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Sample records for cell shape change

  1. Apical Constriction: A Cell Shape Change that Can Drive Morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Sawyer, Jacob M.; Harrell, Jessica R.; Shemer, Gidi; Sullivan-Brown, Jessica; Roh-Johnson, Minna; Goldstein, Bob

    2009-01-01

    Biologists have long recognized that dramatic bending of a cell sheet may be driven by even modest shrinking of the apical sides of cells. Cell shape changes and tissue movements like these are at the core of many of the morphogenetic movements that shape animal form during development, driving processes such as gastrulation, tube formation and neurulation. The mechanisms of such cell shape changes must integrate developmental patterning information in order to spatially and temporally contro...

  2. Cortical forces in cell shape changes and tissue morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rauzi, Matteo; Lenne, Pierre-François

    2011-01-01

    Cortical forces drive a variety of cell shape changes and cell movements during tissue morphogenesis. While the molecular components underlying these forces have been largely identified, how they assemble and spatially and temporally organize at cell surfaces to promote cell shape changes in developing tissues are open questions. We present here different key aspects of cortical forces: their physical nature, some rules governing their emergence, and how their deployment at cell surfaces drives important morphogenetic movements in epithelia. We review a wide range of literature combining genetic/molecular, biophysical and modeling approaches, which explore essential features of cortical force generation and transmission in tissues. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Conformon-driven biopolymer shape changes in cell modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ji, Sungchul; Ciobanu, Gabriel

    2003-07-01

    Conceptual models of the atom preceded the mathematical model of the hydrogen atom in physics in the second decade of the 20th century. The computer modeling of the living cell in the 21st century may follow a similar course of development. A conceptual model of the cell called the Bhopalator was formulated in the mid-1980s, along with its twin theories known as the conformon theory of molecular machines and the cell language theory of biopolymer interactions [Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 227 (1974) 211; BioSystems 44 (1997) 17; Ann. N.Y. Acad. Sci. 870 (1999a) 411; BioSystems 54 (2000) 107; Semiotica 138 (1-4) (2002a) 15; Fundamenta Informaticae 49 (2002b) 147]. The conformon theory accounts for the reversible actions of individual biopolymers coupled to irreversible chemical reactions, while the cell language theory provides a theoretical framework for understanding the complex networks of dynamic interactions among biopolymers in the cell. These two theories are reviewed and further elaborated for the benefit of both computational biologists and computer scientists who are interested in modeling the living cell and its functions. One of the critical components of the mechanisms of cell communication and cell computing has been postulated to be space- and time-organized teleonomic (i.e. goal-directed) shape changes of biopolymers that are driven by exergonic (free energy-releasing) chemical reactions. The generalized Franck-Condon principle is suggested to be essential in resolving the apparent paradox arising when one attempts to couple endergonic (free energy-requiring) biopolymer shape changes to the exergonic chemical reactions that are catalyzed by biopolymer shape changes themselves. Conformons, defined as sequence-specific mechanical strains of biopolymers first invoked three decades ago to account for energy coupling in mitochondria, have been identified as shape changers, the agents that cause shape changes in biopolymers. Given a set of space- and time

  4. Apical constriction: a cell shape change that can drive morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sawyer, Jacob M; Harrell, Jessica R; Shemer, Gidi; Sullivan-Brown, Jessica; Roh-Johnson, Minna; Goldstein, Bob

    2010-05-01

    Biologists have long recognized that dramatic bending of a cell sheet may be driven by even modest shrinking of the apical sides of cells. Cell shape changes and tissue movements like these are at the core of many of the morphogenetic movements that shape animal form during development, driving processes such as gastrulation, tube formation, and neurulation. The mechanisms of such cell shape changes must integrate developmental patterning information in order to spatially and temporally control force production-issues that touch on fundamental aspects of both cell and developmental biology and on birth defects research. How does developmental patterning regulate force-producing mechanisms, and what roles do such mechanisms play in development? Work on apical constriction from multiple systems including Drosophila, Caenorhabditis elegans, sea urchin, Xenopus, chick, and mouse has begun to illuminate these issues. Here, we review this effort to explore the diversity of mechanisms of apical constriction, the diversity of roles that apical constriction plays in development, and the common themes that emerge from comparing systems. Copyright 2009 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Gravity effect on lymphocyte deformation through cell shape change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hung, R J; Tsao, Y D; Spauling, G F

    1995-01-01

    The effects on human cells (lymphocyte) immersed in a culture liquid under microgravity environment has been investigated. The study was based on the numerical simulation of the Morphology of human cells affected by the time dependent variation of gravity acceleration ranging from 10(-3) to 2 g(o) (g(o) = 9.81 m/s2) in 15 s. Both the free floating cells and the cells which came into contact with the upper and lower inclined walls imposed by the time-dependent reduced gravity acceleration were considered in this study. The results show that, when the gravity acceleration increased, the cell morphology changed from spherical to horizontally elongated ellipsoid for both the free floating cells and the stationary cells on the lower inclined wall while the cell morphology varied from spherical to vertically-elongated ellipsoid for the cells hanging on the upper inclined wall. A test of the deformation of human cells exposed to the variation of gravity levels, carried out in the KC-135 free fall aircraft, show that the results of experimental observations agree exactly with the theoretical model computation described in this paper. These results will be useful for study of the behavior and morphology of cells in space.

  6. Inhibition of patterned cell shape change and cell invasion by Discs large during Drosophila oogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goode, Scott; Perrimon, Norbert

    1997-01-01

    Drosophila Discs large (Dlg) is a tumor suppressor gene whose loss in epithelial tissues causes disrupted cell polarity and increased cell proliferation. A human Dlg homolog, hDlg, has been implicated in tumorigenic processes via its association with the product of the Adenomatous Polyposis Coli (APC) gene. We show for the first time that Drosophila Dlg is required to block cell invasion. Loss of dlg activity during oogenesis causes follicle cells to change shape and invade in a pattern similar to border cells, a small population of cells that break from the post-mitotic follicular epithelium during wild-type oogenesis, yet dlg mutant cells have not adopted a border cell fate. Both functional and morphological evidence indicates that cooperation between germ cell and follicle cell Dlg, probably mediated by Dlg PDZ domains, is crucial for regulating cell mixing, suggesting a novel developmental mechanism and mode of action for the Dlg family of molecules. These findings suggest that Dlg does not simply inhibit individual cell behaviors during oogenesis, but rather acts in a developmental pathway essential for blocking cell proliferation and migration in a spatio-temporally defined manner. A model for Dlg action in blocking cell invasion is presented. PMID:9334318

  7. Changes in cell shape are correlated with metastatic potential in murine and human osteosarcomas

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    Samanthe M. Lyons

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Metastatic cancer cells for many cancers are known to have altered cytoskeletal properties, in particular to be more deformable and contractile. Consequently, shape characteristics of more metastatic cancer cells may be expected to have diverged from those of their parental cells. To examine this hypothesis we study shape characteristics of paired osteosarcoma cell lines, each consisting of a less metastatic parental line and a more metastatic line, derived from the former by in vivo selection. Two-dimensional images of four pairs of lines were processed. Statistical analysis of morphometric characteristics shows that shape characteristics of the metastatic cell line are partly overlapping and partly diverged from the parental line. Significantly, the shape changes fall into two categories, with three paired cell lines displaying a more mesenchymal-like morphology, while the fourth displaying a change towards a more rounded morphology. A neural network algorithm could distinguish between samples of the less metastatic cells from the more metastatic cells with near perfect accuracy. Thus, subtle changes in shape carry information about the genetic changes that lead to invasiveness and metastasis of osteosarcoma cancer cells.

  8. Changes in Ect2 localization couple actomyosin-dependent cell shape changes to mitotic progression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Helen K; Delabre, Ulysse; Rohn, Jennifer L; Guck, Jochen; Kunda, Patricia; Baum, Buzz

    2012-08-14

    As they enter mitosis, animal cells undergo profound actin-dependent changes in shape to become round. Here we identify the Cdk1 substrate, Ect2, as a central regulator of mitotic rounding, thus uncovering a link between the cell-cycle machinery that drives mitotic entry and its accompanying actin remodeling. Ect2 is a RhoGEF that plays a well-established role in formation of the actomyosin contractile ring at mitotic exit, through the local activation of RhoA. We find that Ect2 first becomes active in prophase, when it is exported from the nucleus into the cytoplasm, activating RhoA to induce the formation of a mechanically stiff and rounded metaphase cortex. Then, at anaphase, binding to RacGAP1 at the spindle midzone repositions Ect2 to induce local actomyosin ring formation. Ect2 localization therefore defines the stage-specific changes in actin cortex organization critical for accurate cell division. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Effect of cell shape change on the function and differentiation of rabbit mammary cells in culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haeuptle, M T; Suard, Y L; Bogenmann, E; Reggio, H; Racine, L; Kraehenbuhl, J P

    1983-05-01

    We examined the role of cell shape, cytodifferentiation, and tissue topography on the induction and maintenance of functional differentiation in rabbit mammary cells grown as primary cultures on two-dimensional collagen surfaces or in three-dimensional collagen matrices. Mammary glands from mid-pregnant rabbits were dissociated into single cells, and epithelial cells were enriched by isopycnic centrifugation. Small spheroids of epithelial cells (approximately 50 cells) that formed on a rotary shaker were plated on or embedded in collagen gels. The cells were cultured for 1 d in serum-containing medium and then for up to 25 d in chemically defined medium. In some experiments, epithelial monolayers on gels were mechanically freed from the dishes on day 2 or 5. These gels retracted and formed floating collagen gels. On attached collagen gels, flat monolayers of a single cell type developed within a few days. The cells synthesized DNA until the achievement of confluence but did not accumulate milk proteins. No morphological changes were induced by prolactin (PRL). On floating gels, two cell types appeared in the absence of cell proliferation. The cells in direct contact with the medium became cuboidal and developed intracellular organelles typical of secretory cells. PRL-induced lipogenesis, resulting in large fat droplets filling the apical cytoplasm and accumulation of casein and alpha-lactalbumin in vesicles surrounding the fat droplets. We detected tranferrin in the presence or absence of PRL intracellularly in small vesicles but also in the collagen matrix in contact with the cell layer. The second cell type, rich in microfilaments and reminiscent of the myoepithelial cells, was situated between the secretory cell layer and the collagen matrix. In embedding gels, the cells formed hollow ductlike structures, which grew continuously in size. Secretory cells formed typical lumina distended by secretory products. We found few microfilament-rich cells in contact with

  10. Bioelectrical impedance assay to monitor changes in cell shape during apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arndt, Silke; Seebach, Jochen; Psathaki, Katherina; Galla, Hans-Joachim; Wegener, Joachim

    2004-01-15

    Apoptosis is a strictly regulated and genetically encoded cell 'suicide' that may be triggered by cytokines, depletion of growth factors or certain chemicals. It is morphologically characterized by severe alterations in cell shape like cell shrinkage and disintegration of cell-cell contacts. We applied a non-invasive electrochemical technique referred to as electric cell-substrate impedance sensing (ECIS) in order to monitor the apoptosis-induced changes in cell shape in an integral and quantitative fashion with a time resolution in the order of minutes. In ECIS the cells are grown directly on the surface of small gold-film electrodes (d = 2 mm). From readings of the electrical impedance of the cell-covered electrode, performed with non-invasive, low amplitude sensing voltages, it is possible to deduce alterations in cell-cell and cell-substrate contacts. To improve the sensitivity of this impedance assay we used endothelial cells derived from cerebral micro-vessels as cellular model systems since these are well known to express electrically tight intercellular junctions. Apoptosis was induced by cycloheximide (CHX) and verified by biochemical and cytological assays. The time course of cell shape changes was followed with unprecedented time resolution by impedance readings at 1 kHz and correlated with biochemical parameters. From impedance readings along a broad frequency range of 1-10(6) Hz we could assign the observed impedance changes to alterations on the subcellular level. We observed that disassembly of barrier-forming tight junctions precedes changes in cell-substrate contacts and correlates strongly with the time course of protease activation.

  11. Automated characterization of cell shape changes during amoeboid motility by skeletonization

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    Robinson Douglas N

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ability of a cell to change shape is crucial for the proper function of many cellular processes, including cell migration. One type of cell migration, referred to as amoeboid motility, involves alternating cycles of morphological expansion and retraction. Traditionally, this process has been characterized by a number of parameters providing global information about shape changes, which are insufficient to distinguish phenotypes based on local pseudopodial activities that typify amoeboid motility. Results We developed a method that automatically detects and characterizes pseudopodial behavior of cells. The method uses skeletonization, a technique from morphological image processing to reduce a shape into a series of connected lines. It involves a series of automatic algorithms including image segmentation, boundary smoothing, skeletonization and branch pruning, and takes into account the cell shape changes between successive frames to detect protrusion and retraction activities. In addition, the activities are clustered into different groups, each representing the protruding and retracting history of an individual pseudopod. Conclusions We illustrate the algorithms on movies of chemotaxing Dictyostelium cells and show that our method makes it possible to capture the spatial and temporal dynamics as well as the stochastic features of the pseudopodial behavior. Thus, the method provides a powerful tool for investigating amoeboid motility.

  12. Passive Mechanical Forces Control Cell-Shape Change during Drosophila Ventral Furrow Formation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polyakov, Oleg; He, Bing; Swan, Michael; Shaevitz, Joshua W.; Kaschube, Matthias; Wieschaus, Eric

    2014-01-01

    During Drosophila gastrulation, the ventral mesodermal cells constrict their apices, undergo a series of coordinated cell-shape changes to form a ventral furrow (VF) and are subsequently internalized. Although it has been well documented that apical constriction is necessary for VF formation, the mechanism by which apical constriction transmits forces throughout the bulk tissue of the cell remains poorly understood. In this work, we develop a computational vertex model to investigate the role of the passive mechanical properties of the cellular blastoderm during gastrulation. We introduce to our knowledge novel data that confirm that the volume of apically constricting cells is conserved throughout the entire course of invagination. We show that maintenance of this constant volume is sufficient to generate invagination as a passive response to apical constriction when it is combined with region-specific elasticities in the membranes surrounding individual cells. We find that the specific sequence of cell-shape changes during VF formation is critically controlled by the stiffness of the lateral and basal membrane surfaces. In particular, our model demonstrates that a transition in basal rigidity is sufficient to drive VF formation along the same sequence of cell-shape change that we observed in the actual embryo, with no active force generation required other than apical constriction. PMID:25140436

  13. G proteins mediate changes in cell shape by stabilizing the axis of polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nern, A; Arkowitz, R A

    2000-05-01

    Upon exposure to mating pheromone, yeast cells change their form to pear-shaped shmoos. We looked at pheromone-dependent cell shape changes in mutants that are unable to orient growth during mating and unable to choose a bud site. In these double mutants, cell surface growth, secretion sites, cytoskeleton, and pheromone receptors are spread out, explaining why these cells are round. In contrast, polarity establishment proteins localize to discrete sites in these mutants. However, the location of these sites wanders. Thus, these mutants are able to initiate polarized growth but fail to maintain the location of growth sites. Our results demonstrate that stabilization of the growth axis requires positional signaling from either the pheromone receptor or specific bud site selection proteins.

  14. Cell-sized liposomes reveal how actomyosin cortical tension drives shape change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carvalho, Kevin; Tsai, Feng-Ching; Tsai, Feng C; Lees, Edouard; Voituriez, Raphaël; Koenderink, Gijsje H; Sykes, Cecile

    2013-10-08

    Animal cells actively generate contractile stress in the actin cortex, a thin actin network beneath the cell membrane, to facilitate shape changes during processes like cytokinesis and motility. On the microscopic scale, this stress is generated by myosin molecular motors, which bind to actin cytoskeletal filaments and use chemical energy to exert pulling forces. To decipher the physical basis for the regulation of cell shape changes, here, we use a cell-like system with a cortex anchored to the outside or inside of a liposome membrane. This system enables us to dissect the interplay between motor pulling forces, cortex-membrane anchoring, and network connectivity. We show that cortices on the outside of liposomes either spontaneously rupture and relax built-up mechanical stress by peeling away around the liposome or actively compress and crush the liposome. The decision between peeling and crushing depends on the cortical tension determined by the amount of motors and also on the connectivity of the cortex and its attachment to the membrane. Membrane anchoring strongly affects the morphology of cortex contraction inside liposomes: cortices contract inward when weakly attached, whereas they contract toward the membrane when strongly attached. We propose a physical model based on a balance of active tension and mechanical resistance to rupture. Our findings show how membrane attachment and network connectivity are able to regulate actin cortex remodeling and membrane-shape changes for cell polarization.

  15. A reagent-based dynamic trigger for cell adhesion, shape change, or cocultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Dongen, Stijn F M; Maiuri, Paolo; Piel, Matthieu

    2014-01-01

    The described protocol is a simple and easily implemented method for making dynamic micropatterns for cell culture. It is based on the use of a surface coating material (azido-PLL-g-PEG (APP)) that initially repels cells, but which can be made strongly adherent by addition of a small functional peptide (BCN-RGD) to the cell culture medium. The method can be applied to trigger the adhesion, migration, or shape change of single cells or of populations of cells, and it can be used to create patterned cocultures. The entire process can be subdivided into three main parts. The first part describes the creation of patterned APP substrates. The second part describes cell seeding and "click" triggering of cell adhesion; the final part describes variations that allow the overlay of multiple patterns or the creation of patterned cocultures. The APP coating of substrates and the triggering of adhesion only involves treating the surface with aqueous stock solutions, allowing any biology lab to adopt this technique. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Computational modeling of anodic current distribution and anode shape change in aluminium reduction cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xu Y.

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In aluminium reduction cells, the profile of a new carbon anode changes with time before reaching a steady state shape, since the anode consumption rate, depending on the current density normal to anode surfaces, varies from one region to another. In this paper, a two-dimension model based on Laplace equation and Tafel equation was built up to calculate the secondary current distribution, and the shift of anode shape with time was simulated with arbitrary Lagrangian-Eulerian method. The time it takes to reach the steady shape for the anode increases with the enlargement of the width of the channels between the anodes or between the anode and the sidewall. This time can be shortened by making a sloped bottom or cutting off the lower corners of the new anode. Forming two slots in the bottom surface increases the anodic current density at the underside of the anode, but leads to the enlargement of the current at the side of the anode.

  17. Curling and local shape changes of red blood cell membranes driven by cytoskeletal reorganization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kabaso, Doron; Shlomovitz, Roie; Auth, Thorsten; Lew, Virgilio L; Gov, Nir S

    2010-08-04

    Human red blood cells (RBCs) lack the actin-myosin-microtubule cytoskeleton that is responsible for shape changes in other cells. Nevertheless, they can display highly dynamic local deformations in response to external perturbations, such as those that occur during the process of apical alignment preceding merozoite invasion in malaria. Moreover, after lysis in divalent cation-free media, the isolated membranes of ruptured ghosts show spontaneous inside-out curling motions at the free edges of the lytic hole, leading to inside-out vesiculation. The molecular mechanisms that drive these rapid shape changes are unknown. Here, we propose a molecular model in which the spectrin filaments of the RBC cortical cytoskeleton control the sign and dynamics of membrane curvature depending on whether the ends of the filaments are free or anchored to the bilayer. Computer simulations of the model reveal that curling, as experimentally observed, can be obtained either by an overall excess of weakly-bound filaments throughout the cell, or by the flux of such filaments toward the curling edges. Divalent cations have been shown to arrest the curling process, and Ca2+ ions have also been implicated in local membrane deformations during merozoite invasion. These effects can be replicated in our model by attributing the divalent cation effects to increased filament-membrane binding. This process converts the curl-inducing loose filaments into fully bound filaments that arrest curling. The same basic mechanism can be shown to account for Ca2+-induced local and dynamic membrane deformations in intact RBCs. The implications of these results in terms of RBC membrane dynamics under physiological, pathological, and experimental conditions is discussed. 2010 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Shape Changing Airfoil

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Eric A.

    2005-01-01

    Scoping of shape changing airfoil concepts including both aerodynamic analysis and materials-related technology assessment effort was performed. Three general categories of potential components were considered-fan blades, booster and compressor blades, and stator airfoils. Based on perceived contributions to improving engine efficiency, the fan blade was chosen as the primary application for a more detailed assessment. A high-level aerodynamic assessment using a GE90-90B Block 4 engine cycle and fan blade geometry indicates that blade camber changes of approximately +/-4deg would be sufficient to result in fan efficiency improvements nearing 1 percent. Constraints related to flight safety and failed mode operation suggest that use of the baseline blade shape with actuation to the optimum cruise condition during a portion of the cycle would be likely required. Application of these conditions to the QAT fan blade and engine cycle was estimated to result in an overall fan efficiency gain of 0.4 percent.

  19. Dynamic shape changes of ECM-producing cells drive morphogenesis of ball-and-socket joints in the fly leg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tajiri, Reiko; Misaki, Kazuyo; Yonemura, Shigenobu; Hayashi, Shigeo

    2010-06-01

    Animal body shape is framed by the skeleton, which is composed of extracellular matrix (ECM). Although how the body plan manifests in skeletal morphology has been studied intensively, cellular mechanisms that directly control skeletal ECM morphology remain elusive. In particular, how dynamic behaviors of ECM-secreting cells, such as shape changes and movements, contribute to ECM morphogenesis is unclear. Strict control of ECM morphology is crucial in the joints, where opposing sides of the skeleton must have precisely reciprocal shapes to fit each other. Here we found that, in the development of ball-and-socket joints in the Drosophila leg, the two sides of ECM form sequentially. We show that distinct cell populations produce the 'ball' and the 'socket', and that these cells undergo extensive shape changes while depositing ECM. We propose that shape changes of ECM-producing cells enable the sequential ECM formation to allow the morphological coupling of adjacent components. Our results highlight the importance of dynamic cell behaviors in precise shaping of skeletal ECM architecture.

  20. Changes in hemoglobin-oxygen affinity with shape variations of red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Aniket; Dasgupta, Raktim; Majumder, Shovan K.

    2017-10-01

    Shape variations of red blood cells (RBCs) are known to occur upon exposure to various drugs or under diseased conditions. The commonly observed discocytic RBCs can be transformed to echinocytic or stomatocytic shape under such conditions. Raman spectra of the three major shape variations, namely discocyte, echinocyte, and stomatocyte, of RBCs were studied while subjecting the cells to oxygenated and deoxygenated conditions. Analysis of the recorded spectra suggests an increased level of hemoglobin (Hb)-oxygen affinity for the echinocytes. Also, some level of Hb degradation could be noticed for the deoxygenated echinocytes. The effects may arise from a reduced level of intracellular adenosine triphosphate in echinocytic cells and an increased fraction of submembrane Hb.

  1. Cell shape: taking the heat.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kunda, Patricia; Rohn, Jennifer L; Baum, Buzz

    2008-06-03

    Preservation of cell architecture under physically stressful conditions is a basic requirement for many biological processes and is critical for mechanosensory systems built to translate subtle changes in cell shape into changes in organism behaviour. A new study reveals how an extracellular protein--Spam--helps mechanosensory organs in the fruit fly to withstand the effects of the water loss that accompanies heat shock.

  2. The development and geometry of shape change in Arabidopsis thaliana cotyledon pavement cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Chunhua; Halsey, Leah E; Szymanski, Daniel B

    2011-02-01

    The leaf epidermis is an important architectural control element that influences the growth properties of underlying tissues and the overall form of the organ. In dicots, interdigitated pavement cells are the building blocks of the tissue, and their morphogenesis includes the assembly of specialized cell walls that surround the apical, basal, and lateral (anticlinal) cell surfaces. The microtubule and actin cytoskeletons are highly polarized along the cortex of the anticlinal wall; however, the relationships between these arrays and cell morphogenesis are unclear. We developed new quantitative tools to compare population-level growth statistics with time-lapse imaging of cotyledon pavement cells in an intact tissue. The analysis revealed alternating waves of lobe initiation and a phase of lateral isotropic expansion that persisted for days. During lateral isotropic diffuse growth, microtubule organization varied greatly between cell surfaces. Parallel microtubule bundles were distributed unevenly along the anticlinal surface, with subsets marking stable cortical domains at cell indentations and others clearly populating the cortex within convex cell protrusions. Pavement cell morphogenesis is discontinuous, and includes punctuated phases of lobe initiation and lateral isotropic expansion. In the epidermis, lateral isotropic growth is independent of pavement cell size and shape. Cortical microtubules along the upper cell surface and stable cortical patches of anticlinal microtubules may coordinate the growth behaviors of orthogonal cell walls. This work illustrates the importance of directly linking protein localization data to the growth behavior of leaf epidermal cells.

  3. Change in cell shape is required for matrix metalloproteinase-induced epithelial-mesenchymal transition of mammary epithelial cells

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    Nelson, Celeste M.; Khauv, Davitte; Bissell, Mina J.; Radisky, Derek C.

    2008-06-26

    Cell morphology dictates response to a wide variety of stimuli, controlling cell metabolism, differentiation, proliferation, and death. Epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a developmental process in which epithelial cells acquire migratory characteristics, and in the process convert from a 'cuboidal' epithelial structure into an elongated mesenchymal shape. We had shown previously that matrix metalloproteinase-3 (MMP3) can stimulate EMT of cultured mouse mammary epithelial cells through a process that involves increased expression of Rac1b, a protein that stimulates alterations in cytoskeletal structure. We show here that cells treated with MMP-3 or induced to express Rac1b spread to cover a larger surface, and that this induction of cell spreading is a requirement of MMP-3/Rac1b-induced EMT. We find that limiting cell spreading, either by increasing cell density or by culturing cells on precisely defined micropatterned substrata, blocks expression of characteristic markers of EMT in cells treated with MMP-3. These effects are not caused by general disruptions in cell signaling pathways, as TGF-{beta}-induced EMT is not affected by similar limitations on cell spreading. Our data reveal a previously unanticipated cell shape-dependent mechanism that controls this key phenotypic alteration and provide insight into the distinct mechanisms activated by different EMT-inducing agents.

  4. Claudins are essential for cell shape changes and convergent extension movements during neural tube closure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumholtz, Amanda I; Simard, Annie; Nikolopoulou, Evanthia; Oosenbrug, Marcus; Collins, Michelle M; Piontek, Anna; Krause, Gerd; Piontek, Jörg; Greene, Nicholas D E; Ryan, Aimee K

    2017-08-01

    During neural tube closure, regulated changes at the level of individual cells are translated into large-scale morphogenetic movements to facilitate conversion of the flat neural plate into a closed tube. Throughout this process, the integrity of the neural epithelium is maintained via cell interactions through intercellular junctions, including apical tight junctions. Members of the claudin family of tight junction proteins regulate paracellular permeability, apical-basal cell polarity and link the tight junction to the actin cytoskeleton. Here, we show that claudins are essential for neural tube closure: the simultaneous removal of Cldn3, -4 and -8 from tight junctions caused folate-resistant open neural tube defects. Their removal did not affect cell type differentiation, neural ectoderm patterning nor overall apical-basal polarity. However, apical accumulation of Vangl2, RhoA, and pMLC were reduced, and Par3 and Cdc42 were mislocalized at the apical cell surface. Our data showed that claudins act upstream of planar cell polarity and RhoA/ROCK signaling to regulate cell intercalation and actin-myosin contraction, which are required for convergent extension and apical constriction during neural tube closure, respectively. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Aging changes in body shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/003998.htm Aging changes in body shape To use the sharing ... and both sexes. Height loss is related to aging changes in the bones, muscles, and joints. People ...

  6. Shape deformation of the organ of Corti associated with length changes of outer hair cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zimmermann, U.; Fermin, C.

    1996-01-01

    Cochlear outer hair cells (OHC) are commonly assumed to function as mechanical effectors as well as sensory receptors in the organ of Corti (OC) of the inner ear. OHC in vitro and in organ explants exhibit mechanical responses to electrical, chemical or mechanical stimulation which may represent an aspect of their effector process that is expected in vivo. A detailed description, however, of an OHC effector operation in situ is still missing. Specifically, little is known as to how OHC movements influence the geometry of the OC in situ. Previous work has demonstrated that the motility of isolated OHCs in response to electrical stimulation and to K(+)-gluconate is probably under voltage control and causes depolarisation (shortening) and hyperpolarization (elongation). This work was undertaken to investigate if the movements that were observed in isolated OHC, and which are induced by ionic stimulation, could change the geometry of the OC. A synchronized depolarization of OHC was induced in guinea pig cochleae by exposing the entire OC to artificial endolymph (K+). Subsequent morphometry of mid-modiolar sections from these cochleae revealed that the distance between the basilar membrane (BM) and the reticular lamina (RL) had decreased considerably. Furthermore, in the three upper turns OHC had significantly shortened in all rows. The results suggest that OHC can change their length in the organ of Corti (OC) thus deforming the geometry of the OC. The experiments reveal a tonic force generation within the OC that may change the position of RL and/or BM, contribute to damping, modulate the BM-RL-distance and control the operating points of RL and sensory hair bundles. Thus, the results suggest active self-adjustments of cochlear mechanics by slow OHC length changes. Such mechanical adjustments have recently been postulated to correspond to timing elements of animal communication, speech or music.

  7. Myoferlin depletion in breast cancer cells promotes mesenchymal to epithelial shape change and stalls invasion.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruth Li

    Full Text Available Myoferlin (MYOF is a mammalian ferlin protein with homology to ancestral Fer-1, a nematode protein that regulates spermatic membrane fusion, which underlies the amoeboid-like movements of its sperm. Studies in muscle and endothelial cells have reported on the role of myoferlin in membrane repair, endocytosis, myoblast fusion, and the proper expression of various plasma membrane receptors. In this study, using an in vitro human breast cancer cell model, we demonstrate that myoferlin is abundantly expressed in invasive breast tumor cells. Depletion of MYOF using lentiviral-driven shRNA expression revealed that MDA-MB-231 cells reverted to an epithelial morphology, suggesting at least some features of mesenchymal to epithelial transition (MET. These observations were confirmed by the down-regulation of some mesenchymal cell markers (e.g., fibronectin and vimentin and coordinate up-regulation of the E-cadherin epithelial marker. Cell invasion assays using Boyden chambers showed that loss of MYOF led to a significant diminution in invasion through Matrigel or type I collagen, while cell migration was unaffected. PCR array and screening of serum-free culture supernatants from shRNA(MYOF transduced MDA-MB-231 cells indicated a significant reduction in the steady-state levels of several matrix metalloproteinases. These data when considered in toto suggest a novel role of MYOF in breast tumor cell invasion and a potential reversion to an epithelial phenotype upon loss of MYOF.

  8. Endocytic and recycling endosomes modulate cell shape changes and tissue behaviour during morphogenesis in Drosophila.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Margarida Mateus

    Full Text Available During development tissue deformations are essential for the generation of organs and to provide the final form of an organism. These deformations rely on the coordination of individual cell behaviours which have their origin in the modulation of subcellular activities. Here we explore the role endocytosis and recycling on tissue deformations that occur during dorsal closure of the Drosophila embryo. During this process the AS contracts and the epidermis elongates in a coordinated fashion, leading to the closure of a discontinuity in the dorsal epidermis of the Drosophila embryo. We used dominant negative forms of Rab5 and Rab11 to monitor the impact on tissue morphogenesis of altering endocytosis and recycling at the level of single cells. We found different requirements for endocytosis (Rab5 and recycling (Rab11 in dorsal closure, furthermore we found that the two processes are differentially used in the two tissues. Endocytosis is required in the AS to remove membrane during apical constriction, but is not essential in the epidermis. Recycling is required in the AS at early stages and in the epidermis for cell elongation, suggesting a role in membrane addition during these processes. We propose that the modulation of the balance between endocytosis and recycling can regulate cellular morphology and tissue deformations during morphogenesis.

  9. Shroom3 and a Pitx2-N-cadherin pathway function cooperatively to generate asymmetric cell shape changes during gut morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plageman, Timothy F; Zacharias, Amanda L; Gage, Phillip J; Lang, Richard A

    2011-09-01

    The cytoskeletal protein Shroom3 is a potent inducer of epithelial cell shape change and is required for lens and neural plate morphogenesis. Analysis of gut morphogenesis in Shroom3 deficient mouse embryos revealed that the direction of gut rotation is also disrupted. It was recently established that Pitx2-dependent, asymmetrical cellular behaviors in the dorsal mesentery (DM) of the early mid-gut, a structure connecting the gut-tube to the rest of the embryo, contribute to the direction of gut rotation in chicken embryos by influencing the direction of the dorsal mesenteric tilt. Asymmetric cell shapes in the DM epithelium are hypothesized to contribute to the tilt, however, it is unclear what lies downstream of Pitx2 to alter epithelial cell shape. The cells of the left DM epithelium in either Pitx2 or Shroom3 deficient embryos are shorter and wider than those in control embryos and resemble the shape of those on the right, demonstrating that like Pitx2, Shroom3 is required for cell shape asymmetry and the leftward DM tilt. Because N-cadherin expression is specific to the left side and is Pitx2 dependent, we determined whether Shroom3 and N-cadherin function together to regulate cell shape in the left DM epithelium. Analysis of mouse embryos lacking one allele of both Shroom3 and N-cadherin revealed that they possess shorter and wider left epithelial DM cells when compared with Shroom3 or N-cadherin heterozygous embryos. This indicates a genetic interaction. Together these data provide evidence that Shroom3 and N-cadherin function cooperatively downstream of Pitx2 to directly regulate cell shape changes necessary for early gut tube morphogenesis. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  10. Ultrathin Shape Change Smart Materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weinan; Kwok, Kam Sang; Gracias, David H

    2018-01-23

    With the discovery of graphene, significant research has focused on the synthesis, characterization, and applications of ultrathin materials. Graphene has also brought into focus other ultrathin materials composed of organics, polymers, inorganics, and their hybrids. Together, these ultrathin materials have unique properties of broad significance. For example, ultrathin materials have a large surface area and high flexibility which can enhance conformal contact in wearables and sensors leading to improved sensitivity. When porous, the short transverse diffusion length in these materials allows rapid mass transport. Alternatively, when impermeable, these materials behave as an ultrathin barrier. Such controlled permeability is critical in the design of encapsulation and drug delivery systems. Finally, ultrathin materials often feature defect-free and single-crystal-like two-dimensional atomic structures resulting in superior mechanical, optical, and electrical properties. A unique property of ultrathin materials is their low bending rigidity, which suggests that they could easily be bent, curved, or folded into 3D shapes. In this Account, we review the emerging field of 2D to 3D shape transformations of ultrathin materials. We broadly define ultrathin to include materials with a thickness below 100 nm and composed of a range of organic, inorganic, and hybrid compositions. This topic is important for both fundamental and applied reasons. Fundamentally, bending and curving of ultrathin films can cause atomistic and molecular strain which can alter their physical and chemical properties and lead to new 3D forms of matter which behave very differently from their planar precursors. Shape change can also lead to new 3D architectures with significantly smaller form factors. For example, 3D ultrathin materials would occupy a smaller space in on-chip devices or could permeate through tortuous media which is important for miniaturized robots and smart dust applications. Our

  11. Cell shape dynamics: from waves to migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meghan K Driscoll

    Full Text Available We observe and quantify wave-like characteristics of amoeboid migration. Using the amoeba Dictyostelium discoideum, a model system for the study of chemotaxis, we demonstrate that cell shape changes in a wave-like manner. Cells have regions of high boundary curvature that propagate from the leading edge toward the back, usually along alternating sides of the cell. Curvature waves are easily seen in cells that do not adhere to a surface, such as cells that are electrostatically repelled from surfaces or cells that extend over the edge of micro-fabricated cliffs. Without surface contact, curvature waves travel from the leading edge to the back of a cell at -35 µm/min. Non-adherent myosin II null cells do not exhibit these curvature waves. At the leading edge of adherent cells, curvature waves are associated with protrusive activity. Like regions of high curvature, protrusive activity travels along the boundary in a wave-like manner. Upon contact with a surface, the protrusions stop moving relative to the surface, and the boundary shape thus reflects the history of protrusive motion. The wave-like character of protrusions provides a plausible mechanism for the zig-zagging of pseudopods and for the ability of cells both to swim in viscous fluids and to navigate complex three dimensional topography.

  12. Shaping Innate Lymphoid Cell Diversity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiutong Huang

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs are a key cell type that are enriched at mucosal surfaces and within tissues. Our understanding of these cells is growing rapidly. Paradoxically, these cells play a role in maintaining tissue integrity but they also function as key drivers of allergy and inflammation. We present here the most recent understanding of how genomics has provided significant insight into how ILCs are generated and the enormous heterogeneity present within the canonical subsets. This has allowed the generation of a detailed blueprint for ILCs to become highly sensitive and adaptive sensors of environmental changes and therefore exquisitely equipped to protect immune surfaces.

  13. [Empathic leadership: shaping positive change].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wetterauer, U; Ruhl, S

    2011-12-01

    This paper explains the concept of empathic leadership in the setting of fundamental organisational changes. It deals with the question of how you can establish a culture of leadership, which motivates employees positively and enthuses them for the upcoming changes. It discusses the basics of empathic leadership and considers the question of how handling of emotions influences change processes and how different management styles can be used supportively during changes. With the help of a practical example the different phases of change are presented from a management point of view. Thereby the theory of different levels of employee motivation is explained inter alia. The article shows that empathic leadership also has a lasting economic effect. This can be seen particularly in the power of motivation for change, in addition to recruitment and long-term employee retention.

  14. Premeiotic microsporocyte cell shape influences shape of tetrads during microsporogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Penet, Laurent

    2012-01-01

    Angiosperm microspores are grouped into tetrads before they mature into functional pollen grains. This tetrad stage is an important step in microsporogenesis. Tetrad shapes are diverse across angiosperms, with high levels of variation sometimes occurring within species, reflecting variation in early developmental events of nuclear and cell division (i.e., meiosis and cytokinesis). Among these developmental influences, the shape of the microsporocyte (pollen mother cell; hereafter PMC) is like...

  15. Encounters on a Shape-changing Bench

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kinch, Sofie; Grönvall, Erik; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2014-01-01

    ; a concert hall, an airport and a shopping mall. We gathered insights from more than 120 people, as they unexpectedly encountered the shape changing capabilities of the bench. By taking the user tests out of the lab and into the wild, we explored the influence of context on the users experience of a shape...

  16. Tethyan changes shaped aquatic diversification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hou, Zhonge; Li, Shuqiang

    2017-10-12

    The Tethys Ocean existed between the continents of Gondwana and Laurasia from the Triassic to the Pliocene. Analyses of multiple biogeographic and phylogenetic histories reveal that the subsequent breakup of the Tethys greatly influenced the distributions of many species. The ancestral Tethyan realm broke into five biogeographic provinces, including the present-day East Pacific, West Atlantic, East Atlantic, Mediterranean Sea, and Indo-West Pacific. Palaeogeographic maps illustrate the Mesozoic Atlantic opening, the Cenozoic closure of the Tethys, the Messinian Salinity Crisis, the mid-Miocene closure of the Central American Seaway, and Quaternary geological changes. Further, we consider Cenozoic sea-level changes and the formation of freshwater habitats. These reconstructions allow assessment of patterns of aquatic diversification for marine and freshwater animals, and comparison of vicariance and dispersal processes. Estimated divergence times indicate that fragmentation of the Tethys was responsible for the vicariant speciation of aquatic animals because these dates are consistent with associated tectonic events. The opening of the Atlantic Ocean during the Cretaceous is responsible for the earliest isolation between the West and East Atlantic. The mid-Miocene closure of the Tethys, which blocked global equatorial currents, appears to have isolated the Atlantic/Mediterranean Sea and Indo-West Pacific. Finally, formation of the Isthmus of Panama isolated East Pacific and West Atlantic marine organisms. Dispersals related to the Messinian Salinity Crisis and Quaternary sea-level changes influenced population structuring. Tethyan changes affected marine habitats, created new freshwater habitats, inland caves and ancient lakes along the Alps and Himalayas, and influenced anchialine caves at the edge of the ancient sea. The extensive new habitats provided opportunities for colonisation and rapid diversification. Future work should focus on testing the biological

  17. Preserving cell shape under environmental stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Boaz; Hardy, Robert W; McConnaughey, William B; Zuker, Charles S

    2008-03-20

    Maintaining cell shape and tone is crucial for the function and survival of cells and tissues. Mechanotransduction relies on the transformation of minuscule mechanical forces into high-fidelity electrical responses. When mechanoreceptors are stimulated, mechanically sensitive cation channels open and produce an inward transduction current that depolarizes the cell. For this process to operate effectively, the transduction machinery has to retain integrity and remain unfailingly independent of environmental changes. This is particularly challenging for poikilothermic organisms, where changes in temperature in the environment may impact the function of mechanoreceptor neurons. Thus, we wondered how insects whose habitat might quickly vary over several tens of degrees of temperature manage to maintain highly effective mechanical senses. We screened for Drosophila mutants with defective mechanical responses at elevated ambient temperatures, and identified a gene, spam, whose role is to protect the mechanosensory organ from massive cellular deformation caused by heat-induced osmotic imbalance. Here we show that Spam protein forms an extracellular shield that guards mechanosensory neurons from environmental insult. Remarkably, heterologously expressed Spam protein also endowed other cells with superb defence against physically and chemically induced deformation. We studied the mechanical impact of Spam coating and show that spam-coated cells are up to ten times stiffer than uncoated controls. Together, these results help explain how poikilothermic organisms preserve the architecture of critical cells during environmental stress, and illustrate an elegant and simple solution to such challenge.

  18. Preserving cell shape under environmental stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cook, Boaz; Hardy, Robert W.; McConnaughey, William B.; Zuker, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    Maintaining cell shape and tone is crucial for the function and survival of cells and tissues. Mechanotransduction relies on the transformation of minuscule mechanical forces into high-fidelity electrical responses1 2 3. When mechanoreceptors are stimulated, mechanically sensitive cation channels open and produce an inward transduction current that depolarizes the cell. For this process to operate effectively, the transduction machinery has to retain integrity and remain unfailingly independent of environmental changes. This is particularly challenging for poikilothermic organisms, where changes in temperature in the environment may impact the function of mechanoreceptor neurons. Thus, we wondered how insects whose habitat might quickly vary over several tens of degrees of temperature manage to maintain highly effective mechanical senses. We screened for Drosophila mutants with defective mechanical responses at elevated ambient temperatures, and identified a gene, spam, whose role is to protect the mechanosensory organ from massive cellular deformation caused by heat-induced osmotic imbalance. Here, we show that Spam protein forms an extracellular shield that guards mechanosensory neurons from environmental insult. Remarkably, heterologously expressed Spam protein also endowed other cells with superb defense against physically- and chemically-induced deformation. We studied the mechanical impact of Spam-coating and show that spam-coated cells are up to ten times stiffer than uncoated-controls. Together, these results help explain how poikilothermic organisms preserve the architecture of critical cells during environmental stress, and illustrate an elegant and simple solution to such challenge. PMID:18297055

  19. Mechanism of shape determination in motile cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keren, Kinneret; Pincus, Zachary; Allen, Greg M; Barnhart, Erin L; Marriott, Gerard; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A

    2008-05-22

    The shape of motile cells is determined by many dynamic processes spanning several orders of magnitude in space and time, from local polymerization of actin monomers at subsecond timescales to global, cell-scale geometry that may persist for hours. Understanding the mechanism of shape determination in cells has proved to be extremely challenging due to the numerous components involved and the complexity of their interactions. Here we harness the natural phenotypic variability in a large population of motile epithelial keratocytes from fish (Hypsophrys nicaraguensis) to reveal mechanisms of shape determination. We find that the cells inhabit a low-dimensional, highly correlated spectrum of possible functional states. We further show that a model of actin network treadmilling in an inextensible membrane bag can quantitatively recapitulate this spectrum and predict both cell shape and speed. Our model provides a simple biochemical and biophysical basis for the observed morphology and behaviour of motile cells.

  20. Shape memory activation can affect cell seeding of shape memory polymer scaffolds designed for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jing; Brasch, Megan E; Baker, Richard M; Tseng, Ling-Fang; Peña, Alexis N; Henderson, James H

    2017-08-31

    The ability of a three-dimensional scaffold to support cell seeding prior to implantation is a critical criterion for many scaffold-based tissue engineering and regenerative medicine strategies. Shape memory polymer functionality may present important new opportunities and challenges in cell seeding, but the extent to which shape memory activation can positively or negatively affect cell seeding has yet to be reported. The goal of this study was to determine whether shape memory activation can affect cell seeding. The hypothesis was that shape memory activation of porous scaffolds during cell seeding can affect both the number of cells seeded in a scaffold and the distribution (in terms of average infiltration distance) of cells following seeding. Here, we used a porous shape memory foam scaffold programmed to expand when triggered to study cell number and average cell infiltration distance following shape memory activation. We found that shape memory activation can affect both the number of cells and the average cell infiltration distance. The effect was found to be a function of rate of shape change and scaffold pore interconnectivity. Magnitude of shape change had no effect. Only reductions in cell number and infiltration distance (relative to control and benchmark) were observed. The findings suggest that strategies for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine that involve shape memory activation in the presence of a cell-containing medium in vitro or in vivo should consider how recovery rate and scaffold pore interconnectivity may ultimately impact cell seeding.

  1. Cell shape, cytoskeletal mechanics, and cell cycle control in angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D. E.; Prusty, D.; Sun, Z.; Betensky, H.; Wang, N.

    1995-01-01

    when cytoskeletal stiffness was measured directly in living cells using magnetic twisting cytometry. These results emphasize the importance of matrix-dependent changes in cell and nuclear shape as well as higher order structural interactions between different cytoskeletal filament systems for control of capillary cell growth during angiogenesis.

  2. Light-dependent governance of cell shape dimensions in cyanobacteria

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Beronda L Montgomery

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available The regulation of cellular dimension is important for the function and survival of cells. Cellular dimensions, such as size and shape, are regulated throughout the life cycle of bacteria and can be adapted in response to environmental changes to fine-tune cellular fitness. Cell size and shape are generally coordinated with cell growth and division. Cytoskeletal regulation of cell shape and cell wall biosynthesis and/or deposition occurs in a range of organisms. Photosynthetic organisms, such as cyanobacteria, particularly exhibit light-dependent regulation of morphogenes and generation of reactive oxygen species and other signals that can impact cellular dimensions. Environmental signals initiate adjustments of cellular dimensions, which may be vitally important for optimizing resource acquisition and utilization or for coupling the cellular dimensions with the regulation of subcellular organization to maintain optimal metabolism. Although the involvement of cytoskeletal components in the regulation of cell shape is widely accepted, the signaling factors that regulate cytoskeletal and other distinct components involved in cell shape control, particularly in response to changes in external light cues, remain to be fully elucidated. In this review, factors impacting the inter-coordination of growth and division, the relationship between the regulation of cellular dimensions and central carbon metabolism, and consideration of the effects of specific environment signals, primarily light, on cell dimensions in cyanobacteria will be discussed. Current knowledge about the molecular bases of the light-dependent regulation of cellular dimensions and cell shape in cyanobacteria will be highlighted.

  3. Modeling the Shapes of Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garimella, Umadevi I.; Robertson, Belinda M.

    2015-01-01

    A solid understanding of the structure and function of cells can help establish the foundation for learning advanced concepts in the biological sciences. The concept of the cell is introduced in middle school life science courses and is continued at the undergraduate level in college (NRC 2012; Reece et al. 2014). Cells are introduced to students…

  4. Oriented Shape Index Histograms for Cell Classification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo; Dahl, Anders Bjorholm; Larsen, Rasmus

    2015-01-01

    evaluate our new feature descriptor using a public dataset consisting of HEp-2 cell images from indirect immunoflourescence lighting. Our results show that we can improve classification performance significantly when including the shape index orientation. Notably, we show that shape index orientation...

  5. Reconfigurable assemblies of shape-changing nanorods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, Trung Dac; Glotzer, Sharon C

    2010-05-25

    Reconfigurable nanostructures represent an exciting new direction for materials. Applications of reversible transformations between nanostructures induced by molecular conformations under external fields can be found in a broad range of advanced technologies including smart materials, electromagnetic sensors, and drug delivery. With recent breakthroughs in synthesis and fabrication techniques, shape-changing nanoparticles are now possible. Such novel building blocks provide a conceptually new and exciting approach to self-assembly and phase transformations by providing tunable parameters fundamentally different from the usual thermodynamic parameters. Here we investigate via molecular simulation a transformation between two thermodynamically stable structures self-assembled by laterally tethered nanorods whose rod length is switched between two values. Building blocks with longer rods assemble into a square grid structure, while those with short rods form bilayer sheets with internal smectic A ordering at the same thermodynamic conditions. By shortening or lengthening the rods over a short time scale relative to the system equilibration time, we observe a transformation from the square grid structure into bilayer sheets, and vice versa. We also observe honeycomb grid and pentagonal grid structures for intermediate rod lengths. The reconfiguration between morphologically distinct nanostructures induced by dynamically switching the building block shape serves to motivate the fabrication of shape-changing nanoscale building blocks as a new approach to the self-assembly of reconfigurable materials.

  6. Shape change in mouthguard sheets during thermoforming.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Mutsumi; Koide, Kaoru; Satoh, Yoshihide; Iwasaki, Shin-Ichi

    2016-10-01

    The purpose of this study was to identify changes in sheet shape during thermoforming and the effect of the model position in the molding machine on fabricated mouthguard thickness. Ethylene vinyl acetate mouthguard sheets (3.8 mm thick) were used that had cross-stripes (10 × 10 mm), and the anteroposterior and bilateral lengths were used for measurements. Two forming machines were used: a vacuum- and a pressure-forming machine, and two heating conditions were investigated that defined as the time when sagging of the softened sheet was 15 mm (H-15) and 20 mm (H-20) below the clamp, and the length of each cross-stripes was measured. The area of each lattice was calculated using Bretschneider's formula to compare changes in sheet shape for each condition. Next, mouthguards were molded by forming machine where the working model was positioned under two different conditions: with the model anterior centered in the forming unit and with the model centered. The sheet thickness after fabrication was determined for the incisal and the molar portion, and dimensional measurements were obtained using a measuring device. Differences in the thickness were analyzed by two-way analysis of variance (anova). In both molding machines, the change in the area under H-20 was greater than H-15. While the increase in area tended to expand from the center of the sheet in concentric circles, the difference between the central and surrounding areas was only approximately 5%. For both molding machines, differences in thickness after molding due to setting position of the model were not observed. The results showed that shape changes of the sheet during thermoforming tend to concentrically and almost uniformly expand from the center and that it is important to center the sheet and the model when positioning the model in the forming unit. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  7. Memorizing Shape to Orient Cell Division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michel, Marcus; Dahmann, Christian

    2016-03-21

    A century ago, Oscar Hertwig discovered that cells orient their cleavage plane orthogonal to their long axis. Reporting recently in Nature, Bosveld et al. (2016) shed light on how, showing that NuMA/Mud localization at tricellular junctions provides mitotic cells with the memory of interphase shape used to orient cleavage plane. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. Cell shape regulates global histone acetylation in human mammaryepithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Le Beyec, Johanne; Xu, Ren; Lee, Sun-Young; Nelson, Celeste M.; Rizki, Aylin; Alcaraz, Jordi; Bissell, Mina J.

    2007-02-28

    Extracellular matrix (ECM) regulates cell morphology and gene expression in vivo; these relationships are maintained in three-dimensional (3D) cultures of mammary epithelial cells. In the presence of laminin-rich ECM (lrECM), mammary epithelial cells round up and undergo global histone deacetylation, a process critical for their functional differentiation. However, it remains unclear whether lrECM-dependent cell rounding and global histone deacetylation are indeed part of a common physical-biochemical pathway. Using 3D cultures as well as nonadhesive and micropatterned substrata, here we showed that the cell 'rounding' caused by lrECM was sufficient to induce deacetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the absence of biochemical cues. Microarray and confocal analysis demonstrated that this deacetylation in 3D culture is associated with a global increase in chromatin condensation and a reduction in gene expression. Whereas cells cultured on plastic substrata formed prominent stress fibers, cells grown in 3D lrECM or on micropatterns lacked these structures. Disruption of the actin cytoskeleton with cytochalasin D phenocopied the lrECM-induced cell rounding and histone deacetylation. These results reveal a novel link between ECM-controlled cell shape and chromatin structure, and suggest that this link is mediated by changes in the actin cytoskeleton.

  9. Preserving cell shape under environmental stress

    OpenAIRE

    Cook, Boaz; Hardy, Robert W.; McConnaughey, William B.; Zuker, Charles S.

    2008-01-01

    Maintaining cell shape and tone is crucial for the function and survival of cells and tissues. Mechanotransduction relies on the transformation of minuscule mechanical forces into high-fidelity electrical responses1 2 3. When mechanoreceptors are stimulated, mechanically sensitive cation channels open and produce an inward transduction current that depolarizes the cell. For this process to operate effectively, the transduction machinery has to retain integrity and remain unfailingly independe...

  10. Bacterial Cell Wall Growth, Shape and Division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Derouaux, A.; Terrak, M.; den Blaauwen, T.; Vollmer, W.; Remaut, H.; Fronzes, R.

    2014-01-01

    The shape of a bacterial cell is maintained by its peptidoglycan sacculus that completely surrounds the cytoplasmic membrane. During growth the sacculus is enlarged by peptidoglycan synthesis complexes that are controlled by components linked to the cytoskeleton and, in Gram-negative bacteria, by

  11. Mechanochemical Polarization of Contiguous Cell Walls Shapes Plant Pavement Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majda, Mateusz; Grones, Peter; Sintorn, Ida-Maria; Vain, Thomas; Milani, Pascale; Krupinski, Pawel; Zagórska-Marek, Beata; Viotti, Corrado; Jönsson, Henrik; Mellerowicz, Ewa J; Hamant, Olivier; Robert, Stéphanie

    2017-11-06

    The epidermis of aerial plant organs is thought to be limiting for growth, because it acts as a continuous load-bearing layer, resisting tension. Leaf epidermis contains jigsaw puzzle piece-shaped pavement cells whose shape has been proposed to be a result of subcellular variations in expansion rate that induce local buckling events. Paradoxically, such local compressive buckling should not occur given the tensile stresses across the epidermis. Using computational modeling, we show that the simplest scenario to explain pavement cell shapes within an epidermis under tension must involve mechanical wall heterogeneities across and along the anticlinal pavement cell walls between adjacent cells. Combining genetics, atomic force microscopy, and immunolabeling, we demonstrate that contiguous cell walls indeed exhibit hybrid mechanochemical properties. Such biochemical wall heterogeneities precede wall bending. Altogether, this provides a possible mechanism for the generation of complex plant cell shapes. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Exploring the Design Space of Shape-Changing Objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Merritt, Timothy; Petersen, Marianne Graves; Nørgaard, Mie

    2015-01-01

    -changing interfaces is a growing area in HCI design research and that authors often shy away from articulating the special qualities brought to a design by using changing shape to communicate information, we set out to explore shape changing interfaces through a series of sketching experiments through the support...... for the further expansion of the design space of shape changing interfaces relating to the perception and understanding of behaviour, causality and the mechanics involved in shape change events, which we call “Imagined Physics.” This concept is described along with additional insights into the qualities of shape...

  13. Exploring the design space of shape-changing objects

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nørgaard, Mie; Merritt, Timothy Robert; Rasmussen, Majken

    2013-01-01

    -changing interfaces is a growing area in HCI design research and that authors often shy away from articulating the special qualities brought to a design by using changing shape to communicate information, we set out to explore shape changing interfaces through a series of sketching experiments through the support...... for the further expansion of the design space of shape changing interfaces relating to the perception and understanding of behaviour, causality and the mechanics involved in shape change events, which we call "Imagined Physics." This concept is described along with additional insights into the qualities of shape...

  14. Shaping the Public Dialogue on Climate Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzer, W.; Anderson, J. C.

    2012-12-01

    In order to broaden the public dialogue about climate change, climate scientists need to leverage the potential of informal science education and recent advances in social and cognitive science. In the US, more than 1,500 informal science venues (science centers, museums, aquariums, zoos, nature centers, national parks, etc.) are visited annually by 61% of the population. Extensive research shows that these visitors are receptive to learning about climate change and trust these institutions as reliable sources. Given that we spend less than 5% of our lifetime in a classroom, and only a fraction of that is focused on science, informal science venues will continue to play a critical role in shaping public understanding of environmental issues in the years ahead. Public understanding of climate change continues to lag far behind the scientific consensus not merely because the public lacks information, but because there is in fact too much complex and contradictory information available. Fortunately, we can now (1) build on careful empirical cognitive and social science research to understand what people already value, believe, and understand; and then (2) design and test strategies for translating complex science so that people can examine evidence, make well-informed inferences, and embrace science-based solutions. The New England Aquarium is leading a national effort to enable informal science education institutions to effectively communicate the impacts of climate change and ocean acidification on marine ecosystems. This NSF-funded partnership, the National Network for Ocean and Climate Change Interpretation (NNOCCI), involves the Association of Zoos and Aquariums, FrameWorks Institute, Woods Hole Oceanographic Institution, Monterey Bay Aquarium, and National Aquarium, with evaluation conducted by the New Knowledge Organization, Pennsylvania State University, and Ohio State University. We believe that skilled interpreters can serve as "communication strategists" by

  15. Shape Changes and Interaction Mechanism of Escherichia coli Cells Treated with Sericin and Use of a Sericin-Based Hydrogel for Wound Healing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Rui; Liu, Yalong; Zhang, Qingsong; Liang, Congcong; Qin, Huazhen; Liu, Pengfei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Li; Wei, Yen

    2016-08-01

    To verify the interaction mechanism between sericin and Escherichia coli, especially the morphological and structural changes in the bacterial cells, the antimicrobial activity of sericin against E. coli as a model for Gram-negative bacteria was investigated. The antibacterial activity of sericin on E. coli and the interaction mechanism were investigated in this study by analyzing the growth, integrity, and morphology of the bacterial cells following treatment with sericin. The changes in morphology and cellular compositions of bacterial cells treated with sericin were observed by an inverted fluorescence microscope, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Changes in electrical conductivity, total sugar concentration of the broth for the bacteria, and protein expression of the bacteria were determined to investigate the permeability of the cell membrane. A sericin-based hydrogel was prepared for an in vivo study of wound dressing. The results showed that the antibacterial activity of the hydrogel increased with the increase in the concentration of sericin from 10 g/liter to 40 g/liter. The introduction of sericin induces membrane blebbing of E. coli cells caused by antibiotic action on the cell membrane. The cytoplasm shrinkage phenomenon was accompanied by blurring of the membrane wall boundaries. When E. coli cells were treated with sericin, release of intracellular components quickly increased. The electrical conductivity assay indicated that the charged ions are reduced after exposure to sericin so that the integrity of the cell membrane is weakened and metabolism is blocked. In addition, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that sericin hinders the expression of bacterial protein. Sericin may damage the integrity of the bacterial cell membrane, thereby eventually inhibiting the growth and reproduction of E. coli Compared to sterile gauze, the sericin-based hydrogel promoted fibroblast cell

  16. Shape Changes and Interaction Mechanism of Escherichia coli Cells Treated with Sericin and Use of a Sericin-Based Hydrogel for Wound Healing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xue, Rui; Liu, Yalong; Liang, Congcong; Qin, Huazhen; Liu, Pengfei; Wang, Ke; Zhang, Xiaoyong; Chen, Li

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT To verify the interaction mechanism between sericin and Escherichia coli, especially the morphological and structural changes in the bacterial cells, the antimicrobial activity of sericin against E. coli as a model for Gram-negative bacteria was investigated. The antibacterial activity of sericin on E. coli and the interaction mechanism were investigated in this study by analyzing the growth, integrity, and morphology of the bacterial cells following treatment with sericin. The changes in morphology and cellular compositions of bacterial cells treated with sericin were observed by an inverted fluorescence microscope, scanning electron microscopy, and transmission electron microscopy. Changes in electrical conductivity, total sugar concentration of the broth for the bacteria, and protein expression of the bacteria were determined to investigate the permeability of the cell membrane. A sericin-based hydrogel was prepared for an in vivo study of wound dressing. The results showed that the antibacterial activity of the hydrogel increased with the increase in the concentration of sericin from 10 g/liter to 40 g/liter. The introduction of sericin induces membrane blebbing of E. coli cells caused by antibiotic action on the cell membrane. The cytoplasm shrinkage phenomenon was accompanied by blurring of the membrane wall boundaries. When E. coli cells were treated with sericin, release of intracellular components quickly increased. The electrical conductivity assay indicated that the charged ions are reduced after exposure to sericin so that the integrity of the cell membrane is weakened and metabolism is blocked. In addition, sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis demonstrated that sericin hinders the expression of bacterial protein. Sericin may damage the integrity of the bacterial cell membrane, thereby eventually inhibiting the growth and reproduction of E. coli. Compared to sterile gauze, the sericin-based hydrogel promoted fibroblast cell

  17. Cytoskeletal influences on nuclear shape in granulocytic HL-60 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Olins, Ada L; Olins, Donald E

    2004-08-19

    During granulopoiesis in the bone marrow, the nucleus differentiates from ovoid to lobulated shape. Addition of retinoic acid (RA) to leukemic HL-60 cells induces development of lobulated nuclei, furnishing a convenient model system for nuclear differentiation during granulopoiesis. Previous studies from our laboratory have implicated nuclear envelope composition as playing important roles in nuclear shape changes. Specifically noted were: 1) a paucity of lamins A/C and B1 in the undifferentiated and RA treated cell forms; 2) an elevation of lamin B receptor (LBR) during induced granulopoiesis. The present study demonstrates that perturbation of cytoskeletal elements influences nuclear differentiation of HL-60 cells. Because of cytotoxicity from prolonged exposure to cytoskeleton-modifying drugs, most studies were performed with a Bcl-2 overexpressing HL-60 subline. We have found that: 1) nocodazole prevents RA induction of lobulation; 2) taxol induces lobulation and micronuclear formation, even in the absence of RA; 3) cytochalasin D does not inhibit RA induced nuclear lobulation, and prolonged exposure induces nuclear shape changes in the absence of RA. The present results, in the context of earlier data and models, suggest a mechanism for granulocytic nuclear lobulation. Our current hypothesis is that the nuclear shape change involves factors that increase the flexibility of the nuclear envelope (reduced lamin content), augment connections to the underlying heterochromatin (increased levels of LBR) and promote distortions imposed by the cytoskeleton (microtubule motors creating tension in the nuclear envelope).

  18. Cytoskeletal influences on nuclear shape in granulocytic HL-60 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olins Donald E

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background During granulopoiesis in the bone marrow, the nucleus differentiates from ovoid to lobulated shape. Addition of retinoic acid (RA to leukemic HL-60 cells induces development of lobulated nuclei, furnishing a convenient model system for nuclear differentiation during granulopoiesis. Previous studies from our laboratory have implicated nuclear envelope composition as playing important roles in nuclear shape changes. Specifically noted were: 1 a paucity of lamins A/C and B1 in the undifferentiated and RA treated cell forms; 2 an elevation of lamin B receptor (LBR during induced granulopoiesis. Results The present study demonstrates that perturbation of cytoskeletal elements influences nuclear differentiation of HL-60 cells. Because of cytotoxicity from prolonged exposure to cytoskeleton-modifying drugs, most studies were performed with a Bcl-2 overexpressing HL-60 subline. We have found that: 1 nocodazole prevents RA induction of lobulation; 2 taxol induces lobulation and micronuclear formation, even in the absence of RA; 3 cytochalasin D does not inhibit RA induced nuclear lobulation, and prolonged exposure induces nuclear shape changes in the absence of RA. Conclusions The present results, in the context of earlier data and models, suggest a mechanism for granulocytic nuclear lobulation. Our current hypothesis is that the nuclear shape change involves factors that increase the flexibility of the nuclear envelope (reduced lamin content, augment connections to the underlying heterochromatin (increased levels of LBR and promote distortions imposed by the cytoskeleton (microtubule motors creating tension in the nuclear envelope.

  19. p53 shapes genome-wide and cell type-specific changes in microRNA expression during the human DNA damage response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hattori, Hiroyoshi; Janky, Rekin's; Nietfeld, Wilfried; Aerts, Stein; Madan Babu, M; Venkitaraman, Ashok R

    2014-01-01

    The human DNA damage response (DDR) triggers profound changes in gene expression, whose nature and regulation remain uncertain. Although certain micro-(mi)RNA species including miR34, miR-18, miR-16 and miR-143 have been implicated in the DDR, there is as yet no comprehensive description of genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs triggered by DNA breakage in human cells. We have used next-generation sequencing (NGS), combined with rigorous integrative computational analyses, to describe genome-wide changes in the expression of miRNAs during the human DDR. The changes affect 150 of 1523 miRNAs known in miRBase v18 from 4-24 h after the induction of DNA breakage, in cell-type dependent patterns. The regulatory regions of the most-highly regulated miRNA species are enriched in conserved binding sites for p53. Indeed, genome-wide changes in miRNA expression during the DDR are markedly altered in TP53-/- cells compared to otherwise isogenic controls. The expression levels of certain damage-induced, p53-regulated miRNAs in cancer samples correlate with patient survival. Our work reveals genome-wide and cell type-specific alterations in miRNA expression during the human DDR, which are regulated by the tumor suppressor protein p53. These findings provide a genomic resource to identify new molecules and mechanisms involved in the DDR, and to examine their role in tumor suppression and the clinical outcome of cancer patients.

  20. On the shape memory of red blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordasco, Daniel; Bagchi, Prosenjit

    2017-04-01

    , followed by a slow recovery to the biconcave shape combined with membrane rotation, and a final rotational return of the membrane elements back to their original locations. A fast time scale on the order of a few hundred milliseconds characterizes the initial compression phase while a slow time scale on the order of tens of seconds is associated with the rotational phase. We observe that the response is strongly dependent on the stress-free state of the cells, that is, the relaxation time decreases significantly and the mode of recovery changes from rotation-driven to deformation-driven as the stress-free state becomes more non-spherical. We show that while membrane shear elasticity and non-spherical stress-free shape are necessary and sufficient for the membrane elements to return to their original locations, bending rigidity is needed for the "global" recovery of the biconcave shape. We also perform a novel relaxation simulation in which the cell axis of revolution is not aligned with the shear plane and show that the shape memory is exhibited even when the membrane elements are displaced normal to the imposed flow direction. The results presented here could motivate new experiments to determine the exact stress-free state of the RBC and also to clearly identify different tank-treading modes.

  1. Ontogenetic Shape Change in the Chicken Brain: Implications for Paleontology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawabe, Soichiro; Matsuda, Seiji; Tsunekawa, Naoki; Endo, Hideki

    2015-01-01

    Paleontologists have investigated brain morphology of extinct birds with little information on post-hatching changes in avian brain morphology. Without the knowledge of ontogenesis, assessing brain morphology in fossil taxa could lead to misinterpretation of the phylogeny or neurosensory development of extinct species. Hence, it is imperative to determine how avian brain morphology changes during post-hatching growth. In this study, chicken brain shape was compared at various developmental stages using three-dimensional (3D) geometric morphometric analysis and the growth rate of brain regions was evaluated to explore post-hatching morphological changes. Microscopic MRI (μMRI) was used to acquire in vivo data from living and post-mortem chicken brains. The telencephalon rotates caudoventrally during growth. This change in shape leads to a relative caudodorsal rotation of the cerebellum and myelencephalon. In addition, all brain regions elongate rostrocaudally and this leads to a more slender brain shape. The growth rates of each brain region were constant and the slopes from the growth formula were parallel. The dominant pattern of ontogenetic shape change corresponded with interspecific shape changes due to increasing brain size. That is, the interspecific and ontogenetic changes in brain shape due to increased size have similar patterns. Although the shape of the brain and each brain region changed considerably, the volume ratio of each brain region did not change. This suggests that the brain can change its shape after completing functional differentiation of the brain regions. Moreover, these results show that consideration of ontogenetic changes in brain shape is necessary for an accurate assessment of brain morphology in paleontological studies.

  2. Ontogenetic Shape Change in the Chicken Brain: Implications for Paleontology.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soichiro Kawabe

    Full Text Available Paleontologists have investigated brain morphology of extinct birds with little information on post-hatching changes in avian brain morphology. Without the knowledge of ontogenesis, assessing brain morphology in fossil taxa could lead to misinterpretation of the phylogeny or neurosensory development of extinct species. Hence, it is imperative to determine how avian brain morphology changes during post-hatching growth. In this study, chicken brain shape was compared at various developmental stages using three-dimensional (3D geometric morphometric analysis and the growth rate of brain regions was evaluated to explore post-hatching morphological changes. Microscopic MRI (μMRI was used to acquire in vivo data from living and post-mortem chicken brains. The telencephalon rotates caudoventrally during growth. This change in shape leads to a relative caudodorsal rotation of the cerebellum and myelencephalon. In addition, all brain regions elongate rostrocaudally and this leads to a more slender brain shape. The growth rates of each brain region were constant and the slopes from the growth formula were parallel. The dominant pattern of ontogenetic shape change corresponded with interspecific shape changes due to increasing brain size. That is, the interspecific and ontogenetic changes in brain shape due to increased size have similar patterns. Although the shape of the brain and each brain region changed considerably, the volume ratio of each brain region did not change. This suggests that the brain can change its shape after completing functional differentiation of the brain regions. Moreover, these results show that consideration of ontogenetic changes in brain shape is necessary for an accurate assessment of brain morphology in paleontological studies.

  3. Photo-Responsive Shape-Memory and Shape-Changing Liquid-Crystal Polymer Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Danish Iqbal

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available “Surrounding matters” is a phrase that has become more significant in recent times when discussing polymeric materials. Although regular polymers do respond to external stimuli like softening of material at higher temperatures, that response is gradual and linear in nature. Smart polymers (SPs or stimuli-responsive polymers (SRPs behave differently to those external stimuli, as their behavior is more rapid and nonlinear in nature and even a small magnitude of external stimulus can cause noticeable changes in their shape, size, color or conductivity. Of these SRPs, two types of SPs with the ability to actively change can be differentiated: shape-memory polymers and shape-changing polymers. The uniqueness of these materials lies not only in the fast macroscopic changes occurring in their structure but also in that some of these shape changes are reversible. This paper presents a brief review of current progress in the area of light activated shape-memory polymers and shape-changing polymers and their possible field of applications.

  4. Late Quaternary climate change shapes island biodiversity

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Weigelt, Patrick; Steinbauer, Manuel; Cabral, Juliano

    2016-01-01

    Island biogeographical models consider islands either as geologically static with biodiversity resulting from ecologically neutral immigration–extinction dynamics1, or as geologically dynamic with biodiversity resulting from immigration–speciation–extinction dynamics influenced by changes in island...... sea levels3, 4 and caused massive changes in island area, isolation and connectivity5, orders of magnitude faster than the geological processes of island formation, subsidence and erosion considered in island theory2, 6. Consequences of these oscillations for present biodiversity remain unassessed5, 7...

  5. Ordered patterns of cell shape and orientational correlation during spontaneous cell migration.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yusuke T Maeda

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In the absence of stimuli, most motile eukaryotic cells move by spontaneously coordinating cell deformation with cell movement in the absence of stimuli. Yet little is known about how cells change their own shape and how cells coordinate the deformation and movement. Here, we investigated the mechanism of spontaneous cell migration by using computational analyses. METHODOLOGY: We observed spontaneously migrating Dictyostelium cells in both a vegetative state (round cell shape and slow motion and starved one (elongated cell shape and fast motion. We then extracted regular patterns of morphological dynamics and the pattern-dependent systematic coordination with filamentous actin (F-actin and cell movement by statistical dynamic analyses. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We found that Dictyostelium cells in both vegetative and starved states commonly organize their own shape into three ordered patterns, elongation, rotation, and oscillation, in the absence of external stimuli. Further, cells inactivated for PI3-kinase (PI3K and/or PTEN did not show ordered patterns due to the lack of spatial control in pseudopodial formation in both the vegetative and starved states. We also found that spontaneous polarization was achieved in starved cells by asymmetric localization of PTEN and F-actin. This breaking of the symmetry of protein localization maintained the leading edge and considerably enhanced the persistence of directed migration, and overall random exploration was ensured by switching among the different ordered patterns. Our findings suggest that Dictyostelium cells spontaneously create the ordered patterns of cell shape mediated by PI3K/PTEN/F-actin and control the direction of cell movement by coordination with these patterns even in the absence of external stimuli.

  6. HLA DR and AB surface antigens correlate with cell shape (surface area).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ende, N; Ritter, A B

    1998-01-01

    In order to help explain some of the various phenomena associated with both benign and malignant cells, this study was undertaken to determine if changes in the shape of the cell could alter the recognition of the cell. Non-transformed Human cells, HEL 299, were evaluated for their shape and surface antigens. A direct statistical correlation was found between the two surface antigens HLA AB and DR and the cell shape (surface area). The possible significance of this phenomena in non transformed human cells to neoplastic proliferation is suggested.

  7. HEp-2 Cell Classification Using Shape Index Histograms With Donut-Shaped Spatial Pooling

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Anders Boesen Lindbo; Vestergaard, Jacob Schack; Larsen, Rasmus

    2014-01-01

    We present a new method for automatic classification of indirect immunoflourescence images of HEp-2 cells into different staining pattern classes. Our method is based on a new texture measure called shape index histograms that captures second-order image structure at multiple scales. Moreover, we...... datasets. Our results show that shape index histograms are superior to other popular texture descriptors for HEp-2 cell classification. Moreover, when comparing to other automated systems for HEp-2 cell classification we show that shape index histograms are very competitive; especially considering...

  8. Overexpression of the downward leaf curling (DLC) gene from melon changes leaf morphology by controlling cell size and shape in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kee, Jae-Jun; Jun, Sang Eun; Baek, Seung-A; Lee, Tae-Soo; Cho, Myung Rae; Hwang, Hyun-Sik; Lee, Suk-Chan; Kim, Jongkee; Kim, Gyung-Tae; Im, Kyung-Hoan

    2009-08-31

    A plant-specific gene was cloned from melon fruit. This gene was named downward leaf curling (CmDLC) based on the phenotype of transgenic Arabidopsis plants overexpressing the gene. This expression level of this gene was especially upregulated during melon fruit enlargement. Overexpression of CmDLC in Arabidopsis resulted in dwarfism and narrow, epinastically curled leaves. These phenotypes were found to be caused by a reduction in cell number and cell size on the adaxial and abaxial sides of the epidermis, with a greater reduction on the abaxial side of the leaves. These phenotypic characteristics, combined with the more wavy morphology of epidermal cells in overexpression lines, indicate that CmDLC overexpression affects cell elongation and cell morphology. To investigate intracellular protein localization, a CmDLC-GFP fusion protein was made and expressed in onion epidermal cells. This protein was observed to be preferentially localized close to the cell membrane. Thus, we report here a new plant-specific gene that is localized to the cell membrane and that controls leaf cell number, size and morphology.

  9. Virtual work and shape change in solid mechanics

    CERN Document Server

    Frémond, Michel

    2017-01-01

    This book provides novel insights into two basic subjects in solid mechanics: virtual work and shape change. When we move a solid, the work we expend in moving it is used to modify both its shape and its velocity. This observation leads to the Principle of Virtual Work. Virtual work depends linearly on virtual velocities, which are velocities we may think of. The virtual work of the internal forces accounts for the changes in shape. Engineering provides innumerable examples of shape changes, i.e., deformations, and of velocities of deformation. This book presents examples of usual and unusual shape changes, providing with the Principle of Virtual Work various and sometimes new equations of motion for smooth and non-smooth (i.e., with collisions) motions: systems of disks, systems of balls, classical and non-classical small deformation theories, systems involving volume and surface damage, systems with interactions at a distance (e.g., solids reinforced by fibers), systems involving porosity, beams with third ...

  10. Cell shape and organelle modification in apoptotic U937 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MR Montinari

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available U937 cells induced to apoptosis, progressively and dramatically modified their cell shape by intense blebbing formation, leading to the production of apoptotic bodies. The blebs evolved with time; milder forms of blebbing involving only a region or just the cortical part of the cytoplasm were observed within the first hour of incubation with puromycin; blebbing involving the whole cell body with very deep constrictions is the most frequent event observed during late times of incubation. The ultrastructural analysis of apoptotic cells revealed characteristic features of nuclear fragmentation (budding and cleavage mode and cytoplasmatic modifications. The cytoplasm of blebs does not contain organelles, such as ribosomes or mitochondria. Scarce presence of endoplasmic reticulum can be observed at the site of bleb detachment. However, blebbing is a dispensable event as evaluated by using inhibitor of actin polymerization. In the present study, the progressive modifications of the nucleus, mitochondria, nuclear fragmentation, cytoplasmic blebs formation and production of apoptotic bodies in U937 monocytic cells induced to apoptosis by puromycin (an inhibitor of protein synthesis were simultaneously analyzed.

  11. Identification and initial characterisation of a protein involved in Campylobacter jejuni cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Esson, Diane; Gupta, Srishti; Bailey, David; Wigley, Paul; Wedley, Amy; Mather, Alison E; Méric, Guillaume; Mastroeni, Pietro; Sheppard, Samuel K; Thomson, Nicholas R; Parkhill, Julian; Maskell, Duncan J; Christie, Graham; Grant, Andrew J

    2017-03-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is the leading cause of bacterial food borne illness. While helical cell shape is considered important for C. jejuni pathogenesis, this bacterium is capable of adopting other morphologies. To better understand how helical-shaped C. jejuni maintain their shape and thus any associated colonisation, pathogenicity or other advantage, it is first important to identify the genes and proteins involved. So far, two peptidoglycan modifying enzymes Pgp1 and Pgp2 have been shown to be required for C. jejuni helical cell shape. We performed a visual screen of ∼2000 transposon mutants of C. jejuni for cell shape mutants. Whole genome sequence data of the mutants with altered cell shape, directed mutants, wild type stocks and isolated helical and rod-shaped 'wild type' C. jejuni, identified a number of different mutations in pgp1 and pgp2, which result in a change in helical to rod bacterial cell shape. We also identified an isolate with a loss of curvature. In this study, we have identified the genomic change in this isolate, and found that targeted deletion of the gene with the change resulted in bacteria with loss of curvature. Helical cell shape was restored by supplying the gene in trans. We examined the effect of loss of the gene on bacterial motility, adhesion and invasion of tissue culture cells and chicken colonisation, as well as the effect on the muropeptide profile of the peptidoglycan sacculus. Our work identifies another factor involved in helical cell shape. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  12. Aerodynamically-Actuated Radical Shape-Change Concept

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ivanco, Thomas G.; Ivanco, Marie L.; Ancel, Ersin; Grubb, Amanda L.; Prasad, Supranamaaya

    2017-01-01

    Aerodynamically-actuated radical shape change (AARSC) is a novel concept that enables flight vehicles to conduct a mission profile containing radically different flight regimes while possibly mitigating the typical penalties incurred by radical geometric change. Weight penalties are mitigated by utilizing a primary flight control to generate aerodynamic loads that then drive a shape-change actuation. The flight mission profile used to analyze the AARSC concept is that of a transport aircraft that cruises at a lower altitude than typical transports. Based upon a preliminary analysis, substantial fuel savings are realized for mission ranges below 2000 NM by comparison to a state-of-the-art baseline, with an increasing impact as mission range is reduced. The predicted savings are so significant at short-haul ranges that the shape-change concept rivals the fuel-burn performance of turboprop aircraft while completing missions in less time than typical jet aircraft. Lower-altitude cruise has also been sought after in recent years for environmental benefits, however, the performance penalty to conventional aircraft was prohibitive. AARSC may enable the opportunity to realize the environmental benefits of lower-altitude emissions coupled with mission fuel savings. The findings of this study also reveal that the AARSC concept appears to be controllable, turbulence susceptibility is likely not an issue, and the shape change concept appears to be mechanically and aerodynamically feasible.

  13. Designing for scale: How relationships shape curriculum change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie; Corbalan, Gemma; McKenney, Susan; Nieveen, Nienke; Van den Akker, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Pareja Roblin, N., Corbalan Perez, G., McKenney, S., Nieveen, N., & Van den Akker, J. (2012, 13-17 April). Designing for scale: How relationships shape curriculum change. Paper presentation at the AERA annual meeting, Vancouver, Canada. Please see also: http://hdl.handle.net/1820/4678

  14. Designing for scale: How relationships shape curriculum change

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pareja Roblin, Natalie; Corbalan, Gemma; McKenney, Susan; Nieveen, Nienke; Van den Akker, Jan

    2012-01-01

    Pareja Roblin, N., Corbalan Perez, G., McKenney, S., Nieveen, N., & Van den Akker, J. (2012, 13-17 April). Designing for scale: How relationships shape curriculum change. Presentation at the AERA annual meeting, Vancouver, Canada. Please see also http://hdl.handle.net/1820/4679

  15. Proxemic Transitions: Designing Shape-Changing Furniture for Informal Meetings

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grønbæk, Jens Emil; Korsgaard, Henrik; Petersen, Marianne Graves

    2017-01-01

    of informal meetings and design work with shape-changing furniture, we develop the notion of proxemic transitions. We present three design aspects of proxemic transitions: transition speed, step- wise reconfiguration, and situational flexibility. The design aspects focus on how to balance between physical...

  16. Shape change as entropic phase transition: A study using Jarzynski ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Chemical Sciences; Volume 124; Issue 1. Shape change as entropic phase transition: A study using ... Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jcsc/124/01/0021-0028. Keywords. Fick-Jacobs equation; entropic potental; Jarzynski equality; phase transition.

  17. Augmented Endoscopic Images Overlaying Shape Changes in Bone Cutting Procedures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, Megumi; Endo, Shota; Nakao, Shinichi; Yoshida, Munehito; Matsuda, Tetsuya

    2016-01-01

    In microendoscopic discectomy for spinal disorders, bone cutting procedures are performed in tight spaces while observing a small portion of the target structures. Although optical tracking systems are able to measure the tip of the surgical tool during surgery, the poor shape information available during surgery makes accurate cutting difficult, even if preoperative computed tomography and magnetic resonance images are used for reference. Shape estimation and visualization of the target structures are essential for accurate cutting. However, time-varying shape changes during cutting procedures are still challenging issues for intraoperative navigation. This paper introduces a concept of endoscopic image augmentation that overlays shape changes to support bone cutting procedures. This framework handles the history of the location of the measured drill tip as a volume label and visualizes the remains to be cut overlaid on the endoscopic image in real time. A cutting experiment was performed with volunteers, and the feasibility of this concept was examined using a clinical navigation system. The efficacy of the cutting aid was evaluated with respect to the shape similarity, total moved distance of a cutting tool, and required cutting time. The results of the experiments showed that cutting performance was significantly improved by the proposed framework.

  18. CELL SHAPE AND HEXOSE TRANSPORT IN NORMAL AND VIRUS-TRANSFORMED CELLS IN CULTURE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bissell, M.J.; Farson, D.; Tung, A.S.C.

    1976-07-01

    The rate of hexose transport was compared in normal and virus-transformed cells on a monolayer and in suspension. It was shown that: (1) Both trypsin-removed cells and those suspended for an additional day in methyl cellulose had decreased rates of transport and lower available water space when compared with cells on a monolayer. Thus, cell shape affects the overall rate of hexose transport, especially at higher sugar concentrations. (2) Even in suspension, the initial transport rates remained higher in transformed cells with reference to normal cells. Scanning electron micrographs of normal and transformed chick cells revealed morphological differences only in the flat state. This indicates that the increased rate of hexose transport after transformation is not due to a difference in the shape of these cells on a monolayer. The relation between the geometry of cells, transport rates, and growth regulation is undoubtedly very complex, and our knowledge of these relationships is still very elementary. In a recent review on the influence of geometry on control of cell growth, Folkman and Greenspan (1) pointed out that the permeability of cells in a flat versus a spherical state may indeed be very different. The growth properties of cells on a surface and in suspension have been compared often (1-5). However, with one exception. little is known about the changes in transport properties when cell shape is changed. Foster and Pardee (6) demonstrated that the active transport of a-aminoisobutyric acid was reduced 2.5 times in suspension cultures of Chinese hamster cells with respect to the cells grown on a coverslip. They attributed this to the smaller surface area of suspended cells. While it is not clear why active transport should be dependent on the surface area available, it is possible that once the cells assume a spherical configuration, the carrier proteins are redistributed in such a way as to make them less accessible to the substrate. What happens to

  19. Osteogenic Capacity of Human Adipose-Derived Stem Cells is Preserved Following Triggering of Shape Memory Scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tseng, Ling-Fang; Wang, Jing; Baker, Richard M; Wang, Guirong; Mather, Patrick T; Henderson, James H

    2016-08-01

    Recent advances in shape memory polymers have enabled the study of programmable, shape-changing, cytocompatible tissue engineering scaffolds. For treatment of bone defects, scaffolds with shape memory functionality have been studied for their potential for minimally invasive delivery, conformal fitting to defect margins, and defect stabilization. However, the extent to which the osteogenic differentiation capacity of stem cells resident in shape memory scaffolds is preserved following programmed shape change has not yet been determined. As a result, the feasibility of shape memory polymer scaffolds being employed in stem cell-based treatment strategies remains unclear. To test the hypothesis that stem cell osteogenic differentiation can be preserved during and following triggering of programmed architectural changes in shape memory polymer scaffolds, human adipose-derived stem cells were seeded in shape memory polymer foam scaffolds or in shape memory polymer fibrous scaffolds programmed to expand or contract, respectively, when warmed to body temperature. Osteogenic differentiation in shape-changing and control scaffolds was compared using mineral deposition, protein production, and gene expression assays. For both shape-changing and control scaffolds, qualitatively and quantitatively comparable amounts of mineral deposition were observed; comparable levels of alkaline phosphatase activity were measured; and no significant differences in the expression of genetic markers of osteogenesis were detected. These findings support the feasibility of employing shape memory in scaffolds for stem cell-based therapies for bone repair.

  20. The shape of cells adhering to sulfonated copolymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kowalczyńska, Hanna M; Nowak-Wyrzykowska, Małgorzata; Inkielman, Marcin; Stołowska, Liliana; Marciniak, Ewa

    2005-01-01

    We studied the shape of L1210 leukaemia cells adhering in a protein-free medium to sulfonated (styrene/methyl methacrylate) copolymer surfaces of two sulfonic group densities, and thus of differing wettability. The use of our image analysis method and the mathematical procedure [Kowalczynska, H.M. et al, Colloids Surfaces B: Biointerfaces, 30 (2003) 193-206.] allowed us to calculate the values of the so-called shape parameter, which quantitatively determines the three-dimensional cell shape. Here, we show that the values of the shape parameter of the adhering cells and the F-actin concentration, in the region near the cell-substratum interface, depend on the density of sulfonic groups present on the substratum surface.

  1. Cell shape characterization and classification with discrete Fourier transforms and self-organizing maps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kriegel, Fabian L; Köhler, Ralf; Bayat-Sarmadi, Jannike; Bayerl, Simon; Hauser, Anja E; Niesner, Raluca; Luch, Andreas; Cseresnyes, Zoltan

    2017-10-27

    Cells in their natural environment often exhibit complex kinetic behavior and radical adjustments of their shapes. This enables them to accommodate to short- and long-term changes in their surroundings under physiological and pathological conditions. Intravital multi-photon microscopy is a powerful tool to record this complex behavior. Traditionally, cell behavior is characterized by tracking the cells' movements, which yields numerous parameters describing the spatiotemporal characteristics of cells. Cells can be classified according to their tracking behavior using all or a subset of these kinetic parameters. This categorization can be supported by the a priori knowledge of experts. While such an approach provides an excellent starting point for analyzing complex intravital imaging data, faster methods are required for automated and unbiased characterization. In addition to their kinetic behavior, the 3D shape of these cells also provide essential clues about the cells' status and functionality. New approaches that include the study of cell shapes as well may also allow the discovery of correlations amongst the track- and shape-describing parameters. In the current study, we examine the applicability of a set of Fourier components produced by Discrete Fourier Transform (DFT) as a tool for more efficient and less biased classification of complex cell shapes. By carrying out a number of 3D-to-2D projections of surface-rendered cells, the applied method reduces the more complex 3D shape characterization to a series of 2D DFTs. The resulting shape factors are used to train a Self-Organizing Map (SOM), which provides an unbiased estimate for the best clustering of the data, thereby characterizing groups of cells according to their shape. We propose and demonstrate that such shape characterization is a powerful addition to, or a replacement for kinetic analysis. This would make it especially useful in situations where live kinetic imaging is less practical or not

  2. Cell sorting using efficient light shaping approaches

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Banas, Andrew; Palima, Darwin; Villangca, Mark Jayson

    2016-01-01

    Early detection of diseases can save lives. Hence, there is emphasis in sorting rare disease-indicating cells within small dilute quantities such as in the confines of lab-on-a-chip devices. In our work, we use optical forces to isolate red blood cells detected by machine vision. This approach is...

  3. Shape-controlled high cell-density microcapsules by electrodeposition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zeyang; Takeuchi, Masaru; Nakajima, Masahiro; Hasegawa, Yasuhisa; Huang, Qiang; Fukuda, Toshio

    2016-06-01

    Cell encapsulation within alginate-poly-l-lysine (PLL) microcapsules has been developed to provide a miniaturized three-dimensional (3D) microenvironment with an aqueous core while promoting development of encapsulated cells into high cell-density structures. In this paper, a novel method for fabricating shape-controlled alginate-PLL microcapsules to construct 3D cell structures based on electrodeposition method is provided. Two-dimensional Ca-alginate cell-laden gel membranes were electrodeposited onto a micro-patterned electrode and further detached from the electrode. The PLL was coated onto the gel structures to form alginate-PLL complex as an outer shell and sodium citric solution was utilized to melt the internal alginate to achieve miniaturized 3D microcapsules (sphere, cuboid, and rod shape). By this proposed method, rat liver cells (RLC-18) formed multi-cellular aggregates with high cell-density after cultivation for 2weeks. The use of alginate-poly-l-lysine (PLL) microcapsules has shown great potential in fabricating 3D cell structures with high cell density. Despite their success related to their ability to provide a miniaturized microenvironment with an aqueous core, alginate-PLL microcapsules has drawback such as a limited shape-control ability. Because of the mechanism of Ca-induced alginate gel formation, it is still difficult to precisely control the gelation process to produce alginate-PLL microcapsules with specific shape. The present study provides an electrodeposition-based method to generate shape-controlled microcapsules for 3D cell structures. Sphere, cuboid, and rod shaped microcapsules of RLC-18 cells were produced for long-term culture to obtain desired morphologies of cell aggregates. Copyright © 2016 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. A rapid method of fruit cell isolation for cell size and shape measurements

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johnston Jason W

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell size is a structural component of fleshy fruit, contributing to important traits such as fruit size and texture. There are currently a number of methods for measuring cell size; most rely either on tissue sectioning or digestion of the tissue with cell wall degrading enzymes or chemicals to release single cells. Neither of these approaches is ideal for assaying large fruit numbers as both require a considerable time to prepare the tissue, with current methods of cell wall digestions taking 24 to 48 hours. Additionally, sectioning can lead to a measurement of a plane that does not represent the widest point of the cell. Results To develop a more rapid way of measuring fruit cell size we have developed a protocol that solubilises pectin in the middle lamella of the plant cell wall releasing single cells into a buffered solution. Gently boiling small fruit samples in a 0.05 M Na2CO3 solution, osmotically balanced with 0.3 M mannitol, produced good cell separation with little cellular damage in less than 30 minutes. The advantage of combining a chemical treatment with boiling is that the cells are rapidly killed. This stopped cell shape changes that could potentially occur during separation. With this method both the rounded and angular cells of the apple cultivars SciRos 'Pacific Rose' and SciFresh 'Jazz'™ were observed in the separated cells. Using this technique, an in-depth analysis was performed measuring cell size from 5 different apple cultivars. Cell size was measured using the public domain ImageJ software. For each cultivar a minimum of 1000 cells were measured and it was found that each cultivar displayed a different distribution of cell size. Cell size within cultivars was similar and there was no correlation between flesh firmness and cell size. This protocol was tested on tissue from other fleshy fruit including tomato, rock melon and kiwifruit. It was found that good cell separation was achieved with flesh

  5. Influence of Helical Cell Shape on Motility of Helicobacter Pylori

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hardcastle, Joseph; Martinez, Laura; Salama, Nina; Bansil, Rama; Boston University Collaboration; University of Washington Collaboration

    2014-03-01

    Bacteria's body shape plays an important role in motility by effecting chemotaxis, swimming mechanisms, and swimming speed. A prime example of this is the bacteria Helicobacter Pylori;whose helical shape has long been believed to provide an advantage in penetrating the viscous mucus layer protecting the stomach lining, its niche environment. To explore this we have performed bacteria tracking experiments of both wild-type bacteria along with mutants, which have a straight rod shape. A wide distribution of speeds was found. This distribution reflects both a result of temporal variation in speed and different shape morphologies in the bacterial population. Our results show that body shape plays less role in a simple fluid. However, in a more viscous solution the helical shape results in increased swimming speeds. In addition, we use experimentally obtained cell shape measurements to model the hydrodynamic influence of cell shape on swimming speed using resistive force theory. The results agree with the experiment, especially when we fold in the temporal distribution. Interestingly, our results suggest distinct wild-type subpopulations with varying number of half helices can lead to different swimming speeds. NSF PHY

  6. Molecular mechanisms controlling pavement cell shape in Arabidopsis leaves.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qian, Pingping; Hou, Suiwen; Guo, Guangqin

    2009-08-01

    Pavement cells have an interlocking jigsaw puzzle-shaped leaf surface pattern. Twenty-three genes involved in the pavement cell morphogenesis were discovered until now. The mutations of these genes through various means lead to pavement cell shape defects, such as loss or lack of interdigitation, the reduction of lobing, gaps between lobe and neck regions in pavement cells, and distorted trichomes. These phenotypes are affected by the organization of microtubules and microfilaments. Microtubule bands are considered corresponding with the neck regions of the cell, while lobe formation depends on patches of microfilaments. The pathway of Rho of plant (ROP) GTPase signaling cascades regulates overall activity of the cytoskeleton in pavement cells. Some other proteins, in addition to the ROPs, SCAR/WAVE, and ARP2/3 complexes, are also involved in the pavement cell morphogenesis.

  7. Robust mechanisms of ventral furrow invagination require the combination of cellular shape changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Conte, Vito; Muñoz, José J.; Baum, Buzz; Miodownik, Mark

    2009-03-01

    Ventral furrow formation in Drosophila is the first large-scale morphogenetic movement during the life of the embryo, and is driven by co-ordinated changes in the shape of individual epithelial cells within the cellular blastoderm. Although many of the genes involved have been identified, the details of the mechanical processes that convert local changes in gene expression into whole-scale changes in embryonic form remain to be fully understood. Biologists have identified two main cell deformation modes responsible for ventral furrow invagination: constriction of the apical ends of the cells (apical wedging) and deformation along their apical-basal axes (radial lengthening/shortening). In this work, we used a computer 2D finite element model of ventral furrow formation to investigate the ability of different combinations of three plausible elementary active cell shape changes to bring about epithelial invagination: ectodermal apical-basal shortening, mesodermal apical-basal lengthening/shortening and mesodermal apical constriction. We undertook a systems analysis of the biomechanical system, which revealed many different combinations of active forces (invagination mechanisms) were able to generate a ventral furrow. Two important general features were revealed. First that combinations of shape changes are the most robust to environmental and mutational perturbation, in particular those combining ectodermal pushing and mesodermal wedging. Second, that ectodermal pushing plays a big part in all of the robust mechanisms (mesodermal forces alone do not close the furrow), and this provides evidence that it may be an important element in the mechanics of invagination in Drosophila.

  8. Transformers: Shape-Changing Space Systems Built with Robotic Textiles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoica, Adrian

    2013-01-01

    Prior approaches to transformer-like robots had only very limited success. They suffer from lack of reliability, ability to integrate large surfaces, and very modest change in overall shape. Robots can now be built from two-dimensional (2D) layers of robotic fabric. These transformers, a new kind of robotic space system, are dramatically different from current systems in at least two ways. First, the entire transformer is built from a single, thin sheet; a flexible layer of a robotic fabric (ro-fabric); or robotic textile (ro-textile). Second, the ro-textile layer is foldable to small volume and self-unfolding to adapt shape and function to mission phases.

  9. Thermoforming of tracheal cartilage: viability, shape change, and mechanical behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chae, Yongseok; Protsenko, Dmitriy; Holden, Paul K; Chlebicki, Cara; Wong, Brian J F

    2008-10-01

    Trauma, emergent tracheostomy, and prolonged intubation are common causes of severe deformation and narrowing of the trachea. Laser technology may be used to reshape tracheal cartilage using minimally invasive methods. The objectives of this study were to determine: (1) the dependence of tracheal cartilage shape change on temperature and laser dosimetry using heated saline bath immersion and laser irradiation, respectively, (2) the effect of temperature on the mechanical behavior of cartilage, and (3) tissue viability as a function of laser dosimetry. Ex vivo rabbit trachea cartilage specimens were bent and secured around a cylinder (6 mm), and then immersed in a saline bath (45 and 72 degrees C) for 5-100 seconds. In separate experiments, tracheal specimens were irradiated with a diode laser (lambda = 1.45 microm, 220-400 J/cm(2)). Mechanical analysis was then used to determine the elastic modulus in tension after irradiation. Fluorescent viability assays combined with laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM) were employed to image and identify thermal injury regions. Shape change transition zones, between 62 and 66 degrees C in the saline heating bath and above power densities of 350 J/cm(2) (peak temperatures 65+/-10 degrees C) for laser irradiation were identified. Above these zones, the elastic moduli were higher (8.2+/-4 MPa) than at lower temperatures (4.5+/-3 MPa). LSCM identified significant loss of viable chondrocytes within the laser-irradiation zones. Our results indicate a change in mechanical properties occurs with laser irradiation and further demonstrates that significant thermal damage is concurrent with clinically relevant shape change in the elastic cartilage tissues of the rabbit trachea using the present laser and dosimetry parameters. (c) 2008 Wiley-Liss, Inc.

  10. Model of fission yeast cell shape driven by membrane-bound growth factors and the cytoskeleton.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tyler Drake

    Full Text Available Fission yeast serves as a model for how cellular polarization machinery consisting of signaling molecules and the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton regulates cell shape. In this work, we develop mathematical models to investigate how these cells maintain a tubular shape of approximately constant diameter. Many studies identify active Cdc42, found in a cap at the inner membrane of growing cell tips, as an important regulator of local cell wall remodeling, likely through control of exocyst tethering and the targeting of other polarity-enhancing structures. First, we show that a computational model with Cdc42-dependent local cell wall remodeling under turgor pressure predicts a relationship between spatial extent of growth signal and cell diameter that is in agreement with prior experiments. Second, we model the consequences of feedback between cell shape and distribution of Cdc42 growth signal at cell tips. We show that stability of cell diameter over successive cell divisions places restrictions on their mutual dependence. We argue that simple models where the spatial extent of the tip growth signal relies solely on geometrical alignment of confined microtubules might lead to unstable width regulation. Third, we study a computational model that combines a growth signal distributed over a characteristic length scale (as, for example, by a reaction-diffusion mechanism with an axis-sensing microtubules system that places landmarks at positions where microtubule tips touch the cortex. A two-dimensional implementation of this model leads to stable cell diameter for a wide range of parameters. Changes to the parameters of this model reproduce straight, bent, and bulged cell shapes, and we discuss how this model is consistent with other observed cell shapes in mutants. Our work provides an initial quantitative framework for understanding the regulation of cell shape in fission yeast, and a scaffold for understanding this process on a more molecular

  11. Tubular Scaffold with Shape Recovery Effect for Cell Guide Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazi M. Zakir Hossain

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Tubular scaffolds with aligned polylactic acid (PLA fibres were fabricated for cell guide applications by immersing rolled PLA fibre mats into a polyvinyl acetate (PVAc solution to bind the mats. The PVAc solution was also mixed with up to 30 wt % β-tricalcium phosphate (β-TCP content. Cross-sectional images of the scaffold materials obtained via scanning electron microscopy (SEM revealed the aligned fibre morphology along with a significant number of voids in between the bundles of fibres. The addition of β-TCP into the scaffolds played an important role in increasing the void content from 17.1% to 25.3% for the 30 wt % β-TCP loading, which was measured via micro-CT (µCT analysis. Furthermore, µCT analyses revealed the distribution of aggregated β-TCP particles in between the various PLA fibre layers of the scaffold. The compressive modulus properties of the scaffolds increased from 66 MPa to 83 MPa and the compressive strength properties decreased from 67 MPa to 41 MPa for the 30 wt % β-TCP content scaffold. The scaffolds produced were observed to change into a soft and flexible form which demonstrated shape recovery properties after immersion in phosphate buffered saline (PBS media at 37 °C for 24 h. The cytocompatibility studies (using MG-63 human osteosarcoma cell line revealed preferential cell proliferation along the longitudinal direction of the fibres as compared to the control tissue culture plastic. The manufacturing process highlighted above reveals a simple process for inducing controlled cell alignment and varying porosity features within tubular scaffolds for potential tissue engineering applications.

  12. Anomalous Shape Changes of Silicon Nanopillars by Electrochemical Lithiation

    KAUST Repository

    Lee, Seok Woo

    2011-07-13

    Silicon is one of the most attractive anode materials for use in Li-ion batteries due to its ∼10 times higher specific capacity than existing graphite anodes. However, up to 400% volume expansion during reaction with Li causes particle pulverization and fracture, which results in rapid capacity fading. Although Si nanomaterials have shown improvements in electrochemical performance, there is limited understanding of how volume expansion takes place. Here, we study the shape and volume changes of crystalline Si nanopillars with different orientations upon first lithiation and discover anomalous behavior. Upon lithiation, the initially circular cross sections of nanopillars with 〈100〉, 〈110〉, and 〈111〉 axial orientations expand into cross, ellipse, and hexagonal shapes, respectively. We explain this by identifying a high-speed lithium ion diffusion channel along the 〈110〉 direction, which causes preferential volume expansion along this direction. Surprisingly, the 〈111〉 and 〈100〉 nanopillars shrink in height after partial lithiation, while 〈110〉 nanopillars increase in height. The length contraction is suggested to be due to a collapse of the {111} planes early in the lithiation process. These results give new insight into the Si volume change process and could help in designing better battery anodes. © 2011 American Chemical Society.

  13. Testing for nonrandom shape similarity between sister cells using automated shape comparison

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Monica; Marshall, Wallace F.

    2009-02-01

    Several reports in the biological literature have indicated that when a living cell divides, the two daughter cells have a tendency to be mirror images of each other in terms of their overall cell shape. This phenomenon would be consistent with inheritance of spatial organization from mother cell to daughters. However the published data rely on a small number of examples that were visually chosen, raising potential concerns about inadvertent selection bias. We propose to revisit this issue using automated quantitative shape comparison methods which would have no contribution from the observer and which would allow statistical testing of similarity in large numbers of cells. In this report we describe a first order approach to the problem using rigid curve matching. Using test images, we compare a pointwise correspondence based distance metric with a chamfer matching strategy and find that the latter provides better correspondence and smaller distances between aligned curves, especially when we allow nonrigid deformation of the outlines in addition to rotation.

  14. Dynamic multiprotein assemblies shape the spatial structure of cell signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nussinov, Ruth; Jang, Hyunbum

    2014-01-01

    Cell signaling underlies critical cellular decisions. Coordination, efficiency as well as fail-safe mechanisms are key elements. How the cell ensures that these hallmarks are at play are important questions. Cell signaling is often viewed as taking place through discrete and cross-talking pathways; oftentimes these are modularized to emphasize distinct functions. While simple, convenient and clear, such models largely neglect the spatial structure of cell signaling; they also convey inter-modular (or inter-protein) spatial separation that may not exist. Here our thesis is that cell signaling is shaped by a network of multiprotein assemblies. While pre-organized, the assemblies and network are loose and dynamic. They contain transiently-associated multiprotein complexes which are often mediated by scaffolding proteins. They are also typically anchored in the membrane, and their continuum may span the cell. IQGAP1 scaffolding protein which binds proteins including Raf, calmodulin, Mek, Erk, actin, and tens more, with actin shaping B-cell (and likely other) membrane-anchored nanoclusters and allosterically polymerizing in dynamic cytoskeleton formation, and Raf anchoring in the membrane along with Ras, provides a striking example. The multivalent network of dynamic proteins and lipids, with specific interactions forming and breaking, can be viewed as endowing gel-like properties. Collectively, this reasons that efficient, productive and reliable cell signaling takes place primarily through transient, preorganized and cooperative protein-protein interactions spanning the cell rather than stochastic, diffusion-controlled processes. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. Shape changing thin films powered by DNA hybridization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Tae Soup; Estephan, Zaki G.; Qian, Zhaoxia; Prosser, Jacob H.; Lee, Su Yeon; Chenoweth, David M.; Lee, Daeyeon; Park, So-Jung; Crocker, John C.

    2017-01-01

    Active materials that respond to physical and chemical stimuli can be used to build dynamic micromachines that lie at the interface between biological systems and engineered devices. In principle, the specific hybridization of DNA can be used to form a library of independent, chemically driven actuators for use in such microrobotic applications and could lead to device capabilities that are not possible with polymer- or metal-layer-based approaches. Here, we report shape changing films that are powered by DNA strand exchange reactions with two different domains that can respond to distinct chemical signals. The films are formed from DNA-grafted gold nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer deposition process. Films consisting of an active and a passive layer show rapid, reversible curling in response to stimulus DNA strands added to solution. Films consisting of two independently addressable active layers display a complex suite of repeatable transformations, involving eight mechanochemical states and incorporating self-righting behaviour.

  16. Cell shape recognition by colloidal cell imprints: energy of the cell-imprint interaction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovička, Josef; Stoyanov, Simeon D; Paunov, Vesselin N

    2015-09-01

    The results presented in this study are aimed at the theoretical estimate of the interactions between a spherical microbial cell and the colloidal cell imprints in terms of the Derjaguin, Landau, Vervey, and Overbeek (DLVO) surface forces. We adapted the Derjaguin approximation to take into account the geometry factor in the colloidal interaction between a spherical target particle and a hemispherical shell at two different orientations with respect to each other. We took into account only classical DLVO surface forces, i.e., the van der Waals and the electric double layer forces, in the interaction of a spherical target cell and a hemispherical shell as a function of their size ratio, mutual orientation, distance between their surfaces, their respective surface potentials, and the ionic strength of the aqueous solution. We found that the calculated interaction energies are several orders higher when match and recognition between the target cell and the target cell imprint is achieved. Our analysis revealed that the recognition effect of the hemispherical shell towards the target microsphere comes from the greatly increased surface contact area when a full match of their size and shape is produced. When the interaction between the surfaces of the hemishell and the target cell is attractive, the recognition greatly amplifies the attraction and this increases the likelihood of them to bind strongly. However, if the surface interaction between the cell and the imprint is repulsive, the shape and size match makes this interaction even more repulsive and thus decreases the likelihood of binding. These results show that the surface chemistry of the target cells and their colloidal imprints is very important in controlling the outcome of the interaction, while the shape recognition only amplifies the interaction. In the case of nonmonotonous surface-to-surface interaction we discovered some interesting interplay between the effects of shape match and surface chemistry

  17. Chorein Sensitivity of Actin Polymerization, Cell Shape and Mechanical Stiffness of Vascular Endothelial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ioana Alesutan

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: Endothelial cell stiffness plays a key role in endothelium-dependent control of vascular tone and arterial blood pressure. Actin polymerization and distribution of microfilaments is essential for mechanical cell stiffness. Chorein, a protein encoded by the VPS13A gene, defective in chorea-acanthocytosis (ChAc, is involved in neuronal cell survival as well as cortical actin polymerization of erythrocytes and blood platelets. Chorein is expressed in a wide variety of further cells, yet nothing is known about the impact of chorein on cells other than neurons, erythrocytes and platelets. The present study explored whether chorein is expressed in human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs and addressed the putative role of chorein in the regulation of cytoskeletal architecture, stiffness and survival of those cells. Methods: In HUVECs with or without silencing of the VPS13A gene, VPS13A mRNA expression was determined utilizing quantitative RT-PCR, cytoskeletal organization visualized by confocal microscopy, G/F actin ratio and phosphorylation status of focal adhesion kinase quantified by western blotting, cell death determined by flow cytometry, mechanical properties studied by atomic force microscopy (AFM and cell morphology analysed by scanning ion conductance microscopy (SICM. Results: VPS13A mRNA expression was detectable in HUVECs. Silencing of the VPS13A gene attenuated the filamentous actin network, decreased the ratio of soluble G-actin over filamentous F-actin, reduced cell stiffness and changed cell morphology as compared to HUVECs silenced with negative control siRNA. These effects were paralleled by a significant decrease in FAK phosphorylation following VPS13A silencing. Moreover, silencing of the VPS13A gene increased caspase 3 activity and induced necrosis in HUVECs. Conclusions: Chorein is a novel regulator of cytoskeletal architecture, cell shape, mechanical stiffness and survival of vascular endothelial cells.

  18. Defect driven shapes in nematic droplets: analogies with cell division

    CERN Document Server

    Leoni, Marco; Bowick, Mark J; Marchetti, M Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Building on the striking similarity between the structure of the spindle during mitosis in living cells and nematic textures in confined liquid crystals, we use a continuum model of two-dimensional nematic liquid crystal droplets, to examine the physical aspects of cell division. The model investigates the interplay between bulk elasticity of the microtubule assembly, described as a nematic liquid crystal, and surface elasticity of the cell cortex, modelled as a bounding flexible membrane, in controlling cell shape and division. The centrosomes at the spindle poles correspond to the cores of the topological defects required to accommodate nematic order in a closed geometry. We map out the progression of both healthy bipolar and faulty multi-polar division as a function of an effective parameter that incorporates active processes and controls centrosome separation. A robust prediction, independent of energetic considerations, is that the transition from a single cell to daughters cells occurs at critical value...

  19. Topological defects in confined populations of spindle-shaped cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duclos, Guillaume; Erlenkämper, Christoph; Joanny, Jean-François; Silberzan, Pascal

    2017-01-01

    Most spindle-shaped cells (including smooth muscles and sarcomas) organize in vivo into well-aligned `nematic’ domains, creating intrinsic topological defects that may be used to probe the behaviour of these active nematic systems. Active non-cellular nematics have been shown to be dominated by activity, yielding complex chaotic flows. However, the regime in which live spindle-shaped cells operate, and the importance of cell-substrate friction in particular, remains largely unexplored. Using in vitro experiments, we show that these active cellular nematics operate in a regime in which activity is effectively damped by friction, and that the interaction between defects is controlled by the system’s elastic nematic energy. Due to the activity of the cells, these defects behave as self-propelled particles and pairwise annihilate until all displacements freeze as cell crowding increases. When confined in mesoscopic circular domains, the system evolves towards two identical +1/2 disclinations facing each other. The most likely reduced positions of these defects are independent of the size of the disk, the cells’ activity or even the cell type, but are well described by equilibrium liquid crystal theory. These cell-based systems thus operate in a regime more stable than other active nematics, which may be necessary for their biological function.

  20. Chromosome replication, cell growth, division and shape: a personal perspective

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arieh eZaritsky

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The origins of Molecular Biology and Bacterial Physiology are reviewed, from our personal standpoints, emphasizing the coupling between bacterial growth, chromosome replication and cell division, dimensions and shape. Current knowledge is discussed with historical perspective, summarizing past and present achievements and enlightening ideas for future studies. An interactive simulation program of the Bacterial Cell Division Cycle (BCD, described as The Central Dogma in Bacteriology, is briefly represented. The coupled process of transcription/translation of genes encoding membrane proteins and insertion into the membrane (so-called transertion is invoked as the functional relationship between the only two unique macromolecules in the cell, DNA and peptidoglycan embodying the nucleoid and the sacculus respectively. We envision that nucleoid complexity, defined as the weighted-mean DNA content associated with the replication terminus, is directly related to cell shape through the transertion process. Accordingly, the primary signal for cell division transmitted by DNA dynamics (replication, transcription and segregation to the peptidoglycan biosynthetic machinery is of a physico-chemical nature, eg stress in the plasma membrane, relieving nucleoid occlusion in the cell's center hence enabling the divisome to assemble and function between segregated daughter nucleoids.

  1. Cell Migration According to Shape of Graphene Oxide Micropatterns

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sung Eun Kim

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Photolithography is a unique process that can effectively manufacture micro/nano-sized patterns on various substrates. On the other hand, the meniscus-dragging deposition (MDD process can produce a uniform surface of the substrate. Graphene oxide (GO is the oxidized form of graphene that has high hydrophilicity and protein absorption. It is widely used in biomedical fields such as drug delivery, regenerative medicine, and tissue engineering. Herein, we fabricated uniform GO micropatterns via MDD and photolithography. The physicochemical properties of the GO micropatterns were characterized by atomic force microscopy (AFM, scanning electron microscopy (SEM, and Raman spectroscopy. Furthermore, cell migration on the GO micropatterns was investigated, and the difference in cell migration on triangle and square GO micropatterns was examined for their effects on cell migration. Our results demonstrated that the GO micropatterns with a desired shape can be finely fabricated via MDD and photolithography. Moreover, it was revealed that the shape of GO micropatterns plays a crucial role in cell migration distance, speed, and directionality. Therefore, our findings suggest that the GO micropatterns can serve as a promising biofunctional platform and cell-guiding substrate for applications to bioelectric devices, cell-on-a-chip, and tissue engineering scaffolds.

  2. Atypical chemokine receptor 4 shapes activated B cell fate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kara, Ervin E; Bastow, Cameron R; McKenzie, Duncan R; Gregor, Carly E; Fenix, Kevin A; Babb, Rachelle; Norton, Todd S; Zotos, Dimitra; Rodda, Lauren B; Hermes, Jana R; Bourne, Katherine; Gilchrist, Derek S; Nibbs, Robert J; Alsharifi, Mohammed; Vinuesa, Carola G; Tarlinton, David M; Brink, Robert; Hill, Geoffrey R; Cyster, Jason G; Comerford, Iain; McColl, Shaun R

    2018-01-31

    Activated B cells can initially differentiate into three functionally distinct fates-early plasmablasts (PBs), germinal center (GC) B cells, or early memory B cells-by mechanisms that remain poorly understood. Here, we identify atypical chemokine receptor 4 (ACKR4), a decoy receptor that binds and degrades CCR7 ligands CCL19/CCL21, as a regulator of early activated B cell differentiation. By restricting initial access to splenic interfollicular zones (IFZs), ACKR4 limits the early proliferation of activated B cells, reducing the numbers available for subsequent differentiation. Consequently, ACKR4 deficiency enhanced early PB and GC B cell responses in a CCL19/CCL21-dependent and B cell-intrinsic manner. Conversely, aberrant localization of ACKR4-deficient activated B cells to the IFZ was associated with their preferential commitment to the early PB linage. Our results reveal a regulatory mechanism of B cell trafficking via an atypical chemokine receptor that shapes activated B cell fate. © 2018 Kara et al.

  3. Simultaneous characterization of cellular RNA structure and function with in-cell SHAPE-Seq.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watters, Kyle E; Abbott, Timothy R; Lucks, Julius B

    2016-01-29

    Many non-coding RNAs form structures that interact with cellular machinery to control gene expression. A central goal of molecular and synthetic biology is to uncover design principles linking RNA structure to function to understand and engineer this relationship. Here we report a simple, high-throughput method called in-cell SHAPE-Seq that combines in-cell probing of RNA structure with a measurement of gene expression to simultaneously characterize RNA structure and function in bacterial cells. We use in-cell SHAPE-Seq to study the structure-function relationship of two RNA mechanisms that regulate translation in Escherichia coli. We find that nucleotides that participate in RNA-RNA interactions are highly accessible when their binding partner is absent and that changes in RNA structure due to RNA-RNA interactions can be quantitatively correlated to changes in gene expression. We also characterize the cellular structures of three endogenously expressed non-coding RNAs: 5S rRNA, RNase P and the btuB riboswitch. Finally, a comparison between in-cell and in vitro folded RNA structures revealed remarkable similarities for synthetic RNAs, but significant differences for RNAs that participate in complex cellular interactions. Thus, in-cell SHAPE-Seq represents an easily approachable tool for biologists and engineers to uncover relationships between sequence, structure and function of RNAs in the cell. © The Author(s) 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Nucleic Acids Research.

  4. Shape Changing Thin Films Powered by DNA Strand Exchange

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shim, Tae Soup; Estephan, Zaki; Qian, Zhaoxia; Chenoweth, David; Lee, Daeyeon; Park, So-Jung; Crocker, John

    Active materials that respond to physical and chemical stimuli can be used to build dynamic thin-film micromachines that lie at the interface between biological systems and engineered devices. In principle, the specific hybridization of DNA can be used to form a library of independent, chemically driven actuators for use in such microrobotic applications and could lead to device capabilities that are not possible with polymer- or metal-layer-based approaches. Here, we report shape changing films that are powered by DNA strand exchange reactions with two different domains that can respond to distinct chemical signals. The films are formed from DNA-grafted gold nanoparticles using a layer-by-layer deposition process. Films consisting of an active and a passive layer show rapid, reversible curling in response to stimulus DNA strands added to solution. Films consisting of two independently addressable active layers display a complex suite of repeatable transformations, involving eight mechanochemical states and incorporating self-righting behavior. DMR11-20901, NRF-2015R1A2A2A01003528, NRF-2016R1C1B2016089.

  5. A genome-wide resource of cell cycle and cell shape genes of fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hayles, Jacqueline; Wood, Valerie; Jeffery, Linda; Hoe, Kwang-Lae; Kim, Dong-Uk; Park, Han-Oh; Salas-Pino, Silvia; Heichinger, Christian; Nurse, Paul

    2013-01-01

    To identify near complete sets of genes required for the cell cycle and cell shape, we have visually screened a genome-wide gene deletion library of 4843 fission yeast deletion mutants (95.7% of total protein encoding genes) for their effects on these processes. A total of 513 genes have been identified as being required for cell cycle progression, 276 of which have not been previously described as cell cycle genes. Deletions of a further 333 genes lead to specific alterations in cell shape and another 524 genes result in generally misshapen cells. Here, we provide the first eukaryotic resource of gene deletions, which describes a near genome-wide set of genes required for the cell cycle and cell shape. PMID:23697806

  6. Shape change as entropic phase transition: A study using Jarzynski ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Abstract. A Brownian particle in a confined space with varying cross-section, experiences an effective entropic potential in reduced dimension. We modulate the shape of the confinement and examine the nature of dynamical transition between two distinct thermalized entropic states corresponding to different shapes of the.

  7. Shape features for recognition of Pap smear cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goggin, Shelly D. D.; Janson, Scott D.

    1996-10-01

    Automated cytology relies on the use of features extracted form cell images to classify cells. This paper examines the classification capability of a number of shape features on a database of normal, abnormal and endocervical cell nuclei images. The features include the chain code, the directed Hausdorff distance, measured of the length of the radii of the cell and measures of ellipticity. The area under the receiver operating characteristic curve is used as a figure of merit. For the calculation of the directed Hausdorff distance, the images are filtered using the Sorbel gradient and erosion. The feature in the image with the largest chain code is considered to be the nucleus. The other features use images threshold at a percentage of the maximum intensity in the image. The best feature for the discrimination between normal cells and either abnormal or endocervical cells was the directed Hausdorff distance, but this feature is computationally expensive. The minimum diameter as determined by the chain code was the second best feature for recognizing abnormal cells and is less computationally expensive. Ellipticity was the second best feature for recognizing endocervical cells, which is also less computationally expensive than the directed Hausdorff distance. An optical design for the calculation of directed Hausdorff distance feature is included, which could reduce the computational expense.

  8. Resistance to alveolar shape change limits range of force propagation in lung parenchyma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Baoshun; Smith, Bradford J; Bates, Jason H T

    2015-06-01

    We have recently shown that if the lung parenchyma is modeled in 2 dimensions as a network of springs arranged in a pattern of repeating hexagonal cells, the distortional forces around a contracting airway propagate much further from the airway wall than classic continuum theory predicts. In the present study we tested the hypothesis that this occurs because of the negligible shear modulus of a hexagonal spring network. We simulated the narrowing of an airway embedded in a hexagonal network of elastic alveolar walls when the hexagonal cells of the network offered some resistance to a change in shape. We found that as the forces resisting shape change approach about 10% of the forces resisting length change of an individual spring the range of distortional force propagation in the spring network fell of rapidly as in an elastic continuum. We repeated these investigations in a 3-dimensional spring network composed of space-filling polyhedral cells and found similar results. This suggests that force propagation away from a point of local parenchymal distortion also falls off rapidly in real lung tissue. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  9. Viscosity-dependent variations in the cell shape and swimming manner of Leptospira.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takabe, Kyosuke; Tahara, Hajime; Islam, Md Shafiqul; Affroze, Samia; Kudo, Seishi; Nakamura, Shuichi

    2017-02-01

    Spirochaetes are spiral or flat-wave-shaped Gram-negative bacteria that have periplasmic flagella between the peptidoglycan layer and outer membrane. Rotation of the periplasmic flagella transforms the cell body shape periodically, allowing the cell to swim in aqueous environments. Because the virulence of motility-deficient mutants of pathogenic species is drastically attenuated, motility is thought to be an essential virulence factor in spirochaetes. However, it remains unknown how motility practically contributes to the infection process. We show here that the cell body configuration and motility of the zoonotic spirochaete Leptospira changes depending on the viscosity of the medium. Leptospira swim and reverse the swimming direction by transforming the cell body. Motility analysis showed that the frequency of cell shape transformation was increased by increasing the viscosity of the medium. The increased cell body transformation induced highly frequent reversal of the swimming direction. A simple kinetic model based on the experimental results shows that the viscosity-induced increase in reversal limits cell migration, resulting in the accumulation of cells in high-viscosity regions. This behaviour could facilitate the colonization of the spirochaete on host tissues covered with mucosa.

  10. Endocytosis and Signaling: Cell Logistics Shape the Eukaryotic Cell Plan

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigismund, Sara; Confalonieri, Stefano; Ciliberto, Andrea; Polo, Simona; Scita, Giorgio; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo

    2017-01-01

    Our understanding of endocytosis has evolved remarkably in little more than a decade. This is the result not only of advances in our knowledge of its molecular and biological workings, but also of a true paradigm shift in our understanding of what really constitutes endocytosis and of its role in homeostasis. Although endocytosis was initially discovered and studied as a relatively simple process to transport molecules across the plasma membrane, it was subsequently found to be inextricably linked with almost all aspects of cellular signaling. This led to the notion that endocytosis is actually the master organizer of cellular signaling, providing the cell with understandable messages that have been resolved in space and time. In essence, endocytosis provides the communications and supply routes (the logistics) of the cell. Although this may seem revolutionary, it is still likely to be only a small part of the entire story. A wealth of new evidence is uncovering the surprisingly pervasive nature of endocytosis in essentially all aspects of cellular regulation. In addition, many newly discovered functions of endocytic proteins are not immediately interpretable within the classical view of endocytosis. A possible framework, to rationalize all this new knowledge, requires us to “upgrade” our vision of endocytosis. By combining the analysis of biochemical, biological, and evolutionary evidence, we propose herein that endocytosis constitutes one of the major enabling conditions that in the history of life permitted the development of a higher level of organization, leading to the actuation of the eukaryotic cell plan. PMID:22298658

  11. Endocytosis and signaling: cell logistics shape the eukaryotic cell plan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sigismund, Sara; Confalonieri, Stefano; Ciliberto, Andrea; Polo, Simona; Scita, Giorgio; Di Fiore, Pier Paolo

    2012-01-01

    Our understanding of endocytosis has evolved remarkably in little more than a decade. This is the result not only of advances in our knowledge of its molecular and biological workings, but also of a true paradigm shift in our understanding of what really constitutes endocytosis and of its role in homeostasis. Although endocytosis was initially discovered and studied as a relatively simple process to transport molecules across the plasma membrane, it was subsequently found to be inextricably linked with almost all aspects of cellular signaling. This led to the notion that endocytosis is actually the master organizer of cellular signaling, providing the cell with understandable messages that have been resolved in space and time. In essence, endocytosis provides the communications and supply routes (the logistics) of the cell. Although this may seem revolutionary, it is still likely to be only a small part of the entire story. A wealth of new evidence is uncovering the surprisingly pervasive nature of endocytosis in essentially all aspects of cellular regulation. In addition, many newly discovered functions of endocytic proteins are not immediately interpretable within the classical view of endocytosis. A possible framework, to rationalize all this new knowledge, requires us to "upgrade" our vision of endocytosis. By combining the analysis of biochemical, biological, and evolutionary evidence, we propose herein that endocytosis constitutes one of the major enabling conditions that in the history of life permitted the development of a higher level of organization, leading to the actuation of the eukaryotic cell plan.

  12. Detecting global and local hippocampal shape changes in Alzheimer's disease using statistical shape models

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shen, Kai-kai; Fripp, Jurgen; Mériaudeau, Fabrice; Chételat, Gaël; Salvado, Olivier; Bourgeat, Pierrick; Saradha, A.; Abdi, Hervé; Abdulkadir, Ahmed; Acharya, Deepa; Achuthan, Anusha; Adluru, Nagesh; Aghajanian, Jania; Agrusti, Antonella; Agyemang, Alex; Ahdidan, Jamila; Ahmad, Duaa; Ahmed, Shiek; Aisen, Paul; Akhondi-Asl, Alireza; Aksu, Yaman; Alberca, Roman; Alcauter, Sarael; Alexander, Daniel; Alin, Aylin; Almeida, Fabio; Alvarez-Lineara, Juan; Amlien, Inge; Anand, Shyam; Anderson, Dallas; Ang, Amma; Angersbach, Steve; Ansarian, Reza; Aoyama, Eiji; Appannah, Arti; Arfanakis, Konstantinos; Armor, Tom; Arrighi, Michael; Arumughababu, S. Vethanayaki; Arunagiri, Vidhya; Ashe-McNalley, Cody; Ashford, Wes; Le Page, Aurelie; Avants, Brian; Aviv, Richard; Awasthi, Sukrati; Ayache, Nicholas; Ayan-Oshodi, Mosun; Ayhan, Murat; Sumana, B. V.; Babic, Tomislav; Baek, Young; Bagepally, Bhavani; Baird, Geoffrey; Baker, John; Baker, Suzanne; Bakker, Arnold; Barbash, Shahar; Bard, Jonathan; Barker, Warren; Bartlett, Jonathan; Baruchin, Andrea; Battaglini, Iacopo; Bauer, Corinna; Bayley, Peter; Beck, Irene; Becker, James; Becker, J. Alex; Beckett, Laurel; Bednar, Martin; Bedner, Arkadiusz; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Bekris, Lynn; Belaroussi, Boubakeur; Belloch, Vicente; Belmokhtar, Nabil; Ben Ahmed, Olfa; Bender, J. Dennis; Benois-Pineau, Jenny; Bhaskar, Uday; Bienkowska, Katarzyna; Biffi, Alessandro; Bigler, Erin; Bilgic, Basar; Bishop, Courtney; Bittner, Daniel; Black, Sandra; Bloss, Cinnamon; Bocti, Christian; Bohorquez, Adriana; Bokde, Arun; Boone, John; Boppana, Madhu; Borrie, Michael; Bouttout, Haroune; Bowes, Mike; Bowman, DuBois; Bowman, Gene; Bracard, Serge; Braskie, Meredith; Braunewell, Karl; Breitner, Joihn; Bresell, Anders; Brewer, James; Brickhouse, Michael; Brickman, Adam; Britschgi, Markus; Broadbent, Steve; Brogren, Jacob; Brunton, Simon; Buchsbaum, Monte; Buckley, Chris; Buerger, Katharina; Bunce, David; Burnham, Samantha; Burns, Jeffrey; Burton, David; Burzykowski, Tomasz; Butler, Tracy; Cabeza, Rafael; Caffery, Terrell; Cairns, Nigel; Callhoff, Johanna; Calvini, Piero; Carbotti, Angela; Carle, Adam; Carmasin, Jeremy; Carmichael, Owen; Carvalho, Janessa; Casabianca, Jodi; Casanova, Ramon; Casey, Anne; Cash, David; Cataldo, Rosella; Cedarbaum, Jesse; Cella, Massimo; Celsis, Pierre; Chakravarty, Mallar; Chang, Ih; Chao, Linda; Charil, Arnaud; Chang, Che-Wei; Chemali, Zeina; Chen, Kewei; Chen, Shuzhong; Chen, Rong; Chen, Qiang; Chen, Jung-Tai; Chen, Gang; Chen, Jake; Chen, Wei; Cheng, Wei-Chen; Cheng, Xi; Cherkas, Yauheniya; Chertkow, Howard; Cheung, Vinci; Cheung, Charlton; Chiang, Gloria; Chiao, Ping; chibane, Mouatez Billah; Chida, Noriko; Chin, Simon; Ching, Christopher; Chisholm, Jane; Cho, Claire; Cho, Youngsang; Choe, John; Choubey, Suresh; Chowbina, Sudhir; Christensen, Anette Luther; Ciocia, Gianluigi; Clark, David; Clark, Chris; Clarkson, Matt; Clerc, Stephanie; Clunie, David; Coen, Michael; Ciombra, Alexandre; Compton, David; Coppola, Giovanni; Coubard, Olivier; Coulin, Samuel; Cover, Keith S.; Crane, Paul; Crans, Gerald; Croop, Robert; Crowther, Daniel; Crum, William; Cui, Yue; Curry, Charles; Cutter, Gary; Da, Long; Daliri, Mohammad Reza; Damato, Vito Domenico; Darby, Eveleen; Darkner, Sune; Davatzikos, Christos; DavidPrakash, Bhaskaran; Davidson, Christopher; Davis, Melissa; de Bruijne, Marleen; de Meyer, Geert; de Nunzio, Giorgio; Decarli, Charles; Dechairo, Bryan; DeDuck, Kristina; Dehghan, Hossein; Delfino, Manuel; Della Rosa, Pasquale Anthony; Dellavedova, Luca; Delpassand, Ebrahim; Delrieu, Julien; DeOrchis, Vincent; Dépy Carron, Delphine; Desjardins, Benoit; deToledo-Morrell, Leyla; Devanand, Davangere; Devanarayan, Viswanath; Devier, Deidre; DeVous, Michael; Dgetluck, Nancy; Di, Jianing; Di, Xin; Diaz-Arrastia, Ramon; Dickerson, Bradford; Dickie, David Alexander; Dill, Vanderson; Ding, Xiaobo; Dinov, Ivo; Dobosh, Brian; Dobson, Howard; Dodge, Hiroko; Dolman, Andrew; Dolmo, Bess-Carolina; Donohue, Michael; Dore, Vincent; Dorflinger, Ernest; Dowling, Maritza; Dragicevic, Natasa; Dubal, Dena; Duchesne, Simon; Duff, Kevin; Dukart, Jürgen; Durazzo, Timothy; Dutta, Joyita; DWors, Robert; Earl, Nancy; Edula, Goutham; Elcoroaristizabal, Xabier; Emahazion, Tesfai; Endres, Christopher; Epstein, Noam; Ereshefsky, Larry; Eskildsen, Simon; Espinosa, Ana; Esposito, Mario; Ewers, Michael; Falcone, Guido; Fan, Yong; Fan, Jing; Fan, Lingzhong; Farahibozorg, Seyedehrezvan; Farb, Norman; Fardo, David; Farias, Sarah; Farnum, Michael; Farrer, Lindsay; Fatke, Bastian; Faux, Noel; Feldman, Howard; Feldman, Susan; Feldman, Betsy; Félix, Zandra; Fennema-Notestine, Christine; Fernandes, Michel; Fernandez, Elsa; Ferreira, Manuel Joao; Ferrer, Eugene; Fetterman, Bob; Figurski, Michal; Fillit, Howard; Finch, Stephen; Fiot, Jean-Baptiste; Flenniken, Derek; Fletcher, Evan; Flores, Christopher; Longmire, Crystal Flynn; Focke, Niels; Forman, Mark; Forsythe, Alan; Fox, Steven; Fox-Bosetti, Sabrina; Foxhall, Suzanne; Franko, Edit; Freeman, Roderick; Friedrich, Christoph M.; Friesenhahn, Michel; Frisoni, Giovanni; Fritzsche, Klaus; Fujimoto, Yoko; Fujiwara, Ken; Fullerton, Terence; Gaffour, Yacine; Galvin, Ben; Gamst, Anthony; Gao, Sujuan; Garg, Gaurav; Gaser, Christian; Gastineau, Edward; Gattaz, Wagner; Gaubert, Malo; Gauthier, Serge; Gavett, Brandon; Ge, Tian; Gemme, Gianluca; Geraci, Joseph; Gholipour, Farhad; Ghosh, Debashis; Ghosh, Satrajit; Gieschke, Ronald; Gill, Ryan; Gillespie, William; Gitelman, Darren; Gkontra, Xenia; Gleason, Carey; Glymour, M. Maria; Godbey, Michael; Gold, Brian; Goldberg, Terry; Goldman, Jennifer; Gonzalez-Beltran, Alejandra; Goodro, Robert; Gore, Chris; Gorriz, Juan Manuel; Goto, Masami; Grachev, Igor; Gradkowski, Wojciech; Grandey, Emily; Grasela, Thaddeus; Gray, Katherine; Greenberg, Barry; Greicius, Michael; Grill, Joshua; Gross, Alden; Gross, Alan; Grydeland, Håkon; Guignot, Isabelle; Guo, Qimiao; Guo, Liang-Hao; Guo, Hongbin; Gupta, Vinay; Guyot, Jennifer; Habeck, Christian; Habte, Frezghi; Haight, Thaddeus; Hajaj, Chen; Hajiesmaeili, Maryam; Hajjar, Ihab; Hammarstrom, Per; Hampel, Harald; Han, Duke; Han, Jian; Han, Zhaoying; Hanna, Yousef; Hao, Yongfu; Hardy, Peter; Harvey, Danielle; Hasan, Md Kamrul; Hayashi, Toshihiro; Haynes, John-Dylan; He, Huiguang; He, Yong; Head, Denise; Heckemann, Rolf; Heegaard, Niels; Heidebrink, Judith; Hellyer, Peter; Helwig, Michael; Henderson, David; Herholz, Karl; Herskovits, A. Zara; Hess, Christopher; Hildenbrand, Maike; Ming, Au Yeung Ho; Hobart, Jeremy; Hochstetler, Helen; Hofer, Scott; Hoffman, John; Holder, Daniel; Hollingworth, Paul; Holmes, Robin; Hong, Quan; Honigberg, Lee; Hope, Thomas; Hoppin, Jack; Hot, Pascal; Hou, Yangyang; Hsieh, Helen; Hsu, Ailing; Hu, Xiaochen; Hu, Mingxing; Hu, William; Hua, Wen-Yu; Huang, Shuai; Huang, Fude; Huang, Zihan; Huang, Chun-Jung; Huang, Chien-Chih; Huang, Juebin; Hubbard, Rebecca; Huentelman, Matthew; Huppertz, Hans-Jürgen; Hurko, Orest; Hurt, Stephen; Hutchins, Jim; Hwang, Scott; Hyun, JungMoon; Ifeachor, Emmanuel; Iglesias, Martina; Ikari, Yasuhiko; Ikonomidou, Vasiliki; Iman, Adjoudj; Imani, Farzin; Immermann, Fred; Inlow, Mark; Inoue, Lurdes; Insel, Philip; Irizarry, Michael; Ishibashi, Taro; Ishii, Kenji; Ismail, Sara; Ito, Kaori; Iturria-Medina, Yasser; Iwatsubo, Takeshi; Jacks, Adam; Jacobson, Mark; Jacqmin, Philippe; Jaffe, Carl; Jagust, William; Janousova, Eva; Jara, Hernan; Jasperse, Bas; Jedynak, Bruno; Jefferson, Angela; Jennings, J. 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Ilyas; Kamer, Angela; Kanakaraj, Sithara; Kanchev, Vladimir; Kaneko, Tomoki; Kaneta, Tomohiro; Kang, Hyunseok; Kang, Ju Hee; Kang, Jian; Karageorgiou, Elissaios; Karantzoulis, Stella; Karlawish, Jason; Katz, Elyse; Kaushik, Sandeep S.; Kauwe, John; Kawakami, Hirofumi; Kawashima, Shoji; Kaye, Edward; Kazemi, Samaneh; Ke, Han; Kelleher, Thomas; Kennedy, Richard; Keogh, Bart; Kerchner, Geoffrey; Kerr, Daniel; Keshava, Nirmal; Khalil, Iya; Khalil, Andre; Khondker, Zakaria; Kihara, Takeshi; Killeen, Neil; Killiany, Ron; Kim, Dajung; Kim, Hyoungkyu; Kim, Seongkyun; Kim, Jong Hun; Kim, Ana; Kim, Jung-Hyun; Kimberg, Daniel; Kimura, Tokunori; King, Richard; Kirby, Justin; Kirsch, Wolff; Klimas, Michael; Kline, Richard; Kling, Mitchel; Klopfenstein, Erin; Koen, Joshua; Koikkalainen, Juha; Kokomoor, Anders; Kong, Xiangnan; Koppel, Jeremy; Korolev, Igor; Kotran, Nickolas; Kowalczyk, Adam; Krahnke, Tillmann; Krams, Michael; Kuceyeski, Amy; Kuhl, Donald; Kumar, Vinod; Roy, P. Kumar; Kuo, Julie; Labrish, Catherine; Lai, Song; Lakatos, Anita; Lalonde, François; Lam, On Ki; Lampron, Antoine; Landau, Susan; Lane, Richard; Lane, Barton; Langbaum, Jessica; Langford, Dianne; Lanius, Vivian; Latella, Marco; Leahy, Richard; an Lee, Jong; Lee, Dongsoo; Lee, Noah; Lee, Sei; Lee, Doheon; Lee, Grace; Lefkimmiatis, Stamatis; Lemaitre, Herve; Lenfant, Pierre; Lenz, Robert; Leong, Josiah; Leoutsakos, Jeannie-Marie; Leung, Yuk Yee; Levey, Alan; Li, Rui; Li, Xiaodong; Li, Weidong; Li, Xiaobo; Li, Ming; Li, Lexin; Li, Jun; Li, Gang; Li, Quanzheng; Li, Yi; Li, Junning; Li, Jie; Li, Yue; Li, Shanshan; Liang, Kelvin; Liang, Kuchang; Liang, Peipeng; Liang, Lichen; Liao, Weiqi; Liaquat, Saad; Liberman, Gilad; Lin, Lan; Lin, Ai-Ling; Lin, Frank; Liu, Tao; Liu, Dazhong; Liu, Li; Liu, Honggang; Liu, Sidong; Liu, Tianming; Liu, Xiuwen; Liu, Sophia; Liu, Linda; Liu, Wei; Liu, Guodong; Liu, Yangping; Liu, Collins; Lo, Raymond; Lobanov, Victor; Lockhart, Andrew; Loewenstein, David; Logovinsky, Veronika; Long, Miaomiao; Long, Ziyi; Long, Xiaojing; Looi, Jeffrey; Lu, Huanxiang; Lu, Po-Haong; Lucena, Nathaniel; Lukas, Carsten; Lukic, Ana; Luo, Lei; Luo, Xiongjian; Luo, Xi; Lynch, John; Ma, Shen-Ming; Mackin, Scott; Mada, Marius; Madabhushi, Anant; Maglio, Silvio; Mahanta, Mohammad Shahin; Maikusa, Norihide; Maldjian, Joseph; Mandal, Indrajit; Manjon, Jose; Mantri, Ninad; Manzour, Amir; Marchewka, Artur; Marcus, Daniel; Margolin, Richard; Marrett, Sean; Marshall, Gad; Gonzalez, Alberto Martinez; Torteya, Antonio Martinez; Mather, Mara; Mathis, Chester; Mattei, Peter; Matthews, Dawn; McArdle, John; McCarroll, Steven; McEvoy, Linda; McGeown, William; McGinnis, Scott; McGonigle, John; McIntyre, John; McLaren, Donald; McQuail, Joseph; Meadowcroft, Mark; Meda, Shashwath; Melie-Garcia, Lester; Melrose, Rebecca; Mendelson, Alexander; Mendez, Mario; Menendez, Enrique; Meng, Meng; Meredith, Jere; Metti, Andrea; Meyer, Carsten; Mez, Jesse; Mickael, Guedj; Miftahof, Roustem; Mikula, Margit; Miller, Michael; Millikin, Colleen; Mintun, Mark; Mirza, Mubeena; Mistridis, Panagiota; Mitchell, Meghan; Mitsis, Effie; Mon, Anderson; Moore, Dana; Morabito, Francesco C.; Birgani, Parmida Moradi; Moratal, David; Morimoto, Bruce; Mormino, Elizabeth; Morris, Jill; Mortamet, Bénédicte; Moscato, Pablo; Mueller, Kathyrne; Mueller, Susanne; Mukherjee, Shubhabrata; Mulder, Emma; Mungas, Dan; Munir, Kamran; Murayama, Shigeo; Murphy, Michael; Myers, Amanda; Sairam, N.; Nagata, Ken; Nair, Anil; Nativio, Raffaella; Nazarparvar, Babak; Nazeri, Arash; Nejad, Leila; Nekooei, Sirous; Nettiksimmons, Jasmine; Neu, Scott; Ng, Yen-Bee; Nguyen, Nghi; Nichols, Thomas; Nicodemus, Kristin; Niecko, Timothy; Nielsen, Casper; Nishio, Tomoyuki; Nordstrom, Matthew; Noshad, Sina; Notomi, Keiji; Novak, Nic; Nutakki, Gopi Chand; O'Bryant, Sid; Obisesan, Thomas; Oh, Joonmi; Okonkwo, Ozioma; Olde Rikkert, Marcel; Oliveira, Ailton; Oliveira, João; Oliver, Ruth; Olmos, Salvador; Oltra, Javier; Ortner, Marion; Osadebey, Michael; Ostrowitzki, Susanne; Overholser, Rosanna; Anishiya, P.; Chitra, P. K. A.; Pa, Judy; Palanisamy, Preethi; Pan, Sarah; Pan, Zhifang; Pande, Yogesh; Pardo, Jose; Pardoe, Heath; Park, Sang hyun; Park, Sujin; Park, Lovingly; Park, Hyunjin; Park, Moon Ho; Parker, Christopher; Patel, Yogen; Patil, Amol; Patil, Manasi; Pawlak, Mikolaj; Payoux, Pierre; Pearson, Jim; Pell, Gaby; Peng, Yahong; Pennec, Xavier; Pepin, Jean louis; Pereira, Francisco; Perneczky, Robert; Petitti, Diana; Petrella, Jeffrey; Peyrat, Jean-Marc; Ngoc, Phuong Trinh Pham; Phillips, Justin; Phillips, Nicole; Pian, Wen-ting; Pierson, Ronald; Piovezan, Mauro; Pipitone, Jon; Pirraglia, Elizabeth; Planes, Xavi; Podhorski, Adam; Pollari, Mika; Pomara, Nunzio; Pontecorvo, Michael; Popov, Veljko; Poppenk, Jordan; Posner, Holly; Potkin, Steven; Potter, Guy; Potter, Elizabeth; Poulin, Stephane; Prastawa, Marcel; Prince, Jerry; Priya, Anandh; Pruessner, Jens; Qiu, Wendy; Qu, Annie; Qualls, Constance Dean; Quarg, Peter; Quinlan, Judith; Rabbia, Michael; Rajagovindan, Rajasimhan; Rajeesh, Rajeesh; Rallabandi, V. 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Subramanyam; Ramadubramani, Vanamamalai; Ramage, Amy; Ramirez, Alfredo; Randolph, Chrstopher; Rao, Anil; Rao, Hengyi; Rao, Divya; Raubertas, Richard; Ray, Debashis; Razak, Hana; Reed, Bruce; Reid, Andrew; Reihac, Anthonin; Reiner, Peggy; Reinsberger, Claus; Restrepo, Lucas; Retico, Alessandra; Rhatigan, Lewis; Rhinn, Herve; Rhoades, Earl; Ribbens, Annemie; Richard, Edo; Richards, John; Richter, Mirco; Riddle, William; Ridgway, Gerard; Ries, Michele; Ringman, John; Rischall, Matt; Rizk-Jackson, Angela; Rizzi, Massimo; Robieson, Weining; Rodriguez, Laura; Rodriguez-Vieitez, Elena; Rogalski, Emily; Rogers, Elizabeth; Balderrama, Javier Rojas; Rokicki, Jaroslav; Romero, Klaus; Rorden, Chris; Rosand, Jonathan; Rosen, Ori; Rosenberg, Paul; Roubini, Eli; Rousseau, François; Rowe, Christopher; Rubin, Daniel; Rubright, Jonathan; Rucinski, Marek; Ruiz, Agustin; Rulseh, Aaron; Rusinek, Henry; Ryan, Laurie; Saad, Ahmed; Sabuncu, Mert; Sahuquillo, Juan; Said, Yasmine; Saito, Naomi; Sakata, Muneyuki; 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Simon, Adam; Simon, Melvin; Simpson, Ivor; Singh, Nikhil; Singh, Simer Preet; Sinha, Neelam; Siuciak, Judy; Sjögren, Niclas; Skinner, Jeannine; Smith, Michael; Smith, Charles; Smyth, Timothy; Snow, Sarah; Snyder, Peter; Soares, Holly; Soldan, Anja; Soldea, Octavian; Solomon, Alan; Solomon, Paul; Som, Subhojit; Song, Zhuang; Song, Shide; Sosova, Iveta; Soydemir, Melih; Spampinato, Maria Vittoria; Speier, William; Sperling, Reisa; Renãâ, Spiegel; Spies, Lothar; Springate, Beth; Staff, Roger; Steffener, Jason; Stern, Yaakov; Stokman, Harro; Straw, Jack; Stricker, Nikki; Stühler, Elisabeth; Styren, Scot; Subramanian, Vijayalakshmi; Suen, Summit; Sugishita, Morihiro; Sukkar, Rafid; Sun, Ying; Sun, Jia; Sun, Yu; Sundell, Karen; Suzuki, Akiyuki; Svetnik, Vladimir; Swan, Melanie; Symons, Sean; Szigeti, Kinga; Szoeke, Cassandra; Sørensen, Lauge; Genish, T.; Takahasi, Tetsuhiko; Takeuchi, Tomoko; Tanaka, Shoji; Tanaka, Rie; Tanchi, Chaturaphat; Tancredi, Daniel; Tang, Qi; Tarnow, Eugen; Tartaglia, Maria Carmela; Tarver, Erika; Tassy, Dominique; Tauber, Clovis; Taylor-Reinwald, Lisa; Teipel, Stefan; Teng, Edmond; Terriza, Felipe; Thambisetty, Madhav; Thames, April; Thatavarti, Raja Sekhar; Thiele, Frank; Thomas, Charlene; Thomas, Ronald; Thomas, Benjamin; Thompson, Paul; Thompson, Wesley; Thornton-Wells, Tricia; Thorvaldsson, Valgeir; Thurfjell, Lennart; Tokuda, Takahiko; Toledo, Juan B.; Tölli, Tuomas; Toma, Ahmed; Tomita, Naoki; Toro, Roberto; Torrealdea, Patxi; Tosto, Giuseppe; Tosun, Duygu; Tousian, Mona; Toussaint, Paule; Toyoshiba, Hiroyoshi; Tractenberg, Rochelle E.; Triggs, Tyler; Trittschuh, Emily; Trojanowski, John; Trotta, Gabriele; Huu, Tram Truong; Truran, Diana; Tsanas, Athanasios; Tsang, Candy; Tufail, Ahsan; Tung, Joyce; Turken, And; Ueda, Yoji; Uematsu, Daisuke; Ullrich, Lauren; Venkataraju, Kannan Umadevi; Umar, Nisser; Ungar, Leo; Uzunbas, Gokhan; van de Nes, Joseph; van der Brug, Marcel; van der Lijn, Fedde; van Hecke, Wim; van Horn, John; van Leemput, Koen; van Train, Kenneth; Varkuti, Balint; Vasanawala, Minal; Veeraraghavan, Harini; Vemuri, Prashanthi; Verma, Manish; Videbaek, Charlotte; Vidoni, Eric; Villanueva-Meyer, Javier; Vinyes, Georgina; Visser, Pieter Jelle; Vitek, Michael; Vogel, Simon; Voineskos, Aristotle; Vos, Stephanie; Vounou, Maria; Wade, Sara; Walsh, Alexander; Wan, Hong; Wang, Tianyao; Wang, Yongmei Michelle; Wang, Wei; Wang, Angela; Wang, Song; Wang, Lubin; Wang, Li; Wang, Yaping; Wang, Li-San; Wang, Lei; Wang, Alex; Wang, Yue; Wang, Xu; Wang, Ze; Wang, Tiger; Ward, Michael; Ward, Andrew; Watanabe, Toshiyuki; Watson, David; Webb, David; Wefel, Jeffrey; Weiner, Michael; Westlye, Lars T.; Wheland, David; Whitcher, Brandon; White, Brooke; Whitlow, Christopher; Wilhelmsen, Kirk; Wilmot, Beth; Wilson, Lorraine; Wimsatt, Matt; Wingo, Thomas; Wirth, Miranka; Wishart, Heather; Wiste, Heather; Wolf, Henrike; Wolke, Ira; Wolz, Robin; Wong, Koon; Woo, Jongwook; Woo, Ellen; Woods, Lynn; Worth, Andrew; Wu, Yanjun; Wu, Liang; Wu, Ellen; Wyman, Bradley; Xiao, Guanghua; Xie, Sharon; Xu, Ye; Xu, Yi-Zheng; Xu, Guofan; Xu, Steven; Xu, Shunbin; Xu, Jun; Yamada, Tomoko; Yamashita, Fumio; Yan, Yunyi; Yan, Pingkun; Yang, Chung-Yi; Yang, Zijiang; Yang, Edward; Yang, Guang; Yang, Wenlu; Yang, Eric; Yank, Hyun Duk; Yang, Jinzhong; Yassa, Michael; Yavorsky, Christian; Ye, Byoung Seok; Ye, Liang; Ye, Jong; Yee, Laura; Ying, Song; Yokoyama, Takao; Young, Stewart; Young, Jonathan; Younhyun, Jung; Yu, Dongchuan; Yu, Shiwei; Yu, C. Q.; Yu, Peng; Yuan, Ying; Yuan, Kai; Yuan, Guihong; Yuen, Bob; Yushkevich, Paul; Zaborszky, Laszlo; Zagorodnov, Vitali; Zagorski, Michael; Zahodne, Laura; Zarei, Mojtaba; Zawadzki, Rezi; Zeitzer, Jamie; Zelinski, Elizabeth; Zeskind, Benjamin; Zhan, Shu; Zhang, Jing; Zhang, Lijun; Zhang, Zhiguo; Zhang, Linda; Zhang, Zhe; Zhang, Daoqiang; Zhang, Huixiong; Zhang, Xin; Zhang, Tianhao; Zhang, Ping; Zhao, Jim; Zhao, Qinying; Zhao, Peng; Zhen, Xiantong; Zhijun, Yao; Zhou, Luping; Zhou, Bin; Zhou, Yongxia; Zhou, Sheng; Zhu, Hongtu; Zhu, Wen; Zhu, Wanlin; Zhu, Xuyan; Ziegler, Gabriel; Zilka, Samantha; Zisserman, Andrew; Zito, Giancarlo; Zu, Chen; Zulfigar, Annam

    2012-01-01

    The hippocampus is affected at an early stage in the development of Alzheimer's disease (AD). With the use of structural magnetic resonance (MR) imaging, we can investigate the effect of AD on the morphology of the hippocampus. The hippocampal shape variations among a population can be usually

  13. Dynamics of cell wall elasticity pattern shapes the cell during yeast mating morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goldenbogen, Björn; Giese, Wolfgang; Hemmen, Marie; Uhlendorf, Jannis; Herrmann, Andreas; Klipp, Edda

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall defines cell shape and maintains integrity of fungi and plants. When exposed to mating pheromone, Saccharomyces cerevisiae grows a mating projection and alters in morphology from spherical to shmoo form. Although structural and compositional alterations of the cell wall accompany shape transitions, their impact on cell wall elasticity is unknown. In a combined theoretical and experimental approach using finite-element modelling and atomic force microscopy (AFM), we investigated the influence of spatially and temporally varying material properties on mating morphogenesis. Time-resolved elasticity maps of shmooing yeast acquired with AFM in vivo revealed distinct patterns, with soft material at the emerging mating projection and stiff material at the tip. The observed cell wall softening in the protrusion region is necessary for the formation of the characteristic shmoo shape, and results in wider and longer mating projections. The approach is generally applicable to tip-growing fungi and plants cells. © 2016 The Authors.

  14. Anatomically shaped tooth and periodontal regeneration by cell homing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, K; Lee, C H; Kim, B K; Mao, J J

    2010-08-01

    Tooth regeneration by cell delivery encounters translational hurdles. We hypothesized that anatomically correct teeth can regenerate in scaffolds without cell transplantation. Novel, anatomically shaped human molar scaffolds and rat incisor scaffolds were fabricated by 3D bioprinting from a hybrid of poly-epsilon-caprolactone and hydroxyapatite with 200-microm-diameter interconnecting microchannels. In each of 22 rats, an incisor scaffold was implanted orthotopically following mandibular incisor extraction, whereas a human molar scaffold was implanted ectopically into the dorsum. Stromal-derived factor-1 (SDF1) and bone morphogenetic protein-7 (BMP7) were delivered in scaffold microchannels. After 9 weeks, a putative periodontal ligament and new bone regenerated at the interface of rat incisor scaffold with native alveolar bone. SDF1 and BMP7 delivery not only recruited significantly more endogenous cells, but also elaborated greater angiogenesis than growth-factor-free control scaffolds. Regeneration of tooth-like structures and periodontal integration by cell homing provide an alternative to cell delivery, and may accelerate clinical applications.

  15. Assessment of shape changes of mistletoe berries: a new software approach to automatize the parameterization of path curve shaped contours.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbidge, Renatus; Feiten, Linus; Conradt, Oliver; Heusser, Peter; Baumgartner, Stephan

    2013-01-01

    Photographs of mistletoe (Viscum album L.) berries taken by a permanently fixed camera during their development in autumn were subjected to an outline shape analysis by fitting path curves using a mathematical algorithm from projective geometry. During growth and maturation processes the shape of mistletoe berries can be described by a set of such path curves, making it possible to extract changes of shape using one parameter called Lambda. Lambda describes the outline shape of a path curve. Here we present methods and software to capture and measure these changes of form over time. The present paper describes the software used to automatize a number of tasks including contour recognition, optimization of fitting the contour via hill-climbing, derivation of the path curves, computation of Lambda and blinding the pictures for the operator. The validity of the program is demonstrated by results from three independent measurements showing circadian rhythm in mistletoe berries. The program is available as open source and will be applied in a project to analyze the chronobiology of shape in mistletoe berries and the buds of their host trees.

  16. Assessment of shape changes of mistletoe berries: a new software approach to automatize the parameterization of path curve shaped contours.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renatus Derbidge

    Full Text Available Photographs of mistletoe (Viscum album L. berries taken by a permanently fixed camera during their development in autumn were subjected to an outline shape analysis by fitting path curves using a mathematical algorithm from projective geometry. During growth and maturation processes the shape of mistletoe berries can be described by a set of such path curves, making it possible to extract changes of shape using one parameter called Lambda. Lambda describes the outline shape of a path curve. Here we present methods and software to capture and measure these changes of form over time. The present paper describes the software used to automatize a number of tasks including contour recognition, optimization of fitting the contour via hill-climbing, derivation of the path curves, computation of Lambda and blinding the pictures for the operator. The validity of the program is demonstrated by results from three independent measurements showing circadian rhythm in mistletoe berries. The program is available as open source and will be applied in a project to analyze the chronobiology of shape in mistletoe berries and the buds of their host trees.

  17. Exercise, oxidants, and antioxidants change the shape of the bell-shaped hormesis curve

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsolt Radak

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available It is debated whether exercise-induced ROS production is obligatory to cause adaptive response. It is also claimed that antioxidant treatment could eliminate the adaptive response, which appears to be systemic and reportedly reduces the incidence of a wide range of diseases. Here we suggest that if the antioxidant treatment occurs before the physiological function-ROS dose-response curve reaches peak level, the antioxidants can attenuate function. On the other hand, if the antioxidant treatment takes place after the summit of the bell-shaped dose response curve, antioxidant treatment would have beneficial effects on function. We suggest that the effects of antioxidant treatment are dependent on the intensity of exercise, since the adaptive response, which is multi pathway dependent, is strongly influenced by exercise intensity. It is further suggested that levels of ROS concentration are associated with peak physiological function and can be extended by physical fitness level and this could be the basis for exercise pre-conditioning. Physical inactivity, aging or pathological disorders increase the sensitivity to oxidative stress by altering the bell-shaped dose response curve.

  18. Light quantity affects the regulation of cell shape in Fremyella diplosiphon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bagmi ePattanaik

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available In some cyanobacteria, the color or prevalent wavelengths of ambient light can impact the protein or pigment composition of the light-harvesting complexes. In some cases, light color or quality impacts cellular morphology. The significance of changes in pigmentation is associated strongly with optimizing light absorption for photosynthesis, whereas the significance of changes in light quality-dependent cellular morphology is less well understood. In natural aquatic environments, light quality and intensity change simultaneously at varying depths of the water column. Thus, we hypothesize that changes in morphology that also have been attributed to differences in the prevalent wavelengths of available light may largely be associated with changes in light intensity. Fremyella diplosiphon shows highly reproducible light-dependent changes in pigmentation and morphology. Under red light (RL, F. diplosiphon cells are blue-green in color, due to the accumulation of high levels of phycocyanin, a RL- absorbing pigment in the light-harvesting complexes or phycobilisomes (PBSs, and the shape of cells are short and rounded. Conversely, under green light (GL, F. diplosiphon cells are red in color due to accumulation of GL- absorbing phycoerythrin in PBSs, and are longer and brick-shaped. GL is enriched at lower depths in the water column, where overall levels of light also are reduced, i.e., to 10% or less of the intensity found at the water surface. We hypothesize that longer cells under low light intensity, which is generally enriched in green wavelengths, are associated with greater levels of total photosynthetic pigments in the thylakoid membranes. To test this hypothesis, we grew F. diplosiphon under increasing intensities of GL and observed whether the length of cells diminished due to reduced pressure to maintain larger cells and the associated increased photosynthetic membrane capacity under high light intensity, independent of whether it is light of

  19. Shape-dependent control of cell growth, differentiation, and apoptosis: switching between attractors in cell regulatory networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, S.; Ingber, D. E.

    2000-01-01

    Development of characteristic tissue patterns requires that individual cells be switched locally between different phenotypes or "fates;" while one cell may proliferate, its neighbors may differentiate or die. Recent studies have revealed that local switching between these different gene programs is controlled through interplay between soluble growth factors, insoluble extracellular matrix molecules, and mechanical forces which produce cell shape distortion. Although the precise molecular basis remains unknown, shape-dependent control of cell growth and function appears to be mediated by tension-dependent changes in the actin cytoskeleton. However, the question remains: how can a generalized physical stimulus, such as cell distortion, activate the same set of genes and signaling proteins that are triggered by molecules which bind to specific cell surface receptors. In this article, we use computer simulations based on dynamic Boolean networks to show that the different cell fates that a particular cell can exhibit may represent a preprogrammed set of common end programs or "attractors" which self-organize within the cell's regulatory networks. In this type of dynamic network model of information processing, generalized stimuli (e.g., mechanical forces) and specific molecular cues elicit signals which follow different trajectories, but eventually converge onto one of a small set of common end programs (growth, quiescence, differentiation, apoptosis, etc.). In other words, if cells use this type of information processing system, then control of cell function would involve selection of preexisting (latent) behavioral modes of the cell, rather than instruction by specific binding molecules. Importantly, the results of the computer simulation closely mimic experimental data obtained with living endothelial cells. The major implication of this finding is that current methods used for analysis of cell function that rely on characterization of linear signaling pathways or

  20. Changes in Astrocyte Shape Induced by Sublytic Concentrations of the Cholesterol-Dependent Cytolysin Pneumolysin Still Require Pore-Forming Capacity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Förtsch

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Streptococcus pneumoniae is a common pathogen that causes various infections, such as sepsis and meningitis. A major pathogenic factor of S. pneumoniae is the cholesterol-dependent cytolysin, pneumolysin. It produces cell lysis at high concentrations and apoptosis at lower concentrations. We have shown that sublytic amounts of pneumolysin induce small GTPase-dependent actin cytoskeleton reorganization and microtubule stabilization in human neuroblastoma cells that are manifested by cell retraction and changes in cell shape. In this study, we utilized a live imaging approach to analyze the role of pneumolysin’s pore-forming capacity in the actin-dependent cell shape changes in primary astrocytes. After the initial challenge with the wild-type toxin, a permeabilized cell population was rapidly established within 20–40 minutes. After the initial rapid permeabilization, the size of the permeabilized population remained unchanged and reached a plateau. Thus, we analyzed the non-permeabilized (non-lytic population, which demonstrated retraction and shape changes that were inhibited by actin depolymerization. Despite the non-lytic nature of pneumolysin treatment, the toxin’s lytic capacity remained critical for the initiation of cell shape changes. The non-lytic pneumolysin mutants W433F-pneumolysin and delta6-pneumolysin, which bind the cell membrane with affinities similar to that of the wild-type toxin, were not able to induce shape changes. The initiation of cell shape changes and cell retraction by the wild-type toxin were independent of calcium and sodium influx and membrane depolarization, which are known to occur following cellular challenge and suggested to result from the ion channel-like properties of the pneumolysin pores. Excluding the major pore-related phenomena as the initiation mechanism of cell shape changes, the existence of a more complex relationship between the pore-forming capacity of pneumolysin and the actin cytoskeleton

  1. Effect of Lidocaine and Epinephrine on Human Erythrocyte Shape and Vesiculability of Blood Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tanja Slokar

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of local anesthetic composed of lidocaine and epinephrine on vesiculability of blood cells and erythrocyte shape was studied. Whole blood and plasma were incubated with lidocaine/epinephrine. Extracellular vesicles were isolated by centrifugation and washing and counted by flow cytometry. Lidocaine/epinephrine and each component alone were added to diluted blood. Shape changes were recorded by micrographs. An ensemble of captured frames was analyzed for populations of discocytes, echinocytes, and stomatocytes by using statistical methods. Incubation of whole blood and blood plasma with lidocaine/epinephrine considerably increased concentration of extracellular vesicles in isolates (for an average factor 3.4 in blood and 2.8 in plasma. Lidocaine/epinephrine caused change of erythrocyte shape from mainly discocytic to mainly stomatocytic (higher than 50%. Lidocaine alone had even stronger stomatocytic effect (the percent of stomatocytes was higher than 95% while epinephrine had echinocytic effect (the percent of echinocytes was higher than 80%. The differences were highly statistically significant p<10-8 with statistical power P=1. Lidocaine/epinephrine induced regions of highly anisotropically curved regions indicating that lidocaine and epinephrine interact with erythrocyte membrane. It was concluded that lidocaine/epinephrine interacts with cell membranes and increases vesiculability of blood cells in vitro.

  2. Gene Delivery Particle Engineering Strategies for Shape-dependent Targeting of Cells and Tissues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozielski, Kristen L; Sitti, Metin

    2017-01-01

    Successful gene delivery requires overcoming both systemic and intracellular obstacles before the nucleic acid cargo can successfully reach its tissue and subcellular target location. Materials & Methods: Non-viral mechanisms to enable targeting while avoiding off-target delivery have arisen via biological, chemical, and physical engineering strategies. Herein we will discuss the physical parameters in particle design that promote tissue- and cell-targeted delivery of genetic cargo. We will discuss systemic concerns, such as circulation, tissue localization, and clearance, as well as cell-scale obstacles, such as cellular uptake and nucleic acid packaging. In particular, we will focus on engineering particle shape and size in order to enhance delivery and promote precise targeting. We will also address methods to program or change particle shape in situ using environmentally triggered cues. Copyright© Bentham Science Publishers; For any queries, please email at epub@benthamscience.org.

  3. The Drosophila actin regulator ENABLED regulates cell shape and orientation during gonad morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hiroko Sano

    Full Text Available Organs develop distinctive morphologies to fulfill their unique functions. We used Drosophila embryonic gonads as a model to study how two different cell lineages, primordial germ cells (PGCs and somatic gonadal precursors (SGPs, combine to form one organ. We developed a membrane GFP marker to image SGP behaviors live. These studies show that a combination of SGP cell shape changes and inward movement of anterior and posterior SGPs leads to the compaction of the spherical gonad. This process is disrupted in mutants of the actin regulator, enabled (ena. We show that Ena coordinates these cell shape changes and the inward movement of the SGPs, and Ena affects the intracellular localization of DE-cadherin (DE-cad. Mathematical simulation based on these observations suggests that changes in DE-cad localization can generate the forces needed to compact an elongated structure into a sphere. We propose that Ena regulates force balance in the SGPs by sequestering DE-cad, leading to the morphogenetic movement required for gonad compaction.

  4. Smart Kirigami open honeycombs in shape changing actuation and dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neville, R. M.; Scarpa, F.; Leng, J.

    2017-04-01

    Kirigami is the ancient Japanese art of cutting and folding paper, widespread in Asia since the 17th century. Kirigami offers a broader set of geometries and topologies than classical fold/valleys Origami, because of the presence of cuts. Moreover, Kirigami can be readily applied to a large set of composite and smart 2D materials, and can be used to up-scaled productions with modular molding. We describe the manufacturing and testing of a topology of Kirigami cellular structures defined as Open Honeycombs. Open Honeycombs (OHs) can assume fully closed shape and be alike classical hexagonal centresymmetric honeycombs, or can vary their morphology by tuning the opening angle and rotational stiffness of the folds. We show the performance of experimental PEEK OHs with cable actuation and morphing shape characteristics, and the analogous morphing behavior of styrene SMPs under combined mechanical and thermal loading. We also show the dynamic (modal analysis) behavior of OHs configurations parameterized against their geometry characteristics, and the controllable modal density characteristics that one could obtain by tuning the topology and folding properties.

  5. Combining Shape-Changing Interfaces and Spatial Augmented Reality Enables Extended Object Appearance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lindlbauer, David; Grønbæk, Jens Emil; Birk, Morten

    2016-01-01

    for increasing the realism of 3D objects such as bump mapping. This extensible framework helps us identify challenges of the two techniques and benefits of their combination. We utilize our prototype shape-changing device enriched with spatial augmented reality through projection mapping to demonstrate...... the concept. We present a novel mechanical distance-fields algorithm for real-time fitting of mechanically constrained shape-changing devices to arbitrary 3D graphics. Furthermore, we present a technique for increasing effective screen real estate for spatial augmented reality through view-dependent shape......We propose combining shape-changing interfaces and spatial augmented reality for extending the space of appearances and interactions of actuated interfaces. While shape-changing interfaces can dynamically alter the physical appearance of objects, the integration of spatial augmented reality...

  6. An adhesion-dependent switch between mechanisms that determine motile cell shape.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erin L Barnhart

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes.

  7. An Adhesion-Dependent Switch between Mechanisms That Determine Motile Cell Shape

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barnhart, Erin L.; Lee, Kun-Chun; Keren, Kinneret; Mogilner, Alex; Theriot, Julie A.

    2011-01-01

    Keratocytes are fast-moving cells in which adhesion dynamics are tightly coupled to the actin polymerization motor that drives migration, resulting in highly coordinated cell movement. We have found that modifying the adhesive properties of the underlying substrate has a dramatic effect on keratocyte morphology. Cells crawling at intermediate adhesion strengths resembled stereotypical keratocytes, characterized by a broad, fan-shaped lamellipodium, clearly defined leading and trailing edges, and persistent rates of protrusion and retraction. Cells at low adhesion strength were small and round with highly variable protrusion and retraction rates, and cells at high adhesion strength were large and asymmetrical and, strikingly, exhibited traveling waves of protrusion. To elucidate the mechanisms by which adhesion strength determines cell behavior, we examined the organization of adhesions, myosin II, and the actin network in keratocytes migrating on substrates with different adhesion strengths. On the whole, our results are consistent with a quantitative physical model in which keratocyte shape and migratory behavior emerge from the self-organization of actin, adhesions, and myosin, and quantitative changes in either adhesion strength or myosin contraction can switch keratocytes among qualitatively distinct migration regimes. PMID:21559321

  8. The myth of hidden ovulation: Shape and texture changes in the face during the menstrual cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Oberzaucher, E.; Katina, S; Schmehl, S.F.; Holzleitner, I.J.; Mehu-Blantar, I.; Grammer, K

    2012-01-01

    In recent years, evidence has been gathered indicating increased attractiveness of female faces at the point of ovulation. In this paper, we asked what changes in facial appearance occur during menstrual cycle that lead to this shift in attractiveness. We analysed facial photographs of 20 young women with a normal cycle. We found evidence for textural changes, as well as shape changes that might account for the ovulatory peak in attractiveness. Generally, facial shape at ovulation is perceive...

  9. Changes in shape and water shedding potential of three landforms ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    In the case of the Cambered Bed and Furrow (CBF), crest height decreased from 0.39 m to 0.35 m after two years and further to 0.30 m after five years of formation. Accompanying the changes in crest height were also changes in land sur-face configuration. In both BBF and CBF, there was significant reduction in concavity of ...

  10. Automated three-dimensional single cell phenotyping of spindle dynamics, cell shape, and volume

    CERN Document Server

    Plumb, Kemp; Pelletier, Vincent; Kilfoil, Maria L

    2015-01-01

    We present feature finding and tracking algorithms in 3D in living cells, and demonstrate their utility to measure metrics important in cell biological processes. We developed a computational imaging hybrid approach that combines automated three-dimensional tracking of point-like features with surface determination from which cell (or nuclear) volume, shape, and planes of interest can be extracted. After validation, we applied the technique to real space context-rich dynamics of the mitotic spindle, and cell volume and its relationship to spindle length, in dividing living cells. These methods are additionally useful for automated segregation of pre-anaphase and anaphase spindle populations in budding yeast. We found that genetic deletion of the yeast kinesin-5 mitotic motor cin8 leads to large mother and daughter cells that were indistinguishable based on size, and that in those cells the spindle length becomes uncorrelated with cell size. The technique can be used to visualize and quantify tracked feature c...

  11. Spatiotemporal organization of exocytosis emerges during neuronal shape change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Urbina, Fabio L; Gomez, Shawn M; Gupton, Stephanie L

    2018-01-19

    Neurite elongation and branching in developing neurons requires plasmalemma expansion, hypothesized to occur primarily via exocytosis. We posited that exocytosis in developing neurons and nonneuronal cells would exhibit distinct spatiotemporal organization. We exploited total internal reflection fluorescence microscopy to image vesicle-associated membrane protein (VAMP)-pHluorin-mediated exocytosis in mouse embryonic cortical neurons and interphase melanoma cells, and developed computer-vision software and statistical tools to uncover spatiotemporal aspects of exocytosis. Vesicle fusion behavior differed between vesicle types, cell types, developmental stages, and extracellular environments. Experiment-based mathematical calculations indicated that VAMP2-mediated vesicle fusion supplied excess material for the plasma membrane expansion that occurred early in neuronal morphogenesis, which was balanced by clathrin-mediated endocytosis. Spatial statistics uncovered distinct spatiotemporal regulation of exocytosis in the soma and neurites of developing neurons that was modulated by developmental stage, exposure to the guidance cue netrin-1, and the brain-enriched ubiquitin ligase tripartite motif 9. In melanoma cells, exocytosis occurred less frequently, with distinct spatial clustering patterns. © 2018 Urbina et al.

  12. Numerical simulation of s-shaped organic bulk-heterojunction solar cell current-voltage characteristics

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wagenpfahl, Alexander; Rauh, Daniel; Deibel, Carsten [Experimental Physics VI, Julius-Maximilians-University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Dyakonov, Vladimir [Experimental Physics VI, Julius-Maximilians-University of Wuerzburg (Germany); Bavarian Center for Applied Energy Research, ZAE Bayern e.V., Wuerzburg (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Organic solar cell devices based on semiconducting polymer-fullerene blends occasionally possess current-voltage characteristics showing an s-shaped behavior. A strong effect of this kind easily reduces the solar cells working efficiency to a minimum. The detailed origin of the double diode behavior is still unknown. Using a poly(3-hexylthiophene): phenyl-C{sub 61}-butyric acid methyl ester (P3HT:PCBM) blend as active layer, we will present how such an s-shape is experimentally achieved using a plasma etch process on the transparent hole conducting anode (indium tin oxide). By considering a finite surface recombination in a device simulation program, we show that this s-shape can be calculated, only by assuming finite charge extraction velocities from the active layer to the metallic electrodes. The resulting charge carrier accumulation at the surfaces thereby changes the current transport from ohmic to space charge limited. By analyzing the found dependencies we demonstrate under which conditions this effect influences the solar cell performance.

  13. Shape change of cured 2D and 3D nanostructures from imprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Meghali J.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.

    2015-03-01

    Nanosculpting, the fabrication of two- and three-dimensional shapes at the nanoscale, enables applications in photonics, metamaterials, multi-bit magnetic memory, and bio-nanoparticles. A promising high resolution and high throughput method for nanosculpting is nanoimprint lithography (NIL). A key requirement to achieving manufacturing viability of nanosculptures in NIL is maintaining image fidelity through each step of the imprinting process. In particular, polymer densification during UV curing can distort the imprinted image. Here we study the shape changes introduced by polymer densification and develop a forward method for predicting changes in nanoscale geometries from UV curing. We show that shape changes by polymer densification are governed by the Poisson's ratio, the shrinkage coefficient of the polymer resist, and the geometric aspect ratios of the nanosculpted shape. We also show that the size of the residual layer does not impact the final profile of the imprinted shape.

  14. Understanding sudden environmental and societal change through coupled geochronological and artefact shape analyses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoggard, Christian Steven; Sauer, Florian Rudolf; Zernack, Anke Verena

    Over the last twenty years, advances in geometric morphometric methodologies have revolutionised how archaeologists understand changes in artefact shape and form (size plus shape) throughout the Quaternary period. Such methodologies provide a high resolution of artefact coverage, and allow a crit...

  15. Shapes of Early Change in Psychotherapy under Routine Outpatient Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stulz, Niklaus; Lutz, Wolfgang; Leach, Chris; Lucock, Mike; Barkham, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Although improvement of clients' state is a central concern for psychotherapy, relatively little is known about how change in outcome variables unfolds during psychotherapy. Client progress may follow highly variable temporal courses, and this variation in treatment courses may have important clinical implications. By analyzing treatment progress…

  16. Shape and Dynamics of Adhesive Cells: Mechanical Response of Open Systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yuehua; Jiang, Hongyuan

    2017-05-01

    Cell adhesion is an essential biological process. However, previous theoretical and experimental studies ignore a key variable, the changes of cellular volume and pressure, during the dynamic adhesion process. Here, we treat cells as open systems and propose a theoretical framework to investigate how the exchange of water and ions with the environment affects the shape and dynamics of cells adhered between two adhesive surfaces. We show that adherent cells can be either stable (convex or concave) or unstable (spontaneous rupture or collapse) depending on the adhesion energy density, the cell size, the separation of two adhesive surfaces, and the stiffness of the flexible surface. Strikingly, we find that the unstable states vanish when cellular volume and pressure are constant. We further show that the detachments of convex and concave cells are very different. The mechanical response of adherent cells is mainly determined by the competition between the loading rate and the regulation of the cellular volume and pressure. Finally, we show that as an open system the detachment of adherent cells is also significantly influenced by the loading history. Thus, our findings reveal a major difference between living cells and nonliving materials.

  17. DNA sequence–directed shape change of photopatterned hydrogels via high-degree swelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cangialosi, Angelo; Yoon, ChangKyu; Liu, Jiayu; Huang, Qi; Guo, Jingkai; Nguyen, Thao D.; Gracias, David H.; Schulman, Rebecca

    2017-09-01

    Shape-changing hydrogels that can bend, twist, or actuate in response to external stimuli are critical to soft robots, programmable matter, and smart medicine. Shape change in hydrogels has been induced by global cues, including temperature, light, or pH. Here we demonstrate that specific DNA molecules can induce 100-fold volumetric hydrogel expansion by successive extension of cross-links. We photopattern up to centimeter-sized gels containing multiple domains that undergo different shape changes in response to different DNA sequences. Experiments and simulations suggest a simple design rule for controlled shape change. Because DNA molecules can be coupled to molecular sensors, amplifiers, and logic circuits, this strategy introduces the possibility of building soft devices that respond to diverse biochemical inputs and autonomously implement chemical control programs.

  18. How Changing Human Lifestyles are Shaping Europe's Regional Seas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mee, L. D.; Lowe, C. D.; Langmead, O.; McQuatters-Gollop, A.; Attrill, M.; Cooper, P.; Gilbert, A.; Knudsen, S.; Garnacho, E.

    2007-05-01

    European society is experiencing unprecedented changes triggered by expansion of the European Union, the fall of Communism, economic growth and the onset of globalisation. Europe's regional seas, the Baltic, Black Sea, Mediterranean and North-East Atlantic (including the North Sea), provide key goods and services to the human population but have suffered from severe degradation in past decades. Their integrity as coupled social and ecological systems depends on how humanity will anticipate potential problems and deal with its ecological footprint in the future. We report the outcome of an EU-funded 15-country, 28 institution project entitled European Lifestyles and Marine Ecosystems (ELME). Our studies were designed to inform new EU policy and legislation that incorporates Ecosystem-Based Management. ELME has modelled the key relationships between economic and social drivers (D), environmental pressures (P) and changes in the state of the environment (S) in Europe's regional seas. We examined four key issues in each sea: habitat change, eutrophication, chemical pollution and fisheries. We developed conceptual models for each regional sea and employed a novel stochastic modelling technique to examine the interrelationship between key components of the conceptual models. We used the models to examine 2-3 decade projections of current trends in D, P and S and how a number of alternative development scenarios might modify these trends. These simulations demonstrate the vulnerability of Europe's seas to human pressure. As affluence increases in countries acceding to the EU, so does the demand for marine goods and services. There are `winners' and `losers' amongst marine species; the winners are often species that are opportunistic invaders or those with low economic value. In the case of eutrophication, semi-enclosed seas such as the Baltic or Black Sea are already affected by the `legacy of the past'; nutrients that have accumulated in soils, ground waters and

  19. Feeding variations and shape changes of a temperate reef clingfish during its early ontogeny

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Valentina Bernal-Durán

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The majority of rocky reef fishes have complex life cycles, involving transition from a pelagic to a benthic environment. This means that as they grow, their morphology, behaviour and feeding habits must change. Therefore, shape changes occurring during early development of these fishes will be related to diet changes. The clingfish Sicyases sanguineus was selected for this study, because it displays a noticeable variation in shape from pelagic larvae to juvenile stage, and it is expected that diet composition will change as well. The pattern of shape changes was studied using geometric morphometrics. A set of 9 landmarks were digitized in 159 larval and juvenile fish and the same specimens were used for gut content analysis. Allometric growth was most prominent early in the ontogeny, from 4 to 12 mm. Morphology changed from a thin and hydrodynamic shape to a more robust and deeper body prior to settlement. The diet of the clingfish during larval stages showed preferences for a variety of copepod stages. As individual grows the ingested prey volume increases, but not the number and width of prey. A partial least square analysis showed low covariance between shape changes and diet composition changes in prey number and volume, suggesting that the two processes were temporally decoupled. The biggest shape changes, a lengthening of the visceral cavity and a flattening of the head, occurred up to 12 mm standard length, while the largest feeding differentiation, shifting from copepods to microalgae, occurred after 16 mm. Results suggest that shape changes precede trophic changes in this clingfish species during the transition from a pelagic to a benthic habitat.

  20. Effect of power shape on energy extraction from microbial fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alaraj, Muhannad; Feng, Shuo; Roane, Timberley M.; Park, Jae-Do

    2017-10-01

    Microbial fuel cells (MFCs) generate renewable energy in the form of direct current (DC) power. Harvesting energy from MFCs started with passive components such as resistors and capacitors, then charge pumps were introduced with some more advantages. Power electronics converters were later preferred due to their higher efficiency and controllability; however, they introduce high frequency current ripple due to their high frequency switching. In this paper, the effect of shape of power extraction on MFC performance was investigated using three types of current shapes: continuous, square-wave, and triangular-wave. Simultaneously, chemical parameters, such as pH, dissolved oxygen, electrical conductivity, and redox potential, in the anode chamber were monitored to see how these parameters change with the shape of the electrical power extraction. Results showed that the shape of the extracted current did not have a substantial effect on the MFC life span, output power, and energy extraction, nor on the chemical parameters. The outcome of this study provided insight for the electrical impact by power electronics converters on some microbial and chemical aspects of an MFC system.

  1. γδ T Cells Shape Pre-Immune Peripheral B Cell Populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Yafei; Getahun, Andrew; Heiser, Ryan A.; Detanico, Thiago O.; Aviszus, Katja; Kirchenbaum, Greg A.; Casper, Tamara L.; Huang, Chunjian; Aydintug, M. Kemal; Carding, Simon R.; Ikuta, Koichi; Huang, Hua; Wysocki, Lawrence J.; Cambier, John C.; O’Brien, Rebecca L.; Born, Willi K.

    2015-01-01

    We previously reported that selective ablation of certain γδ T cell subsets rather than removal of all γδ T cells, strongly affects serum antibody levels in non-immunized mice. This type of manipulation also changed T cells including residual γδ T cells, revealing some interdependence of γδ T cell populations. For example, in mice lacking Vγ4+ and Vγ6+ γδ T cells (B6.TCR-Vγ4−/−/6−/−), we observed expanded Vγ1+ cells, which changed in composition and activation and produced more IL-4 upon stimulation in vitro, increased IL-4 production by αβ T cells as well as spontaneous germinal center formation in the spleen, elevated serum Ig and autoantibodies. We therefore examined B cell populations in this and other γδ-deficient mouse strains. Whereas immature bone marrow B cells remained largely unchanged, peripheral B cells underwent several changes. Specifically, transitional and mature B cells in the spleen of B6.TCR-Vγ4−/−/6−/− mice and other peripheral B cell populations were diminished, most of all splenic marginal zone (MZ) B cells. However, relative frequencies and absolute numbers of antibody-producing cells, and serum levels of antibodies, IL-4 and BAFF, were increased. Cell transfers confirmed that these changes are directly dependent on the altered γδ T cells in this strain, and their enhanced potential of producing IL-4. Further evidence suggests the possibility of direct interactions between γδ T cells and B cells in the splenic MZ. Together, these data demonstrate the capability of γδ T cells of modulating size and productivity of pre-immune peripheral B cell populations. PMID:26582947

  2. Tension and Elasticity Contribute to Fibroblast Cell Shape in Three Dimensions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brand, Christoph A; Linke, Marco; Weißenbruch, Kai; Richter, Benjamin; Bastmeyer, Martin; Schwarz, Ulrich S

    2017-08-22

    The shape of animal cells is an important regulator for many essential processes such as cell migration or division. It is strongly determined by the organization of the actin cytoskeleton, which is also the main regulator of cell forces. Quantitative analysis of cell shape helps to reveal the physical processes underlying cell shape and forces, but it is notoriously difficult to conduct it in three dimensions. Here we use direct laser writing to create 3D open scaffolds for adhesion of connective tissue cells through well-defined adhesion platforms. Due to actomyosin contractility in the cell contour, characteristic invaginations lined by actin bundles form between adjacent adhesion sites. Using quantitative image processing and mathematical modeling, we demonstrate that the resulting shapes are determined not only by contractility, but also by elastic stress in the peripheral actin bundles. In this way, cells can generate higher forces than through contractility alone. Copyright © 2017 Biophysical Society. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Collective motion of cells crawling on a substrate: roles of cell shape and contact inhibition.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schnyder, Simon K; Molina, John J; Tanaka, Yuki; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2017-07-12

    Contact inhibition plays a crucial role in cell motility, wound healing, and tumour formation. By mimicking the mechanical motion of cells crawling on a substrate, we constructed a minimal model of migrating cells that naturally gives rise to contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL). The model cell consists of two disks, a front disk (a pseudopod) and a back disk (cell body), which are connected by a finite extensible spring. Despite the simplicity of the model, the collective behaviour of the cells is highly non-trivial and depends on both the shape of the cells and whether CIL is enabled. Cells with a small front disk (i.e., a narrow pseudopod) form immobile colonies. In contrast, cells with a large front disk (e.g., a lamellipodium) exhibit coherent migration without any explicit alignment mechanism in the model. This result suggests that crawling cells often exhibit broad fronts because this helps facilitate alignment. After increasing the density, the cells develop density waves that propagate against the direction of cell migration and finally stop at higher densities.

  4. Morph or Move? How Distinct Endothelial Cell Responses to Blood Flow Shape Vascular Networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franco, Claudio A; Gerhardt, Holger

    2017-06-19

    Blood vessel shape is malleable and dynamically regulated. In two recent papers in Nature Cell Biology, Jin et al. (2017) and Sugden et al. (2017) show that endoglin alters endothelial cell shape or behavior in response to blood flow, thus regulating vessel structure. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Use of chiral cell shape to ensure highly directional swimming in trypanosomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard John

    2017-01-01

    Swimming cells typically move along a helical path or undergo longitudinal rotation as they swim, arising from chiral asymmetry in hydrodynamic drag or propulsion bending the swimming path into a helix. Helical paths are beneficial for some forms of chemotaxis, but why asymmetric shape is so prevalent when a symmetric shape would also allow highly directional swimming is unclear. Here, I analyse the swimming of the insect life cycle stages of two human parasites; Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania mexicana. This showed quantitatively how chirality in T. brucei cell shape confers highly directional swimming. High speed videomicrographs showed that T. brucei, L. mexicana and a T. brucei RNAi morphology mutant have a range of shape asymmetries, from wild-type T. brucei (highly chiral) to L. mexicana (near-axial symmetry). The chiral cells underwent longitudinal rotation while swimming, with more rapid longitudinal rotation correlating with swimming path directionality. Simulation indicated hydrodynamic drag on the chiral cell shape caused rotation, and the predicted geometry of the resulting swimming path matched the directionality of the observed swimming paths. This simulation of swimming path geometry showed that highly chiral cell shape is a robust mechanism through which microscale swimmers can achieve highly directional swimming at low Reynolds number. It is insensitive to random variation in shape or propulsion (biological noise). Highly symmetric cell shape can give highly directional swimming but is at risk of giving futile circular swimming paths in the presence of biological noise. This suggests the chiral T. brucei cell shape (associated with the lateral attachment of the flagellum) may be an adaptation associated with the bloodstream-inhabiting lifestyle of this parasite for robust highly directional swimming. It also provides a plausible general explanation for why swimming cells tend to have strong asymmetries in cell shape or propulsion.

  6. Use of chiral cell shape to ensure highly directional swimming in trypanosomes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard John Wheeler

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Swimming cells typically move along a helical path or undergo longitudinal rotation as they swim, arising from chiral asymmetry in hydrodynamic drag or propulsion bending the swimming path into a helix. Helical paths are beneficial for some forms of chemotaxis, but why asymmetric shape is so prevalent when a symmetric shape would also allow highly directional swimming is unclear. Here, I analyse the swimming of the insect life cycle stages of two human parasites; Trypanosoma brucei and Leishmania mexicana. This showed quantitatively how chirality in T. brucei cell shape confers highly directional swimming. High speed videomicrographs showed that T. brucei, L. mexicana and a T. brucei RNAi morphology mutant have a range of shape asymmetries, from wild-type T. brucei (highly chiral to L. mexicana (near-axial symmetry. The chiral cells underwent longitudinal rotation while swimming, with more rapid longitudinal rotation correlating with swimming path directionality. Simulation indicated hydrodynamic drag on the chiral cell shape caused rotation, and the predicted geometry of the resulting swimming path matched the directionality of the observed swimming paths. This simulation of swimming path geometry showed that highly chiral cell shape is a robust mechanism through which microscale swimmers can achieve highly directional swimming at low Reynolds number. It is insensitive to random variation in shape or propulsion (biological noise. Highly symmetric cell shape can give highly directional swimming but is at risk of giving futile circular swimming paths in the presence of biological noise. This suggests the chiral T. brucei cell shape (associated with the lateral attachment of the flagellum may be an adaptation associated with the bloodstream-inhabiting lifestyle of this parasite for robust highly directional swimming. It also provides a plausible general explanation for why swimming cells tend to have strong asymmetries in cell shape or propulsion.

  7. Glia delimit shape changes of sensory neuron receptive endings in C. elegans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Procko, Carl; Lu, Yun; Shaham, Shai

    2011-04-01

    Neuronal receptive endings, such as dendritic spines and sensory protrusions, are structurally remodeled by experience. How receptive endings acquire their remodeled shapes is not well understood. In response to environmental stressors, the nematode Caenorhabditis elegans enters a diapause state, termed dauer, which is accompanied by remodeling of sensory neuron receptive endings. Here, we demonstrate that sensory receptive endings of the AWC neurons in dauers remodel in the confines of a compartment defined by the amphid sheath (AMsh) glial cell that envelops these endings. AMsh glia remodel concomitantly with and independently of AWC receptive endings to delimit AWC receptive ending growth. Remodeling of AMsh glia requires the OTD/OTX transcription factor TTX-1, the fusogen AFF-1 and probably the vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGFR)-related protein VER-1, all acting within the glial cell. ver-1 expression requires direct binding of TTX-1 to ver-1 regulatory sequences, and is induced in dauers and at high temperatures. Our results demonstrate that stimulus-induced changes in glial compartment size provide spatial constraints on neuronal receptive ending growth.

  8. Collective motion of cells crawling on a substrate: roles of cell shape and contact inhibition

    CERN Document Server

    Schnyder, Simon Kaspar; Molina, John Jairo; Yamamoto, Ryoichi

    2016-01-01

    Contact inhibition plays a crucial role in the motility of cells, the process of wound healing, and the formation of tumors. By mimicking the mechanical motion of calls crawling on a substrate using a pseudopod, we constructed a minimal model for migrating cells which gives rise to contact inhibition of locomotion (CIL) naturally. The model cell consists of two disks, one in the front (a pseudopod) and the other one in the back (cell body), connected by a finitely extensible spring. Despite the simplicity of the model, the cells' collective behavior is highly nontrivial, depending on the shape of cells and whether CIL is enabled or not. Cells with a small front circle (i.e. a narrow pseudopod) form immobile colonies. In contrast, cells with a large front circle (i.e. such as a lamellipodium) exhibit coherent migration without any explicit alignment mechanism being present in the model. This suggests that crawling cells often exhibit broad fronts because it helps them avoid clustering. Upon increasing the dens...

  9. Changes in rabbit and cow lens shape and volume upon imposition of anisotonic conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Chi-Wing; Gerometta, Rosana; Alvarez, Lawrence J; Candia, Oscar A

    2009-10-01

    In vivo, mammalian lenses have the capacity to effect fully reversible changes in shape, and possibly volume, during the accommodation process. Isolated lenses also change shape by readily swelling or shrinking when placed in anisotonic media. However, the manner by which the lens changes its shape when its volume is changed osmotically is not firmly established. Putatively, the lens could swell or shrink evenly in all directions, or manifest distinctive swelling and/or shrinking patterns when exposed to anisotonic media. The present study measured physical changes in lenses consistent with the latter alternative using methods we developed for determining rapid changes in lens shape and volume. It was found in isolated rabbit and cow lenses that the length of the axis between the anterior and posterior poles (A-P length) primarily increases under hypotonic conditions (-40 to -100 mOsM), with smaller, or no changes, in equatorial diameter (ED). Hypertonic conditions (+50 to +100 mOsM) on rabbit lenses elicited a predominant reduction in ED, while the A-P length was only marginally reduced. Hypertonic solutions of +150 mOsM were required to obtain similar changes in cow lens shape. The ratio of the A-P length to the ED was taken as a measure of "circularity". This ratio increased gradually in rabbit and cow lenses bathed in hypotonic solutions because of the increase in the A-P length. The calculated lens volume increased in tandem with the increase in "circularity". Lens circularity also increased under hypertonic conditions due to the decrease in ED, but this increase in circularity during shrinkage was not as pronounced as that which occurred during swelling. As such, the lens has a tendency upon swelling to change its shape by approaching the structure of a globular spheroid (as occurs during accommodation for near focusing), but lens shrinkage does not result in a flatter lens with a reduced A-P length as occurs during dis-accommodation for distance focusing

  10. Nuclear shape changes are induced by knockdown of the SWI/SNF ATPase BRG1 and are independent of cytoskeletal connections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karen M Imbalzano

    Full Text Available Changes in nuclear morphology occur during normal development and have been observed during the progression of several diseases. The shape of a nucleus is governed by the balance of forces exerted by nuclear-cytoskeletal contacts and internal forces created by the structure of the chromatin and nuclear envelope. However, factors that regulate the balance of these forces and determine nuclear shape are poorly understood. The SWI/SNF chromatin remodeling enzyme ATPase, BRG1, has been shown to contribute to the regulation of overall cell size and shape. Here we document that immortalized mammary epithelial cells show BRG1-dependent nuclear shape changes. Specifically, knockdown of BRG1 induced grooves in the nuclear periphery that could be documented by cytological and ultrastructural methods. To test the hypothesis that the observed changes in nuclear morphology resulted from altered tension exerted by the cytoskeleton, we disrupted the major cytoskeletal networks and quantified the frequency of BRG1-dependent changes in nuclear morphology. The results demonstrated that disruption of cytoskeletal networks did not change the frequency of BRG1-induced nuclear shape changes. These findings suggest that BRG1 mediates control of nuclear shape by internal nuclear mechanisms that likely control chromatin dynamics.

  11. Changes in visual object recognition precede the shape bias in early noun learning

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meagan N Yee

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Two of the most formidable skills that characterize human beings are language and our prowess in visual object recognition. They may also be developmentally intertwined. Two experiments, a large sample cross-sectional study and a smaller sample 6-month longitudinal study of 18- 24 month olds tested a hypothesized developmental link between changes in the visual object representation and noun learning. Previous findings in visual object recognition indicate that children’s ability to recognize common basic level categories from sparse structural shape representations of object shape emerges between the ages of 18 and 24 months, is related to noun vocabulary size, and is lacking in children with language delay. Other research shows that in artificial noun learning tasks, during this same developmental period, young children systematically generalize object names by shape, that this shape bias predicts future noun learning, and is lacking in children with language delay. The two experiments examine the developmental relation between visual object recognition and the shape bias for the first time. The results show that developmental changes in visual object recognition systematically preceded the emergence of the shape bias. The results suggest a developmental pathway in which early changes in visual object recognition that are themselves linked to category learning enable the discovery of higher-order regularities in category structure and thus the shape bias in novel noun learning tasks. The proposed developmental pathway has implications for understanding the role of specific experience in the development of both visual object recognition and the shape bias in early noun learning.

  12. No Stress! Relax! Mechanisms Governing Growth and Shape in Plant Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gea Guerriero

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The mechanisms through which plant cells control growth and shape are the result of the coordinated action of many events, notably cell wall stress relaxation and turgor-driven expansion. The scalar nature of turgor pressure would drive plant cells to assume spherical shapes; however, this is not the case, as plant cells show an amazing variety of morphologies. Plant cell walls are dynamic structures that can display alterations in matrix polysaccharide composition and concentration, which ultimately affect the wall deformation rate. The wide varieties of plant cell shapes, spanning from elongated cylinders (as pollen tubes and jigsaw puzzle-like epidermal cells, to very long fibres and branched stellate leaf trichomes, can be understood if the underlying mechanisms regulating wall biosynthesis and cytoskeletal dynamics are addressed. This review aims at gathering the available knowledge on the fundamental mechanisms regulating expansion, growth and shape in plant cells by putting a special emphasis on the cell wall-cytoskeleton system continuum. In particular, we discuss from a molecular point of view the growth mechanisms characterizing cell types with strikingly different geometries and describe their relationship with primary walls. The purpose, here, is to provide the reader with a comprehensive overview of the multitude of events through which plant cells manage to expand and control their final shapes.

  13. Integrated Aerodynamic/Structural/Dynamic Analyses of Aircraft with Large Shape Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samareh, Jamshid A.; Chwalowski, Pawel; Horta, Lucas G.; Piatak, David J.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.

    2007-01-01

    The conceptual and preliminary design processes for aircraft with large shape changes are generally difficult and time-consuming, and the processes are often customized for a specific shape change concept to streamline the vehicle design effort. Accordingly, several existing reports show excellent results of assessing a particular shape change concept or perturbations of a concept. The goal of the current effort was to develop a multidisciplinary analysis tool and process that would enable an aircraft designer to assess several very different morphing concepts early in the design phase and yet obtain second-order performance results so that design decisions can be made with better confidence. The approach uses an efficient parametric model formulation that allows automatic model generation for systems undergoing radical shape changes as a function of aerodynamic parameters, geometry parameters, and shape change parameters. In contrast to other more self-contained approaches, the approach utilizes off-the-shelf analysis modules to reduce development time and to make it accessible to many users. Because the analysis is loosely coupled, discipline modules like a multibody code can be easily swapped for other modules with similar capabilities. One of the advantages of this loosely coupled system is the ability to use the medium-to high-fidelity tools early in the design stages when the information can significantly influence and improve overall vehicle design. Data transfer among the analysis modules are based on an accurate and automated general purpose data transfer tool. In general, setup time for the integrated system presented in this paper is 2-4 days for simple shape change concepts and 1-2 weeks for more mechanically complicated concepts. Some of the key elements briefly described in the paper include parametric model development, aerodynamic database generation, multibody analysis, and the required software modules as well as examples for a telescoping wing, a

  14. Hoxb1b controls oriented cell division, cell shape and microtubule dynamics in neural tube morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Žigman, Mihaela; Laumann-Lipp, Nico; Titus, Tom; Postlethwait, John; Moens, Cecilia B.

    2014-01-01

    Hox genes are classically ascribed to function in patterning the anterior-posterior axis of bilaterian animals; however, their role in directing molecular mechanisms underlying morphogenesis at the cellular level remains largely unstudied. We unveil a non-classical role for the zebrafish hoxb1b gene, which shares ancestral functions with mammalian Hoxa1, in controlling progenitor cell shape and oriented cell division during zebrafish anterior hindbrain neural tube morphogenesis. This is likely distinct from its role in cell fate acquisition and segment boundary formation. We show that, without affecting major components of apico-basal or planar cell polarity, Hoxb1b regulates mitotic spindle rotation during the oriented neural keel symmetric mitoses that are required for normal neural tube lumen formation in the zebrafish. This function correlates with a non-cell-autonomous requirement for Hoxb1b in regulating microtubule plus-end dynamics in progenitor cells in interphase. We propose that Hox genes can influence global tissue morphogenesis by control of microtubule dynamics in individual cells in vivo. PMID:24449840

  15. Human red blood cell behavior under homogeneous extensional flow in a hyperbolic-shaped microchannel.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yaginuma, T; Oliveira, M S N; Lima, R; Ishikawa, T; Yamaguchi, T

    2013-01-01

    It is well known that certain pathological conditions result in a decrease of red blood cells (RBCs) deformability and subsequently can significantly alter the blood flow in microcirculation, which may block capillaries and cause ischemia in the tissues. Microfluidic systems able to obtain reliable quantitative measurements of RBC deformability hold the key to understand and diagnose RBC related diseases. In this work, a microfluidic system composed of a microchannel with a hyperbolic-shaped contraction followed by a sudden expansion is presented. We provide a detailed quantitative description of the degree of deformation of human RBCs under a controlled homogeneous extensional flow field. We measured the deformation index (DI) as well as the velocity of the RBCs travelling along the centerline of the channel for four different flow rates and analyze the impact of the particle Reynolds number. The results show that human RBC deformation tends to reach a plateau value in the region of constant extensional rate, the value of which depends on the extension rate. Additionally, we observe that the presence of a sudden expansion downstream of the hyperbolic contraction modifies the spatial distribution of cells and substantially increases the cell free layer (CFL) downstream of the expansion plane similarly to what is seen in other expansion flows. Beyond a certain value of flow rate, there is only a weak effect of inlet flow rates on the enhancement of the downstream CFL. These in vitro experiments show the potential of using microfluidic systems with hyperbolic-shaped microchannels both for the separation of the RBCs from plasma and to assess changes in RBC deformability in physiological and pathological situations for clinical purposes. However, the selection of the geometry and the identification of the most suitable region to evaluate the changes on the RBC deformability under extensional flows are crucial if microfluidics is to be used as an in vitro clinical

  16. Specific biomolecule corona is associated with ring-shaped organization of silver nanoparticles in cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drescher, Daniela; Guttmann, Peter; Büchner, Tina; Werner, Stephan; Laube, Gregor; Hornemann, Andrea; Tarek, Basel; Schneider, Gerd; Kneipp, Janina

    2013-09-01

    We correlate the localization of silver nanoparticles inside cells with respect to the cellular architecture with the molecular information in the vicinity of the particle surface by combining nanoscale 3D cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The interaction of the silver nanoparticle surface with small molecules and biopolymers was monitored by SERS in vitro over time in living cells. The spectra indicate a stable, time-independent surface composition of silver nanoparticles, despite the changing environment in the endosomal structure. Cryo-SXT reveals a characteristic ring-shaped organization of the silver nanoparticles in endosomes of different cell types. The ring-like structures inside the endosomes suggest a strong association among silver particles and with membrane structures. The comparison of the data with those obtained with gold nanoparticles suggests that the interactions between the nanoparticles and with the endosomal component are influenced by the molecular composition of the corona.We correlate the localization of silver nanoparticles inside cells with respect to the cellular architecture with the molecular information in the vicinity of the particle surface by combining nanoscale 3D cryo-soft X-ray tomography (cryo-SXT) with surface-enhanced Raman scattering (SERS). The interaction of the silver nanoparticle surface with small molecules and biopolymers was monitored by SERS in vitro over time in living cells. The spectra indicate a stable, time-independent surface composition of silver nanoparticles, despite the changing environment in the endosomal structure. Cryo-SXT reveals a characteristic ring-shaped organization of the silver nanoparticles in endosomes of different cell types. The ring-like structures inside the endosomes suggest a strong association among silver particles and with membrane structures. The comparison of the data with those obtained with gold nanoparticles suggests that the

  17. Direct-write fabrication of 4D active shape-changing behavior based on a shape memory polymer and its nanocomposite (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Hongqiu; Zhang, Qiwei; Yao, Yongtao; Liu, Liwu; Liu, Yanju; Leng, Jinsong

    2017-04-01

    Shape memory polymers (SMPs), a typical class of smart materials, have been witnessed significant advances in the past decades. Based on the unique performance to recover the initial shape after going through a shape deformation, the applications of SMPs have aroused growing interests. However, most of the researches are hindered by traditional processing technologies which limit the design space of SMPs-based structures. Three-dimension (3D) printing as an emerging technology endows design freedom to manufacture materials with complex structures. In present article, we show that by employing direct-write printing method; one can realize the printing of SMPs to achieve 4D active shape-changing structures. We first fabricated a kind of 3D printable polylactide (PLA)-based SMPs and characterized the overall properties of such materials. Results demonstrated the prepared PLA-based SMPs presenting excellent shape memory effect. In what follows, the rheological properties of such PLA-based SMP ink during printing process were discussed in detail. Finally, we designed and printed several 3D configurations for investigation. By combining 3D printing with shape memory behavior, these printed structures achieve 4D active shape-changing performance under heat stimuli. This research presents a high flexible method to realize the fabrication of SMP-based 4D active shape-changing structures, which opens the way for further developments and improvements of high-tech fields like 4D printing, soft robotics, micro-systems and biomedical devices.

  18. Oxygen-induced shape changes of Pt nanoparticles on MgO(100)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hejral, Uta; Stierle, Andreas; Vlad, Alina; Delheusy, Melissa; Dosch, Helmut [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Metallforschung, Heisenbergstr. 3, 70569 Stuttgart (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    Platinum nanoparticles on oxide carrier materials are used in heterogenous catalysis and are applied successfully in reactions like the oxidation of hydrocarbons or carbon monoxide. In order to achieve better catalyst efficiency, lifetime and selectivity it is important to comprehend catalytic processes on an atomic basis. Thus, the interplay between particle shape, adsorbed oxygen, bulk oxides and catalytic activity needs to be understood. Therefore Pt nanoparticles have been grown epitaxially on MgO(100) substrates under controlled conditions. It has previously been reported that Rh nanoparticles undergo reversible shape changes induced by surface oxides. We have studied oxygen-induced shape changes of Pt nanoparticles on MgO(100) by means of in situ X-ray diffraction. The experiment was performed at 300 C and oxygen pressures ranging from UHV to 500 mbar. The experimental results are compared to theoretically predicted ones.

  19. Antigen Availability Shapes T Cell Differentiation and Function during Tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moguche, Albanus O; Musvosvi, Munyaradzi; Penn-Nicholson, Adam; Plumlee, Courtney R; Mearns, Helen; Geldenhuys, Hennie; Smit, Erica; Abrahams, Deborah; Rozot, Virginie; Dintwe, One; Hoff, Søren T; Kromann, Ingrid; Ruhwald, Morten; Bang, Peter; Larson, Ryan P; Shafiani, Shahin; Ma, Shuyi; Sherman, David R; Sette, Alessandro; Lindestam Arlehamn, Cecilia S; McKinney, Denise M; Maecker, Holden; Hanekom, Willem A; Hatherill, Mark; Andersen, Peter; Scriba, Thomas J; Urdahl, Kevin B

    2017-06-14

    CD4 T cells are critical for protective immunity against Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb), the cause of tuberculosis (TB). Yet to date, TB vaccine candidates that boost antigen-specific CD4 T cells have conferred little or no protection. Here we examined CD4 T cell responses to two leading TB vaccine antigens, ESAT-6 and Ag85B, in Mtb-infected mice and in vaccinated humans with and without underlying Mtb infection. In both species, Mtb infection drove ESAT-6-specific T cells to be more differentiated than Ag85B-specific T cells. The ability of each T cell population to control Mtb in the lungs of mice was restricted for opposite reasons: Ag85B-specific T cells were limited by reduced antigen expression during persistent infection, whereas ESAT-6-specific T cells became functionally exhausted due to chronic antigenic stimulation. Our findings suggest that different vaccination strategies will be required to optimize protection mediated by T cells recognizing antigens expressed at distinct stages of Mtb infection. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. The deletion of bacterial dynamin and flotillin genes results in pleiotrophic effects on cell division, cell growth and in cell shape maintenance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dempwolff Felix

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In eukaryotic cells, dynamin and flotillin are involved in processes such as endocytosis and lipid raft formation, respectively. Dynamin is a GTPase that exerts motor-like activity during the pinching off of vesicles, while flotillins are coiled coil rich membrane proteins with no known enzymatic activity. Bacteria also possess orthologs of both classes of proteins, but their function has been unclear. Results We show that deletion of the single dynA or floT genes lead to no phenotype or a mild defect in septum formation in the case of the dynA gene, while dynA floT double mutant cells were highly elongated and irregularly shaped, although the MreB cytoskeleton appeared to be normal. DynA colocalizes with FtsZ, and the dynA deletion strain shows aberrant FtsZ rings in a subpopulation of cells. The mild division defect of the dynA deletion is exacerbated by an additional deletion in ezrA, which affects FtsZ ring formation, and also by the deletion of a late division gene (divIB, indicating that DynA affects several steps in cell division. DynA and mreB deletions generated a synthetic defect in cell shape maintenance, showing that MreB and DynA play non-epistatic functions in cell shape maintenance. TIRF microscopy revealed that FloT forms many dynamic membrane assemblies that frequently colocalize with the division septum. The deletion of dynA did not change the pattern of localization of FloT, and vice versa, showing that the two proteins play non redundant roles in a variety of cellular processes. Expression of dynamin or flotillin T in eukaryotic S2 cells revealed that both proteins assemble at the cell membrane. While FloT formed patch structures, DynA built up tubulated structures extending away from the cells. Conclusions Bacillus subtilis dynamin ortholog DynA plays a role during cell division and in cell shape maintenance. It shows a genetic link with flotillin T, with both proteins playing non-redundant functions at

  1. Shape change in Hf, W and Os-isotopes: A non-relativistic Hartree ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Pramana – Journal of Physics; Volume 62; Issue 4. Shape change in Hf, W and Os-isotopes: A non-relativistic Hartree-Fock versus relativistic Hartree approximation. Z Naik B K Sharma T K Jha P Arumugam S K Patra. Research Articles Volume 62 Issue 4 April 2004 pp 827-839 ...

  2. Application of shape changing smart materials in household appliances : A fragmented and inconsistent uptake

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bin Kassim, A.; Horvath, I.; Gerritsen, B.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    Shape changing smart materials (SCSM) have a wide range of applications, supporting product functions through material features. Surprisingly, their application in consumer durables such as household appliances is not as expected. This phenomenon could be related to a possible SCSM knowledge gap

  3. Sorting of cells of the same size, shape, and cell cycle stage for a single cell level assay without staining

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yomo Tetsuya

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-cell level studies are being used increasingly to measure cell properties not directly observable in a cell population. High-performance data acquisition systems for such studies have, by necessity, developed in synchrony. However, improvements in sample purification techniques are also required to reveal new phenomena. Here we assessed a cell sorter as a sample-pretreatment tool for a single-cell level assay. A cell sorter is routinely used for selecting one type of cells from a heterogeneous mixture of cells using specific fluorescence labels. In this case, we wanted to select cells of exactly the same size, shape, and cell-cycle stage from a population, without using a specific fluorescence label. Results We used four light scatter parameters: the peak height and area of the forward scatter (FSheight and FSarea and side scatter (SSheight and SSarea. The rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cell line, a neuronal cell line, was used for all experiments. The living cells concentrated in the high FSarea and middle SSheight/SSarea fractions. Single cells without cell clumps were concentrated in the low SS and middle FS fractions, and in the higher FSheight/FSarea and SSheight/SSarea fractions. The cell populations from these viable, single-cell-rich fractions were divided into twelve subfractions based on their FSarea-SSarea profiles, for more detailed analysis. We found that SSarea was proportional to the cell volume and the FSarea correlated with cell roundness and elongation, as well as with the level of DNA in the cell. To test the method and to characterize the basic properties of the isolated single cells, sorted cells were cultured in separate wells. The cells in all subfractions survived, proliferated and differentiated normally, suggesting that there was no serious damage. The smallest, roundest, and smoothest cells had the highest viability. There was no correlation between proliferation and differentiation. NGF increases

  4. The PHR Family: The Role of Extracellular Transglycosylases in Shaping Candida albicans Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Popolo

    2017-10-01

    Full Text Available Candida albicans is an opportunistic microorganism that can become a pathogen causing mild superficial mycosis or more severe invasive infections that can be life-threatening for debilitated patients. In the etiology of invasive infections, key factors are the adaptability of C. albicans to the different niches of the human body and the transition from a yeast form to hypha. Hyphal morphology confers high adhesiveness to the host cells, as well as the ability to penetrate into organs. The cell wall plays a crucial role in the morphological changes C. albicans undergoes in response to specific environmental cues. Among the different categories of enzymes involved in the formation of the fungal cell wall, the GH72 family of transglycosylases plays an important assembly role. These enzymes cut and religate β-(1,3-glucan, the major determinant of cell shape. In C. albicans, the PHR family encodes GH72 enzymes, some of which work in specific environmental conditions. In this review, we will summarize the work from the initial discovery of PHR genes to the study of the pH-dependent expression of PHR1 and PHR2, from the characterization of the gene products to the recent findings concerning the stress response generated by the lack of GH72 activity in C. albicans hyphae.

  5. Profilin Plays a Role in Cell Elongation, Cell Shape Maintenance, and Flowering in Arabidopsis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ramachandran, S.; Christensen, Hans Erik Mølager; Ishimaru, Y.

    2000-01-01

    Profilin (PFN) is an ubiquitous, low-M-r, actin-binding protein involved in the organization of the cytoskeleton of eukaryotes including higher plants. PFNs are encoded by a multigene family in Arabidopsis. We have analyzed in vivo functions of Arabidopsis PFN by generating transgenic plants carr...... expressed in the vascular bundles of cotyledons and leaves. Our results show that Arabidopsis PFNs play a role in cell elongation, cell shape maintenance, polarized growth of root hair, and unexpectedly, in determination of flowering time........ Compared with equivalent cells in WT, most cells in PFN-U hypocotyls and roots were shorter, but more isodiametric, and microscopic observations of etiolated PFN-U hypocotyls revealed a rough epidermal surface. In contrast, light-grown seedlings overexpressing PFN had longer roots and root hair although...... etiolated seedlings overexpressing PFN were either the same size or slightly longer than WT seedlings. Transgenic seedlings harboring a PFN-1-GUS transgene directed expression in root and root hair and in a ring of cells at the elongating zone of the root tip. As the seedlings matured PFN-1-GUS was mainly...

  6. Deformation-based nuclear morphometry: capturing nuclear shape variation in HeLa cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Gustavo K; Ribeiro, Alexandre J S; Dahl, Kris N; Murphy, Robert F

    2008-04-01

    The empirical characterization of nuclear shape distributions is an important unsolved problem with many applications in biology and medicine. Numerous genetic diseases and cancers have alterations in nuclear morphology, and methods for characterization of morphology could aid in both diagnoses and fundamental understanding of these disorders. Automated approaches have been used to measure features related to the size and shape of the cell nucleus, and statistical analysis of these features has often been performed assuming an underlying Euclidean (linear) vector space. We discuss the difficulties associated with the analysis of nuclear shape in light of the fact that shape spaces are nonlinear, and demonstrate methods for characterizing nuclear shapes and shape distributions based on spatial transformations that map one nucleus to another. By combining large deformation metric mapping with multidimensional scaling we offer a flexible approach for elucidating the intrinsic nonlinear degrees of freedom of a distribution of nuclear shapes. More specifically, we demonstrate approaches for nuclear shape interpolation and computation of mean nuclear shape. We also provide a method for estimating the number of free parameters that contribute to shape as well as an approach for visualizing most representative shape variations within a distribution of nuclei. The proposed methodology can be completely automated, is independent of the dimensionality of the images, and can handle complex shapes. Results obtained by analyzing two sets of images of HeLa cells are shown. In addition to identifying the modes of variation in normal HeLa nuclei, the effects of lamin A/C on nuclear morphology are quantitatively described. (c) 2007 International Society for Analytical Cytology.

  7. Contribution of Aggregation-Promoting Factor to Maintenance of Cell Shape in Lactobacillus gasseri 4B2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jankovic, Ivana; Ventura, Marco; Meylan, Valerie; Rouvet, Martine; Elli, Marina; Zink, Ralf

    2003-01-01

    Aggregation-promoting factor (APF) was originally described as a protein involved in the conjugation and autoaggregation of Lactobacillus gasseri 4B2, whose corresponding apf gene was cloned and sequenced. In this report, we identified and sequenced an additional apf gene located in the region upstream of the previously published one. Inactivation of both apf genes was unsuccessful, indicating that APF function may be essential for the cell. Overproduction of APF proteins caused drastic alteration in the cell shape of this strain. These cells were irregular, twisted, enlarged, and tightly bound in unbreakable clumps of chains. Down-regulation of APF synthesis was achieved by cloning of the apf2 promoter region on a high-copy-number plasmid, which recruited a putative apf activator. As a consequence, the shape of the corresponding recombinant cells was elongated (filamentous) and cell division sites were no longer visible. None of the induced changes in APF production levels was clearly correlated with modifications of the aggregation phenotype. This report shows, for the first time, that APF proteins are mainly critical for L. gasseri 4B2 cell shape maintenance. PMID:12754226

  8. Aging changes in organs - tissue - cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... this page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/004012.htm Aging changes in organs, tissues, and cells To use ... lose some function as you age during adulthood. Aging changes occur in all of the body's cells, ...

  9. Tulip flames: changes in shape of premixed flames propagating in closed tubes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dunn-Rankin, D.; Sawyer, R. F.

    The experimental results that are the subject of this communication provide high-speed schlieren images of the closed-tube flame shape that has come to be known as the tulip flame. The schlieren images, along with in-chamber pressure records, help demonstrate the effects of chamber length, equivalence ratio, and igniter geometry on formation of the tulip flame. The pressure/time records show distinct features which correlate with flame shape changes during the transition to tulip. The measurements indicate that the basic tulip flame formation is a robust phenomenon that depends on little except the overall geometry of the combustion vessel.

  10. Phase-Change Thermoplastic Elastomer Blends for Tunable Shape Memory by Physical Design

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mineart, Kenneth P.; Tallury, Syamal S.; Li, Tao; Lee, Byeongdu; Spontak, Richard J.

    2016-12-14

    Shape-memory polymers (SMPs) change shape upon exposure to an environmental stimulus.1-3 They are of considerable importance in the ongoing development of stimuli-responsive biomedical4,5 and deployable6 devices, and their function depends on the presence of two components.7 The first provides mechanical rigidity to ensure retention of one or more temporary strain states and also serves as a switch capable of releasing a temporary strain state. The second, a network-forming component, is required to restore the polymer to a prior strain state upon stimulation. In thermally-activated SMPs, the switching element typically relies on a melting or glass transition temperature,1-3,7 and broad or multiple switches permit several temporary strain states.8-10 Chemical integration of network-forming and switching species endows SMPs with specific properties.8,10,11 Here, we demonstrate that phase-change materials incorporated into network-forming macromolecules yield shape-memory polymer blends (SMPBs) with physically tunable switching temperatures and recovery kinetics for use in multi-responsive laminates and shape-change electronics.

  11. CELL TRACKING USING PARTICLE FILTERS WITH IMPLICIT CONVEX SHAPE MODEL IN 4D CONFOCAL MICROSCOPY IMAGES.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramesh, Nisha; Tasdizen, Tolga

    2014-10-01

    Bayesian frameworks are commonly used in tracking algorithms. An important example is the particle filter, where a stochastic motion model describes the evolution of the state, and the observation model relates the noisy measurements to the state. Particle filters have been used to track the lineage of cells. Propagating the shape model of the cell through the particle filter is beneficial for tracking. We approximate arbitrary shapes of cells with a novel implicit convex function. The importance sampling step of the particle filter is defined using the cost associated with fitting our implicit convex shape model to the observations. Our technique is capable of tracking the lineage of cells for nonmitotic stages. We validate our algorithm by tracking the lineage of retinal and lens cells in zebrafish embryos.

  12. The Impact of Cathode Material and Shape on Current Density in an Aluminum Electrolysis Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Yang; Peng, Jianping; Di, Yuezhong; Wang, Yaowu; Li, Baokuan; Feng, Naixiang

    2016-02-01

    A finite element model was developed to determine the impact of cathode material and shape on current density in an aluminum electrolysis cell. For the cathode material, results show that increased electrical resistivity leads to a higher cathode voltage drop; however, the horizontal current is reduced in the metal. The horizontal current magnitude for six different cathode materials in decreasing order is graphitized, semi-graphitized, full graphitic, 50% anthracite (50% artificial graphite), 70% anthracite (30% artificial graphite), 100% anthracite. The modified cathode shapes with an inclined cathode surface, higher collector bar and cylindrical protrusions are intended to improve horizontal current and flow resistance. Compared to a traditional cathode, modified collector bar sizes of 70 mm × 230 mm and 80 mm × 270 mm can reduce horizontal current density component Jx by 10% and 19%, respectively, due to better conductivity of the steel. The horizontal current in the metal decreases with increase of cathode inclination. The peak value of Jx can be approximately reduced by 20% for a 2° change in inclination. Cylindrical protrusions lead to local horizontal current increase on their tops, but the average current is less affected and the molten metal is effectively slowed down.

  13. Shape of red blood cells in contact with artificial surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grzhibovskis, Richards; Krämer, Elisabeth; Bernhardt, Ingolf; Kemper, Björn; Zanden, Carl; Repin, Nikolay V; Tkachuk, Bogdan V; Voinova, Marina V

    2017-03-01

    The phenomenon of physical contact between red blood cells and artificial surfaces is considered. A fully three-dimensional mathematical model of a bilayer membrane in contact with an artificial surface is presented. Numerical results for the different geometries and adhesion intensities are found to be in agreement with experimentally observed geometries obtained by means of digital holographic microscopy.

  14. Star-Shaped Thermoresponsive Polymers with Various Functional Groups for Cell Sheet Engineering.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudo, Yu; Kawai, Ryuki; Sakai, Hideaki; Kikuchi, Ryohei; Nabae, Yuta; Hayakawa, Teruaki; Kakimoto, Masa-Aki

    2018-01-16

    This study demonstrates the facile preparation of poly(N-isopropylacrylamide) (PNIPAM)-immobilized Petri dishes by drop-casting a star-shaped copolymer of hyperbranched polystyrene (HBPS) possessing PNIPAM arms (HBPS-g-PNIPAM) functionalized with polar groups. HBPS was synthesized via reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT) self-condensing vinyl polymerization (SCVP), and HBPS polymers with different terminal structures were prepared by changing the monomer structure. HBPS-g-PNIPAM was synthesized by the grafting of PNIPAM from each terminal of HBPS. To tune the cell adhesion and detachment properties, polar functional groups such as carboxylic acid and dimethylamino groups were introduced to HBPS-g-PNIPAM. Based on surface characterization using scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS), and contact angle measurements, the advantage of the hyperbranched structure for the PNIPAM immobilization was evident in terms of the uniformity, stability, and thermoresponsiveness. Successful cell sheet harvesting was demonstrated on dishes coated with HBPS-g-PNIPAM. In addition, the cell adhesion and detachment properties could be tuned by the introduction of polar functional groups.

  15. Efficient Multidisciplinary Analysis Approach for Conceptual Design of Aircraft with Large Shape Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chwalowski, Pawel; Samareh, Jamshid A.; Horta, Lucas G.; Piatak, David J.; McGowan, Anna-Maria R.

    2009-01-01

    The conceptual and preliminary design processes for aircraft with large shape changes are generally difficult and time-consuming, and the processes are often customized for a specific shape change concept to streamline the vehicle design effort. Accordingly, several existing reports show excellent results of assessing a particular shape change concept or perturbations of a concept. The goal of the current effort was to develop a multidisciplinary analysis tool and process that would enable an aircraft designer to assess several very different morphing concepts early in the design phase and yet obtain second-order performance results so that design decisions can be made with better confidence. The approach uses an efficient parametric model formulation that allows automatic model generation for systems undergoing radical shape changes as a function of aerodynamic parameters, geometry parameters, and shape change parameters. In contrast to other more self-contained approaches, the approach utilizes off-the-shelf analysis modules to reduce development time and to make it accessible to many users. Because the analysis is loosely coupled, discipline modules like a multibody code can be easily swapped for other modules with similar capabilities. One of the advantages of this loosely coupled system is the ability to use the medium- to high-fidelity tools early in the design stages when the information can significantly influence and improve overall vehicle design. Data transfer among the analysis modules are based on an accurate and automated general purpose data transfer tool. In general, setup time for the integrated system presented in this paper is 2-4 days for simple shape change concepts and 1-2 weeks for more mechanically complicated concepts. Some of the key elements briefly described in the paper include parametric model development, aerodynamic database generation, multibody analysis, and the required software modules as well as examples for a telescoping wing

  16. Global contraction or local growth, bleb shape depends on more than just cell structure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woolley, Thomas E; Gaffney, Eamonn A; Oliver, James M; Waters, Sarah L; Baker, Ruth E; Goriely, Alain

    2015-09-07

    When the plasma membrane of a cell locally delaminates from its actin cortex the membrane is pushed outwards due to the cell׳s internal fluid pressure. The resulting spherical protrusion is known as a bleb. A cell׳s ability to function correctly is highly dependent on the production of such protrusions with the correct size and shape. Here, we investigate the nucleation of large blebs from small, local neck regions. A mathematical model of a cell׳s membrane, cortex and interconnecting adhesions demonstrates that these three components are unable to capture experimentally observed bleb shapes without the addition of further assumptions. We have identified that combinations of global cortex contraction and localised membrane growth are the most promising methods for generating prototypical blebs. Currently, neither proposed mechanism has been fully tested experimentally and, thus, we propose experiments that will distinguish between the two methods of bleb production. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Cell culture arrays using micron-sized ferromagnetic ring-shaped thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huang, Chen-Yu; Wei, Zung-Hang, E-mail: wei@pme.nthu.edu.tw [Department of Power Mechanical Engineering, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China); Lai, Mei-Feng; Ger, Tzong-Rong [Institute of NanoEngineering and MicroSystems, National Tsing Hua University, Hsinchu City 300, Taiwan (China)

    2015-05-07

    Cell patterning has become an important technology for tissue engineering. In this research, domain walls are formed at the two ends of a ferromagnetic ring thin film after applying a strong external magnetic field, which can effectively attract magnetically labeled cells and control the position for biological cell. Magnetophoresis experiment was conducted to quantify the magnetic nanoparticle inside the cells. A ring-shaped magnetic thin films array was fabricated through photolithography. It is observed that magnetically labeled cells can be successfully attracted to the two ends of the ring-shaped magnetic thin film structure and more cells were attracted and further attached to the structures. The cells are co-cultured with the structure and kept proliferating; therefore, such ring thin film can be an important candidate for in-vitro biomedical chips or tissue engineering.

  18. How cells explore shape space: A quantitative statistical perspective of cellular morphogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Zheng; Sailem, Heba; Sero, Julia; Ardy, Rico; Wong, Stephen T.C.; Bakal, Chris

    2014-01-01

    Through statistical analysis of datasets describing single cell shape following systematic gene depletion, we have found that the morphological landscapes explored by cells are composed of a small number of attractor states. We propose that the topology of these landscapes is in large part determined by cell-intrinsic factors, such as biophysical constraints on cytoskeletal organization, and reflect different stable signaling and/or transcriptional states. Cell-extrinsic factors act to determine how cells explore these landscapes, and the topology of the landscapes themselves. Informational stimuli primarily drive transitions between stable states by engaging signaling networks, while mechanical stimuli tune, or even radically alter, the topology of these landscapes. As environments fluctuate, the topology of morphological landscapes explored by cells dynamically adapts to these fluctuations. Finally we hypothesize how complex cellular and tissue morphologies can be generated from a limited number of simple cell shapes. PMID:25220035

  19. Transport-related mylonitic ductile deformation and shape change of alluvial gold, southern New Zealand

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerr, Gemma; Falconer, Donna; Reith, Frank; Craw, Dave

    2017-11-01

    Gold is a malleable metal, and detrital gold particles deform via internal distortion. The shapes of gold particles are commonly used to estimate transport distances from sources, but the mechanisms of internal gold deformation leading to shape changes are poorly understood because of subsequent recrystallisation of the gold in situ in placer deposits, which creates a rim zone around the particles, with undeformed > 10 μm grains. This paper describes samples from southern New Zealand in which grain size reduction (to submicrometer scale) and mylonitic textures have resulted from internal ductile deformation. These textures have been preserved without subsequent recrystallisation after deposition in late Pleistocene-Holocene alluvial fan placers. These mylonitic textures were imposed by transport-related deformation on recrystallised rims that were derived from previous stages of fluvial transportation and deposition. This latest stage of fluvial transport and deformation has produced numerous elongated gold smears that are typically 100 μm long and 10-20 μm wide. These smears are the principal agents for transport-induced changes in particle shape in the studied placers. Focused ion beam (FIB) sectioning through these deformed zones combined with scanning electron microscopic (SEM) imaging show that the interior of the gold particles has undergone grain size reduction (to 500 nm) and extensive folding with development of a ductile deformation fabric that resembles textures typical of mylonites in silicate rocks. Relict pods of the pre-existing recrystallised rim zone are floating in this ductile deformation zone and these pods are irregular in shape and discontinuous in three dimensions. Micrometer scale biologically-mediated deposition from groundwater of overgrowth gold on particle surfaces occurs at all stages of placer formation, and some of this overgrowth gold has been incorporated into deformation zones. These examples provide a rare view into the nature

  20. Pattern formation in B-cell immune networks : Domains and dots in shape-space

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Noest, A.J.; Takumi, K.; Boer, R.J. de

    1997-01-01

    The immune system contains many types of B-cells, which can activate each other if the shapes and surface properties of their receptors (or antibodies) match well. The dynamics of the resulting network is analysed using a recently derived B-cell activation function which captures the effects of the

  1. Climates Past, Present, and Yet-to-Come Shape Climate Change Vulnerabilities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nadeau, Christopher P; Urban, Mark C; Bridle, Jon R

    2017-10-01

    Climate change is altering life at multiple scales, from genes to ecosystems. Predicting the vulnerability of populations to climate change is crucial to mitigate negative impacts. We suggest that regional patterns of spatial and temporal climatic variation scaled to the traits of an organism can predict where and why populations are most vulnerable to climate change. Specifically, historical climatic variation affects the sensitivity and response capacity of populations to climate change by shaping traits and the genetic variation in those traits. Present and future climatic variation can affect both climate change exposure and population responses. We provide seven predictions for how climatic variation might affect the vulnerability of populations to climate change and suggest key directions for future research. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  2. Fast Response, Open-Celled Porous, Shape Memory Effect Actuators with Integrated Attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Andrew Peter (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates to the exploitation of porous foam articles exhibiting the Shape Memory Effect as actuators. Each foam article is composed of a plurality of geometric shapes, such that some geometric shapes can fit snugly into or around rigid mating connectors that attach the Shape Memory foam article intimately into the load path between a static structure and a moveable structure. The foam is open-celled, composed of a plurality of interconnected struts whose mean diameter can vary from approximately 50 to 500 microns. Gases and fluids flowing through the foam transfer heat rapidly with the struts, providing rapid Shape Memory Effect transformations. Embodiments of porous foam articles as torsional actuators and approximately planar structures are disposed. Simple, integral connection systems exploiting the ability to supply large loads to a structure, and that can also supply hot and cold gases and fluids to effect rapid actuation are also disposed.

  3. Crawling and turning in a minimal reaction-diffusion cell motility model: Coupling cell shape and biochemistry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camley, Brian A.; Zhao, Yanxiang; Li, Bo; Levine, Herbert; Rappel, Wouter-Jan

    2017-01-01

    We study a minimal model of a crawling eukaryotic cell with a chemical polarity controlled by a reaction-diffusion mechanism describing Rho GTPase dynamics. The size, shape, and speed of the cell emerge from the combination of the chemical polarity, which controls the locations where actin polymerization occurs, and the physical properties of the cell, including its membrane tension. We find in our model both highly persistent trajectories, in which the cell crawls in a straight line, and turning trajectories, where the cell transitions from crawling in a line to crawling in a circle. We discuss the controlling variables for this turning instability and argue that turning arises from a coupling between the reaction-diffusion mechanism and the shape of the cell. This emphasizes the surprising features that can arise from simple links between cell mechanics and biochemistry. Our results suggest that similar instabilities may be present in a broad class of biochemical descriptions of cell polarity.

  4. Particle shape dependence of CD8+ T cell activation by artificial antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sunshine, Joel C; Perica, Karlo; Schneck, Jonathan P; Green, Jordan J

    2014-01-01

    Previous work developing particle-based acellular, artificial antigen presenting cells (aAPCs) has focused exclusively on spherical platforms. To explore the role of shape, we generated ellipsoidal PLGA microparticles with varying aspect ratios (ARs) and synthesized aAPCs from them. The ellipsoidal biomimetic aAPCs with high-AR showed significantly enhanced in vitro and in vivo activity above spherical aAPCs with particle volume and antigen content held constant. Confocal imaging indicates that CD8+ T cells preferentially migrate to and are activated by interaction with the long axis of the aAPC. Importantly, enhanced activity of high-AR aAPCs was seen in a mouse melanoma model, with high-AR aAPCs improving melanoma survival compared to non-cognate aAPCs (p = 0.004) and cognate spherical aAPCs (p = 0.05). These findings indicate that particle geometry is a critical design criterion in the generation of aAPCs, and may offer insight into the essential role of geometry in the interaction between CD8+ T cells and biological APCs. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  5. Changes in knee shape and geometry resulting from total knee arthroplasty.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akbari Shandiz, Mohsen; Boulos, Paul; Saevarsson, Stefan Karl; Ramm, Heiko; Fu, Chun Kit Jack; Miller, Stephen; Zachow, Stefan; Anglin, Carolyn

    2018-01-01

    Changes in knee shape and geometry resulting from total knee arthroplasty can affect patients in numerous important ways: pain, function, stability, range of motion, and kinematics. Quantitative data concerning these changes have not been previously available, to our knowledge, yet are essential to understand individual experiences of total knee arthroplasty and thereby improve outcomes for all patients. The limiting factor has been the challenge of accurately measuring these changes. Our study objective was to develop a conceptual framework and analysis method to investigate changes in knee shape and geometry, and prospectively apply it to a sample total knee arthroplasty population. Using clinically available computed tomography and radiography imaging systems, the three-dimensional knee shape and geometry of nine patients (eight varus and one valgus) were compared before and after total knee arthroplasty. All patients had largely good outcomes after their total knee arthroplasty. Knee shape changed both visually and numerically. On average, the distal condyles were slightly higher medially and lower laterally (range: +4.5 mm to -4.4 mm), the posterior condyles extended farther out medially but not laterally (range: +1.8 to -6.4 mm), patellofemoral distance increased throughout flexion by 1.8-3.5 mm, and patellar thickness alone increased by 2.9 mm (range: 0.7-5.2 mm). External femoral rotation differed preop and postop. Joint line distance, taking cartilage into account, changed by +0.7 to -1.5 mm on average throughout flexion. Important differences in shape and geometry were seen between pre-total knee arthroplasty and post-total knee arthroplasty knees. While this is qualitatively known, this is the first study to report it quantitatively, an important precursor to identifying the reasons for the poor outcome of some patients. Using the developed protocol and visualization techniques to compare patients with good versus poor clinical outcomes could

  6. Modelling changes in leaf shape prior to phyllode acquisition in Acacia mangium Willd. seedlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leroy, Céline; Heuret, Patrick

    2008-02-01

    The aim of this study was to characterise changes in leaf shape prior to phyllode acquisition along the axes of Acacia mangium seedlings. The study area was located in North Lampung (South Sumatra, Indonesia), where these trees belong to a naturally regenerated stand. A total of 173 seedlings, less than three months old, were described node by node. Leaf shape and leaf length were recorded and the way in which one leaf type succeeded another was modelled using a hidden semi-Markov chain composed of seven states. The phyllotactical pattern was studied using another sample of forty 6-month-old seedlings. The results indicate (i) the existence of successive zones characterised by one or a combination of leaf types, and (ii) that phyllode acquisition seems to be accompanied by a change in the phyllotactical pattern. The concepts of juvenility and heteroblasty, as well as potential applications for taxonomy are discussed.

  7. Effects of density and cell morphologies on the shape memory effect of a porous shape memory polymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Simkevitz, Steven; Naguib, Hani

    2007-04-01

    This paper investigates the effects of different densities and cellular morphologies on the shape memory effect (SME) of a porous shape memory polymer (SMP). The batch foaming processing technique was employed to obtain the desired foamed cellular structures. A study was conducted where the variable of saturation pressure was varied in order to obtain a reduction in relative density while the variables of saturation time, foaming temperature and foaming time were kept constant. The advantage of foaming the SMP is to reduce the weight of the material while still retaining its mechanical and thermomechanical characteristics. One particular point of interest is to understand how a change in density affects the SME. It is also of importance to determine how the SME is influenced by different amounts of strain and by the cellular morphology of the SMP. The objective is to modify the SMP to have the greatest SME while maintaining weight savings. Focusing on the SME, the area of greatest significance is the time response of the SMP. This approach is vital as it dictates the possibility of using a SMP as an effective actuator.

  8. shape change in Hf, W and Os-isotopes: A non-relativistic Hartree ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Shape change in Hf, W and Os isotopes. 2. Formalisms. 2.1 Non-relativistic Hartree-Fock. Theoretically, the band structure of the Nilsson orbit [ЖТ3A]Ω , is studied with a well-known microscopic model, i.e., deformed Hartree-Fock and angular momentum projection [19,20]. In this calculation, axial symmetry of the ...

  9. Changes in Mitral Valve Annular Geometry After Repair: Saddle-Shaped Versus Flat Annuloplasty Rings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahmood, Feroze; Gorman, Joseph H.; Subramaniam, Balachundhar; Gorman, Robert C.; Panzica, Peter J.; Hagberg, Robert C.; Lerner, Adam B.; Hess, Philip E.; Maslow, Andrew; Khabbaz, Kamal R.

    2011-01-01

    Background Saddle-shaped annuloplasty rings are being increasingly used during mitral valve (MV) repair to conform the mitral annulus to a more nonplanar shape and possibly reduce leaflet stress. In this study utilizing three-dimensional transesophageal echocardiography we compared the effects of rigid flat rings with those of the saddle rings on the mitral annular geometry. Specifically we measured the changes in nonplanarity angle (NPA) before and after MV repair. Methods Geometric analysis on 38 patients undergoing MV repair for myxomatous and ischemic mitral regurgitation with full flat rings (n = 18) and saddle rings (n = 18) were performed. The acquired three-dimensional volumetric data were analyzed utilizing the “Image Arena” software (TomTec GmBH, Munich, Germany). Specifically, the degree of change in the NPA was calculated and compared before and after repair for both types of rings. Results Both types of annuloplasty rings resulted in significant changes in the geometric structure of the MV after repair. However, saddle rings lead to a decrease in the NPA (7% for ischemic and 8% for myxomatous MV repairs) (ie, made the annulus more nonplanar), whereas flat rings increased the NPA (7.9% for ischemic and 11.8% for myxomatous MV repairs) (ie, made the annulus less nonplanar); p value 0.001 or less. Conclusions Implantation of saddle-shaped rings during MV repair surgery is associated with augmentation of the nonplanar shape of the mitral annulus (ie, decreases NPA). This favorable change in the mitral annular geometry could possibly confer a structural advantage to MV repairs with the saddle rings. PMID:20868816

  10. Extracellular matrix and cell shape: potential control points for inhibition of angiogenesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ingber, D.

    1991-01-01

    Capillary endothelial (CE) cells require two extracellular signals in order to switch from quiescence to growth and back to differentiation during angiogenesis: soluble angiogenic factors and insoluble extracellular matrix (ECM) molecules. Soluble endothelial mitogens, such as basic fibroblast growth factor (FGF), act over large distances to trigger capillary growth, whereas ECM molecules act locally to modulate cell responsiveness to these soluble cues. Recent studies reveal that ECM molecules regulate CE cell growth and differentiation by modulating cell shape and by activating intracellular chemical signaling pathways inside the cell. Recognition of the importance of ECM and cell shape during capillary morphogenesis has led to the identification of a series of new angiogenesis inhibitors. Elucidation of the molecular mechanism of capillary regulation may result in development of even more potent angiogenesis modulators in the future.

  11. A measurement system for evaluation of shape changes and proportions after cosmetic breast surgery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Swanson, Eric

    2012-04-01

    Evaluation of changes in breast shape, particularly "upper pole fullness," "breast projection," and "bottoming out," has been made difficult by the lack of an accepted definition of these entities and no standardized system for measurements and comparison. Three-dimensional imaging is impractical for most surgeons and limited in providing evidence-based assessments. Using standardized photographs and computer imaging software to match size and orientation, breast shape and size are measured and compared before and after cosmetic breast surgery. Practical landmarks and analysis allow assessment of results using standard two-dimensional frontal and lateral views. A horizontal plane at the level of maximum postoperative breast projection and a vertical plane dropped from the sternal notch serve as the reference planes. Breast projection, upper pole projection, lower pole level, nipple level, lower pole width, breast parenchymal ratio, and lower pole ratio (a measure of the boxiness of the lower pole) are defined and measured. These simple measurements may be easily used by surgeons to evaluate the effectiveness of their techniques in breast augmentation, mastopexy, augmentation/mastopexy, and reduction. Claims regarding changes in breast projection, upper pole projection, and breast mound elevation may be objectively evaluated. This measurement system provides a highly practical means with which to quantitate breast shape changes after surgery and assess surgical results using well-defined references. Therapeutic, V.

  12. A changing climate of skepticism: The factors shaping climate change coverage in the US press.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmid-Petri, Hannah; Adam, Silke; Schmucki, Ivo; Häussler, Thomas

    2017-05-01

    Skepticism toward climate change has a long tradition in the United States. We focus on mass media as the conveyors of the image of climate change and ask: Is climate change skepticism still a characteristic of US print media coverage? If so, to what degree and in what form? And which factors might pave the way for skeptics entering mass media debates? We conducted a quantitative content analysis of US print media during one year (1 June 2012 to 31 May 2013). Our results show that the debate has changed: fundamental forms of climate change skepticism (such as denial of anthropogenic causes) have been abandoned in the coverage, being replaced by more subtle forms (such as the goal to avoid binding regulations). We find no evidence for the norm of journalistic balance, nor do our data support the idea that it is the conservative press that boosts skepticism.

  13. PaCeQuant: A Tool for High-Throughput Quantification of Pavement Cell Shape Characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Möller, Birgit; Poeschl, Yvonne; Plötner, Romina; Bürstenbinder, Katharina

    2017-11-01

    Pavement cells (PCs) are the most frequently occurring cell type in the leaf epidermis and play important roles in leaf growth and function. In many plant species, PCs form highly complex jigsaw-puzzle-shaped cells with interlocking lobes. Understanding of their development is of high interest for plant science research because of their importance for leaf growth and hence for plant fitness and crop yield. Studies of PC development, however, are limited, because robust methods are lacking that enable automatic segmentation and quantification of PC shape parameters suitable to reflect their cellular complexity. Here, we present our new ImageJ-based tool, PaCeQuant, which provides a fully automatic image analysis workflow for PC shape quantification. PaCeQuant automatically detects cell boundaries of PCs from confocal input images and enables manual correction of automatic segmentation results or direct import of manually segmented cells. PaCeQuant simultaneously extracts 27 shape features that include global, contour-based, skeleton-based, and PC-specific object descriptors. In addition, we included a method for classification and analysis of lobes at two-cell junctions and three-cell junctions, respectively. We provide an R script for graphical visualization and statistical analysis. We validated PaCeQuant by extensive comparative analysis to manual segmentation and existing quantification tools and demonstrated its usability to analyze PC shape characteristics during development and between different genotypes. PaCeQuant thus provides a platform for robust, efficient, and reproducible quantitative analysis of PC shape characteristics that can easily be applied to study PC development in large data sets. © 2017 American Society of Plant Biologists. All Rights Reserved.

  14. Octupole shapes and shape changes at high spins in the Z approx 58, N approx 88 nuclei

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nazarewicz, W. (Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States) Joint Institute for Heavy Ion Research, Holifield Heavy Ion Research Facility, P.O. Box 2008, Oak Ridge, Tennessee 37831 (United States)); Tabor, S.L. (Department of Physics, Florida State University, Tallahassee, Florida 32306 (United States))

    1992-05-01

    The shapes of rotating Xe, Ba, Ce, Nd, and Sm nuclei (84{le}{ital N}{le}94) are calculated using the cranking model with the Woods-Saxon average potential and pairing. The lightest isotopes of Xe and Ba have nearly spherical ground states, but develop octupole and quadrupole deformations under rotation which remain up to very high spins. The ground states of the heavier isotopes have octupole and quadrupole deformations which persist up to medium spins ({ital I}{approx}12{h bar}). At higher spins, a shape transition is predicted to reflection-symmetric aligned many-quasiparticle configurations.

  15. Shape and shear guide sperm cells spiraling upstream

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kantsler, Vasily; Dunkel, Jorn; Goldstein, Raymond E.

    2014-11-01

    A major puzzle in biology is how mammalian sperm determine and maintain the correct swimming direction during the various phases of the sexual reproduction process. Currently debated mechanisms for sperm long range travel vary from peristaltic pumping to temperature sensing (thermotaxis) and direct response to fluid flow (rheotaxis), but little is known quantitatively about their relative importance. Here, we report the first quantitative experimental study of mammalian sperm rheotaxis. Using microfluidic devices, we investigate systematically the swimming behavior of human and bull sperm over a wide range of physiologically relevant shear rates and viscosities. Our measurements show that the interplay of fluid shear, steric surface-interactions and chirality of the flagellar beat leads to a stable upstream spiraling motion of sperm cells, thus providing a generic and robust rectification mechanism to support mammalian fertilization. To rationalize these findings, we identify a minimal mathematical model that is capable of describing quantitatively the experimental observations.

  16. On exact and approximated formulations for scaling-mode shapes in operational modal analysis by mass and stiffness change

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Aenlle, Manuel; Brincker, Rune; Pelayo, F.

    2012-01-01

    When operational modal analysis (OMA) is used to estimate modal parameters, mode shapes cannot be mass normalized. In the past few years, some equations have been proposed to scale mode shapes using the mass-change method, which consists of repeating modal testing after changing the mass at diffe...

  17. The Vindija Neanderthal scapular glenoid fossa: comparative shape analysis suggests evo-devo changes among Neanderthals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Vincenzo, Fabio; Churchill, Steven E; Manzi, Giorgio

    2012-02-01

    Although the shape of the scapular glenoid fossa (SGF) may be influenced by epigenetic and developmental factors, there appears to be strong genetic control over its overall form, such that variation within and between hominin taxa in SGF shape may contain information about their evolutionary histories. Here we present the results of a geometric morphometric study of the SGF of the Neanderthal Vi-209 from Vindjia Cave (Croatia), relative to samples of Plio-Pleistocene, later Pleistocene, and recent hominins. Variation in overall SGF shape follows a chronological trend from the plesiomorphic condition seen in Australopithecus to modern humans, with pre-modern species of the genus Homo exhibiting intermediate morphologies. Change in body size across this temporal series is not linearly directional, which argues against static allometry as an explanation. However, life history and developmental rates change directionally across the series, suggesting an ontogenetic effect on the observed changes in shape (ontogenetic allometry). Within this framework, the morphospace occupied by the Neanderthals exhibits a discontinuous distribution. The Vindija SGF and those of the later Near Eastern Neanderthals (Kebara and Shanidar) approach the modern condition and are somewhat segregated from both northwestern European (Neandertal and La Ferrassie) and early Mediterranean Neanderthals (Krapina and Tabun). Although more than one scenario may account for the pattern seen in the Neanderthals, the data is consistent with palaeogenetic evidence suggesting low levels of gene flow between Neanderthals and modern humans in the Near East after ca. 120-100 ka (thousands of years ago) (with subsequent introgression of modern human alleles into eastern and central Europe). Thus, in keeping with previous analyses that document some modern human features in the Vindija Neanderthals, the Vindija G(3) sample should not be seen as representative of 'classic'--that is, unadmixed, pre

  18. Cell responses only partially shape cell-to-cell variations in protein abundances in Escherichia coli chemotaxis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukherjee, Sayak; Seok, Sang-Cheol; Vieland, Veronica J; Das, Jayajit

    2013-11-12

    Cell-to-cell variations in protein abundance in clonal cell populations are ubiquitous in living systems. Because protein composition determines responses in individual cells, it stands to reason that the variations themselves are subject to selective pressures. However, the functional role of these cell-to-cell differences is not well understood. One way to tackle questions regarding relationships between form and function is to perturb the form (e.g., change the protein abundances) and observe the resulting changes in some function. Here, we take on the form-function relationship from the inverse perspective, asking instead what specific constraints on cell-to-cell variations in protein abundance are imposed by a given functional phenotype. We develop a maximum entropy-based approach to posing questions of this type and illustrate the method by application to the well-characterized chemotactic response in Escherichia coli. We find that full determination of observed cell-to-cell variations in protein abundances is not inherent in chemotaxis itself but, in fact, appears to be jointly imposed by the chemotaxis program in conjunction with other factors (e.g., the protein synthesis machinery and/or additional nonchemotactic cell functions, such as cell metabolism). These results illustrate the power of maximum entropy as a tool for the investigation of relationships between biological form and function.

  19. Mathematical modelling of the viable epidermis: impact of cell shape and vertical arrangement

    KAUST Repository

    Wittum, Rebecca

    2017-12-07

    In-silico methods are valuable tools for understanding the barrier function of the skin. The key benefit is that mathematical modelling allows the interplay between cell shape and function to be elucidated. This study focuses on the viable (living) epidermis. For this region, previous works suggested a diffusion model and an approximation of the cells by hexagonal prisms. The work at hand extends this in three ways. First, the extracellular space is treated with full spatial resolution. This induces a decrease of permeability by about 10%. Second, cells of tetrakaidecahedral shape are considered, in addition to the original hexagonal prisms. For both cell types, the resulting membrane permeabilities are compared. Third, for the first time, the influence of cell stacking in the vertical direction is considered. This is particularly important for the stratum granulosum, where tight junctions are present.

  20. Scaling the Mode Shapes of a Building Model by Mass Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brincker, Rune; Rodrigues, J.; Andersen, P.

    2004-01-01

    It is well known, that when using natural input modal analysis, the loads are not known, and thus, the mode scaling factor that relates the magnitude of the loading to the magnitude of the response cannot be estimated. However It has been pointed out by several theoretical papers that mode shapes...... change technique can be used on a ¼ scale model of a 4-storey building. The uncertainties on the estimated scaling factors are illustrated by repeating the estimation using different mass changes....... can be scaled by performing  several natural input modal analysis tests with different mass changes, observe the frequency shift introduced by the mass changes and then follow an estimation scheme that allows the user to estimate the scaling factor modeby- mode, i.e. only information of the particular...

  1. Size, shape and age-related changes of the mandibular condyle during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Karlo, Christoph A. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Stolzmann, Paul [University Hospital Zurich, Institute of Diagnostic and Interventional Radiology, Zurich (Switzerland); Habernig, Sandra; Kellenberger, Christian J. [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Diagnostic Imaging, Zurich (Switzerland); Mueller, Lukas [University of Zurich, Clinics for Orthodontics and Paediatric Dentistry, Zurich (Switzerland); Saurenmann, Traudel [University Children' s Hospital Zurich, Department of Rheumatology, Zurich (Switzerland)

    2010-10-15

    To determine age-related differences in the size and shape of the mandibular condyle in children to establish anatomical reference values. A total of 420 mandibular condyles in 210 children (mean age, 7 years) were retrospectively analysed by using computed tomography (CT) imaging. The greatest left-right (LRD) and anterior-posterior (APD) diameters and the anteversion angles (AA) were measured by two readers. An APD/LRD ratio was calculated. The shape of the condyles was graded into three types on sagittal images. Correlations of parameters with the children's age were assessed by using Pearson's correlation analyses. The LRD (mean, 14.1 {+-} 2.4 mm), APD (mean, 7.3 {+-} 1.0 mm) and LRD/APD ratio (mean, 1.9 {+-} 0.3) increased (r{sub LRD} = 0.70, p < 0.01; r{sub APD} = 0.56, p < 0.01; r{sub rat} = 0.28, p < 0.01) while the AA (mean, 27 {+-} 7 ) decreased significantly (r{sub antang} = -0.26, p < 0.001) with age. The condylar shape as determined on sagittal images correlated significantly with age (r = 0.69, p < 0.05). Boys had significantly higher anteversion angles (p < 0.01), greater LRDs (p < 0.05) and greater mean ratios (p < 0.05). The mandibular condyle is subject to significant age-related changes in size and shape during childhood. As the size of the condyles increases with age, the anteversion angles decrease and the shape of the condyle turns from round to oval. (orig.)

  2. Subcortical Shape Changes, Hippocampal Atrophy and Cortical Thinning in Future Alzheimer's Disease Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kälin, Andrea M; Park, Min T M; Chakravarty, M Mallar; Lerch, Jason P; Michels, Lars; Schroeder, Clemens; Broicher, Sarah D; Kollias, Spyros; Nitsch, Roger M; Gietl, Anton F; Unschuld, Paul G; Hock, Christoph; Leh, Sandra E

    2017-01-01

    Efficacy of future treatments depends on biomarkers identifying patients with mild cognitive impairment at highest risk for transitioning to Alzheimer's disease. Here, we applied recently developed analysis techniques to investigate cross-sectional differences in subcortical shape and volume alterations in patients with stable mild cognitive impairment (MCI) (n = 23, age range 59-82, 47.8% female), future converters at baseline (n = 10, age range 66-84, 90% female) and at time of conversion (age range 68-87) compared to group-wise age and gender matched healthy control subjects (n = 23, age range 61-81, 47.8% female; n = 10, age range 66-82, 80% female; n = 10, age range 68-82, 70% female). Additionally, we studied cortical thinning and global and local measures of hippocampal atrophy as known key imaging markers for Alzheimer's disease. Apart from bilateral striatal volume reductions, no morphometric alterations were found in cognitively stable patients. In contrast, we identified shape alterations in striatal and thalamic regions in future converters at baseline and at time of conversion. These shape alterations were paralleled by Alzheimer's disease like patterns of left hemispheric morphometric changes (cortical thinning in medial temporal regions, hippocampal total and subfield atrophy) in future converters at baseline with progression to similar right hemispheric alterations at time of conversion. Additionally, receiver operating characteristic curve analysis indicated that subcortical shape alterations may outperform hippocampal volume in identifying future converters at baseline. These results further confirm the key role of early cortical thinning and hippocampal atrophy in the early detection of Alzheimer's disease. But first and foremost, and by distinguishing future converters but not patients with stable cognitive abilities from cognitively normal subjects, our results support the value of early subcortical shape alterations and reduced hippocampal

  3. Measurement of cell volume changes by fluorescence self-quenching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hamann, Steffen; Kiilgaard, J.F.; Litman, Thomas

    2002-01-01

    At high concentrations, certain fluorophores undergo self-quenching, i.e., fluorescence intensity decreases with increasing fluorophore concentration. Accordingly, the self-quenching properties can be used for measuring water volume changes in lipid vesicles. In cells, quantitative determination....... The relationship was bell-shaped, with the negative slope in the concentration range where the fluorophore undergoes fluorescence self-quenching. In cultured retinal pigment epithelial cells, calcein fluorescence and extracellular osmolarity were linearly related. A 25-mOsm hypertonic challenge corresponded...

  4. A temperature-responsive network links cell shape and virulence traits in a primary fungal pathogen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sinem Beyhan

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Survival at host temperature is a critical trait for pathogenic microbes of humans. Thermally dimorphic fungal pathogens, including Histoplasma capsulatum, are soil fungi that undergo dramatic changes in cell shape and virulence gene expression in response to host temperature. How these organisms link changes in temperature to both morphologic development and expression of virulence traits is unknown. Here we elucidate a temperature-responsive transcriptional network in H. capsulatum, which switches from a filamentous form in the environment to a pathogenic yeast form at body temperature. The circuit is driven by three highly conserved factors, Ryp1, Ryp2, and Ryp3, that are required for yeast-phase growth at 37°C. Ryp factors belong to distinct families of proteins that control developmental transitions in fungi: Ryp1 is a member of the WOPR family of transcription factors, and Ryp2 and Ryp3 are both members of the Velvet family of proteins whose molecular function is unknown. Here we provide the first evidence that these WOPR and Velvet proteins interact, and that Velvet proteins associate with DNA to drive gene expression. Using genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation studies, we determine that Ryp1, Ryp2, and Ryp3 associate with a large common set of genomic loci that includes known virulence genes, indicating that the Ryp factors directly control genes required for pathogenicity in addition to their role in regulating cell morphology. We further dissect the Ryp regulatory circuit by determining that a fourth transcription factor, which we name Ryp4, is required for yeast-phase growth and gene expression, associates with DNA, and displays interdependent regulation with Ryp1, Ryp2, and Ryp3. Finally, we define cis-acting motifs that recruit the Ryp factors to their interwoven network of temperature-responsive target genes. Taken together, our results reveal a positive feedback circuit that directs a broad transcriptional switch between

  5. Image analysis tools to quantify cell shape and protein dynamics near the leading edge.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, Gillian L; Watanabe, Naoki; Vavylonis, Dimitrios

    2013-01-01

    We present a set of flexible image analysis tools to analyze dynamics of cell shape and protein concentrations near the leading edge of cells adhered to glass coverslips. Plugins for ImageJ streamline common analyses of microscopic images of cells, including the calculation of leading edge speeds, total and average intensities of fluorescent markers, and retrograde flow rate measurements of fluorescent single-molecule speckles. We also provide automated calculations of auto- and cross-correlation functions between velocity and intensity measurements. The application of the methods is illustrated on images of XTC cells.

  6. Impact of polymer curing on two-dimensional and three-dimensional shape change in nanoimprint lithography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopra, Meghali J.; Bonnecaze, Roger T.

    2015-10-01

    Polymer shrinkage from curing in nanoimprint lithography (NIL) strongly affects the ultimate shapes of two- and three-dimensional structures produced following etching. We computationally study the curing step in the NIL process and predict the shape changes caused by polymer shrinkage. The shape changes are predicted for crosses, diamonds with sharp and rounded tips, and multitiered structures that are applicable for multibit memory devices and dual damascene processes. The shape changes from curing are shown to be governed by the shrinkage coefficient of the polymer resist, its Poisson's ratio, and the geometric aspect ratios of the shapes. Finite element simulations demonstrate that shape change due to polymer densification is equal to the average volumetric contraction of the resist material, but shrinkage is not isotropic and vertical displacement dominates. The thickness of the residual layer does not impact the final profile of the imprinted shapes considered. Further analysis shows that diamonds with sharp tips stay sharp while the tips of rounded diamonds get sharper. Additionally, shape changes for multitiered structures are not uniformly distributed among the tiers. Using etch simulations, we demonstrate the significant impact of polymer shrinkage on the final feature profile.

  7. Shaping of Natural Killer Cell Antitumor Activity by Ex Vivo Cultivation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Granzin, Markus; Wagner, Juliane; Köhl, Ulrike; Cerwenka, Adelheid; Huppert, Volker; Ullrich, Evelyn

    2017-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells are a promising tool for the use in adoptive immunotherapy, since they efficiently recognize and kill tumor cells. In this context, ex vivo cultivation is an attractive option to increase NK cells in numbers and to improve their antitumor potential prior to clinical applications. Consequently, various strategies to generate NK cells for adoptive immunotherapy have been developed. Here, we give an overview of different NK cell cultivation approaches and their impact on shaping the NK cell antitumor activity. So far, the cytokines interleukin (IL)-2, IL-12, IL-15, IL-18, and IL-21 are used to culture and expand NK cells. The selection of the respective cytokine combination is an important factor that directly affects NK cell maturation, proliferation, survival, distribution of NK cell subpopulations, activation, and function in terms of cytokine production and cytotoxic potential. Importantly, cytokines can upregulate the expression of certain activating receptors on NK cells, thereby increasing their responsiveness against tumor cells that express the corresponding ligands. Apart from using cytokines, cocultivation with autologous accessory non-NK cells or addition of growth-inactivated feeder cells are approaches for NK cell cultivation with pronounced effects on NK cell activation and expansion. Furthermore, ex vivo cultivation was reported to prime NK cells for the killing of tumor cells that were previously resistant to NK cell attack. In general, NK cells become frequently dysfunctional in cancer patients, for instance, by downregulation of NK cell activating receptors, disabling them in their antitumor response. In such scenario, ex vivo cultivation can be helpful to arm NK cells with enhanced antitumor properties to overcome immunosuppression. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge on NK cell modulation by different ex vivo cultivation strategies focused on increasing NK cytotoxicity for clinical application in malignant

  8. Detection of RNA-Protein Interactions in Living Cells with SHAPE.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smola, Matthew J; Calabrese, J Mauro; Weeks, Kevin M

    2015-11-24

    SHAPE-MaP is unique among RNA structure probing strategies in that it both measures flexibility at single-nucleotide resolution and quantifies the uncertainties in these measurements. We report a straightforward analytical framework that incorporates these uncertainties to allow detection of RNA structural differences between any two states, and we use it here to detect RNA-protein interactions in healthy mouse trophoblast stem cells. We validate this approach by analysis of three model cytoplasmic and nuclear ribonucleoprotein complexes, in 2 min in-cell probing experiments. In contrast, data produced by alternative in-cell SHAPE probing methods correlate poorly (r = 0.2) with those generated by SHAPE-MaP and do not yield accurate signals for RNA-protein interactions. We then examine RNA-protein and RNA-substrate interactions in the RNase MRP complex and, by comparing in-cell interaction sites with disease-associated mutations, characterize these noncoding mutations in terms of molecular phenotype. Together, these results reveal that SHAPE-MaP can define true interaction sites and infer RNA functions under native cellular conditions with limited preexisting knowledge of the proteins or RNAs involved.

  9. Climate Change Fuel Cell Program

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Paul Belard

    2006-09-21

    Verizon is presently operating the largest Distributed Generation Fuel Cell project in the USA. Situated in Long Island, NY, the power plant is composed of seven (7) fuel cells operating in parallel with the Utility grid from the Long Island Power Authority (LIPA). Each fuel cell has an output of 200 kW, for a total of 1.4 mW generated from the on-site plant. The remaining power to meet the facility demand is purchased from LIPA. The fuel cell plant is utilized as a co-generation system. A by-product of the fuel cell electric generation process is high temperature water. The heat content of this water is recovered from the fuel cells and used to drive two absorption chillers in the summer and a steam generator in the winter. Cost savings from the operations of the fuel cells are forecasted to be in excess of $250,000 per year. Annual NOx emissions reductions are equivalent to removing 1020 motor vehicles from roadways. Further, approximately 5.45 million metric tons (5 millions tons) of CO2 per year will not be generated as a result of this clean power generation. The project was partially financed with grants from the New York State Energy R&D Authority (NYSERDA) and from Federal Government Departments of Defense and Energy.

  10. Involvement of filamin A and filamin A-interacting protein (FILIP) in controlling the start and cell shape of radially migrating cortical neurons.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Makoto; Nagano, Takashi

    2005-03-01

    Precisely regulated radial cell migration out of the ventricular zone is essential for corticogenesis. However, molecular mechanisms controlling the start of migration and the dynamics of migrating cell shape remain elusive. Here, we show novel mechanisms that can tether ventricular zone cells and control migrating cell shape. The novel protein Filamin A-interacting protein (FILIP) interacts with Filamin A, an indispensable actin-binding protein for cell motility, and induces its degradation in COS-7 cells. Degradation of Filamin A is indicated in the cortical ventricular zone where FILIP mRNA localizes. Furthermore, most ventricular zone cells that overexpress FILIP fail to migrate in explants. These results indicate that FILIP acts through a Filamin A-F-actin axis to control the start of neocortical cell migration from the ventricular zone. Filamin A also determines the shape of migrating neocortical neurons, which show global morphological changes and complicated behavior during that migration. Dysfunction of Filamin A, caused by a mutant Filamin A expression, prevents cells from acquiring consistent polarity toward specific direction and decreases motility in the subventricular and intermediate zones. In contrast, Filamin A overexpression, achieved by a short interfering RNA for FILIP, promotes the development and maintenance of a bipolar shape also in the subventricular and intermediate zones. These results suggest that the amount of Filamin A helps migrating neurons determine their mode of migration, multipolar or bipolar, prior to entering the cortical plate and that FILIP is responsible, at least in part, for the Filamin A content of migrating neurons.

  11. Intracellular Delivery by Shape Anisotropic Magnetic Particle-Induced Cell Membrane Cuts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ming-Yu; Wu, Yi-Chien; Lee, Ji-Ann; Tung, Kuan-Wen; Zhou, Jessica; Teitell, Michael A; Yeh, J Andrew; Chiou, Pei Yu

    2016-08-01

    Introducing functional macromolecules into a variety of living cells is challenging but important for biology research and cell-based therapies. We report a novel cell delivery platform based on rotating shape anisotropic magnetic particles (SAMPs), which make very small cuts on cell membranes for macromolecule delivery with high efficiency and high survivability. SAMP delivery is performed by placing commercially available nickel powder onto cells grown in standard cell culture dishes. Application of a uniform magnetic field causes the magnetic particles to rotate because of mechanical torques induced by shape anisotropic magnetization. Cells touching these rotating particles are nicked, which generates transient membrane pores that enable the delivery of macromolecules into the cytosol of cells. Calcein dye, 3 and 40 kDa dextran polymers, a green fluorescence protein (GFP) plasmid, siRNA, and an enzyme (β-lactamase) were successfully delivered into HeLa cells, primary normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHDFs), and mouse cortical neurons that can be difficult to transfect. The SAMP approach offers several advantages, including easy implementation, low cost, high throughput, and efficient delivery of a broad range of macromolecules. Collectively, SAMP delivery has great potential for a broad range of academic and industrial applications. © 2016 Society for Laboratory Automation and Screening.

  12. Precise measurement of photoresist cross-sectional shape change caused by SEM-induced shrinkage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohashi, Takeyoshi; Sekiguchi, Tomoko; Yamaguchi, Atsuko; Tanaka, Junichi; Kawada, Hiroki

    2013-04-01

    The mechanism of photoresist shrinkage induced by electron-beam (EB) irradiation was studied. A precise cross-sectional profile of a photoresist pattern was obtained by a scanning transmission electron microscope (STEM) after atomic layer deposition of HfO2 on the sample patterns. Photoresist lines and spaces fabricated with positive-tone development and negative-tone development were exposed to an EB with much higher dose than a practical dose (to accelerate shrinkage intentionally). The obtained STEM images of the patterns before and after EB irradiation show that the shrinkage of the negative-tone-developed patterns is smaller than that of the positive-tone-developed patterns. This observation is explained by the fact that negative-tone-developed photoresist molecules do not contain protection groups, whose volatilization caused by EB irradiation is one of the origins of shrinkage. Another finding is that the EB irradiation causes top-rounding and necking of the pattern profile as well as linewidth slimming. The rounding of the pattern top profile suggests that the pattern's shape was elastically deformed. In addition, EB irradiation only onto the spaces caused sidewall shrinkage and a necking profile, although no electrons were irradiated directly onto the pattern. These phenomena are considered to be due to the electrons scattered from the spaces to the pattern sidewall. Finally, a Monte Carlo simulation of electron scattering showed that the distribution of the deposited EB energy on the pattern surface corresponds to the above-described change in pattern shape. Consequently, these observations and simulation results clarify the importance of the effect of elastic shape change and the impact of the electrons scattered from the underlying layer onto the sidewall in the mechanism of photoresist shrinkage.

  13. Protein farnesylation inhibitors cause donut-shaped cell nuclei attributable to a centrosome separation defect

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verstraeten, Valerie L. R. M.; Peckham, Lana A.; Olive, Michelle; Capell, Brian C.; Collins, Francis S.; Nabel, Elizabeth G.; Young, Stephen G.; Fong, Loren G.; Lammerding, Jan

    2011-01-01

    Despite the success of protein farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs) in the treatment of certain malignancies, their mode of action is incompletely understood. Dissecting the molecular pathways affected by FTIs is important, particularly because this group of drugs is now being tested for the treatment of Hutchinson–Gilford progeria syndrome. In the current study, we show that FTI treatment causes a centrosome separation defect, leading to the formation of donut-shaped nuclei in nontransformed cell lines, tumor cell lines, and tissues of FTI-treated mice. Donut-shaped nuclei arise during chromatin decondensation in late mitosis; subsequently, cells with donut-shaped nuclei exhibit defects in karyokinesis, develop aneuploidy, and are often binucleated. Binucleated cells proliferate slowly. We identified lamin B1 and proteasome-mediated degradation of pericentrin as critical components in FTI-induced “donut formation” and binucleation. Reducing pericentrin expression or ectopic expression of nonfarnesylated lamin B1 was sufficient to elicit donut formation and binucleated cells, whereas blocking proteasomal degradation eliminated FTI-induced donut formation. Our studies have uncovered an important role of FTIs on centrosome separation and define pericentrin as a (indirect) target of FTIs affecting centrosome position and bipolar spindle formation, likely explaining some of the anticancer effects of these drugs. PMID:21383178

  14. Design and Evaluation of Shape-Changing Haptic Interfaces for Pedestrian Navigation Assistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spiers, Adam J; Dollar, Aaron M

    2017-01-01

    Shape-changing interfaces are a category of device capable of altering their form in order to facilitate communication of information. In this work, we present a shape-changing device that has been designed for navigation assistance. 'The Animotus' (previously, 'The Haptic Sandwich' ), resembles a cube with an articulated upper half that is able to rotate and extend (translate) relative to the bottom half, which is fixed in the user's grasp. This rotation and extension, generally felt via the user's fingers, is used to represent heading and proximity to navigational targets. The device is intended to provide an alternative to screen or audio based interfaces for visually impaired, hearing impaired, deafblind, and sighted pedestrians. The motivation and design of the haptic device is presented, followed by the results of a navigation experiment that aimed to determine the role of each device DOF, in terms of facilitating guidance. An additional device, 'The Haptic Taco', which modulated its volume in response to target proximity (negating directional feedback), was also compared. Results indicate that while the heading (rotational) DOF benefited motion efficiency, the proximity (translational) DOF benefited velocity. Combination of the two DOF improved overall performance. The volumetric Taco performed comparably to the Animotus' extension DOF.

  15. Interplay of lancet furrows and shape change in the horseshoe bat noseleaf.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Anupam K; Webster, Dane; Müller, Rolf

    2015-11-01

    Horseshoe bats emit biosonar pulses through the nostrils and diffract the outgoing ultrasonic pulses with baffles, so-called "noseleaves," that surround the nostrils. The noseleaves have complex static geometries and can furthermore undergo dynamic shape changes during emission of the biosonar pulses. The posterior noseleaf part, the lancet, has been shown to carry out anterior-posterior flicking motions during biosonar emissions with average lancet tip displacements of about 1 mm. Here, the acoustic effects of the interplay between the lancet furrows and shape change (lancet rotation) on the emission beam were investigated using the animated digital models obtained from the noseleaves of greater horseshoe bats (Rhinolophus ferrumequinum). It was found that forward lancet rotations increase the amount of sound energy allocated to secondary amplitude maxima (sidelobes) in the beampattern, but only in the presence of the furrows. The interaction between static and dynamic features can be readily quantified by roughness (standard deviation about local mean) of the amplitude distribution of the beampatterns. This effect goes beyond the static impact of the furrows on the width of the mainlobe. It could allow the bats to send out their pulses through a sequence of qualitatively different beampatterns.

  16. Wind Tunnel Test of an RPV with Shape-Change Control Effector and Sensor Arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raney, David L.; Cabell, Randolph H.; Sloan, Adam R.; Barnwell, William G.; Lion, S. Todd; Hautamaki, Bret A.

    2004-01-01

    A variety of novel control effector concepts have recently emerged that may enable new approaches to flight control. In particular, the potential exists to shift the composition of the typical aircraft control effector suite from a small number of high authority, specialized devices (rudder, aileron, elevator, flaps), toward larger numbers of smaller, less specialized, distributed device arrays. The concept envisions effector and sensor networks composed of relatively small high-bandwidth devices able to simultaneously perform a variety of control functions using feedback from disparate data sources. To investigate this concept, a remotely piloted flight vehicle has been equipped with an array of 24 trailing edge shape-change effectors and associated pressure measurements. The vehicle, called the Multifunctional Effector and Sensor Array (MESA) testbed, was recently tested in NASA Langley's 12-ft Low Speed wind tunnel to characterize its stability properties, control authorities, and distributed pressure sensitivities for use in a dynamic simulation prior to flight testing. Another objective was to implement and evaluate a scheme for actively controlling the spanwise pressure distribution using the shape-change array. This report describes the MESA testbed, design of the pressure distribution controller, and results of the wind tunnel test.

  17. Optimization of size and shape of composite heat sinks with phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balaji, C.; Mungara, Praneet; Sharma, Parw

    2011-05-01

    A composite heat sink is one in which a phase change material is interspersed with a high thermal conductivity base material to maximize the thermal performance of the device. Unlike constant area fins considered in literature, this work considers a repeating elemental composite heat sink (ECHS) with variable area fins. The base material is aluminium and the phase change material is n-Eicosane. An in house code was developed in MATLABto determine the time of operation for a vertical fins ECHS for a one dimensional approximation. This was followed by a two dimensional analysis of the problem using FLUENT 6.3. The effects of the shape of the interface surface on the time of operation and overall heat dissipated are determined and design modifications for the composite Heat Sinks based on the results obtained are suggested.

  18. Arabidopsis FH1 Formin Affects Cotyledon Pavement Cell Shape by Modulating Cytoskeleton Dynamics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rosero, Amparo; Oulehlová, Denisa; Stillerová, Lenka; Schiebertová, Petra; Grunt, Michal; Žárský, Viktor; Cvrčková, Fatima

    2016-03-01

    Plant cell morphogenesis involves concerted rearrangements of microtubules and actin microfilaments. We previously reported that FH1, the main Arabidopsis thaliana housekeeping Class I membrane-anchored formin, contributes to actin dynamics and microtubule stability in rhizodermis cells. Here we examine the effects of mutations affecting FH1 (At3g25500) on cell morphogenesis and above-ground organ development in seedlings, as well as on cytoskeletal organization and dynamics, using a combination of confocal and variable angle epifluorescence microscopy with a pharmacological approach. Homozygous fh1 mutants exhibited cotyledon epinasty and had larger cotyledon pavement cells with more pronounced lobes than the wild type. The pavement cell shape alterations were enhanced by expression of the fluorescent microtubule marker GFP-microtubule-associated protein 4 (MAP4). Mutant cotyledon pavement cells exhibited reduced density and increased stability of microfilament bundles, as well as enhanced dynamics of microtubules. Analogous results were also obtained upon treatments with the formin inhibitor SMIFH2 (small molecule inhibitor of formin homology 2 domains). Pavement cell shape in wild-type (wt) and fh1 plants in some situations exhibited a differential response towards anti-cytoskeletal drugs, especially the microtubule disruptor oryzalin. Our observations indicate that FH1 participates in the control of microtubule dynamics, possibly via its effects on actin, subsequently influencing cell morphogenesis and macroscopic organ development. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists. All rights reserved. For permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Blastocyst axis is specified independently of early cell lineage but aligns with the ZP shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurotaki, Yoko; Hatta, Kohei; Nakao, Kazuki; Nabeshima, Yo-Ichi; Fujimori, Toshihiko

    2007-05-04

    The mechanisms controlling the establishment of the embryonic-abembryonic (E-Ab) axis of the mammalian blastocyst are controversial. We used in vitro time-lapse imaging and in vivo lineage labeling to provide evidence that the E-Ab axis of the mouse blastocyst is generated independently of early cell lineage. Rather, both the boundary between two-cell blastomeres and the E-Ab axis of the blastocyst align relative to the ellipsoidal shape of the zona pellucida (ZP), an extraembryonic structure. Lack of correlation between cell lineage and the E-Ab axis can be explained by the rotation of the embryo within the ZP.

  20. Dynamic Flow Impacts Cell-Particle Interactions: Sedimentation and Particle Shape Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Björnmalm, Mattias; Faria, Matthew; Chen, Xi; Cui, Jiwei; Caruso, Frank

    2016-10-17

    The interaction of engineered particles with biological systems determines their performance in biomedical applications. Although standard static cell cultures remain the norm for in vitro studies, modern models mimicking aspects of the dynamic in vivo environment have been developed. Herein, we investigate fundamental cell-particle interactions under dynamic flow conditions using a simple and self-contained device together with standard multiwell cell culture plates. We engineer two particle systems and evaluate their cell interactions under dynamic flow, and we compare the results to standard static cell cultures. We find substantial differences between static and dynamic flow conditions and attribute these to particle shape and sedimentation effects. These results demonstrate how standard static assays can be complemented by dynamic flow assays for a more comprehensive understanding of fundamental cell-particle interactions.

  1. Simulation of imperfections in plastic lenses - transferring local refractive index changes into surface shape modifications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arasa, Josep; Pizarro, Carles; Blanco, Patricia

    2016-06-01

    Injection molded plastic lenses have continuously improved their performance regarding optical quality and nowadays are as usual as glass lenses in image forming devices. However, during the manufacturing process unavoidable fluctuations in material density occur, resulting in local changes in the distribution of refractive index, which degrade the imaging properties of the polymer lens. Such material density fluctuations correlate to phase delays, which opens a path for their mapping. However, it is difficult to transfer the measured variations in refractive index into conventional optical simulation tool. Thus, we propose a method to convert the local variations in refractive index into local changes of one surface of the lens, which can then be described as a free-form surface, easy to introduce in conventional simulation tools. The proposed method was tested on a commercial gradient index (GRIN) lens for a set of six different object positions, using the MTF sagittal and tangential cuts to compare the differences between the real lens and a lens with homogenous refractive index, and the last surface converted into a free-form shape containing the internal refractive index changes. The same procedure was used to reproduce the local refractive index changes of an injected plastic lens with local index changes measured using an in-house built polariscopic arrangement, showing the capability of the method to provide successful results.

  2. Geometric Shape Induced Small Change of Seebeck Coefficient in Bulky Metallic Wires

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gang Li

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we report the results of slight changes in the thermopower of long W, Mo, Zn, Cu, brass, and Ti wires, that resulted from changes in the wire’s diameter or cross-sectional area. The samples used in the tests had a round shape with a diameter that ranged from tens of micron to 2 mm, which was much larger than the corresponding mean free paths of these materials. Nevertheless, a small change in thermopower, at the order of 1–10 nV/K, was repeatedly observed when the wire diameter was changed, or when the cross-sectional area of the wire was altered by mechanical methods, such as grinding or splitting. The results are consistent with previous observations showing that the thermopower in metallic thin film stripes changes with their width, from 100 μm to as little as 70 nm, implying a universal, geometric-boundary-related size effect of thermopower in metal materials, that occurs at the nanometer scale and continuously decreases all the way to the millimeter scale. This effect could be applied in the manufacturing of high-temperature sensors with simple structures.

  3. Changes in neuronal excitability by activated microglia: Differential Na+ current up-regulation in pyramid-shaped and bipolar neurons by TNF-α and IL-18

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lars eKlapal

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Microglia are activated during pathological events in the brain and are capable of releasing various types of inflammatory cytokines. Here we demonstrate that the addition of 5% microglia activated by 1 µg/ml lipopolysaccharides (LPS to hippocampal cultures up-regulates Na+ current densities (INavD of bipolar as well as pyramid-shaped neurons, thereby increasing their excitability. Deactivation of microglia by the addition of 10 ng/ml transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β decreases INavD below control levels suggesting that the residual activated microglial cells influence neuronal excitability in control cultures. Preincubation of hippocampal cultures with 10 ng/ml tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α, a major cytokine released by activated microglia, up-regulated INavD significantly by ~30% in bipolar cells, whereas in pyramid-shaped cells the up-regulation only reached an increase of ~14%. Incubation of the cultures with antibodies against either TNF-receptor 1 or 2 blocked the up-regulation of INavD in bipolar cells, whereas in pyramid-shaped cells increases in INavD were exclusively blocked by antibodies against TNF-receptor 2, suggesting that both cell types respond differently to TNF-α exposure. Since additional cytokines, such as interleukin-18 (IL-18, are released from activated microglia we tested potential effects of IL-18 on INavD in both cell types. Exposure to 5-10 ng/ml IL-18 for 4 days increased INavD in both pyramid-shaped as well as bipolar neurons, albeit the dose-response curves were shifted to lower concentrations in bipolar cells. Our results suggest that by secretion of cytokines microglial cells up-regulate Na+ current densities in bipolar and pyramid-shaped neurons to some extent differentially. Depending on the exact cytokine composition and concentration released this could change the balance between the activity of inhibitory bipolar and excitatory pyramid-shaped cells. Since bipolar cells show a larger up-regulation of

  4. Structure of Csd3 from Helicobacter pylori, a cell shape-determining metallopeptidase

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Doo Ri [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Hyoun Sook [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151 742 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Jieun; Im, Ha Na; Yoon, Hye Jin; Yoon, Ji Young; Jang, Jun Young [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Hesek, Dusan; Lee, Mijoon; Mobashery, Shahriar [University of Notre Dame, Notre Dame, IN 46556 (United States); Kim, Soon-Jong [Mokpo National University, Chonnam 534-729 (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Byung Il [National Cancer Center, Gyeonggi 410-769 (Korea, Republic of); Suh, Se Won, E-mail: sewonsuh@snu.ac.kr [Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of); Seoul National University, Seoul 151-742 (Korea, Republic of)

    2015-03-01

    H. pylori Csd3 (HP0506), together with other peptidoglycan hydrolases, plays an important role in determining cell shape. Its crystal structure in the latent state is reported. Helicobacter pylori is associated with various gastrointestinal diseases such as gastritis, ulcers and gastric cancer. Its colonization of the human gastric mucosa requires high motility, which depends on its helical cell shape. Seven cell shape-determining genes (csd1, csd2, csd3/hdpA, ccmA, csd4, csd5 and csd6) have been identified in H. pylori. Their proteins play key roles in determining the cell shape through modifications of the cell-wall peptidoglycan by the alteration of cross-linking or by the trimming of peptidoglycan muropeptides. Among them, Csd3 (also known as HdpA) is a bifunctional enzyme. Its d, d-endopeptidase activity cleaves the d-Ala{sup 4}-mDAP{sup 3} peptide bond between cross-linked muramyl tetrapeptides and pentapeptides. It is also a d, d-carboxypeptidase that cleaves off the terminal d-Ala{sup 5} from the muramyl pentapeptide. Here, the crystal structure of this protein has been determined, revealing the organization of its three domains in a latent and inactive state. The N-terminal domain 1 and the core of domain 2 share the same fold despite a very low level of sequence identity, and their surface-charge distributions are different. The C-terminal LytM domain contains the catalytic site with a Zn{sup 2+} ion, like the similar domains of other M23 metallopeptidases. Domain 1 occludes the active site of the LytM domain. The core of domain 2 is held against the LytM domain by the C-terminal tail region that protrudes from the LytM domain.

  5. Transcriptome changes during intestinal cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadjali, Mehrdad; Seidelin, Jakob B; Olsen, Jørgen Lillelund

    2002-01-01

    The expression of 18149 genes have been analysed during the differentiation of the human intestinal cell line Caco-2. cDNA probes from undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells were separately hybridised to EST DNAs spotted in an array on a nylon membrane. A remarkable change in the transc......The expression of 18149 genes have been analysed during the differentiation of the human intestinal cell line Caco-2. cDNA probes from undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells were separately hybridised to EST DNAs spotted in an array on a nylon membrane. A remarkable change...

  6. Single-Cell Optical Distortion Correction and Label-Free 3D Cell Shape Reconstruction on Lattices of Nanostructures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stephan, Jürgen; Keber, Felix; Stierle, Valentin; Rädler, Joachim O; Paulitschke, Philipp

    2017-12-13

    Imaging techniques can be compromised by aberrations. Especially when imaging through biological specimens, sample-induced distortions can limit localization accuracy. In particular, this phenomenon affects localization microscopy, traction force measurements, and single-particle tracking, which offer high-resolution insights into biological tissue. Here we present a method for quantifying and correcting the optical distortions induced by single, adherent, living cells. The technique uses periodically patterned gold nanostructures as a reference framework to quantify optically induced displacements with micrometer-scale sampling density and an accuracy of a few nanometers. The 3D cell shape and a simplified geometrical optics approach are then utilized to remap the microscope image. Our experiments reveal displacements of up to several hundred nanometers, and in corrected images these distortions are reduced by a factor of 3. Conversely, the relationship between cell shape and distortion provides a novel method of 3D cell shape reconstruction from a single image, enabling label-free 3D cell analysis.

  7. The changing shape characteristics associated with success in world-class sprinters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watts, Adam S; Coleman, Iain; Nevill, Alan

    2012-01-01

    The aims of this study were to identify whether relative shape and size characteristics of world-class sprinters have changed over time, and whether any anthropometric parameters characterize the most successful world-class sprinters. The results suggest that body mass index, reflecting greater muscle mass rather than greater adiposity, is an important factor associated with success in both male and female world-class sprinters over time. However, in female athletes the reciprocal ponderal index (RPI) has emerged as a more important indicator of success over several decades, with taller, more linear sprinters achieving greater success, as measured by sprint speed. In male sprinters it is only in the most recent decade that RPI has emerged as an important predictor of success. We speculate that the prominence of the RPI and an ectomophic somatotype being typical of the most successful world-class sprinters might be explained, in part, by the influence of stride length on sprint speed. In conclusion, these results suggest that coaches, selectors, and sports scientists should consider body shape when selecting potential athletes for sprint events, encouraging more linear athletes with a high RPI.

  8. Locomotion and Body Shape Changes of Metabolically Different C.elegans in Fluids with Varying Viscosities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wong, Rachel; Brenowitz, Noah; Shen, Amy

    2010-11-01

    Caenorhabditis elegans (C.elegans) are soil dwelling roundworms that have served as model organisms for studying a multitude of biological and engineering phenomena. On agar, the locomotion of the worm is sinusoidal, while in water, the swimming motion of the worm appears more episodic. The efficiency of the worm locomotion is tested by placing the worm in four fluids with varying viscosities. We quantify the locomotion pattern variations by categorizing the swimming kinematics and shapes of the C.elegans. The locomotion of two mutants C.elegans and a control C.elegans was tested: daf2, nhr49, and N2 Wildtype. The metabolic effects of the worms are evaluated by focusing on the forward swimming velocity, wavelength, amplitude and swimming frequency were compared. Using these measured values, we were able to quantify the efficiency, the speed of propagation of the wave along the body resulting in forward movement (wave velocity), and transverse velocity, defined as the amplitude times the frequency, of the worm locomotion. It was shown that C.elegans has a preferential swimming shape that adapts as the environment changes regardless of its efficiency.

  9. Strength analysis of CARR-CNS with crescent-shape moderator cell and helium sub-cooling jacket covering cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Qingfeng; Feng, Quanke; Kawai, Takeshi; Shen, Feng; Yuan, Luzheng; Cheng, Liang

    2005-12-01

    The new type of the moderator cell was developed for the cold neutron source (CNS) of the China Advanced Research Reactor (CARR) which is now being constructed at the China Institute of Atomic Energy in Beijing. A crescent-shape moderator cell covered by the helium sub-cooling jacket is adopted. The structure of the moderator cell is optimized by the stress FEM analysis. A crescent-shape would help to increase the volume of the moderator cell for fitting it to the four cold neutron guide tubes, even if liquid hydrogen, not liquid deuterium, was used as a cold moderator. The helium sub-cooling jacket covering the moderator cell removes the nuclear heating of the outer shell wall of the cell. It contributes to reduce the void fraction of liquid hydrogen in the outer shell of the moderator cell. Such a type of a moderator cell is suitable for the CNS with higher nuclear heating. The cold helium gas flows down first into the helium sub-cooling jacket and then flows up to the condenser. The theory of the self-regulation suitable to the thermo-siphon type of the CNS is also applicable and validated.

  10. Deep-red emissive crescent-shaped fluorescent dyes: substituent effect on live cell imaging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Weimin; Zhou, Bingjiang; Niu, Guangle; Ge, Jiechao; Wu, Jiasheng; Zhang, Hongyan; Xu, Haitao; Wang, Pengfei

    2015-04-08

    A series of crescent-shaped fluorescent dyes (CP1-CP6) were synthesized by hybridizing coumarin and pyronin moieties with different amino substituents at both ends. The molecular structures and photophysical properties of these fluorescent dyes were investigated through X-ray diffraction, absorption spectroscopy, and fluorescence spectroscopy. Results show that the fluorescent dyes exhibited crescent-shaped structures, deep-red emissions (approximately 650 nm), and significant Stokes shifts. In live-cell-imaging experiments, CP1 stains mitochondria, whereas CP3 and CP6 stain the lysosomes in a cytoplasm and the RNA in nucleoli. The relationships between different amino substituent groups and the imaging properties of CP dyes were discussed as well. Additionally, findings from the cytotoxicity and photostability experiments on living cells indicated the favorable biocompatibility and high photostability of the CP dyes.

  11. Shape normalization of 3D cell nuclei using elastic spherical mapping.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gladilin, E; Goetze, S; Mateos-Langerak, J; VAN Driel, R; Eils, R; Rohr, K

    2008-07-01

    Topological analysis of cells and subcellular structures on the basis of image data, is one of the major trends in modern quantitative biology. However, due to the dynamic nature of cell biology, the optical appearance of different cells or even time-series of the same cell is undergoing substantial variations in shape and texture, which makes a comparison of shapes and distances across different cells a nontrivial task. In the absence of canonical invariances, a natural approach to the normalization of cells consists of spherical mapping, enabling the analysis of targeted regions in terms of canonical spherical coordinates, that is, radial distances and angles. In this work, we present a physically-based approach to spherical mapping, which has been applied for topological analysis of multichannel confocal laser scanning microscopy images of human fibroblast nuclei. Our experimental results demonstrate that spherical mapping of entire nuclear domains can automatically be obtained by inverting affine and elastic transformations, performed on a spherical finite element template mesh.

  12. A Miniaturized Prototype of Resonant Banana-Shaped Photoacoustic Cell for Gas Sensing

    CERN Document Server

    Ulasevich, A L; Kouzmouk, A A; Starovoitov, V S

    2013-01-01

    A resonant photoacoustic cell intended for laser-spectroscopy gas sensing is represented. This cell is a miniature imitation of a macro-scale banana-shaped cell developed previously. The parameters, which specify the cavity shape, are chosen so as not only to provide optimal cell operation at a selected acoustic resonance but also to reduce substantially the cell sizes. A miniaturized prototype cell (the volume of acoustic cavity of ~ 5 mm^3) adapted to the narrow diffraction-limited beam of near-infrared laser is produced and examined experimentally. The noise-associated measurement error and laser-initiated signals are studied as functions of modulation frequency. The background signal and the useful response to light absorption by the gas are analyzed in measurements of absorption for ammonia in nitrogen flow with the help of a pigtailed DFB laser diode oscillated near a wavelength of 1.53 um. The performance of prototype operation at the second longitudinal acoustic resonance (the resonance frequency of ~...

  13. Cell shape and spreading of stromal (mesenchymal) stem cells cultured on fibronectin coated gold and hydroxyapatite surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A; Jensen, Thomas Hartvig Lindkjær; Kolind, Kristian

    2011-01-01

    the number of polyclonal and monoclonal antibodies directed against the cell-binding domain (CB-domain) on the fibronectin (Fn) is significantly larger on the (HA) surfaces. Moreover, a higher number of antibodies bound to the fibronectin coatings formed from the highest bulk fibronection concentration...... coated surfaces the cells adapted to a more polygonal shape with a well-defined actin cytoskeleton, while a larger cell area and roundness values were observed for cells cultured on the coated surfaces. Among the coated surfaces a slightly larger cell area and roundness values was observed on HA...... as compared to Au. Moreover, the results revealed that the morphology of cells cultured on fibronectin coated HA surfaces were less irregular. In summary we find that fibronectin adsorbs in a more activated state on the HA surfaces, resulting in a slightly different cellular response as compared...

  14. Vimentin Levels and Serine 71 Phosphorylation in the Control of Cell-Matrix Adhesions, Migration Speed, and Shape of Transformed Human Fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emmanuel Terriac

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Metastasizing tumor cells show increased expression of the intermediate filament (IF protein vimentin, which has been used to diagnose invasive tumors for decades. Recent observations indicate that vimentin is not only a passive marker for carcinoma, but may also induce tumor cell invasion. To clarify how vimentin IFs control cell adhesions and migration, we analyzed the nanoscale (30–50 nm spatial organization of vimentin IFs and cell-matrix adhesions in metastatic fibroblast cells, using three-color stimulated emission depletion (STED microscopy. We also studied whether wild-type and phospho-deficient or -mimicking mutants of vimentin changed the size and lifetime of focal adhesions (FAs, cell shape, and cell migration, using live-cell total internal reflection imaging and confocal microscopy. We observed that vimentin exists in fragments of different lengths. Short fragments were mostly the size of a unit-length filament and were mainly localized close to small cell-matrix adhesions. Long vimentin filaments were found in the proximity of large FAs. Vimentin expression in these cells caused a reduction in FAs size and an elongated cell shape, but did not affect FA lifetime, or the speed or directionality of cell migration. Expression of a phospho-mimicking mutant (S71D of vimentin increased the speed of cell migration. Taken together, our results suggest that in highly migratory, transformed mesenchymal cells, vimentin levels control the cell shape and FA size, but not cell migration, which instead is linked to the phosphorylation status of S71 vimentin. These observations are consistent with the possibility that not only levels, but also the assembly status of vimentin control cell migration.

  15. Influence of pore and strut shape on open cell metal foam bulk properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Prashant; Hugo, Jean-Michel; Topin, Frederic; Vicente, Jerome

    2012-05-01

    The thermo-physical behavior of open-celled metal foams depends on their microscopic structure. An ideal periodic isotropic structure of tetrakaidecahedron shape i.e. Kelvin cell is studied. We have proposed an analytical model in order to obtain geometrical parameters correctly as they have substantial influence on thermal and hydraulic phenomena, where strut geometry is of prime importance. Various relationships between different geometrical parameters and porosities are presented. Consequently, empirical correlations are proposed to determine permeability and inertia coefficient using Ergun like model for computing pressure drop.

  16. Fluorescence intensity decay shape analysis microscopy (FIDSAM) for quantitative and sensitive live-cell imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peter, Sébastien; Elgass, Kirstin; Sackrow, Marcus; Caesar, Katharina; Born, Anne-Kathrin; Maniura, Katharina; Harter, Klaus; Meixner, Alfred J.; Schleifenbaum, Frank

    2010-02-01

    Fluorescence microscopy became an invaluable tool in cell biology in the past 20 years. However, the information that lies in these studies is often corrupted by a cellular fluorescence background known as autofluorescence. Since the unspecific background often overlaps with most commonly used labels in terms of fluorescence spectra and fluorescence lifetime, the use of spectral filters in the emission beampath or timegating in fluorescence lifetime imaging (FLIM) is often no appropriate means for distinction between signal and background. Despite the prevalence of fluorescence techniques only little progress has been reported in techniques that specifically suppress autofluorescence or that clearly discriminate autofluorescence from label fluorescence. Fluorescence intensity decay shape analysis microscopy (FIDSAM) is a novel technique which is based on the image acquisition protocol of FLIM. Whereas FLIM spatially resolved maps the average fluorescence lifetime distribution in a heterogeneous sample such as a cell, FIDSAM enhances the dynamic image contrast by determination of the autofluorescence contribution by comparing the fluorescence decay shape to a reference function. The technique therefore makes use of the key difference between label and autofluorescence, i.e. that for label fluorescence only one emitting species contributes to fluorescence intensity decay curves whereas many different species of minor intensity contribute to autofluorescence. That way, we were able to suppress autofluorescence contributions from chloroplasts in Arabidopsis stoma cells and from cell walls in Arabidopsis hypocotyl cells to background level. Furthermore, we could extend the method to more challenging labels such as the cyan fluorescent protein CFP in human fibroblasts.

  17. Effect of Electrode Shape on Impedance of Single HeLa Cell: A COMSOL Simulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Min-Haw; Chang, Wen-Hao

    2015-01-01

    In disease prophylaxis, single cell inspection provides more detailed data compared to conventional examinations. At the individual cell level, the electrical properties of the cell are helpful for understanding the effects of cellular behavior. The electric field distribution affects the results of single cell impedance measurements whereas the electrode geometry affects the electric field distributions. Therefore, this study obtained numerical solutions by using the COMSOL multiphysics package to perform FEM simulations of the effects of electrode geometry on microfluidic devices. An equivalent circuit model incorporating the PBS solution, a pair of electrodes, and a cell is used to obtain the impedance of a single HeLa cell. Simulations indicated that the circle and parallel electrodes provide higher electric field strength compared to cross and standard electrodes at the same operating voltage. Additionally, increasing the operating voltage reduces the impedance magnitude of a single HeLa cell in all electrode shapes. Decreasing impedance magnitude of the single HeLa cell increases measurement sensitivity, but higher operational voltage will damage single HeLa cell.

  18. Automatic Cell Segmentation Using a Shape-Classification Model in Immunohistochemically Stained Cytological Images

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shah, Shishir

    This paper presents a segmentation method for detecting cells in immunohistochemically stained cytological images. A two-phase approach to segmentation is used where an unsupervised clustering approach coupled with cluster merging based on a fitness function is used as the first phase to obtain a first approximation of the cell locations. A joint segmentation-classification approach incorporating ellipse as a shape model is used as the second phase to detect the final cell contour. The segmentation model estimates a multivariate density function of low-level image features from training samples and uses it as a measure of how likely each image pixel is to be a cell. This estimate is constrained by the zero level set, which is obtained as a solution to an implicit representation of an ellipse. Results of segmentation are presented and compared to ground truth measurements.

  19. Internal resistance of rear totally diffused solar cells with line shaped contacts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meier, Sebastian; Saint-Cast, Pierre; Wöhrle, Nico; Fell, Andreas; Greulich, Johannes; Wolf, Andreas; Glunz, Stefan W.

    2017-11-01

    We present an analytical model for the internal resistance of passivated emitter and rear totally diffused (PERT) solar cells. First, we apply the model of Saint-Cast for the spreading resistance of a passivated emitter and rear cell (PERC) structure with line-shaped contacts. To account for the additional vertical current flow through the silicon wafer and the lateral current flow through the back surface field of a PERT structure, we add a parallel current path using common analytical expressions. We compare the analytical models with two-dimensional numerical simulations based on Quokka 3 and find deviations of less than 6% for the internal resistance. In addition, we compare the analytical model of the internal resistance of PERC and PERT solar cells with experimental data of the series resistance of PERC and PERT solar cells.

  20. Segmentation of clustered cells in negative phase contrast images with integrated light intensity and cell shape information.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Y; Wang, C; Zhang, Z

    2017-12-27

    Automated cell segmentation plays a key role in characterisations of cell behaviours for both biology research and clinical practices. Currently, the segmentation of clustered cells still remains as a challenge and is the main reason for false segmentation. In this study, the emphasis was put on the segmentation of clustered cells in negative phase contrast images. A new method was proposed to combine both light intensity and cell shape information through the construction of grey-weighted distance transform (GWDT) within preliminarily segmented areas. With the constructed GWDT, the clustered cells can be detected and then separated with a modified region skeleton-based method. Moreover, a contour expansion operation was applied to get optimised detection of cell boundaries. In this paper, the working principle and detailed procedure of the proposed method are described, followed by the evaluation of the method on clustered cell segmentation. Results show that the proposed method achieves an improved performance in clustered cell segmentation compared with other methods, with 85.8% and 97.16% accuracy rate for clustered cells and all cells, respectively. © 2017 The Authors Journal of Microscopy © 2017 Royal Microscopical Society.

  1. 6 x 40 mins exercise improves body image, even though body weight and shape do not change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appleton, Katherine M

    2013-01-01

    Body weight, shape and body image were assessed in 16 males and 18 females before and after both 6 x 40 mins exercise and 6 x 40 mins reading. Over both conditions, body weight and shape did not change. Various aspects of body image, however, improved after exercise compared to before, while no changes were found over reading. These findings have implications for exercise promotion where a possible role for body image in exercise adherence is suggested, and confirm current theories of body image, where changes in body image are mediated by body perceptions as opposed to actual body indices.

  2. Changes in diet and physical activity resulting from the Shape Up Somerville community intervention.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Folta, Sara C; Kuder, Julia F; Goldberg, Jeanne P; Hyatt, Raymond R; Must, Aviva; Naumova, Elena N; Nelson, Miriam E; Economos, Christina D

    2013-10-04

    The purpose of this study is to describe the behavioral changes in children resulting from Shape Up Somerville (SUS), a community-based, participatory obesity prevention intervention that used a multi-level, systems-based approach. It was set in Somerville, an urban, culturally diverse community in Massachusetts, USA. This was a non-randomized, controlled 2-year community-based intervention trial with children enrolled in grades 1 to 3 (ages 6-8 years). Overall, the SUS intervention was designed to create environmental and policy change to impact all aspects of a child's day. Pre-post outcomes were compared between Somerville and two control communities that were chosen based on socio-demographic similarities. Behavioral outcomes were fruit and vegetable and sugar-sweetened beverage consumption; number of organized sports and physical activities per year; walking to and from school; screen and television time; television in bedroom; and dinner in room with television on. These measures were assessed by parent/caregiver report using a 68-item Family Survey Form. Data were analyzed using multiple linear regression, accounting for covariates and clustering by community. Intervention group children, compared to the control group, significantly reduced sugar-sweetened beverage consumption (-2.0 ounces per day; 95% CI -3.8 to -0.2), increased participation in organized sports and physical activities (0.20 sports or activities per year; 95% CI 0.06 to 0.33), and reduced their screen time (-0.24 hours per day; 95% CI -0.42 to -0.06). Results of this study, particularly intake of sugar-sweetened beverages and screen time, are similar to others that used a multi-level approach to realize change in behavior. These results support the efficacy of a multi-level and systems-based approach for promoting the behavioral changes necessary for childhood obesity prevention. This study is registered at ClinicalTrials.gov as NCT00153322.

  3. Cenozoic climate change shaped the evolutionary ecophysiology of the Cupressaceae conifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pittermann, Jarmila; Stuart, Stephanie A; Dawson, Todd E; Moreau, Astrid

    2012-06-12

    The Cupressaceae clade has the broadest diversity in habitat and morphology of any conifer family. This clade is characterized by highly divergent physiological strategies, with deciduous swamp-adapted genera-like Taxodium at one extreme, and evergreen desert genera-like Cupressus at the other. The size disparity within the Cupressaceae is equally impressive, with members ranging from 5-m-tall juniper shrubs to 100-m-tall redwood trees. Phylogenetic studies demonstrate that despite this variation, these taxa all share a single common ancestor; by extension, they also share a common ancestral habitat. Here, we use a common-garden approach to compare xylem and leaf-level physiology in this family. We then apply comparative phylogenetic methods to infer how Cenozoic climatic change shaped the morphological and physiological differences between modern-day members of the Cupressaceae. Our data show that drought-resistant crown clades (the Cupressoid and Callitroid clades) most likely evolved from drought-intolerant Mesozoic ancestors, and that this pattern is consistent with proposed shifts in post-Eocene paleoclimates. We also provide evidence that within the Cupressaceae, the evolution of drought-resistant xylem is coupled to increased carbon investment in xylem tissue, reduced xylem transport efficiency, and at the leaf level, reduced photosynthetic capacity. Phylogenetically based analyses suggest that the ancestors of the Cupressaceae were dependent upon moist habitats, and that drought-resistant physiology developed along with increasing habitat aridity from the Oligocene onward. We conclude that the modern biogeography of the Cupressaceae conifers was shaped in large part by their capacity to adapt to drought.

  4. Mold-shaped, nanofiber scaffold-based cartilage engineering using human mesenchymal stem cells and bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janjanin, Sasa; Li, Wan-Ju; Morgan, Meredith T; Shanti, Rabie M; Tuan, Rocky S

    2008-09-01

    Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC)-based tissue engineering is a promising future alternative to autologous cartilage grafting. This study evaluates the potential of using MSCs, seeded into electrospun, biodegradable polymeric nanofibrous scaffolds, to engineer cartilage with defined dimensions and shape, similar to grafts used for subcutaneous implantation in plastic and reconstructive surgery. Human bone marrow derived MSCs seeded onto nanofibrous scaffolds and placed in custom-designed molds were cultured for up to 42 days in bioreactors. Chondrogenesis was induced with either transforming growth factor-beta1 (TGF-beta1) alone or in combination with insulin-like growth factor-I (IGF-I). Constructs exhibited hyaline cartilage histology with desired thickness and shape as well as favorable tissue integrity and shape retention, suggesting the presence of elastic tissue. Time-dependent increase in cartilage matrix gene expression was seen in both types of culture: at Day 42, TGF-beta1/IGF-I treated cultures showed higher collagen Type 2 and aggrecan expression. Both culture conditions showed significant time-dependent increase in sulfated glycosaminoglycan and hydroxyproline contents. TGF-beta1/IGF-I-treated samples were significantly stiffer; with equilibrium compressive Young's modulus values reaching 17 kPa by Day 42. The successful ex vivo development of geometrically defined cartilaginous construct using customized molding suggests the potential of cell-based cartilage tissue for reconstructive surgery.

  5. Effects of adhesion dynamics and substrate compliance on the shape and motility of crawling cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Falko Ziebert

    Full Text Available Computational modeling of eukaryotic cells moving on substrates is an extraordinarily complex task: many physical processes, such as actin polymerization, action of motors, formation of adhesive contacts concomitant with both substrate deformation and recruitment of actin etc., as well as regulatory pathways are intertwined. Moreover, highly nontrivial cell responses emerge when the substrate becomes deformable and/or heterogeneous. Here we extended a computational model for motile cell fragments, based on an earlier developed phase field approach, to account for explicit dynamics of adhesion site formation, as well as for substrate compliance via an effective elastic spring. Our model displays steady motion vs. stick-slip transitions with concomitant shape oscillations as a function of the actin protrusion rate, the substrate stiffness, and the rates of adhesion. Implementing a step in the substrate's elastic modulus, as well as periodic patterned surfaces exemplified by alternating stripes of high and low adhesiveness, we were able to reproduce the correct motility modes and shape phenomenology found experimentally. We also predict the following nontrivial behavior: the direction of motion of cells can switch from parallel to perpendicular to the stripes as a function of both the adhesion strength and the width ratio of adhesive to non-adhesive stripes.

  6. Adjoint-based shape optimization of fin geometry for enhanced solid/liquid phase-change process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morimoto, Kenichi; Suzuki, Yuji

    2015-11-01

    In recent years, the control of heat transfer processes, which play a critical role in various engineering devices/systems, has gained renewed attention. The present study aims to establish an adjoint-based shape optimization method for high-performance heat transfer processes involving phase-change phenomena. A possible example includes the application to the thermal management technique using phase-change material. Adjoint-based shape optimization scheme is useful to optimal shape design and optimal control of systems, for which the base function of the solution is unknown and the solution includes an infinite number of degrees of freedom. Here we formulate the shape-optimization scheme based on adjoint heat conduction analyses, focusing on the shape optimization of fin geometry. In the computation of the developed scheme, a meshless local Petrov-Galerkin (MLPG) method that is suited for dealing with complex boundary geometry is employed, and the enthalpy method is adopted for analyzing the motion of the phase-change interface. We examine in detail the effect of the initial geometry and the node distribution in the MLPG analysis upon the final solution of the shape optimization. Also, we present a new strategy for the computation using bubble mesh.

  7. Phase diagrams and morphological evolution in wrapping of rod-shaped elastic nanoparticles by cell membrane: A two-dimensional study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yi, Xin; Gao, Huajian

    2014-06-01

    A fundamental understanding of cell-nanomaterial interaction is essential for biomedical diagnostics, therapeutics, and nanotoxicity. Here, we perform a theoretical analysis to investigate the phase diagram and morphological evolution of an elastic rod-shaped nanoparticle wrapped by a lipid membrane in two dimensions. We show that there exist five possible wrapping phases based on the stability of full wrapping, partial wrapping, and no wrapping states. The wrapping phases depend on the shape and size of the particle, adhesion energy, membrane tension, and bending rigidity ratio between the particle and membrane. While symmetric morphologies are observed in the early and late stages of wrapping, in between a soft rod-shaped nanoparticle undergoes a dramatic symmetry breaking morphological change while stiff and rigid nanoparticles experience a sharp reorientation. These results are of interest to the study of a range of phenomena including viral budding, exocytosis, as well as endocytosis or phagocytosis of elastic particles into cells.

  8. Shape-dependent conversion efficiency of Si nanowire solar cells with polygonal cross-sections

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    He, Yan; Yu, Wangbing; Ouyang, Gang, E-mail: gangouy@hunnu.edu.cn [Key Laboratory of Low-Dimensional Quantum Structures and Quantum Control of Ministry of Education, Synergetic Innovation Center for Quantum Effects and Applications (SICQEA), Hunan Normal University, Changsha 410081 (China)

    2016-06-14

    A deeper insight into shape-dependent power conversion efficiency (PCE) of Si nanowire (SiNW) solar cells with polygonal cross-sectional shapes, including trigon, tetragon, hexagon, and circle, has been explored based on the atomic-bond-relaxation approach and detailed balance principle. It has been found that the surface effect induced by the loss-coordination atoms located at edges and surfaces, as well as the thermal effect, plays the dominant roles for the band shift and PCE of SiNWs due to the lattice strain occurrence at the self-equilibrium state. Our predictions are consistent with the available evidences, providing an important advance in the development of Si-based nanostructures for the desirable applications.

  9. Effects of Ag Nanocubes with Different Corner Shape on the Absorption Enhancement in Organic Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Feng Shan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The effects of corner shape of silver (Ag nanocubes (NCs on optical absorptions of organic solar cells (OSCs are theoretically investigated by finite element method (FEM calculations. The absorption of sun light in the active layer is calculated. Significant absorption enhancements have been demonstrated in metallic region with different shapes of Ag NCs, among them corner radius (R is zero result in the best light absorption performance of up to 55% enhancement with respect to bare OSCs. The origins of increased absorption are believed to be the effects of the huge electric field enhancement and increased scattering upon the excitation of localized surface plasmon resonance (LSPR. Apart from using R=0, we show that R=3, 6, and 11.29 of Ag NCs in metallic region of active layer may also result in the maximum comparable absorption enhancement of 49%, 41%, and 28%, respectively. In addition, a significant effect of the period of NCs is observed.

  10. Menstruum induces changes in mesothelial cell morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koks, C A; Demir Weusten, A Y; Groothuis, P G; Dunselman, G A; de Goeij, A F; Evers, J L

    2000-01-01

    In previous studies, we have shown that menstrual endometrium preferentially adheres to the subepithelial lining of the peritoneum. It remains to be elucidated, however, whether this damage is preexisting or inflicted by the menstrual tissue itself. We hypothesized that the menstrual tissue itself damages the peritoneum. To investigate this, the viability of menstrual endometrial tissue in peritoneal fluid (PF) was evaluated and the morphologic changes in the mesothelial cells were studied by in vitro cocultures of menstruum with mesothelial cell monolayers. Menstruum was collected with a menstrual cup. Endometrial tissue was isolated from the menstruum, resuspended in culture medium or in the cell-free fraction of PF and cultured for 24, 48 or 72 h. A 3(4, 5-dimethylthiazolyl-2)-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT) assay was performed to obtain a relative measure of viable adhered endometrial cells. Mesothelial cells isolated from human omental tissue were cultured on Matrigel or uncoated plastic. At confluence, overnight cocultures were performed and scanning electron microscopy was used to evaluate the morphologic changes. The viability of endometrial fragments was 84% (n = 36, p Menstrual endometrial fragments or menstrual serum added to and cocultured with mesothelial cells induced severe morphologic alterations of the latter, including retraction, shrinking and gap formation. Similar morphologic changes were observed when mesothelial cells were cocultured with menstrual endometrial fragments in PF or in culture inserts. Incubation with conditioned medium from cultured menstrual endometrium induced similar but less pronounced changes in morphology. In conclusion, menstrual endometrial fragments remain viable in PF in vitro for at least 72 h. Antegradely shed menstruum induces changes in mesothelial cell morphology, including retraction and shrinking with exposure of the underlying surface. These findings suggest that menstruum is harmful to the peritoneal

  11. Transcriptome changes during intestinal cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadjali, Mehrdad; Seidelin, Jakob B; Olsen, Jørgen Lillelund

    2002-01-01

    The expression of 18149 genes have been analysed during the differentiation of the human intestinal cell line Caco-2. cDNA probes from undifferentiated and differentiated Caco-2 cells were separately hybridised to EST DNAs spotted in an array on a nylon membrane. A remarkable change...... cells by performing reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction on RNA extracted from laser dissected intestinal crypt and villi. In a screen of eight transcripts one - SART3 - was identified as a marker for human colonic crypts....... in the transcriptome was observed during the differentiation of the Caco-2 cells. 8762 of the 18149 genes analysed were expressed above background level in the undifferentiated Caco-2 cells, whereas only 5767 genes were expressed above background in differentiated Caco-2 cells. This pattern of expression was caused...

  12. Autonomous oscillatory shape change of DEA induced by the charge-discharge process under a constant voltage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamagawa, Hirohisa; Kakihana, Masaki; Sasaki, Minoru

    Despite the promising characteristics of Dielectric Elastomel Actuator (DEA) as a practical soft actuator, the need of high voltage for its operation prevents the successful fabrication of a practical DEA, that is, the high voltage generation takes a bulky and costly power supply. Induction of complex shape change motion of DEA such as oscillatory shape change takes even a more bulky and costly multipurpose power supply. It is a serious practical issue to be overcome. In our latest study, however, we could build a simple DEA system which exhibited a relatively complex and autonomous oscillatory shape change merely under a constant voltage, though the voltage needed was high. This successful outcome must broaden the potential usefulness of DEA as a practical soft actuator.

  13. Changes of Langerhans cells during skin ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Zegarska

    2017-05-01

    Full Text Available Introduction : During the process of skin ageing, changes occur in all skin layers and all cells, including the Langerhans cells. Aim: To assess whether any quantitative difference in the number of CD1a+ LC cells/mm 2 and HLA-DR+ LC cells/mm 2 as well as in their morphological features can be observed during the course of different types of skin ageing. Material and methods: The study was conducted in a group of 60 women, which was divided into three independent groups: group I with symptoms of menopausal skin ageing, group II with symptoms of photoageing, group III with symptoms of chronological ageing. Skin biopsy samples were taken from the pre-auricular region from all of the participants. The number of CD1a+ LC cells/mm 2 and HLA-DR+ LC cells/mm 2 as well as their morphological features were evaluated. Results : The frequency of CD1a+ LC and HLA-DR+ LC in all the studied groups was diverse. In groups I and III, the LC with large cell bodies and long, multi-branched processes were the majority. In group II, the LC had small cell bodies and their processes were mainly short and unbranched. Conclusions : The obtained results indicate the presence of quantitative and morphological changes of the CD1a+ LC and HLA-DR+ LC during the course of different types of skin ageing.

  14. Mistletoe Berry Outline Mapping with a Path Curve Function and Recording the Circadian Rhythm of Their Phenotypic Shape Change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Derbidge, Renatus; Baumgartner, Stephan; Heusser, Peter

    2016-01-01

    This paper presents a discovery: the change of the outline shape of mistletoe (Viscum album ssp. album) berries in vivo and in situ during ripening. It was found that a plant organ that is usually considered to merely increase in size actually changes shape in a specific rhythmic fashion. We introduce a new approach to chronobiological research on a macro-phenotypic scale to trace changes over long periods of time (with a resolution from hours to months) by using a dynamic form-determining parameter called Lambda (λ). λ is known in projective geometry as a measure for pertinent features of the outline shapes of egg-like forms, so called path curves. Ascertained circadian changes of form were analyzed for their correlation with environmental factors such as light, temperature, and other weather influences. Certain weather conditions such as sky cover, i.e., sunshine minutes per hour, have an impact on the amplitude of the daily change in form. The present paper suggests a possible supplement to established methods in chronobiology, as in this case the dynamic of form-change becomes a measurable feature, displaying a convincing accordance between mathematical rule and plant shape.

  15. Mistletoe Berry Outline Mapping with a Path Curve Function and Recording the Circadian Rhythm of their Phenotypic Shape Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Renatus Derbidge

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a discovery: the change of the outline shape of mistletoe (Viscum album ssp. album berries in vivo and in situ during ripening. It was found that a plant organ that is usually considered to merely increase in size actually changes shape in a specific rhythmic fashion. We introduce a new approach to chronobiological research on a macro-phenotypic scale to trace changes over long periods of time (with a resolution from hours to months by using a dynamic form-determining parameter called Lambda (λ. λ is known in projective geometry as a measure for pertinent features of the outline shapes of egg-like forms, so called path curves. Ascertained circadian changes of form were analyzed for their correlation with environmental factors such as light, temperature and other weather influences. Certain weather conditions such as sky cover i.e. sunshine minutes per hour, have an impact on the amplitude of the daily change in form. The present paper suggests a possible supplement to established methods in chronobiology, as in this case the dynamic of form-change becomes a measurable feature, displaying a convincing accordance between mathematical rule and plant shape.

  16. Shape Memory Polymers Containing Higher Acrylate Content Display Increased Endothelial Cell Attachment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tina Govindarajan

    2017-11-01

    Full Text Available Shape Memory Polymers (SMPs are smart materials that can recall their shape upon the application of a stimulus, which makes them appealing materials for a variety of applications, especially in biomedical devices. Most prior SMP research has focused on tuning bulk properties; studying surface effects of SMPs may extend the use of these materials to blood-contacting applications, such as cardiovascular stents, where surfaces that support rapid endothelialization have been correlated to stent success. Here, we evaluate endothelial attachment onto the surfaces of a family of SMPs previously developed in our group that have shown promise for biomedical devices. Nine SMP formulations containing varying amounts of tert-Butyl acrylate (tBA and Poly(ethylene glycol dimethacrylate (PEGDMA were analyzed for endothelial cell attachment. Dynamic mechanical analysis (DMA, contact angle studies, and atomic force microscopy (AFM were used to verify bulk and surface properties of the SMPs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cell (HUVEC attachment and viability was verified using fluorescent methods. Endothelial cells preferentially attached to SMPs with higher tBA content, which have rougher, more hydrophobic surfaces. HUVECs also displayed an increased metabolic activity on these high tBA SMPs over the course of the study. This class of SMPs may be promising candidates for next generation blood-contacting devices.

  17. Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs): High density polyethylene and hydrocarbon waxes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mu, Mulan, E-mail: mmu01@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: m.basheer@qub.ac.uk; Basheer, P. A. M., E-mail: mmu01@qub.ac.uk, E-mail: m.basheer@qub.ac.uk [School of Planning, Architecture and Civil Engineering, Queen' s University Belfast, BT9 5AG (United Kingdom); Bai, Yun, E-mail: yun.bai@ucl.ac.uk [Department of Civil, Environmental and Geomatic Engineering, University College London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); McNally, Tony, E-mail: t.mcnally@warwick.ac.uk [WMG, University of Warwick, CV4 7AL (United Kingdom)

    2014-05-15

    Shape stabilised phase change materials (SSPCMs) based on high density polyethylene (HDPE) with high (HPW, T{sub m}=56-58 °C) and low (L-PW, T{sub m}=18-23 °C) melting point waxes were prepared by melt-mixing in a twin-screw extruder and their potential in latent heat thermal energy storage (LHTES) applications for housing assessed. The structure and morphology of these blends were investigated by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). Both H-PW and L-PW were uniformly distributed throughout the HDPE matrix. The melting point and latent heat of the SSPCMs were determined by differential scanning calorimetry (DSC). The results demonstrated that both H-PW and L-PW have a plasticisation effect on the HDPE matrix. The tensile and flexural properties of the samples were measured at room temperature (RT, 20±2 °C) and 70 °C, respectively. All mechanical properties of HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends decreased from RT to 70 °C. In all instances at RT, modulus and stress, irrespective of the mode of deformation was greater for the HDPE/H-PW blends. However, at 70 °C, there was no significant difference in mechanical properties between the HDPE/H-PW and HDPE/L-PW blends.

  18. Shape shifting predicts ontogenetic changes in metabolic scaling in diverse aquatic invertebrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glazier, Douglas S; Hirst, Andrew G; Atkinson, David

    2015-03-07

    Metabolism fuels all biological activities, and thus understanding its variation is fundamentally important. Much of this variation is related to body size, which is commonly believed to follow a 3/4-power scaling law. However, during ontogeny, many kinds of animals and plants show marked shifts in metabolic scaling that deviate from 3/4-power scaling predicted by general models. Here, we show that in diverse aquatic invertebrates, ontogenetic shifts in the scaling of routine metabolic rate from near isometry (bR = scaling exponent approx. 1) to negative allometry (bR < 1), or the reverse, are associated with significant changes in body shape (indexed by bL = the scaling exponent of the relationship between body mass and body length). The observed inverse correlations between bR and bL are predicted by metabolic scaling theory that emphasizes resource/waste fluxes across external body surfaces, but contradict theory that emphasizes resource transport through internal networks. Geometric estimates of the scaling of surface area (SA) with body mass (bA) further show that ontogenetic shifts in bR and bA are positively correlated. These results support new metabolic scaling theory based on SA influences that may be applied to ontogenetic shifts in bR shown by many kinds of animals and plants. © 2015 The Author(s) Published by the Royal Society. All rights reserved.

  19. Response of the North Atlantic storm track to climate change shaped by ocean-atmosphere coupling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woollings, T.; Gregory, J. M.; Pinto, J. G.; Reyers, M.; Brayshaw, D. J.

    2012-05-01

    A poleward shift of the mid-latitude storm tracks in response to anthropogenic greenhouse-gas forcing has been diagnosed in climate model simulations. Explanations of this effect have focused on atmospheric dynamics. However, in contrast to storm tracks in other regions, the North Atlantic storm track responds by strengthening and extending farther east, in particular on its southern flank. These adjustments are associated with an intensification and extension of the eddy-driven jet towards western Europe and are expected to have considerable societal impacts related to a rise in storminess in Europe. Here, we apply a regression analysis to an ensemble of coupled climate model simulations to show that the coupling between ocean and atmosphere shapes the distinct storm-track response to greenhouse-gas forcing in the North Atlantic region. In the ensemble of simulations we analyse, at least half of the differences between the storm-track responses of different models are associated with uncertainties in ocean circulation changes. We compare the fully coupled simulations with both the associated slab model simulations and an ocean-forced experiment with one climate model to establish causality. We conclude that uncertainties in the response of the North Atlantic storm track to anthropogenic emissions could be reduced through tighter constraints on the future ocean circulation.

  20. Facing HIV: body shape change and the (in)visibility of illness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Asha

    2005-01-01

    Illness is commonly invested with considerable stigma because of its tendency to evoke charged meanings around corporeality, selfhood, suffering, and mortality. Perhaps more than any contemporary disease HIV/AIDS has served as a powerful signifier for a range of cultural anxieties. Given the resultant stigma, HIV becomes very much a question of visibility. This article explores the visibility of HIV within the Sydney gay community with reference to lipodystrophy, an unusual process of fat redistribution caused by HIV therapy that manifests in a series of distinctive body shape changes that have come to signify HIV socially. Conceived through the cultural lenses of AIDS, medicine, illness, and body image, lipodystrophy is largely constituted as negative and shameful, as Other in the ethnographic domain. I examine how this conception is reproduced and contested in narratives and experiences among HIV-positive gay men who have lipodystrophy. Their stories suggest diverse "ways of seeing" lipodystrophy that reveal an ambivalent potential of visibility not only as a medium of stigma, differentiation, and discrimination but also as a medium of affinity, empathy, and desire. These localized patterns of illness visibility are explored in relation to the circulation of meanings within a broader social sense and their significance in terms of a more general consideration of representational practices and their social and ethical implications, with specific attention given to educational and media representations of HIV/AIDS in Australia and also in the United States.

  1. Shape-changing magnetic assemblies as high-sensitivity NMR-readable nanoprobes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zabow, G.; Dodd, S. J.; Koretsky, A. P.

    2015-04-01

    Fluorescent and plasmonic labels and sensors have revolutionized molecular biology, helping visualize cellular and biomolecular processes. Increasingly, such probes are now being designed to respond to wavelengths in the near-infrared region, where reduced tissue autofluorescence and photon attenuation enable subsurface in vivo sensing. But even in the near-infrared region, optical resolution and sensitivity decrease rapidly with increasing depth. Here we present a sensor design that obviates the need for optical addressability by operating in the nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) radio-frequency spectrum, where signal attenuation and distortion by tissue and biological media are negligible, where background interferences vanish, and where sensors can be spatially located using standard magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) equipment. The radio-frequency-addressable sensor assemblies presented here comprise pairs of magnetic disks spaced by swellable hydrogel material; they reversibly reconfigure in rapid response to chosen stimuli, to give geometry-dependent, dynamic NMR spectral signatures. The sensors can be made from biocompatible materials, are themselves detectable down to low concentrations, and offer potential responsive NMR spectral shifts that are close to a million times greater than those of traditional magnetic resonance spectroscopies. Inherent adaptability should allow such shape-changing systems to measure numerous different environmental and physiological indicators, thus providing broadly generalizable, MRI-compatible, radio-frequency analogues to optically based probes for use in basic chemical, biological, medical and engineering research.

  2. Unusual changes in the shape of solid parahydrogen with higher than natural isotope content

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alekseeva, L. A.; Dobryden, I.

    2016-06-01

    The relative elongation ɛ of samples of high purity (99.9999 mol. % with respect to nonhydrogenic impurities) parahydrogen (p-H2, ˜0.2% o-H2) with different amounts of the stable hydrogen isotope deuterium is measured as a function of applied stress σ at temperatures of 1.8-4.2 K. The samples were subjected to uniaxial tension by stepwise loading. The ratio [D]/[H] of the number [D] of deuterium atoms to the number [H] of p-H2 hydrogen atoms ranged from 0.0055 ± 0.0005 at. % up to 0.07 at. %. For deuterium enriched p-H2, the easy slip dislocation stage vanished from the σ(ɛ) curves and there was a significant reduction in the total relative elongation of the samples, as well as a substantial increase in the hardening coefficient dσ/dɛ. Deformation of samples of p-H2 with deuterium contents higher than the natural amount produces an unusual change in their shape owing to the appearance of a rotational component of the low-temperature plastic mass transfer.

  3. Changes in optical properties of electroporated cells as revealed by digital holographic microscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Calin, Violeta L.; Mihailescu, Mona; Mihale, Nicolae; Baluta, Alexandra V.; Kovacs, Eugenia; Savopol, Tudor; Moisescu, Mihaela G.

    2017-01-01

    Changes in optical and shape-related characteristics of B16F10 cells after electroporation were investigated using digital holographic microscopy (DHM). Bipolar rectangular pulses specific for electrochemotherapy were used. Electroporation was performed in an ?off-axis? DHM set-up without using exogenous markers. Two types of cell parameters were monitored seconds and minutes after pulse train application: parameters addressing a specifically defined area of the cell (refractive index and cel...

  4. Dietary changes during weaning shape the gut microbiota of red pandas (Ailurus fulgens).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Candace L; Dill-McFarland, Kimberly A; Sparks, Darrell L; Kouba, Andrew J; Willard, Scott T; Suen, Garret; Brown, Ashli E

    2018-01-01

    Mammalian herbivores have developed numerous adaptations to utilize their plant-based diets including a modified gastrointestinal tract (GIT) and symbiosis with a GIT microbiota that plays a major role in digestion and the maintenance of host health. The red panda ( Ailurus fulgens ) is a herbivorous carnivore that lacks the specialized GIT common to other herbivores but still relies on microorganisms for survival on its almost entirely bamboo diet. The GIT microbiota is of further importance in young red pandas, as high cub mortality is problematic and has been attributed to failure to meet nutritional requirements. To gain insight into the establishment of the GIT microbiota of red pandas, we examined microbial communities in two individuals following dietary changes associated with weaning using next-generation 16S rRNA Illumina MiSeq paired-end sequencing of faecal samples. Across all four stages (pre-weaning, during weaning, post-weaning and adult), the GIT microbial community displayed low diversity and was dominated by bacteria in the phylum Firmicutes with lesser contributions from the Proteobacteria. A core community was found consistently across all weaning stages and included species within the taxa Escherichia-Shigella, Streptococcus , Clostridium and an unclassified Clostridiaceae. Analysis of the overall community composition and structure showed that although the GIT microbiota is established early in red pandas, dietary changes during weaning further shape the community and are correlated with the presence of new bacterial species. This work is the first analysis of the GIT microbiota for red panda cubs during weaning and provides a framework for understanding how diet and host microbiota impact the development of these threatened animals.

  5. 2007 Effect of Changes in Layout Shape on Unit Construction Cost

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    ezra

    floor space. Ibrahim (2004) used regression analysis to develop such predictive models for assessing the effect of variation in building plan shape on unit construction cost. However, contrary to Chau's conclusions, Ibrahim's results confirmed the predictive powers of the existing plan shape indices and that of using some of ...

  6. Shape change in the atlas with congenital midline non-union of its posterior arch: a morphometric geometric study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ríos, Luis; Palancar, Carlos; Pastor, Francisco; Llidó, Susana; Sanchís-Gimeno, Juan Alberto; Bastir, Markus

    2017-10-01

    The congenital midline non-union of the posterior arch of the atlas is a developmental variant present at a frequency ranging from 0.7% to 3.9%. Most of the reported cases correspond to incidental findings during routine medical examination. In cases of posterior non-union, hypertrophy of the anterior arch and cortical bone thickening of the posterior arches have been observed and interpreted as adaptive responses of the atlas to increased mechanical stress. We sought to determine if the congenital non-union of the posterior arch results in a change in the shape of the atlas. This study is an analysis of the first cervical vertebrae from osteological collections through morphometric geometric techniques. A total of 21 vertebrae were scanned with a high-resolution three-dimensional scanner (Artec Space Spider, Artec Group, Luxembourg). To capture vertebral shape, 19 landmarks and 100 semilandmarks were placed on the vertebrae. Procrustes superimposition was applied to obtain size and shape data (MorphoJ 1.02; Klingenberg, 2011), which were analyzed through principal component analysis (PCA) and mean shape comparisons. The PCA resulted in two components explaining 22.32% and 18.8% of the total shape variance. The graphic plotting of both components indicates a clear shape difference between the control atlas and the atlas with posterior non-union. This observation was supported by statistically significant differences in mean shape comparisons between both types of vertebra (patlas is associated with significant changes in the shape of the vertebra. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Plasma membrane changes during programmed cell deaths.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yingying; Chen, Xin; Gueydan, Cyril; Han, Jiahuai

    2018-01-01

    Ruptured and intact plasma membranes are classically considered as hallmarks of necrotic and apoptotic cell death, respectively. As such, apoptosis is usually considered a non-inflammatory process while necrosis triggers inflammation. Recent studies on necroptosis and pyroptosis, two types of programmed necrosis, revealed that plasma membrane rupture is mediated by MLKL channels during necroptosis but depends on non-selective gasdermin D (GSDMD) pores during pyroptosis. Importantly, the morphology of dying cells executed by MLKL channels can be distinguished from that executed by GSDMD pores. Interestingly, it was found recently that secondary necrosis of apoptotic cells, a previously believed non-regulated form of cell lysis that occurs after apoptosis, can be programmed and executed by plasma membrane pore formation like that of pyroptosis. In addition, pyroptosis is associated with pyroptotic bodies, which have some similarities to apoptotic bodies. Therefore, different cell death programs induce distinctive reshuffling processes of the plasma membrane. Given the fact that the nature of released intracellular contents plays a crucial role in dying/dead cell-induced immunogenicity, not only membrane rupture or integrity but also the nature of plasma membrane breakdown would determine the fate of a cell as well as its ability to elicit an immune response. In this review, we will discuss recent advances in the field of apoptosis, necroptosis and pyroptosis, with an emphasis on the mechanisms underlying plasma membrane changes observed on dying cells and their implication in cell death-elicited immunogenicity.

  8. Changes in optical properties of electroporated cells as revealed by digital holographic microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calin, Violeta L; Mihailescu, Mona; Mihale, Nicolae; Baluta, Alexandra V; Kovacs, Eugenia; Savopol, Tudor; Moisescu, Mihaela G

    2017-04-01

    Changes in optical and shape-related characteristics of B16F10 cells after electroporation were investigated using digital holographic microscopy (DHM). Bipolar rectangular pulses specific for electrochemotherapy were used. Electroporation was performed in an "off-axis" DHM set-up without using exogenous markers. Two types of cell parameters were monitored seconds and minutes after pulse train application: parameters addressing a specifically defined area of the cell (refractive index and cell height) and global cell parameters (projected area, optical phase shift profile and dry mass). The biphasic behavior of cellular parameters was explained by water and mannitol dynamics through the electropermeabilized cell membrane.

  9. Changes in optical properties of electroporated cells as revealed by digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calin, Violeta L.; Mihailescu, Mona; Mihale, Nicolae; Baluta, Alexandra V.; Kovacs, Eugenia; Savopol, Tudor; Moisescu, Mihaela G.

    2017-01-01

    Changes in optical and shape-related characteristics of B16F10 cells after electroporation were investigated using digital holographic microscopy (DHM). Bipolar rectangular pulses specific for electrochemotherapy were used. Electroporation was performed in an “off-axis” DHM set-up without using exogenous markers. Two types of cell parameters were monitored seconds and minutes after pulse train application: parameters addressing a specifically defined area of the cell (refractive index and cell height) and global cell parameters (projected area, optical phase shift profile and dry mass). The biphasic behavior of cellular parameters was explained by water and mannitol dynamics through the electropermeabilized cell membrane. PMID:28736667

  10. Diacylglycerol Kinases: Shaping Diacylglycerol and Phosphatidic Acid Gradients to Control Cell Polarity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Baldanzi

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Diacylglycerol kinases (DGKs terminate diacylglycerol (DAG signaling and promote phosphatidic acid (PA production. Isoform specific regulation of DGKs activity and localization allows DGKs to shape the DAG and PA gradients. The capacity of DGKs to constrain the areas of DAG signaling is exemplified by their role in defining the contact interface between T cells and antigen presenting cells: the immune synapse. Upon T cell receptor engagement, both DGK α and ζ metabolize DAG at the immune synapse thus constraining DAG signaling. Interestingly, their activity and localization are not fully redundant because DGKζ activity metabolizes the bulk of DAG in the cell, whereas DGKα limits the DAG signaling area localizing specifically at the periphery of the immune synapse.When DGKs terminate DAG signaling, the local PA production defines a new signaling domain, where PA recruits and activates a second wave of effector proteins. The best-characterized example is the role of DGKs in protrusion elongation and cell migration. Indeed, upon growth factor stimulation, several DGK isoforms, such as α, ζ, and γ, are recruited and activated at the plasma membrane. Here, local PA production controls cell migration by finely modulating cytoskeletal remodeling and integrin recycling. Interestingly, DGK-produced PA also controls the localization and activity of key players in cell polarity such as aPKC, Par3, and integrin β1. Thus, T cell polarization and directional migration may be just two instances of the general contribution of DGKs to the definition of cell polarity by local specification of membrane identity signaling.

  11. Probing of the Changing Shapes and Viscosity of Suspended Organic Particles as a Function of Relative Humidity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Y.; Sanchez, M. S.; Douet, C.; Wang, Y.; Bateman, A. P.; Gong, Z.; Kuwata, M.; Wolff, L. R.; Liu, P.; Sato, B. B.; Bertram, A. K.; Geiger, F.; Martin, S. T.

    2014-12-01

    Aerosol particles of secondary organic material (SOM) were produced by α-pinene ozonolysis in a flow tube reactor. The aerosol flow was passed into a chamber with a long residence time where coagulation of primary particles occurred. An experimental apparatus, consisting of a differential mobility analyzer coupled to a particle mass analyzer (DMA-APM), was used to classify coagulated particles by particle electric mobility diameter (52.4 to 190.0 nm) and then to measure associated particle mass. From these data, the dynamic shape factor was determined for particles of known material density. Experiments were conducted for variable relativity humidity (RH). The results showed that the dynamic shape factor depended on post-coagulation particle number concentration, particle diameter, and relative humidity. For some particle number concentrations, coagulation occurred between particles of similar diameters under dry conditions (< 5% RH), thereby forming non-spherical particles. The dynamic shape factors were observed to change from 1.24 to 1.02 between 5 and 35% RH, and 1.27 to 1.03 between 20% to 60% RH, implying a transformation from non-spherical to round shapes. The shape change arose from decreased viscosity at elevated RH, allowing the material to flow and thereby form a spherical shape (i.e., as favored by minimization of surface area). Numerical modeling was used to estimate the particle viscosity associated with this flow. Based on the particle size and exposure time to elevated RH, the viscosity was determined from 109 Pa s down to 107 Pa s from 3% RH to 65% RH. The experiments establish a method for estimating the viscosity of suspended submicron aerosol particles based on changes in particle shape.

  12. Effect of structural modifications on the drying kinetics of foods: changes in volume, surface area and product shape

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Antonio De Michelis

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Macro and micro-structural changes take place during food dehydration. Macro-structural changes encompass modifications in shape, area and volume. Studies of such changes are important because dehydration kinetics (essential for calculating industrial dryers may be highly influenced by changes in food shape and dimensions. The overall changes in volume, surface area (“shrinkage” and shape (Heywood factor, with provides a close description of food shape were determined experimentally, and the results were correlated with simple expressions. Hence, although dehydration kinetics can be modeled with simplified overall shrinkage expressions, the possibility of selecting a suitable geometry and predicting the characteristics dimensions will provide higher accuracy. An additional unresolved problem is the lack of a general model that predicts macro-structural changes for various foods and diverse geometries. In this work, based on experimental data of sweet and sour cherries, and rose hip fruits, a simplified general model to predict changes in volume and surface area are proposed. To estimate how the changes in characteristic dimensions affect the kinetic studies, experimental drying curves for the three fruits by means of a diffusional model considered the following variants for the characteristic dimensions: (i The radius of the fresh food, assumed constant; (ii The radius of the partially dehydrated product; (iii The radius predicted by the correlation for structural changes, especially volume, obtained in this work and generalized for the three fruits, and (iv to demonstrate the need to study the macro-structural changes for all dehydrated foods, also be present the case of a restructured food.

  13. The GATA factor Serpent cross-regulates lozenge and u-shaped expression during Drosophila blood cell development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muratoglu, Selen; Hough, Barry; Mon, Soe T.; Fossett, Nancy

    2007-01-01

    The Drosophila GATA factor Serpent interacts with the RUNX factor Lozenge to activate the crystal cell program, whereas SerpentNC binds the Friend of GATA protein U-shaped to limit crystal cell production. Here, we identified a lozenge minimal hematopoietic cis-regulatory module and showed that lozenge-lacZ reporter-gene expression was autoregulated by Serpent and Lozenge. We also showed that upregulation of u-shaped was delayed until after lozenge activation, consistent with our previous results that showed u-shaped expression in the crystal cell lineage is dependent on both Serpent and Lozenge. Together, these observations describe a feed forward regulatory motif, which controls the temporal expression of u-shaped. Finally, we showed that lozenge reporter-gene activity increased in a u-shaped mutant background and that forced expression of SerpentNC with U-shaped blocked lozenge- and u-shaped-lacZ reporter-gene activity. This is the first demonstration of GATA:FOG regulation of Runx and Fog gene expression. Moreover, these results identify components of a Serpent cross-regulatory sub-circuit that can modulate lozenge expression. Based on the sub-circuit design and the combinatorial control of crystal cell production, we present a model for the specification of a dynamic bi-potential regulatory state that contributes to the selection between a Lozenge-positive and Lozenge-negative state. PMID:17869239

  14. Regional Cellular Environment Shapes Phenotypic Variations of Hippocampal and Neocortical Chandelier Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishino, Yugo; Yetman, Michael J; Sossi, Serena M; Steinecke, André; Hayano, Yasufumi; Taniguchi, Hiroki

    2017-10-11

    Different cortical regions processing distinct information, such as the hippocampus and the neocortex, share common cellular components and circuit motifs but form unique networks by modifying these cardinal units. Cortical circuits include diverse types of GABAergic interneurons (INs) that shape activity of excitatory principal neurons (PNs). Canonical IN types conserved across distinct cortical regions have been defined by their morphological, electrophysiological, and neurochemical properties. However, it remains largely unknown whether canonical IN types undergo specific modifications in distinct cortical regions and display "regional variants." It is also poorly understood whether such phenotypic variations are shaped by early specification or regional cellular environment. The chandelier cell (ChC) is a highly stereotyped IN type that innervates axon initial segments of PNs and thus serves as a good model with which to address this issue. Here, we show that Cadherin-6 (Cdh6), a homophilic cell adhesion molecule, is a reliable marker of ChCs and Cdh6-CreER mice (both sexes) provide genetic access to hippocampal ChCs (h-ChCs). We demonstrate that, compared with neocortical ChCs (nc-ChCs), h-ChCs cover twice as much area and innervate twice as many PNs. Interestingly, a subclass of h-ChCs exhibits calretinin (CR) expression, which is not found in nc-ChCs. Furthermore, we find that h-ChCs appear to be born earlier than nc-ChCs. Surprisingly, despite the difference in temporal origins, ChCs display host-region-dependent axonal/synaptic organization and CR expression when transplanted heterotopically. These results suggest that local cellular environment plays a critical role in shaping terminal phenotypes of regional IN variants in the hippocampus and the neocortex. SIGNIFICANCE STATEMENT Canonical interneuron (IN) types conserved across distinct cortical regions such as the hippocampus and the neocortex are defined by morphology, physiology, and gene expression

  15. Assembly and Reorientation of Stress Fibers Drives Morphological Changes to Endothelial Cells Exposed to Shear Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Noria, Sabrena; Xu, Feng; McCue, Shannon; Jones, Mara; Gotlieb, Avrum I.; Langille, B. Lowell

    2004-01-01

    Fluid shear stress greatly influences the biology of vascular endothelial cells and the pathogenesis of atherosclerosis. Endothelial cells undergo profound shape change and reorientation in response to physiological levels of fluid shear stress. These morphological changes influence cell function; however, the processes that produce them are poorly understood. We have examined how actin assembly is related to shear-induced endothelial cell shape change. To do so, we imposed physiological levels of shear stress on cultured endothelium for up to 96 hours and then permeabilized the cells and exposed them briefly to fluorescently labeled monomeric actin at various time points to assess actin assembly. Alternatively, monomeric actin was microinjected into cells to allow continuous monitoring of actin distribution. Actin assembly occurred primarily at the ends of stress fibers, which simultaneously reoriented to the shear axis, frequently fused with neighboring stress fibers, and ultimately drove the poles of the cells in the upstream and/or downstream directions. Actin polymerization occurred where stress fibers inserted into focal adhesion complexes, but usually only at one end of the stress fiber. Neither the upstream nor downstream focal adhesion complex was preferred. Changes in actin organization were accompanied by translocation and remodeling of cell-substrate adhesion complexes and transient formation of punctate cell-cell adherens junctions. These findings indicate that stress fiber assembly and realignment provide a novel mode by which cell morphology is altered by mechanical signals. PMID:15039210

  16. A computational framework for cortical microtubule dynamics in realistically shaped plant cells

    KAUST Repository

    Chakrabortty, Bandan

    2018-02-02

    Plant morphogenesis is strongly dependent on the directional growth and the subsequent oriented division of individual cells. It has been shown that the plant cortical microtubule array plays a key role in controlling both these processes. This ordered structure emerges as the collective result of stochastic interactions between large numbers of dynamic microtubules. To elucidate this complex self-organization process a number of analytical and computational approaches to study the dynamics of cortical microtubules have been proposed. To date, however, these models have been restricted to two dimensional planes or geometrically simple surfaces in three dimensions, which strongly limits their applicability as plant cells display a wide variety of shapes. This limitation is even more acute, as both local as well as global geometrical features of cells are expected to influence the overall organization of the array. Here we describe a framework for efficiently simulating microtubule dynamics on triangulated approximations of arbitrary three dimensional surfaces. This allows the study of microtubule array organization on realistic cell surfaces obtained by segmentation of microscopic images. We validate the framework against expected or known results for the spherical and cubical geometry. We then use it to systematically study the individual contributions of global geometry, cell-edge induced catastrophes and cell-face induced stability to array organization in a cuboidal geometry. Finally, we apply our framework to analyze the highly non-trivial geometry of leaf pavement cells of Arabidopsis thaliana, Nicotiana benthamiana and Hedera helix. We show that our simulations can predict multiple features of the microtubule array structure in these cells, revealing, among others, strong constraints on the orientation of division planes.

  17. Alcohol-soluble Star-shaped Oligofluorenes as Interlayer for High Performance Polymer Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Yang; He, Zhicai; Zhao, Baofeng; Liu, Yuan; Yang, Chuluo; Wu, Hongbin; Cao, Yong

    2015-11-01

    Two star-shaped oligofluorenes with hexakis(fluoren-2-yl)benzene as core are designed and sythesized for interfacial materials in polymer solar cell. Diethanolamino groups are attached to the side chain of fluorene units for T0-OH and T1-OH to enable the alcohol solubility, and additional hydrophobic n-hexyl chains are also grafted on the increased fluorene arms for T1-OH. In conventional device with PCDTBT/PC71BM as active layer, a 50% enhanced PCE is obtained by incorporating T0-OH and T1-OH as the interlayer compared with device without interlayer. By optimizing the active material with PTB7 and with the inverted device structure, a maximum PCE of 9.30% is achieved, which is among the highest efficiencies for PTB7 based polymer solar cells. The work function of modified electrode, the surface morphology and the suraface properties are systematically studied. By modifying the structures of the star-shaped molecules, a balance between the hydrophobic and hydrophilic property is finely tuned, and thus facilitate the interlayer for high performance of PSCs.

  18. Contractility of single cardiomyocytes differentiated from pluripotent stem cells depends on physiological shape and substrate stiffness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Alexandre J S; Ang, Yen-Sin; Fu, Ji-Dong; Rivas, Renee N; Mohamed, Tamer M A; Higgs, Gadryn C; Srivastava, Deepak; Pruitt, Beth L

    2015-10-13

    Single cardiomyocytes contain myofibrils that harbor the sarcomere-based contractile machinery of the myocardium. Cardiomyocytes differentiated from human pluripotent stem cells (hPSC-CMs) have potential as an in vitro model of heart activity. However, their fetal-like misalignment of myofibrils limits their usefulness for modeling contractile activity. We analyzed the effects of cell shape and substrate stiffness on the shortening and movement of labeled sarcomeres and the translation of sarcomere activity to mechanical output (contractility) in live engineered hPSC-CMs. Single hPSC-CMs were cultured on polyacrylamide substrates of physiological stiffness (10 kPa), and Matrigel micropatterns were used to generate physiological shapes (2,000-µm(2) rectangles with length:width aspect ratios of 5:1-7:1) and a mature alignment of myofibrils. Translation of sarcomere shortening to mechanical output was highest in 7:1 hPSC-CMs. Increased substrate stiffness and applied overstretch induced myofibril defects in 7:1 hPSC-CMs and decreased mechanical output. Inhibitors of nonmuscle myosin activity repressed the assembly of myofibrils, showing that subcellular tension drives the improved contractile activity in these engineered hPSC-CMs. Other factors associated with improved contractility were axially directed calcium flow, systematic mitochondrial distribution, more mature electrophysiology, and evidence of transverse-tubule formation. These findings support the potential of these engineered hPSC-CMs as powerful models for studying myocardial contractility at the cellular level.

  19. Combinatorial interactions of Serpent, Lozenge, and U-shaped regulate crystal cell lineage commitment during Drosophila hematopoiesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fossett, Nancy; Hyman, Kristy; Gajewski, Kathleen; Orkin, Stuart H.; Schulz, Robert A.

    2003-01-01

    The GATA factor Serpent (Srp) is required for hemocyte precursor formation during Drosophila hematopoiesis. These blood cell progenitors give rise to two distinct lineages within the developing embryo. Lozenge, a Runx protein homologue, and Glial cells missing-1 and -2 are essential for crystal cell and plasmatocyte production, respectively. In contrast U-shaped, a Friend of GATA class factor, antagonizes crystal cell formation. Here we show that Srp, Lozenge, and U-shaped interact in different combinations to regulate crystal cell lineage commitment. Coexpression of Srp and Lozenge synergistically activated the crystal cell program in both embryonic and larval stages. Furthermore, expression of Lozenge and SrpNC, a Srp isoform with N- and C-terminal zinc fingers, inhibited u-shaped expression, indicating that crystal cell activation coincided with the down-regulation of this repressor-encoding gene. In contrast, whereas U-shaped and SrpNC together blocked crystal cell production, coexpression of U-shaped with noninteracting Srp proteins failed to prevent overproduction of this hemocyte population. Such results indicated that U-shaped and SrpNC must interact to block crystal cell production. Taken together, these studies show that the specialized SrpNC isoform plays a pivotal role during crystal cell lineage commitment, acting as an activator or repressor depending on the availability of specific transcriptional coregulators. These findings provide definitive proof of the combinatorial regulation of hematopoiesis in Drosophila and an in vivo demonstration of GATA and Runx functional interaction in a blood cell commitment program. PMID:14504400

  20. Investigation of the shape change of bio-flocs and its influence on mass transport using particle image velocimetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ren, T T; Xiao, F; Sun, W J; Sun, F Y; Lam, K M; Li, X Y

    2014-01-01

    In this laboratory study, an advanced flow visualization technique - particle image velocimetry (PIV) - was employed to investigate the change of shape of activated sludge flocs in water and its influence on the material transport characteristics of the flocs. The continuous shape change of the bio-flocs that occurred within a very short period of time could be captured by the PIV system. The results demonstrate that the fluid turbulence caused the shift of parts of a floc from one side to the other in less than 200 ms. During the continuous shape change, the liquid within the floc was forced out of the floc, which was then refilled with the liquid from the surrounding flow. For the bio-flocs saturated with a tracer dye, it was shown that the dye could be released from the flocs at a faster rate when the flocs were swayed around in water. The experimental results indicate that frequent shape change of bio-flocs facilitates the exchange of fluid and materials between the floc interior and the surrounding water. This mass transfer mechanism can be more important than molecular diffusion and internal permeation to the function and behavior of particle aggregates, including bio-flocs, in natural waters and treatment systems.

  1. Improving the thermal behaviour of bricks by incorporating shape-stabilized phase change materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serrano, A.; Acosta, A.; Iglesias, I.; Rodríguez, J. F.; Carmona, M.

    2017-10-01

    The addition of a new shape-stabilized phase change material (ssPCM) in ceramic elements having large porosity has been carried out. In that way, a novel form-stable PCM based on bricks was developed. In order to study the incorporation of the thermoregulatory material in the composites, bricks with different porosities have been manufactured. In this work the ssPCM was synthesized using polyethylene glycol (PEG) as PCM and tetraethyl orthosilicate (TEOS) as supporter precursor by sol-gel method. The initial liquid product can be further turned into solid by neutralization procedures. ssPCM in its liquid form is adsorbed inside the porous brick by capillary action and it is further stabilized by controlling its gelation time, obtaining the new form-stable PCM. The adsorption curves, the long-term stability after 100 cycles of heating and cooling processes and the improved thermal energy storage capacities for the obtained samples have been studied. Different composites containing between 15 to 110 wt% of ssPCM respect to the initial dried mass of brick have been obtained, with thermal capacities within 8.94 to 28.80 kWh/m3. The Fick´s law was used to predict the adsorption curves and only one diffusion coefficient was required to predict the content of the ssPCM into the bricks, independently of their porosity. Besides, all the samples exhibited a high long-term thermal stability influenced by the additional stabilizer effect of the ceramic matrix.

  2. The predictive power of balloon shape and change of sensory functions on outcome of percutaneous balloon compression for trigeminal neuralgia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asplund, Pär; Linderoth, Bengt; Bergenheim, A Tommy

    2010-09-01

    Percutaneous balloon compression is a simple and effective treatment of trigeminal neuralgia. However, results between and within different series are varying. To further improve the results in terms of pain relief, the authors believe that a careful study of the surgical procedure is important. The object of this study was to analyze the impact of balloon shape, balloon position, balloon volume, and compression time on duration of the therapeutic effect following percutaneous balloon compression. Furthermore, they analyzed the sensory side effects associated with this treatment, and how these relate to surgical parameters. Medical records and intraoperative radiographs from 87 balloon compressions were reviewed, and different surgical parameters were categorized. Univariate and multivariate analyses were performed to correlate surgical parameters to pain relief. Sensory testing with a transcutaneous electrical stimulation technique and clinical examination data were reviewed to analyze changes in sensory function. The balloon shape had a significant impact on time to recurrence of pain. A pear-shaped balloon resulted in a far better surgical result than a non-pear-shaped balloon (p pear shape was not significant (p = 0.14). Statistical significance was not reached for any of the other parameters in relation to duration of therapeutic effect. A pear-shaped balloon was also significantly associated with increased thresholds for percutaneous electrical stimulation in the immediate postoperative period, but the perception thresholds were normalized at the late follow-up at 3-9 months. A similar outcome was found for clinical testing with light touch and pinprick. The authors have demonstrated that using a pear-shaped balloon when performing percutaneous balloon compression for trigeminal neuralgia results in longer pain relief than non-pear-shaped balloons. Other surgical parameters seemed less important with respect to pain relief. Balloon compression also, in many

  3. TCS1, a Microtubule-Binding Protein, Interacts with KCBP/ZWICHEL to Regulate Trichome Cell Shape in Arabidopsis thaliana.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangliang Chen

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available How cell shape is controlled is a fundamental question in developmental biology, but the genetic and molecular mechanisms that determine cell shape are largely unknown. Arabidopsis trichomes have been used as a good model system to investigate cell shape at the single-cell level. Here we describe the trichome cell shape 1 (tcs1 mutants with the reduced trichome branch number in Arabidopsis. TCS1 encodes a coiled-coil domain-containing protein. Pharmacological analyses and observations of microtubule dynamics show that TCS1 influences the stability of microtubules. Biochemical analyses and live-cell imaging indicate that TCS1 binds to microtubules and promotes the assembly of microtubules. Further results reveal that TCS1 physically associates with KCBP/ZWICHEL, a microtubule motor involved in the regulation of trichome branch number. Genetic analyses indicate that kcbp/zwi is epistatic to tcs1 with respect to trichome branch number. Thus, our findings define a novel genetic and molecular mechanism by which TCS1 interacts with KCBP to regulate trichome cell shape by influencing the stability of microtubules.

  4. Mismatch between shape changes and ecological shifts during the post-settlement growth of the surgeonfish, Acanthurus triostegus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frédérich, Bruno; Colleye, Orphal; Lepoint, Gilles; Lecchini, David

    2012-04-25

    Many coral reef fishes undergo habitat and diet shifts during ontogeny. However, studies focusing on the physiological and morphological adaptations that may prepare them for these transitions are relatively scarce. Here, we explored the body shape variation related to ontogenetic shifts in the ecology of the surgeonfish Acanthurus triostegus (Acanthuridae) from new settler to adult stages at Moorea Island (French Polynesia). Specifically, we tested the relationship between diet and habitat shifts and changes in overall body shape during the ontogeny of A. triostegus using a combination of geometric morphometric methods, stomach contents and stable isotope analysis. After reef settlement, stable isotope composition of carbon and nitrogen revealed a change from a zooplanktivorous to a benthic algae diet. The large amount of algae (> 75% of stomach contents) found in the digestive tract of small juveniles (25-30 mm SL) suggested the diet shift is rapid. The post-settlement growth of A. triostegus is highly allometric. The allometric shape changes mainly concern cephalic and pectoral regions. The head becomes shorter and more ventrally oriented during growth. Morphological changes are directly related to the diet shift given that a small mouth ventrally oriented is particularly suited for grazing activities at the adult stage. The pectoral fin is more anteriorely and vertically positioned and its basis is larger in adults than in juveniles. This shape variation had implications for swimming performance, manoeuvrability, turning ability and is related to habitat shift. Acanthurus triostegus achieves its main transformation of body shape to an adult-like form at size of 35-40 mm SL. Most of the shape changes occurred after the reef colonization but before the transition between juvenile habitat (fringing reef) and adult habitat (barrier reef). A large amount of allometric variation was observed after diet shift from zooplankton to benthic algae. Diet shift could act as

  5. Maize development: Cell wall changes in leaves and sheaths

    Science.gov (United States)

    Developmental changes occur in maize (Zea mays L.) as it transitions from juvenile stages to the mature plant. Changes also occur as newly formed cells mature into adult cells. Maize leaf blades, including the midribs and sheaths, undergo cell wall changes as cells transition to fully mature cell ty...

  6. Broccoli-shaped biosensor hierarchy for electrochemical screening of noradrenaline in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emran, Mohammed Y; Mekawy, Moataz; Akhtar, Naeem; Shenashen, Mohamed A; El-Sewify, Islam M; Faheem, Ahmed; El-Safty, Sherif A

    2018-02-15

    Monitoring and determination of ultra-trace concentrations of monoamine neurotransmitter such as noradrenaline (NA) in living cells with simple, sensitive and selective assays are significantly interesting. We design NA-electrode sensing system based on C-, N-doped NiO broccoli-like hierarchy (CNNB). The spherical broccoli-head umbrella architectures associated with nano-tubular arrangements enabled to tailor NA biosensor design. The homogenous doping and anisotropic dispersion of CN nanospheres along the entire NB head nanotubes lead to creating of abundant electroactive sites in the interior tubular vessels and outer surfaces for ultrasensitive detection of NA in living cells such as PC12. The CNNB biosensor electrodes showed efficient electrocatalytic activity, enhanced kinetics for electrooxidation of NA, and fast electron-transfer between electrode-electrolyte interface surfaces, enabling synergistic enhancement in sensitivity, and selectivity at a low-detectable concentration of ∼ 6nM and reproducibility of broccoli-shaped NA-electrodes. The integrated CNNB biosensor electrodes showed evidence of monitoring and screening of NA released from PC12 cells under K + ion-extracellular stimulation process. The unique features of CNNB in terms of NA-selectivity among multi-competitive components, long-term stability during the detection of NA may open their practical, in-vitro application for extracellular monoamine neurotransmitters detection in living cells. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Cellular Changes of Stem Cells in 3-Dimensional Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Green, Matthew P; Hou, Bo

    2017-11-01

    During various operations and procedures, such as distraction osteogenesis and orthodontics, skeletal tissues use mechanotransduction. Mechanotransduction is important for maintaining bone health and converting mechanical forces into biochemical signals. We hypothesized that cells put under mechanical stress would adapt and change morphologically and respond with a decrease in cellular proliferation to accommodate the stress differences. These differences will be measured at the molecular and genetic level. We also wanted to test the practicality of an in vitro 3-dimensional gel model system. We implemented a 3-dimensional cell culture model. The sample was composed of isolated mouse mesenchymal prefibroblast bone marrow cells from the femurs and tibias of 6- to 8-week-old wild-type C57BL6 mice. The cells were seeded on fibronectin-coated hydrogels along with fibrin and nodulin growth factors. The variables tested were a no-force model (control) and a force model. The force model required two 0.1-mm suture pins put through one 0.25-cm length of cell-gel matrix. After the experiments were run to completion, the samples were fixed with 4% paraformaldehyde and embedded in paraffin. Serial sections were cut at a thickness of 5 μm along the long axis for the force construct and encompassing the entire circular area of the control construct. Descriptive and bivariate statistics were computed, and the P value was set at 5%. There was a statistically significant difference between the 2 models. The force model had longer and straighter primary cilia, less apoptosis, and an increase in cell proliferation. In addition, the shape of the cells was markedly different after the experiment. The results of the study suggest cells put under tensile stress have the ability to mechanically sense the environment to provide improved adaptation. Our work also confirms the usefulness of the in vitro 3-dimensional gel model system to mimic in vivo applications. Published by Elsevier

  8. The Shape of the Ganglion Cell plus Inner Plexiform Layers of the Normal Human Macula

    Science.gov (United States)

    Knighton, Robert W.; Gregori, Giovanni

    2012-01-01

    Purpose. To use surfaces generated by two-dimensional penalized splines (2D P-splines) to characterize the shape of the macular ganglion cell plus inner plexiform layers (GCL+IPL) in a group of normal humans. Methods. Macular images of the right eyes of 23 normal subjects ranging in age from 18 to 75 years were obtained with spectral-domain optical coherence tomography (SD-OCT). The thickness of GCL+IPL was determined by manual segmentation, areas with blood vessels were removed, and the resulting maps were fit by smooth surfaces in polar coordinates centered on the fovea. Results. Smooth surfaces based on 2D P-splines could precisely represent GCL+IPL thickness data, with errors comparable to the axial resolution of the SD-OCT instrument. Metrics were developed for the size, shape, and slope of the edge of the foveal depression and size and shape of the surrounding macular ridge. The slope of the foveal edge was negatively correlated with foveal size (r = −0.60). The size of the macular ridge was positively correlated with foveal size (r = 0.75), with a slope near unity (0.90 ± 0.18). The centroids of the foveal edge and macular ridge clustered near the foveal center. The foveal edge and macular ridge were well fit by ellipses. The mean GCL+IPL thickness formed an elliptical annulus elongated by approximately 30% in the horizontal direction. Conclusions. The methods developed here provide precise characterization of retinal layers for the study of glaucoma, foveal development, and other applications. PMID:23033389

  9. Oryza sativa H+-ATPase (OSA) is Involved in the Regulation of Dumbbell-Shaped Guard Cells of Rice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Yosuke; Wang, Yin; Takahashi, Akira; Kawai, Yuya; Tada, Yasuomi; Yamaji, Naoki; Feng Ma, Jian; Ashikari, Motoyuki; Kinoshita, Toshinori

    2016-06-01

    The stomatal apparatus consists of a pair of guard cells and regulates gas exchange between the leaf and atmosphere. In guard cells, blue light (BL) activates H(+)-ATPase in the plasma membrane through the phosphorylation of its penultimate threonine, mediating stomatal opening. Although this regulation is thought to be widely adopted among kidney-shaped guard cells in dicots, the molecular basis underlying that of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocots remains unclear. Here, we show that H(+)-ATPases are involved in the regulation of dumbbell-shaped guard cells. Stomatal opening of rice was promoted by the H(+)-ATPase activator fusicoccin and by BL, and the latter was suppressed by the H(+)-ATPase inhibitor vanadate. Using H(+)-ATPase antibodies, we showed the presence of phosphoregulation of the penultimate threonine in Oryza sativa H(+)-ATPases (OSAs) and localization of OSAs in the plasma membrane of guard cells. Interestingly, we identified one H(+)-ATPase isoform, OSA7, that is preferentially expressed among the OSA genes in guard cells, and found that loss of function of OSA7 resulted in partial insensitivity to BL. We conclude that H(+)-ATPase is involved in BL-induced stomatal opening of dumbbell-shaped guard cells in monocotyledon species. © The Author 2016. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of Japanese Society of Plant Physiologists.

  10. Surface shape memory in polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mather, Patrick

    2012-02-01

    Many crosslinked polymers exhibit a shape memory effect wherein a permanent shape can be prescribed during crosslinking and arbitrary temporary shapes may be set through network chain immobilization. Researchers have extensively investigated such shape memory polymers in bulk form (bars, films, foams), revealing a multitude of approaches. Applications abound for such materials and a significant fraction of the studies in this area concern application-specific characterization. Recently, we have turned our attention to surface shape memory in polymers as a means to miniaturization of the effect, largely motivated to study the interaction of biological cells with shape memory polymers. In this presentation, attention will be given to several approaches we have taken to prepare and study surface shape memory phenomenon. First, a reversible embossing study involving a glassy, crosslinked shape memory material will be presented. Here, the permanent shape was flat while the temporary state consisted of embossed parallel groves. Further the fixing mechanism was vitrification, with Tg adjusted to accommodate experiments with cells. We observed that the orientation and spreading of adherent cells could be triggered to change by the topographical switch from grooved to flat. Second, a functionally graded shape memory polymer will be presented, the grading being a variation in glass transition temperature in one direction along the length of films. Characterization of the shape fixing and recovery of such films utilized an indentation technique that, along with polarizing microscopy, allowed visualization of stress distribution in proximity to the indentations. Finally, very recent research concerning shape memory induced wrinkle formation on polymer surfaces will be presented. A transformation from smooth to wrinkled surfaces at physiological temperatures has been observed to have a dramatic effect on the behavior of adherent cells. A look to the future in research and

  11. Fan Efficiency Improvement via Changing Guide Blade Shape Under Various Operating Conditions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. I. Zamolodchikov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to examine the influence of sweep and tangential blade lean the guide vanes (GV on the pressure losses in the blade row, and development of an approach to creating the GV with a rationally-shaped blades to ensure increased efficiency in the partial operating conditions.A numerical simulation method was used for research. As an object to be studied, was used an axial fan comprising an impeller and a GV, which were profiled to have constant circulation of velocity in radius. Verification of numerical simulation was based on the experimental data of fan. It comprised a GV with a straight blade and a circular-arc blade, with an impeller remained stationary in both cases. Among the turbulence models under consideration, preference is given to k-ω, as under operating conditions close to design ones, its result falls within the confidence span of the experimental characteristics, and at much higher and lower discharge coefficients a discrepancy is 4% at most.  In addition to the characteristics, the fields of pressure losses in GV have been analyzed. Numerical modeling allowed us to have a well-reproduced structure of losses in the stationary blade row.Analysis of pressure loss fields has shown that in the original GV near the hub, on the blade back, under design conditions a flow breakdown takes off. In view of the research, was designed a new GV with a modified blade geometry. The GV blade axis near the hub was bent in the circumferential direction by 0.1 length of the blade. In the near-hub cross-sections the blade chord was increased by 10%.The results of numerical simulation have shown that, with the flow less than the designed one, a change of just the GV blade tip sections leads to reduced break-down zone near the hub by about 40% under both operating conditions without raising profile losses and to improved fan efficiency, which reduces fan drive power consumption under typical operating conditions in the propulsion

  12. Go reconfigure: how fish change shape as they swim and evolve.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, John H; Porter, Marianne E; Root, Robert G; Liew, Chun Wai

    2010-12-01

    The bodies of fish change shape over propulsive, behavioral, developmental, and evolutionary time scales, a general phenomenon that we call "reconfiguration". Undulatory, postural, and form-reconfiguration can be distinguished, studied independently, and examined in terms of mechanical interactions and evolutionary importance. Using a combination of live, swimming fishes and digital robotic fish that are autonomous and self-propelled, we examined the functional relation between undulatory and postural reconfiguration in forward swimming, backward swimming, and yaw turning. To probe how postural and form reconfiguration interact, the yaw turning of leopard sharks was examined using morphometric and kinematic analyses. To test how undulatory reconfiguration might evolve, the digital robotic fish were subjected to selection for enhanced performance in a simulated ecology in which each individual had to detect and move towards a food source. In addition to the general issue of reconfiguration, these investigations are united by the fact that the dynamics of undulatory and postural reconfigurations are predicted to be determined, in part, by the structural stiffness of the fish's body. Our method defines undulatory reconfiguration as the combined, point-by-point periodic motion of the body, leaving postural reconfiguration as the combined deviations from undulatory reconfiguration. While undulatory reconfiguration appears to be the sole or primary propulsive driver, postural reconfiguration may contribute to propulsion in hagfish and it is correlated with differences in forward, and backward, swimming in lamprey. Form reconfigures over developmental time in leopard sharks in a manner that is consistent with an allometric scaling theory in which structural stiffness of the body is held constant. However, correlation of a form proxy for structural stiffness of the body suggests that body stiffness may scale in order to limit maximum postural reconfiguration during routine

  13. Nonrandom chromosomal changes in human malignant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rowley, J D

    1977-01-01

    The role of chromosomal changes in human malignant cells has been the subject of much debate. The observation of nonrandom chromosomal changes has become well recognized in chronic myelogenous leukemia, and more recently in acute myelogenous leukemia. In the present report, data are presented on the sites of duplication of chromosome No. 1 in hematologic disorders. Trisomy for region lq25 to lq32 was observed in every one of 34 patients whose cells showed duplication of some part of chromosome No. 1. Adjacent regions lq21 to lq25, and lq32 to lqter, also were trisomic in the majority of patients. Two patients had deletions, one of lq32 to qter, and the other, of lp32 to pter. The sites of chromosomal breaks leading to trisomy differ from those involved in balanced reciprocal translocations. Some of these sites are sometimes, but not always, vulnerable in constitutional chromosomal abnormalities. The nature of the proliferative advantage conferred on myeloid cells by these chromosomal changes is unknown.

  14. The changing world of modern cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misteli, Tom

    2009-01-01

    Change is always ambiguous. There is the enticing prospect of novelty and better times ahead, but at the same time the concern of losing the good of the past. It is with these sentiments that I take over as the Editor-in-Chief from Ira Mellman who for a decade has cleverly and effectively lead the JCB. During this time he directed and oversaw an extensive modernization of the journal and guided it through dramatic changes in the publishing world. Ira lead the journal with unyielding dedication and enthusiasm and we in the cell biology community must thank him profoundly for his service. It is his work, together with the invaluable contribution of the best editorial board and the most dedicated professional editorial staff in the scientific publishing business, that allows me to now take over the stewardship of the JCB with a tremendous sense of excitement and determination to continue and expand the JCB's role as the leading journal in the cell biology community and as a trendsetter in the rapidly changing world of modern cell biology. PMID:19139259

  15. Shape-shifting, identity, and change in Harry Potter and the Prisoner of Azkaban

    OpenAIRE

    Ward, Renee

    2005-01-01

    Complex representations of identity abound in children or youth’s fantasy literature, particularly in texts that employ the shape-shifting motif. In two of the most studied youth’s fantasy literature texts, A Wizard of Earthsea and The Sword in the Stone, Ursula K. Le Guin and T. H. White link shape-shifting to the identity and development of their protagonists. J. K. Rowling’s Harry Potter series also serves as an excellent case study, and her use of the motif, and its connected themes of id...

  16. An Experimental Study on the Shape Changes of TiO2 Nanocrystals Synthesized by Microemulsion-Solvothermal Method

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Kong

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Titanium dioxide (TiO2 nanocrystals of different shape were successfully synthesized in a new microemulsion system through a solvothermal process. The TiO2 nanocrystals were prepared from the reaction of tetrabutyl titanate (TBT, H2O, and oleic acid (OA, which were used as solvent and surfactant at 300∘C and 240∘C in a stainless steel autoclave. The sphere, polygon, and rhombus-shaped nanocrystals have been prepared at 300∘C and the dot- and- rod shaped nanocrystals have been synthesized at 240∘C. The effect of the reaction time on the shape and size of TiO2 nanocrystals in this method was studied in the present paper. The size distribution of TiO2 nanocrystals prepared at 300∘C for different hours is also studied. In addition, an attempt to describe the mechanism of shape change of TiO2 nanocrystals was presented in this paper.

  17. RESECTION OF THE S-SHAPED CROSSED DYSTOPIC KIDNEY IN A PATIENT WITH RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    B. Ya. Alekseev

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Renal cell carcinoma (RCC is one of the most urgent topics in modern oncourology. This is attributable to the high morbidity and mortality rates associated with this pathology. Renal dystopia is a rather rare developmental anomaly. The literature data describing cases of the diagnosis and treatment in patients with dystopic kidney malignancies are scarce. Moreover, if a tumor is present in the solitary dystopic kidney, it is often extremely difficult to perform an organ-saving operation for a number of features of the anatomic structure of the dystopic kidney and its vascular architectonics. The paper describes a clinical case of S-shaped crossed dystopic kidney resection in a patient with RCC.

  18. SHAPE SELECTIVE NANO-CATALYSTS: TOWARD DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS APPLICATIONS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S.

    2010-06-16

    A series of bimetallic core-shell-alloy type Au-Pt nanomaterials with various morphologies, aspect ratios and compositions, were produced in a heterogenous epitaxial fashion. Gold nanoparticles with well-controlled particle size and shape, e.g. spheres, rods and cubes, were used as 'seeds' for platinum growth in the presence of a mild reducing agent, ascorbic acid and a cationic surfactant cethyltrimethyl ammonium bromide (CTAB). The reactions take place in air and water, and are quick, economical and amenable for scaling up. The synthesized nanocatalysts were characterized by electron microscopy techniques and energy dispersive X-ray analysis. Nafion membranes were embedded with the Au-Pt nanomaterials and analyzed by atomic force microscopy (AFM) and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for their potential in direct methanol fuel cells applications.

  19. Axisymmetric Drop Shape Analysis for Estimating the Surface Tension of Cell Aggregates by Centrifugation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalantarian, Ali; Ninomiya, Hiromasa; Saad, Sameh M.I.; David, Robert; Winklbauer, Rudolf; Neumann, A. Wilhelm

    2009-01-01

    Biological tissues behave in certain respects like liquids. Consequently, the surface tension concept can be used to explain aspects of the in vitro and in vivo behavior of multicellular aggregates. Unfortunately, conventional methods of surface tension measurement cannot be readily applied to small cell aggregates. This difficulty can be overcome by an experimentally straightforward method consisting of centrifugation followed by axisymmetric drop shape analysis (ADSA). Since the aggregates typically show roughness, standard ADSA cannot be applied and we introduce a novel numerical method called ADSA-IP (ADSA for imperfect profile) for this purpose. To examine the new methodology, embryonic tissues from the gastrula of the frog, Xenopus laevis, deformed in the centrifuge are used. It is confirmed that surface tension measurements are independent of centrifugal force and aggregate size. Surface tension is measured for ectodermal cells in four sample batches, and varies between 1.1 and 7.7 mJ/m2. Surface tension is also measured for aggregates of cells expressing cytoplasmically truncated EP/C-cadherin, and is approximately half as large. In parallel, such aggregates show a reduction in convergent extension-driven elongation after activin treatment, reflecting diminished intercellular cohesion. PMID:19217876

  20. Ovarian polarity and cell shape determination by Btk29A in Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamada-Kawaguchi, Noriko; Yamamoto, Daisuke

    2017-08-01

    Drosophila Btk29A is a Tec family nonreceptor tyrosine kinase, the ortholog of which causes X-linked agammaglobulinemia in humans when mutant. In Btk29AficP mutant ovaries, multiple defects are observed: extrapolar cells form ectopically; osk mRNA fails to accumulate posteriorly in mature oocytes; the shape and alignment of follicle cells are grossly distorted. All these phenotypes are rescued by selectively overexpressing the type 2 isoform of wild-type Btk29A in follicle cells. Expression of certain proteins enriched in adherens junctions is markedly affected in Btk29AficP mutants; the anterior-posterior gradient normally observed in the expression of DE-Cadherin and Armadillo are lost and Canoe is sequestered from adherens junctions. Intriguingly, tyrosine phosphorylation of Canoe is reduced in Btk29AficP mutants. It is proposed that Btk29A is required for the establishment of egg chamber polarity presumably through the regulation of subcellular localization of its downstream proteins, including Cno. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Size, Shape, and Arrangement of Cellulose Microfibril in Higher Plant Cell Walls

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ding, S. Y.

    2013-01-01

    Plant cell walls from maize (Zea mays L.) are imaged using atomic force microscopy (AFM) at the sub-nanometer resolution. We found that the size and shape of fundamental cellulose elementary fibril (CEF) is essentially identical in different cell wall types, i.e., primary wall (PW), parenchyma secondary wall (pSW), and sclerenchyma secondary wall (sSW), which is consistent with previously proposed 36-chain model (Ding et al., 2006, J. Agric. Food Chem.). The arrangement of individual CEFs in these wall types exhibits two orientations. In PW, CEFs are horizontally associated through their hydrophilic faces, and the planar faces are exposed, forming ribbon-like macrofibrils. In pSW and sSW, CEFs are vertically oriented, forming layers, in which hemicelluloses are interacted with the hydrophobic faces of the CEF and serve as spacers between CEFs. Lignification occurs between CEF-hemicelluloses layers in secondary walls. Furthermore, we demonstrated quantitative analysis of plant cell wall accessibility to and digestibility by different cellulase systems at real-time using chemical imaging (e.g., stimulated Raman scattering) and fluorescence microscopy of labeled cellulases (Ding et al., 2012, Science, in press).

  2. Effect of Changes in Layout Shape on Unit Construction Cost of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    cost and overall project cost are affected by variation in plan shape narrowness and complexity (irregularity). These results will assist construction professionals, especially the cost consultants, in making more objective design decisions and in giving cost advice related to plan layout for the benefits of their clients. Samaru ...

  3. Self-organizing actin patterns shape membrane architecture but not cell mechanics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fritzsche, M.; Li, D.; Colin-York, H.; Chang, V. T.; Moeendarbary, E.; Felce, J. H.; Sezgin, E.; Charras, G.; Betzig, E.; Eggeling, C.

    2017-02-01

    Cell-free studies have demonstrated how collective action of actin-associated proteins can organize actin filaments into dynamic patterns, such as vortices, asters and stars. Using complementary microscopic techniques, we here show evidence of such self-organization of the actin cortex in living HeLa cells. During cell adhesion, an active multistage process naturally leads to pattern transitions from actin vortices over stars into asters. This process is primarily driven by Arp2/3 complex nucleation, but not by myosin motors, which is in contrast to what has been theoretically predicted and observed in vitro. Concomitant measurements of mechanics and plasma membrane fluidity demonstrate that changes in actin patterning alter membrane architecture but occur functionally independent of macroscopic cortex elasticity. Consequently, tuning the activity of the Arp2/3 complex to alter filament assembly may thus be a mechanism allowing cells to adjust their membrane architecture without affecting their macroscopic mechanical properties.

  4. dsRNA silencing of an R2R3-MYB transcription factor affects flower cell shape in a Dendrobium hybrid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Su-Ee; Schwarzacher, Trude; Othman, Rofina Yasmin; Harikrishna, Jennifer Ann

    2015-08-11

    The R2R3-MYB genes regulate pigmentation and morphogenesis of flowers, including flower and cell shape, and therefore have importance in the development of new varieties of orchids. However, new variety development is limited by the long breeding time required in orchids. In this study, we identified a cDNA, DhMYB1, that is expressed during flower development in a hybrid orchid, Dendrobium hybrida (Dendrobium bobby messina X Dendrobium chao phraya) then used the direct application of dsRNA to observe the effect of gene silencing on flower phenotype and floral epidermal cell shape. Flower bud development in the Dendrobium hybrid was characterised into seven stages and the time of meiosis was determined as between stages 3 to 5 when the bud is approximately half of the mature size. Scanning electron microscopy characterisation of adaxial epidermal cells of the flower perianth, showed that the petals and sepals each are divided into two distinct domains based on cell shape and size, while the labellum comprises seven domains. Thirty-two partial cDNA fragments representing R2R3-MYB gene sequences were isolated from D. hybrida. Phylogenetic analysis revealed that nine of the translated sequences were clustered with MYB sequences that are known to be involved in cell shape development and from these, DhMYB1 was selected for full length cDNA cloning and functional study. Direct application of a 430 bp dsRNA from the 3' region of DhMYB1 to emerging orchid flower buds reduced expression of DhMYB1 RNA compared with untreated control. Scanning electron microscopy of adaxial epidermal cells within domain one of the labellum of flowers treated with DhMYB1 dsRNA showed flattened epidermal cells whilst those of control flowers were conical. DhMYB1 is expressed throughout flower bud development and is involved in the development of the conical cell shape of the epidermal cells of the Dendrobium hybrida flower labellum. The direct application of dsRNA changed the phenotype of

  5. PaCeQuant: A Tool for High-Throughput Quantification of Pavement Cell Shape Characteristics1[OPEN

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poeschl, Yvonne; Plötner, Romina

    2017-01-01

    Pavement cells (PCs) are the most frequently occurring cell type in the leaf epidermis and play important roles in leaf growth and function. In many plant species, PCs form highly complex jigsaw-puzzle-shaped cells with interlocking lobes. Understanding of their development is of high interest for plant science research because of their importance for leaf growth and hence for plant fitness and crop yield. Studies of PC development, however, are limited, because robust methods are lacking that enable automatic segmentation and quantification of PC shape parameters suitable to reflect their cellular complexity. Here, we present our new ImageJ-based tool, PaCeQuant, which provides a fully automatic image analysis workflow for PC shape quantification. PaCeQuant automatically detects cell boundaries of PCs from confocal input images and enables manual correction of automatic segmentation results or direct import of manually segmented cells. PaCeQuant simultaneously extracts 27 shape features that include global, contour-based, skeleton-based, and PC-specific object descriptors. In addition, we included a method for classification and analysis of lobes at two-cell junctions and three-cell junctions, respectively. We provide an R script for graphical visualization and statistical analysis. We validated PaCeQuant by extensive comparative analysis to manual segmentation and existing quantification tools and demonstrated its usability to analyze PC shape characteristics during development and between different genotypes. PaCeQuant thus provides a platform for robust, efficient, and reproducible quantitative analysis of PC shape characteristics that can easily be applied to study PC development in large data sets. PMID:28931626

  6. Targeting cholesterol in a liquid-disordered environment by theonellamides modulates cell membrane order and cell shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arita, Yuko; Nishimura, Shinichi; Ishitsuka, Reiko; Kishimoto, Takuma; Ikenouchi, Junichi; Ishii, Kumiko; Umeda, Masato; Matsunaga, Shigeki; Kobayashi, Toshihide; Yoshida, Minoru

    2015-05-21

    Roles of lipids in the cell membrane are poorly understood. This is partially due to the lack of methodologies, for example, tool chemicals that bind to specific membrane lipids and modulate membrane function. Theonellamides (TNMs), marine sponge-derived peptides, recognize 3β-hydroxysterols in lipid membranes and induce major morphological changes in cultured mammalian cells through as yet unknown mechanisms. Here, we show that TNMs recognize cholesterol-containing liquid-disordered domains and induce phase separation in model lipid membranes. Modulation of membrane order was also observed in living cells following treatment with TNM-A, in which cells shrank considerably in a cholesterol-, cytoskeleton-, and energy-dependent manner. These findings present a previously unrecognized mode of action of membrane-targeting natural products. Meanwhile, we demonstrated the importance of membrane order, which is maintained by cholesterol, for proper cell morphogenesis. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Shape of the self-concept clarity change during group psychotherapy predicts the outcome: an empirical validation of the theoretical model of the self-concept change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styła, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    Background: Self-Concept Clarity (SCC) describes the extent to which the schemas of the self are internally integrated, well defined, and temporally stable. This article presents a theoretical model that describes how different shapes of SCC change (especially stable increase and “V” shape) observed in the course of psychotherapy are related to the therapy outcome. Linking the concept of Jean Piaget and the dynamic systems theory, the study postulates that a stable SCC increase is needed for the participants with a rather healthy personality structure, while SCC change characterized by a “V” shape or fluctuations is optimal for more disturbed patients. Method: Correlational study in a naturalistic setting with repeated measurements (M = 5.8) was conducted on the sample of 85 patients diagnosed with neurosis and personality disorders receiving intensive eclectic group psychotherapy under routine inpatient conditions. Participants filled in the Self-Concept Clarity Scale (SCCS), Symptoms' Questionnaire KS-II, and Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON-2006 at the beginning and at the end of the course of psychotherapy. The SCCS was also administered every 2 weeks during psychotherapy. Results: As hypothesized, among the relatively healthiest group of patients the stable SCC increase was related to positive treatment outcome, while more disturbed patients benefited from the fluctuations and “V” shape of SCC change. Conclusions: The findings support the idea that for different personality dispositions either a monotonic increase or transient destabilization of SCC is a sign of a good treatment prognosis. PMID:26579001

  8. Shape of the self-concept clarity change during group psychotherapy predicts the outcome: an empirical validation of the theoretical model of the self-concept change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Styła, Rafał

    2015-01-01

    Self-Concept Clarity (SCC) describes the extent to which the schemas of the self are internally integrated, well defined, and temporally stable. This article presents a theoretical model that describes how different shapes of SCC change (especially stable increase and "V" shape) observed in the course of psychotherapy are related to the therapy outcome. Linking the concept of Jean Piaget and the dynamic systems theory, the study postulates that a stable SCC increase is needed for the participants with a rather healthy personality structure, while SCC change characterized by a "V" shape or fluctuations is optimal for more disturbed patients. Correlational study in a naturalistic setting with repeated measurements (M = 5.8) was conducted on the sample of 85 patients diagnosed with neurosis and personality disorders receiving intensive eclectic group psychotherapy under routine inpatient conditions. Participants filled in the Self-Concept Clarity Scale (SCCS), Symptoms' Questionnaire KS-II, and Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON-2006 at the beginning and at the end of the course of psychotherapy. The SCCS was also administered every 2 weeks during psychotherapy. As hypothesized, among the relatively healthiest group of patients the stable SCC increase was related to positive treatment outcome, while more disturbed patients benefited from the fluctuations and "V" shape of SCC change. The findings support the idea that for different personality dispositions either a monotonic increase or transient destabilization of SCC is a sign of a good treatment prognosis.

  9. Controlled Retention and Release of Biomolecular Transport Systems Using Shape-Changing Polymer Bilayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stoychev, Georgi; Reuther, Cordula; Diez, Stefan; Ionov, Leonid

    2016-12-23

    Biomolecular transport systems based on cytoskeletal filaments and motor proteins have become promising tools for a wide range of nanotechnological applications. In this paper, we report control of such transport systems using substrates with switchable shape. We demonstrate this approach on the example of microtubules gliding on surfaces of self-folding polymer bilayers with adsorbed kinesin motors. The polymer bilayers are able to undergo reversible transitions between flat and tube-like shapes that allow the externally controlled retention and release of gliding microtubules. The demonstrated approach, based on surfaces with reconfigurable topography, opens broad perspectives to control biomolecular transport systems for bioanalytical and sensing applications, as well as for the construction of subcellular compartments in the field of synthetic biology. © 2016 Wiley-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  10. Effect of Changing the Vocal Tract Shape on the Sound Production of the Recorder: An Experimental and Theoretical Study

    CERN Document Server

    Auvray, R; Terrien, S; Fabre, B; Vergez, C

    2016-01-01

    Changing the vocal tract shape is one of the techniques which can be used by the players of wind instruments to modify the quality of the sound. It has been intensely studied in the case of reed instruments but has received only little attention in the case of air-jet instruments. This paper presents a first study focused on changes in the vocal tract shape in recorder playing techniques. Measurements carried out with recorder players allow to identify techniques involving changes of the mouth shape as well as consequences on the sound. A second experiment performed in laboratory mimics the coupling with the vocal tract on an artificial mouth. The phase of the transfer function between the instrument and the mouth of the player is identified to be the relevant parameter of the coupling. It is shown to have consequences on the spectral content in terms of energy distribution among the even and odd harmonics, as well as on the stability of the first two oscillating regimes. The results gathered from the two exp...

  11. Development of siloxane-based amphiphiles as cell stabilizers for porous shape memory polymer systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hasan, Sayyeda M; Easley, Alexandra D; Monroe, Mary Beth Browning; Maitland, Duncan J

    2016-09-15

    Polyurethane foaming surfactants are cell stabilized at the polymer-gas interface during foam blowing to prevent bubble coalescence. Siloxane-based surfactants are typically used to generate a surface tension gradient at the interface. The chemical structure of the hydrophobic and hydrophilic units affects surfactant properties, which can further influence foam morphology. Siloxane-polyethylene glycol (PEG) ether amphiphiles were synthesized in high yield via hydrosilylation to serve as surfactants for shape memory polymer (SMP) foams. Hydrophobic units consisted of trisiloxane and polydimethyl siloxane, and PEG allyl methyl ether (n=8 or 25) was the hydrophilic component. Upon confirming successful synthesis of the surfactants, their surface tension was measured to study their suitability for use in foaming. SMP foams were synthesized using the four surfactants, and the effects of surfactant structure and concentration on foam morphology were evaluated. Spectroscopic data confirmed successful siloxane-PEG coupling. All surfactants had a low surface tension of 20-21mN/m, indicating their ability to reduce interfacial tension. SMP foams were successfully fabricated with tunable cell size and morphology as a function of surfactant type and concentration. Copyright © 2016. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  12. MicroRNA319a-targeted Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis TCP genes modulate head shape in chinese cabbage by differential cell division arrest in leaf regions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Yanfei; Wu, Feijie; Yu, Xiang; Bai, Jinjuan; Zhong, Weili; He, Yuke

    2014-02-01

    Leafy heads of cabbage (Brassica oleracea), Chinese cabbage (Brassica rapa), and lettuce (Lactuca sativa) are composed of extremely incurved leaves. The shape of these heads often dictates the quality, and thus the commercial value, of these crops. Using quantitative trait locus mapping of head traits within a population of 150 recombinant inbred lines of Chinese cabbage, we investigated the relationship between expression levels of microRNA-targeted Brassica rapa ssp. pekinensis TEOSINTE BRANCHED1, cycloidea, and PCF transcription factor4 (BrpTCP4) genes and head shape. Here, we demonstrate that a cylindrical head shape is associated with relatively low BrpTCP4-1 expression, whereas a round head shape is associated with high BrpTCP4-1 expression. In the round-type Chinese cabbage, microRNA319 (miR319) accumulation and BrpTCP4-1 expression decrease from the apical to central regions of leaves. Overexpression of BrpMIR319a2 reduced the expression levels of BrpTCP4 and resulted in an even distribution of BrpTCP4 transcripts within all leaf regions. Changes in temporal and spatial patterns of BrpTCP4 expression appear to be associated with excess growth of both apical and interveinal regions, straightened leaf tips, and a transition from the round to the cylindrical head shape. These results suggest that the miR319a-targeted BrpTCP gene regulates the round shape of leafy heads via differential cell division arrest in leaf regions. Therefore, the manipulation of miR319a and BrpTCP4 genes is a potentially important tool for use in the genetic improvement of head shape in these crops.

  13. LGBT Family Lawyers and Same-Sex Marriage Recognition: How Legal Change Shapes Professional Identity and Practice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baumle, Amanda K

    2018-01-10

    Lawyers who practice family law for LGBT clients are key players in the tenuous and evolving legal environment surrounding same-sex marriage recognition. Building on prior research on factors shaping the professional identities of lawyers generally, and activist lawyers specifically, I examine how practice within a rapidly changing, patchwork legal environment shapes professional identity for this group of lawyers. I draw on interviews with 21 LGBT family lawyers to analyze how the unique features of LGBT family law shape their professional identities and practice, as well as their predictions about the development of the practice in a post-Obergefell world. Findings reveal that the professional identities and practice of LGBT family lawyers are shaped by uncertainty, characteristics of activist lawyering, community membership, and community service. Individual motivations and institutional forces work to generate a professional identity that is resilient and dynamic, characterized by skepticism and distrust coupled with flexibility and creativity. These features are likely to play a role in the evolution of the LGBT family lawyer professional identity post-marriage equality.

  14. Electrochemical properties of electrodes with different shapes and diffusion kinetic analysis of microbial fuel cells on ocean floor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fu, Yubin; Liu, Jia; Su, Jia; Zhao, Zhongkai; Liu, Yang; Xu, Qian

    2012-03-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) on the ocean floor is a kind of novel energy- harvesting device that can be developed to drive small instruments to work continuously. The shape of electrode has a great effect on the performance of the MFC. In this paper, several shapes of electrode and cell structure were designed, and their performance in MFC were compared in pairs: Mesh (cell-1) vs. flat plate (cell-2), branch (cell-3) vs. cylinder (cell-4), and forest (cell-5) vs. disk (cell-6) FC. Our results showed that the maximum power densities were 16.50, 14.20, 19.30, 15.00, 14.64, and 9.95 mWm-2 for cell-1, 2, 3, 4, 5 and 6 respectively. And the corresponding diffusion-limited currents were 7.16, 2.80, 18.86, 10.50, 18.00, and 6.900 mA. The mesh and branch anodes showed higher power densities and much higher diffusion-limited currents than the flat plate and the cylinder anodes respectively due to the low diffusion hindrance with the former anodes. The forest cathode improved by 47% of the power density and by 161% of diffusion-limited current than the disk cathode due to the former's extended solid/liquid/gas three-phase boundary. These results indicated that the shape of electrode is a major parameter that determining the diffusion-limited current of an MFC, and the differences in the electrode shape lead to the differences in cell performance. These results would be useful for MFC structure design in practical applications.

  15. The relevance of transformational leadership in shaping employee attitudes towards organizational change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Penava Suada

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The subject of the research presented in this paper is the role of the leadership of change agents in the implementation of organizational change. The focus of research is on the micro-aspect of change, specifically on the impact of changes in employees and their attitudes and behaviors that have a direct and significant impact on change success. The results of empirical research conducted in one Bosnian company show that the transformational behavior of the change agent is not equally relevant and effective in the case of the three organizational changes implemented in the company. The explanation for this can be found in the characteristics of the changes themselves, both those related to their cause and those related to the depth of the intervention and the expected consequences of change in the organizational culture.

  16. Fascial hierarchies and the relevance of crossed-helical arrangements of collagen to changes in the shape of muscles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scarr, Graham

    2016-04-01

    Muscles are composite structures consisting of contractile myofibres surrounded by complex hierarchies of collagen-reinforced fascial sheaths. They are essentially flexible cylinders that change in shape, with the particular alignment of collagen fibres within their myofascial walls reflecting the most efficient distribution of mechanical stresses and coordinating these changes. However, while the functional significance of this crossed-helical fibre arrangement is well established in other species and in different parts of the body, relatively little attention has been given to this within the fascia of humans; and the relevance of this geometric configuration to muscles and surrounding fascial tissues is described. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  17. Advanced Ring-Shaped Microelectrode Assay Combined with Small Rectangular Electrode for Quasi-In vivo Measurement of Cell-to-Cell Conductance in Cardiomyocyte Network

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Fumimasa; Kaneko, Tomoyuki; Hamada, Tomoyo; Hattori, Akihiro; Yasuda, Kenji

    2013-06-01

    To predict the risk of fatal arrhythmia induced by cardiotoxicity in the highly complex human heart system, we have developed a novel quasi-in vivo electrophysiological measurement assay, which combines a ring-shaped human cardiomyocyte network and a set of two electrodes that form a large single ring-shaped electrode for the direct measurement of irregular cell-to-cell conductance occurrence in a cardiomyocyte network, and a small rectangular microelectrode for forced pacing of cardiomyocyte beating and for acquiring the field potential waveforms of cardiomyocytes. The advantages of this assay are as follows. The electrophysiological signals of cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped network are superimposed directly on a single loop-shaped electrode, in which the information of asynchronous behavior of cell-to-cell conductance are included, without requiring a set of huge numbers of microelectrode arrays, a set of fast data conversion circuits, or a complex analysis in a computer. Another advantage is that the small rectangular electrode can control the position and timing of forced beating in a ring-shaped human induced pluripotent stem cell (hiPS)-derived cardiomyocyte network and can also acquire the field potentials of cardiomyocytes. First, we constructed the human iPS-derived cardiomyocyte ring-shaped network on the set of two electrodes, and acquired the field potential signals of particular cardiomyocytes in the ring-shaped cardiomyocyte network during simultaneous acquisition of the superimposed signals of whole-cardiomyocyte networks representing cell-to-cell conduction. Using the small rectangular electrode, we have also evaluated the response of the cell network to electrical stimulation. The mean and SD of the minimum stimulation voltage required for pacing (VMin) at the small rectangular electrode was 166+/-74 mV, which is the same as the magnitude of amplitude for the pacing using the ring-shaped electrode (179+/-33 mV). The results showed that the

  18. Chondrogenic potential of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells on a novel, auricular-shaped, nanocomposite scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kavi H Patel

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Reconstruction of the human auricle remains a challenge to plastic surgeons, and current approaches are not ideal. Tissue engineering provides a promising alternative. This study aims to evaluate the chondrogenic potential of bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells on a novel, auricular-shaped polymer. The proposed polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-modified poly(hexanolactone/carbonateurethane/urea nanocomposite polymer has already been transplanted in patients as the world’s first synthetic trachea, tear duct and vascular bypass graft. The nanocomposite scaffold was fabricated via a coagulation/salt-leaching method and shaped into an auricle. Adult bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells were isolated, cultured and seeded onto the scaffold. On day 21, samples were sent for scanning electron microscopy, histology and immunofluorescence to assess for neocartilage formation. Cell viability assay confirmed cytocompatability and normal patterns of cellular growth at 7, 14 and 21 days after culture. This study demonstrates the potential of a novel polyhedral oligomeric silsesquioxane-modified poly(hexanolactone/carbonateurethane/urea scaffold for culturing bone marrow–derived mesenchymal stem cells in chondrogenic medium to produce an auricular-shaped construct. This is supported by scanning electron microscopy, histological and immunofluorescence analysis revealing markers of chondrogenesis including collagen type II, SOX-9, glycosaminoglycan and elastin. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report of stem cell application on an auricular-shaped scaffold for tissue engineering purposes. Although many obstacles remain in producing a functional auricle, this is a promising step forward.

  19. Cell proliferation, cell shape, and microtubule and cellulose microfibril organization of tobacco BY-2 cells are not altered by exposure to near weightlessness in space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sieberer, Björn J; Kieft, Henk; Franssen-Verheijen, Tiny; Emons, Anne Mie C; Vos, Jan W

    2009-11-01

    The microtubule cytoskeleton and the cell wall both play key roles in plant cell growth and division, determining the plant's final stature. At near weightlessness, tubulin polymerizes into microtubules in vitro, but these microtubules do not self-organize in the ordered patterns observed at 1g. Likewise, at near weightlessness cortical microtubules in protoplasts have difficulty organizing into parallel arrays, which are required for proper plant cell elongation. However, intact plants do grow in space and therefore should have a normally functioning microtubule cytoskeleton. Since the main difference between protoplasts and plant cells in a tissue is the presence of a cell wall, we studied single, but walled, tobacco BY-2 suspension-cultured cells during an 8-day space-flight experiment on board of the Soyuz capsule and the International Space Station during the 12S mission (March-April 2006). We show that the cortical microtubule density, ordering and orientation in isolated walled plant cells are unaffected by near weightlessness, as are the orientation of the cellulose microfibrils, cell proliferation, and cell shape. Likely, tissue organization is not essential for the organization of these structures in space. When combined with the fact that many recovering protoplasts have an aberrant cortical microtubule cytoskeleton, the results suggest a role for the cell wall, or its production machinery, in structuring the microtubule cytoskeleton.

  20. Intra-aneurysmal pressure and flow changes induced by flow diverters: relation to aneurysm size and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larrabide, I; Aguilar, M L; Morales, H G; Geers, A J; Kulcsár, Z; Rüfenacht, D; Frangi, A F

    2013-04-01

    Effects of blood flow modification by flow diverters are observed to lead often to aneurysm thrombosis and reverse remodeling. For this process, to further understand the potential roles of intra-aneurysmal blood pressure changes and aneurysm morphologies, 23 patients were studied by numeric simulation. 3D imaging of aneurysms of different sizes and shapes, all located at the supraclinoid segment of the ICA (n=23), was prepared for CFD simulations. Hemodynamic variables were calculated for conditions before and after virtual FD implantation, reconstituting a vessel wall scaffold across the aneurysm neck. WSS, velocity, residence time, turnover time, and intra-aneurysmal pressure were assessed statistically. After placement of FDs, significant reductions inside the aneurysm were observed for most hemodynamic variables (Paneurysmal pressures. For minimum/maximum intra-aneurysmal pressure values, small but significant changes were found; however, they were considered too small to be of relevance. Calculations in 23 cases did not reveal significant intra-aneurysmal mean or peak pressure changes, indicating a minor role of pressure changes in the rare event of secondary ruptures after FD use. Other hemodynamic variables (WSS and velocity) exhibited more significant changes, indicating their role in intra-aneurysmal thrombus formation. Size-dependent, significantly higher reduction in WSS (P=.069) and velocity (P=.013) was observed in small aneurysms compared with larger ones. When it came to shape, there were significantly higher reductions in WSS (P=.055) and velocity (P=.065) and a significantly higher increase in turnover time in fusiform aneurysms compared with saccular aneurysms.

  1. Potassium currents of pear-shaped hair cells in relation to their location in frog crista ampullaris.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prigioni, I; Russo, G; Marcotti, W

    1996-07-29

    Voltage-dependent K+ currents in pear-shaped hair cells of the frog crista ampullaris were investigated in thin slice preparations using the whole-cell variant of the patch-clamp technique. Microscopy observation revealed that pear-shaped cells are located in intermediate and peripheral regions of the crista, whereas they are absent in the central region. Voltage-clamp recordings in cells from the peripheral regions revealed that the total outward K+ current could be separated pharmacologically into three distinct components: a A-type K+ current (IA); an inactivating calcium-activated K+ current (IK(Ca)) and a delayed rectifier K+ current (IK). IK and IK(Ca) exhibited similar magnitude and accounted for most of the membrane cell conductance. The same experimental protocol applied to cells from the intermediate regions showed the presence of a large and sustained IK(Ca) which represented 95% of the total outward current. In this region IA was absent. The present results demonstrated that pear-shaped hair cells located in two discrete regions of frog crista ampullaris exhibit a different complement of voltage-dependent conductances, suggesting that they can play a different role in processing the natural stimulus.

  2. Preparation and characterization of Kraft lignin-based moisture-responsive films with reversible shape-change capability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dallmeyer, Ian; Chowdhury, Sudip; Kadla, John F

    2013-07-08

    Preparation of moisture-responsive Kraft lignin-based materials by electrospinning blends of Kraft lignin fractions with different physical properties is presented. The differences in thermal mobility between lignin fractions are shown to influence the degree of interfiber fusion occurring during oxidative thermostabilization of electrospun nonwoven fabrics, resulting in different material morphologies including submicrometer fibers, bonded nonwovens, porous films, and smooth films. The relative amount of different lignin fractions and degree of fiber flow and fiber fusion is shown to influence the tendency for the electrospun materials to be transformed into moisture-responsive materials capable of reversible changes in shape. Material characterization by scanning electron microscopy and atomic force microscopy as well characterization of the chemical and physical properties of Kraft lignin fractions by dynamic rheology, 1H and 13C NMR, and gel permeation chromatography combined with multiangle laser light scattering are presented. A proposed mechanism underlying moisture-responsiveness, shape change, and shape recovery is discussed based on the differences in chemical structure and physical properties of Kraft lignin fractions.

  3. Multi-Shaped Ag Nanoparticles in the Plasmonic Layer of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells for Increased Power Conversion Efficiency

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Da Hyun Song

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The use of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs is widespread owing to their high power conversion efficiency (PCE and low cost of manufacturing. We prepared multi-shaped Ag nanoparticles (NPs and introduced them into DSSCs to further enhance their PCE. The maximum absorption wavelength of the multi-shaped Ag NPs is 420 nm, including the shoulder with a full width at half maximum (FWHM of 121 nm. This is a broad absorption wavelength compared to spherical Ag NPs, which have a maximum absorption wavelength of 400 nm without the shoulder of 61 nm FWHM. Therefore, when multi-shaped Ag NPs with a broader plasmon-enhanced absorption were coated on a mesoporous TiO2 layer on a layer-by-layer structure in DSSCs, the PCE increased from 8.44% to 10.22%, equivalent to an improvement of 21.09% compared to DSSCs without a plasmonic layer. To confirm the plasmon-enhanced effect on the composite film structure in DSSCs, the PCE of DSSCs based on the composite film structure with multi-shaped Ag NPs increased from 8.58% to 10.34%, equivalent to an improvement of 20.51% compared to DSSCs without a plasmonic layer. This concept can be applied to perovskite solar cells, hybrid solar cells, and other solar cells devices.

  4. Multi-Shaped Ag Nanoparticles in the Plasmonic Layer of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells for Increased Power Conversion Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Da Hyun; Kim, Ho-Sub; Suh, Jung Sang; Jun, Bong-Hyun; Rho, Won-Yeop

    2017-06-04

    The use of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) is widespread owing to their high power conversion efficiency (PCE) and low cost of manufacturing. We prepared multi-shaped Ag nanoparticles (NPs) and introduced them into DSSCs to further enhance their PCE. The maximum absorption wavelength of the multi-shaped Ag NPs is 420 nm, including the shoulder with a full width at half maximum (FWHM) of 121 nm. This is a broad absorption wavelength compared to spherical Ag NPs, which have a maximum absorption wavelength of 400 nm without the shoulder of 61 nm FWHM. Therefore, when multi-shaped Ag NPs with a broader plasmon-enhanced absorption were coated on a mesoporous TiO₂ layer on a layer-by-layer structure in DSSCs, the PCE increased from 8.44% to 10.22%, equivalent to an improvement of 21.09% compared to DSSCs without a plasmonic layer. To confirm the plasmon-enhanced effect on the composite film structure in DSSCs, the PCE of DSSCs based on the composite film structure with multi-shaped Ag NPs increased from 8.58% to 10.34%, equivalent to an improvement of 20.51% compared to DSSCs without a plasmonic layer. This concept can be applied to perovskite solar cells, hybrid solar cells, and other solar cells devices.

  5. Wire-shaped quantum dots-sensitized solar cells based on nanosheets and nanowires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Haining; Zhu, Liqun; Wang, Meng; Liu, Huicong; Li, Weiping

    2011-11-25

    Wire-shaped quantum dots-sensitized solar cells (WS-QDSCs) based on nanosheets and nanowires were fabricated and investigated for this paper. The nanosheets grown on stainless steel (SS) wire by electrodeposition were mainly composed of Zn₅(OH)₈Cl₂·H₂O and most of the Zn₅(OH)₈Cl₂·H₂O was converted to ZnO by post-treatment, and ZnO nanowires were directly grown on SS wire by the hydrothermal method. CdS QDs were deposited on nanosheets and nanowires by successive ionic layer adsorption and reaction method. The results of photoelectrochemical performance indicated that WS-QDSCs showed a similar conversion efficiency in polysulfide and Na₂SO₄ electrolytes, while the WS-QDSCs based on the Cu2S counter electrode achieved much higher performance than those based on SS and Cu counter electrodes. By optimizing electrodeposition duration, the WS-QDSCs based on nanosheets presented the highest conversion efficiency of 0.60% for the duration of 20 min. Performance comparison indicated that the WS-QDSC based on nanosheets showed very superior performance to that based on the nanowires with similar film thickness.

  6. From shape to cells: mouse models reveal mechanisms altering palate development in Apert syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neus Martínez-Abadías

    2013-05-01

    Apert syndrome is a congenital disorder characterized by severe skull malformations and caused by one of two missense mutations, S252W and P253R, on fibroblast growth factor receptor 2 (FGFR2. The molecular bases underlying differential Apert syndrome phenotypes are still poorly understood and it is unclear why cleft palate is more frequent in patients carrying the S252W mutation. Taking advantage of Apert syndrome mouse models, we performed a novel combination of morphometric, histological and immunohistochemical analyses to precisely quantify distinct palatal phenotypes in Fgfr2+/S252W and Fgfr2+/P253R mice. We localized regions of differentially altered FGF signaling and assessed local cell patterns to establish a baseline for understanding the differential effects of these two Fgfr2 mutations. Palatal suture scoring and comparative 3D shape analysis from high resolution μCT images of 120 newborn mouse skulls showed that Fgfr2+/S252W mice display relatively more severe palate dysmorphologies, with contracted and more separated palatal shelves, a greater tendency to fuse the maxillary-palatine sutures and aberrant development of the inter-premaxillary suture. These palatal defects are associated with suture-specific patterns of abnormal cellular proliferation, differentiation and apoptosis. The posterior region of the developing palate emerges as a potential target for therapeutic strategies in clinical management of cleft palate in Apert syndrome patients.

  7. TUNING OF SIZE AND SHAPE OF AU-PT NANOCATALYST FOR DIRECT METHANOL FUEL CELLS

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murph, S.

    2011-04-20

    In this paper, we report the precise control of the size, shape and surface morphology of Au-Pt nanocatalysts (cubes, blocks, octahedrons and dogbones) synthesized via a seed-mediated approach. Gold 'seeds' of different aspect ratios (1 to 4.2), grown by a silver-assisted approach, were used as templates for high-yield production of novel Au-Pt nanocatalysts at a low temperature (40 C). Characterization by electron microscopy (SEM, TEM, HRTEM), energy dispersive X-ray analysis (EDX), UV-Vis spectroscopy, zeta-potential (surface charge), atomic force microscopy (AFM), X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy (XPS) and inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry (ICP-MS) were used to better understand their physico-chemical properties, preferred reactivities and underlying nanoparticle growth mechanism. A rotating disk electrode was used to evaluate the Au-Pt nanocatalysts electrochemical performance in the oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) and the methanol oxidation reaction (MOR) of direct methanol fuel cells. The results indicate the Au-Pt dogbones are partially and in some cases completely unaffected by methanol poisoning during the evaluation of the ORR. The ORR performance of the octahedron particles in the absence of MeOH is superior to that of the Au-Pt dogbones and Pt-black, however its performance is affected by the presence of MeOH.

  8. Unit Cell Analysis of the Superelastic Behavior of Open-Cell Tetrakaidecahedral Shape Memory Alloy Foam under Quasi-Static Loading

    OpenAIRE

    Guillaume Maîtrejean; Patrick Terriault; Diego Devís Capilla; Vladimir Brailovski

    2014-01-01

    Cellular solid materials and, more specifically, foams are increasingly common in many industrial applications due to their attractive characteristics. The tetrakaidecahedral foam microstructure, which can be observed in many types of foams, is studied in the present work in association with shape memory alloys (SMA) material. SMA foams are of particular interest as they associate both the shape memory effect and the superelasticity with the characteristics of foam. A Unit Cell Finite Element...

  9. An Analysis of the Changing Shape of Initial Teacher Education and Training in Wales since Devolution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reid, Ken; Tanner, Howard

    2012-01-01

    After a sustained period of relative calm, initial teacher education and training (ITET) in Wales has seen much change in recent times since devolution and all the indications are that this change agenda is likely to escalate in both the short and long term. In order to understand what has been happening in the ITET field in Wales, our paper sets…

  10. Geometric morphometric analysis of cyclical body shape changes in color pattern variants of Cichla temensis Humboldt, 1821 (Perciformes: Cichlidae demonstrates reproductive energy allocation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Reiss

    Full Text Available Previously recognized color and pattern variants of adult Cichla temensis in Amazon flood pulse river environments reflect the cycling of individuals through seasonal sexual maturity and spawning. Individuals also vary in shape from blocky to fusiform. To determine if shape differences are related to patterns of fat reserve deposition and utilization, and to quantify the relationship of shape with color and pattern variation and life history status, specimens in each of four previously defined grades of color and pattern variation were compared using geometric morphometric techniques. Progressive shape changes occurred between grades independent of sex and correlated to gonosomatic index (GSI. Thin plate spline deformation visualizations indicate that the observed shape differences are related to fat deposition patterns. The seasonal timing of shape change and its link to color pattern variation, sexual maturity and local water level conditions suggests a relationship between the physiological and behavioral characteristics of C. temensis and the cyclical flood pulse pattern of its habitat.

  11. Clear-cornea cataract surgery: pupil size and shape changes, along with anterior chamber volume and depth changes. A Scheimpflug imaging study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kanellopoulos, Anastasios John; Asimellis, George

    2014-01-01

    To investigate, by high-precision digital analysis of data provided by Scheimpflug imaging, changes in pupil size and shape and anterior chamber (AC) parameters following cataract surgery. The study group (86 eyes, patient age 70.58±10.33 years) was subjected to cataract removal surgery with in-the-bag intraocular lens implantation (pseudophakic). A control group of 75 healthy eyes (patient age 51.14±16.27 years) was employed for comparison. Scheimpflug imaging (preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively) was employed to investigate central corneal thickness, AC depth, and AC volume. In addition, by digitally analyzing the black-and-white dotted line pupil edge marking in the Scheimpflug "large maps," the horizontal and vertical pupil diameters were individually measured and the pupil eccentricity was calculated. The correlations between AC depth and pupil shape parameters versus patient age, as well as the postoperative AC and pupil size and shape changes, were investigated. Compared to preoperative measurements, AC depth and AC volume of the pseudophakic eyes increased by 0.99±0.46 mm (39%; PPupil size analysis showed that the horizontal pupil diameter was reduced by -0.27±0.22 mm (-9.7%; P=0.001) and the vertical pupil diameter was reduced by -0.32±0.24 mm (-11%; PPupil eccentricity was reduced by -39.56%; Paffect pupil size and shape, possibly in correlation to AC depth increase. This novel investigation based on digital analysis of Scheimpflug imaging data suggests that the cataract postoperative photopic pupil is reduced and more circular. These changes appear to be more significant with increasing patient age.

  12. Shape of the self-concept clarity change during group psychotherapy predicts the outcome: An empirical validation of the theoretical model of the self-concept change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafał eStyła

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available Background: Self-concept clarity describes the extent to which the schemas of the self are internally integrated, well defined, and temporally stable. This article presents a theoretical model that describes how different shapes of self-concept clarity change (especially stable increase and V shape observed in the course of psychotherapy are related to the therapy outcome. Linking the concept of Jean Piaget and the dynamic systems theory, the study postulates that a stable self-concept clarity increase is needed for the participants with a rather healthy personality structure, while self-concept clarity change characterized by a V shape or fluctuations is optimal for more disturbed patients. Method: Correlational study in a naturalistic setting with repeated measurements (M=5.8 was conducted on the sample of 85 patients diagnosed with neurosis and personality disorders receiving intensive eclectic group psychotherapy under routine inpatient conditions. Participants filled in the Self-Concept Clarity Scale, Symptoms’ Questionnaire KS-II, and Neurotic Personality Questionnaire KON-2006 at the beginning and at the end of the course of psychotherapy. The Self-Concept Clarity Scale was also administered every two weeks during psychotherapy. Results: As hypothesized, among the relatively healthiest group of patients the stable self-concept clarity increase was related to positive treatment outcome, while more disturbed patients benefited from the fluctuations and V shape of self-concept clarity change. Conclusions: The findings support the idea that for different personality dispositions either a monotonic increase or transient destabilization of self-concept clarity is a sign of a good treatment prognosis.

  13. Eight-Shaped Hatching Increases the Risk of Inner Cell Mass Splitting in Extended Mouse Embryo Culture.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zheng Yan

    Full Text Available Increased risk of monozygotic twinning (MZT has been shown to be associated with assisted reproduction techniques, particularly blastocyst culture. Interestingly, inner cell mass (ICM splitting in human '8'-shaped hatching blastocysts that resulted in MZT was reported. However, the underlying cause of MZT is not known. In this study, we investigated in a mouse model whether in vitro culture leads to ICM splitting and its association with hatching types. Blastocyst hatching was observed in: (i in vivo developed blastocysts and (ii-iii in vitro cultured blastocysts following in vivo or in vitro fertilization. We found that '8'-shaped hatching occurred with significantly higher frequency in the two groups of in vitro cultured blastocysts than in the group of in vivo developed blastocysts (24.4% and 20.4% versus 0.8%, respectively; n = 805, P < 0.01. Moreover, Oct4 immunofluorescence staining was performed to identify the ICM in the hatching and hatched blastocysts. Scattered and split distribution of ICM cells was observed around the small zona opening of '8'-shaped hatching blastocysts. This occurred at a high frequency in the in vitro cultured groups. Furthermore, we found more double OCT4-positive masses, suggestive of increased ICM splitting in '8'-shaped hatching and hatched blastocysts than in 'U'-shaped hatching and hatched blastocysts (12.5% versus 1.9%, respectively; n = 838, P < 0.01. Therefore, our results demonstrate that extended in vitro culture can cause high frequencies of '8'-shaped hatching, and '8'-shaped hatching that may disturb ICM herniation leading to increased risk of ICM splitting in mouse blastocysts. These results may provide insights into the increased risk of human MZT after in vitro fertilization and blastocyst transfer.

  14. Characteristics of Wind Velocity and Temperature Change Near an Escarpment-Shaped Road Embankment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Young-Moon Kim

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Artificial structures such as embankments built during the construction of highways influence the surrounding airflow. Various types of damage can occur due to changes in the wind velocity and temperature around highway embankments. However, no study has accurately measured micrometeorological changes (wind velocity and temperature due to embankments. This study conducted a wind tunnel test and field measurement to identify changes in wind velocity and temperature before and after the construction of embankments around roads. Changes in wind velocity around an embankment after its construction were found to be influenced by the surrounding wind velocity, wind angle, and the level difference and distance from the embankment. When the level difference from the embankment was large and the distance was up to 3H, the degree of wind velocity declines was found to be large. In changes in reference wind velocities around the embankment, wind velocity increases were not proportional to the rate at which wind velocities declined. The construction of the embankment influenced surrounding temperatures. The degree of temperature change was large in locations with large level differences from the embankment at daybreak and during evening hours when wind velocity changes were small.

  15. Noiseless signal shaping and cluster-state generation with a quantum memory cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manukhova, A. D.; Tikhonov, K. S.; Golubeva, T. Yu.; Golubev, Yu. M.

    2017-08-01

    In this article, we employ multimode radiation of a synchronously pumped optical parametric oscillator (SPOPO) to build a cluster state through a conversion on the base of a quantum memory cell. We demonstrate that by choosing an appropriate driving field we can ensure the effective writing of only one supermode from the entire set of the SPOPO squeezed supermodes. Further, by changing the driving field profile at the readout, we convert the time profile of the retrieved signal while maintaining its quantum state. We demonstrate the possibilities of using the presented scheme by the example of creating a four-mode linear cluster state of light.

  16. Uncertainty and innovation: Understanding the role of cell-based manufacturing facilities in shaping regulatory and commercialization environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Isasi, Rosario; Rahimzadeh, Vasiliki; Charlebois, Kathleen

    2016-12-01

    The purpose of this qualitative study is to elucidate stakeholder perceptions of, and institutional practices related to cell-based therapies and products (CTP) regulation and commercialization in Canada. The development of reproducible, safe and effective CTPs is predicated on regulatory and commercialization environments that enable innovation. Manufacturing processes constitute a critical step for CTP development in this regard. The road from CTP manufacturing to translation in the clinic, however, has yet to be paved. This study aims to fill an empirical gap in the literature by exploring how CTP manufacturing facilities navigate Canadian regulatory and commercialization environments, which together drive the translation of novel CTPs from bench to bedside. Using the multi-level model of practice-driven institutional change proposed by Smets et al., we demonstrate how CTP manufacturing practices are governed by established standards, yet meaningfully shape higher-order regulatory and commercial norms in CTP research and development. We identify four key themes that undergird such processes of innovation: 1) managing regulatory uncertainty, which stems from an inability to classify CTPs within existing regulatory categories for approval and commercialization purposes; 2) building a 'business case' whereby a CTP's market potential is determined in large part by proving its safety and effectiveness; 3) standardizing manufacturing procedures that mobilize CTPs from a research and development phase to a commercialization one; and 4) networking between researchers and regulators to develop responsible commercialization processes that reflect the uniqueness of CTPs as distinct from other biologics and medical devices.

  17. Silica particle size and shape: in vitro effects on extracellular matrix metabolism and viability of human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bodo, M; Lilli, C; Calvitti, M; Rosati, E; Luca, G; Lumare, A; Gambelunghe, A; Murgia, N; Muzi, G; Bellucci, C

    2012-01-01

    Crystal micro-morphology and dimension of silica particles could be responsible for the high prevalence of silicosis as recently found among goldsmiths. In the present study we investigated two samples of silica particles with different surface sizes and shapes for their capacity to induce changes in ECM component production. In addition we investigated if their different effects could be related to cytotoxicity and apoptotic effects. Human bronchial epithelial cells were cultured with or without a sample of Silica used for casting gold jewellery, named in our experiments Silica P or a commercial sample of Silica with different physical and chemical properties, named in our experiments Silica F. After 48 h of exposure PCR analysis determined levels of several matrix components. As induction of the apoptosis cascade, annexin assay, caspase 3 activity and cellular cytoxicity by MTT assay were assayed. Silica F promoted fibronectin, MMP12, tenascin C and Integrins b5 gene expressions more than Silica P. Silica P stimulated more TGFß1 and its TGFßR1 receptor than Silica F. Cytotoxic effects were induced by the two samples of Silica. On the contrary, no alteration in classic apoptotic marker protein expression was observed in presence of either Silica F or Silica P, suggesting silica particles affect ECM production and metalloproteases through a mechanism that does not involve apoptotic activation. Different Silica micromorphology and TGFß signal pathway are linked to lung fibrotic effects but the potential role Silica in apoptotic and toxic reaction remains to be ascertained.

  18. Spatial and temporal changes in the morphology of preosteoblastic cells seeded on microstructured tantalum surfaces

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Justesen, Jørn; Lorentzen, M.; Andersen, L. K.

    2009-01-01

    It has been widely reported that surface morphology on the micrometer scale affects cell function as well as cell shape. In this study, we have systematically compared the influence of 13 topographically micropatterned tantalum surfaces on the temporal development of morphology, including spreading......, and length of preosteoblastic cells (MC3T3-E1). Cells were examined after 0.5, 1, 4, and 24 h on different Ta microstructures with vertical dimensions (heights) of 0.25 and 1.6 mu m. Cell morphologies depended upon the underlying Surface topography, and the length and spreading of cells varied as a function...... to depend on the distance between the pillars with one specific pillar Structure exhibiting a decreased spreading combined with a radical change in morphology of the cells. Interestingly, this morphology on the particular pillar structure was associated with a markedly different distribution of the actio...

  19. Relation between the change of density of states and the shape of the potential in two-body interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bo

    2017-04-01

    We derive a general relation in two-body scattering theory that more directly relates the change of density of states (DDOS) due to interaction to the shape of the potential. The relation allows us to infer certain global properties of the DDOS from the global properties of the potential. In particular, we show that DDOS is negative at all energies and for all partial waves, for potentials that are more repulsive than +1 /r2 everywhere. This behavior represents a different class of global properties of DDOS from that described by the Levinson's theorem.

  20. Comparison of SHAPE reagents for mapping RNA structures inside living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Byron; Flynn, Ryan A; Kadina, Anastasia; Guo, Jimmy K; Kool, Eric T; Chang, Howard Y

    2017-02-01

    Recent advances in SHAPE technology have converted the classic primer extension method to next-generation sequencing platforms, allowing transcriptome-level analysis of RNA secondary structure. In particular, icSHAPE and SHAPE-MaP, using NAI-N3 and 1M7 reagents, respectively, are methods that claim to measure in vivo structure with high-throughput sequencing. However, these compounds have not been compared on an unbiased, raw-signal level. Here, we directly compare several in vivo SHAPE acylation reagents using the simple primer extension assay. We conclude that while multiple SHAPE technologies are effective at measuring purified RNAs in vitro, acylimidazole reagents NAI and NAI-N3 give markedly greater signals with lower background than 1M7 for in vivo measurement of the RNA structurome. © 2017 Lee et al.; Published by Cold Spring Harbor Laboratory Press for the RNA Society.

  1. Cell-shaped silicon-on-insulator microdosimeters: characterization and response to 239PuBe irradiations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mazza, Anthony; Newhauser, Wayne; Pittman, Stephen; Halloran, Andrew; Maggi, Paul; Tran, Linh; Gila, Brent; Rosenfeld, Anatoly; Ziegler, James

    2017-09-01

    This work tested the feasibility of a silicon-on-insulator microdosimeter, which mimics the size and shape of specific cells within the human body, to determine dose equivalent from neutron irradiation. The microdosimeters were analyzed in terms of their basic diode characteristics, i.e., leakage current as a function of bias voltage. Lineal energy spectra were acquired using two different converter layers placed atop the microdosimeter: a tissue-substitute converter made from high-density polyethylene, and a boron converter consisting of epoxy coated with boron powder. The spectra were then converted into absorbed dose and dose equivalent. Experimental results were compared to Monte Carlo simulations of the neutron irradiations, revealing good agreement. Uncertainty in the dose equivalent determinations was 7.5% when using the cell-shaped microdosimeter with the tissue-substitute converter and 13.1% when using the boron converter. This work confirmed that the SOI approach to cell-mimicking microdosimetry is feasible.

  2. Gross changes in forest area shape the future carbon balance of tropical forests

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    W. Li

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Bookkeeping models are used to estimate land-use and land-cover change (LULCC carbon fluxes (ELULCC. The uncertainty of bookkeeping models partly arises from data used to define response curves (usually from local data and their representativeness for application to large regions. Here, we compare biomass recovery curves derived from a recent synthesis of secondary forest plots in Latin America by Poorter et al. (2016 with the curves used previously in bookkeeping models from Houghton (1999 and Hansis et al. (2015. We find that the two latter models overestimate the long-term (100 years vegetation carbon density of secondary forest by about 25 %. We also use idealized LULCC scenarios combined with these three different response curves to demonstrate the importance of considering gross forest area changes instead of net forest area changes for estimating regional ELULCC. In the illustrative case of a net gain in forest area composed of a large gross loss and a large gross gain occurring during a single year, the initial gross loss has an important legacy effect on ELULCC so that the system can be a net source of CO2 to the atmosphere long after the initial forest area change. We show the existence of critical values of the ratio of gross area change over net area change (γAnetAgross, above which cumulative ELULCC is a net CO2 source rather than a sink for a given time horizon after the initial perturbation. These theoretical critical ratio values derived from simulations of a bookkeeping model are compared with observations from the 30 m resolution Landsat Thematic Mapper data of gross and net forest area change in the Amazon. This allows us to diagnose areas in which current forest gains with a large land turnover will still result in LULCC carbon emissions in 20, 50 and 100 years.

  3. The Rcs stress response and accessory envelope proteins are required for de novo generation of cell shape in Escherichia coli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ranjit, Dev K; Young, Kevin D

    2013-06-01

    Interactions with immune responses or exposure to certain antibiotics can remove the peptidoglycan wall of many Gram-negative bacteria. Though the spheroplasts thus created usually lyse, some may survive by resynthesizing their walls and shapes. Normally, bacterial morphology is generated by synthetic complexes directed by FtsZ and MreBCD or their homologues, but whether these classic systems can recreate morphology in the absence of a preexisting template is unknown. To address this question, we treated Escherichia coli with lysozyme to remove the peptidoglycan wall while leaving intact the inner and outer membranes and periplasm. The resulting lysozyme-induced (LI) spheroplasts recovered a rod shape after four to six generations. Recovery proceeded via a series of cell divisions that produced misshapen and branched intermediates before later progeny assumed a normal rod shape. Importantly, mutants defective in mounting the Rcs stress response and those lacking penicillin binding protein 1B (PBP1B) or LpoB could not divide or recover their cell shape but instead enlarged until they lysed. LI spheroplasts from mutants lacking the Lpp lipoprotein or PBP6 produced spherical daughter cells that did not recover a normal rod shape or that did so only after a significant delay. Thus, to regenerate normal morphology de novo, E. coli must supplement the classic FtsZ- and MreBCD-directed cell wall systems with activities that are otherwise dispensable for growth under normal laboratory conditions. The existence of these auxiliary mechanisms implies that they may be required for survival in natural environments, where bacterial walls can be damaged extensively or removed altogether.

  4. Cell-type-specific resonances shape the responses of striatal neurons to synaptic input.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beatty, Joseph A; Song, Soomin C; Wilson, Charles J

    2015-02-01

    Neurons respond to synaptic inputs in cell-type-specific ways. Each neuron type may thus respond uniquely to shared patterns of synaptic input. We applied statistically identical barrages of artificial synaptic inputs to four striatal cell types to assess differences in their responses to a realistic input pattern. Each interneuron type fired in phase with a specific input-frequency component. The fast-spiking interneuron fired in relation to the gamma-band (and higher) frequencies, the low-threshold spike interneuron to the beta-band frequencies, and the cholinergic neurons to the delta-band frequencies. Low-threshold spiking and cholinergic interneurons showed input impedance resonances at frequencies matching their spiking resonances. Fast-spiking interneurons showed resonance of input impedance but at lower than gamma frequencies. The spiny projection neuron's frequency preference did not have a fixed frequency but instead tracked its own firing rate. Spiny cells showed no input impedance resonance. Striatal interneurons are each tuned to a specific frequency band corresponding to the major frequency components of local field potentials. Their influence in the circuit may fluctuate along with the contribution of that frequency band to the input. In contrast, spiny neurons may tune to any of the frequency bands by a change in firing rate. Copyright © 2015 the American Physiological Society.

  5. The Ginger-shaped Asteroid 4179 Toutatis: New Observations from a Successful Flyby of Chang'e-2

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Jiangchuan; Ji, Jianghui; Ye, Peijian; Wang, Xiaolei; Yan, Jun; Meng, Linzhi; Wang, Su; Li, Chunlai; Li, Yuan; Qiao, Dong; Zhao, Wei; Zhao, Yuhui; Zhang, Tingxin; Liu, Peng; Jiang, Yun; Rao, Wei; Li, Sheng; Huang, Changning; Ip, Wing-Huen; Hu, Shoucun; Zhu, Menghua; Yu, Liangliang; Zou, Yongliao; Tang, Xianglong; Li, Jianyang; Zhao, Haibin; Huang, Hao; Jiang, Xiaojun; Bai, Jinming

    2013-12-01

    On 13 December 2012, Chang'e-2 conducted a successful flyby of the near-Earth asteroid 4179 Toutatis at a closest distance of 770 +/- 120 meters from the asteroid's surface. The highest-resolution image, with a resolution of better than 3 meters, reveals new discoveries on the asteroid, e.g., a giant basin at the big end, a sharply perpendicular silhouette near the neck region, and direct evidence of boulders and regolith, which suggests that Toutatis may bear a rubble-pile structure. Toutatis' maximum physical length and width are (4.75 × 1.95 km) +/-10%, respectively, and the direction of the +z axis is estimated to be (250 +/- 5°, 63 +/- 5°) with respect to the J2000 ecliptic coordinate system. The bifurcated configuration is indicative of a contact binary origin for Toutatis, which is composed of two lobes (head and body). Chang'e-2 observations have significantly improved our understanding of the characteristics, formation, and evolution of asteroids in general.

  6. Inversion of Earth's changing shape to weigh sea level in static equilibrium with surface mass redistribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewitt, Geoffrey; Clarke, Peter

    2003-06-01

    We develop a spectral inversion method for mass redistribution on the Earth's surface given geodetic measurements of the solid Earth's geometrical shape, using the elastic load Love numbers. First, spectral coefficients are geodetically estimated to some degree. Spatial inversion then finds the continental surface mass distribution that would force geographic variations in relative sea level such that it is self-consistent with an equipotential top surface and the deformed ocean bottom surface and such that the total (ocean plus continental mass) load has the same estimated spectral coefficients. Applying this theory, we calculate the contribution of seasonal interhemispheric (degree 1) mass transfer to variation in global mean sea level and nonsteric static ocean topography, using published GPS results for seasonal degree-1 surface loading from the global IGS network. Our inversion yields ocean-continent mass exchange with annual amplitude (2.92 ± 0.14) × 1015 kg and maximum ocean mass on 25 August ±3 days. After correction for the annual variation in global mean vertical deformation of the ocean floor (0.4 mm amplitude), we find geocentric sea level has an amplitude of 7.6 ± 0.4 mm, consistent with TOPEX-Poseidon results (minus steric effects). The seasonal variation in sea level at a point strongly depends on location ranging from 3 to 19 mm, the largest being around Antarctica in mid-August. Seasonal gradients in static topography have amplitudes of up to 10 mm over 5000 km, which may be misinterpreted as dynamic topography. Peak continental loads occur at high latitudes in late winter at the water-equivalent level of 100-200 mm.

  7. A Municipal 'Climate Revolution'? The Shaping of Municipal Climate Change Policies

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoff, Jens Villiam; Strobel, Bjarne W.

    2013-01-01

    -reduction goals between 0.9 and 5.9%. Size of municipality, degree of incorporation of climate change policies in the municipal administration, presence of ‘green organizations’, as well as membership of national and international climate networks, are found to be of importance for the level of ambition...

  8. From rice husk to high performance shape stabilized phase change materials for thermal energy storage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mehrali, Mohammad; Latibari, Sara Tahan; Rosen, Marc A.

    2016-01-01

    and a sodium hydroxide activation procedure. Palmitic acid as a phase change material was impregnated into the porous carbon by a vacuum impregnation technique. Graphene nanoplatelets (GNPs) were employed as an additive for thermal conductivity enhancement of the SSPCMs. The attained composites exhibited...

  9. More black box to explore: how quality improvement collaboratives shape practice change.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Eric K; Chase, Sabrina M; Howard, Jenna; Nutting, Paul A; Crabtree, Benjamin F

    2012-01-01

    Quality improvement collaboratives (QICs) are used extensively to promote quality improvement in health care. Evidence of their effectiveness is limited, prompting calls to "open up the black box" to better understand how and why such collaboratives work. We selected a cohort of 5 primary care practices that participated in a 6-month intervention study aimed at improving colorectal cancer screening rates. Using an immersion/crystallization technique, we analyzed qualitative data that included audio recordings and field notes of QICs and practice-based team meetings. Three themes emerged from our analysis: (1) practice staff became empowered through and drew on the QICs to advance change efforts in the face of leader/physician resistance; (2) a mix of content and media in the QIC program was important for reaching all participants; (3) resources offered at the QIC did little to spur practice change efforts. QICs offer a potentially powerful way of disseminating health care innovations through enhanced strategies for learning and change. Creating collaborative environments in which diverse participants learn, listen, reflect, and share together can enable them to take back to their own organizations key messages and change strategies that benefit them the most.

  10. More Black Box to Explore: How Quality Improvement Collaboratives Shape Practice Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shaw, Eric K.; Chase, Sabrina M.; Howard, Jenna; Nutting, Paul; Crabtree, Benjamin F.

    2012-01-01

    Background Quality improvement collaboratives (QICs) are used extensively to promote quality improvement in healthcare. Evidence of their effectiveness is limited, prompting calls to open up the ‘black box’ to better understand how and why such collaboratives work. Methods We selected a cohort of five primary care practices that participated in a six-month intervention study aimed at improving colorectal cancer screening rates. Using an immersion/crystallization technique, we analyzed qualitative data which included audio-recordings and fieldnotes of QICs and practice-based team meetings. Results Three themes emerged from our analysis. 1) Practice staff became empowered through and drew on the QICs to advance change efforts in the face of leader/physician resistance. 2) A mix of content and media in a QIC program was important for reaching all participants. 3) Resources offered at the QIC did little to spur practice change efforts. Discussion QICs offer a potentially powerful way of disseminating healthcare innovations through enhanced strategies for learning and change. Creating collaborative environments where diverse participants learn, listen, reflect, and share together can enable them to take key messages and change strategies back to their own organizations that benefit them the most. PMID:22403195

  11. Anisotropic Shape Changes of Silica Nanoparticles Induced in Liquid with Scanning Transmission Electron Microscopy

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Zecevic, J.; Hermannsdorfer, Justus; Schuh, Tobias; de Jong, Krijn P.; de Jonge, Niels

    2017-01-01

    Liquid-phase transmission electron microscopy (TEM) is used for in-situ imaging of nanoscale processes taking place in liquid, such as the evolution of nanoparticles during synthesis or structural changes of nanomaterials in liquid environment. Here, it is shown that the focused electron beam of

  12. Changes in total and differential white cell counts, total lymphocyte ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Published reports on the possible changes in the various immune cell populations, especially the total lymphocyte and CD4 cell counts, during the menstrual cycle in Nigerian female subjects are relatively scarce. Aim: To determine possible changes in the total and differential white blood cell [WBC] counts, ...

  13. Shape Memory Polymers Containing Higher Acrylate Content Display Increased Endothelial Cell Attachment

    OpenAIRE

    Tina Govindarajan; Robin Shandas

    2017-01-01

    Shape Memory Polymers (SMPs) are smart materials that can recall their shape upon the application of a stimulus, which makes them appealing materials for a variety of applications, especially in biomedical devices. Most prior SMP research has focused on tuning bulk properties; studying surface effects of SMPs may extend the use of these materials to blood-contacting applications, such as cardiovascular stents, where surfaces that support rapid endothelialization have been correlated to stent ...

  14. Correction: Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parapat, Riny Y; Wijaya, Muliany; Schwarze, Michael; Selve, Sören; Willinger, Marc; Schomäcker, Reinhard

    2016-04-07

    Correction for 'Particle shape optimization by changing from an isotropic to an anisotropic nanostructure: preparation of highly active and stable supported Pt catalysts in microemulsions' by Riny Y. Parapat et al., Nanoscale, 2013, 5, 796-805.

  15. Clear-cornea cataract surgery: pupil size and shape changes, along with anterior chamber volume and depth changes. A Scheimpflug imaging study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kanellopoulos AJ

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Anastasios John Kanellopoulos,1,2 George Asimellis11Laservision.gr Eye Institute, Athens, Greece; 2New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Purpose: To investigate, by high-precision digital analysis of data provided by Scheimpflug imaging, changes in pupil size and shape and anterior chamber (AC parameters following cataract surgery.Patients and methods: The study group (86 eyes, patient age 70.58±10.33 years was subjected to cataract removal surgery with in-the-bag intraocular lens implantation (pseudophakic. A control group of 75 healthy eyes (patient age 51.14±16.27 years was employed for comparison. Scheimpflug imaging (preoperatively and 3 months postoperatively was employed to investigate central corneal thickness, AC depth, and AC volume. In addition, by digitally analyzing the black-and-white dotted line pupil edge marking in the Scheimpflug “large maps,” the horizontal and vertical pupil diameters were individually measured and the pupil eccentricity was calculated. The correlations between AC depth and pupil shape parameters versus patient age, as well as the postoperative AC and pupil size and shape changes, were investigated.Results: Compared to preoperative measurements, AC depth and AC volume of the pseudophakic eyes increased by 0.99±0.46 mm (39%; P<0.001 and 43.57±24.59 mm3 (36%; P<0.001, respectively. Pupil size analysis showed that the horizontal pupil diameter was reduced by -0.27±0.22 mm (-9.7%; P=0.001 and the vertical pupil diameter was reduced by -0.32±0.24 mm (-11%; P<0.001. Pupil eccentricity was reduced by -39.56%; P<0.001.Conclusion: Cataract extraction surgery appears to affect pupil size and shape, possibly in correlation to AC depth increase. This novel investigation based on digital analysis of Scheimpflug imaging data suggests that the cataract postoperative photopic pupil is reduced and more circular. These changes appear to be more significant with increasing patient age. Keywords

  16. Clear-cornea cataract surgery: pupil size and shape changes, along with anterior chamber volume and depth changes. A Scheimpflug imaging study

    OpenAIRE

    Kanellopoulos AJ; Asimellis G

    2014-01-01

    Anastasios John Kanellopoulos,1,2 George Asimellis11Laservision.gr Eye Institute, Athens, Greece; 2New York University School of Medicine, New York, NY, USA Purpose: To investigate, by high-precision digital analysis of data provided by Scheimpflug imaging, changes in pupil size and shape and anterior chamber (AC) parameters following cataract surgery.Patients and methods: The study group (86 eyes, patient age 70.58±10.33 years) was subjected to cataract removal surgery with in-the...

  17. Changes in orientation and shape of protoplanetary discs moving through an ambient medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wijnen, T. P. G.; Pelupessy, F. I.; Pols, O. R.; Portegies Zwart, S.

    2017-08-01

    Misalignments between the orbital planes of planets and the equatorial planes of their host stars have been observed in our solar system, in transiting exoplanets, and for the orbital planes of debris discs. We present a mechanism that causes such a spin-orbit misalignment for a protoplanetary disc due to its movement through an ambient medium. Our physical explanation of the mechanism is based on the theoretical solutions to the Stark problem. We test this idea by performing self-consistent hydrodynamical simulations and simplified gravitational N-body simulations. The N-body model reduces the mechanism to the relevant physical processes. The hydrodynamical simulations show the mechanism in its full extent, including gas-dynamical and viscous processes in the disc which are not included in the theoretical framework. We find that a protoplanetary disc embedded in a flow changes its orientation as its angular momentum vector tends to align parallel to the relative velocity vector. Due to the force exerted by the flow, orbits in the disc become eccentric, which produces a net torque and consequentially changes the orbital inclination. The tilting of the disc causes it to contract. Apart from becoming lopsided, the gaseous disc also forms a spiral arm even if the inclination does not change substantially. The process is most effective at high velocities and observational signatures are therefore mostly expected in massive star-forming regions and around winds or supernova ejecta. Our N-body model indicates that the interaction with supernova ejecta is a viable explanation for the observed spin-orbit misalignment in our solar system.

  18. Division of labor: subsets of dorsal-appendage-forming cells control the shape of the entire tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boyle, Michael J; French, Rachael L; Cosand, K Amber; Dorman, Jennie B; Kiehart, Daniel P; Berg, Celeste A

    2010-10-01

    The function of an organ relies on its form, which in turn depends on the individual shapes of the cells that create it and the interactions between them. Despite remarkable progress in the field of developmental biology, how cells collaborate to make a tissue remains an unsolved mystery. To investigate the mechanisms that determine organ structure, we are studying the cells that form the dorsal appendages (DAs) of the Drosophila melanogaster eggshell. These cells consist of two differentially patterned subtypes: roof cells, which form the outward-facing roof of the lumen, and floor cells, which dive underneath the roof cells to seal off the floor of the tube. In this paper, we present three lines of evidence that reveal a further stratification of the DA-forming epithelium. Laser ablation of only a few cells in the anterior of the region causes a disproportionately severe shortening of the appendage. Genetic alteration through the twin peaks allele of tramtrack69 (ttk(twk)), a female-sterile mutation that leads to severely shortened DAs, causes no such shortening when removed from a majority of the DA-forming cells, but rather, produces short appendages only when removed from cells in the very anterior of the tube-forming tissue. Additionally we show that heterotrimeric G-protein function is required for DA morphogenesis. Like TTK69, Gbeta 13F is not required in all DA-forming follicle cells but only in the floor and leading roof cells. The different phenotypes that result from removal of Gbeta 13F from each region demonstrate a striking division of function between different DA-forming cells. Gbeta mutant floor cells are unable to control the width of the appendage while Gbeta mutant leading roof cells fail to direct the elongation of the appendage and the convergent-extension of the roof-cell population. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  19. Host immunity shapes the impact of climate changes on the dynamics of parasite infections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mignatti, Andrea; Boag, Brian; Cattadori, Isabella M

    2016-03-15

    Global climate change is predicted to alter the distribution and dynamics of soil-transmitted helminth infections, and yet host immunity can also influence the impact of warming on host-parasite interactions and mitigate the long-term effects. We used time-series data from two helminth species of a natural herbivore and investigated the contribution of climate change and immunity on the long-term and seasonal dynamics of infection. We provide evidence that climate warming increases the availability of infective stages of both helminth species and the proportional increase in the intensity of infection for the helminth not regulated by immunity. In contrast, there is no significant long-term positive trend in the intensity for the immune-controlled helminth, as immunity reduces the net outcome of climate on parasite dynamics. Even so, hosts experienced higher infections of this helminth at an earlier age during critical months in the warmer years. Immunity can alleviate the expected long-term effect of climate on parasite infections but can also shift the seasonal peak of infection toward the younger individuals.

  20. Shaping the landscape of the Escherichia coli chromosome: replication-transcription encounters in cells with an ectopic replication origin

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ivanova, Darja; Taylor, Toni; Smith, Sarah L

    2015-01-01

    Each cell division requires the unwinding of millions of DNA base pairs to allow chromosome duplication and gene transcription. As DNA replication and transcription share the same template, conflicts between both processes are unavoidable and head-on collisions are thought to be particularly prob...... a chromosomal rearrangement that alleviates replication-transcription conflicts in an intriguingly simple way. Our data support the idea that avoiding head-on collisions has significantly contributed to shaping the distinct architecture of bacterial chromosomes...

  1. Shock wave induced martensitic transformations and morphology changes in Fe-Pd ferromagnetic shape memory alloy thin films

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bischoff, A. J., E-mail: alina.bischoff@iom-leipzig.de; Arabi-Hashemi, A.; Ehrhardt, M.; Lorenz, P.; Zimmer, K. [Leibniz Institute for Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Mayr, S. G., E-mail: stefan.mayr@iom-leipzig.de [Leibniz Institute for Surface Modification, Permoserstr. 15, 04318 Leipzig (Germany); Department of Physics and Earth Sciences, Leipzig University, Linnéstr. 5, 04103 Leipzig (Germany)

    2016-04-11

    Combining experimental methods and classical molecular dynamics (MD) computer simulations, we explore the martensitic transformation in Fe{sub 70}Pd{sub 30} ferromagnetic shape memory alloy thin films induced by laser shock peening. X-ray diffraction and scanning electron microscope measurements at shock wave pressures of up to 2.5 GPa reveal formation of martensitic variants with preferred orientation of the shorter c-axis of the tetragonal unit cell perpendicular to the surface plane. Moreover, consequential merging of growth islands on the film surface is observed. MD simulations unveil the underlying physics that are characterized by an austenite-martensite transformation with a preferential alignment of the c-axis along the propagation direction of the shock wave, resulting in flattening and in-plane expansion of surface features.

  2. A Particle-In-Cell approach to particle flux shaping with a surface mask

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G. Kawamura

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available The Particle-In-Cell simulation code PICS has been developed to study plasma in front of a surface with two types of masks, step-type and roof-type. Parameter scans with regard to magnetic field angle, electron density, and mask height were carried out to understand their influence on ion particle flux distribution on a surface. A roof-type mask with a small mask height yields short decay length in the flux distribution which is consistent with that estimated experimentally. A roof-type mask with a large height yields very long decay length and the flux value does not depend on a mask height or an electron density, but rather on a mask length and a biasing voltage of the surface. Mask height also changes the flux distribution apart from the mask because of the shading effect of the mask. Electron density changes the distribution near the mask edge according to the Debye length. Dependence of distribution on parameters are complicated especially for a roof-type mask, and simulation study with various parameters are useful to understand the physical reasons of dependence and also is useful as a tool for experiment studies.

  3. A color and shape based algorithm for segmentation of white blood cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow images.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arslan, Salim; Ozyurek, Emel; Gunduz-Demir, Cigdem

    2014-06-01

    Computer-based imaging systems are becoming important tools for quantitative assessment of peripheral blood and bone marrow samples to help experts diagnose blood disorders such as acute leukemia. These systems generally initiate a segmentation stage where white blood cells are separated from the background and other nonsalient objects. As the success of such imaging systems mainly depends on the accuracy of this stage, studies attach great importance for developing accurate segmentation algorithms. Although previous studies give promising results for segmentation of sparsely distributed normal white blood cells, only a few of them focus on segmenting touching and overlapping cell clusters, which is usually the case when leukemic cells are present. In this article, we present a new algorithm for segmentation of both normal and leukemic cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow images. In this algorithm, we propose to model color and shape characteristics of white blood cells by defining two transformations and introduce an efficient use of these transformations in a marker-controlled watershed algorithm. Particularly, these domain specific characteristics are used to identify markers and define the marking function of the watershed algorithm as well as to eliminate false white blood cells in a postprocessing step. Working on 650 white blood cells in peripheral blood and bone marrow images, our experiments reveal that the proposed algorithm improves the segmentation performance compared with its counterparts, leading to high accuracies for both sparsely distributed normal white blood cells and dense leukemic cell clusters. © 2014 International Society for Advancement of Cytometry.

  4. Temperature-Driven Shape Changes of the Near Earth Asteroid Scout Solar Sail

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stohlman, Olive R.; Loper, Erik R.; Lockett, Tiffany E.

    2017-01-01

    Near Earth Asteroid Scout (NEA Scout) is a NASA deep space Cubesat, scheduled to launch on the Exploration Mission 1 flight of the Space Launch System. NEA Scout will use a deployable solar sail as its primary propulsion system. The sail is a square membrane supported by rigid metallic tapespring booms, and analysis predicts that these booms will experience substantial thermal warping if they are exposed to direct sunlight in the space environment. NASA has conducted sunspot chamber experiments to confirm the thermal distortion of this class of booms, demonstrating tip displacement of between 20 and 50 centimeters in a 4-meter boom. The distortion behavior of the boom is complex and demonstrates an application for advanced thermal-structural analysis. The needs of the NEA Scout project were supported by changing the solar sail design to keep the booms shaded during use of the solar sail, and an additional experiment in the sunspot chamber is presented in support of this solution.

  5. Hybrid Methods and Atomistic Models to Explore Free Energies, Rates and Pathways of Protein Shape Changes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, Yong

    , for example, accurately quantifying the free energy differences and transition times of protein conformational exchanges and their dependence on sequence modications, we are still at the early stages. In this dissertation, I present a number of new methodological improvements and applications for protein...... folding, conformational exchange and binding with ligands at long time scales. In Chapter 2, we benchmarked how well the current force elds and molecular dynamics (MD) simulations could model changes in structure, dynamics, free energy and kinetics for an extensively studied protein called T4 lysozyme (T4......", and subsequently used to estimate the free energy dierences based on a twostate assumption. To show its practical utility, we applied this approach by taking T4L-benzene system as the model system in which binding free energies from kinetics, free energy perturbation and experiments are all in good agreement...

  6. Evolutionary change within a bipotential switch shaped the sperm/oocyte decision in hermaphroditic nematodes.

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    Yiqing Guo

    Full Text Available A subset of transcription factors like Gli2 and Oct1 are bipotential--they can activate or repress the same target, in response to changing signals from upstream genes. Some previous studies implied that the sex-determination protein TRA-1 might also be bipotential; here we confirm this hypothesis by identifying a co-factor, and use it to explore how the structure of a bipotential switch changes during evolution. First, null mutants reveal that C. briggsae TRR-1 is required for spermatogenesis, RNA interference implies that it works as part of the Tip60 Histone Acetyl Transferase complex, and RT-PCR data show that it promotes the expression of Cbr-fog-3, a gene needed for spermatogenesis. Second, epistasis tests reveal that TRR-1 works through TRA-1, both to activate Cbr-fog-3 and to control the sperm/oocyte decision. Since previous studies showed that TRA-1 can repress fog-3 as well, these observations demonstrate that it is bipotential. Third, TRR-1 also regulates the development of the male tail. Since Cbr-tra-2 Cbr-trr-1 double mutants resemble Cbr-tra-1 null mutants, these two regulatory branches control all tra-1 activity. Fourth, striking differences in the relationship between these two branches of the switch have arisen during recent evolution. C. briggsae trr-1 null mutants prevent hermaphrodite spermatogenesis, but not Cbr-fem null mutants, which disrupt the other half of the switch. On the other hand, C. elegans fem null mutants prevent spermatogenesis, but not Cel-trr-1 mutants. However, synthetic interactions confirm that both halves of the switch exist in each species. Thus, the relationship between the two halves of a bipotential switch can shift rapidly during evolution, so that the same phenotype is produce by alternative, complementary mechanisms.

  7. Data in support on the shape of Schwann cells and sympathetic neurons onto microconically structured silicon surfaces

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    C. Simitzi

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available This article contains data related to the research article entitled “Laser fabricated discontinuous anisotropic microconical substrates as a new model scaffold to control the directionality of neuronal network outgrowth” in the Biomaterials journal [1]. Scanning electron microscopy (SEM analysis is performed to investigate whether Schwann cells and sympathetic neurons alter their morphology according to the underlying topography, comprising arrays of silicon microcones with anisotropic geometrical characteristics [1]. It is observed that although soma of sympathetic neurons always preserves its round shape, this is not the case for Schwann cells that become highly polarized in high roughness microconical substrates.

  8. Dietary resources shape the adaptive changes of cyanide detoxification function in giant panda (Ailuropoda melanoleuca).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, He; Yie, Shangmian; Liu, Yuliang; Wang, Chengdong; Cai, Zhigang; Zhang, Wenping; Lan, Jingchao; Huang, Xiangming; Luo, Li; Cai, Kailai; Hou, Rong; Zhang, Zhihe

    2016-10-05

    The functional adaptive changes in cyanide detoxification in giant panda appear to be response to dietary transition from typical carnivore to herbivorous bear. We tested the absorption of cyanide contained in bamboo/bamboo shoots with a feeding trial in 20 adult giant pandas. We determined total cyanide content in bamboo shoots and giant panda's feces, levels of urinary thiocyanate and tissue rhodanese activity using color reactions with a spectrophotometer. Rhodanese expression in liver and kidney at transcription and translation levels were measured using real-time RT-PCR and immunohistochemistry, respectively. We compared differences of rhodanese activity and gene expressions among giant panda, rabbit (herbivore) and cat (carnivore), and between newborn and adult giant pandas. Bamboo shoots contained 3.2 mg/kg of cyanide and giant pandas absorbed more than 65% of cyanide. However, approximately 80% of absorbed cyanide was metabolized to less toxic thiocyanate that was discharged in urine. Rhodanese expression and activity in liver and kidney of giant panda were significantly higher than in cat, but lower than in rabbit (all P pandas were higher than that in newborn cub. Phylogenetic analysis of both nucleotide and amino acid sequences of the rhodanese gene supported a closer relationship of giant panda with carnivores than with herbivores.

  9. Age and experience shape developmental changes in the neural basis of language-related learning.

    Science.gov (United States)

    McNealy, Kristin; Mazziotta, John C; Dapretto, Mirella

    2011-11-01

    Very little is known about the neural underpinnings of language learning across the lifespan and how these might be modified by maturational and experiential factors. Building on behavioral research highlighting the importance of early word segmentation (i.e. the detection of word boundaries in continuous speech) for subsequent language learning, here we characterize developmental changes in brain activity as this process occurs online, using data collected in a mixed cross-sectional and longitudinal design. One hundred and fifty-six participants, ranging from age 5 to adulthood, underwent functional magnetic resonance imaging (fMRI) while listening to three novel streams of continuous speech, which contained either strong statistical regularities, strong statistical regularities and speech cues, or weak statistical regularities providing minimal cues to word boundaries. All age groups displayed significant signal increases over time in temporal cortices for the streams with high statistical regularities; however, we observed a significant right-to-left shift in the laterality of these learning-related increases with age. Interestingly, only the 5- to 10-year-old children displayed significant signal increases for the stream with low statistical regularities, suggesting an age-related decrease in sensitivity to more subtle statistical cues. Further, in a sample of 78 10-year-olds, we examined the impact of proficiency in a second language and level of pubertal development on learning-related signal increases, showing that the brain regions involved in language learning are influenced by both experiential and maturational factors. 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  10. Cultural and climatic changes shape the evolutionary history of the Uralic languages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Honkola, T; Vesakoski, O; Korhonen, K; Lehtinen, J; Syrjänen, K; Wahlberg, N

    2013-06-01

    Quantitative phylogenetic methods have been used to study the evolutionary relationships and divergence times of biological species, and recently, these have also been applied to linguistic data to elucidate the evolutionary history of language families. In biology, the factors driving macroevolutionary processes are assumed to be either mainly biotic (the Red Queen model) or mainly abiotic (the Court Jester model) or a combination of both. The applicability of these models is assumed to depend on the temporal and spatial scale observed as biotic factors act on species divergence faster and in smaller spatial scale than the abiotic factors. Here, we used the Uralic language family to investigate whether both 'biotic' interactions (i.e. cultural interactions) and abiotic changes (i.e. climatic fluctuations) are also connected to language diversification. We estimated the times of divergence using Bayesian phylogenetics with a relaxed-clock method and related our results to climatic, historical and archaeological information. Our timing results paralleled the previous linguistic studies but suggested a later divergence of Finno-Ugric, Finnic and Saami languages. Some of the divergences co-occurred with climatic fluctuation and some with cultural interaction and migrations of populations. Thus, we suggest that both 'biotic' and abiotic factors contribute either directly or indirectly to the diversification of languages and that both models can be applied when studying language evolution. © 2013 The Authors. Journal of Evolutionary Biology © 2013 European Society For Evolutionary Biology.

  11. Glaucomatous and age-related changes in corneal pulsation shape. The ocular dicrotism.

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    Monika E Danielewska

    Full Text Available To ascertain whether the incidence of ocular dicrotic pulse (ODP increases with age, it is more pronounced in glaucomatous than in normal eyes and whether it is related to cardiovascular activity.261 subjects aged 47 to 78 years were included in the study and classified into four groups: primary open angle glaucoma (POAG, primary angle-closure glaucoma (PACG, glaucoma suspects with glaucomatous optic disc appearance (GODA and the controls (CG. Additionally, in each group, subjects with ODP were divided into two age subgroups around the median age. A non-contact ultrasonic method was used to measure corneal indentation pulse (CIP synchronically with the acquisition of electrocardiography (ECG and blood pulse signals. ODP was assessed from the acquired signals that were numerically processed in a custom written program.ODP incidence was about 78%, 66%, 66% and 84% for CG, GODA, POAG, and PACG group, respectively. With advancing age, the ODP incidence increased for all subjects (Δ = 12%, the highest being for the PACG and POAG groups (Δ = 30%. GODA group did not show an age-related increase in the incidence of ODP.The ocular dicrotism, measured with non-contact ultrasonic method, was found to be a common phenomenon in elderly subjects. The increased ODP incidence in PACG and POAG group may correspond to either higher stiffness of glaucoma eyes, biochemical abnormalities in eye tissues, changes in ocular hemodynamics, may reflect the effect of medications or be a combination of all those factors. The results of GODA group suggest different mechanisms governing their ocular pulse that makes them less susceptible to generating ODP and having decreased predisposition to glaucoma.

  12. Transcranial Random Noise Stimulation (tRNS Shapes the Processing of Rapidly Changing Auditory Information

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    Katharina S. Rufener

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Neural oscillations in the gamma range are the dominant rhythmic activation pattern in the human auditory cortex. These gamma oscillations are functionally relevant for the processing of rapidly changing acoustic information in both speech and non-speech sounds. Accordingly, there is a tight link between the temporal resolution ability of the auditory system and inherent neural gamma oscillations. Transcranial random noise stimulation (tRNS has been demonstrated to specifically increase gamma oscillation in the human auditory cortex. However, neither the physiological mechanisms of tRNS nor the behavioral consequences of this intervention are completely understood. In the present study we stimulated the human auditory cortex bilaterally with tRNS while EEG was continuously measured. Modulations in the participants’ temporal and spectral resolution ability were investigated by means of a gap detection task and a pitch discrimination task. Compared to sham, auditory tRNS increased the detection rate for near-threshold stimuli in the temporal domain only, while no such effect was present for the discrimination of spectral features. Behavioral findings were paralleled by reduced peak latencies of the P50 and N1 component of the auditory event-related potentials (ERP indicating an impact on early sensory processing. The facilitating effect of tRNS was limited to the processing of near-threshold stimuli while stimuli clearly below and above the individual perception threshold were not affected by tRNS. This non-linear relationship between the signal-to-noise level of the presented stimuli and the effect of stimulation further qualifies stochastic resonance (SR as the underlying mechanism of tRNS on auditory processing. Our results demonstrate a tRNS related improvement in acoustic perception of time critical auditory information and, thus, provide further indices that auditory tRNS can amplify the resonance frequency of the auditory system.

  13. Novel Shape-Stabilized Phase Change Materials Composed of Polyethylene Glycol/Nonsurfactant-Templated Mesoporous Silica: Preparation and Thermal Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yan; Zhu, Yingying; Wang, Jinbao; Lv, Mengjiao; Zhang, Xiongjie; Gao, Junkai; Zhang, Zijun; Lei, Hao

    2017-12-01

    A novel shape-stabilized phase change material (PEG/TAMS), fabricated using tannic acid-templated mesoporous silica (TAMS) as a support for polyethylene glycol, was developed for thermal energy storage. The method used to synthesize TAMS was simple, cost effective, environmentally friendly, and free of surfactant. The characterization results indicated that PEG was physically absorbed to TAMS and that TAMS had no influence on the crystal structure of PEG. According to the TGA thermograms, PEG/TAMS has excellent thermal stability and can be applied over a wide temperature range. Additionally, the differential scanning calorimetry results suggested that PEG/TAMS has good thermal properties and that its fusion and solidification enthalpies reached 114.7 J/g and 102.4 J/g, respectively. The results indicated that PEG/TAMS has great potential for practical applications.

  14. Festival Fever and International DJs: The Changing Shape of DJ Culture in Sydney’s Commercial Electronic Dance Music Scene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ed Montano

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available In recent years there has been an increase in the number of electronic dance music festivals in Sydney. This has served to shift the clubbing landscape in the city from night to daytime, taking dance music out of clubs and into parks and other public spaces. With its roots in imported versions and local interpretations of overseas dance culture, the dance scene in the city has always been heavily dependent on international sounds and fashions. With the dominance of these festivals, such as Field Day, Parklife, Harbourlife, Future Music, Creamfields, Good Vibrations and Stereosonic, this dependence is further emphasised through the high billing of international DJs in promotional material. Drawing on a decade of ethnographic research and participant-observation in the commercial electronic dance music scene in Sydney, this article explores how this festival fever is changing the shape of DJ and dance music culture in the city.Keywords: Sydney, DJs, club culture, festivals, mainstream, underground

  15. Correlation of the hypotonic shock response and extent of shape change with the new ThromboLUX ™.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraemer, L; Raczat, T; Weiss, D R; Strobel, J; Eckstein, R; Ringwald, J

    2015-08-01

    ThromboLUX (TLX)-Score was compared with hypotonic shock response (HSR) and extent of shape change (ESC) in 99 samples from 42 platelet concentrates. Tests were performed in parallel and duplicate. Mean values for TLX Score, HSR and ESC were 30.3 ± 3.8%, 69.0 ± 12.2% and 23.2 ± 4.9%, respectively. We found no significant correlation between TLX Score and HSR or ESC (r = -0.158, P = 0.118 and r = -115, P = 0.255, respectively), whereas HSR and ESC correlated significantly (r = 0.351, P < 0.001). As TLX Score did not show significant correlation with HSR and ESC, the value of TLX for platelet quality testing remains unclear. Studies comparing these parameters with transfusion outcome are needed. © 2015 International Society of Blood Transfusion.

  16. Dynamic shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koenderink, J J; van Doorn, A J

    1986-01-01

    Many useful notions of partial order and/or similarity and relatedness of different geometrical features of smooth shapes that occur in psychologically valid descriptions of shape have no equivalents in the usual geometrical shape theories. This is especially true where similarities are noted between objects of different connectivity: in almost all of the present theories the topological type generates the primary categorization. It is argued that such relations find a logical place only in shape theories that involve morphogenesis. Any object can be embedded uniquely in a morphogenetic sequence if one takes resolution as the parameter of the sequence. A theory of measurement is presented that allows one to define surfaces and (boundary-) curves on multiple levels of resolution. The embedding is essentially unique and is generated via a partial differential equation that governs the evolution. A canonical projection connects any high resolution specimen to lower resolution versions. The bifurcation set of the projection generates natural part boundaries. Singularities of the evolution are completely characterized as emergence, accretion and versification processes (involving topological change) and singularities by which inflections (inflection points for curves, parabolic curves for surfaces) are generated. The latter singularities involve a single process for the generation of inflections and three other processes by which the existing inflection structure may be changed. Relations with existing theories in vogue in robotics and AI, as well as in psychophysics are discussed.

  17. Shape normalization of 3D cell nuclei using elastic spherical mapping

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gladilin, E.; Goetze, S.; Mateos-Langerak, J.; van Driel, R.; Eils, R.; Rohr, K.

    2008-01-01

    Topological analysis of cells and subcellular structures on the basis of image data, is one of the major trends in modern quantitative biology. However, due to the dynamic nature of cell biology, the optical appearance of different cells or even time-series of the same cell is undergoing substantial

  18. KCNQ1 channels sense small changes in cell volume

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grunnet, Morten; Jespersen, Thomas; MacAulay, Nanna

    2003-01-01

    Many important physiological processes involve changes in cell volume, e.g. the transport of salt and water in epithelial cells and the contraction of cardiomyocytes. In this study, we show that voltage-gated KCNQ1 channels, which are strongly expressed in epithelial cells or cardiomyocytes......, and KCNQ4 channels, expressed in hair cells and the auditory tract, are tightly regulated by small cell volume changes when co-expressed with aquaporin 1 water-channels (AQP1) in Xenopus oocytes. The KCNQ1 and KCNQ4 current amplitudes precisely reflect the volume of the oocytes. By contrast, the related...... KCNQ2 and KCNQ3 channels, which are prominently expressed in neurons, are insensitive to cell volume changes. The sensitivity of the KCNQ1 and KCNQ4 channels to cell volume changes is independent of the presence of the auxiliary KCNE1-3 subunits, although modulated by KCNE1 in the case of KCNQ1...

  19. Biological responses according to the shape and size of carbon nanotubes in BEAS-2B and MESO-1 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haniu, Hisao; Saito, Naoto; Matsuda, Yoshikazu; Tsukahara, Tamotsu; Usui, Yuki; Maruyama, Kayo; Takanashi, Seiji; Aoki, Kaoru; Kobayashi, Shinsuke; Nomura, Hiroki; Tanaka, Manabu; Okamoto, Masanori; Kato, Hiroyuki

    2014-01-01

    This study aimed to investigate the influence of the shape and size of multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and cup-stacked carbon nanotubes (CSCNTs) on biological responses in vitro. Three types of MWCNTs - VGCF(®)-X, VGCF(®)-S, and VGCF(®) (vapor grown carbon fibers; with diameters of 15, 80, and 150 nm, respectively) - and three CSCNTs of different lengths (CS-L, 20-80 μm; CS-S, 0.5-20 μm; and CS-M, of intermediate length) were tested. Human bronchial epithelial (BEAS-2B) and malignant pleural mesothelioma cells were exposed to the CNTs (1-50 μg/mL), and cell viability, permeability, uptake, total reactive oxygen species/superoxide production, and intracellular acidity were measured. CSCNTs were less toxic than MWCNTs in both cell types over a 24-hour exposure period. The cytotoxicity of endocytosed MWCNTs varied according to cell type/size, while that of CSCNTs depended on tube length irrespective of cell type. CNT diameter and length influenced cell aggregation and injury extent. Intracellular acidity increased independently of lysosomal activity along with the number of vacuoles in BEAS-2B cells exposed for 24 hours to either CNT (concentration, 10 μg/mL). However, total reactive oxygen species/superoxide generation did not contribute to cytotoxicity. The results demonstrate that CSCNTs could be suitable for biological applications and that CNT shape and size can have differential effects depending on cell type, which can be exploited in the development of highly specialized, biocompatible CNTs.

  20. Time-lapse microscopy and classification of 2D human mesenchymal stem cells based on cell shape picks up myogenic from osteogenic and adipogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seiler, Christof; Gazdhar, Amiq; Reyes, Mauricio; Benneker, Lorin M; Geiser, Thomas; Siebenrock, Klaus A; Gantenbein-Ritter, Benjamin

    2014-09-01

    Current methods to characterize mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are limited to CD marker expression, plastic adherence and their ability to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic precursors. It seems evident that stem cells undergoing differentiation should differ in many aspects, such as morphology and possibly also behaviour; however, such a correlation has not yet been exploited for fate prediction of MSCs. Primary human MSCs from bone marrow were expanded and pelleted to form high-density cultures and were then randomly divided into four groups to differentiate into adipogenic, osteogenic chondrogenic and myogenic progenitor cells. The cells were expanded as heterogeneous and tracked with time-lapse microscopy to record cell shape, using phase-contrast microscopy. The cells were segmented using a custom-made image-processing pipeline. Seven morphological features were extracted for each of the segmented cells. Statistical analysis was performed on the seven-dimensional feature vectors, using a tree-like classification method. Differentiation of cells was monitored with key marker genes and histology. Cells in differentiation media were expressing the key genes for each of the three pathways after 21 days, i.e. adipogenic, osteogenic and chondrogenic, which was also confirmed by histological staining. Time-lapse microscopy data were obtained and contained new evidence that two cell shape features, eccentricity and filopodia (= 'fingers') are highly informative to classify myogenic differentiation from all others. However, no robust classifiers could be identified for the other cell differentiation paths. The results suggest that non-invasive automated time-lapse microscopy could potentially be used to predict the stem cell fate of hMSCs for clinical application, based on morphology for earlier time-points. The classification is challenged by cell density, proliferation and possible unknown donor-specific factors, which affect the performance of

  1. Ammonite shell shape covaries with facies and hydrodynamics: Iterative evolution as a response to changes in basinal environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobs, David K.; Landman, Neil H.; Chamberlain, John A., Jr.

    1994-10-01

    Shell shape varies within many ammonoid species, and some ammonoid lineages appear to have evolved in concert with changes in their environment. We report variation within an Upper Cretaceous ammonoid species that correlates with facies differences and is consistent with a hydrodynamic explanation. In the Turner Sandy Member of the Carlile Shale (Turonian) of South Dakota and Wyoming, more compressed morphs of Scaphites whitfieldi Cobban are found in nearshore sandy facies, whereas more depressed morphs occur in offshore muds. We measured drag forces on models of juvenile and adult shells that differed in lateral compression of the shell. Plots of drag coefficient as a function of Reynolds number indicate that thinner, more compressed morphs swam more efficiently at higher velocities and depressed morphs swam more efficiently at low velocities. Higher swimming velocities may be essential for life in nearshore sandy environments, which have higher ambient current velocities. Shelled cephalopods swim most efficiently at low swimming speeds; therefore, lower velocity, more energetically economical swimming should be preferred in more quiescent offshore settings. An analysis of power consumption supports this interpretation. Correlated changes in shell compression and environmental factors, here observed within a species, have been documented in numerous ammonite lineages. These iterative evolutionary changes within lineages may be similarly explained by selection for shell morphologies appropriate to environments that fluctuate cyclically with sea level.

  2. Changes in Parthenogenetic Imprinting Patterns during Reprogramming by Cell Fusion.

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    Hyun Sik Jang

    Full Text Available Differentiated somatic cells can be reprogrammed into the pluripotent state by cell-cell fusion. In the pluripotent state, reprogrammed cells may then self-renew and differentiate into all three germ layers. Fusion-induced reprogramming also epigenetically modifies the somatic cell genome through DNA demethylation, X chromosome reactivation, and histone modification. In this study, we investigated whether fusion with embryonic stem cells (ESCs also reprograms genomic imprinting patterns in somatic cells. In particular, we examined imprinting changes in parthenogenetic neural stem cells fused with biparental ESCs, as well as in biparental neural stem cells fused with parthenogenetic ESCs. The resulting hybrid cells expressed the pluripotency markers Oct4 and Nanog. In addition, methylation of several imprinted genes except Peg3 was comparable between hybrid cells and ESCs. This finding indicates that reprogramming by cell fusion does not necessarily reverse the status of all imprinted genes to the state of pluripotent fusion partner.

  3. Impact of cell culture process changes on endogenous retrovirus expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brorson, Kurt; De Wit, Christina; Hamilton, Elizabeth; Mustafa, Mehnaz; Swann, Patrick G; Kiss, Robert; Taticek, Ron; Polastri, Gian; Stein, Kathryn E; Xu, Yuan

    2002-11-05

    Cell culture process changes (e.g., changes in scale, medium formulation, operational conditions) and cell line changes are common during the development life cycle of a therapeutic protein. To ensure that the impact of such process changes on product quality and safety is minimal, it is standard practice to compare critical product quality and safety attributes before and after the changes. One potential concern introduced by cell culture process improvements is the possibility of increased endogenous retrovirus expression to a level above the clearance capability of the subsequent purification process. To address this, retrovirus expression was measured in scaled down and full production scaled Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cell cultures of four monoclonal antibodies and one recombinant protein before and after process changes. Two highly sensitive, quantitative (Q)-PCR-based assays were used to measure endogenous retroviruses. It is shown that cell culture process changes that primarily alter media components, nutrient feed volume, seed density, cell bank source (i.e., master cell bank vs. working cell bank), and vial size, or culture scale, singly or in combination, do not impact the rate of retrovirus expression to an extent greater than the variability of the Q-PCR assays (0.2-0.5 log(10)). Cell culture changes that significantly alter the metabolic state of the cells and/or rates of protein expression (e.g., pH and temperature shifts, NaButyrate addition) measurably impact the rate of retrovirus synthesis (up to 2 log(10)). The greatest degree of variation in endogenous retrovirus expression was observed between individual cell lines (up to 3 log(10)). These data support the practice of measuring endogenous retrovirus output for each new cell line introduced into manufacturing or after process changes that significantly increase product-specific productivity or alter the metabolic state, but suggest that reassessment of retrovirus expression after other

  4. Functional Characterization of Shape Memory CuZnAl Open-Cell Foams by Molten Metal Infiltration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arnaboldi, S.; Bassani, P.; Passaretti, F.; Redaelli, A.; Tuissi, A.

    2011-07-01

    In the recent years, the research for novel materials with tailored mechanical properties, as well as functional properties, has encouraged the study of porous and cellular materials. Our previous work proposed and reported about the possibility to manufacture open-cell metal foams of CuZnAl shape memory alloy by liquid infiltration in a leachable bed of silica-gel particles. This innovative methodology is based on cheap commercial consumables and a simple technology, focusing on intermediate-density low-cost foams with interesting cost/benefits ratio. Microstructural analyses on foamed specimens showed uniform microstructure of ligaments and a very regular and well reproducible open-cell morphology. Moreover, calorimetric analysis detected a thermo-elastic martensitic transformation in the foamed material. In this study, a CuZnAl shape memory alloy was considered and tested to clarify possible effects of the foaming process on the functional properties of the material. Morphological, calorimetric, and thermo-mechanical analyses were carried out. The results show that it is possible to produce metal foams of CuZnAl shape memory alloy with different functional properties and able to recover mono-axial compressive strains up to 3%.

  5. Transforming growth factor-β signaling is constantly shaping memory T-cell population.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Chaoyu; Zhang, Nu

    2015-09-01

    The long-term maintenance of memory T cells is essential for successful vaccines. Both the quantity and the quality of the memory T-cell population must be maintained. The signals that control the maintenance of memory T cells remain incompletely identified. Here we used two genetic models to show that continuous transforming growth factor-β signaling to antigen-specific T cells is required for the differentiation and maintenance of memory CD8(+) T cells. In addition, both infection-induced and microbiota-induced inflammation impact the phenotypic and functional identity of memory CD8(+) T cells.

  6. Fabrication of hydrogels with elasticity changed by alkaline phosphatase for stem cell culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toda, Hiroyuki; Yamamoto, Masaya; Uyama, Hiroshi; Tabata, Yasuhiko

    2016-01-01

    The objective of this study is to design hydrogels whose elasticity can be changed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in cell culture and evaluate the effect of hydrogel elasticity on an osteogenic gene expression of cells. Hydrogels were prepared by the radical polymerization of acrylamide (AAm), N,N'-methylenebisacrylamide (BIS), and Phosmer™M containing phosphate groups (PE-PAAm hydrogels). The storage modulus of PE-PAAm hydrogels prepared was changed by the preparation conditions. When human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSC) were cultured on the ALP-responsive PE-PAAm hydrogels in the presence or absence of ALP, the morphology of hMSC was observed and one of the osteogenic differentiation markers, Runx2, was evaluated. By ALP addition into the culture medium, the morphology of hMSC was changed into an elongated shape without cell damage. ALP addition modified the level of Runx2 gene expression, which was influenced by the modulus of PE-PAAm hydrogels. It is concluded that the elasticity change of hydrogel substrates in cell culture had an influence on the Runx2 gene expression of hMSC. Stem cells sense the surface elasticity of culture substrates, and their differentiation fate is biologically modified by substrate properties. Most of experiments have been performed in static conditions during cell culture, while the in vivo microenvironment is dynamically changed. In this study, we established to design an enzyme-responsive hydrogel whose elasticity can be changed by alkaline phosphatase (ALP) in cell culture to mimic in vivo conditions. As a result, the cells were deformed and the gene expression level of an osteogenic maker, Runx2, was modified by ALP treatment. This is the novel report describing to demonstrate that the dynamic alteration of hydrogel substrate elasticity could modulate the osteoblastic gene expression of human MSC in vitro. Copyright © 2015 Acta Materialia Inc. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Will embryonic stem cells change health policy?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sage, William M

    2010-01-01

    Embryonic stem cells are actively debated in political and public policy arenas. However, the connections between stem cell innovation and overall health care policy are seldom elucidated. As with many controversial aspects of medical care, the stem cell debate bridges to a variety of social conversations beyond abortion. Some issues, such as translational medicine, commercialization, patient and public safety, health care spending, physician practice, and access to insurance and health care services, are core health policy concerns. Other issues, such as economic development, technologic progress, fiscal politics, and tort reform, are only indirectly related to the health care system but are frequently seen through a health care lens. These connections will help determine whether the stem cell debate reaches a resolution, and what that resolution might be.

  8. Transforming growth factor-β signaling is constantly shaping memory T-cell population

    OpenAIRE

    Ma, Chaoyu; Zhang, Nu

    2015-01-01

    A persistent memory T-cell population is the basis for successful T-cell–based vaccine against pathogens. Numerous extracellular and intracellular molecules have been demonstrated to play critical roles in the differentiation of memory T cells; however, the mechanisms that control the long-term maintenance of memory T cells remain incompletely understood. Here we show that continuous transforming growth factor-β signaling is required to maintain the identity of memory T cells.

  9. Numerical investigation of the effect of shape change in graphite crucible during top-seeded solution growth of SiC

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mukaiyama, Yuji; Iizuka, Masaya; Vorob'ev, Andrey; Kalaev, Vladimir

    2017-10-01

    In the present work, a combined 2D-3D numerical simulation was performed to study the effect of shape change in the graphite crucible on the heat transfer, flow pattern, mass transport, and electromagnetic field during top seeded solution growth of SiC considering the dissolution of carbon during crystal growth. The graphite crucible shapes at each growth process time were predicted using 2D axisymmetric steady global heat and mass transfer simulations. The crucible geometries obtained for each time step, including the predicted crucible shapes, were used for 3D unsteady simulations. The investigation revealed a significant effect of the shape change of the crucible on the temperature, Lorentz force distribution induced by the radiofrequency heating system, flow pattern, carbon concentration in the solution, and growth rate of SiC.

  10. Hybrid Spreading Mechanisms and T Cell Activation Shape the Dynamics of HIV-1 Infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Changwang; Zhou, Shi; Groppelli, Elisabetta; Pellegrino, Pierre; Williams, Ian; Borrow, Persephone; Chain, Benjamin M.; Jolly, Clare

    2015-01-01

    HIV-1 can disseminate between susceptible cells by two mechanisms: cell-free infection following fluid-phase diffusion of virions and by highly-efficient direct cell-to-cell transmission at immune cell contacts. The contribution of this hybrid spreading mechanism, which is also a characteristic of some important computer worm outbreaks, to HIV-1 progression in vivo remains unknown. Here we present a new mathematical model that explicitly incorporates the ability of HIV-1 to use hybrid spreading mechanisms and evaluate the consequences for HIV-1 pathogenenesis. The model captures the major phases of the HIV-1 infection course of a cohort of treatment naive patients and also accurately predicts the results of the Short Pulse Anti-Retroviral Therapy at Seroconversion (SPARTAC) trial. Using this model we find that hybrid spreading is critical to seed and establish infection, and that cell-to-cell spread and increased CD4+ T cell activation are important for HIV-1 progression. Notably, the model predicts that cell-to-cell spread becomes increasingly effective as infection progresses and thus may present a considerable treatment barrier. Deriving predictions of various treatments’ influence on HIV-1 progression highlights the importance of earlier intervention and suggests that treatments effectively targeting cell-to-cell HIV-1 spread can delay progression to AIDS. This study suggests that hybrid spreading is a fundamental feature of HIV infection, and provides the mathematical framework incorporating this feature with which to evaluate future therapeutic strategies. PMID:25837979

  11. Patterning of the MinD cell division protein in cells of arbitrary shape can be predicted using a heuristic dispersion relation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James C. Walsh

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Many important cellular processes require the accurate positioning of subcellular structures. Underpinning many of these are protein systems that spontaneously generate spatiotemporal patterns. In some cases, these systems can be described by non-linear reaction-diffusion equations, however, a full description of such equations is rarely available. A well-studied patterning system is the Min protein system that underpins the positioning of the FtsZ contractile ring during cell division in Escherichia coli. Using a coordinate-free linear stability analysis, the reaction terms can be separated from the geometry of a cell. The reaction terms produce a dispersion relation that can be used to predict patterning on any cell shape and size. Applying linear stability analysis to an accurate mathematical model of the Min system shows that while it correctly predicts the onset of patterning, the dispersion relation fails to predict oscillations and quantitative mode transitions. However, we show that data from full solutions of the Min model can be used to generate a heuristic dispersion relation. We show that this heuristic dispersion relation can be used to approximate the Min protein patterning obtained by full simulations of the non-linear reaction-diffusion equations. Moreover, it also predicts Min patterning obtained from experiments where the shapes of E. coli cells have been deformed into rectangles or arbitrary shapes. Using this procedure, it should be possible to generate heuristic dispersion relations from protein patterning data or simulations for any patterning process and subsequently use these to predict patterning for arbitrary cell shapes.

  12. Adaptive spatiotemporal changes in morphology, anatomy, and mechanics during the ontogeny of subshrubs with square-shaped stems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaminski, Ruwen; Speck, Thomas; Speck, Olga

    2017-08-16

    Plant stems can be regarded as fiber-reinforced structures characterized by anatomical heterogeneity, mechanical anisotropy, and adaptability to changing internal and external constraints. Our study focused on adaptive spatiotemporal changes in morphology, anatomy, and mechanical properties during the ontogeny of Leonurus cardiaca L. (Lamiaceae) internodes, proving considerable functional adaptability. Four-point bending tests and torsional tests were carried out on the same internodes to measure flexural and torsional stiffness. Axial and polar second moments of area for entire cross sections and for individual tissues were determined from transverse stem sections immediately after testing. Based on these data, additional relevant mechanical parameters such as bending elastic modulus, torsional modulus and twist to bend ratio were calculated. Leonurus cardiaca is characterized by a square-shaped hollow stem in transverse section with an outer frame of various strengthening tissues and an inner ring of parenchyma. Statistical analyses of axial and polar second moment of area, flexural stiffness, torsional stiffness, bending elastic modulus, and torsional modulus revealed significant differences for all comparisons with respect to spatial resolution (two adjacent internodes) and temporal resolution (in June before flowering and in September after fruit formation). The twist to bend ratios of the internodes, however, always remain in the same range. With respect to spatiotemporal development, stems of the subshrub L. cardiaca show a marked increase in flexural and torsional stiffness during ontogeny. Strikingly, changes in stem mechanics are more influenced by variations in mechanical tissue properties than by changes in relative proportion of different tissue types. © 2017 Botanical Society of America.

  13. Silicon chips detect intracellular pressure changes in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gómez-Martínez, Rodrigo; Hernández-Pinto, Alberto M; Duch, Marta; Vázquez, Patricia; Zinoviev, Kirill; de la Rosa, Enrique J; Esteve, Jaume; Suárez, Teresa; Plaza, José A

    2013-07-01

    The ability to measure pressure changes inside different components of a living cell is important, because it offers an alternative way to study fundamental processes that involve cell deformation. Most current techniques such as pipette aspiration, optical interferometry or external pressure probes use either indirect measurement methods or approaches that can damage the cell membrane. Here we show that a silicon chip small enough to be internalized into a living cell can be used to detect pressure changes inside the cell. The chip, which consists of two membranes separated by a vacuum gap to form a Fabry-Pérot resonator, detects pressure changes that can be quantified from the intensity of the reflected light. Using this chip, we show that extracellular hydrostatic pressure is transmitted into HeLa cells and that these cells can endure hypo-osmotic stress without significantly increasing their intracellular hydrostatic pressure.

  14. Allometric shape change of the lower pharyngeal jaw correlates with a dietary shift to piscivory in a cichlid fish

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hellig, Christoph J.; Kerschbaumer, Michaela; Sefc, Kristina M.; Koblmüller, Stephan

    2010-07-01

    The morphological versatility of the pharyngeal jaw of cichlid fishes is assumed to represent a key factor facilitating their unparalleled trophic diversification and explosive radiation. It is generally believed that the functional design of an organism relates to its ecology, and thus, specializations to different diets are typically associated with distinct morphological designs, especially manifested in the cichlids’ pharyngeal jaw apparatus. Thereby, the lower pharyngeal jaw (LPJ) incorporates some of the most predictive features for distinct diet-related morphotypes. Thus, considering that piscivorous cichlids experience an ontogenetic dietary shift from typically various kinds of invertebrates to fish, concomitant morphological changes in the LPJ are expected. Using Lepidiolamprologus elongatus, a top predator in the shallow rocky habitat of Lake Tanganyika, as model, and applying geometric and traditional morphometric techniques, we demonstrate an allometric change in ontogenetic LPJ shape development coinciding with the completion of the dietary shift toward piscivory. The piscivorous LPJ morphotype is initiated in juvenile fish by increasing elongation and narrowing of the LPJ and—when the fish reach a size of 80-90 mm standard length—further refined by the elongation of the posterior muscular processes, which serve as insertion for the fourth musculus levator externus. The enlarged muscular processes of the fully mature piscivorous morphotype provide for the construction of a powerful lever system, which allows the large individuals to process large prey fish and rely on exclusive piscivory.

  15. Metric distances between hippocampal shapes indicate different rates of change over time in nondemented and demented subjects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceyhan, Elvan; Beg, Mirza Faisal; Ceritoğlu, Can; Wang, Lei; Morris, John C; Csernansky, John G; Miller, Michael I; Ratnanather, J Tilak

    2012-10-01

    In this article, we use longitudinal morphometry (shape and size) measures of hippocampus in subjects with mild dementia of Alzheimer type (DAT) and nondemented controls in logistic discrimination. The morphometric measures we use are volume and metric distance measures at baseline and follow-up (two years apart from baseline). Morphometric differences with respect to a template hippocampus were measured by the metric distance obtained from the large deformation diffeomorphic metric mapping (LDDMM) algorithm. LDDMM assigns metric distances on the space of anatomical images, thereby allowing for the direct comparison and quantization of morphometric changes. We also apply principal component analysis (PCA) on volume and metric distance measures to obtain principal components that capture some salient aspect of morphometry. We construct classifiers based on logistic regression to distinguish diseased and healthy hippocampi (hence potentially diagnose the mild form of DAT). We consider logistic classifiers based on volume and metric distance change over time (from baseline to follow-up), on the raw volumes and metric distances, and on principal components from various types of PCA analysis. We provide a detailed comparison of the performance of these classifiers and guidelines for their practical use. Moreover, combining the information conveyed by volume and metric distance measures by PCA can provide a better biomarker for detection of dementia compared to volume, metric distance, or both.

  16. Bone Remodelling Model Incorporating Both Shape and Internal Structure Changes by Three Different Reconstruction Mechanisms. A Lumbar Spine Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wymysłowski Paweł

    2016-12-01

    Full Text Available The paper presents a method of analysis of bone remodelling in the vicinity of implants. The authors aimed at building a model and numerical procedures which may be used as a tool in the prosthesis design process. The model proposed by the authors is based on the theory of adaptive elasticity and the lazy zone concept. It takes into consideration not only changes of the internal structure of the tissue (described by apparent density but also surface remodelling and changes caused by the effects revealing some features of “creep”. Finite element analysis of a lumbar spinal segment with an artificial intervertebral disc was performed by means of the Ansys system with custom APDL code. The algorithms were in two variants: the so-called siteindependent and site-specific. Resultant density distribution and modified shape of the vertebra are compared for both of them. It is shown that this two approaches predict the bone remodelling in different ways. A comparison with available clinical outcomes is also presented and similarities to the numerical results are pointed out.

  17. Transcriptome changes during intestinal cell differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tadjali, Mehrdad; Seidelin, Jakob B; Olsen, Jørgen

    2002-01-01

    by a general down-regulation of genes in the low abundance class. Similar results were found using mouse small intestinal crypt and villus cells, suggesting that the phenomenon also occurs in the intestine in vivo. The expression data were subsequently used in a search for markers for subsets of epithelial...... cells by performing reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction on RNA extracted from laser dissected intestinal crypt and villi. In a screen of eight transcripts one - SART3 - was identified as a marker for human colonic crypts....

  18. [Case report of rare co-occurrence of renal cell carcinoma and crossed renal dystopia (L-shaped kidney)].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bakov, V N; Los, M S

    2017-10-01

    L-shaped kidney refers to a rare anomaly of the relative kidney positioning. Due to low prevalence, the literature on the co-occurrence of this anomaly with malignancy is lacking. And, if the diagnosis of a renal anomaly does not present difficulties, if a tumor is detected in such a kidney, even MSCT does not always help differentiate a pelvic tumor from a tumor of the renal parenchyma spreading to the pelvicalyceal system. This has important implications for choosing an appropriate surgical strategy. A feature of the presented clinical observation is the co-occurrence of the rare anomaly of kidney position and locally advanced renal cell carcinoma spreading to the renal pelvis. Due to the massive spread of the tumor, an organ-sparing surgery was not feasible. Due to the suspicion of tumor spread to the renal pelvis, the patient underwent nephrureterectomy of the L-shaped kidney. Introduction to renoprival state with transfer to chronic hemodialysis became the only option to maintain homeostasis and extend the patients life. Histological examination revealed clear cell renal cell carcinoma with invasion of the pelvis and renal capsule, with no clear demarcation between the fused kidneys.

  19. Influence of Polyplex Formation on the Performance of Star-Shaped Polycationic Transfection Agents for Mammalian Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Raup

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic modification (“transfection” of mammalian cells using non-viral, synthetic agents such as polycations, is still a challenge. Polyplex formation between the DNA and the polycation is a decisive step in such experiments. Star-shaped polycations have been proposed as superior transfection agents, yet have never before been compared side-by-side, e.g., in view of structural effects. Herein four star-shaped polycationic structures, all based on (2-dimethylamino ethyl methacrylate (DMAEMA building blocks, were investigated for their potential to deliver DNA to adherent (CHO, L929, HEK-293 and non-adherent (Jurkat, primary human T lymphocytes mammalian cells. The investigated vectors included three structures where the PDMAEMA arms (different arm length and grafting densities had been grown from a center silsesquioxane or silica-coated γ-Fe2O3-core and one micellar structure self-assembled from poly(1,2-butadiene-block PDMAEMA polymers. All nano-stars combined high transfection potential with excellent biocompatibility. The micelles slightly outperformed the covalently linked agents. For method development and optimization, the absolute amount of polycation added to the cells was more important than the N/P-ratio (ratio between polycation nitrogen and DNA phosphate, provided a lower limit was passed and enough polycation was present to overcompensate the negative charge of the plasmid DNA. Finally, the matrix (NaCl vs. HEPES-buffered glucose solution, but also the concentrations adjusted during polyplex formation, affected the results.

  20. Infection Programs Sustained Lymphoid Stromal Cell Responses and Shapes Lymph Node Remodeling upon Secondary Challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia L. Gregory

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Lymph nodes (LNs are constructed of intricate networks of endothelial and mesenchymal stromal cells. How these lymphoid stromal cells (LSCs regulate lymphoid tissue remodeling and contribute to immune responses remains poorly understood. We performed a comprehensive functional and transcriptional analysis of LSC responses to skin viral infection and found that LSC subsets responded robustly, with different kinetics for distinct pathogens. Recruitment of cells to inflamed LNs induced LSC expansion, while B cells sustained stromal responses in an antigen-independent manner. Infection induced rapid transcriptional responses in LSCs. This transcriptional program was transient, returning to homeostasis within 1 month of infection, yet expanded fibroblastic reticular cell networks persisted for more than 3 months after infection, and this altered LN composition reduced the magnitude of LSC responses to subsequent heterologous infection. Our results reveal the complexity of LSC responses during infection and suggest that amplified networks of LN stromal cells support successive immune responses.

  1. Relationship between nanotopographical alignment and stem cell fate with live imaging and shape analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Newman, Peter; Galenano-Ni?o, Jorge Luis; Graney, Pamela; Razal, Joselito M.; Minett, Andrew I.; Ribas, Jo?o; Ovalle-Robles, Raquel; Biro, Mat?; Zreiqat, Hala

    2016-01-01

    The topography of a biomaterial regulates cellular interactions and determine stem cell fate. A complete understanding of how topographical properties affect cell behavior will allow the rational design of material surfaces that elicit specified biological functions once placed in the body. To this end, we fabricate substrates with aligned or randomly organized fibrous nanostructured topographies. Culturing adipose-derived stem cells (ASCs), we explore the dynamic relationship between the ali...

  2. Determination of Specific Heat Capacity on Composite Shape-Stabilized Phase Change Materials and Asphalt Mixtures by Heat Exchange System.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Biao; Zhou, Xue-Yan; Liu, Jiang; You, Zhanping; Wei, Kun; Huang, Xiao-Feng

    2016-05-19

    Previous research has shown that composite shape-stabilized phase change material (CPCM) has a remarkable capacity for thermal storage and stabilization, and it can be directly applied to highway construction without leakage. However, recent studies on temperature changing behaviors of CPCM and asphalt mixture cannot intuitively reflect the thermoregulation mechanism and efficiency of CPCM on asphalt mixture. The objective of this paper is to determine the specific heat capacity of CPCM and asphalt mixtures mixed with CPCM using the heat exchange system and the data acquisition system. Studies have shown that the temperature-rise curve of 5 °C CPCM has an obvious temperature plateau, while an asphalt mixture mixed with 5 °C CPCM does not; with increasing temperature, the specific heat capacities of both 5 °C CPCM and asphalt mixture first increase and then decrease, while the variation rate of 5 °C CPCM is larger than that of the asphalt mixture, and the maximum specific heat capacity of 5 °C CPCM appears around the initial phase change temperature. It is concluded that the temperature intervals of 5 °C CPCM are -18 °C-7 °C, 7 °C-25 °C and 25 °C-44 °C, respectively, and that of the asphalt mixture are -18 °C~10 °C, -10 °C~5 °C and 5 °C~28 °C. A low dosage of 5 °C CPCM has little influence on the specific heat capacity of asphalt mixture. Finally, the functions of specific heat capacities and temperature for CPCM and asphalt mixture mixed with CPCM were recommended by the sectional regression method.

  3. Antigen experience shapes phenotype and function of memory Th1 cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aaruni Khanolkar

    Full Text Available Primary and secondary (boosted memory CD8 T cells exhibit differences in gene expression, phenotype and function. The impact of repeated antigen stimulations on memory CD4 T cells is largely unknown. To address this issue, we utilized LCMV and Listeria monocytogenes infection of mice to characterize primary and secondary antigen (Ag-specific Th1 CD4 T cell responses. Ag-specific primary memory CD4 T cells display a CD62L(loCCR7(hi CD27(hi CD127(hi phenotype and are polyfunctional (most produce IFNγ, TNFα and IL-2. Following homologous prime-boost immunization we observed pathogen-specific differences in the rate of CD62L and CCR7 upregulation on memory CD4 T cells as well as in IL-2+IFNγco-production by secondary effectors. Phenotypic and functional plasticity of memory Th1 cells was observed following heterologous prime-boost immunization, wherein secondary memory CD4 T cells acquired phenotypic and functional characteristics dictated by the boosting agent rather than the primary immunizing agent. Our data also demonstrate that secondary memory Th1 cells accelerated neutralizing Ab formation in response to LCMV infection, suggesting enhanced capacity of this population to provide quality help for antibody production. Collectively these data have important implications for prime-boost vaccination strategies that seek to enhance protective immune responses mediated by Th1 CD4 T cell responses.

  4. The morphological and molecular changes of brain cells exposed to direct current electric field stimulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pelletier, Simon J; Lagacé, Marie; St-Amour, Isabelle; Arsenault, Dany; Cisbani, Giulia; Chabrat, Audrey; Fecteau, Shirley; Lévesque, Martin; Cicchetti, Francesca

    2014-12-07

    The application of low-intensity direct current electric fields has been experimentally used in the clinic to treat a number of brain disorders, predominantly using transcranial direct current stimulation approaches. However, the cellular and molecular changes induced by such treatment remain largely unknown. Here, we tested various intensities of direct current electric fields (0, 25, 50, and 100V/m) in a well-controlled in vitro environment in order to investigate the responses of neurons, microglia, and astrocytes to this type of stimulation. This included morphological assessments of the cells, viability, as well as shape and fiber outgrowth relative to the orientation of the direct current electric field. We also undertook enzyme-linked immunosorbent assays and western immunoblotting to identify which molecular pathways were affected by direct current electric fields. In response to direct current electric field, neurons developed an elongated cell body shape with neurite outgrowth that was associated with a significant increase in growth associated protein-43. Fetal midbrain dopaminergic explants grown in a collagen gel matrix also showed a reorientation of their neurites towards the cathode. BV2 microglial cells adopted distinct morphological changes with an increase in cyclooxygenase-2 expression, but these were dependent on whether they had already been activated with lipopolysaccharide. Finally, astrocytes displayed elongated cell bodies with cellular filopodia that were oriented perpendicularly to the direct current electric field. We show that cells of the central nervous system can respond to direct current electric fields both in terms of their morphological shape and molecular expression of certain proteins, and this in turn can help us to begin understand the mechanisms underlying the clinical benefits of direct current electric field. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of CINP.

  5. Exosomes Secreted by Toxoplasma gondii-Infected L6 Cells: Their Effects on Host Cell Proliferation and Cell Cycle Changes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min Jae; Jung, Bong-Kwang; Cho, Jaeeun; Song, Hyemi; Pyo, Kyung-Ho; Lee, Ji Min; Kim, Min-Kyung; Chai, Jong-Yil

    2016-04-01

    Toxoplasma gondii infection induces alteration of the host cell cycle and cell proliferation. These changes are not only seen in directly invaded host cells but also in neighboring cells. We tried to identify whether this alteration can be mediated by exosomes secreted by T. gondii-infected host cells. L6 cells, a rat myoblast cell line, and RH strain of T. gondii were selected for this study. L6 cells were infected with or without T. gondii to isolate exosomes. The cellular growth patterns were identified by cell counting with trypan blue under confocal microscopy, and cell cycle changes were investigated by flow cytometry. L6 cells infected with T. gondii showed decreased proliferation compared to uninfected L6 cells and revealed a tendency to stay at S or G2/M cell phase. The treatment of exosomes isolated from T. gondii-infected cells showed attenuation of cell proliferation and slight enhancement of S phase in L6 cells. The cell cycle alteration was not as obvious as reduction of the cell proliferation by the exosome treatment. These changes were transient and disappeared at 48 hr after the exosome treatment. Microarray analysis and web-based tools indicated that various exosomal miRNAs were crucial for the regulation of target genes related to cell proliferation. Collectively, our study demonstrated that the exosomes originating from T. gondii could change the host cell proliferation and alter the host cell cycle.

  6. Leaf-shape remodeling: programmed cell death in fistular leaves of Allium fistulosum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ni, Xi-Lu; Su, Hui; Zhou, Ya-fu; Wang, Feng-Hua; Liu, Wen-Zhe

    2015-03-01

    Some species of Allium in Liliaceae have fistular leaves. The fistular lamina of Allium fistulosum undergoes a process from solid to hollow during development. The aims were to reveal the process of fistular leaf formation involved in programmed cell death (PCD) and to compare the cytological events in the execution of cell death to those in the unusual leaf perforations or plant aerenchyma formation. In this study, light and transmission electron microscopy were used to characterize the development of fistular leaves and cytological events. Terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assays and gel electrophoresis were used to determine nuclear DNA cleavage during the PCD. The cavity arises in the leaf blade by degradation of specialized cells, the designated pre-cavity cells, in the center of the leaves. Nuclei of cells within the pre-cavity site become TUNEL-positive, indicating that DNA cleavage is an early event. Gel electrophoresis revealed that DNA internucleosomal cleavage occurred resulting in a characteristic DNA ladder. Ultrastructural analysis of cells at the different stages showed disrupted vacuoles, misshapen nuclei with condensed chromatin, degraded cytoplasm and organelles and emergence of secondary vacuoles. The cell walls degraded last, and residue of degraded cell walls aggregated together. These results revealed that PCD plays a critical role in the development of A. fistulosum fistular leaves. The continuous cavity in A. fistulosum leaves resemble the aerenchyma in the pith of some gramineous plants to improve gas exchange. © 2014 Scandinavian Plant Physiology Society.

  7. My oh my(osin): Insights into how auditory hair cells count, measure, and shape.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Lana M; Chou, Shih-Wei; McDermott, Brian M

    2016-01-18

    The mechanisms underlying mechanosensory hair bundle formation in auditory sensory cells are largely mysterious. In this issue, Lelli et al. (2016. J. Cell Biol. http://dx.doi.org/10.1083/jcb.201509017) reveal that a pair of molecular motors, myosin IIIa and myosin IIIb, is involved in the hair bundle's morphology and hearing. © 2016 Pollock et al.

  8. Cytotoxic effects and morphological changes of silver nanoparticles in CHO-K1 cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masoumeh Heshmati

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Background: Silver nanoparticles are of interest to be used as antimicrobial agents in medical care, wound dressings and cosmetics. Despite the fact that AgNPs are among the most commercialized nano materials owing to their specific antimicrobial properties, there is limited information about their risk assessment and possible hazards to human health and environment. Thus, this study was carried out to evaluate the cytotoxicity and morphological changes of different concentrations of two samples of commercialized silver nanoparticles (A and B in CHO-K1 cells using MTT assay. Methods: The cytotoxicity effect of silver nanoparticles AgNP-A (19.6 nm in diameter and AgNP-B (15 nm in diameter on CHO-K1 was evaluated in the range of 0.005-500 µg/ml after 24 hours of treatment using MTT assay. The morphological changes of treated cells were examined by light microscopy. Results: Based on the results of cytotoxicity by MTT assay, reduced viability of cells and cytotoxicity were observed. The 50% inhibitory concentration (IC50 of silver nanoparticles was recorded at 100 and 10 µg/ml for AgNP-A and AgNP-B, respectively. Moreover, microscopic observations indicated clear morphological changes of treated cells. Conclusion: Concentration and physicochemical properties of silver nanoparticles like size, shape, surface area, coating and zeta potential play a role in cytotoxicity and morphological changes of treated cells.

  9. The functional interplay of Rab11, FIP3 and Rho proteins on the endosomal recycling pathway controls cell shape and symmetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bouchet, Jérôme; McCaffrey, Mary W; Graziani, Andrea; Alcover, Andrés

    2016-08-17

    Several families of small GTPases regulate a variety of fundamental cellular processes, encompassing growth factor signal transduction, vesicular trafficking and control of the cytoskeleton. Frequently, their action is hierarchical and complementary, but much of the detail of their functional interactions remains to be clarified. It is well established that Rab family members regulate a variety of intracellular vesicle trafficking pathways. Moreover, Rho family GTPases are pivotal for the control of the actin and microtubule cytoskeleton. However, the interplay between these 2 types of GTPases has been rarely reported. We discuss here our recent findings showing that Rab11, a key regulator of endosomal recycling, and Rac1, a central actin cytoskeleton regulator involved in lamellipodium formation and cell migration, interplay on endosomes through the Rab11 effector FIP3. In the context of the rapidly reactive T lymphocytes, Rab11-Rac1 endosomal functional interplay is important to control cell shape changes and cell symmetry during lymphocyte spreading and immunological synapse formation and ultimately modulate T cell activation.

  10. Shaping bacterial population behavior through computer-interfaced control of individual cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chait, Remy; Ruess, Jakob; Bergmiller, Tobias; Tkačik, Gašper; Guet, Călin C

    2017-11-16

    Bacteria in groups vary individually, and interact with other bacteria and the environment to produce population-level patterns of gene expression. Investigating such behavior in detail requires measuring and controlling populations at the single-cell level alongside precisely specified interactions and environmental characteristics. Here we present an automated, programmable platform that combines image-based gene expression and growth measurements with on-line optogenetic expression control for hundreds of individual Escherichia coli cells over days, in a dynamically adjustable environment. This integrated platform broadly enables experiments that bridge individual and population behaviors. We demonstrate: (i) population structuring by independent closed-loop control of gene expression in many individual cells, (ii) cell-cell variation control during antibiotic perturbation, (iii) hybrid bio-digital circuits in single cells, and freely specifiable digital communication between individual bacteria. These examples showcase the potential for real-time integration of theoretical models with measurement and control of many individual cells to investigate and engineer microbial population behavior.

  11. An ortholog of MIXTA-like2 controls epidermal cell shape in flowers of Thalictrum.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Di Stilio, Verónica S; Martin, Cathie; Schulfer, Anjelique F; Connelly, Caitlin F

    2009-08-01

    Here, we investigated the genetic underpinnings of pollination-related floral phenotypes in Thalictrum, a ranunculid with apetalous flowers. The variable presence of petaloid features in other floral organs correlates with distinct adaptations to insect vs. wind pollination. Conical cells are present in sepals or stamens of insect-pollinated species, and in stigmas. We characterized a Thalictrum ortholog of the Antirrhinum majus transcription factor MIXTA-like2, responsible for conical cells, from three species with distinct floral morphologies, representing two pollination syndromes. Genes were cloned by PCR and analysed phylogenetically. Expression analyses were conducted by quantitative PCR and in situ hybridization, followed by functional studies in transgenic tobacco. The cloned genes encode R2R3 MYB proteins closely related to Antirrhinum AmMYBML2 and Petunia hybrida PhMYB1. Spatial expression by in situ hybridization overlaps areas of conical cells. Overexpression in tobacco induces cell outgrowths in carpel epidermis and significantly increases the height of petal conical cells. We have described the first orthologs of AmMIXTA-like2 outside the core eudicots, likely ancestral to the MIXTA/MIXTA-like1 duplication. The conserved role in epidermal cell elongation results in conical cells, micromorphological markers for petaloidy. This adaptation to attract insect pollinators was apparently lost after the evolution of wind pollination in Thalictrum.

  12. [Study on shell shape changes of filial generation Oncomelania hupensis snails in Weishan Lake region, Shandong Province].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miao, Feng; Liu, Xin; Wang, Li-Lei; Deng, Xu-Li; Chen, Xi-Xin; Fu, Zhao-Yi; Wang, Yong-Bin

    2014-02-01

    To explore the shape change characteristics of Oncomelania hupensis snail shell after the snails being passively migrated into Shandong intake area of the South-to-North Water Diversion Project. The snails raised on the Dushan island in Weishan Lake region were captured, and 115 the first filial generation snails and 107 the second filial generation ones were selected. The length and width of shells and apertures, and the labial ridge thickness of those snails were measured, the longitudinal rib number of snail spiral was counted, and 107 parental snails were chosen as controls. The labial ridge thickness of the filial generation snail was significantly reduced with the increase of algebras, and the labial ridge thickness among the 3 generations had a significant difference (P snail shell and the width of snail apertures were decreased, while the width of snail shell, the length of snail apertures, the multiplication product of snail aperture's length and width and the longitudinal rib number of snail spiral were all increased. The body size of Oncomelania snails in Weishan Lake region becomes smaller, and their shells become thinner, which indicates that the environment of the lake region is not suitable for snail breeding, and the snails have natural decay tendency with the extension of time.

  13. Modularity of the Oral Jaws Is Linked to Repeated Changes in the Craniofacial Shape of African Cichlids

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parsons, Kevin J.; Cooper, W. James; Albertson, R. Craig

    2011-01-01

    The African cichlids of the East-African rift-lakes provide one of the most dramatic examples of adaptive radiation known. It has long been thought that functional decoupling of the oral and pharyngeal jaws in cichlids has facilitated their explosive evolution. Recent research has also shown that craniofacial evolution from radiations in lakes Victoria, Malawi, and Tanganyika has occurred along a shared primary axis of shape divergence, whereby the preorbital region of the skull changes in a manner that is, relatively independent from other head regions. We predicted that the preorbital region would comprise a variational module and used an extensive dataset from each lake that allowed us to test this prediction using a model selection approach. Our findings supported the presence of a preorbital module across all lakes, within each lake, and for Malawi, within sand and rock-dwelling clades. However, while a preorbital module was consistently present, notable differences were also observed among groups. Of particular interest, a negative association between patterns of variational modularity was observed between the sand and rock-dwelling clades, a patter consistent with character displacement. These findings provide the basis for further experimental research involving the determination of the developmental and genetic bases of these patterns of modularity. PMID:21716745

  14. Earth's changing shape and the seasonal water cycle: Direct estimation of low-degree spherical harmonic loading coefficients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blewitt, G.; Clarke, P. J.; Lavallee, D.; Nurutdinov, K.

    2003-04-01

    The hydrological cycle can in principle be explored on a global, seasonal scale by using geodetic measurement of the Earth’s changing shape to invert for surface mass redistribution, through dynamic models of how the solid Earth responds to surface loading. We show how surface displacements represented as a vector spherical harmonic expansion relate to the surface mass distribution. Our previously published results show direct estimates of the degree-1 component of seasonal loading using the observed seasonal deformation of GPS stations in the IGS network. Here we extend this work to additional low-degree components, assessing the sensitivity of the results to the degree of truncation, and assessing the potential spatial resolution that might be possible with this new technique. In addition, we show how to apply the dynamic constraint that sea level be in accord with the deformed geoid and the deformed ocean bottom in a way that is self-consistent with loading theory, the estimated distribution of mass, and the estimated exchange of ocean-land mass.

  15. Modularity of the Oral Jaws Is Linked to Repeated Changes in the Craniofacial Shape of African Cichlids

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin J. Parsons

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available The African cichlids of the East-African rift-lakes provide one of the most dramatic examples of adaptive radiation known. It has long been thought that functional decoupling of the oral and pharyngeal jaws in cichlids has facilitated their explosive evolution. Recent research has also shown that craniofacial evolution from radiations in lakes Victoria, Malawi, and Tanganyika has occurred along a shared primary axis of shape divergence, whereby the preorbital region of the skull changes in a manner that is, relatively independent from other head regions. We predicted that the preorbital region would comprise a variational module and used an extensive dataset from each lake that allowed us to test this prediction using a model selection approach. Our findings supported the presence of a preorbital module across all lakes, within each lake, and for Malawi, within sand and rock-dwelling clades. However, while a preorbital module was consistently present, notable differences were also observed among groups. Of particular interest, a negative association between patterns of variational modularity was observed between the sand and rock-dwelling clades, a patter consistent with character displacement. These findings provide the basis for further experimental research involving the determination of the developmental and genetic bases of these patterns of modularity.

  16. Changes in the Shape of Histograms Constructed from the Results of 239-Pu Alpha-Activity Measurements Correlate with the Deviations of the Moon from the Keplerian Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapovalov S. N.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We have found that the shape of the histograms, constructed on the basis of the results of radioactivity measurements, changes in correlation with the distortions of the lunar Keplerian orbit (due to the gravitational influence of the Sun. Taking into account that the phenomenon of “macroscopic fluctuations” (regular changes in the fine structure of histograms constructed from the results of measurements of natural processes does not depend on the nature of the process under study, one can consider the correlation of the histogram shape with the Moon’s deviations from the Keplerian orbit to be independent from the nature of the process the histograms were obtained on.

  17. Changes in the Shape of Histograms Constructed from the Results of 239-Pu Alpha-Activity Measurements Correlate with the Deviations of the Moon from the Keplerian Orbit

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shapovalov S. N.

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available We have found that the shape of the histograms, constructed on the basis of the results of radioactivity measurements, changes in correlation with the distortions of the lunar Keplerian orbit (due to the gravitational influence of the Sun. Taking into account that the phenomenon of "macroscopic fluctuations" (regular changes in the fine structure of histograms constructed from the results of measurements of natural processes does not depend on the nature of the process under study, one can consider the correlation of the histogram shape with the Moon's deviations from the Keplerian orbit to be independent from the nature of the process the histograms were obtained on.

  18. Roles of Municipal Councils in Poland and in the Czech Republic: Factors Shaping the Roles and the Dynamic of Change

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katarzyna Radzik-Maruszak

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract: Research Question (RQ: After many years of not being in vogue, the issue of representative democracy at the local level has yet again caught the scholars’ attention. The interest is related both to falling turnout in local elections, disappointment in party politics as well as to the impact of the new trends such as the strengthening of the executive power or citizens’ more direct involvement in the decision-making process. Quite often the afore-mentioned trends force local councils to redefine their roles. Purpose: The main objective of the article is to investigate the factors that shape the roles of municipal councils in two CEE countries, Poland and the Czech Republic, and to track the possible dynamic of their change. Method: The analysis conducted in the paper is grounded mainly in institutional theory. The study is based on available statistic data, examination of legal regulations, documents and information included in the corpus of selected articles and books. Results: The outcome of the analysis conducted indicates that in both countries the basic roles of councils – representative, decision - making and administrative one – are being diminished. Nevertheless, the existing institutional framework as well as reforms implemented in recent years provide potential for the development of new roles, such as the facilitator of the governing process or a network coordinator. Organization: The paper may contribute to better organisation of local administration at the municipal level. Society: The study has an impact on the understanding of representative democracy in local self-governments. Originality: The paper elaborates on representative democracy at the municipal level in Poland and the Czech Republic, countries where the discussion over this issue is still much less visible than in Western Europe. Limitations / further research: The paper should be mainly perceived as a kind of theoretical introduction to further

  19. Effects of Selenium on Morphological Changes in Candida utilis ATCC 9950 Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieliszek, Marek; Błażejak, Stanisław; Bzducha-Wróbel, Anna; Kurcz, Agnieszka

    2016-02-01

    This paper presents the results of microscopic examinations of the yeast cells cultured in yeast extract-peptone-dextrose (YPD) media supplemented with sodium selenite(IV). The analysis of the morphological changes in yeast cells aimed to determine whether the selected selenium doses and culturing time may affect this element accumulation in yeast cell structures in a form of inorganic or organic compounds, as a result of detoxification processes. The range of characteristic morphological changes in yeasts cultivated in experimental media with sodium selenite(IV) was observed, including cell shrinkage and cytoplasm thickening of the changes within vacuole structure. The processes of vacuole disintegration were observed in aging yeast cells in culturing medium, which may indicate the presence of so-called ghost cells lacking intracellular organelles The changes occurring in the morphology of yeasts cultured in media supplemented with sodium selenite were typical for stationary phase of yeast growth. From detailed microscopic observations, larger surface area of the cell (6.03 μm(2)) and yeast vacuole (2.17 μm(2)) were noticed after 24-h culturing in the medium with selenium of 20 mg Se(4+)/L. The coefficient of shape of the yeast cells cultured in media enriched with sodium selenite as well as in the control YPD medium ranged from 1.02 to 1.22. Elongation of cultivation time (up to 48 and 72 h) in the media supplemented with sodium selenite caused a reduction in the surface area of the yeast cell and vacuole due to detoxification processes.

  20. Shape-induced terminal differentiation of human epidermal stem cells requires p38 and is regulated by histone acetylation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John T Connelly

    Full Text Available Engineered model substrates are powerful tools for examining interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment. Using this approach, we have previously shown that restricted cell adhesion promotes terminal differentiation of human epidermal stem cells via activation of serum response factor (SRF and transcription of AP-1 genes. Here we investigate the roles of p38 MAPK and histone acetylation. Inhibition of p38 activity impaired SRF transcriptional activity and shape-induced terminal differentiation of human keratinocytes. In addition, inhibiting p38 reduced histone H3 acetylation at the promoters of SRF target genes, FOS and JUNB. Although histone acetylation correlated with SRF transcriptional activity and target gene expression, treatment with the histone de-acetylase inhibitor, trichostatin A (TSA blocked terminal differentiation on micro-patterned substrates and in suspension. TSA treatment simultaneously maintained expression of LRIG1, TP63, and ITGB1. Therefore, global histone de-acetylation represses stem cell maintenance genes independent of SRF. Our studies establish a novel role for extrinsic physical cues in the regulation of chromatin remodeling, transcription, and differentiation of human epidermal stem cells.

  1. Shape reconstruction and height fluctuations of red blood cells using defocusing microscopy

    CERN Document Server

    Siman, L; Amaral, F T; Agero, U; Mesquita, O N

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the bright-field defocusing microscopy (DM) technique is presented. DM is able to obtain quantitative information of each plane/surface of pure phase objects, as live unlabeled cells, and its application to red blood cells (RBCs) is demonstrated. Based on contrast, simple methods to obtain thickness profile and three dimensional (3D) total reconstruction of RBCs are proposed and the actual height profiles of upper and lower surface-membranes (lipid bilayer$/$cytoskeleton) of discocyte and stomatocyte red cells are presented as examples. In addition, using the mean square contrast fluctuation and modeling the RBC membranes fluctuations spectra as dependent of a bending modulus $(\\kappa_c)$, a surface tension $(\\sigma)$ and a confining potential $(\\gamma)$ term, slowly varying quantities along the cell radius, a genetic algorithm (GA) is used and the radial height fluctuations of each surface-membrane are accessed, separately. The radial behaviors of $\\kappa_c$, $\\sigma$ and $\\gamma$ are also obta...

  2. IL-2 Shapes the Survival and Plasticity of IL-17-Producing γδ T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corpuz, Theresa M; Vazquez-Lombardi, Rodrigo; Luong, Jason K; Warren, Joanna; Stolp, Jessica; Christ, Daniel; King, Cecile; Brink, Robert; Sprent, Jonathan; Webster, Kylie E

    2017-10-01

    IL-17-producing γδ T (γδT-17) cells have proved to be an important early source of IL-17 in many inflammatory settings and are emerging as an important participant in protumor immune responses. Considering that their peripheral activation depends largely on innate signals rather than TCR ligation, it is important to understand what mechanisms exist to curb unwanted activation. Expression of the high-affinity IL-2R on γδT-17 cells prompted us to investigate a role for this cytokine. We found γδT-17 cells to be enriched, not depleted, in IL-2-deficient mice. The absence of IL-2 also resulted in higher IL-17 production and the emergence of IL-17 + IFN-γ + double producers. Furthermore, the addition of IL-2 to in vitro cultures of sorted γδT-17 cells was able to moderate IL-17 and affect differentiation into polyfunctional cytokine-producing cells. Interestingly, the Vγ6 + subset was more susceptible to the effects of IL-2 than Vγ4 + γδT-17 cells. We also found that unlike other γδ T cells, γδT-17 cells do not produce IL-2, but express Blimp-1, a known transcriptional repressor of IL-2. Although IL-2 was able to induce robust proliferation of γδT-17 cells, it did not sustain viability, negatively impacting their survival via downregulation of the IL-7R. Taken together, these data indicate that IL-2 can augment the γδT-17 response in favor of short-lived effectors with limited plasticity, particularly in the presence of IL-1β and IL-23. In this way, IL-2 may act to curtail the innate-like response of γδT-17 cells upon arrival of IL-2-producing adaptive immune cells at the site of inflammation. Copyright © 2017 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  3. The tumor microenvironment shapes lineage, transcriptional, and functional diversity of infiltrating myeloid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elpek, Kutlu G; Cremasco, Viviana; Shen, Hua; Harvey, Christopher J; Wucherpfennig, Kai W; Goldstein, Daniel R; Monach, Paul A; Turley, Shannon J

    2014-07-01

    Myeloid cells play important regulatory roles within the tumor environment by directly promoting tumor progression and modulating the function of tumor-infiltrating lymphocytes, and as such, they represent a potential therapeutic target for the treatment of cancer. Although distinct subsets of tumor-associated myeloid cells have been identified, a broader analysis of the complete myeloid cell landscape within individual tumors and also across different tumor types has been lacking. By establishing the developmental and transcriptomic signatures of infiltrating myeloid cells from multiple primary tumors, we found that tumor-associated macrophages (TAM) and tumor-associated neutrophils (TAN), while present within all tumors analyzed, exhibited strikingly different frequencies, gene expression profiles, and functions across cancer types. We also evaluated the impact of anatomic location and circulating factors on the myeloid cell composition of tumors. The makeup of the myeloid compartment was determined by the tumor microenvironment rather than the anatomic location of tumor development or tumor-derived circulating factors. Protumorigenic and hypoxia-associated genes were enriched in TAMs and TANs compared with splenic myeloid-derived suppressor cells. Although all TANs had an altered expression pattern of secretory effector molecules, in each tumor type they exhibited a unique cytokine, chemokine, and associated receptor expression profile. One such molecule, haptoglobin, was uniquely expressed by 4T1 TANs and identified as a possible diagnostic biomarker for tumors characterized by the accumulation of myeloid cells. Thus, we have identified considerable cancer-specific diversity in the lineage, gene expression, and function of tumor-infiltrating myeloid cells. ©2014 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Well-defined star-shaped conjugated macroelectrolytes as efficient electron-collecting interlayer for inverted polymer solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Weidong; Kan, Zhipeng; Ye, Tengling; Zhao, Li; Lai, Wen-Yong; Xia, Ruidong; Lanzani, Guglielmo; Keivanidis, Panagiotis E; Huang, Wei

    2015-01-14

    A star-shaped monodisperse conjugated macroelectrolyte grafted with cationic side chains, TrNBr, was designed, synthesized, and utilized as efficient electron-collecting cathode interlayers for inverted polymer solar cells. A neutral one composed of identical star-shaped conjugated backbone, TrOH, was also investigated for comparison. The surface properties and the function as interfacial layers on modulating the work function of bottom electrode (indium tin oxide) were systematically studied. Both interfacial electron-selective materials show strongly thickness-dependent performance for inverted polymer solar cells, and the best performance could be achieved via optimizing the thickness with 2.4 nm of TrNBr and 8.7 nm of TrOH. Parallel investigations of optimized TrNBr and TrOH interlayer in inverted architecture with active blend layer of poly(3-hexylthiophene):indene-C60 bisadduct (P3HT:ICBA) demonstrated a remarkable power conversion efficiency (PCE) enhancement (PCE of 4.88% for TrNBr and 4.74% for TrOH) in comparison with those of conventional noninverted devices using Ca/Al cathodes (3.94%) and inverted devices with sol-gel ZnO buffer layer (4.21%). In addition, the inverted devices using the TrNBr and TrOH interlayer exhibited improved device stability in contrast to conventional noninverted devices using Ca/Al cathodes.

  5. Shape-Dependent Activity of Ceria for Hydrogen Electro-Oxidation in Reduced-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Xiaofeng; Luo, Ting; Meng, Xie; Wu, Hao; Li, Junliang; Liu, Xuejiao; Ji, Xiaona; Wang, Jianqiang; Chen, Chusheng; Zhan, Zhongliang

    2015-11-04

    Single crystalline ceria nanooctahedra, nanocubes, and nanorods are hydrothermally synthesized, colloidally impregnated into the porous La0.9Sr0.1Ga0.8Mg0.2O3-δ (LSGM) scaffolds, and electrochemically evaluated as the anode catalysts for reduced temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs). Well-defined surface terminations are confirmed by the high-resolution transmission electron microscopy--(111) for nanooctahedra, (100) for nanocubes, and both (110) and (100) for nanorods. Temperature-programmed reduction in H2 shows the highest reducibility for nanorods, followed sequentially by nanocubes and nanooctahedra. Measurements of the anode polarization resistances and the fuel cell power densities reveal different orders of activity of ceria nanocrystals at high and low temperatures for hydrogen electro-oxidation, i.e., nanorods > nanocubes > nanooctahedra at T ≤ 450 °C and nanooctahedra > nanorods > nanocubes at T ≥ 500 °C. Such shape-dependent activities of these ceria nanocrystals have been correlated to their difference in the local structure distortions and thus in the reducibility. These findings will open up a new strategy for design of advanced catalysts for reduced-temperature SOFCs by elaborately engineering the shape of nanocrystals and thus selectively exposing the crystal facets. © 2015 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  6. Planar cell polarity and tissue design: Shaping the Drosophila wing membrane.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valentine, Meagan; Collier, Simon

    2011-01-01

    Planar cell polarity (PCP) describes the orientation of a cell within the plane of an epithelial cell layer. During tissue development, epithelial cells normally align their PCP so that they face in the same direction. This alignment allows cells to move in a common direction, or to generate structures with a common orientation. A classic system for studying the coordination of epithelial PCP is the developing Drosophila wing. The alignment of epithelial PCP during pupal wing development allows the production of an array of cell hairs that point towards the wing tip. Multiple studies have established that the Frizzled (Fz) PCP signaling pathway coordinates wing PCP. Recently, we have found that the same pathway also controls the formation of ridges on the Drosophila wing membrane. However, in contrast to hair polarity, ridge orientation differs between the anterior and posterior wing. How can the Fz PCP pathway generate a different relationship between hair and ridge orientation in different parts of the wing? In this Extra View article, we discuss membrane ridge development drawing upon our recent PLoS Genetics paper and other, published and unpublished, data. We also speculate upon how our findings impact the ongoing debate concerning the interaction of the Fz PCP and Fat/Dachsous pathways in the control of PCP.

  7. Nano-shape varied cerium oxide nanomaterials rescue human dental stem cells from oxidative insult through intracellular or extracellular actions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahapatra, Chinmaya; Singh, Rajendra K; Lee, Jung-Hwan; Jung, Jieun; Hyun, Jung Keun; Kim, Hae-Won

    2017-03-01

    Cerium oxide nanomaterials (CeNMs), due to their excellent scavenging properties of reactive oxygen species (ROS), have gained great promise for therapeutic applications. A high level of ROS often degrades the potential of stem cells in terms of survivability, maintenance and lineage differentiation. Here we hypothesize the CeNMs may play an important role in protecting the capacity of stem cells against the oxidative insult, and the suppression mechanism of ROS level may depend on the internalization of CeNMs. We synthesized CeNMs with different directional shapes (aspect ratios) by a pH-controlled hydrothermal method, and treated them to stem cells derived from human dental pulp at various doses. The short CeNMs (nanoparticles and nanorods) were internalized rapidly to cells whereas long CeNMs (nanowires) were slowly internalized, which led to different distributions of CeNMs and suppressed the ROS levels either intracellularly or extracellularly under the H2O2-exposed conditions. Resultantly, the stem cells, when dosed with the CeNMs, were rescued to have excellent cell survivability; the damages in intracellular components including DNA fragmentation, lipid rupture and protein degradation were significantly alleviated. The findings imply that the ROS-scavenging events of CeNMs need special consideration of aspect ratio-dependent cellular internalization, and also suggest the promising use of CeNMs to protect stem cells from the ROS-insult environments, which can ultimately improve the stem cell potential for tissue engineering and regenerative medicine uses. Oxidative stress governs many stem cell functions like self-renewal and lineage differentiation, and the biological conditions involving tissue repair and disease cure where stem cell therapy is often needed. Here we demonstrate the unique role of cerium oxide nanomaterials (CeNMs) in rescuing stem cell survivability, migration ability, and intracellular components from oxidative stress. In particular, we

  8. Morphogenesis of complex plant cell shapes: the mechanical role of crystalline cellulose in growing pollen tubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aouar, Leila; Chebli, Youssef; Geitmann, Anja

    2010-03-01

    Cellulose is the principal component of the load-bearing system in primary plant cell walls. The great resistance to tensile forces of this polysaccharide and its embedding in matrix components make the cell wall a material similar to a fiber composite. In the rapidly growing pollen tube, the amount of cellulose in the cell wall is untypically low. Therefore, we want to investigate whether the load-bearing function of cellulose is nevertheless important for the architecture of this cell. Enzymatic digestion with cellulase and inhibition of cellulose crystal formation with CGA (1-cyclohexyl-5-(2,3,4,5,6-pentafluorophenoxy)-1lambda4,2,4,6-thiatriazin-3-amine) resulted in the formation of tubes with increased diameter in Solanum chacoense and Lilium orientalis when present during germination. In pre-germinated tubes, application of both agents resulted in the transient arrest of growth accompanied by the formation of an apical swelling indicating a role in the mechanical stabilization of this cellular region. Once growth resumed in the presence of cellulase, however, the cell wall in the newly formed tube showed increased amounts of pectins, possibly to compensate for the reduced amount of cellulose. Scanning electron microscopy of pollen tubes subjected to digestion of matrix polysaccharides revealed the mechanical anisotropy of the cell wall. In both Lilium and Solanum, the angle of highest stability revealed by crack formation was significantly below 45 degrees , an indication that in the mature part of the cell cellulose may not the main stress-bearing component against turgor pressure induced tensile stress in circumferential direction.

  9. Cell Morphology Change by the Ultraviolet Ray Irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Myung Joo; Matuo, Yoichirou; Akiyama, Yoko; Izumi, Yoshinobu; Nishijima, Shigehiro [Osaka University, Osaka (Japan)

    2009-03-15

    The effect of low doses of ultraviolet (UV) irradiation on morphology changes of cell has been studied based on the observation of the cell length. It was shown that UV-irradiated cell has different behavior in comparison with nonirradiated cell. From the histogram of cell-length distribution, it was confirmed that cell cycle of non irradiated cell was 28 hours, and that cell cycle of irradiated cell with dose of 20 Jm{sup -2} was delayed (39 hours), while irradiated cell with 40 Jm{sup -2} and 60 Jm{sup -2} did not divide and kept growing continuously. It was supposed that in case of 20 Jm{sup -2} of irradiation dose, the cell cycle was delayed because the checkpoint worked in order to repair DNA damage induced by generation of pyrimidine dimer, reactive oxygen species and so on. It was also supposed that in case of 40 Jm{sup -2} and 60 Jm{sup -2} of irradiation dose, overgrowth was induced because the checkpoint was not worked well. The morphology of overgrown cell was similar to that of normally senescent cell. Therefore, it was considered that cell senescence was accelerated by UV irradiation with irradiation doses of 40 Jm{sup -2} and 60 Jm{sup -2}

  10. Lipopolysaccharides with acylation defects potentiate TLR4 signaling and shape T cell responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anna Martirosyan

    Full Text Available Lipopolysaccharides or endotoxins are components of Gram-negative enterobacteria that cause septic shock in mammals. However, a LPS carrying hexa-acyl lipid A moieties is highly endotoxic compared to a tetra-acyl LPS and the latter has been considered as an antagonist of hexa-acyl LPS-mediated TLR4 signaling. We investigated the relationship between the structure and the function of bacterial LPS in the context of human and mouse dendritic cell activation. Strikingly, LPS with acylation defects were capable of triggering a strong and early TLR4-dependent DC activation, which in turn led to the activation of the proteasome machinery dampening the pro-inflammatory cytokine secretion. Upon activation with tetra-acyl LPS both mouse and human dendritic cells triggered CD4(+ T and CD8(+ T cell responses and, importantly, human myeloid dendritic cells favored the induction of regulatory T cells. Altogether, our data suggest that LPS acylation controlled by pathogenic bacteria might be an important strategy to subvert adaptive immunity.

  11. Ionic channel changes in glaucomatous retinal ganglion cells: multicompartment modeling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maturana, Matias I; Turpin, Andrew; McKendrick, Allison M; Kameneva, Tatiana

    2014-01-01

    This research takes a step towards discovering underlying ionic channel changes in the glaucomatous ganglion cells. Glaucoma is characterized by a gradual death of retinal ganglion cells. In this paper, we propose a hypothesis that the ionic channel concentrations change during the progression of glaucoma. We use computer simulation of a multi-compartment morphologically correct model of a mouse retinal ganglion cell to verify our hypothesis. Using published experimental data, we alter the morphology of healthy ganglion cells to replicate glaucomatous cells. Our results suggest that in glaucomatous cell, the sodium channel concentration decreases in the soma by 30% and by 60% in the dendrites, calcium channel concentration decreases by 10% in all compartments, and leak channel concentration increases by 40% in the soma and by 100% in the dendrites.

  12. Biodegradability of para-aramid respirable-sized fiber-shaped particulates (RFP) in human lung cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warheit, D B; Reed, K L; Stonehuerner, J D; Ghio, A J; Webb, T R

    2006-01-01

    Using both in vivo (inhalation) and in vitro (cell culture) studies, we previously reported that p-aramid respirable fibers (RFP--defined as respirable-sized fiber-shaped particulates) are biodegraded in lungs and lung cells of rats following exposures. The current studies were undertaken to determine whether shortening mechanisms of p-aramid RFP biodegradability are also operative in human lung cells. Cultures of human A549 lung epithelial cells (A549), primary alveolar macrophages (HBAL) (collected via bronchoalveolar lavage [BAL]) from volunteers), and co-cultures (Co) of the A549 and HBAL were incubated with p-aramid RFP for either 1 h, 1 day, or 1 week to assess RFP shortening. Lengths of RFP were measured using scanning electron microscopy (SEM) following fixation, digestion of culture tissue components, and processing. Similar to findings using rat lung cells, only slight RFP shortening was measured in A549 cultures at 1-day and 1-week post-incubation. More importantly, in HBAL and Co groups, greater transverse cleavage of p-aramid RFP was measured at 1-day and 1-week postexposure compared to 1-h HBAL or Co groups, or in any A549 groups. In contrast, cellulose RFP, a biopersistent reference control fiber, were not measurably shortened under similar circumstances. Second, p-aramid RFP were incubated either with phosphate-buffered saline (PBS), or acellular BAL fluids from human volunteers or rats and processed for SEM analysis of RFP lengths. Mean lengths of p-aramid RFP incubated with human or rat BAL fluids were substantially decreased compared to PBS. Similar to our findings with rat lung cells, components of human lung fluids coat the p-aramid RFP as a prerequisite for subsequent enzymatic cleavage by human phagocytic lung cells and this finding reinforces the concept that inhaled p-aramid RFP are likely to be biodegradable in the lungs of humans.

  13. Xeno-free and shrinkage-free preparation of scaffold-free cartilage-like disc-shaped cell sheet using human bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sato, Yasushi; Wakitani, Shigeyuki; Takagi, Mutsumi

    2013-12-01

    Aiming for the clinical application of cartilage regeneration, the xeno-free cultivation method to obtain a scaffold-free cartilage-like disc-shaped cell sheet using mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) derived from human bone marrow without the shrinkage of the sheet was investigated. MSCs were inoculated into Cell Culture Insert (0.3 cm(2), pore size; 0.4 μm, pore density; 1.0 × 10(8)/cm(2)) using serum-free chondrogenic differentiation medium containing TGF-β3, IGF-1 and dexamethasone or other modified media, and cultured at 37 °C in 5% CO2 for 3 weeks. Sheet thickness, cartilage specific genes expression, ECM accumulation were determined, and the sections of sheets were stained with alcian blue. A novel mixed medium consisting of a growth medium (10% FCS) with a serum-free chondrogenic differentiation medium could prevent the shrinkage of the sheet and produced a disc-shaped cell sheet. The depth of the sheet was approximately 0.7 mm and the gene expression levels were higher than those in cells in normal human cartilage. The use of human serum instead of FCS did not cause shrinkage and did not decrease the accumulation levels of sGAG and type 2 collagen in the sheet. The cultivation of MSCs grown with completely xeno-free materials using the mixed medium containing human serum in a cell culture insert showed a sheet depth of 1.0 mm and gene expression levels higher than those in normal cartilage. The scaffold-free and xeno-free cartilage-like cell sheet was successfully formed without shrinkage using human bone marrow MSCs and the chondrogenic differentiation medium containing human serum. Copyright © 2013. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  14. The shape of the lymphocyte receptor repertoire: lessons from the B cell receptor

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katherine J. L. Jackson

    2013-09-01

    Full Text Available Both the B cell receptor (BCR and the T cell receptor (TCR repertoires are generated through essentially identical processes of V(DJ recombination, exonuclease trimming of germline genes and the random addition of non-template encoded nucleotides. The naïve TCR repertoire is constrained by thymic selection, and TCR repertoire studies have therefore focused strongly on the diversity of MHC-binding CDR3. The process of somatic point mutations has given B cell studies a major focus on variable (IGHV, IGLV and IGKV genes. This in turn has influenced how both the naïve and memory BCR repertoires have been studied. Diversity (D genes are also more easily identified in BCR VDJ rearrangements than in TCR VDJ rearrangements, and this has allowed the processes and elements that contribute to the incredible diversity of the immunoglobulin heavy chain CDR3 to be analyzed in detail. This diversity can be contrasted with that of the light chain where a small number of polypeptide sequences dominate the repertoire. Biases in the use of different germline genes, in gene processing and in the addition of non-template encoded nucleotides appear to be intrinsic to the recombination process, imparting ‘shape’ to the repertoire of rearranged genes as a result of differences spanning many orders of magnitude in the probabilities that different BCRs will be generated. This may function to increase the precursor frequency of naïve B cells with important specificities, and the likely emergence of such B cell lineages upon antigen exposure is discussed with reference to public and private T cell clonotypes.

  15. T-cell recognition is shaped by epitope sequence conservation in the host proteome and microbiome

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bresciani, Anne Gøther; Paul, Sinu; Schommer, Nina

    2016-01-01

    or allergen with the conservation of its sequence in the human proteome or the healthy human microbiome. Indeed, performing such comparisons on large sets of validated T-cell epitopes, we found that epitopes that are similar with self-antigens above a certain threshold showed lower immunogenicity, presumably...... as a result of negative selection of T cells capable of recognizing such peptides. Moreover, we also found a reduced level of immune recognition for epitopes conserved in the commensal microbiome, presumably as a result of peripheral tolerance. These findings indicate that the existence (and potentially...

  16. Unit Cell Analysis of the Superelastic Behavior of Open-Cell Tetrakaidecahedral Shape Memory Alloy Foam under Quasi-Static Loading

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Maîtrejean

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Cellular solid materials and, more specifically, foams are increasingly common in many industrial applications due to their attractive characteristics. The tetrakaidecahedral foam microstructure, which can be observed in many types of foams, is studied in the present work in association with shape memory alloys (SMA material. SMA foams are of particular interest as they associate both the shape memory effect and the superelasticity with the characteristics of foam. A Unit Cell Finite Element Method approach is used, an approach that allows accurate predicting of the macroscale response of the foam with a highly reduced numerical effort. The tetrakaidecahedral foam’s responses, both in the elastic and in the superelastic stages, are then extracted and compared with results from the literature. The tetrakaidecahedral geometry is found to be of particular interest when associated with SMA as it takes more advantage of the superelastic property of the material than foams with randomly distributed porosity.

  17. Changes in corneal endothelial cell profile measurements after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty for keratoconus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salouti, Ramin; Masoumpour, Masoumeh; Nowroozzadeh, Mohammad H; Zamani, Mohammad; Ghoreyshi, Maryam; Melles, Gerrit R J

    2013-06-01

    The primary objective was to evaluate whether postoperative alterations in corneal shape (as reflected by keratometry values) affect endothelial cell profile measurements after deep anterior lamellar keratoplasty (DALK) in a group of patients with keratoconus. Secondary objective was to describe the pattern of changes in corneal endothelial cell profile measurements during the first 3 years after DALK. In this prospective interventional case series, we enrolled patients who had significant keratoconus and were scheduled for DALK (Melles technique). Cases with concomitant intraocular surgeries, intra-/postoperative complications, and poor quality of images were excluded. Two hundred one eyes and 45 eyes (of the original 201) were enrolled for evaluating the primary and the secondary objectives, respectively. At 3 months post DALK, the mean endothelial cell density (ECD) had significantly increased and the mean cell area had decreased compared with preoperative measurements (2721 vs. 2823 cells/mm2, P = 0.015; and 378 vs. 362 μm2, P = 0.005, respectively). Regression analysis revealed a weak but significant nonlinear association between changes in mean keratometry and ECD changes at 3 months (R2 = 0.039, P = 0.02). Standard deviation of mean cell area had significantly decreased at 12 months after DALK compared with measurements taken at 3 months after surgery (P = 0.023) and remained stable thereafter. Apparent measurements of ECD may not show a decrease but instead even a slight increase in some cases after uncomplicated DALK (Melles technique) for keratoconus. This finding along with a later decrease in standard deviation of mean cell area suggests that notable postoperative changes in corneal biomechanical forces may affect endothelial cell profile measurements.

  18. Dynamic changes in brewing yeast cells in culture revealed by statistical analyses of yeast morphological data.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohnuki, Shinsuke; Enomoto, Kenichi; Yoshimoto, Hiroyuki; Ohya, Yoshikazu

    2014-03-01

    The vitality of brewing yeasts has been used to monitor their physiological state during fermentation. To investigate the fermentation process, we used the image processing software, CalMorph, which generates morphological data on yeast mother cells and bud shape, nuclear shape and location, and actin distribution. We found that 248 parameters changed significantly during fermentation. Successive use of principal component analysis (PCA) revealed several important features of yeast, providing insight into the dynamic changes in the yeast population. First, PCA indicated that much of the observed variability in the experiment was summarized in just two components: a change with a peak and a change over time. Second, PCA indicated the independent and important morphological features responsible for dynamic changes: budding ratio, nucleus position, neck position, and actin organization. Thus, the large amount of data provided by imaging analysis can be used to monitor the fermentation processes involved in beer and bioethanol production. Copyright © 2013 The Society for Biotechnology, Japan. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  19. Flow channel shape optimum design for hydroformed metal bipolar plate in PEM fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Peng, Linfa; Lai, Xinmin; Liu, Dong' an; Hu, Peng [State Key Laboratory of Mechanical System and Vibration, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai 200240 (China); Ni, Jun [Department of Mechanical Engineering and Applied Mechanics, University of Michigan, Ann Arbor, MI 48109 (United States)

    2008-03-15

    Bipolar plate is one of the most important and costliest components of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Micro-hydroforming is a promising process to reduce the manufacturing cost of PEM fuel cell bipolar plates made of metal sheets. As for hydroformed bipolar plates, the main defect is the rupture because of the thinning of metal sheet during the forming process. The flow channel section decides whether high quality hydroformed bipolar plates can be successively achieved or not. Meanwhile, it is also the key factor that is related with the reaction efficiency of the fuel cell stacks. In order to obtain the optimum flow channel section design prior the experimental campaign, some key geometric dimensions (channel depth, channel width, rib width and transition radius) of flow channel section, which are related with both reaction efficiency and formability, are extracted and parameterized as the design variables. By design of experiments (DOE) methods and an adoptive simulated annealing (ASA) optimization method, an optimization model of flow channel section design for hydroformed metal bipolar plate is proposed. Optimization results show that the optimum dimension values for channel depth, channel width, rib width and transition radius are 0.5, 1.0, 1. 6 and 0.5 mm, respectively with the highest reaction efficiency (79%) and the acceptable formability (1.0). Consequently, their use would lead to improved fuel cell efficiency for low cost hydroformed metal bipolar plates. (author)

  20. UV-induced changes in cell cycle and gene expression within rabbit lens epithelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sidjanin, D. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences; Grdina, D. [Argonne National Lab., IL (United States); Woloschak, G.E. [Northern Illinois Univ., De Kalb, IL (United States). Dept. of Biological Sciences

    1994-11-01

    Damage to lens epithelial cells is a probable initiation process in cataract formation induced by ultraviolet radiation. These experiments investigated the ability of 254 nm radiation on cell cycle progression and gene expression in rabbit lens epithelial cell line N/N1003A. No changes in expression of c-fos, c-jun, alpha- tubulin, or vimentin was observed following UV exposure. Using flow cytometry, an accumulation of cells in G1/S phase of the cell cycle 1 hr following exposure. The observed changes in gene expression, especially the decreased histone transcripts reported here may play a role in UV induced inhibition of cell cycle progression.

  1. A newly developed floor chair placed on an office chair reduces lumbar muscle fatigue by cyclically changing its lumbar supporting shape

    OpenAIRE

    Matsuda, Tadamitsu; Koyama, Takayuki; Kurihara, Yasushi; Tagami, Miki; Kusumoto, Yasuaki; Nitta, Osamu

    2017-01-01

    [Purpose] This study investigated lumbar muscle fatigue before and after maintaining a seated position for one hour, lumbar and pelvic inclination angle change, in subjects with and without active lumber support. [Subjects and Methods] Fourteen healthy subjects randomized into two groups sat on a floor chair, placed on an office chair, that cyclically changed its lumbar supporting shape to provide active lumbar support (ALS) or no ALS for one hour. Before and after, we measured the frequency ...

  2. Biogovernance Beyond the State: The Shaping of Stem Cell Therapy by Patient Organizations in India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heitmeyer, Carolyn

    2017-04-01

    Public engagement through government-sponsored "public consultations" in biomedical innovation, specifically stem cell research and therapy, has been relatively limited in India. However, patient groups are drawing upon collaborations with medical practitioners to gain leverage in promoting biomedical research and the conditions under which patients can access experimental treatments. Based on qualitative fieldwork conducted between 2012 and 2015, I examine the ways in which two patient groups engaged with debates around how experimental stem cell therapy should be regulated, given the current lack of legally binding research guidelines. Such processes of engagement can be seen as an alternative form of biomedical governance which responds to the priorities and exigencies of Indian patients, contrasting with the current measures taken by the Indian state which, instead, are primarily directed at the global scientific and corporate world.

  3. Treatment of Presbyopia in Emmetropes Using a Shape-Changing Corneal Inlay: One-Year Clinical Outcomes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Whitman, Jeffrey; Dougherty, Paul J; Parkhurst, Gregory D; Olkowski, John; Slade, Stephen G; Hovanesian, John; Chu, Ralph; Dishler, Jon; Tran, Dan B; Lehmann, Robert; Carter, Harvey; Steinert, Roger F; Koch, Douglas D

    2016-03-01

    To report 1-year safety and efficacy clinical outcomes of a shape-changing corneal inlay for the treatment of presbyopia. Prospective, nonrandomized, multicenter United States Food and Drug Administration Investigational Device Exemption clinical trial (clinicaltrials.gov identifier, NCT01373580). Nondominant eyes (N = 373) of emmetropic presbyopic subjects were implanted at 11 sites with the Raindrop Near Vision Inlay (ReVision Optics, Lake Forest, CA); 340 eyes underwent the 1-year follow-up visit. The corneal inlay was implanted under a corneal flap at the center of the light-constricted pupil created with a femtosecond laser. For subjects completing the 1-year follow-up, monocular and binocular uncorrected and corrected visual acuity, refractive stability, contrast sensitivity (CS; photopic and mesopic), symptom and satisfaction questionnaire results, and adverse events. At 1 year in the treated eye, on average, uncorrected near visual acuity (UNVA) improved by 5.1 lines, uncorrected intermediate visual acuity (UIVA) improved by 2.5 lines, and uncorrected distance visual acuity (UDVA) decreased by 1.2 lines. From 3 months through 1 year, 93% of subjects achieved UNVA of 20/25 or better, 97% achieve UIVA of 20/32 or better, and 95% achieved UDVA of 20/40 or better. Binocularly, the mean UDVA exceeded 20/20 from 3 months through 1 year. Contrast sensitivity loss occurred only at the highest spatial frequencies, with no loss binocularly. Absent or mild scores were reported in 96% of subjects for visual symptoms (glare, halos, double vision, and fluctuations in vision), in 99% for ocular symptoms (pain, light sensitivity, and discomfort), and in 95% for dryness. Adverse events were treatable and resolved. Eighteen inlays were replaced, usually soon after implantation because of decentration, but UNVA was little affected in this group thereafter. In the 11 cases requiring inlay explantations, 100% achieved a corrected distance visual acuity of 20/25 or better by 3

  4. Fiber-Shaped Perovskite Solar Cells with High Power Conversion Efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Longbin; He, Sisi; Yang, Jiahua; Deng, Jue; Peng, Huisheng

    2016-05-01

    A perovskite solar cell fiber is created with a high power conversion efficiency of 7.1% through a controllable deposition method. A combination of aligned TiO2 nanotubes, a uniform perovskite layer, and transparent aligned carbon nanotube sheet contributes to the high photovoltaic performance. It is flexible and stable, and can be woven into smart clothes for wearable applications. © 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  5. A Clostridium difficile Cell Wall Glycopolymer Locus Influences Bacterial Shape, Polysaccharide Production and Virulence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Chu

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Clostridium difficile is a diarrheagenic pathogen associated with significant mortality and morbidity. While its glucosylating toxins are primary virulence determinants, there is increasing appreciation of important roles for non-toxin factors in C. difficile pathogenesis. Cell wall glycopolymers (CWGs influence the virulence of various pathogens. Five C. difficile CWGs, including PSII, have been structurally characterized, but their biosynthesis and significance in C. difficile infection is unknown. We explored the contribution of a conserved CWG locus to C. difficile cell-surface integrity and virulence. Attempts at disrupting multiple genes in the locus, including one encoding a predicted CWG exporter mviN, were unsuccessful, suggesting essentiality of the respective gene products. However, antisense RNA-mediated mviN downregulation resulted in slight morphology defects, retarded growth, and decreased surface PSII deposition. Two other genes, lcpA and lcpB, with putative roles in CWG anchoring, could be disrupted by insertional inactivation. lcpA- and lcpB- mutants had distinct phenotypes, implying non-redundant roles for the respective proteins. The lcpB- mutant was defective in surface PSII deposition and shedding, and exhibited a remodeled cell surface characterized by elongated and helical morphology, aberrantly-localized cell septae, and an altered surface-anchored protein profile. Both lcpA- and lcpB- strains also displayed heightened virulence in a hamster model of C. difficile disease. We propose that gene products of the C. difficile CWG locus are essential, that they direct the production/assembly of key antigenic surface polysaccharides, and thereby have complex roles in virulence.

  6. Innate Immune Responses in Viral Hepatitis: the role of Kupffer cells and liver-derived monocytes in shaping intrahepatic immunity in mice using the LCMV infection model

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    D. Movita (Dowty)

    2014-01-01

    markdownabstract__Abstract__ This study was performed to elucidate the immunological role of the liver in viral hepatitis. The immune functions of the liver are shaped by the intrahepatic cells present during steady state condition, as well as the recruited immune cells during liver

  7. Objective assessment of contact lens wear-associated conjunctival squamous metaplasia by linear measures of cell size, shape and nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratios.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doughty, Michael J

    2011-07-01

    To objectively assess the cell and nucleus dimensions of human bulbar conjunctival cells in female soft contact lens wearers to illustrate a method for assessment of the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio based on simple linear measures. Impression cytology samples were taken from the nasal side exposed bulbar conjunctiva surface from 12 young adult, white European females with a history of successful daily soft contact lens wear. A Millcell(®)-CM filter was used after topical anesthesia, which was stained with Giemsa. Color images of portions of the cells, in a monolayer at 200× magnification by light microscopy, were graded by the Nelson scale and then a projection overlay method was used to outline the cell and nucleus borders. The cell longest dimension (LONG), shorter dimension (SHORT), and the longest dimension of the nucleus (NUCLONG) were measured. A nucleus-to-cytoplasm N:C ratio was calculated from (LONG-NUCLONG)/NUCLONG. Cells had appearances consistent with a grade 2 or 3 squamous metaplasia and were moderately enlarged (mean LONG ± SD of 46.0 ± 3.8 microm), only slightly elongated (mean LONG:SHORT ratio of 1.397 ± 0.101) and the nucleus size was consistently greater than normal (man 12.8 ± 1.3 microm). A calculation of N:C showed a relatively wide range of values with average values from 1:2.143 to 1:3.317 (for an overall mean of 2.675 ± 0.371). These studies further indicate that grade 2 to 3 squamous metaplasia of the exposed bulbar conjunctival cells is an expected consequence of soft contact lens wear. The cell enlargement is not associated with a significant change in cell shape (i.e., the LONG:SHORT ratio is little different from grade 0 cells) but is associated in a slight increase in nucleus size. The calculated N:C ratio based on linear measures is no higher than 1:5 and more likely closer to 1:2.5.

  8. Sickle Cell Crisis (For Teens)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Plan Hot Topics Flu Facts Arrhythmias Abuse Sickle Cell Crisis (Pain Crisis) KidsHealth > For Teens > Sickle Cell ... drepanocíticas (Crisis de dolor) What Is a Sickle Cell Crisis? Sickle cell disease changes the shape of ...

  9. Immune tolerance maintained by cooperative interactions between T cells and antigen presenting cells shapes a diverse TCR repertoire

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katharine eBest

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The T cell population in an individual needs to avoid harmful activation by self-peptides while maintaining the ability to respond to an unknown set of foreign peptides. This property is acquired by a combination of thymic and extra-thymic mechanisms. We extend current models for the development of self/non-self discrimination to consider the acquisition of self-tolerance as an emergent system level property of the overall T cell receptor repertoire. We propose that tolerance is established at the level of the antigen presenting cell/T cell cluster, which facilitates and integrates co-operative interactions between T cells of different specificity. The threshold for self-reactivity is therefore imposed at a population level, and not at the level of the individual T cell/antigen encounter. Mathematically, the model can be formulated as a linear programming optimisation problem, which can be implemented as a multiplicative update algorithm which shows a rapid convergence to a stable state. The model constrains self-reactivity within a predefined threshold, but maintains the diversity and cross reactivity which are key characteristics of human T cell immunity. We show further that the size of individual clones in the model repertoire remains heterogeneous, and that new clones can establish themselves even when the repertoire is stable. Our study combines the salient features of the danger model of self/non-self discrimination with the concepts of quorum sensing, and extends repertoire generation models to encompass the establishment of tolerance. Furthermore, the dynamic and continuous repertoire reshaping which underlies tolerance in this model suggests opportunities for therapeutic intervention to achieve long-term tolerance following transplantation.

  10. Microstructure and calorimetric behavior of laser welded open cell foams in CuZnAl shape memory alloy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biffi, Carlo Alberto; Previtali, Barbara; Tuissi, Ausonio

    Cellular shape memory alloys (SMAs) are very promising smart materials able to combine functional properties of the material with lightness, stiffness, and damping capacity of the cellular structure. Their processing with low modification of the material properties remains an open question. In this work, the laser weldability of CuZnAl SMA in the form of open cell foams was studied. The cellular structure was proved to be successfully welded in lap joint configuration by using a thin plate of the same alloy. Softening was seen in the welded bead in all the investigated ranges of process speed as well as a double stage heat affected zone was identified due to different microstructures; the martensitic transformation was shifted to higher temperatures and the corresponding peaks were sharper with respect to the base material due to the rapid solidification of the material. Anyways, no compositional variations were detected in the joints.

  11. Shape and assembly of type IV procollagen obtained from cell culture.

    OpenAIRE

    Oberbäumer, I; Wiedemann, H.; Timpl, R; Kühn, K

    1982-01-01

    Type IV procollagen was isolated from the culture medium of the teratocarcinoma cell line PYS-2 by affinity chromatography on heparin-Sepharose. Immunological studies showed that type IV procollagen is composed of pro-alpha 1(IV) and pro-alpha 2(IV) chains and contains two potential cross-linking sites which are located in the short triple-helical 7S domain and the globular domain NC1 . The 7S domain was also identified as the heparin binding site. Rotary shadowing visualized type IV procolla...

  12. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective...

  13. The use of 3d scanner for testing changes in shape of human limbs under the influence of external mechanical load

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasperska, Kamila; Wieczorowski, Michał; Krolczyk, Jolanta B.

    2017-10-01

    Three-dimensional scanning is used in many fields: medicine, architecture, industry, reverse engineering. The aim of the article was to analyze the changes in the shape of the limbs under the influence of a mechanical external load using the method of three-dimensional scanner uses white light technology. The paper presents a system of human movement, passive part - skeleton and active part - the muscles, and principles of their interaction, which results in a change of the position of the body. Furthermore, by using the 3D scan, the differences in appearance of the arm and leg depending on the size of the external load in different positions have been presented. The paper shows that with increasing load, which muscles must prevent, increases the volume of certain parts of the legs, while another parts of them will be reduced. Results of the research using three-dimensional scanner allow determining what impact on changing the legs shape has an external mechanical load.

  14. Spatial Characterization of the Uplink Inter-Cell Interference in Polygonal-Shaped Wireless Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K. B. Baltzis

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available The uplink inter-cell interference is a major impairment in wireless systems. In this paper, we provide a geometrical-based framework for its analysis in networks with convex polygonal coverage area. Algebraic expressions for the Angle-of-Arrival (AoA statistics of the uplink interfering signals are obtained. Simulation results validate the model. Representative examples show the dependence of the AoA on system geometry and demonstrate the relation between uplink interference and the radiation pattern of the receiver antenna. The proposed model is a generalization of previous studies in simpler geometries. It is a useful tool for the design, simulation and performance evaluation of wireless communication systems. The obtained expressions simplify the analysis of wireless networks and reduce the complexity and computational cost of their modeling and simulation.

  15. Measurement of radionuclides using ion chromatography and flow-cell scintillation counting with pulse shape discrimination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DeVol, T.A.; Fjeld, R.A. [Clemson Univ., Clemson, SC (United States)

    1995-10-01

    The use of ion chromatography (IC) for radiochemical separations is a well established technique. IC is commonly used in routine environmental monitoring applications as well as in specialized research applications. Typical usage involves the separation of a single radionuclide from the non-radioactive constituents. During the past decade, a limited amount of research has been conducted using automated IC systems in actinide separation applications (e.g.). More recently, separation procedures for common non-gamma emitting activation and fission products were developed utilizing a high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC) system. In addition, a separation procedure for six common actinides has been developed using a HPLC system. These latter systems used on-line flow-cell detectors for quantification of the radioactive constituents of the effluent stream.

  16. Changes in cell adhesion molecule expression on T cells associated with systemic virus infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersson, E C; Christensen, Jan Pravsgaard; Marker, O

    1994-01-01

    Virus-induced changes in adhesion molecule expression on T cells were investigated to understand how antiviral effector cells migrate into infectious foci. FACS analysis revealed that after systemic infection with lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus a number of cell adhesion molecules, including VLA......, it was found that up-regulation of VLA-4 expression on splenic T cells correlated with influx of inflammatory cells into the cerebrospinal fluid of intracerebrally infected animals, and that the number of CD8+VLA-4hi cells increased from lymph nodes and spleen to blood and cerebrospinal fluid. These results......-4, LFA-1, and ICAM-1, are up-regulated on CD8+ cells, whereas the lymph node homing receptor MEL-14 is down-regulated during the infection; only marginal changes were observed for CD4+ cells. Basically similar but less marked results were obtained in mice infected with Pichinde virus. Further...

  17. Role of sustained antigen release from nanoparticle vaccines in shaping the T cell memory phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demento, Stacey L; Cui, Weiguo; Criscione, Jason M; Stern, Eric; Tulipan, Jacob; Kaech, Susan M; Fahmy, Tarek M

    2012-06-01

    Particulate vaccines are emerging promising technologies for the creation of tunable prophylactics against a wide variety of conditions. Vesicular and solid biodegradable polymer platforms, exemplified by liposomes and polyesters, respectively, are two of the most ubiquitous platforms in vaccine delivery studies. Here we directly compared the efficacy of each in a long-term immunization study and in protection against a model bacterial antigen. Immunization with poly(lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) nanoparticles elicited prolonged antibody titers compared to liposomes and alum. The magnitude of the cellular immune response was also highest in mice vaccinated with PLGA, which also showed a higher frequency of effector-like memory T cell phenotype, leading to an effective clearance of intracellular bacteria. The difference in performance of these two common particulate platforms is shown not to be due to material differences but appears to be connected to the kinetics of antigen delivery. Thus, this study highlights the importance of sustained antigen release mediated by particulate platforms and its role in the long-term appearance of effector memory cellular response. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Three-dimensional shape of the Golgi apparatus in different cell types: serial section scanning electron microscopy of the osmium-impregnated Golgi apparatus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, Daisuke; Kusumi, Satoshi; Ushiki, Tatsuo

    2016-04-01

    Although many studies of the Golgi apparatus structure have been performed by light and electron microscopy, the full shape of the Golgi apparatus remained unclear due to the technical limitations of the previously applied microscopy techniques. In this study, we used serial section scanning electron microscopy (SEM) for the morphological study of the Golgi apparatus. This method is useful for three-dimensional (3D) reconstruction of cellular structures without requiring specialized instruments, unlike focused ion beam SEM (FIB-SEM) and serial block face SEM (SBF-SEM). Using the serial section SEM method developed by our laboratory, we investigate the 3D shape of the osmium-impregnated Golgi apparatus in rat epididymal cells, pancreatic acinar cells and gonadotropes. The combination of serial section SEM and a 3D reconstruction technique enabled us to elucidate the entire shape of the Golgi apparatus in these cells. The full shape of the Golgi apparatus in epididymal cells formed a basket-like structure with oval-shaped cisterns, while the Golgi apparatus in an acinar cell from the pancreas was composed of elongated ribbon-like structures that were connected to each other, making a coarse network. The overall image of the Golgi apparatus cisterns from a gonadotrope looked like a spherical cage. This study has clearly shown that entire 3D shape of the Golgi apparatus varies depending on the cell type and that the Golgi cisterns network appears as a single mass located in the large region of the cytoplasm. © The Author 2015. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of The Japanese Society of Microscopy. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  19. Morphological changes in nerve cells during normal aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pannese, Ennio

    2011-06-01

    During normal aging, widespread loss of nerve cells does not occur. Neuronal loss is limited to restricted regions of the nervous system and is slight (probably no more than 10%). The commonest age-related structural changes undergone by nerve cells are as follows: dendrites decrease in number and length and many dendritic spines are lost; axons decrease in number and their myelin sheaths may become less compact and undergo segmental demyelination followed by remyelination; and significant loss of synapses occurs. These changes probably make a significant contribution to the behavioral impairment and cognitive decline that often accompany normal aging.

  20. Cell cycle and epigenetic changes of plant DNA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shevchenko G. V.

    2010-04-01

    Full Text Available Plants can apply various strategies to minimize environmental impact. One of the strategies is heritable modifications of gene expression which occur without changing original DNA sequence and are known as epigenetic. Signaling pathway Rb-E2F (retinoblastoma (Rb-transcription factor E2F/DP connects the cell cycle with factors, modifying structure of chromatin and DNA. It also coordinates cell proliferation and differentiation influenced by external stimuli. The article highlights the activity of Rb-E2F/DP signaling pathway and its connection with the epigenetic changes of DNA in plants.