cell function and enhances life span in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hongbo; Ryu, Dongryeol; Wu, Yibo; Gariani, Karim; Wang, Xu; Luan, Peiling; D'Amico, Davide; Ropelle, Eduardo R; Lutolf, Matthias P; Aebersold, Ruedi; Schoonjans, Kristina; Menzies, Keir J; Auwerx, Johan

    2016-06-17

    Adult stem cells (SCs) are essential for tissue maintenance and regeneration yet are susceptible to senescence during aging. We demonstrate the importance of the amount of the oxidized form of cellular nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD(+)) and its effect on mitochondrial activity as a pivotal switch to modulate muscle SC (MuSC) senescence. Treatment with the NAD(+) precursor nicotinamide riboside (NR) induced the mitochondrial unfolded protein response and synthesis of prohibitin proteins, and this rejuvenated MuSCs in aged mice. NR also prevented MuSC senescence in the mdx (C57BL/10ScSn-Dmd(mdx)/J) mouse model of muscular dystrophy. We furthermore demonstrate that NR delays senescence of neural SCs and melanocyte SCs and increases mouse life span. Strategies that conserve cellular NAD(+) may reprogram dysfunctional SCs and improve life span in mammals. PMID:27127236

  10. Lipopolysaccharide-induced inflammation attenuates taste progenitor cell proliferation and shortens the life span of taste bud cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brand Joseph

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mammalian taste bud, a complex collection of taste sensory cells, supporting cells, and immature basal cells, is the structural unit for detecting taste stimuli in the oral cavity. Even though the cells of the taste bud undergo constant turnover, the structural homeostasis of the bud is maintained by balancing cell proliferation and cell death. Compared with nongustatory lingual epithelial cells, taste cells express higher levels of several inflammatory receptors and signalling proteins. Whether inflammation, an underlying condition in some diseases associated with taste disorders, interferes with taste cell renewal and turnover is unknown. Here we report the effects of lipopolysaccharide (LPS-induced inflammation on taste progenitor cell proliferation and taste bud cell turnover in mouse taste tissues. Results Intraperitoneal injection of LPS rapidly induced expression of several inflammatory cytokines, including tumor necrosis factor (TNF-α, interferon (IFN-γ, and interleukin (IL-6, in mouse circumvallate and foliate papillae. TNF-α and IFN-γ immunoreactivities were preferentially localized to subsets of cells in taste buds. LPS-induced inflammation significantly reduced the number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU-labeled newborn taste bud cells 1-3 days after LPS injection, suggesting an inhibition of taste bud cell renewal. BrdU pulse-chase experiments showed that BrdU-labeled taste cells had a shorter average life span in LPS-treated mice than in controls. To investigate whether LPS inhibits taste cell renewal by suppressing taste progenitor cell proliferation, we studied the expression of Ki67, a cell proliferation marker. Quantitative real-time RT-PCR revealed that LPS markedly reduced Ki67 mRNA levels in circumvallate and foliate epithelia. Immunofluorescent staining using anti-Ki67 antibodies showed that LPS decreased the number of Ki67-positive cells in the basal regions surrounding circumvallate taste buds

  11. State-of-art of asphalt surfacings on long-spanned orthotropic steel deck in China

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chen, X.; Liu, X.; Qian, Z.; Lei, Z.

    2012-01-01

    Reliable and durable asphalt surfacing systems still remain to be desired for the long-spanned orthotropic steel bridges as the nationally and internationally reports on distresses in deck pavement. Based on ten-year research works, this paper has presented a brief review and discussion of the Chine

  12. Boundary Spanning

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zølner, Mette

    in the period of post-acquisition when their organization is being integrated into the acquiring MNC. The paper contributes to the literature on boundary spanning in three ways: First, by illustrating that boundary spanning is performed by numerous organizational actors in a variety of positions in MNCs......, inclusively by locals in subsidiaries. Second, by showing that boundary spanning is ‘situated’ in the sense that its result depends on the kind of knowledge to be transmitted and the attitude of the receivers. A third contribution is methodological. The study illustrates that combining bottom-up grounded...

  13. Daughter cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae from old mothers display a reduced life span

    OpenAIRE

    1994-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae typically divides asymmetrically to give a large mother cell and a smaller daughter cell. As mother cells become old, they enlarge and produce daughter cells that are larger than daughters derived from young mother cells. We found that occasional daughter cells were indistinguishable in size from their mothers, giving rise to a symmetric division. The frequency of symmetric divisions became greater as mother cells aged and reached a maximum occurrence of 30%...

  14. Aging is associated with decreased maximal life span and accelerated senescence of bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dokkedahl, Karin Stenderup; Justesen, Jeannette; Clausen, Christian;

    2003-01-01

    -gal+) cells and mean telomere length in early-passage cells obtained from young and old donors. However, MSC from old donors exhibited accelerated senescence evidenced by increased number of SA beta-gal+ cells per PD as compared with young (4% per PD vs 0.4% per PD, respectively). MSC from young and old...

  15. Human breast microvascular endothelial cells retain phenotypic traits in long-term finite life span culture

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sigurdsson, Valgardur; Fridriksdottir, Agla J R; Kjartansson, Jens;

    2007-01-01

    Attempts to study endothelial-epithelial interactions in the human breast have been hampered by lack of protocols for long-term cultivation of breast endothelial cells (BRENCs). The aim of this study was to establish long-term cultures of BRENCs and to compare their phenotypic traits with the tis......Attempts to study endothelial-epithelial interactions in the human breast have been hampered by lack of protocols for long-term cultivation of breast endothelial cells (BRENCs). The aim of this study was to establish long-term cultures of BRENCs and to compare their phenotypic traits...... with the tissue of origin. Microvasculature was localized in situ by immunohistochemistry in breast samples. From this tissue, collagen-rich stroma and adipose tissue were dissected mechanically and further disaggregated to release microvessel organoids. BRENCs were cultured from these organoids in endothelial......-galactosidase staining. We demonstrate here that breast microvasculature may serve as a large-scale source for expansion of BRENCs with molecular and functional traits preserved. These cells will form the basis for studies on the role of endothelial cells in breast morphogenesis....

  16. Effect and Mechanism of Ginsenoside Rg3 on Postoperative Life Span of Patients with Non-Small Cell Lung Cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LU Ping; SU Wei; MIAO Zhan-hui; NIU Hong-rui; LIU Jing; HUA Qin-liang

    2008-01-01

    Objective: To explore the effect and mechanism of ginsenoside Rg3 (Shenyi Capsule,参一胶囊) on the postoperative life span of patients with non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Methods: The prospective, randomized, controlled method was adopted. One hundred and thirty- three patients with NSCLC were randomly assigned to 3 groups: Shenyi Capsule group (43 cases), combined therapy group (Shenyi Capsule plus chemotherapy, 46 cases), and chemotherapy group (44 cases). The survival rates, immune function and the correlation between vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) expression and clinical effect were analyzed in the three groups. Results: (1) The 1-year survival rate in the Shenyi group, the combined group and the chemotherapy group was 76.7% (33/43), 82.6% (38/46), and 79.5% (35/44), respectively; the 2-year survival rate was 67.4% (29/43), 71.7% (33/46), and 70.5% (31/44), respectively; and the 3-year survival rate was 46.5% (20/43), 54.3% (25/46), and 47.7% (21/44), respectively. There was no significant difference among the 3 groups (P>0.05). (2) NK cells were increased to different degrees and the ratio of CD4/CD8 was normal in the Shenyi Capsule group and the combined group, while the ratio of CD4/CD8 was disproportional in the chemotherapy group. (3) In the chemotherapy group, the 3-year survival rate was lower in patients with positive expression of VEGF than in patients with negative expression (37.0% vs 64.7%, ~ 2=17.9, P0.05; 44.4% vs 50.0%, P>0.05). Conclusion: Shenyi Capsule, especially in combination with chemotherapy, can improve the life span of patients with NSCLC after operation. The mechanism might be correlated with improving the immune function and anti-tumor angiogenesis.

  17. Beta-cell function, incretin effect, and incretin hormones in obese youth along the span of glucose tolerance from normal to prediabetes to Type 2 diabetes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Using the hyperglycemic and euglycemic clamp, we demonstrated impaired Beta-cell function in obese youth with increasing dysglycemia. Herein we describe oral glucose tolerance test (OGTT)-modeled Beta-cell function and incretin effect in obese adolescents spanning the range of glucose tolerance. Bet...

  18. Positive regulation of DNA double strand break repair activity during differentiation of long life span cells: the example of adipogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aline Meulle

    Full Text Available Little information is available on the ability of terminally differentiated cells to efficiently repair DNA double strand breaks (DSBs, and one might reasonably speculate that efficient DNA repair of these threatening DNA lesions, is needed in cells of long life span with no or limited regeneration from precursor. Few tissues are available besides neurons that allow the study of DNA DSBs repair activity in very long-lived cells. Adipocytes represent a suitable model since it is generally admitted that there is a very slow turnover of adipocytes in adult. Using both Pulse Field Gel Electrophoresis (PFGE and the disappearance of the phosphorylated form of the histone variant H2AX, we demonstrated that the ability to repair DSBs is increased during adipocyte differentiation using the murine pre-adipocyte cell line, 3T3F442A. In mammalian cells, DSBs are mainly repaired by the non-homologous end-joining pathway (NHEJ that relies on the DNA dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK activity. During the first 24 h following the commitment into adipogenesis, we show an increase in the expression and activity of the catalytic sub-unit of the DNA-PK complex, DNA-PKcs. The increased in DNA DSBs repair activity observed in adipocytes was due to the increase in DNA-PK activity as shown by the use of DNA-PK inhibitor or sub-clones of 3T3F442A deficient in DNA-PKcs using long term RNA interference. Interestingly, the up-regulation of DNA-PK does not regulate the differentiation program itself. Finally, similar positive regulation of DNA-PKcs expression and activity was observed during differentiation of primary culture of pre-adipocytes isolated from human sub-cutaneous adipose tissue. Our results show that DNA DSBs repair activity is up regulated during the early commitment into adipogenesis due to an up-regulation of DNA-PK expression and activity. In opposition to the general view that DNA DSBs repair is decreased during differentiation, our results demonstrate

  19. Span of Control and Span of Activity

    OpenAIRE

    Oriana Bandiera; Andrea Prat; Raffaella Sadun; Julie Wulf

    2012-01-01

    For both practitioners and researchers, span of control plays an important role in defining and understanding the role of the CEO. In this paper, we combine organizational chart information for a sample of 65 companies with detailed data on how their CEOs allocate their work time, which we define as their span of activity. Span of activity provides a direct measure of the CEO's management style, including the attention devoted to specific subordinates and functions, the time devoted to indivi...

  20. State sensitivity analysis of the pantograph system for a high-speed rail vehicle considering span length and static uplift force

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Jin-Woo; Chae, Ho-Chol; Park, Bum-Seok; Lee, Seung-Yeol; Han, Chang-Soo; Jang, Jin-Hee

    2007-06-01

    In this paper, dynamic characteristics analysis of catenary and pantograph systems for a high-speed rail vehicle is carried out. The catenary system is considered to be a beam model. The analysis of the catenary based on the finite element method (FEM) is performed to develop the pantograph. The stiffness value can be obtained at each nodal point on the contact wire. State sensitivity analysis was executed with respect to design variables considered by the pantograph system. The pantograph of linear spring-mass-damper system is considered as a 3dof model using lumped parameters. Dynamic modeling of the pantograph system is verified by actual experimental vibration data. To perform the sensitivity analysis, our study was considered lift force effect of the pan-head occurring at high-speed runs. Also, a span length and static uplift force were included into design variables. As a result, we could confirm that span length and plunger spring constant are some of the important design variables of catenary and the pantograph systems.

  1. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America, 2010

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, Sandra; Delmont, Elizabeth; Gangi, Jennifer

    2010-04-01

    This report, written by Fuel Cells 2000 and partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, provides a snapshot of fuel cell and hydrogen activity in the 50 states and District of Columbia. It features the top five fuel cell states (in alphabetical order): California, Connecticut, New York, Ohio, and South Carolina. State activities reported include supportive fuel cell and hydrogen policies, installations and demonstrations, road maps, and level of activism.

  2. Visualizing cell state transition using Raman spectroscopy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Taro Ichimura

    Full Text Available System level understanding of the cell requires detailed description of the cell state, which is often characterized by the expression levels of proteins. However, understanding the cell state requires comprehensive information of the cell, which is usually obtained from a large number of cells and their disruption. In this study, we used Raman spectroscopy, which can report changes in the cell state without introducing any label, as a non-invasive method with single cell capability. Significant differences in Raman spectra were observed at the levels of both the cytosol and nucleus in different cell-lines from mouse, indicating that Raman spectra reflect differences in the cell state. Difference in cell state was observed before and after the induction of differentiation in neuroblastoma and adipocytes, showing that Raman spectra can detect subtle changes in the cell state. Cell state transitions during embryonic stem cell (ESC differentiation were visualized when Raman spectroscopy was coupled with principal component analysis (PCA, which showed gradual transition in the cell states during differentiation. Detailed analysis showed that the diversity between cells are large in undifferentiated ESC and in mesenchymal stem cells compared with terminally differentiated cells, implying that the cell state in stem cells stochastically fluctuates during the self-renewal process. The present study strongly indicates that Raman spectral morphology, in combination with PCA, can be used to establish cells' fingerprints, which can be useful for distinguishing and identifying different cellular states.

  3. Uniform random spanning trees

    OpenAIRE

    Pemantle, Robin

    2004-01-01

    There are several good reasons you might want to read about uniform spanning trees, one being that spanning trees are useful combinatorial objects. Not only are they fundamental in algebraic graph theory and combinatorial geometry, but they predate both of these subjects, having been used by Kirchoff in the study of resistor networks. This article addresses the question about spanning trees most natural to anyone in probability theory, namely what does a typical spanning tree look like?

  4. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    2011-06-15

    This 2011 report, written by Fuel Cells 2000 and partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, provides an update of fuel cell and hydrogen activity in the 50 states and District of Columbia. State activities reported include new policies and funding, recent and planned fuel cell and hydrogen installations, and recent activities by state industries and universities.

  5. State of the States. Fuel Cells in America 2012

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, Sandra [Fuel Cells 2000, Washington, DC (United States); Gangi, Jennifer [Fuel Cells 2000, Washington, DC (United States); Skukowski, Ryan [Fuel Cells 2000, Washington, DC (United States)

    2012-09-01

    This report, written by Fuel Cells 2000 and partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Program, continues to build on the April 2010 State of the States report that provided a snapshot of fuel cell and hydrogen activity in the 50 states and District of Columbia. This update report provides more details on the progress and activities that happened since the second report, issued in June 2011. Details reported for each state include new policies and funding, recent and planned fuel cell and hydrogen installations, and recent activity by state industry and universities.

  6. Late effects of selected immunosuppressants on immunocompetence, disease incidence, and mean life-span. II. Cell-mediated immune activity. [Mice, X radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peterson, W.J.; Perkins, E.H.; Goodman, S.A.; Hori, Y.; Halsall, M.K.; Makinodan, T.

    1975-01-01

    The late effects of various immunosuppressive insults on cell-mediated immunity in mice were studied in an attempt to assess the role of immune surveillance in the aging process. Results were obtained using susceptibility to allogeneic tumor cell challenge, graft-versus-host reaction (GVHR), blastogenic response to PHA, a thymus derived T cell-specific plant mitogen, and cytolytic activity against allogeneic tumor cells as measures of immunologic activity. In vivo studies late in life show that resistance to allogeneic tumor cells is significantly decreased in thymectomized mice, whereas those treated with cortisone, cyclophosphamide and sublethal x-ray remain unchanged. Spleen cells from only the thymectomized and the sublethally irradiated mice show reduced activity in the GVHR. No difference is seen in the activity of bone marrow cells. Results consistent with these findings were obtained in in vitro studies. Thus spleen cells from thymectomized or sublethally irradiated mice show decreased activity in response to PHA, whereas no change is seen in spleen cells from other treated groups. Hence, surgical and physical insults are more likely to induce long-lasting immunosuppression in those immunocompetent tissues whose activity normally diminishes with advancing age. Furthermore, the degree of immunosuppression seen in this study is not of the order of magnitude that one could reasonably predict a significant decrease in mean life-span.

  7. Telomerase expression extends the proliferative life-span and maintains the osteogenic potential of human bone marrow stromal cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Simonsen, Janne Lytoft; Rosada, Cecilia; Serakinci, Nedime;

    2002-01-01

    . The transduced cells have now undergone more than 260 population doublings (PD) and continue to proliferate, whereas control cells underwent senescence-associated proliferation arrest after 26 PD. The cells maintained production of osteoblastic markers and differentiation potential during continuous subculturing...

  8. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2013

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Curtin, Sandra; Gangi, Jennifer

    2013-10-31

    This October 2013 report, written by Fuel Cells 2000 and partially funded by the U.S. Department of Energy's Fuel Cell Technologies Office, continues to build on the April 2010 State of the States report that provided a snapshot of fuel cell and hydrogen activity in the 50 states and District of Columbia. This update report provides more details on the progress and activities that happened since the third report, issued in August 2012.

  9. State of the States: Fuel Cells in America 2015

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sandra Curtin and Jennifer Gangi

    2015-12-17

    This December 2015 report, the sixth in a series, provides a comprehensive analysis of state activities supporting fuel cell and hydrogen technology, profiles of leading states, and a catalog of recent installations, policies, funding, and deployments around the country.

  10. Identifying immunogenic CD4+ T-cell epitopes of Myeloid cell leukemia 1 using overlapping 20-mer peptides spanning the whole protein

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Woodworth, Joshua S.; Agger, Else Marie; Hansen, Paul Robert

    2015-01-01

    ) small-molecule inhibitors [6] and (iii) peptide inhibitors [7]. In recent years, therapeutic vaccination with synthetic peptides derived from anti-apoptotic proteins such as Mcl-1 has emerged as a promising strategy against hematological cancers. In this study, 34 overlapping 20-mer peptides, spanning...

  11. Insulin-like growth factor-I extends in vitro replicative life span of skeletal muscle satellite cells by enhancing G1/S cell cycle progression via the activation of phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt signaling pathway

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chakravarthy, M. V.; Abraha, T. W.; Schwartz, R. J.; Fiorotto, M. L.; Booth, F. W.

    2000-01-01

    Interest is growing in methods to extend replicative life span of non-immortalized stem cells. Using the insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I) transgenic mouse in which the IGF-I transgene is expressed during skeletal muscle development and maturation prior to isolation and during culture of satellite cells (the myogenic stem cells of mature skeletal muscle fibers) as a model system, we elucidated the underlying molecular mechanisms of IGF-I-mediated enhancement of proliferative potential of these cells. Satellite cells from IGF-I transgenic muscles achieved at least five additional population doublings above the maximum that was attained by wild type satellite cells. This IGF-I-induced increase in proliferative potential was mediated via activation of the phosphatidylinositol 3'-kinase/Akt pathway, independent of mitogen-activated protein kinase activity, facilitating G(1)/S cell cycle progression via a down-regulation of p27(Kip1). Adenovirally mediated ectopic overexpression of p27(Kip1) in exponentially growing IGF-I transgenic satellite cells reversed the increase in cyclin E-cdk2 kinase activity, pRb phosphorylation, and cyclin A protein abundance, thereby implicating an important role for p27(Kip1) in promoting satellite cell senescence. These observations provide a more complete dissection of molecular events by which increased local expression of a growth factor in mature skeletal muscle fibers extends replicative life span of primary stem cells than previously known.

  12. Compatible spanning trees

    OpenAIRE

    Garcia Olaverri, Alfredo Martin; Huemer, Clemens; Hurtado Díaz, Fernando Alfredo; Tejel Altarriba, Francisco Javier

    2014-01-01

    Two plane geometric graphs are said to be compatible when their union is a plane geometric graph. Let S be a set of n points in the Euclidean plane in general position and let T be any given plane geometric spanning tree of S. In this work, we study the problem of finding a second plane geometric tree T' spanning S, such that is compatible with T and shares the minimum number of edges with T. We prove that there is always a compatible plane geometric tree T' having at most #n - 3#/4 edges in ...

  13. Life Span Developmental Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ali Eryilmaz

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available The Life Span Developmental Approach examines development of individuals which occurs from birth to death. Life span developmental approach is a multi-disciplinary approach related with disciplines like psychology, psychiatry, sociology, anthropology and geriatrics that indicates the fact that development is not completed in adulthood, it continues during the life course. Development is a complex process that consists of dying and death. This approach carefully investigates the development of individuals with respect to developmental stages. This developmental approach suggests that scientific disciplines should not explain developmental facts only with age changes. Along with aging, cognitive, biological, and socioemotional development throughout life should also be considered to provide a reasonable and acceptable context, guideposts, and reasonable expectations for the person. There are three important subjects whom life span developmental approach deals with. These are nature vs nurture, continuity vs discontinuity, and change vs stability. Researchers using life span developmental approach gather and produce knowledge on these three most important domains of individual development with their unique scientific methodology.

  14. Long Span Bridges in Scandinavia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    The first Scandinavian bridge with a span of more than 500 m was the Lillebælt Suspension Bridge opened to traffic in 1970.Art the end of the 20th century the longest span of any European bridge is found in the Storebælt East Bridge with a main span of 1624 m. Also the third longest span in Europ...

  15. Spanning paths in hypercubes

    OpenAIRE

    Dvořák, Tomáš; Gregor, Petr; Koubek, Václav

    2005-01-01

    Given a family \\u_i,v_i\\_i=1^k of pairwise distinct vertices of the n-dimensional hypercube Q_n such that the distance of u_i and v_i is odd and k≤n-1, there exists a family \\P_i\\_i=1^k of paths such that u_i and v_i are the endvertices of P_i and \\V(P_i)\\_i=1^k partitions V(Q_n). This holds for any n≥2 with one exception in the case when n=k+1=4. On the other hand, for any n≥3 there exist n pairs of vertices satisfying the above condition for which such a family of spanning paths does not ex...

  16. Encoding network states by striatal cell assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Tapia, Dagoberto; Hernández-Cruz, Arturo; Galarraga, Elvira; Drucker-Colin, René; Bargas, José

    2008-03-01

    Correlated activity in cortico-basal ganglia circuits plays a key role in the encoding of movement, associative learning and procedural memory. How correlated activity is assembled by striatal microcircuits is not understood. Calcium imaging of striatal neuronal populations, with single-cell resolution, reveals sporadic and asynchronous activity under control conditions. However, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) application induces bistability and correlated activity in striatal neurons. Widespread neurons within the field of observation present burst firing. Sets of neurons exhibit episodes of recurrent and synchronized bursting. Dimensionality reduction of network dynamics reveals functional states defined by cell assemblies that alternate their activity and display spatiotemporal pattern generation. Recurrent synchronous activity travels from one cell assembly to the other often returning to the original assembly; suggesting a robust structure. An initial search into the factors that sustain correlated activity of neuronal assemblies showed a critical dependence on both intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms: blockage of fast glutamatergic transmission annihilates all correlated firing, whereas blockage of GABAergic transmission locked the network into a single dominant state that eliminates assembly diversity. Reduction of L-type Ca(2+)-current restrains synchronization. Each cell assembly comprised different cells, but a small set of neurons was shared by different assemblies. A great proportion of the shared neurons was local interneurons with pacemaking properties. The network dynamics set into action by NMDA in the striatal network may reveal important properties of striatal microcircuits under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:18184883

  17. SPAN C - Terminal sterilization process analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Computer program, SPAN-C, measures the dry heat thermal sterilization process applied to a planetary capsule and calculates the time required for heat application, steady state conditions, and cooling. The program is based on the logarithmic survival of micro-organisms. Temperature profiles must be input on cards.

  18. SPAN - Terminal sterilization process analysis program

    Science.gov (United States)

    1969-01-01

    Computer program, SPAN, measures the dry heat thermal sterilization process applied to a planetary capsule and calculates the time required for heat application, steady state conditions, and cooling. The program is based on the logarithmic survival of micro-organisms. Temperature profiles must be input on tape.

  19. Impounding Experimental Research of Large Span Aqueduct

    OpenAIRE

    Huafeng Deng; Min Zhu; Xianfan Yuan; Qian Luo

    2013-01-01

    In this study, we have a research of the impounding experimental research of large span aqueduct. Caohe aqueduct is the mark building of the middle line of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project, of which the span is 30m. For this aqueduct, the structure is relatively complicated with great technical difficulties, what’s more there's no engineering experience or theoretical method to provide reference in domestic and abroad. It can be seen clear that whether the actual stressing state, de...

  20. 大跨度悬索桥结构状态参数敏感性分析%Analysis for Sensitivity of Structural State Parameters of Large-span Suspension Bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    苏龙; 杨絮; 胡章立

    2011-01-01

    This paper analyzes the sensitivity of structural state parameters of suspension bridges in combination with project examples, focusing on analysis for influences of change of cable length, change of horizontal span, change of integral temperature, weight error of girder, curvature of the Earth and change of elastic modulus of main cable on midspan sag of main cable. Self-made programs are used to calculate and compare to obtain corresponding sensitivities of all parameters and some useful conclusions, providing rapid control means and methods for construction of large-span suspension bridges.%结合工程实例对悬索桥结构状态参数进行敏感性分析,重点分析索长变化、水平跨度变化、整体温度变化、主梁重量误差、地球曲率及主缆弹性模量变化对主缆跨中垂度的影响.通过自编程序进行计算和比较,得到各参数相应的灵敏度及一些有用结论,为大跨度悬索桥施工控制提供快捷的控制手段和方法.

  1. Counting spanning trees in graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Azarija, Jernej

    2012-01-01

    The history of counting the number of spanning trees dates back into the year 1842 in which the German mathematician Gustav Kirchhoff derived a relation between the number of spanning trees of a graph G (τ(G)) and the determinant of a specific submatrix associated with G. After this result many other related results followed. For example in 1889 the British mathematician A. Cayley showed that the complete graph on n nodes has nn−2 spanning trees.The function τ can nowadays be found in the fi...

  2. Spanning Tree Based Attribute Clustering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zeng, Yifeng; Jorge, Cordero Hernandez

    2009-01-01

    inconsistent edges from a maximum spanning tree by starting appropriate initial modes, therefore generating stable clusters. It discovers sound clusters through simple graph operations and achieves significant computational savings. We compare the Star Discovery algorithm against earlier attribute clustering...

  3. Thermodynamics and life span estimation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this study, the life span of people living in seven regions of Turkey is estimated by applying the first and second laws of thermodynamics to the human body. The people living in different regions of Turkey have different food habits. The first and second laws of thermodynamics are used to calculate the entropy generation rate per unit mass of a human due to the food habits. The lifetime entropy generation per unit mass of a human was previously found statistically. The two entropy generations, lifetime entropy generation and entropy generation rate, enable one to determine the life span of people living in seven regions of Turkey with different food habits. In order to estimate the life span, some statistics of Turkish Statistical Institute regarding the food habits of the people living in seven regions of Turkey are used. The life spans of people that live in Central Anatolia and Eastern Anatolia regions are the longest and shortest, respectively. Generally, the following inequality regarding the life span of people living in seven regions of Turkey is found: Eastern Anatolia < Southeast Anatolia < Black Sea < Mediterranean < Marmara < Aegean < Central Anatolia. - Highlights: • The first and second laws of thermodynamics are applied to the human body. • The entropy generation of a human due to his food habits is determined. • The life span of Turks is estimated by using the entropy generation method. • Food habits of a human have effect on his life span

  4. Life span, testis damage and immune cell populations of spleen in C57BL mice with neutron irradiation by lying flat pose

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, Ki Jung; kim, Myung Sup; Kyung, Yoo Bo [KAERI, Taejon (Korea)

    2003-10-01

    This study deals with the biological effects of black mouse (C57BL) irradiated with neutron irradiation by using Boron Neutron Capture Therapy facility in HANARO reactor. These include mortality, body wt., hair color, testis volume, sperm count and immune cell populations in mouse spleen after 80 days later by thermal neutron irradiation. Six week old C57BL male mice were irradiated with neutron irradiation for 1 hr or 2 hrs (flux : 1.036739E +09). These irradiat ion doses estimated 15Gy and 30Gy, respectively. Survival days and hair color in mice was checked. On day 80 after irradiation, testis were taken for volume and sperm count. Also spleen was taken for FACS and spleen cells were isolatd and discarded RBC by treating with lysising solution. These cells were placed on ice and immunofluorescence staining was performed. Phycoerythrin (PE )-anti-CD3e, fluorescein isothiocyanate (FITC)-anti-CD4, and FITC-anti-CD8 were added, then the immunostaining cells were incubated on ice for 40 min. The resulting cells were washed with a PBS buffer 3 times and analyzed using a Flow cytometer. All experimental animals survived over 90 days but in case of 30 Gy neutron irradiation, black mice hair were changed white color on the center of the back. Neutron irradiation of black mice show similar in damage of spleen immune cells by subpopulation of T helper and T cytotoxic cells compared to the control non - irradiated group. These results show that treatment of neutron irradiation without boron compounds for 2 hrs in mice can survive over 90 days with hair color change from black to white. Damaged spleen cells recover after long time by irradiation but testis volume and no. of sperm are not recover compared to the normal group in response to neutron irradiation.

  5. Loneliness across the life span

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qualter, P.; Vanhalst, J.; Harris, R.; Roekel, G.H. van; Lodder, G.M.A.; Bangee, M.; Maes, M.; Verhagen, M.

    2015-01-01

    Most people have experienced loneliness and have been able to overcome it to reconnect with other people. In the current review, we provide a life-span perspective on one component of the evolutionary theory of lonelinessa component we refer to as the reaffiliation motive (RAM). The RAM represents t

  6. Loneliness Across the Life Span

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qualter, Pamela; Vanhalst, Janne; Harris, Rebecca; Van Roekel, Eeske; Lodder, Gerine; Bangee, Munirah; Maes, Marlies; Verhagen, Maaike

    2015-01-01

    Most people have experienced loneliness and have been able to overcome it to reconnect with other people. In the current review, we provide a life-span perspective on one component of the evolutionary theory of lonelinessa component we refer to as the reaffiliation motive (RAM). The RAM represents t

  7. A distributed spanning tree algorithm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johansen, Karl Erik; Jørgensen, Ulla Lundin; Nielsen, Svend Hauge;

    1988-01-01

    We present a distributed algorithm for constructing a spanning tree for connected undirected graphs. Nodes correspond to processors and edges correspond to two way channels. Each processor has initially a distinct identity and all processors perform the same algorithm. Computation as well...

  8. Identification of a yeast artificial chromosome that spans the human papillary renal cell carcinoma-associated t(X;1) breakpoint in Xp11.2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Suijkerbuijk, R F; Meloni, A M; Sinke, R J; de Leeuw, B; Wilbrink, M; Janssen, H A; Geraghty, M T; Monaco, A P; Sandberg, A A; Geurts van Kessel, A

    1993-01-01

    Recently, a specific chromosome abnormality, t(X;1)(p11;q21), was described for a subgroup of human papillary renal cell carcinomas. The translocation breakpoint in Xp11 is located in the same region as that in t(X;18)(p11;q11)-positive synovial sarcoma. We used fluorescence in situ hybridization (F

  9. Impounding Experimental Research of Large Span Aqueduct

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huafeng Deng

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we have a research of the impounding experimental research of large span aqueduct. Caohe aqueduct is the mark building of the middle line of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project, of which the span is 30m. For this aqueduct, the structure is relatively complicated with great technical difficulties, what’s more there's no engineering experience or theoretical method to provide reference in domestic and abroad. It can be seen clear that whether the actual stressing state, deformation conditions and prestressed tension effect etc. meet the design requirements will directly affect the safe operation of aqueduct, so the impounding experiment of the aqueduct was carried out before formal operation. At the meanwhile, the deformation characteristics and stress characteristics of the aqueduct under various impounding conditions were analyzed in detail. The experiment results analysis shows that, the aqueduct structure is under a good elastic working condition with only 0.98mm maximum deflection deformation at mid-span, which meets the design and specification requirements. At the same time, all of the measure point’s stress is in the range of designed material, which means the structure form is safe and reliable and can meet the requirements of the later operation good.

  10. Loneliness across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qualter, Pamela; Vanhalst, Janne; Harris, Rebecca; Van Roekel, Eeske; Lodder, Gerine; Bangee, Munirah; Maes, Marlies; Verhagen, Maaike

    2015-03-01

    Most people have experienced loneliness and have been able to overcome it to reconnect with other people. In the current review, we provide a life-span perspective on one component of the evolutionary theory of loneliness-a component we refer to as the reaffiliation motive (RAM). The RAM represents the motivation to reconnect with others that is triggered by perceived social isolation. Loneliness is often a transient experience because the RAM leads to reconnection, but sometimes this motivation can fail, leading to prolonged loneliness. We review evidence of how aspects of the RAM change across development and how these aspects can fail for different reasons across the life span. We conclude with a discussion of age-appropriate interventions that may help to alleviate prolonged loneliness.

  11. SPANNING Between Structure and Nature

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Yongmei

    2005-01-01

    The design project, a new student union building for the Virginia Tech campus is a 420-foot-long structure spanning from earth to water. Along a steel-glass bridge, three simple volumes play together to achieve the functions of the student union. There is an order among Nature, Architecture, and People in this project. Simple geometric forms and the elegant structure interact with nature to achieve the order. People animate the serenity and become the core of the poetic environment. ...

  12. KeySpan Energy Canada

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2001-09-01

    Operating in Alberta, KeySpan is a gas processing company with 14 gas plant facilities and pipelines in the province. Since its employees are sometimes working at remote locations, it has been difficult to use conventional classroom and seminar learning techniques to meet training needs. Cost-effective and innovative learning delivery solutions are now available from sophisticated information and communication technologies such as the Internet. In 1998, the Capability Development System (CDS) was developed by KeySpan as an on-line training system. It comprised a software assessment tool, a number of skills profiles for different occupations, and a curriculum registry providing technical information on the gas processing industry. E-learning initiatives are focused on specific projects or business units in order to better manage the training outcomes. The e-learning experience of KeySpan has resulted in benefits such as: better support to its customers and clients' needs through focused training on company-critical processes, services, products, and functions; more efficient employees; and, employees that feel part of the team.

  13. A four-state memory cell based on magnetoelectric composite

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    SHI Zhan; WANG CuiPing; LIU XinJun; NAN OeWen

    2008-01-01

    A four-state memory can store four states in each memory cell. We designed a four-state memory cell using Co/PZT magnetoelectric composite and observed a broad magnetoelectric hysteretic output loop on applying magnetic field. Based on magnetoelectric hysteresis, we developed a read method by ap-plying a bias magnetic field on the memory cell. Results gave clearly four-state signals of 15.8, -4.4, 5.5 and -11.3 μV, which demonstrated the feasibility of our design.

  14. The organelle of differentiation in embryos: the cell state splitter.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gordon, Natalie K; Gordon, Richard

    2016-01-01

    The cell state splitter is a membraneless organelle at the apical end of each epithelial cell in a developing embryo. It consists of a microfilament ring and an intermediate filament ring subtending a microtubule mat. The microtubules and microfilament ring are in mechanical opposition as in a tensegrity structure. The cell state splitter is bistable, perturbations causing it to contract or expand radially. The intermediate filament ring provides metastability against small perturbations. Once this snap-through organelle is triggered, it initiates signal transduction to the nucleus, which changes gene expression in one of two readied manners, causing its cell to undergo a step of determination and subsequent differentiation. The cell state splitter also triggers the cell state splitters of adjacent cells to respond, resulting in a differentiation wave. Embryogenesis may be represented then as a bifurcating differentiation tree, each edge representing one cell type. In combination with the differentiation waves they propagate, cell state splitters explain the spatiotemporal course of differentiation in the developing embryo. This review is excerpted from and elaborates on "Embryogenesis Explained" (World Scientific Publishing, Singapore, 2016). PMID:26965444

  15. Novel Low Temperature Solid State Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Chonglin [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Nash, Patrick [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Liu, Jian [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States); Collins, Gregory [Univ. of Texas, San Antonio, TX (United States)

    2010-03-23

    We have successfully fabricated (PrBa)Co2O5+δ and (LaBa)Co2O5+δ epitaxial thin film on various single crystal substrates. Physical and electrochemical properties characterizations were carried out. Highly conductive oxygen-deficient double perovskite LnBaCo2O5+ thin films were grown on single crystal (001) SrTiO3 (STO), (001) MgO, (001) LaAlO3 and (110) NdGaO3} substrate by pulsed laser deposition. Microstructure studies from synchrotron X-ray diffraction and Transmission electron microscopy. High temperature transport properties was carried in different atmosphere (O2,Air, N2) up to ~900K. Resistance response of (LaBa)Co2O5+δ epitaxial thin film was characterized in oxygen, nitrogen and 4% hydrogen over a wide range of temperature from 400 C up to 800 C. To determine the electrode performance and oxygen exchange kinetics of PrBaCo2O5+δ, multi-layered thin film based half cell was deposited on LaAlO3(001) substrate. The temperature dependence of the resistance of this half cell structure was characterized by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) within different temperature and gas environments. Anode supported fuel cells, with GCO:YSZ multilayer thin film as electrolyte and PBCO thin film as electrode, are fabricated on tape casted NiO/YSZ substrate. Full cell performance is characterized up to 800 C.

  16. Spanning Trees in Random Satisfiability Problems

    OpenAIRE

    Ramezanpour, A.; Moghimi-Araghi, S.

    2005-01-01

    Working with tree graphs is always easier than with loopy ones and spanning trees are the closest tree-like structures to a given graph. We find a correspondence between the solutions of random K-satisfiability problem and those of spanning trees in the associated factor graph. We introduce a modified survey propagation algorithm which returns null edges of the factor graph and helps us to find satisfiable spanning trees. This allows us to study organization of satisfiable spanning trees in t...

  17. Mechanism for multiplicity of steady states with distinct cell concentration in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yongky, Andrew; Lee, Jongchan; Le, Tung; Mulukutla, Bhanu Chandra; Daoutidis, Prodromos; Hu, Wei-Shou

    2015-07-01

    Continuous culture for the production of biopharmaceutical proteins offers the possibility of steady state operations and thus more consistent product quality and increased productivity. Under some conditions, multiplicity of steady states has been observed in continuous cultures of mammalian cells, wherein with the same dilution rate and feed nutrient composition, steady states with very different cell and product concentrations may be reached. At those different steady states, cells may exhibit a high glycolysis flux with high lactate production and low cell concentration, or a low glycolysis flux with low lactate and high cell concentration. These different steady states, with different cell concentration, also have different productivity. Developing a mechanistic understanding of the occurrence of steady state multiplicity and devising a strategy to steer the culture toward the desired steady state is critical. We establish a multi-scale kinetic model that integrates a mechanistic intracellular metabolic model and cell growth model in a continuous bioreactor. We show that steady state multiplicity exists in a range of dilution rate in continuous culture as a result of the bistable behavior in glycolysis. The insights from the model were used to devise strategies to guide the culture to the desired steady state in the multiple steady state region. The model provides a guideline principle in the design of continuous culture processes of mammalian cells.

  18. Synthetic recombinase-based state machines in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roquet, Nathaniel; Soleimany, Ava P; Ferris, Alyssa C; Aaronson, Scott; Lu, Timothy K

    2016-07-22

    State machines underlie the sophisticated functionality behind human-made and natural computing systems that perform order-dependent information processing. We developed a recombinase-based framework for building state machines in living cells by leveraging chemically controlled DNA excision and inversion operations to encode states in DNA sequences. This strategy enables convenient readout of states (by sequencing and/or polymerase chain reaction) as well as complex regulation of gene expression. We validated our framework by engineering state machines in Escherichia coli that used one, two, or three chemical inputs to control up to 16 DNA states. These state machines were capable of recording the temporal order of all inputs and performing multi-input, multi-output control of gene expression. We also developed a computational tool for the automated design of gene regulation programs using recombinase-based state machines. Our scalable framework should enable new strategies for recording and studying how combinational and temporal events regulate complex cell functions and for programming sophisticated cell behaviors.

  19. Derivation of novel human ground state naive pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Ohad; Weinberger, Leehee; Mansour, Abed AlFatah; Manor, Yair S; Chomsky, Elad; Ben-Yosef, Dalit; Kalma, Yael; Viukov, Sergey; Maza, Itay; Zviran, Asaf; Rais, Yoach; Shipony, Zohar; Mukamel, Zohar; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Zerbib, Mirie; Geula, Shay; Caspi, Inbal; Schneir, Dan; Shwartz, Tamar; Gilad, Shlomit; Amann-Zalcenstein, Daniela; Benjamin, Sima; Amit, Ido; Tanay, Amos; Massarwa, Rada; Novershtern, Noa; Hanna, Jacob H

    2013-12-12

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and can be preserved in vitro in a naive inner-cell-mass-like configuration by providing exogenous stimulation with leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and small molecule inhibition of ERK1/ERK2 and GSK3β signalling (termed 2i/LIF conditions). Hallmarks of naive pluripotency include driving Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1) transcription by its distal enhancer, retaining a pre-inactivation X chromosome state, and global reduction in DNA methylation and in H3K27me3 repressive chromatin mark deposition on developmental regulatory gene promoters. Upon withdrawal of 2i/LIF, naive mouse ES cells can drift towards a primed pluripotent state resembling that of the post-implantation epiblast. Although human ES cells share several molecular features with naive mouse ES cells, they also share a variety of epigenetic properties with primed murine epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). These include predominant use of the proximal enhancer element to maintain OCT4 expression, pronounced tendency for X chromosome inactivation in most female human ES cells, increase in DNA methylation and prominent deposition of H3K27me3 and bivalent domain acquisition on lineage regulatory genes. The feasibility of establishing human ground state naive pluripotency in vitro with equivalent molecular and functional features to those characterized in mouse ES cells remains to be defined. Here we establish defined conditions that facilitate the derivation of genetically unmodified human naive pluripotent stem cells from already established primed human ES cells, from somatic cells through induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming or directly from blastocysts. The novel naive pluripotent cells validated herein retain molecular characteristics and functional properties that are highly similar to mouse naive ES cells, and distinct from conventional primed human pluripotent cells. This includes competence in the generation

  20. Derivation of novel human ground state naive pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gafni, Ohad; Weinberger, Leehee; Mansour, Abed AlFatah; Manor, Yair S; Chomsky, Elad; Ben-Yosef, Dalit; Kalma, Yael; Viukov, Sergey; Maza, Itay; Zviran, Asaf; Rais, Yoach; Shipony, Zohar; Mukamel, Zohar; Krupalnik, Vladislav; Zerbib, Mirie; Geula, Shay; Caspi, Inbal; Schneir, Dan; Shwartz, Tamar; Gilad, Shlomit; Amann-Zalcenstein, Daniela; Benjamin, Sima; Amit, Ido; Tanay, Amos; Massarwa, Rada; Novershtern, Noa; Hanna, Jacob H

    2013-12-12

    Mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells are isolated from the inner cell mass of blastocysts, and can be preserved in vitro in a naive inner-cell-mass-like configuration by providing exogenous stimulation with leukaemia inhibitory factor (LIF) and small molecule inhibition of ERK1/ERK2 and GSK3β signalling (termed 2i/LIF conditions). Hallmarks of naive pluripotency include driving Oct4 (also known as Pou5f1) transcription by its distal enhancer, retaining a pre-inactivation X chromosome state, and global reduction in DNA methylation and in H3K27me3 repressive chromatin mark deposition on developmental regulatory gene promoters. Upon withdrawal of 2i/LIF, naive mouse ES cells can drift towards a primed pluripotent state resembling that of the post-implantation epiblast. Although human ES cells share several molecular features with naive mouse ES cells, they also share a variety of epigenetic properties with primed murine epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). These include predominant use of the proximal enhancer element to maintain OCT4 expression, pronounced tendency for X chromosome inactivation in most female human ES cells, increase in DNA methylation and prominent deposition of H3K27me3 and bivalent domain acquisition on lineage regulatory genes. The feasibility of establishing human ground state naive pluripotency in vitro with equivalent molecular and functional features to those characterized in mouse ES cells remains to be defined. Here we establish defined conditions that facilitate the derivation of genetically unmodified human naive pluripotent stem cells from already established primed human ES cells, from somatic cells through induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cell reprogramming or directly from blastocysts. The novel naive pluripotent cells validated herein retain molecular characteristics and functional properties that are highly similar to mouse naive ES cells, and distinct from conventional primed human pluripotent cells. This includes competence in the generation

  1. Methionine restriction beyond life-span extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ables, Gene P; Hens, Julie R; Nichenametla, Sailendra N

    2016-01-01

    Dietary methionine restriction (MR) extends life span across species via various intracellular regulatory mechanisms. In rodents, MR induces resistance against adiposity, improves hepatic glucose metabolism, preserves cardiac function, and reduces body size, all of which can affect the onset of age-related diseases. Recent studies have shown that MR-affected biomarkers, such as fibroblast growth factor 21, adiponectin, leptin, cystathionine β synthase, and insulin-like growth factor 1, can potentially alter physiology. The beneficial effects of MR could be explained in part by its ability to reduce mitochondrial oxidative stress. Studies have revealed that MR can reduce reactive oxygen species that damage cells and promote cancer progression. It has been demonstrated that either MR or the targeting of specific genes in the methionine cycle could induce cell apoptosis while decreasing proliferation in several cancer models. The complete mechanism underlying the actions of MR on the cell cycle during cancer has not been fully elucidated. Epigenetic mechanisms, such as methylation and noncoding RNAs, are also possible downstream effectors of MR; future studies should help to elucidate some of these mechanisms. Despite evidence that changes in dietary methionine can affect epigenetics, it remains unknown whether epigenetics is a mechanism in MR. This review summarizes research on MR and its involvement in metabolism, cancer, and epigenetics.

  2. Solid state proton conductors properties and applications in fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Knauth, Philippe

    2012-01-01

    Proton conduction can be found in many different solid materials, from organic polymers at room temperature to inorganic oxides at high temperature. Solid state proton conductors are of central interest for many technological innovations, including hydrogen and humidity sensors, membranes for water electrolyzers and, most importantly, for high-efficiency electrochemical energy conversion in fuel cells. Focusing on fundamentals and physico-chemical properties of solid state proton conductors, topics covered include: Morphology and Structure of Solid Acids Diffusion in Soli

  3. Mapping the stem cell state: eight novel human embryonic stem and embryonal carcinoma cell antibodies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wright, A; Andrews, N; Bardsley, K;

    2011-01-01

    The antigenic profile of human embryonic stem (ES) and embryonal carcinoma (EC) cells has served as a key element of their characterization, with a common panel of surface and intracellular markers now widely used. Such markers have been used to identify cells within the 'undifferentiated state...... of reactivity for all antibodies against both ES and EC cells, suggesting that these markers will afford recognition of unique sub-states within the undifferentiated stem cell compartment.......', yet it appears that this categorization may be an oversimplification, because a number of sub-states appear to exist within this state. To increase the resolution of the undifferentiated state, we have generated eight novel monoclonal antibodies, all capable of recognizing undifferentiated human ES...

  4. Assistant pullback technique for main span closure of Sutong Bridge

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Chen Ming; Luo Chengbin; Wu Qihe; Zhang Yongtao; You Xinpeng

    2009-01-01

    Sutong Bridge is a cable-stayed steel box girder bridge with a main span of 1 088 m. The erection of upper structure adopts geometry control method and requires no change to the unit's size and the structure's none-stress geometry. Before main span closure, the cantilever of girder reaches 540.8 m, the structure state is noticeably influenced by external circumstances, the main span closure face great difficulty. By abstracting the advantage of the pullback method abroad and the domestic temperature-cutting method, a new assistant pullback method have put forward and bring into practice actually. In this paper, the analysis key point of practice conditions, key parameter of practice, main measures of the method and the performance is introduced.

  5. High Efficiency Boost Converter with Three State Switching Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Klimczak, Pawel; Munk-Nielsen, Stig

    2009-01-01

    The boost converter with the three-state switching cell seems to be a good candidate for a dc-dc stage for non-isolated generators based on alternative energy sources. It provides a high voltage gain, a reduced voltage stress on transistors and limited input current ripples. In this paper the focus...

  6. Spans in 2-Categories: A monoidal tricategory

    CERN Document Server

    Hoffnung, Alexander E

    2011-01-01

    We present Trimble's definition of a tetracategory and prove that the spans in (strict) 2-categories with certain limits have the structure of a monoidal tricategory, defined as a one-object tetracategory. We recall some notions of limits in 2-categories for use in the construction of the monoidal tricategory of spans.

  7. Radio-frequency-modulated Rydberg states in a vapor cell

    CERN Document Server

    Miller, Stephanie A; Raithel, Georg

    2016-01-01

    We measure strong radio-frequency (RF) electric fields using rubidium Rydberg atoms prepared in a room-temperature vapor cell as field sensors. Electromagnetically induced transparency is employed as an optical readout. We RF-modulate the 60$S_{1/2}$ and 58$D_{5/2}$ Rydberg states with 50~MHz and 100~MHz fields, respectively. For weak to moderate RF fields, the Rydberg levels become Stark-shifted, and sidebands appear at even multiples of the driving frequency. In high fields, the adjacent hydrogenic manifold begins to intersect the shifted levels, providing rich spectroscopic structure suitable for precision field measurements. A quantitative description of strong-field level modulation and mixing of $S$ and $D$ states with hydrogenic states is provided by Floquet theory. Additionally, we estimate the shielding of DC electric fields in the interior of the glass vapor cell.

  8. Performance, Career Dynamics, and Span of Control

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smeets, Valerie Anne Rolande; Waldman, Michael; Warzynski, Frederic Michel Patrick

    ’s predictions concerning span of control including predictions derived from the learning component of the model. Overall, our investigation supports the notion that the scale-of-operations effect and additionally learning are important determinants of the internal organization of firms including span of control....... that higher ability managers should supervise more subordinates, or equivalently, have a larger span of control. And although some of this theory’s predictions have been empirically investigated, there has been little systematic investigation of the theory’s predictions concerning span of control....... In this paper we first extend the theoretical literature on the scale-of-operations effect to allow firms’ beliefs concerning a manager’s ability to evolve over the manager’s career, where much of our focus is the determinants of span of control. We then empirically investigate testable predictions from...

  9. Burnup span sensitivity analysis of different burnup coupling schemes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► The objective of this work is the burnup span sensitivity analysis of different coupling schemes. ► Three kinds of schemes have been implemented in a new MCNP–ORIGEN linkage program. ► Two kinds of schemes are based predictor–corrector technique and the third is based on Euler explicit method. ► The analysis showed that the predictor–corrector approach better accounts for nonlinear behavior of burnup. ► It is sufficiently good to use the Euler method at small spans but for large spans use of second order scheme is mandatory. - Abstract: The analysis of core composition changes is complicated by the fact that the time and spatial variations in isotopic composition depend on the neutron flux distribution and vice versa. Fortunately, changes in core composition occur relatively slowly and hence the burnup analysis can be performed by dividing the burnup period into some burnup spans and assuming that the averaged flux and cross sections are constant during each burn up span. The burnup span sensitivity analysis attempts to find how much the burnup spans could be increased without any significant change in results. This goal has been achieved by developing a new MCNP–ORIGEN linkage program named MOBC (MCNP–ORIGEN Burnup Calculation). Three kinds of coupling scheme have been implemented in MOBC. Two of these are based on second order predictor–corrector technique and enable us to choose larger time steps, whilst the third one is based on Euler explicit first order method and is faster than the other two. The validity of the developed program has been evaluated by the code vs. code comparison technique. Two different types of codes are employed. The first one is based on deterministic two dimensional transport method, like CASMO-4 and HELIOS codes, and the second one is based on Monte Carlo method, like MCODE code. Only one coupling technique is employed in each of these state of the art codes, while the MOBC excels in its ability to

  10. Single-Cell DNA Methylome Sequencing and Bioinformatic Inference of Epigenomic Cell-State Dynamics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthias Farlik

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Methods for single-cell genome and transcriptome sequencing have contributed to our understanding of cellular heterogeneity, whereas methods for single-cell epigenomics are much less established. Here, we describe a whole-genome bisulfite sequencing (WGBS assay that enables DNA methylation mapping in very small cell populations (μWGBS and single cells (scWGBS. Our assay is optimized for profiling many samples at low coverage, and we describe a bioinformatic method that analyzes collections of single-cell methylomes to infer cell-state dynamics. Using these technological advances, we studied epigenomic cell-state dynamics in three in vitro models of cellular differentiation and pluripotency, where we observed characteristic patterns of epigenome remodeling and cell-to-cell heterogeneity. The described method enables single-cell analysis of DNA methylation in a broad range of biological systems, including embryonic development, stem cell differentiation, and cancer. It can also be used to establish composite methylomes that account for cell-to-cell heterogeneity in complex tissue samples.

  11. Data resources for life span study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The Life Span Study sample consists originally of 82,000 A-bomb survivors who were enumerated from a nation-wide A-bomb survivors survey conducted in 1950 and 27,000 non-exposed individuals. Mortality ascertainment is essentially complete by periodic checks against Koseki, but its weakness is the inexactness of the cause of death stated on the death certificate. Some of the latter can be compensated for by collateral use of autopsy information and the data from Tissue and Tumor Registries. Updating of the Hiroshima Tumor Registry has been recently completed and no serious bias related to radiation dose was observed in the data collection for either Hiroshima or Nagasaki. Also the completeness of registration is the highest among registries in Japan. The Tumor and Tissue Registries should be very useful data resources to determine the radiation effects on non-fatal cancers i.e., thyroid and breast cancers as well as the fatal types. Lack of information on the out-migrated subjects from the two cities should be seriously considered, especially those who were of young age at the time of the bombing. Information on environmental factors other than radiation exposure, such as occupation, smoking and diet, has been collected by interviewers, mail questionnaires or record linkage with census data, since 1960. Such information is also currently obtained on a case-control basis for certain sites of cancer, such as breast, lung, colon and rectum, in this cohort. 11 references, 6 tables

  12. Single-Cell-State Culture of Human Pluripotent Stem Cells Increases Transfection Efficiency

    OpenAIRE

    Nii, Takenobu; Kohara, Hiroshi; Marumoto, Tomotoshi; Sakuma, Tetsushi; Yamamoto, Takashi; Tani, Kenzaburo

    2016-01-01

    Abstract Efficient gene transfer into human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) holds great promise for regenerative medicine and pharmaceutical development. In the past decade, various methods were developed for gene transfer into hPSCs; however, hPSCs form tightly packed colonies, making gene transfer difficult. In this study, we established a stable culture method of hPSCs at a single-cell state to reduce cell density and investigated gene transfection efficiency followed by gene editing effici...

  13. Signal Enhancement with Variable Span Linear Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benesty, Jacob; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    This book introduces readers to the novel concept of variable span speech enhancement filters, and demonstrates how it can be used for effective noise reduction in various ways. Further, the book provides the accompanying Matlab code, allowing readers to easily implement the main ideas discussed....... Variable span filters combine the ideas of optimal linear filters with those of subspace methods, as they involve the joint diagonalization of the correlation matrices of the desired signal and the noise. The book shows how some well-known filter designs, e.g. the minimum distortion, maximum signal......-to-noise ratio, Wiener, and tradeoff filters (including their new generalizations) can be obtained using the variable span filter framework. It then illustrates how the variable span filters can be applied in various contexts, namely in single-channel STFT-based enhancement, in multichannel enhancement in both...

  14. Elevated histone expression promotes life span extension.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feser, Jason; Truong, David; Das, Chandrima; Carson, Joshua J; Kieft, Jeffrey; Harkness, Troy; Tyler, Jessica K

    2010-09-10

    Changes to the chromatin structure accompany aging, but the molecular mechanisms underlying aging and the accompanying changes to the chromatin are unclear. Here, we report a mechanism whereby altering chromatin structure regulates life span. We show that normal aging is accompanied by a profound loss of histone proteins from the genome. Indeed, yeast lacking the histone chaperone Asf1 or acetylation of histone H3 on lysine 56 are short lived, and this appears to be at least partly due to their having decreased histone levels. Conversely, increasing the histone supply by inactivation of the histone information regulator (Hir) complex or overexpression of histones dramatically extends life span via a pathway that is distinct from previously known pathways of life span extension. This study indicates that maintenance of the fundamental chromatin structure is critical for slowing down the aging process and reveals that increasing the histone supply extends life span. PMID:20832724

  15. Signal enhancement with variable span linear filters

    CERN Document Server

    Benesty, Jacob; Jensen, Jesper R

    2016-01-01

    This book introduces readers to the novel concept of variable span speech enhancement filters, and demonstrates how it can be used for effective noise reduction in various ways. Further, the book provides the accompanying Matlab code, allowing readers to easily implement the main ideas discussed. Variable span filters combine the ideas of optimal linear filters with those of subspace methods, as they involve the joint diagonalization of the correlation matrices of the desired signal and the noise. The book shows how some well-known filter designs, e.g. the minimum distortion, maximum signal-to-noise ratio, Wiener, and tradeoff filters (including their new generalizations) can be obtained using the variable span filter framework. It then illustrates how the variable span filters can be applied in various contexts, namely in single-channel STFT-based enhancement, in multichannel enhancement in both the time and STFT domains, and, lastly, in time-domain binaural enhancement. In these contexts, the properties of ...

  16. Experimental study of single span railway bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Rigueiro, Constança; Rebelo, C.; Silva, L. Simões da

    2007-01-01

    The main purpose of this paper is to present some results concerning the investigation that has been done by the authors regarding the dynamic response of small to médium span railway bridges using response acceleration data colleted during the measurements carried out on single span bridges on the railway track Linz-Wels, in Austria. Using output-only methods in this experimental program, it was possible to have an estimation of the igenfrequencies, mode shapes and the corresponding viscous ...

  17. Reduced span spray – Part 1: Retention

    OpenAIRE

    Massinon, Mathieu; De Cock, Nicolas; Ouled Taleb Salah, Sofiene; Lebeau, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Maximising treatment efficiency for a given target lies mainly on depositing a maximum part of the spray volume within an optimal droplet size range, which has to be as narrow as possible to reduce retention variability and drift issues. The present work focuses on exploring the effect of span factor of the droplet size distribution on the final retention by a 3D target plant using a modelling approach with the final aim of guiding the development of a reduced span nozzle (Redu...

  18. Reconstructing dynamic molecular states from single-cell time series.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Lirong; Pauleve, Loic; Zechner, Christoph; Unger, Michael; Hansen, Anders S; Koeppl, Heinz

    2016-09-01

    The notion of state for a system is prevalent in the quantitative sciences and refers to the minimal system summary sufficient to describe the time evolution of the system in a self-consistent manner. This is a prerequisite for a principled understanding of the inner workings of a system. Owing to the complexity of intracellular processes, experimental techniques that can retrieve a sufficient summary are beyond our reach. For the case of stochastic biomolecular reaction networks, we show how to convert the partial state information accessible by experimental techniques into a full system state using mathematical analysis together with a computational model. This is intimately related to the notion of conditional Markov processes and we introduce the posterior master equation and derive novel approximations to the corresponding infinite-dimensional posterior moment dynamics. We exemplify this state reconstruction approach using both in silico data and single-cell data from two gene expression systems in Saccharomyces cerevisiae, where we reconstruct the dynamic promoter and mRNA states from noisy protein abundance measurements. PMID:27605167

  19. Modeling of Cancer Stem Cell State Transitions Predicts Therapeutic Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Sehl

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs possess capacity to both self-renew and generate all cells within a tumor, and are thought to drive tumor recurrence. Targeting the stem cell niche to eradicate CSCs represents an important area of therapeutic development. The complex nature of many interacting elements of the stem cell niche, including both intracellular signals and microenvironmental growth factors and cytokines, creates a challenge in choosing which elements to target, alone or in combination. Stochastic stimulation techniques allow for the careful study of complex systems in biology and medicine and are ideal for the investigation of strategies aimed at CSC eradication. We present a mathematical model of the breast cancer stem cell (BCSC niche to predict population dynamics during carcinogenesis and in response to treatment. Using data from cell line and mouse xenograft experiments, we estimate rates of interconversion between mesenchymal and epithelial states in BCSCs and find that EMT/MET transitions occur frequently. We examine bulk tumor growth dynamics in response to alterations in the rate of symmetric self-renewal of BCSCs and find that small changes in BCSC behavior can give rise to the Gompertzian growth pattern observed in breast tumors. Finally, we examine stochastic reaction kinetic simulations in which elements of the breast cancer stem cell niche are inhibited individually and in combination. We find that slowing self-renewal and disrupting the positive feedback loop between IL-6, Stat3 activation, and NF-κB signaling by simultaneous inhibition of IL-6 and HER2 is the most effective combination to eliminate both mesenchymal and epithelial populations of BCSCs. Predictions from our model and simulations show excellent agreement with experimental data showing the efficacy of combined HER2 and Il-6 blockade in reducing BCSC populations. Our findings will be directly examined in a planned clinical trial of combined HER2 and IL-6 targeted

  20. Device and Method for Continuously Equalizing the Charge State of Lithium Ion Battery Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Paul D. (Inventor); Martin, Mark N. (Inventor); Roufberg, Lewis M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of equalizing charge states of individual cells in a battery includes measuring a previous cell voltage for each cell, measuring a previous shunt current for each cell, calculating, based on the previous cell voltage and the previous shunt current, an adjusted cell voltage for each cell, determining a lowest adjusted cell voltage from among the calculated adjusted cell voltages, and calculating a new shunt current for each cell.

  1. Perovskite enhanced solid state ZnO solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper will report on the design, fabrication and testing of a solid-state perovskite enhanced ZnO solar cell. The p-type perovskite material used is bismuth ferrite (BFO) which has an absorption range within the blue range of the visible light spectrum. The solid state solar cell, was sensitized with N719 dye and used a CuSCN hole conductor. A disadvantage of ZnO is its poor chemical stability in acidic and corrosive environments. As chemical solution techniques were used in depositing BFO, a buffer method using an aminosilane ((3-aminopropyltrimethoxysilane or H2N(CH2)3Si(OCH3)3)) coating was used to provide a protective coating on the ZnO nanorods before the BFO film was spin coated onto the ZnO nanorods. The photovoltaic performance of the solar cells were tested using a Keithley 2400 source meter under 100mW/cm2, AM 1.5G simulated sunlight, where improvements in Jsc and efficiency were observed. The BFO was able to harness more electrons and also acted as a buffer from electron recombination

  2. The Relationship of Role-Based, Task-Based, Boundary-Spanning, and Conflict-Mediating Stress Experienced by New York State Special Education Administrators and Emotional Exhaustion, Depersonalization, and Personal Accomplishment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ambrosini, MaryAnn

    2013-01-01

    Given the challenges faced in ensuring the needs of students with disabilities are met in the midst of fiscal constraints, increasing litigation, meeting adequate yearly progress and compliance with State regulations, special education administrators are more at risk for burnout than ever before. Burnout is characterized by a high degree of…

  3. Behavior of three-span braced columns with equal and unequal spans

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Yu-Wen

    1993-01-01

    Columns with three spans separated by elastic braces are analyzed. The influences of translational and rotational resistance at the braces, various end conditions, and the bracing locations for the perfect columns with equal and unequal spans subjected to uniform and nonuniform axial load are investigated. For imperfect columns with equal or unequal spans subjected to uniform compression, the effects of various end conditions at the top and various initial deflections are studied. "Ide...

  4. Transcriptomic profiling of human embryonic stem cells upon cell cycle manipulation during pluripotent state dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonzales, Kevin Andrew Uy; Liang, Hongqing

    2015-12-01

    While distinct cell cycle structures have been known to correlate with pluripotent or differentiated cell states [1], there is no evidence on how the cell cycle machinery directly contributes to human embryonic stem cell (hESC) pluripotency. We established a determinant role of cell cycle machineries on the pluripotent state by demonstrating that the specific perturbation of the S and G2 phases can prevent pluripotent state dissolution (PSD) [2]. Active mechanisms in these phases, such as the DNA damage checkpoint and Cyclin B1, promote the pluripotent state [2]. To understand the mechanisms behind the effect on PSD by these pathways in hESCs, we performed comprehensive gene expression analysis by time-course microarray experiments. From these datasets, we observed expression changes in genes involved in the TGFβ signaling pathway, which has a well-established role in hESC maintenance [3], [4], [5]. The microarray data have been deposited in NCBI's Gene Expression Omnibus (GEO) and can be accessed through GEO Series accession numbers GSE62062 and GSE63215.

  5. Saccharide blocking layers in solid state dye sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Handa, S.; Haque, S.A.; Durrant, J.R. [Department of Chemistry, Imperial College London, Exhibition Road, South Kensington, SW7 2AZ. London (United Kingdom)

    2007-10-15

    The adsorption of saccharides on dye sensitized, nanocrystalline metal oxide films is shown to improve the efficiency of solid state dye sensitized solar cells. The function of the saccharide treatment is evaluated by transient optical studies, and correlated with device photovoltaic performance. A range of saccharides, including cyclodextrins and their linear analogue amylose, are investigated. The saccharide blocking layer is shown to retard interfacial charge recombination losses, resulting in increased device open circuit voltage. Highest device performance is achieved with linear saccharide amylose, resulting in a 60 % improvement in device efficiency relative to the non-treated control, with a device open circuit voltage of 1 V. (Abstract Copyright [2007], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  6. Characterising of solid state electrochemical cells under operation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holtappels, Peter

    2014-01-01

    Compared to significant progress in PEMFC especially regarding the utilization of complex fuels such as methanol significant progress has been made by applying spectroscopic / differential IR and spectrometric techniques to working fuel cells, the processes in solid state high temperature....... This relates to interrelation between NOx/ O2 on cathodes but also to sulfur and carbon exposure at the anode. Past and recent activities on SOFC anodes and cathodes will be presented as well as perspectives and gaps discussed for these systems. Especially interaction between sulfur interactions with solids...

  7. Seismic Performance of Multi-Span RC Railway Bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Georgakis, Christos; Barrau, Xavier

    2008-01-01

    and fragility curves in relation to PGA. The cost comparisons clearly show that particular bridge types perform better than others economically for specific ground types and expected seismic intensities, even though in some cases they may be expected to suffer larger damages during their lifetime....... with Lead Rubber Bearing (LRB) supports and the laterally fixed continuous deck (CRB) with LRBs. In this paper, the seismic performance of these four types is examined for varying ground types and seismic intensities. For the purposes of comparison, all of the bridges have five spans with identical span...... to increase the performance and reduce the overall bridge cost. Finally, an evaluation of the lifetime bridge costs are made assuming current prices, including costs relating to the damage associated with the expected seismic events. This is accomplished through the use of approximated damage states...

  8. Cell receptor and surface ligand density effects on dynamic states of adhering circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Xiangjun; Cheung, Luthur Siu-Lun; Schroeder, Joyce A; Jiang, Linan; Zohar, Yitshak

    2011-10-21

    Dynamic states of cancer cells moving under shear flow in an antibody-functionalized microchannel are investigated experimentally and theoretically. The cell motion is analyzed with the aid of a simplified physical model featuring a receptor-coated rigid sphere moving above a solid surface with immobilized ligands. The motion of the sphere is described by the Langevin equation accounting for the hydrodynamic loadings, gravitational force, receptor-ligand bindings, and thermal fluctuations; the receptor-ligand bonds are modeled as linear springs. Depending on the applied shear flow rate, three dynamic states of cell motion have been identified: (i) free motion, (ii) rolling adhesion, and (iii) firm adhesion. Of particular interest is the fraction of captured circulating tumor cells, defined as the capture ratio, via specific receptor-ligand bonds. The cell capture ratio decreases with increasing shear flow rate with a characteristic rate. Based on both experimental and theoretical results, the characteristic flow rate increases monotonically with increasing either cell-receptor or surface-ligand density within certain ranges. Utilizing it as a scaling parameter, flow-rate dependent capture ratios for various cell-surface combinations collapse onto a single curve described by an exponential formula.

  9. State of the art: stem cells in equine regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopez, M J; Jarazo, J

    2015-03-01

    According to Greek mythology, Prometheus' liver grew back nightly after it was removed each day by an eagle as punishment for giving mankind fire. Hence, contrary to popular belief, the concept of tissue and organ regeneration is not new. In the early 20th century, cell culture and ex vivo organ preservation studies by Alexis Carrel, some with famed aviator Charles Lindbergh, established a foundation for much of modern regenerative medicine. While early beliefs and discoveries foreshadowed significant accomplishments in regenerative medicine, advances in knowledge within numerous scientific disciplines, as well as nano- and micromolecular level imaging and detection technologies, have contributed to explosive advances over the last 20 years. Virtually limitless preparations, combinations and applications of the 3 major components of regenerative medicine, namely cells, biomaterials and bioactive molecules, have created a new paradigm of future therapeutic options for most species. It is increasingly clear, however, that despite significant parallels among and within species, there is no 'one-size-fits-all' regenerative therapy. Likewise, a panacea has yet to be discovered that completely reverses the consequences of time, trauma and disease. Nonetheless, there is no question that the promise and potential of regenerative medicine have forever altered medical practices. The horse is a relative newcomer to regenerative medicine applications, yet there is already a large body of work to incorporate novel regenerative therapies into standard care. This review focuses on the current state and potential future of stem cells in equine regenerative medicine. PMID:24957845

  10. A murine ESC-like state facilitates transgenesis and homologous recombination in human pluripotent stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    C. Buecker (Christa); H.H. Chen; J.M. Polo; L. Daheron (Laurence); L. Bu (Lei); T.S. Barakat (Tahsin Stefan); P. Okwieka (Patricia); A. Porter (Andrew); J.H. Gribnau (Joost); K. Hochedlinger (Konrad); N. Geijsen (Niels)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractMurine pluripotent stem cells can exist in two functionally distinct states, LIF-dependent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bFGF-dependent epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). However, human pluripotent cells so far seemed to assume only an epiblast-like state. Here we demonstrate that human iPS

  11. A Murine ESC-like State Facilitates Transgenesis and Homologous Recombination in Human Pluripotent Stem Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Buecker, Christa; Chen, Hsu-Hsin; Polo, Jose Maria; Daheron, Laurence; Bu, Lei; Barakat, Tahsin Stefan; Okwieka, Patricia; Porter, Andrew; Gribnau, Joost; Hochedlinger, Konrad; Geijsen, Niels

    2010-01-01

    Murine pluripotent stem cells can exist in two functionally distinct states, LIF-dependent embryonic stem cells (ESCs) and bFGF-dependent epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs). However, human pluripotent cells so far seemed to assume only an epiblast-like state. Here we demonstrate that human iPSC reprogramm

  12. Friendship and adaption across the life span

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hartup, W.W.; Stevens, N.L.

    1999-01-01

    Friends foster self-esteem and a sense of well-being, socialize one another, and support one another in coping with developmental transitions and life stress. Friends engage in different activities with one another across the life span, but friendship is conceived similarly by children and adults. F

  13. Dentulous Appliance for Upper Anterior Edentulous Span

    OpenAIRE

    Chalakkal, Paul; Devi, Ramisetty Sabitha; Srinivas, G Vijay; Venkataramana, Pammi

    2013-01-01

    This article discusses about a fixed dentulous appliance that was constructed to replace the primary upper anterior edentulous span in a four year old girl. It constituted a design, whereby the maxillary primary second molars were used to support the appliance through bands and a wire that contained an acrylic flange bearing trimmed acrylic teeth, anteriorly. The appliance was functionally and aesthetically compliant.

  14. Spanning organizational boundaries to manage creative processes:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Kragh, Hanne; Lettl, Christopher

    2013-01-01

    In order to continue to be innovative in the current fast-paced and competitive environment, organizations are increasingly dependent on creative inputs developed outside their boundaries. The paper addresses the boundary spanning activities that managers undertake to a) select and mobilize creat...

  15. Evaluating the efficiency of shortcut span protection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Dittmann, Lars; Berger, Michael Stübert;

    2010-01-01

    This paper presents a comparison of various recovery methods in terms of capacity efficiency with the underlying aim of reducing control plane load. In particular, a method where recovery requests are bundled towards the destination (Shortcut Span Protection) is evaluated can compared against...

  16. CONTEMPORARY CONCEPTS OF TIME SPAN IN NATURAL DEVELOPMENTS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan Lazarevich Mowravov

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The paper explored some empirical patterns of time span being set up in various natural branches of science for their being conceptually incompatible with the patterns in the theoretic (academic physics, and considered the concept of "functional" time span as well that relieved the above contradiction. The author stated in the paper that biologists, physiologists, psychologists, sociologists, economists, etc. have been involved into the efforts to set up the above patterns, to solve their research-and-occupation-related issues upon their own criteria derived from their understanding of academic and practical appropriateness of their work rather than with the criteria the physics suggested.The author has paid much attention to the way the functional concept of timespan operated, which relieved conceptual incompatibility existing between the empirical patterns of time span and the pattern set up in the theoretic (academic physics. This concept enables significant alteration to a perception of a position and part taken by the cognisant self (represented in the physics as "an observer" in the academic concept, in order to extend it, by means of selfdetermination, with the conception of a " perceiver position/ standing". This conception, in its turn, shall be defined by the set of factors of various origin, ranging from those produced by an individual mind to those shaped with societal ideology, all of them encouraging a researcher to select out of the series of properties observed of an entity explored exactly the features "substantial" for study, and not the other.

  17. Methionine restriction and life-span control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byung Cheon; Kaya, Alaattin; Gladyshev, Vadim N

    2016-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) without malnutrition is associated with longevity in various organisms. However, it has also been shown that reduced calorie intake is often ineffective in extending life span. Selecting optimal dietary regimens for DR studies is complicated, as the same regimen may lead to different outcomes depending on genotype and environmental factors. Recent studies suggested that interventions such as moderate protein restriction with or without adequate nutrition (e.g., particular amino acids or carbohydrates) may have additional beneficial effects mediated by certain metabolic and hormonal factors implicated in the biology of aging, regardless of total calorie intake. In particular, it was shown that restriction of a single amino acid, methionine, can mimic the effects of DR and extend life span in various model organisms. We discuss the beneficial effects of a methionine-restricted diet, the molecular pathways involved, and the use of this regimen in longevity interventions.

  18. Octave Spanning Frequency Comb on a Chip

    CERN Document Server

    Del'Haye, P; Gavartin, E; Holzwarth, R; Kippenberg, T J

    2009-01-01

    Optical frequency combs have revolutionized the field of frequency metrology within the last decade and have become enabling tools for atomic clocks, gas sensing and astrophysical spectrometer calibration. The rapidly increasing number of applications has heightened interest in more compact comb generators. Optical microresonator based comb generators bear promise in this regard. Critical to their future use as 'frequency markers', is however the absolute frequency stabilization of the optical comb spectrum. A powerful technique for this stabilization is self-referencing, which requires a spectrum that spans a full octave, i.e. a factor of two in frequency. In the case of mode locked lasers, overcoming the limited bandwidth has become possible only with the advent of photonic crystal fibres for supercontinuum generation. Here, we report for the first time the generation of an octave-spanning frequency comb directly from a toroidal microresonator on a silicon chip. The comb spectrum covers the wavelength range...

  19. Interorganizational Boundary Spanning in Global Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søderberg, Anne-Marie; Romani, Laurence

    , and which skills and competencies they draw on in their efforts to deal with emerging cross-cultural issues in a way that paves ground for developing a shared understanding and common platform for the client and vendor representatives. A framework of boundary spanning leadership practices is adapted...... to virtuality and cultural diversity. This paper, which draws on a case study of collaborative work in a global software development project, focuses on key boundary spanners in an Indian vendor company, who are responsible for developing trustful and sustainable client relations and coordinating complex...... projects across multiple cultures, languages, organisational boundaries, time zones and geographical distances. It looks into how these vendor managers get prepared for their complex boundary spanning work, which cross-cultural challenges they experience in their collaboration with Western clients...

  20. Boundary Spanning in Global Software Development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Søderberg, Anne-Marie; Romani, Laurence

    How does a global company deal with inter-organizational boundary spanning activities? If the company is an Indian vendor, and the client a Western multinational company in need of major transformations, the answer to this question challenges prior research. This paper builds on a field study...... of Indian IT vendor managers who are responsible for developing client relations and coordinating complex global development projects. The authors revise a framework of boundary spanning leadership practices to adapt it to an offshore outsourcing context. The empirical investigation highlights how...... imbalances of power, exacerbated in the case of an Indian vendor and a European client, need to be taken into account. The paper thus contributes with a more context sensitive understanding of inter-organizational boundary work. Taking the vendor perspective also leads to problematization of common...

  1. Spanning forests on the Sierpinski gasket

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shu-Chiuan Chang

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available We present the numbers of spanning forests on the Sierpinski gasket $SG_d(n$ at stage $n$ with dimension $d$ equal to two, three and four, and determine the asymptotic behaviors. The corresponding results on the generalized Sierpinski gasket $SG_{d,b}(n$ with $d=2$ and $b=3,4$ are obtained. We also derive the upper bounds of the asymptotic growth constants for both $SG_d$ and $SG_{2,b}$.

  2. Robustness of Long Span Reciprocal Timber Structures

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Balfroid, Nathalie; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning; Sassone, Mario SASSONE

    2011-01-01

    engineer may take necessary steps to design robust structures that are insensitive to accidental circumstances. The present paper makes a discussion of such robustness issues related to the future development of reciprocal timber structures. The paper concludes that these kind of structures can have...... a potential as long span timber structures in real projects if they are carefully designed with respect to the overall robustness strategies....

  3. Vision in Flies: Measuring the Attention Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenig, Sebastian; Wolf, Reinhard; Heisenberg, Martin

    2016-01-01

    A visual stimulus at a particular location of the visual field may elicit a behavior while at the same time equally salient stimuli in other parts do not. This property of visual systems is known as selective visual attention (SVA). The animal is said to have a focus of attention (FoA) which it has shifted to a particular location. Visual attention normally involves an attention span at the location to which the FoA has been shifted. Here the attention span is measured in Drosophila. The fly is tethered and hence has its eyes fixed in space. It can shift its FoA internally. This shift is revealed using two simultaneous test stimuli with characteristic responses at their particular locations. In tethered flight a wild type fly keeps its FoA at a certain location for up to 4s. Flies with a mutation in the radish gene, that has been suggested to be involved in attention-like mechanisms, display a reduced attention span of only 1s.

  4. Vision in Flies: Measuring the Attention Span.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Koenig

    Full Text Available A visual stimulus at a particular location of the visual field may elicit a behavior while at the same time equally salient stimuli in other parts do not. This property of visual systems is known as selective visual attention (SVA. The animal is said to have a focus of attention (FoA which it has shifted to a particular location. Visual attention normally involves an attention span at the location to which the FoA has been shifted. Here the attention span is measured in Drosophila. The fly is tethered and hence has its eyes fixed in space. It can shift its FoA internally. This shift is revealed using two simultaneous test stimuli with characteristic responses at their particular locations. In tethered flight a wild type fly keeps its FoA at a certain location for up to 4s. Flies with a mutation in the radish gene, that has been suggested to be involved in attention-like mechanisms, display a reduced attention span of only 1s.

  5. Spanning trees and the Eurozone crisis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, João

    2013-12-01

    The sovereign debt crisis in the euro area has not yet been solved and recent developments in Spain and Italy have further deteriorated the situation. In this paper we develop a new approach to analyze the ongoing Eurozone crisis. Firstly, we use Maximum Spanning Trees to analyze the topological properties of government bond rates’ dynamics. Secondly, we combine the information given by both Maximum and Minimum Spanning Trees to obtain a measure of market dissimilarity or disintegration. Thirdly, we extend this measure to include a convenient distance not limited to the interval [0, 2]. Our empirical results show that Maximum Spanning Tree gives an adequate description of the separation of the euro area into two distinct groups: those countries strongly affected by the crisis and those that have remained resilient during this period. The measures of market dissimilarity also reveal a persistent separation of these two groups and, according to our second measure, this separation strongly increased during the period July 2009-March 2012.

  6. Sox10 Regulates Stem/Progenitor and Mesenchymal Cell States in Mammary Epithelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Dravis

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available To discover mechanisms that mediate plasticity in mammary cells, we characterized signaling networks that are present in the mammary stem cells responsible for fetal and adult mammary development. These analyses identified a signaling axis between FGF signaling and the transcription factor Sox10. Here, we show that Sox10 is specifically expressed in mammary cells exhibiting the highest levels of stem/progenitor activity. This includes fetal and adult mammary cells in vivo and mammary organoids in vitro. Sox10 is functionally relevant, as its deletion reduces stem/progenitor competence whereas its overexpression increases stem/progenitor activity. Intriguingly, we also show that Sox10 overexpression causes mammary cells to undergo a mesenchymal transition. Consistent with these findings, Sox10 is preferentially expressed in stem- and mesenchymal-like breast cancers. These results demonstrate a signaling mechanism through which stem and mesenchymal states are acquired in mammary cells and suggest therapeutic avenues in breast cancers for which targeted therapies are currently unavailable.

  7. Analysis of Dynamic Characteristics of Submarine Free Spanning Pipelines by Complex Damping Method

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    傅强; 郭海燕; 杨新华

    2004-01-01

    Considering the effect of the internal flowing fluid and the external marine environmental condition, the differential equation for the vortex-induced vibration (VIV) of the free spanning pipeline is derived and is discretized by the Hermit interpolation function. The free vibration equation with the damping term is solved by the complex damping method for the natural frequency, and then the effect of fluid damping on the natural frequency of the free spanning pipeline is analyzed.The results show that fluid damping has a significant influence on the damped natural frequency of the free spanning pipeline in the lock-in state, while it has little influence when the pipeline is out of the lock-in state. In the meantime,the change of the free span length has the same effect on the damped natural frequency and the undamped natural frequency.

  8. An ES-Like pluripotent state in FGF-dependent murine iPS cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    B. di Stefano (Bruno); C. Buecker (Christa); F. Ungaro (Federica); A. Prigione (Alessandro); H.H. Chen; M. Welling (Maaike); M. Eijpe (Maureen); G. Mostoslavsky (Gustavo); P. Tesar (Paul); J. Adjaye (James); N. Geijsen (Niels); V. Broccoli (Vania)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractRecent data demonstrates that stem cells can exist in two morphologically, molecularly and functionally distinct pluripotent states; a naïve LIF-dependent pluripotent state which is represented by murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs) and an FGFdependent primed pluripotent state represente

  9. Decentralized Pricing in Minimum Cost Spanning Trees

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougaard, Jens Leth; Moulin, Hervé; Østerdal, Lars Peter

    In the minimum cost spanning tree model we consider decentralized pricing rules, i.e. rules that cover at least the ecient cost while the price charged to each user only depends upon his own connection costs. We de ne a canonical pricing rule and provide two axiomatic characterizations. First......, the canonical pricing rule is the smallest among those that improve upon the Stand Alone bound, and are either superadditive or piece-wise linear in connection costs. Our second, direct characterization relies on two simple properties highlighting the special role of the source cost....

  10. Variable Span Filters for Speech Enhancement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Benesty, Jacob; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2016-01-01

    distortion. Subspace approaches, on the other hand, can potentially yield better control by filtering in the eigen-domain, but traditionally these approaches have not been optimized explicitly for traditional noise reduction and signal distortion measures. Herein, we combine these approaches by deriving...... optimal filters using a joint diagonalization as a basis. This gives excellent control over the performance, as we can optimize for noise reduction or signal distortion performance. Results from real data experiments show that the proposed variable span filters can achieve better performance than existing...

  11. Signal Enhancement with Variable Span Linear Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Benesty, Jacob; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll; Jensen, Jesper Rindom

    . Variable span filters combine the ideas of optimal linear filters with those of subspace methods, as they involve the joint diagonalization of the correlation matrices of the desired signal and the noise. The book shows how some well-known filter designs, e.g. the minimum distortion, maximum signal...... the time and STFT domains, and, lastly, in time-domain binaural enhancement. In these contexts, the properties of these filters are analyzed in terms of their noise reduction capabilities and desired signal distortion, and the analyses are validated and further explored in simulations....

  12. Technology for cell cycle research with unstressed steady-state cultures

    OpenAIRE

    Lebleu, Valerie S.; Thornton, Maureen; Gonda, Steven R.; Helmstetter, Charles E.

    2006-01-01

    A culture system for performing cell cycle analyses on cells in undisturbed steady-state populations was designed and tested. In this system, newborn cells are shed continuously from an immobilized, perfused culture rotating about the horizontal axis. As a result of this arrangement, the number of newborn cells released into the effluent medium each generation is identical to the number of cells residing in the immobilized population, indicating that one of the two new daughter cells is shed ...

  13. Emotional Egocentricity Bias across the life-span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federica eRiva

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available In our daily lives, we often have to quickly estimate the emotions of our conspecifics in order to have successful social interactions. While this estimation process seems quite easy when we are ourselves in a neutral or equivalent emotional state, it has recently been shown that in case of incongruent emotional states between ourselves and the others, our judgments can be biased. This phenomenon, introduced to the literature with the term Emotional Egocentricity Bias (EEB, has been found to occur in young adults and, to a greater extent, in children. However, how EEB changes across the life-span from adolescence to old age has been largely unexplored. In this study, we recruited 114 female participants subdivided in four cohorts (adolescents, young adults, middle-aged adults, older adults to examine EEB age-related changes. Participants were administered with a paradigm which, by making use of visuo-tactile stimulation that elicits conflicting feelings in paired participants, allows the valid and reliable exploration of EEB. Results highlighted a U-shaped relation between age and EEB, revealing higher emotional egocentricity in adolescents and older adults compared to young and middle-aged adults. These results are in line with the neuroscientific literature which has recently shown that overcoming EEB is associated with a greater activation of a portion of the parietal lobe, namely the right Supramarginal Gyrus (rSMG. This is an area that reaches full maturation only by the end of adolescence, and displays an early decay in older age. Thus, the age-related changes of the EEB could be possibly due to the life-span development of the rSMG. This study is the first one to show the quadratic relation between age and the EEB and set a milestone for further research exploring the neural correlates of the life-span development of the EEB. Future studies are needed in order to generalize these results to the male population and to explore gender

  14. Steady state hemoglobin concentration and packed cell volume in homozygous sickle cell disease patients in Lagos, Nigeria

    OpenAIRE

    Akinbami, Akinsegun; Dosunmu, Adedoyin; Adediran, Adewumi; Oshinaike, Olajumoke; Phillip, Adebola; Vincent, Osunkalu; Olanrewaju, Arogundade; Oluwaseun, Adelekan

    2012-01-01

    Background: Sickle cell disease is a genetic disorder of hemoglobin causing myriad of pathology including anemia. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the baseline values of steady state hemoglobin and packed cell volume as a guide to managing the early recognition of hemolytic crises in sickle cell anemia.

  15. Battery system and method for sensing and balancing the charge state of battery cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davies, Francis J. (Inventor)

    2012-01-01

    A battery system utilizes a plurality of transformers interconnected with the battery cells. The transformers each have at least one transformer core operable for magnetization in at least a first magnetic state with a magnetic flux in a first direction and a second magnetic state with a magnetic flux in a second direction. The transformer cores retain the first magnetic state and the second magnetic state without current flow through said plurality of transformers. Circuitry is utilized for switching a selected transformer core between the first and second magnetic states to sense voltage and/or balance particular cells or particular banks of cells.

  16. Matroidal Degree-Bounded Minimum Spanning Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Zenklusen, Rico

    2011-01-01

    We consider the minimum spanning tree (MST) problem under the restriction that for every vertex v, the edges of the tree that are adjacent to v satisfy a given family of constraints. A famous example thereof is the classical degree-constrained MST problem, where for every vertex v, a simple upper bound on the degree is imposed. Iterative rounding/relaxation algorithms became the tool of choice for degree-bounded network design problems. A cornerstone for this development was the work of Singh and Lau, who showed for the degree-bounded MST problem how to find a spanning tree violating each degree bound by at most one unit and with cost at most the cost of an optimal solution that respects the degree bounds. However, current iterative rounding approaches face several limits when dealing with more general degree constraints. In particular, when several constraints are imposed on the edges adjacent to a vertex v, as for example when a partition of the edges adjacent to v is given and only a fixed number of elemen...

  17. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  18. In situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy of electrochemical cells: batteries, supercapacitors, and fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blanc, Frédéric; Leskes, Michal; Grey, Clare P

    2013-09-17

    Electrochemical cells, in the form of batteries (or supercapacitors) and fuel cells, are efficient devices for energy storage and conversion. These devices show considerable promise for use in portable and static devices to power electronics and various modes of transport and to produce and store electricity both locally and on the grid. For example, high power and energy density lithium-ion batteries are being developed for use in hybrid electric vehicles where they improve the efficiency of fuel use and help to reduce greenhouse gas emissions. To gain insight into the chemical reactions involving the multiple components (electrodes, electrolytes, interfaces) in the electrochemical cells and to determine how cells operate and how they fail, researchers ideally should employ techniques that allow real-time characterization of the behavior of the cells under operating conditions. This Account reviews the recent use of in situ solid-state NMR spectroscopy, a technique that probes local structure and dynamics, to study these devices. In situ NMR studies of lithium-ion batteries are performed on the entire battery, by using a coin cell design, a flat sealed plastic bag, or a cylindrical cell. The battery is placed inside the NMR coil, leads are connected to a potentiostat, and the NMR spectra are recorded as a function of state of charge. (7)Li is used for many of these experiments because of its high sensitivity, straightforward spectral interpretation, and relevance to these devices. For example, (7)Li spectroscopy was used to detect intermediates formed during electrochemical cycling such as LixC and LiySiz species in batteries with carbon and silicon anodes, respectively. It was also used to observe and quantify the formation and growth of metallic lithium microstructures, which can cause short circuits and battery failure. This approach can be utilized to identify conditions that promote dendrite formation and whether different electrolytes and additives can help

  19. The influence of microwave radiation on the state of chromatin in human cells

    CERN Document Server

    Shckorbatov, Y G; Grabina, V A; Kolchigin, N N; Batrakov, D O; Kalashnikov, V V; Ivanchenko, D D; Bykov, V N

    2008-01-01

    Isolated human buccal epithelium cell were irradiated by microwaves at frequency f=35 GHz and surface power density E=30 mcW/cm2. The state of chromatin in human cells was determined by methodsof light and electron microscopy. The state of cell membranes was evaluated by the method of vital indigo carmine staining. The microwave-induced condensation of chromatin in human cells was revealed. Left side circulary polarized waves induced less effect than linearly polarized radiation. The linearly polarized electromagnetic waves induced cell membrane damage revealed by the increase of cell stainability. The data obtained are discussed in connection with the mechanisms of biologica effect of electromagnetic waves.

  20. Distinct mechanical behavior of HEK293 cells in adherent and suspended states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haghparast, Seyed Mohammad Ali; Kihara, Takanori; Miyake, Jun

    2015-01-01

    The mechanical features of individual animal cells have been regarded as indicators of cell type and state. Previously, we investigated the surface mechanics of cancer and normal stromal cells in adherent and suspended states using atomic force microscopy. Cancer cells possessed specific mechanical and actin cytoskeleton features that were distinct from normal stromal cells in adherent and suspended states. In this paper, we report the unique mechanical and actin cytoskeletal features of human embryonic kidney HEK293 cells. Unlike normal stromal and cancer cells, the surface stiffness of adherent HEK293 cells was very low, but increased after cell detachment from the culture surface. Induced actin filament depolymerization revealed that the actin cytoskeleton was the underlying source of the stiffness in suspended HEK293 cells. The exclusive mechanical response of HEK293 cells to perturbation of the actin cytoskeleton resembled that of adherent cancer cells and suspended normal stromal cells. Thus, with respect to their special cell-surface mechanical features, HEK293 cells could be categorized into a new class distinct from normal stromal and cancer cells.

  1. Solid-State NMR on bacterial cells: selective cell wall signal enhancement and resolution improvement using dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for the study of material surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate its potential to investigate cell surface in intact cells. Using Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells as an example, it is shown that the polarizing agent 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL) has a strong binding affinity to cell wall polymers (peptidoglycan). This particular interaction is thoroughly investigated with a systematic study on extracted cell wall materials, disrupted cells, and entire cells, which proved that TOTAPOL is mainly accumulating in the cell wall. This property is used on one hand to selectively enhance or suppress cell wall signals by controlling radical concentrations and on the other hand to improve spectral resolution by means of a difference spectrum. Comparing DNP-enhanced and conventional solid-state NMR, an absolute sensitivity ratio of 24 was obtained on the entire cell sample. This important increase in sensitivity together with the possibility of enhancing specifically cell wall signals and improving resolution really opens new avenues for the use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR as an on-cell investigation tool. (authors)

  2. Faster generation of random spanning trees

    CERN Document Server

    Kelner, Jonathan A

    2009-01-01

    In this paper, we set forth a new algorithm for generating approximately uniformly random spanning trees in undirected graphs. We show how to sample from a distribution that is within a multiplicative $(1+\\delta)$ of uniform in expected time $\\TO(m\\sqrt{n}\\log 1/\\delta)$. This improves the sparse graph case of the best previously known worst-case bound of $O(\\min \\{mn, n^{2.376}\\})$, which has stood for twenty years. To achieve this goal, we exploit the connection between random walks on graphs and electrical networks, and we use this to introduce a new approach to the problem that integrates discrete random walk-based techniques with continuous linear algebraic methods. We believe that our use of electrical networks and sparse linear system solvers in conjunction with random walks and combinatorial partitioning techniques is a useful paradigm that will find further applications in algorithmic graph theory.

  3. Galactic Archaeology and Minimum Spanning Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Macfarlane, B A; Flynn, C M L

    2015-01-01

    Chemical tagging of stellar debris from disrupted open clusters and associations underpins the science cases for next-generation multi-object spectroscopic surveys. As part of the Galactic Archaeology project TraCD (Tracking Cluster Debris), a preliminary attempt at reconstructing the birth clouds of now phase-mixed thin disk debris is undertaken using a parametric minimum spanning tree (MST) approach. Empirically-motivated chemical abundance pattern uncertainties (for a 10-dimensional chemistry-space) are applied to NBODY6-realised stellar associations dissolved into a background sea of field stars, all evolving in a Milky Way potential. We demonstrate that significant population reconstruction degeneracies appear when the abundance uncertainties approach 0.1 dex and the parameterised MST approach is employed; more sophisticated methodologies will be required to ameliorate these degeneracies.

  4. Turning Simple Span into Complex Span: Time for Decay or Interference from Distractors?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewandowsky, Stephan; Geiger, Sonja M.; Morrell, Daniel B.; Oberauer, Klaus

    2010-01-01

    We investigated the effects of the duration and type of to-be-articulated distractors during encoding of a verbal list into short-term memory (STM). Distractors and to-be-remembered items alternated during list presentation, as in the complex-span task that underlies much of working-memory research. According to an interference model of STM, known…

  5. The effect of cerium valence states at cerium oxide nanoparticle surfaces on cell proliferation

    KAUST Repository

    Naganuma, Tamaki

    2014-05-01

    Understanding and controlling cell proliferation on biomaterial surfaces is critical for scaffold/artificial-niche design in tissue engineering. The mechanism by which underlying integrin ligates with functionalized biomaterials to induce cell proliferation is still not completely understood. In this study, poly-l-lactide (PL) scaffold surfaces were functionalized using layers of cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs), which have recently attracted attention for use in therapeutic application due to their catalytic ability of Ce4+ and Ce3+ sites. To isolate the influence of Ce valance states of CNPs on cell proliferation, human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) and osteoblast-like cells (MG63) were cultured on the PL/CNP surfaces with dominant Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions. Despite cell type (hMSCs and MG63 cells), different surface features of Ce4+ and Ce3+ regions clearly promoted and inhibited cell spreading, migration and adhesion behavior, resulting in rapid and slow cell proliferation, respectively. Cell proliferation results of various modified CNPs with different surface charge and hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity, indicate that Ce valence states closely correlated with the specific cell morphologies and cell-material interactions that trigger cell proliferation. This finding suggests that the cell-material interactions, which influence cell proliferation, may be controlled by introduction of metal elements with different valence states onto the biomaterial surface. © 2014 Elsevier Ltd.

  6. Novel Molecular Insights into Classical and Alternative Activation States of Microglia as Revealed by Stable Isotope Labeling by Amino Acids in Cell Culture (SILAC)-based Proteomics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bell-Temin, Harris; Culver-Cochran, Ashley E; Chaput, Dale; Carlson, Christina M; Kuehl, Melanie; Burkhardt, Brant R; Bickford, Paula C; Liu, Bin; Stevens, Stanley M

    2015-12-01

    Microglia, the resident immune cells of the brain, have been shown to display a complex spectrum of roles that span from neurotrophic to neurotoxic depending on their activation status. Microglia can be classified into four stages of activation, M1, which most closely matches the classical (pro-inflammatory) activation stage, and the alternative activation stages M2a, M2b, and M2c. The alternative activation stages have not yet been comprehensively analyzed through unbiased, global-scale protein expression profiling. In this study, BV2 mouse immortalized microglial cells were stimulated with agonists specific for each of the four stages and total protein expression for 4644 protein groups was quantified using SILAC-based proteomic analysis. After validating induction of the various stages through a targeted cytokine assay and Western blotting of activation states, the data revealed novel insights into the similarities and differences between the various states. The data identify several protein groups whose expression in the anti-inflammatory, pro-healing activation states are altered presumably to curtail inflammatory activation through differential protein expression, in the M2a state including CD74, LYN, SQST1, TLR2, and CD14. The differential expression of these proteins promotes healing, limits phagocytosis, and limits activation of reactive nitrogen species through toll-like receptor cascades. The M2c state appears to center around the down-regulation of a key member in the formation of actin-rich phagosomes, SLP-76. In addition, the proteomic data identified a novel activation marker, DAB2, which is involved in clathrin-mediated endocytosis and is significantly different between M2a and either M1 or M2b states. Western blot analysis of mouse primary microglia stimulated with the various agonists of the classical and alternative activation states revealed a similar trend of DAB2 expression compared with BV2 cells.

  7. Increased Life Span due to Calorie Restriction in Respiratory-Deficient Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2005-11-01

    Full Text Available A model for replicative life span extension by calorie restriction (CR in yeast has been proposed whereby reduced glucose in the growth medium leads to activation of the NAD-dependent histone deacetylase Sir2. One mechanism proposed for this putative activation of Sir2 is that CR enhances the rate of respiration, in turn leading to altered levels of NAD or NADH, and ultimately resulting in enhanced Sir2 activity. An alternative mechanism has been proposed in which CR decreases levels of the Sir2 inhibitor nicotinamide through increased expression of the gene coding for nicotinamidase, PNC1. We have previously reported that life span extension by CR is not dependent on Sir2 in the long-lived BY4742 strain background. Here we have determined the requirement for respiration and the effect of nicotinamide levels on life span extension by CR. We find that CR confers robust life span extension in respiratory-deficient cells independent of strain background, and moreover, suppresses the premature mortality associated with loss of mitochondrial DNA in the short-lived PSY316 strain. Addition of nicotinamide to the medium dramatically shortens the life span of wild type cells, due to inhibition of Sir2. However, even in cells lacking both Sir2 and the replication fork block protein Fob1, nicotinamide partially prevents life span extension by CR. These findings (1 demonstrate that respiration is not required for the longevity benefits of CR in yeast, (2 show that nicotinamide inhibits life span extension by CR through a Sir2-independent mechanism, and (3 suggest that CR acts through a conserved, Sir2-independent mechanism in both PSY316 and BY4742.

  8. Stem cells and chronic wound healing: state of the art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leavitt T

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Tripp Leavitt, Michael S Hu, Clement D Marshall, Leandra A Barnes, Michael T Longaker, H Peter Lorenz Hagey Laboratory for Pediatric Regenerative Medicine, Division of Plastic Surgery, Department of Surgery, Stanford University School of Medicine, Stanford, CA, USA Abstract: Currently available treatments for chronic wounds are inadequate. A clearly effective therapy does not exist, and treatment is often supportive. This is largely because the cellular and molecular processes underlying failure of wound repair are still poorly understood. With an increase in comorbidities, such as diabetes and vascular disease, as well as an aging population, the incidence of these intractable wounds is expected to rise. As such, chronic wounds, which are already costly, are rapidly growing as a tremendous burden to the health-care system. Stem cells have garnered much interest as a therapy for chronic wounds due to their inherent ability to differentiate into multiple lineages and promote regeneration. Herein, we discuss the types of stem cells used for chronic wound therapy, as well as the proposed means by which they do so. In particular, we highlight mesenchymal stem cells (including adipose-derived stem cells, endothelial progenitor cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. We include the results of recent in vitro and in vivo studies in both animal models and human clinical trials. Finally, we discuss the current studies to improve stem cell therapies and the limitations of stem cell-based therapeutics. Stem cells promise improved therapies for healing chronic wounds, but further studies that are well-designed with standardized protocols are necessary for fruition. Keywords: stem cells, chronic wounds, cell therapy, wound healing

  9. Kinetic Studies on State of the Art Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Graves, Christopher R.; Hjelm, Johan;

    2014-01-01

    Introduction The Solid Oxide Fuel Cell (SOFC), which converts hydrogen as well as hydrocarbon fuels directly into electricity, has demonstrated almost comparable performance when operated reversely as Solid Oxide Electrolyser Cell (SOEC) for electrical energy storage as fuels. In both application...

  10. State Ballots on Stem Cells and Race Are Decided

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wiedeman, Reeves

    2008-01-01

    This article reports that a state ballot measure to ban affirmative-action programs based on race, gender, and national origin at public colleges and other state agencies was defeated. Colorado voters narrowly rejected such a referendum last week by a razor-thin margin that took two days to become official. Voters in Nebraska, however, took the…

  11. Spanning the Creative Space between Home and Work

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davis, Lee N.; Hoisl, Karin; Davis, Jerome

    invention, and the degree of radicalness of the invention. We find that employees who continue to think about their workplace research while away from work produce more valuable inventions. Diversity of hobbies, more socially oriented hobbies, and more focused hobbies are also positively related...... the employee brings to work. Based on Woodman et al.’s (1993) “interactionist perspective” on organizational creativity, supplemented by literature on search and knowledge/combination, we explore whether leisure time activities can span the creative space between the employee’s home and workplace – given...... the range of multi-level inputs that may also contribute to workplace creativity. We use original survey data comprising 4,138 inventions from 21 European countries, the United States and Japan, in all major industries. Organizational creativity is measured by the asset value of the patent on the associated...

  12. Solid State Polymer Electrolytes for Dye-sensitized Solar Cell

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    1 Introduction Over the past decade,Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have been intensively investigated as potential alternatives to conventional inorganic photovoltaic devices due to their low production cost and high energy conversion[1-4]. This type of solar cell has achieved an impressive energy conversion efficiency of over 10%,whose electrolyte is a voltaic organic liquid solvent containing iodide/triiodide as redox couple.However,the use of a liquid electrolyte brings difficulties in the practi...

  13. Map service: United States Decadal Production History Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — This map service displays present and past oil and gas production in the United States, as well as the location and intensity of exploratory drilling outside...

  14. Kinetic Studies on State of the Art Solid Oxide Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Njodzefon, Jean-Claude; Graves, Christopher R.; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg;

    2016-01-01

    Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigated – hydrogen/steam and refor......Electrochemical reaction kinetics at the electrodes of Solid Oxide Cells (SOCs) were investigated at 700 °C for two cells with different fuel electrode microstructures as well as on a third cell with a reduced active electrode area. Three fuel mixtures were investigated – hydrogen....../steam and reformate fuels hydrogen/carbon-dioxide and hydrogen/methane/steam. It was found that the kinetics at the fuel electrode were exactly the same in both reformates. The hydrogen/steam fuel displayed slightly faster kinetics than the reformate fuels. Furthermore the gas conversion impedance in the hydrogen...... into a single process as the gas conversion was reduced. The SOC with finer electrode microstructure displayed improved kinetics....

  15. The cell monolayer trajectory from the system state point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stys, Dalibor; Vanek, Jan; Nahlik, Tomas; Urban, Jan; Cisar, Petr

    2011-10-01

    Time-lapse microscopic movies are being increasingly utilized for understanding the derivation of cell states and predicting cell future. Often, fluorescence and other types of labeling are not available or desirable, and cell state-definitions based on observable structures must be used. We present the methodology for cell behavior recognition and prediction based on the short term cell recurrent behavior analysis. This approach has theoretical justification in non-linear dynamics theory. The methodology is based on the general stochastic systems theory which allows us to define the cell states, trajectory and the system itself. We introduce the usage of a novel image content descriptor based on information contribution (gain) by each image point for the cell state characterization as the first step. The linkage between the method and the general system theory is presented as a general frame for cell behavior interpretation. We also discuss extended cell description, system theory and methodology for future development. This methodology may be used for many practical purposes, ranging from advanced, medically relevant, precise cell culture diagnostics to very utilitarian cell recognition in a noisy or uneven image background. In addition, the results are theoretically justified. PMID:21879106

  16. The cell monolayer trajectory from the system state point of view.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stys, Dalibor; Vanek, Jan; Nahlik, Tomas; Urban, Jan; Cisar, Petr

    2011-10-01

    Time-lapse microscopic movies are being increasingly utilized for understanding the derivation of cell states and predicting cell future. Often, fluorescence and other types of labeling are not available or desirable, and cell state-definitions based on observable structures must be used. We present the methodology for cell behavior recognition and prediction based on the short term cell recurrent behavior analysis. This approach has theoretical justification in non-linear dynamics theory. The methodology is based on the general stochastic systems theory which allows us to define the cell states, trajectory and the system itself. We introduce the usage of a novel image content descriptor based on information contribution (gain) by each image point for the cell state characterization as the first step. The linkage between the method and the general system theory is presented as a general frame for cell behavior interpretation. We also discuss extended cell description, system theory and methodology for future development. This methodology may be used for many practical purposes, ranging from advanced, medically relevant, precise cell culture diagnostics to very utilitarian cell recognition in a noisy or uneven image background. In addition, the results are theoretically justified.

  17. Life span study report 9, part 3

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The incidence of malignant tumors in the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) sample in Nagasaki as revealed by the Nagasaki Tumor Registry (Registry) has been investigated for the period 1959-78. No exposure status bias in data collection has been revealed. Neither method of diagnosis, reporting hospitals, nor the frequency of doubtful cases differ by exposure dose. Thus, the effect of a bias, if one exists, must be small and should not affect the interpretation of the results obtained in the present analysis. The risk of radiogenic cancer definitely increases with radiation dose for leukemia, cancer of the breast, lung, stomach, and thyroid, and suggestively so for cancer of the colon and urinary tract and multiple myeloma. However, there is no increase as yet for cancer of the esophagus, liver, gall bladder, uterus, ovary, and salivary gland, or for malignant lymphoma. For fatal cancers, these results strengthen those of the recent analysis of mortality based on death certificates on the same LSS cohort. In general, the relative risks based on incidence (that is, on Registry data) are either the same or slightly higher than those based on mortality for the same years; however, the absolute risk estimates (excess cancer per million person-year per rad) are far higher. (author)

  18. Reduced span spray: Part 3: Design of a narrow span nozzle

    OpenAIRE

    De Cock, Nicolas; Massinon, Mathieu; Ouled Taleb Salah, Sofiene; Lebeau, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Optimisation of the droplet spectra of the agricultural spray may increase the spray application efficiency. The optimal spray would contain only the most efficient droplets in term of speed and size. Therefore, this paper is presenting the first steps of the design of a narrow span nozzle in order to produce an optimised spray. The starting geometry is a splash plate nozzle with a disk ending with structures (i.e. tooth, grooves, and needles) that would separate the liquid sheet...

  19. Cord blood mesenchymal stem cells propel human dendritic cells to an intermediate maturation state and boost interleukin-12 production by mature dendritic cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Berk, L.C.J. van den; Roelofs, H.; Huijs, T.; Siebers-Vermeulen, K.G.C.; Raymakers, R.A.P.; Kogler, G.; Figdor, C.G.; Torensma, R.

    2009-01-01

    Pathogen-derived entities force the tissue-resident dendritic cells (DCs) towards a mature state, followed by migration to the draining lymph node to present antigens to T cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modulate the differentiation, maturation and function of DCs. In umbilical cord

  20. Genetic determinants of human health span and life span: progress and new opportunities.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    George M Martin

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available We review three approaches to the genetic analysis of the biology and pathobiology of human aging. The first and so far the best-developed is the search for the biochemical genetic basis of varying susceptibilities to major geriatric disorders. These include a range of progeroid syndromes. Collectively, they tell us much about the genetics of health span. Given that the major risk factor for virtually all geriatric disorders is biological aging, they may also serve as markers for the study of intrinsic biological aging. The second approach seeks to identify allelic contributions to exceptionally long life spans. While linkage to a locus on Chromosome 4 has not been confirmed, association studies have revealed a number of significant polymorphisms that impact upon late-life diseases and life span. The third approach remains theoretical. It would require longitudinal studies of large numbers of middle-aged sib-pairs who are extremely discordant or concordant for their rates of decline in various physiological functions. We can conclude that there are great opportunities for research on the genetics of human aging, particularly given the huge fund of information on human biology and pathobiology, and the rapidly developing knowledge of the human genome.

  1. Single-cell gene expression profiling and cell state dynamics: collecting data, correlating data points and connecting the dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Carsten; Zhou, Joseph X; Huang, Sui

    2016-06-01

    Single-cell analyses of transcript and protein expression profiles-more precisely, single-cell resolution analysis of molecular profiles of cell populations-have now entered the center stage with widespread applications of single-cell qPCR, single-cell RNA-Seq and CyTOF. These high-dimensional population snapshot techniques are complemented by low-dimensional time-resolved, microscopy-based monitoring methods. Both fronts of advance have exposed a rich heterogeneity of cell states within uniform cell populations in many biological contexts, producing a new kind of data that has triggered computational analysis methods for data visualization, dimensionality reduction, and cluster (subpopulation) identification. The next step is now to go beyond collecting data and correlating data points: to connect the dots, that is, to understand what actually underlies the identified data patterns. This entails interpreting the 'clouds of points' in state space as a manifestation of the underlying molecular regulatory network. In that way control of cell state dynamics can be formalized as a quasi-potential landscape, as first proposed by Waddington. We summarize key methods of data acquisition and computational analysis and explain the principles that link the single-cell resolution measurements to dynamical systems theory. PMID:27152696

  2. ω-6 Polyunsaturated fatty acids extend life span through the activation of autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Rourke, Eyleen J; Kuballa, Petric; Xavier, Ramnik; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-02-15

    Adaptation to nutrient scarcity depends on the activation of metabolic programs to efficiently use internal reserves of energy. Activation of these programs in abundant food regimens can extend life span. However, the common molecular and metabolic changes that promote adaptation to nutritional stress and extend life span are mostly unknown. Here we present a response to fasting, enrichment of ω-6 polyunsaturated fatty acids (PUFAs), which promotes starvation resistance and extends Caenorhabditis elegans life span. Upon fasting, C. elegans induces the expression of a lipase, which in turn leads to an enrichment of ω-6 PUFAs. Supplementing C. elegans culture media with these ω-6 PUFAs increases their resistance to starvation and extends their life span in conditions of food abundance. Supplementation of C. elegans or human epithelial cells with these ω-6 PUFAs activates autophagy, a cell recycling mechanism that promotes starvation survival and slows aging. Inactivation of C. elegans autophagy components reverses the increase in life span conferred by supplementing the C. elegans diet with these fasting-enriched ω-6 PUFAs. We propose that the salubrious effects of dietary supplementation with ω-3/6 PUFAs (fish oils) that have emerged from epidemiological studies in humans may be due to a similar activation of autophagic programs. PMID:23392608

  3. State of direct fuel cell/turbine systems development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghezel-Ayagh, Hossein; Walzak, Jim; Patel, Dilip; Daly, Joseph; Maru, Hans; Sanderson, Robert; Livingood, William

    FuelCell Energy Inc. (FCE) is actively developing fuel cell/gas turbine hybrid systems, DFC/T ®, for generation of clean electric power with very high efficiencies. The gas turbine extends the high efficiency of the fuel cell without the need for supplementary fuel. Key features of the DFC/T system include: electrical efficiencies of up to 75% on natural gas (60% on coal gas), minimal emissions, simple design, reduced carbon dioxide release to the environment, and potential cost competitiveness with existing combined cycle power plants. FCE successfully completed sub-MW scale proof-of-concept tests (pre-alpha DFC/T hybrid power plant). The tests demonstrated that the concept results in higher power plant efficiency. A small packaged natural gas fueled sub-MW unit is being developed for demonstrations (alpha and beta units). Also, the preliminary design of a 40 MW power plant including the key equipment layout and the site plan was completed.

  4. The state of organic solar cells-A meta analysis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, Mikkel; Carlé, Jon Eggert; Søndergaard, Roar R.;

    2013-01-01

    Solar cells that convert sunlight into electrical power have demonstrated a large and consistent growth through several decades. The growth has spawned research on new technologies that potentially enable much faster, less costly and environmentally friendly manufacture from earth abundant materi...

  5. Dissecting cellular states and cell state transitions through integrative analysis of epigenetic dynamics

    OpenAIRE

    Ziller, Michael

    2014-01-01

    Understanding how a single genome that is common to all cells in an organism can give rise to many different and highly specialized, cell types has been one of the major questions in biology over the past century and still many aspects remain unanswered. Over the last 15 years, incredible progress has been made in pinpointing the regulatory mechanisms that establish, maintain, and change cellular identities. In particular, the role of histone modifications and DNA methylation in the spatio-te...

  6. Teaching about September 11th and Its Aftermath. C-SPAN in the Classroom.

    Science.gov (United States)

    C-SPAN, Washington, DC.

    The events of and since September 11, 2001 have had an immeasurable impact on all facets of people's lives, especially in the United States. The loss of human life, threatened public safety, and the impact of a military response are just some of the issues concerning U.S. citizens and public officials. This C-SPAN in the Classroom series offers…

  7. Spanning Trees and bootstrap reliability estimation in correlation based networks

    CERN Document Server

    Tumminello, M; Lillo, F; Micciché, S; Mantegna, R N

    2006-01-01

    We introduce a new technique to associate a spanning tree to the average linkage cluster analysis. We term this tree as the Average Linkage Minimum Spanning Tree. We also introduce a technique to associate a value of reliability to links of correlation based graphs by using bootstrap replicas of data. Both techniques are applied to the portfolio of the 300 most capitalized stocks traded at New York Stock Exchange during the time period 2001-2003. We show that the Average Linkage Minimum Spanning Tree recognizes economic sectors and sub-sectors as communities in the network slightly better than the Minimum Spanning Tree does. We also show that the average reliability of links in the Minimum Spanning Tree is slightly greater than the average reliability of links in the Average Linkage Minimum Spanning Tree.

  8. Power, Governance and Boundary Spanning Leadership in Public Sector Organisations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Elmholdt, Claus Westergård; Fogsgaard, Morten

    2015-01-01

    . The general interest in this workshop, and the study of boundary spanning leadership and power in public organizations, is related to perspectives concerning the extent to which the quality of boundary spanning activities has significant spillover effects on the organization's productivity, job satisfaction......The phenomenon of power and boundary spanning leadership in public sector organizations is the topic for the present workshop. In this workshop we present a practice perspective (Corradi, Gherardi and Verzelloni 2010) on the management of power and boundary spanning leadership. We will focus...... on the practice that evolves on the boundaries that span occupational groups, departments and organizations. The workshop takes it’s starting point in an interdisciplinary Scandinavian research project which deals with the question of how power processes can promote, or hinder, boundary spanning leadership...

  9. Life span study report, 9; 1950-78

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The RERF life span study report 9 consists of three parts and supplementary tables, each bound separately. Life span study report 9 supplementary tables, supplement to TR 12-80 and TR 5-81, are computer pritouts containing the life span study data from 1950-78. These tables are pertinent only to part 1 (Cancer mortality among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-78) and part 2 (Mortality from causes other than cancer among atomic bomb survivors, 1950-78) of Life span study report 9. This study extends Life span study report 8 by four years from 1975-78. These tables are included following data: The life span study sample, Death certificate data by cause, Malignant neoplasms, Neoplasms generally, Diseases other than neoplasms, Injuries and accidents, Summary of death certificate data. (J.P.N.)

  10. A Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development

    OpenAIRE

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article had four goals. First, the authors identified a set of general challenges and questions that a life-span theory of development should address. Second, they presented a comprehensive account of their Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. They integrated the model of optimization in primary and secondary control and the action-phase model of developmental regulation with their original life-span theory of control to present a comprehensive theory of development. Third, they...

  11. Fuel cells: State of the Art and Future Developments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Apfel, H.; Cremers, C.; Stimming, U. [Technische Univ. Muenchen (Germany). Physik-Department E19

    2004-07-01

    Providing electricity and heats is one key issue of our civilization today and in the future. Conserving non-renewable resources and reducing emissions become more and more important in the development of energy converters. Fuel cells are one possibility. They convert energy with high efficiency and extremely low mission of pollutants. In this paper construction and operation of fuel cells are explained briefly. Applications for high (SOFC) and low (PEM) temperature fuel cells are shown by means of several existing prototypes. The main issues inhibiting higher power densities are discussed and a possible solution by an structure of the catalysis is presented. (orig.) [German] Die Bereitstellung von Elektrizitaet und Waerme ist und bleibt eine wesentliche technologische Aufgabe der zivilisatorischen Gesellschaft. Resourcenschonung und Minimierung der Schadstoffemissionen gewinnen zunehmend an Bedeutung. Brennstoffzellen sind Energiewandler, die mit hoher Effizienz bei extrem geringen Schadstoffemissionen arbeiten. Aufbau und Funktionsweise von Brennstoffzellen werden kurz vorgestellt. Es werden Anwendungsbeispiele fuer Hochtemperatur-Brennstoffzellen (z. B. SOFC) fuer die stationaere Erzeugung von Elektrizitaet und Waerme aus Erdgas und fuer Niedertemperatur-Brennstoffzellen (z. B. PEMFC) mit fluessigen Energietraegern im Fahrzeugbereich gegeben. Fuer die Entwicklung geeigneter Brennstoffzellensysteme muss die Peripherie, insbesondere die Gasaufbereitung, so gestaltet werden, dass der hohe elektrische Wirkungsgrad und die Schadstoffarmut erhalten bleiben. Die mikroskopischen Prozesse in Brennstoffzellen werden beleuchtet, und es wird, anhand einer potentiell deutlich verbesserten Katalysatorstruktur, ein moeglicher Weg zur Ueberwindung momentaner Schwierigkeiten bei der Entwicklung von Brennstoffzellen diskutiert. (orig.)

  12. The phosphorylation state of CD3gamma influences T cell responsiveness and controls T cell receptor cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Backstrom, T; Lauritsen, JP;

    1998-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) is internalized following activation of protein kinase C (PKC) via a leucine (Leu)-based motif in CD3gamma. Some studies have indicated that the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface following PKC-mediated internalization. The functional state of recycled TCR and the ...... the phosphorylation state of CD3gamma and T cell responsiveness. Based on these observations a physiological role of CD3gamma and TCR cycling is proposed.......The T cell receptor (TCR) is internalized following activation of protein kinase C (PKC) via a leucine (Leu)-based motif in CD3gamma. Some studies have indicated that the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface following PKC-mediated internalization. The functional state of recycled TCR...... and the mechanisms involved in the sorting events following PKC-induced internalization are not known. In this study, we demonstrated that following PKC-induced internalization, the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface in a functional state. TCR recycling was dependent on dephosphorylation of CD3gamma, probably...

  13. Improved construction of medium-span concrete viaducts

    OpenAIRE

    Caballero, Ángel; Turmo Coderque, José

    2011-01-01

    Concreting of span by span construction with travelling scaffolding is typically made in two phases. In the first phase, webs and bottom flange of the box girder are concreted. In the second phase, top flange is concreted. Once the cross section is self-supporting, this is to say, once the concrete of the top flange is hardened, the segment can be prestressed and the scaffolding can be shifted to the next span. This procedure takes usually two weeks per span. In order to shorten the critic...

  14. Long span cable supported bridges - present technology and trends

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gimsing, Niels Jørgen

    1998-01-01

    The activity within the field of long-span cable supported bridges has never been larger than at the end of the 20th century. The technology is well advanced to cope with the present challenges but it is also approaching its limits so if the trend towards ever increasing spans continues into the ......The activity within the field of long-span cable supported bridges has never been larger than at the end of the 20th century. The technology is well advanced to cope with the present challenges but it is also approaching its limits so if the trend towards ever increasing spans continues...

  15. Mathematical analysis of steady-state solutions in compartment and continuum models of cell polarization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Zhenzhen; Chou, Ching-Shan; Yi, Tau-Mu; Nie, Qing

    2011-10-01

    Cell polarization, in which substances previously uniformly distributed become asymmetric due to external or/and internal stimulation, is a fundamental process underlying cell mobility, cell division, and other polarized functions. The yeast cell S. cerevisiae has been a model system to study cell polarization. During mating, yeast cells sense shallow external spatial gradients and respond by creating steeper internal gradients of protein aligned with the external cue. The complex spatial dynamics during yeast mating polarization consists of positive feedback, degradation, global negative feedback control, and cooperative effects in protein synthesis. Understanding such complex regulations and interactions is critical to studying many important characteristics in cell polarization including signal amplification, tracking dynamic signals, and potential trade-off between achieving both objectives in a robust fashion. In this paper, we study some of these questions by analyzing several models with different spatial complexity: two compartments, three compartments, and continuum in space. The step-wise approach allows detailed characterization of properties of the steady state of the system, providing more insights for biological regulations during cell polarization. For cases without membrane diffusion, our study reveals that increasing the number of spatial compartments results in an increase in the number of steady-state solutions, in particular, the number of stable steady-state solutions, with the continuum models possessing infinitely many steady-state solutions. Through both analysis and simulations, we find that stronger positive feedback, reduced diffusion, and a shallower ligand gradient all result in more steady-state solutions, although most of these are not optimally aligned with the gradient. We explore in the different settings the relationship between the number of steady-state solutions and the extent and accuracy of the polarization. Taken together

  16. The state of the union: the cell biology of fertilization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evans, Janice P; Florman, Harvey M

    2002-10-01

    Fertilization is the process by which sperm and egg unite. An expanded understanding of the mechanisms that underlie these events has provided insights into an important aspect of early development and also has proven to be a valuable model in which to study cellular function. In addition, many emerging strategies for contraception and for the treatment of infertility are based on the mechanism of gamete interaction. Here, we discuss the cell and molecular biology of mammalian fertilization, highlight selected recent breakthroughs and attempt to identify key unanswered questions.

  17. Tequila Regulates Insulin-Like Signaling and Extends Life Span in Drosophila melanogaster.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Cheng-Wen; Wang, Horng-Dar; Bai, Hua; Wu, Ming-Shiang; Yen, Jui-Hung; Tatar, Marc; Fu, Tsai-Feng; Wang, Pei-Yu

    2015-12-01

    The aging process is a universal phenomenon shared by all living organisms. The identification of longevity genes is important in that the study of these genes is likely to yield significant insights into human senescence. In this study, we have identified Tequila as a novel candidate gene involved in the regulation of longevity in Drosophila melanogaster. We have found that a hypomorphic mutation of Tequila (Teq(f01792)), as well as cell-specific downregulation of Tequila in insulin-producing neurons of the fly, significantly extends life span. Tequila deficiency-induced life-span extension is likely to be associated with reduced insulin-like signaling, because Tequila mutant flies display several common phenotypes of insulin dysregulation, including reduced circulating Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 (Dilp2), reduced Akt phosphorylation, reduced body size, and altered glucose homeostasis. These observations suggest that Tequila may confer life-span extension by acting as a modulator of Drosophila insulin-like signaling.

  18. The Mother Enrichment Program: A Genetic System for Facile Replicative Life Span Analysis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Lindstrom, Derek L.; Gottschling, Daniel E.

    2009-01-01

    The replicative life span (RLS) of Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been established as a model for the genetic regulation of longevity despite the inherent difficulty of the RLS assay, which requires separation of mother and daughter cells by micromanipulation after every division. Here we present the mother enrichment program (MEP), an inducible genetic system in which mother cells maintain a normal RLS—a median of 36 generations in the diploid MEP strain—while the proliferative potential of da...

  19. Identifying sexual differentiation genes that affect Drosophila life span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tower John

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sexual differentiation often has significant effects on life span and aging phenotypes. For example, males and females of several species have different life spans, and genetic and environmental manipulations that affect life span often have different magnitude of effect in males versus females. Moreover, the presence of a differentiated germ-line has been shown to affect life span in several species, including Drosophila and C. elegans. Methods Experiments were conducted to determine how alterations in sexual differentiation gene activity might affect the life span of Drosophila melanogaster. Drosophila females heterozygous for the tudor[1] mutation produce normal offspring, while their homozygous sisters produce offspring that lack a germ line. To identify additional sexual differentiation genes that might affect life span, the conditional transgenic system Geneswitch was employed, whereby feeding adult flies or developing larvae the drug RU486 causes the over-expression of selected UAS-transgenes. Results In this study germ-line ablation caused by the maternal tudor[1] mutation was examined in a long-lived genetic background, and was found to increase life span in males but not in females, consistent with previous reports. Fitting the data to a Gompertz-Makeham model indicated that the maternal tudor[1] mutation increases the life span of male progeny by decreasing age-independent mortality. The Geneswitch system was used to screen through several UAS-type and EP-type P element mutations in genes that regulate sexual differentiation, to determine if additional sex-specific effects on life span would be obtained. Conditional over-expression of transformer female isoform (traF during development produced male adults with inhibited sexual differentiation, however this caused no significant change in life span. Over-expression of doublesex female isoform (dsxF during development was lethal to males, and produced a limited

  20. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE DELPHI SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Steven Shaffer; Sean Kelly; Subhasish Mukerjee; David Schumann; Gail Geiger; Kevin Keegan; John Noetzel; Larry Chick

    2003-12-08

    The objective of Phase I under this project is to develop a 5 kW Solid Oxide Fuel Cell power system for a range of fuels and applications. During Phase I, the following will be accomplished: Develop and demonstrate technology transfer efforts on a 5 kW stationary distributed power generation system that incorporates steam reforming of natural gas with the option of piped-in water (Demonstration System A). Initiate development of a 5 kW system for later mass-market automotive auxiliary power unit application, which will incorporate Catalytic Partial Oxidation (CPO) reforming of gasoline, with anode exhaust gas injected into an ultra-lean burn internal combustion engine. This technical progress report covers work performed by Delphi from January 1, 2003 to June 30, 2003, under Department of Energy Cooperative Agreement DE-FC-02NT41246. This report highlights technical results of the work performed under the following tasks: Task 1 System Design and Integration; Task 2 Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Stack Developments; Task 3 Reformer Developments; Task 4 Development of Balance of Plant (BOP) Components; Task 5 Manufacturing Development (Privately Funded); Task 6 System Fabrication; Task 7 System Testing; Task 8 Program Management; and Task 9 Stack Testing with Coal-Based Reformate.

  1. Biomanufacturing of Therapeutic Cells: State of the Art, Current Challenges, and Future Perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Kyung-Ho; Nerem, Robert M; Roy, Krishnendu

    2016-06-01

    Stem cells and other functionally defined therapeutic cells (e.g., T cells) are promising to bring hope of a permanent cure for diseases and disorders that currently cannot be cured by conventional drugs or biological molecules. This paradigm shift in modern medicine of using cells as novel therapeutics can be realized only if suitable manufacturing technologies for large-scale, cost-effective, reproducible production of high-quality cells can be developed. Here we review the state of the art in therapeutic cell manufacturing, including cell purification and isolation, activation and differentiation, genetic modification, expansion, packaging, and preservation. We identify current challenges and discuss opportunities to overcome them such that cell therapies become highly effective, safe, and predictively reproducible while at the same time becoming affordable and widely available. PMID:27276552

  2. Multiple steady states with distinct cellular metabolism in continuous culture of mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Europa, A F; Gambhir, A; Fu, P C; Hu, W S

    2000-01-01

    Mammalian cells have the ability to proliferate under different nutrient environments by utilizing different combinations of the nutrients, especially glucose and the amino acids. Under the conditions often used in in vitro cultivation, the cells consume glucose and amino acids in great excess of what is needed for making up biomass and products. They also produce large amounts of metabolites with lactate, ammonia, and some non-essential amino acids such as alanine as the most dominant ones. By controlling glucose and glutamine at low levels, cellular metabolism can be altered and can result in reduced glucose and glutamine consumption as well as in reduced metabolite formation. Using a fed-batch reactor to manipulate glucose at a low level (as compared to a typical batch culture), cell metabolism was altered to a state with substantially reduced lactate production. The culture was then switched to a continuous mode and allowed to reach a steady-state. At this steady-state, the concentrations of cells and antibody were substantially higher than a control culture that was initiated from a batch culture without first altering cellular metabolism. The lactate and other metabolite concentrations were also substantially reduced as compared to the control culture. This newly observed steady-state was achieved at the same dilution rate and feed medium as the control culture. The paths leading to the two steady-states, however, were different. These results demonstrate steady-state multiplicity. At this new steady-state, not only was glucose metabolism altered, but the metabolism of amino acids was altered as well. The amino acid metabolism in the new steady-state was more balanced, and the excretion of non-essential amino acids and ammonia was substantially lower. This approach of reaching a more desirable steady-state with higher concentrations of cells and product opens a new avenue for high-density- and high-productivity-cell culture.

  3. Reconstructing and analysing cellular states, space and time from gene expression profiles of many cells and single cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francesconi, Mirko; Lehner, Ben

    2015-10-01

    Genome-wide gene expression profiling is a fast, cheap and standardised analysis that provides a high dimensional measurement of the state of a biological sample. In this review we describe computational methods that can be applied to identify and interpret sources of variance in gene expression in whole organisms, organs, tissues or single cells. This allows the identification of constituent cell types and states in complex mixtures, the reconstruction of temporal trajectories of development, differentiation and progression, and the reconstruction of spatial patterning. When applied to genetically variable samples, these methods allow the efficient investigation of how genetic variation influences gene expression and biological processes in space and time.

  4. Paternal smoking habits affect the reproductive life span of daughters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fukuda, Misao; Fukuda, Kiyomi; Shimizu, Takashi;

    2011-01-01

    The present study assessed whether the smoking habits of fathers around the time of conception affected the period in which daughters experienced menstrual cycles (i.e., the reproductive life span). The study revealed that the smoking habits of the farther shortened the daughters' reproductive life...... span compared with daughters whose fathers did not smoke....

  5. The Effect of Orthographic Neighborhood in the Reading Span Task

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Christelle; Postal, Virginie; Mathey, Stéphanie

    2015-01-01

    This study aimed at examining whether and to what extent orthographic neighborhood of words influences performance in a working memory span task. Twenty-five participants performed a reading span task in which final words to be memorized had either no higher frequency orthographic neighbor or at least one. In both neighborhood conditions, each…

  6. A Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heckhausen, Jutta; Wrosch, Carsten; Schulz, Richard

    2010-01-01

    This article had four goals. First, the authors identified a set of general challenges and questions that a life-span theory of development should address. Second, they presented a comprehensive account of their Motivational Theory of Life-Span Development. They integrated the model of optimization in primary and secondary control and the…

  7. C-Span in the Classroom. Teacher's Guide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carey, Helen H.; Greenberg, Judith E.

    This teacher's guide is designed to show how Cable-Satellite Public Affairs Network (C-SPAN) can be used as a primary source in the secondary education classroom to teach citizenship education for concept and skill development. Subject areas that C-SPAN can supplement are global education, government, public speaking, economics education, law…

  8. Community Engagement and Boundary-Spanning Roles at Research Universities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weerts, David J.; Sandmann, Lorilee R.

    2010-01-01

    Over the past decade, community engagement has emerged as an important priority among many colleges and universities. This study employs a multi-case study design to examine boundary spanning practices of research universities that have adopted a community engagement agenda. A model is advanced to conceptualize spanning behaviors and to inform…

  9. Rhesus monkey cumulus cells revert to a mural granulosa cell state after an ovulatory stimulus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaffin, Charles L; Lee, Young S; VandeVoort, Catherine A; Patel, Bela G; Latham, Keith E

    2012-11-01

    Follicular somatic cells (mural granulosa cells and cumulus cells) and the oocyte communicate through paracrine interactions and through direct gap junctions between oocyte and cumulus cells. Considering that mural and cumulus cells arise through a common developmental pathway and that their differentiation is essential to reproductive success, understanding how these cells differ is a key aspect to understanding their critical functions. Changes in global gene expression before and after an ovulatory stimulus were compared between cumulus and mural granulosa cells to test the hypothesis that mural and cumulus cells are highly differentiated at the time of an ovulatory stimulus and further differentiate during the periovulatory interval. The transcriptomes of the two cell types were markedly different (>1500 genes) before an ovulatory hCG bolus but converged after ovulation to become completely overlapping. The predominant transition was for the cumulus cells to become more like mural cells after hCG. This indicates that the differentiated phenotype of the cumulus cell is not stable and irreversibly established but may rather be an ongoing physiological response to the oocyte.

  10. Effects of defect states on the performance of perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fengjuan, Si; Fuling, Tang; Hongtao, Xue; Rongfei, Qi

    2016-07-01

    We built an ideal perovskite solar cell model and investigated the effects of defect states on the solar cell's performance. The verities of defect states with a different energy level in the band gap and those in the absorption layer CH3NH3PbI3 (MAPbI3), the interface between the buffer layer/MAPbI3, and the interface between the hole transport material (HTM) and MAPbI3, were studied. We have quantitatively analyzed these effects on perovskite solar cells' performance parameters. They are open-circuit voltage, short-circuit current, fill factor, and photoelectric conversion efficiency. We found that the performances of perovskite solar cells change worse with defect state density increasing, but when defect state density is lower than 1016 cm-3, the effects are small. Defect states in the absorption layer have much larger effects than those in the adjacent interface layers. The perovskite solar cells have better performance as its working temperature is reduced. When the thickness of MAPbI3 is about 0.3 μm, perovskite solar cells show better comprehensive performance, while the thickness 0.05 μm for Spiro-OMeTAD is enough. Project supported by the National Natural Science Foundation of China (Nos. 11164014, 11364025), the Gansu Science and Technology Pillar Program (No. 1204GKCA057), and the Gansu Supercomputer Center.

  11. Fuzzy α-minimum spanning tree problem: definition and solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Jian; Chen, Lu; Wang, Ke; Yang, Fan

    2016-04-01

    In this paper, the minimum spanning tree problem is investigated on the graph with fuzzy edge weights. The notion of fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree is presented based on the credibility measure, and then the solutions of the fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree problem are discussed under different assumptions. First, we respectively, assume that all the edge weights are triangular fuzzy numbers and trapezoidal fuzzy numbers and prove that the fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree problem can be transformed to a classical problem on a crisp graph in these two cases, which can be solved by classical algorithms such as the Kruskal algorithm and the Prim algorithm in polynomial time. Subsequently, as for the case that the edge weights are general fuzzy numbers, a fuzzy simulation-based genetic algorithm using Prüfer number representation is designed for solving the fuzzy ? -minimum spanning tree problem. Some numerical examples are also provided for illustrating the effectiveness of the proposed solutions.

  12. Dendritic cell function in vivo during the steady state: a role in peripheral tolerance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinman, Ralph M; Hawiger, Daniel; Liu, Kang; Bonifaz, Laura; Bonnyay, David; Mahnke, Karsten; Iyoda, Tomonori; Ravetch, Jeffrey; Dhodapkar, Madhav; Inaba, Kayo; Nussenzweig, Michel

    2003-04-01

    The avoidance of autoimmunity requires mechanisms to actively silence or tolerize self reactive T cells in the periphery. During infection, dendritic cells are not only capturing microbial antigens, but also are processing self antigens from dying cells as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Since the dendritic cells are maturing in response to microbial and other stimuli, peptides will be presented from both noxious and innocuous antigens. Therefore it would be valuable to have mechanisms whereby dendritic cells, prior to infection, establish tolerance to those self and environmental antigens that can be processed upon pathogen encounter. In the steady state, prior to acute infection and inflammation, dendritic cells are in an immature state and not fully differentiated to carry out their known roles as inducers of immunity. These immature cells are not inactive, however. They continuously circulate through tissues and into lymphoid organs, capturing self antigens as well as innocuous environmental proteins. Recent experiments have provided direct evidence that antigen-loaded immature dendritic in vivo silence T cells either by deleting them or by expanding regulatory T cells. In this way, it is proposed that the immune system overcomes at least some of the risk of developing autoimmunity and chronic inflammation. It is proposed that dendritic cells play a major role in defining immunologic self, not only centrally in the thymus but also in the periphery.

  13. CD24 tracks divergent pluripotent states in mouse and human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakiba, Nika; White, Carl A.; Lipsitz, Yonatan Y.; Yachie-Kinoshita, Ayako; Tonge, Peter D; Hussein, Samer M. I.; Puri, Mira C.; Elbaz, Judith; Morrissey-Scoot, James; Li, Mira; Munoz, Javier; Benevento, Marco; Rogers, Ian M.; Hanna, Jacob H.; Heck, Albert J. R.; Wollscheid, Bernd; Nagy, Andras; Zandstra, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming is a dynamic process that can result in multiple pluripotent cell types emerging from divergent paths. Cell surface protein expression is a particularly desirable tool to categorize reprogramming and pluripotency as it enables robust quantification and enrichment of live cells. Here we use cell surface proteomics to interrogate mouse cell reprogramming dynamics and discover CD24 as a marker that tracks the emergence of reprogramming-responsive cells, while enabling the analysis and enrichment of transgene-dependent (F-class) and -independent (traditional) induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) at later stages. Furthermore, CD24 can be used to delineate epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs) from embryonic stem cells (ESCs) in mouse pluripotent culture. Importantly, regulated CD24 expression is conserved in human pluripotent stem cells (PSCs), tracking the conversion of human ESCs to more naive-like PSC states. Thus, CD24 is a conserved marker for tracking divergent states in both reprogramming and standard pluripotent culture. PMID:26076835

  14. Investigation of in vitro cytotoxicity of the redox state of ionic iron in neuroblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajay Vikram Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: there is an intimate relation between transition metals and cell homeostasis due to the physiological necessity of metals in vivo. Particularly, iron (ferrous and ferric state is utilized in many physiological processes of the cell but in excess has been linked with negative role contributing in many neurodegenerative processes. Objective: the aim of this study was to investigate which oxidation state of ionic iron (Ferrous (II versus Ferric (III is more toxic to neuronal cells (SHSY5Y. Materials and Methods: The neuroblastoma (SHSY5Y cells were exposed to varying concentration of ferric and ferrous iron. Morphological studies using immunofluorescence staining and microscopic analysis as confirmed by intracellular glutathione (GSH test demonstrated oxidative stress to cells in iron microenvironment. In addition, MTT assay was performed to evaluate the viability and metabolic state of the cells. Results: the results showed that ferrous form has significantly higher toxicity compared to the ferric ionic state of higher concentration. In addition, microscopic analysis shows cell fenestration at higher concentrations and swelling at intermediate ferric dosages as demonstrated by atomic force microscopy (AFM. Interestingly, the addition of a differentiation inducing factor, trans-retinoic rcid (RA retains significant viability and morphological features of the cells irrespective of the ionic state of the iron. AFM images revealed clustered aggregates arising from iron chelation with RA. Conclusions: the results indicate that Fe (II has more toxic effects on cells. In addition, it could be an interesting finding with respect to the antioxidant properties of RA as a chelating agent for the neurodegenerative therapeutics.

  15. Detailed free span assessment for Mexilhao flow lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pereira, Antonio; Franco, Luciano; Eigbe, Uwa; BomfimSilva, Carlos [INTECSEA, Houston, TX (United States); Escudero, Carlos [PETROBRAS S.A., Rio de Janeiro, RJ (Brazil)

    2009-07-01

    The subsea gas production system of Mexilhao Field SPS-35, Santos Basin, offshore Brazil, is composed basically of two rigid 12.75 inches production flow lines approximately 21 km long installed in a fairly rough seabed. During the basic design, the free span assessment was performed considering the maximum allowable free span length determined by the response model proposed by DNV-RP-F105. This approach resulted in a large number of predicted free span requiring corrections, leading to a higher capital cost for the project. In this sense, a detailed free span VIV fatigue assessment was proposed, considering multi-spans and multi-mode effects and also the post lay survey data. The assessment followed the DNV-RP-F105 recommendations for multi-spans and multi-mode effects, using Finite Element Analysis to determine the natural frequencies, mode shapes and corresponding stresses associated with the mode shapes. The assessment was performed in three stages, the first during the detailed design as part of the bottom roughness analysis using the expected residual pipelay tension. The second stage was performed after pipelay, considering the post-lay survey data, where the actual requirements for span correction were determined. Actual pipelay tension was used and seabed soil stiffness adjusted in the model to match the as-laid pipeline profile obtained from the survey data. The first and second stage assessments are seamlessly automated to speed up the evaluation process and allow for quick response in the field, which was important to keep the construction vessel time minimized. The third stage was performed once the corrections of the spans were made and the purpose was to confirm that the new pipeline configuration along the supported spans had sufficient fatigue life for the temporary and operational phases. For the assessment of all three stages, the probability of occurrence and directionality of the near bottom current was considered to improve prediction of the

  16. Molecular-scale Description of SPAN80 Desorption from the Squalane-Water Interface

    CERN Document Server

    Tan, L; Chaudhari, M I

    2016-01-01

    Extensive all-atom molecular dynamics calculations on the water-squalane interface for nine different loadings with sorbitan monooleate (SPAN80), at $T=300$K, are analyzed for the surface tension equation of state, desorption free energy profiles as they depend on loading, and to evaluate escape times for absorbed SPAN80 into the bulk phases. These results suggest that loading only weakly affects accommodation of a SPAN80 molecule by this squalane-water interface. Specifically, the surface tension equation of state is simple through the range of high tension to high loading studied, and the desorption free energy profiles are weakly dependent on loading here. The perpendicular motion of the centroid of the SPAN80 head-group ring is well-described by a diffusional model near the minimum of the desorption free energy profile. Lateral diffusional motion is weakly dependent on loading. Escape times evaluated on the basis of a diffusional model and the desorption free energies are $7\\times 10^{-2}$ s (into the squ...

  17. Cybernetic modeling and regulation of metabolic pathways in multiple steady states of hybridoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guardia, M J; Gambhir, A; Europa, A F; Ramkrishna, D; Hu, W S

    2000-01-01

    Hybridoma cells utilize a pair of complementary and partially substitutable substrates, glucose and glutamine, for growth. It has been shown that cellular metabolism shifts under different culture conditions. When those cultures at different metabolic states are switched to a continuous mode, they reach different steady states under the same operating conditions. A cybernetic model was constructed to describe the complementary and partial substitutable nature of substrate utilization. The model successfully predicted the metabolic shift and multiple steady-state behavior. The results are consistent with the experimental observation that the history of the culture affects the resulting steady state.

  18. An ES-like pluripotent state in FGF-dependent murine iPS cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bruno Di Stefano

    Full Text Available Recent data demonstrates that stem cells can exist in two morphologically, molecularly and functionally distinct pluripotent states; a naïve LIF-dependent pluripotent state which is represented by murine embryonic stem cells (mESCs and an FGF-dependent primed pluripotent state represented by murine and rat epiblast stem cells (EpiSCs. We find that derivation of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs under EpiSC culture conditions yields FGF-dependent iPSCs from hereon called FGF-iPSCs which, unexpectedly, display naïve ES-like/ICM properties. FGF-iPSCs display X-chromosome activation, multi-lineage differentiation, teratoma competence and chimera contribution in vivo. Our findings suggest that in 129 and Bl6 mouse strains, iPSCs can dominantly adopt a naive pluripotent state regardless of culture growth factor conditions. Characterization of the key molecular signalling pathways revealed FGF-iPSCs to depend on the Activin/Nodal and FGF pathways, while signalling through the JAK-STAT pathway is not required for FGF-iPS cell maintenance. Our findings suggest that in 129 and Bl6 mouse strains, iPSCs can dominantly adopt a naive pluripotent state regardless of culture growth factor conditions.

  19. Using measures of single-cell physiology and physiological state to understand organismic aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendenhall, Alexander; Driscoll, Monica; Brent, Roger

    2016-02-01

    Genetically identical organisms in homogeneous environments have different lifespans and healthspans. These differences are often attributed to stochastic events, such as mutations and 'epimutations', changes in DNA methylation and chromatin that change gene function and expression. But work in the last 10 years has revealed differences in lifespan- and health-related phenotypes that are not caused by lasting changes in DNA or identified by modifications to DNA or chromatin. This work has demonstrated persistent differences in single-cell and whole-organism physiological states operationally defined by values of reporter gene signals in living cells. While some single-cell states, for example, responses to oxygen deprivation, were defined previously, others, such as a generally heightened ability to make proteins, were, revealed by direct experiment only recently, and are not well understood. Here, we review technical progress that promises to greatly increase the number of these measurable single-cell physiological variables and measureable states. We discuss concepts that facilitate use of single-cell measurements to provide insight into physiological states and state transitions. We assert that researchers will use this information to relate cell level physiological readouts to whole-organism outcomes, to stratify aging populations into groups based on different physiologies, to define biomarkers predictive of outcomes, and to shed light on the molecular processes that bring about different individual physiologies. For these reasons, quantitative study of single-cell physiological variables and state transitions should provide a valuable complement to genetic and molecular explanations of how organisms age. PMID:26616110

  20. The phosphorylation state of CD3gamma influences T cell responsiveness and controls T cell receptor cycling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dietrich, J; Bäckström, T; Lauritsen, J P;

    1998-01-01

    The T cell receptor (TCR) is internalized following activation of protein kinase C (PKC) via a leucine (Leu)-based motif in CD3gamma. Some studies have indicated that the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface following PKC-mediated internalization. The functional state of recycled TCR...... and the mechanisms involved in the sorting events following PKC-induced internalization are not known. In this study, we demonstrated that following PKC-induced internalization, the TCR is recycled back to the cell surface in a functional state. TCR recycling was dependent on dephosphorylation of CD3gamma, probably...... mediated by the serine/threonine protein phosphatase-2A, but independent on microtubules or actin polymerization. Furthermore, in contrast to ligand-mediated TCR sorting, recycling of the TCR was independent of the tyrosine phosphatase CD45 and the Src tyrosine kinases p56(Lck) and p59(Fyn). Studies...

  1. Cortical gyrification and sulcal spans in early stage Alzheimer's disease.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tao Liu

    Full Text Available Alzheimer's disease (AD is characterized by an insidious onset of progressive cerebral atrophy and cognitive decline. Previous research suggests that cortical folding and sulcal width are associated with cognitive function in elderly individuals, and the aim of the present study was to investigate these morphological measures in patients with AD. The sample contained 161 participants, comprising 80 normal controls, 57 patients with very mild AD, and 24 patients with mild AD. From 3D T1-weighted brain scans, automated methods were used to calculate an index of global cortex gyrification and the width of five individual sulci: superior frontal, intra-parietal, superior temporal, central, and Sylvian fissure. We found that global cortex gyrification decreased with increasing severity of AD, and that the width of all individual sulci investigated other than the intra-parietal sulcus was greater in patients with mild AD than in controls. We also found that cognitive functioning, as assessed by Mini-Mental State Examination (MMSE scores, decreased as global cortex gyrification decreased. MMSE scores also decreased in association with a widening of all individual sulci investigated other than the intra-parietal sulcus. The results suggest that abnormalities of global cortex gyrification and regional sulcal span are characteristic of patients with even very mild AD, and could thus facilitate the early diagnosis of this condition.

  2. GEL-STATE NMR OF BALL-MILLED WHOLE CELL WALLS IN DMSO-d6 USING 2D SOLUTION-STATE NMR SPECTROSCOPY

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant cell walls were used for obtaining 2D solution-state NMR spectra without actual solubilization or structural modification. Ball-milled whole cell walls were swelled directly in the NMR tube with DMSO-d6 where they formed a gel. There are relatively few gel-state NMR studies. Most have involved...

  3. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. A report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2011-08-15

    The purpose of this report is to provide members of the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells with information regarding collaborative opportunities in the United States. The report is designed to provide an overview of key issues and activities and to provide guidance on strategies for finding U.S. research and commercial partners and gaining access to the U.S. market. Section 1 of this report provides an overview of the key drivers of policy at the federal and state government levels regarding hydrogen and fuel cell technologies and provides a perspective of the U.S. industry and key players. It also suggests three general pathways for accessing U.S. opportunities: enhancing visibility; developing vendor relationships; and establishing a formal presence in the U.S. The next sections summarize focus areas for commercial and research activity that currently are of the greatest interest in the U.S. Section 2 describes major programs within the federal government and national laboratories, and discusses various methods for identifying R and D funding opportunities, with an overview of federal acquisition regulations. Section 3 reviews the efforts of several state governments engaging the fuel cell industry as an economic driver and presents an overview of acquisition at the state level. Section 4 discusses university research and development (R and D) and university-industry partnerships. There are 12 appendices attached to the report. These appendices provide more detailed information regarding the key federal government agencies involved in fuel cells and hydrogen, state-specific policies and activities, national laboratories and universities, and other information regarding the fuel cell and hydrogen industry in the U.S. (Author)

  4. Study of Semi-Span Model Testing Techniques

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gatlin, Gregory M.; McGhee, Robert J.

    1996-01-01

    An investigation has been conducted in the NASA Langley 14- by 22-Foot Subsonic Tunnel in order to further the development of semi-span testing capabilities. A twin engine, energy efficient transport (EET) model with a four-element wing in a takeoff configuration was used for this investigation. Initially a full span configuration was tested and force and moment data, wing and fuselage surface pressure data, and fuselage boundary layer measurements were obtained as a baseline data set. The semi-span configurations were then mounted on the wind tunnel floor, and the effects of fuselage standoff height and shape as well as the effects of the tunnel floor boundary layer height were investigated. The effectiveness of tangential blowing at the standoff/floor juncture as an active boundary-layer control technique was also studied. Results indicate that the semi-span configuration was more sensitive to variations in standoff height than to variations in floor boundary layer height. A standoff height equivalent to 30 percent of the fuselage radius resulted in better correlation with full span data than no standoff or the larger standoff configurations investigated. Undercut standoff leading edges or the use of tangential blowing in the standoff/ floor juncture improved correlation of semi-span data with full span data in the region of maximum lift coefficient.

  5. Plasticity between Epithelial and Mesenchymal States Unlinks EMT from Metastasis-Enhancing Stem Cell Capacity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beerling, Evelyne; Seinstra, Daniëlle; de Wit, Elzo; Kester, Lennart; van der Velden, Daphne; Maynard, Carrie; Schäfer, Ronny; van Diest, Paul; Voest, Emile; van Oudenaarden, Alexander; Vrisekoop, Nienke; van Rheenen, Jacco

    2016-01-01

    Summary Forced overexpression and/or downregulation of proteins regulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been reported to alter metastasis by changing migration and stem cell capacity of tumor cells. However, these manipulations artificially keep cells in fixed states, while in vivo cells may adapt transient and reversible states. Here, we have tested the existence and role of epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in metastasis of mammary tumors without artificially modifying EMT regulators. In these tumors, we found by intravital microscopy that the motile tumor cells have undergone EMT, while their epithelial counterparts were not migratory. Moreover, we found that epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity renders any EMT-induced stemness differences, as reported previously, irrelevant for metastatic outgrowth, because mesenchymal cells that arrive at secondary sites convert to the epithelial state within one or two divisions, thereby obtaining the same stem cell potential as their arrived epithelial counterparts. We conclude that epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity supports migration but additionally eliminates stemness-enhanced metastatic outgrowth differences. PMID:26947068

  6. Plasticity between Epithelial and Mesenchymal States Unlinks EMT from Metastasis-Enhancing Stem Cell Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Evelyne Beerling

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Forced overexpression and/or downregulation of proteins regulating epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT has been reported to alter metastasis by changing migration and stem cell capacity of tumor cells. However, these manipulations artificially keep cells in fixed states, while in vivo cells may adapt transient and reversible states. Here, we have tested the existence and role of epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity in metastasis of mammary tumors without artificially modifying EMT regulators. In these tumors, we found by intravital microscopy that the motile tumor cells have undergone EMT, while their epithelial counterparts were not migratory. Moreover, we found that epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity renders any EMT-induced stemness differences, as reported previously, irrelevant for metastatic outgrowth, because mesenchymal cells that arrive at secondary sites convert to the epithelial state within one or two divisions, thereby obtaining the same stem cell potential as their arrived epithelial counterparts. We conclude that epithelial-mesenchymal plasticity supports migration but additionally eliminates stemness-enhanced metastatic outgrowth differences.

  7. Stem cell-like ALDHbright cellular states in EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corominas-Faja, Bruna; Oliveras-Ferraros, Cristina; Cuyàs, Elisabet; Segura-Carretero, Antonio; Joven, Jorge; Martin-Castillo, Begoña; Barrajón-Catalán, Enrique; Micol, Vicente; Bosch-Barrera, Joaquim; Menendez, Javier A

    2013-01-01

    The enrichment of cancer stem cell (CSC)-like cellular states has not previously been considered to be a causative mechanism in the generalized progression of EGFR-mutant non-small cell lung carcinomas (NSCLC) after an initial response to the EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitor erlotinib. To explore this possibility, we utilized a pre-clinical model of acquired erlotinib resistance established by growing NSCLC cells containing a TKI-sensitizing EGFR exon 19 deletion (ΔE746-A750) in the continuous presence of high doses of erlotinib. Genome-wide analyses using Agilent 44K Whole Human Genome Arrays were evaluated via bioinformatics analyses through GSEA-based screening of the KEGG pathway database to identify the molecular circuitries that were over-represented in the transcriptomic signatures of erlotinib-refractory cells. The genomic spaces related to erlotinib resistance included a preponderance of cell cycle genes (E2F1, -2, CDC2, -6) and DNA replication-related genes (MCM4, -5, -6, -7), most of which are associated with early lung development and poor prognosis. In addition, metabolic genes such as ALDH1A3 (a candidate marker for lung cancer cells with CSC-like properties) were identified. Thus, we measured the proportion of erlotinib-resistant cells expressing very high levels of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity attributed to ALDH1/3 isoforms. Using flow cytometry and the ALDEFLUOR® reagent, we confirmed that erlotinib-refractory cell populations contained drastically higher percentages (>4500%) of ALDHbright cells than the parental erlotinib-responsive cells. Notably, strong decreases in the percentages of ALDHbright cells were observed following incubation with silibinin, a bioactive flavonolignan that can circumvent erlotinib resistance in vivo. The number of lung cancer spheres was drastically suppressed by silibinin in a dose-dependent manner, thus confirming the ability of this agent to inhibit the self-renewal of erlotinib-refractory CSC-like cells

  8. The maximum weight spanning star forest problem on cactus graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Nguyen, Viet Hung

    2015-01-01

    International audience A star is a graph in which some node is incident with every edge of the graph, i.e., a graph of diameter at most 2. A star forest is a graph in which each connected component is a star. Given a connected graph G in which the edges may be weighted positively. A spanning star forest of G is a subgraph of G which is a star forest spanning the nodes of G. The size of a spanning star forest F of G is defined to be the number of edges of F if G is unweighted and the total ...

  9. Pluripotent cells in farm animals: state of the art and future perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowak-Imialek, Monika; Niemann, Heiner

    2012-01-01

    Pluripotent cells, such as embryonic stem (ES) cells, embryonic germ cells and embryonic carcinoma cells are a unique type of cell because they remain undifferentiated indefinitely in in vitro culture, show self-renewal and possess the ability to differentiate into derivatives of the three germ layers. These capabilities make them a unique in vitro model for studying development, differentiation and for targeted modification of the genome. True pluripotent ESCs have only been described in the laboratory mouse and rat. However, rodent physiology and anatomy differ substantially from that of humans, detracting from the value of the rodent model for studies of human diseases and the development of cellular therapies in regenerative medicine. Recently, progress in the isolation of pluripotent cells in farm animals has been made and new technologies for reprogramming of somatic cells into a pluripotent state have been developed. Prior to clinical application of therapeutic cells differentiated from pluripotent stem cells in human patients, their survival and the absence of tumourigenic potential must be assessed in suitable preclinical large animal models. The establishment of pluripotent cell lines in farm animals may provide new opportunities for the production of transgenic animals, would facilitate development and validation of large animal models for evaluating ESC-based therapies and would thus contribute to the improvement of human and animal health. This review summarises the recent progress in the derivation of pluripotent and reprogrammed cells from farm animals. We refer to our recent review on this area, to which this article is complementary.

  10. Lung Cancer Stem Cell Lose Their Stemness Default State after Exposure to Microgravity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Elena Pisanu

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Microgravity influences cell differentiation by modifying the morphogenetic field in which stem cells are embedded. Preliminary data showed indeed that stem cells are committed to selective differentiation when exposed to real or simulated microgravity. Our study provides evidence that a similar event occurs when cancer stem cells (CSCs are cultured in microgravity. In the same time, a significant increase in apoptosis was recorded: those data point out that microgravity rescues CSCs from their relative quiescent state, inducing CSCs to lose their stemness features, as documented by the decrease in ALDH and the downregulation of both Nanog and Oct-4 genes. Those traits were stably acquired and preserved by CSCs when cells were placed again on a 1 g field. Studies conducted in microgravity on CSCs may improve our understanding of the fundamental role exerted by biophysical forces in cancer cell growth and function.

  11. Correlation between the Open-Circuit Voltage and Charge Transfer State Energy in Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yunlong; Holmes, Russell J

    2015-08-26

    In order to further improve the performance of organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs), it is essential to better understand the factors that limit the open-circuit voltage (VOC). Previous work has sought to correlate the value of VOC in donor-acceptor (D-A) OPVs to the interface energy level offset (EDA). In this work, measurements of electroluminescence are used to extract the charge transfer (CT) state energy for multiple small molecule D-A pairings. The CT state as measured from electroluminescence is found to show better correlation to the maximum VOC than EDA. The difference between EDA and the CT state energy is attributed to the Coulombic binding energy of the CT state. This correlation is demonstrated explicitly by inserting an insulating spacer layer between the donor and acceptor materials, reducing the binding energy of the CT state and increasing the measured VOC. These results demonstrate a direct correlation between maximum VOC and CT state energy.

  12. Fuel cell collaboration in the United States. Follow up report to the Danish Partnership for Hydrogen and Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    2013-01-15

    Fuel cell technology continues to grow in the United States, with strong sales in stationary applications and early markets such as data centers, materials handling equipment, and telecommunications sites. New fuel cell customers include Fortune 500 companies Apple, eBay, Coca-Cola, and Walmart, who will use fuel cells to provide reliable power to data centers, stores, and facilities. Some are purchasing multi-megawatt (MW) systems, including three of the largest non-utility purchases of stationary fuel cells in the world by AT and T, Apple and eBay - 17 MW, 10 MW and 6 MW respectively. Others are replacing fleets of battery forklifts with fuel cells. Sysco, the food distributor, has more than 700 fuel cell-powered forklifts operating at seven facilities, with more on order. Mega-retailer Walmart now operates more than 500 fuel cell forklifts at three warehouses, including a freezer facility. Although federal government budget reduction efforts are impacting a wide range of departments and programs, fuel cell and hydrogen technology continues to be funded, albeit at a lower level than in past years. The Department of Energy (DOE) is currently funding fuel cell and hydrogen R and D and has nearly 300 ongoing projects at companies, national labs, and universities/institutes universities. The American Recovery and Reinvestment Act (ARRA) of 2009 and DOE's Market Transformation efforts have acted as a government ''catalyst'' for market success of emerging technologies. Early market deployments of about 1,400 fuel cells under the ARRA have led to more than 5,000 additional fuel cell purchases by industry with no DOE funding. In addition, interest in Congress remains high. Senators Richard Blumenthal (D-CT), Chris Coons (D-DE), Lindsey Graham (R-SC) and John Hoeven (R-ND) re-launched the bipartisan Senate Fuel Cell and Hydrogen Caucus in August 2012 to promote the continued development and commercialization of hydrogen and fuel cell technologies

  13. Relationship between the number of cells surrounding oocytes and energy states of oocytes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munakata, Yasuhisa; Ichinose, Tomoya; Ogawa, Kaori; Itami, Nobuhiko; Tasaki, Hidetaka; Shirasuna, Koumei; Kuwayama, Takehito; Iwata, Hisataka

    2016-10-15

    Lipid content, ATP content, and histone acetylation are thought to reflect the energy state of cells. In addition, the energy state closely associates with growth and developmental ability of oocytes. Oocyte growth is accompanied by active proliferation of the surrounding granulosa cells (GCs), and GCs play a key role in the provision of energy substrates to the oocytes. In the present study, we first examined the relationship among the average number of GCs per follicle, the average number of cumulus cells (CCs) per oocyte, and the average lipid content in oocytes that developed in vivo within individual donor gilts. Second, we validated the relationship between the number of cells surrounding oocytes and the energy states of oocytes by using an IVC system of oocyte granulosa cell complexes (OGCs) derived from early antral follicles. We collected cumulus cells and oocyte complexes (COCs) from antral follicles (3-5 mm in diameter) and found that average lipid content in oocytes significantly correlated with the average number of both GCs/follicle and CCs/oocyte (P cell number of OGCs, as well as the lipid content, ATP content, and acetylation level of H4K12 in oocytes grown in vitro. In addition, glucose consumption by OGCs was calculated from the sample media collected at Days 13 and 14. The lipid content of oocytes grown in vitro, significantly correlated with the number of cells surrounding the oocytes (P number of cells surrounding the oocytes (P number of cells surrounding the oocytes, and glucose uptake by OGCs is crucial for lipid content and ATP content, and H4K12 acetylation in oocytes.

  14. Charge transfer state in DBP:C70 organic solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherafatipour, Golenaz; Benduhn, Johannes; Spoltore, Donato;

    Organic solar cells (OSC) are green solar energy technology, which can be fabricated from organic compounds with cheep techniques and on flexible or transparent substrates such as plastic or glass. OSCs are cost efficient, and lightweight devices that can exhibit high power conversion efficiency...... of the CT states from which the maximum open circuit can be calculated and will set the base for modeling and optimizing the stability of the solar cells. 1. Cao, H. et al. Recent progress in degradation and stabilization of organic solar cells. J. Power Sources 264, 168–183 (2014). 2. Tvingstedt, K. et al....... Electroluminescence from charge transfer states in polymer solar cells. J. Am. Chem. Soc. 131, 11819–11824 (2009)....

  15. Density of states measurements in a p-i-n solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crandall, R.S.; Wang, Q. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1996-05-01

    The authors describe results of density of states (DOS) profiling in p-i-n solar-cell devices using drive-level capacitance (DLC) techniques. Near the p-i interface the defect density is high, decreasing rapidly into the interior, reaching low values in the central region of the cell, and rising rapidly again at the n-i interface. They show that the states in the central region are neutral dangling-bond defects, whereas those near the interfaces with the doped layers are charged dangling bonds.

  16. Sleep: A synchrony of cell activity-driven small network states

    OpenAIRE

    Krueger, James M.; Huang, Yanhua; Rector, David M.; Buysse, Daniel J.

    2013-01-01

    We posit a bottom-up sleep regulatory paradigm in which state changes are initiated within small networks as a consequence of local cell activity. Bottom-up regulatory mechanisms are prevalent throughout nature, occurring in vastly different systems and levels of organization. Synchronization of state without top-down regulation is a fundamental property of large collections of small semi-autonomous entities. We posit that such synchronization mechanisms are sufficient and necessary for whole...

  17. The hydration state of human red blood cells and their susceptibility to invasion by Plasmodium falciparum

    OpenAIRE

    Tiffert, Teresa; Lew, Virgilio L; Ginsburg, Hagai; Krugliak, Miriam; Croisille, Laure; Mohandas, Narla

    2005-01-01

    In most inherited red blood cell (RBC) disorders with high gene frequencies in malaria-endemic regions, the distribution of RBC hydration states is much wider than normal. The relationship between the hydration state of circulating RBCs and protection against severe falciparum malaria remains unexplored. The present investigation was prompted by a casual observation suggesting that falciparum merozoites were unable to invade isotonically dehydrated normal RBCs. We designed an experimental mod...

  18. EMERGENCE OF A 600-HZ BUZZ UP STATE PURKINJE CELL FIRING IN ALERT MICE

    OpenAIRE

    Cheron, G.; Prigogine, C.; CHERON, J.; MÁRQUEZ-RUIZ, J.; Traub, R.D.; B. Dan

    2014-01-01

    Purkinje cell (PC) firing represents the sole output from the cerebellar cortex onto the deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. Here, we explored the different modes of PC firing in alert mice by extracellular recording. We confirm the existence of a tonic and/or bursting and quiescent modes corresponding to UP and DOWN state, respectively. We demonstrate the existence of a novel 600-Hz buzz UP state of firing characterized by simple spikes (SS) of very small amplitude. Climbing fiber (CF) in...

  19. USING GENETIC ALGORTIHM TO SOLVE STEINER MINIMUM SPANNING TREE PROBLEM

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Öznur İŞÇİ

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Genetic algorithms (GA are a stochastic research methods, and they produce solutions that are close to optimum or near optimum. In addition to GA's successful application to traveling salesman problem, square designation, allocation, workshop table, preparation of lesson/examination schedules, planning of communication networks, assembling line balanced, minimum spanning tree type many combinatorial optimization problems it would be applicable to make the best comparison in optimization. In this study a Java program is developed to solve Steiner minimum spanning tree problem by genetic algorithm and its performance is examined. According to the tests carried out on the problems that were given before in the literature, results that are close to optimum are obtained in by GA approach that is recommended in this study. For the predetermined points in the study, length and gain are calculated for Steiner minimum spanning tree problem and minimum spanning tree problem.

  20. Antibody-targeting of steady state dendritic cells induces tolerance mediated by regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karsten eMahnke

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DCs are often defined as pivotal inducers of immunity, but these proinflammatory properties only develop after stimulation or ex vivo manipulation of DCs. Under non-inflammatory conditions in vivo, DCs are embedded into a tissue environment and encounter a plethora of self-antigens derived from apoptotic material. This material is transported to secondary lymphoid organs. As DCs maintain their non-activated phenotype in a sterile tissue environment, interaction with T cells will induce rather regulatory T cells (Treg than effector T cells. Thus, DCs are not only inducers of immunity but are also critical for maintenance of peripheral tolerance. Therapeutical intervention for the induction of long lasting tolerance in several autoimmune conditions may therefore be possible by manipulating DC activation and/or targeting of DCs in their natural tissue environment.

  1. Single-Cell Analyses of ESCs Reveal Alternative Pluripotent Cell States and Molecular Mechanisms that Control Self-Renewal

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dmitri Papatsenko

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Analyses of gene expression in single mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs cultured in serum and LIF revealed the presence of two distinct cell subpopulations with individual gene expression signatures. Comparisons with published data revealed that cells in the first subpopulation are phenotypically similar to cells isolated from the inner cell mass (ICM. In contrast, cells in the second subpopulation appear to be more mature. Pluripotency Gene Regulatory Network (PGRN reconstruction based on single-cell data and published data suggested antagonistic roles for Oct4 and Nanog in the maintenance of pluripotency states. Integrated analyses of published genomic binding (ChIP data strongly supported this observation. Certain target genes alternatively regulated by OCT4 and NANOG, such as Sall4 and Zscan10, feed back into the top hierarchical regulator Oct4. Analyses of such incoherent feedforward loops with feedback (iFFL-FB suggest a dynamic model for the maintenance of mESC pluripotency and self-renewal.

  2. Three order state space modeling of proton exchange membrane fuel cell with energy function definition

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becherif, M.; Hissel, D.; Gaagat, S.; Wack, M.

    The fuel cell is a complex system which is the centre of a lot of multidisciplinary research activities since it involves intricate application of various fields of study. The operation of a fuel cell depends on a wide range of parameters. The effect of one cannot be studied in isolation without disturbing the system which makes it very difficult to comprehend, analyze and predict various phenomena occurring in the fuel cell. In the current work, we present an equivalent electrical circuit of the pneumatics and fluidics in a fuel cell stack. The proposed model is based on the physical phenomena occurring inside fuel cell stack where we define the fluidic-electrical and pneumatic-electrical analogy. The effect of variation in temperature and relative humidity on the cell are considered in this model. The proposed model, according to the considered hypothesis, is a simple three order state space model which is suitable for the control purpose where a desired control structure can be formulated for high-end applications of the fuel cell as a subpart of a larger system, for instance, in hybrid propulsion of vehicles coupled with batteries and supercapacitors. Another key point of our work is the definition of the natural fuel cell stack energy function. The circuit analysis equations are presented and the simulated model is validated using the experimental data obtained using the fuel cell test bench available in Fuel Cell Laboratory, France.

  3. SOLVING MINIMUM SPANNING TREE PROBLEM WITH DNA COMPUTING

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Xikui; Li Yan; Xu Jin

    2005-01-01

    Molecular programming is applied to minimum spanning problem whose solution requires encoding of real values in DNA strands. A new encoding scheme is proposed for real values that is biologically plausible and has a fixed code length. According to the characteristics of the problem, a DNA algorithm solving the minimum spanning tree problem is given. The effectiveness of the proposed method is verified by simulation. The advantages and disadvantages of this algorithm are discussed.

  4. Life spans of planktonic foraminifers: New sight through sediment traps

    Digital Repository Service at National Institute of Oceanography (India)

    Nigam, R.; Saraswat, R.; Mazumder, A.

    foraminifers, life span, sediment traps, quiescent period. INTRODUCTION The morphology along with oxygen isotopic ratio of calcareous test secreted by foraminifera, unicellular marine protists with a hard covering called test, is a function of physico... estimations based on whole test ICP-MS oxygen isotope analysis of planktonic foraminifers. The life spans of foraminifers are crucial for the effective use of foraminiferal proxies for paleoclimatic reconstruction, as it will give an idea about the duration...

  5. A Minimum Spanning Tree Representation of Anime Similarities

    OpenAIRE

    Wibowo, Canggih Puspo

    2016-01-01

    In this work, a new way to represent Japanese animation (anime) is presented. We applied a minimum spanning tree to show the relation between anime. The distance between anime is calculated through three similarity measurements, namely crew, score histogram, and topic similarities. Finally the centralities are also computed to reveal the most significance anime. The result shows that the minimum spanning tree can be used to determine the similarity anime. Furthermore, by using centralities ca...

  6. Elders’ Attitudes toward Extending the Healthy Life Span

    OpenAIRE

    Cicirelli, Victor G.

    2011-01-01

    Despite continuing debate between anti-aging researchers seeking major life span extension and concerned gerontologists and bioethicists, elders’ views have received little research attention. Study aimed to relate elders’ attitudes toward strong life span extension to psychosocial and background factors. Participants were 109 American elders (65% women) aged 60-99 (M = 77.08, SD = 9.05). Measures included attitudes toward living long and living forever, Desired Age, Death Acceptance, Goal...

  7. Brain Weight and Life-Span in Primate Species

    OpenAIRE

    Allman, J; McLaughlin, T.; A Hakeem

    1993-01-01

    In haplorhine primates (tarsiers, monkeys, apes, and humans), there is a significant correlation between brain weight and maximum life-span when the effect of body size is removed. There is also a significant correlation in haplorhine primates between brain weight and female age at first reproduction. For strepsirhine primates (lorises and lemurs), there are no significant correlations between brain weight and either life-span or female reproductive age when the effect of body size is removed...

  8. Spanning connectedness and Hamiltonian thickness of graphs and interval graphs

    OpenAIRE

    Li, Peng; Wu, Yaokun

    2015-01-01

    International audience A spanning connectedness property is one which involves the robust existence of a spanning subgraph which is of some special form, say a Hamiltonian cycle in which a sequence of vertices appear in an arbitrarily given ordering, or a Hamiltonian path in the subgraph obtained by deleting any three vertices, or three internally-vertex-disjoint paths with any given endpoints such that the three paths meet every vertex of the graph and cover the edges of an almost arbitra...

  9. Amnion-Epithelial-Cell-Derived Exosomes Demonstrate Physiologic State of Cell under Oxidative Stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheller, Samantha; Papaconstantinou, John; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Richardson, Lauren; Saade, George; Salomon, Carlos; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-01-01

    At term, the signals of fetal maturity and feto-placental tissue aging prompt uterine readiness for delivery by transitioning quiescent myometrium to an active stage. It is still unclear how the signals reach the distant myometrium. Exosomes are a specific type of extracellular vesicle (EVs) that transport molecular signals between cells, and are released from a wide range of cells, including the maternal and fetal cells. In this study, we hypothesize that i) exosomes act as carriers of signals in utero-placental compartments and ii) exosomes reflect the physiologic status of the origin cells. The primary aims of this study were to determine exosomal contents in exosomes derived from primary amnion epithelial cells (AEC). We also determined the effect of oxidative stress on AEC derived exosomal cargo contents. AEC were isolated from amniotic membrane obtained from normal, term, not in labor placentae at delivery, and culture under standard conditions. Oxidative stress was induced using cigarette smoke extract for 48 hours. AEC-conditioned media were collected and exosomes isolated by differential centrifugations. Both growth conditions (normal and oxidative stress induced) produced cup shaped exosomes of around 50 nm, expressed exosomes enriched markers, such as CD9, CD63, CD81 and HSC70, embryonic stem cell marker Nanog, and contained similar amounts of cell free AEC DNA. Using confocal microscopy, the colocalization of histone (H) 3, heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and activated form of pro-senescence and term parturition associated marker p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) (P-p38 MAPK) co-localized with exosome enrich marker CD9. HSP70 and P-p38 MAPK were significantly higher in exosomes from AEC grown under oxidative stress conditions than standard conditions (pmass spectrometry and bioinformatics analysis identified 221 different proteins involved in immunomodulatory response and cell-to-cell communication. This study determined AEC exosome

  10. Evolution of Shanghai STOCK Market Based on Maximal Spanning Trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chunxia; Shen, Ying; Xia, Bingying

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, using a moving window to scan through every stock price time series over a period from 2 January 2001 to 11 March 2011 and mutual information to measure the statistical interdependence between stock prices, we construct a corresponding weighted network for 501 Shanghai stocks in every given window. Next, we extract its maximal spanning tree and understand the structure variation of Shanghai stock market by analyzing the average path length, the influence of the center node and the p-value for every maximal spanning tree. A further analysis of the structure properties of maximal spanning trees over different periods of Shanghai stock market is carried out. All the obtained results indicate that the periods around 8 August 2005, 17 October 2007 and 25 December 2008 are turning points of Shanghai stock market, at turning points, the topology structure of the maximal spanning tree changes obviously: the degree of separation between nodes increases; the structure becomes looser; the influence of the center node gets smaller, and the degree distribution of the maximal spanning tree is no longer a power-law distribution. Lastly, we give an analysis of the variations of the single-step and multi-step survival ratios for all maximal spanning trees and find that two stocks are closely bonded and hard to be broken in a short term, on the contrary, no pair of stocks remains closely bonded for a long time.

  11. Cellular Barcoding Links B-1a B Cell Potential to a Fetal Hematopoietic Stem Cell State at the Single-Cell Level

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristiansen, Trine A; Jaensson Gyllenbäck, Elin; Zriwil, Alya;

    2016-01-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) undergo a functional switch in neonatal mice hallmarked by a decrease in self-renewing divisions and entry into quiescence. Here, we investigated whether the developmental attenuation of B-1a cell output is a consequence of a shift in stem cell state during ontogeny....... Using cellular barcoding for in vivo single-cell fate analyses, we found that fetal liver definitive HSCs gave rise to both B-1a and B-2 cells. Whereas B-1a potential diminished in all HSCs with time, B-2 output was maintained. B-1a and B-2 plasticity could be reinitiated in a subset of adult HSCs...... by ectopic expression of the RNA binding protein LIN28B, a key regulator of fetal hematopoiesis, and this coincided with the clonal reversal to fetal-like elevated self-renewal and repopulation potential. These results anchor the attenuation of B-1a cell output to fetal HSC behavior and demonstrate...

  12. Yeast MRX deletions have short chronological life span and more triacylglycerols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanagavijayan, Dhanabalan; Rajasekharan, Ram; Srinivasan, Malathi

    2016-02-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an excellent model organism for lipid research. Here, we have used yeast haploid RAdiation Damage (RAD) deletion strains to study life span and lipid storage patterns. RAD genes are mainly involved in DNA repair mechanism and hence, their deletions have resulted in shorter life span. Viable RAD mutants were screened for non-polar lipid content, and some of the mutants showed significantly high amounts of triacylglycerol (TAG) and steryl ester, besides short chronological life span. Among these, RAD50, MRE11 and XRS2 form a complex, MRX that is involved in homologous recombination that showed an increase in the amount of TAG. Microarray data of single MRX deletions revealed that besides DNA damage signature genes, lipid metabolism genes are also differentially expressed. Lipid biosynthetic genes (LPP1, SLC1) were upregulated and lipid hydrolytic gene (TGL3) was downregulated. We observed that rad50Δ, mre11Δ, xrs2Δ and mrxΔ strains have high number of lipid droplets (LDs) with fragmented mitochondria. These mutants have a short chronological life span compared to wild type. Aged wild-type cells also accumulated TAG with LDs of ∼2.0 μm in diameter. These results suggest that TAG accumulation and big size LDs could be possible markers for premature or normal aging. PMID:26678749

  13. The Role of Covert Retrieval in Working Memory Span Tasks: Evidence from Delayed Recall Tests

    OpenAIRE

    McCabe, David P.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined delayed recall of items that had been processed during simple and complex span tasks. Three experiments were reported showing that despite more items being recalled initially from a simple span task (i.e., word span) than a complex span task (i.e., operation span), on a delayed recall test more items were recalled that had initially been processed during the complex span task. This delayed recall advantage for items processed during complex span tasks persisted when...

  14. Liver-derived systemic factors drive β-cell hyperplasia in insulin resistant states

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El Ouaamari, Abdelfattah; Kawamori, Dan; Dirice, Ercument; Liew, Chong Wee; Shadrach, Jennifer L.; Hu, Jiang; Katsuta, Hitoshi; Hollister-Lock, Jennifer; Qian, Weijun; Wagers, Amy J.; Kulkarni, Rohit N.

    2013-02-21

    Integrative organ cross-talk regulates key aspects of energy homeostasis and its dysregulation may underlie metabolic disorders such as obesity and diabetes. To test the hypothesis that cross-talk between the liver and pancreatic islets modulates β-cell growth in response to insulin resistance, we used the Liver-specific Insulin Receptor Knockout (LIRKO) mouse, a unique model that exhibits dramatic islet hyperplasia. Using complementary in vivo parabiosis and transplantation assays, and in vitro islet culture approaches, we demonstrate that humoral, non-neural, non-cell autonomous factor(s) induce β-cell proliferation in LIRKO mice. Furthermore, we report that a hepatocyte-derived factor(s) stimulates mouse and human β-cell proliferation in ex vivo assays, independent of ambient glucose and insulin levels. These data implicate the liver as a critical source of β-cell growth factors in insulin resistant states.

  15. Trade-off between cellular immunity and life span in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Indrikis KRAMS; Jan(i)na DAUK(S)TE; Inese KIVLENIECE; Ants KAASIK; Tatjana KRAMA; Todd M.FREEBERG; Markus J.RANTALA

    2013-01-01

    Encapsulation is a nonspecific,cellular response through which insects defend themselves against multicellular pathogens.During this immune reaction,haemocytes recognize an object as foreign and cause other haemocytes to aggregate and form a capsule around the object,often consisting of melanized cells.The process of melanisation is accompanied by the formation of potentially toxic reactive oxygen species,which can kill not only pathogens but also host cells.In this study we tested whether the encapsulation response is costly in mealworm beetles Tenebrio molitor.We found a negative relationship between the duration of implantation via a nylon monofilament and remaining life span.We also found a negative relationship between the strength of immune response and remaining life span,suggesting that cellular immunity is costly in T.molitor,and that there is a trade-off between immune response and remaining life span.However,this relationship disappeared at 31-32 hours of implantation at 25 ± 2℃.As the disappearance of a relationship between duration of implantation and lifespan coincided with the highest values of encapsulation response,we concluded that the beetles stopped investment in the production of melanotic cells,as the implant,a synthetic parasite,was fully isolated from the host's tissues.

  16. Amnion-Epithelial-Cell-Derived Exosomes Demonstrate Physiologic State of Cell under Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheller, Samantha; Papaconstantinou, John; Urrabaz-Garza, Rheanna; Richardson, Lauren; Saade, George; Salomon, Carlos; Menon, Ramkumar

    2016-01-01

    At term, the signals of fetal maturity and feto-placental tissue aging prompt uterine readiness for delivery by transitioning quiescent myometrium to an active stage. It is still unclear how the signals reach the distant myometrium. Exosomes are a specific type of extracellular vesicle (EVs) that transport molecular signals between cells, and are released from a wide range of cells, including the maternal and fetal cells. In this study, we hypothesize that i) exosomes act as carriers of signals in utero-placental compartments and ii) exosomes reflect the physiologic status of the origin cells. The primary aims of this study were to determine exosomal contents in exosomes derived from primary amnion epithelial cells (AEC). We also determined the effect of oxidative stress on AEC derived exosomal cargo contents. AEC were isolated from amniotic membrane obtained from normal, term, not in labor placentae at delivery, and culture under standard conditions. Oxidative stress was induced using cigarette smoke extract for 48 hours. AEC-conditioned media were collected and exosomes isolated by differential centrifugations. Both growth conditions (normal and oxidative stress induced) produced cup shaped exosomes of around 50 nm, expressed exosomes enriched markers, such as CD9, CD63, CD81 and HSC70, embryonic stem cell marker Nanog, and contained similar amounts of cell free AEC DNA. Using confocal microscopy, the colocalization of histone (H) 3, heat shock protein (HSP) 70 and activated form of pro-senescence and term parturition associated marker p38 mitogen activated protein kinase (MAPK) (P-p38 MAPK) co-localized with exosome enrich marker CD9. HSP70 and P-p38 MAPK were significantly higher in exosomes from AEC grown under oxidative stress conditions than standard conditions (pexosome characteristics and their cargo reflected the physiologic status of the cell of origin and suggests that AEC-derived exosomal p38 MAPK plays a major role in determining the fate of pregnancy

  17. Regulations in the United States for cell transplantation clinical trials in neurological diseases

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    He Zhu; Yuanqing Tan; Qi Gu; Weifang Han; Zhongwen Li; Jason S Meyer; Baoyang Hu

    2015-01-01

    Objective: This study aimed to use a systematic approach to evaluate the current utilization, safety, and effectiveness of cell therapies for neurological diseases in human. And review the present regulations, considering United States (US) as a representative country, for cell transplantation in neurological disease and discuss the challenges facing the field of neurology in the coming decades. Methods:A detailed search was performed in systematic literature reviews of cellular‐based therapies in neurological diseases, using PubMed, web of science, and clinical trials. Regulations of cell therapy products used for clinical trials were searched from the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) and the National Institutes of Health (NIH). Results: Seven most common types of cell therapies for neurological diseases have been reported to be relatively safe with varying degrees of neurological recovery. And a series of regulations in US for cellular therapy was summarized including preclinical evaluations, sourcing material, stem cell manufacturing and characterization, cell therapy product, and clinical trials. Conclusions:Stem cell‐based therapy holds great promise for a cure of such diseases and will value a growing population of patients. However, regulatory permitting activity of the US in the sphere of stem cells, technologies of regenerative medicine and substitutive cell therapy are selective, theoretical and does not fit the existing norm and rules. Compiled well‐defined regulations to guide the application of stem cell products for clinical trials should be formulated.

  18. CARS hyperspectral imaging of cartilage aiming for state discrimination of cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Manabu; Shirai, Masataka; Izumisawa, Junko; Tanabe, Maiko; Watanabe, Koichi

    2016-03-01

    Non-invasive cell analyses are increasingly important for medical field. A CARS microscope is one of the non-invasive imaging equipments and enables to obtain images indicating molecular distribution. Some studies on discrimination of cell state by using CARS images of lipid are reported. However, due to low signal intensity, it is still challenging to obtain images of the fingerprint region (800~1800 cm-1), in which many spectrum peaks correspond to compositions of a cell. Here, to identify cell differentiation by using multiplex CARS, we investigated hyperspectral imaging of fingerprint region of living cells. To perform multiplex CARS, we used a prototype of a compact light source, which consists of a microchip laser, a single-mode fiber, and a photonic crystal fiber to generate supercontinuum light. Assuming application to regenerative medicine, we chose a cartilage cell, whose differentiation is difficult to be identified by change of the cell morphology. Because one of the major components of cartilage is collagen, we focused on distribution of proline, which accounts for approximately 20% of collagen in general. The spectrum quality was improved by optical adjustments about power branching ratio and divergence of broadband Stokes light. Hyperspectral images were successfully obtained by the improvement. Periphery of a cartilage cell was highlighted in CARS image of proline, and this result suggests correspondence with collagen generated as extracellular matrix. A possibility of cell analyses by using CARS hyperspectral imaging was indicated.

  19. The Effects of High Steady State Auxin Levels on Root Cell Elongation in Brachypodium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Villalobos, David; Díaz-Moreno, Sara M; van der Schuren, Alja; Tamaki, Takayuki; Kang, Yeon Hee; Gujas, Bojan; Novak, Ondrej; Jaspert, Nina; Li, Zhenni; Wolf, Sebastian; Oecking, Claudia; Ljung, Karin; Bulone, Vincent; Hardtke, Christian S

    2016-05-01

    The long-standing Acid Growth Theory of plant cell elongation posits that auxin promotes cell elongation by stimulating cell wall acidification and thus expansin action. To date, the paucity of pertinent genetic materials has precluded thorough analysis of the importance of this concept in roots. The recent isolation of mutants of the model grass species Brachypodium distachyon with dramatically enhanced root cell elongation due to increased cellular auxin levels has allowed us to address this question. We found that the primary transcriptomic effect associated with elevated steady state auxin concentration in elongating root cells is upregulation of cell wall remodeling factors, notably expansins, while plant hormone signaling pathways maintain remarkable homeostasis. These changes are specifically accompanied by reduced cell wall arabinogalactan complexity but not by increased proton excretion. On the contrary, we observed a tendency for decreased rather than increased proton extrusion from root elongation zones with higher cellular auxin levels. Moreover, similar to Brachypodium, root cell elongation is, in general, robustly buffered against external pH fluctuation in Arabidopsis thaliana However, forced acidification through artificial proton pump activation inhibits root cell elongation. Thus, the interplay between auxin, proton pump activation, and expansin action may be more flexible in roots than in shoots. PMID:27169463

  20. The Effects of High Steady State Auxin Levels on Root Cell Elongation in Brachypodium[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pacheco-Villalobos, David; Tamaki, Takayuki; Gujas, Bojan; Jaspert, Nina; Oecking, Claudia; Bulone, Vincent; Hardtke, Christian S.

    2016-01-01

    The long-standing Acid Growth Theory of plant cell elongation posits that auxin promotes cell elongation by stimulating cell wall acidification and thus expansin action. To date, the paucity of pertinent genetic materials has precluded thorough analysis of the importance of this concept in roots. The recent isolation of mutants of the model grass species Brachypodium distachyon with dramatically enhanced root cell elongation due to increased cellular auxin levels has allowed us to address this question. We found that the primary transcriptomic effect associated with elevated steady state auxin concentration in elongating root cells is upregulation of cell wall remodeling factors, notably expansins, while plant hormone signaling pathways maintain remarkable homeostasis. These changes are specifically accompanied by reduced cell wall arabinogalactan complexity but not by increased proton excretion. On the contrary, we observed a tendency for decreased rather than increased proton extrusion from root elongation zones with higher cellular auxin levels. Moreover, similar to Brachypodium, root cell elongation is, in general, robustly buffered against external pH fluctuation in Arabidopsis thaliana. However, forced acidification through artificial proton pump activation inhibits root cell elongation. Thus, the interplay between auxin, proton pump activation, and expansin action may be more flexible in roots than in shoots. PMID:27169463

  1. Electroluminescence from charge transfer states in Donor/Acceptor solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sherafatipour, Golenaz; Madsen, Morten

    which the maximum open-circuit voltage can be estimated, and further can be used in the modeling and optimization of the OPV devices. [1] C. Deibe, T. Strobe, and V. Dyakonov, “Role of the charge transfer state in organic donor-acceptor solar cells,” Adv. Mater., vol. 22, pp. 4097–4111, 2010. [2] K...

  2. Evaluating effect of surface state density at the interfaces in degraded bulk heterojunction organic solar cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arora, Swati, E-mail: drswatia@yahoo.com [Department of Physics, Zakir Husain College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110002 (India); Singh, Vinamrita [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Arora, Manoj [Department of Physics, Ramjas College, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India); Pal Tandon, Ram [Department of Physics and Astrophysics, University of Delhi, Delhi 110007 (India)

    2012-08-01

    Degradation and short shelf life have been observed experimentally in poly(3-hexylthiophene) (P3HT): 6,6-phenyl C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) based blend solar cells. Both dark and illuminated current-voltage characteristics could be explained quantitatively with a proposed single model for a typical degraded organic solar cell-glass/ITO/PEDOT:PSS/P3HT:PCBM/Al. It has been found that surface state density, interface thickness, tunneling coefficient and occupation probabilities of the interface states becomes important with the passage of time. To look into the problem the activity at ITO/PEDOT:PSS and P3HT:PCBM/Al interfaces are studied using realistic values of the interfaces. The experimental J-V characteristics is well explained with the inclusion of tunneling current through these surface states and becomes the dominant current component for the degraded cell. It is also found that surface state density increases to 10{sup 12}-10{sup 13} cm{sup -2} eV{sup -1}, which has been verified with C-V measurements and also is in agreement with our proposed model for BHJ solar cell after 150 h of fabrication.

  3. Numerical study of metal oxide hetero-junction solar cells with defects and interface states

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Le; Shao, Guosheng; Luo, J. K.

    2013-05-01

    Further to our previous work on ideal metal oxide (MO) hetero-junction solar cells, a systematic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of defects and interface states on the cells. Two structures of the window/absorber (WA) and window/absorber/voltage-enhancer (WAV) were modelled with defect concentration, defect energy level, interface state (ISt) density and ISt energy level as parameters. The simulation showed that the defects in the window layer and the voltage-enhancer layer have very limited effects on the performance of the cells, but those in the absorption layer have profound effects on the cell performance. The interface states at the W/A interface have a limited effect on the performance even for a density up to 1013 cm-2, while those at the A/V interface cause the solar cell to deteriorate severely even at a low density of lower than 1 × 1011 cm-2. It also showed that the back surface field (BSF) induced by band gap off-set in the WAV structure loses its function when defects with a modest concentration exist in the absorption layer and does not improve the open voltage at all.

  4. Numerical study of metal oxide hetero-junction solar cells with defects and interface states

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Further to our previous work on ideal metal oxide (MO) hetero-junction solar cells, a systematic simulation has been carried out to investigate the effects of defects and interface states on the cells. Two structures of the window/absorber (WA) and window/absorber/voltage-enhancer (WAV) were modelled with defect concentration, defect energy level, interface state (ISt) density and ISt energy level as parameters. The simulation showed that the defects in the window layer and the voltage-enhancer layer have very limited effects on the performance of the cells, but those in the absorption layer have profound effects on the cell performance. The interface states at the W/A interface have a limited effect on the performance even for a density up to 1013 cm−2, while those at the A/V interface cause the solar cell to deteriorate severely even at a low density of lower than 1 × 1011 cm−2. It also showed that the back surface field (BSF) induced by band gap off-set in the WAV structure loses its function when defects with a modest concentration exist in the absorption layer and does not improve the open voltage at all. (paper)

  5. Using biomarker signature patterns for an mRNA molecular diagnostic of mouse embryonic stem cell differentiation state

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhang Xue W

    2007-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The pluripotency and self-renewal capabilities, which define the "stemness" state, of mouse embryonic stem (ES cells, are usually investigated by functional assays or quantitative measurements of the expression levels of known ES cell markers. Strong correlations between these expression levels and functional assays, particularly at the early stage of cell differentiation, have usually not been observed. An effective molecular diagnostic to properly identify the differentiation state of mouse ES cells, prior to further experimentation, is needed. Results A novel molecular pattern recognition procedure has been developed to diagnose the differentiation state of ES cells. This is based on mRNA transcript levels of genes differentially expressed between ES cells and their differentiating progeny. Large publicly available ES cell data sets from various platforms were used to develop and test the diagnostic model. Signature patterns consisting of five gene expression levels achieved high accuracy at determining the cell state (sensitivity and specificity > 97%. Conclusion The effective ES cell state diagnostic scheme described here can be implemented easily to assist researchers in identifying the differentiation state of their cultures. It also provides a step towards standardization of experiments relying on cells being in the stem cell or differentiating state.

  6. State of the Art in Stem Cell Research: Human Embryonic Stem Cells, Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells, and Transdifferentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giuseppe Maria de Peppo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells divide by asymmetric division and display different degrees of potency, or ability to differentiate into various specialized cell types. Owing to their unique regenerative capacity, stem cells have generated great enthusiasm worldwide and represent an invaluable tool with unprecedented potential for biomedical research and therapeutic applications. Stem cells play a central role in the understanding of molecular mechanisms regulating tissue development and regeneration in normal and pathological conditions and open large possibilities for the discovery of innovative pharmaceuticals to treat the most devastating diseases of our time. Not least, their intrinsic characteristics allow the engineering of functional tissues for replacement therapies that promise to revolutionize the medical practice in the near future. In this paper, the authors present the characteristics of pluripotent stem cells and new developments of transdifferentiation technologies and explore some of the biomedical applications that this emerging technology is expected to empower.

  7. Determining the Oxidation States of Manganese in NT2 Cells and Cultured Astrocytes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gunter,K.; Aschner, M.; Miller, L.; Eliseev, R.; Salter, J.; Andersen, K.; Gunter, T.

    2006-01-01

    Excessive brain manganese (Mn) can produce a syndrome called 'manganism', which correlates with loss of striatal dopamine and cell death in the striatum and globus pallidus. The prevalent hypothesis for the cause of this syndrome has been oxidation of cell components by the strong oxidizing agent, Mn{sup 3+}, either formed by oxidation of intracellular Mn{sup 2+} or transported into the cell as Mn{sup 3+}. We have recently used X-ray absorption near edge structure spectroscopy (XANES) to determine the oxidation states of manganese complexes in brain and liver mitochondria and in nerve growth factor (NGF)-induced and non-induced PC12 cells. No evidence was found for stabilization or accumulation of Mn{sup 3+} complexes because of oxidation of Mn{sup 2+} by reactive oxygen species in these tissues. Here we extend these studies of manganese oxidation state to cells of brain origin, human neuroteratocarcinoma (NT2) cells and primary cultures of rat astrocytes. Again we find no evidence for stabilization or accumulation of any Mn{sup 3+} complex derived from oxidation of Mn{sup 2+} under a range of conditions.

  8. Multi-bits memory cell using degenerated magnetic states in a synthetic antiferromagnetic reference layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukushima, Akio; Yakushiji, Kay; Konoto, Makoto; Kubota, Hitoshi; Imamura, Hiroshi; Yuasa, Shinji

    2016-02-01

    We newly developed a magnetic memory cell having multi-bit function. The memory cell composed of a perpendicularly magnetized magnetic tunnel junction (MB-pMTJ) and a synthetic antiferromagnetic reference layer. The multi-bit function is realized by combining the freedom of states of the magnetic free layer and that in the antiferromagnetically coupled reference layer. The structure of the reference layer is (FeB/Ta/[Co/Pt]3)/Ru/([Co/Pt]6); the top and the bottom layers are coupled through Ru layer where the reference layer has two degrees of freedom of a head-to-head and a bottom-to-bottom magnetic configuration. A four-state memory cell is realized by combination of both degrees of freedom. The states in the reference layer however is hardly detected by the total resistance of MB-pMTJ, because the magnetoresistance effect in the reference layer is negligibly small. That implies that the resistance values for the different states in the reference layer are degenerated. On the other hand, the two different states in the reference layer bring different stray fields to the free layer, which generate two different minor loop with different switching fields. Therefore, the magnetic states in the reference layer can be differentiated by the two-step reading, before and after applying the appropriately pulsed magnetic field which can identify the initial state in the reference layer. This method is similar to distinguishing different magnetic states in an in-plane magnetized spin-valve element. We demonstrated that four different states in the MB-pMTJ can be distinguished by the two-step read-out. The important feature of the two-step reading is a practically large operation margins (large resistance change in reading) which is equal to that of a single MTJ. Even though the two-step reading is a destructive method by which 50% of the magnetic state is changed, this MB-pMTJ is promising for high density non-volatile memory cell with a minor cost of operation speed.

  9. Cell state switching factors and dynamical patterning modules: complementary mediators of plasticity in development and evolution

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Stuart A Newman; Ramray Bhat; Nadejda V Mezentseva

    2009-10-01

    Ancient metazoan organisms arose from unicellular eukaryotes that had billions of years of genetic evolution behind them. The transcription factor networks present in single-celled ancestors at the origin of the Metazoa (multicellular animals) were already capable of mediating the switching of the unicellular phenotype among alternative states of gene activity in response to environmental conditions. Cell differentiation, therefore, had its roots in phenotypic plasticity, with the ancient regulatory proteins acquiring new targets over time and evolving into the ``developmental transcription factors” (DTFs) of the ``developmental-genetic toolkit.” In contrast, the emergence of pattern formation and morphogenesis in the Metazoa had a different trajectory. Aggregation of unicellular metazoan ancestors changed the organisms’ spatial scale, leading to the first ``dynamical patterning module” (DPM): cell-cell adhesion. Following this, other DPMs (defined as physical forces and processes pertinent to the scale of the aggregates mobilized by a set of toolkit gene products distinct from the DTFs), transformed simple cell aggregates into hollow, multilayered, segmented, differentiated and additional complex structures, with minimal evolution of constituent genes. Like cell differentiation, therefore, metazoan morphologies also originated from plastic responses of cells and tissues. Here we describe examples of DTFs and most of the important DPMs, discussing their complementary roles in the evolution of developmental mechanisms. We also provide recently characterized examples of DTFs in cell type switching and DPMs in morphogenesis of avian limb bud mesenchyme, an embryo-derived tissue that retains a high degree of developmental plasticity.

  10. Cell-State Transitions Regulated by SLUG Are Critical for Tissue Regeneration and Tumor Initiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah Phillips

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Perturbations in stem cell activity and differentiation can lead to developmental defects and cancer. We use an approach involving a quantitative model of cell-state transitions in vitro to gain insights into how SLUG/SNAI2, a key developmental transcription factor, modulates mammary epithelial stem cell activity and differentiation in vivo. In the absence of SLUG, stem cells fail to transition into basal progenitor cells, while existing basal progenitor cells undergo luminal differentiation; together, these changes result in abnormal mammary architecture and defects in tissue function. Furthermore, we show that in the absence of SLUG, mammary stem cell activity necessary for tissue regeneration and cancer initiation is lost. Mechanistically, SLUG regulates differentiation and cellular plasticity by recruiting the chromatin modifier lysine-specific demethylase 1 (LSD1 to promoters of lineage-specific genes to repress transcription. Together, these results demonstrate that SLUG plays a dual role in repressing luminal epithelial differentiation while unlocking stem cell transitions necessary for tumorigenesis.

  11. The Role of Covert Retrieval in Working Memory Span Tasks: Evidence from Delayed Recall Tests

    Science.gov (United States)

    McCabe, David P.

    2008-01-01

    The current study examined delayed recall of items that had been processed during simple and complex span tasks. Three experiments were reported showing that despite more items being recalled initially from a simple span task (i.e., word span) than a complex span task (i.e., operation span), on a delayed recall test more items were recalled that…

  12. Design and operational considerations for unsupported offshore pipeline spans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shah, B.C.; White, C.N.; Rippon, I.J.

    1988-05-01

    Design and operational considerations have been examined in determining the significance of unsupported offshore pipeline spans that may develop during pipeline installation or field operation. Allowable unsupported span lengths determined during design are generally based on strict code compliance and a design foundation encompassing the worst possible environmental and operational loads. During operation, however, unsupported spans develop beyond the allowable limits, perhaps as a result of various unforseen local conditions. Applying original design criteria is likely to result in cost-prohibitive repair predictions, while lack of action may result in loss of production. Without the design code requirements of an existing or a proposed pipeline system being violated, realistically safe design can be approached through evaluation of the sensitivity of the key design parameters. Priorities for remedial repair of the unsupported spans can be established for the pipelines in service while operating constraints, budget, and schedule are recognized. On the basis of periodic surveys, properly formatted survey data, and reanalysis of the design parameters, pipeline span repair cost estimates and schedules can be appreciably reduced. Similar principles can be applied to a pipeline in planning and design stages to ensure a safe operating design and to eliminate an uneconomically conservative design. These design and operational considerations are illustrated through a case study.

  13. Radiation effects on life span in Caenorhabditis elegans

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, T.E.; Hartman, P.S.

    1988-09-01

    Wild-type and radiation-sensitive (Rad) mutants of Caenorhabditis elegans were irradiated using a /sup 137/Cs source (2.7 krads/min.) at several developmental stages and subsequently monitored for life span. Acute doses of radiation ranged from 1 krad to 300 krads. All stages required doses above 100 krads to reduce mean life span. Dauers and third stage larvae were more sensitive, and 8-day-old adults were the most resistant. Occasional statistically significant but nonrepeatable increases in survival were observed after intermediate levels of irradiation (10-30 krads). Unirradiated rad-4 and rad-7 had life spans similar to wild-type; all others had a significant reduction in survival. The mutants were about as sensitive as wild-type to the effects of ionizing radiation including occasional moderate life span extensions at intermediate doses. We conclude that the moderate life span extensions sometimes observed after irradiation are likely to be mediated by a means other than the induction of DNA repair enzymes.

  14. The cellular state determines the effect of melatonin on the survival of mixed cerebellar cell culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daiane Gil Franco

    Full Text Available The constitutive activation of nuclear factor-κB (NF-κB, a key transcription factor involved in neuroinflammation, is essential for the survival of neurons in situ and of cerebellar granule cells in culture. Melatonin is known to inhibit the activation of NF-κB and has a cytoprotective function. In this study, we evaluated whether the cytoprotective effect of melatonin depends on the state of activation of a mixed cerebellar culture that is composed predominantly of granule cells; we tested the effect of melatonin on cultured rat cerebellar cells stimulated or not with lipopolysaccharide (LPS. The addition of melatonin (0.1 nM-1 µM reduced the survival of naïve cells while inhibiting LPS-induced cell death. Melatonin (100 nM transiently (15 min inhibited the nuclear translocation of both NF-κB dimers (p50/p50, p50/RelA and, after 60 min, increased the activation of p50/RelA. Melatonin-induced p50/RelA activity in naïve cells resulted in the transcription of inducible nitric oxide synthase (iNOS and the production of NO. Otherwise, in cultures treated with LPS, melatonin blocked the LPS-induced activation of p50/RelA and the reduction in p50/p50 levels and inhibited iNOS expression and NO synthesis. Therefore, melatonin in vehicle-treated cells induces cell death, while it protects against LPS-induced cytotoxicity. In summary, we confirmed that melatonin is a neuroprotective drug when cerebellar cells are challenged; however, melatonin can also lead to cell death when the normal balance of the NF-κB pathway is disturbed. Our data provide a mechanistic basis for understanding the influence of cell context on the final output response of melatonin.

  15. Expansion on stromal cells preserves the undifferentiated state of human hematopoietic stem cells despite compromised reconstitution ability.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mattias Magnusson

    Full Text Available Lack of HLA-matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC limits the number of patients with life-threatening blood disorders that can be treated by HSC transplantation. So far, insufficient understanding of the regulatory mechanisms governing human HSC has precluded the development of effective protocols for culturing HSC for therapeutic use and molecular studies. We defined a culture system using OP9M2 mesenchymal stem cell (MSC stroma that protects human hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC from differentiation and apoptosis. In addition, it facilitates a dramatic expansion of multipotent progenitors that retain the immunophenotype (CD34+CD38-CD90+ characteristic of human HSPC and proliferative potential over several weeks in culture. In contrast, transplantable HSC could be maintained, but not significantly expanded, during 2-week culture. Temporal analysis of the transcriptome of the ex vivo expanded CD34+CD38-CD90+ cells documented remarkable stability of most transcriptional regulators known to govern the undifferentiated HSC state. Nevertheless, it revealed dynamic fluctuations in transcriptional programs that associate with HSC behavior and may compromise HSC function, such as dysregulation of PBX1 regulated genetic networks. This culture system serves now as a platform for modeling human multilineage hematopoietic stem/progenitor cell hierarchy and studying the complex regulation of HSC identity and function required for successful ex vivo expansion of transplantable HSC.

  16. Germ Cell Testicular Cancer Incidence, Latitude and Sunlight Associations in the United States and Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biggar, Robert J; Baade, Peter D; Sun, Jiandong; Brandon, Lindsay E; Kimlin, Michael

    2016-09-01

    International patterns suggest germ cell testicular cancer (GCTC) incidence may be lower in lower latitudes. To investigate this possibility, we examined GCTC incidence by latitude (population centroid in 2000) for men ≥15 years within two reasonably homogeneous countries, the United States and Australia. In the United States, we examined age-adjusted incidence/latitude trends using data from states (2001-2010) and local-area registries (1980-2011). In Australia, we evaluated incidence/latitude trends in 61 Statistical Divisions (2000-2009). In U.S. White men (68 566 cases), state incidences increased by latitude, rising 5.74% (4.45-7.05%) per 5°North latitude increment. Similar trends were found for seminoma and nonseminoma subtypes (P distance from the equator, approximately 1% per degree within the range of latitudes studied. PMID:27400420

  17. Recursive Bayesian filtering framework for lithium-ion cell state estimation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tagade, Piyush; Hariharan, Krishnan S.; Gambhire, Priya; Kolake, Subramanya Mayya; Song, Taewon; Oh, Dukjin; Yeo, Taejung; Doo, Seokgwang

    2016-02-01

    Robust battery management system is critical for a safe and reliable electric vehicle operation. One of the most important functions of the battery management system is to accurately estimate the battery state using minimal on-board instrumentation. This paper presents a recursive Bayesian filtering framework for on-board battery state estimation by assimilating measurables like cell voltage, current and temperature with physics-based reduced order model (ROM) predictions. The paper proposes an improved Particle filtering algorithm for implementation of the framework, and compares its performance against the unscented Kalman filter. Functionality of the proposed framework is demonstrated for a commercial NCA/C cell state estimation at different operating conditions including constant current discharge at room and low temperatures, hybrid power pulse characterization (HPPC) and urban driving schedule (UDDS) protocols. In addition to accurate voltage prediction, the electrochemical nature of ROM enables drawing of physical insights into the cell behavior. Advantages of using electrode concentrations over conventional Coulomb counting for accessible capacity estimation are discussed. In addition to the mean state estimation, the framework also provides estimation of the associated confidence bounds that are used to establish predictive capability of the proposed framework.

  18. A kinetic-metabolic model based on cell energetic state: study of CHO cell behavior under Na-butyrate stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghorbaniaghdam, Atefeh; Henry, Olivier; Jolicoeur, Mario

    2013-04-01

    A kinetic-metabolic model approach describing and simulating Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell behavior is presented. The model includes glycolysis, pentose phosphate pathway, TCA cycle, respiratory chain, redox state and energetic metabolism. Growth kinetic is defined as a function of the major precursors for the synthesis of cell building blocks. Michaelis-Menten type kinetic is used for metabolic intermediates as well as for regulatory functions from energy shuttles (ATP/ADP) and cofactors (NAD/H and NADP/H). Model structure and parameters were first calibrated using results from bioreactor cultures of CHO cells expressing recombinant t-PA. It is shown that the model can simulate experimental data for all available experimental data, such as extracellular glucose, glutamine, lactate and ammonium concentration time profiles, as well as cell energetic state. A sensitivity analysis allowed identifying the most sensitive parameters. The model was then shown to be readily adaptable for studying the effect of sodium butyrate on CHO cells metabolism, where it was applied to the cases with sodium butyrate addition either at mid-exponential growth phase (48 h) or at the early plateau phase (74 h). In both cases, a global optimization routine was used for the simultaneous estimation of the most sensitive parameters, while the insensitive parameters were considered as constants. Finally, confidence intervals for the estimated parameters were calculated. Results presented here further substantiate our previous findings that butyrate treatment at mid-exponential phase may cause a shift in cellular metabolism toward a sustained and increased efficiency of glucose utilization channeled through the TCA cycle. PMID:22976819

  19. Network access to PCDS (SPAN, ESN, SESNET, ARPANET)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, J.

    1986-01-01

    One of the major goals of the National Space Science Data Center is to increase access to NASA data systems by enhancing networking activities. The activities are centered around three basic networking systems: the Space Physics Analysis Network (SPAN); the Earth Science Network (ESN); and the NASA Packet Switched System (NPSS). Each system is described, linkages among systems are explained, and future plans are announced. The inclusion of several new climate nodes on SPAN or ESN are also mentioned. Presently, the Pilot Climate Data System is accessible through SPAN and will be accessible through NPSS by summer and ESN by the end of 1986. Ambitious plans for implementation are underway. The implementation of these plans will represent a major advance in the utilization and accessibility of data worldwide.

  20. Advanced aerostatic analysis of long-span suspension bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2006-01-01

    As the span length of suspension bridges increases, the diameter of cables and thus the wind load acting on them, the nonlinear wind-structure interaction and the wind speed spatial non-uniformity all increase consequently, which may have unnegligible influence on the aerostatic behavior of long-span suspension bridges. In this work, a method of advanced aerostatic analysis is presented firstly by considering the geometric nonlinearity, the nonlinear wind-structures and wind speed spatial non-uniformity. By taking the Runyang Bridge over the Yangtze River as example, effects of the nonlinear wind-structure interaction, wind speed spatial non-uniformity, and the cable's wind load on the aerostatic behavior of the bridge are investigated analytically. The results showed that these factors all have important influence on the aerostatic behavior, and should be considered in the aerostatic analysis of long and particularly super long-span suspension bridges.

  1. Experimental Study on Free Spanning Submarine Pipeline Under Dynamic Excitation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李昕; 刘亚坤; 周晶; 马恒春; 朱彤

    2002-01-01

    Seismic load has a significant effect on the response of a free spanning submarine pipeline when the pipeline is constructed in a seismically active region. The model experiment is performed on an underwater shaking table to simulate the response of submarine pipelines under dynamic input. In consideration of the effects of the terrestrial and submarine pipeline, water depth, support condition, distance from seabed, empty and full pipeline, and span on dynamic response, 120 groups of experiments are conducted. Affecting factors are analyzed and conclnsions are drawn for reference. For the control of dynamic response, the span of a submarine pipeline is by far more important than the other factors. Meanwhile, the rosponse difference between a submarine pipeline under sine excitation and that under random excitation exists in experiments.

  2. Mathematical modelling of phenotypic plasticity and conversion to a stem-cell state under hypoxia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dhawan, Andrew; Madani Tonekaboni, Seyed Ali; Taube, Joseph H.; Hu, Stephen; Sphyris, Nathalie; Mani, Sendurai A.; Kohandel, Mohammad

    2016-02-01

    Hypoxia, or oxygen deficiency, is known to be associated with breast tumour progression, resistance to conventional therapies and poor clinical prognosis. The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process that confers invasive and migratory capabilities as well as stem cell properties to carcinoma cells thus promoting metastatic progression. In this work, we examined the impact of hypoxia on EMT-associated cancer stem cell (CSC) properties, by culturing transformed human mammary epithelial cells under normoxic and hypoxic conditions, and applying in silico mathematical modelling to simulate the impact of hypoxia on the acquisition of CSC attributes and the transitions between differentiated and stem-like states. Our results indicate that both the heterogeneity and the plasticity of the transformed cell population are enhanced by exposure to hypoxia, resulting in a shift towards a more stem-like population with increased EMT features. Our findings are further reinforced by gene expression analyses demonstrating the upregulation of EMT-related genes, as well as genes associated with therapy resistance, in hypoxic cells compared to normoxic counterparts. In conclusion, we demonstrate that mathematical modelling can be used to simulate the role of hypoxia as a key contributor to the plasticity and heterogeneity of transformed human mammary epithelial cells.

  3. Low temperature measurements of state-of-the-art concentrator solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rumyantsev, Valery D.; Chekalin, Alexander V.; Malevskiy, Dmitry A.; Shvarts, Maxim Z.; Andreev, Valery M.

    2015-09-01

    Knowing the temperature behavior of the photovoltaic parameters in multi-junction (MJ) solar cells (SCs) can give information suitable for comparing different cell structures and for estimating a potential of their operation in various environmental conditions. As a rule, the cell structures are designed specifically for terrestrial (with high sunlight concentration), or space (sometimes with relatively low concentration) applications, differing in certain, but not principal, details. Structural improvements introduced in one of the cell types may highlight the effective ways for improvements applicable for another cell type. In this work, a set of the state-of-the-art concentrator triple-junction SCs were investigated to analyze the influence of temperature in a very wide range of -170 ≤ T ≤ +85°C, together with the sunlight concentration ratio variation, on the cell performance. In particular, the PV conversion efficiencies as high as 50 - 52% (AM1.5d) have been measured in the temperature range of -120 - -150°C for the sunlight concentration ratios of C = 50 - 300 suns. Such investigations may be regarded as a tool for revealing the presence of the "parasitic" built-in energy barriers at cell structure optimization.

  4. Current State of Technology of Fuel Cell Power Systems for Autonomous Underwater Vehicles

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alejandro Mendez

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Autonomous Underwater Vehicles (AUVs are vehicles that are primarily used to accomplish oceanographic research data collection and auxiliary offshore tasks. At the present time, they are usually powered by lithium-ion secondary batteries, which have insufficient specific energies. In order for this technology to achieve a mature state, increased endurance is required. Fuel cell power systems have been identified as an effective means to achieve this endurance but no implementation in a commercial device has yet been realized. This paper summarizes the current state of development of the technology in this field of research. First, the most adequate type of fuel cell for this application is discussed. The prototypes and design concepts of AUVs powered by fuel cells which have been developed in the last few years are described. Possible commercial and experimental fuel cell stack options are analyzed, examining solutions adopted in the analogous aerial vehicle applications, as well as the underwater ones, to see if integration in an AUV is feasible. Current solutions in oxygen and hydrogen storage systems are overviewed and energy density is objectively compared between battery power systems and fuel cell power systems for AUVs. A couple of system configuration solutions are described including the necessary lithium-ion battery hybrid system. Finally, some closing remarks on the future of this technology are given.

  5. Research development of digital maintenance and management system for long-span cable-stayed bridges

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yuan; HUANG Qiao; SUN Yong-ming

    2009-01-01

    Digital cable-stayed bridge maintenance and management system (DCBMS) was developed for the need of maintenance and management of long-span cable-stayed bridges. In this paper, the major functions and theoretical application of eight modules were systematically stated with the background of Harbin Songhua River cable-stayed bridge, which include data management module, inspection and measurement module, assessment module, finite element analysis module, disease diagnosis and prediction module, maintenance module, query module and help module. By analyzing and calculating the data from manual inspection database, basic database and health monitoring subsystem, DCBMS can accomplish the functions like life prediction, disease diagnosis, comprehensive assessment, maintenance and management of bridges. Therefore, the maintenance and management of long-span cable-stayed bridges can be made digital, professional and scientific. By running this system, a real-time and specific technical guidance can be provided for the maintainers and managers of longspan cable-stayed bridges.

  6. Innovative configurations for long-span suspension bridges

    OpenAIRE

    Bartoli, G.; P. D’Asdia; S. Febo; C. Mannini; S. Noè; L. Procino

    2009-01-01

    This paper reports the results of a piece of research about long-span suspension bridges with multiple-box girder steel deck characterized by low drag coefficient and high aeroelastic stability. For this type of bridges, by increasing the span length, the contribution to the stiffness of the suspension cables becomes dominant with respect to that of the deck, so that the ratio of the frequency of the first torsional mode to the frequency of the first vertical bending mode approaches unity, wh...

  7. A noise model for the evaluation of defect states in solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, G.; Barone, C.; Mauro, C.; Neitzert, H. C.; Pagano, S.

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical model, combining trapping/detrapping and recombination mechanisms, is formulated to explain the origin of random current fluctuations in silicon-based solar cells. In this framework, the comparison between dark and photo-induced noise allows the determination of important electronic parameters of the defect states. A detailed analysis of the electric noise, at different temperatures and for different illumination levels, is reported for crystalline silicon-based solar cells, in the pristine form and after artificial degradation with high energy protons. The evolution of the dominating defect properties is studied through noise spectroscopy. PMID:27412097

  8. A noise model for the evaluation of defect states in solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landi, G; Barone, C; Mauro, C; Neitzert, H C; Pagano, S

    2016-01-01

    A theoretical model, combining trapping/detrapping and recombination mechanisms, is formulated to explain the origin of random current fluctuations in silicon-based solar cells. In this framework, the comparison between dark and photo-induced noise allows the determination of important electronic parameters of the defect states. A detailed analysis of the electric noise, at different temperatures and for different illumination levels, is reported for crystalline silicon-based solar cells, in the pristine form and after artificial degradation with high energy protons. The evolution of the dominating defect properties is studied through noise spectroscopy. PMID:27412097

  9. Optimizations of large area quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Biancardo, M.; West, K.; Krebs, Frederik C

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, we address optimizations of dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) through the combination of important issues like semi-transparency, quasi-solid-state constructions and low-cost realization of serially connected modules. DSSCs with a transparency of 50% in the visible region, moderate...... efficiency similar to 1%, and long lifetime allow solar cells application in building elements like windows, facades and semi-transparent roofs. The use in DSSCs of gel polymer electrolytes prepared by liquid electrolyte incorporation into a polymer matrix such as poly-methyl-methacrylate presents...

  10. Differentiations and Functional State of Osteogenic Cells in Conditions of Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onishchenko, Ganna; Rodionova, Natalia; Markevich, Ganna; Markevich, Ganna

    The space flight factors (space radiation, magnetic fields etc.) affect considerably the state of bone tissue, leading to the development of osteoporosis and osteopenia in the bone skeleton. Many aspects of reactions of bone tissue cells still remain unclear until now. With the use of electron microscopy and autoradiography with 3H-thymidine we studied the samples gathered from the femoral bone epiphyses and metaphyses of rats flown on board American Spacelab -2 and in experiments with modeling of microgravity ("tail suspension" method). In our work the main attention is focused on studying the ultrastructure and metabolism of osteogenetic cells. The degree of differentiation and functional state are evaluated according to the degree of development of organelles for specific biosynthesis: rough endoplasmic reticulum (RER), Golgy complex (GC), as well as the state of mitochondria and cell nucleus. As compared with a control, the population of osteogenetic cells from zones of bone reconstruction shows a decrease in the number of functionally active forms. We can judge of this from the reduction volume of RER, GC, mitochondria in osteoblasts. RER loses architectonics typical for osteoblasts and, as against the control, is represented by short narrow canaliculi distributed throughout the cy-toplasm; some canals disintegrate. GC is slightly pronounced, mitochondria become smaller in size and acquire an optically dark matrix. These phenomena are supposed to be associated with the desorganization of microtubules and microfilaments in the cells under microgravity condi-tions. The number of degrading and apoptotic cells increases in the population of osteoblasts. The dynamics of labeled cells following various intervals after 3H-thymidine injection testifies to a delay in the rates of osteoblasts' differentiation and their transformation to osteocytes in the experiment animals. A lower 3H-glycine uptake by the osteogenic cells and bone matrix as compared with a control is

  11. Totipotent Embryonic Stem Cells Arise in Ground-State Culture Conditions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Morgani, Sophie M; Canham, Maurice A; Nichols, Jennifer;

    2013-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are derived from mammalian embryos during the transition from totipotency, when individual blastomeres can make all lineages, to pluripotency, when they are competent to make only embryonic lineages. ESCs maintained with inhibitors of MEK and GSK3 (2i) are thought...... not directly support Nanog-positive epiblast-like ESCs. Thus, 2i and LIF support a totipotent state comparable to early embryonic cells that coexpress embryonic and extraembryonic determinants....... to represent an embryonically restricted ground state. However, we observed heterogeneous expression of the extraembryonic endoderm marker Hex in 2i-cultured embryos, suggesting that 2i blocked development prior to epiblast commitment. Similarly, 2i ESC cultures were heterogeneous and contained a Hex...

  12. Electrolytes in solid-state dye-sensitized nanocrystalline solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    AN Hongli; XUE Bofei; LI Dongmei; MENG Qingbo; GUO Lin

    2006-01-01

    In this paper, the structure and operating principle of the dye-sensitized nanocrystalline solar cells (DSSC) are discussed. The electrolytes can be divided into three types: liquid electrolyte, quasi-solid electrolyte and solid electrolyte. Based on the rele vant study of our group, we summarized mainly the research progress of the quasi-solid electrolyte and solid electrolyte in solid-state DSSC.

  13. Effects of Collective Histone State Dynamics on Epigenetic Landscape and Kinetics of Cell Reprogramming

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ashwin, S. S.; Sasai, Masaki

    2015-11-01

    Cell reprogramming is a process of transitions from differentiated to pluripotent cell states via transient intermediate states. Within the epigenetic landscape framework, such a process is regarded as a sequence of transitions among basins on the landscape; therefore, theoretical construction of a model landscape which exhibits experimentally consistent dynamics can provide clues to understanding epigenetic mechanism of reprogramming. We propose a minimal gene-network model of the landscape, in which each gene is regulated by an integrated mechanism of transcription-factor binding/unbinding and the collective chemical modification of histones. We show that the slow collective variation of many histones around each gene locus alters topology of the landscape and significantly affects transition dynamics between basins. Differentiation and reprogramming follow different transition pathways on the calculated landscape, which should be verified experimentally via single-cell pursuit of the reprogramming process. Effects of modulation in collective histone state kinetics on transition dynamics and pathway are examined in search for an efficient protocol of reprogramming.

  14. Shifts in oxidation states of cerium oxide nanoparticles detected inside intact hydrated cells and organelles

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Szymanski, Craig J.; Munusamy, Prabhakaran; Mihai, Cosmin; Xie, Yumei; Hu, Dehong; Gilles, Marry K.; Tyliszczak, T.; Thevuthasan, Suntharampillai; Baer, Donald R.; Orr, Galya

    2015-09-01

    Cerium oxide nanoparticles (CNPs) have been shown to induce diverse biological effects, ranging from toxic to beneficial. The beneficial effects have been attributed to the potential antioxidant activity of CNPs via certain redox reactions, depending on their oxidation state or Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio. However, this ratio is strongly dependent on the environment and age of the nanoparticles and it is unclear whether and how the complex intracellular environment impacts this ratio and the possible redox reactions of CNPs. To identify any changes in the oxidation state of CNPs in the intracellular environment and better understand their intracellular reactions, we directly quantified the oxidation states of CNPs outside and inside intact hydrated cells and organelles using correlated scanning transmission x-ray and super resolution fluorescence microscopies. By analyzing hundreds of small CNP aggregates, we detected a shift to a higher Ce3+/Ce4+ ratio in CNPs inside versus outside the cells, indicating a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment. We further found a similar ratio in the cytoplasm and in the lysosomes, indicating that the net reduction occurs earlier in the internalization pathway. Together with oxidative stress and toxicity measurements, our observations identify a net reduction of CNPs in the intracellular environment, which is consistent with their involvement in potentially beneficial oxidation reactions, but also point to interactions that can negatively impact the health of cells.

  15. A new state-observer of the inner PEM fuel cell pressures for enhanced system monitoring

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bethoux, Olivier; Godoy, Emmanuel; Roche, Ivan; Naccari, Bruno; Amira Taleb, Miassa; Koteiche, Mohamad; Nassif, Younane

    2014-06-01

    In embedded systems such as electric vehicles, Proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) has been an attractive technology for many years especially in automotive applications. This paper deals with PEMFC operation monitoring which is a current target for improvement for attaining extended durability. In this paper, supervision of the PEMFC is done using knowledge-based models. Without extra sensors, it enables a clear insight of state variables of the gases in the membrane electrode assembly (MEA) which gives the PEMFC controller the ability to prevent abnormal operating conditions and associated irreversible degradations. First, a new state-observer oriented model of the PEM fuel cell is detailed. Based on this model, theoretical and practical observability issues are discussed. This analysis shows that convection phenomena can be considered negligible from the dynamic point of view; this leads to a reduced model. Finally a state-observer enables the estimation of the inner partial pressure of the cathode by using only the current and voltage measurements. This proposed model-based approach has been successfully tested on a PEM fuel cell simulator using a set of possible fault scenarios.

  16. Temperature dependency of state of charge inhomogeneities and their equalization in cylindrical lithium-ion cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osswald, P. J.; Erhard, S. V.; Rheinfeld, A.; Rieger, B.; Hoster, H. E.; Jossen, A.

    2016-10-01

    The influence of cell temperature on the current density distribution and accompanying inhomogeneities in state of charge (SOC) during cycling is analyzed in this work. To allow for a detailed insight in the electrochemical behavior of the cell, commercially available 26650 cells were modified to allow for measuring local potentials at four different, nearly equidistant positions along the electrodes. As a follow-up to our previous work investigating local potentials within a cell, we apply this method for studying SOC deviations and their sensitivity to cell temperature. The local potential distribution was studied during constant current discharge operations for various current rates and discharge pulses in order to evoke local inhomogeneities for temperatures ranging from 10 °C to 40 °C. Differences in local potentials were considered for estimating local SOC variations within the electrodes. It could be observed that even low currents such as 0.1C can lead to significant inhomogeneities, whereas a higher cell temperature generally results in more pronounced inhomogeneities. A rapid SOC equilibration can be observed if the variation in the SOC distribution corresponds to a considerable potential difference defined by the open circuit voltage of either the positive or negative electrode. With increasing temperature, accelerated equalization effects can be observed.

  17. Temporal dynamics of distinct CA1 cell populations during unconscious state induced by ketamine.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hui Kuang

    Full Text Available Ketamine is a widely used dissociative anesthetic which can induce some psychotic-like symptoms and memory deficits in some patients during the post-operative period. To understand its effects on neural population dynamics in the brain, we employed large-scale in vivo ensemble recording techniques to monitor the activity patterns of simultaneously recorded hippocampal CA1 pyramidal cells and various interneurons during several conscious and unconscious states such as awake rest, running, slow wave sleep, and ketamine-induced anesthesia. Our analyses reveal that ketamine induces distinct oscillatory dynamics not only in pyramidal cells but also in at least seven different types of CA1 interneurons including putative basket cells, chandelier cells, bistratified cells, and O-LM cells. These emergent unique oscillatory dynamics may very well reflect the intrinsic temporal relationships within the CA1 circuit. It is conceivable that systematic characterization of network dynamics may eventually lead to better understanding of how ketamine induces unconsciousness and consequently alters the conscious mind.

  18. Robustness Analysis of Big Span Glulam Truss Structure

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajčié, V.; čizmar, D.; Kirkegaard, Poul Henning;

    2010-01-01

    (Eurocode 0 &1, Probabilistic model code etc.) Based on a project of big span glulam truss structure, build in Croatia few years ago, a probabilistic model is made with four failure elements. Reliability analysis of components is conducted and based on this a robustness analysis is preformed. It can...

  19. Life Span and Resiliency Theory: A Critical Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexa Smith-Osborne

    2007-05-01

    Full Text Available Theories of life span development describe human growth and change over the life cycle (Robbins, Chatterjee, & Canda, 2006. Major types of developmental theories include biological, psychodynamic, behavioral, and social learning, cognitive, moral, and spiritual, and those influenced by systems, empowerment, and conflict theory. Life span development theories commonly focus on ontogenesis and sequential mastery of skills, tasks, and abilities. Social work scholars have pointed out that a limitation of life span and other developmental theory is lack of attention to resilience (Greene, 2007; Robbins et al., 1998. The concept of resilience was developed to “describe relative resistance to psychosocial risk experiences” (Rutter, 1999b, p. 119. Longitudinal studies focused on typical and atypical child development informed theory formulation in developmental psychopathology (Garmezy & Rutter, 1983; Luthar, Cichetti,& Becker, 2000 and in an evolving resilience model (Richardson, 2002; Werner & Smith, 1992. Research on resilience has found a positive relationship between a number of individual traits and contextual variables and resistance to a variety of risk factors among children and adolescents. More recently, resilience research has examined the operation of these same factors in the young adult, middle-age, and elder life stages. This article examines the historical and conceptual progression of the two developmental theories—life span and resiliency—and discusses their application to social work practice and education in human behavior in the social environment.

  20. Neuromodulation of Behavioral and Cognitive Development across the Life Span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shu-Chen

    2012-01-01

    Among other mechanisms, behavioral and cognitive development entail, on the one hand, contextual scaffolding and, on the other hand, neuromodulation of adaptive neurocognitive representations across the life span. Key brain networks underlying cognition, emotion, and motivation are innervated by major transmitter systems (e.g., the catecholamines…

  1. 1-Skeletons of the Spanning Tree Problems with Additional Constraints

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V. A. Bondarenko

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we study polyhedral properties of two spanning tree problems with additional constraints. In the first problem, it is required to find a tree with a minimum sum of edge weights among all spanning trees with the number of leaves less than or equal to a given value. In the second problem, an additional constraint is the assumption that the degree of all nodes of the spanning tree does not exceed a given value. The recognition versions of both problems are NP-complete. We consider polytopes of these problems and their 1-skeletons. We prove that in both cases it is a NP-complete problem to determine whether the vertices of 1-skeleton are adjacent. Although it is possible to obtain a superpolynomial lower bounds on the clique numbers of these graphs. These values characterize the time complexity in a broad class of algorithms based on linear comparisons. The results indicate a fundamental difference between combinatorial and geometric properties of the considered problems from the classical minimum spanning tree problem.

  2. Definition of Measure-theoretic Pressure Using Spanning Sets

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Lian Fa HE; Jin Feng LV; Li Na ZHOU

    2004-01-01

    We introduce a new definition of measure-theoretic pressure for ergodic measures of continuous maps on a compact metric space. This definition is similar to those of topological pressure involving spanning sets. As an application, for C1+α(α> 0) diffeomorphisms of a compact manifold, we study the relationship between the measure-theoretic pressure and the periodic points.

  3. On the number of spanning trees in random regular graphs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Greenhill, Catherine; Kwan, Matthew; Wind, David Kofoed

    2014-01-01

    Let d >= 3 be a fixed integer. We give an asympotic formula for the expected number of spanning trees in a uniformly random d-regular graph with n vertices. (The asymptotics are as n -> infinity, restricted to even n if d is odd.) We also obtain the asymptotic distribution of the number of spanni...

  4. A CRTCal link between energy and life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brunet, Anne

    2011-04-01

    Cutting down calories prolongs life, but how this works remains largely unknown. A recent study in Nature (Mair et al., 2011) shows that life span extension triggered by the energy-sensing protein kinase AMPK is mediated by an evolutionarily conserved transcriptional circuit involving CRTC-1 and CREB.

  5. Alpha9beta1 integrin in melanoma cells can signal different adhesion states for migration and anchorage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lydolph, Magnus C; Morgan-Fisher, Marie; Høye, Anette M;

    2009-01-01

    of endosomal vesicle recycling, but not inhibitors of protein kinase C or the small GTPase Rho. Our results demonstrated that although alpha9beta1 integrin can induce and localise to focal adhesions in a high activation state, its intermediate activity state normally supports cell adhesion consistent......Cell surface integrins are the primary receptors for cell migration on extracellular matrix, and exist in several activation states regulated in part by ectodomain conformation. The alpha9 integrin subunit, which pairs only with beta1, has specific roles in the immune system and may regulate cell...... migration. Melanoma cells express abundant alpha9beta1 integrin, and its role in cell migration was assessed. Ligands derived from Tenascin-C and ADAM12 supported alpha9beta1 integrin-mediated cell attachment and GTP-Rac dependent migration, but not focal adhesion formation. Manganese ions induced alpha9...

  6. A new type quasi-solid state electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Miao; YANG Lei; ZHOU Xiaowen; LIN Yuan; LI Xueping; FENG Shujing; XIAO Xurui

    2006-01-01

    A new type quasi-solid state electrolyte was prepared by solidifying liquid electrolytes containing organic solvents (such as mixture of ethylene carbonate (EC) and propylene carbonate (PC), 3-methoxypropinitrile (NMP) and N-methyl-oxazolidinone (NMO)) with comb-like molten salt type polymer,and was for the first time employed in dyesensitized solar cells (DSSCs). The optimal electrolyte composition was obtained by regulating the polymer content in the electrolytes and optimizing performance data of the electrolytes and assembled cells, yielding a maximum conversion efficiency of 6.58% (AM 1.5,100 mW.cm-2). Furthermore, the existence of this new type polymer in the electrolyte suppresses the evaporation of organic solvent and improves the stability of the cells.

  7. HYDROGEN AND FUEL CELL EDUCATION AT CALIFORNIA STATE UNIVERSITY, LOS ANGELES

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blekhman, David

    2011-09-30

    California State University, Los Angeles, has partnered with the Department of Energy in addressing the workforce preparation and public education needs of the fuel cell industry and the US economy through a comprehensive set of curriculum development and training activities: * Developing and offering several courses in fuel cell technologies, hydrogen and alternative fuels production, alternative and renewable energy technologies as means of zero emissions hydrogen economy, and sustainable environment. * Establishing a zero emissions PEM fuel cell and hydrogen laboratory supporting curriculum and graduate students teaching and research experiences. * Providing engaging capstone projects for multi-disciplinary teams of senior undergraduate students. * Fostering partnerships with automotive OEMs and energy providers. * Organizing and participating in synergistic projects and activities that grow the program and assure its sustainability.

  8. Dynamic chromatin states in human ES cells reveal potential regulatory sequences and genes involved in pluripotency

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    R David Hawkins; Zhen Ye; Samantha Kuan; Pengzhi Yu; Hui Liu; Xinmin Zhang; Roland D Green; Victor V Lobanenkov; Ron Stewart; James A Thomson; Bing Ren; Gary C Hon; Chuhu Yang; Jessica E Antosiewicz-Bourget; LeonardKLee; Que-Minh Ngo; Sarit Klugman; Keith A Ching; Lee E Edsall

    2011-01-01

    Pluripotency,the ability of a cell to differentiate and give rise to all embryonic lineages,defines a small number of mammalian cell types such as embryonic stem (ES) cells.While it has been generally held that pluripotency is the product of a transcriptional regulatory network that activates and maintains the expression of key stem cell genes,accumulating evidence is pointing to a critical role for epigenetic processes in establishing and safeguarding the pluripotency of ES cells,as well as maintaining the identity of differentiated cell types.In order to better understand the role of epigenetic mechanisms in pluripotency,we have examined the dynamics of chromatin modifications genomewide in human ES cells (hESCs) undergoing differentiation into a mesendodermal lineage.We found that chromatin modifications at promoters remain largely invariant during differentiation,except at a small number of promoters where a dynamic switch between acetylation and methylation at H3K27 marks the transition between activation and silencing of gene expression,suggesting a hierarchy in cell fate commitment over most differentially expressed genes.We also mapped over 50 000 potential enhancers,and observed much greater dynamics in chromatin modifications,especially H3K4mel and H3K27ac,which correlate with expression of their potential target genes.Further analysis of these enhancers revealed potentially key transcriptional regulators of pluripotency and a chromatin signature indicative of a poised state that may confer developmental competence in hESCs.Our results provide new evidence supporting the role of chromatin modifications in defining enhancers and pluripotency.

  9. Comparison of device models for organic solar cells: Band-to-band vs. tail states recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldera, Marcos; Taretto, Kurt [Departamento de Electrotecnia, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires, Neuquen (Argentina); Kirchartz, Thomas [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    The efficiency-limiting recombination mechanism in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is a current topic of investigation and debate in organic photovoltaics. In this work, we simulate state-of-the-art BHJ solar cells using two different models. The first model takes into account band-to-band recombination and field dependent carrier generation. The second model assumes a Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination mechanism via tail states and field independent carrier generation. Additionally, we include in both cases optical modelling and, thus, position-dependent exciton generation and non-ideal exciton collection. We explore both recombination mechanisms by fitting light and dark current-voltage (JV) characteristics of BHJ cells of five materials: P3HT, MDMO-PPV, MEH-PPV, PCDTBT and PF10TBT, all blended with fullerene derivatives. We show that although main device parameters such as short circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor and ideality factor are accurately reproduced by both Langevin and tail recombination, only tail recombination reproduces also the ideality factor of dark characteristics accurately. Nevertheless, the model with SRH recombination via tail states needs the inclusion of external circuitry to account for the heavy shunt present in all the blends, except P3HT:PCBM, when illuminated. Finally, we propose a means to find analytical expressions for the short circuit current by assuming a linear relation between the recombination rate and the concentration of free minority carriers. The model reproduces experimental data of P3HT cells at various thickness values using realistic parameters for this material. Dark JV measurement (circles) of a PCDTBT:PC{sub 70}BM solar cell (Park et al., Nature Photon. 3, 297 (2009) [1]), the fit with the model including recombination via tail states (solid line) and the fit with the model reported by (Koster et al., Phys. Rev. B 72, 085205 (2005) [2]) that includes bimolecular band-to-band recombination

  10. Activation of anaphase-promoting complex by p53 induces a state of dormancy in cancer cells against chemotherapeutic stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Yafei; Wang, Lujuan; Tang, Jingqun; Cao, Pengfei; Luo, Zhaohui; Sun, Jun; Kiflu, Abraha; Sai, Buqing; Zhang, Meili; Wang, Fan; Li, Guiyuan; Xiang, Juanjuan

    2016-01-01

    Cancer dormancy is a stage in tumor progression in which residual disease remains occult and asymptomatic for a prolonged period. Cancer cell dormancy is the main cause of cancer recurrence and failure of therapy. However, cancer dormancy is poorly characterized and the mechanisms of how cancer cells develop dormancy and relapse remain elusive. In this study, 5- fluorouracil (5-FU) was used to induce cancer cell dormancy. We found that cancer cells escape the cytotoxicity of 5-FU by becoming “dormant”. After exposure to 5-FU, residual non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cells underwent epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT), followed by mesenchymal-epithelial transition (MET). These EMT-transformed NSCLC cells were in the state of cell quiescence where cells were not dividing and were arrested in the cell cycle in G0-G1. The dormant cells underwent an EMT showed characteristics of cancer stem cells. P53 is strongly accumulated in response to 5-FU-induced dormant cells through the activation of ubiquitin ligase anaphase-promoting complex (APC/C) and TGF-β/Smad signaling. In contrast to the EMT-transformed cells, MET-transformed cells showed an increased ability to proliferate, suggesting that dormant EMT cells were reactivated in the MET process. During the EMT-MET process, DNA repair including nonhomologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) is critical to dormant cell reactivation. Our findings provide a mechanism to unravel cancer cell dormancy and reactivation of the cancer cell population. PMID:27009858

  11. Modeling system states in liver cells: Survival, apoptosis and their modifications in response to viral infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timmer Jens

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The decision pro- or contra apoptosis is complex, involves a number of different inputs, and is central for the homeostasis of an individual cell as well as for the maintenance and regeneration of the complete organism. Results This study centers on Fas ligand (FasL-mediated apoptosis, and a complex and internally strongly linked network is assembled around the central FasL-mediated apoptosis cascade. Different bioinformatical techniques are employed and different crosstalk possibilities including the integrin pathway are considered. This network is translated into a Boolean network (74 nodes, 108 edges. System stability is dynamically sampled and investigated using the software SQUAD. Testing a number of alternative crosstalk possibilities and networks we find that there are four stable system states, two states comprising cell survival and two states describing apoptosis by the intrinsic and the extrinsic pathways, respectively. The model is validated by comparing it to experimental data from kinetics of cytochrome c release and caspase activation in wildtype and Bid knockout cells grown on different substrates. Pathophysiological modifications such as input from cytomegalovirus proteins M36 and M45 again produces output behavior that well agrees with experimental data. Conclusion A network model for apoptosis and crosstalk in hepatocytes shows four different system states and reproduces a number of different conditions around apoptosis including effects of different growth substrates and viral infections. It produces semi-quantitative predictions on the activity of individual nodes, agreeing with experimental data. The model (SBML format and all data are available for further predictions and development.

  12. Human adipose cells in vitro are either refractory or responsive to insulin, reflecting host metabolic state.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vladimir A Lizunov

    Full Text Available While intercellular communication processes are frequently characterized by switch-like transitions, the endocrine system, including the adipose tissue response to insulin, has been characterized by graded responses. Yet here individual cells from adipose tissue biopsies are best described by a switch-like transition between the basal and insulin-stimulated states for the trafficking of the glucose transporter GLUT4. Two statistically-defined populations best describe the observed cellular heterogeneity, representing the fractions of refractive and responsive adipose cells. Furthermore, subjects exhibiting high systemic insulin sensitivity indices (SI have high fractions of responsive adipose cells in vitro, while subjects exhibiting decreasing SI have increasing fractions of refractory cells in vitro. Thus, a two-component model best describes the relationship between cellular refractory fraction and subject SI. Since isolated cells exhibit these different response characteristics in the presence of constant culture conditions and milieu, we suggest that a physiological switching mechanism at the adipose cellular level ultimately drives systemic SI.

  13. Carbon/Silicon Heterojunction Solar Cells: State of the Art and Prospects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinming; Lv, Zheng; Zhu, Hongwei

    2015-11-01

    In the last few decades, advances and breakthroughs of carbon materials have been witnessed in both scientific fundamentals and potential applications. The combination of carbon materials with traditional silicon semiconductors to fabricate solar cells has been a promising field of carbon science. The power conversion efficiency has reached 15-17% with an astonishing speed, and the diversity of systems stimulates interest in further research. Here, the historical development and state-of-the-art carbon/silicon heterojunction solar cells are covered. Firstly, the basic concept and mechanism of carbon/silicon solar cells are introduced with a specific focus on solar cells assembled with carbon nanotubes and graphene due to their unique structures and properties. Then, several key technologies with special electrical and optical designs are introduced to improve the cell performance, such as chemical doping, interface passivation, anti-reflection coatings, and textured surfaces. Finally, potential pathways and opportunities based on the carbon/silicon heterojunction are envisaged. The aspects discussed here may enable researchers to better understand the photovoltaic effect of carbon/silicon heterojunctions and to optimize the design of graphene-based photodevices for a wide range of applications. PMID:26422457

  14. Enhanced stress resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans cells in the dried state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauermeister, Anja; Moeller, Ralf; Reitz, Guenther; Billi, Daniela; Rettberg, Petra

    Liquid water is often regarded as a pre-requisite for life as we know it. However, some organisms can survive prolonged periods in a desiccated state and seem to resist other environmental stres-sors even better when water is absent. We tested this observation in Deinococcus radiodurans, a non-sporeforming soil bacterium well-known for its outstanding resistance to DNA damaging stressors, including high doses of UV and ionizing radiation, oxidants, and desiccation. Due to its polyextremophilic characteristics it has been regarded as a model organism in astrobiological research. To determine if the cellular changes imposed by the removal of water have an effect on the stress resistance of D. radiodurans, we compared the survival capacity of dried cells with that of hydrated cells after exposure to mono-and polychromatic UV radiation, -radiation, and heat shock (85C). In all cases, resistance was enhanced in dried cells. It is suggested that these effects are mainly due to a reduced oxidative stress in dried cells, as the metabolism is shut down and radical diffusion is very limited. Hence, desiccating conditions as encountered in space vacuum or on arid planets such as Mars may be beneficial instead of detrimental to the survival of some polyextremophilic microbes. Ongoing experiments aim to evaluate damage at a subcellular level in dried and hydrated cells after exposure to irradiation or heat shock.

  15. POSTMENOPAUSAL BLEEDING: HISTOPATHOLOGICAL SPECTRUM AND ASSOCIATION WITH AGE AND CLEAR SPAN: CASE SERIES OF 328 CASES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruchita

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available : Introduction: Postmenopausal bleeding is defined as vaginal bleeding occurring after twelve months of amenorrhea in a woman of the age where the menopause can be expected. With increase in life expectancy, a larger proportion of female population will be in postmenopausal age group; hence, the incidence of postmenopausal bleeding is expected to increase. AIM: We studied the prevalence of malignancy as well as the histopathological spectrum of genital tract lesions in cases of postmenopausal bleeding. The association between age, period between cessation of menses and onset of bleeding per vaginum (clear span was also studied. RESULTS: Malignant causes were more common (58.5% than benign causes and included cervical carcinoma, malignant uterine tumors (13.1%, carcinoma vagina (4.3%, malignant ovarian tumors (5.5%, carcinoma vulva (0.9% and carcinoma fallopian tube (0.3%. Squamous cell carcinoma was the commonest among cervical malignancies. The benign causes included polyps (16.5%, endometrial hyperplasia (4.9%, adenomyosis (2.7%, atrophic endometrium (2.4%, cervicitis (2.1%, leiomyoma (1.8%, proliferative endometrium (1.5%, endometritis (1.5%, secretory endometrium (1.2%, retained IUCD (0.9% and uterovaginal prolapse (0.6%. The likelihood of malignancy increased significantly with advancing age (p-value 0.042. The clear span of cases with malignant tumors was significantly longer than the clear span of cases with benign lesions. Hence, the likelihood of malignancy increased with length of clear span (p-value 0.00809. CONCLUSION: Any postmenopausal patient with vaginal bleeding needs to be investigated thoroughly to determine the cause of the bleeding and should be considered to have abnormal histopathology until proved otherwise

  16. [Information theory of ageing: studying the effect of bone marrow transplantation on the life span of mice].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karnaukhov, A V; Karnaukhova, E V; Sergievich, L A; Karnaukhova, N A; Karnaukhova, N A; Bogdanenko, E V; Smirnov, A A; Manokhina, I A; Karnaukhov, V N

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the method of life span extension of multicellular organisms (human) using the reservation of stem cells followed by autotransplantation has been proposed. As the efficiency of this method results from the information theory of ageing, it is important to verify it experimentally testing the basic concepts of the theory. Taking it into consideration, the experiment on the bone marrow transplantation to old mice from young closely-related donors of the inbred line was carried out. It has been shown, that transplanted animals exhibited a survival advantage, a mean life span increased by 34% as compared to the control. This result not only demonstrates the efficiency of the proposed method for life span extension of multicellular organisms, but also confirms the basis of the information theory of ageing. PMID:25707248

  17. Enhancement of Gleditsia sinensis gum rheological properties with pressure cell treatment in semi-solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zi-yuan; Zhang, Wei-an; Duan, Jiu-fang; Zhang, Wei-ming; Sun, Da-feng; Jiang, Jian-xin

    2016-03-01

    The apparent viscosity, molecular weight, and molecular weight distribution are important physical properties that determine the functional properties of galactomannan gum. Gleditsia sinensis gum (GSG) in semi-solid state was pressure cell treated over a range of temperature (30-110 °C) under nitrogen maintained at a pressure of 1.0-4.0 MPa. Physicochemical properties of GSG samples both before and after the pressure cell treatment were characterized. These include measurements of rheological properties by LVDV-III Ultra Rheometer, molecular weight and radius of gyration by light scattering, and changes in surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy. GSG had the highest apparent viscosity at a treatment temperature of 30 °C; further increase in temperature led to decrease in apparent viscosity. The apparent viscosity of GSG can be efficiently improved at room temperature and low pressure. The process of pressure cell treatment of GSG in semi-solid state could be industrialized for enhancement of rheological properties of galactomannan gum.

  18. Enhancement of Gleditsia sinensis gum rheological properties with pressure cell treatment in semi-solid state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Zi-yuan; Zhang, Wei-an; Duan, Jiu-fang; Zhang, Wei-ming; Sun, Da-feng; Jiang, Jian-xin

    2016-03-01

    The apparent viscosity, molecular weight, and molecular weight distribution are important physical properties that determine the functional properties of galactomannan gum. Gleditsia sinensis gum (GSG) in semi-solid state was pressure cell treated over a range of temperature (30-110 °C) under nitrogen maintained at a pressure of 1.0-4.0 MPa. Physicochemical properties of GSG samples both before and after the pressure cell treatment were characterized. These include measurements of rheological properties by LVDV-III Ultra Rheometer, molecular weight and radius of gyration by light scattering, and changes in surface morphology by scanning electron microscopy. GSG had the highest apparent viscosity at a treatment temperature of 30 °C; further increase in temperature led to decrease in apparent viscosity. The apparent viscosity of GSG can be efficiently improved at room temperature and low pressure. The process of pressure cell treatment of GSG in semi-solid state could be industrialized for enhancement of rheological properties of galactomannan gum. PMID:26718865

  19. Cell phone recycling experiences in the United States and potential recycling options in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Geraldo T R; Chang, Shoou-Yuh

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of cell phone recycling programs currently available in the United States. At the same time, it also provides analyses of the current recycling situation and possible recycling alternatives for Brazil. Although there are several recycling options in the United States, collection rates are still only 10% of all potential devices because customers are not aware of these possibilities. The whole system is financially based on reselling refurbished cell phones and recycled materials to developing countries which represent an effective and strong market. Several recyclers offer funds to collection partners who are either charities or who work with charities while obtaining the materials that they need in order to run their operations. A mobile phone recycling system for Brazil considering the United States experience and the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) principle is suggested. A deposit/refund/advance-recycling fee is proposed which might be implemented as a voluntary industrial initiative managed by PRO Brazil, a producer responsibility organization. One widespread public-private agreement will integrate all mobile phone stakeholders, and environmental education actions and promotional events will promote citizen's participation.

  20. Cell phone recycling experiences in the United States and potential recycling options in Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silveira, Geraldo T R; Chang, Shoou-Yuh

    2010-11-01

    This paper presents an overview of cell phone recycling programs currently available in the United States. At the same time, it also provides analyses of the current recycling situation and possible recycling alternatives for Brazil. Although there are several recycling options in the United States, collection rates are still only 10% of all potential devices because customers are not aware of these possibilities. The whole system is financially based on reselling refurbished cell phones and recycled materials to developing countries which represent an effective and strong market. Several recyclers offer funds to collection partners who are either charities or who work with charities while obtaining the materials that they need in order to run their operations. A mobile phone recycling system for Brazil considering the United States experience and the Extended Producer Responsibility (EPR) principle is suggested. A deposit/refund/advance-recycling fee is proposed which might be implemented as a voluntary industrial initiative managed by PRO Brazil, a producer responsibility organization. One widespread public-private agreement will integrate all mobile phone stakeholders, and environmental education actions and promotional events will promote citizen's participation. PMID:20554440

  1. Active chatter control in a milling machinspan>e

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dohner, J.L.; Hinnerichs, T.D.; Lauffer, J.P. [and others

    1997-08-01

    The use of active feedback compensation to mitigate cutting instabilities in an advanced milling machinspan>e is discussed in this paper. A linear structural model delineating dynamics significant to the onset of cutting instabilities was combined with a nonlinear cutting model to form a dynamic depiction of an existing milling machinspan>e. The model was validated with experimental data. Modifications made to an existing machine model were used to predict alterations in dynamics due to the integration of active feedback compensation. From simulations, subcomponent requirements were evaluated and cutting enhancements were predicted. Active compensation was shown to enable more than double the metal removal rate over conventional milling machines. 25 refs., 10 figs., 1 tab.

  2. Octave-spanning supercontinuum generation via microwave frequency multiplication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cole, D. C.; Beha, K. M.; Diddams, S. A.; Papp, S. B.

    2016-06-01

    We demonstrate a system based on telecom components for the generation of a coherent octave-spanning supercontinuum from a continuous-wave laser. The system utilizes direct multiplication of a 10 GHz signal derived from a commercial synthesizer to carve pulses from the laser, which are then iteratively chirped and compressed in two stages. After reducing the repetition rate of the resulting pulse train to 2.5 GHz using selective transmission through an electro-optic gate, propagation through highly-nonlinear fiber generates an octave-spanning supercontinuum spectrum. We discuss the impact of the noise of the modulation frequency on the coherence of the supercontinuum and discuss its mitigation. Close agreement between experiment and theory is shown throughout, and we use our ability to precisely model the experiment to propose an extension of the system to 20 GHz repetition rate.

  3. Temperature Distribution in a Long-Span Aircraft Hangar

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    PEI Yongzhong; BAI Yin; SHI Yongjiu; ZHU Dan; WANG Yuanqing

    2008-01-01

    Long-span aircraft hangars have features which differ from other large structural systems. The temperature stresses due to temperature variations often greatly impact the mechanical performance of the structure. The paper presents an analysis of the heat transfer processes and factors which influence the temperature distribution. The AMECO-A380 aircraft hangar at the Beijing Capital International Airport was selected as a practical example to illustrate the use of finite volume analysis to calculate the temperature field taking into account meteorological conditions, solar radiation, heat convection, etc. The temperature distribution and the variation of the length of the upper and lower chords of the grid structure roof were ana-lyzed to develop guidelines for the temperature distributions in very large aircraft hangars. The results show that the temperature effect will be large for long-span hangars, and the temperature stresses due to non-uniform temperatures should be analyzed to guarantee the structural safety of large aircraft hangars.

  4. Evaluating the life cycle environmental impact of short span bridges

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Du, Guangli; Pettersson, Lars; Karoumi, Raid

    2016-01-01

    Bridge infrastructure consumes large amount of energy and raw materials, leading to considerable environmental burdens. The traditional infrastructure construction prioritizes its technical and economic viability. In recent years, the society devotes an ever-increased attention to the environmental...... impact of the construction sector. Life cycle assessment (LCA) is a systematic method for assessing the environmental impact of products and systems, but its application in bridges is scarce. In Swede, most of the bridges are short spans and the type of concrete slab-frame bridge (CFB) accounts...... for a large share. Soil steel composite bridge (SSCB) is a functional equivalent solution for CFB. In order to mitigate the environmental burdens of short span bridges, this paper performed a comparative LCA study between these two types of bridge. The results indicate that the initial material consumption...

  5. 复杂悬跨条件下的管线涡激振动分析%VIV analysis of pipelines under complex span conditions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    James WANG; F. Steven WANG; Gang DUAN; Paul JUKES

    2009-01-01

    Spans occur when a pipeline is laid on a rough undulating seabed or when upheaval buckling occurs due to constrained thermal expansion. This not only results in static and dynamic loads on the flowline at span sections, but also generates vortex induced vibration (VIV), which can lead to fatigue issues. The phenomenon, if not predicted and controlled properly, will negatively affect pipeline integrity, leading to expensive remediation and intervention work. Span analysis can be complicated by: long span lengths, a large number of spans caused by a rough seabed, and multi-span interactions. In addition, the complexity can be more onerous and challenging when soil uncertainty, concrete degradation and unknown residual lay tension are considered in the analysis. This paper describes the latest developments and a .state-of-the-art. finite element analysis program that has been developed to simulate the span response of a flowline under complex boundary and loading conditions. Both VIV and direct wave loading are captured in the analysis and the results are sequentially used for the ultimate limit state (ULS) check and fatigue life calculation.

  6. Psychosocial stressors and the short life spans of legendary jazz musicians.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patalano, F

    2000-04-01

    Mean age at death of 168 legendary jazz musicians and 100 renowned classical musicians were compared to examine whether psychosocial stressors such as severe substance abuse, haphazard working conditions, lack of acceptance of jazz as an art form in the United States, marital and family discord, and a vagabond life style may have contributed to shortened life spans for the jazz musicians. Analysis indicated that the jazz musicians died at an earlier age (57.2 yr.) than the classical musicians (73.3 yr.).

  7. A Vesicle Superpool Spans Multiple Presynaptic Terminals in Hippocampal Neurons

    OpenAIRE

    Staras, K.; Branco, T.; Burden, J. J.; Pozo, K.; Darcy, K.; Marra, V; Ratnayaka, A.; Goda, Y

    2010-01-01

    Synapse-specific vesicle pools have been widely characterized at central terminals. Here, we demonstrate a vesicle pool that is not confined to a synapse but spans multiple terminals. Using fluorescence imaging, correlative electron microscopy, and modeling of vesicle dynamics, we show that some recycling pool vesicles at synapses form part of a larger vesicle "superpool." The vesicles within this superpool are highly mobile and are rapidly exchanged between terminals (turnover: similar to 4%...

  8. Minocycline Effect on Life and Health Span of Drosophila Melanogaster

    OpenAIRE

    Oxenkrug, Gregory; Navrotskaya, Valeriya; Vorobyova, Lyudmila; Summergrad, Paul

    2012-01-01

    Up-regulation of kynurenine (KYN) pathway of tryptophan (TRP) was suggested as one of the mechanisms of aging and aging-associated disorders. Genetic and pharmacological impairment of TRP – KYN metabolism resulted in prolongation of life span in Drosophila models. Minocycline, an antibiotic with anti-inflammatory, antioxidant and neuroprotective properties independent of its antibacterial activity, inhibited KYN formation from TRP. Since minocycline is the only FDA approved for human use medi...

  9. Weighted spanning trees on some self-similar graphs

    CERN Document Server

    D'Angeli, Daniele

    2010-01-01

    We compute the complexity of two infinite families of finite graphs: the Sierpi\\'{n}ski graphs, which are finite approximations of the well-known Sierpi\\'nsky gasket, and the Schreier graphs of the Hanoi Towers group $H^{(3)}$ acting on the rooted ternary tree. For both of them, we study the weighted generating functions of the spanning trees, associated with several natural labellings of the edge sets.

  10. Exercise, brain, and cognition across the life span

    OpenAIRE

    Voss, Michelle W.; Nagamatsu, Lindsay S.; Liu-Ambrose, Teresa; Arthur F Kramer

    2011-01-01

    This is a brief review of current evidence for the relationships between physical activity and exercise and the brain and cognition throughout the life span in non-pathological populations. We focus on the effects of both aerobic and resistance training and provide a brief overview of potential neurobiological mechanisms derived from non-human animal models. Whereas research has focused primarily on the benefits of aerobic exercise in youth and young adult populations, there is growing eviden...

  11. Local membrane mechanics of pore-spanning bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mey, Ingo; Stephan, Milena; Schmitt, Eva K; Müller, Martin Michael; Ben Amar, Martine; Steinem, Claudia; Janshoff, Andreas

    2009-05-27

    The mechanical behavior of lipid bilayers spanning the pores of highly ordered porous silicon substrates was scrutinized by local indentation experiments as a function of surface functionalization, lipid composition, solvent content, indentation velocity, and pore radius. Solvent-containing nano black lipid membranes (nano-BLMs) as well as solvent-free pore-spanning bilayers were imaged by fluorescence and atomic force microscopy prior to force curve acquisition, which allows distinguishing between membrane-covered and uncovered pores. Force indentation curves on pore-spanning bilayers attached to functionalized hydrophobic porous silicon substrates reveal a predominately linear response that is mainly attributed to prestress in the membranes. This is in agreement with the observation that indentation leads to membrane lysis well below 5% area dilatation. However, membrane bending and lateral tension dominate over prestress and stretching if solvent-free supported membranes obtained from spreading giant liposomes on hydrophilic porous silicon are indented. An elastic regime diagram is presented that readily allows determining the dominant contribution to the mechanical response upon indentation as a function of load and pore radius. PMID:19453196

  12. Sector spanning agrifood process transparency with Direct Computer Mapping

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mónika Varga

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Agrifood processes are built from multiscale, time-varied networks that span many sectors from cultivation, through animal breeding, food industry and trade to the consumers. The sector spanning traceability has not yet been solved, because neither the“one-step backward, one-step forward” passing of IDs, nor the large sophisticated databases give a feasible solution. In our approach, the transparency of process networks is based on the generic description of dynamic mass balances. The solution of this,apparently more difficult task, makes possible the unified acquisition of the data from the different ERP systems, and the scalable storage of these simplified process models. Inaddition, various task specific intensive parameters (e.g. concentrations, prices, etc. can also be carried with the mass flows. With the knowledge of these structured models, theplanned Agrifood Interoperability Centers can serve tracing and tracking results for the actors and for the public authorities. Our methodology is based on the Direct Computer Mapping of process models. The software is implemented in open source code GNUPrologand C++ languages. In the first, preliminary phase we have studied a couple of consciously different realistic actors, as well as an example for the sector spanning chain,combined from these realistic elements.

  13. Cord blood mesenchymal stem cells propel human dendritic cells to an intermediate maturation state and boost interleukin-12 production by mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Berk, Lieke C J; Roelofs, Helene; Huijs, Tonnie; Siebers-Vermeulen, Kim G C; Raymakers, Reinier A; Kögler, Gesine; Figdor, Carl G; Torensma, Ruurd

    2009-12-01

    Pathogen-derived entities force the tissue-resident dendritic cells (DCs) towards a mature state, followed by migration to the draining lymph node to present antigens to T cells. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) modulate the differentiation, maturation and function of DCs. In umbilical cord blood an immature MSC population was identified. Remarkably, these immature stem cells modulated DCs in a different way. Marker expression was unchanged during the differentiation of monocytes towards immature DCs (iDCs) when cocultured with cord blood MSC [unrestricted somatic stem cells (USSCs)]. The maturation to mature DCs (mDCs) was enhanced when DCs were co-cultured with USSC, as evidenced by the up-regulation of costimulatory molecules. Endocytosis of dextran by iDCs was hampered in the presence of USSCs, which is indicative for the maturation of iDCs. Despite this maturation, the migration of iDCs cocultured with USSCs appeared to be identical to iDCs cultured alone. However, USSCs increased the migration of mDCs towards CCL21 and boosted interleukin-12 production. So, USSCs mature iDCs, thereby redirecting the antigen-uptake phenotype towards a mature phenotype. Furthermore, DC maturation by lipopolysaccharide (LPS) or USSCs reflects two distinct pathways because migration was unaffected when iDCs were matured by coculture with USSCs, while it was strongly enhanced in the presence of LPS. DCs are able to discriminate the different MSC subtypes, resulting in diverse differentiation programmes.

  14. An integrated transcriptional regulatory circuit that reinforces the breast cancer stem cell state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polytarchou, Christos; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Struhl, Kevin

    2012-09-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are a highly tumorigenic cell type present as a minority population in developmentally diverse tumors and cell lines. Using a genetic screen in an inducible model of CSC formation in a breast cell line, we identify microRNAs (miRNAs) that inhibit CSC growth and are down-regulated in CSCs. Aside from the previously identified miR-200 family, these include the miR-15/16 (miR-16, miR-15b) and miR-103/107 (miR-103, miR-107) families as well as miR-145, miR-335, and miR-128b. Interestingly, these miRNAs affect common target genes that encode the Bmi1 and Suz12 components of the polycomb repressor complexes as well as the DNA-binding transcription factors Zeb1, Zeb2, and Klf4. Conversely, expression of the CSC-modulating miRNAs is inhibited by Zeb1 and Zeb2. There is an inverse relationship between the levels of CSC-regulating miRNAs and their respective targets in samples from triple-negative breast cancer patients, providing evidence for the relevance of these interactions in human cancer. In addition, combinatorial overexpression of these miRNAs progressively attenuates the growth of CSCs derived from triple-negative breast cancers. These observations suggest that CSC formation and function are reinforced by an integrated regulatory circuit of miRNAs, transcription factors, and chromatin-modifying activities that can act as a bistable switch to drive cells into either the CSC or the nonstem state within the population of cancer cells.

  15. An integrated transcriptional regulatory circuit that reinforces the breast cancer stem cell state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polytarchou, Christos; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Struhl, Kevin

    2012-01-01

    Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are a highly tumorigenic cell type present as a minority population in developmentally diverse tumors and cell lines. Using a genetic screen in an inducible model of CSC formation in a breast cell line, we identify microRNAs (miRNAs) that inhibit CSC growth and are down-regulated in CSCs. Aside from the previously identified miR-200 family, these include the miR-15/16 (miR-16, miR-15b) and miR-103/107 (miR-103, miR-107) families as well as miR-145, miR-335, and miR-128b. Interestingly, these miRNAs affect common target genes that encode the Bmi1 and Suz12 components of the polycomb repressor complexes as well as the DNA-binding transcription factors Zeb1, Zeb2, and Klf4. Conversely, expression of the CSC-modulating miRNAs is inhibited by Zeb1 and Zeb2. There is an inverse relationship between the levels of CSC-regulating miRNAs and their respective targets in samples from triple-negative breast cancer patients, providing evidence for the relevance of these interactions in human cancer. In addition, combinatorial overexpression of these miRNAs progressively attenuates the growth of CSCs derived from triple-negative breast cancers. These observations suggest that CSC formation and function are reinforced by an integrated regulatory circuit of miRNAs, transcription factors, and chromatin-modifying activities that can act as a bistable switch to drive cells into either the CSC or the nonstem state within the population of cancer cells. PMID:22908280

  16. SOLID STATE ENERGY CONVERSION ALLIANCE (SECA) SOLID OXIDE FUEL CELL PROGRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Unknown

    2003-06-01

    This report summarizes the progress made during the September 2001-March 2002 reporting period under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled ''Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program''. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. The overall objective of the program is to demonstrate a modular SOFC system that can be configured to create highly efficient, cost-competitive, and environmentally benign power plants tailored to specific markets. When fully developed, the system will meet the efficiency, performance, life, and cost goals for future commercial power plants.

  17. Direct determination of defect density of states in organic bulk heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verma, Upkar K.; Tripathi, Durgesh C.; Mohapatra, Y. N.

    2016-09-01

    The measurement of the occupied trap density of states (DOS) is important for optimization of organic bulk heterojunction solar cells. We demonstrate a direct method for obtaining it from the trap related peak in capacitance-voltage characteristics under different levels of illumination, and its correlation with the dark current density-voltage characteristics. We use the method to measure the parameters of DOS, occupied trap distribution, and its temperature dependence for poly(3-hexathiophene) (P3HT):phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester (PCBM) based solar cells. The total occupied trap concentration is approximately 7 × 1015 cm-3 with a standard deviation for a truncated Gaussian distribution varying between 32 and 44 meV in the temperature range of 310-270 K within a total Gaussian DOS with a standard deviation of 92 meV.

  18. Recombination barrier layers in solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells

    KAUST Repository

    Roelofs, Katherine E.

    2012-06-01

    By replacing the dye in the dye-sensitized solar cell design with semiconductor quantum dots as the light-absorbing material, solid-state quantum dot-sensitized solar cells (ss-QDSSCs) were fabricated. Cadmium sulfide quantum dots (QDs) were grown in situ by successive ion layer adsorption and reaction (SILAR). Aluminum oxide recombination barrier layers were deposited by atomic layer deposition (ALD) at the TiO2/hole-conductor interface. For low numbers of ALD cycles, the Al2O3 barrier layer increased open circuit voltage, causing an increase in device efficiency. For thicker Al2O3 barrier layers, photocurrent decreased substantially, leading to a decrease in device efficiency. © 2012 IEEE.

  19. Online state of health estimation on NMC cells based on predictive analytics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berecibar, Maitane; Devriendt, Floris; Dubarry, Matthieu; Villarreal, Igor; Omar, Noshin; Verbeke, Wouter; Van Mierlo, Joeri

    2016-07-01

    Accurate on board state of health estimation is a key battery management system function to provide optimal management of the battery system under control. In this regard, this paper presents an extensive study and comparison of three of commonly used supervised learning methods for state of health estimation in Graphite/Nickel Manganese Cobalt oxide cells. The three methods were based from the study of both incremental capacity and differential voltage curves. According to the ageing evolution of both curves, features were extracted and used as inputs for the estimation techniques. Ordinary Least Squares, Multilayer Perceptron and Support Vector Machine were used as the estimation techniques and accurate results were obtained while requiring a low computational effort. Moreover, this work allows a deep comparison of the different estimation techniques in terms of accuracy, online estimation and BMS applicability. In addition, estimation can be developed by partial charging and/or partial discharging, reducing the required maintenance time.

  20. A differential equation with state-dependent delay from cell population biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Getto, Philipp; Waurick, Marcus

    2016-04-01

    We analyze a differential equation, describing the maturation of a stem cell population, with a state-dependent delay, which is implicitly defined via the solution of an ODE. We elaborate smoothness conditions for the model ingredients, in particular vital rates, that guarantee the existence of a local semiflow and allow to specify the linear variational equation. The proofs are based on theoretical results of Hartung et al. combined with implicit function arguments in infinite dimensions. Moreover we elaborate a criterion for global existence for differential equations with state-dependent delay. To prove the result we adapt a theorem by Hale and Lunel to the C1-topology and use a result on metric spaces from Diekmann et al.

  1. Emergence of a 600-Hz buzz UP state Purkinje cell firing in alert mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheron, G; Prigogine, C; Cheron, J; Márquez-Ruiz, J; Traub, R D; Dan, B

    2014-03-28

    Purkinje cell (PC) firing represents the sole output from the cerebellar cortex onto the deep cerebellar and vestibular nuclei. Here, we explored the different modes of PC firing in alert mice by extracellular recording. We confirm the existence of a tonic and/or bursting and quiescent modes corresponding to UP and DOWN state, respectively. We demonstrate the existence of a novel 600-Hz buzz UP state of firing characterized by simple spikes (SS) of very small amplitude. Climbing fiber (CF) input is able to switch the 600-Hz buzz to the DOWN state, as for the classical UP-to-DOWN state transition. Conversely, the CF input can initiate a typical SS pattern terminating into 600-Hz buzz. The 600-Hz buzz was transiently suppressed by whisker pad stimulation demonstrating that it remained responsive to peripheral input. It must not be mistaken for a DOWN state or the sign of PC inhibition. Complex spike (CS) frequency was increased during the 600-Hz buzz, indicating that this PC output actively contributes to the cerebello-olivary loop by triggering a disinhibition of the inferior olive. During the 600-Hz buzz, the first depolarizing component of the CS was reduced and the second depolarizing component was suppressed. Consistent with our experimental observations, using a 559-compartment single-PC model - in which PC UP state (of about -43mV) was obtained by the combined action of large tonic AMPA conductances and counterbalancing GABAergic inhibition - removal of this inhibition produced the 600-Hz buzz; the simulated buzz frequency decreased following an artificial CS. PMID:24440752

  2. Polymer Sensitized Quasi Solid-State Photovoltaic Cells Using Derivatives of Polythiophene

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    G.K.R.Senadeera; J.M.R.C. Fernando

    2006-01-01

    Substituted thiophene sensitized, nanocrystalline TiO2-based quasi solid-state solar cells were fabricated by using either poly (3-thiophene acetic acid) (P3TAA) or a copolymer with poly (3-thiophene acetic acid)-poly (hexyl thiophene) (P3TAA-PHT) polymers and copper iodide (Cul) as a hole conducting material together with an ionic liquid 1-ethyl-3-methylimidazolium bis (trifluoromethylsulfonyl) amide and lithium bis (trifluoromethanesulfone) imide as additives for charge transport promotion. Dramatic enhancements in the cell performances were observed with the additives in Cul. While the cell sensitized with P3TAA generated a conversion efficiency of ~0.3% under simulated full sunlight of 100 mW.cm-2 (air mass: 1.5), the cell sensitized with copolymer P3TAA-PHT delivered ~0.25% efficiency under the same conditions with ~1.23 mA.cm-2 as photocurrent and ~371 mV as photovoltage.

  3. [Radiation-induced changes in structural state of membranes of human blood cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burlakova, E B; Atkarskaia, M V; Fatkullina, L D; Andreev, S G

    2014-01-01

    To evaluate radiation-induced changes in the structural state of the membranes, blood samples of healthy donors were subjected to gamma radiation in the range of small (1-10 cGy) and medium doses (50 cGy-2 Gy). After irradiation, the microviscosity of lipid membranes of red and white blood cells was measured by ESR spin probe method. At doses exceeding 1 cGy, statistically significant changes of the degree of spontaneous erythrocyte hemolysis and of the lymphocyte plasma membrane microviscosity were observed. Under identical irradiation conditions, the stability of lymphocyte membranes was less as compared to erythrocyte membranes.

  4. Hydrogen ions directly regulating the oligomerization state of Photosystem I in intact Spirulina platensis cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    H+ concentration induced-monomerization or trimerization of photosystem I (PSI) in cyanobacteria has never been directly observed. In this work, taking characteristic spectra for the trimers and monomers as the indicators, it was experimentally demonstrated that H+ could induce the oligomeric changes of PSI reaction centers in the intact Spirulina ,platensis cells and also in the isolated thylakoid membrane complexes. Especially, the higher concentration of H+ would induce the monomerization while the lower the trimerization, suggesting the electrostatic interaction should be mainly responsible forchanges in the oligomeric state of PSI in Spirulina platensis.

  5. Addition of multimodal therapy to standard management of steady state sickle cell disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okpala, Iheanyi; Ezenwosu, Osita; Ikefuna, Anthony; Duru, Augustine; Chukwu, Barth; Madu, Anazoeze; Nwagha, Theresa; Ocheni, Sunday; Ibegbulam, Obike; Emodi, Ifeoma; Anike, Uche; Nonyelu, Charles; Anigbo, Chukwudi; Agu, Kingsley; Ajuba, Ifeoma; Chukwura, Awele; Ugwu, Ogechukwu; Ololo, Uche

    2013-01-01

    Most people on folic acid to boost erythropoiesis and prophylactic antimicrobials, the standard management of steady state sickle cell disease (SCD), have unacceptable numbers of crises. The objective of this study was to evaluate the effects of adding multimodal therapy with potassium thiocyanate and omega-3 fatty acids to the standard management of steady state SCD. Pre- and post-treatment numbers of crises and other disease indices were compared in 16 HbSS individuals on folic acid and paludrine after 12 months of adding eicosapentaenoic acid 15 mg/kg/day, docosahexaenoic acid 10 mg/kg/day, and potassium thiocyanate 1-2 mL/day, each milliliter of which contained 250 mg of thiocyanate and 100 micrograms of iodine to prevent hypothyroidism: a possible side-effect due to competitive inhibition of the transport of iodide into the thyroid gland by thiocyanate. Median number of crises reduced from 3/yr to 1/yr (P < 0.0001). There was no evidence of impaired thyroid function. Plasma level of tri-iodothyronine improved (P < 0.0001). Steady state full blood count and bilirubin level did not change significantly. The findings suggest that addition of potassium thiocyanate and eicosapentaenoic and docosahexaenoic acids to standard management of steady state SCD reduces the number of crises. This observation needs to be evaluated in larger studies.

  6. Implementation and Use of State-of-the-Art, Cell-Based In Vitro Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langer, Gernot

    2016-01-01

    The impressive advances in the generation and interpretation of functional omics data have greatly contributed to a better understanding of the (patho-)physiology of many biological systems and led to a massive increase in the number of specific targets and phenotypes to investigate in both basic and applied research. The obvious complexity revealed by these studies represents a major challenge to the research community and asks for improved target characterisation strategies with the help of reliable, high-quality assays. Thus, the use of living cells has become an integral part of many research activities because the cellular context more closely represents target-specific interrelations and activity patterns. Although still predominant, the use of traditional two-dimensional (2D) monolayer cell culture models has been gradually complemented by studies based on three-dimensional (3D) spheroid (Sutherland 1988) and other 3D tissue culture systems (Santos et al. 2012; Matsusaki et al. 2014) in an attempt to employ model systems more closely representing the microenvironment of cells in the body. Hence, quite a variety of state-of-the-art cell culture models are available for the generation of novel chemical probes or the identification of starting points for drug development in translational research and pharma drug discovery. In order to cope with these information-rich formats and their increasing technical complexity, cell-based assay development has become a scientific research topic in its own right and is used to ensure the provision of significant, reliable and high-quality data outlasting any discussions related to the current "irreproducibility epidemic" (Dolgin 2014; Prinz et al. 2011; Schatz 2014). At the same time the use of cells in microplate assay formats has become state of the art and greatly facilitates rigorous cell-based assay development by providing the researcher with the opportunity to address the multitude of factors affecting the actual

  7. Irrigation Practices, State Intervention and Farmers' Life- Worlds in Drought-Prone Tigray, Ethiopia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Teshome, W.

    2003-01-01

    This study examines irrigation practices, state intervention and the responses of farmers in the<span class=SpellE>Tigrayspan>region ofspan><span lang=EN-US style='font-family:Palatino'>Ethiopiaspan><span lang=EN-US style='font-fa

  8. Shorter Life Span of Microorganisms and Plants as a Consequence of Shielded Magnetic Environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dobrota, C.; Piso, I. M.; Bathory, D.

    The geomagnetic field is an essential environmental factor for life and health on this planet. In order to survey how magnetic fields affect the life span and the nitrogenase (an iron-sulphur enzyme) activity of Azotobacter chroococcum as well as the life span, the main organic synthesis and the water balance of plants (22 species), the biological tests were incubated under shielded magnetic field and also in normal geo-magnetic environment. The shielding level was about 10-6 of the terrestrial magnetic field.Life cycles of all organisms require the co-ordinated control of a complex set of interlocked physiological processes and metabolic pathways. Such processes are likely to be regulated by a large number of genes. Our researches suggest that the main point in biological structures, which seems to be affected by the low magnetic environment, is the water molecule. Magnetic field induces a molecular alignment. Under shielded conditions, unstructured water molecules with fewer hydrogen bonds, which are producing a more reactive environment, are occurring. As compared to control, the life span of both microorganisms and plants was shorter in shielded environment. A higher nitrogenase affinity for the substrate was recorded in normal geo-magnetic field compared to low magnetic field. The synthesis of carbohydrates, lipids, proteins and enzymes was modified under experimental conditions. The stomatal conductance was higher between 158 and 300% in shielded environment indicating an important water loss from the plant cells.Our results support the idea that the shielded magnetic environment induces different reactions depending on the time of exposure and on the main metabolic pathways of the cells.

  9. Characterization of proton exchange membrane materials for fuel cells by solid state nuclear magnetic resonance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kong, Zueqian [Iowa State Univ., Ames, IA (United States)

    2010-01-01

    Solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has been used to explore the nanometer-scale structure of Nafion, the widely used fuel cell membrane, and its composites. We have shown that solid-state NMR can characterize chemical structure and composition, domain size and morphology, internuclear distances, molecular dynamics, etc. The newly-developed water channel model of Nafion has been confirmed, and important characteristic length-scales established. Nafion-based organic and inorganic composites with special properties have also been characterized and their structures elucidated. The morphology of Nafion varies with hydration level, and is reflected in the changes in surface-to-volume (S/V) ratio of the polymer obtained by small-angle X-ray scattering (SAXS). The S/V ratios of different Nafion models have been evaluated numerically. It has been found that only the water channel model gives the measured S/V ratios in the normal hydration range of a working fuel cell, while dispersed water molecules and polymer ribbons account for the structures at low and high hydration levels, respectively.

  10. Effect of Cefazolin Treatment on the Nonresonant Raman Signatures of the Metabolic State of Individual Escherichia coli Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Moritz, T.; Taylor, D.; Polage, C.; Krol, D.M.; Lane, S.; Chan, J.

    2010-01-01

    Laser tweezers Raman spectroscopy (LTRS) was used to characterize the Raman fingerprints of the metabolic states of Escherichia coli (E. coli) cells and to determine the spectral changes associated with cellular response to the antibiotic Cefazolin. The Raman spectra of E. coli cells sampled at diff

  11. Progress in human embryonic stem cell research in the United States between 2001 and 2010.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Keyvan Vakili

    Full Text Available On August 9th, 2001, the federal government of the United States announced a policy restricting federal funds available for research on human embryonic stem cell (hESCs out of concern for the "vast ethical mine fields" associated with the creation of embryos for research purposes. Until the policy was repealed on March 9th, 2009, no U.S. federal funds were available for research on hESCs extracted after August 9, 2001, and only limited federal funds were available for research on a subset of hESC lines that had previously been extracted. This paper analyzes how the 2001 U.S. federal funding restrictions influenced the quantity and geography of peer-reviewed journal publications on hESC. The primary finding is that the 2001 policy did not have a significant aggregate effect on hESC research in the U.S. After a brief lag in early 2000s, U.S. hESC research maintained pace with other areas of stem cell and genetic research. The policy had several other consequences. First, it was tied to increased hESC research funding within the U.S. at the state level, leading to concentration of related activities in a relatively small number of states. Second, it stimulated increased collaborative research between US-based scientists and those in countries with flexible policies toward hESC research (including Canada, the U.K., Israel, China, Spain, and South Korea. Third, it encouraged independent hESC research in countries without restrictions.

  12. Fuel cell-gas turbine hybrid system design part I: Steady state performance

    Science.gov (United States)

    McLarty, Dustin; Brouwer, Jack; Samuelsen, Scott

    2014-07-01

    The hybridization of gas turbine technology with high temperature fuel cells represents an ultra-high efficiency, ultra-low emission, fuel flexible power generation platform. The performance of past prototypes has been limited by marginal compatibility of the two primary sub-systems. This paper addresses the challenge of selecting compatible hardware by presenting a simple and robust method for bespoke hybrid system design and off-the-shelf component integration. This is the first application of detailed, spatially resolved, physical models capable of resolving off-design performance to the integration analysis of FC-GT hybrids. Static maps are produced for both turbine and fuel cell sub-systems that readily evaluate the compatibility and hybrid performance. Molten carbonate and solid oxide fuel cells are considered for hybridization with recuperated micro-turbines and larger axial flow gas turbine systems. Current state-of-the-art molten carbonate technology is shown to pair well with present micro-turbine technology in an FC bottoming cycle design achieving 74.4% LHV efficiency. Solid oxide technology demonstrates remarkable potential for integration with larger scale axial turbo-machinery to achieve greater than 75% LHV efficiency. This performance map technique closely matches results from detailed integrated hybrid system analyses, and enables quick determination of performance requirements for balance of plant design and optimization.

  13. Can we predict the intracellular metabolic state of a cell based on extracellular metabolite data?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granucci, Ninna; Pinu, Farhana R; Han, Ting-Li; Villas-Boas, Silas G

    2015-12-01

    The analysis of extracellular metabolites presents many technical advantages over the analysis of intracellular compounds, which made this approach very popular in recent years as a high-throughput tool to assess the metabolic state of microbial cells. However, very little effort has been made to determine the actual relationship between intracellular and extracellular metabolite levels. The secretion of intracellular metabolites has been traditionally interpreted as a consequence of an intracellular metabolic overflow, which is based on the premise that for a metabolite to be secreted, it must be over-produced inside the cell. Therefore, we expect to find a secreted metabolite at increased levels inside the cells. Here we present a time-series metabolomics study of Saccharomyces cerevisiae growing on a glucose-limited chemostat with parallel measurements of intra- and extracellular metabolites. Although most of the extracellular metabolites were also detected in the intracellular samples and showed a typical metabolic overflow behaviour, we demonstrate that the secretion of many metabolites could not be explained by the metabolic overflow theory. PMID:26400772

  14. Unravelling the low-temperature metastable state in perovskite solar cells by noise spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barone, C.; Lang, F.; Mauro, C.; Landi, G.; Rappich, J.; Nickel, N. H.; Rech, B.; Pagano, S.; Neitzert, H. C.

    2016-01-01

    The hybrid perovskite methylammonium lead iodide CH3NH3PbI3 recently revealed its potential for the manufacturing of low-cost and efficient photovoltaic cells. However, many questions remain unanswered regarding the physics of the charge carrier conduction. In this respect, it is known that two structural phase transitions, occurring at temperatures near 160 and 310 K, could profoundly change the electronic properties of the photovoltaic material, but, up to now, a clear experimental evidence has not been reported. In order to shed light on this topic, the low-temperature phase transition of perovskite solar cells has been thoroughly investigated by using electric noise spectroscopy. Here it is shown that the dynamics of fluctuations detect the existence of a metastable state in a crossover region between the room-temperature tetragonal and the low-temperature orthorhombic phases of the perovskite compound. Besides the presence of a noise peak at this transition, a saturation of the fluctuation amplitudes is observed induced by the external DC current or, equivalently, by light exposure. This noise saturation effect is independent on temperature, and may represent an important aspect to consider for a detailed explanation of the mechanisms of operation in perovskite solar cells. PMID:27703203

  15. [MORPHOFUNCTIONAL STATE OF BLOOD CELLS AFTER CHRONIC EXPOSURE OF THE PROTEIN KINASES INHIBITOR MALEIMIDE DERIVATIVE].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byelinska, I V; Lynchak, O V; Tsyvinska, S M; Rybalchenko, V K

    2015-01-01

    The effect of the protein kinases inhibitor maleimide derivative (MI-1, 1-(4-Cl-benzyl)-3-Cl-4-(CF3-phenylamino)-1H-pyrrole-2,5-dione), inhibitor of VEGF-R1,2,3, FGF-R1, EGF-R(h), PDK1, Src(h), Syk(h), YES, ZAP70 et al. with antineoplastic activity, on blood cells parameters of rats after chronic exposure has been studied. Administration of MI-1 at doses 0.027 and 2.7 mg/kg (suppress colon carcinogenesis) for 20 and 26 weeks does not affect the morphofunctional state of red blood cells in healthy rats. This is confirmed by the lack of differences in the concentration of hemoglobin in blood, red blood cells count, mean corpuscular hemoglobin and mean corpuscular hemoglobin concentration, hematocrit and mean corpuscular volume, and the number of reticulocytes in blood after 20 and 26 weeks of exposure compared with the control group. MI-1 at indicated doses does not influence total leukocytes count and content (eosinophilic and neutrophilic granulocytes, lymphocytes, monocytes) and does not inhibit thrombocytopoiesis (platelet count remains unchanged). No negative effect of MI-1 on hematopoiesis is not limited (by the hemopoietic system) use of this compound as a potential antitumor drug PMID:26552308

  16. Effects of radiation on T regulatory cells in normal states and cancer: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu; Sun, Xiangdong; Luo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongcheng; Yang, Xi; Guo, Qing; Song, Yaqi; Sun, Xinchen

    2015-01-01

    Radiation remains an important component of cancer treatment. In addition to inducing tumor cell death through direct cytotoxic effects, radiation can also promote the regression of tumor via augment of immune response. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a unique subpopulation of CD4 positive cells, which are characterized by expression of the forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) transcription factor and high levels of CD25. Mounting evidence has shown that Tregs are implicated in the development and progression of various types of cancer, which makes Tregs an important target in cancer therapeutics. Generally, lymphocytes are regarded as radiosensitive. However, Tregs have been demonstrated to be relatively resistant to radiotherapy, which is partly mediated by downregulation of pro-apoptotic proteins and upregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins. Moreover, radiotherapy can increase the production of Tregs and the recruitment of Tregs to local tumor microenvironment. Tregs can attenuate radiation-induced tumor death, which cause the resistance of tumor to radiotherapy. Recent experimental studies and clinical trails have demonstrated that the combination of radiation with medications that target Tregs is promising in the treatment of several types of neoplasms. In this review, we discussed the effect of radiation on Tregs in physiological states and cancer. Further, we presented an overview of therapies that target Tregs to enhance the efficacy of radiation in cancer therapeutics. PMID:26807310

  17. Adipose-Derived Mesenchymal Cells for Bone Regereneration: State of the Art

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marta Barba

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Adipose tissue represents a hot topic in regenerative medicine because of the tissue source abundance, the relatively easy retrieval, and the inherent biological properties of mesenchymal stem cells residing in its stroma. Adipose-derived mesenchymal stem cells (ASCs are indeed multipotent somatic stem cells exhibiting growth kinetics and plasticity, proved to induce efficient tissue regeneration in several biomedical applications. A defined consensus for their isolation, classification, and characterization has been very recently achieved. In particular, bone tissue reconstruction and regeneration based on ASCs has emerged as a promising approach to restore structure and function of bone compromised by injury or disease. ASCs have been used in combination with osteoinductive biomaterial and/or osteogenic molecules, in either static or dynamic culture systems, to improve bone regeneration in several animal models. To date, few clinical trials on ASC-based bone reconstruction have been concluded and proved effective. The aim of this review is to dissect the state of the art on ASC use in bone regenerative applications in the attempt to provide a comprehensive coverage of the topics, from the basic laboratory to recent clinical applications.

  18. Chemical, colloidal and mechanical contributions to the state of water in wood cell walls

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bertinetti, L.; Fratzl, P.; Zemb, T.

    2016-08-01

    The properties of wood depend strongly on its water content, but the physicochemical basis for the interaction of water with cell wall components is poorly understood. Due to the importance of the problem both in the context of wood technology and the biological function of swelling and dehydration for growth stresses and seed dispersal, a wealth of descriptive data has been accumulated but a microscopic theory of water-biomolecular interactions is missing. We develop here, at a primitive level, a minimal parameter-free, coarse-grained, model of wood secondary cell walls to predict water absorption, in the form of an equation of state. It includes for the first time all three—mechanical, colloidal and chemical—contributions, taking into account the cell walls microstructure. The hydration force around the elongated cellulose crystals and entropy of mixing of the matrix polymers (hemicelluloses and lignin) are the dominant contributions driving the swelling. The elastic energy needed to swell the composite is the main term opposing water uptake. Hysteresis is not predicted but water uptake versus humidity, is reproduced in a large temperature range. Within this framework, the origin of wood dissolution and different effects of wood treatments on water sorption can be understood at the molecular level.

  19. Desempenho da tangerineira 'Span Americana' em diferentes porta-enxertos

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Simone Rodrigues da Silva

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Este trabalho objetivou avaliar o crescimento vegetativo, a produção e a qualidade de frutos da tangerina 'Span Americana' em diferentes porta-enxertos, nas condições edafoclimáticas de Bebedouro-SP. O plantio foi realizado em junho de 2003, em espaçamento de 6,0 m x 3,0 m, sendo utilizada irrigação por gotejamento a partir de 2006. Os porta-enxertos avaliados foram: citranges [Citrus sinensis (L. Osbeck × Poncirus trifoliata L. Raf] 'Carrizo' e 'Troyer', tetraploides; trifoliatas (P. trifoliata 'Davis A' e 'Flying Dragon'; limão Volkameriano Catania 2 (C. volkameriana Tenn. et Pasq., HRS 849 [(C. aurantium L. cv. 'Smooth Flat Seville' x P. trifoliata cv. 'Argentina'], tangelo 'Orlando' (C. reticulata Blanco × C. paradisi Macf. e limão 'Cravo' (C. limonia Osbeck. Foram avaliadas a produção acumulada, a eficiência produtiva e a precocidade de entrada em produção, no período de 2007 a 2009. Avaliaram-se, também, as dimensões das plantas e a taxa média de crescimento das plantas no período de 2005 a 2008, além da qualidade dos frutos em 2006 e 2007. Em pomares irrigados de tangerineira 'Span Americana', os porta-enxertos trifoliata 'Davis A' e HRS 849 apresentam desempenho horticultural satisfatório. Para plantio em alta densidade, a melhor performance da tangerineira 'Span Americana' é obtida com a utilização dos porta-enxertos trifoliata 'Flying Dragon' e citranges 'Troyer' e 'Carrizo'.

  20. The eye-voice span during reading aloud

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jochen eLaubrock

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available Although eye movements during reading are modulated by cognitive processing demands, they also reflect visual sampling of the input, and possibly preparation of output for speech or the inner voice. By simultaneously recording eye movements and the voice during reading aloud, we obtained an output measure that constrains the length of time spent on cognitive processing. Here we investigate the dynamics of the eye-voice span (EVS, the distance between eye and voice. We show that the EVS is regulated immediately during fixation of a word by either increasing fixation duration or programming a regressive eye movement against the reading direction. EVS size at the beginning of a fixation was positively correlated with the likelihood of regressions and refixations. Regression probability was further increased if the EVS was still large at the end of a fixation: if adjustment of fixation duration did not sufficiently reduce the EVS during a fixation, then a regression rather than a refixation followed with high probability. We further show that the EVS can help understand cognitive influences on fixation duration during reading: in mixed model analyses, the EVS was a stronger predictor of fixation durations than either word frequency or word length. The EVS modulated the influence of several other predictors on single fixation durations. For example, word-N frequency effects were larger with a large EVS, especially when word N-1 frequency was low. Finally, a comparison of single fixation durations during oral and silent reading showed that reading is governed by similar principles in both reading modes, although EVS maintenance and articulatory processing also cause some differences. In summary, the eye-voice span is regulated by adjusting fixation duration and/or by programming a regressive eye movement when the eye-voice span gets too large. Overall, the EVS appears to be directly related to updating of the working memory buffer during reading.

  1. In vivo MRI discrimination between live and lysed iron-labelled cells using balanced steady state free precession

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The goal of this study was to evaluate the ability of balanced steady state free precession (b-SSFP) magnetic resonance imaging sequence to distinguish between live and lysed iron-labelled cells. Human breast cancer cells were labelled with iron oxide nanoparticles. Cells were lysed using sonication. Imaging was performed at 3 T. The timing parameters for b-SSFP and the number of iron-labelled cells in samples were varied to optimise the b-SSFP signal difference between live and lysed iron-labelled cell samples. For in vivo experiments, cells were mixed with Matrigel and implanted into nude mice. Three mice implanted with live labelled cancer cells were irradiated to validate this method. Lysed iron-labelled cells have a significantly higher signal compared with live, intact iron-labelled cells in bSSFP images. The contrast between live and dead cells can be maximised by careful optimisation of timing parameters. A change in the b-SSFP signal was measured 6 days after irradiation, reflecting cell death in vivo. Histology confirmed the presence of dead cells in the implant. Our results show that the b-SSFP sequence can be optimised to allow for the discrimination of live iron-labelled cells and lysed iron-labelled cells in vitro and in vivo. (orig.)

  2. Exploring boundary-spanning practices among creativity managers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Poul Houman; Kragh, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    projects across organisational boundaries. Design/methodology/approach – The authors link to previous literature and present findings from a comparative case study of managerial practices for managing creativity projects. Data were collected through interviews, secondary materials, site visits...... and observation. Findings – Three meta-practices used by managers to manage boundary-spanning creative projects are presented: defining the creative space, making space for creativity and acting in the creative space. These practices are detailed in seven case studies of creative projects. Research limitations...

  3. Minimum weight spanning trees of weighted scale free networks

    CERN Document Server

    Melchert, O

    2012-01-01

    In this lecture we will consider the minimum weight spanning tree (MST) problem, i.e., one of the simplest and most vital combinatorial optimization problems. We will discuss a particular greedy algorithm that allows to compute a MST for undirected weighted graphs, namely Kruskal's algorithm, and we will study the structure of MSTs obtained for weighted scale free random graphs. This is meant to clarify whether the structure of MSTs is sensitive to correlations between edge weights and topology of the underlying scale free graphs.

  4. Minimal spanning tree for 100 companies in Bursa Malaysia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bahaludin, Hafizah; Abdullah, Mimi Hafizah; Salleh, Supian Mat

    2015-02-01

    This paper investigates the stock market network among the stocks traded in Bursa Malaysia by using minimal spanning tree (MST) techniques. The daily closing prices from 2011 until 2013 of 100 companies based on market capitalization are chosen to construct the network. By constructing the stock market network, the most influential stocks in Malaysian stock market are identified by employing the centrality measurements which are degree, betweenness and closeness. The findings of this study ascertain that from the 100 companies studied, four companies are identified as the most influential in the Malaysian stock market.

  5. Gas turbine blade with intra-span snubber

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merrill, Gary B.; Mayer, Clinton

    2014-07-29

    A gas turbine blade (10) including a hollow mid-span snubber (16). The snubber is affixed to the airfoil portion (14) of the blade by a fastener (20) passing through an opening (24) cast into the surface (22) of the blade. The opening is defined during an investment casting process by a ceramic pedestal (38) which is positioned between a ceramic core (32) and a surrounding ceramic casting shell (48). The pedestal provides mechanical support for the ceramic core during both wax and molten metal injection steps of the investment casting process.

  6. Counting spanning trees on fractal graphs and their asymptotic complexity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anema, Jason A.; Tsougkas, Konstantinos

    2016-09-01

    Using the method of spectral decimation and a modified version of Kirchhoff's matrix-tree theorem, a closed form solution to the number of spanning trees on approximating graphs to a fully symmetric self-similar structure on a finitely ramified fractal is given in theorem 3.4. We show how spectral decimation implies the existence of the asymptotic complexity constant and obtain some bounds for it. Examples calculated include the Sierpiński gasket, a non-post critically finite analog of the Sierpiński gasket, the Diamond fractal, and the hexagasket. For each example, the asymptotic complexity constant is found.

  7. Maximum Leaf Spanning Trees of Growing Sierpinski Networks Models

    CERN Document Server

    Yao, Bing; Xu, Jin

    2016-01-01

    The dynamical phenomena of complex networks are very difficult to predict from local information due to the rich microstructures and corresponding complex dynamics. On the other hands, it is a horrible job to compute some stochastic parameters of a large network having thousand and thousand nodes. We design several recursive algorithms for finding spanning trees having maximal leaves (MLS-trees) in investigation of topological structures of Sierpinski growing network models, and use MLS-trees to determine the kernels, dominating and balanced sets of the models. We propose a new stochastic method for the models, called the edge-cumulative distribution, and show that it obeys a power law distribution.

  8. a Minimum Spanning Tree Based Method for Uav Image Segmentation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Ping; Wei, Zheng; Cui, Weihong; Lin, Zhiyong

    2016-06-01

    This paper proposes a Minimum Span Tree (MST) based image segmentation method for UAV images in coastal area. An edge weight based optimal criterion (merging predicate) is defined, which based on statistical learning theory (SLT). And we used a scale control parameter to control the segmentation scale. Experiments based on the high resolution UAV images in coastal area show that the proposed merging predicate can keep the integrity of the objects and prevent results from over segmentation. The segmentation results proves its efficiency in segmenting the rich texture images with good boundary of objects.

  9. Fluorofluorophores: fluorescent fluorous chemical tools spanning the visible spectrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sletten, Ellen M; Swager, Timothy M

    2014-10-01

    "Fluoro" refers to both fluorescent and fluorinated compounds. Despite the shared prefix, there are very few fluorescent molecules that are soluble in perfluorinated solvents. This paucity is surprising, given that optical microscopy is a ubiquitous technique throughout the physical sciences and the orthogonality of fluorous materials is a commonly exploited strategy in synthetic chemistry, materials science, and chemical biology. We have addressed this shortage by synthesizing a panel of "fluorofluorophores," fluorescent molecules containing high weight percent fluorine with optical properties spanning the visible spectrum. We demonstrate the utility of these fluorofluorophores by preparing fluorescent perfluorocarbon nanoemulsions. PMID:25229987

  10. Span Restoration in Optical Networks with Limited Wavelength Conversion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Buron, Jakob Due; Andriolli, N;

    2007-01-01

    the merging nodes, the wavelength of the connection stubs can be considered. In this study, we evaluate the recovery performance of the suggested vector scheme and a scheme exploiting standard protocol extensions only. The behavior of both schemes with a stub-aware extension for span restoration is...... also assessed. Our simulations show that the Suggested Vector scheme achieves a higher recovery performance than the standard scheme. Both schemes benefit from the stub-aware modification. The performance increase is especially predominant if few wavelength converters are available and at medium load...

  11. Progressive collapse susceptibility of a long span suspension bridge

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olmati, Pierluigi; Giuliani, Luisa

    2013-01-01

    should be maintained in case of an accidental hanger detachment. Local damages in bridges, which are characterized by an horizontal load transfer system, may progress along the deck or along the suspension system, as the dynamic overloading of the structural elements immediately adjacent to the failed...... ones may lead to subsequent failures. In suspension bridges, which are characterized by a relatively low continuity of the system, the damage of the deck may favor a collapse standstill, in case of an early detachment of the deck collapsing section. In the paper, a long span suspension bridge is taken...

  12. Octave spanning wedge dispersive mirrors with low dispersion oscillations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habel, Florian; Shirvanyan, Vage; Trubetskov, Michael; Burger, Christian; Sommer, Annkatrin; Kling, Matthias F; Schultze, Martin; Pervak, Vladimir

    2016-05-01

    A novel concept for octave spanning dispersive mirrors with low spectral dispersion oscillations is presented. The key element of the so-called wedge dispersive mirror is a slightly wedged layer which is coated on a specially optimized dispersive multilayer stack by a common sputter coating process. The group delay dispersion (GDD) of a pulse reflected on a wedge dispersive mirror is nearly free of oscillations. Fabricated mirrors with negative GDD demonstrate the compression of a pulse down to 3.8 fs as good as double angled mirrors optimized for the same bandwidth. PMID:27137538

  13. Profiling of Altered Metabolomic States in Nicotiana tabacum Cells Induced by Priming Agents

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mhlongo, Msizi I.; Steenkamp, Paul A.; Piater, Lizelle A.; Madala, Ntakadzeni E.; Dubery, Ian A.

    2016-01-01

    Metabolomics has developed into a valuable tool for advancing our understanding of plant metabolism. Plant innate immune defenses can be activated and enhanced so that, subsequent to being pre-sensitized, plants are able to launch a stronger and faster defense response upon exposure to pathogenic microorganisms, a phenomenon known as priming. Here, three contrasting chemical activators, namely acibenzolar-S-methyl, azelaic acid and riboflavin, were used to induce a primed state in Nicotiana tabacum cells. Identified biomarkers were then compared to responses induced by three phytohormones—abscisic acid, methyljasmonate, and salicylic acid. Altered metabolomes were studied using a metabolite fingerprinting approach based on liquid chromatography and mass spectrometry. Multivariate data models indicated that these inducers cause time-dependent metabolic perturbations in the cultured cells and revealed biomarkers of which the levels are affected by these agents. A total of 34 metabolites were annotated from the mass spectral data and online databases. Venn diagrams were used to identify common biomarkers as well as those unique to a specific agent. Results implicate 20 cinnamic acid derivatives conjugated to (i) quinic acid (chlorogenic acids), (ii) tyramine, (iii) polyamines, or (iv) glucose as discriminatory biomarkers of priming in tobacco cells. Functional roles for most of these metabolites in plant defense responses could thus be proposed. Metabolites induced by the activators belong to the early phenylpropanoid pathway, which indicates that different stimuli can activate similar pathways but with different metabolite fingerprints. Possible linkages to phytohormone-dependent pathways at a metabolomic level were indicated in the case of cells treated with salicylic acid and methyljasmonate. The results contribute to a better understanding of the priming phenomenon and advance our knowledge of cinnamic acid derivatives as versatile defense metabolites. PMID

  14. Human T cell leukemia virus-I (HTLV-I) Tax-mediated apoptosis in activated T cells requires an enhanced intracellular prooxidant state

    OpenAIRE

    Los, Marek Jan; Khazaie, K; Schulze-Osthoff, Klaus; Baeuerle, P A; Schirrmacher, V.; Chlichlia, K.

    1998-01-01

    We have shown that an estradiol-dependent activation of human T cell leukemia virus-I Tax leads to the inhibition of cell proliferation and to the induction of apoptosis, The present study demonstrates that a hormone-dependent activation of Tax promotes an enhanced prooxidant state in stably transfected Jurkat cells as measured by changes in the intracellular levels of glutathione and H2O2; these changes are followed by apoptotic cell death. Additional stimulation of the CD3/TCR pathway enhan...

  15. Bax-induced apoptosis shortens the life span of DNA repair defect Ku70-knockout mice by inducing emphysema.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuyama, Shigemi; Palmer, James; Bates, Adam; Poventud-Fuentes, Izmarie; Wong, Kelvin; Ngo, Justine; Matsuyama, Mieko

    2016-06-01

    Cells with DNA damage undergo apoptosis or cellular senescence if the damage cannot be repaired. Recent studies highlight that cellular senescence plays a major role in aging. However, age-associated diseases, including emphysema and neurodegenerative disorders, are caused by apoptosis of lung alveolar epithelial cells and neurons, respectively. Therefore, enhanced apoptosis also promotes aging and shortens the life span depending on the cell type. Recently, we reported that ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(-) (/) (-) and ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(+/) (-) mice showed significantly extended life span in comparison with ku70(-) (/) (-)bax(+/+) mice. Ku70 is essential for non-homologous end joining pathway for DNA double strand break repair, and Bax plays an important role in apoptosis. Our study suggests that Bax-induced apoptosis has a significant impact on shortening the life span of ku70(-) (/) (-) mice, which are defective in one of DNA repair pathways. The lung alveolar space gradually enlarges during aging, both in mouse and human, and this age-dependent change results in the decrease of respiration capacity during aging that can lead to emphysema in more severe cases. We found that emphysema occurred in ku70(-) (/) (-) mice at the age of three-months old, and that Bax deficiency was able to suppress it. These results suggest that Bax-mediated apoptosis induces emphysema in ku70(-) (/) (-) mice. We also found that the number of cells, including bronchiolar epithelial cells and type 2 alveolar epithelial cells, shows a higher DNA double strand break damage response in ku70 KO mouse lung than in wild type. Recent studies suggest that non-homologous end joining activity decreases with increased age in mouse and rat model. Together, we hypothesize that the decline of Ku70-dependent DNA repair activity in lung alveolar epithelial cells is one of the causes of age-dependent decline of lung function resulting from excess Bax-mediated apoptosis of lung alveolar epithelial cells (and their

  16. Contribution of adipose tissue to health span and longevity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huffman, Derek M; Barzilai, Nir

    2010-01-01

    Adipose tissue accounts for approximately 20% (lean) to >50% (in extreme obesity) of body mass and is biologically active through its secretion of numerous peptides and release and storage of nutrients such as free fatty acids. Studies in rodents and humans have revealed that body fat distribution, including visceral fat (VF), subcutaneous (SC) fat and ectopic fat are critical for determining the risk posed by obesity. Specific depletion or expansion of the VF depot using genetic or surgical strategies in animal models has proven to have direct effects on metabolic characteristics and disease risk. In humans, there is compelling evidence that abdominal obesity most strongly predicts mortality risk, while in rats, surgical removal of VF improves mean and maximum life span. There is also growing evidence that fat deposition in ectopic depots such as skeletal muscle and liver can cause lipotoxicity and impair insulin action. Conversely, expansion of SC adipose tissue may confer protection from metabolic derangements by serving as a 'metabolic sink' to limit both systemic lipids and the accrual of visceral and ectopic fat. Treatments targeting the prevention of fat accrual in these harmful depots should be considered as a primary target for improving human health span and longevity. PMID:20703052

  17. Homeless Aging Veterans in Transition: A Life-Span Perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carla J. Thompson

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The need for counseling and career/educational services for homeless veterans has captured political and economic venues for more than 25 years. Veterans are three times more likely to become homeless than the general population if veterans live in poverty or are minority veterans. This mixed methods study emphasized a life-span perspective approach for exploring factors influencing normative aging and life-quality of 39 homeless veterans in Alabama and Florida. Seven descriptive quantitative and qualitative research questions framed the investigation. Study participants completed a quantitative survey reflecting their preferences and needs with a subset of the sample (N=12 also participating in individual qualitative interview sessions. Thirty-two service providers and stakeholders completed quantitative surveys. Empirical and qualitative data with appropriate triangulation procedures provided interpretive information relative to a life-span development perspective. Study findings provide evidence of the need for future research efforts to address strategies that focus on the health and economic challenges of veterans before they are threatened with the possibility of homelessness. Implications of the study findings provide important information associated with the premise that human development occurs throughout life with specific characteristics influencing the individual’s passage. Implications for aging/homelessness research are grounded in late-life transitioning and human development intervention considerations.

  18. Efficiency enhancement in solid state dye sensitized solar cells by including inverse opals with controlled layer thicknesses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zheng, Hanbin; Shah, Said Karim; Abbas, Mamatimin; Ly, Isabelle; Rivera, Thomas; Almeida, Rui M.; Hirsch, Lionel; Toupance, Thierry; Ravaine, Serge

    2016-09-01

    The photoconversion efficiency of dye sensitized solar cells can be enhanced by the incorporation of light management nanostructures such as photonic crystals. Here, we present a facile route to incorporate titania inverse opals into solid state dye sensitized solar cells and report photoconversion efficiency enhancements of up to 56% compared with a model system without the inverse opal. Our approach is based on the precise design of titania inverse opals with a predetermined thickness that can be controlled at the individual layer level. By choosing an inverse opal exhibiting a photonic bandgap which overlaps the absorption bands of the dye, our results show that there is an optimal thickness of the inverse opal structure for maximum efficiency enhancement of the cell. This is the first experimental proof that the thickness of a titania inverse opal plays a pivotal role in cell efficiency enhancement in solid state dye sensitized solar cells.

  19. Recent progress in all-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Qingyao, E-mail: wangqingyao0532@163.com [Ludong University, School of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Chen, Chao; Liu, Wei [Tongji University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China); Gao, Shanmin [Ludong University, School of Chemistry and Materials Science (China); Yang, Xiuchun, E-mail: yangxc@tongji.edu.cn [Tongji University, School of Materials Science and Engineering (China)

    2016-01-15

    All-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells have been drawing great attention to solar energy conversion, which break through restrictions in traditional solar cells, such as the high recombination at interfaces of porous TiO{sub 2} films/sensitizers/hole conductors/counter electrodes, instability of dyes, and leakage of solution electrolyte, and so the novel solar cells exhibit promising applications in the future. In this Minireview article, the assembling of solar cells including the preparation of TiO{sub 2} nanotube array photoanodes, quantum dot preparation and sensitization on photoanodes, filling of hole conductors in TiO{sub 2} nanotubes, and selection of counter electrodes are overviewed, and the development course of all-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells in recent years are summarized in detail. Moreover, the influences of TiO{sub 2} nanotube array photoanodes, quantum dots, solid electrolyte, and counter electrodes on photon-to-current efficiencies of solar cells are summarized. In addition, current problems of solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO{sub 2} nanotube array solar cells are analyzed, and the corresponding improvements, such as multisensitizers and passivation layers, are proposed to improve the photoelectric conversion efficiency. Finally, this Minireview provides a perspective for the future development of this novel solar cell.

  20. Recent progress in all-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO2 nanotube array solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    All-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO2 nanotube array solar cells have been drawing great attention to solar energy conversion, which break through restrictions in traditional solar cells, such as the high recombination at interfaces of porous TiO2 films/sensitizers/hole conductors/counter electrodes, instability of dyes, and leakage of solution electrolyte, and so the novel solar cells exhibit promising applications in the future. In this Minireview article, the assembling of solar cells including the preparation of TiO2 nanotube array photoanodes, quantum dot preparation and sensitization on photoanodes, filling of hole conductors in TiO2 nanotubes, and selection of counter electrodes are overviewed, and the development course of all-solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO2 nanotube array solar cells in recent years are summarized in detail. Moreover, the influences of TiO2 nanotube array photoanodes, quantum dots, solid electrolyte, and counter electrodes on photon-to-current efficiencies of solar cells are summarized. In addition, current problems of solid-state quantum dot-sensitized TiO2 nanotube array solar cells are analyzed, and the corresponding improvements, such as multisensitizers and passivation layers, are proposed to improve the photoelectric conversion efficiency. Finally, this Minireview provides a perspective for the future development of this novel solar cell

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells increase proliferation but do not change quiescent state of osteosarcoma cells: Potential implications according to the tumor resection status

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avril, Pierre; Le Nail, Louis-Romée; Brennan, Meadhbh Á.; Rosset, Philippe; De Pinieux, Gonzague; Layrolle, Pierre; Heymann, Dominique; Perrot, Pierre; Trichet, Valérie

    2015-01-01

    Conventional therapy of primary bone tumors includes surgical excision with wide resection, which leads to physical and aesthetic defects. For reconstruction of bone and joints, allografts can be supplemented with mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs). Similarly, adipose tissue transfer (ATT) is supplemented with adipose-derived stem cells (ADSCs) to improve the efficient grafting in the correction of soft tissue defects. MSC-like cells may also be used in tumor-targeted cell therapy. However, MSC may have adverse effects on sarcoma development. In the present study, human ADSCs, MSCs and pre-osteoclasts were co-injected with human MNNG-HOS osteosarcoma cells in immunodeficient mice. ADSCs and MSCs, but not the osteoclast precursors, accelerated the local proliferation of MNNG-HOS osteosarcoma cells. However, the osteolysis and the metastasis process were not exacerbated by ADSCs, MSCs, or pre-osteoclasts. In vitro proliferation of MNNG-HOS and Saos-2 osteosarcoma cells was increased up to 2-fold in the presence of ADSC-conditioned medium. In contrast, ADSC-conditioned medium did not change the dormant, quiescent state of osteosarcoma cells cultured in oncospheres. Due to the enhancing effect of ADSCs/MSCs on in vivo/in vitro proliferation of osteosarcoma cells, MSCs may not be good candidates for osteosarcoma-targeted cell therapy. Although conditioned medium of ADSCs accelerated the cell cycle of proliferating osteosarcoma cells, it did not change the quiescent state of dormant osteosarcoma cells, indicating that ADSC-secreted factors may not be involved in the risk of local recurrence. PMID:26998421

  2. Beta-globin gene cluster haplotypes in Venezuelan sickle cell patients from the State of Aragua

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Moreno Nancy

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Seven polymorphic sites in the beta-globin gene cluster were analyzed on a sample of 96 chromosomes of Venezuelan sickle cell patients from the State of Aragua. The Benin haplotype was predominant with a frequency of 0.479, followed by the Bantu haplotype (0.406; a minority of cases with other haplotypes was also identified: atypical Bantu A2 (0.042, Senegal (0.031, atypical Bantu A7 (0.021 and Saudi Arabia/Indian (0.021 haplotypes; however, the Cameroon haplotype was not identified in this study. Our results are in agreement with the historical records that establish Sudanese and Bantu origins for the African slaves brought into Venezuela.

  3. The reprogrammed pancreatic progenitor-like intermediate state of hepatic cells is more susceptible to pancreatic beta cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qiwei; Wang, Hai; Sun, Yu; Li, Shi-Wu; Donelan, William; Chang, Lung-Ji; Jin, Shouguang; Terada, Naohiro; Cheng, Henrique; Reeves, Westley H; Yang, Li-Jun

    2013-08-15

    Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) hold great promise for cell therapy. However, their low efficiency of lineage-specific differentiation and tumorigenesis severely hinder clinical translation. We hypothesized that reprogramming of somatic cells into lineage-specific progenitor cells might allow for large-scale expansion, avoiding the tumorigenesis inherent with iPSCs and simultaneously facilitating lineage-specific differentiation. Here we aimed at reprogramming rat hepatic WB cells, using four Yamanaka factors, into pancreatic progenitor cells (PPCs) or intermediate (IM) cells that have characteristics of PPCs. IM clones were selected based on their specific morphology and alkaline phosphatase activity and stably passaged under defined culture conditions. IM cells did not have iPSC properties, could be stably expanded in large quantity, and expressed all 14 genes that are used to define the PPC developmental stage. Directed differentiation of IM and WB cells by Pdx1-Ngn3-MafA (PNM) into pancreatic beta-like cells revealed that the IM cells are more susceptible to directed beta cell differentiation because of their open chromatin configuration, as demonstrated by expression of key pancreatic beta cell genes, secretion of insulin in response to glucose stimulation, and easy access to exogenous PNM proteins at the rat insulin 1 and Pdx1 promoters. This notion that IM cells are superior to their parental cells is further supported by the epigenetic demonstration of accessibility of Pdx1 and insulin 1 promoters. In conclusion, we have developed a strategy to derive and expand PPC cells from hepatic WB cells using conventional cell reprogramming. This proof-of-principal study may offer a novel, safe and effective way to generate autologous pancreatic beta cells for cell therapy of diabetes. PMID:23750005

  4. Novel chemically cross-linked solid state electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yin Xiong; Tan Weiwei; Xiang Wangchun [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)] [Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Lin Yuan, E-mail: Linyuan@iccas.ac.c [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Zhang Jingbo, E-mail: jbzhang@iccas.ac.c [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China); Xiao Xurui; Li Xueping; Zhou Xiaowen; Fang Shibi [Key Laboratory of Photochemistry, Beijing National Laboratory for Molecular Sciences (BNLMS), Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100190 (China)

    2010-08-01

    Poly(vinylpyridine-co-ethylene glycol methyl ether methacrylate) (P(VP-co-MEOMA)) and {alpha},{omega}-diiodo poly(ethylene oxide-co-propylene oxide) (I[(EO){sub 0.8}-co-(PO){sub 0.2}]{sub y}I) were synthesized and used as chemically cross-linked precursors of the electrolyte for dye-sensitized solar cells. Meanwhile, {alpha}-iodo poly(ethylene oxide-co-propylene oxide) methyl ether (CH{sub 3}O[(EO){sub 0.8}-co-(PO){sub 0.2}]{sub x}I) was synthesized and added into the electrolyte as an internal plasticizer. Novel polymer electrolyte resulting from chemically cross-linked precursors was obtained by the quaterisation at 90 {sup o}C for 30 min. The characteristics for this kind of electrolyte were investigated by means of ionic conductivity, thermogravimetric and photocurrent-voltage. The ambient ionic conductivity was significantly enhanced to 2.3 x 10{sup -4} S cm{sup -1} after introducing plasticizer, modified-ionic liquid. The weight loss of the solid state electrolyte at 200 {sup o}C was 1.8%, and its decomposition temperature was 287 {sup o}C. Solid state dye-sensitized solar cell based on chemically cross-linked electrolyte presented an overall conversion efficiency of 2.35% under AM1.5 irradiation (100 mW cm{sup -2}). The as-fabricated device maintained 88% of its initial performance at room temperature even without sealing for 30 days, showing a good stability.

  5. Operation of a steady-state pH-differential water electrolysis cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teschke, O.; Zwanziger, M. G.

    The design features and experimental results with a steady-state electrolysis cell using an acid pH at the cathode and a basic condition at the anode are described. The differential pH concentrations were configured to obtain water decomposition voltages lower than the nominal 1.23 V at 1 atm and 25 C. Oxygen evolution occurs 0.8 V less anodic at a pH of 14 than at a pH of 0, while lower voltage is needed for hydrogen evolution in an acidic solution. The pH differential was set up with an external water feed in the test cell. The anode and cathode were positioned on either side of a solid polymer electrolyte sheet. The trials were run with pure water in circulating, closed systems, with KOH in a closed system, and with KOH in a circulating system. Lowered electricity consumption was demonstrated, although none of the configurations showed a favorable energy balance.

  6. Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nguyen Minh

    2006-07-31

    This report summarizes the work performed for Phase I (October 2001 - August 2006) under Cooperative Agreement DE-FC26-01NT41245 for the U. S. Department of Energy, National Energy Technology Laboratory (DOE/NETL) entitled 'Solid State Energy Conversion Alliance (SECA) Solid Oxide Fuel Cell Program'. The program focuses on the development of a low-cost, high-performance 3-to-10-kW solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) system suitable for a broad spectrum of power-generation applications. During Phase I of the program significant progress has been made in the area of SOFC technology. A high-efficiency low-cost system was designed and supporting technology developed such as fuel processing, controls, thermal management, and power electronics. Phase I culminated in the successful demonstration of a prototype system that achieved a peak efficiency of 41%, a high-volume cost of $724/kW, a peak power of 5.4 kW, and a degradation rate of 1.8% per 500 hours. . An improved prototype system was designed, assembled, and delivered to DOE/NETL at the end of the program. This prototype achieved an extraordinary peak efficiency of 49.6%.

  7. Hyperbranched quasi-1D nanostructures for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Passoni, Luca; Ghods, Farbod; Docampo, Pablo; Abrusci, Agnese; Martí-Rujas, Javier; Ghidelli, Matteo; Divitini, Giorgio; Ducati, Caterina; Binda, Maddalena; Guarnera, Simone; Li Bassi, Andrea; Casari, Carlo Spartaco; Snaith, Henry J; Petrozza, Annamaria; Di Fonzo, Fabio

    2013-11-26

    In this work we demonstrate hyperbranched nanostructures, grown by pulsed laser deposition, composed of one-dimensional anatase single crystals assembled in arrays of high aspect ratio hierarchical mesostructures. The proposed growth mechanism relies on a two-step process: self-assembly from the gas phase of amorphous TiO2 clusters in a forest of tree-shaped hierarchical mesostructures with high aspect ratio; oriented crystallization of the branches upon thermal treatment. Structural and morphological characteristics can be optimized to achieve both high specific surface area for optimal dye uptake and broadband light scattering thanks to the microscopic feature size. Solid-state dye sensitized solar cells fabricated with arrays of hyperbranched TiO2 nanostructures on FTO-glass sensitized with D102 dye showed a significant 66% increase in efficiency with respect to a reference mesoporous photoanode and reached a maximum efficiency of 3.96% (among the highest reported for this system). This result was achieved mainly thanks to an increase in photogenerated current directly resulting from improved light harvesting efficiency of the hierarchical photoanode. The proposed photoanode overcomes typical limitations of 1D TiO2 nanostructures applied to ss-DSC and emerges as a promising foundation for next-generation high-efficiency solid-state devices comprosed of dyes, polymers, or quantum dots as sensitizers.

  8. Characterization of the Pore Filling of Solid State Dye Sensitized Solar Cells with Photoinduced Absorption Spectroscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carol Olson

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Near steady-state photoinduced absorption (PIA and UV-Vis absorption spectroscopy are used to characterize the pore filling of spiro-MeOTAD (2,2′,7,7′-tetrakis-(N,N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine9,9′-spirobifluorene into the nanoparticulate TiO2 electrode of a solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell (ssDSC. The volumetric ratio of filled to unfilled pore volumes, as well as the optical signature of interacting chemical species, that is, the hole-transfer yield (HTY, are investigated. PIA spectroscopy is used to measure the HTY, relative to the amount of spiro-MeOTAD present, without needing to determine the extinction coefficients of the dye and spiro-MeOTAD cation species. The Beer-Lambert law is used to relate the relative PIA signal to the penetration length of the hole-conductor in the TiO2 film. For the sample thickness range of 1.4–5 μm investigated here, the optimum characteristic penetration length is determined to be 3.1+0.46 μm, which is compared to 1.4 μm for the 200 mg mL−1 concentration of spiro-MeOTAD conventionally used. Therefore, doubling the effective penetration of spiro-MeOTAD is necessary to functionalize all the dye molecules in a ssDSC.

  9. Subsea Pipeline Span Analysis Based on Fatigue Life%基于疲劳寿命的海底管道自由悬跨分析

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李秀锋; 冯现洪

    2015-01-01

    Traditionally,span analysis determines the maximum allowable free span length based on the condition that no vortex induced vibration (VIV)will happen and the assumption of strength ultimate limit state (ULS).The cost of span mitigation rises rapidly with the increase of water depth.Free span analysis based on fatigue life could remarkably increase the maximum allowable span length and cut the engineering cost.We present the free span analysis method and criteria for subsea pipeline.Based on the engineering project which is the first time to use fatigue limit for pipeline design,the free span analysis is conducted by fatigue limit state (FLS)and finite element method,and the results minimize the number of span mitigation.%传统悬跨分析以不发生涡激振动和强度极限状态为原则确定最大可以接受的自由悬跨长度。随着水深的增加,悬跨处理的成本急剧增加,以疲劳寿命为准则可以显著地增加最大可接受悬跨长度,减少工程费用。介绍了海底管道设计过程中的悬跨分析方法和悬跨接受标准。提出在设计阶段以疲劳极限状态为接受标准,并结合有限元计算进行悬跨分析,可减少悬跨处理量,节约大量工程费用。

  10. The redox state of cytochrome c modulates resistance to methotrexate in human MCF7 breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Susana Barros

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Methotrexate is a chemotherapeutic agent used to treat a variety of cancers. However, the occurrence of resistance limits its effectiveness. Cytochrome c in its reduced state is less capable of triggering the apoptotic cascade. Thus, we set up to study the relationship among redox state of cytochrome c, apoptosis and the development of resistance to methotrexate in MCF7 human breast cancer cells. RESULTS: Cell incubation with cytochrome c-reducing agents, such as tetramethylphenylenediamine, ascorbate or reduced glutathione, decreased the mortality and apoptosis triggered by methotrexate. Conversely, depletion of glutathione increased the apoptotic action of methotrexate, showing an involvement of cytochrome c redox state in methotrexate-induced apoptosis. Methotrexate-resistant MCF7 cells showed increased levels of endogenous reduced glutathione and a higher capability to reduce exogenous cytochrome c. Using functional genomics we detected the overexpression of GSTM1 and GSTM4 in methotrexate-resistant MCF7 breast cancer cells, and determined that methotrexate was susceptible of glutathionylation by GSTs. The inhibition of these GSTM isoforms caused an increase in methotrexate cytotoxicity in sensitive and resistant cells. CONCLUSIONS: We conclude that overexpression of specific GSTMs, GSTM1 and GSTM4, together with increased endogenous reduced glutathione levels help to maintain a more reduced state of cytochrome c which, in turn, would decrease apoptosis, thus contributing to methotrexate resistance in human MCF7 breast cancer cells.

  11. MECHANISMS OF CELL RESISTANCE TO CYTOMEGALOVIRUS ARE CONNECTED WITH CELL PROLIFERATION STATE AND TRANSCRIPTION ACTIVITY OF LEUKOCYTE AND IMMUNE INTERFERON GENES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T. M. Sokolova

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract. Cytomegalovirus (CMV infection in diploid human fibroblasts (HF and levels of cell resistance to this virus were shown to be in direct correlation with high α-interferon (IFNα gene activity and induction of IFNγ gene transcription. Regulation of IFNα mRNA transcription was revealed to be positively associated with cellular DNA synthesis. At the same time, activities of IFNβ and IFNγ genes were at the constantly low level and were not induced in DNA-synthetic phase (S-phase of the cells. Levels of IFNα mRNA synthesis are quite different for G0- vs S-phase-synchronized HF110044 cell cultures: appropriate values for dividing cells (S-phase proved to be 100-fold higher than in resting state (G0. The mode of CMV infection in resting HF-cell could be considered either as acute, or a productive one. On the contrary, proliferating cells exhibited lagging viral syntheses and delayed cell death. Arrest of CMV replication may be, to some extent, comparable with latent infectious state, being associated with high production of IFNα. Both basal and induced levels of IFNα mRNA in CMV-resistant adult human skin fibroblast cells (HSF-1608 were 10-fold higher than in human embryo lung cell line (HELF-977, which is highly sensitive to CMV. Moreover, a short-time induction of IFNγ genes was observed in resistant cells, whereas no such effect was noticed in highly sensitive cells. CMV reproduction in sensitive cell lines (HELF-977 and HELF-110044 partially inhibits IFNα mRNA transcription at the later stages of infection (24 to 48 hours. Thus, cellular resistance and control of CMV infection in diploid fibroblasts are associated predominantly with high transcription of IFNα gene, and with temporal induction of IFNγ gene. We did not reveal any participation of IFNβ genes in protection of human diploid fibroblasts from CMV.

  12. Multiscale modeling of cellular epigenetic states: stochasticity in molecular networks, chromatin folding in cell nuclei, and tissue pattern formation of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liang, Jie; Cao, Youfang; Gürsoy, Gamze; Naveed, Hammad; Terebus, Anna; Zhao, Jieling

    2016-01-01

    Genome sequences provide the overall genetic blueprint of cells, but cells possessing the same genome can exhibit diverse phenotypes. There is a multitude of mechanisms controlling cellular epigenetic states and that dictate the behavior of cells. Among these, networks of interacting molecules, often under stochastic control, depending on the specific wirings of molecular components and the physiological conditions, can have a different landscape of cellular states. In addition, chromosome folding in three-dimensional space provides another important control mechanism for selective activation and repression of gene expression. Fully differentiated cells with different properties grow, divide, and interact through mechanical forces and communicate through signal transduction, resulting in the formation of complex tissue patterns. Developing quantitative models to study these multi-scale phenomena and to identify opportunities for improving human health requires development of theoretical models, algorithms, and computational tools. Here we review recent progress made in these important directions. PMID:27480462

  13. CALHM1 Deletion in Mice Affects Glossopharyngeal Taste Responses, Food Intake, Body Weight, and Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellekant, Göran; Schmolling, Jared; Marambaud, Philippe; Rose-Hellekant, Teresa A

    2015-07-01

    Stimulation of Type II taste receptor cells (TRCs) with T1R taste receptors causes sweet or umami taste, whereas T2Rs elicit bitter taste. Type II TRCs contain the calcium channel, calcium homeostasis modulator protein 1 (CALHM1), which releases adenosine triphosphate (ATP) transmitter to taste fibers. We have previously demonstrated with chorda tympani nerve recordings and two-bottle preference (TBP) tests that mice with genetically deleted Calhm1 (knockout [KO]) have severely impaired perception of sweet, bitter, and umami compounds, whereas their sour and salty tasting ability is unaltered. Here, we present data from KO mice of effects on glossopharyngeal (NG) nerve responses, TBP, food intake, body weight, and life span. KO mice have no NG response to sweet and a suppressed response to bitter compared with control (wild-type [WT]) mice. KO mice showed some NG response to umami, suggesting that umami taste involves both CALHM1- and non-CALHM1-modulated signals. NG responses to sour and salty were not significantly different between KO and WT mice. Behavioral data conformed in general with the NG data. Adult KO mice consumed less food, weighed significantly less, and lived almost a year longer than WT mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate that sweet taste majorly influences food intake, body weight, and life span. PMID:25855639

  14. CTT1 overexpression increases life span of calorie-restricted Saccharomyces cerevisiae deficient in Sod1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rona, Germana; Herdeiro, Ricardo; Mathias, Cristiane Juliano; Torres, Fernando Araripe; Pereira, Marcos Dias; Eleutherio, Elis

    2015-06-01

    Studies using different organisms revealed that reducing calorie intake, without malnutrition, known as calorie restriction (CR), increases life span, but its mechanism is still unkown. Using the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae as eukaryotic model, we observed that Cu, Zn-superoxide dismutase (Sod1p) is required to increase longevity, as well as to confer protection against lipid and protein oxidation under CR. Old cells of sod1 strain also presented a premature induction of apoptosis. However, when CTT1 (which codes for cytosolic catalase) was overexpressed, sod1 and WT strains showed similar survival rates. Furthermore, CTT1 overexpression decreased lipid peroxidation and delayed the induction of apoptotic process. Superoxide is rapidly converted to hydrogen peroxide by superoxide dismutase, but it also undergoes spontaneous dismutation albeit at a slower rate. However, the quantity of peroxide produced from superoxide in this way is two-fold higher. Peroxide degradation, catalyzed by catalase, is of vital importance, because in the presence of a reducer transition metal peroxide is reduced to the highly reactive hydroxyl radical, which reacts indiscriminately with most cellular constituents. These findings might explain why overexpression of catalase was able to overcome the deficiency of Sod1p, increasing life span in response to CR. PMID:25573485

  15. Sensitivity Analysis of Flutter Response of a Wing Incorporating Finite-Span Corrections

    Science.gov (United States)

    Issac, Jason Cherian; Kapania, Rakesh K.; Barthelemy, Jean-Francois M.

    1994-01-01

    Flutter analysis of a wing is performed in compressible flow using state-space representation of the unsteady aerodynamic behavior. Three different expressions are used to incorporate corrections due to the finite-span effects of the wing in estimating the lift-curve slope. The structural formulation is based on a Rayleigh-Pitz technique with Chebyshev polynomials used for the wing deflections. The aeroelastic equations are solved as an eigen-value problem to determine the flutter speed of the wing. The flutter speeds are found to be higher in these cases, when compared to that obtained without accounting for the finite-span effects. The derivatives of the flutter speed with respect to the shape parameters, namely: aspect ratio, area, taper ratio and sweep angle, are calculated analytically. The shape sensitivity derivatives give a linear approximation to the flutter speed curves over a range of values of the shape parameter which is perturbed. Flutter and sensitivity calculations are performed on a wing using a lifting-surface unsteady aerodynamic theory using modules from a system of programs called FAST.

  16. Methane absorption and application of mixed organic aggregate prepared from Span80 and alkaline salt

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANG ZengZhi; GU Na; CAO Lei; SHU XinQian

    2009-01-01

    The water-based materials for mine gas absorption and explosion suppression were prepared,in which the mixed organic aggregate of SpanS0 and alkaline salt can be used as methane absorbent.Methane was used as a model of mine gas,and the absorptions of methane with different complex materials were studied using head space gas chromatography.Then the state of aqueous material was characterized with laser light scattering instrument and the effects of different complex materials on explosion suppression were preliminarily studied in explosion chamber which can simulate mine gas explosion.The research results showed that complex material could absorb methane and there was some correlation between the mean diameter of organic aggregate in aqueous material and the absorption effect.Additionally,the aqueous material could suppress the methane explosion to some degree.The material can absorb mine gas in atomization condition,therefore,degrease mine gas concentration and influence the distribution of mine gas in the space,and then suppress the mine gas explosion to some extent.

  17. ETEA: a Euclidean minimum spanning tree-based evolutionary algorithm for multi-objective optimization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Miqing; Yang, Shengxiang; Zheng, Jinhua; Liu, Xiaohui

    2014-01-01

    The Euclidean minimum spanning tree (EMST), widely used in a variety of domains, is a minimum spanning tree of a set of points in space where the edge weight between each pair of points is their Euclidean distance. Since the generation of an EMST is entirely determined by the Euclidean distance between solutions (points), the properties of EMSTs have a close relation with the distribution and position information of solutions. This paper explores the properties of EMSTs and proposes an EMST-based evolutionary algorithm (ETEA) to solve multi-objective optimization problems (MOPs). Unlike most EMO algorithms that focus on the Pareto dominance relation, the proposed algorithm mainly considers distance-based measures to evaluate and compare individuals during the evolutionary search. Specifically, in ETEA, four strategies are introduced: (1) An EMST-based crowding distance (ETCD) is presented to estimate the density of individuals in the population; (2) A distance comparison approach incorporating ETCD is used to assign the fitness value for individuals; (3) A fitness adjustment technique is designed to avoid the partial overcrowding in environmental selection; (4) Three diversity indicators-the minimum edge, degree, and ETCD-with regard to EMSTs are applied to determine the survival of individuals in archive truncation. From a series of extensive experiments on 32 test instances with different characteristics, ETEA is found to be competitive against five state-of-the-art algorithms and its predecessor in providing a good balance among convergence, uniformity, and spread.

  18. The real TiO2/HTM interface of solid-state dye solar cells: role of trapped states from a multiscale modelling perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gagliardi, Alessio; Auf der Maur, Matthias; Gentilini, Desiree; di Fonzo, Fabio; Abrusci, Agnese; Snaith, Henry J; Divitini, Giorgio; Ducati, Caterina; Di Carlo, Aldo

    2015-01-21

    In this paper we present a multiscale simulation of charge transport in a solid-state dye-sensitized solar cell, where the real morphology between TiO2 and the hole transport material is included. The geometry of the interface is obtained from an electron tomography measurement and imported in a simulation software. Charge distribution, electric field and current densities are computed using the drift-diffusion model. We use this approach to investigate the electrostatic effect of trap states at the interface between the electron and hole transport materials. The simulations show that when the trapped electrons are not screened by external additives, the dynamics of holes is perturbed. Holes accumulate at the interface, enhancing recombination and reducing cell performance.

  19. Adults' conceptions of intelligence across the adult life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berg, C A; Sternberg, R J

    1992-06-01

    To examine whether young, middle-aged, and older adults view the concept of intelligent person as similar or different during adulthood, 140 adults of various ages rated how likely it would be for individuals of average and exceptional intelligence at 30, 50, and 70 years of age to be engaged in behaviors previously identified by adults as characterizing adult intelligence. Adults perceived more similarity between exceptionally intelligent prototypes of closer ages (i.e., 30 and 50 and 50 and 70). Intelligence was perceived to consist of interest and ability to deal with novelty, everyday competence, and verbal competence--dimensions that were perceived to be differentially important for different-aged prototypes and by individuals of different ages. Participants' conceptions also included the idea that intelligence is malleable and that abilities differentially increase or decrease across the life span. PMID:1610512

  20. Graph Sparsification by Edge-Connectivity and Random Spanning Trees

    CERN Document Server

    Fung, Wai Shing

    2010-01-01

    We present two new approaches to constructing graph sparsifiers - weighted subgraphs for which every cut has the same value as the original graph, up to a factor of $(1 \\pm \\epsilon)$. The first approach independently samples each edge $uv$ with probability inversely proportional to the edge-connectivity between $u$ and $v$. The fact that this approach produces a sparsifier resolves an open question of Bencz\\'ur and Karger. Concurrent work of Hariharan and Panigrahi (2010) also resolves this question. The second approach samples uniformly random spanning trees. Both of our approaches produce sparsifiers with $O(n \\log^2(n)/\\epsilon^2)$ edges. Our proofs are based on extensions of the Karger-Stein contraction algorithm which allow it to compute minimum "Steiner cuts".

  1. Fast Self-Stabilizing Minimum Spanning Tree Construction

    CERN Document Server

    Blin, Lélia; Potop-Butucaru, Maria; Rovedakis, Stephane

    2010-01-01

    We present a novel self-stabilizing algorithm for minimum spanning tree (MST) construction. The space complexity of our solution is $O(\\log^2n)$ bits and it converges in $O(n^2)$ rounds. Thus, this algorithm improves the convergence time of all previously known self-stabilizing asynchronous MST algorithms by a multiplicative factor $\\Theta(n)$, to the price of increasing the best known space complexity by a factor $O(\\log n)$. The main ingredient used in our algorithm is the design, for the first time in self-stabilizing settings, of a labeling scheme for computing the nearest common ancestor with only $O(\\log^2n)$ bits.

  2. Indoor Positioning Using Nonparametric Belief Propagation Based on Spanning Trees

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Savic Vladimir

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonparametric belief propagation (NBP is one of the best-known methods for cooperative localization in sensor networks. It is capable of providing information about location estimation with appropriate uncertainty and to accommodate non-Gaussian distance measurement errors. However, the accuracy of NBP is questionable in loopy networks. Therefore, in this paper, we propose a novel approach, NBP based on spanning trees (NBP-ST created by breadth first search (BFS method. In addition, we propose a reliable indoor model based on obtained measurements in our lab. According to our simulation results, NBP-ST performs better than NBP in terms of accuracy and communication cost in the networks with high connectivity (i.e., highly loopy networks. Furthermore, the computational and communication costs are nearly constant with respect to the transmission radius. However, the drawbacks of proposed method are a little bit higher computational cost and poor performance in low-connected networks.

  3. Membrane-spanning peptides and the origin of life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bywater, Robert P

    2009-12-01

    An explanation is given as to why membrane-spanning peptides must have been the first "information-rich" molecules in the development of life. These peptides are stabilised in a lipid bilayer membrane environment and they are preferentially made from the simplest, and likewise oldest, of the amino acids that survive today. Transmembrane peptides can exercise functions that are essential for biological systems such as signal transduction and material transport across membranes. More complex peptides possessing catalytic properties could later develop on either side of the membrane as independently folding functional units formed by extension of the protruding ends of the transmembrane peptides within an aqueous environment and thereby give rise to more of the functions that are necessary for life. But the membrane was the cradle for the development of the first information-rich biomolecules. PMID:19679140

  4. Explanations of a magic trick across the life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olson, Jay A; Demacheva, Irina; Raz, Amir

    2015-01-01

    Studying how children and adults explain magic tricks can reveal developmental differences in cognition. We showed 167 children (aged 4-13 years) a video of a magician making a pen vanish and asked them to explain the trick. Although most tried to explain the secret, none of them correctly identified it. The younger children provided more supernatural interpretations and more often took the magician's actions at face value. Combined with a similar study of adults (N = 1008), we found that both young children and older adults were particularly overconfident in their explanations of the trick. Our methodology demonstrates the feasibility of using magic to study cognitive development across the life span. PMID:25798117

  5. Noise Reduction with Optimal Variable Span Linear Filters

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Jesper Rindom; Benesty, Jacob; Christensen, Mads Græsbøll

    2016-01-01

    of eigenvectors stemming from a joint diagonalization of the covariance matrices of the signal of interest and the noise. The resulting filters are flexible in that it is possible to trade off distortion of the desired signal for improved noise reduction. This tradeoff is controlled by the number of eigenvectors...... included in forming the filter. Using these concepts, a number of different filter designs are considered, like minimum distortion, Wiener, maximum SNR, and tradeoff filters. Interestingly, all these can be expressed as special cases of variable span filters. We also derive expressions for the speech...... distortion and noise reduction of the various filter designs. Moreover, we consider an alternative approach, wherein the filter is designed for extracting an estimate of the noise signal, which can then be extracted from the observed signals, which is referred to as the indirect approach. Simulations...

  6. Critical Behaviour of Spanning Forests on Random Planar Graphs

    CERN Document Server

    Bondesan, Roberto; Sportiello, Andrea

    2016-01-01

    As a follow-up of previous work of the authors, we analyse the statistical mechanics model of random spanning forests on random planar graphs. Special emphasis is given to the analysis of the critical behaviour. Exploiting an exact relation with a model of O(-2)-loops and dimers, previously solved by Kostov and Staudacher, we identify critical and multicritical loci, and find them consistent with recent results of Bousquet-M\\'elou and Courtiel. This is also consistent with the KPZ relation, and the Berker-Kadanoff phase in the anti-ferromagnetic regime of the Potts Model on periodic lattices, predicted by Saleur. To our knowledge, this is the first known example of KPZ appearing explicitly to work within a Berker-Kadanoff phase. We set up equations for the generating function, at the value t=-1 of the fugacity, which is of combinatorial interest, and we investigate the resulting numerical series, a Tony Guttmann's favourite problem.

  7. Explanations of a magic trick across the life span

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jay A Olson

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Studying how children and adults explain magic tricks can reveal developmental differences in cognition. We showed 167 children (aged 4 to 13 years a video of a magician making a pen vanish and asked them to explain the trick. Although most claimed to know the secret, none of them correctly identified it. The younger children provided more supernatural interpretations and more often took the magician’s actions at face value. Combined with a similar study of adults (N=1008, we found that both young children and older adults were particularly overconfident in their explanations of the trick. Our methodology demonstrates the feasibility of using magic to study cognitive development across the life span.

  8. Physarum machines: encapsulating reaction-diffusion to compute spanning tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adamatzky, Andrew

    2007-12-01

    The Physarum machine is a biological computing device, which employs plasmodium of Physarum polycephalum as an unconventional computing substrate. A reaction-diffusion computer is a chemical computing device that computes by propagating diffusive or excitation wave fronts. Reaction-diffusion computers, despite being computationally universal machines, are unable to construct certain classes of proximity graphs without the assistance of an external computing device. I demonstrate that the problem can be solved if the reaction-diffusion system is enclosed in a membrane with few ‘growth points’, sites guiding the pattern propagation. Experimental approximation of spanning trees by P. polycephalum slime mold demonstrates the feasibility of the approach. Findings provided advance theory of reaction-diffusion computation by enriching it with ideas of slime mold computation.

  9. Rényi indices of financial minimum spanning trees

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nie, Chun-Xiao; Song, Fu-Tie; Li, Sai-Ping

    2016-02-01

    The Rényi index is used here to describe topological structures of minimum spanning trees (MSTs) of financial markets. We categorize the topological structures of MSTs as dragon, star and super-star types. The MST based on Geometric Brownian motion is of dragon type, the MST constructed by One-Factor Model is super-star type, and most MSTs based on real market data belong to the star type. The Rényi index of the MST corresponding to S&P500 is evaluated, and the result shows that the Rényi index varies significantly in different time periods. In particular, it rose during crises and dropped when the S&P500 index rose significantly. A comparison study between the CSI300 index of the Chinese market and the S&P500 index shows that the MST structure of the CSI300 index varies more dramatically than the MST structure of the S&P500.

  10. RESEARCHING FORMS OF NATURAL OSCILLATIONS OF THE SCHEME ON THE FREQUENCY OF BRIDGE SPAN STRUCTURES

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    H. S. Zhelezniak

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available In this paper on the example of continuous spans of bridges the asymmetry influence of the scheme on the frequency and forms of natural oscillations is investigated. It is shown that under certain span lengths of regular schemes the use of them to determine the span frequencies is possible.

  11. The composite complex span: French validation of a short working memory task.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gonthier, Corentin; Thomassin, Noémylle; Roulin, Jean-Luc

    2016-03-01

    Most studies in individual differences in the field of working memory research use complex span tasks to measure working memory capacity. Various complex span tasks based on different materials have been developed, and these tasks have proven both reliable and valid; several complex span tasks are often combined to provide a domain-general estimate of working memory capacity with even better psychometric properties. The present work sought to address two issues. Firstly, having participants perform several full-length complex span tasks in succession makes for a long and tedious procedure. Secondly, few complex span tasks have been translated and validated in French. We constructed a French working memory task labeled the Composite Complex Span (CCS). The CCS includes shortened versions of three classic complex span tasks: the reading span, symmetry span, and operation span. We assessed the psychometric properties of the CCS, including test-retest reliability and convergent validity, with Raven's Advanced Progressive Matrices and with an alpha span task; the CCS demonstrated satisfying qualities in a sample of 1,093 participants. This work provides evidence that shorter versions of classic complex span tasks can yield valid working memory estimates. The materials and normative data for the CCS are also included.

  12. On the irreducible core and the equal remaining obligations rule of minimum cost spanning extension problems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Feltkamp, V.; Tijs, S.H.; Muto, S.

    1994-01-01

    Minimum cost spanning extension problems are generalizations of minimum cost spanning tree problems in which an existing network has to be extended to connect users to a source. This paper generalizes the definition of irreducible core to minimum cost spanning extension problems and introduces an al

  13. Solidification of liquid electrolyte with imidazole polymers for quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quasi-solid-state electrolytes were prepared by employing the imidazole polymers to solidify the liquid electrolyte containing lithium iodide, iodine and ethylene carbonate (EC)/propylene carbonate (PC) mixed solvent. The ionic conductivity and diffusion behavior of triiodide in the quasi-solid-state electrolytes were examined in terms of the polymer content. Application of the quasi-solid-state electrolytes to the dye-sensitized solar cells, the maximum energy conversion efficiency of 7.6% (AM 1.5, 100 mW cm-2) was achieved. The dependence of the photovoltaic performance on the polymer content and on the different anions of the imidazole polymers was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The results indicate the charge transfer behaviors occurred at nanocrystalline TiO2/electrolyte and Pt/electrolyte interface play an important role in influencing the photovoltaic performance of quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

  14. Solidification of liquid electrolyte with imidazole polymers for quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang Miao [Beijing National laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Lin Yuan [Beijing National laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)], E-mail: linyuan@iccas.ac.cn; Zhou Xiaowen; Xiao Xurui [Beijing National laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Yang Lei [Beijing National laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China); Graduate School of Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100039 (China); Feng Shujing; Li Xueping [Beijing National laboratory for Molecular Sciences, Key laboratory of Photochemistry, Institute of Chemistry, Chinese Academy of Sciences, Beijing 100080 (China)

    2008-01-15

    Quasi-solid-state electrolytes were prepared by employing the imidazole polymers to solidify the liquid electrolyte containing lithium iodide, iodine and ethylene carbonate (EC)/propylene carbonate (PC) mixed solvent. The ionic conductivity and diffusion behavior of triiodide in the quasi-solid-state electrolytes were examined in terms of the polymer content. Application of the quasi-solid-state electrolytes to the dye-sensitized solar cells, the maximum energy conversion efficiency of 7.6% (AM 1.5, 100 mW cm{sup -2}) was achieved. The dependence of the photovoltaic performance on the polymer content and on the different anions of the imidazole polymers was studied by electrochemical impedance spectroscopy and cyclic voltammetry. The results indicate the charge transfer behaviors occurred at nanocrystalline TiO{sub 2}/electrolyte and Pt/electrolyte interface play an important role in influencing the photovoltaic performance of quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells.

  15. Cathode material comparison of thermal runaway behavior of Li-ion cells at different state of charges including over charge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mendoza-Hernandez, Omar Samuel; Ishikawa, Hiroaki; Nishikawa, Yuuki; Maruyama, Yuki; Umeda, Minoru

    2015-04-01

    The analysis of Li-ion secondary cells under outstanding conditions, as overcharge and high temperatures, is important to determine thermal abuse characteristics of electroactive materials and precise risk assessments on Li-ion cells. In this work, the thermal runaway behavior of LiCoO2 and LiMn2O4 cathode materials were compared at different state of charges (SOCs), including overcharge, by carrying out accelerating rate calorimetry (ARC) measurements using 18650 Li-ion cells. Onset temperatures of self-heating reactions and thermal runaway behavior were identified, and by using these onset points thermal mapping plots were made. We were able to identify non-self-heating, self-heating and thermal runaway regions as a function of state of charge and temperature. The cell using LiMn2O4 cathode material was found to be more thermally stable than the cell using LiCoO2. In parallel with the ARC measurements, the electrochemical behavior of the cells was monitored by measuring the OCV and internal resistance of the cells. The electrochemical behavior of the cells showed a slightly dependency on SOC.

  16. Cryo-soft X-ray tomography: a journey into the world of the native-state cell

    OpenAIRE

    Carzaniga, Raffaella; Domart, Marie-Charlotte; Collinson, Lucy M; Duke, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    One of the ultimate aims of imaging in biology is to achieve molecular localisation in the context of the structure of cells in their native state. Here, we review the current state of the art in cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT), which is the only imaging modality that can provide nanoscale 3D information from cryo-preserved, unstained, whole cells thicker than 1 μm. Correlative cryo-fluorescence and cryo-SXT adds functional information to structure, enabling studies of cellular events t...

  17. PLACENTAL STEREOLOGY: SPANNING THE LEVELS FROM MOLECULE TO WHOLE ORGAN

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Terry M Mayhew

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Stereology can provide hard (functionally-relevant quantitative information at different levels of 3D structural organization. My researches have applied established methods to study organ function and developed novel methods to study subcellular localization of marker probes. We have studied whole-organ function (passive diffusion in the human placenta and quantified various processes at tissue and subcellular levels and in normal and complicated pregnancies. Fetoplacental angiogenesis and villous growth and maturation involve phased changes particularly around mid-gestation. Growth is associated with increased numbers of cells or nuclei and counts have shown that villous trophoblast continuously renews itself via cytotrophoblast (CT proliferation and recruitment and syncytiotrophoblast (ST differentiation and extrusion. Integration of these processes results in changes in total oxygen (O2 diffusive conductance which match the growing fetal mass. Similar processes occur during development of the mouse placenta and at least some are compromised in human pregnancies. For example: [a] in pure pre-eclampsia (PE, villous and fetoplacental vascular volumes and surfaces are similar to those seen in uncomplicated pregnancies but reduced in pure intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR and in PE+IUGR; [b] trophoblast extrusion is accelerated in PE and IUGR but the latter exhibits reduced CT proliferation and this perturbed steady state leads to smaller trophoblast volumes and surfaces; [c] O2 diffusive conductances alter in various pregnancy complications, including IUGR and PE+IUGR; [d] fetal weight is diminished, but diffusive transport increases, in placentas from mice exposed to urban air pollution. Finally, innovations in quantitative immunoelectron microscopy (immunoEM have produced a portfolio of methods for revealing non-random distributions of marker gold particles in different cellular compartments and for testing whether patterns shift following

  18. Expression and state of phosphorylation of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene product in cycling and noncycling human hematopoietic cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Furukawa, Y.; DeCaprio, J A; Freedman, A.; Kanakura, Y.; Nakamura, M.; Ernst, T J; Livingston, D M; Griffin, J D

    1990-01-01

    The product of the retinoblastoma susceptibility gene RB1 (Rb) is likely to function as an inhibitor of cell growth. Previous studies have suggested that certain growth-suppressing effects of Rb are exerted in G0/G1 phase and that phosphorylation can inactivate these functions. We tested this hypothesis by examining the expression and state of phosphorylation of Rb in several lineages of primary hematopoietic cells that spontaneously arrest in G0 phase. Resting lymphocytes were found to expre...

  19. Interfacing of Science, Medicine and Law: The Stem Cell Patent Controversy in the United States and the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Davey, Sonya; Davey, Neil; Gu, Qian; Xu, Na; Vatsa, Rajet; Devalaraja, Samir; Harris, Paul; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dave, Raj; Chakrabarty, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    The patent eligibility of stem cells–particularly those derived from human embryos–has long been under debate in both the scientific and legal communities. On the basis of moral grounds, the European Patent Office (EPO) has refrained from granting patents for stem cells obtained through the destruction of human embryos. On the contrary, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has historically granted patents regarding the isolation and use of human embryonic and other stem cells...

  20. Interfacing of science, medicine and law: The stem cell patent controversy in the United States and the European Union

    OpenAIRE

    Sonya eDavey; Neil eDavey; Qian eGu; Na eXu; Rajet eVatsa; Samir eDevalaraja; Paul eHarris; Sreenivas eGannavaram; Raj eDave; Ananda eChakrabarty

    2015-01-01

    The patent eligibility of stem cells – particularly those derived from human embryos – has long been under debate in both the scientific and legal communities. On the basis of moral grounds, the European Patent Office (EPO) has refrained from granting patents for stem cells obtained through the destruction of human embryos. On the contrary, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has historically granted patents regarding the isolation and use of human embryonic and other stem c...

  1. Discarded cell phone lithium ion batteries state of health quick method analysis by galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT) concept

    OpenAIRE

    Paulo Rogério Catarini; Jair Scarmínio; Ricardo Floriano; Danilo Toscano; Ziani Schiaber de Souza; Alexandre Urbano

    2009-01-01

    The state of health (SOH) is a important evaluation parameter to rechargeable batteries, because determine its cycle life and help on electric devices supplied by batteries maintenance. In this work the lithium ion discards cell phones batteries state of health and apparent diffusion coefficient (Dap) were measured and correlated which purpose is diminish the batteries analyze time. The apparent diffusion coefficient is a ionic diffusion coefficient modification from GITT technique. The SOH a...

  2. Q Fever Outbreak Among Travelers to Germany Who Received Live Cell Therapy--United States and Canada, 2014.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robyn, Misha P; Newman, Alexandra P; Amato, Michael; Walawander, Mary; Kothe, Cynthia; Nerone, James D; Pomerantz, Cynthia; Behravesh, Casey Barton; Biggs, Holly M; Dahlgren, F Scott; Pieracci, Emily G; Whitfield, Yvonne; Sider, Doug; Ozaldin, Omar; Berger, Lisa; Buck, Peter A; Downing, Mark; Blog, Debra

    2015-10-01

    During September–November 2014, the New York State Department of Health (NYSDOH) was notified of five New York state residents who had tested seropositive for Coxiella burnetii, the causative agent of Q fever. All five patients had symptoms compatible with Q fever (e.g., fever, fatigue, chills, and headache) and a history of travel to Germany to receive a medical treatment called "live cell therapy" (sometimes called "fresh cell therapy") in May 2014. Live cell therapy is the practice of injecting processed cells from organs or fetuses of nonhuman animals (e.g., sheep) into human recipients. It is advertised to treat a variety of health conditions. This practice is unavailable in the United States; however, persons can travel to foreign locations to receive injections. Local health departments interviewed the patients, and NYSDOH notified CDC and posted a report on CDC’s Epidemic Information Exchange to solicit additional cases. Clinical and exposure information for each patient was reported to the Robert Koch Institute in Germany, which forwarded the information to local health authorities. A Canada resident who also received live cell therapy in May 2014 was diagnosed with Q fever in July 2014. Clinicians should be aware of health risks, such as Q fever and other zoonotic diseases, among patients with a history of receiving treatment with live cell therapy products. PMID:26421460

  3. Influence of cell physiological state on gene delivery to T lymphocytes by chimeric adenovirus Ad5F35.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Wen-feng; Shao, Hong-wei; Wu, Feng-lin; Xie, Xin; Li, Zhu-ming; Bo, Hua-ben; Shen, Han; Wang, Teng; Huang, Shu-lin

    2016-01-01

    Adoptive transfer of genetically-modified T cells is a promising approach for treatment of both human malignancies and viral infections. Due to its ability to efficiently infect lymphocytes, the chimeric adenovirus Ad5F35 is potentially useful as an immunotherapeutic for the genetic modification of T cells. In previous studies, it was found that the infection efficiency of Ad5F35 was significantly increased without enhanced expression of the viral receptor after T cell stimulation; however, little is known about the underlying mechanism. Nonetheless, cell physiology has long been thought to affect viral infection. Therefore, we aimed to uncover the physiologic changes responsible for the increased infection efficiency of Ad5F35 following T cell stimulation. Given the complexity of intracellular transport we analyzed viral binding, entry, and escape using a Jurkat T cell model and found that both cell membrane fluidity and endosomal escape of Ad5F35 were altered under different physiological states. This, in turn, resulted in differences in the amount of virus entering cells and reaching the cytoplasm. These results provide additional insight into the molecular mechanisms underlying Ad5F35 infection of T cells and consequently, will help further the clinical application of genetically-modified T cells for immunotherapy. PMID:26972139

  4. CAST-ChIP Maps Cell-Type-Specific Chromatin States in the Drosophila Central Nervous System

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tamás Schauer

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Chromatin organization and gene activity are responsive to developmental and environmental cues. Although many genes are transcribed throughout development and across cell types, much of gene regulation is highly cell-type specific. To readily track chromatin features at the resolution of cell types within complex tissues, we developed and validated chromatin affinity purification from specific cell types by chromatin immunoprecipitation (CAST-ChIP, a broadly applicable biochemical procedure. RNA polymerase II (Pol II CAST-ChIP identifies ∼1,500 neuronal and glia-specific genes in differentiated cells within the adult Drosophila brain. In contrast, the histone H2A.Z is distributed similarly across cell types and throughout development, marking cell-type-invariant Pol II-bound regions. Our study identifies H2A.Z as an active chromatin signature that is refractory to changes across cell fates. Thus, CAST-ChIP powerfully identifies cell-type-specific as well as cell-type-invariant chromatin states, enabling the systematic dissection of chromatin structure and gene regulation within complex tissues such as the brain.

  5. Molecular characterization of sickle cell anemia in the Northern Brazilian state of Pará.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Lemos Cardoso, Greice; Guerreiro, João Farias

    2010-01-01

    To assess alpha+-thalassemia deletion alleles, beta-thalassemia mutations and haplotypes linked to the HBB*S cluster in a sample of 130 unrelated sickle cell anemia (SCA) patients (55% female) from Belém, Pará State, for their possible effects on the patients' survival. -alpha(3.7), -alpha(42), -alpha(20.5), and -(MED) alpha+-thalassemia deletion alleles were investigated using multiplex gap-PCR method. Characterization of beta-thalassemia mutations was made by direct genomic sequencing of the beta-globin gene amplified through polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Haplotypes were determined by analysis of six polymorphic restriction sites [(1) XmnI-5'gammaG, (2) HindIII-gammaG, (3) HindIII-gammaA, (4) HincII-psibeta, (5) HincII-3'psibeta, and (6) HinfI-5'beta] followed by restriction digestion and agarose gel electrophoresis. Twenty-one patients (16%) presented -alpha3.7 thalassemia. Sixteen of those (76%) were heterozygous (-alpha3.7/alphaalpha) and 5 (24%) were homozygous (-alpha3.7/-alpha3.7). -Alpha(4.2), -alpha(20.5) and -(MED) deletions were not found. Nine cases of sickle cell-beta thalassemia were found and four different beta-thal mutations were identified: beta(+) -88 (C>T), 3.8%; beta(+) codon 24 (T > A), 1.5%; beta(+) IVSI-110 (G > A), 0.7% and beta (IVSI-1 (G > A), 0.7%. No differences according to age were observed in -alpha(3.7) deletion, beta-thalassemia and HHB*S haplotypes distribution. Our results suggest that although alpha- and beta-thalassemia and betaS haplotypes may have modulating effect on clinical expression and hematological parameters of SCA, these genetic variables probably have little influence on the subjects' survival. PMID:20737602

  6. Probing iron spin state by optical absorption in laser-heated diamond anvil cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lobanov, S.; Goncharov, A. F.; Holtgrewe, N.; Lin, J. F.

    2015-12-01

    Pressure-induced spin-pairing transitions in iron-bearing minerals have been in the focus of geophysical studies1. Modern consensus is that iron spin state in the lower mantle is a complex function of crystal structure, composition, pressure, and temperature. Discontinuities in physical properties of lower mantle minerals have been revealed over the spin transition pressure range, but at room temperature. In this work, we have used a supercontinuum laser source and an intensified CCD camera to probe optical properties of siderite, FeCO3, and post-perovskite, Mg0.9Fe0.1SiO3, across the spin transition in laser-heated diamond anvil cell. Synchronously gating the CCD with the supercontinuum pulses (Fig. 1A) allowed diminishing thermal background to ~8.3*10-4. Utilizing the experimental setup we infer the spin state of ferrous iron in siderite at high pressure and temperature conditions (Fig. 1B). Similar behavior is observed for low spin ferric iron in post-perovskite at 130 GPa indicating that all iron in post-perovskite is high spin at lower mantle conditions. Also, our experimental setup holds promise for measuring radiative thermal conductivity of mantle minerals at relevant mantle conditions. Figure 1. (A) Timing of the optical absorption measurements at high temperature. (B) High temperature siderite absorption spectra at 45 GPa. Before heating and quenched after 1300 K spectra are shown in light and dark blue, respectively. Green and red curves are absorption spectra at 1200 K and 1300 K, respectively. Spectra shown in black represent room temperature absorption data on HS (43 GPa) and LS (45.5 GPa) siderite after Lobanov et al., 2015, shown for comparison.

  7. Inverse microemulsion system of Span 80-Tween 80/liquid paraffin/acrylamide-H2O%Span 80-Tween 80/液体石蜡/AM-H2O反相微乳液体系

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王风贺; 夏明珠; 雷武; 魏运洋; 王风云

    2005-01-01

    The reverse microemulsion system of Span 80-Tween 80/liquid paraffin/acrylamide-H2O was prepared, and the effects of n-butanol, NaC1, NaAc were studied with the conductivity method. The stability of reverse microemulsion was reflected, and the information of its dynamic process was obtained by measuring its state changes continuously through testing its electronic conductivity by using electrochemistry. The results showed that the Span 80-Tween 80/liquid paraffin/acrylamide-H2O system was most stable when the HLB value approached 7.5, and its stability was enhanced when 5.0% (mass) NaCl or 10% (mass) NaAc was added into this systerm.

  8. Altered Lipid Synthesis by Lack of Yeast Pah1 Phosphatidate Phosphatase Reduces Chronological Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Yeonhee; Han, Gil-Soo; Mileykovskaya, Eugenia; Garrett, Teresa A; Carman, George M

    2015-10-16

    In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Pah1 phosphatidate phosphatase, which catalyzes the dephosphorylation of phosphatidate to yield diacylglycerol, plays a crucial role in the synthesis of the storage lipid triacylglycerol. This evolutionarily conserved enzyme also plays a negative regulatory role in controlling de novo membrane phospholipid synthesis through its consumption of phosphatidate. We found that the pah1Δ mutant was defective in the utilization of non-fermentable carbon sources but not in oxidative phosphorylation; the mutant did not exhibit major changes in oxygen consumption rate, mitochondrial membrane potential, F1F0-ATP synthase activity, or gross mitochondrial morphology. The pah1Δ mutant contained an almost normal complement of major mitochondrial phospholipids with some alterations in molecular species. Although oxidative phosphorylation was not compromised in the pah1Δ mutant, the cellular levels of ATP in quiescent cells were reduced by 2-fold, inversely correlating with a 4-fold increase in membrane phospholipids. In addition, the quiescent pah1Δ mutant cells had 3-fold higher levels of mitochondrial superoxide and cellular lipid hydroperoxides, had reduced activities of superoxide dismutase 2 and catalase, and were hypersensitive to hydrogen peroxide. Consequently, the pah1Δ mutant had a shortened chronological life span. In addition, the loss of Tsa1 thioredoxin peroxidase caused a synthetic growth defect with the pah1Δ mutation. The shortened chronological life span of the pah1Δ mutant along with its growth defect on non-fermentable carbon sources and hypersensitivity to hydrogen peroxide was suppressed by the loss of Dgk1 diacylglycerol kinase, indicating that the underpinning of pah1Δ mutant defects was the excess synthesis of membrane phospholipids. PMID:26338708

  9. Reovirus type 3 synthesizes proteins in interferon-treated HeLa cells without reversing the antiviral state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feduchi, E; Esteban, M; Carrasco, L

    1988-06-01

    Treatment of HeLa cells with human lymphoblastoid interferon (IFN-alpha) does not inhibit reovirus type 3 protein synthesis during virus infection. In contrast, reovirus translation is blocked by treatment of L cells with mouse IFN-alpha. The (2'-5')A synthetase activity is induced in HeLa cells by IFN-alpha treatment and is activated after reovirus infection, since cell lysates from these cells synthesize in vitro (2'-5')A oligonucleotides. The IFN-induced protein kinase activity is also triggered in those lysates upon dsRNA addition. Thus, contrary to DNA-containing viruses, such as vaccinia virus or adenovirus, reovirus infection does not destroy or reverse the IFN-induced antiviral state. In support of this conclusion, superinfection with poliovirus or vesicular stomatitis virus of reovirus-infected HeLa cells treated with IFN leads only to a blockade of translation of the former viruses. These results provide a remarkable example where in the same cells doubly infected with two different viruses, the antiviral state induced by IFN-alpha is manifested by selectively inhibiting translation of one kind of virus (poliovirus or vesicular stomatitis virus) without affecting the translation of reovirus type 3. In addition, these results indicate that the resistance of reovirus translation to inhibition by IFN is different from the mechanism of resistance induced by DNA-containing viruses.

  10. Identification of lipid and saccharide constituents of whole microalgal cells by ¹³C solid-state NMR.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnold, Alexandre A; Genard, Bertrand; Zito, Francesca; Tremblay, Réjean; Warschawski, Dror E; Marcotte, Isabelle

    2015-01-01

    Microalgae are unicellular organisms in which plasma membrane is protected by a complex cell wall. The chemical nature of this barrier is important not only for taxonomic identification, but also for interactions with exogenous molecules such as contaminants. In this work, we have studied freshwater (Chlamydomonas reinhardtii) and marine (Pavlova lutheri and Nannochloropsis oculata) microalgae with different cell wall characteristics. C. reinhardtii is covered by a network of fibrils and glycoproteins, while P. lutheri is protected by small cellulose scales, and the picoplankton N. oculata by a rigid cellulose wall. The objective of this work was to determine to what extent the different components of these microorganisms (proteins, carbohydrates, lipids) can be distinguished by ¹³C solid-state NMR with an emphasis on isolating the signature of their cell walls and membrane lipid constituents. By using NMR experiments which select rigid or mobile zones, as well as ¹³C-enriched microalgal cells, we improved the spectral resolution and simplified the highly crowded spectra. Interspecies differences in cell wall constituents, storage sugars and membrane lipid compositions were thus evidenced. Carbohydrates from the cell walls could be distinguished from those incorporated into sugar reserves or glycolipids. Lipids from the plasmalemma and organelle membranes and from storage vacuoles could also be identified. This work establishes a basis for a complete characterization of phytoplankton cells by solid-state NMR. PMID:25065670

  11. Modelling of PEM Fuel Cell Performance: Steady-State and Dynamic Experimental Validation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idoia San Martín

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available This paper reports on the modelling of a commercial 1.2 kW proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC, based on interrelated electrical and thermal models. The electrical model proposed is based on the integration of the thermodynamic and electrochemical phenomena taking place in the FC whilst the thermal model is established from the FC thermal energy balance. The combination of both models makes it possible to predict the FC voltage, based on the current demanded and the ambient temperature. Furthermore, an experimental characterization is conducted and the parameters for the models associated with the FC electrical and thermal performance are obtained. The models are implemented in Matlab Simulink and validated in a number of operating environments, for steady-state and dynamic modes alike. In turn, the FC models are validated in an actual microgrid operating environment, through the series connection of 4 PEMFC. The simulations of the models precisely and accurately reproduce the FC electrical and thermal performance.

  12. Novel bidirectional DC-DC converters based on the three-state switching cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    da Silva Júnior, José Carlos; Robles Balestero, Juan Paulo; Lessa Tofoli, Fernando

    2016-05-01

    It is well known that there is an increasing demand for bidirectional DC-DC converters for applications that range from renewable energy sources to electric vehicles. Within this context, this work proposes novel DC-DC converter topologies that use the three-state switching cell (3SSC), whose well-known advantages over conventional existing structures are ability to operate at high current levels, while current sharing is maintained by a high frequency transformer; reduction of cost and dimensions of magnetics; improved distribution of losses, with consequent increase of global efficiency and reduction of cost associated to the need of semiconductors with lower current ratings. Three distinct topologies can be derived from the 3SSC: one DC-DC converter with reversible current characteristic able to operate in the first and second quadrants; one DC-DC converter with reversible voltage characteristic able to operate in the first and third quadrants and one DC-DC converter with reversible current and voltage characteristics able to operate in four quadrants. Only the topology with bidirectional current characteristic is analysed in detail in terms of the operating stages in both nonoverlapping and overlapping modes, while the design procedure of the power stage elements is obtained. In order to validate the theoretical assumptions, an experimental prototype is also implemented, so that relevant issues can be properly discussed.

  13. Hydrazone based molecular glasses for solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Biscarbazole and terthiophene based molecular glasses with hydrazone functional goups (named respectively 2CzMPH and 3TDPH) have been synthesized and the thermal, optical and electrochemical properties have been studied. Differential scanning calorimetry characterizations confirm the metastable amorphous properties of these molecules with glass transition temperatures at 80 deg. C for the 3TDPH and 93 deg. C for the 2CzMPH. Their electrochemical properties have been studied and showed the effect of the conjugated hydrazone groups on the electronic delocalization of the structures. The concept of solid state dye-sensitized solar cells using hydrazone based molecular glasses has been verified with the elaboration of a SnO2: F/nc-TiO2/Ru-dye/2CzMPH /Au devices. Under full sunlight (98 mW/cm2, air mass 1.5) the I-V characterization of the device give a short circuit photocurrents Isc = 0.42 mA/cm2, open circuit voltage Voc = 500 mV with a fill factor of 0.35

  14. The effects of the band bending caused by interface states in CdTe and CIS solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Youn-Jung; Gray, J.L. [Purdue Univ., Lafayette, IN (United States). School of Electrical Engineering

    1994-12-31

    In this paper, the effects of interface states in the Z-nO/CdS/CuinSe{sub 2}, and CdS/CdTe solar cells are presented. The effects are investigated through numerical modeling using ADEPT (A Device Emulation Program and Tool). The results show that donor-like interface states have very little effect but acceptor-like interface states at the resistive ZnO/CdS can cause pinning of the bands at the interface, thus leading to non-exponential illuminated I-V curves when the interface state densities are high enough. High density of acceptor-like states between the CdS and In-rich CIS does not result in the two-diode like IV curves. Instead they can significantly lower the fill factor. In the CdS/CdTe solar cells. either donor- or acceptor-like interface states have little effect since almost all the depletion region lies in the CdTe. Thus, the metallurgical junction where the interface states are located is away from the electrical junction where the conductivity type changes.

  15. Thermal conductivity of biological cells at cellular level and correlation with disease state

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Byoung Kyoo; Woo, Yunho; Jeong, Dayeong; Park, Jaesung; Choi, Tae-Youl; Simmons, Denise Perry; Ha, Jeonghong; Kim, Dongsik

    2016-06-01

    This paper reports the thermal conductivity k of matched pair cell lines: two pairs of a normal and a cancer cell, one pair of a primary and metastatic cell. The 3ω method with a nanoscale thermal sensor was used to measure k at the single-cell level. To observe the difference in k between normal and cancer cells, the measurements were conducted for Hs 578Bst/Hs 578 T (human breast cells) and TE 353.Sk/TE 354.T (human skin cells). Then k of WM-115/WM-266-4, a primary and metastatic pair of human skin cell, was measured to find the effect of disease progression on k. The measured k data for normal and disease cell samples show statistically meaningful differences. In all cases, k decreased as the disease progressed. This work shows that thermal-analysis schemes, such as the 3ω method, have a potential to detect diseases at the cell level.

  16. Histamine from Brain Resident MAST Cells Promotes Wakefulness and Modulates Behavioral States

    OpenAIRE

    Sachiko Chikahisa; Tohru Kodama; Atsushi Soya; Yohei Sagawa; Yuji Ishimaru; Hiroyoshi Séi; Seiji Nishino

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS). Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing espec...

  17. Stochastic finite element analysis of long-span bridges with CFRP cables under earthquake ground motion

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Özlem Çavdar; Alemdar Bayraktar; Süleyman Adanur; Hasan Basri Başaǧa

    2010-06-01

    Stochastic seismic analysis of long-span bridges with Carbon fibre reinforced polymer (CFRP) cables are presented in this study through combination of the advantages of the perturbation based stochastic finite element method (SFEM) and Monte Carlo simulation (MCS) method. Jindo cable-stayed and Fatih Sultan Mehmet (Second Bosporus) suspension bridges are chosen as an example. Carbon fibre reinforced polymer cable (CFRP) and steel cables are used separately, in which the cable’s cross sectional area is determined by the principle equivalent axial stiffness. Geometric nonlinear effects are considered in the analysis. Uncertainties in the material are taken into account and Kocaeli earthquake in 1999 is chosen as a ground motion. The efficiency and accuracy of the proposed algorithm are validated by comparing with results of MCS method. It can be stated that using of CFRP cables in long-span bridges subjected to earthquake forces is feasible.

  18. Consensus seeking in multi-agent systems with noisy and delayed communication in digraphs having spanning tree

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djaidja, Sabir; Wu, Qinghe

    2016-09-01

    This paper studies the consensus problem of continuous-time single-integrator multi-agent systems with measurement noises and time delays under directed fixed topologies. Each agent in the team receives imprecise and delayed information from its neighbours. The noises are considered white noises, and time delays are assumed to be uniform for all the received information states. An analysis framework based on graph theory and stochastic tools is followed to derive conditions under which the asymptotic unbiased mean square linear χ-consensus is achieved in directed fixed topologies having a spanning tree. Then, conditions to achieve asymptotic unbiased mean square average consensus are deduced for fixed balanced digraphs having a spanning tree. The effectiveness of the proposed algorithms is proved through some simulations.

  19. HIGH-RESOLUTION SOLUTION-STATE NMR OF UNFRACTIONATED PLANT CELL WALLS: POTENTIAL FOR BIOMASS SELECTION AND PROCESS OPTIMIZATION

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detailed structural studies on the plant cell wall have traditionally been difficult. NMR is one of the preeminent structural tools, but obtaining high-resolution solution-state spectra has typically required fractionation and isolation of components of interest. With new methods for dissolution of,...

  20. Quasi-Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells based on Mesoporous Silica SBA-15 Framework Materials

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YANG Hong; CHENG Yun-Fei; LI Fu-You; ZHOU Zhi-Guo; YI Tao; HUANG Chun-Hui; JIA Neng-Qin

    2005-01-01

    @@ We develop a novel and efficient quasi-solid-state electrolyte based on the mesoporous silica SBA-15 as a framework material for a dye sensitized nanocrystalline TiO2 solar cell. A solar energy-to-electricity conversion efficiency of 4.34% is achieved under AM 1.5 illumination (100mW/cm2).

  1. Using the minimum spanning tree to trace mass segregation

    CERN Document Server

    Allison, Richard J; Parker, Richard J; Zwart, Simon F Portegies; de Grijs, Richard; Kouwenhoven, M B N

    2009-01-01

    We present a new method to detect and quantify mass segregation in star clusters. It compares the minimum spanning tree (MST) of massive stars with that of random stars. If mass segregation is present, the MST length of the most massive stars will be shorter than that of random stars. This difference can be quantified (with an associated significance) to measure the degree of mass segregation. We test the method on simulated clusters in both 2D and 3D and show that the method works as expected. We apply the method to the Orion Nebula Cluster (ONC) and show that the method is able to detect the mass segregation in the Trapezium with a `mass segregation ratio' \\Lambda_{MSR}=8.0 \\pm 3.5 (where \\Lambda_{MSR}=1 is no mass segregation) down to 16 \\Msun, and also that the ONC is mass segregated at a lower level (~2.0 \\pm 0.5) down to 5 \\Msun. Below 5 \\Msun we find no evidence for any further mass segregation in the ONC.

  2. Developing a Solar Magnetic Catalog Spanning Four Cycles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Werginz, Zachary; Munoz-Jaramillo, Andres; DeLuca, Michael D.; Vargas Acosta, Juan Pablo; Vargas Dominguez, Santiago; Zhang, Jie; Longcope, Dana; Martens, Petrus C.

    2016-05-01

    Bipolar magnetic regions (BMRs) are the cornerstone of solar cycle propagation, the building blocks that give structure to the solar atmosphere, and the origin of the majority of space weather events. However, in spite of their importance, there is no homogeneous BMR catalog spanning the era of systematic solar magnetic field measurements. Here we present the results of an ongoing project to address this deficiency applying the Bipolar Active Region Detection (BARD) code to magnetograms from the 512 Channel of the Kitt Peak Vaccum Telescope, SOHO/MDI, and SDO/HMI.The BARD code automatically identifies BMRs and tracks them as they are rotated by differential rotation. The output of the automatic detection is supervised by a human observer to correct possible mistakes made by the automatic algorithm (like incorrect pairings and tracking mislabels). Extra passes are made to integrate fragmented regions as well as to balance the flux between BMR polarities. At the moment, our BMR database includes 6,885 unique objects (detected and tracked) belonging to four separate solar cycles (21-24).

  3. Colour constancy across the life span: evidence for compensatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerger, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the peripheral visual system declines with age: the yellowing of the lens causes a selective reduction of short-wavelength light and sensitivity losses occur in the cone receptor mechanisms. At the same time, our subjective experience of colour does not change with age. The main purpose of this large-scale study (n = 185) covering a wide age range of colour-normal observers (18-75 years of age) was to assess the extent to which the human visual system is able to compensate for the changes in the optical media and at which level of processing this compensation is likely to occur. We report two main results: (1) Supra-threshold parafoveal colour perception remains largely unaffected by the age-related changes in the optical media (yellowing of the lens) whereas our ability to discriminate between small colour differences is compromised with an increase in age. (2) Significant changes in colour appearance are only found for unique green settings under daylight viewing condition which is consistent with the idea that the yellow-blue mechanism is most affected by an increase in age due to selective attenuation of short-wavelength light. The data on the invariance of hue perception, in conjunction with the age-related decline in chromatic sensitivity, provides evidence for compensatory mechanisms that enable colour-normal human observers a large degree of colour constancy across the life span. These compensatory mechanisms are likely to originate at cortical sites. PMID:23667689

  4. Colour constancy across the life span: evidence for compensatory mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wuerger, Sophie

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that the peripheral visual system declines with age: the yellowing of the lens causes a selective reduction of short-wavelength light and sensitivity losses occur in the cone receptor mechanisms. At the same time, our subjective experience of colour does not change with age. The main purpose of this large-scale study (n = 185) covering a wide age range of colour-normal observers (18-75 years of age) was to assess the extent to which the human visual system is able to compensate for the changes in the optical media and at which level of processing this compensation is likely to occur. We report two main results: (1) Supra-threshold parafoveal colour perception remains largely unaffected by the age-related changes in the optical media (yellowing of the lens) whereas our ability to discriminate between small colour differences is compromised with an increase in age. (2) Significant changes in colour appearance are only found for unique green settings under daylight viewing condition which is consistent with the idea that the yellow-blue mechanism is most affected by an increase in age due to selective attenuation of short-wavelength light. The data on the invariance of hue perception, in conjunction with the age-related decline in chromatic sensitivity, provides evidence for compensatory mechanisms that enable colour-normal human observers a large degree of colour constancy across the life span. These compensatory mechanisms are likely to originate at cortical sites.

  5. Television programming and disability: a ten year span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Byrd, E K; McDaniel, R S; Rhoden, R B

    1980-01-01

    Television programming covering disability over a ten year span, 1967-68 and 1977-78, was studied to determine similarities and differences. Variables identified for comparisons included network, program type, disability, time slot, and length of programming. The largest frequency of programs occurred on NBC in 1968. However, in 1978 the largest frequency occurred on the Public Broadcasting System. This can be partially explained by the increased numbers of programs on PBS overall and their traditional concern with public interest and service programming. The commercial networks historically have been in the business of entertaining and portray disability more so in that fashion. Movies head the list in 1968. However, in 1978, dramatic series and children's programming head the list followed by news documentaries and telethon. Paraplegia was the most frequent disability portrayed in 1968 followed by mental illness, drug addiction and emotional disability. In 1978 mental illness headed the list followed by alcoholism, emotional disability and physically handicapped. Paraplegia in 1968 can be accounted for by the program "Ironside" that featured a paraplegic detective. Mental illness and emotional disturbance seem to be consistent targets over the decade for popular programming in prime time. PMID:6450185

  6. The span of correlations in dolphin whistle sequences

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Long-range correlations are found in symbolic sequences from human language, music and DNA. Determining the span of correlations in dolphin whistle sequences is crucial for shedding light on their communicative complexity. Dolphin whistles share various statistical properties with human words, i.e. Zipf's law for word frequencies (namely that the probability of the ith most frequent word of a text is about i−α) and a parallel of the tendency of more frequent words to have more meanings. The finding of Zipf's law for word frequencies in dolphin whistles has been the topic of an intense debate on its implications. One of the major arguments against the relevance of Zipf's law in dolphin whistles is that it is not possible to distinguish the outcome of a die-rolling experiment from that of a linguistic or communicative source producing Zipf's law for word frequencies. Here we show that statistically significant whistle–whistle correlations extend back to the second previous whistle in the sequence, using a global randomization test, and to the fourth previous whistle, using a local randomization test. None of these correlations are expected by a die-rolling experiment and other simple explanations of Zipf's law for word frequencies, such as Simon's model, that produce sequences of unpredictable elements

  7. Conversion to stem-cell state in response to microenvironmental cues is regulated by balance between epithelial and mesenchymal features in lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andriani, Francesca; Bertolini, Giulia; Facchinetti, Federica; Baldoli, Erika; Moro, Massimo; Casalini, Patrizia; Caserini, Roberto; Milione, Massimo; Leone, Giorgia; Pelosi, Giuseppe; Pastorino, Ugo; Sozzi, Gabriella; Roz, Luca

    2016-02-01

    Cancer cells within a tumor are functionally heterogeneous and specific subpopulations, defined as cancer initiating cells (CICs), are endowed with higher tumor forming potential. The CIC state, however, is not hierarchically stable and conversion of non-CICs to CICs under microenvironment signals might represent a determinant of tumor aggressiveness. How plasticity is regulated at the cellular level is however poorly understood. To identify determinants of plasticity in lung cancer we exposed eight different cell lines to TGFβ1 to induce EMT and stimulate modulation of CD133(+) CICs. We show that response to TGFβ1 treatment is heterogeneous with some cells readily switching to stem cell state (1.5-2 fold CICs increase) and others being unresponsive to stimulation. This response is unrelated to original CICs content or extent of EMT engagement but is tightly dependent on balance between epithelial and mesenchymal features as measured by the ratio of expression of CDH1 (E-cadherin) to SNAI2. Epigenetic modulation of this balance can restore sensitivity of unresponsive models to microenvironmental stimuli, including those elicited by cancer-associated fibroblasts both in vitro and in vivo. In particular, tumors with increased prevalence of cells with features of partial EMT (hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype) are endowed with the highest plasticity and specific patterns of expression of SNAI2 and CDH1 markers identify a subset of tumors with worse prognosis. In conclusion, here we describe a connection between a hybrid epithelial/mesenchymal phenotype and conversion to stem-cell state in response to external stimuli. These findings have implications for current endeavors to identify tumors with increased plasticity.

  8. Ultrastructural and molecular distinctions between the porcine inner cell mass and epiblast reveal unique pluripotent cell states

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hall, V. J.; Jacobsen, Janus Valentin; Rasmussen, M. A.;

    2010-01-01

    Characterization of the pluripotent cell populations within the porcine embryo is essential for understanding pluripotency and self-renewal regulation in the inner cell mass (ICM) and epiblast. In this study, we perform detailed ultrastructural and molecular characterization of the developing...... pluripotent cell population as it develops from the ICM to the late epiblast. The ultrastructural observations revealed that the outer cells of the ICM have a high nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio but are transcriptionally inactive and contain mitochondria with few cristae. In contrast, the epiblast cells have...... a reduced nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio, are more transcriptionally active, and contain abundant cellular organelles. This study also revealed cavitation and potential unfolding of the epiblast. As the ICM forms the epiblast, SSEA1 is lost and VIMENTIN is lost and re-expressed. The D6 blastocyst expressed high...

  9. Gel electrolytes containing several kinds of particles used in quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GENG Yi; SUN Xiaodan; CAI Qiang; SHI Yantao; LI Hengde

    2006-01-01

    Composite gel electrolytes containing several kinds of particles used as the quasi-solid-state electrolytes in dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) were reported. Mesoporous particles (MCM-41) with unique structures composed of ordered nanochannels were served as a new kind of gelator for quasi-solid-state electrolytes. MCM-41, hydrophobic fumed silica Aerosil R972 and TiO2 nanopatricles P25 were dispersed into gel electrolytes respectively. The solar energy-to-electricity conversion efficiency of these cells is 4.65%, 6.85% and 5.05% respectively under 30 mW·cm-2 illumination. The preparation methods and the particles sizes exert an influence on the performance of corresponding solar cells. Owing to unique pore structures and high specific BET surface area, mesoporous silica MCM-41 was expected to have the potential to afford conducting nanochannels for redox couple diffusion.

  10. Who actually receives cell phone use while driving citations and how much are these laws enforced among states? A descriptive, cross-sectional study

    OpenAIRE

    Rudisill, Toni M.; Zhu, Motao

    2016-01-01

    Objectives While numerous cell phone use while driving laws have been passed among states, little information exists regarding who gets cited for these traffic infractions and how much these laws are enforced at the state-level within the USA. Design Cross-sectional, descriptive study. Setting 14 states and the District of Columbia. Participants Those receiving cell phone use while driving citations within included states from 2007 to 2013. Primary outcome Demographic characteristics of cited...

  11. Rapid detection of an ABT-737-sensitive primed for death state in cells using microplate-based respirometry.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pascaline Clerc

    Full Text Available Cells that exhibit an absolute dependence on the anti-apoptotic BCL-2 protein for survival are termed "primed for death" and are killed by the BCL-2 antagonist ABT-737. Many cancers exhibit a primed phenotype, including some that are resistant to conventional chemotherapy due to high BCL-2 expression. We show here that 1 stable BCL-2 overexpression alone can induce a primed for death state and 2 that an ABT-737-induced loss of functional cytochrome c from the electron transport chain causes a reduction in maximal respiration that is readily detectable by microplate-based respirometry. Stable BCL-2 overexpression sensitized non-tumorigenic MCF10A mammary epithelial cells to ABT-737-induced caspase-dependent apoptosis. Mitochondria within permeabilized BCL-2 overexpressing cells were selectively vulnerable to ABT-737-induced cytochrome c release compared to those from control-transfected cells, consistent with a primed state. ABT-737 treatment caused a dose-dependent impairment of maximal O(2 consumption in MCF10A BCL-2 overexpressing cells but not in control-transfected cells or in immortalized mouse embryonic fibroblasts lacking both BAX and BAK. This impairment was rescued by delivering exogenous cytochrome c to mitochondria via saponin-mediated plasma membrane permeabilization. An ABT-737-induced reduction in maximal O(2 consumption was also detectable in SP53, JeKo-1, and WEHI-231 B-cell lymphoma cell lines, with sensitivity correlating with BCL-2:MCL-1 ratio and with susceptibility (SP53 and JeKo-1 or resistance (WEHI-231 to ABT-737-induced apoptosis. Multiplexing respirometry assays to ELISA-based determination of cytochrome c redistribution confirmed that respiratory inhibition was associated with cytochrome c release. In summary, cell-based respiration assays were able to rapidly identify a primed for death state in cells with either artificially overexpressed or high endogenous BCL-2. Rapid detection of a primed for death state in

  12. Chronic inflammatory state in sickle cell anemia patients is associated with HBB(*)S haplotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bandeira, Izabel C J; Rocha, Lillianne B S; Barbosa, Maritza C; Elias, Darcielle B D; Querioz, José A N; Freitas, Max Vitor Carioca; Gonçalves, Romélia P

    2014-02-01

    The chronic inflammatory state in sickle cell anemia (SCA) is associated with several factors such as the following: endothelial damage; increased production of reactive oxygen species; hemolysis; increased expression of adhesion molecules by leukocytes, erythrocytes, and platelets; and increased production of proinflammatory cytokines. Genetic characteristics affecting the clinical severity of SCA include variations in the hemoglobin F (HbF) level, coexistence of alpha-thalassemia, and the haplotype associated with the HbS gene. The different haplotypes of SCA are Bantu, Benin, Senegal, Cameroon, and Arab-Indian. These haplotypes are associated with ethnic groups and also based on the geographical origin. Studies have shown that the Bantu haplotype is associated with higher incidence of clinical complications than the other haplotypes and is therefore considered to have the worst prognosis. This study aimed to evaluate the profile of the proinflammatory cytokines interleukin-6, tumor necrosis factor-α, and interleukin-17 in patients with SCA and also to assess the haplotypes associated with beta globin cluster S (HBB(*)S). We analyzed a total of 62 patients who had SCA and had been treated with hydroxyurea; they had received a dose ranging between 15 and 25 (20.0±0.6)mg/kg/day for 6-60 (18±3.4)months; their data were compared with those for 30 normal individuals. The presence of HbS was detected and the haplotypes of the beta S gene cluster were analyzed by polymerase chain reaction-restriction fragment length polymorphism (PCR-RFLP). Our study demonstrated that SCA patients have increased inflammatory profile when compared to the healthy individuals. Further, analysis of the association between the haplotypes and inflammatory profile showed that the levels of IL-6 and TNF-α were greater in subjects with the Bantu/Bantu haplotype than in subjects with the Benin/Benin haplotype. The Bantu/Benin haplotype individuals had lower levels of cytokines than those with

  13. Loss of variation of state detected in soybean metabolic and human myelomonocytic leukaemia cell transcriptional networks under external stimuli

    KAUST Repository

    Sakata, Katsumi

    2016-10-24

    Soybean (Glycine max) is sensitive to flooding stress, and flood damage at the seedling stage is a barrier to growth. We constructed two mathematical models of the soybean metabolic network, a control model and a flooded model, from metabolic profiles in soybean plants. We simulated the metabolic profiles with perturbations before and after the flooding stimulus using the two models. We measured the variation of state that the system could maintain from a state–space description of the simulated profiles. The results showed a loss of variation of state during the flooding response in the soybean plants. Loss of variation of state was also observed in a human myelomonocytic leukaemia cell transcriptional network in response to a phorbol-ester stimulus. Thus, we detected a loss of variation of state under external stimuli in two biological systems, regardless of the regulation and stimulus types. Our results suggest that a loss of robustness may occur concurrently with the loss of variation of state in biological systems. We describe the possible applications of the quantity of variation of state in plant genetic engineering and cell biology. Finally, we present a hypothetical “external stimulus-induced information loss” model of biological systems.

  14. Effect of informing the diagnosis on depressive state in patients with non-small cell lung cancer of stage Ⅲ

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei WANG

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective As other tumors, unresectabe lung cancer can cause many psychological problems to the patients, such as depression and anxiety. The present paper aims to evaluate the status of depression before and after knowing the state of illness in patients with non-small cell lung cancer of stage Ⅲ. Methods 43 casesof newly diagnosed non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC with stage Ⅲ were enrolled in the study. All the patients were distributed into three groups and given different intervention, that was completely unknowing the state of illness (group A, partly knowing the state of illness (group B and completely knowing the state of illness (group C. Before and after knowing the state of illness, the depression status was assessed with the Hamilton depression rating scale for depression(HAMD. Results The mean total score of HAMD was unchanged both in group A and C, while significantly reduced in group B. The scores of anxiety somatization, cognitive disorder, retardation and feeling of despair were all significant lower in the group B after the patients partly knowing the state of illness, while the scores of sleep disorder was obviously higher in group C after the patients completely knowing the state of illness. The hypochondriasis was much severer in the group A, and in the group C, the score of suicidal idea became significantly higher after the patient knowing the diagnosis.Conclusion Depression is very common in the NSCLC patients with stage Ⅲ. Partly knowing the state of illness can obviously ameliorate the symptoms of depression, while completely knowing or completely unknowing the state of illness have no effect on relieving the patients' depression.

  15. Comparison between P25 and anatase-based TiO2 quasi-solid state dye sensitized solar cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LUO Fen; WANG LiDuo; QIU Yong

    2008-01-01

    Pure anatase TiO2 films have been made via hydration of titanium isopropoxide using a sol-gel tech-nique, while mixed TiO2 films which contained both anatase and rutile TiO2 were made from commercial P25 powder. Quasi-solid state dye-sensitized solar cells were fabricated with these two kinds of mesoporous films and a comparison study was carried out. The result showed that the open-circuit photovoltages (Voc) for both kinds of cells were essentially the same, whereas the short-circuit photo-currents (Isc) of the anatase-based cells were about 33% higher than that of the P25-based cells. The highest photocurrent intensity of the anatase-based cell was 6.12 mA/cm2 and that of the P25-based cell was 4.60 mA/cm2. Under an illumination with the light intensity of 30 mW/cm2, the corresponding en-ergy conversion efficiencywas measured to be 7.07% and 6.89% for anatase-based cells and P25-based cells, respectively.

  16. In vitro fertilization and stem cell harvesting from human embryos: the law and practice in the United States

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    C. Christopher Hook

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available The challenges before science and medicine are these: science must explore the natural world as thoroughly as possible, while still honoring, protecting, serving and preserving the subject of its investigations, and the human beings for whom it is a tool; medicine must confront disease and disability as effectively as possible, while also honoring, protecting, and preserving those beings for whom it serves – all of those beings, not just some, or even most, at the potential expense of others. These goals are challenged by embryo-destructive human embryonic stem cell research. The human embryo is a human being as clearly defined by embryology, and as such should be protected by the codes governing human subject research. However, because of the “potential” benefits offered by pluripotent stem cells, coupled with abortion politics and a very poorly regulated infertility industry, United States governmental advisory commissions and the scientific, medical, and political communities have attempted to define away the humanity of the human embryo, witha few notable exceptions. Because infertility treatments in the United States are poorly regulated, there are large numbersof supernumerary embryos in cryopreservation. However, only a tiny portion of these will ever be potentially available for research, and thus are not a realistic source of the cells necessary to provide treatments to the millions who might benefit from proposed stem cell based therapies. Cloning willnot be the answer either, given the millions of women who must be exploited to provide sufficient numbers of eggs to generate the cloned cell lines. Moreover, the disposition decisions parents must make for their extra embryos are often agonizing, and not uncommonly change.The use of supernumerary embryos as a source for human embryonic stem cells is unethical, will never be a sufficient source for the medical treatments expected from stem cell research, and is often a source of

  17. In vitro fertilization and stem cell harvesting from human embryos: the law and practice in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hook, C Christopher

    2010-07-01

    The challenges before science and medicine are these: science must explore the natural world as thoroughly as possible, while still honoring, protecting, serving and preserving the subject of its investigations, and the human beings for whom it is a tool; medicine must confront disease and disability as effectively as possible, while also honoring, protecting, and preserving those beings for whom it serves - all of those beings, not just some, or even most, at the potential expense of others. These goals are challenged by embryo-destructive human embryonic stem cell research. The human embryo is a human being as clearly defined by embryology, and as such should be protected by the codes governing human subject research. However, because of the "potential" benefits offered by pluripotent stem cells, coupled with abortion politics and a very poorly regulated infertility industry, United States governmental advisory commissions and the scientific, medical, and political communities have attempted to define away the humanity of the human embryo, with a few notable exceptions. Because infertility treatments in the United States are poorly regulated, there are large numbers of supernumerary embryos in cryopreservation. However, only a tiny portion of these will ever be potentially available for research, and thus are not a realistic source of the cells necessary to provide treatments to the millions who might benefit from proposed stem cell based therapies. Cloning will not be the answer either, given the millions of women who must be exploited to provide sufficient numbers of eggs to generate the cloned cell lines. Moreover, the disposition decisions parents must make for their extra embryos are often agonizing, and not uncommonly change. The use of supernumerary embryos as a source for human embryonic stem cells is unethical, will never be a sufficient source for the medical treatments expected from stem cell research, and is often a source of great distress for the

  18. Present state and future perspectives of using pluripotent stem cells in toxicology research

    OpenAIRE

    Wobus, Anna M.; Löser, Peter

    2011-01-01

    The use of novel drugs and chemicals requires reliable data on their potential toxic effects on humans. Current test systems are mainly based on animals or in vitro–cultured animal-derived cells and do not or not sufficiently mirror the situation in humans. Therefore, in vitro models based on human pluripotent stem cells (hPSCs) have become an attractive alternative. The article summarizes the characteristics of pluripotent stem cells, including embryonic carcinoma and embryonic germ cells, a...

  19. Colour constancy across the life span: evidence for compensatory mechanisms.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophie Wuerger

    Full Text Available It is well known that the peripheral visual system declines with age: the yellowing of the lens causes a selective reduction of short-wavelength light and sensitivity losses occur in the cone receptor mechanisms. At the same time, our subjective experience of colour does not change with age. The main purpose of this large-scale study (n = 185 covering a wide age range of colour-normal observers (18-75 years of age was to assess the extent to which the human visual system is able to compensate for the changes in the optical media and at which level of processing this compensation is likely to occur. We report two main results: (1 Supra-threshold parafoveal colour perception remains largely unaffected by the age-related changes in the optical media (yellowing of the lens whereas our ability to discriminate between small colour differences is compromised with an increase in age. (2 Significant changes in colour appearance are only found for unique green settings under daylight viewing condition which is consistent with the idea that the yellow-blue mechanism is most affected by an increase in age due to selective attenuation of short-wavelength light. The data on the invariance of hue perception, in conjunction with the age-related decline in chromatic sensitivity, provides evidence for compensatory mechanisms that enable colour-normal human observers a large degree of colour constancy across the life span. These compensatory mechanisms are likely to originate at cortical sites.

  20. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  1. Boundaries of life: estimating the life span of the biosphere

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franck, S.; Bounama, C.; von Bloh, W.

    We present a minimal model for the global carbon cycle of the Earth containing the reservoirs mantle ocean floor continental crust continental biosphere and the Kerogen as well as the aggregated reservoir ocean and atmosphere and obtain reasonable values for the present distribution of carbon in the surface reservoirs of the Earth The Earth system model for the long-term carbon cycle is specified by introducing three different types of biosphere prokaryotes eucaryotes and complex multicellular life They are characterized by different global temperature tolerance windows prokaryotes 2oC 100oC eucaryotes 5oC 45oC complex multicellular life 0oC 30oC From the Archaean to the future there always exists a prokaryotic biosphere 2 Gyr ago eucaryotic life first appears because the global surface temperature reaches the tolerance window for eucaryotes The emergence of complex multicellular life is connected with an explosive increase in biomass and a strong decrease in Cambrian global surface temperature at about 0 54 Gyr ago In the long-term future the three types of biosphere will die out in reverse sequence of their appearance For realistic values of the biotic enhancement of weathering there is no bistability in the future solutions for complex life Therefore complex organisms will not extinct by an implosion in comparison to the Cambrian explosion Eucaryotes and complex life become extinct because of too high surface temperatures in the future The ultimate life span of the biosphere is defined by the extinction of procaryotes in about 1 6 Gyr

  2. Renal cell cancer: a shift in approaches for treatment of advanced disease in the United States.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banegas, Matthew P; Harlan, Linda C; Mann, Bhupinder; Yabroff, K Robin

    2014-09-01

    Several new agents have become available to treat renal cell cancer (RCC) in recent years, although evidence on their dissemination is limited. This study examined recent trends in RCC treatment in US community practices. Data from the population-based National Cancer Institute's Patterns of Care studies were used to evaluate treatment of patients with RCC newly diagnosed in 2004 and 2009 (N=2357). Descriptive statistics and logistic and Cox proportional hazards regression analyses were used to assess treatment patterns and the associations among demographic, clinical, and hospital characteristics, with receipt of systemic therapy and time-to-systemic treatment. Between 2004 and 2009, systemic therapy use increased among patients with stage III and IV RCC, from 3.8% to 15.7% and 35.2% to 57.4%, respectively. Among patients with stage IV disease, the most commonly used therapies changed from interleukin-2 (16.3%) and interferon-alfa (16.6%) in 2004 to sunitinib (39.2%) and temsirolimus (15.2%) in 2009. Further, notable decreases were seen in the use of surgery and time-to-systemic treatment for patients with stage IV disease. Patients who were older, living in areas with lower educational attainment, and diagnosed in 2004 were significantly less likely to receive systemic therapy and had longer time-to-systemic treatment (P<.05). The findings indicate that over the past decade, treatment for RCC in the United States has evolved toward increased use of systemic therapy. As the diffusion of new therapies continues, it will be imperative to understand how variation in care for RCC will impact health outcomes and costs of care. PMID:25190695

  3. CD24 tracks divergent pluripotent states in mouse and human cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shakiba, Nika; White, Carl A; Lipsitz, Yonatan Y; Yachie-Kinoshita, Ayako; Tonge, Peter D; Hussein, Samer M I; Puri, Mira C; Elbaz, Judith; Morrissey-Scoot, James; Li, Mira; Munoz Peralta, Javier; Benevento, Marco; Rogers, Ian M; Hanna, Jacob H; Heck, Albert J R; Wollscheid, Bernd; Nagy, Andras; Zandstra, Peter W

    2015-01-01

    Reprogramming is a dynamic process that can result in multiple pluripotent cell types emerging from divergent paths. Cell surface protein expression is a particularly desirable tool to categorize reprogramming and pluripotency as it enables robust quantification and enrichment of live cells. Here we

  4. Interfacing of science, medicine and law: The stem cell patent controversy in the United States and the European Union

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya eDavey

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The patent eligibility of stem cells – particularly those derived from human embryos – has long been under debate in both the scientific and legal communities. On the basis of moral grounds, the European Patent Office (EPO has refrained from granting patents for stem cells obtained through the destruction of human embryos. On the contrary, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO has historically granted patents regarding the isolation and use of human embryonic and other stem cells. To date, these US patents remain valid despite an increasing onslaught of challenges in court. However, recent precedents established in US courts significantly narrow the scope of patent eligibility within biotechnology. This article compares the implications of recent legal changes on stem cell patent eligibility between the EU and US.

  5. Interfacing of Science, Medicine and Law: The Stem Cell Patent Controversy in the United States and the European Union.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davey, Sonya; Davey, Neil; Gu, Qian; Xu, Na; Vatsa, Rajet; Devalaraja, Samir; Harris, Paul; Gannavaram, Sreenivas; Dave, Raj; Chakrabarty, Ananda

    2015-01-01

    The patent eligibility of stem cells-particularly those derived from human embryos-has long been under debate in both the scientific and legal communities. On the basis of moral grounds, the European Patent Office (EPO) has refrained from granting patents for stem cells obtained through the destruction of human embryos. On the contrary, the United States Patent and Trademark Office (USPTO) has historically granted patents regarding the isolation and use of human embryonic and other stem cells. To date, these US patents remain valid despite an increasing onslaught of challenges in court. However, recent precedents established in US courts significantly narrow the scope of patent eligibility within biotechnology. This article compares the implications of recent legal changes on stem cell patent eligibility between the EU and US. PMID:26618158

  6. The retinoblastoma gene pathway regulates the postmitotic state of hair cells of the mouse inner ear

    OpenAIRE

    Mantela, Johanna; Jiang, Zhe; Ylikoski, Jukka; Fritzsch, Bernd; Zacksenhaus, Eldad; Pirvola, Ulla

    2005-01-01

    Precursors of cochlear and vestibular hair cells of the inner ear exit the cell cycle at midgestation. Hair cells are mitotically quiescent during late-embryonic differentiation stages and postnatally. We show here that the retinoblastoma gene Rb and the encoded protein pRb are expressed in differentiating and mature hair cells. In addition to Rb, the cyclin dependent kinase inhibitor (CKI) p21 is expressed in developing hair cells, suggesting that p21 is an upstream effector of pRb activity....

  7. Novel Degree Constrained Minimum Spanning Tree Algorithm Based on an Improved Multicolony Ant Algorithm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuemei Sun

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Degree constrained minimum spanning tree (DCMST refers to constructing a spanning tree of minimum weight in a complete graph with weights on edges while the degree of each node in the spanning tree is no more than d (d ≥ 2. The paper proposes an improved multicolony ant algorithm for degree constrained minimum spanning tree searching which enables independent search for optimal solutions among various colonies and achieving information exchanges between different colonies by information entropy. Local optimal algorithm is introduced to improve constructed spanning tree. Meanwhile, algorithm strategies in dynamic ant, random perturbations ant colony, and max-min ant system are adapted in this paper to optimize the proposed algorithm. Finally, multiple groups of experimental data show the superiority of the improved algorithm in solving the problems of degree constrained minimum spanning tree.

  8. Biological characterization and next-generation genome sequencing of the unclassified Cotia virus SPAn232 (Poxviridae).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Priscila P; Silva, Patrícia M; Schnellrath, Laila C; Jesus, Desyreé M; Hu, Jianhong; Yang, Yajie; Renne, Rolf; Attias, Marcia; Condit, Richard C; Moussatché, Nissin; Damaso, Clarissa R

    2012-05-01

    Cotia virus (COTV) SPAn232 was isolated in 1961 from sentinel mice at Cotia field station, São Paulo, Brazil. Attempts to classify COTV within a recognized genus of the Poxviridae have generated contradictory findings. Studies by different researchers suggested some similarity to myxoma virus and swinepox virus, whereas another investigation characterized COTV SPAn232 as a vaccinia virus strain. Because of the lack of consensus, we have conducted an independent biological and molecular characterization of COTV. Virus growth curves reached maximum yields at approximately 24 to 48 h and were accompanied by virus DNA replication and a characteristic early/late pattern of viral protein synthesis. Interestingly, COTV did not induce detectable cytopathic effects in BSC-40 cells until 4 days postinfection and generated viral plaques only after 8 days. We determined the complete genomic sequence of COTV by using a combination of the next-generation DNA sequencing technologies 454 and Illumina. A unique contiguous sequence of 185,139 bp containing 185 genes, including the 90 genes conserved in all chordopoxviruses, was obtained. COTV has an interesting panel of open reading frames (ORFs) related to the evasion of host defense, including two novel genes encoding C-C chemokine-like proteins, each present in duplicate copies. Phylogenetic analysis revealed the highest amino acid identity scores with Cervidpoxvirus, Capripoxvirus, Suipoxvirus, Leporipoxvirus, and Yatapoxvirus. However, COTV grouped as an independent branch within this clade, which clearly excluded its classification as an Orthopoxvirus. Therefore, our data suggest that COTV could represent a new poxvirus genus.

  9. Tracing paleo-ocean redox using Cr isotopes in carbonates spanning the Great Oxidation Event

    Science.gov (United States)

    Holmden, C. E.; Bekker, A.

    2013-12-01

    Cr is an element whose isotopes are fractionated by redox reactions in the Earth's exogenic system, such as those occuring during oxidative weathering on the continents and scavenging into reduced marine sediments. Frei et al. (2009) proposed that the range of Cr isotope fractionation in exogenic materials in the absence of molecular oxygen would likely not extend beyond the range in igneous rocks, which is quite small (δ53Cr = -0.1 ×0.1‰). They tested their hypothesis on iron formations spanning the Great Oxidation Event (GOE) and found small fractionations that predated the GOE, but no permil level fractionation until the Neoproterozoic. We tested whether δ53Cr values in shallow-water carbonates spanning the GOE might record steps in the rise of atmospheric oxygen between 2.45 and 2.06 Ga. Carbonates representing 15 formations were chosen with depositonal ages ranging between 2.5 Ga and 1.9 Ga. We find very little Cr isotope fractionation recorded in carbonates deposited during this time with the exception of those corresponding to the peak of the Lomagundi Event at ca. 2.15 Ga. A defining characterisitic of the Lomagundi Event is the widespread prevalance of shallow-water carbonate platforms with abundant stromatolites, making their deposits an ideal lithology to record the state of the seawater Cr cycle. Five formations deposited during this time yield δ53Cr values with permil level fractionation recorded in some examples, in both positive and negative directions with respect to the igenous rock baseline. The data suggests that although the oxidative part of the Cr cycle started at least during the peak of the Lomagundi Event, the Cr(VI) reservoir and its residence time remained small, making it susceptible to local processes. 1. Frei et al. (2009) Fluctuations in Precambrian atmospheric oxygen recorded by Cr isotopes, Nature, v. 461, 250-253.

  10. Bacillus anthracis spore interactions with mammalian cells: Relationship between germination state and the outcome of in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stojkovic Bojana

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During inhalational anthrax, internalization of Bacillus anthracis spores by host cells within the lung is believed to be a key step for initiating the transition from the localized to disseminated stages of infection. Despite compelling in vivo evidence that spores remain dormant within the bronchioalveolar spaces of the lungs, and germinate only after uptake into host cells, most in vitro studies of infection have been conducted under conditions that promote rapid germination of spores within the culture medium. Results Using an in vitro model of infection, we evaluated the influence of the germination state of B. anthracis spores, as controlled by defined culture conditions, on the outcome of infection. Spores prepared from B. anthracis Sterne 7702 germinated in a variety of common cell culture media supplemented with fetal bovine serum (FBS while, in the absence of FBS, germination was strictly dependent on medium composition. RAW264.7 macrophage-like cells internalized spores to the same extent in either germinating or non-germinating media. However, significantly more viable, intracellular B. anthracis were recovered from cells infected under non-germinating conditions compared to germinating conditions. At the same time, RAW264.7 cells demonstrated a significant loss in viability when infected under non-germinating conditions. Conclusions These results suggest that the outcome of host cell infection is sensitive to the germination state of spores at the time of uptake. Moreover, this study demonstrates the efficacy of studying B. anthracis spore infection of host cells within a defined, non-germinating, in vitro environment.

  11. Embryonic Stem Cell Culture Conditions Support Distinct States Associated with Different Developmental Stages and Potency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Martin Gonzalez, Javier; Morgani, Sophie M; Bone, Robert A;

    2016-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells (ESCs) are cell lines derived from the mammalian pre-implantation embryo. Here we assess the impact of derivation and culture conditions on both functional potency and ESC transcriptional identity. Individual ESCs cultured in either two small-molecule inhibitors (2i....... Conversely, the transcriptome of serum-cultured ESCs correlated with later stages of development (E4.5), at which point embryonic cells are more restricted in their developmental potential. Thus, ESC culture systems are not equivalent, but support cell types that resemble distinct developmental stages. Cells......) or with knockout serum replacement (KOSR), but not serum, can generate high-level chimeras regardless of how these cells were derived. ESCs cultured in these conditions showed a transcriptional correlation with early pre-implantation embryos (E1.5-E3.5) and contributed to development from the 2-cell stage...

  12. Global preferential consistency for the topological sorting-based maximal spanning tree problem

    CERN Document Server

    Joseph, Rémy-Robert

    2012-01-01

    We introduce a new type of fully computable problems, for DSS dedicated to maximal spanning tree problems, based on deduction and choice: preferential consistency problems. To show its interest, we describe a new compact representation of preferences specific to spanning trees, identifying an efficient maximal spanning tree sub-problem. Next, we compare this problem with the Pareto-based multiobjective one. And at last, we propose an efficient algorithm solving the associated preferential consistency problem.

  13. A finite element solver for modal analysis of multi-span offshore pipelines

    OpenAIRE

    2014-01-01

    Accurate determination of pipeline eigenfrequencies and mode shapes is essential to free span design. For pipelines resting on rough seabeds, multiple free spans are commonly located sufficiently close to be interacting, and finite element analysis (FEA) is then conventionally required to determine the modal response. In the present report, a tailor-made (specific purpose) FEA tool is developed to carry out modal analyses of multi-span offshore pipelines. The specific purpose FEA tool is thor...

  14. Degree stability of a minimum spanning tree of price return and volatility

    OpenAIRE

    Salvatore Miccich\\`e; Giovanni Bonanno; Fabrizio Lillo; Rosario N Mantegna

    2002-01-01

    We investigate the time series of the degree of minimum spanning trees obtained by using a correlation based clustering procedure which is starting from (i) asset return and (ii) volatility time series. The minimum spanning tree is obtained at different times by computing correlation among time series over a time window of fixed length $T$. We find that the minimum spanning tree of asset return is characterized by stock degree values, which are more stable in time than the ones obtained by an...

  15. The Process of Team Boundary Spanning in Multi-Organizational Contexts

    OpenAIRE

    Harvey, S.; Peterson, R. S.; Anand, N

    2014-01-01

    Work teams must increasingly operate in complex environments characterized by multiple external actors beyond team and organizational boundaries. Although previous research demonstrates the importance of boundary spanning activities to team effectiveness, it reveals relatively little about the process of boundary spanning in these environments. In this article, we investigated the processes of boundary spanning across multiple external actors in 10 cross-organizational teams. We identified th...

  16. Embryonic Stem Cells Maintain an Undifferentiated State on Dendrimer-Immobilized Surface with d-Glucose Display

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masahito Taya

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available In serial passaging cultures of mouse embryonic stem (ES cells, we employed a dendrimer-immobilized substrate that displayed d-glucose as a terminal ligand. The d-glucose-displaying dendrimer (GLU/D surface caused the ES cells to form loosely attached spherical colonies, while those on a gelatin-coated surface formed flatter colonies that were firmly attached to the surface. Despite the morphological similarities between the colonies on the GLU/D surface and aggregates on a conventional bacteriological dish, immunostaining and RT-PCR analyses revealed the maintenance of cells within the spherical colonies on the GLU/D surface in an undifferentiated state with very low expressions of primitive endoderm markers. On the bacteriological dish, however, the cells within the aggregates showed a different cellular state with partial differentiation into the primitive endoderm lineage, and the expression level increased gradually along with the number of passages. These results indicate that the GLU/D surface can be a potential tool for controlling the ES cell morphology and then govern their self-renewal and fate.

  17. Small lymphocytes in peripheral lymphoid tissues of nude mice. Life-span and distribution

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hougen, H P; Röpke, C

    1975-01-01

    The distribution of small lymphocytes according to life-span in the peripheral lymphoid tissues of the mouse mutant "nude" has been studied by means of auto-radiography and scintillation counting to evaluate the localization of B lymphocytes with varying life-span. The vast majority of the lympho......The distribution of small lymphocytes according to life-span in the peripheral lymphoid tissues of the mouse mutant "nude" has been studied by means of auto-radiography and scintillation counting to evaluate the localization of B lymphocytes with varying life-span. The vast majority...

  18. Relationships between Categorical Perception of Phonemes, Phoneme Awareness, and Visual Attention Span in Developmental Dyslexia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zoubrinetzky, Rachel; Collet, Gregory; Serniclaes, Willy; Nguyen-Morel, Marie-Ange; Valdois, Sylviane

    2016-01-01

    We tested the hypothesis that the categorical perception deficit of speech sounds in developmental dyslexia is related to phoneme awareness skills, whereas a visual attention (VA) span deficit constitutes an independent deficit. Phoneme awareness tasks, VA span tasks and categorical perception tasks of phoneme identification and discrimination using a d/t voicing continuum were administered to 63 dyslexic children and 63 control children matched on chronological age. Results showed significant differences in categorical perception between the dyslexic and control children. Significant correlations were found between categorical perception skills, phoneme awareness and reading. Although VA span correlated with reading, no significant correlations were found between either categorical perception or phoneme awareness and VA span. Mediation analyses performed on the whole dyslexic sample suggested that the effect of categorical perception on reading might be mediated by phoneme awareness. This relationship was independent of the participants' VA span abilities. Two groups of dyslexic children with a single phoneme awareness or a single VA span deficit were then identified. The phonologically impaired group showed lower categorical perception skills than the control group but categorical perception was similar in the VA span impaired dyslexic and control children. The overall findings suggest that the link between categorical perception, phoneme awareness and reading is independent from VA span skills. These findings provide new insights on the heterogeneity of developmental dyslexia. They suggest that phonological processes and VA span independently affect reading acquisition.

  19. The effect of the state of differentiation on labeling of epidermal cell surface glycoproteins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Epidermal cells were grown in a medium in which the Ca++ concentration controlled the stage of differentiation. Cell surface molecules of differentiated and undifferentiated cells were compared by lactoperoxidase-catalyzed iodination, by the interaction with 125I-lectins, and by the metabolic incorporation of L-(3H)-fucose. Molecular weights of the labeled components were determined by SDS-PAGE and autoradiography. After lactoperoxidase iodination, most of the radioactivity was found in polypeptide bands of 79,000, 65,000 and 56,000 daltons. The 79,000 band is the most intense for undifferentiated cells but disappears as differentiation proceeds. The 56,000 band is present in normal cells at all stages of differentiation but is absent from neoplastic cells. Glycoproteins reacted with 125I-lectins were found at 180,000, 130,000 and 85,000 daltons. The 130,000 band was the most prominent for differentiated cells labeled with wheat germ agglutinin but was essentially absent from the undifferentiated cells. With Ricinus communis agglutinin, this band was weaker for undifferentiated than for differentiated cells but was the most intense for both. After metabolic incorporation of tritiated fucose, radioactive glycoproteins were found at 130,000 and 85,000 daltons, with comparable intensities for differentiated and undifferentiated cells

  20. Hydrogen Fuel Cell Performance as Telecommunications Backup Power in the United States

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, Jennifer [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Saur, Genevieve [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States); Sprik, Sam [National Renewable Energy Lab. (NREL), Golden, CO (United States)

    2015-03-01

    Working in collaboration with the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) and industry project partners, the National Renewable Energy Laboratory (NREL) acts as the central data repository for the data collected from real-world operation of fuel cell backup power systems. With American Recovery and Reinvestment Act of 2009 (ARRA) co-funding awarded through DOE's Fuel Cell Technologies Office, more than 1,300 fuel cell units were deployed over a three-plus-year period in stationary, material handling equipment, auxiliary power, and backup power applications. This surpassed a Fuel Cell Technologies Office ARRA objective to spur commercialization of an early market technology by installing 1,000 fuel cell units across several different applications, including backup power. By December 2013, 852 backup power units out of 1,330 fuel cell units deployed were providing backup service, mainly for telecommunications towers. For 136 of the fuel cell backup units, project participants provided detailed operational data to the National Fuel Cell Technology Evaluation Center for analysis by NREL's technology validation team. NREL analyzed operational data collected from these government co-funded demonstration projects to characterize key fuel cell backup power performance metrics, including reliability and operation trends, and to highlight the business case for using fuel cells in these early market applications. NREL's analyses include these critical metrics, along with deployment, U.S. grid outage statistics, and infrastructure operation.

  1. Block Copolymer Electrolytes: Thermodynamics, Ion Transport, and Use in Solid- State Lithium/Sulfur Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teran, Alexander Andrew

    Nanostructured block copolymer electrolytes containing an ion-conducting block and a modulus-strengthening block are of interest for applications in solid-state lithium metal batteries. These materials can self-assemble into well-defined microstructures, creating conducting channels that facilitate ion transport. The overall objective of this dissertation is to gain a better understanding of the behavior of salt-containing block copolymers, and evaluate their potential for use in solid-state lithium/sulfur batteries. Anionically synthesized polystyrene-b-poly(ethylene oxide) (SEO) copolymers doped with lithium bis(trifluoromethanesulfonyl)imide (LiTFSI) salt were used as a model system. This thesis investigates the model system on several levels: from fundamental thermodynamic studies to bulk characterization and finally device assembly and testing. First, the thermodynamics of neat and salt-containing block copolymers was studied. The addition of salt to these materials is necessary to make them conductive, however even small amounts of salt can have significant effects on their phase behavior, and consequently their iontransport and mechanical properties. As a result, the effect of salt addition on block copolymer thermodynamics has been the subject of significant interest over the last decade. A comprehensive study of the thermodynamics of block copolymer/salt mixtures over a wide range of molecular weights, compositions, salt concentrations and temperatures was conducted. Next, the effect of molecular weight on ion transport in both homopolymer and copolymer electrolytes were studied over a wide range of chain lengths. Homopolymer electrolytes show an inverse relationship between conductivity and chain length, with a plateau in the infinite molecular weight limit. This is due to the presence of two mechanisms of ion conduction in homopolymers; the first mechanism is a result of the segmental motion of the chains surrounding the salt ions, 2 creating a liquid

  2. Quasi-solid-state nanocrystalline TiO2 solar cells using gel network polymer electrolytes based on polysiloxanes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2003-01-01

    A quasi-solid-state dye-sensitized nanocrystalline porous TiO2 film solar cell was fabricated using a novel gel network polymer electrolyte based on polysiloxanes with both polyethylene oxide internal plasticized side chains and quaternary ammonium groups. The cell exhibited better photoelectrical conversion performance under 60 mW/cm2 irradiation. The short photocurrent (Isc) of 5.0 mA/cm2 and open voltage (Voc) of 0.68 V were achieved, and the energy conversion efficiency (η) and fill factor (ff) were 3.4% and 0.60, respectively.

  3. Discarded cell phone lithium ion batteries state of health quick method analysis by galvanostatic intermittent titration technique (GITT concept

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paulo Rogério Catarini

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available The state of health (SOH is a important evaluation parameter to rechargeable batteries, because determine its cycle life and help on electric devices supplied by batteries maintenance. In this work the lithium ion discards cell phones batteries state of health and apparent diffusion coefficient (Dap were measured and correlated which purpose is diminish the batteries analyze time. The apparent diffusion coefficient is a ionic diffusion coefficient modification from GITT technique. The SOH and Dap correlation is well behaved, disclosing a cubic dependency. The time analyze was reduced by more than 1 h.

  4. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE) Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Sandeep; Dietrich, Nicholas; Kornfeld, Kerry

    2016-02-01

    Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE) inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms and suggest new

  5. Angiotensin Converting Enzyme (ACE Inhibitor Extends Caenorhabditis elegans Life Span.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandeep Kumar

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Animal aging is characterized by progressive, degenerative changes in many organ systems. Because age-related degeneration is a major contributor to disability and death in humans, treatments that delay age-related degeneration are desirable. However, no drugs that delay normal human aging are currently available. To identify drugs that delay age-related degeneration, we used the powerful Caenorhabditis elegans model system to screen for FDA-approved drugs that can extend the adult lifespan of worms. Here we show that captopril extended mean lifespan. Captopril is an angiotensin-converting enzyme (ACE inhibitor used to treat high blood pressure in humans. To explore the mechanism of captopril, we analyzed the acn-1 gene that encodes the C. elegans homolog of ACE. Reducing the activity of acn-1 extended the mean life span. Furthermore, reducing the activity of acn-1 delayed age-related degenerative changes and increased stress resistance, indicating that acn-1 influences aging. Captopril could not further extend the lifespan of animals with reduced acn-1, suggesting they function in the same pathway; we propose that captopril inhibits acn-1 to extend lifespan. To define the relationship with previously characterized longevity pathways, we analyzed mutant animals. The lifespan extension caused by reducing the activity of acn-1 was additive with caloric restriction and mitochondrial insufficiency, and did not require sir-2.1, hsf-1 or rict-1, suggesting that acn-1 functions by a distinct mechanism. The interactions with the insulin/IGF-1 pathway were complex, since the lifespan extensions caused by captopril and reducing acn-1 activity were additive with daf-2 and age-1 but required daf-16. Captopril treatment and reducing acn-1 activity caused similar effects in a wide range of genetic backgrounds, consistent with the model that they act by the same mechanism. These results identify a new drug and a new gene that can extend the lifespan of worms

  6. Human mesenchymal stem cells reprogram adult cardiomyocytes toward a progenitor-like state through partial cell fusion and mitochondria transfer : Cell fusion-mediated cardiomyocyte reprogramming.

    OpenAIRE

    Acquistapace, Adrien; Bru, Thierry; Lesault, Pierre-François; Figeac, Florence; Coudert, Amélie,; Le Coz, Olivier; Christov, Christo; Baudin, Xavier; Auber, Fréderic; Yiou, René; Dubois-Randé, Jean-Luc; Rodriguez, Anne-Marie

    2011-01-01

    International audience Because stem cells are often found to improve repair tissue including heart without evidence of engraftment or differentiation, mechanisms underlying wound healing are still elusive. Several studies have reported that stem cells can fuse with cardiomyocytes either by permanent or partial cell fusion processes. However, the respective physiological impact of these two processes remains unknown in part because of the lack of knowledge of the resulting hybrid cells. To ...

  7. "The state of the heart": Recent advances in engineering human cardiac tissue from pluripotent stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sirabella, Dario; Cimetta, Elisa; Vunjak-Novakovic, Gordana

    2015-08-01

    The pressing need for effective cell therapy for the heart has led to the investigation of suitable cell sources for tissue replacement. In recent years, human pluripotent stem cell research expanded tremendously, in particular since the derivation of human-induced pluripotent stem cells. In parallel, bioengineering technologies have led to novel approaches for in vitro cell culture. The combination of these two fields holds potential for in vitro generation of high-fidelity heart tissue, both for basic research and for therapeutic applications. However, this new multidisciplinary science is still at an early stage. Many questions need to be answered and improvements need to be made before clinical applications become a reality. Here we discuss the current status of human stem cell differentiation into cardiomyocytes and the combined use of bioengineering approaches for cardiac tissue formation and maturation in developmental studies, disease modeling, drug testing, and regenerative medicine.

  8. On the capacitance of crystalline silicon solar cells in steady state

    OpenAIRE

    BARRO, FABE IDRISSA; SANE, Moustapha; ZOUMA, BERNARD

    2015-01-01

    In this work, an analytical approach is presented for modeling the capacitance of crystalline silicon solar cells. Based on a one-dimensional modeling of the cell, the excess minority carrier density, the photovoltage, and the capacitance are calculated. The motivation of this work are two-fold: to show base doping density and illumination effects on the capacitance of silicon solar cells, and to propose a determination technique for both dark capacitance and base doping density f...

  9. Oxidation state of chromium associated with cell surfaces of Shewanella oneidensis during chromate reduction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Neal, Andrew L.; Lowe, Kristine; Daulton, Tyrone L.; Jones-Meehan, Joanne; Little, Brenda J

    2002-12-30

    Employing electron energy loss spectroscopy (EELS) and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), we demonstrate that in both aerobic and anaerobic culture Shewanella oneidensis cells are capable of chromate reduction. No Cr(VI) or Cr(V) species were identified at the cell surfaces in Cr 2p{sub 3/}ore photoelectron spectra. More chromium was associated with cell surfaces recovered from anaerobic medium than aerobic. Multiplet-splitting models derived for Cr(III) and Cr(IV) were employed to determine contributions from each ion to Cr 2p{sub 3/2} photopeaks collected from the various cell treatments. Whilst in all cases Cr(III) was the major ion associated with cell surfaces, a significant contribution was identified due to Cr(IV) in anaerobically grown cells. The Cr(IV) contribution was far less when cells were grown aerobically. Moreover, when anaerobically grown cells were exposed to oxygen very little re-oxidation of Cr-precipitates occurred, the precipitates were again identified as a mixture of Cr(III) and Cr(IV). A positive relationship was observed between amounts of chromium and phosphorous associated with cell surfaces resulting from the various treatments, suggesting the precipitates included Cr(III)-phosphate. The fact that Cr(IV) remained associated with precipitates following re-oxidation suggests that under anaerobic conditions the intermediate ion is afforded sufficient stability to be incorporated within the precipitate matrix and thus conferred a degree of protection from oxidation.

  10. Metastable states and information propagation in a 1D array of locally-coupled bistable cells

    OpenAIRE

    Anantram, M. P.; Roychowdhury, Vwani P.

    1998-01-01

    We study the effect of metastable states on the relaxation process (and hence information propagation) in locally coupled and boundary-driven structures. We first give a general argument to show that metastable states are inevitable even in the simplest of structures, a wire. At finite temperatures, the relaxation mechanism is a thermally assisted random walk. The time required to reach the ground state and its life time are determined by the coupling parameters. These time scales are studied...

  11. Doping CuSCN films for enhancement of conductivity: application in dye-sensitized solid-state solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perera, V.P.S. [Institute of Fundamental Studies, Kandy (Sri Lanka); Open Univ., Nawala (Sri Lanka). Dept. of Physics; Senevirathna, M.K.I.; Pitigala, P.K.D.D.P.; Tennakone, K. [Open Univ., Nawala (Sri Lanka). Dept. of Physics

    2005-03-31

    Construction of dye-sensitized solid-state solar cells requires high band-gap (therefore, transparent) hole collectors which can be deposited on a dye-coated nanocrystalline semiconductor surface without denaturing the dye. Copper (I) thiocyanate (CuSCN) is an important p-type semiconductor satisfying the above requirements. However, the conductivity of this material, which depends on excess SCN, is not sufficiently high and polymerization of SCN prevents incorporation of sufficient amount of excess SCN during the process of synthesis of CuSCN. We have found that the conductivity of solid CuSCN can be increased by exposure to halogen gases which generate SCN or to a solution of (SCN){sub 2} in CCl{sub 4}. The latter method is suitable for doping of CuSCN films in dye-sensitized solid-state solar cells. (Author)

  12. Deposition of hole-transport materials in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells by doctor-blading

    KAUST Repository

    Ding, I-Kang

    2010-07-01

    We report using doctor-blading to replace conventional spin coating for the deposition of the hole-transport material spiro-OMeTAD (2,20,7,70-tetrakis-(N, N-di-p-methoxyphenylamine)- 9,90-spirobifluorene) in solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells. Doctor-blading is a roll-to-roll compatible, large-area coating technique, is capable of achieving the same spiro-OMeTAD pore filling fraction as spin coating, and uses much less material. The average power conversion efficiency of solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells made from doctorblading is 3.0% for 2-lm thick films and 2.0% for 5-lm thick films, on par with devices made with spin coating. Directions to further improve the filling fraction are also suggested. © 2010 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  13. Self-organization model for a cell system: Ferroelectric, ferroelastic, and magnetic states and related phase transitions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A model is proposed to explain the stability, phase state transformations, and coexistence of different phases for fungi cell ensembles (in particular, dimorphism and linear-to-spiral structure transitions with the Earth's magnetic field screened). This model is based on (i) cell-connected soft polarization modes induced by charge compensation and related ferroelectric and ferroelastic phase transitions and (ii) intracell mobile orbit-spin-lattice clusters with competitive ferromagnetic-diamagnetic behavior and with orbitlattice and spin-lattice interactions. This model makes it possible to explain the structural and magnetic properties of the systems under consideration. In particular, the Lifshitz invariants in the free energy explain the formation of orbit-lattice and spin-lattice spiral and ring-type structures that are formed when the Earth's magnetic field is effectively screened. The model proposed is not restricted to mitochondria, containing orbit-spin-lattice clusters based on the Fe3+/Fe2+ states (considered here).

  14. SUCROALCOHOL SECTOR AND AGRICULTURAL FRONTIER EXPANSION IN THE GOIÁS STATE, BRAZIL AVANÇO DO SETOR SUCROALCOOLEIRO E EXPANSÃO DA FRONTEIRA AGRÍCOLA EM GOIÁS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fausto Miziara

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available

    <span style="color: #000000;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman,serif;"><span style="font-size: x-small;"><span style="color: #000000;"><span style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span lang="pt-BR"><span style="font-style: normal;"><span style="font-weight: normal;">The Brazilian territory occupation dynamics presents patterns defined by literature as “fronts”. A previous process refers to an Agricultural Frontier characterized by the transformation movement towards its using form, based on new technologies implementation. This study aimed to understand the recent sugar cane expansion process in the Goiás State, Brazil, assuming that the sucroalcohol sector progress represents a new stage in the Agricultural Frontier expansion. <span style="color: #000000;"><span style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span lang="pt-BR"><span style="font-style: normal;"><span style="font-weight: normal;">Cartographic products,<span style="color: #000000;"><span style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span lang="pt-BR"><span style="font-style: normal;"><span style="font-weight: normal;"> <span style="color: #000000;"><span style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span lang="pt-BR"><span style="font-style: normal;"><span style="font-weight: normal;">as well as data<span style="color: #000000;"><span style="text-decoration: none;"><span style="font-family: Times New Roman,serif;"><span style="font-size: small;"><span lang="pt-BR"><span style="font-style: normal;"><span style="font-weight: normal;"> <span style="color: #000000;"><span

  15. Diferença entre span verbal e visual nos gêneros: estudo piloto Difference between verbal and visual span in genders: pilot study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mariana Cristina Pedrassa Sagrilo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available OBJETIVO: avaliar a memória de trabalho analisando a capacidade de retenção de estímulos auditivos (span verbal e visuais (span visual e estabelecer a relação com o gênero (masculino e feminino. MÉTODO: participaram deste estudo 20 crianças entre seis anos e cinco meses e sete anos, sendo 10 sujeitos do sexo masculino e 10 sujeitos do sexo feminino. Todos os sujeitos foram submetidos às provas de avaliação do span verbal e visual em ordem direta e inversa. RESULTADOS: apenas na prova de palavras dissílabas com fonologia semelhante e semântica diferente do span verbal, houve variância significante entre os gêneros. As crianças do sexo feminino apresentaram melhor desempenho em relação ao outro gênero, bem como maior capacidade de retenção de palavras dissílabas com fonologia e semântica diferentes. No span visual (ordem direta e inversa as crianças do sexo masculino obtiveram melhor desempenho, apesar de não ter diferenças significantes. Em relação à idade não houve diferença de retenção de estímulos. CONCLUSÃO: as crianças do sexo feminino, neste estudo, apresentaram tendência à melhor desempenho do span verbal e as crianças do sexo masculino tendência a melhor desempenho no span visual. No entanto, o estudo é limitado devido ao reduzido número de participantes na amostra.PURPOSE: to evaluate the working memory analyzing the retention ability of auditory stimuli (verbal span and visual stimuli (visual span, and to establish its relation to gender (male and female. METHOD: 20 subjects - 10 female children and 10 male children - from six and five months to seven years old took part in this study. All subjects were submitted to evaluation tests for both verbal and visual spans in direct and inverse orders. RESULTS: there was a significant variance between genders only in the test involving disyllabic words with phonology similar to and semantics different from verbal span. Female children showed a better

  16. Cell death induced by AC magnetic fields and magnetic nanoparticles: current state and perspectives.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goya, Gerardo F; Asín, Laura; Ibarra, M Ricardo

    2013-12-01

    This review analyses the advances in the field of magnetically induced cell death using intracellular magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs). Emphasis has been given to in vitro research results, discussing the action of radiofrequency (RF) waves on biological systems as well as those results of thermally induced cell death in terms of MNP cell interactions. Our main goal has been to provide a unified depiction of many recent experiments and theoretical models relevant to the effect of applied electromagnetic fields on MNPs after cellular uptake and the cytotoxicity assessment of MNPs. We have addressed the effects of RF waves used for in vitro magnetic hyperthermia on eukaryotic cells regarding physical modifications of the cellular local environment and cell viability.

  17. A Panel of Embryonic Stem Cell Lines Reveals the Variety and Dynamic of Pluripotent States in Rabbits

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pierre Osteil

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Conventional rabbit embryonic stem cell (ESC lines are derived from the inner cell mass (ICM of pre-implantation embryos using methods and culture conditions that are established for primate ESCs. In this study, we explored the capacity of the rabbit ICM to give rise to ESC lines using conditions similar to those utilized to generate naive ESCs in mice. On single-cell dissociation and culture in fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2-free, serum-supplemented medium, rabbit ICMs gave rise to ESC lines lacking the DNA-damage checkpoint in the G1 phase like mouse ESCs, and with a pluripotency gene expression profile closer to the rabbit ICM/epiblast profiles. These cell lines can be converted to FGF2-dependent ESCs after culture in conventional conditions. They can also colonize the rabbit pre-implantation embryo. These results indicate that rabbit epiblast cells can be coaxed toward different types of pluripotent stem cells and reveal the dynamics of pluripotent states in rabbit ESCs.

  18. Maximum Stress Estimation Model for Multi-Span Waler Beams with Deflections at the Supports Using Average Strains

    OpenAIRE

    Sung Woo Park; Byung Kwan Oh; Hyo Seon Park

    2015-01-01

    The safety of a multi-span waler beam subjected simultaneously to a distributed load and deflections at its supports can be secured by limiting the maximum stress of the beam to a specific value to prevent the beam from reaching a limit state for failure or collapse. Despite the fact that the vast majority of accidents on construction sites occur at waler beams in retaining wall systems, no safety monitoring model that can consider deflections at the supports of the beam is available. In this...

  19. Precise test of internal-conversion theory: transitions measured in five nuclei spanning 50≤Z≤78.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardy, J C; Nica, N; Iacob, V E; Miller, S; Maguire, M; Trzhaskovskaya, M B

    2014-05-01

    In a research program aimed at testing calculated internal-conversion coefficients (ICCs), we have made precise measurements of αK values for transitions in five nuclei, (197)Pt, (193)Ir, (137)Ba, (134)Cs and (119)Sn, which span a wide range of A and Z values. In all cases, the results strongly favor calculations in which the final-state electron wave function has been computed using a potential that includes the atomic vacancy created by the internal-conversion process.

  20. Bmi-1 extends the life span of normal human oral keratinocytes by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We previously demonstrated that Bmi-1 extended the in vitro life span of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). We now report that the prolonged life span of NHOK by Bmi-1 is, in part, due to inhibition of the TGF-β signaling pathway. Serial subculture of NHOK resulted in replicative senescence and terminal differentiation and activation of TGF-β signaling pathway. This was accompanied with enhanced intracellular and secreted TGF-β1 levels, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and increased expression of p15INK4B and p57KIP2. An ectopic expression of Bmi-1 in NHOK (HOK/Bmi-1) decreased the level of intracellular and secreted TGF-β1 induced dephosphorylation of Smad2/3, and diminished the level of p15INK4B and p57KIP2. Moreover, Bmi-1 expression led to the inhibition of TGF-β-responsive promoter activity in a dose-specific manner. Knockdown of Bmi-1 in rapidly proliferating HOK/Bmi-1 and cancer cells increased the level of phosphorylated Smad2/3, p15INK4B, and p57KIP2. In addition, an exposure of senescent NHOK to TGF-β receptor I kinase inhibitor or anti-TGF-β antibody resulted in enhanced replicative potential of cells. Taken together, these data suggest that Bmi-1 suppresses senescence of cells by inhibiting the TGF-β signaling pathway in NHOK.

  1. Bmi-1 extends the life span of normal human oral keratinocytes by inhibiting the TGF-{beta} signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Reuben H., E-mail: rkim@dentistry.ucla.edu [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Lieberman, Mark B.; Lee, Rachel [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Shin, Ki-Hyuk [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Mehrazarin, Shebli; Oh, Ju-Eun [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Park, No-Hee [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); David Geffen School of Medicine at UCLA, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); Kang, Mo K., E-mail: mkang@dentistry.ucla.edu [UCLA School of Dentistry, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Dental Research Institute, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States); UCLA Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center, Los Angeles, CA 90095 (United States)

    2010-10-01

    We previously demonstrated that Bmi-1 extended the in vitro life span of normal human oral keratinocytes (NHOK). We now report that the prolonged life span of NHOK by Bmi-1 is, in part, due to inhibition of the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. Serial subculture of NHOK resulted in replicative senescence and terminal differentiation and activation of TGF-{beta} signaling pathway. This was accompanied with enhanced intracellular and secreted TGF-{beta}1 levels, phosphorylation of Smad2/3, and increased expression of p15{sup INK4B} and p57{sup KIP2}. An ectopic expression of Bmi-1 in NHOK (HOK/Bmi-1) decreased the level of intracellular and secreted TGF-{beta}1 induced dephosphorylation of Smad2/3, and diminished the level of p15{sup INK4B} and p57{sup KIP2}. Moreover, Bmi-1 expression led to the inhibition of TGF-{beta}-responsive promoter activity in a dose-specific manner. Knockdown of Bmi-1 in rapidly proliferating HOK/Bmi-1 and cancer cells increased the level of phosphorylated Smad2/3, p15{sup INK4B}, and p57{sup KIP2}. In addition, an exposure of senescent NHOK to TGF-{beta} receptor I kinase inhibitor or anti-TGF-{beta} antibody resulted in enhanced replicative potential of cells. Taken together, these data suggest that Bmi-1 suppresses senescence of cells by inhibiting the TGF-{beta} signaling pathway in NHOK.

  2. Improved Performance of Solid-State Gr(a)tzel Solar Cell by Cosensitization of Quantum Dot and Dye

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Bin; WANG Li-Duo; LI Jiang-Wei; QIU Yong

    2004-01-01

    We report a new cosensitization utilizing quantum dot (QD) PbS and Cis-(SCN)2Bis(2,2'-bipyridyl-4,4'-dicarboxylate)ruthenium (N3) dye on the nanoporous TiO2 film. Solid-state Gratzel solar cells with the cosensitized films show an improved overall efficiency by 200% relative to the cells assembled with only N3 sensitization and an extremely high open-circuit voltage of 840mV, and a fill factor of 70.5%. Back reaction characteristics of the above cells are also investigated, demonstrating a great suppression of recombination due to cosensitization. It seems that the cosensitization also facilitates the electron injection into the conduction band of TiO2.

  3. Ground and excited state properties of high performance anthocyanidin dyes-sensitized solar cells in the basic solutions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Prima, Eka Cahya [Advanced Functional Material Laboratory, Engineering Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Computational Material Design and Quantum Engineering Laboratory, Engineering Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); International Program on Science Education, Universitas Pendidikan Indonesia (Indonesia); Yuliarto, Brian; Suyatman, E-mail: yatman@tf.itb.ac.id [Advanced Functional Material Laboratory, Engineering Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia); Dipojono, Hermawan Kresno [Computational Material Design and Quantum Engineering Laboratory, Engineering Physics, Institut Teknologi Bandung (Indonesia)

    2015-09-30

    The aglycones of anthocyanidin dyes were previously reported to form carbinol pseudobase, cis-chalcone, and trans-chalcone due to the basic levels. The further investigations of ground and excited state properties of the dyes were characterized using density functional theory with PCM(UFF)/B3LYP/6-31+G(d,p) level in the basic solutions. However, to the best of our knowledge, the theoretical investigation of their potential photosensitizers has never been reported before. In this paper, the theoretical photovoltaic properties sensitized by dyes have been successfully investigated including the electron injections, the ground and excited state oxidation potentials, the estimated open circuit voltages, and the light harvesting efficiencies. The results prove that the electronic properties represented by dyes’ LUMO-HOMO levels will affect to the photovoltaic performances. Cis-chalcone dye is the best anthocyanidin aglycone dye with the electron injection spontaneity of −1.208 eV, the theoretical open circuit voltage of 1.781 V, and light harvesting efficiency of 56.55% due to the best HOMO-LUMO levels. Moreover, the ethanol solvent slightly contributes to the better cell performance than the water solvent dye because of the better oxidation potential stabilization in the ground state as well as in the excited state. These results are in good agreement with the known experimental report that the aglycones of anthocyanidin dyes in basic solvent are the high potential photosensitizers for dye-sensitized solar cell.

  4. Three-Dimensional Multiscale Modeling of Stable Intermediate State Formation Mechanism in a Single Active Layer- Phase Change Memory Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dincer, Onur; Cinar, Ibrahim; Karakas, Vedat; Aslan, Ozgur Burak; Gokce, Aisha; Stipe, Barry; Katine, Jordan A.; Aktas, Gulen; Ozatay, Ozhan

    2014-03-01

    Phase change memory (PCM) appears as a potential memory technology with its superior scalability which could be enhanced by a boost in storage density via multiple-bit per cell functionality. Given the large contrast between set and reset states of a PCM cell it is yet unclear whether it is possible to create intermediate logic states reproducibly and controllably in a device with a single active phase change layer. Here we report the results of a 3D finite element model that pinpoints the direct effect of current distribution and the indirect effect of device top contact fabrication induced defects through modification of phase change kinetics (crystallite nucleation and growth rates) on stabilization of intermediate states. A comprehensive picture of the electrical, thermal and phase change dynamics is obtained using a multiphysics approach. Our study shows that homogeneous and heterogeneous phase transition can be induced in the active region such that nonuniform temperature distribution and modification of switching dynamics with various contact shapes and sizes play a major role in the stabilization of a mixed phase state. This work has been supported by the European Commission FP7 Marie Curie IRG grant: PCM-256281 and TUBITAK grant: 113F385.

  5. Determination of β haplotypes in patients with sickle-cell anemia in the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabral, Cynthia Hatsue Kitayama; Serafim, Edvis Santos Soares; de Medeiros, Waleska Rayane Dantas Bezerra; de Medeiros Fernandes, Thales Allyrio Araújo; Kimura, Elza Miyuki; Costa, Fernando Ferreira; de Fátima Sonati, Maria; Rebecchi, Ivanise Marina Moretti; de Medeiros, Tereza Maria Dantas

    2011-07-01

    β(S) haplotypes were studied in 47 non-related patients with sickle-cell anemia from the state of Rio Grande do Norte, Brazil. Molecular analysis was conducted by PCR/RFLP using restriction endonucleases XmnI, HindIII, HincII and HinfI to analyze six polymorphic sites from the beta cluster. Twenty-seven patients (57.5%) were identified with genotype CAR/CAR, 9 (19.1%) CAR/BEN, 6 (12.8%) CAR/CAM, 1 (2.1%) BEN/BEN, 2 (4.3%) CAR/Atp, 1 (2.1%) BEN/Atp and 1 (2.1%) with genotype Atp/Atp. The greater frequency of Cameroon haplotypes compared to other Brazilian states suggests the existence of a peculiarity of African origin in the state of Rio Grande do Norte. PMID:21931513

  6. Absorbency and conductivity of quasi-solid-state polymer electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells: A characterization review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamad, Ahmad Azmin

    2016-10-01

    The application of quasi-solid state electrolytes for dye-sensitized solar cells opens up an interesting research field to explore, which is evident from the increasing amount of publications on this topic. Since 2010, significant progress has been made with new and more complicated quasi-solid-states materials being produced. The optimization of new materials requires specific characterizations. This review presents a comprehensive overview and recent progress of characterization methods for studying quasi-solid-state electrolytes. Emphasis is then placed on the absorbency and conductivity characterizations. Each characterization will be reviewed according to the objective, experimental set-up, summary of important outcomes, and a few case studies worth discussing. Finally, strategies for future characterizations and developments are described.

  7. Sequential and Coordinative Processing Dynamics in Figural Transformations across the Life Span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayr, Ulrich; And Others

    1996-01-01

    Investigated the proposition that two distinct factors involved in life span cognitive development are mental speed and coordination efficiency. Results show dissociable speed of processing and working memory functioning over the life span and age-related differential effects of coordinative demands. (ET)

  8. The Rate of Source Memory Decline across the Adult Life Span

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cansino, Selene; Estrada-Manilla, Cinthya; Hernandez-Ramos, Evelia; Martinez-Galindo, Joyce Graciela; Torres-Trejo, Frine; Gomez-Fernandez, Tania; Ayala-Hernandez, Mariana; Osorio, David; Cedillo-Tinoco, Melisa; Garces-Flores, Lissete; Gomez-Melgarejo, Sandra; Beltran-Palacios, Karla; Guadalupe Garcia-Lazaro, Haydee; Garcia-Gutierrez, Fabiola; Cadena-Arenas, Yadira; Fernandez-Apan, Luisa; Bartschi, Andrea; Resendiz-Vera, Julieta; Rodriguez-Ortiz, Maria Dolores

    2013-01-01

    Previous studies have suggested that the ability to remember contextual information related to specific episodic experiences declines with advancing age; however, the exact moment in the adult life span when this deficit begins is still controversial. Source memory for spatial information was tested in a life span sample of 1,500 adults between…

  9. Validating the Food Behavior Questions from the Elementary School SPAN Questionnaire

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thiagarajah, Krisha; Fly, Alyce D.; Hoelscher, Deanna M.; Bai, Yeon; Lo, Kaman; Leone, Angela; Shertzer, Julie A.

    2008-01-01

    Background: The School Physical Activity and Nutrition (SPAN) questionnaire was developed as a surveillance instrument to measure physical activity, nutrition attitudes, and dietary and physical activity behaviors in children and adolescents. The SPAN questionnaire has 2 versions. Objective: This study was conducted to evaluate the validity of…

  10. STUDY THE CHARACTERISTICS OF SMALL AND VERY SMALL SPAN WINGS, USED ON SHIPS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beazit ALI

    2011-07-01

    Full Text Available This scientific work presents the way in which the small, and very small span wings can be obtainedstarting from the great span wings and using the two scales of the similarity theory. Basing on two scales modelit can transcribe from model at nature the coefficients x c , y c and lengthening λ of Gottingen - 612 profile.

  11. SOME EXAMPLES OF TRANSITION SPANS MINERALIZING AND ANALYSIS OF THEIR DYNAMICS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    BI Hua; ZHAO Zhi-zhong; ZHU Wei-huang; YANG Yuan-gen; HUANG Lan; LIU Qiang

    2002-01-01

    The transitional span is a special environment for deposits. Taking peat, oil-gas, metallic deposits as examples, this paper discusses the spatial-temporal transitional characteristics of mineralization in transitional regions, points out the importance of the mineralization in transition spans, and analyses their dynamics finally.

  12. Balancing Ties: Boundary Spanning and Influence in the Organization's Extended Network of Communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manev, Ivan M.; Stevenson, William B.

    2001-01-01

    Presents a study of the business communication connecting an organization with others in its environment. Links boundary spanning with network theory and proposes the concept of an extended network of communication. Studies the relationship between boundary-spanning communication and individual influence in a network with 108 organizational…

  13. 7 CFR 701.37 - Loss of control of the property during the practice life span.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... the property during the practice life span. In the event of voluntary or involuntary loss of control... 7 Agriculture 7 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false Loss of control of the property during the practice life span. 701.37 Section 701.37 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture...

  14. Relations between Preschool Attention Span-Persistence and Age 25 Educational Outcomes

    Science.gov (United States)

    McClelland, Megan M.; Acock, Alan C.; Piccinin, Andrea; Rhea, Sally Ann; Stallings, Michael C.

    2013-01-01

    This study examined relations between children's attention span-persistence in preschool and later school achievement and college completion. Children were drawn from the Colorado Adoption Project using adopted and non-adopted children (N = 430). Results of structural equation modeling indicated that children's age 4 attention span-persistence…

  15. Perceptual Representation as a Mechanism of Lexical Ambiguity Resolution: An Investigation of Span and Processing Time

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madden, Carol J.; Zwaan, Rolf A.

    2006-01-01

    In 2 experiments, the authors investigated the ability of high- and low-span comprehenders to construe subtle shades of meaning through perceptual representation. High- and low-span comprehenders responded to pictures that either matched or mismatched a target object's shape as implied by the preceding sentence context. At 750 ms after hearing the…

  16. Coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering hyperspectral imaging of cartilage aiming for state discrimination of cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shiozawa, Manabu; Shirai, Masataka; Izumisawa, Junko; Tanabe, Maiko; Watanabe, Koich

    2016-07-01

    Noninvasive cell analyses are increasingly important in the medical field. A coherent anti-Stokes Raman scattering (CARS) microscope is the noninvasive imaging equipment and enables to obtain images indicating molecular distribution. However, due to low-signal intensity, it is still challenging to obtain images of the fingerprint region, in which many spectrum peaks correspond to compositions of a cell. Here, to identify cell differentiation by using multiplex CARS, we investigated hyperspectral imaging of the fingerprint region of living cells. To perform multiplex CARS, we used a prototype of a compact light source generating both pump light and broadband Stokes light. Assuming application to regenerative medicine, we chose a cartilage cell, whose differentiation is difficult to be identified by change of the cell morphology. Because one of the major components of cartilage is collagen, we focused on distribution of proline, which accounts for approximately 20% of collagen. The spectrum quality was improved by optical adjustments of the power branching ratio and divergence of Stokes light. Periphery of a cartilage cell was highlighted in a CARS image of proline, and this result suggests correspondence with collagen generated as an extracellular matrix. The possibility of noninvasive analyses by using CARS hyperspectral imaging was indicated.

  17. The palmitoylation state of PMP22 modulates epithelial cell morphology and migration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David A. Zacharias

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available PMP22 (peripheral myelin protein 22, also known as GAS 3 (growth-arrest-specific protein 3, is a disease-linked tetraspan glycoprotein of peripheral nerve myelin and constituent of intercellular junctions in epithelia. To date, our knowledge of the post-translational modification of PMP22 is limited. Using the CSS-Palm 2.0 software we predicted that C85 (cysteine 85, a highly conserved amino acid located between the second and third transmembrane domains, is a potential site for palmitoylation. To test this, we mutated C85S (C85 to serine and established stable cells lines expressing the WT (wild-type or the C85S-PMP22. In Schwann and MDCK (Madin–Darby canine kidney cells mutating C85 blocked the palmitoylation of PMP22, which we monitored using 17-ODYA (17-octadecynoic acid. While palmitoylation was not necessary for processing the newly synthesized PMP22 through the secretory pathway, overexpression of C85S-PMP22 led to pronounced cell spreading and uneven monolayer thinning. To further investigate the functional significance of palmitoylated PMP22, we evaluated MDCK cell migration in a wound-healing assay. While WT-PMP22 expressing cells were resistant to migration, C85S cells displayed lamellipodial protrusions and migrated at a similar rate to vector control. These findings indicate that palmitoylation of PMP22 at C85 is critical for the role of the protein in modulating epithelial cell shape and motility.

  18. Extracellular localization of catalase is associated with the transformed state of malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Böhm, Britta; Heinzelmann, Sonja; Motz, Manfred; Bauer, Georg

    2015-12-01

    Oncogenic transformation is dependent on activated membrane-associated NADPH oxidase (NOX). However, the resultant extracellular superoxide anions are also driving the NO/peroxynitrite and the HOCl pathway, which eliminates NOX-expressing transformed cells through selective apoptosis induction. Tumor progression is dependent on dominant interference with intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through membrane-associated catalase, which decomposes H2O2 and peroxynitrite and oxidizes NO. Particularly, the decomposition of extracellular peroxynitrite strictly requires membrane-associated catalase. We utilized small interfering RNA (siRNA)-mediated knockdown of catalase and neutralizing antibodies directed against the enzyme in combination with challenging H2O2 or peroxynitrite to determine activity and localization of catalase in cells from three distinct steps of multistage oncogenesis. Nontransformed cells did not generate extracellular superoxide anions and only showed intracellular catalase activity. Transformed cells showed superoxide anion-dependent intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling in the presence of suboptimal catalase activity in their membrane. Tumor cells exhibited tight control of intercellular apoptosis-inducing ROS signaling through a high local concentration of membrane-associated catalase. These data demonstrate that translocation of catalase to the outside of the cell membrane is already associated with the transformation step. A strong local increase in the concentration of membrane-associated catalase is achieved during tumor progression and is controlled by tumor cell-derived H2O2 and by transglutaminase.

  19. Probabilistic remote state preparation by W states

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Liu Jin-Ming; Wang Yu-Zhu

    2004-01-01

    In this paper we consider a scheme for probabilistic remote state preparation of a general qubit by using W states. The scheme consists of the sender, Alice, and two remote receivers Bob and Carol. Alice performs a projective measurement on her qubit in the basis spanned by the state she wants to prepare and its orthocomplement. This allows either Bob or Carol to reconstruct the state with finite success probability. It is shown that for some special ensembles of qubits, the remote state preparation scheme requires only two classical bits, unlike the case in the scheme of quantum teleportation where three classical bits are needed.

  20. Histamine from brain resident MAST cells promotes wakefulness and modulates behavioral states.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sachiko Chikahisa

    Full Text Available Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS. Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/W(v mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/W(v mice and their wild-type littermates (WT, although W/W(v mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/W(v mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/W(v mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/W(v mice. W/W(v mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior.

  1. Histamine from brain resident MAST cells promotes wakefulness and modulates behavioral states.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chikahisa, Sachiko; Kodama, Tohru; Soya, Atsushi; Sagawa, Yohei; Ishimaru, Yuji; Séi, Hiroyoshi; Nishino, Seiji

    2013-01-01

    Mast cell activation and degranulation can result in the release of various chemical mediators, such as histamine and cytokines, which significantly affect sleep. Mast cells also exist in the central nervous system (CNS). Since up to 50% of histamine contents in the brain are from brain mast cells, mediators from brain mast cells may significantly influence sleep and other behaviors. In this study, we examined potential involvement of brain mast cells in sleep/wake regulations, focusing especially on the histaminergic system, using mast cell deficient (W/W(v)) mice. No significant difference was found in the basal amount of sleep/wake between W/W(v) mice and their wild-type littermates (WT), although W/W(v) mice showed increased EEG delta power and attenuated rebound response after sleep deprivation. Intracerebroventricular injection of compound 48/80, a histamine releaser from mast cells, significantly increased histamine levels in the ventricular region and enhanced wakefulness in WT mice, while it had no effect in W/W(v) mice. Injection of H1 antagonists (triprolidine and mepyramine) significantly increased the amounts of slow-wave sleep in WT mice, but not in W/W(v) mice. Most strikingly, the food-seeking behavior observed in WT mice during food deprivation was completely abolished in W/W(v) mice. W/W(v) mice also exhibited higher anxiety and depression levels compared to WT mice. Our findings suggest that histamine released from brain mast cells is wake-promoting, and emphasizes the physiological and pharmacological importance of brain mast cells in the regulation of sleep and fundamental neurobehavior.

  2. Serum-Free Cryopreservation of Five Mammalian Cell Lines in Either a Pelleted or Suspended State

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Corsini Joe

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Herein we have explored two practical aspects of cryopreserving cultured mammalian cells during routine laboratory maintenance. First, we have examined the possibility of using a serum-free, hence more affordable, cryopreservative. Using five mammalian lines (Crandell Feline Kidney, MCF7, A72, WI 38 and NB324K, we found that the serum-free alternative preserves nearly as efficiently as the serum-containing preservatives. Second, we compared cryostorage of those cells in suspended versus a pellet form using both aforementioned cryopreservatives. Under our conditions, cells were in general recovered equally well in a suspended versus a pellet form.

  3. Cell-Autonomous and Non-Cell-Autonomous Regulation of a Feeding State-Dependent Chemoreceptor Gene via MEF-2 and bHLH Transcription Factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Winbush, Ari; van der Linden, Alexander M.

    2016-01-01

    Food and feeding-state dependent changes in chemoreceptor gene expression may allow Caenorhabditis elegans to modify their chemosensory behavior, but the mechanisms essential for these expression changes remain poorly characterized. We had previously shown that expression of a feeding state-dependent chemoreceptor gene, srh-234, in the ADL sensory neuron of C. elegans is regulated via the MEF-2 transcription factor. Here, we show that MEF-2 acts together with basic helix-loop-helix (bHLH) transcription factors to regulate srh-234 expression as a function of feeding state. We identify a cis-regulatory MEF2 binding site that is necessary and sufficient for the starvation-induced down regulation of srh-234 expression, while an E-box site known to bind bHLH factors is required to drive srh-234 expression in ADL. We show that HLH-2 (E/Daughterless), HLH-3 and HLH-4 (Achaete-scute homologs) act in ADL neurons to regulate srh-234 expression. We further demonstrate that the expression levels of srh-234 in ADL neurons are regulated remotely by MXL-3 (Max-like 3 homolog) and HLH-30 (TFEB ortholog) acting in the intestine, which is dependent on insulin signaling functioning specifically in ADL neurons. We also show that this intestine-to-neuron feeding-state regulation of srh-234 involves a subset of insulin-like peptides. These results combined suggest that chemoreceptor gene expression is regulated by both cell-autonomous and non-cell-autonomous transcriptional mechanisms mediated by MEF2 and bHLH factors, which may allow animals to fine-tune their chemosensory responses in response to changes in their feeding state. PMID:27487365

  4. Genomic instability is associated with natural life span variation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hong Qin

    Full Text Available Increasing genomic instability is associated with aging in eukaryotes, but the connection between genomic instability and natural variation in life span is unknown. We have quantified chronological life span and loss-of-heterozygosity (LOH in 11 natural isolates of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We show that genomic instability increases and mitotic asymmetry breaks down during chronological aging. The age-dependent increase of genomic instability generally lags behind the drop of viability and this delay accounts for approximately 50% of the observed natural variation of replicative life span in these yeast isolates. We conclude that the abilities of yeast strains to tolerate genomic instability co-vary with their replicative life spans. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first quantitative evidence that demonstrates a link between genomic instability and natural variation in life span.

  5. Disentangling rectangularization and life span extension with the moving rectangle method

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schalkwijk, Frank H; Koopman, Jacob J E; Ghariq, Eidrees;

    2016-01-01

    PURPOSE: The moving rectangle method is used to disentangle the contributions of rectangularization and life span extension to the increase in life expectancy. It requires the choice of an endpoint of the survival curve that approaches the maximum age at death. We examined the effect of choosing...... of rectangularization and life span extension to the increase in life expectancy were calculated using the moving rectangle method. RESULTS: The choice of different survival values as end points profoundly influenced the estimated contributions of rectangularization and life span extension to the increase in life...... expectancy. When choosing 0.001, rectangularization contributed most years, whereas when choosing 0.1, life span extension contributed most years. CONCLUSIONS: When the moving rectangle method is used to estimate the contributions of rectangularization and life span extension to the increase in life...

  6. Oil and Gas Exploration and Production in the United States Shown as Quarter-Mile Cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    U.S. Geological Survey, Department of the Interior — A cells polygon feature class was created by the U.S. Geological Survey (USGS) to illustrate the degree of exploration, type of production, and distribution of...

  7. Time Domain Characterization of Light Trapping States in Thin Film Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pfeiffer W.

    2013-03-01

    Full Text Available Spectral interferometry of the backscattered radiation reveals coherence lifetimes of about 150 fs for nanolocalized electromagnetic modes in textured layered nanostructures as they are commonly used in thin film photovoltaics to achieve high cell efficiencies.

  8. Carriers in mesenchymal stem cell osteoblast mineralization-State-of-the-art

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Morten; Jørgensen, Niklas Rye; Hørberg, Mette;

    2014-01-01

    PURPOSE: Tissue engineering is a new way to regenerate bone tissue, where osteogenic capable cells combine with an appropriate scaffolding material. Our aim was in a Medline Search to evaluate osteoblast mineralization in vitro and in vivo including gene expressing combining mesenchymal stem cells...... (MSCs) and five different carriers, titanium, collagen, calcium carbonate, calcium phosphate and polylactic acid-polyglycolic acid copolymer for purpose of a meta-or a descriptive analysis. MATERIALS AND METHODS: The search included the following MeSH words in different combinations-mesenchymal stem...... cells, alkaline phosphatase, bone regeneration, tissue engineering, drug carriers, tissue scaffolds, titanium, collagen, calcium carbonate, calcium phosphates and polylactic acid-polyglycolic acid copolymer. RESULTS: Two out of 80 articles included numerical values and as control, carriers and cells...

  9. Solid-state devices for detection of DNA, protein biomarkers and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Waseem

    Nanobiotechnology and BioMEMS have had tremendous impact on biosensing in the areas of cancer cell detection and therapeutics, disease diagnostics, proteomics and DNA analysis. Diseases are expressed on all levels including DNA, protein, cell and tissue. Therefore it is very critical to develop biosensors at each level. The power of the nanotechnology lies in the fact that we can fabricate devices on all scales from micro to nano. This dissertation focuses on four areas: 1) Development of nanopore sensors for DNA analysis; 2) Development of micropore sensors for early detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood; 3) Synthesis of nano-textured substrates for cancer isolation and tissue culture applications; 4) Fabrication of nanoscale break-junctions. All of these sensors are fabricated using standard silicon processing techniques. Pulsed plasma polymer deposition is also utilized to control the density of the biosensor surface charges. These devices are then used for efficient detection of DNA, proteins and cells, and can be potentially used in point-of-care systems. Overall, our designed biosensing platforms offer improved selectivity, yield and reliability. Novel approaches to nanopore shrinking are simple, reliable and do not change the material composition around the pore boundary. The micropores provide a direct interface to distinguish CTCs from normal cell without requiring fluorescent dyes and surface functionalization. Nano-textured surfaces and break-junctions can be used for enhanced adhesion of cells and selective detection of proteins respectively.

  10. Fuel cell programs in the United States for stationary power applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singer, M.

    1996-04-01

    The Department of Energy (DOE), Office of Fossil Energy, is participating with the private sector in sponsoring the development of molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) and solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) technologies for application in the utility, commercial and industrial sectors. Phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) development was sponsored by the Office of Fossil Energy in previous years and is now being commercialized by the private sector. Private sector participants with the Department of Energy include the Electric Power Research Institute (EPRI), the Gas Research institute (GRI), electric and gas utilities, universities, manufacturing companies and their suppliers. through continued government and private sector support, fuel cell systems are emerging power generation technologies which are expected to have significant worldwide impacts. An industry with annual sales of over a billion dollars is envisioned early in the 21st century. PAFC power plants have begun to enter the marketplace and MCFC and SOFC power plants are expected to be ready to enter the marketplace in the late 1990s. In support of the efficient and effective use of our natural resources, the fuel cell program seeks to increase energy efficiency and economic effectiveness of power generation. This is to be accomplished through effectiveness of power generation. This is accomplished through the development and commercialization of cost-effective, efficient and environmentally desirable fuel cell systems which will operate on fossil fuels in multiple and end use sectors.

  11. Modeling heterogeneity in the pluripotent state: A promising strategy for improving the efficiency and fidelity of stem cell differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Espinosa Angarica, Vladimir; Del Sol, Antonio

    2016-08-01

    Pluripotency can be considered a functional characteristic of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) populations and their niches, rather than a property of individual cells. In this view, individual cells within the population independently adopt a variety of different expression states, maintained by different signaling, transcriptional, and epigenetics regulatory networks. In this review, we propose that generation of integrative network models from single cell data will be essential for getting a better understanding of the regulation of self-renewal and differentiation. In particular, we suggest that the identification of network stability determinants in these integrative models will provide important insights into the mechanisms mediating the transduction of signals from the niche, and how these signals can trigger differentiation. In this regard, the differential use of these stability determinants in subpopulation-specific regulatory networks would mediate differentiation into different cell fates. We suggest that this approach could offer a promising avenue for the development of novel strategies for increasing the efficiency and fidelity of differentiation, which could have a strong impact on regenerative medicine. PMID:27321053

  12. A Method to Study the Epigenetic Chromatin States of Rare Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells; MiniChIP–Chip

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Weishaupt Holger

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dynamic chromatin structure is a fundamental property of gene transcriptional regulation, and has emerged as a critical modulator of physiological processes during cellular differentiation and development. Analysis of chromatin structure using molecular biology and biochemical assays in rare somatic stem and progenitor cells is key for understanding these processes but poses a great challenge because of their reliance on millions of cells. Through the development of a miniaturized genome-scale chromatin immunoprecipitation method (miniChIP–chip, we have documented the genome-wide chromatin states of low abundant populations that comprise hematopoietic stem cells and immediate progeny residing in murine bone marrow. In this report, we describe the miniChIP methodology that can be used for increasing an understanding of the epigenetic mechanisms underlying hematopoietic stem and progenitor cell function. Application of this method will reveal the contribution of dynamic chromatin structure in regulating the function of other somatic stem cell populations, and how this process becomes perturbed in pathological conditions. Additional file 1 Click here for file

  13. Differential mechanism of Escherichia coli Inactivation by (+-limonene as a function of cell physiological state and drug's concentration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beatriz Chueca

    Full Text Available (+-limonene is a lipophilic antimicrobial compound, extracted from citrus fruits' essential oils, that is used as a flavouring agent and organic solvent by the food industry. A recent study has proposed a common and controversial mechanism of cell death for bactericidal antibiotics, in which hydroxyl radicals ultimately inactivated cells. Our objective was to determine whether the mechanism of Escherichia coli MG1655 inactivation by (+-limonene follows that of bactericidal antibiotics. A treatment with 2,000 μL/L (+-limonene inactivated 4 log10 cycles of exponentially growing E. coli cells in 3 hours. On one hand, an increase of cell survival in the ΔacnB mutant (deficient in a TCA cycle enzyme, or in the presence of 2,2'-dipyridyl (inhibitor of Fenton reaction by iron chelation, thiourea, or cysteamine (hydroxyl radical scavengers was observed. Moreover, the ΔrecA mutant (deficient in an enzyme involved in SOS response to DNA damage was more sensitive to (+-limonene. Thus, this indirect evidence indicates that the mechanism of exponentially growing E. coli cells inactivation by 2,000 μL/L (+-limonene is due to the TCA cycle and Fenton-mediated hydroxyl radical formation that caused oxidative DNA damage, as observed for bactericidal drugs. However, several differences have been observed between the proposed mechanism for bactericidal drugs and for (+-limonene. In this regard, our results demonstrated that E. coli inactivation was influenced by its physiological state and the drug's concentration: experiments with stationary-phase cells or 4,000 μL/L (+-limonene uncovered a different mechanism of cell death, likely unrelated to hydroxyl radicals. Our research has also shown that drug's concentration is an important factor influencing the mechanism of bacterial inactivation by antibiotics, such as kanamycin. These results might help in improving and spreading the use of (+-limonene as an antimicrobial compound, and in clarifying the

  14. Swelling of root cell walls as an indicator of their functional state.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meychik, N R; Yermakov, I P

    2001-02-01

    The swelling capacity of cell walls isolated from different parts of lupine root was investigated. The water content in fragments of intact roots (Q) and swelling coefficient of standardized samples of cell walls (Kcw) were determined, and the dependences of Q and Kcw on the distance from the root tip (L) were plotted. It was shown that the change in Q value along the stretch of the lupine root reaches its maximum at distances of 1.5-6 cm or 7-12 cm from the root tip in 7-day-old and 14-day-old seedlings, respectively, whereas the Kcw value distribution over the root length is virtually invariable. In the radial direction, both the Q and Kcw values in cortex tissues are about twice higher than in the central cylinder. In our opinion, the changes of both Q and Kcw in the radial direction are associated with different degrees of cross-linking between polymer chains in cell wall structures of root cortex and central cylinder. The results of measurement of the Kcw value are consistent with the widely accepted mechanisms of water transport in roots in the radial direction. These data show that water transport through apoplast to the border between the cortex and central cylinder is accompanied by an increase in the resistance to water flow. Among other factors, this increase is due to a greater degree of cross-linking between cell wall polymers in the central cylinder. The results of measurement of the swelling coefficient of standardized cell wall samples in water and in 10 mM KCl at different pH values show that the swelling capacity of root cell walls varies according to the physicochemical properties of synthetic ion exchangers. Cell walls shrink (cell wall volume decreases) as ion concentration in solution increases and pH decreases. This causes an increase in the hydraulic resistance (or a decrease in the hydraulic conductivity) of apoplast. It was concluded that swelling is determined by the physicochemical properties of the cell wall, whereas the change in the

  15. Development of the plastic solid-dye cell for tunable solid-state dye lasers and study on its optical properties

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ko, Do Kyeong; Lee, Jong Min; Cha, Byung Heon; Jung, E. C.; Kim, Hyun Su; Lim, Gwon

    2001-01-01

    we have fabricated solid-state dyes with PMMA and sol-gel materials. We developed single longitudianl mode solid-state dye laser with the linewidth of less than 500MHz. We have constructed a self-seeded laser and observed the increase of the output power because of self-seeding effect. We investigated the operating characteristics of the dualwave laser oscillator and DFDL with solid-state dyes. And we have constructed the 3-color solid-state dye laser oscillator and amplifier system and observed 3-color operation. We also improved the laser oscliiator with disk-type solid-state dye cell which can be translated and rotated with the help of the two stepping motors. With the help of computer control, we could constantly changed the illuminated area of the dye cell and, therefore, were able to achieve long time operation and to use almost the entire region of the solid-state dye cell.

  16. Development of the plastic solid-dye cell for tunable solid-state dye lasers and study on its optical properties

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    we have fabricated solid-state dyes with PMMA and sol-gel materials. We developed single longitudianl mode solid-state dye laser with the linewidth of less than 500MHz. We have constructed a self-seeded laser and observed the increase of the output power because of self-seeding effect. We investigated the operating characteristics of the dualwave laser oscillator and DFDL with solid-state dyes. And we have constructed the 3-color solid-state dye laser oscillator and amplifier system and observed 3-color operation. We also improved the laser oscliiator with disk-type solid-state dye cell which can be translated and rotated with the help of the two stepping motors. With the help of computer control, we could constantly changed the illuminated area of the dye cell and, therefore, were able to achieve long time operation and to use almost the entire region of the solid-state dye cell

  17. Levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C among children with steady-state sickle cell disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seixas Magda O

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The search for sickle cell disease (SCD prognosis biomarkers is a challenge. These markers identification can help to establish further therapy, later severe clinical complications and with patients follow-up. We attempted to study a possible involvement of levels of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol (HDL-C in steady-state children with SCD, once that this lipid marker has been correlated with anti-inflammatory, anti-oxidative, anti-aggregation, anti-coagulant and pro-fibrinolytic activities, important aspects to be considered in sickle cell disease pathogenesis. Methods We prospectively analyzed biochemical, inflammatory and hematological biomarkers of 152 steady-state infants with SCD and 132 healthy subjects using immunochemistry, immunoassay and electronic cell counter respectively. Clinical data were collected from patient medical records. Results Of the 152 infants investigated had a significant positive association of high-density lipoprotein cholesterol with hemoglobin (P Conclusions We hypothesize that some SCD patients can have a specific dyslipidemic subphenotype characterized by low HDL-C with hypertriglyceridemia and high VLDL-C in association with other biomarkers, including those related to inflammation. This represents an important step toward a more reliable clinical prognosis. Additional studies are warranted to test this hypothesis and the probably mechanisms involved in this complex network of markers and their role in SCD pathogenesis.

  18. The effects of intrinsic noise on the behaviour of bistable cell regulatory systems under quasi-steady state conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cruz, Roberto; Alarcón, Tomás de la [Centre de Recerca Matemàtica. Edifici C, Campus de Bellaterra, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Departament de Matemàtiques, Universitat Autònoma de Barcelona, 08193 Bellaterra (Barcelona) (Spain); Guerrero, Pilar [Department of Mathematics, University College London, Gower Street, London WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Spill, Fabian [Department of Biomedical Engineering, Boston University, 44 Cummington Street, Boston, Massachusetts 02215 (United States); Department of Mechanical Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, 77 Massachusetts Avenue, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States)

    2015-08-21

    We analyse the effect of intrinsic fluctuations on the properties of bistable stochastic systems with time scale separation operating under quasi-steady state conditions. We first formulate a stochastic generalisation of the quasi-steady state approximation based on the semi-classical approximation of the partial differential equation for the generating function associated with the chemical master equation. Such approximation proceeds by optimising an action functional whose associated set of Euler-Lagrange (Hamilton) equations provides the most likely fluctuation path. We show that, under appropriate conditions granting time scale separation, the Hamiltonian can be re-scaled so that the set of Hamilton equations splits up into slow and fast variables, whereby the quasi-steady state approximation can be applied. We analyse two particular examples of systems whose mean-field limit has been shown to exhibit bi-stability: an enzyme-catalysed system of two mutually inhibitory proteins and a gene regulatory circuit with self-activation. Our theory establishes that the number of molecules of the conserved species is order parameters whose variation regulates bistable behaviour in the associated systems beyond the predictions of the mean-field theory. This prediction is fully confirmed by direct numerical simulations using the stochastic simulation algorithm. This result allows us to propose strategies whereby, by varying the number of molecules of the three conserved chemical species, cell properties associated to bistable behaviour (phenotype, cell-cycle status, etc.) can be controlled.

  19. The effects of intrinsic noise on the behaviour of bistable cell regulatory systems under quasi-steady state conditions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We analyse the effect of intrinsic fluctuations on the properties of bistable stochastic systems with time scale separation operating under quasi-steady state conditions. We first formulate a stochastic generalisation of the quasi-steady state approximation based on the semi-classical approximation of the partial differential equation for the generating function associated with the chemical master equation. Such approximation proceeds by optimising an action functional whose associated set of Euler-Lagrange (Hamilton) equations provides the most likely fluctuation path. We show that, under appropriate conditions granting time scale separation, the Hamiltonian can be re-scaled so that the set of Hamilton equations splits up into slow and fast variables, whereby the quasi-steady state approximation can be applied. We analyse two particular examples of systems whose mean-field limit has been shown to exhibit bi-stability: an enzyme-catalysed system of two mutually inhibitory proteins and a gene regulatory circuit with self-activation. Our theory establishes that the number of molecules of the conserved species is order parameters whose variation regulates bistable behaviour in the associated systems beyond the predictions of the mean-field theory. This prediction is fully confirmed by direct numerical simulations using the stochastic simulation algorithm. This result allows us to propose strategies whereby, by varying the number of molecules of the three conserved chemical species, cell properties associated to bistable behaviour (phenotype, cell-cycle status, etc.) can be controlled

  20. Inevitability and containment of replication errors for eukaryotic genome lengths spanning megabase to gigabase

    Science.gov (United States)

    Al Mamun, Mohammed; Moreno, Alberto; Carrington, James T.; Blow, J. Julian; Newman, Timothy J.

    2016-01-01

    The replication of DNA is initiated at particular sites on the genome called replication origins (ROs). Understanding the constraints that regulate the distribution of ROs across different organisms is fundamental for quantifying the degree of replication errors and their downstream consequences. Using a simple probabilistic model, we generate a set of predictions on the extreme sensitivity of error rates to the distribution of ROs, and how this distribution must therefore be tuned for genomes of vastly different sizes. As genome size changes from megabases to gigabases, we predict that regularity of RO spacing is lost, that large gaps between ROs dominate error rates but are heavily constrained by the mean stalling distance of replication forks, and that, for genomes spanning ∼100 megabases to ∼10 gigabases, errors become increasingly inevitable but their number remains very small (three or less). Our theory predicts that the number of errors becomes significantly higher for genome sizes greater than ∼10 gigabases. We test these predictions against datasets in yeast, Arabidopsis, Drosophila, and human, and also through direct experimentation on two different human cell lines. Agreement of theoretical predictions with experiment and datasets is found in all cases, resulting in a picture of great simplicity, whereby the density and positioning of ROs explain the replication error rates for the entire range of eukaryotes for which data are available. The theory highlights three domains of error rates: negligible (yeast), tolerable (metazoan), and high (some plants), with the human genome at the extreme end of the middle domain. PMID:27630194