WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell selection devices

  1. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-09-18

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  2. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Lusheng; Wang, Yamei; Ding, Zhizhong; Wang, Xiumin

    2015-01-01

    With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs) tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS) game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI). In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG), forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI) and a congestion game with capacity (CGC). For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE). Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell) is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified. PMID:26393617

  3. Cell Selection Game for Densely-Deployed Sensor and Mobile Devices In 5G Networks Integrating Heterogeneous Cells and the Internet of Things

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lusheng Wang

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available With the rapid development of wireless networking technologies, the Internet of Things and heterogeneous cellular networks (HCNs tend to be integrated to form a promising wireless network paradigm for 5G. Hyper-dense sensor and mobile devices will be deployed under the coverage of heterogeneous cells, so that each of them could freely select any available cell covering it and compete for resource with others selecting the same cell, forming a cell selection (CS game between these devices. Since different types of cells usually share the same portion of the spectrum, devices selecting overlapped cells can experience severe inter-cell interference (ICI. In this article, we study the CS game among a large amount of densely-deployed sensor and mobile devices for their uplink transmissions in a two-tier HCN. ICI is embedded with the traditional congestion game (TCG, forming a congestion game with ICI (CGI and a congestion game with capacity (CGC. For the three games above, we theoretically find the circular boundaries between the devices selecting the macrocell and those selecting the picocells, indicated by the pure strategy Nash equilibria (PSNE. Meanwhile, through a number of simulations with different picocell radii and different path loss exponents, the collapse of the PSNE impacted by severe ICI (i.e., a large number of picocell devices change their CS preferences to the macrocell is profoundly revealed, and the collapse points are identified.

  4. Selection of Air Terminal Device

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Peter V.

    This paper discusses the selection of the air terminal device for the experiments and numerical prediction in the International Energy Agency Annex 20 work: Air Flow Pattern within Buildings,......This paper discusses the selection of the air terminal device for the experiments and numerical prediction in the International Energy Agency Annex 20 work: Air Flow Pattern within Buildings,...

  5. Microfluidic Cell Culture Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takayama, Shuichi (Inventor); Cabrera, Lourdes Marcella (Inventor); Heo, Yun Seok (Inventor); Smith, Gary Daniel (Inventor)

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic devices for cell culturing and methods for using the same are disclosed. One device includes a substrate and membrane. The substrate includes a reservoir in fluid communication with a passage. A bio-compatible fluid may be added to the reservoir and passage. The reservoir is configured to receive and retain at least a portion of a cell mass. The membrane acts as a barrier to evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid from the passage. A cover fluid may be added to cover the bio-compatible fluid to prevent evaporation of the bio-compatible fluid.

  6. Whole Blood Cell Staining Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sams, Clarence F.; Clift, Vaughan L.; McDonald, Kelly E.

    2000-01-01

    An apparatus and method for staining particular cell markers is disclosed. The apparatus includes a flexible tube that is reversibly pinched into compartments with one or more clamps. Each compartment of the tube contains a separate reagent and is in selective fluid communication with adjoining compartments.

  7. An optically induced cell lysis device using dielectrophoresis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Yen-Heng; Lee, Gwo-Bin

    2009-01-01

    This letter reports an optically induced cell lysis device that can selectively lyse a single cell within a group of cells, a function which cannot be performed using traditional tools. This chip-scale device was made of a photoconductive material, which can induce a nonuniform electric field at a specific position under illumination of a beam spot generating a transmembrane potential in the cell. With this approach, cell lysis can be performed using the optically induced electric field. Fibroblast cells and oral cancer cells were used to demonstrate the capability of the developed chip. In addition to lysing the whole cell, the developed method also allowed one to selectively disrupt the cell membrane without damaging the nucleus. Operating parameters such as illumination power density and beam spot diameter for cell lysis were systematically investigated.

  8. Heat sink material selection in electronic devices by computational approach

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Geffroy, P.M. [S.P.C.T.S CNRS, ENSCI, Science des Procedes Ceramiques et de Traitements de Surface, 43 a 73 avenue Albert Thomas, 87065 Limoges (France); Mathias, J.D. [G.E.M.H., ENSCI, Groupe d' Etude des Materiaux Heterogenes, 43 a 73 avenue Albert Thomas, 87065 Limoges (France); Silvain, J.F. [I.C.M.C.B. CNRS, Institut de la Chimie et de la Matiere Condensee de Bordeaux, Universite de Bordeaux 1, 87 Avenue du Docteur Schweitzer, 33608 Pessac (France)

    2008-04-15

    Due to the increasing complexity and higher density of components in modern devices, reliability and lifetime are important issues in electronic packaging. Many material solutions have been suggested and tested for the reliability optimisation of electronic devices. This study presents methodical and numerical approaches for the selection of composite materials and compares the results of different actual solutions in terms of static and fatigue criteria. (Abstract Copyright [2008], Wiley Periodicals, Inc.)

  9. Designing Passivating, Carrier-Selective Contacts for Photovoltaic Devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boccard, Matthieu [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Koswatta, Priyaranga [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States); Holman, Zachary [Arizona State Univ., Tempe, AZ (United States)

    2015-04-06

    "The first step towards building a high-efficiency solar cell is to develop an absorber with few recombination-active defects. Many photovoltaic technologies have already achieved this (monocrystalline Si, III-V materials grown on lattice-matched substrates, perovskites, polycrystalline CdTe and CIGS); those that have not (a-Si:H, organics) have been limited to low open-circuit voltage. The second step is to develop contacts that both inhibit surface recombination and allow for low-resistance collection of either only electrons or only holes. For most photovoltaic technologies, this step is both more difficult and less explored than the first, and we are unaware of a prescribed methodology for selecting materials for contacts to solar cells. We elucidate a unified, conceptual understanding of contacts within which existing contacting schemes can be interpreted and future contacting schemes can be imagined. Whereas a split of the quasi-Fermi levels of holes and electrons is required in the absorber of any solar cell to generate a voltage, carriers are eventually collected through a metallic wire in which no such quasi-Fermi-level split exists. We define a contact to be all layers between the bulk of the absorber and the recombination-active interface through which carriers are extracted. The quasi-Fermi levels must necessarily collapse at this interface, and thus the transition between maximal quasi-Fermi-level splitting (in the absorber) and no splitting occurs entirely in the contact. Depending on the solar cell architecture, the contact will usually extend from the surface of the absorber to the surface of a metal or transparent conductive oxide layer, and may include deposited or diffused doped layers (e.g., as in crystalline and thin-film Si cells) and heterostructure buffer layers (e.g., the CdS layer in a CdTe device). We further define a passivating contact as one that enables high quasi-Fermi-level splitting in the absorber (large “internal” voltage

  10. Novel Hydrogen Purification Device Integrated with PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Joseph Schwartz; Hankwon Lim; Raymond Drnevich

    2010-12-31

    A prototype device containing twelve membrane tubes was designed, built, and demonstrated. The device produced almost 300 scfh of purified hydrogen at 200 psig feed pressure. The extent of purification met the program target of selectively removing enough impurities to enable industrial-grade hydrogen to meet purity specifications for PEM fuel cells. An extrusion process was developed to produce substrate tubes. Membranes met several test objectives, including completing 20 thermal cycles, exceeding 250 hours of operating life, and demonstrating a flux of 965 scfh/ft2 at 200 psid and 400 C.

  11. Cell biology apps for Apple devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Louisa A

    2012-01-01

    Apps for touch-pad devices hold promise for guiding and supporting learning. Students may use them in the classroom or on their own for didactic instruction, just-in-time learning, or review. Since Apple touch-pad devices (i.e., iPad and iPhone) have a substantial share of the touch-pad device market (Campbell, 2012), this Feature will explore cell biology apps available from the App Store. My review includes iPad and iPhone apps available in June 2012, but does not include courses, lectures, podcasts, audiobooks, texts, or other books. I rated each app on a five-point scale (1 star = lowest; 5 stars = highest) for educational and production values; I also provide an overall score. PMID:22949420

  12. Cell biology apps for Apple devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stark, Louisa A

    2012-01-01

    Apps for touch-pad devices hold promise for guiding and supporting learning. Students may use them in the classroom or on their own for didactic instruction, just-in-time learning, or review. Since Apple touch-pad devices (i.e., iPad and iPhone) have a substantial share of the touch-pad device market (Campbell, 2012), this Feature will explore cell biology apps available from the App Store. My review includes iPad and iPhone apps available in June 2012, but does not include courses, lectures, podcasts, audiobooks, texts, or other books. I rated each app on a five-point scale (1 star = lowest; 5 stars = highest) for educational and production values; I also provide an overall score.

  13. Game theory-based mode cooperative selection mechanism for device-to-device visible light communication

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Yuxin; Huang, Zhitong; Li, Wei; Ji, Yuefeng

    2016-03-01

    Various patterns of device-to-device (D2D) communication, from Bluetooth to Wi-Fi Direct, are emerging due to the increasing requirements of information sharing between mobile terminals. This paper presents an innovative pattern named device-to-device visible light communication (D2D-VLC) to alleviate the growing traffic problem. However, the occlusion problem is a difficulty in D2D-VLC. This paper proposes a game theory-based solution in which the best-response dynamics and best-response strategies are used to realize a mode-cooperative selection mechanism. This mechanism uses system capacity as the utility function to optimize system performance and selects the optimal communication mode for each active user from three candidate modes. Moreover, the simulation and experimental results show that the mechanism can attain a significant improvement in terms of effectiveness and energy saving compared with the cases where the users communicate via only the fixed transceivers (light-emitting diode and photo diode) or via only D2D.

  14. Reversible (unitized) PEM fuel cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mitlitsky, F; Myers, B; Smith, W F; Weisberg, Molter, T M

    1999-06-01

    Regenerative fuel cells (RFCs) are enabling for many weight-critical portable applications, since the packaged specific energy (>400 Wh/kg) of properly designed lightweight RFC systems is several-fold higher than that of the lightest weight rechargeable batteries. RFC systems can be rapidly refueled (like primary fuel cells), or can be electrically recharged (like secondary batteries) if a refueling infrastructure is not conveniently available. Higher energy capacity systems with higher performance, reduced weight, and freedom from fueling infrastructure are the features that RFCs promise for portable applications. Reversible proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, also known as unitized regenerative fuel cells (URFCs), or reversible regenerative fuel cells, are RFC systems which use reversible PEM cells, where each cell is capable of operating both as a fuel cell and as an electrolyzer. URFCs further economize portable device weight, volume, and complexity by combining the functions of fuel cells and electrolyzers in the same hardware, generally without any system performance or efficiency reduction. URFCs are being made in many forms, some of which are already small enough to be portable. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory (LLNL) has worked with industrial partners to design, develop, and demonstrate high performance and high cycle life URFC systems. LLNL is also working with industrial partners to develop breakthroughs in lightweight pressure vessels that are necessary for URFC systems to achieve the specific energy advantages over rechargeable batteries. Proton Energy Systems, Inc. (Proton) is concurrently developing and commercializing URFC systems (UNIGEN' product line), in addition to PEM electrolyzer systems (HOGEN' product line), and primary PEM fuel cell systems. LLNL is constructing demonstration URFC units in order to persuade potential sponsors, often in their own conference rooms, that advanced applications based on URFC s are

  15. Nanostructured Semiconductor Device Design in Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dang, Hongmei

    We demonstrate the use of embedded CdS nanowires in improving spectral transmission loss and the low mechanical and electrical robustness of planar CdS window layer and thus enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability of the CdS-CdTe solar cells. CdS nanowire window layer enables light transmission gain at 300nm-550nm. A nearly ideal spectral response of quantum efficiency at a wide spectrum range provides an evidence for improving light transmission in the window layer and enhancing absorption and carrier generation in absorber. Nanowire CdS/CdTe solar cells with Cu/graphite/silver paste as back contacts, on SnO2/ITO-soda lime glass substrates, yield the highest efficiency of 12% in nanostructured CdS-CdTe solar cells. Reliability is improved by approximately 3 times over the cells with the traditional planar CdS counterpart. Junction transport mechanisms are delineated for advancing the basic understanding of device physics at the interface. Our results prove the efficacy of this nanowire approach for enhancing the quantum efficiency and the reliability in windowabsorber type solar cells (CdS-CdTe, CdS-CIGS and CdS-CZTSSe etc) and other optoelectronic devices. We further introduce MoO3-x as a transparent, low barrier back contact. We design nanowire CdS-CdTe solar cells on flexible foils of metals in a superstrate device structure, which makes low-cost roll-to-roll manufacturing process feasible and greatly reduces the complexity of fabrication. The MoO3 layer reduces the valence band offset relative to the CdTe, and creates improved cell performance. Annealing as-deposited MoO3 in N 2 reduces series resistance from 9.98 O/cm2 to 7.72 O/cm2, and hence efficiency of the nanowire solar cell is improved from 9.9% to 11%, which efficiency comparable to efficiency of planar counterparts. When the nanowire solar cell is illuminated from MoO 3-x /Au side, it yields an efficiency of 8.7%. This reduction in efficiency is attributed to decrease in Jsc from 25.5m

  16. Compact disk (CD)-shaped device for single cell isolation and PCR of a specific gene in the isolated cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furutani, Shunsuke; Nagai, Hidenori; Takamura, Yuzuru; Kubo, Izumi

    2010-12-01

    For immediate discrimination among isolated cells we propose a novel device and technique for isolation of cells and sequential detection of specific gene(s) within them by polymerase chain reaction (PCR). In this study, we isolated Salmonella enterica cells and detected the Salmonella-specific invA gene from isolated cells by PCR on a compact disk (CD)-shaped device. This device enabled liquid flow by centrifugal force without a micro pump, and was fabricated from silicon wafer and glass to avoid evaporation of a small amount of reagent. One device has 24 microchannels, and 313 microchambers integrated on each microchannel. One microliter of PCR mixture containing cells was separated into microchambers on the device at 5000 rpm for 30 s. Each microchamber contained approximately 1.5 nL PCR mixture. A Poisson distribution of S. enterica cells was observed for different densities of cell suspension. At 200 cells μL(-1) of S. enterica or less, isolated single cells could be determined on the device by amplification of DNA of the invA gene; at 400 cells μL(-1), chambers containing no, one, two, or three cells could be determined on the device. Selective detection of S. enterica was achieved by PCR from a mixture of S. enterica and Escherichia coli on the CD-shaped device.

  17. Local doping of graphene devices by selective hydrogen adsorption

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    N-type graphene fabricated by exposure to hydrogen gas has been previously studied. Based on this property of graphene, herein, we demonstrate local doping in single-layer graphene using selective adsorption of dissociative hydrogen at 350 K. A graphene field effect transistor was produced covered with PMMA on half of the graphene region. The charge neutrality point of the PMMA-window region shifted to a negative gate voltage (VG) region prominently compared with that of the PMMA-covered region. Consequently, a single graphene p-n junction was obtained by measuring the VG-dependent resistance of the whole graphene region. This method presents opportunities for developing and controlling the electronic structure of graphene and device applications

  18. Practical, Microfabrication-Free Device for Single-Cell Isolation

    OpenAIRE

    Liang-I Lin; Shih-Hui Chao; Meldrum, Deirdre R.

    2009-01-01

    Microfabricated devices have great potential in cell-level studies, but are not easily accessible for the broad biology community. This paper introduces the Microscale Oil-Covered Cell Array (MOCCA) as a low-cost device for high throughput single-cell analysis that can be easily produced by researchers without microengineering knowledge. Instead of using microfabricated structures to capture cells, MOCCA isolates cells in discrete aqueous droplets that are separated by oil on patterned hydrop...

  19. A Microfluidic Device for Spatiotemporal Delivery of Stimuli to Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zubaidah Ningsih

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Living cells encounter many stimuli from the immediate environment. Receptors recognize these environmental cues and transduce signals to produce cell responses. The frequency of a signal is now emerging as an important factor determining cell responses. As a componentry system in understanding temporal stimulation, microfluidic devices allow the observation of cell behaviour under dynamic stimulation and controllable environment. In this paper we describe the design, construction and characterization of a microfluidic device suitable for cell stimulation studies.

  20. Survey Musik und Medien 2012: Audio Media Usage in Germany - Audio Devices - Audio Devices used in 2012 - Selective Traditionalists

    OpenAIRE

    Lepa, Steffen

    2013-01-01

    By what means was music played back in 2012? Audio Devices comprise technical devices that permit access to and enable playback of Audio Sources. This includes CD players, record players, cassette recorders, MP3 player and smartphones but also computers and various multimedia entertainment devices that allow music use. 11,6 % of our participants may be described as Selective Traditionalists who are typically born between 1955 and 1975. The radio is the dominant audio source used at least ...

  1. On-Demand Cell Internal Short Circuit Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darcy, Eric; Keyser, Matthew

    2014-01-01

    A device implantable in Li-ion cells that can generate a hard internal short circuit on-demand by exposing the cell to 60?C has been demonstrated to be valuable for expanding our understanding of cell responses. The device provides a negligible impact to cell performance and enables the instigation of the 4 general categories of cell internal shorts to determine relative severity and cell design susceptibility. Tests with a 18650 cell design indicates that the anode active material short to the aluminum cathode current collector tends to be more catastrophic than the 3 other types of internal shorts. Advanced safety features (such as shutdown separators) to prevent or mitigate the severity of cell internal shorts can be verified with this device. The hard short success rate achieved to date in 18650 cells is about 80%, which is sufficient for using these cells in battery assemblies for field-failure-relevant, cell-cell thermal runaway propagation verification tests

  2. IDEA. VOCES: A Mnemonic Device to Cue Mood Selection after Impersonal Expressions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandler, Paul Michael

    1996-01-01

    Providing language learners with mnemonic devices assists retention and recall of vocabulary and structural items. This idea provides one such memory device to assist beginning and intermediate students who struggle with mood selection after impersonal expressions. (five references) (Author)

  3. A Model for Service Life Control of Selected Device Systems

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zieja Mariusz

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available This paper presents a way of determining distribution of limit state exceedence time by a diagnostic parameter which determines accuracy of maintaining zero state. For calculations it was assumed that the diagnostic parameter is deviation from nominal value (zero state. Change of deviation value occurs as a result of destructive processes which occur during service. For estimation of deviation increasing rate in probabilistic sense, was used a difference equation from which, after transformation, Fokker-Planck differential equation was obtained [4, 11]. A particular solution of the equation is deviation increasing rate density function which was used for determining exceedance probability of limit state. The so-determined probability was then used to determine density function of limit state exceedance time, by increasing deviation. Having at disposal the density function of limit state exceedance time one determined service life of a system of maladjustment. In the end, a numerical example based on operational data of selected aircraft [weapon] sights was presented. The elaborated method can be also applied to determining residual life of shipboard devices whose technical state is determined on the basis of analysis of values of diagnostic parameters.

  4. How do I perform hematopoietic progenitor cell selection?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Avecilla, Scott T; Goss, Cheryl; Bleau, Sharon; Tonon, Jo-Ann; Meagher, Richard C

    2016-05-01

    Graft-versus-host disease remains the most important source of morbidity and mortality associated with allogeneic stem cell transplantation. The implementation of hematopoietic progenitor cell (HPC) selection is employed by some stem cell processing facilities to mitigate this complication. Current cell selection methods include reducing the number of unwanted T cells (negative selection) and/or enriching CD34+ hematopoietic stem/progenitors (positive selection) using immunomagnetic beads subjected to magnetic fields within columns to separate out targeted cells. Unwanted side effects of cell selection as a result of T-cell reduction are primary graft failure, increased infection rates, delayed immune reconstitution, possible disease relapse, and posttransplant lymphoproliferative disease. The Miltenyi CliniMACS cell isolation system is the only device currently approved for clinical use by the Food and Drug Administration. It uses magnetic microbeads conjugated with a high-affinity anti-CD34 monoclonal antibody capable of binding to HPCs in marrow, peripheral blood, or umbilical cord blood products. The system results in significantly improved CD34+ cell recoveries (50%-100%) and consistent 3-log CD3+ T-cell reductions compared to previous generations of CD34+ cell selection procedures. In this article, the CliniMACS procedure is described in greater detail and the authors provide useful insight into modifications of the system. Successful implementation of cell selection procedures can have a significant positive clinical effect by greatly increasing the pool of donors for recipients requiring transplants. However, before a program implements cell selection techniques, it is important to consider the time and financial resources required to properly and safely perform these procedures. PMID:26919388

  5. Method and apparatus for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reduction device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmieg, Steven J; Viola, Michael B; Cheng, Shi-Wai S; Mulawa, Patricia A; Hilden, David L; Sloane, Thompson M; Lee, Jong H

    2014-05-06

    A method for monitoring a hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device of an exhaust aftertreatment system of an internal combustion engine operating lean of stoichiometry includes injecting a reductant into an exhaust gas feedstream upstream of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device at a predetermined mass flowrate of the reductant, and determining a space velocity associated with a predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device. When the space velocity exceeds a predetermined threshold space velocity, a temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is determined, and a threshold temperature as a function of the space velocity and the mass flowrate of the reductant is determined. If the temperature differential across the predetermined forward portion of the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device is below the threshold temperature, operation of the engine is controlled to regenerate the hydrocarbon-selective catalytic reactor device.

  6. Electroporation of cells in microfluidic devices: a review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Fox, M.B.; Esveld, D.C.; Valero, A.; Luttge, R.; Mastwijk, H.C.; Bartels, P.V.; Berg, van den A.; Boom, R.M.

    2006-01-01

    In recent years, several publications on microfluidic devices have focused on the process of electroporation, which results in the poration of the biological cell membrane. The devices involved are designed for cell analysis, transfection or pasteurization. The high electric field strengths needed a

  7. Miniaturized Cell Lysis Device Using Spherically Focused Ultrasound

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    李刚; 肖宏; 郭旻; 程京

    2003-01-01

    A prototype of a miniaturized cell lysis device developed using a concave spherical transducer is capable of lysing bacteria without added chemical denaturants, enzymes or microparticles and is capable of efficiently lysing yeast without any mechanical or enzymatic pretreatment.The device is designed for miniature bio-analysis systems where cell lysing is needed to obtain intracellular materials for further analysis such as DNA identification.The device lysis efficiency was evaluated using viable cell counts and microscopy.Additionally, the device efficiency was compared with that of traditional chemical cell lysis methods using standard molecular biological techniques such as agarose gels and ultraviolet (UV) spectroscopy.The results indicate that efficient bacteria and cell disruption can be achieved through a low-voltage-driven and spherically focused high-frequency ultrasonic device.

  8. Wireless induction heating in a microfluidic device for cell lysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Seung-ki; Min, Junghong; Park, Jung-Hwan

    2010-04-01

    A wireless induction heating system in a microfluidic device was devised for cell lysis to extract DNA and RNA from Escherichia coli. The thermal responses of nickel, iron and copper heating units were studied by applying an alternating magnetic field as a function of geometry of unit, strength of magnetic field, and kind of metal. Heating units were prepared by cutting metal film using a fiber laser, and the units were integrated into a microchannel system using a soft lithographic process. Variation and distribution of temperature on the surface of the heating units was observed using a thermographic camera and temperature labels. The amount of protein released from E. coli by thermal lysis was determined by protein concentration measurement. Hemoglobin released from red blood cells was observed using colorimetric intensity measurement. Extracted DNA was quantified by real-time polymerase chain reaction, and the profile was compared with that of a positive control of ultrasonically disrupted E. coli. The stability of RNA extracted by induction heating was quantified by the measurement of 23S/16S rRNA ratio and comparison with that by normal RNA extraction kit as a gold standard. A solid-shaped nickel structure was selected as the induction heating element in the microfluidic device because of the relatively small influence of geometries and faster thermal response.The amount of protein extracted from E. coli and hemoglobin released from red blood cells by induction heating of the nickel unit in the microfluidic device was proportional to the strength of the applied magnetic field. The lysis of E. coli by induction heating was as effective as lysis of DNA by the ultrasonication method because the threshold cycle values of the sample were compatible with those of the positive control as measured by ultrasonication. Thermal lysis of E. coli by induction heating represents a reasonable alternative to a commercial RNA extraction method as shown by the comparative

  9. Production, characterization and stability of organic solar cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gevorgyan, S.A.

    2010-01-15

    Despite the fact that the field of organic photovoltaics (OPVs) is in a rapid progress, organic solar cells continue taking backstage roll in the growing markets of various solar technologies. The main challenge of the field is to develop devices that would possess all the optimal properties required for efficient, stable and cheap solar cells, i.e. devices that can deliver high photoconversion efficiencies and long lifetimes and can be efficiently produced in large scales using roll-to-roll coating technologies. This dissertation is primarily devoted to the issues of photoconversion efficiency and device lifetimes. In particular, descriptions of some practical approaches for different device designs and processing of active layer for typical small scale OPV devices were presented. The emphasis was put on some optimizing techniques for processing of active layer that can significantly improve the device photoconversion efficiency. The techniques were further applied for manufacturing and characterization of solar cell devices based on various materials. In particular, a number of thermocleavable polymers were studied and devices based on such materials were produced and characterized. The applicability of such materials in photovoltaic devices was shown and further challenges were discussed. Another task of this work was to manufacture and study inverted device structures and compare their properties with normal structure based devices. Device based on both structure were successfully produced with same level of performance in terms of photoconversion efficiency, yet with totally different stability performance. As another task, metal oxides, such as MoO{sub 3} or V{sub 2}O{sub 5} were studied in solar cell devices as buffer layers instead of PEDOT:PSS. Although the device efficiencies obtained with metal oxides were inferior to PEDOT based device, it was shown that such materials can possibly improve the device efficiency if the processing of the layers is

  10. Photon absorption models in nanostructured semiconductor solar cells and devices

    CERN Document Server

    Luque, Antonio

    2015-01-01

    This book is intended to be used by materials and device physicists and also solar cells researchers. It models the performance characteristics of nanostructured solar cells and resolves the dynamics of transitions between several levels of these devices. An outstanding insight into the physical behaviour of these devices is provided, which complements experimental work. This therefore allows a better understanding of the results, enabling the development of new experiments and optimization of new devices. It is intended to be accessible to researchers, but also to provide engineering tools w

  11. Microfluidic application-specific integrated device for monitoring direct cell-cell communication via gap junctions between individual cell pairs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Philip J.; Hung, Paul J.; Shaw, Robin; Jan, Lily; Lee, Luke P.

    2005-05-01

    Direct cell-cell communication between adjacent cells is vital for the development and regulation of functional tissues. However, current biological techniques are difficult to scale up for high-throughput screening of cell-cell communication in an array format. In order to provide an effective biophysical tool for the analysis of molecular mechanisms of gap junctions that underlie intercellular communication, we have developed a microfluidic device for selective trapping of cell-pairs and simultaneous optical characterizations. Two different cell populations can be brought into membrane contact using an array of trapping channels with a 2μm by 2μm cross section. Device operation was verified by observation of dye transfer between mouse fibroblasts (NIH3T3) placed in membrane contact. Integration with lab-on-a-chip technologies offers promising applications for cell-based analytical tools such as drug screening, clinical diagnostics, and soft-state biophysical devices for the study of gap junction protein channels in cellular communications. Understanding electrical transport mechanisms via gap junctions in soft membranes will impact quantitative biomedical sciences as well as clinical applications.

  12. Intracavity Microfluidic Laser Device for Single Cell Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul

    2015-03-01

    An intracavity microfluidic laser device has been developed to study bioparticles ranging in size from 50 nm to 20 μm (virons to organelles to whole cells). The versatile device can be operated used in several modes including static or flowing fluids, with or without molecular labels, and microscopic imaging and/or spectroscopy. It enables advantageous new ways to perform analyses of bioparticles for applications including cell biology, detection of disease and pathogens, environmental monitoring, pharmaceuticals, agriculture, and food processing. This talk will briefly summarize the physics of the device including its laser optics, fluid dynamics, and intracavity light interaction with cells. The talk will then focus on results of a study of mitochondria in normal and cancer liver cells. The study examines the transformation of intracellular and isolated mitochondria from the normal to disease state. The results highlight the unique utility of the device to rapidly assess biophysical changes arising from altered biomolecular states of cells and organelles.

  13. Device simulation of cuprous oxide heterojunction solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takiguchi, Yuki; Miyajima, Shinsuke

    2015-11-01

    We developed a device simulation model of cuprous oxide (Cu2O)-based heterojunction solar cells. The developed model well reproduces the reported experimental current density-voltage characteristics and the external quantum efficiency results. By using the model, we explored structures for high-efficiency Cu2O-based heterojunction solar cells. It was found that the electron affinity of the buffer layer between transparent conducting oxide and Cu2O significantly affects solar cell performance. Surface recombination on the rear side of the device can be suppressed by employing a highly doped back surface layer. Our device simulation demonstrates a conversion efficiency of 16% without any optical confinement structure.

  14. Select & apply:understanding how users act upon objects across devices

    OpenAIRE

    Simeone, Adalberto; Chong, Ming Ki; Sas, Corina; Gellersen, Hans

    2015-01-01

    As our interactions increasingly cut across diverse devices, we often encounter situations where we find information on one device but wish to use it on another device, for instance, a phone number spotted on a public display but wanted on a mobile. We conceptualize this problem as Select & Apply and contribute two user studies where we presented participants with eight different scenarios involving different device combinations, applications and data types. In the first, we used a think-alou...

  15. Provision Of Carbon Nanotube Bucky Paper Cages For Immune Shielding Of Cells, Tissues, and Medical Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loftus, David J. (Inventor)

    2006-01-01

    System and method for enclosing cells and/or tissue, for purposes of growth, cell differentiation, suppression of cell differentiation, biological processing and/or transplantation of cells and tissues (biological inserts), and for secretion, sensing and monitoring of selected chemical substances and activation of gene expression of biological inserts implanted into a human body. Selected cells and/or tissue are enveloped in a "cage" that is primarily carbon nanotube Bucky paper, with a selected thickness and porosity. Optionally, selected functional groups, proteins and/or peptides are attached to the carbon nanotube cage, or included within the cage, to enhance the growth and/or differentiation of the cells and/or tissue, to select for certain cellular sub-populations, to optimize certain functions of the cells and/or tissue and/or to optimize the passage of chemicals across the cage surface(s). A cage system is also used as an immuns shield and to control operation of a nano-device or macroscopic device, located within the cage, to provide or transform a selected chemical and/or a selected signal.

  16. Device operation of organic tandem solar cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hadipour, A.; de Boer, B.; Blom, P. W. M.

    2008-01-01

    A generalized methodology is developed to obtain the current-voltage characteristic of polymer tandem solar cells by knowing the electrical performance of both sub cells. We demonstrate that the electrical characteristics of polymer tandem solar cells are correctly predicted for both the series and

  17. Single cell electroporation using microfluidic devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Le Gac, S.; Berg, van den A.; Lindstrom, S.; Andersson-Svahn, S.M.H.

    2012-01-01

    Electroporation is a powerful technique to increase the permeability of cell membranes and subsequently introduce foreign materials into cells. Pores are created in the cell membrane upon application of an electric fi eld (kV/cm). Most applications employ bulk electroporation, at the scale of 1 mL o

  18. Device and materials modeling in PEM fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Promislow, Keith

    2009-01-01

    Device and Materials Modeling in PEM Fuel Cells is a specialized text that compiles the mathematical details and results of both device and materials modeling in a single volume. Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells will likely have an impact on our way of life similar to the integrated circuit. The potential applications range from the micron scale to large scale industrial production. Successful integration of PEM fuel cells into the mass market will require new materials and a deeper understanding of the balance required to maintain various operational states. This book contains articles from scientists who contribute to fuel cell models from both the materials and device perspectives. Topics such as catalyst layer performance and operation, reactor dynamics, macroscopic transport, and analytical models are covered under device modeling. Materials modeling include subjects relating to the membrane and the catalyst such as proton conduction, atomistic structural modeling, quantum molecular dynamics, an...

  19. Evaluation of selected information on splitting devices for water samples

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capel, P.D.; Larson, S.J.

    1996-01-01

    Four devices for splitting water samples into representative aliquots are used by the U.S. Geological Survey's Water Resources Division. A thorough evaluation of these devices (14-liter churn, 8-liter churn, plastic cone, and Teflon cone) encompasses a wide variety of concerns, based on both chemical and physical considerations. This report surveys the existing data (as of April 1994) on cleaning efficiency and splitting capability of these devices and presents the data in a systematic framework for evaluation. From the existing data, some of these concerns are adequately or partially addressed, but the majority of concerns could not be addressed because of the lack of data. In general, the existing cleaning and transport protocols are adequate at the milligram per liter level, but the adequacy is largely unknown for trace elements and organic chemicals at lower concen- trations. The existing data indicate that better results are obtained when the splitters are cleaned in the laboratory rather than in the field. Two conclusions that can be reached on the splitting capability of solids are that more work must be done with all four devices to characterize and quantify their limitations and range of usefulness, and that the 14-liter churn (and by association, the 8-liter churn) is not useful in obtaining representative splits of sand-sized particles.

  20. Femtosecond laser fabrication of optofluidic devices for single cell manipulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bragheri Francesca

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this work we fabricate and validate two optofludic devices for the manipulation and analysis of single cells. The chips are fabricated by femtosecond laser micromachining exploiting the 3D capabilities of the technique and the inherent perfect alignment between microfluidic channels and optical networks. Both devices have been validated by probing the mechanical properties of different cancer cell lines, which are expected to show different elasticity because of their different metastatic potential.

  1. Selected Advances in Nanoelectronic Devices Logic, Memory and RF

    CERN Document Server

    Joodaki, Mojtaba

    2013-01-01

    Nanoelectronics, as a true successor of microelectronics, is certainly a major technology boomer in the 21st century. This has been shown by its several applications and also by its enormous potential to influence all areas of electronics, computers, information technology, aerospace defense, and consumer goods. Although the current semiconductor technology is projected to reach its physical limit in about a decade, nanoscience and nanotechnology promise breakthroughs for the future. The present books provides an in-depth review of the latest advances in the technology of nanoelectronic devices and their developments over the past decades. Moreover, it introduces new concepts for the realization of future nanoelectronic devices. The main focus of the book is on three fundamental branches of semiconductor products or applications: logic, memory, and RF and communication. By pointing out to the key technical challenges, important aspects and characteristics of various designs are used to illustrate mechanisms t...

  2. A Strip Cell in Pyroelectric Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siao, An-Shen; Chao, Ching-Kong; Hsiao, Chun-Ching

    2016-01-01

    The pyroelectric effect affords the opportunity to convert temporal temperature fluctuations into usable electrical energy in order to develop abundantly available waste heat. A strip pyroelectric cell, used to enhance temperature variation rates by lateral temperature gradients and to reduce cell capacitance to further promote the induced voltage, is described as a means of improving pyroelectric energy transformation. A precision dicing saw was successfully applied in fabricating the pyroelectric cell with a strip form. The strip pyroelectric cell with a high-narrow cross section is able to greatly absorb thermal energy via the side walls of the strips, thereby inducing lateral temperature gradients and increasing temperature variation rates in a thicker pyroelectric cell. Both simulation and experimentation show that the strip pyroelectric cell improves the electrical outputs of pyroelectric cells and enhances the efficiency of pyroelectric harvesters. The strip-type pyroelectric cell has a larger temperature variation when compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by about 1.9 and 2.4 times, respectively. The measured electrical output of the strip type demonstrates a conspicuous increase in stored energy as compared to the trenched electrode and the original type, by of about 15.6 and 19.8 times, respectively. PMID:26999134

  3. Organic solar cells fundamentals, devices, and upscaling

    CERN Document Server

    Rand, Barry P

    2014-01-01

    Solution-Processed DonorsB. Burkhart, B. C. ThompsonSmall-Molecule and Vapor-Deposited Organic Photovoltaics R. R. Lunt, R. J. HolmesAcceptor Materials for Solution-Processed Solar Cells Y. HeInterfacial Layers R. Po, C. Carbonera, A. BernardiElectrodes in Organic Photovoltaic Cells S. Yoo, J.-Y. Lee, H. Kim, J. LeeTandem and Multi-Junction Organic Solar Cells J. Gilot, R. A. J. JanssenBulk Heterojunction Morphology Control and Characterization T. Wang, D. G. LidzeyOptical Modeling and Light Management

  4. Feeding Devices Design for Selective Laser Melting Formation of Heterogeneous Powder Structures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grinin, O. I.; Valdaytseva, E. A.; Lasota, I. T.; Pevzner, Ya B.; Somonov, V. V.

    2016-08-01

    The article presents the principles of selective laser melting technology for manufacturing of polymetallic products. The results of theoretical investigations of heat and mass transfer at the border of materials are shown. Types of feeding devices design have been demonstrated.

  5. Integration of microcantilevers with photonic structures for mechano-optical wavelength selective devices

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Chakkalakkal Abdulla, Shahina Mumthaz

    2011-01-01

    This thesis deals with the fabrication technology and mechano-optical characterisation of compact integrated wavelength selective optical devices for use in telecommunication applications. Upon electrostatic actuation, a mechanical element perturbs the optical evanescent field of a guided wave provi

  6. Different Device Architectures for Bulk-Heterojunction Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Getachew Adam

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available We report different solar cell designs which allow a simple electrical connection of subsequent devices deposited on the same substrate. By arranging so-called standard and inverted solar-cell architectures next to each other, a serial connection of the two devices can easily be realized by a single compound electrode. In this work, we tested different interfacial layer materials like polyethylenimine (PEI and PEDOT:PSS, and silver as a non-transparent electrode material. We also built organic light emitting diodes applying the same device designs demonstrating the versatility of applied layer stacks. The proposed design should allow the preparation of organic bulk-heterojunction modules with minimized photovoltaically inactive regions at the interconnection of individual devices.

  7. Cell Selection Using Recursive Bipartite Matching

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zakrzewska, Anna; Ruepp, Sarah Renée; Berger, Michael Stübert

    Wireless communication network consist nowadays of multiple standards, as well as cells of different sizes and coverage. Providing the best connection in such environment is a challenging task. We propose a new approach of solving the cell selection problem in heterogeneous networks. The method...

  8. Effect of bottom cell properties on micromorph tandem device performance

    OpenAIRE

    Delli Veneri, Paola; Mercaldo, Lucia Vittoria; PRIVATO Carlo

    2009-01-01

    Abstract Micromorph tandem solar cells represent an elegant way of overcoming the efficiency limits of single-junction solar cells and reducing the light-induced degradation of amorphous silicon films. Micromorph devices have been realized on Asahi U-type TCO-covered glass substrates by very high frequency plasma enhanced chemical vapour deposition (VHF-PECVD) at 100 MHz at low substrate temperature (150 ?C). For the bottom cell different growth regimes have been explored by changi...

  9. Towards autonomous lab-on-a-chip devices for cell phone biosensing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Comina, Germán; Suska, Anke; Filippini, Daniel

    2016-03-15

    Modern cell phones are a ubiquitous resource with a residual capacity to accommodate chemical sensing and biosensing capabilities. From the different approaches explored to capitalize on such resource, the use of autonomous disposable lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices-conceived as only accessories to complement cell phones-underscores the possibility to entirely retain cell phones' ubiquity for distributed biosensing. The technology and principles exploited for autonomous LOC devices are here selected and reviewed focusing on their potential to serve cell phone readout configurations. Together with this requirement, the central aspects of cell phones' resources that determine their potential for analytical detection are examined. The conversion of these LOC concepts into universal architectures that are readable on unaccessorized phones is discussed within this context. PMID:26569446

  10. A synthetic circuit for selectively arresting daughter cells to create aging populations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Afonso, Bruno; Silver, Pamela A; Ajo-Franklin, Caroline M

    2010-05-01

    The ability to engineer genetic programs governing cell fate will permit new safeguards for engineered organisms and will further the biological understanding of differentiation and aging. Here, we have designed, built and implemented a genetic device in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae that controls cell-cycle progression selectively in daughter cells. The synthetic device was built in a modular fashion by combining timing elements that are coupled to the cell cycle, i.e. cell-cycle specific promoters and protein degradation domains, and an enzymatic domain which conditionally confers cell arrest. Thus, in the presence of a drug, the device is designed to arrest growth of only newly-divided daughter cells in the population. Indeed, while the engineered cells grow normally in the absence of drug, with the drug the engineered cells display reduced, linear growth on the population level. Fluorescence microscopy of single cells shows that the device induces cell arrest exclusively in daughter cells and radically shifts the age distribution of the resulting population towards older cells. This device, termed the 'daughter arrester', provides a blueprint for more advanced devices that mimic developmental processes by having control over cell growth and death.

  11. Practical, microfabrication-free device for single-cell isolation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liang-I Lin

    Full Text Available Microfabricated devices have great potential in cell-level studies, but are not easily accessible for the broad biology community. This paper introduces the Microscale Oil-Covered Cell Array (MOCCA as a low-cost device for high throughput single-cell analysis that can be easily produced by researchers without microengineering knowledge. Instead of using microfabricated structures to capture cells, MOCCA isolates cells in discrete aqueous droplets that are separated by oil on patterned hydrophilic areas across a relatively more hydrophobic substrate. The number of randomly seeded Escherichia coli bacteria in each discrete droplet approaches single-cell levels. The cell distribution on MOCCA is well-fit with Poisson distribution. In this pioneer study, we created an array of 900-picoliter droplets. The total time needed to seed cells in approximately 3000 droplets was less than 10 minutes. Compared to traditional microfabrication techniques, MOCCA dramatically lowers the cost of microscale cell arrays, yet enhances the fabrication and operational efficiency for single-cell analysis.

  12. A device model for the tandem junction solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matzen, W. T.; Chiang, S. Y.; Carbajal, B. G.

    1979-01-01

    A conceptual device model has been developed to explain operation of the tandem junction cell (TJC) when back contacts only are used. Operation and parameters of the cell are explained by transistor action. Experimental observations are presented which confirm that current is collected for carrier generation in the front uncontacted n(plus) region. The model should be useful as a guideline to optimize the TJC by application of transistor design principles.

  13. Sensitivity Analysis of Centralized Dynamic Cell Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Victor Fernandez; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret; Pedersen, Klaus I.;

    2016-01-01

    and a suboptimal optimization algorithm that nearly achieves the performance of the optimal Hungarian assignment. Moreover, an exhaustive sensitivity analysis with different network and traffic configurations is carried out in order to understand what conditions are more appropriate for the use of the proposed...... with two different traffic models, and it is not necessary to be able to connect to a large number of cells in order to reap most of the benefits of the centralized dynamic cell selection....

  14. PMC: Select Materialized Cells in Data Cubes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hong-Song Li; Hou-Kuan Huang

    2006-01-01

    QC-Tree is one of the most storage-efficient structures for data cubes in an MOLAP system. Although QC-Tree can achieve a high compression ratio, it is still a fully materialized data cube. In this paper, an improved structure PMC is presented allowing us to materialize only a part of the cells in a QC-Tree to save more storage space. There is a notable difference between our partially materialization algorithm and traditional materialized views selection algorithms. In a traditional algorithm, when a view is selected, all the cells in this view are to be materialized. Otherwise, if a view is not selected, all the cells in this view will not be materialized. This strategy results in the unstable query performance. The presented algorithm, however, selects and materializes data in cell level, and, along with further reduced space and update cost, it can ensure a stable query performance. A series of experiments are conducted on both synthetic and real data sets. The results show that PMC can further reduce storage space occupied by the data cube, and can shorten the time to update the cube.

  15. Acoustic Devices for Particle and Cell Manipulation and Sensing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yongqiang Qiu

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available An emerging demand for the precise manipulation of cells and particles for applications in cell biology and analytical chemistry has driven rapid development of ultrasonic manipulation technology. Compared to the other manipulation technologies, such as magnetic tweezing, dielectrophoresis and optical tweezing, ultrasonic manipulation has shown potential in a variety of applications, with its advantages of versatile, inexpensive and easy integration into microfluidic systems, maintenance of cell viability, and generation of sufficient forces to handle particles, cells and their agglomerates. This article briefly reviews current practice and reports our development of various ultrasonic standing wave manipulation devices, including simple devices integrated with high frequency (>20 MHz ultrasonic transducers for the investigation of biological cells and complex ultrasonic transducer array systems to explore the feasibility of electronically controlled 2-D and 3-D manipulation. Piezoelectric and passive materials, fabrication techniques, characterization methods and possible applications are discussed. The behavior and performance of the devices have been investigated and predicted with computer simulations, and verified experimentally. Issues met during development are highlighted and discussed. To assist long term practical adoption, approaches to low-cost, wafer level batch-production and commercialization potential are also addressed.

  16. Ventricular Assist Device and Destination Therapy Candidates from Preoperative Selection Through End of Hospitalization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doty, Diane

    2015-12-01

    Mechanical circulatory support (MCS) devices offer advanced heart failure patients a potential long-term solution. MCS devices implantation is increasing related to the increased volume of heart failure patients, the shortfall of suitable donors, and the advanced technology and smaller size of the devices. To ensure a successful outcome, some key elements must be taken into consideration and managed: patient selection, preoperative preparation, intraoperative care, postoperative care, and posthospital education. The ultimate success of an MCS implantation relies on a multidisciplinary approach and excellent patient/caregiver education in each phase of hospitalization. PMID:26567498

  17. [Wearable Medical Devices' MCU Selection Analysis Based on the ARM Cortex-MO+ Architecture].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Zaoquan; Liu, Mengxing; Qin, Liping; Ye, Shuming; Chen, Hang

    2015-03-01

    According to the characteristics of low cost, high performance, high integration and long battery life of wearable medical devices, the mainstream low-power microcontroller(MCU) series were compared, and came to the conclusion that the MCU series based on ARM Cortex-M0+ architecture were suitable for the development of wearable medical devices. In aspects of power consumption, operational performance, integrated peripherals and cost, the MCU series based on Cortex-M0+ architecture of primary semiconductor companies were compared, aimed at providing the guides of MCU selection for wearable medical devices.

  18. Sensitivity Analysis of Centralized Dynamic Cell Selection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Lopez, Victor Fernandez; Alvarez, Beatriz Soret; Pedersen, Klaus I.;

    2016-01-01

    and a suboptimal optimization algorithm that nearly achieves the performance of the optimal Hungarian assignment. Moreover, an exhaustive sensitivity analysis with different network and traffic configurations is carried out in order to understand what conditions are more appropriate for the use of the proposed...... with two different traffic models, and it is not necessary to be able to connect to a large number of cells in order to reap most of the benefits of the centralized dynamic cell selection.......Centralized architectures with fronthauls can be used to deal with some of the problems inherently associated with dense small cell deployments. This study examines a joint cell assignment and scheduling solution for the downlink to increase the users’ data rates, based on cell switching...

  19. Highly Multiplexed RNA Aptamer Selection using a Microplate-based Microcolumn Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reinholt, Sarah J; Ozer, Abdullah; Lis, John T; Craighead, Harold G

    2016-01-01

    We describe a multiplexed RNA aptamer selection to 19 different targets simultaneously using a microcolumn-based device, MEDUSA (Microplate-based Enrichment Device Used for the Selection of Aptamers), as well as a modified selection process, that significantly reduce the time and reagents needed for selections. We exploited MEDUSA's reconfigurable design between parallel and serially-connected microcolumns to enable the use of just 2 aliquots of starting library, and its 96-well microplate compatibility to enable the continued use of high-throughput techniques in downstream processes. Our modified selection protocol allowed us to perform the equivalent of a 10-cycle selection in the time it takes for 4 traditional selection cycles. Several aptamers were discovered with nanomolar dissociation constants. Furthermore, aptamers were identified that not only bound with high affinity, but also acted as inhibitors to significantly reduce the activity of their target protein, mouse decapping exoribonuclease (DXO). The aptamers resisted DXO's exoribonuclease activity, and in studies monitoring DXO's degradation of a 30-nucleotide substrate, less than 1 μM of aptamer demonstrated significant inhibition of DXO activity. This aptamer selection method using MEDUSA helps to overcome some of the major challenges with traditional aptamer selections, and provides a platform for high-throughput selections that lends itself to process automation. PMID:27432610

  20. A polystyrene-based microfluidic device with three-dimensional interconnected microporous walls for perfusion cell culture

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, Chung Yu; Goral, Vasiliy N.; DeRosa, Michael E.; Huang, Tony Jun

    2014-01-01

    In this article, we present a simple, rapid prototyped polystyrene-based microfluidic device with three-dimensional (3D) interconnected microporous walls for long term perfusion cell culture. Patterned 3D interconnected microporous structures were created by a chemical treatment together with a protective mask and the native hydrophobic nature of the microporous structures were selectively made hydrophilic using oxygen plasma treatment together with a protective mask. Using this polystyrene-based cell culture microfluidic device, we successfully demonstrated the support of four days perfusion cell culture of hepatocytes (C3A cells). PMID:25379110

  1. BLAST: Battery Lifetime-constrained Adaptation with Selected Target in Mobile Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pietro Mercati

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Mobile devices today contain many power hungry subsystems and execute different applications. Standard power management is not aware of the desired battery lifetime and has no visibility into which applications are executing. However, power consumption is strongly dependent on which applications are executed. In this work, we propose a novel power characterization strategy for mobile devices called application-dependent power states (AP-states. Based on that, we formulate a management problem to improve performance under battery lifetime constraints, and we implement the management framework on a real Android device. We call our framework BLAST: Battery Lifetime-constrained Adaptation with Selected Target. The goal of such framework is to maximize performance while letting the device battery to last at least for a certain required lifetime, and only requires the user to select the desired target lifetime. The implementation does not require OS modifications and can be ported and installed to any Android device. We experimentally verify that our strategy can still meets user experience requirements with a selected target battery lifetime extension of at least 25%.

  2. Moulded interconnect device fabrication by two shot molding and lasert induced selective activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sun, Jie; Hansen, Hans Nørgaard

    interconnect device was achieved with two innovative processes such as two shot injection molding which combines platetable and none-platetable thermoplastics, and laser induced selective activation which uses a laser to draw circuit on the thermoplastic surface containing laser sensitive additive. Different...

  3. Investigation of frequency-selective devices based on a microstrip 2D photonic crystal

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belyaev, B. A.; Khodenkov, S. A.; Shabanov, V. F.

    2016-04-01

    The frequency-selective properties of structures based on a 2D microstrip photonic crystal have been investigated theoretically and experimentally. It is shown that various microwave devices, including diplexers, bandpass filters, and double bandpass filters, can be designed based on these structures.

  4. Development of a microfluidic device for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maria, M Sneha; Kumar, B S; Chandra, T S; Sen, A K

    2015-12-01

    This work presents design, fabrication and test of a microfluidic device which employs Fahraeus-Lindqvist and Zweifach-Fung effects for cell concentration and blood cell-plasma separation. The device design comprises a straight main channel with a series of branched channels placed symmetrically on both sides of the main channel. The design implements constrictions before each junction (branching point) in order to direct cells that would have migrated closer to the wall (naturally or after liquid extraction at a junction) towards the centre of the main channel. Theoretical and numerical analysis are performed for design of the microchannel network to ensure that a minimum flow rate ratio (of 2.5:1, main channel-to-side channels) is maintained at each junction and predict flow rate at the plasma outlet. The dimensions and location of the constrictions were determined using numerical simulations. The effect of presence of constrictions before the junctions was demonstrated by comparing the performances of the device with and without constrictions. To demonstrate the performance of the device, initial experiments were performed with polystyrene microbeads (10 and 15 μm size) and droplets. Finally, the device was used for concentration of HL60 cells and separation of plasma and cells in diluted blood samples. The cell concentration and blood-plasma purification efficiency was quantified using Haemocytometer and Fluorescence-Activated Cell Sorter (FACS). A seven-fold cell concentration was obtained with HL60 cells and a purification efficiency of 70 % and plasma recovery of 80 % was observed for diluted (1:20) blood sample. FACS was used to identify cell lysis and the cell viability was checked using Trypan Blue test which showed that more than 99 % cells are alive indicating the suitability of the device for practical use. The proposed device has potential to be used as a sample preparation module in lab on chip based diagnostic platforms.

  5. Annealing of Solar Cells and Other Thin Film Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobar, Hector; Kuhlman, Franz; Dils, D. W.; Lush, G. B.; Mackey, Willie R. (Technical Monitor)

    2001-01-01

    Annealing is a key step in most semiconductor fabrication processes, especially for thin films where annealing enhances performance by healing defects and increasing grain sizes. We have employed a new annealing oven for the annealing of CdTe-based solar cells and have been using this system in an attempt to grow US on top of CdTe by annealing in the presence of H2S gas. Preliminary results of this process on CdTe solar cells and other thin-film devices will be presented.

  6. Microgravity-Enhanced Stem Cell Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Claudio, Pier Paolo; Valluri, Jagan

    2011-01-01

    Stem cells, both embryonic and adult, promise to revolutionize the practice of medicine in the future. In order to realize this potential, a number of hurdles must be overcome. Most importantly, the signaling mechanisms necessary to control the differentiation of stem cells into tissues of interest remain to be elucidated, and much of the present research on stem cells is focused on this goal. Nevertheless, it will also be essential to achieve large-scale expansion and, in many cases, assemble cells in 3D as transplantable tissues. To this end, microgravity analog bioreactors can play a significant role. Microgravity bioreactors were originally conceived as a tool to study the cellular responses to microgravity. However, the technology can address some of the shortcomings of conventional cell culture systems; namely, the deficiency of mass transport in static culture and high mechanical shear forces in stirred systems. Unexpectedly, the conditions created in the vessel were ideal for 3D cell culture. Recently, investigators have demonstrated the capability of the microgravity bioreactors to expand hematopoietic stem cells compared to static culture, and facilitate the differentiation of umbilical cord stem cells into 3D liver aggregates. Stem cells are capable of differentiating into functional cells. However, there are no reliable methods to induce the stem cells to form specific cells or to gain enough cells for transplantation, which limits their application in clinical therapy. The aim of this study is to select the best experimental setup to reach high proliferation levels by culturing these cells in a microgravity-based bioreactor. In typical cell culture, the cells sediment to the bottom surface of their container and propagate as a one-cell-layer sheet. Prevention of such sedimentation affords the freedom for self-assembly and the propagation of 3D tissue arrays. Suspension of cells is easily achievable using stirred technologies. Unfortunately, in

  7. Engineering novel cell surface chemistry for selective tumor cell targeting

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bertozzi, C.R. [Univ. of California, Berkeley, CA (United States)]|[Lawrence Berkeley National Lab., CA (United States)

    1997-12-31

    A common feature of many different cancers is the high expression level of the two monosaccharides sialic acid and fucose within the context of cell-surface associated glycoconjugates. A correlation has been made between hypersialylation and/or hyperfucosylation and the highly metastatic phenotype. Thus, a targeting strategy based on sialic acid or fucose expression would be a powerful tool for the development of new cancer cell-selective therapies and diagnostic agents. We have discovered that ketone groups can be incorporated metabolically into cell-surface associated sialic acids. The ketone is can be covalently ligated with hydrazide functionalized proteins or small molecules under physiological conditions. Thus, we have discovered a mechanism to selectively target hydrazide conjugates to highly sialylated cells such as cancer cells. Applications of this technology to the generation of novel cancer cell-selective toxins and MRI contrast reagents will be discussed, in addition to progress towards the use of cell surface fucose residues as vehicles for ketone expression.

  8. Ventricular assist devices for heart failure: a focus on patient selection and complications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cipriani M

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Manlio Cipriani, Vincenzo De Simone, Luciana D'Angelo, Enrico Perna, Marzia Lilliu, Virginia Bovolo, Fabrizio Oliva, Maria Frigerio Cardiovascular and Thoracic Department, A De Gasperis Niguarda Ca' Granda Hospital, Milan, Italy Abstract: Heart transplantation represents the “gold standard” for the treatment of patients with end-stage heart failure, but remains challenged by inadequate donor supply, finite graft survival, and long-term complications arising from immunosuppressive therapy. In addition, a lot of patients waiting for a heart transplant experience clinical deterioration, and other patients become ineligible to undergo this treatment due to their age or relevant comorbidities. Left ventricular assist devices have emerged as a valid therapeutic option for advanced heart failure. In recent years, we have seen significant advances not only in the technologies available, but also in patient selection, indications for use, and management after implantation. Consequently, there has been an increase in the number of implants and an improvement in the survival rate and quality of life for these patients. At the same time, there are new challenges on the horizon. Patient selection is a difficult process, based on clinical and imaging parameters and risk scores, and more data are needed to refine patient selection criteria and the timing of the implant. Left ventricular assist device-related complications are still a serious problem, causing adverse events and hospital readmissions. Continuous progress in the development of these implantable devices, such as a further reduction in size and hopefully the abolition of the external driveline, will probably make ventricular assist devices an option also for less advanced stages of heart failure. Here, we discuss the current indications for left ventricular assist device implantation, patient selection criteria, and the most frequent complications associated with these devices. Keywords

  9. Solid-state devices for detection of DNA, protein biomarkers and cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asghar, Waseem

    Nanobiotechnology and BioMEMS have had tremendous impact on biosensing in the areas of cancer cell detection and therapeutics, disease diagnostics, proteomics and DNA analysis. Diseases are expressed on all levels including DNA, protein, cell and tissue. Therefore it is very critical to develop biosensors at each level. The power of the nanotechnology lies in the fact that we can fabricate devices on all scales from micro to nano. This dissertation focuses on four areas: 1) Development of nanopore sensors for DNA analysis; 2) Development of micropore sensors for early detection of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from whole blood; 3) Synthesis of nano-textured substrates for cancer isolation and tissue culture applications; 4) Fabrication of nanoscale break-junctions. All of these sensors are fabricated using standard silicon processing techniques. Pulsed plasma polymer deposition is also utilized to control the density of the biosensor surface charges. These devices are then used for efficient detection of DNA, proteins and cells, and can be potentially used in point-of-care systems. Overall, our designed biosensing platforms offer improved selectivity, yield and reliability. Novel approaches to nanopore shrinking are simple, reliable and do not change the material composition around the pore boundary. The micropores provide a direct interface to distinguish CTCs from normal cell without requiring fluorescent dyes and surface functionalization. Nano-textured surfaces and break-junctions can be used for enhanced adhesion of cells and selective detection of proteins respectively.

  10. Cold atmospheric plasma treatment selectively targets head and neck squamous cell carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guerrero-Preston, Rafael; Ogawa, Takenori; Uemura, Mamoru; Shumulinsky, Gary; Valle, Blanca L; Pirini, Francesca; Ravi, Rajani; Sidransky, David; Keidar, Michael; Trink, Barry

    2014-10-01

    The treatment of locoregional recurrence (LRR) of head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) often requires a combination of surgery, radiation therapy and/or chemotherapy. Survival outcomes are poor and the treatment outcomes are morbid. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas produced at room temperature under laboratory conditions. We have previously demonstrated that treatment with a CAP jet device selectively targets cancer cells using in vitro melanoma and in vivo bladder cancer models. In the present study, we wished to examine CAP selectivity in HNSCC in vitro models, and to explore its potential for use as a minimally invasive surgical approach that allows for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue ablation without affecting the surrounding healthy cells and tissues. Four HNSCC cell lines (JHU-022, JHU-028, JHU-029, SCC25) and 2 normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines (OKF6 and NOKsi) were subjected to cold plasma treatment for durations of 10, 30 and 45 sec, and a helium flow of 20 l/min-1 for 10 sec was used as a positive treatment control. We showed that cold plasma selectively diminished HNSCC cell viability in a dose-response manner, as evidenced by MTT assays; the viability of the OKF6 cells was not affected by the cold plasma. The results of colony formation assays also revealed a cell-specific response to cold plasma application. Western blot analysis did not provide evidence that the cleavage of PARP occurred following cold plasma treatment. In conclusion, our results suggest that cold plasma application selectively impairs HNSCC cell lines through non-apoptotic mechanisms, while having a minimal effect on normal oral cavity epithelial cell lines.

  11. CMOS compatible electrode materials selection in oxide-based memory devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhuo, V. Y.-Q.; Li, M.; Guo, Y.; Wang, W.; Yang, Y.; Jiang, Y.; Robertson, J.

    2016-07-01

    Electrode materials selection guidelines for oxide-based memory devices are constructed from the combined knowledge of observed device operation characteristics, ab-initio calculations, and nano-material characterization. It is demonstrated that changing the top electrode material from Ge to Cr to Ta in the Ta2O5-based memory devices resulted in a reduction of the operation voltages and current. Energy Dispersed X-ray (EDX) Spectrometer analysis clearly shows that the different top electrode materials scavenge oxygen ions from the Ta2O5 memory layer at various degrees, leading to different oxygen vacancy concentrations within the Ta2O5, thus the observed trends in the device performance. Replacing the Pt bottom electrode material with CMOS compatible materials (Ru and Ir) further reduces the power consumption and can be attributed to the modification of the Schottky barrier height and oxygen vacancy concentration at the electrode/oxide interface. Both trends in the device performance and EDX results are corroborated by the ab-initio calculations which reveal that the electrode material tunes the oxygen vacancy concentration via the oxygen chemical potential and defect formation energy. This experimental-theoretical approach strongly suggests that the proper selection of CMOS compatible electrode materials will create the critical oxygen vacancy concentration to attain low power memory performance.

  12. Evaluating the performance of microbial fuel cells powering electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dewan, Alim; Beyenal, Haluk [Gene and Linda Voiland School of Chemical Engineering and Bioengineering, Center for Environmental, Sediment and Aquatic Research, Pullman, WA (United States); Donovan, Conrad; Heo, Deukhyoun [School of Electrical Engineering and Computer Science, Washington State University, Pullman, WA 99163-2710 (United States)

    2010-01-01

    A microbial fuel cell (MFC) is capable of powering an electronic device if we store the energy in an external storage device, such as a capacitor, and dispense that energy intermittently in bursts of high-power when needed. Therefore its performance needs to be evaluated using an energy-storing device such as a capacitor which can be charged and discharged rather than other evaluation techniques, such as continuous energy dissipation through a resistor. In this study, we develop a method of testing microbial fuel cell performance based on storing energy in a capacitor. When a capacitor is connected to a MFC it acts like a variable resistor and stores energy from the MFC at a variable rate. In practice the application of this method to testing microbial fuel cells is very challenging and time consuming; therefore we have custom-designed a microbial fuel cell tester (MFCT). The MFCT evaluates the performance of a MFC as a power source. It uses a capacitor as an energy storing device and waits until a desired amount of energy is stored then discharges the capacitor. The entire process is controlled using an analog-to-digital converter (ADC) board controlled by a custom-written computer program. The utility of our method and the MFCT is demonstrated using a laboratory microbial fuel cell (LMFC) and a sediment microbial fuel cell (SMFC). We determine (1) how frequently a MFC can charge a capacitor, (2) which electrode is current-limiting, (3) what capacitor value will allow the maximum harvested energy from a MFC, which is called the ''optimum charging capacitor value,'' and (4) what capacitor charging potential will harvest the maximum energy from a MFC, which is called the ''optimum charging potential.'' Using a LMFC we find that (1) the time needed to charge a 3-F capacitor from 0 to 500 mV is 108 min, (2) the optimum charging capacitor value is 3 F, and (3) the optimum charging potential is 300 mV. Using a SMFC we find that (1

  13. 78 FR 27441 - NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-05-10

    ... of Justice Programs NIJ Evaluation of Hand-Held Cell Phone Detector Devices AGENCY: National...) is soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an... soliciting interest in supplying hand-held cell phone detector devices for participation in an evaluation...

  14. Selective ablation of photovoltaic materials with UV laser sources for monolithic interconnection of devices based on a-Si:H

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Molpeceres, C. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain)], E-mail: carlos.molpeceres@upm.es; Lauzurica, S.; Garcia-Ballesteros, J.J.; Morales, M.; Guadano, G.; Ocana, J.L. [Centro Laser UPM, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Crta. de Valencia Km 7.3, 28031 Madrid (Spain); Fernandez, S.; Gandia, J.J. [Dept. de Energias Renovables, Energia Solar Fotovoltaica, CIEMAT, Avda, Complutense 22, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Villar, F.; Nos, O.; Bertomeu, J. [CeRMAE Dept. Fisica Aplicada i Optica, Universitat de Barcelona, Av. Diagonal 647, 08028 Barcelona (Spain)

    2009-03-15

    Lasers are essential tools for cell isolation and monolithic interconnection in thin-film-silicon photovoltaic technologies. Laser ablation of transparent conductive oxides (TCOs), amorphous silicon structures and back contact removal are standard processes in industry for monolithic device interconnection. However, material ablation with minimum debris and small heat affected zone is one of the main difficulty is to achieve, to reduce costs and to improve device efficiency. In this paper we present recent results in laser ablation of photovoltaic materials using excimer and UV wavelengths of diode-pumped solid-state (DPSS) laser sources. We discuss results concerning UV ablation of different TCO and thin-film silicon (a-Si:H and nc-Si:H), focussing our study on ablation threshold measurements and process-quality assessment using advanced optical microscopy techniques. In that way we show the advantages of using UV wavelengths for minimizing the characteristic material thermal affection of laser irradiation in the ns regime at higher wavelengths. Additionally we include preliminary results of selective ablation of film on film structures irradiating from the film side (direct writing configuration) including the problem of selective ablation of ZnO films on a-Si:H layers. In that way we demonstrate the potential use of UV wavelengths of fully commercial laser sources as an alternative to standard backscribing process in device fabrication.

  15. Materials Research Advances towards High-Capacity Battery/Fuel Cell Devices (Invited paper)

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei-Dong He; Lu-Han Ye; Ke-Chun Wen; Ya-Chun Liang; Wei-Qiang Lv; Gao-Long Zhu; Kelvin H. L. Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The world has entered an era featured with fast transportations, instant communications, and prompt technological revolutions, the further advancement of which all relies fundamentally, yet, on the development of cost-effective energy resources allowing for durable and high-rate energy supply. Current battery and fuel cell systems are challenged by a few issues characterized either by insufficient energy capacity or by operation instability and, thus, are not ideal for such highly-demanded applications as electrical vehicles and portable electronic devices. In this mini-review, we present, from materials perspectives, a few selected important breakthroughs in energy resources employed in these applications. Prospectives are then given to look towards future research activities for seeking viable materials solutions for addressing the capacity, durability, and cost shortcomings associated with current battery/fuel cell devices.

  16. Performance evaluation of aluminum/phosphate cell for powering small electronic devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gymama Slaughter

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available We report on an innovative membrane-free aluminum/phosphate cell based on the activation of aluminum (Al as anodic material using ZnO nanocrystal in phosphate rich electrolyte that is capable of generating sufficient power to power a light-emitting diode (LED, selected as a model of a small electronic device. The energy from the cell is periodically supplied in high power bursts due to the charge and discharge cycle of the capacitor. The entire process is controlled by a switched capacitor regulator. The Al/phosphate cell was studied in neutral 100 mM phosphate buffer solution (7.4 at a temperature of 25 °C. We demonstrate that two Al/phosphate cells connected in series can generate an open circuit voltage (Voc up to 1.66 V to continuously power a LED via a switched capacitor regulator circuit. The switched capacitor regulator circuit enabled the 1 μF capacitor to store the incoming power from the cell and discharge it in a large power burst to supply the necessary drive strength required by the LED. This new Al/phosphate cell configuration is a ‘green’ alternative to the use of glucose abiotic and biofuel cells for powering ultra-low power implantable electronic devices.

  17. Particle Trajectories in Rotating Wall Cell Culture Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramachandran N.; Downey, J. P.

    1999-01-01

    Cell cultures are extremely important to the medical community since such cultures provide an opportunity to perform research on human tissue without the concerns inherent in experiments on individual humans. Development of cells in cultures has been found to be greatly influenced by the conditions of the culture. Much work has focused on the effect of the motions of cells in the culture relative to the solution. Recently rotating wall vessels have been used with success in achieving improved cellular cultures. Speculation and limited research have focused on the low shear environment and the ability of rotating vessels to keep cells suspended in solution rather than floating or sedimenting as the primary reasons for the improved cellular cultures using these devices. It is widely believed that the cultures obtained using a rotating wall vessel simulates to some degree the effect of microgravity on cultures. It has also been speculated that the microgravity environment may provide the ideal acceleration environment for culturing of cellular tissues due to the nearly negligible levels of sedimentation and shear possible. This work predicts particle trajectories of cells in rotating wall vessels of cylindrical and annular design consistent with the estimated properties of typical cellular cultures. Estimates of the shear encountered by cells in solution and the interactions with walls are studied. Comparisons of potential experiments in ground and microgravity environments are performed.

  18. Advanced materials and processes for polymer solar cell devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Petersen, Martin Helgesen; Søndergaard, Roar; Krebs, Frederik C

    2010-01-01

    The rapidly expanding field of polymer and organic solar cells is reviewed in the context of materials, processes and devices that significantly deviate from the standard approach which involves rigid glass substrates, indium-tin-oxide electrodes, spincoated layers of conjugated polymer....../fullerene mixtures and evaporated metal electrodes in a flat multilayer geometry. It is likely that significant advances can be found by pursuing many of these novel ideas further and the purpose of this review is to highlight these reports and hopefully spark new interest in materials and methods that may...

  19. One Hand or Two Hands? 2D Selection Tasks With the Leap Motion Device

    OpenAIRE

    Seixas, Manuel; Jorge C. S. Cardoso; Dias, Maria Teresa Galvão

    2015-01-01

    In this paper, we present the results from an experiment designed to compare two selection gestures (hand grab and screen tap) for the Leap Motion controller in 2D pointing tasks. We used the ISO 9241-9 multi-directional tapping test for comparing the devices, and we analyze the results using standard throughput and error rate measures as well as additional accuracy measures. We also present the results from the ISO 92...

  20. Selectively bonded polymeric glaucoma drainage device for reliable regulation of intraocular pressure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Seunghwan; Im, Seongmin; An, Jaeyong; Park, Chang Ju; Kim, Hwang Gyun; Park, Sang Woo; Kim, Hyoung Ihl; Lee, Jong-Hyun

    2012-04-01

    A novel glaucoma drainage device (GDD) using a polymeric micro check valve with no reverse flow is presented for the effective regulation of intraocular pressure (IOP). A significant functional improvement was achieved by reducing the possible incidence of hypotony, as the proposed GDD only drains aqueous humor at a certain cracking pressure or higher. The device consists of three biocompatible polymer layers: a top layer (cover), an intermediate layer (membrane), and a bottom layer (base plate with a cannula). All three layers, made of soft polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS), were bonded together to realize the thin GDDs. The bottom layer was selectively coated with chromium (Cr)/gold (Au) to prevent stiction between the valve seat and the valve orifice so that the device could show enhanced reliability in operation and high yield in production. Two types of polymeric devices were fabricated; one was a glaucoma drainage device for humans (GDDH) and the other was a glaucoma drainage device for animals (GDDA). From subsequent in vitro tests, the cracking pressures were 18.33 ± 0.66 mmHg (mean ± standard deviation) for GDDH and 12.42 mmHg for GDDA, both of which were very close to the corresponding normal IOPs. From in vivo tests of GDDA, the IOP of all implanted devices was properly regulated within the target pressure (10-15 mmHg). The experimental results showed that the proposed polymeric GDD has high potential for use in the treatment of glaucoma disease in terms of its repeatability of the cracking pressure and patients' relief from post-operative discomfort. PMID:22094823

  1. Sodium selectivity of Reissner's membrane epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kim Kyunghee X

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium absorption by Reissner's membrane is thought to contribute to the homeostasis of the volume of cochlear endolymph. It was previously shown that the absorptive transepithelial current was blocked by amiloride and benzamil. The most commonly-observed target of these drugs is the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, which is composed of the three subunits α-,β- and γ-ENaC. However, other less-selective cation channels have also been observed to be sensitive to benzamil and amiloride. The aim of this study was to determine whether Reissner's membrane epithelial cells could support parasensory K+ absorption via amiloride- and benzamil-sensitive electrogenic pathways. Results We determined the molecular and functional expression of candidate cation channels with gene array (GEO GSE6196, RT-PCR, and whole-cell patch clamp. Transcript expression analysis of Reissner's membrane detected no amiloride-sensitive acid-sensing ion channels (ASIC1a, ASIC2a, ASIC2b nor amiloride-sensitive cyclic-nucleotide gated channels (CNGA1, CNGA2, CNGA4, CNGB3. By contrast, α-,β- and γ-ENaC were all previously reported as present in Reissner's membrane. The selectivity of the benzamil-sensitive cation currents was observed in whole-cell patch clamp recordings under Cl--free conditions where cations were the only permeant species. The currents were carried by Na+ but not K+, and the permeability of Li+ was greater than that of Na+ in Reissner's membrane. Complete replacement of bath Na+ with the inpermeable cation NMDG+ led to the same inward current as with benzamil in a Na+ bath. Conclusions These results are consistent with the amiloride/benzamil-sensitive absorptive flux of Reissner's membrane mediated by a highly Na+-selective channel that has several key characteristics in common with αβγ-ENaC. The amiloride-sensitive pathway therefore absorbs only Na+ in this epithelium and does not provide a parasensory K+ efflux route from scala

  2. All-Inorganic Spin-Cast Nanoparticle Solar Cells with Non-Selective Electrodes

    OpenAIRE

    Anderson, I. E.; Olson, J. D.; Yang, L.; Carter, S. A.

    2008-01-01

    Spin-cast all-inorganic nanoparticle solutions have been used to make a CdTe/CdSe solar cell with an efficiency of up to 2.8% without alumina or calcium buffer layers. The type of junction and non-selective nature of the contacts made to these devices is explored.

  3. Frequency Selective Surfaces with Nanoparticles Unit Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nga Hung Poon

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The frequency selective surface (FSS is a periodic structure with filtering performance for optical and microwave signals. The general periodic arrays made with patterned metallic elements can act as an aperture or patch on a substrate. In this work, two kinds of materials were used to produce unit cells with various patterns. Gold nanoparticles of 25 nm diameter were used to form periodic monolayer arrays by a confined photocatalytic oxidation-based surface modification method. As the other material, silver gel was used to create multiple layers of silver. Due to the ultra-thin nature of the self-assembled gold nanoparticle monolayer, it is very easy to penetrate the FSS with terahertz radiation. However, the isolated silver islands made from silver gel form thicker multiple layers and contribute to much higher reflectance. This work demonstrated that multiple silver layers are more suitable than gold nanoparticles for use in the fabrication of FSS structures.

  4. Cancer Cell Analyses at the Single Cell-Level Using Electroactive Microwell Array Device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marina Kobayashi

    Full Text Available Circulating tumor cells (CTCs, shed from primary tumors and disseminated into peripheral blood, are playing a major role in metastasis. Even after isolation of CTCs from blood, the target cells are mixed with a population of other cell types. Here, we propose a new method for analyses of cell mixture at the single-cell level using a microfluidic device that contains arrayed electroactive microwells. Dielectrophoretic (DEP force, induced by the electrodes patterned on the bottom surface of the microwells, allows efficient trapping and stable positioning of single cells for high-throughput biochemical analyses. We demonstrated that various on-chip analyses including immunostaining, viability/apoptosis assay and fluorescent in situ hybridization (FISH at the single-cell level could be conducted just by applying specific reagents for each assay. Our simple method should greatly help discrimination and analysis of rare cancer cells among a population of blood cells.

  5. Device Modeling and Characterization for CIGS Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Sang Ho

    We studied the way to achieve high efficiency and low cost of CuIn1-xGaxSe2 (CIGS) solar cells. The Fowler-Nordheim (F-N) tunneling currents at low bias decreased the shunt resistances and degraded the fill factor and efficiency. The activation energies of majority traps were directly related with F-N tunneling currents by the energy barriers. Air anneals decreased the efficiency from 7.74% to 5.18% after a 150 °C, 1000 hour anneal. The decrease of shunt resistance due to F-N tunneling and the increase of series resistance degrade the efficiencies of solar cells. Air anneal reduces the free carrier densities by the newly generated Cu interstitial defects (Cui). Mobile Cui defects induce the metastability in CIGS solar cell. Since oxygen atoms are preferred to passivate the Se vacancies thus Cu interstitial defects explains well metastability of CIGS solar cells. Lattice mismatch and misfit stress between layers in CIGS solar cells can explain the particular effects of CIGS solar cells. The misfits of 35.08° rotated (220/204) CIGS to r-plane (102) MoSe2 layers are 1% ˜ -4% lower than other orientation and the lattice constants of two layers in short direction are matched at Ga composition x=0.35. This explains well the preferred orientation and the maximum efficiency of Ga composition effects. Misfit between CIGS and CdS generated the dislocations in CdS layer as the interface traps. Thermionic emission currents due to interface traps limit the open circuit voltage at high Ga composition. The trap densities were calculated by critical thickness and dislocation spacing and the numerical device simulation results were well matched with the experimental results. A metal oxide broken-gap p-n heterojunction is suggested for tunnel junction for multi-junction polycrystalline solar cells and we examined the characteristics of broken-gap tunnel junction by numerical simulation. Ballistic transport mechanism explains well I-V characteristics of broken-gap junction. P

  6. A bioMEMS device for the study of mechanical properties of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanders, Joseph M.; Butt, Logan; Clark, Ashley; Williams, James; Padgen, Michael; Leung, Edison; Keely, Patricia; Condeelis, John S.; Aguirre-Ghiso, Julio; Castracane, James

    2015-03-01

    The tumor microenvironment is a complex system which is not fully understood. New technologies are needed to provide a better understanding of the role of the tumor microenvironment in promoting metastasis. The Nano Intravital Device, or NANIVID, has been developed as an optically transparent, implantable tool to study the tumor microenvironment. Two etched glass substrates are sealed using a thin polymer membrane to create a reservoir with a single outlet. This reservoir is loaded with a custom hydrogel blend that contains selected factors for delivery to the tumor microenvironment. When the device is implanted in the tumor, the hydrogel swells and releases these entrapped molecules, forming a sustained concentration gradient. The NANIVID has previously been successful in manipulating the tumor microenvironment both in vitro as well as in vivo. As metastatic cells intravasate, it has been shown that some are able to do so unscathed and reach their new location, while others are cleaved during the process1. There appears to be a correlation between cell migration and the mechanical properties of these cells. It is believed that these properties can be detected in real time by atomic force microscopy. In this study, metastatic MTLn3 rat mammary cells are seeded onto 1-dimensional microfibers and directed up a stable gradient of growth factor. The NANIVID device is placed behind our AFM tip, where it generates a stable chemotactic gradient of epidermal growth factor. Scanning confocal laser microscopy is also used to monitor movement of the cells over time. This experiment will shed light on the mechanical changes in metastatic cells as they undergo directed migration.

  7. Enhanced Mode Selection Algorithm for H.264 encoder for Application in Low Computational power devices

    CERN Document Server

    Rungta, Sourabh; Tripathi, Neeta; Shukla, Anupam

    2009-01-01

    The intent of the H.264 AVC project was to create a standard capable of providing good video quality at substantially lower bit rates than previous standards without increasing the complexity of design so much that it would be impractical or excessively expensive to implement. An additional goal was to provide enough flexibility to allow the standard to be applied to a wide variety of applications. To achieve better coding efficiency, H.264 AVC uses several techniques such as inter mode and intra mode prediction with variable size motion compensation, which adopts Rate Distortion Optimization (RDO). This increases the computational complexity of the encoder especially for devices with lower processing capabilities such as mobile and other handheld devices. In this paper, we propose an algorithm to reduce the number of mode and sub mode evaluations in inter mode prediction. Experimental results show that this fast intra mode selection algorithm can lessen about 75 percent encoding time with little loss of bit ...

  8. Single Glucose Biofuel Cells Implanted in Rats Power Electronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zebda, A.; Cosnier, S.; Alcaraz, J.-P.; Holzinger, M.; Le Goff, A.; Gondran, C.; Boucher, F.; Giroud, F.; Gorgy, K.; Lamraoui, H.; Cinquin, P.

    2013-01-01

    We describe the first implanted glucose biofuel cell (GBFC) that is capable of generating sufficient power from a mammal's body fluids to act as the sole power source for electronic devices. This GBFC is based on carbon nanotube/enzyme electrodes, which utilize glucose oxidase for glucose oxidation and laccase for dioxygen reduction. The GBFC, implanted in the abdominal cavity of a rat, produces an average open-circuit voltage of 0.57 V. This implanted GBFC delivered a power output of 38.7 μW, which corresponded to a power density of 193.5 μW cm−2 and a volumetric power of 161 μW mL−1. We demonstrate that one single implanted enzymatic GBFC can power a light-emitting diode (LED), or a digital thermometer. In addition, no signs of rejection or inflammation were observed after 110 days implantation in the rat. PMID:23519113

  9. Modularity of select riboswitch expression platforms enables facile engineering of novel genetic regulatory devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ceres, Pablo; Garst, Andrew D; Marcano-Velázquez, Joan G; Batey, Robert T

    2013-08-16

    RNA-based biosensors and regulatory devices have received significant attention for their potential in a broad array of synthetic biology applications. One of the primary difficulties in engineering these molecules is the lack of facile methods to link sensory modules, or aptamers, to readout domains. Such efforts typically require extensive screening or selection of sequences that facilitate interdomain communication. Bacteria have evolved a widespread form of gene regulation known as riboswitches that perform this task with sufficient fidelity to control expression of biosynthetic and transport proteins essential for normal cellular homeostasis. In this work, we demonstrate that select riboswitch readout domains, called expression platforms, are modular in that they can host a variety of natural and synthetic aptamers to create novel chimeric RNAs that regulate transcription both in vitro and in vivo. Importantly, this technique does not require selection of device-specific "communication modules" required to transmit ligand binding to the regulatory domain, enabling rapid engineering of novel functional RNAs. PMID:23654267

  10. Optional Frame Selection Algorithm for Adaptive Symmetric Service of Augmented Reality Big Data on Smart Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    HwiRim Byun

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Following recent technological advances in diverse mobile devices, including smartphones, tablets and smartwatches, in-depth studies aimed at improving the quality of augmented reality (AR are currently ongoing. Smartphones feature the essential elements of AR implementation, such as a camera, a processor and a display in a single device. As a result, additional hardware expansion for AR implementation has become unnecessary, popularizing AR technology at the user level. In the early stages, low-level AR technology was used mainly in limited fields, including simple road guides and marker-based recognition. Due to advances in AR technology, the range of usage has expanded as diverse technologies and purposes are combined. Users’ expectations of AR technology have also increased with this trend, and a high quality of service (QoS, with high-resolution, high-quality images, is now available. However, there are limitations in terms of processing speed and graphic treatment with smart devices, which, due to their small size, have inferior performance compared to the desktop environment when processing data for the implementation of high-resolution, high-quality images. This paper proposes an optional frame-selection algorithm (OFSA, which eliminates the unnecessary work involved with redundant frames during rendering for adaptive symmetric service of augmented reality big data on smart devices. Moreover, the memory read-write delay of the internally-operating OFSA, is minimized by adding an adaptive operation function. It is possible to provide adaptive common AR images at an improved frame rate in heterogeneous smart devices with different levels of performance.

  11. A novel closed cell culture device for fabrication of corneal epithelial cell sheets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakajima, Ryota; Kobayashi, Toyoshige; Moriya, Noboru; Mizutani, Manabu; Kan, Kazutoshi; Nozaki, Takayuki; Saitoh, Kazuo; Yamato, Masayuki; Okano, Teruo; Takeda, Shizu

    2015-11-01

    Automation technology for cell sheet-based tissue engineering would need to optimize the cell sheet fabrication process, stabilize cell sheet quality and reduce biological contamination risks. Biological contamination must be avoided in clinical settings. A closed culture system provides a solution for this. In the present study, we developed a closed culture device called a cell cartridge, to be used in a closed cell culture system for fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets. Rabbit limbal epithelial cells were cultured on the surface of a porous membrane with 3T3 feeder cells, which are separate from the epithelial cells in the cell cartridges and in the cell-culture inserts as a control. To fabricate the stratified cell sheets, five different thicknesses of the membranes which were welded to the cell cartridge, were examined. Multilayered corneal epithelial cell sheets were fabricated in cell cartridges that were welded to a 25 µm-thick gas-permeable membrane, which was similar to the results with the cell-culture inserts. However, stratification of corneal epithelial cell sheets did not occur with cell cartridges that were welded to 100-300 µm-thick gas-permeable membranes. The fabricated cell sheets were evaluated by histological analyses to examine the expression of corneal epithelial-specific markers. Immunohistochemical analyses showed that a putative stem cell marker, p63, a corneal epithelial differentiation maker, CK3, and a barrier function marker, Claudin-1, were expressed in the appropriate position in the cell sheets. These results suggest that the cell cartridge is effective for fabricating corneal epithelial cell sheets.

  12. Novel techniques for selective doping of silicon carbide for device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Bharat

    Superior properties of Silicon Carbide (SiC), such as wide bandgap, high breakdown field and high thermal conductivity, have made it the frontrunner to replace Silicon for applications requiring high breakdown strength, mechanical and radiation hardness. Commercial SiC devices are already available, although their expected performance has not yet been realized due to a few problems related to device fabrication technologies, such as selective doping. This work explores non-traditional techniques for SiC doping (and selective doping in particular) based on previously unknown types of defect reactions in SiC and novel epitaxial growth techniques, which offer advantages over currently available technologies. Recent developments in SiC epitaxial growth techniques at MSU have enabled the growth of high quality SiC epitaxial layers at record low temperatures of 1,300°C. Lower growth temperatures have enabled highly doped epilayers for device applications. Prototypes of SiC PiN diodes fabricated, demonstrated low values of the series resistance associated with anodes grown by the low temperature epitaxial growth technique. At room temperature, 100 mum-diameter diodes with a forward voltage of 3.75 V and 3.23V at 1,000 A/cm2 before and after annealing were achieved. The reverse breakdown voltage was more than 680 V on average, even without surface passivation or edge termination. Reduced growth temperatures also enabled the possibility of selective epitaxial growth (SEG) of SiC with traditional masks used in the SEG in Si technology. Previously, SEG of SiC was impossible without high temperature masks. Good quality, defect free, selectively grown 4H-SiC epilayers were obtained using SiO2 mask. Nitrogen doped selectively grown epilayers were also obtained, which were almost completely ohmic, indicating doping exceeding 1x1019 cm-3. Moreover, conductivity modulation via defect reactions in SiC has been reported as a part of this work for the first time. The approach is

  13. Bring-Your-Own-Device: Turning Cell Phones into Forces for Good

    Science.gov (United States)

    Imazeki, Jennifer

    2014-01-01

    Over the last few years, classroom response systems (or "clickers") have become increasingly common. Although most systems require students to use a standalone handheld device, bring-your-own-device (BYOD) systems allow students to use devices they already own (e.g., a cell phone, tablet or laptop) to submit responses via text message or…

  14. Opportunities for inhaler device selection in elderly patients with asthma or COPD

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barrons R

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Robert Barrons,1 James Wheeler,2 J Andrew Woods1 1Wingate University School of Pharmacy, Wingate, NC, USA; 2University of Tennessee Health Science Center, Nashville, TN, USA Abstract: An anticipated surge in the elderly population will be accompanied by a rise in aging patients with asthma or COPD. Clinician selection of inhalers needs to address the unique challenges to elderly patients. These challenges to the use of inhalers include diminished physical and cognitive abilities, as well as cost reimbursement issues associated with polypharmacy and the Medicare gap. Clinicians should consider patient preferences for an inhaler device that provides ease of administration, and addresses conveniences such as portability, visual, and auditory indicators of dosing completion. The addition of spacer devices resolves hand-breath coordination difficulty with pressurized metered dose inhalers, but reduces overall inhaler convenience. Soft mist inhalers (Respimat® improve ease of administration, but use may be limited by cost and formulary availability. Multiple dose dry powder inhalers provide convenience and simplified use by requiring only one to two steps prior to administration, but concerns of peak inspiratory flow requirements remain among patients with advanced age and severity of COPD. If unaddressed, these challenges to inhaler selection contribute to inappropriate use of inhalers in 41% to 69% of patients, accompanied by at least 51% non-adherence to treatment. Clinicians must first avail themselves of reputable educational resources regarding new inhaler developments and administration, for competent patient instruction. Patient education should include a checklist of inhaler technique, with physical demonstration of each device by the patient and provider. Device demonstration significantly improves inhaler technique and identifies the need for nebulization therapy. Clinician and patient knowledge of available inhalers and their

  15. Strategies to Optimizing Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Organic Sensitizers, Tandem Device Structures, and Numerical Device Modeling

    OpenAIRE

    Wenger, Sophie

    2010-01-01

    Dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) constitute a novel class of hybrid organic-inorganic solar cells. At the heart of the device is a mesoporous film of titanium dioxide (TiO2) nanoparticles, which are coated with a monolayer of dye sensitive to the visible region of the solar spectrum. The role of the dye is similar to the role of chlorophyll in plants; it harvests solar light and transfers the energy via electron transfer to a suitable material (here ...

  16. Two-dimensional device simulation and p erformance optimization of crystalline silicon selective-emitter solar cell%选择性发射极晶体硅太阳电池的二维器件模拟及性能优化

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    贾晓洁; 艾斌; 许欣翔; 杨江海; 邓幼俊; 沈辉

    2014-01-01

    利用PC2D二维模拟软件对选择性发射极晶体硅太阳电池(SE电池)进行了器件模拟和参数优化的研究.在对丝网印刷磷浆法制备的SE电池的实测典型电流-电压曲线实现完美拟合的基础上,全面系统地研究了栅线、基区、选择性发射区和背表面场层等的参数对电池性能的影响.模拟表明:基区少子寿命、前表面复合速度和背表面复合速度是对电池效率影响幅度最大的三个参数.在所研究的参数范围内,当基区少子寿命从50µs上升到600µs时,电池效率从18.53%上升到19.27%.低的前表面复合速度是使发射区方块电阻配比优化有意义的前提.要取得理想的电池效率,背表面复合速度需控制在500 cm/s以下.此外,对于不同的前表面复合速度,电池效率的最大值总是在50-90Ω/?的重掺区方阻、110-180Ω/?的轻掺区方阻的范围内取得.对不同的栅线数目,重掺区宽度与栅线间距之比为32%时,电池的效率最高.另外,在主栅结构保持较低面积比率的前提下,主栅数目的增加也可提高效率.最后,通过优化p型SE电池的效率可达到20.45%.%In this paper, device simulation and parameter optimization on crystalline silicon (c-Si) selective-emitter (SE) solar cell are performed by using PC2D two-dimensional simulator. On the basis of achieving perfect fitting to the measured I-V curve of a typical c-Si SE solar cell fabricated by screen printing phosphoric paste method, the effects of physical parameters of gridlines, base, selective emitter and back surface field layer on the optoelectronic performance of the SE solar cell are comprehensively and systematically investigated. Simulation results show that the base minority carrier lifetime, the front surface recombination velocity and the back surface recombination velocity are the three largest efficiency-affecting parameters. In the studied parameter range, when the base minority

  17. Mode-selective vibrational modulation of charge transport in organic electronic devices

    KAUST Repository

    Bakulin, Artem A.

    2015-08-06

    The soft character of organic materials leads to strong coupling between molecular, nuclear and electronic dynamics. This coupling opens the way to influence charge transport in organic electronic devices by exciting molecular vibrational motions. However, despite encouraging theoretical predictions, experimental realization of such approach has remained elusive. Here we demonstrate experimentally that photoconductivity in a model organic optoelectronic device can be modulated by the selective excitation of molecular vibrations. Using an ultrafast infrared laser source to create a coherent superposition of vibrational motions in a pentacene/C60 photoresistor, we observe that excitation of certain modes in the 1,500–1,700 cm−1 region leads to photocurrent enhancement. Excited vibrations affect predominantly trapped carriers. The effect depends on the nature of the vibration and its mode-specific character can be well described by the vibrational modulation of intermolecular electronic couplings. This presents a new tool for studying electron–phonon coupling and charge dynamics in (bio)molecular materials.

  18. Device for the selective positioning of a component on a tube plate

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The invention relates to a device for the selective positioning of a component on a tube plate. It particularly applies to the positioning of a guide tube head successively opposite all the tubes of the tube bundle of a nuclear reactor steam generator. The large number of tubes in the tube bundle of the steam generator in a pressure water nuclear power station must be checked periodically for any likely corrosion. This check is effected with a Foucault current probe which is inserted in each tube in turn and is connected to a probe signal processing unit. The probe is placed in a flexible guide tube brought in turn in front of each tube of the bundle to be checked. The invention concerns a device to move the opening of a tube guide for a Foucault current detector over the entire surface of the tube plate, thereby providing access to all the tubes whilst limiting the interventions to a single positioning and a single withdrawal of the apparatus for testing all the bundle. Between the two interventions at the beginning and end of the operation, all displacements are remote controlled from outside the dangerous radioacive area

  19. Adhesion and Interfacial Fracture: From Organic Light Emitting Devices and Photovoltaic Cells to Solar Lanterns for Developing Regions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tong, Tiffany Michelle

    From that “ah-ha!” moment when a new technology is first conceived until the time that it reaches the hands of consumers, products undergo numerous iterations of research, development, testing, and redesign in order to create an end-product that is relevant, desirable, functional, and affordable. One crucial step, particularly for electronic devices, is a rigorous testing stage to ensure that a product will be able to withstand regular wear-and-tear. An understanding of how, when, and under what conditions a technology will fail is important in improving device performance and creating high quality products that consumers trust. Understanding that success is inherently tied to failure, this thesis focuses on studies of mechanical failure related to two types of electronic devices: solar cells and light emitting devices. By considering the interfaces that are relevant to the next generation of solar cells and light emitting devices that are built using organic conducting polymers, an atomic force microscopy test is introduced to characterize and rank the relative interfacial adhesion between layers at the nano-scale. These results have implications for material selection that can enhance device processing and performance. This method is then linked to fracture mechanics techniques that determine critical loading forces that induce separation and, hence, mechanical failure between layers of these devices. These results demonstrate the effect of nano-scale interactions on macro-scale behavior, and are particularly valuable in product testing as flexible electronics gain interest. Finally, a case study is conducted in Rural Kenya that measures the impact of commercially-available LED lanterns that are charged by solar panels on a community that is disconnected from the power grid. By demonstrating the value of these lanterns for the community, the role of device reliability and lifetime is examined in underscoring the critical need for proper device testing before

  20. Theta phase precession and phase selectivity: a cognitive device description of neural coding

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zalay, Osbert C.; Bardakjian, Berj L.

    2009-06-01

    Information in neural systems is carried by way of phase and rate codes. Neuronal signals are processed through transformative biophysical mechanisms at the cellular and network levels. Neural coding transformations can be represented mathematically in a device called the cognitive rhythm generator (CRG). Incoming signals to the CRG are parsed through a bank of neuronal modes that orchestrate proportional, integrative and derivative transformations associated with neural coding. Mode outputs are then mixed through static nonlinearities to encode (spatio) temporal phase relationships. The static nonlinear outputs feed and modulate a ring device (limit cycle) encoding output dynamics. Small coupled CRG networks were created to investigate coding functionality associated with neuronal phase preference and theta precession in the hippocampus. Phase selectivity was found to be dependent on mode shape and polarity, while phase precession was a product of modal mixing (i.e. changes in the relative contribution or amplitude of mode outputs resulted in shifting phase preference). Nonlinear system identification was implemented to help validate the model and explain response characteristics associated with modal mixing; in particular, principal dynamic modes experimentally derived from a hippocampal neuron were inserted into a CRG and the neuron's dynamic response was successfully cloned. From our results, small CRG networks possessing disynaptic feedforward inhibition in combination with feedforward excitation exhibited frequency-dependent inhibitory-to-excitatory and excitatory-to-inhibitory transitions that were similar to transitions seen in a single CRG with quadratic modal mixing. This suggests nonlinear modal mixing to be a coding manifestation of the effect of network connectivity in shaping system dynamic behavior. We hypothesize that circuits containing disynaptic feedforward inhibition in the nervous system may be candidates for interpreting upstream rate codes to

  1. Integrated microfluidic device for single-cell trapping and spectroscopy

    KAUST Repository

    Liberale, Carlo

    2013-02-13

    Optofluidic microsystems are key components towards lab-on-a-chip devices for manipulation and analysis of biological specimens. In particular, the integration of optical tweezers (OT) in these devices allows stable sample trapping, while making available mechanical, chemical and spectroscopic analyses.

  2. Combinational Effect of Cell Adhesion Biomolecules and Their Immobilized Polymer Property to Enhance Cell-Selective Adhesion

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rio Kurimoto

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Although surface immobilization of medical devices with bioactive molecules is one of the most widely used strategies to improve biocompatibility, the physicochemical properties of the biomaterials significantly impact the activity of the immobilized molecules. Herein we investigate the combinational effects of cell-selective biomolecules and the hydrophobicity/hydrophilicity of the polymeric substrate on selective adhesion of endothelial cells (ECs, fibroblasts (FBs, and smooth muscle cells (SMCs. To control the polymeric substrate, biomolecules are immobilized on thermoresponsive poly(N-isopropylacrylamide-co-2-carboxyisopropylacrylamide (poly(NIPAAm-co-CIPAAm-grafted glass surfaces. By switching the molecular conformation of the biomolecule-immobilized polymers, the cell-selective adhesion performances are evaluated. In case of RGDS (Arg-Gly-Asp-Ser peptide-immobilized surfaces, all cell types adhere well regardless of the surface hydrophobicity. On the other hand, a tri-Arg-immobilized surface exhibits FB-selectivity when the surface is hydrophilic. Additionally, a tri-Ile-immobilized surface exhibits EC-selective cell adhesion when the surface is hydrophobic. We believe that the proposed concept, which is used to investigate the biomolecule-immobilized surface combination, is important to produce new biomaterials, which are highly demanded for medical implants and tissue engineering.

  3. UV laser mediated cell selective destruction by confocal microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giangrande Angela

    2008-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Analysis of cell-cell interactions, cell function and cell lineages greatly benefits selective destruction techniques, which, at present, rely on dedicated, high energy, pulsed lasers and are limited to cells that are detectable by conventional microscopy. We present here a high resolution/sensitivity technique based on confocal microscopy and relying on commonly used UV lasers. Coupling this technique with time-lapse enables the destruction and following of any cell(s in any pattern(s in living animals as well as in cell culture systems.

  4. A co-culture device with a tunable stiffness to understand combinatorial cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rao, Nikhil; Grover, Gregory N.; Vincent, Ludovic G.; Evans, Samantha C.; Choi, Yu Suk; Vincent, Ludovic G.; Spencer, Katrina H.; Hui, Elliot E.; Engler, Adam J.; Christman, Karen L.

    2013-01-01

    Cell behavior on 2-D in vitro cultures is continually being improved to better mimic in vivo physiological conditions by combining niche cues including multiple cell types and substrate stiffness, which are well known to impact cell phenotype. However, no system exists in which a user can systematically examine cell behavior on a substrate with a specific stiffness (elastic modulus) in culture with a different cell type, while maintaining distinct cell populations. We demonstrate the modification of a silicon reconfigurable co-culture system with a covalently linked hydrogel of user-defined stiffness. This device allows the user to control whether two separate cell populations are in contact with each other or only experience paracrine interactions on substrates of controllable stiffness. To illustrate the utility of this device, we examined the role of substrate stiffness combined with myoblast co-culture on adipose derived stem cell (ASC) differentiation and found that the presence of myoblasts and a 10 kPa substrate stiffness increased ASC myogenesis versus co-culture on stiff substrates. As this example highlights, this technology better controls the in vitro microenvironment, allowing the user to develop a more thorough understanding of the combined effects of cell-cell and cell-matrix interactions. PMID:24061208

  5. Ion-Selective Detection with Glass Nanopipette for Living Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takami, T.; Son, J. W.; Kang, E. J.; Deng, X. L.; Kawai, T.; Lee, S.-W.; Park, B. H.

    2013-05-01

    We developed a method to probe local ion concentration with glass nanopipette in which poly(vinyl chloride) membrane containing ionophore for separate ion detection is prepared. Here we demonstrate how ion-selective detections are available for living cells such as HeLa cell, rat vascular myocyte, and neuron cell.

  6. Development of a rare cell fractionation device: application for cancer detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohamed, Hisham; McCurdy, Leslie D; Szarowski, Donald H; Duva, Salvatore; Turner, James N; Caggana, Michele

    2004-12-01

    Isolating rare cells from biological fluids including whole blood or bone marrow is an interesting biological problem. Characterization of a few metastatic cells from cancer patients for further study is desirable for prognosis/diagnosis. Traditional methods have not proven adequate, due to the compositional complexity of blood, with its large numbers of cell types. To separate individual cells based on their mechanical characteristics, we have developed a series of massively parallel microfabricated sieving device. These devices were constructed with four successively narrower regions of channels numbering approximately 1800 per region. As cells traversed the device, they encountered each region and stopped at a gap width that prohibited passage due to their size. Cultured neuroblastoma cells, when mixed with whole blood and applied to the device, were retained in the 10-microm-wide by 20-microm-deep channels. All other cells migrated to the output. A derivative of the same device was utilized to characterize migration of whole blood. Adult white blood cells were retained at the 2.5-microm-wide by 5-microm-deep channels, while red blood cells passed through these channels. Devices designed to capture rare cells in peripheral circulation for downstream analysis will provide an important tool for diagnosis and treatment.

  7. Synergistic interaction between selective drugs in cell populations models.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Victoria Doldán-Martelli

    Full Text Available The design of selective drugs and combinatorial drug treatments are two of the main focuses in modern pharmacology. In this study we use a mathematical model of chimeric ligand-receptor interaction to show that the combination of selective drugs is synergistic in nature, providing a way to gain optimal selective potential at reduced doses compared to the same drugs when applied individually. We use a cell population model of proliferating cells expressing two different amounts of a target protein to show that both selectivity and synergism are robust against variability and heritability in the cell population. The reduction in the total drug administered due to the synergistic performance of the selective drugs can potentially result in reduced toxicity and off-target interactions, providing a mechanism to improve the treatment of cell-based diseases caused by aberrant gene overexpression, such as cancer and diabetes.

  8. Feasibility study of using a Zener diode as the selection device for bipolar RRAM and WORM memory arrays

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingtao; Fu, Liping; Tao, Chunlan; Jiang, Xinyu; Sun, Pengxiao

    2014-01-01

    Cross-bar arrays are usually used for the high density application of resistive random access memory (RRAM) devices. However, cross-talk interference limits an increase in the integration density. In this paper, the Zener diode is proposed as a selection device to suppress the sneak current in bipolar RRAM arrays. Measurement results show that the Zener diode can act as a good selection device, and the sneak current can be effectively suppressed. The readout margin is sufficiently improved compared to that obtained without the selection device. Due to the improvement for the reading disturbance, the size of the cross-bar array can be enhanced to more than 103 × 103. Furthermore, the possibility of using a write-once-read-many-times (WORM) cross-bar array is also demonstrated by connecting the Zener diode and the bipolar RRAM in series. These results strongly suggest that using a Zener diode as a selection device opens up great opportunities to realize high density bipolar RRAM arrays.

  9. Advancing tandem solar cells by spectrally selective multilayer intermediate reflectors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoffmann, Andre; Paetzold, Ulrich W; Zhang, Chao; Merdzhanova, Tsvetelina; Lambertz, Andreas; Ulbrich, Carolin; Bittkau, Karsten; Rau, Uwe

    2014-08-25

    Thin-film silicon tandem solar cells are composed of an amorphous silicon top cell and a microcrystalline silicon bottom cell, stacked and connected in series. In order to match the photocurrents of the top cell and the bottom cell, a proper photon management is required. Up to date, single-layer intermediate reflectors of limited spectral selectivity are applied to match the photocurrents of the top and the bottom cell. In this paper, we design and prototype multilayer intermediate reflectors based on aluminum doped zinc oxide and doped microcrystalline silicon oxide with a spectrally selective reflectance allowing for improved current matching and an overall increase of the charge carrier generation. The intermediate reflectors are successfully integrated into state-of-the-art tandem solar cells resulting in an increase of overall short-circuit current density by 0.7 mA/cm(2) in comparison to a tandem solar cell with the standard single-layer intermediate reflector. PMID:25322181

  10. Hard top soft bottom microfluidic devices for cell culture and chemical analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehta, Geeta; Lee, Jay; Cha, Wansik; Tung, Yi-Chung; Linderman, Jennifer J; Takayama, Shuichi

    2009-05-15

    We report fabrication and characterization of microfluidic devices made of thermoplastic and elastomeric polymers. These hard-soft hybrid material devices are motivated by the combined need for large scale manufacturability, enhanced barrier properties to gas permeation and evaporation of aqueous solutions compared to poly(dimethyl siloxane) (PDMS) devices, and compatibility with deformation-based actuation. Channel features are created on rigid polymers such as polyethylene terephthalate glycol (PETG), cyclic olefin copolymer (COC), and polystyrene (PS) by hot embossing. These "hard tops" are bonded to elastomeric "soft bottoms" (polyurethane (PU) or PDMS-parylene C-PDMS) to create devices that can be used for microfluidic cell culture where deformation-based fluid actuation schemes are used to perfuse and recirculate media. The higher barrier properties of this device compared to PDMS devices enable cell culture with less evaporation and creation of hypoxic conditions. PMID:19382754

  11. Spectroelectrochemical sensing based on multimode selectivity simultaneously achievable in a single device. 16. Sensing by fluorescence.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaval, Necati; Seliskar, Carl J; Heineman, William R

    2003-11-15

    A fluorescence spectroelectrochemical sensor capable of detecting very low concentrations of metal complexes is described. The sensor is based on a novel spectroelectrochemical sensor that incorporates multiple internal reflection spectroscopy at an optically transparent electrode (OTE) coated with a selective film to enhance detection limits by preconcentrating the analyte at the OTE surface. Nafion was used as the selective cation exchange film for detecting Ru(bpy)(3)(2+), the model analyte, which fluoresces at 605 nm when excited with a 441.6-nm HeCd laser. The unoptimized linear dynamic range of the sensor for Ru(bpy)(3)(2+) is between 1 x 10(-)(11) and 1 x 10(-)(7) M with a calculated 2 x 10(-)(13) M detection limit. The sensor employs extremely thin films ( approximately 12 nm) without significantly sacrificing its sensitivity. The sensor response is demonstrated with varying film thicknesses. A state-of-the-art flow cell design allows variable cell volumes as low as approximately 4 microL. Fluorescence of the sample can be controlled by electromodulation between 0.7 and 1.3 V. Sensor operation is not reversible for the chosen model film (Nafion) and sample (Ru(bpy)(3)(2+)) but it can be regenerated with ethanol for multiple uses.

  12. Selectable-Tip Corrosion-Testing Electrochemical Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lomness, Janice; Hintze, Paul

    2008-01-01

    The figure depicts aspects of an electrochemical cell for pitting- corrosion tests of material specimens. The cell is designed to generate a region of corrosion having a pit diameter determined by the diameter of a selectable tip. The average depth of corrosion is controlled by controlling the total electric charge passing through the cell in a test. The cell is also designed to produce minimal artifacts associated with crevice corrosion. There are three selectable tips, having diameters of 0.1 in. (0.254 cm), 0.3 in. (0.762 cm), and 0.6 in. (1.524 cm), respectively.

  13. Cell separator for use in bipolar-stack energy storage devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, Steven T.; Feikert, John H.; Kachmitter, James L.; Pekala, Richard W.

    1995-01-01

    An improved multi-cell electrochemical energy storage device, such as a battery, fuel cell, or double layer capacitor using a cell separator which allows cells to be stacked and interconnected with low electrical resistance and high reliability while maximizing packaging efficiency. By adding repeating cells, higher voltages can be obtained. The cell separator is formed by applying an organic adhesive on opposing surfaces of adjacent carbon electrodes or surfaces of aerogel electrodes of a pair of adjacent cells prior to or after pyrolysis thereof to form carbon aerogel electrodes. The cell separator is electronically conductive, but ionically isolating, preventing an electrolytic conduction path between adjacent cells in the stack.

  14. Adhesion in flexible organic and hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting device and solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This paper presents the results of an experimental study of the adhesion between bi-material pairs that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, organic bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid organic/inorganic solar cells on flexible substrates. Adhesion between the possible bi-material pairs is measured using force microscopy (AFM) techniques. These include: interfaces that are relevant to organic light emitting devices, hybrid organic/inorganic light emitting devices, bulk heterojunction solar cells, and hybrid combinations of titanium dioxide (TiO2) and poly(3-hexylthiophene). The results of AFM measurements are incorporated into the Derjaguin-Muller-Toporov model for the determination of adhesion energies. The implications of the results are then discussed for the design of robust organic and hybrid organic/inorganic electronic devices

  15. T cell depleted haploidentical transplantation: positive selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Franco Aversa

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Interest in mismatched transplantation arises from the fact that a suitable one-haplotype mismatched donor is immediately available for virtually all patients, particularly for those who urgently need an allogenic transplant. Work on one haplotype-mismatched transplants has been proceeding for over 20 years all over the world and novel transplant techniques have been developed. Some centres have focused on the conditioning regimens and post transplant immune suppression; others have concentrated on manipulating the graft which may be a megadose of extensively T celldepleted or unmanipulated progenitor cells. Excellent engraftment rates are associated with a very low incidence of acute and chronic GVHD and regimen-related mortality even in patients who are over 50 years old. Overall, event-free survival and transplant-related mortality compare favourably with reports on transplants from sources of stem cells other than the matched sibling.

  16. Selective Function of PKC-θ in T cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Santhakumar Manicassamy; Sonal Gupta; Zuoming Sun

    2006-01-01

    T cell activation is a critical process in initiating adaptive immune response since only through this process the na(i)ve antigen specific T cells differentiate into armed effector T cells that mediate the actual immune response.During T cell activation, na(i)ve T cells undergo clonal expansion and acquire the capability to kill target cells infected with pathogens or produce cytokines essential for regulating immune response. Inappropriate activation or inactivation of T cells leads to autoimmunity or severe immunodeficiencies. PKC-θ is selectively expressed in T cells and required for mediating T cell activation process. Mice deficient in PKC-θ exhibit defects in T cell activation, survival and activation-inducedcell death. PKC-θ selectively translocates to immunological synapse and mediates the signals required for activation of NF-κB, AP1 and NFAT that are essential for T cell activation.Furthermore, PKC-θ-/- mice displayed multiple defects in the development of T cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. PKC-θ is thus a critical molecule that regulates T cell function at multiple stages in T cell-mediated immune responses in vivo. Cellular & Molecular Immunology. 2006;3(4):263-270.

  17. Selective in situ functionalization of biosensors on LOC devices using laminar co-flow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parra-Cabrera, C; Sporer, C; Rodriguez-Villareal, I; Rodriguez-Trujillo, R; Homs-Corbera, A; Samitier, J

    2012-10-21

    Many applications involving lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices are prevented from entering the market because of difficulties to achieve mass production and impart suitable properties allowing long-term storage. To integrate biosensors on these microfluidic chips, one of the main restrictions is the fabrication and stability of the molecular modifications that must be performed on the surfaces of the sensors for a given application. The complexity of the problem increases exponentially when the LOC integrates several of these sensors. Here we present a system based on laminar co-flow to perform an on-chip selective surface bio-functionalization of LOC-integrated sensors. This method has the advantage that the surface modification protocols are performed in situ before analyte detection. This approach reduces the burdens during LOC fabrication, keeping the required reagents stored outside of the detection structure in suitable wet conditions. The proof of concept is demonstrated through an optical characterization followed by electronic detection based on a novel differential impedance measurement setup. The system can be easily scaled to incorporate several sensors with distinct biosensing targets in a single chip.

  18. Process for cooling a solar cell and a combined photovoltaic and photothermic solar device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Arnould, J.

    1982-07-13

    A solar cell cooling process is disclosed. The device implementing this process comprises a transparent assembly disposed in front of a photovoltaic cell. The transparent assembly, through which flows the cooling fluid leaving a radiator integral with the cell, absorbs the wavelengths greater than 1.1 micron. Thus, heating of the cell is limited and the fluid leaving the radiator is heated by the beam striking the cell.

  19. Reliability Through Life of Internal Protection Devices in Small-Cell ABSL Batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Jeremy; Ng, Ka Lok; Bennetti, Andrea; Pearson, Chris; Rao, gopal

    2007-01-01

    This viewgraph presentation reviews a reliability analysis of small cell protection batteries. The contents include: 1) The s-p Topology; 2) Cell Level Protection Devices; 3) Battery Level Fault Protection; 4) Large Cell Comparison; and 5) Battery Level Testing and Results.

  20. Non-Destructive Detection and Separation of Radiation Damaged Cells in Miniaturized, Inexpensive Device Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Our objective is to develop and demonstrate a novel microfluidic device for non-destructive identification, sorting and counting of radiation damaged cells. A major...

  1. The cell-stretcher: A novel device for the mechanical stimulation of cell populations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seriani, S.; Del Favero, G.; Mahaffey, J.; Marko, D.; Gallina, P.; Long, C. S.; Mestroni, L.; Sbaizero, O.

    2016-08-01

    Mechanical stimulation appears to be a critical modulator for many aspects of biology, both of living tissue and cells. The cell-stretcher, a novel device for the mechanical uniaxial stimulation of populations of cells, is described. The system is based on a variable stroke cam-lever-tappet mechanism which allows the delivery of cyclic stimuli with frequencies of up to 10 Hz and deformation between 1% and 20%. The kinematics is presented and a simulation of the dynamics of the system is shown, in order to compute the contact forces in the mechanism. The cells, following cultivation and preparation, are plated on an ad hoc polydimethylsiloxane membrane which is then loaded on the clamps of the cell-stretcher via force-adjustable magnetic couplings. In order to show the viability of the experimentation and biocompatibility of the cell-stretcher, a set of two in vitro tests were performed. Human epithelial carcinoma cell line A431 and Adult Mouse Ventricular Fibroblasts (AMVFs) from a dual reporter mouse were subject to 0.5 Hz, 24 h cyclic stretching at 15% strain, and to 48 h stimulation at 0.5 Hz and 15% strain, respectively. Visual analysis was performed on A431, showing definite morphological changes in the form of cellular extroflections in the direction of stimulation compared to an unstimulated control. A cytometric analysis was performed on the AMVF population. Results show a post-stimulation live-dead ratio deviance of less than 6% compared to control, which proves that the environment created by the cell-stretcher is suitable for in vitro experimentation.

  2. Electrical Characterization of Organic Devices and Solar Cells by Impedance Spectroscopy

    OpenAIRE

    Burtone, Lorenzo

    2014-01-01

    In this work, the capacitive response of organic electronic devices is analysed. Particular attention is given to small-molecule organic solar cells, with the purpose of deriving an equivalent circuit for the small-signal response of these devices. The different components characterising the solar cells electrical response are individuated and discussed and a specific physical meaning is associated with each element of the equivalent circuit. In the experimental section, the capacitive e...

  3. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heyden, S.; Ortiz, M.

    2016-07-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  4. Oncotripsy: Targeting cancer cells selectively via resonant harmonic excitation

    CERN Document Server

    Heyden, Stefanie

    2015-01-01

    We investigate a method of selectively targeting cancer cells by means of ultrasound harmonic excitation at their resonance frequency, which we refer to as oncotripsy. The geometric model of the cells takes into account the cytoplasm, nucleus and nucleolus, as well as the plasma membrane and nuclear envelope. Material properties are varied within a pathophysiologically-relevant range. A first modal analysis reveals the existence of a spectral gap between the natural frequencies and, most importantly, resonant growth rates of healthy and cancerous cells. The results of the modal analysis are verified by simulating the fully-nonlinear transient response of healthy and cancerous cells at resonance. The fully nonlinear analysis confirms that cancerous cells can be selectively taken to lysis by the application of carefully tuned ultrasound harmonic excitation while simultaneously leaving healthy cells intact.

  5. Development path and current status of the NANIVID: a new device for cancer cell studies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, Waseem Khan; Padgen, Michael R.; Williams, James K.; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Condeelis, John; Castracane, James

    2011-02-01

    Cancer cells create a unique microenvironment in vivo which enables migration to distant organs. To better understand the tumor microenvironment, special tools and devices are required to monitor the interactions between different cell types and the effects of particular chemical gradients. This study presents the design and optimization of a new, versatile chemotaxis device called the NANIVID (NANo IntraVital Device). The device is fabricated using BioMEMS techniques and consists of etched and bonded Pyrex substrates, a soluble factor reservoir, fluorescent tracking beads and a microelectrode array for cell quantification. The reservoir contains a customized hydrogel blend loaded with EGF which diffuses out of the hydrogel to create a chemotactic gradient. This reservoir sustains a steady release of growth factor into the surrounding environment for many hours and establishes a concentration gradient that attracts specific cells to the device. In addition to a cell collection tool, the NANIVID can be modified to act as a delivery vehicle for the local generation of alternate soluble factor gradients to initiate controlled changes to the microenvironment such as hypoxia, ECM stiffness and etc. The focus of this study is to design and optimize the new device for wide ranging studies of breast cancer cell dynamics in vitro and ultimately, implantation for in vivo work.

  6. Selective toxicity of rhodamine 123 in carcinoma cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lampidis, T J; Bernal, S D; Summerhayes, I C; Chen, L B

    1983-02-01

    The study of mitochondria in situ has recently been facilitated through the use of rhodamine 123, a mitochondrial-specific fluorescent dye. It has been found to be nontoxic when applied for short periods to a variety of cell types and has thus become an invaluable tool for examining mitochondrial morphology and function in the intact living cell. In this report, however, we demonstrate that with continuous exposure, rhodamine 123 selectively kills carcinoma as compared to normal epithelial cells grown in vitro. At doses of rhodamine 123 which were toxic to carcinoma cells, the conversion of mitochondrial-specific to cytoplasmic-nonspecific localization of the drug was observed prior to cell death. At 10 microgram/ml, greater than 50% cell death occurred within 7 days in all nine of the carcinoma cell types and lines of different origin studied, while six of six normal epithelial cell types and lines remained unaffected. Cotreating carcinoma cells with 2-deoxyglucose and rhodamine 123 enhanced the inhibition of growth by rhodamine 123 alone in clonogenic survival assays. The observation of the selective toxicity of rhodamine 123 appears to be unique in view of the absence of selective toxicity reported in vitro for the various antitumor agents currently in clinical use. Preliminary results with rhodamine 123 in animal tumor systems indicate antitumor activity for carcinomas.

  7. SEMICONDUCTOR DEVICES: Optimization of grid design for solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Liu; Yueqiang, Li; Jianjun, Chen; Yanling, Chen; Xiaodong, Wang; Fuhua, Yang

    2010-01-01

    By theoretical simulation of two grid patterns that are often used in concentrator solar cells, we give a detailed and comprehensive analysis of the influence of the metal grid dimension and various losses directly associated with it during optimization of grid design. Furthermore, we also perform the simulation under different concentrator factors, making the optimization of the front contact grid for solar cells complete.

  8. Performance of miniaturized direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) devices using micropump for fuel delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Tao; Wang, Qing-Ming

    A fuel cell is a device that can convert chemical energy into electricity directly. Among various types of fuel cells, both polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) and direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) can work at low temperature (mini pumps, the size of the piezoelectric micropump is much smaller and the energy consumption is much lower. Thus, it is very viable and effective to use a piezoelectric valveless micropump for fuel delivery in miniaturized DMFC power systems.

  9. Micro and Nanofluidic devices: For Single cell and DNA analysis

    OpenAIRE

    Mokkapati, V.R.S.S.

    2011-01-01

    Research in the field of Micro/nanofluidics has been extensively carried out for the last few years. With the available technological advancements today many complex systems can be fabricated in a more efficient and simpler way. Conventional methods in a laboratory consumes a lot of time, chemicals and in turn generates a lot of waste unlike the Lab-on-a-chip (LOC) devices where all the processes are carried out on a small chip with small drops of chemicals, negligible wastes and in minimum t...

  10. Comparison of Chip Inlet Geometry in Microfluidic Devices for Cell Studies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yung-Shin Sun

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Micro-fabricated devices integrated with fluidic components provide an in vitro platform for cell studies best mimicking the in vivo micro-environment. These devices are capable of creating precise and controllable surroundings of pH value, temperature, salt concentration, and other physical or chemical stimuli. Various cell studies such as chemotaxis and electrotaxis can be performed by using such devices. Moreover, microfluidic chips are designed and fabricated for applications in cell separations such as circulating tumor cell (CTC chips. Usually, there are two most commonly used inlets in connecting the microfluidic chip to sample/reagent loading tubes: the vertical (top-loading inlet and the parallel (in-line inlet. Designing this macro-to-micro interface is believed to play an important role in device performance. In this study, by using the commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software, we compared the cell capture behavior in microfluidic devices with different inlet types and sample flow velocities. Three different inlets were constructed: the vertical inlet, the parallel inlet, and the vertically parallel inlet. We investigated the velocity field, the flow streamline, the cell capture rate, and the laminar shear stress in these inlets. It was concluded that the inlet should be designed depending on the experimental purpose, i.e., one wants to maximize or minimize cell capture. Also, although increasing the flow velocity could reduce cell sedimentation, too high shear stresses are thought harmful to cells. Our findings indicate that the inlet design and flow velocity are crucial and should be well considered in fabricating microfluidic devices for cell studies.

  11. Comparison of Chip Inlet Geometry in Microfluidic Devices for Cell Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Yung-Shin

    2016-01-01

    Micro-fabricated devices integrated with fluidic components provide an in vitro platform for cell studies best mimicking the in vivo micro-environment. These devices are capable of creating precise and controllable surroundings of pH value, temperature, salt concentration, and other physical or chemical stimuli. Various cell studies such as chemotaxis and electrotaxis can be performed by using such devices. Moreover, microfluidic chips are designed and fabricated for applications in cell separations such as circulating tumor cell (CTC) chips. Usually, there are two most commonly used inlets in connecting the microfluidic chip to sample/reagent loading tubes: the vertical (top-loading) inlet and the parallel (in-line) inlet. Designing this macro-to-micro interface is believed to play an important role in device performance. In this study, by using the commercial COMSOL Multiphysics software, we compared the cell capture behavior in microfluidic devices with different inlet types and sample flow velocities. Three different inlets were constructed: the vertical inlet, the parallel inlet, and the vertically parallel inlet. We investigated the velocity field, the flow streamline, the cell capture rate, and the laminar shear stress in these inlets. It was concluded that the inlet should be designed depending on the experimental purpose, i.e., one wants to maximize or minimize cell capture. Also, although increasing the flow velocity could reduce cell sedimentation, too high shear stresses are thought harmful to cells. Our findings indicate that the inlet design and flow velocity are crucial and should be well considered in fabricating microfluidic devices for cell studies. PMID:27314318

  12. Mammosphere culture of cancer stem cells in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saadin, Katayoon; White, Ian M.

    2012-03-01

    It is known that tumor-initiating cells with stem-like properties will form spherical colonies - termed mammospheres - when cultured in serum-free media on low-attachment substrates. Currently this assay is performed in commercially available 96-well trays with low-attachment surfaces. Here we report a novel microsystem that features on-chip mammosphere culture on low attachment surfaces. We have cultured mammospheres in this microsystem from well-studied human breast cancer cell lines. To enable the long-term culture of these unattached cells, we have integrated diffusion-based delivery columns that provide zero-convection delivery of reagents, such as fresh media, staining agents, or drugs. The multi-layer system consists of parallel cell-culture chambers on top of a low-attachment surface, connected vertically with a microfluidic reagent delivery layer. This design incorporates a reagent reservoir, which is necessary to reduce evaporation from the cell culture micro-chambers. The development of this microsystem will lead to the integration of mammosphere culture with other microfluidic functions, including circulating tumor cell recovery and high throughput drug screening. This will enable the cancer research community to achieve a much greater understanding of these tumor initiating cancer stem cells.

  13. Ordered arrangements of selective-area grown MnAs nanoclusters as components for novel, planar magneto-electronic devices

    OpenAIRE

    Fischer, Martin

    2015-01-01

    Novel concepts such as racetrack memory devices or planar logic elements based on ferromagnetic materials are subject of today’s research. However, there are certain limits which will have to be faced by the established technology. A very attractive model kit for planar magneto-electronic devices can be found in Manganese arsenide (MnAs ) nanoclusters grown by selective-area metal-organic vapor-phase epitaxy (SA-MOVPE). MnAs exposes ferromagnetism at room temperature and below, and the growt...

  14. Hole-selective and impedance characteristics of an aqueous solution-processable MoO3 layer for solution-processable organic semiconducting devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moon, Byung Seuk; Lee, Soo-Hyoung; Huh, Yoon Ho; Park, Byoungchoo

    2015-02-01

    We herein report an investigation of aqueous solution-processable molybdenum-oxide (MoO3) hole-selective layers fabricated for solution-processable organic semiconducting devices. A homogeneous MoO3 layer was successfully deposited via spin-coating using aqueous solutions of ammonium heptamolybdate as a MoO3 precursor. The use of the solution-processable MoO3 layer as a hole-injecting layer (HIL) on an indium-tin-oxide (ITO) anode in solution-processable organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs) resulted in excellent device performance in terms of the brightness (maximum brightness of 37,000 cd m-2) and the efficiency (peak efficiency of 25.2 cd A-1), comparable to or better than those of a reference OLED with a conventional poly(ethylenedioxy thiophene):poly(styrene sulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS) HIL. Such good device performance is attributed to the water-processable MoO3 hole-selective layers, which allowed the formation of a high-quality film and provided good matching of the energy levels between adjacent layers with improved hole-injecting properties, impedance characteristics, and stability. Furthermore, polymer solar cells (PSCs) with a MoO3 layer used as a hole-collecting layer (HCL) showed improved power conversion efficiency (3.81%), which was higher than that obtained using the PEDOT:PSS HCL. These results clearly indicate the benefits of using a water-processable MoO3 layer, which effectively acts as a hole-selective layer on an ITO anode and provides good hole-injection/collection, electron-blocking and energy-level-matching properties, and improved stability. They, therefore, offer considerable promise as an alternative to a conventional PEDOT:PSS layer in the production of high-performance solution-processable organic semiconducting devices.

  15. Cohesion and device reliability in organic bulk heterojunction photovoltaic cells

    KAUST Repository

    Brand, Vitali

    2012-04-01

    The fracture resistance of P3HT:PC 60BM-based photovoltaic devices are characterized using quantitative adhesion and cohesion metrologies that allow identification of the weakest layer or interface in the device structure. We demonstrate that the phase separated bulk heterojunction layer is the weakest layer and report quantitative cohesion values which ranged from ∼1 to 20 J m -2. The effects of layer thickness, composition, and annealing treatments on layer cohesion are investigated. Using depth profiling and X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy on the resulting fracture surfaces, we examine the gradient of molecular components through the thickness of the bulk heterojunction layer. Finally, using atomic force microscopy we show how the topography of the failure path is related to buckling of the metal electrode and how it develops with annealing. The research provides new insights on how the molecular design, structure and composition affect the cohesive properties of organic photovoltaics. © 2011 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  16. Single cell studies of mouse embryonic stem cell (mESC) differentiation by electrical impedance measurements in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest; Seshia, Ashwin A.

    2016-01-01

    Biological populations of cells show considerable cell-to-cell variability. Study of single cells and analysis of cell heterogeneity are considered to be critical in understanding biological processes such as stem cell differentiation and cancer development. Recent advances in lab-on-a-chip techniques have allowed single-cell capture in microfluidic channels with the possibility of precise environmental control and high throughput of experiments with minimal usage of samples and reagents. In recent years, label-free techniques such as electrical impedance spectroscopy have emerged as a non-invasive approach to studying cell properties. In this study, we have designed and fabricated a microfluidic device that combines hydrodynamic trapping of single cells in pre-defined locations with the capability of running electrical impedance measurements within the same device. We have measured mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) at different states during differentiation (t=0 h, 24 h and 48 h) and quantitatively analysed the changes in electrical parameters of cells during differentiation. A marked increase in the magnitude of the cell impedance is found during cell differentiation, which can be attributed to an increase in cell size. The analysis of the measurements shows that the nucleus-to-cytoplasm ratio decreases during this process. The degree of cell heterogeneity is observed to be the highest when the cells are at the transition state (24 h), compare with cells at undifferentiated (0 h) and fully differentiated (48 h) states. The device enables highly efficient single cell trapping and provides sensitive, label-free electrical impedance measurements of individual cells, enabling the possibility of quantitatively analysing their physical state as well as studying the associated heterogeneity of a cell population. PMID:26963790

  17. Splicing Regulation: A Molecular Device to Enhance Cancer Cell Adaptation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittoria Pagliarini

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Alternative splicing (AS represents a major resource for eukaryotic cells to expand the coding potential of their genomes and to finely regulate gene expression in response to both intra- and extracellular cues. Cancer cells exploit the flexible nature of the mechanisms controlling AS in order to increase the functional diversity of their proteome. By altering the balance of splice isoforms encoded by human genes or by promoting the expression of aberrant oncogenic splice variants, cancer cells enhance their ability to adapt to the adverse growth conditions of the tumoral microenvironment. Herein, we will review the most relevant cancer-related splicing events and the underlying regulatory mechanisms allowing tumour cells to rapidly adapt to the harsh conditions they may face during the occurrence and development of cancer.

  18. Adipose-derived stem cells: selecting for translational success.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johal, Kavan S; Lees, Vivien C; Reid, Adam J

    2015-01-01

    We have witnessed a rapid expansion of in vitro characterization and differentiation of adipose-derived stem cells, with increasing translation to both in vivo models and a breadth of clinical specialties. However, an appreciation of the truly heterogeneous nature of this unique stem cell group has identified a need to more accurately delineate subpopulations by any of a host of methods, to include functional properties or surface marker expression. Cells selected for improved proliferative, differentiative, angiogenic or ischemia-resistant properties are but a few attributes that could prove beneficial for targeted treatments or therapies. Optimizing cell culture conditions to permit re-introduction to patients is critical for clinical translation.

  19. Development of standard technical report on using and selecting wireless device in nuclear power plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    1. Purpose · Development of IEC technical report on wireless device using in nuclear power plants 2. Contents · IEC technical reports of draft for circulation and final draft for next planary meeting · Case study on experiment of wireless devices 3. Implementation methods · Preparation of first draft with experts group, its circulation, discussions on the results of the circulation · Organizing three teams such as preparation, reviews and experiment 4. Results · Maintenance cost will be reduced with application of the wireless technologies in nuclear power plants · Commercial wireless devices will be developed before standard is issued

  20. Building a better cell trap: Applying Lagrangian modeling to the design of microfluidic devices for cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Min-Cheol; Wang, Zhanhui; Lam, Raymond H. W.; Thorsen, Todd

    2008-02-01

    In this report, we show how computational fluid dynamics can be applied to the design of efficient hydrodynamic cell traps in microfluidic devices. Modeled hydrodynamic trap designs included a large, multiple-aperture "C-type" sieve for trapping hundreds of cells, flat single-aperture arrays for single cells, and "U-type" hydrodynamic structures with one or two apertures to confine small clusters of cells (˜10-15 cells per trap). Using 3T3 cells as a model system, the motion of each individual cell was calculated using a one-way coupled Lagrangian method. The cell was assumed to be a solid sphere, and interactions with other cells were only considered when a cell sedimented in the trap. The ordinary differential equations were solved along the cell trajectory for the three components of the velocity and location vector by using the Rosenbrock method based on an adaptive time-stepping technique. Validation of the predictive value of modeling, using 3T3 cells flowed through microfluidic devices containing "U-type sieves" under the simulation flow parameters, showed excellent agreement between experiment and simulation with respect to cell number per trap and the uniformity of cell distribution within individual microchambers. For applications such as on-chip cell culture or high-throughput screening of cell populations within a lab-on-a-chip environment, Lagrangian simulations have the potential to greatly simplify the design process.

  1. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles selectively induce apoptosis of tumor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang Y

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Ye Wang,1,2,* Xiao-Yuan Zi,1,* Juan Su,1 Hong-Xia Zhang,1 Xin-Rong Zhang,3 Hai-Ying Zhu,1 Jian-Xiu Li,1 Meng Yin,3 Feng Yang,3 Yi-Ping Hu,11Department of Cell Biology, 2School of Clinical Medicine, 3Department of Pharmaceuticals, Second Military Medical University, Shanghai, People's Republic of China*Authors contributed equally.Abstract: In the rapid development of nanoscience and nanotechnology, many researchers have discovered that metal oxide nanoparticles have very useful pharmacological effects. Cuprous oxide nanoparticles (CONPs can selectively induce apoptosis and suppress the proliferation of tumor cells, showing great potential as a clinical cancer therapy. Treatment with CONPs caused a G1/G0 cell cycle arrest in tumor cells. Furthermore, CONPs enclosed in vesicles entered, or were taken up by mitochondria, which damaged their membranes, thereby inducing apoptosis. CONPs can also produce reactive oxygen species (ROS and initiate lipid peroxidation of the liposomal membrane, thereby regulating many signaling pathways and influencing the vital movements of cells. Our results demonstrate that CONPs have selective cytotoxicity towards tumor cells, and indicate that CONPs might be a potential nanomedicine for cancer therapy.Keywords: nanomedicine, selective cytotoxicity, apoptosis, cell cycle arrest, mitochondrion-targeted nanomaterials

  2. Design and Fabrication a Microfluidic Device for Fetal Cells Dielectrophoretic Properties Characterization

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Guolin [Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnologies, 31 Biopolis, Way, The Nanos, hashmark 04-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore); Chan, M B [Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. 16 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637722 (Singapore); Yang, Charles [Nanyang Technological University, Singapore. 16 Nanyang Drive, Singapore 637722 (Singapore); Sukumar, P [National University Hospital, Singapore. 10 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Choolani, M [National University Hospital, Singapore. 10 Medical Drive, Singapore 117597 (Singapore); Ying, Jackie Y [Institute of Bioengineering and Nanotechnologies, 31 Biopolis, Way, The Nanos, hashmark 04-01, Singapore 138669 (Singapore)

    2006-04-01

    The present work presents a microfluidic device with interdigitated microelectrode and microchannel for fetal nucleated red blood cell dielectrophoresis properties characterization using crossover frequency method. To obtain the electric field and its gradient along the microchannel, simulation study was done by using MAXWELL{sup TM} software. Results show maximum electric field and gradient are obtained near the electrode edge and they are affected by electrode width and the electrode gap. The crossover frequency should be obtained by keeping the cell moving near the electrode edge. The device has been successfully used in fetal cell characterization with better than 1KHz frequency repeatability, which is about 2% of the measured crossover frequency.

  3. Totally implantable artificial hearts and left ventricular assist devices: selecting impermeable polycarbonate urethane to manufacture ventricles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, M; Zhang, Z; Hahn, C; Laroche, G; King, M W; Guidoin, R

    1999-01-01

    In the development of a new generation of totally implantable artificial hearts and left ventricular assist devices (VADs) for long-term use, the selection of an acceptable material for the fabrication of the ventricles probably represents one of the greatest challenges. Segmented polyether urethanes used to be the material of choice due to their superior flexural performance, acceptable blood compatibility, and ease of processing. However, because they are known to degrade and to be readily permeable to water, they cannot meet the rigorous requirements needed for a new generation of implantable artificial hearts and VADs. Therefore, the objective of the present study was to identify alternative polymeric materials that would be satisfactory for fabricating the ventricles, and in particular, to determine the water permeability through membranes made from four commercial polycarbonate urethanes (Carbothane PC3570A, Chronoflex AR, Corethane 80A, and Corethane 55D) in comparison to those made from two traditional polyether urethanes (Tecoflex EG80A and Tecothane TT-1074A). In addition to determining the rate of water transmission through the six membranes by exposing them to deionized water, saline, and albumin-Krebs solution under pressure and measuring the displacement of liquid by means of a recently developed capillary method, the inherent surface and chemical properties of the six membranes were characterized by SEM, contact angle measurements, FTIR, DSC, and GPC techniques. The results of the study demonstrated that the rate of water transmission through the four polycarbonate urethane membranes was significantly lower than through the two polyether urethanes. In fact the lowest values were recorded with the two Corethane membranes, and the harder type 55D polymer had a lower value (2.7 x 10(-7) g/s cm2) than the softer 80A version (3.3 x 10(-7) g/s cm2). This level of water vapor permeability, which appears to be controlled primarily by a Fickian diffusion

  4. CdSe Quantum Dots for Solar Cell Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. B. Kashyout

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available CdSe quantum dots have been prepared with different sizes and exploited as inorganic dye to sensitize a wide bandgap TiO2 thin films for QDs solar cells. The synthesis is based on the pyrolysis of organometallic reagents by injection into a hot coordinating solvent. This provides temporally discrete nucleation and permits controlled growth of macroscopic quantities of nanocrystallites. XRD, HRTEM, UV-visible, and PL were used to characterize the synthesized quantum dots. The results showed CdSe quantum dots with sizes ranging from 3 nm to 6 nm which enabled the control of the optical properties and consequently the solar cell performance. Solar cell of 0.08% performance under solar irradiation with a light intensity of 100 mW/cm2 has been obtained. CdSe/TiO2 solar cells without and with using mercaptopropionic acid (MPA as a linker between CdSe and TiO2 particles despite a Voc of 428 mV, Jsc of 0.184 mAcm-2, FF of 0.57, and η of 0.05% but with linker despite a Voc of 543 mV, Jsc of 0.318 mAcm-2 , FF of 0.48, and η of 0.08%, respectively.

  5. Single cell analysis of yeast replicative aging using a new generation of microfluidic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available A major limitation to yeast aging study has been the inability to track mother cells and observe molecular markers during the aging process. The traditional lifespan assay relies on manual micro-manipulation to remove daughter cells from the mother, which is laborious, time consuming, and does not allow long term tracking with high resolution microscopy. Recently, we have developed a microfluidic system capable of retaining mother cells in the microfluidic chambers while removing daughter cells automatically, making it possible to observe fluorescent reporters in single cells throughout their lifespan. Here we report the development of a new generation of microfluidic device that overcomes several limitations of the previous system, making it easier to fabricate and operate, and allowing functions not possible with the previous design. The basic unit of the device consists of microfluidic channels with pensile columns that can physically trap the mother cells while allowing the removal of daughter cells automatically by the flow of the fresh media. The whole microfluidic device contains multiple independent units operating in parallel, allowing simultaneous analysis of multiple strains. Using this system, we have reproduced the lifespan curves for the known long and short-lived mutants, demonstrating the power of the device for automated lifespan measurement. Following fluorescent reporters in single mother cells throughout their lifespan, we discovered a surprising change of expression of the translation elongation factor TEF2 during aging, suggesting altered translational control in aged mother cells. Utilizing the capability of the new device to trap mother-daughter pairs, we analyzed mother-daughter inheritance and found age dependent asymmetric partitioning of a general stress response reporter between mother and daughter cells.

  6. Selective Cell Targeting with Light-Absorbing Microparticles and Nanoparticles

    OpenAIRE

    Pitsillides, Costas M; Joe, Edwin K.; Wei, Xunbin; Anderson, R. Rox; Lin, Charles P.

    2003-01-01

    We describe a new method for selective cell targeting based on the use of light-absorbing microparticles and nanoparticles that are heated by short laser pulses to create highly localized cell damage. The method is closely related to chromophore-assisted laser inactivation and photodynamic therapy, but is driven solely by light absorption, without the need for photochemical intermediates (particularly singlet oxygen). The mechanism of light-particle interaction was investigated by nanosecond ...

  7. Use of selective devices in trawls to support recovery of the Kattegat cod stock: a review of experiments and experience

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Madsen, Niels; Valentinsson, Daniel

    2010-01-01

    this provides a valuable management tool for reducing the bycatch of cod and reducing mortality, and thus helping to rebuild the depleted stock. Gear research in the area has been focused on devices that allow for continued exploitation of the Norway lobster (Nephrops norvegicus) and flatfish, but minimizing......The spawning-stock biomass of cod (Gadus morhua) in the Kattegat area is at a historically low level. Throughout the past decade considerable efforts have been devoted to research on improving both species and size selectivity of the trawls used in the mixed demersal fishery in the area, because...... measures and their effectiveness in maintaining a commercial fishery on viable stocks, yet protecting cod. We discuss the results in relation to changes in legislation and experience with implementation of new selective devices in recent years. We also discuss ways to create stronger incentives for fishers...

  8. Positive dielectrophoresis used for selective trapping of nanoparticles from flue gas in a gradient field electrodes device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lungu, Mihail, E-mail: lmihai@physics.uvt.ro; Neculae, Adrian; Lungu, Antoanetta [West University of Timisoara, Faculty of Physics (Romania)

    2015-12-15

    This paper investigates the possibility to use positive dielectrophoresis (pDEP) for selective trapping of nanoparticle dispersed in flue gas in a vertical pDEP-based microfluidic system. The experimental gradient field electrodes device contains as main part a vertical deposition plate with parallel planar electrodes in single connection on an insulating substrate, parallel to the reference electrode—a dielectric plate with a metalized side. The performances of the device were described and analyzed by numerical simulations and experimental tests in terms of two new specific parameters, called Retention rate and Filtration, related to the trapping of nanoparticles in suspension inside the device and the consequent purification of flue gas. It is outlined, both numerically and experimentally, that the concentration of particles trapped inside the device decreases as they are moving away from the inlet zone. The experimental results also highlight the nanoparticle size distribution of the particles collected from the deposition plate, using a nanoparticle tracking analysis method, and their selective capture on the deposition plate, depending on the amplitude and shape of the applied voltage, in a good agreement with the numerical simulations results.

  9. Micro 3D cell culture systems for cellular behavior studies: Culture matrices, devices, substrates, and in-situ sensing methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Jonghoon; Lee, Eun Kyu; Choo, Jaebum; Yuh, Junhan; Hong, Jong Wook

    2015-09-01

    Microfabricated systems equipped with 3D cell culture devices and in-situ cellular biosensing tools can be a powerful bionanotechnology platform to investigate a variety of biomedical applications. Various construction substrates such as plastics, glass, and paper are used for microstructures. When selecting a construction substrate, a key consideration is a porous microenvironment that allows for spheroid growth and mimics the extracellular matrix (ECM) of cell aggregates. Various bio-functionalized hydrogels are ideal candidates that mimic the natural ECM for 3D cell culture. When selecting an optimal and appropriate microfabrication method, both the intended use of the system and the characteristics and restrictions of the target cells should be carefully considered. For highly sensitive and near-cell surface detection of excreted cellular compounds, SERS-based microsystems capable of dual modal imaging have the potential to be powerful tools; however, the development of optical reporters and nanoprobes remains a key challenge. We expect that the microsystems capable of both 3D cell culture and cellular response monitoring would serve as excellent tools to provide fundamental cellular behavior information for various biomedical applications such as metastasis, wound healing, high throughput screening, tissue engineering, regenerative medicine, and drug discovery and development. PMID:26358782

  10. Microfluidic device for continuous single cells analysis via Raman spectroscopy enhanced by integrated plasmonic nanodimers

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2015-12-11

    In this work a Raman flow cytometer is presented. It consists of a microfluidic device that takes advantages of the basic principles of Raman spectroscopy and flow cytometry. The microfluidic device integrates calibrated microfluidic channels- where the cells can flow one-by-one -, allowing single cell Raman analysis. The microfluidic channel integrates plasmonic nanodimers in a fluidic trapping region. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman Spectroscopy on single cell. These allow a label-free analysis, providing information about the biochemical content of membrane and cytoplasm of the each cell. Experiments are performed on red blood cells (RBCs), peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) and myelogenous leukemia tumor cells (K562). © 2015 Optical Society of America.

  11. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mian; Holmes, Benjamin; Cheng, Xiaoqian; Zhu, Wei; Keidar, Michael; Zhang, Lijie Grace

    2013-01-01

    Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa) cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  12. Cold atmospheric plasma for selectively ablating metastatic breast cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mian Wang

    Full Text Available Traditional breast cancer treatments such as surgery and radiotherapy contain many inherent limitations with regards to incomplete and nonselective tumor ablation. Cold atmospheric plasma (CAP is an ionized gas where the ion temperature is close to room temperature. It contains electrons, charged particles, radicals, various excited molecules, UV photons and transient electric fields. These various compositional elements have the potential to either enhance and promote cellular activity, or disrupt and destroy them. In particular, based on this unique composition, CAP could offer a minimally-invasive surgical approach allowing for specific cancer cell or tumor tissue removal without influencing healthy cells. Thus, the objective of this research is to investigate a novel CAP-based therapy for selectively bone metastatic breast cancer treatment. For this purpose, human metastatic breast cancer (BrCa cells and bone marrow derived human mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs were separately treated with CAP, and behavioral changes were evaluated after 1, 3, and 5 days of culture. With different treatment times, different BrCa and MSC cell responses were observed. Our results showed that BrCa cells were more sensitive to these CAP treatments than MSCs under plasma dose conditions tested. It demonstrated that CAP can selectively ablate metastatic BrCa cells in vitro without damaging healthy MSCs at the metastatic bone site. In addition, our study showed that CAP treatment can significantly inhibit the migration and invasion of BrCa cells. The results suggest the great potential of CAP for breast cancer therapy.

  13. Cell culture device and microchamber which can be monitored using nuclear magnetic resonance

    OpenAIRE

    Celda-Muñoz, Bernardo; Esteve-Moya, Vicent; Sancho-Bielsa, Francisco; Villa Sanz, Rosa; Fernández Ledesma, Luis José; Berganzo Ruiz, Javier

    2010-01-01

    [EN] The invention relates to a cell culture device and microchamber which can be monitored using nuclear magnetic resonance and other imaging techniques, in which the culture microchamber is encapsulated and housed inside a chip. The microchamber and the device are easy for the user to handle, allowing same to be handled or repositioned without requiring complex mounting operations. In addition, the invention allows cultures to be studied for long periods, great...

  14. Use of Surface Enhanced Blocking (SEB) Electrodes for Microbial Cell Lysis in Flow-Through Devices

    OpenAIRE

    Talebpour, Abdossamad; Maaskant, Robert; Khine, Aye Aye; Alavie, Tino

    2014-01-01

    By simultaneously subjecting microbial cells to high amplitude pulsed electric fields and flash heating of the cell suspension fluid, effective release of intracellular contents was achieved. The synergistic effect of the applied electric field and elevated temperature on cell lysis in a flow-through device was demonstrated for Gram-negative and Gram-positive bacteria, and Mycobacterium species. The resulting lysate is suitable for downstream nucleic acid amplification and detection without r...

  15. Dynamic monitoring of single cell lysis in an impedance-based microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ying; Basu, Srinjan; Laue, Ernest D; Seshia, Ashwin A

    2016-08-01

    A microfluidic device that is capable of trapping and sensing dynamic variations in the electrical properties of individual cells is demonstrated. The device is applied to the real-time recording of impedance measurements of mouse embryonic stem cells (mESCs) during the process of membrane lysis, with the resulting changes in the electrical properties of cells during this process being quantitatively tracked over time. It is observed that the impedance magnitude decreases dramatically after cell membrane lysis. A significant shift in the phase spectrum is also observed during the time course of this process. By fitting experimental data to physical models, the electrical parameters of cells can be extracted and parameter variations quantified during the process. In the cell lysis experiments, the equivalent conductivity of the cell membrane is found to increase significantly due to pore formation in the membrane during lysis. An increase in the specific capacitance of the membrane is also observed. On the other hand, the conductivity of the cytoplasm is observed to decrease, which may be explained the fact that excess water enters the cell through the gradual permeabilization of the membrane during lysis. Cells can be trapped in the device for periods up to several days, and their electrical response can be monitored by real-time impedance measurements in a label-free and non-invasive manner. Furthermore, due to the highly efficient single cell trapping capacity of the device, a number of cells can be trapped and held in separate wells for concurrent parallel experiments, allowing for the possibility of stepped parametric experiments and studying cell heterogeneity by combining measurements across the array. PMID:27299468

  16. Efficiency improvement in thin film solar cell devices with oxygen containing absorber layer.

    OpenAIRE

    Emziane, M.; Durose, K; Halliday, D.P.; Bosio, N.; Romeo, N.

    2005-01-01

    The CdTe/CdS solar cell devices were grown using a dry process consisting of sputtering for the transparent conducting oxide and CdS window layers, and close-space sublimation for CdTe absorber layer. These devices were back contacted using Mo/Sb2Te3 sputtered layers following the CdCl2 activation process carried out in air. It was shown that when oxygen is intentionally introduced in the CdTe layer during its growth, this leads to a significant improvement in all the device parameters yieldi...

  17. Physics of sinking and selection of plankton cell size

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sciascia, R., E-mail: r.sciascia@isac.cnr.it [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy); Doctorate Program in Fluid Dynamics, Politecnico di Torino (Italy); De Monte, S. [CNRS, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Université Pierre et Marie Curie-Paris 6, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Institut de Biologie de l' Ecole Normale Supérieure, UMR 7625 “Ecologie et Evolution”, Paris, F-75005 (France); Provenzale, A. [Institute of Atmospheric Sciences and Climate, CNR, Corso Fiume, 4, 10133 Torino (Italy)

    2013-02-04

    Gravitational sinking in the water column is known to affect size composition of planktonic communities. One important driver toward the reduction of plankton size is the fact that larger cells tend to sink faster below the euphotic layer. In this work, we discuss the role of gravitational sinking in driving cell size selection, showing that the outcome of phytoplankton competition is determined by the dependence of sinking velocity on cell size, shape, and on the temporal variability associated with turbulence. This opens a question on whether regional modulations of the turbulence intensity could affect size distribution of planktonic communities.

  18. Selected fault testing of electronic isolation devices used in nuclear power plant operation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Villaran, M.; Hillman, K.; Taylor, J.; Lara, J.; Wilhelm, W. [Brookhaven National Lab., Upton, NY (United States)

    1994-05-01

    Electronic isolation devices are used in nuclear power plants to provide electrical separation between safety and non-safety circuits and systems. Major fault testing in an earlier program indicated that some energy may pass through an isolation device when a fault at the maximum credible potential is applied in the transverse mode to its output terminals. During subsequent field qualification testing of isolators, concerns were raised that the worst case fault, that is, the maximum credible fault (MCF), may not occur with a fault at the maximum credible potential, but rather at some lower potential. The present test program investigates whether problems can arise when fault levels up to the MCF potential are applied to the output terminals of an isolator. The fault energy passed through an isolated device during a fault was measured to determine whether the levels are great enough to potentially damage or degrade performance of equipment on the input (Class 1E) side of the isolator.

  19. Selected fault testing of electronic isolation devices used in nuclear power plant operation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electronic isolation devices are used in nuclear power plants to provide electrical separation between safety and non-safety circuits and systems. Major fault testing in an earlier program indicated that some energy may pass through an isolation device when a fault at the maximum credible potential is applied in the transverse mode to its output terminals. During subsequent field qualification testing of isolators, concerns were raised that the worst case fault, that is, the maximum credible fault (MCF), may not occur with a fault at the maximum credible potential, but rather at some lower potential. The present test program investigates whether problems can arise when fault levels up to the MCF potential are applied to the output terminals of an isolator. The fault energy passed through an isolated device during a fault was measured to determine whether the levels are great enough to potentially damage or degrade performance of equipment on the input (Class 1E) side of the isolator

  20. Excellent nonlinearity of a selection device based on anti-series connected Zener diodes for ultrahigh-density bipolar RRAM arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yingtao; Li, Rongrong; Fu, Liping; Gao, Xiaoping; Wang, Yang; Tao, Chunlan

    2015-10-23

    A crossbar array is usually used for the high-density application of a resistive random access memory (RRAM) device. However, the cross-talk interference limits the increase in the integration density. In this paper, anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device are proposed for bipolar RRAM arrays. Simulation results show that, by using the anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device, the readout margin is sufficiently improved compared to that obtained without a selection device or with anti-parallel connected diodes as the selection device. The maximum size of the crossbar arrays with anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device over 1 TB is estimated by theoretical simulation. In addition, the feasibility of using the anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device for bipolar RRAM is demonstrated experimentally. These results indicate that anti-series connected Zener diodes as a selection device opens up great opportunities to realize ultrahigh-density bipolar RRAM arrays.

  1. Conductivity based on selective etch for GaN devices and applications thereof

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yu; Sun, Qian; Han, Jung

    2015-12-08

    This invention relates to methods of generating NP gallium nitride (GaN) across large areas (>1 cm.sup.2) with controlled pore diameters, pore density, and porosity. Also disclosed are methods of generating novel optoelectronic devices based on porous GaN. Additionally a layer transfer scheme to separate and create free-standing crystalline GaN thin layers is disclosed that enables a new device manufacturing paradigm involving substrate recycling. Other disclosed embodiments of this invention relate to fabrication of GaN based nanocrystals and the use of NP GaN electrodes for electrolysis, water splitting, or photosynthetic process applications.

  2. An open-chamber flow-focusing device for focal stimulation of micropatterned cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Jonathan W; Chang, Tim C; Bhattacharjee, Nirveek; Folch, Albert

    2016-03-01

    Microfluidic devices can deliver soluble factors to cell and tissue culture microenvironments with precise spatiotemporal control. However, enclosed microfluidic environments often have drawbacks such as the need for continuous culture medium perfusion which limits the duration of experiments, incongruity between microculture and macroculture, difficulty in introducing cells and tissues, and high shear stress on cells. Here, we present an open-chamber microfluidic device that delivers hydrodynamically focused streams of soluble reagents to cells over long time periods (i.e., several hours). We demonstrate the advantage of the open chamber by using conventional cell culture techniques to induce the differentiation of myoblasts into myotubes, a process that occurs in 7-10 days and is difficult to achieve in closed chamber microfluidic devices. By controlling the flow rates and altering the device geometry, we produced sharp focal streams with widths ranging from 36 μm to 187 μm. The focal streams were reproducible (∼12% variation between units) and stable (∼20% increase in stream width over 10 h of operation). Furthermore, we integrated trenches for micropatterning myoblasts and microtraps for confining single primary myofibers into the device. We demonstrate with finite element method (FEM) simulations that shear stresses within the cell trench are well below values known to be deleterious to cells, while local concentrations are maintained at ∼22% of the input concentration. Finally, we demonstrated focused delivery of cytoplasmic and nuclear dyes to micropatterned myoblasts and myofibers. The open-chamber microfluidic flow-focusing concept combined with micropatterning may be generalized to other microfluidic applications that require stringent long-term cell culture conditions. PMID:27158290

  3. On-chip lysis of mammalian cells through a handheld corona device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escobedo, C; Bürgel, S C; Kemmerling, S; Sauter, N; Braun, T; Hierlemann, A

    2015-07-21

    On-chip lysis is required in many lab-on-chip applications involving cell studies. In these applications, the complete disruption of the cellular membrane and a high lysis yield is essential. Here, we present a novel approach to lyse cells on-chip through the application of electric discharges from a corona handheld device. The method only requires a microfluidic chip and a low-cost corona device. We demonstrate the effective lysis of BHK and eGFP HCT 116 cells in the sub-second time range using an embedded microelectrode. We also show cell lysis of non-adherent K562 leukemia cells without the use of an electrode in the chip. Cell lysis has been assessed through the use of bright-field microscopy, high-speed imaging and cell-viability fluorescence probes. The experimental results show effective cell lysis without any bubble formation or significant heating. Due to the simplicity of both the components involved and the lysis procedure, this technique offers an inexpensive lysis option with the potential for integration into lab-on-a-chip devices.

  4. Quality Control of Conventional Radiology Devices in Selected Hospitals of Khuzestan Province, Iran

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Behrouz Rasuli

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Introduction Quality control techniques used to test the components of the radiological system and verify that the equipment is operating satisfactorily. In this study, quality control (QC assessment of conventional radiology devices was performed in frequently visited radiology centers of Khuzestan province, Iran. Materials and Methods Fifteen conventional radiology devices were examined, based on the protocol proposed in Report No. 77 by the Institute of Physics and Engineering in Medicine (IPEM. Ten standard QC tests, including voltage accuracy and reproducibility, exposure time accuracy and reproducibility, tube output linearity (time and milliampere, filtration (half-value layer, tube output (70 kV at FSD =100 cm, tube output reproducibility and beam alignment were performed and assessed. All measurements were performed, using Barracuda multi-purpose detector. Results Thereproducibility of voltage, exposure time and dose output, as well as output linearity, met the standard criteria in all devices. However, in 60% of the units, the results of the beam alignment test were poor. We also found that 66.7% of the studied units offer services to more than 18,000 patients annually or 50 patients per day. Conclusion Despite the fact that radiological devices in Khuzestan province are relatively old with high workload, the obtained results showed that these devices met the standard criteria. This may be mainly related to proper after-sale services, provided by the companies. Although these services may be expensive for radiology centers, the costs may be significantly reduced if QC is defined as a routine procedure performed by qualified medical physicists or radiation safety officers.

  5. Sodium selectivity of semicircular canal duct epithelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Harbidge Donald G

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Sodium absorption by semicircular canal duct (SCCD epithelial cells is thought to contribute to the homeostasis of the volume of vestibular endolymph. It was previously shown that the epithelial cells could absorb Na+ under control of a glucocorticoid hormone (dexamethasone and the absorptive transepithelial current was blocked by amiloride. The most commonly-observed target of amiloride is the epithelial sodium channel (ENaC, comprised of the three subunits α-, β- and γ-ENaC. However, other cation channels have also been observed to be sensitive in a similar concentration range. The aim of this study was to determine whether SCCD epithelial cells absorb only Na+ or also K+ through an amiloride-sensitive pathway. Parasensory K+ absorption could contribute to regulation of the transduction current through hair cells, as found to occur via vestibular transitional cells [S. H. Kim and D. C. Marcus. Regulation of sodium transport in the inner ear. Hear.Res. doi:10.1016/j.heares.2011.05.003, 2011]. Results We determined the molecular and functional expression of candidate cation channels with gene array (GEO GSE6197, whole-cell patch clamp and transepithelial recordings in primary cultures of rat SCCD. α-, β- and γ-ENaC were all previously reported as present. The selectivity of the amiloride-sensitive transepithelial and cell membrane currents was observed in Ussing chamber and whole-cell patch clamp recordings. The cell membrane currents were carried by Na+ but not K+, but the Na+ selectivity disappeared when the cells were cultured on impermeable supports. Transepithelial currents across SCCD were also carried exclusively by Na+. Conclusions These results are consistent with the amiloride-sensitive absorptive flux of SCCD mediated by a highly Na+-selective channel, likely αβγ-ENaC. These epithelial cells therefore absorb only Na+ via the amiloride-sensitive pathway and do not provide a parasensory K+ efflux from the

  6. Room-temperature treatments for all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cell devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Loiudice, Anna, E-mail: anna.loiudice@iit.it [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica " E. De Giorgi" , Università del Salento, via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN — Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies, Italian Institute of Technology, Energy Platform, Via Barsanti sn, 73010 Arnesano (Lecce) (Italy); Rizzo, Aurora [CBN — Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies, Italian Institute of Technology, Energy Platform, Via Barsanti sn, 73010 Arnesano (Lecce) (Italy); NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Corricelli, Michela [Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (IPCF-CNR) Bari, c/o Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Curri, M. Lucia [Istituto per i Processi Chimico Fisici (IPCF-CNR) Bari, c/o Department of Chemistry, University of Bari, Via Orabona 4, I-70126 Bari (Italy); Belviso, Maria R. [NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Cozzoli, P. Davide [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica " E. De Giorgi" , Università del Salento, via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy); Grancini, Giulia; Petrozza, Annamaria [Center for Nano Science and Technology at PoliMi, Istituto Italiano di Tecnologia, Via Pascoli 70/3, 20133 Milano (Italy); Gigli, Giuseppe [Dipartimento di Matematica e Fisica " E. De Giorgi" , Università del Salento, via Arnesano, 73100 Lecce (Italy); CBN — Center for Biomolecular Nanotechnologies, Italian Institute of Technology, Energy Platform, Via Barsanti sn, 73010 Arnesano (Lecce) (Italy); NNL CNR-Istituto Nanoscienze, c/o Distretto Tecnologico, via per Arnesano km. 5, 73100 Lecce (Italy)

    2014-06-02

    We have developed a room-temperature solution processing approach to integrate colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanorods (TiO{sub 2} NRs) and lead sulfide quantum dots (PbS QDs) into a heterostructured p-n junction device. To this aim we have exploited a post-deposition treatment to remove surface-adsorbed ligands by means of UV-light-irradiation of TiO{sub 2} NRs and a dilute acid treatment of PbS QDs. Here we report a systematic study on the optimization of the post-deposition treatments and device fabrication. Our approach is fully compatible with plastic device technology and is potentially useful for the integration of crystalline TiO{sub 2} as active component into disparate solar cell architectures and organic optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • Colloidal nanocrystals offer path to low-cost manufacturing atop flexible substrates. • We fabricate an all-inorganic solar cell under room temperature treatments. • Our approach is fully compatible with plastic device technology. • It is useful for the integration of nanocrystals into disparate device architectures.

  7. Room-temperature treatments for all-inorganic nanocrystal solar cell devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We have developed a room-temperature solution processing approach to integrate colloidal anatase titanium dioxide nanorods (TiO2 NRs) and lead sulfide quantum dots (PbS QDs) into a heterostructured p-n junction device. To this aim we have exploited a post-deposition treatment to remove surface-adsorbed ligands by means of UV-light-irradiation of TiO2 NRs and a dilute acid treatment of PbS QDs. Here we report a systematic study on the optimization of the post-deposition treatments and device fabrication. Our approach is fully compatible with plastic device technology and is potentially useful for the integration of crystalline TiO2 as active component into disparate solar cell architectures and organic optoelectronic devices. - Highlights: • Colloidal nanocrystals offer path to low-cost manufacturing atop flexible substrates. • We fabricate an all-inorganic solar cell under room temperature treatments. • Our approach is fully compatible with plastic device technology. • It is useful for the integration of nanocrystals into disparate device architectures

  8. Optically transparent polymer devices for in situ assessment of cell electroporation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majhi, Amit Kumar; Thrivikraman, Greeshma; Basu, Bikramjit; Venkataraman, V

    2015-02-01

    In order to study cell electroporation in situ, polymer devices have been fabricated from poly-dimethyl siloxane with transparent indium tin oxide parallel plate electrodes in horizontal geometry. This geometry with cells located on a single focal plane at the interface of the bottom electrode allows a longer observation time in both transmitted bright-field and reflected fluorescence microscopy modes. Using propidium iodide (PI) as a marker dye, the number of electroporated cells in a typical culture volume of 10-100 μl was quantified in situ as a function of applied voltage from 10 to 90 V in a series of ~2-ms pulses across 0.5-mm electrode spacing. The electric field at the interface and device current was calculated using a model that takes into account bulk screening of the transient pulse. The voltage dependence of the number of electroporated cells could be explained using a stochastic model for the electroporation kinetics, and the free energy for pore formation was found to be 45.6 ± 0.5 kT at room temperature. With this device, the optimum electroporation conditions can be quickly determined by monitoring the uptake of PI marker dye in situ under the application of millisecond voltage pulses. The electroporation efficiency was also quantified using an ex situ fluorescence-assisted cell sorter, and the morphology of cultured cells was evaluated after the pulsing experiment. Importantly, the efficacy of the developed device was tested independently using two cell lines (C2C12 mouse myoblast cells and yeast cells) as well as in three different electroporation buffers (phosphate buffer saline, electroporation buffer and 10% glycerol).

  9. Enhancement of device performance of organic solar cells by an interfacial perylene derivative layer

    KAUST Repository

    Kim, Inho

    2010-05-26

    We report that device performance of organic solar cells consisting of zinc phthalocyanine and fullerene (C60) can be enhanced by insertion of a perylene derivative interfacial layer between fullerene and bathocuproine (BCP) exciton blocking layer (EBL). The morphology of the BCP is influenced by the underlying N,N′-dihexyl-perylene-3,4,9,10-bis(dicarboximide) (PTCDI-C6), which promotes migration of the cathode metal into the BCP layer. Insertion of a PTCDI-C6 layer between fullerene and BCP layers enhances the power conversion efficiency to 2.5%, an improvement of 32% over devices without PTCDI-C6 layer. The enhancement in device performance by insertion of PTCDI-C6 is attributed to a reduction in series resistance due to promoted metal migration into BCP and optimized optical interference effects in multilayered devices. © 2010 American Chemical Society.

  10. Surface Modified Thread-Based Microfluidic Analytical Device for Selective Potassium Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erenas, Miguel M; de Orbe-Payá, Ignacio; Capitan-Vallvey, Luis Fermin

    2016-05-17

    This paper presents a thread-based microfluidic device (μTAD) that includes ionophore extraction chemistry for the optical recognition of potassium. The device is 1.5 cm × 1.0 cm and includes a cotton thread to transport the aqueous sample via capillary wicking to a 5 mm-long detection area, where the recognition chemistry is deposited that reaches equilibrium in 60 s, changing its color between blue and magenta. A complete characterization of the cotton thread used as well as the sensing element has been carried out. The imaging of the μTAD with a digital camera and the extraction of the H coordinate of the HSV color space used as the analytical parameter make it possible to determine K(I) between 2.4 × 10(-5) and 0.95 M with a precision better than 1.3%. PMID:27077212

  11. Regulated selection of germinal-center cells into the memory B cell compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinnakasu, Ryo; Inoue, Takeshi; Kometani, Kohei; Moriyama, Saya; Adachi, Yu; Nakayama, Manabu; Takahashi, Yoshimasa; Fukuyama, Hidehiro; Okada, Takaharu; Kurosaki, Tomohiro

    2016-07-01

    Despite the importance of memory B cells in protection from reinfection, how such memory cells are selected and generated during germinal-center (GC) reactions remains unclear. We found here that light-zone (LZ) GC B cells with B cell antigen receptors (BCRs) of lower affinity were prone to enter the memory B cell pool. Mechanistically, cells in this memory-prone fraction had higher expression of the transcriptional repressor Bach2 than that of their counterparts with BCRs of higher affinity. Haploinsufficiency of Bach2 resulted in reduced generation of memory B cells, independently of suppression of the gene encoding the transcription factor Blimp-1. Bach2 expression in GC cells was inversely correlated with the strength of help provided by T cells. Thus, we propose an instructive model in which weak help from T cells maintains relatively high expression of Bach2, which predisposes GC cells to enter the memory pool.

  12. Development of microarray device for functional evaluation of PC12D cell axonal extension ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamachi, Eiji; Yanagimoto, Junpei; Murakami, Shinya; Morita, Yusuke

    2014-04-01

    In this study, we developed a microarray bio-MEMS device that could trap PC12D (rat pheochromocytoma cells) cells to examine the intercellular interaction effect on the cell activation and the axonal extension ability. This is needed to assign particular patterns of PC12D cells to establish a cell functional evaluation technique. This experimental observation-based technique can be used for design of the cell sheet and scaffold for peripheral and central nerve regeneration. We have fabricated a micropillar-array bio-MEMS device, whose diameter was approximately 10 μm, by using thick photoresist SU-8 on the glass slide substrate. A maximum trapped PC12D cell ratio, 48.5%, was achieved. Through experimental observation of patterned PC12D "bi-cells" activation, we obtained the following results. Most of the PC12D "bi-cells" which had distances between 40 and 100 μm were connected after 24 h with a high probability. On the other hand, "bi-cells" which had distances between 110 and 200 μm were not connected. In addition, we measured axonal extension velocities in cases where the intercellular distance was between 40 and 100 μm. A maximum axonal extension velocity, 86.4 μm/h, was obtained at the intercellular distance of 40 μm.

  13. Comparative analysis of selected exhaled breath biomarkers obtained with two different temperature-controlled devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brüning Thomas

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The collection of exhaled breath condensate (EBC is a suitable and non-invasive method for evaluation of airway inflammation. Several studies indicate that the composition of the condensate and the recovery of biomarkers are affected by physical characteristics of the condensing device and collecting circumstances. Additionally, there is an apparent influence of the condensing temperature, and often the level of detection of the assay is a limiting factor. The ECoScreen2 device is a new, partly single-use disposable system designed for studying different lung compartments. Methods EBC samples were collected from 16 healthy non-smokers by using the two commercially available devices ECoScreen2 and ECoScreen at a controlled temperature of -20°C. EBC volume, pH, NOx, LTB4, PGE2, 8-isoprostane and cys-LTs were determined. Results EBC collected with ECoScreen2 was less acidic compared to ECoScreen. ECoScreen2 was superior concerning condensate volume and detection of biomarkers, as more samples were above the detection limit (LTB4 and PGE2 or showed higher concentrations (8-isoprostane. However, NOx was detected only in EBC sampled by ECoScreen. Conclusion ECoScreen2 in combination with mediator specific enzyme immunoassays may be suitable for measurement of different biomarkers. Using this equipment, patterns of markers can be assessed that are likely to reflect the complex pathophysiological processes in inflammatory respiratory disease.

  14. A new portable device for automatic controlled-gradient cryopreservation of blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Albeck, G; Hansen, B;

    1993-01-01

    Protection of the functional integrity of mononuclear cells stored in liquid N2 requires careful control of the freezing procedure. Consequently, optimal quality of cryopreserved cells is usually assured by freezing according to a specified time-temperature gradient generated by computer-controll......Protection of the functional integrity of mononuclear cells stored in liquid N2 requires careful control of the freezing procedure. Consequently, optimal quality of cryopreserved cells is usually assured by freezing according to a specified time-temperature gradient generated by computer......-controlled freezing devices. While such equipment offers large capacity and secures maximum survival and functional integrity of the lymphocytes upon thawing, it is quite costly and strictly stationary. We have previously developed and tested an alternative, manual device for controlled-gradient lymphocyte freezing...

  15. Selective Antitumor Activity of Ibrutinib in EGFR-Mutant Non–Small Cell Lung Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Gao, Wen; Wang, Michael; Wang, Li; Lu, Haibo; Wu, Shuhong; Dai, Bingbing; Ou, Zhishuo; Zhang, Liang; Heymach, John V.; Gold, Kathryn A.; Minna, John ,; Roth, Jack A.; Hofstetter, Wayne L.; Swisher, Stephen G.; Fang, Bingliang

    2014-01-01

    Ibrutinib, which irreversibly inhibits Bruton tyrosine kinase, was evaluated for antitumor activity in a panel of non–small cell lung cancer (NSCLC) cell lines and found to selectively inhibit growth of NSCLC cells carrying mutations in the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) gene, including T790M mutant and erlotinib-resistant H1975 cells. Ibrutinib induced dose-dependent inhibition of phosphor-EGFR at both Y1068 and Y1173 sites, suggesting ibrutinib functions as an EGFR inhibitor. Survi...

  16. Tunable Microfluidic Devices for Hydrodynamic Fractionation of Cells and Beads: A Review

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jafar Alvankarian

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The adjustable microfluidic devices that have been developed for hydrodynamic-based fractionation of beads and cells are important for fast performance tunability through interaction of mechanical properties of particles in fluid flow and mechanically flexible microstructures. In this review, the research works reported on fabrication and testing of the tunable elastomeric microfluidic devices for applications such as separation, filtration, isolation, and trapping of single or bulk of microbeads or cells are discussed. Such microfluidic systems for rapid performance alteration are classified in two groups of bulk deformation of microdevices using external mechanical forces, and local deformation of microstructures using flexible membrane by pneumatic pressure. The main advantage of membrane-based tunable systems has been addressed to be the high capability of integration with other microdevice components. The stretchable devices based on bulk deformation of microstructures have in common advantage of simplicity in design and fabrication process.

  17. Building Cell Selectivity into CPP-Mediated Strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Irene Martín

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available There is a pressing need for more effective and selective therapies for cancer and other diseases. Consequently, much effort is being devoted to the development of alternative experimental approaches based on selective systems, which are designed to be specifically directed against target cells. In addition, a large number of highly potent therapeutic molecules are being discovered. However, they do not reach clinical trials because of their low delivery, poor specificity or their incapacity to bypass the plasma membrane. Cell-penetrating peptides (CPPs are an open door for cell-impermeable compounds to reach intracellular targets. Putting all these together, research is sailing in the direction of the design of systems with the capacity to transport new drugs into a target cell. Some CPPs show cell type specificity while others require modifications or form part of more sophisticated drug delivery systems. In this review article we summarize several strategies for directed drug delivery involving CPPs that have been reported in the literature.

  18. Oxygen-Purged Microfluidic Device to Enhance Cell Viability in Photopolymerized PEG Hydrogel Microparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xia, Bingzhao; Krutkramelis, Kaspars; Oakey, John

    2016-07-11

    Encapsulating cells within biocompatible materials is a widely used strategy for cell delivery and tissue engineering. While cells are commonly suspended within bulk hydrogel-forming solutions during gelation, substantial interest in the microfluidic fabrication of miniaturized cell encapsulation vehicles has more recently emerged. Here, we utilize multiphase microfluidics to encapsulate cells within photopolymerized picoliter-volume water-in-oil droplets at high production rates. The photoinitiated polymerization of polyethylene glycol diacrylate (PEGDA) is used to continuously produce solid particles from aqueous liquid drops containing cells and hydrogel forming solution. It is well understood that this photoinitiated addition reaction is inhibited by oxygen. In contrast to bulk polymerization in which ambient oxygen is rapidly and harmlessly consumed, allowing the polymerization reaction to proceed, photopolymerization within air permeable polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic devices allows oxygen to be replenished by diffusion as it is depleted. This sustained presence of oxygen and the consequential accumulation of peroxy radicals produce a dramatic effect upon both droplet polymerization and post-encapsulation cell viability. In this work we employ a nitrogen microjacketed microfluidic device to purge oxygen from flowing fluids during photopolymerization. By increasing the purging nitrogen pressure, oxygen concentration was attenuated, and increased post-encapsulation cell viability was achieved. A reaction-diffusion model was used to predict the cumulative intradroplet concentration of peroxy radicals, which corresponded directly to post-encapsulation cell viability. The nitrogen-jacketed microfluidic device presented here allows the droplet oxygen concentration to be finely tuned during cell encapsulation, leading to high post-encapsulation cell viability. PMID:27285343

  19. Correlation between dynamic parameters and device performance of organic solar cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kniepert, Juliane

    2015-01-01

    Organic bulk heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells based on polymer:fullerene blends are a promising alternative for a low-cost solar energy conversion. Despite significant improvements of the power conversion efficiency in recent years, the fundamental working principles of these devices are yet not fully understood. In general, the current output of organic solar cells is determined by the generation of free charge carriers upon light absorption and their transport to the electrodes in competiti...

  20. Digital Devices, Distraction, and Student Performance: Does In-Class Cell Phone Use Reduce Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Hoekstra, Angel R.; Wilcox, Bethany R.

    2012-01-01

    The recent increase in use of digital devices such as laptop computers, iPads, and web-enabled cell phones has generated concern about how technologies affect student performance. Combining observation, survey, and interview data, this research assesses the effects of technology use on student attitudes and learning. Data were gathered in eight…

  1. A device to facilitate preparation of high-density neural cell cultures in MEAs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mok, S Y; Lim, Y M; Goh, S Y

    2009-05-15

    A device to facilitate high-density seeding of dissociated neural cells on planar multi-electrode arrays (MEAs) is presented in this paper. The device comprises a metal cover with two concentric cylinders-the outer cylinder fits tightly on to the external diameter of a MEA to hold it in place and an inner cylinder holds a central glass tube for introducing a cell suspension over the electrode area of the MEA. An O-ring is placed at the bottom of the inner cylinder and the glass tube to provide a fluid-tight seal between the glass tube and the MEA electrode surface. The volume of cell suspension in the glass tube is varied according to the desired plating density. After plating, the device can be lifted from the MEA without leaving any residue on the contact surface. The device has enabled us to increase and control the plating density of neural cell suspension with low viability, and to prepare successful primary cultures from cryopreserved neurons and glia. The cultures of cryopreserved dissociated cortical neurons that we have grown in this manner remained spontaneously active over months, exhibited stable development and similar network characteristics as reported by other researchers. PMID:19428539

  2. Photovoltaic material and device measurements workshop: focus on polycrystalline thin film cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    None

    1979-01-01

    The general purpose of the workshop was to accelerate the development of thin film solar cells by improving the versatility and reliability of material and device measurement techniques. Papers were presented under the following sessions: structural/chemical session; optical/electro-optical session; charge transport session; and poster session. Each paper was processed for EDB.

  3. Selective removal of carbon dioxide contained in the effluent from ion chromatography suppressors using a new non-vacuum device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masunaga, Hiroto; Higo, Yuji; Ishii, Mizuo; Maruyama, Noboru; Yamazaki, Shigeo

    2015-05-01

    In this paper, a new CO2 gas removal device optimized to selectively remove CO2 gas contained in the effluent from suppressors used in ion chromatography (IC) under non-vacuum conditions is described. This device consists of a closed vessel equipped with gas permeable tubing (GPT) and a CO2 adsorbent. During operation, the CO2 adsorbent adsorbs CO2 gas in the vessel, creating CO2 partial pressure difference between the inside of the GPT and the vessel. The CO2 gas contained in the effluent being pumped into the GPT is selectively removed from the effluent based on the diffusion of the CO2 associated with the CO2 partial pressure difference. The purpose of this study is to optimize the IC operating conditions with the aim of selectively removing HCO3(-) (CO3(2-)) contained in the effluent and reducing the electrical conductivity of the effluent under non-vacuum conditions. The electrical conductivity of the effluent and the signal intensity of the water dip is decreased by approximately 25 μS/cm (from 30 to 5 μS/cm) and by approximately twentieth, respectively, using the optimized CO2 remover. In addition, the anion detection limit achieved in IC instruments with a CO2 remover is on the order of a few ppb.

  4. Ion-selective microelectrode arrays for cell culture monitoring

    OpenAIRE

    Generelli, Silvia; De Rooij, Nicolas-F.

    2008-01-01

    The design, microfabrication and characterization of a platform comprising an array of ion-selective microelectrodes (µISE) aimed at in vitro cellular physiology and toxicology is described. This study focusses on K+ and Ca2+ monitoring in cell culture environments. A potential promising application of such a platform is based on recent findings in molecular biology, revealing connections between certain diseases, as for example some types of cancer or parkinsonism, and a malfunction in cellu...

  5. New biomedical devices with selective peptide recognition properties. Part 1: Characterization and cytotoxicity of molecularly imprinted polymers

    OpenAIRE

    Rechichi, A; Cristallini, C; Vitale, U; Ciardelli, G; Barbani, N; Vozzi, G; Giusti, P.

    2007-01-01

    Abstract Molecular imprinting is a technique for the synthesis of polymers capable to bind target molecules selectively. The imprinting of large proteins, such as cell adhesion proteins or cell receptors, opens the way to important and innovative biomedical applications. However, such molecules can incur into important conformational changes during the preparation of the imprinted polymer impairing the specificity of the recognition cavities. The “epitope approach” can overcome this limit by ...

  6. Material Selection for Dye Sensitized Solar Cells Using Multiple Attribute Decision Making Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarita Baghel

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye sensitized solar cells (DSCs provide a potential alternative to conventional p-n junction photovoltaic devices. The semiconductor thin film plays a crucial role in the working of DSC. This paper aims at formulating a process for the selection of optimum semiconductor material for nanostructured thin film using multiple attribute decision making (MADM approach. Various possible available semiconducting materials and their properties like band gap, cost, mobility, rate of electron injection, and static dielectric constant are considered and MADM technique is applied to select the best suited material. It was found that, out of all possible candidates, titanium dioxide (TiO2 is the best semiconductor material for application in DSC. It was observed that the proposed results are in good agreement with the experimental findings.

  7. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 µg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  8. Microfluidic gradient device for studying mesothelial cell migration and the effect of chronic carbon nanotube exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Hanyuan; Lohcharoenkal, Warangkana; Sun, Jianbo; Li, Xiang; Wang, Liying; Wu, Nianqiang; Rojanasakul, Yon; Liu, Yuxin

    2016-01-01

    Cell migration is one of the crucial steps in many physiological and pathological processes, including cancer development. Our recent studies have shown that carbon nanotubes (CNTs), similarly to asbestos, can induce accelerated cell growth and invasiveness that contribute to their mesothelioma pathogenicity. Malignant mesothelioma is a very aggressive tumor that develops from cells of the mesothelium, and is most commonly caused by exposure to asbestos. CNTs have a similar structure and mode of exposure to asbestos. This has raised a concern regarding the potential carcinogenicity of CNTs, especially in the pleural area which is a key target for asbestos-related diseases. In this paper, a static microfluidic gradient device was applied to study the migration of human pleural mesothelial cells which had been through a long-term exposure (4 months) to subcytotoxic concentration (0.02 μg cm−2) of single-walled CNTs (SWCNTs). Multiple migration signatures of these cells were investigated using the microfluidic gradient device for the first time. During the migration study, we observed that cell morphologies changed from flattened shapes to spindle shapes prior to their migration after their sensing of the chemical gradient. The migration of chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells was evaluated under different fetal bovine serum (FBS) concentration gradients, and the migration speeds and number of migrating cells were extracted and compared. The results showed that chronically SWCNT-exposed mesothelial cells are more sensitive to the gradient compared to non-SWCNT-exposed cells. The method described here allows simultaneous detection of cell morphology and migration under chemical gradient conditions, and also allows for real-time monitoring of cell motility that resembles in vivo cell migration. This platform would be much needed for supporting the development of more physiologically relevant cell models for better assessment and characterization of the

  9. Design of user interfaces for selective editing of digital photos on touchscreen devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binder, Thomas; Steiding, Meikel; Wille, Manuel; Kokemohr, Nils

    2013-03-01

    When editing images it is often desirable to apply a filter with a spatially varying strength. With the usual selection tools like gradient, lasso, brush, or quick selection tools, creating masks containing such spatially varying strength values is time-consuming and cumbersome. We present an interactive filtering approach which allows to process photos selectively without the intermediate step of creating a mask containing strength values. In using this approach, the user only needs to place reference points (called control points) on the image and to adjust the spatial influence and filter strength for each control point. The filter is then applied selectively to the image, with strength values interpolated for each pixel between control points. The interpolation is based on a mixture of distances in space, luminance, and color; it is therefore a low-level operation. Since the main goal of the approach is to make selective image editing intuitive, easy, and playful, emphasis is put on the user interface: We describe the process of developing an existing mouse-driven user interface into a touch-driven one. Many question needed to be answered anew, such as how to present a slider widget on a touchscreen. Several variants are discussed and compared.

  10. High-performance inverted polymer solar cells: device characterization, optical modeling, and hole-transporting modifications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Jingyu; Yip, Hin-Lap; Zhang, Yong; Chien, Shang-Chieh; Chueh, Chu-Chen [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Gao, Yan; Chen, Hongzheng [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); State Key Laboratory of Silicon Materials, MOE Key Laboratory of Macromolecule Synthesis and Functionalization, Zhejiang-California International Nanosystems Institute, Zhejiang University, Hangzhou (China); O' Malley, Kevin; Jen, Alex K.Y. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, University of Washington, Seattle, Washington (United States); Department of Chemistry, University of Washington, Seattle, WA (United States)

    2012-07-10

    Although high power conversion efficiencies (PCE) have already been demonstrated in conventional structure polymer solar cells (PSCs), the development of high performance inverted structure polymer solar cells is still lagging behind despite their demonstrated superior stability and feasibility for roll-to-roll processing. To address this challenge, a detailed study of solution-processed, inverted-structure PSCs based on the blends of a low bandgap polymer, poly(indacenodithiophene-co-phananthrene-quinoxaline) (PIDT-PhanQ) and [6,6]-phenyl-C{sub 71}-butyric acid methyl ester (PC{sub 71}BM) as the bulk heterojunction (BHJ) layer is carried out. Comprehensive characterization and optical modeling of the resulting devices is performed to understand the effect of device geometry on photovoltaic performance. Excellent device performance can be achieved by optimizing the optical field distribution and spatial profiles of excitons generation within the active layer in different device configurations. In the inverted structure, because the peak of the excitons generation is located farther away from the electron-collecting electrode, a higher blending ratio of fullerene is required to provide higher electron mobility in the BHJ for achieving good device performance. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  11. Passive safety device and internal short tested method for energy storage cells and systems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keyser, Matthew; Darcy, Eric; Long, Dirk; Pesaran, Ahmad

    2015-09-22

    A passive safety device for an energy storage cell for positioning between two electrically conductive layers of the energy storage cell. The safety device also comprising a separator and a non-conductive layer. A first electrically conductive material is provided on the non-conductive layer. A first opening is formed through the separator between the first electrically conductive material and one of the electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device. A second electrically conductive material is provided adjacent the first electrically conductive material on the non-conductive layer, wherein a space is formed on the non-conductive layer between the first and second electrically conductive materials. A second opening is formed through the non-conductive layer between the second electrically conductive material and another of the electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device. The first and second electrically conductive materials combine and exit at least partially through the first and second openings to connect the two electrically conductive layers of the energy storage device at a predetermined temperature.

  12. Resistive switching behavior of reduced graphene oxide memory cells for low power nonvolatile device application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pradhan, Sangram K.; Xiao, Bo; Mishra, Saswat; Killam, Alex; Pradhan, Aswini K.

    2016-05-01

    Graphene Oxide (GO) based low cost flexible electronics and memory cell have recently attracted more attention for the fabrication of emerging electronic devices. As a suitable candidate for resistive random access memory technology, reduced graphene oxide (RGO) can be widely used for non-volatile switching memory applications because of its large surface area, excellent scalability, retention, and endurance properties. We demonstrated that the fabricated metal/RGO/metal memory device exhibited excellent switching characteristics, with on/off ratio of two orders of magnitude and operated threshold switching voltage of less than 1 V. The studies on different cell diameter, thickness, scan voltages and period of time corroborate the reliability of the device as resistive random access memory. The microscopic origin of switching operation is governed by the establishment of conducting filaments due to the interface amorphous layer rupturing and the movement of oxygen in the GO layer. This interesting experimental finding indicates that device made up of thermally reduced GO shows more reliability for its use in next generation electronics devices.

  13. Incorporation of wavelength selective devices into waveguides with applications to a miniature spectrometer

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Stallard, B. R.; Kaushik, S.; Hadley, G. R.; Fritz, I. J.; Howard, A. J.; Vawter, G. A.; Wendt, J. R.; Corless, R

    1996-02-01

    This report pertains to a Laboratory Directed Research and Development project which was funded for FY94 and FY95. The goal was to develop building blocks for small, cheap sensors that use optical spectroscopy as a means of detecting chemical analytes. Such sensors can have an impact on a wide variety of technologies, such as: industrial process control, environmental monitors, chemical analysis in medicine, and automotive monitors. We describe work in fabricating and demonstrating a waveguide/grating device that can serve as the wavelength dispersive component in a miniature spectrometer. Also, we describe the invention and modeling of a new way to construct an array of optical interference filters using sub-wavelength lithography to tune the index of refraction of a fixed Fabry-Perot cavity. Next we describe progress in more efficiently calculating the fields in grating devices. Finally we present the invention of a new type of near field optical probe, applicable to scanning microscopy or optical data storage, which is based on a circular grating constructed in a waveguide. This result diverges from the original goal of the project but is quite significant in that it promises to increase the data storage capacity of CD-ROMs by 10 times.

  14. Dielectric response of doped organic semiconductor devices: P3HT:PCBM solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Armbruster, Oskar; Lungenschmied, Christoph; Bauer, Siegfried

    2011-08-01

    We introduce a model to account for the dielectric response of doped organic semiconductor devices. In addition to the phenomena observed for undoped devices, mobile charge carriers created by doping can alter the dielectric function of the organic material and hence the dielectric response of the devices. These extrinsic charges may be trapped and contribute to the capacitance on re-emission. We directly model the real part of the dielectric function based on this phenomenon. The imaginary part is obtained via the application of the Kramers-Kronig transformation. We use oxygen-doped poly(3-hexylthiophene):[6,6]-phenyl-C61-butyric acid methyl ester- (P3HT:PCBM) based organic solar cells as a model system to test our approach and hence contribute to the understanding of oxygen-induced degradation in these devices. We fit our equations to the measured dielectric data and compare it to Debye relaxation as well as two widely used equivalent circuit models. Together with the device resistance determined from the steady-state current-voltage characteristic around 0V an excellent agreement between the experimental data and our model is achieved for both the real and the imaginary part of the dielectric function over a frequency range covering five orders of magnitude. Unlike the Debye relaxation model or the equivalent circuit approach, our model yields important device parameters such as the dopant concentration.

  15. External circuit integration with electromagnetic particle in cell modeling of plasma focus devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The pinch performance of a plasma focus (PF) device is sensitive to the physical conditions of the breakdown phase. It is therefore essential to model and study the initial phase in order to optimize device performance. An external circuit is self consistently coupled to the electromagnetic particle in cell code to model the breakdown and initial lift phase of the United Nations University/International Centre for Theoretical Physics (UNU-ICTP) plasma focus device. Gas breakdown during the breakdown phase is simulated successfully, following a drop in the applied voltage across the device and a concurrent substantial rise in the circuit current. As a result, the plasma becomes magnetized, with the growing value of the magnetic field over time leading to the gradual lift off of the well formed current sheath into the axial acceleration phase. This lifting off, with simultaneous outward sheath motion along the anode and vertical cathode, and the strong magnetic fields in the current sheath region, was demonstrated in this work, and hence validates our method of coupling the external circuit to PF devices. Our method produces voltage waveforms that are qualitatively similar to the observed experimental voltage profiles of the UNU-ICTP device. Values of the mean electron energy before and after voltage breakdown turned out to be different, with the values after breakdown being much lower. In both cases, the electron energy density function turned out to be non-Maxwellian

  16. Efficiency improvement in thin-film solar cell devices with oxygen-containing absorber layer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The CdTe/CdS solar cell devices were grown using a dry process consisting of sputtering for the transparent conducting oxide and CdS window layers, and close-space sublimation for CdTe absorber layer. These devices were back contacted using Mo/Sb2Te3 sputtered layers following the CdCl2 activation process carried out in air. It was shown that when oxygen is intentionally introduced in the CdTe layer during its growth, this leads to a significant improvement in all the device parameters yielding an efficiency of 14% compared to 11.5% for devices fabricated in the same conditions but without intentional oxygen incorporation in CdTe. The data obtained were not altered following a light soaking. The devices were investigated by quantitative secondary ion mass spectrometry, which allowed insight into the distribution and amount of oxygen and chlorine within the entire device structure. Both impurities showed an increased concentration throughout the CdTe absorber layer

  17. Selective-emitter crystalline silicon solar cells using phosphorus paste

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Selective-emitter structures have been studied to improve the conversion efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells. However, such structures require additional complicated processes and incur extra cost. In this work, we used phosphorus paste (P-paste) to form a heavily-doped region beneath the grid and POCl3 to create a shallow emitter area. This method should be convenient to use in the solar-cell industry because it requires only additional P paste printing, compared to the case of homogeneous solar cells. Diffusion parameters including the temperature, diffusion time, and ambient gases were optimized. We observed that the spreading of the P paste was affected by the pyramidal size of the textured wafer due to the low viscosity of the P paste. The pyramidal height of the textured silicon surface was optimized at 3 μm to counterbalance the surface reflectance and the spreading of the P paste. The short-circuit current density of the completed selective emitter solar cell was increased, and an improvement of blue response in the internal quantum efficiency was seen while contact properties such as the fill factor deteriorated due to the spreading of the P paste and the thin emitter on top of the pyramid of the textured silicon surface. Double printing of the P paste was applied to solve this contact problem; a fill factor improvement of 2.4% was obtained.

  18. Selective-emitter crystalline silicon solar cells using phosphorus paste

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Kyung Taek; Kang, Min Gu; Song, Hee-eun

    2014-11-01

    Selective-emitter structures have been studied to improve the conversion efficiency of crystalline silicon solar cells. However, such structures require additional complicated processes and incur extra cost. In this work, we used phosphorus paste (P-paste) to form a heavily-doped region beneath the grid and POCl3 to create a shallow emitter area. This method should be convenient to use in the solar-cell industry because it requires only additional P paste printing, compared to the case of homogeneous solar cells. Diffusion parameters including the temperature, diffusion time, and ambient gases were optimized. We observed that the spreading of the P paste was affected by the pyramidal size of the textured wafer due to the low viscosity of the P paste. The pyramidal height of the textured silicon surface was optimized at 3 μm to counterbalance the surface reflectance and the spreading of the P paste. The short-circuit current density of the completed selective emitter solar cell was increased, and an improvement of blue response in the internal quantum efficiency was seen while contact properties such as the fill factor deteriorated due to the spreading of the P paste and the thin emitter on top of the pyramid of the textured silicon surface. Double printing of the P paste was applied to solve this contact problem; a fill factor improvement of 2.4% was obtained.

  19. Newcastle disease virus selectively kills human tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reichard, K W; Lorence, R M; Cascino, C J; Peeples, M E; Walter, R J; Fernando, M B; Reyes, H M; Greager, J A

    1992-05-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV), strain 73-T, has previously been shown to be cytolytic to mouse tumor cells. In this study, we have evaluated the ability of NDV to replicate in and kill human tumor cells in culture and in athymic mice. Plaque assays were used to determine the cytolytic activity of NDV on six human tumor cell lines, fibrosarcoma (HT1080), osteosarcoma (KHOS), cervical carcinoma (KB8-5-11), bladder carcinoma (HCV29T), neuroblastoma (IMR32), and Wilm's tumor (G104), and on nine different normal human fibroblast lines. NDV formed plaques on all tumor cells tested as well as on chick embryo cells (CEC), the native host for NDV. Plaques did not form on any of the normal fibroblast lines. To detect NDV replication, virus yield assays were performed which measured virus particles in infected cell culture supernatants. Virus yield increased 10,000-fold within 24 hr in tumor and CEC supernatants. Titers remained near zero in normal fibroblast supernatants. In vivo tumoricidal activity was evaluated in athymic nude Balb-c mice by subcutaneous injection of 9 x 10(6) tumor cells followed by intralesional injection of either live or heat-killed NDV (1.0 x 10(6) plaque forming units [PFU]), or medium. After live NDV treatment, tumor regression occurred in 10 out of 11 mice bearing KB8-5-11 tumors, 8 out of 8 with HT-1080 tumors, and 6 out of 7 with IMR-32 tumors. After treatment with heat-killed NDV no regression occurred (P less than 0.01, Fisher's exact test). Nontumor-bearing mice injected with 1.0 x 10(8) PFU of NDV remained healthy. These results indicate that NDV efficiently and selectively replicates in and kills tumor cells, but not normal cells, and that intralesional NDV causes complete tumor regression in athymic mice with a high therapeutic index.

  20. Selective Interlayers and Contacts in Organic Photovoltaic Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ratcliff, Erin L; Zacher, Brian; Armstrong, Neal R

    2011-06-01

    Organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs) are promising solar electric energy conversion systems with impressive recent optimization of active layers. OPV optimization must now be accompanied by the development of new charge-selective contacts and interlayers. This Perspective considers the role of interface science in energy harvesting using OPVs, looking back at early photoelectrochemical (photogalvanic) energy conversion platforms, which suffered from a lack of charge carrier selectivity. We then examine recent platforms and the fundamental aspects of selective harvesting of holes and electrons at opposite contacts. For blended heterojunction OPVs, contact/interlayer design is especially critical because charge harvesting competes with recombination at these same contacts. New interlayer materials can modify contacts to both control work function and introduce selectivity and chemical compatibility with nonpolar active layers and add thermodynamic and kinetic selectivity to charge harvesting. We briefly discuss the surface and interface science required for the development of new interlayer materials and take a look ahead at the challenges yet to be faced in their optimization. PMID:26295432

  1. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Selahi, AmirAli; Madadelahi, Masoud

    2016-03-01

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ~100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s-1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells.

  2. Designing and modeling a centrifugal microfluidic device to separate target blood cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The objective of this study is to design a novel and efficient portable lab-on-a-CD (LOCD) microfluidic device for separation of specific cells (target cells) using magnetic beads. In this study the results are shown for neutrophils as target cells. However, other kinds of target cells can be separated in a similar approach. The designed microfluidics can be utilized as a point of care system for neutrophil detection. This microfluidic system employs centrifugal and magnetic forces for separation. After model validation by the experimental data in the literature (that may be used as a design tool for developing centrifugo-magnetophoretic devices), two models are presented for separation of target cells using magnetic beads. The first model consists of one container in the inlet section and two containers in the outlets. Initially, the inlet container is filled with diluted blood sample which is a mixture of red blood cells (RBCs) plus neutrophils which are attached to Magnetic beads. It is shown that by using centrifugal and magnetic forces, this model can separate all neutrophils with recovery factor of ∼100%. In the second model, due to excess of magnetic beads in usual experimental analysis (to ensure that all target cells are attached to them) the geometry is improved by adding a third outlet for these free magnetic beads. It is shown that at angular velocity of 45 rad s−1, recovery factor of 100% is achievable for RBCs, free magnetic beads and neutrophils as target cells. (paper)

  3. Collateral methotrexate resistance in cisplatin-selected murine leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to anticancer drugs is a major cause of failure of many therapeutic protocols. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The exact mechanism depends upon the drug of interest as well as the tumor type treated. While studying a cell line selected for its resistance to cisplatin we noted that the cells expressed a >25,000-fold collateral resistance to methotrexate. Given the magnitude of this resistance we elected to investigate this intriguing collateral resistance. From a series of investigations we have identified an alteration in a membrane protein of the resistant cell as compared to the sensitive cells that could be the primary mechanism of resistance. Our studies reviewed here indicate decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein (molecular mass = 66 in the resistant cells, which results in little or no transfer of methotrexate from the medium into the cell. Since this is a relatively novel function for tyrosine phosphorylation, this information may provide insight into possible pharmacological approaches to modify therapeutic regimens by analyzing the status of this protein in tumor samples for a better survival of the cancer patients.

  4. High-throughput blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using spiral inertial microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Nan; Ni, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we explored the blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using a spiral inertial microfluidic device. First, the flow-rate and concentration effects on the migration dynamics of blood cells were systematically investigated to uncover the focusing mechanisms and steric crowding effects of cells in Dean-coupled inertial flows. A novel phenomenon that the focusing status of discoid red blood cells (RBCs) changes according to the channel height was discovered. These experimental data may provide valuable insights for the high-throughput processing of blood samples using inertial microfluidics. On the basis of the improved understandings on blood cell focusing, efficient isolation of plasma from whole blood with a 20-fold dilution was achieved at a throughput up to 700 μl/min. The purity of the isolated blood plasma was close to 100 %, and the plasma yield was calculated to be 38.5 %. As compared with previously-reported devices, our spiral inertial microfluidic device provides a balanced overall performance, and has overriding advantages in terms of processing throughput and operating efficiency.

  5. A hybrid microfluidic-vacuum device for direct interfacing with conventional cell culture methods

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Monuki Edwin S

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Microfluidics is an enabling technology with a number of advantages over traditional tissue culture methods when precise control of cellular microenvironment is required. However, there are a number of practical and technical limitations that impede wider implementation in routine biomedical research. Specialized equipment and protocols required for fabrication and setting up microfluidic experiments present hurdles for routine use by most biology laboratories. Results We have developed and validated a novel microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional tissue culture methods to generate and maintain controlled soluble environments in a Petri dish. It incorporates separate sets of fluidic channels and vacuum networks on a single device that allows reversible application of microfluidic gradients onto wet cell culture surfaces. Stable, precise concentration gradients of soluble factors were generated using simple microfluidic channels that were attached to a perfusion system. We successfully demonstrated real-time optical live/dead cell imaging of neural stem cells exposed to a hydrogen peroxide gradient and chemotaxis of metastatic breast cancer cells in a growth factor gradient. Conclusion This paper describes the design and application of a versatile microfluidic device that can directly interface with conventional cell culture methods. This platform provides a simple yet versatile tool for incorporating the advantages of a microfluidic approach to biological assays without changing established tissue culture protocols.

  6. A microfluidic device integrating plasmonic nanodevices for Raman spectroscopy analysis on trapped single living cells

    KAUST Repository

    Perozziello, Gerardo

    2013-11-01

    In this work we developed a microfluidic device integrating nanoplasmonic devices combined with fluidic trapping regions. The microfuidic traps allow to capture single cells in areas where plasmonic sensors are placed. In this way it is possible to perform Enhanced Raman analysis on the cell membranes. Moreover, by changing direction of the flux it is possible to change the orientation of the cell in the trap, so that it is possible to analyze different points of the membrane of the same cell. We shows an innovative procedure to fabricate and assembly the microfluidic device which combine photolithography, focused ion beam machining, and hybrid bonding between a polymer substrate and lid of Calcium fluoride. This procedure is compatible with the fabrication of the plasmonic sensors in close proximity of the microfluidic traps. Moreover, the use of Calcium fluoride as lid allows full compatibility with Raman measurements producing negligible Raman background signal and avoids Raman artifacts. Finally, we performed Raman analysis on cells to monitor their oxidative stress under particular non physiological conditions. © 2013 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. High-throughput blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using spiral inertial microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Nan; Ni, Zhonghua

    2015-12-01

    Herein, we explored the blood cell focusing and plasma isolation using a spiral inertial microfluidic device. First, the flow-rate and concentration effects on the migration dynamics of blood cells were systematically investigated to uncover the focusing mechanisms and steric crowding effects of cells in Dean-coupled inertial flows. A novel phenomenon that the focusing status of discoid red blood cells (RBCs) changes according to the channel height was discovered. These experimental data may provide valuable insights for the high-throughput processing of blood samples using inertial microfluidics. On the basis of the improved understandings on blood cell focusing, efficient isolation of plasma from whole blood with a 20-fold dilution was achieved at a throughput up to 700 μl/min. The purity of the isolated blood plasma was close to 100 %, and the plasma yield was calculated to be 38.5 %. As compared with previously-reported devices, our spiral inertial microfluidic device provides a balanced overall performance, and has overriding advantages in terms of processing throughput and operating efficiency. PMID:26553099

  8. A High Power-Density Mediator-Free Microfluidic Biophotovoltaic Device for Cyanobacterial Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Bombelli, Paolo; Herling, Therese W; Howe, Christopher J; Knowles, Tuomas P J

    2014-01-01

    Biophotovoltaics has emerged as a promising technology for generating renewable energy since it relies on living organisms as inexpensive, self-repairing and readily available catalysts to produce electricity from an abundant resource - sunlight. The efficiency of biophotovoltaic cells, however, has remained significantly lower than that achievable through synthetic materials. Here, we devise a platform to harness the large power densities afforded by miniaturised geometries. To this effect, we have developed a soft-lithography approach for the fabrication of microfluidic biophotovoltaic devices that do not require membranes or mediators. Synechocystis sp. PCC 6803 cells were injected and allowed to settle on the anode, permitting the physical proximity between cells and electrode required for mediator-free operation. We demonstrate power densities of above 100 mW/m2 for a chlorophyll concentration of 100 {\\mu}M under white light, a high value for biophotovoltaic devices without extrinsic supply of additional...

  9. Characterization of Rat Hair Follicle Stem Cells Selected by Vario Magnetic Activated Cell Sorting System

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hair follicle stem cells (HfSCs) play crucial roles in hair follicle morphogenesis and hair cycling. These stem cells are self-renewable and have the multi-lineage potential to generate epidermis, sebaceous glands, and hair follicle. The separation and identification of hair follicle stem cells are important for further research in stem cell biology. In this study, we report on the successful enrichment of rat hair follicle stem cells through vario magnetic activated cell sorting (Vario MACS) and the biological characteristics of the stem cells. We chose the HfSCs positive surface markers CD34, α6-integrin and the negative marker CD71 to design four isolation strategies: positive selection with single marker of CD34, positive selection with single marker of α6-integrin, CD71 depletion followed by CD34 positive selection, and CD71 depletion followed by α6-integrin positive selection. The results of flow cytometry analysis showed that all four strategies had ideal effects. Specifically, we conducted a series of researches on HfSCs characterized by their high level of CD34, termed CD34bri cells, and low to undetectable expression of CD34, termed CD34dim cells. CD34bri cells had greater proliferative potential and higher colony-forming ability than CD34dim cells. Furthermore, CD34bri cells had some typical characteristics as progenitor cells, such as large nucleus, obvious nucleolus, large nuclear:cytoplasmic ratio and few cytoplasmic organelles. Our findings clearly demonstrated that HfSCs with high purity and viability could be successfully enriched with Vario MACS

  10. Selective cell targeting and lineage tracing of human induced pluripotent stem cells using recombinant avian retroviruses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hildebrand, Laura; Seemann, Petra; Kurtz, Andreas; Hecht, Jochen; Contzen, Jörg; Gossen, Manfred; Stachelscheid, Harald

    2015-12-01

    Human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSC) differentiate into multiple cell types. Selective cell targeting is often needed for analyzing gene function by overexpressing proteins in a distinct population of hiPSC-derived cell types and for monitoring cell fate in response to stimuli. However, to date, this has not been possible, as commonly used viruses enter the hiPSC via ubiquitously expressed receptors. Here, we report for the first time the application of a heterologous avian receptor, the tumor virus receptor A (TVA), to selectively transduce TVA(+) cells in a mixed cell population. Expression of the TVA surface receptor via genetic engineering renders cells susceptible for infection by avian leucosis virus (ALV). We generated hiPSC lines with this stably integrated, ectopic TVA receptor gene that expressed the receptor while retaining pluripotency. The undifferentiated hiPSC(TVA+) as well as their differentiating progeny could be infected by recombinant ALV (so-called RCAS virus) with high efficiency. Due to incomplete receptor blocking, even sequential infection of differentiating or undifferentiated TVA(+) cells was possible. In conclusion, the TVA/RCAS system provides an efficient and gentle gene transfer system for hiPSC and extends our possibilities for selective cell targeting and lineage tracing studies.

  11. Scalable graphene synthesised by plasma-assisted selective reaction on silicon carbide for device applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsu-Sheng; Lai, Chih-Chung; Medina, Henry; Lin, Shih-Ming; Shih, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Yu-Ze; Liang, Jenq-Horng; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-10-01

    Graphene, a two-dimensional material with honeycomb arrays of carbon atoms, has shown outstanding physical properties that make it a promising candidate material for a variety of electronic applications. To date, several issues related to the material synthesis and device fabrication need to be overcome. Despite the fact that large-area graphene films synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) can be grown with relatively few defects, the required transfer process creates wrinkles and polymer residues that greatly reduce its performance in device applications. Graphene synthesised on silicon carbide (SiC) has shown outstanding mobility and has been successfully used to develop ultra-high frequency transistors; however, this fabrication method is limited due to the use of costly ultra-high vacuum (UHV) equipment that can reach temperatures over 1500 °C. Here, we show a simple and novel approach to synthesise graphene on SiC substrates that greatly reduces the temperature and vacuum requirements and allows the use of equipment commonly used in the semiconductor processing industry. In this work, we used plasma treatment followed by annealing in order to obtain large-scale graphene films from bulk SiC. After exposure to N2 plasma, the annealing process promotes the reaction of nitrogen ions with Si and the simultaneous condensation of C on the surface of SiC. Eventually, a uniform, large-scale, n-type graphene film with remarkable transport behaviour on the SiC wafer is achieved. Furthermore, graphene field effect transistors (FETs) with high carrier mobilities on SiC were also demonstrated in this study.Graphene, a two-dimensional material with honeycomb arrays of carbon atoms, has shown outstanding physical properties that make it a promising candidate material for a variety of electronic applications. To date, several issues related to the material synthesis and device fabrication need to be overcome. Despite the fact that large-area graphene films

  12. Haptic Addition to a Visual Menu Selection Interface Controlled by an In-Vehicle Rotary Device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Camilla Grane

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Today, several vehicles are equipped with a visual display combined with a haptic rotary device for handling in-vehicle information system tasks while driving. This experimental study investigates whether a haptic addition to a visual interface interferes with or supports secondary task performance and whether haptic information could be used without taking eyes off road. Four interfaces were compared during simulated driving: visual only, partly corresponding visual-haptic, fully corresponding visual-haptic, and haptic only. Secondary task performance and subjective mental workload were measured. Additionally, the participants were interviewed. It was found that some haptic support improved performance. However, when more haptic information was used, the results diverged in terms of task completion time and interface comprehension. Some participants did not sense all haptics provided, some did not comprehend the correspondence between the haptic and visual interfaces, and some did. Interestingly, the participants managed to complete the tasks when using haptic-only information.

  13. Biomechanical analysis of cancerous and normal cells based on bulge generation in a microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Yu Chang; Park, Sang-Jin; Park, Je-Kyun

    2008-10-01

    This paper presents a new biomechanical analysis method for discrimination between cancerous and normal cells through compression by poly(dimethylsiloxane) (PDMS) membrane deflection in a microfluidic device. When a cell is compressed, cellular membrane will expand and then small bulges will appear on the peripheral cell membrane beyond the allowable strain. It is well known that the amount of F-actin in cancer cells is less than that of normal cells and bulges occur at the sites where cytoskeleton becomes detached from the membrane bilayer. Accordingly, we have demonstrated the difference of the bulge generation between breast cancer cells (MCF7) and normal cells (MCF10A). After excessive deformation, the bulges generated in MCF7 cells were not evenly distributed on the cell periphery. Contrary to this, the bulges of MCF10A cells showed an even distribution. In addition, the morphologies of bulges of MCF7 and MCF10A cells looked swollen protrusion and tubular protrusion, respectively. Peripheral strains at the moment of the bulge generation were also 72% in MCF7 and 46% in MCF10A. The results show that the bulge generation can be correlated with the cytoskeleton quantity inside the cell, providing the first step of a new biomechanical approach. PMID:18810292

  14. Scalable graphene synthesised by plasma-assisted selective reaction on silicon carbide for device applications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Hsu-Sheng; Lai, Chih-Chung; Medina, Henry; Lin, Shih-Ming; Shih, Yu-Chuan; Chen, Yu-Ze; Liang, Jenq-Horng; Chueh, Yu-Lun

    2014-11-21

    Graphene, a two-dimensional material with honeycomb arrays of carbon atoms, has shown outstanding physical properties that make it a promising candidate material for a variety of electronic applications. To date, several issues related to the material synthesis and device fabrication need to be overcome. Despite the fact that large-area graphene films synthesised by chemical vapour deposition (CVD) can be grown with relatively few defects, the required transfer process creates wrinkles and polymer residues that greatly reduce its performance in device applications. Graphene synthesised on silicon carbide (SiC) has shown outstanding mobility and has been successfully used to develop ultra-high frequency transistors; however, this fabrication method is limited due to the use of costly ultra-high vacuum (UHV) equipment that can reach temperatures over 1500 °C. Here, we show a simple and novel approach to synthesise graphene on SiC substrates that greatly reduces the temperature and vacuum requirements and allows the use of equipment commonly used in the semiconductor processing industry. In this work, we used plasma treatment followed by annealing in order to obtain large-scale graphene films from bulk SiC. After exposure to N2 plasma, the annealing process promotes the reaction of nitrogen ions with Si and the simultaneous condensation of C on the surface of SiC. Eventually, a uniform, large-scale, n-type graphene film with remarkable transport behaviour on the SiC wafer is achieved. Furthermore, graphene field effect transistors (FETs) with high carrier mobilities on SiC were also demonstrated in this study. PMID:25307846

  15. “Optical communication with brain cells by means of an implanted duplex micro-device with optogenetics and Ca2+ fluoroimaging”

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Takuma; Haruta, Makito; Sasagawa, Kiyotaka; Matsumata, Miho; Eizumi, Kawori; Kitsumoto, Chikara; Motoyama, Mayumi; Maezawa, Yasuyo; Ohta, Yasumi; Noda, Toshihiko; Tokuda, Takashi; Ishikawa, Yasuyuki; Ohta, Jun

    2016-02-01

    To better understand the brain function based on neural activity, a minimally invasive analysis technology in a freely moving animal is necessary. Such technology would provide new knowledge in neuroscience and contribute to regenerative medical techniques and prosthetics care. An application that combines optogenetics for voluntarily stimulating nerves, imaging to visualize neural activity, and a wearable micro-instrument for implantation into the brain could meet the abovementioned demand. To this end, a micro-device that can be applied to the brain less invasively and a system for controlling the device has been newly developed in this study. Since the novel implantable device has dual LEDs and a CMOS image sensor, photostimulation and fluorescence imaging can be performed simultaneously. The device enables bidirectional communication with the brain by means of light. In the present study, the device was evaluated in an in vitro experiment using a new on-chip 3D neuroculture with an extracellular matrix gel and an in vivo experiment involving regenerative medical transplantation and gene delivery to the brain by using both photosensitive channel and fluorescent Ca2+ indicator. The device succeeded in activating cells locally by selective photostimulation, and the physiological Ca2+ dynamics of neural cells were visualized simultaneously by fluorescence imaging.

  16. Turnbuckle diamond anvil cell for high-pressure measurements in a superconducting quantum interference device magnetometer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giriat, Gaétan; Wang, Weiwei; Attfield, J. Paul; Huxley, Andrew D.; Kamenev, Konstantin V.

    2010-07-01

    We have developed a miniature diamond anvil cell for magnetization measurements in a widely used magnetic property measurement system commercial magnetometer built around a superconducting quantum interference device. The design of the pressure cell is based on the turnbuckle principle in which force can be created and maintained by rotating the body of the device while restricting the counterthreaded end-nuts to translational movement. The load on the opposed diamond anvils and the sample between them is generated using a hydraulic press. The load is then locked by rotating the body of the cell with respect to the end-nuts. The dimensions of the pressure cell have been optimized by use of finite element analysis. The cell is approximately a cylinder 7 mm long and 7 mm in diameter and weighs only 1.5 g. Due to its small size the cell thermalizes rapidly. It is capable of achieving pressures in excess of 10 GPa while allowing measurements to be performed with the maximum sensitivity of the magnetometer. The performance of the pressure cell is illustrated by a high pressure magnetic study of Mn3[Cr(CN)6]2ṡxH2O Prussian blue analog up to 10.3 GPa.

  17. Water compatible stir-bar devices imprinted with underivatised glyphosate for selective sample clean-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Caballero, Alberto; Diaz-Diaz, Goretti; Bengoetxea, Olatz; Quintela, Amaia; Unceta, Nora; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2016-06-17

    This paper reports the development of stir bars with a new MIP based coating, for the selective sorptive extraction of the herbicide glyphosate (GLYP). Molecular imprinting of the polymer has directly been carried out employing underivatised GLYP as the template molecule. Due to the poor solubility of the target compound in organic solvents, the MIP methodology has been optimised for rebinding in aqueous media, being the synthesis and the rebinding steps carried out in water:methanol mixtures and pure aqueous media. The coating has been developed by radical polymerisation initiated by UV energy, using N-allylthiourea and 2-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate as functional monomers and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. Mechanical stability of the coating has been improved using 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane in the polymerisation mixture. Under the optimised conditions, the MIP has demonstrated excellent selectivity for the target compound in the presence of structural analogues, including its major metabolites. The applicability of the proposed method to real matrices has also been assessed using river water and soil samples. Registered mean recoveries ranged from 90.6 to 97.3% and RSD values were below 5% in all cases, what confirmed the suitability of the described methodology for the selective extraction and quantification of GLYP. PMID:27207580

  18. Water compatible stir-bar devices imprinted with underivatised glyphosate for selective sample clean-up.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomez-Caballero, Alberto; Diaz-Diaz, Goretti; Bengoetxea, Olatz; Quintela, Amaia; Unceta, Nora; Goicolea, M Aranzazu; Barrio, Ramón J

    2016-06-17

    This paper reports the development of stir bars with a new MIP based coating, for the selective sorptive extraction of the herbicide glyphosate (GLYP). Molecular imprinting of the polymer has directly been carried out employing underivatised GLYP as the template molecule. Due to the poor solubility of the target compound in organic solvents, the MIP methodology has been optimised for rebinding in aqueous media, being the synthesis and the rebinding steps carried out in water:methanol mixtures and pure aqueous media. The coating has been developed by radical polymerisation initiated by UV energy, using N-allylthiourea and 2-dimethyl aminoethyl methacrylate as functional monomers and ethylene glycol dimethacrylate as the cross-linker. Mechanical stability of the coating has been improved using 1,3-divinyltetramethyldisiloxane in the polymerisation mixture. Under the optimised conditions, the MIP has demonstrated excellent selectivity for the target compound in the presence of structural analogues, including its major metabolites. The applicability of the proposed method to real matrices has also been assessed using river water and soil samples. Registered mean recoveries ranged from 90.6 to 97.3% and RSD values were below 5% in all cases, what confirmed the suitability of the described methodology for the selective extraction and quantification of GLYP.

  19. Increasing intracellular bioavailable copper selectively targets prostate cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cater, Michael A; Pearson, Helen B; Wolyniec, Kamil; Klaver, Paul; Bilandzic, Maree; Paterson, Brett M; Bush, Ashley I; Humbert, Patrick O; La Fontaine, Sharon; Donnelly, Paul S; Haupt, Ygal

    2013-07-19

    The therapeutic efficacy of two bis(thiosemicarbazonato) copper complexes, glyoxalbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(gtsm)] and diacetylbis[N4-methylthiosemicarbazonato]Cu(II) [Cu(II)(atsm)], for the treatment of prostate cancer was assessed in cell culture and animal models. Distinctively, copper dissociates intracellularly from Cu(II)(gtsm) but is retained by Cu(II)(atsm). We further demonstrated that intracellular H2gtsm [reduced Cu(II)(gtsm)] continues to redistribute copper into a bioavailable (exchangeable) pool. Both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm) selectively kill transformed (hyperplastic and carcinoma) prostate cell lines but, importantly, do not affect the viability of primary prostate epithelial cells. Increasing extracellular copper concentrations enhanced the therapeutic capacity of both Cu(II)(gtsm) and Cu(II)(atsm), and their ligands (H2gtsm and H2atsm) were toxic only toward cancerous prostate cells when combined with copper. Treatment of the Transgenic Adenocarcinoma of Mouse Prostate (TRAMP) model with Cu(II)(gtsm) (2.5 mg/kg) significantly reduced prostate cancer burden (∼70%) and severity (grade), while treatment with Cu(II)(atsm) (30 mg/kg) was ineffective at the given dose. However, Cu(II)(gtsm) caused mild kidney toxicity in the mice, associated primarily with interstitial nephritis and luminal distention. Mechanistically, we demonstrated that Cu(II)(gtsm) inhibits proteasomal chymotrypsin-like activity, a feature further established as being common to copper-ionophores that increase intracellular bioavailable copper. We have demonstrated that increasing intracellular bioavailable copper can selectively kill cancerous prostate cells in vitro and in vivo and have revealed the potential for bis(thiosemicarbazone) copper complexes to be developed as therapeutics for prostate cancer.

  20. Overview on the application of direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) for portable electronic devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamarudin, S.K. [Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Department of Chemical and Process Engineering, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia); Achmad, F.; Daud, W.R.W. [Fuel Cell Institute, Universiti Kebangsaan Malaysia, 43600 UKM Bangi, Selangor (Malaysia)

    2009-08-15

    Technologically advanced human societies require specialized tools and equipment to enable their diverse and mobile activities. Portable electronic devices like laptop, PDA, handphone, etc. are now an essential tool for many people in their daily lives. The rechargeable batteries used to power the portable electronic devices could be improved upon with regards to power density, and there is a crucial need for efficient, renewable and more environmentally friendly power sources. Many researchers have shown that the direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) is an appropriate alternative to rechargeable battery technology, although many factors must be resolved before it can be commercialized. This paper gives an overview on the possibilities for using the DMFC as portable electronic devices power source along with some views on current and future trends in DMFC development, economic analysis and presents the current problems and solutions by DMFC researchers. (author)

  1. Advances in colloidal quantum dot solar cells: The depleted-heterojunction device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaics combine low-cost solution processibility with quantum size-effect tunability to match absorption with the solar spectrum. Recent advances in CQD photovoltaics have led to 3.6% AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies. Here we report CQD photovoltaic devices on transparent conductive oxides and show that our devices rely on the establishment of a depletion region for field-driven charge transport and separation. The resultant depleted-heterojunction solar cells provide a 5.1% AM1.5 power conversion efficiency. The devices employ infrared-bandgap size-effect-tuned PbS colloidal quantum dots, enabling broadband harvesting of the solar spectrum.

  2. RETRACTED: Advances in colloidal quantum dot solar cells: The depleted-heterojunction device

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2011-08-01

    Colloidal quantum dot (CQD) photovoltaics combine low-cost solution processibility with quantum size-effect tunability to match absorption with the solar spectrum. Recent advances in CQD photovoltaics have led to 3.6% AM1.5 solar power conversion efficiencies. Here we report CQD photovoltaic devices on transparent conductive oxides and show that our devices rely on the establishment of a depletion region for field-driven charge transport and separation. The resultant depleted-heterojunction solar cells provide a 5.1% AM1.5 power conversion efficiency. The devices employ infrared-bandgap size-effect-tuned PbS colloidal quantum dots, enabling broadband harvesting of the solar spectrum. © 2010 Elsevier B.V.

  3. Trap-Assisted Transport and Non-Uniform Charge Distribution in Sulfur-Rich PbS Colloidal Quantum Dot-based Solar Cells with Selective Contacts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Malgras, Victor; Zhang, Guanran; Nattestad, Andrew; Clarke, Tracey M; Mozer, Attila J; Yamauchi, Yusuke; Kim, Jung Ho

    2015-12-01

    This study reports evidence of dispersive transport in planar PbS colloidal quantum dot heterojunction-based devices as well as the effect of incorporating a MoO3 hole selective layer on the charge extraction behavior. Steady state and transient characterization techniques are employed to determine the complex recombination processes involved in such devices. The addition of a selective contact drastically improves the device efficiency up to 3.15% (especially due to increased photocurrent and decreased series resistance) and extends the overall charge lifetime by suppressing the main first-order recombination pathway observed in device without MoO3. The lifetime and mobility calculated for our sulfur-rich PbS-based devices are similar to previously reported values in lead-rich quantum dots-based solar cells. Nevertheless, strong Shockley-Read-Hall mechanisms appear to keep restricting charge transport, as the equilibrium voltage takes more than 1 ms to be established. PMID:26541422

  4. Light trapping in thin film solar cells using photonic engineering device concepts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mutitu, James Gichuhi

    In this era of uncertainty concerning future energy solutions, strong reservations have arisen over the continued use and pursuit of fossil fuels and other conventional sources of energy. Moreover, there is currently a strong and global push for the implementation of stringent measures, in order to reduce the amount of green house gases emitted by every nation. As a consequence, there has emerged a sudden and frantic rush for new renewable energy solutions. In this world of renewable energy technologies is where we find photovoltaic (PV) technology today. However, as is, there are still many issues that need to be addressed before solar energy technologies become economically viable and available to all people, in every part of the world. This renewed interest in the development of solar electricity, has led to the advancement of new avenues that address the issues of cost and efficiency associated with PV. To this end, one of the prominent approaches being explored is thin film solar cell (TFSC) technology, which offers prospects of lower material costs and enables larger units of manufacture than conventional wafer based technology. However, TFSC technologies suffer from one major problem; they have lower efficiencies than conventional wafer based solar cell technologies. This lesser efficiency is based on a number of reasons, one of which is that with less material, there is less volume for the absorption of incident photons. This shortcoming leads to the need for optical light trapping; which is concerned with admitting the maximum amount of light into the solar cell and keeping the light within the structure for as long as possible. In this thesis, I present the fundamental scientific ideas, practice and methodology behind the application of photonic engineering device concepts to increase the light trapping capacity of thin film solar cells. In the introductory chapters, I develop the basic ideas behind light trapping in a sequential manner, where the effects

  5. Reversible energy storage on a fuel cell-supercapacitor hybrid device

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zerpa Unda, Jesus Enrique

    2011-02-18

    A new concept of energy storage based on hydrogen which operates reversibly near ambient conditions and without important energy losses is investigated. This concept involves the hybridization between a proton exchange membrane fuel cell and a supercapacitor. The main idea consists in the electrochemical splitting of hydrogen at a PEM fuel cell-type electrode into protons and electrons and then in the storage of these two species separately in the electrical double layer of a supercapacitor-type electrode which is made of electrically conductive large-surface area carbon materials. The investigation of this concept was performed first using a two-electrode fuel cell-supercapacitor hybrid device. A three-electrode hybrid cell was used to explore the application of this concept as a hydrogen buffer integrated inside a PEM fuel cell to be used in case of peak power demand. (orig.)

  6. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-07-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states.

  7. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states. PMID:27218609

  8. Atomistic simulations of electrochemical metallization cells: mechanisms of ultra-fast resistance switching in nanoscale devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Onofrio, Nicolas; Guzman, David; Strachan, Alejandro

    2016-08-01

    We describe a new method that enables reactive molecular dynamics (MD) simulations of electrochemical processes and apply it to study electrochemical metallization cells (ECMs). The model, called EChemDID, extends the charge equilibration method to capture the effect of external electrochemical potential on partial atomic charges and describes its equilibration over connected metallic structures, on-the-fly, during the MD simulation. We use EChemDID to simulate resistance switching in nanoscale ECMs; these devices consist of an electroactive metal separated from an inactive electrode by an insulator and can be reversibly switched to a low-resistance state by the electrochemical formation of a conducting filament between electrodes. Our structures use Cu as the active electrode and SiO2 as the dielectric and have dimensions at the foreseen limit of scalability of the technology, with a dielectric thickness of approximately 1 nm. We explore the effect of device geometry on switching timescales and find that nanowires with an electroactive shell, where ions migrate towards a smaller inactive electrode core, result in faster switching than planar devices. We observe significant device-to-device variability in switching timescales and intermittent switching for these nanoscale devices. To characterize the evolution in the electronic structure of the dielectric as dissolved metallic ions switch the device, we perform density functional theory calculations on structures obtained from an EChemDID MD simulation. These results confirm the appearance of states around the Fermi energy as the metallic filament bridges the electrodes and show that the metallic ions and not defects in the dielectric contribute to the majority of those states.

  9. Magnesium Fluoride Electron-Selective Contacts for Crystalline Silicon Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wan, Yimao; Samundsett, Chris; Bullock, James; Allen, Thomas; Hettick, Mark; Yan, Di; Zheng, Peiting; Zhang, Xinyu; Cui, Jie; McKeon, Josephine; Javey, Ali; Cuevas, Andres

    2016-06-15

    In this study, we present a novel application of thin magnesium fluoride films to form electron-selective contacts to n-type crystalline silicon (c-Si). This allows the demonstration of a 20.1%-efficient c-Si solar cell. The electron-selective contact is composed of deposited layers of amorphous silicon (∼6.5 nm), magnesium fluoride (∼1 nm), and aluminum (∼300 nm). X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy reveals a work function of 3.5 eV at the MgF2/Al interface, significantly lower than that of aluminum itself (∼4.2 eV), enabling an Ohmic contact between the aluminum electrode and n-type c-Si. The optimized contact structure exhibits a contact resistivity of ∼76 mΩ·cm(2), sufficiently low for a full-area contact to solar cells, together with a very low contact recombination current density of ∼10 fA/cm(2). We demonstrate that electrodes functionalized with thin magnesium fluoride films significantly improve the performance of silicon solar cells. The novel contacts can potentially be implemented also in organic optoelectronic devices, including photovoltaics, thin film transistors, or light emitting diodes. PMID:27219911

  10. Piezoelectric actuator-based cell microstretch device with real-time imaging capability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shinji Deguchi

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Cellular response to physical stretch has been extensively studied as a regulator of various physiological functions. For live cell microscopy combined with stretch experiments, cells are typically seeded on an extensible elastomer sheet. In this case, the position of the cells of interest tends to shift out of the field of view upon stretch, making real-time imaging of identical cells difficult. To circumvent this situation, here we describe a robust methodology in which these cell shifts are minimized. Cells are plated in a custom-designed stretch chamber with an elastomer sheet of a small cell culture area. The cell-supporting chamber is stretched on an inverted microscope by using a piezoelectric actuator that provides small, but precisely controlled displacements. Even under this small displacement within the filed of view, our device allows the cells to undergo physiologically relevant levels of stretch. Identical cells can thus be continuously observed during stretching, thereby potentially enabling imaging of stretch-triggered fast dynamics.

  11. Semi-empirical device model for Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gokmen, Tayfun; Gunawan, Oki; Mitzi, David B.

    2014-07-01

    We present a device model for the hydrazine processed kesterite Cu2ZnSn(S,Se)4 (CZTSSe) solar cell with a world record efficiency of ˜12.6%. Detailed comparison of the simulation results, performed using wxAMPS software, to the measured device parameters shows that our model captures the vast majority of experimental observations, including VOC, JSC, FF, and efficiency under normal operating conditions, and temperature vs. VOC, sun intensity vs. VOC, and quantum efficiency. Moreover, our model is consistent with material properties derived from various techniques. Interestingly, this model does not have any interface defects/states, suggesting that all the experimentally observed features can be accounted for by the bulk properties of CZTSSe. An electrical (mobility) gap that is smaller than the optical gap is critical to fit the VOC data. These findings point to the importance of tail states in CZTSSe solar cells.

  12. Cobalt-Based Electrolytes for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Recent Advances towards Stable Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Federico Bella

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Redox mediators based on cobalt complexes allowed dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs to achieve efficiencies exceeding 14%, thus challenging the emerging class of perovskite solar cells. Unfortunately, cobalt-based electrolytes demonstrate much lower long-term stability trends if compared to the traditional iodide/triiodide redox couple. In view of the large-scale commercialization of cobalt-based DSCs, the scientific community has recently proposed various approaches and materials to increase the stability of these devices, which comprise gelling agents, crosslinked polymeric matrices and mixtures of solvents (including water. This review summarizes the most significant advances recently focused towards this direction, also suggesting some intriguing way to fabricate third-generation cobalt-based photoelectrochemical devices stable over time.

  13. Using gas modifiers to significantly improve sensitivity and selectivity in a cylindrical FAIMS device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purves, Randy W; Ozog, Allison R; Ambrose, Stephen J; Prasad, Satendra; Belford, Michael; Dunyach, Jean-Jacques

    2014-07-01

    Recent reports describing enhanced performance when using gas additives in a DMS device (planar electrodes) have indicated that comparable benefits are not attainable using FAIMS (cylindrical electrodes), owing to the non-homogeneous electric fields within the analyzer region. In this study, a FAIMS system (having cylindrical electrodes) was modified to allow for controlled delivery of gas additives. An experiment was carried out that illustrates the important distinction between gas modifiers present as unregulated contaminants and modifiers added in a controlled manner. The effect of contamination was simulated by adjusting the ESI needle position to promote incomplete desolvation, thereby permitting ESI solvent vapor into the FAIMS analyzer region, causing signal instability and irreproducible CV values. However, by actively controlling the delivery of the gas modifier, reproducible CV spectra were obtained. The effects of adding different gas modifiers were examined using 15 positive ions having mass-to-charge (m/z) values between 90 and 734. Significant improvements in peak capacity and increases in ion transmission were readily attained by adding acetonitrile vapor, even at trace levels (≤0.1%). Increases in signal intensity were greatest for the low m/z ions; for the six lowest molecular weight species, signal intensities increased by ∼10- to over 100-fold compared with using nitrogen without gas additives, resulting in equivalent or better signal intensities compared with ESI without FAIMS. These results confirm that analytical benefits derived from the addition of gas modifiers reported with a uniform electric field (DMS) also are observed using a non-homogenous electric field (FAIMS) in the analyser region.

  14. Microfluidic Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tai, Yu-Chong (Inventor); Zheng, Siyang (Inventor); Lin, Jeffrey Chun-Hui (Inventor); Kasdan, Harvey L. (Inventor)

    2016-01-01

    Described herein are particular embodiments relating to a microfluidic device that may be utilized for cell sensing, counting, and/or sorting. Particular aspects relate to a microfabricated device that is capable of differentiating single cell types from dense cell populations. One particular embodiment relates a device and methods of using the same for sensing, counting, and/or sorting leukocytes from whole, undiluted blood samples.

  15. Selective migration of neuralized embryonic stem cells to stem cell factor and media conditioned by glioma cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria Bernard L

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES cells can be induced in vitro to become neural progenitors. Upon transplantation, neural progenitors migrate toward areas of damage and inflammation in the CNS. We tested whether undifferentiated and neuralized mouse ES cells migrate toward media conditioned by glioma cell lines (C6, U87 & N1321 or Stem Cell Factor (SCF. Results Cell migration assays revealed selective migration by neuralized ES cells to conditioned media as well as to synthetic SCF. Migration of undifferentiated ES cells was extensive, but not significantly different from that of controls (Unconditioned Medium. RT-PCR analysis revealed that all the three tumor cell lines tested synthesized SCF and that both undifferentiated and neuralized ES cells expressed c-kit, the receptor for SCF. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that undifferentiated ES cells are highly mobile and that neural progenitors derived from ES cells are selectively attracted toward factors produced by gliomas. Given that the glioma cell lines synthesize SCF, SCF may be one of several factors that contribute to the selective migration observed.

  16. Selective migration of neuralized embryonic stem cells to stem cell factor and media conditioned by glioma cell lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Serfozo, Peter; Schlarman, Maggie S; Pierret, Chris; Maria, Bernard L; Kirk, Mark D

    2006-01-01

    Background Pluripotent mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells can be induced in vitro to become neural progenitors. Upon transplantation, neural progenitors migrate toward areas of damage and inflammation in the CNS. We tested whether undifferentiated and neuralized mouse ES cells migrate toward media conditioned by glioma cell lines (C6, U87 & N1321) or Stem Cell Factor (SCF). Results Cell migration assays revealed selective migration by neuralized ES cells to conditioned media as well as to synthetic SCF. Migration of undifferentiated ES cells was extensive, but not significantly different from that of controls (Unconditioned Medium). RT-PCR analysis revealed that all the three tumor cell lines tested synthesized SCF and that both undifferentiated and neuralized ES cells expressed c-kit, the receptor for SCF. Conclusion Our results demonstrate that undifferentiated ES cells are highly mobile and that neural progenitors derived from ES cells are selectively attracted toward factors produced by gliomas. Given that the glioma cell lines synthesize SCF, SCF may be one of several factors that contribute to the selective migration observed. PMID:16436212

  17. Cellular Modulation of Polymeric Device Surfaces: Promise of Adult Stem Cells for Neuro-Prosthetics

    OpenAIRE

    Richter, Anja; Kruse, Charli; Moser, Andreas; Hofmann, Ulrich G.; Danner, Sandra

    2011-01-01

    Minimizing the foreign body response is seen as one critical research strategy for implants especially when designed for immune-privileged organs like the brain. The context of this work is to improve deep brain stimulating devices used in a consistently growing spectrum of psychomotor and psychiatric diseases mainly in form of stiff electrodes. Based on the compliance match hypothesis of biocompatibility we present another step forward using flexible implant materials covered with brain cell...

  18. Wood-fired fuel cells in selected buildings

    Science.gov (United States)

    McIlveen-Wright, D. R.; McMullan, J. T.; Guiney, D. J.

    of selected buildings in rural areas, with regard to the high cost of importing other fuel, and/or lack of grid electricity, could still make these systems attractive options. Any economic analysis of these systems is beset with severe difficulties. Capital costs of the major system components are not known with any great precision. However, a guideline assessment of the payback period for such CHP systems was made. When the best available capital costs for system components were used, most of these systems were found to have unacceptably long payback periods, particularly where the fuel cell lifetimes are short, but the larger systems show the potential for a reasonable economic return.

  19. Cell motility regulation on a stepped micro pillar array device (SMPAD) with a discrete stiffness gradient.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Sujin; Hong, Juhee; Lee, Junghoon

    2016-02-28

    Our tissues consist of individual cells that respond to the elasticity of their environment, which varies between and within tissues. To better understand mechanically driven cell migration, it is necessary to manipulate the stiffness gradient across a substrate. Here, we have demonstrated a new variant of the microfabricated polymeric pillar array platform that can decouple the stiffness gradient from the ECM protein area. This goal is achieved via a "stepped" micro pillar array device (SMPAD) in which the contact area with the cell was kept constant while the diameter of the pillar bodies was altered to attain the proper mechanical stiffness. Using double-step SU-8 mold fabrication, the diameter of the top of every pillar was kept uniform, whereas that of the bottom was changed, to achieve the desired substrate rigidity. Fibronectin was immobilized on the pillar tops, providing a focal adhesion site for cells. C2C12, HeLa and NIH3T3 cells were cultured on the SMPAD, and the motion of the cells was observed by time-lapse microscopy. Using this simple platform, which produces a purely physical stimulus, we observed that various types of cell behavior are affected by the mechanical stimulus of the environment. We also demonstrated directed cell migration guided by a discrete rigidity gradient by varying stiffness. Interestingly, cell velocity was highest at the highest stiffness. Our approach enables the regulation of the mechanical properties of the polymeric pillar array device and eliminates the effects of the size of the contact area. This technique is a unique tool for studying cellular motion and behavior relative to various stiffness gradients in the environment. PMID:26787193

  20. ZnO nanotube-based dye-sensitized solar cell and its application in self-powered devices

    KAUST Repository

    Han, Jingbin

    2010-09-10

    Abstract High-density vertically aligned ZnO nanotube arrays were fabricated on FTO substrates by a simple and facile chemical etching process from electrodeposited ZnO nanorods. The nanotube formation was rationalized in terms of selective dissolution of the (001) polar face. The morphology of the nanotubes can be readily controlled by electrodeposition parameters for the nanorod precursor. By employing the 5.1 μm-length nanotubes as the photoanode for a dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC), a full-sun conversion efficiency of 1.18% was achieved. Furthermore, we show that the DSSC unit can serve as a robust power source to drive a humidity sensor, with a potential for self-powered devices. © 2010 IOP Publishing Ltd.

  1. OPTIMIZATION OF A MICROFLUIDIC DEVICE FOR DIFFUSION-BASED EXTRACTION OF DMSO FROM A CELL SUSPENSION

    OpenAIRE

    Fleming Glass, K. K.; Longmire, E. K.; Hubel, A.

    2008-01-01

    This study considers the use of a two-stream microfluidic device for extraction of dimethyl sulphoxide (DMSO) from a cryopreserved cell suspension. The DMSO diffuses from a cell suspension stream into a neighboring wash stream flowing in parallel. The model of Fleming et al.[14] is employed to determine and discuss optimal geometry and operating conditions for a case requiring removal of 95% DMSO from suspension streams with volumetric flow rates up to 2.5 ml/min. The effects of Peclet number...

  2. Method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell and device thereof

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Li, Bo; Smith, David; Cousins, Peter

    2016-08-02

    Methods of fabricating back-contact solar cells and devices thereof are described. A method of fabricating a back-contact solar cell includes forming an N-type dopant source layer and a P-type dopant source layer above a material layer disposed above a substrate. The N-type dopant source layer is spaced apart from the P-type dopant source layer. The N-type dopant source layer and the P-type dopant source layer are heated. Subsequently, a trench is formed in the material layer, between the N-type and P-type dopant source layers.

  3. Influence of Biphasic Stimulation on Olfactory Ensheathing Cells for Neuroprosthetic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hassarati, Rachelle T.; Foster, L. John R.; Green, Rylie A.

    2016-01-01

    The recent success of olfactory ensheathing cell (OEC) assisted regeneration of injured spinal cord has seen a rising interest in the use of these cells in tissue-engineered systems. Previously shown to support neural cell growth through glial scar tissue, OECs have the potential to assist neural network formation in living electrode systems to produce superior neuroprosthetic electrode surfaces. The following study sought to understand the influence of biphasic electrical stimulation (ES), inherent to bionic devices, on cell survival and function, with respect to conventional metallic and developmental conductive hydrogel (CH) coated electrodes. The CH utilized in this study was a biosynthetic hydrogel consisting of methacrylated poly(vinyl-alcohol) (PVA), heparin and gelatin through which poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) was electropolymerised. OECs cultured on Pt and CH surfaces were subjected to biphasic ES. Image-based cytometry yielded little significant difference between the viability and cell cycle of OECs cultured on the stimulated and passive samples. The significantly lower voltages measured across the CH electrodes (147 ± 3 mV) compared to the Pt (317 ± 5 mV), had shown to influence a higher percentage of viable cells on CH (91–93%) compared to Pt (78–81%). To determine the functionality of these cells following electrical stimulation, OECs co-cultured with PC12 cells were found to support neural cell differentiation (an indirect measure of neurotrophic factor production) following ES. PMID:27757072

  4. Regeneration of the lung: Lung stem cells and the development of lung mimicking devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schilders, Kim A A; Eenjes, Evelien; van Riet, Sander; Poot, André A; Stamatialis, Dimitrios; Truckenmüller, Roman; Hiemstra, Pieter S; Rottier, Robbert J

    2016-01-01

    Inspired by the increasing burden of lung associated diseases in society and an growing demand to accommodate patients, great efforts by the scientific community produce an increasing stream of data that are focused on delineating the basic principles of lung development and growth, as well as understanding the biomechanical properties to build artificial lung devices. In addition, the continuing efforts to better define the disease origin, progression and pathology by basic scientists and clinicians contributes to insights in the basic principles of lung biology. However, the use of different model systems, experimental approaches and readout systems may generate somewhat conflicting or contradictory results. In an effort to summarize the latest developments in the lung epithelial stem cell biology, we provide an overview of the current status of the field. We first describe the different stem cells, or progenitor cells, residing in the homeostatic lung. Next, we focus on the plasticity of the different cell types upon several injury-induced activation or repair models, and highlight the regenerative capacity of lung cells. Lastly, we summarize the generation of lung mimics, such as air-liquid interface cultures, organoids and lung on a chip, that are required to test emerging hypotheses. Moreover, the increasing collaboration between distinct specializations will contribute to the eventual development of an artificial lung device capable of assisting reduced lung function and capacity in human patients. PMID:27107715

  5. Entangled photons from quantum dot devices: efficiency of post-selection

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seliger, Marek; Hohenester, Ulrich [Institut fuer Physik, Karl-Franzens-Universitaet Graz (Austria); Pfanner, Gernot [Max-Planck-Institut fuer Eisenforschung, Duesseldorf (Germany)

    2009-02-15

    We theoretically investigate the production of polarization-entangled photons through the biexciton cascade decay in a single semiconductor quantum dot. A biexciton radiatively decays through two intermediate exciton states, where polarization-entangled photons are emitted if the two decay paths differ in polarization but are indistinguishable otherwise. This ideal performance is usually spoiled by the electron-hole exchange interaction splitting the intermediate exciton states by a small amount and consequently attaching a which-path information to the photon frequencies. We discuss post-selection schemes to mask this which-path information to an outside observer. We show how spectral filtering and time shifts at a single photon level affect the photon state. Here the solid state environment plays a crucial role in the effective measurement of intermediate exciton states. Evaluating our analytical results with realistic quantum dot parameters we quantify the applicability of suggested protocols for solid-state based quantum cryptography. Our results indicate, that a high degree of entanglement is only reached by spectral alignment of the exciton states. (copyright 2009 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Measurements of Ion Selective Containment on the RF Charge Breeder Device BRIC

    CERN Document Server

    Variale, Vincenzo; Batazova, Marina; Boggia, Antonio; Clauser, Tarcisio; Kuznetsov, Gennady I; Rainò, Antonio; Shiyankov, Sergey; Skarbo, Boris A; Valentino, Vincenzo; Verrone, Grazia

    2005-01-01

    The "charge state breeder" BRIC (BReeding Ion Charge) is based on an EBIS source and it is designed to accept Radioactive Ion Beam (RIB) with charge +1, in a slow injection mode, to increase their charge state up to +n. BRIC has been developed at the INFN section of Bari (Italy) during these last 3 years with very limited funds. Now, it has been assembled at the LNL (Italy) where are in progress the first tests as stand alone source. The new feature of BRIC, with respect to the classical EBIS, is given by the insertion, in the ion drift chamber, of a Radio Frequency (RF) Quadrupole aiming to filtering the unwanted elements and then making a more efficient containment of the wanted ions. In this contribution, the measurements of the selective effect on the ion charge state containement of the RF quadrupole field, applied on the ion chamber, will be reported and discussed. The ion charge state analisys of the ions trapped in BRIC seem confirm, as foreseen by simulation results carried out previously, that the s...

  7. Photovoltaic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reese, Jason A.; Keenihan, James R.; Gaston, Ryan S.; Kauffmann, Keith L.; Langmaid, Joseph A.; Lopez, Leonardo C.; Maak, Kevin D.; Mills, Michael E.; Ramesh, Narayan; Teli, Samar R.

    2015-06-02

    The present invention is premised upon an improved photovoltaic device ("PV device"), more particularly to an improved photovoltaic device with a multilayered photovoltaic cell assembly and a body portion joined at an interface region and including an intermediate layer, at least one interconnecting structural member, relieving feature, unique component geometry, or any combination thereof.

  8. Contact barrier application of selective CVD-tungsten in a bipolar device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Körner, H.; Bertagnolli, E.; Maier, I.

    1989-09-01

    A selective CVD-tungsten (SCVD-W) contact barrier of 200 nm thickness, deposited via hydrogen reduction of WF 6, has been integrated in a bipolar polysilicon self-aligned transistor instead of the proven PtSi/TiW barrier. In order to restrict the silicon consumption at the highly doped polysilicon electrodes as much as possible, a temperature-ramped deposition process has been evaluated which uses a thin tungsten layer, created at 25°C via silicon reduction, as in situ barrier for the further deposition. The integrity of the tungsten diffusion barrier in the poly Si/SCVD-W/AlSiCu metallization has been tested after different postannealing cycles at 450°C. SEM and TEM investigations reveal a relatively smooth tungsten/silicon interface with ≤ 30 nm vertical Si consumption. No clear evidence of wormhole formation could be detected. The input and transfer characteristics of the transistor employing the SCVD-W barrier show an almost ideal performance, evidencing the absence of any degradation effect. The forward current gain is found to be constant over nearly six decades of collector current variation. The emitter-base diode breakdown occurs at a reverse voltage of 6.5 V, which is in close agreement with the best values for the reference metallization. In addition, low contact resistances ( R c( n+)=0.78 Ω ; R c( p+)=3.85 Ω) to the highly doped 8 × 2 Ωm 2 poly-Si contacts are reported which are stable even after a 60 min post-annealing treatment.

  9. The intercell dynamics of T cells and dendritic cells in a lymph node-on-a-chip flow device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura Rosa, Patrícia; Gopalakrishnan, Nimi; Ibrahim, Hany; Haug, Markus; Halaas, Øyvind

    2016-10-01

    T cells play a central role in immunity towards cancer and infectious diseases. T cell responses are initiated in the T cell zone of the lymph node (LN), where resident antigen-bearing dendritic cells (DCs) prime and activate antigen-specific T cells passing by. In the present study, we investigated the T cell : DC interaction in a microfluidic device to understand the intercellular dynamics and physiological conditions in the LN. We show random migration of antigen-specific T cells onto the antigen-presenting DC monolayer independent of the flow direction with a mean T cell : DC dwell time of 12.8 min and a mean velocity of 6 μm min(-1). Furthermore, we investigated the antigen specific vs. unspecific attachment and detachment of CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells to DCs under varying shear stress. In our system, CD4(+) T cells showed long stable contacts with APCs, whereas CD8(+) T cells presented transient interactions with DCs. By varying the shear stress from 0.01 to 100 Dyn cm(-2), it was also evident that there was a much stronger attachment of antigen-specific than unspecific T cells to stationary DCs up to 1-12 Dyn cm(-2). The mechanical force of the cell : cell interaction associated with the pMHC-TCR match under controlled tangential shear force was estimated to be in the range of 0.25-4.8 nN. Finally, upon performing attachment & detachment tests, there was a steady accumulation of antigen specific CD8(+) T cells and CD4(+) T cells on DCs at low shear stresses, which were released at a stress of 12 Dyn cm(-2). This microphysiological model provides new possibilities to recreate a controlled mechanical force threshold of pMHC-TCR binding, allowing the investigation of intercellular signalling of immune synapses and therapeutic targets for immunotherapy.

  10. Improved performance due to selective passivation of nitrogen clusters in GaInNAs solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Miwa; Whiteside, Vincent R.; Al Khalfioui, Mohamed; Leroux, Mathieu; Hossain, Khalid; Sellers, Ian R.

    2015-03-01

    While GaInNAs has the potential to be a fourth-junction in multi-junction solar cells it has proved to be difficult to incorporate due to the low solubility of nitrogen in these materials. Specifically, mid-gap states attributed to nitrogen clusters have proved prohibitive for practical implementation of these systems. Here, we present the selective passivation of nitrogen impurities using a UV-activated hydrogenation process, which enables the removal of defects while retaining substitution nitrogen. Temperature dependent photoluminescence measurements of the intrinsic region of a GaInNAs p-i-n solar cell show a classic ``s-shape'' associated with localization prior to hydrogenation, while after hydrogenation no sign of the ``s-shape'' is evident. This passivation of nitrogen centers is reflected in improved performance of solar cells structures relative to reference, unpassivated devices presenting a potential route to practical implementation of GaInNAs solar cells. The authors acknowledge support through Oklahoma Center for the Advancement of Science and Technology under the Oklahoma Applied Research Support Grant No. AR12.2-040.

  11. Cooperative Tin Oxide Fullerene Electron Selective Layers for High-Performance Planar Perovskite Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ke, Weijun; Zhao, Dewei; Xiao, Chuanxiao; Wang, Changlei; Cimaroli, Alexander J.; Grice, Corey R.; Yang, Mengjin; Li, Zhen; Jiang, Chun-Sheng; Al-Jassim, Mowafak; Zhu, Kai; Kanatzidis, Mercouri G.; Fang, Guojia; Yan, Yanfa

    2016-10-07

    Both tin oxide (SnO2) and fullerenes have been reported as electron selective layers (ESLs) for producing efficient lead halide perovskite solar cells. Here, we report that SnO2 and fullerenes can work cooperatively to further boost the performance of perovskite solar cells. We find that fullerenes can be redissolved during perovskite deposition, allowing ultra-thin fullerenes to be retained at the interface and some dissolved fullerenes infiltrate into perovskite grain boundaries. The SnO2 layer blocks holes effectively; whereas, the fullerenes promote electron transfer and passivate both the SnO2/perovskite interface and perovskite grain boundaries. With careful device optimization, the best-performing planar perovskite solar cell using a fullerene passivated SnO2 ESL has achieved a steady-state efficiency of 17.75% and a power conversion efficiency of 19.12% with an open circuit voltage of 1.12 V, a short-circuit current density of 22.61 mA cm-2, and a fill factor of 75.8% when measured under reverse voltage scanning. We find that the partial dissolving of fullerenes during perovskite deposition is the key for fabricating high-performance perovskite solar cells based on metal oxide/fullerene ESLs.

  12. Three-dimensional Cell Culture Devices for Cancer Migration and Drug Testing

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Liang

    Porous polymeric materials are widely used to mimic the extracellular matrix (ECM) environment for applications such as 3D cell culturing and tissue engineering. A series of comparative experiments on 3D cell cultures both in PLA porous scaffolds and alginate gels were conducted to create an in vitro tumor model. A novel 3D cell culture device based on porous polymeric material was developed to study cancer migration. Significant cell migration was observed through the porous channel within 1--2 weeks induced by 20% fetal bovine serum (FBS). A three-dimensional micro-scale perfusion-based two-chamber (3D-muPTC) tissue model system was developed to test the cytotoxicity of anticancer drugs by emulating liver metabolism effects in vitro. Hepatoma cells and glioblastoma multiforme (GBM) cancer cells were cultured in porous polymeric scaffolds in two separate chambers, representing the liver and tumor, respectively. The cytotoxic effect of temozolomide (TMZ) was first tested using this system. It was found that the GBM cells showed a much higher viability under the TMZ treatment with liver cells in the system, suggesting that the drug metabolism in liver is affecting the efficacy of the drug. The favorable metabolism effect of cytochrome P450 (CYP) was tested using a prodrug ifosfamide (IFO). Without the liver cells, IFO showed only slight toxicity to GBM cells. Moreover, it was shown that different expression levels of CYP 3A4, a major drug metabolizing enzyme, in liver cells caused significantly different levels of GBM cell viability. Simulation of the flow characteristics in the 3D-muPTC system was conducted using the finite-element analysis approach. The shear stress was predicted in the porous scaffolds under different flow rate conditions. The predicted shear stress effects agreed well with an experimental cell viability study. A low cost organic solvent free approach to fabricating tissue engineering scaffolds was developed by combining the twin-screw extrusion

  13. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E. [Univ. of Delaware, Newark, DE (United States). Institute of Energy Conversion

    1997-11-01

    During the third phase of the subcontract, IEC researchers have continued to provide the thin film PV community with greater depth of understanding and insight into a wide variety of issues including: the deposition and characterization of CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2}, a-Si, CdTe, CdS, and TCO thin films; the relationships between film and device properties; and the processing and analysis of thin film PV devices. This has been achieved through the systematic investigation of all aspects of film and device production and through the analysis and quantification of the reaction chemistries involved in thin film deposition. This methodology has led to controlled fabrications of 15% efficient CuIn{sub 1-x}Ga{sub x}Se{sub 2} solar cells over a wide range of Ga compositions, improved process control of the fabrication of 10% efficient a-Si solar cells, and reliable and generally applicable procedures for both contacting and doping films. Additional accomplishments are listed below.

  14. Few-Layer MoS₂ p-Type Devices Enabled by Selective Doping Using Low Energy Phosphorus Implantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nipane, Ankur; Karmakar, Debjani; Kaushik, Naveen; Karande, Shruti; Lodha, Saurabh

    2016-02-23

    P-type doping of MoS2 has proved to be a significant bottleneck in the realization of fundamental devices such as p-n junction diodes and p-type transistors due to its intrinsic n-type behavior. We report a CMOS compatible, controllable and area selective phosphorus plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) process for p-type doping of MoS2. Physical characterization using SIMS, AFM, XRD and Raman techniques was used to identify process conditions with reduced lattice defects as well as low surface damage and etching, 4X lower than previous plasma based doping reports for MoS2. A wide range of nondegenerate to degenerate p-type doping is demonstrated in MoS2 field effect transistors exhibiting dominant hole transport. Nearly ideal and air stable, lateral homogeneous p-n junction diodes with a gate-tunable rectification ratio as high as 2 × 10(4) are demonstrated using area selective doping. Comparison of XPS data from unimplanted and implanted MoS2 layers shows a shift of 0.67 eV toward lower binding energies for Mo and S peaks indicating p-type doping. First-principles calculations using density functional theory techniques confirm p-type doping due to charge transfer originating from substitutional as well as physisorbed phosphorus in top few layers of MoS2. Pre-existing sulfur vacancies are shown to enhance the doping level significantly.

  15. Heating power lowering by downscaling the cell dimensions in nanoscale filamentary resistive switching devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yin, Qiaonan; Chen, Yan; Xia, Yidong; Xu, Bo; Yin, Jiang; Liu, Zhiguo

    2016-04-01

    In this work, we theoretically investigate the size dependence of the heat process in thermochemical filamentary resistive switching memories of crossbar structure. The equivalent heat resistance of the system increases with the device dimensions scaled down because of the size-dependent electric and thermal conductivity and geometry configurations. The higher equivalent heat resistance by diminishing the cell sizes induces an enhanced self-heating effect of the filament. It promises lower operation voltage and heating power to trigger the thermally activated dissolution of the filament in RESET process. These results strengthen the advantage of filamentary memories in lateral and longitudinal scaling down technologies where less power consumption has long been urged. Our results also show the opposite dependence of the driven electric field on the linewidth and thickness of the device.

  16. Development of oxide layer thickness measuring device for irradiated nuclear fuel rods in hot cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been known that water side corrosion of fuel rods in nuclear reactor is accompanied with the loss of metallic wall thickness and pickup of hydrogen. This corrosion is one of the important limiting factors in the operating life of fuel rods. In connection with the fuel cladding corrosion, a device to measure the water side oxide layer thickness by means of the eddy current method without destructing the fuel rod was developed by KAERI. The device was installed on the multi function testing bench in the nondestructive test hot cell and its calibration was carried out successfully for the standard rod attached with plastic thin films whose thicknesses are predetermined. It shows good precision within 10% error

  17. An Electrochemical Cell for Selective Lithium Capture from Seawater.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Joo-Seong; Lee, Yong-Hee; Choi, Seungyeon; Shin, Jaeho; Dinh, Hung-Cuong; Choi, Jang Wook

    2015-08-18

    Lithium (Li) is a core element of Li-ion batteries (LIBs). Recent developments in mobile electronics such as smartphones and tablet PCs as well as advent of large-scale LIB applications including electrical vehicles and grid-level energy storage systems have led to an increase in demand for LIBs, giving rise to a concern on the availability and market price of Li resources. However, the current Lime-Soda process that is responsible for greater than 80% of worldwide Li resource supply is applicable only in certain regions on earth where the Li concentrations are sufficiently high (salt lakes or salt pans). Moreover, not only is the process time-consuming (12-18 months), but post-treatments are also required for the purification of Li. Here, we have devised a location-independent electrochemical system for Li capture, which can operate within a short time period (a few hours to days). By engaging olivine LiFePO4 active electrode that improves interfacial properties via polydopamine coating, the electrochemical cell achieves 4330 times amplification in Li/Na ion selectivity (Li/Na molar ratio of initial solution = 0.01 and Li/Na molar ratio of final electrode = 43.3). In addition, the electrochemical system engages an I(-)/I3(-) redox couple in the other electrode for balancing of the redox states on both electrode sides and sustainable operations of the entire cell. Based on the electrochemical results, key material and interfacial properties that affect the selectivity in Li capture are identified. PMID:25920476

  18. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs

  19. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiodi, Ilaria; Belgiovine, Cristina; Donà, Francesca; Scovassi, A. Ivana; Mondello, Chiara, E-mail: mondello@igm.cnr.it [Institute of Molecular Genetics, CNR, via Abbiategrasso 207, 27100 Pavia (Italy)

    2011-03-04

    Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  20. Drug Treatment of Cancer Cell Lines: A Way to Select for Cancer Stem Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ilaria Chiodi

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Tumors are generally composed of different cell types. In recent years, it has been shown that in many types of cancers a subset of cells show peculiar characteristics, such as the ability to induce tumors when engrafted into host animals, self-renew and being immortal, and give rise to a differentiated progeny. These cells have been defined as cancer stem cells (CSCs or tumor initiating cells. CSCs can be isolated both from tumor specimens and established cancer cell lines on the basis of their ability to exclude fluorescent dyes, express specific cell surface markers or grow in particular culture conditions. A key feature of CSCs is their resistance to chemotherapeutic agents, which could contribute to the remaining of residual cancer cells after therapeutic treatments. It has been shown that CSC-like cells can be isolated after drug treatment of cancer cell lines; in this review, we will describe the strategies so far applied to identify and isolate CSCs. Furthermore, we will discuss the possible use of these selected populations to investigate CSC biology and develop new anticancer drugs.

  1. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies. (paper)

  2. A microfluidic device for 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D cell navigation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamloo, Amir; Amirifar, Leyla

    2016-01-01

    Microfluidic devices have received wide attention and shown great potential in the field of tissue engineering and regenerative medicine. Investigating cell response to various stimulations is much more accurate and comprehensive with the aid of microfluidic devices. In this study, we introduced a microfluidic device by which the matrix density as a mechanical property and the concentration profile of a biochemical factor as a chemical property could be altered. Our microfluidic device has a cell tank and a cell culture chamber to mimic both 2D to 3D and 3D to 3D migration of three types of cells. Fluid shear stress is negligible on the cells and a stable concentration gradient can be obtained by diffusion. The device was designed by a numerical simulation so that the uniformity of the concentration gradients throughout the cell culture chamber was obtained. Adult neural cells were cultured within this device and they showed different branching and axonal navigation phenotypes within varying nerve growth factor (NGF) concentration profiles. Neural stem cells were also cultured within varying collagen matrix densities while exposed to NGF concentrations and they experienced 3D to 3D collective migration. By generating vascular endothelial growth factor concentration gradients, adult human dermal microvascular endothelial cells also migrated in a 2D to 3D manner and formed a stable lumen within a specific collagen matrix density. It was observed that a minimum absolute concentration and concentration gradient were required to stimulate migration of all types of the cells. This device has the advantage of changing multiple parameters simultaneously and is expected to have wide applicability in cell studies.

  3. Automatic illumination compensation device based on a photoelectrochemical biofuel cell driven by visible light

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, You; Han, Yanchao; Xu, Miao; Zhang, Lingling; Dong, Shaojun

    2016-04-01

    Inverted illumination compensation is important in energy-saving projects, artificial photosynthesis and some forms of agriculture, such as hydroponics. However, only a few illumination adjustments based on self-powered biodetectors that quantitatively detect the intensity of visible light have been reported. We constructed an automatic illumination compensation device based on a photoelectrochemical biofuel cell (PBFC) driven by visible light. The PBFC consisted of a glucose dehydrogenase modified bioanode and a p-type semiconductor cuprous oxide photocathode. The PBFC had a high power output of 161.4 μW cm-2 and an open circuit potential that responded rapidly to visible light. It adjusted the amount of illumination inversely irrespective of how the external illumination was changed. This rational design of utilizing PBFCs provides new insights into automatic light adjustable devices and may be of benefit to intelligent applications.Inverted illumination compensation is important in energy-saving projects, artificial photosynthesis and some forms of agriculture, such as hydroponics. However, only a few illumination adjustments based on self-powered biodetectors that quantitatively detect the intensity of visible light have been reported. We constructed an automatic illumination compensation device based on a photoelectrochemical biofuel cell (PBFC) driven by visible light. The PBFC consisted of a glucose dehydrogenase modified bioanode and a p-type semiconductor cuprous oxide photocathode. The PBFC had a high power output of 161.4 μW cm-2 and an open circuit potential that responded rapidly to visible light. It adjusted the amount of illumination inversely irrespective of how the external illumination was changed. This rational design of utilizing PBFCs provides new insights into automatic light adjustable devices and may be of benefit to intelligent applications. Electronic supplementary information (ESI) available. See DOI: 10.1039/c6nr00759g

  4. Repair of Ischemic Injury by Pluripotent Stem Cell Based Cell Therapy without Teratoma through Selective Photosensitivity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, Seung-Ju; Kim, So-Yeon; Jeong, Ho-Chang; Cheong, Hyeonsik; Kim, Doseok; Park, Soon-Jung; Choi, Jong-Jin; Kim, Hyongbum; Chung, Hyung-Min; Moon, Sung-Hwan; Cha, Hyuk-Jin

    2015-12-01

    Stem-toxic small molecules have been developed to induce selective cell death of pluripotent stem cells (PSCs) to lower the risk of teratoma formation. However, despite their high efficacies, chemical-based approaches may carry unexpected toxicities on specific differentiated cell types. Herein, we took advantage of KillerRed (KR) as a suicide gene, to selectively induce phototoxicity using visible light via the production of reactive oxygen species. PSCs in an undifferentiated state that exclusively expressed KR (KR-PSCs) were eliminated by a single exposure to visible light. This highly selective cell death in KR-PSCs was exploited to successfully inhibit teratoma formation. In particular, endothelial cells from KR-mPSCs remained fully functional in vitro and sufficient to repair ischemic injury in vivo regardless of light exposure, suggesting that a genetic approach in which KR is expressed in a tightly controlled manner would be a viable strategy to inhibit teratoma formation for future safe PSC-based therapies.

  5. Nourseothricin N-acetyl transferase: a positive selection marker for mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bose S Kochupurakkal

    Full Text Available Development of Nourseothricin N-acetyl transferase (NAT as a selection marker for mammalian cells is described. Mammalian cells are acutely susceptible to Nourseothricin, similar to the widely used drug Puromycin, and NAT allows for quick and robust selection of transfected/transduced cells in the presence of Nourseothricin. NAT is compatible with other selection markers puromycin, hygromycin, neomycin, blasticidin, and is a valuable addition to the repertoire of mammalian selection markers.

  6. All polymer photovoltaics: From small inverted devices to large roll-to-roll coated and printed solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liu, Yao; Larsen-Olsen, Thue Trofod; Zhao, Xingang;

    2013-01-01

    Inverted all polymer solar cells based on a blend of a perylene diimide based polymer acceptor and a dithienosilole based polymer donor were fabricated from small area devices to roll-to-roll (R2R) coated and printed large area modules. The device performance was successfully optimized by using...... solution processibility and R2R coated and printed large area (4.2 cm 2) solar cells exhibited a PCE of 0.20%. © 2013 Elsevier B.V....

  7. A microfluidic device for practical label-free CD4+ T cell counting of HIV-infected subjects

    OpenAIRE

    Cheng, Xuanhong; Irimia, Daniel; Dixon, Meredith; Sekine, Kazuhiko; Demirci, Utkan; Zamir, Lee; Tompkins, Ronald G.; Rodriguez, William; Toner, Mehmet

    2006-01-01

    Practical HIV diagnostics are urgently needed in resource-limited settings. While HIV infection can be diagnosed using simple, rapid, lateral flow immunoassays, HIV disease staging and treatment monitoring require accurate counting of a particular white blood cell subset, the CD4+ T lymphocyte. To address the limitations of current expensive, technically demanding and/or time-consuming approaches, we have developed a simple CD4 counting microfluidic device. This device uses cell affinity chro...

  8. Digital Devices, Distraction and Student Performance - Does Cell Phone Use Reduce Learning?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duncan, Douglas K.; Hoekstra, A. R.; Wilcox, B. R.

    2012-01-01

    The recent increase in the use of digital devices such as laptop computers, iPads and web-enabled cell phones has generated concern about how technologies affect student performance. Combining observation, survey, and interview data, this research assesses the effects of technology use for student attitudes and learning. Data were gathered in eight introductory science courses at one large public university in 2010-2011. Results show a significant negative correlation between in-class cell phone use and overall course grades, corresponding to a drop of 0.36 ± 0.08 on a 4-point scale where 4.0 = A. These findings are consistent with recent research[1] suggesting students cannot multi-task nearly as effectively as they think they can. While 75% of students reported regular cell phone use, observation data suggests undergraduates typically under-report the frequency of in-class digital device use. [1] Ophir, E., Nass, C. and A.D. Wagner. 2009. "Cognitive Control in Media Multi-Taskers.” Proceedings of the National Academy of Sciences, 106: 15583-15587.

  9. Curcumin and cancer cells: how many ways can curry kill tumor cells selectively?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravindran, Jayaraj; Prasad, Sahdeo; Aggarwal, Bharat B

    2009-09-01

    Cancer is a hyperproliferative disorder that is usually treated by chemotherapeutic agents that are toxic not only to tumor cells but also to normal cells, so these agents produce major side effects. In addition, these agents are highly expensive and thus not affordable for most. Moreover, such agents cannot be used for cancer prevention. Traditional medicines are generally free of the deleterious side effects and usually inexpensive. Curcumin, a component of turmeric (Curcuma longa), is one such agent that is safe, affordable, and efficacious. How curcumin kills tumor cells is the focus of this review. We show that curcumin modulates growth of tumor cells through regulation of multiple cell signaling pathways including cell proliferation pathway (cyclin D1, c-myc), cell survival pathway (Bcl-2, Bcl-xL, cFLIP, XIAP, c-IAP1), caspase activation pathway (caspase-8, 3, 9), tumor suppressor pathway (p53, p21) death receptor pathway (DR4, DR5), mitochondrial pathways, and protein kinase pathway (JNK, Akt, and AMPK). How curcumin selectively kills tumor cells, and not normal cells, is also described in detail. PMID:19590964

  10. A PCNA-derived cell permeable peptide selectively inhibits neuroblastoma cell growth.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Long Gu

    Full Text Available Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA, through its interaction with various proteins involved in DNA synthesis, cell cycle regulation, and DNA repair, plays a central role in maintaining genome stability. We previously reported a novel cancer associated PCNA isoform (dubbed caPCNA, which was significantly expressed in a broad range of cancer cells and tumor tissues, but not in non-malignant cells. We found that the caPCNA-specific antigenic site lies between L126 and Y133, a region within the interconnector domain of PCNA that is known to be a major binding site for many of PCNA's interacting proteins. We hypothesized that therapeutic agents targeting protein-protein interactions mediated through this region may confer differential toxicity to normal and malignant cells. To test this hypothesis, we designed a cell permeable peptide containing the PCNA L126-Y133 sequence. Here, we report that this peptide selectively kills human neuroblastoma cells, especially those with MYCN gene amplification, with much less toxicity to non-malignant human cells. Mechanistically, the peptide is able to block PCNA interactions in cancer cells. It interferes with DNA synthesis and homologous recombination-mediated double-stranded DNA break repair, resulting in S-phase arrest, accumulation of DNA damage, and enhanced sensitivity to cisplatin. These results demonstrate conceptually the utility of this peptide for treating neuroblastomas, particularly, the unfavorable MYCN-amplified tumors.

  11. Fully automatic flow-based device for monitoring of drug permeation across a cell monolayer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zelená, Lucie; Marques, Sara S; Segundo, Marcela A; Miró, Manuel; Pávek, Petr; Sklenářová, Hana; Solich, Petr

    2016-01-01

    A novel flow-programming setup based on the sequential injection principle is herein proposed for on-line monitoring of temporal events in cell permeation studies. The permeation unit consists of a Franz cell with its basolateral compartment mixed under mechanical agitation and thermostated at 37 °C. The apical compartment is replaced by commercially available Transwell inserts with a precultivated cell monolayer. The transport of drug substances across epithelial cells genetically modified with the P-glycoprotein membrane transporter (MDCKII-MDR1) is monitored on-line using rhodamine 123 as a fluorescent marker. The permeation kinetics of the marker is obtained in a fully automated mode by sampling minute volumes of solution from the basolateral compartment in short intervals (10 min) up to 4 h. The effect of a P-glycoprotein transporter inhibitor, verapamil as a model drug, on the efficiency of the marker transport across the cell monolayer is thoroughly investigated. The analytical features of the proposed flow method for cell permeation studies in real time are critically compared against conventional batch-wise procedures and microfluidic devices. PMID:26615589

  12. Efficient Regular Perovskite Solar Cells Based on Pristine [70]Fullerene as Electron-Selective Contact.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collavini, Silvia; Kosta, Ivet; Völker, Sebastian F; Cabanero, German; Grande, Hans J; Tena-Zaera, Ramón; Delgado, Juan Luis

    2016-06-01

    [70]Fullerene is presented as an efficient alternative electron-selective contact (ESC) for regular-architecture perovskite solar cells (PSCs). A smart and simple, well-described solution processing protocol for the preparation of [70]- and [60]fullerene-based solar cells, namely the fullerene saturation approach (FSA), allowed us to obtain similar power conversion efficiencies for both fullerene materials (i.e., 10.4 and 11.4 % for [70]- and [60]fullerene-based devices, respectively). Importantly, despite the low electron mobility and significant visible-light absorption of [70]fullerene, the presented protocol allows the employment of [70]fullerene as an efficient ESC. The [70]fullerene film thickness and its solubility in the perovskite processing solutions are crucial parameters, which can be controlled by the use of this simple solution processing protocol. The damage to the [70]fullerene film through dissolution during the perovskite deposition is avoided through the saturation of the perovskite processing solution with [70]fullerene. Additionally, this fullerene-saturation strategy improves the performance of the perovskite film significantly and enhances the power conversion efficiency of solar cells based on different ESCs (i.e., [60]fullerene, [70]fullerene, and TiO2 ). Therefore, this universal solution processing protocol widens the opportunities for the further development of PSCs. PMID:26991031

  13. Lamination of organic solar cells and organic light emitting devices: Models and experiments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oyewole, O. K. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10 Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, P.M.B 1530, Ilorin, Kwara State (Nigeria); Yu, D. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Du, J. [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, 137 Reber Building, University Park, Pennsylvania (United States); Asare, J.; Fashina, A. [Department of Theoretical and Applied Physics, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10 Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Anye, V. C. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10 Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria); Zebaze Kana, M. G. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Kwara State University, P.M.B 1530, Ilorin, Kwara State (Nigeria); Soboyejo, W. O., E-mail: soboyejo@princeton.edu [Department of Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, Princeton University, Olden Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Princeton Institute of Science and Technology of Materials, Princeton University, 70 Prospect Street, Princeton, New Jersey 08544 (United States); Department of Materials Science and Engineering, African University of Science and Technology, Km 10 Airport Road, Galadimawa, Abuja, Federal Capital Territory (Nigeria)

    2015-08-21

    In this paper, a combined experimental, computational, and analytical approach is used to provide new insights into the lamination of organic solar cells and light emitting devices at macro- and micro-scales. First, the effects of applied lamination force (on contact between the laminated layers) are studied. The crack driving forces associated with the interfacial cracks (at the bi-material interfaces) are estimated along with the critical interfacial crack driving forces associated with the separation of thin films, after layer transfer. The conditions for successful lamination are predicted using a combination of experiments and computational models. Guidelines are developed for the lamination of low-cost organic electronic structures.

  14. Lamination of organic solar cells and organic light emitting devices: Models and experiments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this paper, a combined experimental, computational, and analytical approach is used to provide new insights into the lamination of organic solar cells and light emitting devices at macro- and micro-scales. First, the effects of applied lamination force (on contact between the laminated layers) are studied. The crack driving forces associated with the interfacial cracks (at the bi-material interfaces) are estimated along with the critical interfacial crack driving forces associated with the separation of thin films, after layer transfer. The conditions for successful lamination are predicted using a combination of experiments and computational models. Guidelines are developed for the lamination of low-cost organic electronic structures

  15. Material characterizations and devices tests of solar cells based on III-V elements nitrides

    OpenAIRE

    Gorge, Vanessa

    2012-01-01

    Among III-V nitrides, the InGaN material has intensively been studied since the year 2000 for photovoltaic applications, in particular for multi-junction solar cells, thanks to its large tunable band gap covering almost the entire solar spectrum. Then, it will be possible to reach high efficiency and low cost. However, one of the problems of InGaN material is the absence of lattice-matched substrate leading to high defect density which limits device performances. We have thus studied the feas...

  16. Replicator Dynamics of of Cancer Stem Cell; Selection in the Presence of Differentiation and Plasticity

    OpenAIRE

    Kaveh, Kamran; Kohandel, Mohammad; Sivaloganathan, Siv

    2014-01-01

    Stem cells have the potential to produce lineages of non-stem cell populations (differentiated cells) via a ubiquitous hierarchal division scheme. Differentiation of a stem cell into (partially) differentiated cells can happen either symmetrically or asymmetrically. The selection dynamics of a mutant cancer stem cell should be investigated in the light of a stem cell proliferation hierarchy and presence of a non-stem cell population. By constructing a three-compartment Moran-type model compos...

  17. A microfluidic cell-trapping device for single-cell tracking of host-microbe interactions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delincé, Matthieu J; Bureau, Jean-Baptiste; López-Jiménez, Ana Teresa; Cosson, Pierre; Soldati, Thierry; McKinney, John D

    2016-08-16

    The impact of cellular individuality on host-microbe interactions is increasingly appreciated but studying the temporal dynamics of single-cell behavior in this context remains technically challenging. Here we present a microfluidic platform, InfectChip, to trap motile infected cells for high-resolution time-lapse microscopy. This approach allows the direct visualization of all stages of infection, from bacterial uptake to death of the bacterium or host cell, over extended periods of time. We demonstrate the utility of this approach by co-culturing an established host-cell model, Dictyostelium discoideum, with the extracellular pathogen Klebsiella pneumoniae or the intracellular pathogen Mycobacterium marinum. We show that the outcome of such infections is surprisingly heterogeneous, ranging from abortive infection to death of the bacterium or host cell. InfectChip thus provides a simple method to dissect the time-course of host-microbe interactions at the single-cell level, yielding new insights that could not be gleaned from conventional population-based measurements. PMID:27425421

  18. 1-eV GaInNAs solar cells for ultrahigh-frequency multijunction devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Friedman, D.J.; Geisz, J.F.; Kurtz, S.R.; Olson, J.M. [National Renewable Energy Lab., Golden, CO (United States)

    1998-09-01

    The authors demonstrate working prototypes of a GaInNAs-based solar cell lattice-matched to GaAs with photoresponse down to 1 eV. This device is intended for use as the third junction of future-generation ultrahigh-efficiency three- and four-junction devices. Under the AM1.5 direct spectrum with all the light higher in energy than the GaAs band gap filtered out, the prototypes have open-circuit voltages ranging from 0.35 to 0.44 V, short-circuit currents of 1.8 mA/cm{sup 2}, and fill factors from 61--66%. The short-circuit currents are of principal concern: the internal quantum efficiencies rise only to about 0.2. The authors discuss the short diffusion lengths which are the reason for this low photocurrent. As a partial workaround for the poor diffusion lengths, they demonstrate a depletion-width-enhanced variation of one of the prototype devices that grades off decreased voltage for increased photocurrent, with a short-circuit current of 6.5 mA/cm{sup 2} and an open-circuit voltage of 0.29 V.

  19. The Architecture of Colloidal Quantum Dot Solar Cells: Materials to Devices

    KAUST Repository

    Kramer, Illan J.

    2014-01-08

    The materials chemistry of Colloidal Quantum Dot (CQDs) suspended in solution and processed into films has provided a foundation onto which useful photovoltaic devices can be built. These active materials offer the benefits of solution processing paired with the flexibility of adjustable bandgaps, tailored to suit a particular need. In parallel with these advances, pursuing device geometries that better leverage the available electronic properties of CQD films has borne fruit in further advancing CQD solar cell performance. For active materials such as CQD films where 1/α, where alpha is the absorption coefficient, is of the same order as the free carrier extraction length, external quantum efficiency (EQE) measurements have proved useful in profiling the effectiveness of each nanometer of device thickness at extracting photogenerated carriers. Because CQD films have the added complications of being made of variable-sized constituent material building blocks as well as being deposited from solution, the nature of charge transport through the films can also be size-dependent and matrix dependent.

  20. Ordering Single Cells and Single Embryos in 3D Confinement: A New Device for High Content Screening.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wollrab, Viktoria; Caballero, David; Thiagarajan, Raghavan; Riveline, Daniel

    2016-01-01

    Biological cells are usually observed on flat (2D) surfaces. This condition is not physiological, and phenotypes and shapes are highly variable. Screening based on cells in such environments have therefore serious limitations: cell organelles show extreme phenotypes, cell morphologies and sizes are heterogeneous and/or specific cell organelles cannot be properly visualized. In addition, cells in vivo are located in a 3D environment; in this situation, cells show different phenotypes mainly because of their interaction with the surrounding extracellular matrix of the tissue. In order to standardize and generate order of single cells in a physiologically-relevant 3D environment for cell-based assays, we report here the microfabrication and applications of a device for in vitro 3D cell culture. This device consists of a 2D array of microcavities (typically 10(5) cavities/cm(2)), each filled with single cells or embryos. Cell position, shape, polarity and internal cell organization become then normalized showing a 3D architecture. We used replica molding to pattern an array of microcavities, 'eggcups', onto a thin polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) layer adhered on a coverslip. Cavities were covered with fibronectin to facilitate adhesion. Cells were inserted by centrifugation. Filling percentage was optimized for each system allowing up to 80%. Cells and embryos viability was confirmed. We applied this methodology for the visualization of cellular organelles, such as nucleus and Golgi apparatus, and to study active processes, such as the closure of the cytokinetic ring during cell mitosis. This device allowed the identification of new features, such as periodic accumulations and inhomogeneities of myosin and actin during the cytokinetic ring closure and compacted phenotypes for Golgi and nucleus alignment. We characterized the method for mammalian cells, fission yeast, budding yeast, C. elegans with specific adaptation in each case. Finally, the characteristics of this

  1. Visual cells remember earlier applied target: plasticity of orientation selectivity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Narcis Ghisovan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A canonical proposition states that, in mature brain, neurons responsive to sensory stimuli are tuned to specific properties installed shortly after birth. It is amply demonstrated that that neurons in adult visual cortex of cats are orientation-selective that is they respond with the highest firing rates to preferred oriented stimuli. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In anesthetized cats, prepared in a conventional fashion for single cell recordings, the present investigation shows that presenting a stimulus uninterruptedly at a non-preferred orientation for twelve minutes induces changes in orientation preference. Across all conditions orientation tuning curves were investigated using a trial by trial method. Contrary to what has been previously reported with shorter adaptation duration, twelve minutes of adaptation induces mostly attractive shifts, i.e. toward the adapter. After a recovery period allowing neurons to restore their original orientation tuning curves, we carried out a second adaptation which produced three major results: (1 more frequent attractive shifts, (2 an increase of their magnitude, and (3 an additional enhancement of responses at the new or acquired preferred orientation. Additionally, we also show that the direction of shifts depends on the duration of the adaptation: shorter adaptation in most cases produces repulsive shifts, whereas adaptation exceeding nine minutes results in attractive shifts, in the same unit. Consequently, shifts in preferred orientation depend on the duration of adaptation. CONCLUSION/SIGNIFICANCE: The supplementary response improvements indicate that neurons in area 17 keep a memory trace of the previous stimulus properties, thereby upgrading cellular performance. It also highlights the dynamic nature of basic neuronal properties in adult cortex since repeated adaptations modified both the orientation tuning selectivity and the response strength to the preferred orientation. These

  2. A portable cell-based optical detection device for rapid detection of Listeria and Bacillus toxins

    Science.gov (United States)

    Banerjee, Pratik; Banada, Padmapriya P.; Rickus, Jenna L.; Morgan, Mark T.; Bhunia, Arun K.

    2005-11-01

    A mammalian cell-based optical biosensor was built to detect pathogenic Listeria and Bacillus species. This sensor measures the ability of the pathogens to infect and induce cytotoxicity on hybrid lymphocyte cell line (Ped-2E9) resulting in the release of alkaline phosphatase (ALP) that can be detected optically using a portable spectrophotometer. The Ped-2E9 cells were encapsulated in collagen gel matrices and grown in 48-well plates or in specially designed filtration tube units. Toxin preparations or bacterial cells were introduced and ALP release was assayed after 3-5 h. Pathogenic L. monocytogenes strains or the listeriolysin toxins preparation showed cytotoxicity ranging from 55% - 92%. Toxin preparations (~20 μg/ml) from B. cereus strains showed 24 - 98% cytotoxicity. In contrast, a non-pathogenic L. innocua (F4247) and a B. substilis induced only 2% and 8% cytotoxicity, respectively. This cell-based detection device demonstrates its ability to detect the presence of pathogenic Listeria and Bacillus species and can potentially be used onsite for food safety or in biosecurity application.

  3. Separable Bilayer Microfiltration Device for Viable Label-free Enrichment of Circulating Tumour Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Ming-Da; Hao, Sijie; Williams, Anthony J.; Harouaka, Ramdane A.; Schrand, Brett; Rawal, Siddarth; Ao, Zheng; Brennaman, Randall; Gilboa, Eli; Lu, Bo; Wang, Shuwen; Zhu, Jiyue; Datar, Ram; Cote, Richard; Tai, Yu-Chong; Zheng, Si-Yang

    2014-12-01

    The analysis of circulating tumour cells (CTCs) in cancer patients could provide important information for therapeutic management. Enrichment of viable CTCs could permit performance of functional analyses on CTCs to broaden understanding of metastatic disease. However, this has not been widely accomplished. Addressing this challenge, we present a separable bilayer (SB) microfilter for viable size-based CTC capture. Unlike other single-layer CTC microfilters, the precise gap between the two layers and the architecture of pore alignment result in drastic reduction in mechanical stress on CTCs, capturing them viably. Using multiple cancer cell lines spiked in healthy donor blood, the SB microfilter demonstrated high capture efficiency (78-83%), high retention of cell viability (71-74%), high tumour cell enrichment against leukocytes (1.7-2 × 103), and widespread ability to establish cultures post-capture (100% of cell lines tested). In a metastatic mouse model, SB microfilters successfully enriched viable mouse CTCs from 0.4-0.6 mL whole mouse blood samples and established in vitro cultures for further genetic and functional analysis. Our preliminary studies reflect the efficacy of the SB microfilter device to efficiently and reliably enrich viable CTCs in animal model studies, constituting an exciting technology for new insights in cancer research.

  4. For whom the cells pull: Hydrogel and micropost devices for measuring traction forces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ribeiro, Alexandre J S; Denisin, Aleksandra K; Wilson, Robin E; Pruitt, Beth L

    2016-02-01

    While performing several functions, adherent cells deform their surrounding substrate via stable adhesions that connect the intracellular cytoskeleton to the extracellular matrix. The traction forces that deform the substrate are studied in mechanotrasduction because they are affected by the mechanics of the extracellular milieu. We review the development and application of two methods widely used to measure traction forces generated by cells on 2D substrates: (i) traction force microscopy with polyacrylamide hydrogels and (ii) calculation of traction forces with arrays of deformable microposts. Measuring forces with these methods relies on measuring substrate displacements and converting them into forces. We describe approaches to determine force from displacements and elaborate on the necessary experimental conditions for this type of analysis. We emphasize device fabrication, mechanical calibration of substrates and covalent attachment of extracellular matrix proteins to substrates as key features in the design of experiments to measure cell traction forces with polyacrylamide hydrogels or microposts. We also report the challenges and achievements in integrating these methods with platforms for the mechanical stimulation of adherent cells. The approaches described here will enable new studies to understand cell mechanical outputs as a function of mechanical inputs and advance the understanding of mechanotransduction mechanisms.

  5. Influence of the starting materials on performance of high temperature oxide fuel cells devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Seo, Emilia Satoshi Miyamaru; Yoshito, Walter Kenji; Ussui, Valter; Lazar, Dolores Ribeiro Ricci; Castanho, Sonia Regina Homem de Mello; Paschoal, Jose Octavio Armani [Instituto de Pesquisas Energeticas e Nucleares (IPEN), Sao Paulo, SP (Brazil)]. E-mail: esmiyseo@net.ipen.br

    2004-03-01

    High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) offer an environmentally friendly technology to convert gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas or gasified coal into electricity at high efficiencies. Besides the efficiency, higher than those obtained from the traditional energy conversion systems, a fuel cell provides many other advantages like reliability, modularity, fuel flexibility and very low levels of N Ox and S Ox emissions. The high operating temperature (950-1000 deg C) used by the current generation of the solid oxide fuel cells imposes severe constraints on materials selection in order to improve the lifetime of the cell. Besides the good electrical, electrochemical, mechanical and thermal properties, the individual cell components must be stable under the fuel cell operating atmospheres. Each material has to perform not only in its own right but also in conjunction with other system components. For this reason, each cell component must fulfill several different criteria. This paper reviews the materials and the methods used to fabricate the different cell components, such as the cathode, the electrolyte, the anode and the interconnect. Some remarkable results, obtained at IPEN (Nuclear Energy Research Institute) in Sao Paulo, have been presented. (author)

  6. Influence of the starting materials on performance of high temperature oxide fuel cells devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Emília Satoshi Miyamaru Seo

    2004-03-01

    Full Text Available High temperature solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs offer an environmentally friendly technology to convert gaseous fuels such as hydrogen, natural gas or gasified coal into electricity at high efficiencies. Besides the efficiency, higher than those obtained from the traditional energy conversion systems, a fuel cell provides many other advantages like reliability, modularity, fuel flexibility and very low levels of NOx and SOx emissions. The high operating temperature (950-1000 °C used by the current generation of the solid oxide fuel cells imposes severe constraints on materials selection in order to improve the lifetime of the cell. Besides the good electrical, electrochemical, mechanical and thermal properties, the individual cell components must be stable under the fuel cell operating atmospheres. Each material has to perform not only in its own right but also in conjunction with other system components. For this reason, each cell component must fulfill several different criteria. This paper reviews the materials and the methods used to fabricate the different cell components, such as the cathode, the electrolyte, the anode and the interconnect. Some remarkable results, obtained at IPEN (Nuclear Energy Research Institute in São Paulo, have been presented.

  7. A two-compartment microfluidic device for long-term live cell detection based on surface plasmon resonance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Shijie; Yu, Xinglong; Liu, Ran; Chen, Weixing; Wang, Peng

    2016-07-01

    A two-compartment microfluidic device integrated with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) interferometric imaging system has been developed for long-term and real-time cell detection. The device uses a porous membrane sandwiched between two chambers to obtain an exact medium exchange rate and minimal fluid shear stress for cell culture. The two-compartment device was optimized by COMSOL simulations and fabricated using Poly (dimethylsiloxane) elastomer replica molding methods. To confirm the capability of the microfluidic device to maintain the cell physiological environment over long intervals, HeLa cells were cultured in the device for up to 48 h. The cell proliferation process was monitored by both SPR and microscopic time-lapse imaging. The SPR response showed four phases with different growth rates, and agreed well with the time-lapse imaging. Furthermore, real-time detection of cell behaviors under different doses of Paclitaxel and Cisplatin was performed. The SPR responses revealed dose-dependent inhibitions of cell proliferation, with distinct drug action kinetics. PMID:27570574

  8. Copper-substituted perovskite compositions for solid oxide fuel cell cathodes and oxygen reduction electrodes in other electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rieke, Peter C.; Coffey, Gregory W.; Pederson, Larry R.; Marina, Olga A.; Hardy, John S.; Singh, Prabhaker; Thomsen, Edwin C.

    2010-07-20

    The present invention provides novel compositions that find advantageous use in making electrodes for electrochemical cells. Also provided are electrochemical devices that include active oxygen reduction electrodes, such as solid oxide fuel cells, sensors, pumps and the like. The compositions comprises a copper-substituted ferrite perovskite material. The invention also provides novel methods for making and using the electrode compositions and solid oxide fuel cells and solid oxide fuel cell assemblies having cathodes comprising the compositions.

  9. Low-cost CdZnTe devices for cascade cell application

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Basol, B.M.; Kapur, V.K. (International Solar Electric Technology, Inglewood, CA (USA))

    1990-11-01

    This report describes a research program to develop a low-cost technique for producing Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te devices for cascade solar cell applications. The technique involves a two-stage process for fabricating such devices with a band gap of about 1.7 eV and a transparent contact layer of low-resistivity ZnTe. In the first stage, thin films of Cd, Zn, and Te are deposited in stacked layers as Cd{sub 1-x}An{sub x}Te. The second stage involves hearing and reacting the layers to form the compound. At first, electrodeposition was used for depositing the layers to successfully fabricate Dc{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te thin-film devices. These films were also intrinsically doped with copper. For the first time, transparent ZnTe films of low resistivity were obtained in a two-stage process; preliminary solar cells using films with low Zn content were demonstrated. A second phase of the project involved growing films with higher Zn content (>15%). Such films were grown on CdS-coated substrates for fabricating devices. The effects of the solar-cell processing steps on the Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te and CdS/Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te interfaces were studied; results showed that the nature of the interface depended on the stoichiometry of the Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te thin film. A sharp interface was observed for the CdS/CdTe structures, but the interface became highly diffused as the Zn content in the absorber layer increased above 15%. The interaction between the CdS window layer and the Cd{sub 1-x}Zn{sub x}Te absorber layer was found to result from an exchange reaction between Zn in the absorber layer and the thin CdS film. 14 refs., 10 figs.

  10. Selectively Transparent and Conducting Photonic Crystals and their Potential to Enhance the Performance of Thin-Film Silicon-Based Photovoltaics and Other Optoelectronic Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    O'Brien, Paul G.

    2011-12-01

    The byproducts of human engineered energy production are increasing atmospheric CO2 concentrations well above their natural levels and accompanied continual decline in the natural reserves of fossil fuels necessitates the development of green energy alternatives. Solar energy is attractive because it is abundant, can be produced in remote locations and consumed on site. Specifically, thin-film silicon-based photovoltaic (PV) solar cells have numerous inherent advantages including their availability, non-toxicity, and they are relatively inexpensive. However, their low-cost and electrical performance depends on reducing their thickness to as great an extent as possible. This is problematic because their thickness is much less than their absorption length. Consequently, enhanced light trapping schemes must be incorporated into these devices. Herein, a transparent and conducting photonic crystal (PC) intermediate reflector (IR), integrated into the rear side of the cell and serving the dual function as a back-reflector and a spectral splitter, is identified as a promising method of boosting the performance of thin-film silicon-based PV. To this end a novel class of PCs, namely selectively transparent and conducting photonic crystals (STCPC), is invented. These STCPCs are a significant advance over existing 1D PCs because they combine intense wavelength selective broadband reflectance with the transmissive and conductive properties of sputtered ITO. For example, STCPCs are made to exhibit Bragg-reflectance peaks in the visible spectrum of 95% reflectivity and have a full width at half maximum that is greater than 200nm. At the same time, the average transmittance of these STCPCs is greater than 80% over the visible spectrum that is outside their stop-gap. Using wave-optics analysis, it is shown that STCPC intermediate reflectors increase the current generated in micromorph cells by 18%. In comparison, the more conventional IR comprised of a single homogeneous

  11. Coupling Binding to Catalysis – Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence activated cell sorting.

  12. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  13. Template-assisted selective epitaxy of III–V nanoscale devices for co-planar heterogeneous integration with Si

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schmid, H., E-mail: sih@zurich.ibm.com; Borg, M.; Moselund, K.; Cutaia, D.; Riel, H. [IBM Research – Zurich, 8803 Rüschlikon (Switzerland); Gignac, L.; Breslin, C. M.; Bruley, J. [IBM Research – T. J. Watson Research Center, Yorktown Heights, New York 10598 (United States)

    2015-06-08

    III–V nanoscale devices were monolithically integrated on silicon-on-insulator (SOI) substrates by template-assisted selective epitaxy (TASE) using metal organic chemical vapor deposition. Single crystal III–V (InAs, InGaAs, GaAs) nanostructures, such as nanowires, nanostructures containing constrictions, and cross junctions, as well as 3D stacked nanowires were directly obtained by epitaxial filling of lithographically defined oxide templates. The benefit of TASE is exemplified by the straightforward fabrication of nanoscale Hall structures as well as multiple gate field effect transistors (MuG-FETs) grown co-planar to the SOI layer. Hall measurements on InAs nanowire cross junctions revealed an electron mobility of 5400 cm{sup 2}/V s, while the alongside fabricated InAs MuG-FETs with ten 55 nm wide, 23 nm thick, and 390 nm long channels exhibit an on current of 660 μA/μm and a peak transconductance of 1.0 mS/μm at V{sub DS} = 0.5 V. These results demonstrate TASE as a promising fabrication approach for heterogeneous material integration on Si.

  14. Nanotemplated platinum fuel cell catalysts and copper-tin lithium battery anode materials for microenergy devices

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rohan, J.F., E-mail: james.rohan@tyndall.ie [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland); Hasan, M.; Holubowitch, N. [Tyndall National Institute, University College Cork, Lee Maltings, Cork (Ireland)

    2011-11-01

    Highlights: > Anodic Aluminum oxide formation on Si substrate. > High density nanotemplated Pt catalyst on Si for integrated energy and electronics. > CuSn alloy deposition from a single, high efficiency methanesulfonate plating bath. > Nanotemplated CuSn Li anode electrodes with high capacity retention. - Abstract: Nanotemplated materials have significant potential for applications in energy conversion and storage devices due to their unique physical properties. Nanostructured materials provide additional electrode surface area beneficial for energy conversion or storage applications with short path lengths for electronic and ionic transport and thus the possibility of higher reaction rates. We report on the use of controlled growth of metal and alloy electrodeposited templated nanostructures for energy applications. Anodic aluminium oxide templates fabricated on Si for energy materials integration with electronic devices and their use for fuel cell and battery materials deposition is discussed. Nanostructured Pt anode catalysts for methanol fuel cells are shown. Templated CuSn alloy anodes that possess high capacity retention with cycling for lithium microbattery integration are also presented.

  15. Effects of nanostructure geometry on polymer chain alignment and device performance in nanoimprinted polymer solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yi; Mielczarek, Kamil; Zakhidov, Anvar; Hu, Walter

    2013-03-01

    Among the various organic photovoltaic devices, the conjugated polymer/fullerene approach has drawn the most research interest. The performance of these types of solar cells is greatly determined by the nanoscale morphology of the two components (donor/acceptor) and the molecular orientation/crystallinity in the photoactive layer. This article demonstrates our recent studies on the nanostructure geometry effects on the nanoimprint induced poly(3 hexylthiophene-2,5-diyl) (P3HT) chain alignment and photovoltaic performance. Out-of-plane and in-plane grazing incident X-ray diffractions are employed to characterize the chain orientations in P3HT nanogratings with different widths and heights. It is found that nanoimprint procedure changes the initial edge-on alignment in non-imprinted P3HT thin film to a vertical orientation which favors the hole transport, with an organization height H≥ 170 nm and width in the range of 60 nmcells show an increase in power conversion efficiency (PCE) with the decrease of nanostructure width, and with the increase of height and junction area. Devices with the highest PCE are made by the fully aligned and highest P3HT nanostructures (width w= 60 nm, height h= 170 nm), allowing for the most efficient charge separation, transport and light absorption. We believe this work will contribute to the optimal geometry design of nanoimprinted polymer solar cells.

  16. Role of Molecular Weight on the Mechanical Device Properties of Organic Polymer Solar Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Bruner, Christopher

    2014-02-11

    For semiconducting polymers, such as regioregular poly(3-hexylthiophene-2, 5-diyl) (rr-P3HT), the molecular weight has been correlated to charge carrier field-effect mobilities, surface morphology, and gelation rates in solution and therefore has important implications for long-Term reliability, manufacturing, and future applications of electronic organic thin films. In this work, we show that the molecular weight rr-P3HT in organic solar cells can also significantly change the internal cohesion of the photoactive layer using micromechanical testing techniques. Cohesive values ranged from ∼0.5 to ∼17 J m -2, following the general trend of greater cohesion with increasing molecular weight. Using nanodynamic mechanical analysis, we attribute the increase in cohesion to increased plasticity which helps dissipate the applied energy. Finally, we correlate photovoltaic efficiency with cohesion to assess the device physics pertinent to optimizing device reliability. This research elucidates the fundamental parameters which affect both the mechanical stability and efficiency of polymer solar cells. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  17. Study of lung-metastasized prostate cancer cell line chemotaxis to epidermal growth factor with a BIOMEMS device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tata, Uday; Rao, Smitha M. N.; Sharma, Akash; Pabba, Krishna; Pokhrel, Kushal; Adhikari, Bandita; Lin, Victor K.; Chiao, J.-C.

    2012-09-01

    Understanding the effects of different growth factors on cancer metastasis will enable researchers to develop effective post-surgery therapeutic strategies to stop the spread of cancer. Conventional Boyden chamber assays to evaluate cell motility in metastasis studies require high volumes of reagents and are impractical for high-throughput analysis. A microfluidic device was designed for arrayed assaying of prostate cancer cell migration towards different growth factors. The device was created with polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) and featured two wells connected by 10 micro channels. One well was for cell seeding and the other well for specific growth factors. Each channel has a width of 20 μm, a length of 1 mm and a depth of 10 μm. The device was placed on a culture dish and primed with growth media. Lung-metastasized cells in suspension of RPMI 1640 media1 supplemented with 2% of fetal bovine serum (FBS) were seeded in the cell wells. Cell culture media with epidermal growth factor (EGF) of 25, 50, 75, 100 and 125 ng ml-1 concentrations were individually added in the respective growth factor wells. A 5-day time-lapsed study of cell migration towards the chemoattractant was performed. The average numbers of cells per device in the microchannels were obtained for each attractant condition. The results indicated migration of cells increased from 50 to 100 ng ml-1 of EGF and significantly decreased at 125 ng ml-1 of EGF, as compared to control.

  18. Novel Cell Selection Proceduref LTE Hetnets Based on Mathematical Modelling of Proportional Fair Scheduling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohamed A. AboulHassan

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Femtocells have been considered one of the most imp ortant technologies in LTE networks to solve indoor coverage problem, however the randomness deployment of femtocells, leads to great challenge for select ing optimum serving cell. In this work, a new cell sele ction algorithm is proposed that enables new user t o select best serving cell whereas several factors ar e put into consideration other than highest instant aneous SNR or maximum RSRP such as cell load .A new predic tion algorithm is designed to predict the performance of (PF scheduling algorithm to calcula te expected number of RBs to be scheduled to new user, then reduction in achievable data rate due to both received SNR and instant cell load is estimat ed. The numerical results show that the new proposed ce ll selection algorithm achieves higher average cell throughput than conventional cell selection methods and achieves less cell load variance between diffe rent adjacent cells.

  19. Assessment of enhanced autofluorescence and impact on cell microscopy for microfabricated thermoplastic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Young, Edmond W K; Berthier, Erwin; Beebe, David J

    2013-01-01

    Thermoplastics such as polystyrene (PS) and cyclo-olefin polymer (COP) have become common materials for fabrication of microfluidic cell-based systems because of a number of attractive properties. However, thermoplastics are also known to exhibit autofluorescence levels that may hinder their utility for cell-based and imaging applications. Here, we identify and characterize a phenomenon causing an increase in the autofluorescence of polystyrene after thermal treatment. This effect is of particular importance for plastic microfluidic device fabrication because the ranges of pressures and temperatures causing this effect match the same range as those used for polystyrene bonding. Further, we find that the enhanced autofluorescence has significant impact on the image quality, accuracy, and ability to identify and quantify fluorescently labeled cells. We tested two alternative strategies, solvent bonding of PS or thermal bonding of COP, to alleviate the adverse effects of heterogeneous and enhanced autofluorescence on cell image analysis, and demonstrate that both strategies are viable options to thermal bonding of PS for specific applications where cellular imaging is of primary interest.

  20. Bypassing antibiotic selection: positive screening of genetically modified cells with an antigen-dependent proliferation switch

    OpenAIRE

    Kawahara, Masahiro; Ueda, Hiroshi; Morita, Sumiyo; Tsumoto, Kouhei; Kumagai, Izumi; Nagamune, Teruyuki

    2003-01-01

    While antibiotic selection has been routinely used for the selection of genetically modified cells, administration of cytotoxic drugs often leads to deleterious effects not only to inert cells but also to transfected or transduced ones. In this study, we propose an Antigen-MEdiated Genetically modified cell Amplification (AMEGA) system employing antibody/receptor chimeras without antibiotic selection. Based on a rational design where the extracellular domains of dimeric erythropoietin recepto...

  1. Selective killing of cancer cells by nanoparticle-assisted ultrasound

    OpenAIRE

    Kosheleva, Olga K.; Lai, Tsung-Ching; Chen, Nelson G.; Hsiao, Michael; Chen, Chung-Hsuan

    2016-01-01

    Background Intense ultrasound, such as that used for tumor ablation, does not differentiate between cancerous and normal cells. A method combining ultrasound and biocompatible gold or magnetic nanoparticles (NPs) was developed under in vitro conditions using human breast and lung epithelial cells, which causes ultrasound to preferentially destroy cancerous cells. Results Co-cultures of BEAS-2B normal lung cells and A549 cancerous lung cells labeled with green and red fluorescent proteins, res...

  2. Mechanosensory calcium-selective cation channels in epidermal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, J. P.; Pickard, B. G.

    1993-01-01

    This paper explores the properties and likely functions of an epidermal Ca(2+)-selective cation channel complex activated by tension. As many as eight or nine linked or linkable equivalent conductance units or co-channels can open together. Open time for co-channel quadruplets and quintuplets tends to be relatively long with millimolar Mg2+ (but not millimolar Ca2+) at the cytosolic face of excised plasma membrane. Sensitivity to tension is regulated by transmembrane voltage and temperature. Under some circumstances channel activity is sychronized in rhythmic pulses. Certain lanthanides and a cytoskeleton-disturbing herbicide that inhibit gravitropic reception act on the channel system at low concentrations. Specifically, ethyl-N-phenylcarbamate promotes tension-dependent activity at micromolar levels. With moderate suction, Gd3+ provided at about 0.5 micromole at the extracellular face of the membrane promotes for several seconds but may then become inhibitory. Provision at 1-2 micromoles promotes and subsequently inhibits more vigorously (often abruptly and totally), and at high levels inhibits immediately. La3+, a poor gravitropic inhibitor, acts similarly but much more gradually and only at much higher concentrations. These properties, particularly these susceptibilities to modulation, indicate that in vivo the mechanosensitive channel must be mechanosensory and mechanoregulatory. It could serve to transduce the shear forces generated in the integrated wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system during turgor changes and cell expansion as well as transducing the stresses induced by gravity, touch and flexure. In so far as such transduction is modulated by voltage and temperature, the channels would also be sensors for these modalities as long as the wall-membrane-cytoskeleton system experiences mechanical stress.

  3. Monitoring of TGF-β 1-Induced Human Lung Adenocarcinoma A549 Cells Epithelial-Mesenchymal Transformation Process by Measuring Cell Adhesion Force with a Microfluidic Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yuan; Gao, AnXiu; Yu, Ling

    2016-01-01

    The epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT) is a process in which epithelial cells lose their cell polarity and cell-cell adhesion, and gain migratory and invasive properties. It is believed that EMT is associated with initiation and completion of the invasion-metastasis cascade. In this study, an economic approach was developed to fabricate a microfluidic device with less instrumentation requirement for the investigation of EMT by quantifying cell adhesion force. Fluid shear force was precisely controlled by a homemade microfluidic perfusion apparatus and interface. The adhesion capability of the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549 on different types of extracellular matrix protein was studied. In addition, effects of transforming growth factor-β (TGF-β) on EMT in A549 cells were investigated by characterizing the adhesion force changes and on-chip fluorescent staining. The results demonstrate that the microfluidic device is a potential tool to characterize the epithelial-mesenchymal transition process by measuring cell adhesion force.

  4. Influence of Nitrogen Doping on Device Operation for TiO2-Based Solid-State Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells: Photo-Physics from Materials to Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Solid-state dye-sensitized solar cells (ssDSSC constitute a major approach to photovoltaic energy conversion with efficiencies over 8% reported thanks to the rational design of efficient porous metal oxide electrodes, organic chromophores, and hole transporters. Among the various strategies used to push the performance ahead, doping of the nanocrystalline titanium dioxide (TiO2 electrode is regularly proposed to extend the photo-activity of the materials into the visible range. However, although various beneficial effects for device performance have been observed in the literature, they remain strongly dependent on the method used for the production of the metal oxide, and the influence of nitrogen atoms on charge kinetics remains unclear. To shed light on this open question, we synthesized a set of N-doped TiO2 nanopowders with various nitrogen contents, and exploited them for the fabrication of ssDSSC. Particularly, we carefully analyzed the localization of the dopants using X-ray photo-electron spectroscopy (XPS and monitored their influence on the photo-induced charge kinetics probed both at the material and device levels. We demonstrate a strong correlation between the kinetics of photo-induced charge carriers probed both at the level of the nanopowders and at the level of working solar cells, illustrating a direct transposition of the photo-physic properties from materials to devices.

  5. A droplet-to-digital (D2D) microfluidic device for single cell assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shih, Steve C C; Gach, Philip C; Sustarich, Jess; Simmons, Blake A; Adams, Paul D; Singh, Seema; Singh, Anup K

    2015-01-01

    We have developed a new hybrid droplet-to-digital microfluidic platform (D2D) that integrates droplet-in-channel microfluidics with digital microfluidics (DMF) for performing multi-step assays. This D2D platform combines the strengths of the two formats-droplets-in-channel for facile generation of droplets containing single cells, and DMF for on-demand manipulation of droplets including control of different droplet volumes (pL-μL), creation of a dilution series of ionic liquid (IL), and parallel single cell culturing and analysis for IL toxicity screening. This D2D device also allows for automated analysis that includes a feedback-controlled system for merging and splitting of droplets to add reagents, an integrated Peltier element for parallel cell culture at optimum temperature, and an impedance sensing mechanism to control the flow rate for droplet generation and preventing droplet evaporation. Droplet-in-channel is well-suited for encapsulation of single cells as it allows the careful manipulation of flow rates of aqueous phase containing cells and oil to optimize encapsulation. Once single cell containing droplets are generated, they are transferred to a DMF chip via a capillary where they are merged with droplets containing IL and cultured at 30 °C. The DMF chip, in addition to permitting cell culture and reagent (ionic liquid/salt) addition, also allows recovery of individual droplets for off-chip analysis such as further culturing and measurement of ethanol production. The D2D chip was used to evaluate the effect of IL/salt type (four types: NaOAc, NaCl, [C2mim] [OAc], [C2mim] [Cl]) and concentration (four concentrations: 0, 37.5, 75, 150 mM) on the growth kinetics and ethanol production of yeast and as expected, increasing IL concentration led to lower biomass and ethanol production. Specifically, [C2mim] [OAc] had inhibitory effects on yeast growth at concentrations 75 and 150 mM and significantly reduced their ethanol production compared to cells grown

  6. Single cell dual adherent-suspension co-culture micro-environment for studying tumor-stromal interactions with functionally selected cancer stem-like cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu-Chih; Zhang, Zhixiong; Fouladdel, Shamileh; Deol, Yadwinder; Ingram, Patrick N; McDermott, Sean P; Azizi, Ebrahim; Wicha, Max S; Yoon, Euisik

    2016-08-01

    Considerable evidence suggests that cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are critical in tumor pathogenesis, but their rarity and transience has led to much controversy about their exact nature. Although CSCs can be functionally identified using dish-based tumorsphere assays, it is difficult to handle and monitor single cells in dish-based approaches; single cell-based microfluidic approaches offer better control and reliable single cell derived sphere formation. However, like normal stem cells, CSCs are heavily regulated by their microenvironment, requiring tumor-stromal interactions for tumorigenic and proliferative behaviors. To enable single cell derived tumorsphere formation within a stromal microenvironment, we present a dual adherent/suspension co-culture device, which combines a suspension environment for single-cell tumorsphere assays and an adherent environment for co-culturing stromal cells in close proximity by selectively patterning polyHEMA in indented microwells. By minimizing dead volume and improving cell capture efficiency, the presented platform allows for the use of small numbers of cells (concept, we co-cultured single T47D (breast cancer) cells and primary cancer associated fibroblasts (CAF) on-chip for 14 days to monitor sphere formation and growth. Compared to mono-culture, co-cultured T47D have higher tumorigenic potential (sphere formation rate) and proliferation rates (larger sphere size). Furthermore, 96-multiplexed single-cell transcriptome analyses were performed to compare the gene expression of co-cultured and mono-cultured T47D cells. Phenotypic changes observed in co-culture correlated with expression changes in genes associated with proliferation, apoptotic suppression, tumorigenicity and even epithelial-to-mesechymal transition. Combining the presented platform with single cell transcriptome analysis, we successfully identified functional CSCs and investigated the phenotypic and transcriptome effects induced by tumor

  7. Thymic selection of T-cell receptors as an extreme value problem

    CERN Document Server

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Kardar, Mehran; Shakhnovich, Eugene I

    2009-01-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) orchestrate adaptive immune responses upon activation. T cell activation requires sufficiently strong binding of T cell receptors (TCRs) on their surface to short peptides (p) derived from foreign proteins, which are bound to major histocompatibility (MHC) gene products (displayed on antigen presenting cells). A diverse and self-tolerant T cell repertoire is selected in the thymus. We map thymic selection processes to an extreme value problem and provide an analytic expression for the amino acid compositions of selected TCRs (which enable its recognition functions).

  8. Selection of mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells altered glycoproteins by means of tritiated fucose suicide.

    OpenAIRE

    Hirschberg, C B; Baker, R.M.; Perez, M.; Spencer, L A; Watson, D

    1981-01-01

    Mutant Chinese hamster ovary cells altered in glycoproteins have been isolated by selecting for ability to survive exposure to [6-3H]fucose. Mutagenized wild-type cells were permitted to incorporate [3H]fucose to approximately 1 cpm of trichloroacetic acid-insoluble radioactivity per cell and then frozen for several days to accumulate radiation damage. The overall viability of the population was reduced by 5- to 50-fold. Four consecutive selection cycles were carried out. The surviving cells ...

  9. Cell surface thiol isomerases may explain the platelet-selective action of S-nitrosoglutathione

    OpenAIRE

    Xiao, Fang; Gordge, Michael P

    2011-01-01

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) at low concentration inhibits platelet aggregation without causing vasodilation, suggesting platelet-selective nitric oxide delivery. The mechanism of this selectivity is unknown, but may involve cell surface thiol isomerases, in particular protein disulphide isomerase (csPDI) (EC 5.3.4.1). We have now compared csPDI expression and activity on platelets, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, and the dependence on thiol reductase activity of these cell...

  10. Resveratrol Sensitizes Selectively Thyroid Cancer Cell to 131-Iodine Toxicity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Jalal Hosseinimehr

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. In this study, the radiosensitizing effect of resveratrol as a natural product was investigated on cell toxicity induced by 131I in thyroid cancer cell. Methods. Human thyroid cancer cell and human nonmalignant fibroblast cell (HFFF2 were treated with 131I and/or resveratrol at different concentrations for 48 h. The cell proliferation was measured by determination of the percent of the survival cells using 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide (MTT assay. Results. Findings of this study show that resveratrol enhanced the cell death induced by 131I on thyroid cancer cell. Also, resveratrol exhibited a protective effect on normal cells against 131I toxicity. Conclusion. This result indicates a promising effect of resveratrol on improvement of cellular toxicity during iodine therapy.

  11. A water-processable organic electron-selective layer for solution-processed inverted organic solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Dongcheng; Zhou, Hu; Cai, Ping; Sun, Shi; Ye, Hua; Su, Shi-Jian, E-mail: mssjsu@scut.edu.cn; Cao, Yong [State Key Laboratory of Luminescent Materials and Devices (South China University of Technology) and Institute of Polymer Optoelectronic Materials and Devices, South China University of Technology, Guangzhou 510640 (China)

    2014-02-03

    A triazine- and pyridinium-containing water-soluble material of 1,1′,1″-(4,4′,4″-(1,3,5-triazine-2,4,6-triyl)tris(benzene-4,1-diyl)) tris(methylene)tripyridinium bromide (TzPyBr) was developed as an organic electron-selective layer in solution-processed inverted organic solar cells due to its strong anti-erosion capacity against non-polar organic solvents commonly used for the active layer. Ohmic-like contact with the adjacent active materials like fullerene derivatives is speculated to be formed, as confirmed by the work-function measurements with scanning Kelvin probe and ultraviolet photoelectron spectroscopy techniques. Besides, considering the deep highest occupied molecular orbital energy level of TzPyBr, excellent hole-blocking property of the electron-selective layer is also anticipated. The inverted organic photovoltaic devices based on the TzPyBr/ITO (indium tin oxide) bilayer cathode exhibit dramatically enhanced performance compared to the control devices with bare ITO as the cathode and even higher efficiency than the conventional type devices with ITO and Al as the electrodes.

  12. Cell-phone-based platform for biomedical device development and education applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zachary J Smith

    Full Text Available In this paper we report the development of two attachments to a commercial cell phone that transform the phone's integrated lens and image sensor into a 350x microscope and visible-light spectrometer. The microscope is capable of transmission and polarized microscopy modes and is shown to have 1.5 micron resolution and a usable field-of-view of 150 x 50 with no image processing, and approximately 350 x 350 when post-processing is applied. The spectrometer has a 300 nm bandwidth with a limiting spectral resolution of close to 5 nm. We show applications of the devices to medically relevant problems. In the case of the microscope, we image both stained and unstained blood-smears showing the ability to acquire images of similar quality to commercial microscope platforms, thus allowing diagnosis of clinical pathologies. With the spectrometer we demonstrate acquisition of a white-light transmission spectrum through diffuse tissue as well as the acquisition of a fluorescence spectrum. We also envision the devices to have immediate relevance in the educational field.

  13. Thymoproteasomes produce unique peptide motifs for positive selection of CD8(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Katsuhiro; Takada, Kensuke; Ohte, Yuki; Kondo, Hiroyuki; Sorimachi, Hiroyuki; Tanaka, Keiji; Takahama, Yousuke; Murata, Shigeo

    2015-01-01

    Positive selection in the thymus provides low-affinity T-cell receptor (TCR) engagement to support the development of potentially useful self-major histocompatibility complex class I (MHC-I)-restricted T cells. Optimal positive selection of CD8(+) T cells requires cortical thymic epithelial cells that express β5t-containing thymoproteasomes (tCPs). However, how tCPs govern positive selection is unclear. Here we show that the tCPs produce unique cleavage motifs in digested peptides and in MHC-I-associated peptides. Interestingly, MHC-I-associated peptides carrying these tCP-dependent motifs are enriched with low-affinity TCR ligands that efficiently induce the positive selection of functionally competent CD8(+) T cells in antigen-specific TCR-transgenic models. These results suggest that tCPs contribute to the positive selection of CD8(+) T cells by preferentially producing low-affinity TCR ligand peptides.

  14. A Flow-Through Cell Electroporation Device for Rapidly and Efficiently Transfecting Massive Amounts of Cells in vitro and ex vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Deyao; Huang, Dong; Li, Yang; Wu, Mengxi; Zhong, Wenfeng; Cheng, Qiang; Wang, Xiaoxia; Wu, Yidi; Zhou, Xiao; Wei, Zewen; Li, Zhihong; Liang, Zicai

    2016-01-01

    Continuous cell electroporation is an appealing non-viral approach for genetically transfecting a large number of cells. Yet the traditional macro-scale devices suffer from the unsatisfactory transfection efficiency and/or cell viability due to their high voltage, while the emerging microfluidic electroporation devices is still limited by their low cell processing speed. Here we present a flow-through cell electroporation device integrating large-sized flow tube and small-spaced distributed needle electrode array. Relatively large flow tube enables high flow rate, simple flow characterization and low shear force, while well-organized needle array electrodes produce an even-distributed electric field with low voltage. Thus the difficulties for seeking the fine balance between high flow rate and low electroporation voltage were steered clear. Efficient in vitro electrotransfection of plasmid DNA was demonstrated in several hard-to-transfect cell lines. Furthermore, we also explored ex vivo electroporated mouse erythrocyte as the carrier of RNA. The strong ability of RNA loading and short exposure time of freshly isolated cells jointly ensured a high yield of valid carrier erythrocytes, which further successfully delivered RNA into targeted tissue. Both in vitro and ex vivo electrotransfection could be accomplished at high cell processing speed (20 million cells per minute) which remarkably outperforms previous devices.

  15. Feasibilty of a Multi-bit Cell Perpendicular Magnetic Tunnel Junction Device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Chang Soo

    The ultimate objective of this research project was to explore the feasibility of making a multi-bit cell perpendicular magnetic tunnel junction (PMTJ) device to increase the storage density of spin-transfer-torque random access memory (STT-RAM). As a first step toward demonstrating a multi-bit cell device, this dissertation contributed a systematic and detailed study of developing a single cell PMTJ device using L10 FePt films. In the beginning of this research, 13 up-and-coming non-volatile memory (NVM) technologies were investigated and evaluated to see whether one of them might outperform NAND flash memories and even HDDs on a cost-per-TB basis in 2020. This evaluation showed that STT-RAM appears to potentially offer superior power efficiency, among other advantages. It is predicted that STTRAM's density could make it a promising candidate for replacing NAND flash memories and possibly HDDs if STTRAM could be improved to store multiple bits per cell. Ta/Mg0 under-layers were used first in order to develop (001) L1 0 ordering of FePt at a low temperature of below 400 °C. It was found that the tradeoff between surface roughness and (001) L10 ordering of FePt makes it difficult to achieve low surface roughness and good perpendicular magnetic properties simultaneously when Ta/Mg0 under-layers are used. It was, therefore, decided to investigate MgO/CrRu under-layers to simultaneously achieve smooth films with good ordering below 400°C. A well ordered 4 nm L10 FePt film with RMS surface roughness close to 0.4 nm, perpendicular coercivity of about 5 kOe, and perpendicular squareness near 1 was obtained at a deposition temperature of 390 °C on a thermally oxidized Si substrate when MgO/CrRu under-layers are used. A PMTJ device was developed by depositing a thin MgO tunnel barrier layer and a top L10 FePt film and then being postannealed at 450 °C for 30 minutes. It was found that the sputtering power needs to be minimized during the thin MgO tunnel barrier

  16. A review of composite and metallic bipolar plates in proton exchange membrane fuel cell: Materials, fabrication, and material selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taherian, Reza

    2014-11-01

    Proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells offer exceptional potential for a clean, efficient, and reliable power source. The bipolar plate (BP) is a key component in this device, as it connects each cell electrically, supplies reactant gases to both anode and cathode, and removes reaction products from the cell. BPs have primarily been fabricated from high-density graphite, but in recent years, much attention has been paid to develop the cost-effective and feasible alternative materials. Recently, two different classes of materials have been attracted attention: metals and composite materials. This paper offers a comprehensive review of the current researches being carried out on the metallic and composite BPs, covering materials and fabrication methods. In this research, the phenomenon of ionic contamination due to the release of the corrosion products of metallic BP and relative impact on the durability as well as performance of PEM fuel cells is extensively investigated. Furthermore, in this paper, upon several effective parameters on commercialization of PEM fuel cells, such as stack cost, weight, volume, durability, strength, ohmic resistance, and ionic contamination, a material selection is performed among the most common BPs currently being used. This material selection is conducted by using Simple Additive Weighting Method (SAWM).

  17. Effect of chemically converted graphene as an electrode interfacial modifier on device-performances of inverted organic photovoltaic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examined the effects of chemically converted graphene (CCG) materials as a metal electrode interfacial modifier on device-performances of inverted organic photovoltaic cells (OPVs). As CCG materials for interfacial layers, a conventional graphene oxide (GO) and reduced graphene oxide (rGO) were prepared, and their functions on OPV-performances were compared. The inverted OPVs with CCG materials showed all improved cell-efficiencies compared with the OPVs with no metal/bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) interlayers. In particular, the inverted OPVs with reduction form of GO showed better device-performances than those with GO and better device-stability than poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene): poly(styrenesulfonate) (PEDOT:PSS)-based inverted solar cells, showing that the rGO can be more desirable as a metal/BHJ interfacial material for fabricating inverted-configuration OPVs. (paper)

  18. Selective assembly of laminin variants by human carcinoma cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wewer, U M; Wayner, E A; Hoffstrom, B G;

    1994-01-01

    in negligible amounts as detected by Northern blotting and PCR. The only exception was the HU-1 lung adenocarcinoma cell line which expressed significant quantities of laminin M chain mRNA and lower levels of laminin A chain mRNA. The presence in the HU-1 cells of translated polypeptides was demonstrated...... cell lines produced laminin chains B1, B2 and S, but no or little A or M. The only exception was the lung carcinoma cell line HU-1. Human HU-1 carcinoma cells in culture synthesize several homologous laminin chains and regulate the process of assembly, secretion and deposition of laminin variants...

  19. The effects of different atmospheric conditions on device stability of organic small-molecule solar cells under constant illumination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karak, S.; Pradhan, S.; Dhar, A.

    2011-09-01

    A systematic study is presented on various effects of different environmental conditions on stability and degradation of small-molecule organic solar cells under continuous simulated solar radiation. Devices were fabricated based on heterojunctions with pentacene and copper phthalocyanine as donor, and [6,6]-phenyl C61 butyric acid methyl ester as acceptor materials. Seven different operating conditions were employed to investigate their degradation stability. Three simultaneous mechanisms were found to be largely responsible for device degradation: (i) photo-oxidation of active materials in the presence of light and oxygen that results in a drop of photocarrier generation and electrical transport properties of the cells, (ii) morphology instability with UV annealing reducing the charge transport within the devices and (iii) bubble formation in the vicinity of the electrodes with moisture absorption, affecting charge collection efficiency of the cells. Significant improvement in device stability was found by careful choice of operating conditions and proper encapsulation. Device lifetime enhanced by almost 100 times under UV filtered vacuum environment or with polydimethylsiloxane encapsulation as compared to a cell operated under ambient conditions without encapsulation.

  20. Polyglycerol-coated nanodiamond as a macrophage-evading platform for selective drug delivery in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Li; Xu, Yong-Hong; Akasaka, Tsukasa; Abe, Shigeaki; Komatsu, Naoki; Watari, Fumio; Chen, Xiao

    2014-07-01

    A successful targeted drug delivery device for cancer chemotherapy should ideally be able to avoid non-specific uptake by nonmalignant cells, particularly the scavenging monocyte-macrophage system as well as targeting efficacy to bring the drug preferentially into tumor cells. To this purpose, we developed a platform based on detonation nanodiamond (dND) with hyperbranched polyglycerol (PG) coating (dND-PG). dND-PG was first demonstrated to evade non-specific cell uptake, particularly by macrophages (U937). RGD targeting peptide was then conjugated to dND-PG through multistep organic transformations to yield dND-PG-RGD that still evaded macrophage uptake but was preferentially taken up by targeted A549 cancer cells (expressing RGD peptide receptors). dND-PG and dND-PG-RGD showed good aqueous solubility and cytocompatibitlity. Subsequently, the anticancer agent doxorubicin (DOX) was loaded through acid-labile hydrazone linkage to yield dND-PG-DOX and dND-PG-RGD-DOX. Their cellular uptake and cytotoxicity were compared against DOX in A549 cells and U937 macrophages. It was found that dND-PG-DOX uptake was substantially reduced, displaying little toxicity in either type of cells by virtue of PG coating, whereas dND-PG-RGD-DOX exerted selective toxicity to A549 cells over U937 macrophages that are otherwise highly sensitive to DOX. Finally, dND-PG was demonstrated to have little influence on U937 macrophage cell functions, except for a slight increase of TNF-α production in resting U937 macrophages. dND-PG is a promising drug carrier for realization of highly selective drug delivery in tumor cells through specific uptake mechanisms, with minimum uptake in and influence on macrophages. PMID:24720879

  1. Bi-module sensing device to in situ quantitatively detect hydrogen peroxide released from migrating tumor cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Yu

    Full Text Available Cell migration is one of the key cell functions in physiological and pathological processes, especially in tumor metastasis. However, it is not feasible to monitor the important biochemical molecules produced during cell migrations in situ by conventional cell migration assays. Herein, for the first time a device containing both electrochemical sensing and trans-well cell migration modules was fabricated to sensitively quantify biochemical molecules released from the cell migration process in situ. The fully assembled device with a multi-wall carbon nanotube/graphene/MnO2 nanocomposite functionalized electrode was able to successfully characterize hydrogen peroxide (H2O2 production from melanoma A375 cells, larynx carcinoma HEp-2 cells and liver cancer Hep G2 under serum established chemotaxis. The maximum concentration of H2O2 produced from A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2 in chemotaxis was 130 ± 1.3 nM, 70 ± 0.7 nM and 63 ± 0.7 nM, respectively. While the time required reaching the summit of H2O2 production was 3.0, 4.0 and 1.5 h for A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2, respectively. By staining the polycarbonate micropore membrane disassembled from the device, we found that the average migration rate of the A375, HEp-2 and Hep G2 cells were 98 ± 6%, 38 ± 4% and 32 ± 3%, respectively. The novel bi-module cell migration platform enables in situ investigation of cell secretion and cell function simultaneously, highlighting its potential for characterizing cell motility through monitoring H2O2 production on rare samples and for identifying underlying mechanisms of cell migration.

  2. Recruitment and selection of marginal zone B cells is independent of exogenous antigens

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Dammers, PM; Kroese, FGM

    2005-01-01

    Marginal zone B (MZ-B) cells of the spleen contribute significantly to the immunity against invasive infections with polysaccharide-encapsulated bacteria. Recent evidence indicates that recruitment and selection of MZ-B cells occurs on the basis of positive selection constraints that likely operate

  3. Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation in sickle cell disease: patient selection and special considerations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhatia M

    2015-07-01

    be donors. Matched siblings should be referred to an experienced transplant center for evaluation and counseling. In this review, we will discuss the rationale for these opinions and make recommendations for patient selection.Keywords: sickle cell disease, morbidity, stem cell transplantation, patient selection, matched sibling donor

  4. New Strategies for Designing Inexpensive but Selective Bioadsorbants for Environmental Pollutants: Selection of specific Ligands and Their Cell Surface Expression

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brent L. Iverson; George Georgiou; Mohammad M. Ataai; Richard R. Koepsel

    2001-02-22

    The Broad, long term objective of the research plan is to develop exquisitely selective polypeptide metal chelators for the remediation of aqueous systems. A variety of polypeptide chelators will be developed and optimized ranging from antibodies to small peptides. Then, through unique molecular engineering approaches developed in our laboratories, the polypeptide chelators will be anchored directly on the surface of the cells that produce them. Thus, instead of using isolated biomolecules we will employ inexpensive genetically engineered whole cell adsorbents. Following a simple, easily scaleable treatment, the engineered cells can be used to manufacture an inexpensive, particulate adsorbent for metal removal.

  5. Experimental and theoretical study of hydrodynamic cell lysing of cancer cells in a high-throughput Circular Multi-Channel Microfiltration device

    KAUST Repository

    Ma, W.

    2013-04-01

    Microfiltration is an important microfluidic technique suitable for enrichment and isolation of cells. However, cell lysing could occur due to hydrodynamic damage that may be detrimental for medical diagnostics. Therefore, we conducted a systematic study of hydrodynamic cell lysing in a high-throughput Circular Multi-Channel Microfiltration (CMCM) device integrated with a polycarbonate membrane. HeLa cells (cervical cancer cells) were driven into the CMCM at different flow rates. The viability of the cells in the CMCM was examined by fluorescence microscopy using Acridine Orange (AO)/Ethidium Bromide (EB) as a marker for viable/dead cells. A simple analytical cell viability model was derived and a 3D numerical model was constructed to examine the correlation of between cell lysing and applied shear stress under varying flow rate and Reynolds number. The measured cell viability as a function of the shear stress was consistent with theoretical and numerical predictions when accounting for cell size distribution. © 2013 IEEE.

  6. Losartan sensitizes selectively prostate cancer cell to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdannejat, H; Hosseinimehr, S J; Ghasemi, A; Pourfallah, T A; Rafiei, A

    2016-01-11

    Losartan is an angiotensin II receptor (AT-II-R) blocker that is widely used by human for blood pressure regulation. Also, it has antitumor property. In this study, we investigated the radiosensitizing effect of losartan on cellular toxicity induced by ionizing radiation on prostate cancer and non-malignant fibroblast cells. Human prostate cancer (DU-145) and human non-malignant fibroblast cells (HFFF2) were treated with losartan at different concentrations (0.5, 1, 10, 50 and 100 µM) and then these cells were exposed to ionizing radiation. The cell proliferation was determined using MTT assay. Our results showed that losartan exhibited antitumor effect on prostate cancer cells; it was reduced cell survival to 66% at concentration 1 µM. Losartan showed an additive killing effect in combination with ionizing radiation on prostate cancer cell. The cell proliferation was reduced to 54% in the prostate cancer cells treated with losartan at concentration 1 µM in combination with ionizing radiation. Losartan did not exhibit any toxicity on HFFF2 cell. This result shows a promising effect of losartan on enhancement of therapeutic effect of ionizing radiation in patients during therapy.

  7. Resveratrol engages selective apoptotic signals in gastric adenocarcinoma cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    William L Riles; Jason Erickson; Sanjay Nayyar; Mary Jo Atten; Bashar M Attar; Oksana Holian

    2006-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the intracellular apoptotic signals engaged by resveratrol in three gastric adenocarcinoma cancer cell lines, two of which (AGS and SNU-1) express p53 and one (KATO-Ⅲ) with deleted p53.METHODS: Nuclear fragmentation was used to quantitate apoptotic cells; caspase activity was determined by photometric detection of cleaved substrates; formation of oxidized cytochrome C was used to measure cytochrome C activity, and Western blot analysis was used to determine protein expression.RESULTS: Gastric cancer cells, irrespective of their p53 status, responded to resveratrol with fragmentation of DNA and cleavage of nuclear lamins A and B and PARP, Resveratrol, however, has no effect on mitochondria-associated apoptotic proteins Bcl-2, Bclxl, Bax, Bid or Smac/Diablo, and did not promote subcellular redistribution of cytochrome C, indicating that resveratrol-induced apoptosis of gastric carcinoma cells does not require breakdown of mitochondrial membrane integrity. Resveratrol up-regulated p53 protein in SNU-1 and AGS cells but there was a difference in response of intracellular apoptotic signals between these cell lines.SNU-1 cells responded to resveratrol treatment with down-regulation of survivin, whereas in AGS and KATO-Ⅲ cells resveratrol stimulated caspase 3 and cytochrome C oxidase activities.CONCLUSION: These findings indicate that even within a specific cancer the intracellular apoptotic signals engaged by resveratrol are cell type dependent and suggest that such differences may be related to differentiation or lack of differentiation of these cells.

  8. Development of a selective chemical etch to improve the conversion efficiency of Zn-rich Cu2ZnSnS4 solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fairbrother, Andrew; García-Hemme, Eric; Izquierdo-Roca, Victor; Fontané, Xavier; Pulgarín-Agudelo, Fabián A; Vigil-Galán, Osvaldo; Pérez-Rodríguez, Alejandro; Saucedo, Edgardo

    2012-05-16

    Improvement of the efficiency of Cu(2)ZnSnS(4) (CZTS)-based solar cells requires the development of specific procedures to remove or avoid the formation of detrimental secondary phases. The presence of these phases is favored by the Zn-rich and Cu-poor conditions that are required to obtain device-grade layers. We have developed a selective chemical etching process based on the use of hydrochloric acid solutions to remove Zn-rich secondary phases from the CZTS film surface, which are partly responsible for the deterioration of the series resistance of the cells and, as a consequence, the conversion efficiency. Using this approach, we have obtained CZTS-based devices with 5.2% efficiency, which is nearly twice that of the devices we have prepared without this etching process. PMID:22545682

  9. Design of a microfluidic device to quantify dynamic intra-nuclear deformation during cell migration through confining environments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, Patricia M; Sliz, Josiah; Isermann, Philipp; Denais, Celine; Lammerding, Jan

    2015-12-01

    The ability of cells to migrate through tissues and interstitial spaces is an essential factor during development and tissue homeostasis, immune cell mobility, and in various human diseases. Deformation of the nucleus and its associated lamina during 3-D migration is gathering increasing interest in the context of cancer metastasis, with the underlying hypothesis that a softer nucleus, resulting from reduced levels of lamin A/C, may aid tumour spreading. However, current methods to study the migration of cells in confining three dimensional (3-D) environments are limited by their imprecise control over the confinement, physiological relevance, and/or compatibility with high resolution imaging techniques. We describe the design of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic device composed of channels with precisely-defined constrictions mimicking physiological environments that enable high resolution imaging of live and fixed cells. The device promotes easy cell loading and rapid, yet long-lasting (>24 hours) chemotactic gradient formation without the need for continuous perfusion. Using this device, we obtained detailed, quantitative measurements of dynamic nuclear deformation as cells migrate through tight spaces, revealing distinct phases of nuclear translocation through the constriction, buckling of the nuclear lamina, and severe intranuclear strain. Furthermore, we found that lamin A/C-deficient cells exhibited increased and more plastic nuclear deformations compared to wild-type cells but only minimal changes in nuclear volume, implying that low lamin A/C levels facilitate migration through constrictions by increasing nuclear deformability rather than compressibility. The integration of our migration devices with high resolution time-lapse imaging provides a powerful new approach to study intracellular mechanics and dynamics in a variety of physiologically-relevant applications, ranging from cancer cell invasion to immune cell recruitment. PMID:26549481

  10. Effect of relative humidity on crystal growth, device performance and hysteresis in planar heterojunction perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gangishetty, Mahesh K.; Scott, Robert W. J.; Kelly, Timothy L.

    2016-03-01

    Due to the hygroscopic nature of organolead halide perovskites, humidity is one of the most important factors affecting the efficiency and longevity of perovskite solar cells. Although humidity has a long term detrimental effect on device performance, it also plays a key role during the initial growth of perovskite crystals. Here we demonstrate that atmospheric relative humidity (RH) plays a key role during the formation of perovskite thin films via the sequential deposition technique. Our results indicate that the RH has a substantial impact on the crystallization process, and hence on device performance. SEM and pXRD analysis show an increase in crystallite size with increasing humidity. At low RH, the formation of small cubic crystallites with large gaps between them is observed. The presence of these voids adversely affects device performance and leads to substantial hysteresis in the device. At higher RH, the perovskite crystals are larger in size, with better connectivity between the crystallites. This produced efficient planar heterojunction solar cells with low hysteresis. By careful control of the RH during the cell fabrication process, efficiencies of up to 12.2% are reached using P3HT as the hole-transport material.Due to the hygroscopic nature of organolead halide perovskites, humidity is one of the most important factors affecting the efficiency and longevity of perovskite solar cells. Although humidity has a long term detrimental effect on device performance, it also plays a key role during the initial growth of perovskite crystals. Here we demonstrate that atmospheric relative humidity (RH) plays a key role during the formation of perovskite thin films via the sequential deposition technique. Our results indicate that the RH has a substantial impact on the crystallization process, and hence on device performance. SEM and pXRD analysis show an increase in crystallite size with increasing humidity. At low RH, the formation of small cubic crystallites

  11. Combining atomic force-fluorescence microscopy with a stretching device for analyzing mechanotransduction processes in living cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hecht, E; Knittel, P; Felder, E; Dietl, P; Mizaikoff, B; Kranz, C

    2012-11-21

    Mechanical forces affect biological systems in their natural environment in a widespread manner. Mechanical stress may either stimulate cells or even induce pathological processes. Cells sensing mechanical stress usually respond to such stressors with proliferation or differentiation. Hence, for in vitro studies, the ability to impose a controlled mechanical stress on cells combined with appropriate analytical tools providing an immediate answer is essential to understand such fundamental processes. Here, we present a novel uniaxial motorized cell stretching device that has been integrated into a combined fluorescence microscope (FM)-atomic force microscope (AFM) system, thereby enabling high-resolution topographic and fluorescent live cell imaging. This unique tool allows the investigation of mechanotransduction processes, as the cells may be exposed to deliberately controlled mechanical stress while simultaneously facilitating fluorescence imaging and AFM studies. The developed stretching device allows applying reproducible uniaxial strain from physiologically relevant to hyperphysiological levels to cultured cells grown on elastic polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) membranes. Exemplarily, stretching experiments are shown for transfected squamous cell carcinoma cells (SCC-25) expressing fluorescent labeled cytokeratin, whereby fluorescence imaging and simultaneously performed AFM measurements reveal the cytokeratin (CSK) network. Topographical changes and mechanical characteristics such as elasticity changes were determined via AFM while the cells were exposed to mechanical stress. By applying a cell deformation of approx. 20%, changes in the Young's modulus of the cytoskeletal network due to stretching of the cells were observed. Consequently, integrating a stretching device into the combined atomic force-fluorescence microscope provides a unique tool for dynamically analyzing structural remodeling and mechanical properties in mechanically stressed cells. PMID:22977882

  12. Selective cytotoxicity of benzyl isothiocyanate in the proliferating fibroblastoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miyoshi, Noriyuki; Uchida, Koji; Osawa, Toshihiko; Nakamura, Yoshimasa

    2007-02-01

    In the present study, experiments using presynchronization culture cells demonstrated that benzyl ITC (BITC), previously isolated from a tropical papaya fruit extract, induced the cytotoxic effect preferentially in the proliferating human colon CCD-18Co cells to the quiescent ones. Quiescent CCD-18Co cells were virtually unaffected by BITC and marginal cytotoxicity was observed at 15 microM. We observed that BITC dramatically induced the p53 phosphorylation and stabilization only in the quiescent (G(0)/G(1) phase-arrested) cells, but not significantly in the proliferating human colon CCD-18Co cells when compared with quiescent ones. We also observed ataxia telangiectasia-mutated (ATM) phosphorylation in the quiescent cells. The BITC-induced p53 phosphorylation was counteracted by caffeine treatment, implying the involvement of an ATM/ataxia telangiectasia and Rad3-related kinase signaling pathway. Moreover, downregulation of p53 by a siRNA resulted in the enhancement of susceptibility to undergo apoptosis by BITC. We also showed here that depletion of p53 abrogated G(0)/G(1) arrest accompanied by the declined expression of p21(waf1/cip1) and p27(kip1) in CCD-18Co cells. In conclusion, we identified p53 as a potential negative regulator of the apoptosis induction by BITC in the normal colon CCD-18Co cells through the inhibition of cell-cycle progression at the G(0)/G(1) phase. PMID:17096346

  13. Modeling a reversible solid oxide fuel cell as a storage device within AC power networks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ren, J.; Roscoe, A.J.; Burt, G. [Department of Electronic and Electrical Engineering, Royal College, University of Strathclyde, Glasgow (United Kingdom); Gamble, S.R.; Irvine, J.T.S. [School of Chemistry, University of St. Andrews, Purdie Building, St. Andrews (United Kingdom)

    2012-10-15

    A reversible solid oxide fuel cell (RSOFC) system, consisting of a RSOFC stack, heat store, and electrical inverters to convert DC to AC power, is shown by computer modeling to have the potential to efficiently store electrical energy. This paper describes the modeling of a single RSOFC, based on a proposed cell geometry, empirical data on the resistivities of the components, and calculation of activation and diffusion polarization resistances from electrochemical theory. Data from ac impedance spectroscopy measurements on symmetrical cells are used to model RSOFC impedance. A RSOFC stack is modeled by electrically linking the individual cells inside a pressurized vessel. A phase change heat store is added to improve energy storage efficiency. The model is implemented in MATLAB {sup registered} /Simulink {sup registered}. Two competing inverter control schemes are compared, trading off DC bus ripple against AC power quality. It is found that selection of appropriate DC bus capacitance is important in certain scenarios, with potential system cost implications. It is shown that the system can store electrical energy at an efficiency of 64% over a single discharge-charge cycle, i.e., hydrogen to electricity and heat to hydrogen. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  14. Involvement of Tspan8 in exosome assembly and target cell selection

    OpenAIRE

    Rana, Sanyukta

    2010-01-01

    Exosomes are the most important intercellular communicators. Tetraspanins/their complexes are suggested to be important in exosomal target cell selection. I showed: changes in Tetraspanin8 associations created from internalization persist upto exosomes and, differences in tetraspanin-complexes on exosomes allow for target cell selectivity.Based on the tetraspanin-complex on exosomes, predictions on potential target cells might be possible, allowing tailored exosome generation for drug delivery.

  15. Perforated hollow core waveguides for Alkali Vapor-cells and Slow Light Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giraud-Carrier, Matthieu C.

    The focus of this work is the integration of alkali vapor atomic vapor cells into common silicon wafer microfabrication processes. Such integrated platforms enable the study of quantum coherence effects such as electromagnetically induced transparency, which can in turn be used to demonstrate slow light. Slow and stopped light devices have applications in the optical communications and quantum computing fields. This project uses hollow core anti-resonant reflecting optical waveguides (ARROWs) to build such slow light devices. An explanation of light-matter interactions and the physics of slow light is first provided, as well as a detailed overview of the fabrication process. Following the discovery of a vapor transport issue, a custom capillary-based testing platform is developed to quantify the effect of confinement, temperature, and wall coatings on rubidium transport. A mathematical model is derived from the experimental results and predicts long transport times. A new design methodology is presented that addresses the transport problem by increasing the number of rubidium entry points. This design also improves chip durability and decreases environmental susceptibility through the use of a single copper reservoir and buried channel waveguides (BCWs). New chips are successfully fabricated, loaded, and monitored for rubidium spectra. Absorption is observed in several chips and absorption peaks depths in excess of 10% are reported. The chip lifetime remains comparable to previous designs. This new design can be expanded to a multi-core platform suitable for slow and stopped light experimentation. Keywords: Matthieu Giraud-Carrier, Aaron Hawkins, microfabrication, spectroscopy, slow light, stopped light, EIT, rubidium, diffusion, vapor transport, microfabrication, ARROW, light-matter interactions, waveguide.

  16. A CMOS-compatible electronic synapse device based on Cu/SiO2/W programmable metallization cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Wenhao; Fang, Runchen; Balaban, Mehmet B.; Yu, Weijie; Gonzalez-Velo, Yago; Barnaby, Hugh J.; Kozicki, Michael N.

    2016-06-01

    In this work, the resistance plasticity of Cu/SiO2/W programmable metallization cell devices is experimentally explored for the emulation of biological synapses. PMC devices were fabricated with foundry friendly materials using standard processes. The resistance can be continuously increased or decreased with both dc and voltage pulse programming. Impedance spectroscopy results indicate that the gradual change of resistance is attributable to the expansion or contraction of a Cu-rich layer within the device. Pulse programming experiments further show that the pulse amplitude plays a more important role in resistance change than pulse width, which is consistent with the proposed ‘dual-layer’ device model. The dense resistance-state distribution, 1 V operating voltage and inherent CMOS-compatibility suggests its potential application as electronic synapse in neuromorphic computing.

  17. Modeling Cu Migration in CdTe Solar Cells Under Device-Processing and Long-Term Stability Conditions: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Teeter, G.; Asher, S.

    2008-05-01

    An impurity migration model for systems with material interfaces is applied to Cu migration in CdTe solar cells. In the model, diffusion fluxes are calculated from the Cu chemical potential gradient. Inputs to the model include Cu diffusivities, solubilities, and segregation enthalpies in CdTe, CdS and contact materials. The model yields transient and equilibrium Cu distributions in CdTe devices during device processing and under field-deployed conditions. Preliminary results for Cu migration in CdTe photovoltaic devices using available diffusivity and solubility data from the literature show that Cu segregates in the CdS, a phenomenon that is commonly observed in devices after back-contact processing and/or stress conditions.

  18. Withaferin A Induces Cell Death Selectively in Androgen-Independent Prostate Cancer Cells but Not in Normal Fibroblast Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yukihiro Nishikawa

    Full Text Available Withaferin A (WA, a major bioactive component of the Indian herb Withania somnifera, induces cell death (apoptosis/necrosis in multiple types of tumor cells, but the molecular mechanism underlying this cytotoxicity remains elusive. We report here that 2 μM WA induced cell death selectively in androgen-insensitive PC-3 and DU-145 prostate adenocarcinoma cells, whereas its toxicity was less severe in androgen-sensitive LNCaP prostate adenocarcinoma cells and normal human fibroblasts (TIG-1 and KD. WA also killed PC-3 cells in spheroid-forming medium. DNA microarray analysis revealed that WA significantly increased mRNA levels of c-Fos and 11 heat-shock proteins (HSPs in PC-3 and DU-145, but not in LNCaP and TIG-1. Western analysis revealed increased expression of c-Fos and reduced expression of the anti-apoptotic protein c-FLIP(L. Expression of HSPs such as HSPA6 and Hsp70 was conspicuously elevated; however, because siRNA-mediated depletion of HSF-1, an HSP-inducing transcription factor, reduced PC-3 cell viability, it is likely that these heat-shock genes were involved in protecting against cell death. Moreover, WA induced generation of reactive oxygen species (ROS in PC-3 and DU-145, but not in normal fibroblasts. Immunocytochemistry and immuno-electron microscopy revealed that WA disrupted the vimentin cytoskeleton, possibly inducing the ROS generation, c-Fos expression and c-FLIP(L suppression. These observations suggest that multiple events followed by disruption of the vimentin cytoskeleton play pivotal roles in WA-mediated cell death.

  19. An operational method and device for the determination of an output signal in a selected spatial section of an information processing system

    OpenAIRE

    Zafiris, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Current strategies in system science with a focus on neuroscience do differ in their methodological approach when exploring and trying to analyze a system in order to detect supposed underlying principle processes in its inherent actions, which one might would call rules or laws. The here suggested procedure and measuring device, performs a mapping of characteristic parameters of the regional output signal, of the supposed structural properties, onto a selected regional part of the informatio...

  20. Device physics of thin-film polycrystalline cells and modules. Annual subcontract report, December 6, 1993--December 5, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sites, J.R.

    1995-05-01

    Progress has been made in several applications of device physics to thin-film polycrystalline cells and modules. At the cell level, results include a more quantitative separation of photon losses, the impact of second barriers on cell operation, and preliminary studies of how current-voltage curves are affected by band offsets. Module analysis includes the effects of the typical monolithic, series-connected cell geometry, analytical techniques when only the two module leads are accessible, and the impact of chopping frequency, local defects, and high-intensity beams on laser-scanning measurements.

  1. Thymic Selection of T-Cell Receptors as an Extreme Value Problem

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kosmrlj, Andrej; Chakraborty, Arup K.; Kardar, Mehran; Shakhnovich, Eugene I.

    2010-03-01

    T lymphocytes (T cells) orchestrate adaptive immune responses that clear pathogens from infected hosts. T cells recognize short peptides (p) derived from foreign proteins, which are bound to major histocompatibility complex (MHC) gene products (displayed on antigen- presenting cells). Recognition occurs when T cell receptor (TCR) proteins expressed on T cells bind sufficiently strongly to antigen- derived pMHC complexes on the surface of antigen-presenting cells. A diverse repertoire of self-tolerant TCR sequences is shaped during development of T cells in the thymus by processes called positive and negative selection. We map thymic selection processes to an extreme value problem and provide analytic expression for the amino acid composition of selected TCR sequences (which enable its recognition functions).

  2. Comparison of device models for organic solar cells: Band-to-band vs. tail states recombination

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Soldera, Marcos; Taretto, Kurt [Departamento de Electrotecnia, Universidad Nacional del Comahue, Buenos Aires, Neuquen (Argentina); Kirchartz, Thomas [Department of Physics, Imperial College London, South Kensington (United Kingdom)

    2012-01-15

    The efficiency-limiting recombination mechanism in bulk-heterojunction (BHJ) solar cells is a current topic of investigation and debate in organic photovoltaics. In this work, we simulate state-of-the-art BHJ solar cells using two different models. The first model takes into account band-to-band recombination and field dependent carrier generation. The second model assumes a Shockley-Read-Hall (SRH) recombination mechanism via tail states and field independent carrier generation. Additionally, we include in both cases optical modelling and, thus, position-dependent exciton generation and non-ideal exciton collection. We explore both recombination mechanisms by fitting light and dark current-voltage (JV) characteristics of BHJ cells of five materials: P3HT, MDMO-PPV, MEH-PPV, PCDTBT and PF10TBT, all blended with fullerene derivatives. We show that although main device parameters such as short circuit current, open circuit voltage, fill factor and ideality factor are accurately reproduced by both Langevin and tail recombination, only tail recombination reproduces also the ideality factor of dark characteristics accurately. Nevertheless, the model with SRH recombination via tail states needs the inclusion of external circuitry to account for the heavy shunt present in all the blends, except P3HT:PCBM, when illuminated. Finally, we propose a means to find analytical expressions for the short circuit current by assuming a linear relation between the recombination rate and the concentration of free minority carriers. The model reproduces experimental data of P3HT cells at various thickness values using realistic parameters for this material. Dark JV measurement (circles) of a PCDTBT:PC{sub 70}BM solar cell (Park et al., Nature Photon. 3, 297 (2009) [1]), the fit with the model including recombination via tail states (solid line) and the fit with the model reported by (Koster et al., Phys. Rev. B 72, 085205 (2005) [2]) that includes bimolecular band-to-band recombination

  3. Biogrid--a microfluidic device for large-scale enzyme-free dissociation of stem cell aggregates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallman, Lars; Åkesson, Elisabet; Ceric, Dario; Andersson, Per Henrik; Day, Kelly; Hovatta, Outi; Falci, Scott; Laurell, Thomas; Sundström, Erik

    2011-10-01

    Culturing stem cells as free-floating aggregates in suspension facilitates large-scale production of cells in closed systems, for clinical use. To comply with GMP standards, the use of substances such as proteolytic enzymes should be avoided. Instead of enzymatic dissociation, the growing cell aggregates may be mechanically cut at passage, but available methods are not compatible with large-scale cell production and hence translation into the clinic becomes a severe bottle-neck. We have developed the Biogrid device, which consists of an array of micrometerscale knife edges, micro-fabricated in silicon, and a manifold in which the microgrid is placed across the central fluid channel. By connecting one side of the Biogrid to a syringe or a pump and the other side to the cell culture, the culture medium with suspended cell aggregates can be aspirated, forcing the aggregates through the microgrid, and ejected back to the cell culture container. Large aggregates are thereby dissociated into smaller fragments while small aggregates pass through the microgrid unaffected. As proof-of-concept, we demonstrate that the Biogrid device can be successfully used for repeated passage of human neural stem/progenitor cells cultured as so-called neurospheres, as well as for passage of suspension cultures of human embryonic stem cells. We also show that human neural stem/progenitor cells tolerate transient pressure changes far exceeding those that will occur in a fluidic system incorporating the Biogrid microgrids. Thus, by using the Biogrid device it is possible to mechanically passage large quantities of cells in suspension cultures in closed fluidic systems, without the use of proteolytic enzymes. PMID:21850297

  4. Double suicide genes selectively kill human umbilical vein endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Lunxu

    2011-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To construct a recombinant adenovirus containing CDglyTK double suicide genes and evaluate the killing effect of the double suicide genes driven by kinase domain insert containing receptor (KDR promoter on human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Methods Human KDR promoter, Escherichia coli (E. coli cytosine deaminase (CD gene and the herpes simplex virus-thymidine kinase (TK gene were cloned using polymerase chain reaction (PCR. Plasmid pKDR-CDglyTK was constructed with the KDR promoter and CDglyTK genes. A recombinant adenoviral plasmid AdKDR-CDglyTK was then constructed and transfected into 293 packaging cells to grow and harvest adenoviruses. KDR-expressing human umbilical vein endothelial cells (ECV304 and KDR-negative liver cancer cell line (HepG2 were infected with the recombinant adenoviruses at different multiplicity of infection (MOI. The infection rate was measured by green fluorescent protein (GFP expression. The infected cells were cultured in culture media containing different concentrations of prodrugs ganciclovir (GCV and/or 5-fluorocytosine (5-FC. The killing effects were measured using two different methods, i.e. annexin V-FITC staining and terminal transferase-mediated dUTP nick end-labeling (TUNEL staining. Results Recombinant adenoviruses AdKDR-CDglyTK were successfully constructed and they infected ECV304 and HepG2 cells efficiently. The infection rate was dependent on MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. ECV304 cells infected with AdKDR-CDglyTK were highly sensitive to GCV and 5-FC. The cell survival rate was dependent on both the concentration of the prodrugs and the MOI of recombinant adenoviruses. In contrast, there were no killing effects in the HepG2 cells. The combination of two prodrugs was much more effective in killing ECV304 cells than GCV or 5-FC alone. The growth of transgenic ECV304 cells was suppressed in the presence of prodrugs. Conclusion AdKDR-CDglyTK/double prodrog system may be a useful

  5. Selective stimulation of prostatic carcinoma cell proliferation by transferrin.

    OpenAIRE

    M.C. Rossi; Zetter, B R

    1992-01-01

    Aggressive prostatic carcinomas most frequently metastasize to the skeletal system. We have previously shown that cultured human prostatic carcinoma cells are highly responsive to growth factors found in human bone marrow. To identify the factor(s) responsible for the increased prostatic carcinoma cell proliferation, we fractionated crude bone marrow preparations by using hydroxylapatite HPLC. The major activity peak contained two high molecular weight bands (M(r) = 80,000 and 69,000) that cr...

  6. Piperlongumine selectively kills cancer cells and increases cisplatin antitumor activity in head and neck cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Kim, Eun Hye; Park, Jin Young; Kim, Ji Won; Kwon, Minsu; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-10-15

    Adaptation to cellular stress is not a vital function of normal cells but is required of cancer cells, and as such might be a sensible target in cancer therapy. Piperlongumine is a naturally occurring small molecule selectively toxic to cancer cells. This study assesses the cytotoxicity of piperlongumine and its combination with cisplatin in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) cells in vitro and in vivo. The effect of piperlongumine, alone and in combination with cisplatin, was assessed in human HNC cells and normal cells by measuring growth, death, cell cycle progression, reactive oxygen species (ROS) production, and protein expression, and in tumor xenograft mouse models. Piperlongumine killed HNC cells regardless of p53 mutational status but spared normal cells. It increased ROS accumulation in HNC cells, an effect that can be blocked by the antioxidant N-acetyl-L-cysteine. Piperlongumine induced selective cell death in HNC cells by targeting the stress response to ROS, leading to the induction of death pathways involving JNK and PARP. Piperlongumine increased cisplatin-induced cytotoxicity in HNC cells in a synergistic manner in vitro and in vivo. Piperlongumine might be a promising small molecule with which to selectively kill HNC cells and increase cisplatin antitumor activity by targeting the oxidative stress response. PMID:25193861

  7. A selective tropism of transfused oval cells for liver

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jian-Zhi Chen; Hai Hong; Jin Xiang; Ling Xue; Guo-Qiang Zhao

    2003-01-01

    AIM: To explore the biological behaviors of hepatic oval cells after transfused into the circulation of experimental animals.METHODS: Oval cells from male SD rat were transfused into the circulation of a female rat which were treated by a 2-AAF/CCl4 program, through caudal vein. Sex-determining gene sry which located on Y chromosome was examined by PCR and in situ hybridization technique in liver, kidney and spleen of the experimental animals, respectively.RESULTS: The results of the cell-transplant experiment showed that the srygene was detectable only in the liver but not in spleen and kidney of the experimental rats, and no signals could be detected in the control animals. It can be also morphologically proved that some exogenous cells had migrated into the parenchyma of the liver and settled there.CONCLUSION: The result means that there are exogenous cells located in the liver of the experimental animal and the localization is specific to the liver. This indicates that some "signal molecules" must exist in the circulation of the rats treated by 2-AAF/CCl4. These "signal molecules" might play an important role in specific localization and differentiation of transfused oval cells.

  8. Three-color polymeric light-emitting devices using selective photo-oxidation of multilayered conjugated polymers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, X. Y.; Wong, K. Y.; Mo, Y. Q.

    2007-02-01

    The authors present a method for fabricating three-color polymer light-emitting devices by low-cost spin-coating and dry photopatterning processes. This method employed two emissive polymer layers in tandem, with each layer separately patterned by a photo-oxidation process. Different combinations of the two patterned layers give rise to the three primary colors, with the emission spectrum of each color essentially the same as that from individual constituent red-, green-, or blue-emitting polymers, and with luminous efficiencies comparable to that from the corresponding standard single-color devices. This method may provide a low-cost, high throughput procedure to manufacture polymeric flat-panel display devices.

  9. Efficient water-splitting device based on a bismuth vanadate photoanode and thin-film silicon solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Lihao; Abdi, Fatwa F; van de Krol, Roel; Liu, Rui; Huang, Zhuangqun; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Dam, Bernard; Zeman, Miro; Smets, Arno H M

    2014-10-01

    A hybrid photovoltaic/photoelectrochemical (PV/PEC) water-splitting device with a benchmark solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 5.2% under simulated air mass (AM) 1.5 illumination is reported. This cell consists of a gradient-doped tungsten-bismuth vanadate (W:BiVO4 ) photoanode and a thin-film silicon solar cell. The improvement with respect to an earlier cell that also used gradient-doped W:BiVO4 has been achieved by simultaneously introducing a textured substrate to enhance light trapping in the BiVO4 photoanode and further optimization of the W gradient doping profile in the photoanode. Various PV cells have been studied in combination with this BiVO4 photoanode, such as an amorphous silicon (a-Si:H) single junction, an a-Si:H/a-Si:H double junction, and an a-Si:H/nanocrystalline silicon (nc-Si:H) micromorph junction. The highest conversion efficiency, which is also the record efficiency for metal oxide based water-splitting devices, is reached for a tandem system consisting of the optimized W:BiVO4 photoanode and the micromorph (a-Si:H/nc-Si:H) cell. This record efficiency is attributed to the increased performance of the BiVO4 photoanode, which is the limiting factor in this hybrid PEC/PV device, as well as better spectral matching between BiVO4 and the nc-Si:H cell. PMID:25138735

  10. Next Generation Solar Cells Based on Graded Bandgap Device Structures Utilising Rod-Type Nano-Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Imyhamy M. Dharmadasa

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Current solar cells under research and development utilise mainly one absorber layer limiting the photon harvesting capabilities. In order to develop next generation solar cells, research should move towards effective photon harvesting methods utilising low-cost solar energy materials. This will lead to reduce the $W−1 figure for direct solar energy conversion to electrical energy. In this work, a graded bandgap solar cell has been designed to absorb all photons from the UV, visible and IR regions. In addition, impurity PV effect and impact ionisation have been incorporated to enhance charge carrier creation within the same device. This new design has been experimentally tested using the most researched MOCVD grown GaAs/AlGaAs system, in order to confirm its validity. Devices with high Voc ~ 1175 mV and the highest possible FF ~ (0.85–0.87 have been produced, increasing the conversion efficiency to ~20% within only two growth runs. These devices were also experimentally tested for the existence of impurity PV effect and impact ionisation. The devices are PV active in complete darkness producing over 800 mV, Voc indicating the harvesting of IR radiation from the surroundings through impurity PV effect. The quantum efficiency measurements show over 140% signal confirming the contribution to PV action from impact ionisation. Since the concept is successfully proven, the low-cost and scalable electrodeposited semiconducting layers are used to produce graded bandgap solar cell structures. The utilisation of nano- and micro-rod type materials in graded bandgap devices are also presented and discussed in this paper. Preliminary work on glass/FTO/n-ZnS/n-CdS/n-CdTe/Au graded bandgap devices show 10%–12% efficient devices indicating extremely high Jsc values ~48 mA·cm−2, showing the high potential of these devices in achieving higher efficiencies. The detailed results on these low-cost and novel graded bandgap devices are presented in a separate

  11. Engineering of Targeted Nanoparticles for Cancer Therapy Using Internalizing Aptamers Isolated by Cell-Uptake Selection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Zeyu; Levy-Nissenbaum, Etgar; Alexis, Frank; Lupták, Andrej; Teply, Benjamin A.; Chan, Juliana M.; Shi, Jinjun; Digga, Elise; Cheng, Judy; Langer, Robert; Farokhzad, Omid C.

    2012-01-01

    One of the major challenges in the development of targeted nanoparticles (NPs) for cancer therapy is to discover targeting ligands that allow for differential binding and uptake by the target cancer cells. Using prostate cancer (PCa) as a model disease, we developed a cell-uptake selection strategy to isolate PCa-specific internalizing 2'-Omethyl RNA aptamers (Apts) for NP incorporation. Twelve cycles of selection and counter-selection were done to obtain a panel of internalizing Apts, which can distinguish PCa cells from non-prostate and normal prostate cells. After Apt characterization, size minimization, and conjugation of the Apts with fluorescently-labeled polymeric NPs, the NP-Apt bioconjugates exhibit PCa specificity and enhancement in cellular uptake when compared to non-targeted NPs lacking the internalizing Apts. Furthermore, when docetaxel, a chemotherapeutic agent used for the treatment of PCa, was encapsulated within the NP-Apt, a significant improvement in cytotoxicity was achieved in targeted PCa cells. Rather than isolating high-affinity Apts as reported in previous selection processes, our selection strategy was designed to enrich cancer-cell specific internalizing Apts. A similar cell-uptake selection strategy may be used to develop specific internalizing ligands for a myriad of other diseases and can potentially facilitate delivering various molecules, including drugs and siRNAs, into cells. PMID:22214176

  12. Use of electrospinning and dynamic air focusing to create three-dimensional cell culture scaffolds in microfluidic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chengpeng; Mehl, Benjamin T; Sell, Scott A; Martin, R Scott

    2016-09-21

    Organs-on-a-chip has emerged as a powerful tool for pharmacological and physiological studies. A key part in the construction of such a model is the ability to pattern or culture cells in a biomimetic fashion. Most of the reported cells-on-a-chip models integrate cells on a flat surface, which does not accurately represent the extracellular matrix that they experience in vivo. Electrospinning, a technique used to generate sub-micron diameter polymer fibers, has been used as an in vitro cell culture substrate and for tissue engineering applications. Electrospinning of fibers directly into a fully sealed fluidic channel using a conventional setup has not been possible due to issues of confining the fibers into a discrete network. In this work, a dynamic focusing method was developed, with this approach enabling direct deposition of electrospun fibers into a fully sealed fluidic channel, to act as a matrix for cell culture and subsequent studies under continuous flowing conditions. Scanning electron microscopy of electrospun polycaprolactone fibers shows that this method enables the formation of fibrous layers on the inner wall of a 3D-printed fluidic device (mean fiber size = 1.6 ± 0.6 μm and average pore size = 113 ± 19 μm(2)). Cells were able to be cultured in this 3D scaffold without the addition of adhesion proteins. Media was pumped through the channel at high flow rates (up to 400 μL min(-1)) during a dynamic cell culture process and both the fibers and the cells were found to be strongly adherent. A PDMS fluidic device was also prepared (from a 3D printed mold) and coated with polycaprolactone fibers. The PDMS device enables optical detection and confocal imaging of cultured cells on the fibers. Finally, macrophages were cultured in the devices to study how the fibrous scaffold can affect cell behavior. It was found that under lipopolysaccharide stimulation, macrophages cultured on PCL fibers inside of a channel secreted significantly more cytokines than

  13. Fuel cells selected entries from the encyclopedia of sustainability science and technology

    CERN Document Server

    Kreuer, Klaus-Dieter

    2012-01-01

    The expected end of the "oil age" will lead to increasing focus and reliance on alternative energy conversion devices, among which fuel cells have the potential to play an important role.  Not only can phosphoric acid and solid oxide fuel cells already efficiently convert today's fossil fuels, including methane, into electricity, but other types of fuel cells, such as polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells, have the potential to become the cornerstones of a possible future hydrogen economy. Featuring 21 peer-reviewed entries from the Encyclopedia of Sustainability Science and Technology, Fuel

  14. Prediction of cell-penetrating peptides with feature selection techniques.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Hua; Su, Zhen-Dong; Wei, Huan-Huan; Chen, Wei; Lin, Hao

    2016-08-12

    Cell-penetrating peptides are a group of peptides which can transport different types of cargo molecules such as drugs across plasma membrane and have been applied in the treatment of various diseases. Thus, the accurate prediction of cell-penetrating peptides with bioinformatics methods will accelerate the development of drug delivery systems. The study aims to develop a powerful model to accurately identify cell-penetrating peptides. At first, the peptides were translated into a set of vectors with the same dimension by using dipeptide compositions. Secondly, the Analysis of Variance-based technique was used to reduce the dimension of the vector and explore the optimized features. Finally, the support vector machine was utilized to discriminate cell-penetrating peptides from non-cell-penetrating peptides. The five-fold cross-validated results showed that our proposed method could achieve an overall prediction accuracy of 83.6%. Based on the proposed model, we constructed a free webserver called C2Pred (http://lin.uestc.edu.cn/server/C2Pred). PMID:27291150

  15. Paper-Based Analytical Devices Relying on Visible-Light-Enhanced Glucose/Air Biofuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Kaiqing; Zhang, Yan; Wang, Yanhu; Ge, Shenguang; Yan, Mei; Yu, Jinghua; Song, Xianrang

    2015-11-01

    A strategy that combines visible-light-enhanced biofuel cells (BFCs) and electrochemical immunosensor into paper-based analytical devices was proposed for sensitive detection of the carbohydrate antigen 15-3 (CA15-3). The gold nanoparticle modified paper electrode with large surface area and good conductibility was applied as an effective matrix for primary antibodies. The glucose dehydrogenase (GDH) modified gold-silver bimetallic nanoparticles were used as bioanodic biocatalyst and signal magnification label. Poly(terthiophene) (pTTh), a photoresponsive conducting polymer, served as catalyst in cathode for the reduction of oxygen upon illumination by visible light. In the bioanode, electrons were generated through the oxidation of glucose catalyzed by GDH. The amount of electrons is determined by the amount of GDH, which finally depended on the amount of CA15-3. In the cathode, electrons from the bioanode could combine with the generated holes in the HOMO energy level of cathode catalysts pTTh. Meanwhile, the high energy level photoexcited electrons were generated in the LUMO energy level and involved in the oxygen reduction reaction, finally resulting in an increasing current and a decreasing overpotential. According to the current signal, simple and efficient detection of CA15-3 was achieved.

  16. TiO2 nanowires for potential facile integration of solar cells and electrochromic devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Self-powered systems usually consist of energy-acquisition components, energy-storage components and functional components. The development of nanoscience and nanotechnology has greatly improved the performance of all the components of self-powered systems. However, huge differences in the materials and configurations in the components cause large difficulties for integration and miniaturization of self-powered systems. Design and fabrication of different components in a self-powered system with the same or similar materials/configurations should be able to make the above goal easier. In this work, a proof-of-concept experiment involving an integrated self-powered color-changing system consisting of TiO2 nanowire based sandwich dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) and electrochromic devices (ECDs) is designed and demonstrated. When sunlight illuminates the entire system, the DSSCs generate electrical power and turn the ECD to a darker color, dimming the light; by switching the connection polarity of the DSSCs, the lighter color can be regained, implying the potential application of this self-powered color-changing system for next generation sun glasses and smart windows. (paper)

  17. Selection of optimal sensors for predicting performance of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Lei; Jackson, Lisa

    2016-10-01

    In this paper, sensor selection algorithms are investigated based on a sensitivity analysis, and the capability of optimal sensors in predicting PEM fuel cell performance is also studied using test data. The fuel cell model is developed for generating the sensitivity matrix relating sensor measurements and fuel cell health parameters. From the sensitivity matrix, two sensor selection approaches, including the largest gap method, and exhaustive brute force searching technique, are applied to find the optimal sensors providing reliable predictions. Based on the results, a sensor selection approach considering both sensor sensitivity and noise resistance is proposed to find the optimal sensor set with minimum size. Furthermore, the performance of the optimal sensor set is studied to predict fuel cell performance using test data from a PEM fuel cell system. Results demonstrate that with optimal sensors, the performance of PEM fuel cell can be predicted with good quality.

  18. Electronic Devices, Methods, and Computer Program Products for Selecting an Antenna Element Based on a Wireless Communication Performance Criterion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    2014-01-01

    A method of operating an electronic device includes providing a plurality of antenna elements, evaluating a wireless communication performance criterion to obtain a performance evaluation, and assigning a first one of the plurality of antenna elements to a main wireless signal reception and trans...

  19. Device and Method for Continuously Equalizing the Charge State of Lithium Ion Battery Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schwartz, Paul D. (Inventor); Martin, Mark N. (Inventor); Roufberg, Lewis M. (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    A method of equalizing charge states of individual cells in a battery includes measuring a previous cell voltage for each cell, measuring a previous shunt current for each cell, calculating, based on the previous cell voltage and the previous shunt current, an adjusted cell voltage for each cell, determining a lowest adjusted cell voltage from among the calculated adjusted cell voltages, and calculating a new shunt current for each cell.

  20. Tunable nanostructured coating for the capture and selective release of viable circulating tumor cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reátegui, Eduardo; Aceto, Nicola; Lim, Eugene J; Sullivan, James P; Jensen, Anne E; Zeinali, Mahnaz; Martel, Joseph M; Aranyosi, Alexander J; Li, Wei; Castleberry, Steven; Bardia, Aditya; Sequist, Lecia V; Haber, Daniel A; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Hammond, Paula T; Toner, Mehmet; Stott, Shannon L

    2015-03-01

    A layer-by-layer gelatin nanocoating is presented for use as a tunable, dual response biomaterial for the capture and release of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) from cancer patient blood. The entire nanocoating can be dissolved from the surface of microfluidic devices through biologically compatible temperature shifts. Alternatively, individual CTCs can be released through locally applied mechanical stress. PMID:25640006

  1. A novel potent Fas agonist for selective depletion of tumor cells in hematopoietic transplants

    OpenAIRE

    Nahimana, A; AUBRY, D.; Lagopoulos, L; Greaney, P.; Attinger, A; Demotz, S; Dawson, K. M.; Schapira, M; Tschopp, J; Dupuis, M.; Duchosal, M A

    2011-01-01

    There remains a clear need for effective tumor cell purging in autologous stem cell transplantation (ASCT) where residual malignant cells within the autograft contribute to disease relapse. Here we propose the use of a novel Fas agonist with potent pro-apoptotic activity, termed MegaFasL, as an effective ex-vivo purging agent. MegaFasL selectively kills hematological cancer cells from lymphomas and leukemias and prevents tumor development at concentrations that do not reduce the functional ca...

  2. Selective tropism of liver stem cells to hepatocellular carcinoma in vivo

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the selective tropism of liver stem cells to hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) in an animal model and its feasibility as a vector to deliver therapeutic genes for targeted therapy of HCC.METHODS: WB-F344, a kind of rat liver stem cell,was infected with recombinant virus to establish a cell line with stable, high-level expressing enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP). An animal model of HCC in Wistar rats was established by implanting HCC cells (CBRH7919) combined with an immunosuppressive drug.EGFP labeled liver stem cells were injected into caudal veins of the animals and distribution was observed at different time points after injection. SDF-1 and c-kit expression in non-tumor liver and tumor tissue were analysed by immunohistochemistry for the relationshiop between the expression and migration of liver stem cells.Furthermore, hepatic stem cells were injected via the portal vein, hepatic artery, caudal vein, or directly into the pericancerous liver tissue, respectively, and effects on migration, localization, and proliferation of the hepatic stem cells within the tumor tissue were observed and analyzed.RESULTS: Recombinant adenovirus could deliver the EGFP gene to hepatic stem cells. A new stem cell line,named WB-EGFP, was established that stably expressed EGFP. WB-EGFP cells still showed selective tropism towards HCC and EGFP expression was stable in vivo.According to immunohistochemistry results, SDF-1 may not be related to the mechanisms of tropism of hepatic stem cells. Different application sites affected the distribution of liver stem cells. Injection via the portal vein was superior with regard to selective migration,localization, and proliferation of the hepatic stem cells within the tumor tissue.CONCLUSION: Liver stem cells have the biological behavior of selective migration to HCC in vivo and they could localize and proliferate within HCC tissue stably expressing the target gene. Liver stem cells are a potential tool for a targeted

  3. Piperlongumine selectively kills cancer cells and increases cisplatin antitumor activity in head and neck cancer

    OpenAIRE

    Roh, Jong-Lyel; Kim, Eun Hye; Park, Jin Young; Kim, Ji Won; Kwon, Minsu; Lee, Byung-Heon

    2014-01-01

    Adaptation to cellular stress is not a vital function of normal cells but is required of cancer cells, and as such might be a sensible target in cancer therapy. Piperlongumine is a naturally occurring small molecule selectively toxic to cancer cells. This study assesses the cytotoxicity of piperlongumine and its combination with cisplatin in head-and-neck cancer (HNC) cells in vitro and in vivo. The effect of piperlongumine, alone and in combination with cisplatin, was assessed in human HNC c...

  4. Selective differentiation and proliferation of hematopoietic cells induced by recombinant human interleukins.

    OpenAIRE

    Saito, H; Hatake, K.; Dvorak, A. M.; Leiferman, K M; Donnenberg, A D; Arai, N.; Ishizaka, K; Ishizaka, T

    1988-01-01

    Effects of recombinant human interleukins on hematopoiesis were explored by using suspension cultures of mononuclear cells of human umbilical-cord blood and bone marrow. The results showed that interleukin 5 induced the selective differentiation and proliferation of eosinophils. After 3 weeks in culture with interleukin 5, essentially all nonadherent cells in both bone marrow and cord blood cell cultures became eosinophilic myelocytes. Culture of the same cells with interleukin 4 resulted in ...

  5. Cancer stem-like cells can be isolated with drug selection in human ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Li Ma; Dongmei Lai; Te Liu; Weiwei Cheng; Lihe Guo

    2010-01-01

     One emerging model for the development of drugresistant tumors utilizes a pool of self-renewing malignant progenitors known as cancer stem cells(CSCs)or cancerinitiating cells(CICs).The purpose of this study was to propagate such CICs from the ovarian cancer cell line SKOV3.The SKOV3 sphere cells were selected using 40.0 μmol/l cisplatin and 10.0 μmol/l paclitaxel in serumfree culture system supplemented with epidermal growth factor,basic fibroblast growth factor,leukemia inhibitory factor,and insufin or standard serum-containing system.These cells formed non-adherent spheres under drug selection(cisplatin and paclitaxel)and serum-free culture system.The selected sphere cells are more resistant to cisplatin,paclitaxel,adriamycin,and methotrexate.Importantly,the sphere cells have the properties of se lfrenewal,with high expression of the stem cell genes Nanog,Oct4,sox2,nestin,ABCG2,CD133,and the stem cell factor receptor CD117(c-kit).Consistently,flow cytometric analysis revealed that the sphere cells have a much higher percentage of CD133+/CD117+-positive cells (71%)than differentiated cells(33%).Moreover,the SKOV3 sphere cells are more tumorigenic.Furthermore,cDNA microarray and subsequent ontological analyses revealed that a large proportion of the classified genes were related to angiogenesis,extracellular matrix,integrin-mediated signaling pathway,cell adhesion,and cell proliferation.The subpopulation isolation from the SKOV3 cell line under this culture system offers a suitable in vitro model for studying ovarian CSCs in terms of their survival,self-renewal,and chemoresistance,and for developing therapeutic drugs that specifically interfere with ovarian CSCs.

  6. Copper conducting electrode with nickel as a seed layer for selective emitter crystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rehman, Atteq ur; Shin, Eun Gu; Lee, Soo Hong [Sejong University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-09-15

    In this research, we investigated selective emitter formation with a single-step photolithography process having a metallization scheme composed of nickel/copper metal stacks. The nickel seed layers were deposited by applying the electroless deposition process while copper was formed by light induced electro-plating arrangements as the main conducting electrode. The electroless deposition of nickel, along with a sintering process, was employed to create a diffusion barrier between copper and silicon. The nickel metal stack below the copper-conducting electrode also helped in lowering the sheet resistance and improving the contact adhesion. The nickel used as a seed layer was successfully demonstrated in the fabrication of a homogeneous 60 Ω/ emitter and selective emitter cells. Lower series resistances of 0.165 Ω and 0.253 Ω were achieved for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. The best cell efficiency of 18.37% for the selective emitter solar cell was achieved, with average cell efficiencies of 18.17% and 17.3% for the selective emitter and the homogeneous emitter cells, respectively. An approximate efficiency increase of about 0.8% was recorded for the selective emitter solar cells.

  7. Glimpse of natural selection of long-lived T-cell clones in healthy life.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Baojun; Jia, Qingzhu; Bock, Cheryl; Chen, Gang; Yu, Haili; Ni, Qingshan; Wan, Ying; Li, Qijing; Zhuang, Yuan

    2016-08-30

    Homeostatic maintenance of T cells with broad clonal diversity is influenced by both continuing output of young T cells from the thymus and ongoing turnover of preexisting clones in the periphery. In the absence of infection, self and commensal antigens are thought to play important roles in selection and homeostatic maintenance of the T-cell pool. Most naïve T cells are short-lived due to lack of antigen encounter, whereas antigen-experienced T cells may survive and persist as long-lived clones. Thus far, little is known about the homeostasis, antigenic specificity, and clonal diversity of long-lived T-cell clones in peripheral lymphoid organs under healthy living conditions. To identify long-lived T-cell clones in mice, we designed a lineage-tracing method to label a wave of T cells produced in the thymus of young mice. After aging the mice for 1.5 y, we found that lineage-tracked T cells consisted of primarily memory-like T cells and T regulatory cells. T-cell receptor repertoire analysis revealed that the lineage-tracked CD4 memory-like T cells and T regulatory cells exhibited age-dependent enrichment of shared clonotypes. Furthermore, these shared clonotypes were found across different mice maintained in the same housing condition. These findings suggest that nonrandom and shared antigens are involved in controlling selection, retention, and immune tolerance of long-lived T-cell clones under healthy living conditions. PMID:27535935

  8. A lab-on-a-chip device for investigating the fusion process of olfactory ensheathing cell spheroids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Munaz, Ahmed; Vadivelu, Raja K; John, James A St; Nguyen, Nam-Trung

    2016-08-01

    Understanding the process of fusion of olfactory ensheathing cell spheroids will lead to improvement of cell transplantation therapies to repair spinal cord injuries. The successful fusion of transplanted spheroids will enable alternative transplantation strategies to be developed for in vivo applications. This paper describes the use of a microfluidic device to trap and fuse olfactory ensheathing cell spheroids. The velocity, the pressure distribution in the device were simulated numerically to predict the trapping location. The simulation predicted the optimum flow rates for trapping the spheroids in the later experiments. Simulated particle trajectories were verified experimentally with tracing of fluorescent micro particles. The fusion process of the spheroids was investigated over a period of 48 hours. The microfluidic platform presented here can be used for testing potential drugs that can promote the fusion process and improve the transplantation therapy. PMID:27387270

  9. Processing and modeling issues for thin-film solar cell devices. Annual subcontract report, January 16, 1993--January 15, 1994

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Birkmire, R.W.; Phillips, J.E.; Buchanan, W.A.; Hegedus, S.S.; McCandless, B.E.; Shafarman, W.N.; Yokimcus, T.A. [Institute of Energy Conversion, Newark, DE (United States)

    1994-09-01

    The overall objective of the research presented in this report is to advance the development and acceptance of thin-film photovoltaic modules by increasing the understanding of film growth and processing and its relationship to materials properties and solar cell performance. The specific means toward meeting this larger goal include: (1) investigating scalable, cost-effective deposition processes; (2) preparing thin-film materials and device layers and completed cell structures; (3) performing detailed material and device analysis; and (4) participating in collaborative research efforts that address the needs of PV-manufacturers. These objectives are being pursued with CuInSe{sub 2}, CdTe and a-Si based solar cells.

  10. Multifunctionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for selective drug delivery to CD44-positive cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aires, Antonio; Ocampo, Sandra M.; Simões, Bruno M.; Josefa Rodríguez, María; Cadenas, Jael F.; Couleaud, Pierre; Spence, Katherine; Latorre, Alfonso; Miranda, Rodolfo; Somoza, Álvaro; Clarke, Robert B.; Carrascosa, José L.; Cortajarena, Aitziber L.

    2016-02-01

    Nanomedicine nowadays offers novel solutions in cancer therapy and diagnosis by introducing multimodal treatments and imaging tools in one single formulation. Nanoparticles acting as nanocarriers change the solubility, biodistribution and efficiency of therapeutic molecules, reducing their side effects. In order to successfully apply these novel therapeutic approaches, efforts are focused on the biological functionalization of the nanoparticles to improve the selectivity towards cancer cells. In this work, we present the synthesis and characterization of novel multifunctionalized iron oxide magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) with antiCD44 antibody and gemcitabine derivatives, and their application for the selective treatment of CD44-positive cancer cells. The lymphocyte homing receptor CD44 is overexpressed in a large variety of cancer cells, but also in cancer stem cells (CSCs) and circulating tumor cells (CTCs). Therefore, targeting CD44-overexpressing cells is a challenging and promising anticancer strategy. Firstly, we demonstrate the targeting of antiCD44 functionalized MNPs to different CD44-positive cancer cell lines using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control, and verify the specificity by ultrastructural characterization and downregulation of CD44 expression. Finally, we show the selective drug delivery potential of the MNPs by the killing of CD44-positive cancer cells using a CD44-negative non-tumorigenic cell line as a control. In conclusion, the proposed multifunctionalized MNPs represent an excellent biocompatible nanoplatform for selective CD44-positive cancer therapy in vitro.

  11. Selective killing of methotrexate-resistant cells carrying amplified dihydrofolate reductase genes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A method for the selective killing of methotrexate (MTX)-resistant cells has been developed. The selection is based on the incorporation of tritiated deoxyuridine into the DNA of MTX-resistant cells but not normal MTX-sensitive cells in the presence of the drug. A Chinese hamster ovary cell mutant that overproduces dihydrofolate reductase was used as an example of a MTX-resistant cell line. In this system, a 10,000-fold enrichment for wild-type MTX-sensitive cells could be achieved after 24 hr of exposure to the drug combination. This selection technique was applied to the isolation of MTX-sensitive segregants from hybrid cells formed between the MTX-resistant mutant and wild-type cells. The loss of MTX resistance and dihydrofolate reductase overproduction was always accompanied by the loss of a homogeneously staining region on chromosome 2 of the resistant parent that contains the amplified genes specifying this enzyme. While this region is always lost, other parts of chromosome 2 are almost always retained, suggesting that deletion rather than chromosome loss underlies marker segregation in this case. When the selection was applied to the resistant mutant itself, no MTX-sensitive revertants were obtained among 10(5) cells screened, attesting to the stability of gene amplification in this clone. It is suggested that this combination of drugs may be useful for the elimination of MTX-resistant tumor cells that develop after MTX chemotherapy

  12. New method for selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted bifidobacteria cells using continuous culture and immobilized cell technology

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Meile Leo

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Oxidative stress can severely compromise viability of bifidobacteria. Exposure of Bifidobacterium cells to oxygen causes accumulation of reactive oxygen species, mainly hydrogen peroxide, leading to cell death. In this study, we tested the suitability of continuous culture under increasing selective pressure combined with immobilized cell technology for the selection of hydrogen peroxide adapted Bifidobacterium cells. Cells of B. longum NCC2705 were immobilized in gellan-xanthan gum gel beads and used to continuously ferment MRS medium containing increasing concentration of H2O2 from 0 to 130 ppm. Results At the beginning of the culture, high cell density of 1013 CFU per litre of reactor was tested. The continuous culture gradually adapted to increasing H2O2 concentrations. However, after increasing the H2O2 concentration to 130 ppm the OD of the culture decreased to 0. Full wash out was prevented by the immobilization of the cells in gel matrix. Hence after stopping the stress, it was possible to re-grow the cells that survived the highest lethal dose of H2O2 and to select two adapted colonies (HPR1 and HPR2 after plating of the culture effluent. In contrast to HPR1, HPR2 showed stable characteristics over at least 70 generations and exhibited also higher tolerance to O2 than non adapted wild type cells. Preliminary characterization of HPR2 was carried out by global genome expression profile analysis. Two genes coding for a protein with unknown function and possessing trans-membrane domains and an ABC-type transporter protein were overexpressed in HPR2 cells compared to wild type cells. Conclusions Our study showed that continuous culture with cell immobilization is a valid approach for selecting cells adapted to hydrogen peroxide. Elucidation of H2O2 adaptation mechanisms in HPR2 could be helpful to develop oxygen resistant bifidobacteria.

  13. Efficient Water-Splitting Device Based on a Bismuth Vanadate Photoanode and Thin-Film Silicon Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Han, Lihao; Abdi, Fatwa F.; Van De Krol, Roel; Liu, Rui; Huang, Zhuangqun; Lewerenz, Hans-Joachim; Dam, Bernard; Zeman, Miro; Arno H. M. Smets

    2014-01-01

    A hybrid photovoltaic/photoelectrochemical (PV/PEC) water-splitting device with a benchmark solar-to-hydrogen conversion efficiency of 5.2 % under simulated air mass (AM) 1.5 illumination is reported. This cell consists of a gradient-doped tungsten–bismuth vanadate (W:BiVO_4) photoanode and a thin-film silicon solar cell. The improvement with respect to an earlier cell that also used gradient-doped W:BiVO4 has been achieved by simultaneously introducing a textured substrate to enhance light t...

  14. Characterization of Damp-Heat Degradation of CuInGaSe2 Solar Cell Components and Devices by (Electrochemical) Impedance Spectroscopy: Preprint

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pern, F. J. J.; Noufi, R.

    2011-09-01

    This work evaluated the capability of (electrochemical) impedance spectroscopy (IS, or ECIS as used here) to monitor damp heat (DH) stability of contact materials, CuInGaSe2 (CIGS) solar cell components, and devices. Cell characteristics and its variation of the CIGS devices were also examined by the ECIS.

  15. Impact of assay selection and study design on the outcome of cytotoxicity testing of medical devices: the case of multi-purpose vision care solutions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lehmann, David M; Richardson, Mary E

    2010-06-01

    Medical device biocompatibility testing usually includes a cytotoxicity component. Assay selection and protocol design often depend on a specific testing standard rather than on the characteristics of the medical device. To better understand the impact of assay selection on study outcome of unstructured medical devices, we evaluated contact lens multi-purpose solutions (MPS) in the agar diffusion, direct contact and two elution cytotoxicity assays. To simulate the conditions of use, MPS were evaluated alone and in combination with contact lenses. All MPS passed the agar diffusion assay (n=3) and extracts prepared from contact lenses soaked in MPS passed the USP elution assay (n=3). Both the duration of contact and MPS concentration impacted the outcome of a modified elution assay. When tested at 25% strength for 48 h, all MPS evaluated were non-cytotoxic (n>3). Test article movement and mechanical damage were significant issues with the direct contact assay. Movement was effectively controlled by manipulating contact lens orientation while using 0.8 mL culture medium. All MPS passed the USP direct contact cytotoxicity test when evaluated using this optimized methodology (n=3). These data are consistent with MPS results in ocular irritation studies in rabbits (n=3).

  16. Selective COX-2 inhibitor, NS-398, suppresses cellular proliferation in human hepatocellular carcinoma cell lines via cell cycle arrest

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ji Yeon Baek; Wonhee Hur; Jin Sang Wang; Si Hyun Bae; Seung Kew Yoon

    2007-01-01

    AIM: To investigate the growth inhibitory mechanism of NS-398, a selective cyclooxygenase-2 (COX-2) inhibitor,in two hepatocellular carcinoma (HCC) cell lines (HepG2and Huh7).METHODS: HepG2 and Huh7 cells were treated with NS-398. Its effects on cell viability, cell proliferation,cell cycles, and gene expression were respectively evaluated by water-soluble tetrazolium salt (WST-1)assay, 4'-6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) staining,flow cytometer analysis, and Western blotting,with dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) as positive control.RESULTS: NS-398 showed dose- and time-dependent growth-inhibitory effects on the two cell lines.Proliferating cell nuclear antigen (PCNA) expressions in HepG2 and Huh7 cells, particularly in Huh7 cells were inhibited in a time- and dose-independent manner.NS-398 caused cell cycle arrest in the G1 phase with cell accumulation in the sub-G1 phase in HepG2 and Huh7cell lines. No evidence of apoptosis was observed in two cell lines.CONCLUSION: NS-398 reduces cell proliferation by inducing cell cycle arrest in HepG2 and Huh7 cell lines,and COX-2 inhibitors may have potent chemoprevention effects on human hepatocellular carcinoma.

  17. Mobile selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) devices and their use for pollution exposure monitoring in breath and ambient air-pilot study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Storer, Malina; Salmond, Jennifer; Dirks, Kim N; Kingham, Simon; Epton, Michael

    2014-09-01

    Studies of health effects of air pollution exposure are limited by inability to accurately determine dose and exposure of air pollution in field trials. We explored the feasibility of using a mobile selected ion flow tube mass spectrometry (SIFT-MS) device, housed in a van, to determine ambient air and breath levels of benzene, xylene and toluene following exercise in areas of high motor vehicle traffic. The breath toluene, xylene and benzene concentration of healthy subjects were measured before and after exercising close to a busy road. The concentration of the volatile organic compounds (VOCs), in ambient air were also analysed in real time. Exercise close to traffic pollution is associated with a two-fold increase in breath VOCs (benzene, xylene and toluene) with levels returning to baseline within 20 min. This effect is not seen when exercising away from traffic pollution sources. Situating the testing device 50 m from the road reduced any confounding due to VOCs in the inspired air prior to the breath testing manoeuvre itself. Real-time field testing for air pollution exposure is possible using a mobile SIFT-MS device. This device is suitable for exploring exposure and dose relationships in a number of large scale field test scenarios.

  18. Energy deposition in selected-mammalian cell for several-MeV single-proton beam

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ding, K.; Yu, Z.

    2007-05-01

    The phenomena resulting from interaction between ion beam and mammalian cell pose important problems for biological applications. Classic Bethe-Bloch theory utilizing attached V79 mammalian cell has been conducted in order to establish the stopping powers of the mammalian cell for several-MeV single-proton microbeam. Based on the biological structure of the mammalian cell, a physical model is proposed which presumes that the attached cell is simple MWM model. According to this model and Monte Carlo simulation, we studied the energy deposition and its ratio on the selected attached mammalian cell for MeV proton implantation.

  19. Selective Cancer Targeting via Aberrant Behavior of Cancer Cell-associated Glucocorticoid Receptor

    OpenAIRE

    Mukherjee, Amarnath; Narayan, Kumar P; Pal, Krishnendu; Kumar, Jerald M.; Rangaraj, Nandini; Shasi V Kalivendi; Banerjee, Rajkumar

    2009-01-01

    Glucocorticoid receptors (GRs) are ubiquitous, nuclear hormone receptors residing in cell types of both cancer and noncancerous origin. It is not known whether cancer cell–associated GR alone can be selectively manipulated for delivery of exogenous genes to its nucleus for eliciting anticancer effect. We find that GR ligand, dexamethasone (Dex) in association with cationic lipoplex (termed as targeted lipoplex) could selectively manipulate GR in cancer cells alone for the delivery of transgen...

  20. Wavelet Menus on Handheld Devices: Stacking Metaphor for Novice Mode and Eyes-Free Selection for Expert Mode

    OpenAIRE

    Francone, Jeremie; Bailly, Gilles; Lecolinet, Éric; Mandran, Nadine; Nigay, Laurence

    2010-01-01

    International audience This paper presents the design and evaluation of the Wavelet menu and its implementation on the iPhone. The Wavelet menu consists of a concentric hierarchical Marking menu using simple gestures. The novice mode, i.e. when the menu is displayed, is well adapted to the limited screen space of handheld devices because the representation of the menu hierarchy is inverted, the deeper submenu being always displayed at the center of the screen. The visual design is based on...

  1. The application of selected radionuclides for monitoring of the D-D reactions produced by dense plasma-focus device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The dense plasma focus (DPF) device-DPF-1000U which is operated at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion is the largest that type plasma experiment in the world. The plasma that is formed in large plasma experiments is characterized by vast numbers of parameters. All of them need to be monitored. A neutron activation method occupies a high position among others plasma diagnostic methods. The above method is off-line, remote, and an integrated one. The plasma which has enough temperature to bring about nuclear fusion reactions is always a strong source of neutrons that leave the reactions area and take along energy and important information on plasma parameters and properties as well. Silver as activated material is used as an effective way of neutrons measurement, especially when they are emitted in the form of short pulses like as it happens from the plasma produced in Dense Plasma-Focus devices. Other elements such as beryllium and yttrium are newly introduced and currently tested at the Institute of Plasma Physics and Laser Microfusion to use them in suitable activation neutron detectors. Some specially designed massive indium samples have been recently adopted for angular neutrons distribution measurements (vertical and horizontal) and have been used in the recent plasma experiment conducted on the DPF-1000U device. This choice was substantiated by relatively long half-lives of the neutron induced isotopes and the threshold character of the 115In(n,n')115mIn nuclear reaction. (author)

  2. Enhanced transfection of cell lines from Atlantic salmon through nucoleofection and antibiotic selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mjaaland Siri

    2011-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell lines from Atlantic salmon kidney have made it possible to culture and study infectious salmon anemia virus (ISAV, an aquatic orthomyxovirus affecting farmed Atlantic salmon. However, transfection of these cells using calcium phosphate precipitation or lipid-based reagents shows very low transfection efficiency. The Amaxa Nucleofector technology™ is an electroporation technique that has been shown to be efficient for gene transfer into primary cells and hard to transfect cell lines. Findings Here we demonstrate, enhanced transfection of the head kidney cell line, TO, from Atlantic salmon using nucleofection and subsequent flow cytometry. Depending on the plasmid promoter, TO cells could be transfected transiently with an efficiency ranging from 11.6% to 90.8% with good viability, using Amaxa's cell line nucleofector solution T and program T-20. A kill curve was performed to investigate the most potent antibiotic for selection of transformed cells, and we found that blasticidin and puromycin were the most efficient for selection of TO cells. Conclusions The results show that nucleofection is an efficient way of gene transfer into Atlantic salmon cells and that stably transfected cells can be selected with blasticidin or puromycin.

  3. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 2: improvements in kinase selectivity and cell potency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anderson, David R; Meyers, Marvin J; Kurumbail, Ravi G; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I; Long, Scott A; Pierce, Betsy S; Mahoney, Matthew W; Mourey, Robert J; Parikh, Mihir D

    2009-08-15

    Optimization of kinase selectivity for a set of benzothiophene MK2 inhibitors provided analogs with potencies of less than 500 nM in a cell based assay. The selectivity of the inhibitors can be rationalized by examination of X-ray crystal structures of inhibitors bound to MK2.

  4. Benzothiophene inhibitors of MK2. Part 2: Improvements in kinase selectivity and cell potency

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Anderson, David R.; Meyers, Marvin J.; Kurumbail, Ravi G.; Caspers, Nicole; Poda, Gennadiy I.; Long, Scott A.; Pierce, Betsy S.; Mahoney, Matthew W.; Mourey, Robert J.; Parikh, Mihir D.; Pfizer

    2010-10-01

    Optimization of kinase selectivity for a set of benzothiophene MK2 inhibitors provided analogs with potencies of less than 500 nM in a cell based assay. The selectivity of the inhibitors can be rationalized by examination of X-ray crystal structures of inhibitors bound to MK2.

  5. Beyond Helper Phage: Using "Helper Cells" to Select Peptide Affinity Ligands.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phipps, M Lisa; Lillo, Antoinetta M; Shou, Yulin; Schmidt, Emily N; Paavola, Chad D; Naranjo, Leslie; Bemdich, Sara; Swanson, Basil I; Bradbury, Andrew R M; Martinez, Jennifer S

    2016-01-01

    Peptides are important affinity ligands for microscopy, biosensing, and targeted delivery. However, because they can have low affinity for their targets, their selection from large naïve libraries can be challenging. When selecting peptidic ligands from display libraries, it is important to: 1) ensure efficient display; 2) maximize the ability to select high affinity ligands; and 3) minimize the effect of the display context on binding. The "helper cell" packaging system has been described as a tool to produce filamentous phage particles based on phagemid constructs with varying display levels, while remaining free of helper phage contamination. Here we report on the first use of this system for peptide display, including the systematic characterization and optimization of helper cells, their inefficient use in antibody display and their use in creating and selecting from a set of phage display peptide libraries. Our libraries were analyzed with unprecedented precision by standard or deep sequencing, and shown to be superior in quality than commercial gold standards. Using our helper cell libraries, we have obtained ligands recognizing Yersinia pestis surface antigen F1V and L-glutamine-binding periplasmic protein QBP. In the latter case, unlike any of the peptide library selections described so far, we used a combination of phage and yeast display to select intriguing peptide ligands. Based on the success of our selections we believe that peptide libraries obtained with helper cells are not only suitable, but preferable to traditional phage display libraries for selection of peptidic ligands. PMID:27626637

  6. Impact of selection for decreased somatic cell score on productive life and culling for mastitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Impact of continued selection for decreased somatic cell score (SCS) was examined to determine if such selection resulted in greater mastitis susceptibility and shorter productive life (PL). Holstein artificial-insemination bulls with a predicted transmitting ability (PTA) for SCS based on >=35 daug...

  7. Distinct genetic alterations occur in ovarian tumor cells selected for combined resistance to carboplatin and docetaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Armstrong Stephen R

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Current protocols for the treatment of ovarian cancer include combination chemotherapy with a platinating agent and a taxane. However, many patients experience relapse of their cancer and the development of drug resistance is not uncommon, making successful second line therapy difficult to achieve. The objective of this study was to develop and characterize a cell line resistant to both carboplatin and docetaxel (dual drug resistant ovarian cell line and to compare this cell line to cells resistant to either carboplatin or docetaxel. Methods The A2780 epithelial endometrioid ovarian cancer cell line was used to select for isogenic carboplatin, docetaxel and dual drug resistant cell lines. A selection method of gradually increasing drug doses was implemented to avoid clonal selection. Resistance was confirmed using a clonogenic assay. Changes in gene expression associated with the development of drug resistance were determined by microarray analysis. Changes in the expression of selected genes were validated by Quantitative Real-Time Polymerase Chain Reaction (QPCR and immunoblotting. Results Three isogenic cell lines were developed and resistance to each drug or the combination of drugs was confirmed. Development of resistance was accompanied by a reduced growth rate. The microarray and QPCR analyses showed that unique changes in gene expression occurred in the dual drug resistant cell line and that genes known to be involved in resistance could be identified in all cell lines. Conclusions Ovarian tumor cells can acquire resistance to both carboplatin and docetaxel when selected in the presence of both agents. Distinct changes in gene expression occur in the dual resistant cell line indicating that dual resistance is not a simple combination of the changes observed in cell lines exhibiting single agent resistance.

  8. Mutual Loan-Guarantee Societies in Credit Markets with Adverse Selection: Do They Act as a Sorting Device?

    OpenAIRE

    Giovanni BUSETTA; Alberto ZAZZARO

    2006-01-01

    Mutual Loan Guarantee Societies (MLGSs) are crucial players in credit markets of many European and non-European countries. In this paper we provide a theory to rationalize the raison d'e'tre of MLGSs. The basic intuition is that the foundation for MLGSs lies in the inefficiencies created by adverse selection, when borrowers do not have enough collateralizable wealth to satisfy collateral requirements and induce self-selecting contracts. In this setting, we view MLGSs as a wealth pooling mecha...

  9. Development of microfluidic devices for in situ investigation of cells using surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ho, Yu-Han; Galvan, Daniel D.; Yu, Qiuming

    2016-03-01

    Surface-enhanced Raman spectroscopy (SERS) has immerged as a power analytical and sensing technique for many applications in biomedical diagnosis, life sciences, food safety, and environment monitoring because of its molecular specificity and high sensitivity. The inactive Raman scattering of water molecule makes SERS a suitable tool for studying biological systems. Microfluidic devices have also attracted a tremendous interest for the aforementioned applications. By integrating SERS-active substrates with microfluidic devices, it offers a new capability for in situ investigation of biological systems, their dynamic behaviors, and response to drugs or microenvironment changes. In this work, we designed and fabricated a microfluidic device with SERS-active substrates surrounding by cell traps in microfluidic channels for in situ study of live cells using SERS. The SERS-active substrates are quasi-3D plasmonic nanostructure array (Q3D-PNA) made in h-PDMS/PMDS with physically separated gold film with nanoholes op top and gold nanodisks at the bottom of nanowells. 3D finite-difference time-domain (3D-FDTD) electromagnetic simulations were performed to design Q3D-PNAs with the strongest local electric fields (hot spots) at the top or bottom water/Au interfaces for sensitive analysis of cells and small components, respectively. The Q3D-PNAs with the hot spots on top and bottom were placed at the up and down stream of the microfluidic channel, respectively. Each Q3D-PNA pattern was surrounded with cell trapping structures. The microfluidic device was fabricated via soft lithography. We demonstrated that normal (COS-7) and cancer (HpeG2) cells were captured on the Q3D-PNAs and investigated in situ using SERS.

  10. Propane Fuel Cells: Selectivity for Partial or Complete Reaction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shadi Vafaeyan

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available The use of propane fuel in high temperature (120°C polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM fuel cells that do not require a platinum group metal catalyst is being investigated in our laboratory. Density functional theory (DFT was used to determine propane adsorption energies, desorption energies, and transition state energies for both dehydrogenation and hydroxylation reactions on a Ni(100 anode catalyst surface. The Boltzmann factor for the hydroxylation of a propyl species to form propanol and its subsequent desorption was compared to that for the dehydrogenation of a propyl species. The large ratio of the respective Boltzmann factors indicated that the formation of a completely reacted product (carbon dioxide is much more likely than the formation of partially reacted products (alcohols, aldehydes, carboxylic acids, and carbon monoxide. That finding is evidence for the major proportion of the chemical energy of the propane fuel being converted to either electrical or thermal energy in the fuel cell rather than remaining unused when partially reacted species are formed.

  11. A nanocomplex that is both tumor cell-selective and cancer gene-specific for anaplastic large cell lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zu Youli

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Many in vitro studies have demonstrated that silencing of cancerous genes by siRNAs is a potential therapeutic approach for blocking tumor growth. However, siRNAs are not cell type-selective, cannot specifically target tumor cells, and therefore have limited in vivo application for siRNA-mediated gene therapy. Results In this study, we tested a functional RNA nanocomplex which exclusively targets and affects human anaplastic large cell lymphoma (ALCL by taking advantage of the abnormal expression of CD30, a unique surface biomarker, and the anaplastic lymphoma kinase (ALK gene in lymphoma cells. The nanocomplexes were formulated by incorporating both ALK siRNA and a RNA-based CD30 aptamer probe onto nano-sized polyethyleneimine-citrate carriers. To minimize potential cytotoxicity, the individual components of the nanocomplexes were used at sub-cytotoxic concentrations. Dynamic light scattering showed that formed nanocomplexes were ~140 nm in diameter and remained stable for more than 24 hours in culture medium. Cell binding assays revealed that CD30 aptamer probes selectively targeted nanocomplexes to ALCL cells, and confocal fluorescence microscopy confirmed intracellular delivery of the nanocomplex. Cell transfection analysis showed that nanocomplexes silenced genes in an ALCL cell type-selective fashion. Moreover, exposure of ALCL cells to nanocomplexes carrying both ALK siRNAs and CD30 RNA aptamers specifically silenced ALK gene expression, leading to growth arrest and apoptosis. Conclusions Taken together, our findings indicate that this functional RNA nanocomplex is both tumor cell type-selective and cancer gene-specific for ALCL cells.

  12. Selective enrichment of hepatoeytes from mouse embryonic stem cells with a culture system containing cholestatic serum

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun MIN; Er-wei SONG; Ji-sheng CHEN; Chang-zhen SHANG; Ya-jin CHEN; Lei ZHANG; Lu LIU; Xiao-geng DENG; Mei YANG; Dong-ping CHEN; Jun CAO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: There is increasing evidence indicating that embryonic stem (ES) cells are capable of differentiating into hepatocyte-like cells in vitro. However, it is neces- sary to improve the differentiation efficiency so as to promote the clinical application. Here, we report an efficient culture system to support hepatocyte differentiation from ES cells by utilizing cholestatic serum. Methods: One week after the induction of El4 mouse ES cells into hepatocytes with sodium butyrate, cholestatic serum was added into the culture system at various concentrations and hepatocyte-like cells were induced to proliferate. The morphological and phenotypic markers of hepatocytes were characterized using light microscopy, immunocytochemistry, and RT-PCR, respectively. The function of glycogen stor- age of the differentiated cells was detected by Periodic acid-Schiff (PAS) reaction, and the ratio of hepatic differentiation was determined by counting the albumin and PAS-positive cells. Results: In the presence of conditional selective medium containing cholestatic serum, numerous epithelial cells resembling hepatocytes were observed. The RT-PCR analysis showed that undifferentiated ES cells did not express any hepatic-specific markers; however, in the presence of sodium butyrate and conditional selective medium containing cholestatic serum, hepatic differentiation markers were detected. Immunofluorescence staining showed that those ES-derived hepatocytes were α-fetoprotein, albumin, and cytokeratin 18 positive, with the ability of storing glycogen. Further determination of the hepatic differentiation ratio showed that the application of cholestatic serum efficiently enriched ES-derived hepatocyte-like cells by inducing lineage differentiation and enhancing lineage proliferation. Conclusion: The conditional selective medium containing cholestatic serum is optimal to selectively enrich hepatocyte-like cells from mixed differentiated ES cells, which may provide a novel method to

  13. Strategies for selecting recombinant CHO cell lines for cGMP manufacturing: improving the efficiency of cell line generation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porter, Alison J; Racher, Andrew J; Preziosi, Richard; Dickson, Alan J

    2010-01-01

    Transfectants with a wide range of cellular phenotypes are obtained during the process of cell line generation. For the successful manufacture of a therapeutic protein, a means is required to identify a cell line with desirable growth and productivity characteristics from this phenotypically wide-ranging transfectant population. This identification process is on the critical path for first-in-human studies. We have stringently examined a typical selection strategy used to isolate cell lines suitable for cGMP manufacturing. One-hundred and seventy-five transfectants were evaluated as they progressed through the different assessment stages of the selection strategy. High producing cell lines, suitable for cGMP manufacturing, were identified. However, our analyses showed that the frequency of isolation of the highest producing cell lines was low and that ranking positions were not consistent between each assessment stage, suggesting that there is potential to improve upon the strategy. Attempts to increase the frequency of isolation of the 10 highest producing cell lines, by in silico analysis of alternative selection strategies, were unsuccessful. We identified alternative strategies with similar predictive capabilities to the typical selection strategy. One alternate strategy required fewer cell lines to be progressed at the assessment stages but the stochastic nature of the models means that cell line numbers are likely to change between programs. In summary, our studies illuminate the potential for improvement to this and future selection strategies, based around use of assessments that are more informative or that reduce variance, paving the way to improved efficiency of generation of manufacturing cell lines. PMID:20623584

  14. Hierarchical structural health monitoring system combining a fiber optic spinal cord network and distributed nerve cell devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minakuchi, Shu; Tsukamoto, Haruka; Takeda, Nobuo

    2009-03-01

    This study proposes novel hierarchical sensing concept for detecting damages in composite structures. In the hierarchical system, numerous three-dimensionally structured sensor devices are distributed throughout the whole structural area and connected with the optical fiber network through transducing mechanisms. The distributed "sensory nerve cell" devices detect the damage, and the fiber optic "spinal cord" network gathers damage signals and transmits the information to a measuring instrument. This study began by discussing the basic concept of the hierarchical sensing system thorough comparison with existing fiber optic based systems and nerve systems in the animal kingdom. Then, in order to validate the proposed sensing concept, impact damage detection system for the composite structure was proposed. The sensor devices were developed based on Comparative Vacuum Monitoring (CVM) system and the Brillouin based distributed strain sensing was utilized to gather the damage signals from the distributed devices. Finally a verification test was conducted using prototype devices. Occurrence of barely visible impact damage was successfully detected and it was clearly indicated that the hierarchical system has better repairability, higher robustness, and wider monitorable area compared to existing systems utilizing embedded optical fiber sensors.

  15. Plasmonic nanoparticle films for solar cell applications fabricated by size-selective aerosol deposition

    OpenAIRE

    Pfeiffer, T.V.; Ortiz Gonzalez, J.; Santbergen, R.; Tan, H.; Schmidt-Ott, A.; Zeman, M.; Smets, A.H.M.

    2014-01-01

    A soft deposition method for incorporating surface plasmon resonant metal nanoparticles within photovoltaic devices was studied. This self-assembly method provides excellent control over both nanoparticle size and surface coverage. Films of spherical Ag nanoparticles with diameter of ∼100 nm were fabricated by depositing size-selected aerosols on various substrates using electrophoresis. This novel deposition method opens the route to embed plasmonic nanoparticles in the intermediate reflecto...

  16. Induction and selection of mutants from in vitro cultured plant cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Yung Il; Kim, Jae Sung; Shin, In Chul; Lee, Sang Jae [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Taejon (Korea, Republic of)

    1994-07-01

    Mutant cell lines are useful for biochemical, physiological and genetical material for marker in various genetic manipulation experiments and for the direct use in crop plant improvement. Mutant selection may lead to the production of plants showing resistance or tolerance to specific environmental stress, such as solinity, drought, toxed metals, herbicides, pathogens and low temperature. In this review, these included the production of the somatic variation, the selection process itself and stability of the selected characters in cell culture and regenerated plant. Which would seem to be useful for improving plants and securring genetic resources. 45 refs. (Author).

  17. Selective control of the apoptosis signaling network in heterogeneous cell populations.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diego Calzolari

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Selective control in a population is the ability to control a member of the population while leaving the other members relatively unaffected. The concept of selective control is developed using cell death or apoptosis in heterogeneous cell populations as an example. Control of apoptosis is essential in a variety of therapeutic environments, including cancer where cancer cell death is a desired outcome and Alzheimer's disease where neuron survival is the desired outcome. However, in both cases these responses must occur with minimal response in other cells exposed to treatment; that is, the response must be selective. METHODOLOGY AND PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Apoptosis signaling in heterogeneous cells is described by an ensemble of gene networks with identical topology but different link strengths. Selective control depends on the statistics of signaling in the ensemble of networks, and we analyze the effects of superposition, non-linearity and feedback on these statistics. Parallel pathways promote normal statistics while series pathways promote skew distributions, which in the most extreme cases become log-normal. We also show that feedback and non-linearity can produce bimodal signaling statistics, as can discreteness and non-linearity. Two methods for optimizing selective control are presented. The first is an exhaustive search method and the second is a linear programming based approach. Though control of a single gene in the signaling network yields little selectivity, control of a few genes typically yields higher levels of selectivity. The statistics of gene combinations susceptible to selective control in heterogeneous apoptosis networks is studied and is used to identify general control strategies. CONCLUSIONS AND SIGNIFICANCE: We have explored two methods for the study of selectivity in cell populations. The first is an exhaustive search method limited to three node perturbations. The second is an effective linear model, based on

  18. Selective effect of cell membrane on synaptic neurotransmission

    Science.gov (United States)

    Postila, Pekka A.; Vattulainen, Ilpo; Róg, Tomasz

    2016-01-01

    Atomistic molecular dynamics simulations were performed with 13 non-peptidic neurotransmitters (NTs) in three different membrane environments. The results provide compelling evidence that NTs are divided into membrane-binding and membrane-nonbinding molecules. NTs adhere to the postsynaptic membrane surface whenever the ligand-binding sites of their synaptic receptors are buried in the lipid bilayer. In contrast, NTs that have extracellular ligand-binding sites do not have a similar tendency to adhere to the membrane surface. This finding is a seemingly simple yet important addition to the paradigm of neurotransmission, essentially dividing it into membrane-independent and membrane-dependent mechanisms. Moreover, the simulations also indicate that the lipid composition especially in terms of charged lipids can affect the membrane partitioning of NTs. The revised paradigm, highlighting the importance of cell membrane and specific lipids for neurotransmission, should to be of interest to neuroscientists, drug industry and the general public alike.

  19. Hypoxia selects bortezomib-resistant stem cells of chronic myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michele Tanturli

    Full Text Available We previously demonstrated that severe hypoxia inhibits growth of Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML cells and selects stem cells where BCR/Abl(protein is suppressed, although mRNA is not, so that hypoxia-selected stem cells, while remaining leukemic, are independent of BCR/Abl signaling and thereby refractory to Imatinib-mesylate. The main target of this study was to address the effects of the proteasome inhibitor Bortezomib (BZ on the maintenance of stem or progenitor cells in hypoxic primary cultures (LC1, by determining the capacity of LC1 cells to repopulate normoxic secondary cultures (LC2 and the kinetics of this repopulation. Unselected K562 cells from day-2 hypoxic LC1 repopulated LC2 with rapid, progenitor-type kinetics; this repopulation was suppressed by BZ addition to LC1 at time 0, but completely resistant to day-1 BZ, indicating that progenitors require some time to adapt to stand hypoxia. K562 cells selected in hypoxic day-7 LC1 repopulated LC2 with stem-type kinetics, which was largely resistant to BZ added at either time 0 or day 1, indicating that hypoxia-selectable stem cells are BZ-resistant per se, i.e. before their selection. Furthermore, these cells were completely resistant to day-6 BZ, i.e. after selection. On the other hand, hypoxia-selected stem cells from CD34-positive cells of blast-crisis CML patients appeared completely resistant to either time-0 or day-1 BZ. To exploit in vitro the capacity of CML cells to adapt to hypoxia enabled to detect a subset of BZ-resistant leukemia stem cells, a finding of particular relevance in light of the fact that our experimental system mimics the physiologically hypoxic environment of bone marrow niches where leukemia stem cells most likely home and sustain minimal residual disease in vivo. This suggests the use of BZ as an enhanced strategy to control CML. in particular to prevent relapse of disease, to be considered with caution and to need further deepening.

  20. Design Of A Hybrid Jet Impingement / Microchannel Cooling Device For Densely Packed PV Cells Under High Concentration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barrau, Jérôme; Rosell, Joan; Ibañez, Manel

    2010-10-01

    A hybrid jet impingement / microchannel cooling scheme was designed and applied to densely packed PV cells under high concentration. An experimental study allows validating the principles of the design and confirming its applicability to the cited system. In order to study the characteristics of the device in a wide range of conditions, a numerical model was developed and experimentally validated. The results allow evaluating the contributions of the cooling device to the performances of densely packed PV cells under high concentration. The main advantages of the system are related to its compactness, its good capacity of heat extraction associated to relatively low pressure losses and its capability to improve the temperature uniformity of the PV receiver with respect to other cooling schemes. These features improve the net electric output of the whole system and its reliability.

  1. Fine tuning of the threshold of T cell selection by the Nck adapters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Schmitt, Sabine; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-12-15

    Thymic selection shapes the T cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage against pathogens while preventing autoimmunity. Recognition of self-peptides in the context of peptide-MHC complexes by the TCR is central to this process, which remains partially understood at the molecular level. In this study we provide genetic evidence that the Nck adapter proteins are essential for thymic selection. In vivo Nck deletion resulted in a reduction of the thymic cellularity, defective positive selection of low-avidity T cells, and impaired deletion of thymocytes engaged by low-potency stimuli. Nck-deficient thymocytes were characterized by reduced ERK activation, particularly pronounced in mature single positive thymocytes. Taken together, our findings identify a crucial role for the Nck adapters in enhancing TCR signal strength, thereby fine-tuning the threshold of thymocyte selection and shaping the preimmune T cell repertoire. PMID:21078909

  2. Fine tuning of the threshold of T cell selection by the Nck adapters.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Edwige; Togbe, Dieudonnée; Holdorf, Amy; Trubetskoy, Dmitry; Nabti, Sabrina; Küblbeck, Günter; Schmitt, Sabine; Kopp-Schneider, Annette; Leithäuser, Frank; Möller, Peter; Bladt, Friedhelm; Hämmerling, Günter J; Arnold, Bernd; Pawson, Tony; Tafuri, Anna

    2010-12-15

    Thymic selection shapes the T cell repertoire to ensure maximal antigenic coverage against pathogens while preventing autoimmunity. Recognition of self-peptides in the context of peptide-MHC complexes by the TCR is central to this process, which remains partially understood at the molecular level. In this study we provide genetic evidence that the Nck adapter proteins are essential for thymic selection. In vivo Nck deletion resulted in a reduction of the thymic cellularity, defective positive selection of low-avidity T cells, and impaired deletion of thymocytes engaged by low-potency stimuli. Nck-deficient thymocytes were characterized by reduced ERK activation, particularly pronounced in mature single positive thymocytes. Taken together, our findings identify a crucial role for the Nck adapters in enhancing TCR signal strength, thereby fine-tuning the threshold of thymocyte selection and shaping the preimmune T cell repertoire.

  3. UV activation of polymeric high aspect ratio microstructures: ramifications in antibody surface loading for circulating tumor cell selection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jackson, Joshua M; Witek, Małgorzata A; Hupert, Mateusz L; Brady, Charles; Pullagurla, Swathi; Kamande, Joyce; Aufforth, Rachel D; Tignanelli, Christopher J; Torphy, Robert J; Yeh, Jen Jen; Soper, Steven A

    2014-01-01

    The need to activate thermoplastic surfaces using robust and efficient methods has been driven by the fact that replication techniques can be used to produce microfluidic devices in a high production mode and at low cost, making polymer microfluidics invaluable for in vitro diagnostics, such as circulating tumor cell (CTC) analysis, where device disposability is critical to mitigate artifacts associated with sample carryover. Modifying the surface chemistry of thermoplastic devices through activation techniques can be used to increase the wettability of the surface or to produce functional scaffolds to allow for the covalent attachment of biologics, such as antibodies for CTC recognition. Extensive surface characterization tools were used to investigate UV activation of various surfaces to produce uniform and high surface coverage of functional groups, such as carboxylic acids in microchannels of different aspect ratios. We found that the efficiency of the UV activation process is highly dependent on the microchannel aspect ratio and the identity of the thermoplastic substrate. Colorimetric assays and fluorescence imaging of UV-activated microchannels following EDC/NHS coupling of Cy3-labeled oligonucleotides indicated that UV-activation of a PMMA microchannel with an aspect ratio of ~3 was significantly less efficient toward the bottom of the channel compared to the upper sections. This effect was a consequence of the bulk polymer's damping of the modifying UV radiation due to absorption artifacts. In contrast, this effect was less pronounced for COC. Moreover, we observed that after thermal fusion bonding of the device's cover plate to the substrate, many of the generated functional groups buried into the bulk rendering them inaccessible. The propensity of this surface reorganization was found to be higher for PMMA compared to COC. As an example of the effects of material and microchannel aspect ratios on device functionality, thermoplastic devices for the

  4. Black silicon laser-doped selective emitter solar cell with 18.1% efficiency

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Davidsen, Rasmus Schmidt; Li, Hongzhao; To, Alexander;

    2016-01-01

    We report fabrication of nanostructured, laser-doped selective emitter (LDSE) silicon solar cells with power conversion efficiency of 18.1% and a fill factor (FF) of 80.1%. The nanostructured solar cells were realized through a single step, mask-less, scalable reactive ion etch (RIE) texturing......-texturing as well as the LDSE process, we consider this specific combination a promising candidate for a cost-efficient process for future Si solar cells....

  5. Selective Retention of Bone Marrow-Derived Cells to Enhance Spinal Fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Muschler, George F.; Matsukura, Yoichi; Nitto, Hironori; Boehm, Cynthia A.; Valdevit, Antonio D.; Kambic, Helen E.; Davros, William J.; Easley, Kirk A.; Powell, Kimerly A.

    2005-01-01

    Connective tissue progenitors can be concentrated rapidly from fresh bone marrow aspirates using some porous matrices as a surface for cell attachment and selective retention, and for creating a cellular graft that is enriched with respect to the number of progenitor cells. We evaluated the potential value of this method using demineralized cortical bone powder as the matrix. Matrix alone, matrix plus marrow, and matrix enriched with marrow cells were compared in an established canine spinal ...

  6. Physical Characteristics of Medical Textile Prostheses Designed for Hernia Repair: A Comprehensive Analysis of Select Commercial Devices

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linli Miao

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Inguinal hernia repairs are among the most frequent operations performed worldwide. This study aims to provide further understanding of structural characteristics of hernia prostheses, and better comprehensive evaluation. Weight, porosity, pore size and other physical characteristics were evaluated; warp knitting structures were thoroughly discussed. Two methods referring to ISO 7198:1998, i.e., weight method and area method, were employed to calculate porosity. Porosity ranged from 37.3% to 69.7% measured by the area method, and 81.1% to 89.6% by the weight method. Devices with two-guide bar structures displayed both higher porosity (57.7%–69.7% and effective porosity (30.8%–60.1% than single-guide bar structure (37.3%–62.4% and 0%–5.9%, respectively. Filament diameter, stitch density and loop structure combined determined the thickness, weight and characteristics of pores. They must be well designed to avoid zero effective porosity regarding a single-bar structure. The area method was more effective in characterizing flat sheet meshes while the weight method was perhaps more accurate in describing stereoscopic void space for 3D structure devices. This article will give instructive clues for engineers to improve mesh structures, and better understanding of warp knitting meshes for surgeons.

  7. Autologous Endothelial Progenitor Cell-Seeding Technology and Biocompatibility Testing For Cardiovascular Devices in Large Animal Model

    OpenAIRE

    Jantzen, Alexandra E.; Lane, Whitney O.; Gage, Shawn M.; Haseltine, Justin M; Galinat, Lauren J; Jamiolkowski, Ryan M.; Lin, Fu-Hsiung; Truskey, George A.; Achneck, Hardean E.

    2011-01-01

    Implantable cardiovascular devices are manufactured from artificial materials (e.g. titanium (Ti), expanded polytetrafluoroethylene), which pose the risk of thromboemboli formation1,2,3. We have developed a method to line the inside surface of Ti tubes with autologous blood-derived human or porcine endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs)4. By implanting Ti tubes containing a confluent layer of porcine EPCs in the inferior vena cava (IVC) of pigs, we tested the improved biocompatibility of the cel...

  8. Evaluation of three levels of selective devices relevant to management of the Danish Kattegat-Skagerrak Nephrops fishery

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frandsen, Rikke; Holst, René; Madsen, Niels

    2009-01-01

    This study illuminates a range of technological options relevant to present legislation for regulating fish by-catch in a small-meshed Nephrops fishery. The selection of cod, haddock, hake, lemon sole, Nephrops, plaice, saithe, witch, and whiting were evaluated using the twin-trawl technique for...... parameters by species and confidence bands to compare the selective properties of different gear types. For cod, haddock, hake, Nephrops, plaice, and whiting we obtained estimates for all three gear variants, whereas we obtained estimates for lemon sole and witch only with the standard and the SMP codends...

  9. Evodiamine selectively targets cancer stem-like cells through the p53-p21-Rb pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Han, Seula; Woo, Jong Kyu; Jung, Yuchae; Jeong, Dawoon; Kang, Minsook; Yoo, Young-Ji; Lee, Hani; Oh, Seung Hyun; Ryu, Jae-Ha; Kim, Woo-Young

    2016-01-22

    In spite of the recent improvements, the resistance to chemotherapy/radiotherapy followed by relapse is the main hurdle for the successful treatment of breast cancer, a leading cause of death in women. A small population of breast cancer cells that have stem-like characteristics (cancer stem-like cells; CSLC) may contribute to this resistance and relapse. Here, we report on a component of a traditional Chinese medicine, evodiamine, which selectively targets CSLC of breast cancer cell lines MCF7 and MDAMB 231 at a concentration that does show a little or no cytotoxic effect on bulk cancer cells. While evodiamine caused the accumulation of bulk cancer cells at the G2/M phase, it did not hold CSLC in a specific cell cycle phase but instead, selectively killed CSLC. This was not due to the culture of CSLC in suspension or without FBS. A proteomic analysis and western blotting revealed that evodiamine changed the expression of cell cycle regulating molecules more efficiently in CSLC cells than in bulk cancer cells. Surprisingly, evodiamine selectively activated p53 and p21 and decreased inactive Rb, the master molecules in G1/S checkpoint. These data collectively suggest a novel mechanism involving CSLC-specific targeting by evodiamine and its possible use to the therapy of breast cancer.

  10. Selection and expansion of natural killer cells for NK cell-based immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Petra S A; Suck, Garnet; Nowakowska, Paulina; Ullrich, Evelyn; Seifried, Erhard; Bader, Peter; Tonn, Torsten; Seidl, Christian

    2016-04-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells have been used in several clinical trials as adaptive immunotherapy. The low numbers of these cells in peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) have resulted in various approaches to preferentially expand primary NK cells from PBMC. While some clinical trials have used the addition of interleukin 2 (IL-2) to co-stimulate the expansion of purified NK cells from allogeneic donors, recent studies have shown promising results in achieving in vitro expansion of NK cells to large numbers for adoptive immunotherapy. NK cell expansion requires multiple cell signals for survival, proliferation and activation. Thus, expansion strategies have been focused either to substitute these factors using autologous feeder cells or to use genetically modified allogeneic feeder cells. Recent developments in the clinical use of genetically modified NK cell lines with chimeric antigen receptors, the development of expansion protocols for the clinical use of NK cell from human embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent stem cells are challenging improvements for NK cell-based immunotherapy. Transfer of several of these protocols to clinical-grade production of NK cells necessitates adaptation of good manufacturing practice conditions, and the development of freezing conditions to establish NK cell stocks will require some effort and, however, should enhance the therapeutic options of NK cells in clinical medicine.

  11. Slot-Die-Coated V2O5 as Hole Transport Layer for Flexible Organic Solar Cells and Optoelectronic Devices

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beliatis, Michail; Helgesen, Martin; Garcia Valverde, Rafael;

    2016-01-01

    Vanadium pentoxide has been proposed as a good alternative hole transport layer for improving device lifetime of organic photovoltaics. The article presents a study on the optimization of slot-die-coated vanadium oxide films produced with a roll coating machine with the aim of achieving scalable...... organic solar cells and photo-detectors with improved performance. The effect of different diluents on the electrical properties of the vanadium oxide films is investigated, and methodologies for efficient interfacing of the anode are studied. Furthermore, the lifetime of the cells with incorporated...

  12. Inhibins Tune the Thymocyte Selection Process by Regulating Thymic Stromal Cell Differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ebzadrel Carbajal-Franco

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Inhibins and Activins are members of the TGF-β superfamily that regulate the differentiation of several cell types. These ligands were initially identified as hormones that regulate the hypothalamus-pituitary-gonadal axis; however, increasing evidence has demonstrated that they are key regulators in the immune system. We have previously demonstrated that Inhibins are the main Activin ligands expressed in the murine thymus and that they regulate thymocyte differentiation, promoting the DN3-DN4 transition and the selection of SP thymocytes. As Inhibins are mainly produced by thymic stromal cells, which also express Activin receptors and Smad proteins, we hypothesized that Inhibins might play a role in stromal cell differentiation and function. Here, we demonstrate that, in the absence of Inhibins, thymic conventional dendritic cells display reduced levels of MHC Class II (MHCII and CD86. In addition, the ratio between cTECs and mTECs was affected, indicating that mTEC differentiation was favoured and cTEC diminished in the absence of Inhibins. These changes appeared to impact thymocyte selection leading to a decreased selection of CD4SP thymocytes and increased generation of natural regulatory T cells. These findings demonstrate that Inhibins tune the T cell selection process by regulating both thymocyte and stromal cell differentiation.

  13. INFLUENCE OF MIXING DEVICE ON SERUM-FREE CULTIVATION OF INSECT CELLS IN SPINNER FLASKS

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    IntroductionThe cultivation of insect cells is presently gainingin popularity mainly for the expression of high-valueheterologous proteins using genetically engineeredbaculoviruseslll. Efficient production of these proteinsrequires a suitable insect cell culture system, includingthe improved cell line with high productivity, suitableculture media and favorable environment that couldstrongly support cell growth.Tn-SBI-4 (Tns ) is a novel cell line establishedfrom Tnt midgut tissue, This cell line proved topo...

  14. Single-photon device requirements for operating linear optics quantum computing outside the post-selection basis

    CERN Document Server

    Jennewein, Thomas; White, Andrew G

    2010-01-01

    Photonics is a promising architecture for the realisation of quantum information processing, since the two-photon interaction, or non-linearity, necessary to build logical gates can efficiently be realised by the use of interference with ancillary photons and detection. Although single-photon sources and detectors are pivotal in realisations of such systems, clear guidelines for the required performance of realistic systems are yet to be defined. We present our detailed numerical simulation of several quantum optics circuits including sources and detectors all represented in multi-dimensional Fockspaces, which allows to obtain experimentally realistic performance bounds for for these devices. In addition, the single-photon source based on switched parametric down-conversion is studied, which in principle could reach the required performance. Three approaches for implementing the switching hierarchy of the photons are simulated, and their anticipated performance is obtained. Our results define the bar for the ...

  15. Selection of mesenchymal-like metastatic cells in primary tumors – an in silico investigation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vipin eNarang

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available In order to metastasize, cancer cells must undergo phenotypic transition from an anchorage-dependent form to a motile form via a process referred to as epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT. It is currently unclear whether metastatic cells emerge late during tumor progression by successive accumulation of mutations, or whether they derive from distinct cell populations already present during the early stages of tumorigenesis. Similarly, the selective pressures that drive metastasis are poorly understood. Selection of cancer cells with increased proliferative capacity and enhanced survival characteristics may explain how some transformations promote a metastatic phenotype. However, it is difficult to explain how disseminated mesenchymal-like cancer cells can be subjected to such selective pressure, since these cells usually remain dormant for prolonged periods of time. In the current study, we have used in silico modeling and simulation to investigate the hypothesis that mesenchymal-like cancer cells evolve during the early stages of primary tumor development, and that these cells exhibit survival and proliferative advantages within the tumor microenvironment. In an agent-based tumor microenvironment model, cancer cell agents with distinct sets of attributes governing nutrient consumption, proliferation, apoptosis, random motility and cell adhesion were allowed to compete for space and nutrients. These simulation data indicated that mesenchymal-like cancer cells displaying high motility and low adhesion proliferate more rapidly and display a survival advantage over epithelial-like cancer cells. Furthermore, the presence of mesenchymal-like cells within the primary tumor influences the macroscopic properties, emergent morphology and growth rate of tumors.

  16. Solid-State NMR on bacterial cells: selective cell wall signal enhancement and resolution improvement using dynamic nuclear polarization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) enhanced solid-state nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) has recently emerged as a powerful technique for the study of material surfaces. In this study, we demonstrate its potential to investigate cell surface in intact cells. Using Bacillus subtilis bacterial cells as an example, it is shown that the polarizing agent 1-(TEMPO-4-oxy)-3-(TEMPO-4-amino)propan-2-ol (TOTAPOL) has a strong binding affinity to cell wall polymers (peptidoglycan). This particular interaction is thoroughly investigated with a systematic study on extracted cell wall materials, disrupted cells, and entire cells, which proved that TOTAPOL is mainly accumulating in the cell wall. This property is used on one hand to selectively enhance or suppress cell wall signals by controlling radical concentrations and on the other hand to improve spectral resolution by means of a difference spectrum. Comparing DNP-enhanced and conventional solid-state NMR, an absolute sensitivity ratio of 24 was obtained on the entire cell sample. This important increase in sensitivity together with the possibility of enhancing specifically cell wall signals and improving resolution really opens new avenues for the use of DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR as an on-cell investigation tool. (authors)

  17. Selective cytotoxicity of indirect nonequilibrium atmospheric pressure plasma against ovarian clear-cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Utsumi, Fumi; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Nakamura, Kae; Tanaka, Hiromasa; Hori, Masaru; Kikkawa, Fumitaka

    2014-01-01

    Ovarian clear cell carcinoma (CCC) is a histological type of epithelial ovarian cancer that is less responsive to chemotherapy and associated with a poorer prognosis than serous and endometrioid carcinoma. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma which produces reactive species has recently led to an explosion of research in plasma medicine. Plasma treatment can be applied to cancer treatment to induce apoptosis and tumor growth arrest. Furthermore, recent studies have shown that a medium exposed to plasma also has an anti-proliferative effect against cancer in the absence of direct exposure to plasma. In this study, we confirmed whether this indirect plasma has an anti-tumor effect against CCC, and investigated whether this efficacy is selective for cancer cells. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma induced apoptosis in CCC cells, while human peritoneal mesothelial cells remained viable. Non-thermal atmospheric pressure plasma exhibits selective cytotoxicity against CCC cells which are resistant to chemotherapy.

  18. Electrochemical device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grimes, Patrick G.; Einstein, Harry; Bellows, Richard J.

    1988-01-12

    A tunnel protected electrochemical device features channels fluidically communicating between manifold, tunnels and cells. The channels are designed to provide the most efficient use of auxiliary power. The channels have a greater hydraulic pressure drop and electrical resistance than the manifold. This will provide a design with the optimum auxiliary energy requirements.

  19. Tight control of light trapping in surface addressable photonic crystal membranes: application to spectrally and spatially selective optical devices (Conference Presentation)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Letartre, Xavier; Blanchard, Cédric; Grillet, Christian; Jamois, Cécile; Leclercq, Jean-Louis; Viktorovitch, Pierre

    2016-04-01

    Surface addressable Photonic Crystal Membranes (PCM) are 1D or 2D photonic crystals formed in a slab waveguides where Bloch modes located above the light line are exploited. These modes are responsible for resonances in the reflection spectrum whose bandwidth can be adjusted at will. These resonances result from the coupling between a guided mode of the membrane and a free-space mode through the pattern of the photonic crystal. If broadband, these structures represent an ideal mirror to form compact vertical microcavity with 3D confinement of photons and polarization selectivity. Among numerous devices, low threshold VCSELs with remarkable and tunable modal properties have been demonstrated. Narrow band PCMs (or high Q resonators) have also been extensively used for surface addressable optoelectronic devices where an active material is embedded into the membrane, leading to the demonstration of low threshold surface emitting lasers, nonlinear bistables, optical traps... In this presentation, we will describe the main physical rules which govern the lifetime of photons in these resonant modes. More specifically, it will be emphasized that the Q factor of the PCM is determined, to the first order, by the integral overlap between the electromagnetic field distributions of the guided and free space modes and of the dielectric periodic perturbation which is applied to the homogeneous membrane to get the photonic crystal. It turns out that the symmetries of these distributions are of prime importance for the strength of the resonance. It will be shown that, by molding in-plane or vertical symmetries of Bloch modes, spectrally and spatially selective light absorbers or emitters can be designed. First proof of concept devices will be also presented.

  20. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Idit Dotan

    Full Text Available The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches.Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining.TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls.A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam radiation or chemotherapy, with

  1. Engineering Multi-Walled Carbon Nanotube Therapeutic Bionanofluids to Selectively Target Papillary Thyroid Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paliouras, Miltiadis; Mitmaker, Elliot J.; Trifiro, Mark A.

    2016-01-01

    Background The incidence of papillary thyroid carcinoma (PTC) has risen steadily over the past few decades as well as the recurrence rates. It has been proposed that targeted ablative physical therapy could be a therapeutic modality in thyroid cancer. Targeted bio-affinity functionalized multi-walled carbon nanotubes (BioNanofluid) act locally, to efficiently convert external light energy to heat thereby specifically killing cancer cells. This may represent a promising new cancer therapeutic modality, advancing beyond conventional laser ablation and other nanoparticle approaches. Methods Thyroid Stimulating Hormone Receptor (TSHR) was selected as a target for PTC cells, due to its wide expression. Either TSHR antibodies or Thyrogen or purified TSH (Thyrotropin) were chemically conjugated to our functionalized Bionanofluid. A diode laser system (532 nm) was used to illuminate a PTC cell line for set exposure times. Cell death was assessed using Trypan Blue staining. Results TSHR-targeted BioNanofluids were capable of selectively ablating BCPAP, a TSHR-positive PTC cell line, while not TSHR-null NSC-34 cells. We determined that a 2:1 BCPAP cell:α-TSHR-BioNanofluid conjugate ratio and a 30 second laser exposure killed approximately 60% of the BCPAP cells, while 65% and >70% of cells were ablated using Thyrotropin- and Thyrogen-BioNanofluid conjugates, respectively. Furthermore, minimal non-targeted killing was observed using selective controls. Conclusion A BioNanofluid platform offering a potential therapeutic path for papillary thyroid cancer has been investigated, with our in vitro results suggesting the development of a potent and rapid method of selective cancer cell killing. Therefore, BioNanofluid treatment emphasizes the need for new technology to treat patients with local recurrence and metastatic disease who are currently undergoing either re-operative neck explorations, repeated administration of radioactive iodine and as a last resort external beam

  2. Melanoma chemotherapy leads to the selection of ABCB5-expressing cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marine Chartrain

    Full Text Available Metastatic melanoma is the most aggressive skin cancer. Recently, phenotypically distinct subpopulations of tumor cells were identified. Among them, ABCB5-expressing cells were proposed to display an enhanced tumorigenicity with stem cell-like properties. In addition, ABCB5(+ cells are thought to participate to chemoresistance through a potential efflux function of ABCB5. Nevertheless, the fate of these cells upon drugs that are used in melanoma chemotherapy remains to be clarified. Here we explored the effect of anti-melanoma treatments on the ABCB5-expressing cells. Using a melanoma xenograft model (WM266-4, we observed in vivo that ABCB5-expressing cells are enriched after a temozolomide treatment that induces a significant tumor regression. These results were further confirmed in a preliminary study conducted on clinical samples from patients that received dacarbazine. In vitro, we showed that ABCB5-expressing cells selectively survive when exposed to dacarbazine, the reference treatment of metastatic melanoma, but also to vemurafenib, a new inhibitor of the mutated kinase V600E BRAF and other various chemotherapeutic drugs. Our results show that anti-melanoma chemotherapy might participate to the chemoresistance acquisition by selecting tumor cell subpopulations expressing ABCB5. This is of particular importance in understanding the relapses observed after anti-melanoma treatments and reinforces the interest of ABCB5 and ABCB5-expressing cells as potential therapeutic targets in melanoma.

  3. Selective photothermal efficiency of citrate capped gold nanoparticles for destruction of cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raji, V. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India); Kumar, Jatish [Division of photochemistry and photobiology, National Institute for Interdisciplinary Sciences and Technology (CSIR), Thiruvananthapuram 695 019, Kerala (India); Rejiya, C.S.; Vibin, M.; Shenoi, Vinesh N. [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India); Abraham, Annie, E-mail: annieab2@yahoo.co.in [Department of Biochemistry, University of Kerala, Kariavattom Campus, Thiruvananthapuram 695 581, Kerala (India)

    2011-08-15

    Gold nanoparticles are recently having much attention because of their increased applications in biomedical fields. In this paper, we demonstrated the photothermal efficacy of citrate capped gold nanoparticles (AuNPs) for the destruction of A431 cancer cells. Citrate capped AuNPs were synthesized successfully and characterized by UV-visible-NIR spectrophotometry and High Resolution Transmission Electron Microscopy (HR-TEM). Further, AuNPs were conjugated with epidermal growth factor receptor antibody (anti-EGFR) and applied for the selective photothermal therapy (PTT) of human epithelial cancer cells, A431. PTT experiments were conducted in four groups, Group I-control cells, Group II-cells treated with laser light alone, Group III-cells treated with unconjugated AuNP and further laser irradiation and Group IV-anti-EGFR conjugated AuNP treated cells irradiated by laser light. After laser irradiation, cell morphology changes that were examined using phase contrast microscopy along with the relevant biochemical parameters like lactate dehydrogenase activity, reactive oxygen species generation and caspase-3 activity were studied for all the groups to determine whether cell death occurs due to necrosis or apoptosis. From these results we concluded that, these immunotargeted nanoparticles could selectively induce cell death via ROS mediated apoptosis when cells were exposed to a low power laser light.

  4. Epicatechin stimulates mitochondrial activity and selectively sensitizes cancer cells to radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hosam A Elbaz

    Full Text Available Radiotherapy is the treatment of choice for solid tumors including pancreatic cancer, but the effectiveness of treatment is limited by radiation resistance. Resistance to chemotherapy or radiotherapy is associated with reduced mitochondrial respiration and drugs that stimulate mitochondrial respiration may decrease radiation resistance. The objectives of this study were to evaluate the potential of (--epicatechin to stimulate mitochondrial respiration in cancer cells and to selectively sensitize cancer cells to radiation. We investigated the natural compound (--epicatechin for effects on mitochondrial respiration and radiation resistance of pancreatic and glioblastoma cancer cells using a Clark type oxygen electrode, clonogenic survival assays, and Western blot analyses. (--Epicatechin stimulated mitochondrial respiration and oxygen consumption in Panc-1 cells. Human normal fibroblasts were not affected. (--Epicatechin sensitized Panc-1, U87, and MIA PaCa-2 cells with an average radiation enhancement factor (REF of 1.7, 1.5, and 1.2, respectively. (--Epicatechin did not sensitize normal fibroblast cells to ionizing radiation with a REF of 0.9, suggesting cancer cell selectivity. (--Epicatechin enhanced Chk2 phosphorylation and p21 induction when combined with radiation in cancer, but not normal, cells. Taken together, (--epicatechin radiosensitized cancer cells, but not normal cells, and may be a promising candidate for pancreatic cancer treatment when combined with radiation.

  5. Positive and negative selection of T cells in T-cell receptor transgenic mice expressing a bcl-2 transgene.

    OpenAIRE

    Strasser, A.; Harris, A W; von Boehmer, H; Cory, S

    1994-01-01

    To explore the role of bcl-2 in T-cell development, a bcl-2 transgene was introduced into mice expressing a T-cell receptor (TCR) transgene encoding reactivity for the mouse male antigen HY presented by the H-2Db class I antigen of the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). Normal thymic development is contingent on the ability of immature thymocytes to interact with self-MHC molecules presented by thymic stroma (positive selection). Thus, thymocyte numbers are low in femal...

  6. Formate: an Energy Storage and Transport Bridge between Carbon Dioxide and a Formate Fuel Cell in a Single Device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vo, Tracy; Purohit, Krutarth; Nguyen, Christopher; Biggs, Brenna; Mayoral, Salvador; Haan, John L

    2015-11-01

    We demonstrate the first device to our knowledge that uses a solar panel to power the electrochemical reduction of dissolved carbon dioxide (carbonate) into formate that is then used in the same device to operate a direct formate fuel cell (DFFC). The electrochemical reduction of carbonate is carried out on a Sn electrode in a reservoir that maintains a constant carbon balance between carbonate and formate. The electron-rich formate species is converted by the DFFC into electrical energy through electron release. The product of DFFC operation is the electron-deficient carbonate species that diffuses back to the reservoir bulk. It is possible to continuously charge the device using alternative energy (e.g., solar) to convert carbonate to formate for on-demand use in the DFFC; the intermittent nature of alternative energy makes this an attractive design. In this work, we demonstrate a proof-of-concept device that performs reduction of carbonate, storage of formate, and operation of a DFFC.

  7. An excitatory amacrine cell detects object motion and provides feature-selective input to ganglion cells in the mouse retina

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Tahnbee; Soto, Florentina; Kerschensteiner, Daniel

    2015-01-01

    Retinal circuits detect salient features of the visual world and report them to the brain through spike trains of retinal ganglion cells. The most abundant ganglion cell type in mice, the so-called W3 ganglion cell, selectively responds to movements of small objects. Where and how object motion sensitivity arises in the retina is incompletely understood. In this study, we use 2-photon-guided patch-clamp recordings to characterize responses of vesicular glutamate transporter 3 (VGluT3)-expressing amacrine cells (ACs) to a broad set of visual stimuli. We find that these ACs are object motion sensitive and analyze the synaptic mechanisms underlying this computation. Anatomical circuit reconstructions suggest that VGluT3-expressing ACs form glutamatergic synapses with W3 ganglion cells, and targeted recordings show that the tuning of W3 ganglion cells' excitatory input matches that of VGluT3-expressing ACs' responses. Synaptic excitation of W3 ganglion cells is diminished, and responses to object motion are suppressed in mice lacking VGluT3. Object motion, thus, is first detected by VGluT3-expressing ACs, which provide feature-selective excitatory input to W3 ganglion cells. DOI: http://dx.doi.org/10.7554/eLife.08025.001 PMID:25988808

  8. Selective cytotoxicity of marine algae extracts to several human leukemic cell lines

    OpenAIRE

    Harada, Hideki; Kamei, Yuto

    1997-01-01

    Extracts from 8 species of marine algae which showed selective cytotoxicity in our previous screening program, were further examined for cytotoxic spectra to five human leukemic cell lines. The extract from a red alga, Amphiroa zonata exhibited strong cytotoxicity to all human leukemic cell lines tested and murine leukemic cells L1210 at the final concentrations from 15 to 375 µg ml−1. Then the cytotoxicity was not found in normal human fibroblast HDF and murine normal cells NIH-3T3. The acti...

  9. Resistance of tumor cells to hydrogen peroxide as a factor of selection of highly metastatic cell variants in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The authors investigate the theory that tumor cells which catabolize H2O2 more actively may possibly have selected advantages in vivo (of different origin). The authors tested the sensitivity to H2O2 of parental cells of strain STHE (which did not progress in vivo) and 17 of its daughter variants isolated from lung tissue of experimental animals at different stages of formation of metastases (before and after their formation) and differing in metastatic activity. Intact cells were placed into test tube No. 6 of each series. After 30 min of exposure at 200C, cells treated with H2O2 and intact cells were washed out by centrifugation, and resuspended in nutritive medium containing 10% bovine serum and 3H-thymidine, and each sample was diffused at a volume of 2.0 ml of cell suspension in each of three scintillation vials. The proliferative pool of cells in each sample was determined according to incorporation (for 22 h at 370C) of 3H-thymidine into cell nuclei. Data concerning incorporation of 3H-thymidine was expressed for each sample of cells in percentages in relation to corresponding intact control (incorporation of label in a control culture of intact cells was taken as 100%). Each cell variant was investigated repeatedly in two-three more experiments

  10. A bcl-xS adenovirus selectively induces apoptosis in transformed cells compared to normal mammary cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sumantran, V N; Lee, D S; Woods Ignatoski, K M; Ethier, S P; Wicha, M S

    2000-01-01

    Oncogenes which drive the cell cycle, such as c-myc, can sensitize cells to apoptosis. This suggests the possibility that the expression of genes such as bcl-2 or bcl-xL is required to inhibit apoptosis induced by oncogene expression. We hypothesized that inhibition of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL by the pro-apoptotic Bcl-xS protein, would result in selective induction of apoptosis in mammary carcinoma cells compared to their nontransformed counterparts. Therefore, we compared the effects of Bcl-xS expression delivered by a bcl-xS adenovirus (bcl-xS-Adv) vector, on viability and apoptosis of nontransformed versus transformed mammary epithelial cells. We report that c-myc-transformed murine mammary cells are extremely sensitive to apoptosis induced by the bcl-xS adenovirus (bcl-xS-Adv) vector, whereas immortalized, nontransformed murine mammary cells are relatively resistant to apoptosis induced by this vector. Likewise, human mammary epithelial cells transduced with c-erbB-2 were more sensitive to apoptosis induced by the bcl-xS vector than the nontransformed parental cells. Similar results were obtained when we tested the effects of bcl-xS adenoviral infection on primary normal human mammary epithelial cells and SUM-190 PT cells, (a c-erbB-2 over-expressing human mammary carcinoma cell line) grown on Matrigel. These data are consistent with the hypothesis that inhibition of Bcl-2/Bcl-xL can result in selective killing of cancer cells compared to their nontransformed counterparts.

  11. Granulosa cells and retinoic acid co-treatment enrich potential germ cells from manually selected Oct4-EGFP expressing human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hsin-Fu; Jan, Pey-Shynan; Kuo, Hung-Chih; Wu, Fang-Chun; Lan, Chen-Wei; Huang, Mei-Chi; Chien, Chung-Liang; Ho, Hong-Nerng

    2014-09-01

    Differentiation of human embryonic stem (HES) cells to germ cells may become clinically useful in overcoming diseases related to germ-cell development. Niches were used to differentiate HES cell lines, NTU1 and H9 Oct4-enhanced green fluorescence protein (EGFP), including laminin, granulosa cell co-culture or conditioned medium, ovarian stromal cell co-culture or conditioned medium, retinoic acid, stem cell factor (SCF) and BMP4-BMP7-BMP8b treatment. Flow cytometry showed that granulosa cell co-culture (P cells expressing early germ cell marker stage-specific embryonic antigen 1(SSEA1); sorted SSEA1[+] cells did not express higher levels of germ cell gene VASA and GDF9. Manually collected H9 Oct4-EGFP[+] cells expressed significantly higher levels of VASA (P = 0.005) and GDF9 (P = 0.001). H9 Oct4-EGFP[+] cells developed to ovarian follicle-like structures after culture for 28 days but with low efficiency. Unlike SCF and BMP4, retinoic acid co-treatment enhanced VASA, GDF9 and SCP3 expression. A protocol is recommended to enrich differentiated HES cells with germ-cell potential by culture with granulosa cells, conditioned medium or retinoic acid, manual selection of Oct4-EGFP[+] cells, and analysis of VASA, GDF9 expression, or both.

  12. Optimizing the fabrication process and interplay of device components of polymer solar cells using a field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Donets, Sergii; Pershin, Anton; Baeurle, Stephan A.

    2015-05-01

    Both the device composition and fabrication process are well-known to crucially affect the power conversion efficiency of polymer solar cells. Major advances have recently been achieved through the development of novel device materials and inkjet printing technologies, which permit to improve their durability and performance considerably. In this work, we demonstrate the usefulness of a recently developed field-based multiscale solar-cell algorithm to investigate the influence of the material characteristics, like, e.g., electrode surfaces, polymer architectures, and impurities in the active layer, as well as post-production treatments, like, e.g., electric field alignment, on the photovoltaic performance of block-copolymer solar-cell devices. Our study reveals that a short exposition time of the polymer bulk heterojunction to the action of an external electric field can lead to a low photovoltaic performance due to an incomplete alignment process, leading to undulated or disrupted nanophases. With increasing exposition time, the nanophases align in direction to the electric field lines, resulting in an increase of the number of continuous percolation paths and, ultimately, in a reduction of the number of exciton and charge-carrier losses. Moreover, we conclude by modifying the interaction strengths between the electrode surfaces and active layer components that a too low or too high affinity of an electrode surface to one of the components can lead to defective contacts, causing a deterioration of the device performance. Finally, we infer from the study of block-copolymer nanoparticle systems that particle impurities can significantly affect the nanostructure of the polymer matrix and reduce the photovoltaic performance of the active layer. For a critical volume fraction and size of the nanoparticles, we observe a complete phase transformation of the polymer nanomorphology, leading to a drop of the internal quantum efficiency. For other particle-numbers and -sizes

  13. ITO-free flexible polymer solar cells: From small model devices to roll-to-roll processed large modules

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Manceau, Matthieu; Angmo, Dechan; Jørgensen, Mikkel;

    2011-01-01

    Manufacturing of flexible ITO-free polymer solar cell modules by roll-to-roll methods (R2R) is described. Inverted devices with top illumination were built on a Kapton foil and an Aluminum/Chromium bi-layer system was used as electron contact. The layer structure was Kapton/Al/Cr/P3HT:PCBM/PEDOT:......Manufacturing of flexible ITO-free polymer solar cell modules by roll-to-roll methods (R2R) is described. Inverted devices with top illumination were built on a Kapton foil and an Aluminum/Chromium bi-layer system was used as electron contact. The layer structure was Kapton/Al/Cr/P3HT...... lab-scale single devices were then transferred to a full R2R process combining slot-die coating and screen printing. All the layers were processed from solution under ambient conditions. Two different concepts were explored: (i) serially connected stripe modules (to reduce the Ohmic losses) and (ii......) monolithic modules (to achieve high geometric fill factor and increase the flexibility of the process). For this second concept, the only layer that needs to be patterned is the silver grid electrode and the grid pattern design can then be readily tuned. As an example, four different patterns were used...

  14. Systems, methods and computer-readable media for modeling cell performance fade of rechargeable electrochemical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gering, Kevin L

    2013-08-27

    A system includes an electrochemical cell, monitoring hardware, and a computing system. The monitoring hardware periodically samples performance characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The computing system determines cell information from the performance characteristics of the electrochemical cell. The computing system also develops a mechanistic level model of the electrochemical cell to determine performance fade characteristics of the electrochemical cell and analyzing the mechanistic level model to estimate performance fade characteristics over aging of a similar electrochemical cell. The mechanistic level model uses first constant-current pulses applied to the electrochemical cell at a first aging period and at three or more current values bracketing a first exchange current density. The mechanistic level model also is based on second constant-current pulses applied to the electrochemical cell at a second aging period and at three or more current values bracketing the second exchange current density.

  15. A novel method for assessing adherent single-cell stiffness in tension: design and testing of a substrate-based live cell functional imaging device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bartalena, Guido; Grieder, Reto; Sharma, Ram I; Zambelli, Tomaso; Muff, Roman; Snedeker, Jess G

    2011-04-01

    Various micro-devices have been used to assess single cell mechanical properties. Here, we designed and implemented a novel, mechanically actuated, two dimensional cell culture system that enables a measure of cell stiffness based on quantitative functional imaging of cell-substrate interaction. Based on parametric finite element design analysis, we fabricated a soft (5 kPa) polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) cell substrate coated with collagen-I and fluorescent micro-beads, thus providing a favorable terrain for cell adhesion and for substrate deformation quantification, respectively. We employed a real-time tracking system that analyzes high magnification images of living cells under stretch, and compensates for gross substrate motions by dynamic adjustment of the microscope stage. Digital image correlation (DIC) was used to quantify substrate deformation beneath and surrounding the cell, leading to an estimate of cell stiffness based upon the ability of the cell to resist the applied substrate deformation. Sensitivity of the system was tested using chemical treatments to both "soften" and "stiffen" the cell cytoskeleton with either 0.5 μg/ml Cytochalasin-D or 3% Glutaraldehyde, respectively. Results indicate that untreated osteosarcoma cells (SAOS-2) exhibit a 1.5 ± 0.7% difference in strain from an applied target substrate strain of 8%. Compared to untreated cells, those treated with Cyochalasin-D passively followed the substrate (0.5 ± 0.5%, p deformation (2.9 ± 1.6%, p < 0.001). Nano-indentation testing showed differences in cell stiffness based on culture treatment, consistent with DIC findings. Our results indicate that mechanics and image analysis approaches do hold promise as a method to quantitatively assess tensile cell constitutive properties. PMID:21120698

  16. Comparative study on direction selectivity and functional organization of the primary visual cortical cells in monkeys and cats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2000-01-01

    Although the directionally selective cells in many visual cortical areas are organized in columnar manner, the functional organization of direction selectivity of area Vl in the monkey still remains unclear. We quantitatively studied the proportion of directionally selective cells, direction selectivity and the functional organization of the striate cortical cells in the monkey and compared those with the cat. The results show that the direction selectivity and directional organization of striate cortical cells in the monkey are significantly weaker than those in the cat, suggesting that the species difference between the two kinds of animal is related to their different anatomic pathways.

  17. Comparative study on direction selectivity and functional organization of the primary visual cortical cells in monkeys and cats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    寿天德; 周逸峰; 俞洪波

    2000-01-01

    Although the directionally selective cells in many visual cortical areas are organized in columnar manner, the functional organization of direction selectivity of area VI in the monkey still remains unclear. We quantitatively studied the proportion of directionally selective cells, direction selectivity and the functional organization of the striate cortical cells in the monkey and compared those with the cat. The results show that the direction selectivity and directional organization of striate cortical cells in the monkey are significantly weaker than those in the cat, suggesting that the species difference between the two kinds of animal is related to their different anatomic pathways.

  18. Conditional Cytotoxic Anti-HIV Gene Therapy for Selectable Cell Modification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garg, Himanshu; Joshi, Anjali

    2016-05-01

    Gene therapy remains one of the potential strategies to achieve a cure for HIV infection. One of the major limitations of anti-HIV gene therapy concerns recovering an adequate number of modified cells to generate an HIV-proof immune system. Our study addresses this issue by developing a methodology that can mark conditional vector-transformed cells for selection and subsequently target HIV-infected cells for elimination by treatment with ganciclovir (GCV). We used the herpes simplex virus thymidine kinase (TK) mutant SR39, which is highly potent at killing cells at low GCV concentrations. This gene was cloned into a conditional HIV vector, pNL-GFPRRESA, which expresses the gene of interest as well as green fluorescent protein (GFP) in the presence of HIV Tat protein. We show here that TK-SR39 was more potent that wild-type TK (TK-WT) at eliminating infected cells at lower concentrations of GCV. As the vector expresses GFP in the presence of Tat, transient expression of Tat either by Tat RNA transfection or transduction by a nonintegrating lentiviral (NIL) vector marked the cells with GFP for selection. In cells selected by this strategy, TK-SR39 was more potent at limiting virus replication than TK-WT. Finally, in Jurkat cells modified and selected by this approach, infection with CXCR4-tropic Lai virus could be suppressed by treatment with GCV. GCV treatment limited the number of HIV-infected cells, virus production, as well as virus-induced cytopathic effects in this model. We provide proof of principle that TK-SR39 in a conditional HIV vector can provide a safe and effective anti-HIV strategy. PMID:26800572

  19. Chromatic analysis by monitoring unmodified silver nanoparticles reduction on double layer microfluidic paper-based analytical devices for selective and sensitive determination of mercury(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meelapsom, Rattapol; Jarujamrus, Purim; Amatatongchai, Maliwan; Chairam, Sanoe; Kulsing, Chadin; Shen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This study demonstrates chromatic analysis based on a simple red green blue (RGB) color model for sensitive and selective determination of mercury(II). The analysis was performed by monitoring the color change of a microfluidic Paper-based Analytical Device (µPAD). The device was fabricated by using alkyl ketene dimer (AKD)-inkjet printing and doped with unmodified silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) which were disintegrated when being exposed to mercury(II). The color intensity was detected by using an apparatus consisting of a digital camera and a homemade light box generating constant light intensity. A progressive increase in color intensity of the tested area on the µPAD (3.0mm) was observed with increasing mercury(II) concentration. The developed system enabled quantification of mercury(II) at low concentration with the detection limit of 0.001mgL(-1) (3 SD blank/slope of the calibration curve) and small sample volume uptake (2µL). The linearity range of the calibration curve in this technique was demonstrated from 0.05 to 7mgL(-1) (r(2)=0.998) with good precision (RSD less than 4.1%). Greater selectivity towards mercury(II) compared with potential interference ions was also observed. Furthermore, the percentage recoveries of spiked water samples were in an acceptable range which was in agreement with the values obtained from the conventional method utilizing cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometer (CVAAS). The proposed technique allows a rapid, simple, sensitive and selective analysis of trace mercury(II) in water samples. PMID:27216673

  20. 特定消谐变频调速实验装置的研制%Development of Selective Harmonic Elimination Variable Frequency Speed-Regulating Test Device

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张文义; 张强; 张缪钟; 蒋燎

    2011-01-01

    研制了变频调速原理和特定消谐技术相结合的实验装置,通过控制电路中的模数转换器对存储器高位地址的切换实现变压;改变循环加法计数器的计数脉冲频率实现变频.在逆变电路中采用了三菱公司的智能功率模块,简化了系统结构,提高了整个系统的可靠性和经济性.理论分析和实验结果表明:将特定消谐技术应用于变频调速系统后在节能和环保方面具有优越性能.该实验装置便于分析特定消谐技术的特点和变频调速的运行规律.%The test device is developed by combination of variable frequency speed-regulating principle and selective harmonic elimination technology. A/D by switching to a high of EPROM address and changing the cycle adder the counting of the pulse frequency achieve VVVF. The inverter circuit is used in the Mitsubishi Corporation of IPM module, simplifying the structure and improving the overall system reliability and economy. The theoretical analysis and experimental results show that it has superior function in the economy energy and environmental protection after selective harmonic elimination technique is applied in variable frequency speed-regulating system. This test device is convenient to analyze the characteristic of selective harmonic elimination technology and operating regulation of variable frequency speed-regulating.

  1. Chromatic analysis by monitoring unmodified silver nanoparticles reduction on double layer microfluidic paper-based analytical devices for selective and sensitive determination of mercury(II).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meelapsom, Rattapol; Jarujamrus, Purim; Amatatongchai, Maliwan; Chairam, Sanoe; Kulsing, Chadin; Shen, Wei

    2016-08-01

    This study demonstrates chromatic analysis based on a simple red green blue (RGB) color model for sensitive and selective determination of mercury(II). The analysis was performed by monitoring the color change of a microfluidic Paper-based Analytical Device (µPAD). The device was fabricated by using alkyl ketene dimer (AKD)-inkjet printing and doped with unmodified silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) which were disintegrated when being exposed to mercury(II). The color intensity was detected by using an apparatus consisting of a digital camera and a homemade light box generating constant light intensity. A progressive increase in color intensity of the tested area on the µPAD (3.0mm) was observed with increasing mercury(II) concentration. The developed system enabled quantification of mercury(II) at low concentration with the detection limit of 0.001mgL(-1) (3 SD blank/slope of the calibration curve) and small sample volume uptake (2µL). The linearity range of the calibration curve in this technique was demonstrated from 0.05 to 7mgL(-1) (r(2)=0.998) with good precision (RSD less than 4.1%). Greater selectivity towards mercury(II) compared with potential interference ions was also observed. Furthermore, the percentage recoveries of spiked water samples were in an acceptable range which was in agreement with the values obtained from the conventional method utilizing cold vapor atomic absorption spectrometer (CVAAS). The proposed technique allows a rapid, simple, sensitive and selective analysis of trace mercury(II) in water samples.

  2. Bezielle selectively targets mitochondria of cancer cells to inhibit glycolysis and OXPHOS.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vivian Chen

    Full Text Available Bezielle (BZL101 is a candidate oral drug that has shown promising efficacy and excellent safety in the early phase clinical trials for advanced breast cancer. Bezielle is an aqueous extract from the herb Scutellaria barbata. We have reported previously that Bezielle was selectively cytotoxic to cancer cells while sparing non-transformed cells. In tumor, but not in non-transformed cells, Bezielle induced generation of ROS and severe DNA damage followed by hyperactivation of PARP, depletion of the cellular ATP and NAD, and inhibition of glycolysis. We show here that tumor cells' mitochondria are the primary source of reactive oxygen species induced by Bezielle. Treatment with Bezielle induces progressively higher levels of mitochondrial superoxide as well as peroxide-type ROS. Inhibition of mitochondrial respiration prevents generation of both types of ROS and protects cells from Bezielle-induced death. In addition to glycolysis, Bezielle inhibits oxidative phosphorylation in tumor cells and depletes mitochondrial reserve capacity depriving cells of the ability to produce ATP. Tumor cells lacking functional mitochondria maintain glycolytic activity in presence of Bezielle thus supporting the hypothesis that mitochondria are the primary target of Bezielle. The metabolic effects of Bezielle towards normal cells are not significant, in agreement with the low levels of oxidative damage that Bezielle inflicts on them. Bezielle is therefore a drug that selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria, and is distinguished from other such drugs by its ability to induce not only inhibition of OXPHOS but also of glycolysis. This study provides a better understanding of the mechanism of Bezielle's cytotoxicity, and the basis of its selectivity towards cancer cells.

  3. Organelle selection determines agonist-specific Ca2+ signals in pancreatic acinar and beta cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yamasaki, M.; Masgrau, R.; Morgan, A. J.; Churchill, G. C.; Patel, S.; Ashcroft, S. J. H.; Galione, A

    2004-01-01

    How different extracellular stimuli can evoke different spatiotemporal Ca2+ signals is uncertain. We have elucidated a novel paradigm whereby different agonists use different Ca2+-storing organelles ("organelle seleetion") to evoke unique responses. Some agonists select the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), and others select lysosome-related (acidic) organelles, evoking spatial Ca2+ responses that mirror the organellar distribution. In pancreatic acinar cells, acetylcholine and bombesin exclusively...

  4. In vitro assessment of antiproliferative action selectivity of dietary isothiocyanates for tumor versus normal human cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Konić-Ristić Aleksandra

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aim. Numerous epidemiological studies have shown beneficial effects of cruciferous vegetables consumption in cancer chemoprevention. Biologically active compounds of different Brassicaceae species with antitumor potential are isothiocyanates, present in the form of their precursors - glucosinolates. The aim of this study was to determine the selectivity of antiproliferative action of dietary isothiocyanates for malignant versus normal cells. Methods. Antiproliferative activity of three isothiocyanates abundant in human diet: sulforaphane, benzyl isothiocyanate (BITC and phenylethyl isothiocyanate, on human cervix carcinoma cell line - HeLa, melanoma cell line - Fem-x, and colon cancer cell line - LS 174, and on peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC, with or without mitogen, were determined by MTT colorimetric assay 72 h after their continuous action. Results. All investigated isothiocyanates inhibited the proliferation of HeLa, Fem-x and LS 174 cells. On all cell lines treated, BITC was the most potent inhibitor of cell proliferation with half-maximum inhibitory concentration (IC50 values of 5.04 mmoL m-3 on HeLa cells, 2.76 mmol m-3 on Fem-x, and 14.30 mmol m-3 on LS 174 cells. Antiproliferative effects on human PBMC were with higher IC50 than on malignant cells. Indexes of selectivity, calculated as a ratio between IC50 values obtained on PBMC and malignant cells, were between 1.12 and 16.57, with the highest values obtained for the action of BITC on melanoma Fem-x cells. Conclusion. Based on its antiproliferative effects on malignant cells, as well as the selectivity of the action to malignant vs normal cells, benzyl isothiocyanate can be considered as a promising candidate in cancer chemoprevention. In general, the safety of investigated compounds, in addition to their antitumor potential, should be considered as an important criterion in cancer chemoprevention. Screening of selectivity is a plausible approach to the evaluation

  5. Design, Fabrication and Characterization of MIM Diodes and Frequency Selective Thermal Emitters for Solar Energy Harvesting and Detection Devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Saumya

    could be achieved in this case. These long chain polymeric molecules exhibit a two-dimensional molecular assembly thereby reducing the tunneling distance between the metal electrodes on either side of the insulating layer. Rectification ratios as high as 450:1 at +/-200mV were obtained for an MIM diode configuration of Ni-LB films of Arachidic Acid films-(Au/Pd). The bandwidth of the incident radiation that can be used by this rectenna assembly is limited to 9.5% of 30THz or +/-1.5THz from the center frequency based on the antenna designs which were proposed for this research. This bandwidth constraint has led to research in the field of frequency selective emitters capable of providing a narrowband emission around 30THz. Several grating structures were fabricated in the form of Ni-Si periodic arrays, in a cleanroom environment using photolithography, sputtering and deep reactive ion etching. These frequency selective samples were characterized with the help of focusing optics, monochromators and HgCdTe detectors. The results obtained from the emission spectra were utilized to calibrate a simulation model with Computer Simulation Technology (CST) which uses numerous robust solving techniques, such as the finite element method, in order to obtain the optical parameters for the model. Thereafter, a thorough analysis of the different dimensional and material parameters was performed, to understand their dependence on the emissivity of the selective emitter. Further research on the frequency selectivity of the periodic nano-disk or nano-hole array led to the temperature dependence of the simulated spectra, because the material parameters, such as refractive index or drude model collision frequency, vary with temperature. Thus, the design of frequency selective absorbers/emitters was found to be significantly affected with temperature range of operation of these structures.

  6. Effect of gold nanoparticles on thermal gradient generation and thermotaxis of E. coli cells in microfluidic device.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murugesan, Nithya; Panda, Tapobrata; Das, Sarit K

    2016-08-01

    Bacteria responds to changing chemical and thermal environment by moving towards or away from a particular location. In this report, we looked into thermal gradient generation and response of E. coli DH5α cells to thermal gradient in the presence and in the absence of spherical gold nanoparticles (size: 15 to 22 nm) in a static microfluidic environment using a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) made microfluidic device. A PDMS-agarose based microfluidic device for generating thermal gradient has been developed and the thermal gradient generation in the device has been validated with the numerical simulation. Our studies revealed that the presence of gold nanoparticles, AuNPs (0.649 μg/mL) has no effect on the thermal gradient generation. The E. coli DH5α cells have been treated with AuNPs of two different concentrations (0.649 μg/mL and 0.008 μg/mL). The thermotaxis behavior of cells in the presence of AuNPs has been studied and compared to the thermotaxis of E.coli DH5α cells in the absence of AuNPs. In case of thermotaxis, in the absence of the AuNPs, the E. coli DH5α cells showed better thermotaxis towards lower temperature range, whereas in the presence of AuNPs (0.649 μg/mL and 0.008 μg/mL) thermotaxis of the E. coli DH5α cells has been inhibited. The results show that the spherical AuNPs intervenes in the themotaxis of E. coli DH5α cells and inhibits the cell migration. The reason for the failure in thermotaxis response mechanism may be due to decreased F-type ATP synthase activity and collapse of membrane potential by AuNPs, which, in turn, leads to decreased ATP levels. This has been hypothesized since both thermotaxis and chemotaxis follows the same response mechanism for migration in which ATP plays critical role. PMID:27246690

  7. Thin film device applications

    CERN Document Server

    Kaur, Inderjeet

    1983-01-01

    Two-dimensional materials created ab initio by the process of condensation of atoms, molecules, or ions, called thin films, have unique properties significantly different from the corresponding bulk materials as a result of their physical dimensions, geometry, nonequilibrium microstructure, and metallurgy. Further, these characteristic features of thin films can be drasti­ cally modified and tailored to obtain the desired and required physical characteristics. These features form the basis of development of a host of extraordinary active and passive thin film device applications in the last two decades. On the one extreme, these applications are in the submicron dimensions in such areas as very large scale integration (VLSI), Josephson junction quantum interference devices, magnetic bubbles, and integrated optics. On the other extreme, large-area thin films are being used as selective coatings for solar thermal conversion, solar cells for photovoltaic conver­ sion, and protection and passivating layers. Ind...

  8. Investigation of doxorubicin for multidrug resistance using a fluorescent cytometric imaging system integrated onto cell culture analog devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Donghyun; Xu, Hui; Kim, Sung J.; Shuler, Michael L.

    2004-06-01

    An integrated cytometric fluorescent imaging system is developed for characterizing chemical concentration and cellular status in microscale cell culture analog (μCCA) devices. A μCCA is used to evaluate the potential toxicity and efficacy of proposed pharmaceutical treatment of animals or humans. The imaging system, based on discrete optical components, not only provides a robust and compact tool for real-time measurements, but the modularity of the system also offers flexibility to be applicable to various μCCA structures that may be appropriate to various animal or human models. We investigate the dynamics of doxorubicin, a chemotherapeutic agent, on cultured cells in a μCCA using the integrated cytometric fluorescent imaging system. This study incorporates two uteran cancer cell lines representing a sensitive cell type and a multi-drug resistant (MDR) derivative cell line. The ultimate goal is to test the effect of MDR modulators in combination with doxorubicin to kill cancer cells while not causing undue harm to normal cells.

  9. Lab-on-a-brain: Implantable micro-optical fluidic devices for neural cell analysis in vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takehara, Hiroaki; Nagaoka, Akira; Noguchi, Jun; Akagi, Takanori; Kasai, Haruo; Ichiki, Takanori

    2014-10-01

    The high-resolution imaging of neural cells in vivo has brought about great progress in neuroscience research. Here, we report a novel experimental platform, where the intact brain of a living mouse can be studied with the aid of a surgically implanted micro-optical fluidic device; acting as an interface between neurons and the outer world. The newly developed device provides the functions required for the long-term and high-resolution observation of the fine structures of neurons by two-photon laser scanning microscopy and the microfluidic delivery of chemicals or drugs directly into the brain. A proof-of-concept experiment of single-synapse stimulation by two-photon uncaging of caged glutamate and observation of dendritic spine shrinkage over subsequent days demonstrated a promising use for the present technology.

  10. Prolonged remission state of refractory adult onset Still's disease following CD34-selected autologous peripheral blood stem cell transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanza, F; Dominici, M; Govoni, M; Moretti, S; Campioni, D; Corte, R L; Latorraca, A; Tieghi, A; Castagnari, B; Trotta, F; Castoldi, G

    2000-06-01

    We report a 38-year-old patient affected by refractory adult onset Still's disease who achieved a prolonged remission following CD34-selected ABMT. The conditioning regimen was based on the use of CY and anti-thymocyte globulin. A 3.0 and 2.0 log reduction of T (CD3+) and B (CD19+) lymphocytes, respectively, was obtained using a Ceprate device to select CD34+ cells from PBSC. In the pre-transplant period (1994-1998) the patient had a chronic persistent disease course with frequent and recurrent systemic articular flares and loss of some functional abilities, despite daily prednisone, pulses of CY and immunosuppressive therapy (CYA or MTX). At the time of ABMT the patient had become non-ambulatory. Within 3 weeks of ABMT the patient showed a marked decrease in joint swelling, and morning stiffness. Joint pain and systemic symptoms disappeared, the patient was able to walk and run and gained general well being. ESR, C-reactive protein and WBC count were significantly decreased, while Hb level increased. This partial remission persisted for at least 1 year after ABMT, although at 15 months of follow-up a reappearance of moderate synovitis in the knees and wrists was noted. Our data further showed that both patient BM microenvironment and stem-progenitor cell function (as assessed by LTC-IC assay) were damaged even 1 year after CD34-selected ABMT, suggesting that the persistence of these alterations could have facilitated the favorable outcome of the disease following ABMT. Bone Marrow Transplantation (2000) 25, 1307-1310. PMID:10871738

  11. ELECTRONIC WASTE GENERATED BY HAND HELD WIRELESS DEVICES WITH A FOCUS ON CELL PHONES

    Science.gov (United States)

    Characterization of wireless products; identify cell phone composition (particularly toxic components), document end of life programs for cell phones in the U.S. and Europe, examine provisions in the draft European Union Waste Electronic Equipment document. Project will include ...

  12. A laser-based technology for fabricating a soda-lime glass based microfluidic device for circulating tumour cell capture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieto, Daniel; Couceiro, Ramiro; Aymerich, Maria; Lopez-Lopez, Rafael; Abal, Miguel; Flores-Arias, María Teresa

    2015-10-01

    We developed a laser-based technique for fabricating microfluidic microchips on soda-lime glass substrates. The proposed methodology combines a laser direct writing, as a manufacturing tool for the fabrication of the microfluidics structures, followed by a post-thermal treatment with a CO2 laser. This treatment will allow reshaping and improving the morphological (roughness) and optical qualities (transparency) of the generated microfluidics structures. The use of lasers commonly implemented for material processing makes this technique highly competitive when compared with other glass microstructuring approaches. The manufactured chips were tested with tumour cells (Hec 1A) after being functionalized with an epithelial cell adhesion molecule (EpCAM) antibody coating. Cells were successfully arrested on the pillars after being flown through the device giving our technology a translational application in the field of cancer research. PMID:26218523

  13. Culture and selection of somatic hybrids using an auxotrophic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hein, T; Przewoźny, T; Schieder, O

    1983-01-01

    Protoplast fusions between Nicotiana tabacum and N. paniculata and between N. tabacum and N. sylvestris were obtained by polyethylene glycol and Ca(NO3)2 treatment. The protoplasts of one parent originated from cell suspensions, while the protoplasts of the other originated from leaf mesophyll. The heterokaryons were detectable by their intermediate phenotype, namely the green chloroplasts from mesophyll and the dense cytoplasm from suspension cells. They were isolated with micropipettes immediately after fusion using a micromanipulator and were transferred into a protoplast suspension of an auxotrophic cell line serving as a nursery. This mutant is not able to utilize nitrate and had to be supplemented with amino acids. The somatic hybrids were selected by a stepwise reduction of the supplements, which caused the death of the mutant cell colonies, while the autotrophic somatic hybrids continued to grow. The hybrid character of the selected colonies was confirmed by isoenzyme investigations.

  14. Monitoring Ion Activities In and Around Cells Using Ion-Selective Liquid-Membrane Microelectrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mark D. Parker

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Determining the effective concentration (i.e., activity of ions in and around living cells is important to our understanding of the contribution of those ions to cellular function. Moreover, monitoring changes in ion activities in and around cells is informative about the actions of the transporters and/or channels operating in the cell membrane. The activity of an ion can be measured using a glass microelectrode that includes in its tip a liquid-membrane doped with an ion-selective ionophore. Because these electrodes can be fabricated with tip diameters that are less than 1 μm, they can be used to impale single cells in order to monitor the activities of intracellular ions. This review summarizes the history, theory, and practice of ion-selective microelectrode use and brings together a number of classic and recent examples of their usefulness in the realm of physiological study.

  15. Comparing the Device Physics and Morphology of Polymer Solar Cells Employing Fullerenes and Non-Fullerene Acceptors

    KAUST Repository

    Bloking, Jason T.

    2014-04-23

    There is a need to find electron acceptors for organic photovoltaics that are not based on fullerene derivatives since fullerenes have a small band gap that limits the open-circuit voltage (VOC), do not absorb strongly and are expensive. Here, a phenylimide-based acceptor molecule, 4,7-bis(4-(N-hexyl-phthalimide)vinyl)benzo[c]1,2,5-thiadiazole (HPI-BT), that can be used to make solar cells with VOC values up to 1.11 V and power conversion efficiencies up to 3.7% with two thiophene polymers is demonstrated. An internal quantum efficiency of 56%, compared to 75-90% for polymer-fullerene devices, results from less efficient separation of geminate charge pairs. While favorable energetic offsets in the polymer-fullerene devices due to the formation of a disordered mixed phase are thought to improve charge separation, the low miscibility (<5 wt%) of HPI-BT in polymers is hypothesized to prevent the mixed phase and energetic offsets from forming, thus reducing the driving force for charges to separate into the pure donor and acceptor phases where they can be collected. A small molecule electron acceptor, 4,7-bis(4-(N-hexyl-phthalimide)vinyl)benzo[c]1,2,5-thiadiazole (HPI-BT), achieves efficiencies of 3.7% and open-circuit voltage values of 1.11 V in bulk heterojunction (BHJ) devices with polythiophene donor materials. The lower internal quantum efficiency (56%) in these non-fullerene acceptor devices is attributed to an absence of the favorable energetic offsets resulting from nanoscale mixing of donor and acceptor found in comparable fullerene-based devices. © 2014 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  16. Injection molded pinched flow fractionation device for enrichment of somatic cells in cow milk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jensen, Marie Pødenphant; Marie, Rodolphe; Olesen, Tom;

    2014-01-01

    In this paper the continuous microfluidic separation technique pinched flow fractionation is applied to the enrichment of somatic cells from cow milk. Somatic cells were separated from the smallest fat particles and proteins thus better imaging and analysis of the cells can be achieved...

  17. Design and realization of on-line selection device of annihilations for PP experiment at 100GeV

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This work relates the conception and then realisation of an on-line annihilation trigger for an antiprotons-protons experiment at 100 GeV. We specify the conditions of running for the European Hybrid Spectrometer (C.E.R.N.) to eliminate on-line with a good efficiency the non-annihilation interactions. We study the use on-line of a Cerenkov multicellular detector (to detect the antiprotons), a hadronic iron-scintillator calorimeter (to detect the antineutrons and neutrons) in association with two multicellular hodoscopes to select the non-annihilation events and to preserve the annihilations. A suggestion for improvement is to include this trigger in new experiments for charm and beauty search

  18. Metformin selectively targets cancer stem cells, and acts together with chemotherapy to block tumor growth and prolong remission

    OpenAIRE

    Hirsch, Heather A; Iliopoulos, Dimitrios; Tsichlis, Philip N.; Struhl, Kevin

    2009-01-01

    The cancer stem cell hypothesis suggests that, unlike most cancer cells within a tumor, cancer stem cells resist chemotherapeutic drugs and can regenerate the various cell types in the tumor, thereby causing relapse of the disease. Thus, drugs that selectively target cancer stem cells offer great promise for cancer treatment, particularly in combination with chemotherapy. Here, we show that low doses of metformin, a standard drug for diabetes, inhibits cellular transformation and selectively ...

  19. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-06-24

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronectin coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4-fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet arrays

  20. Patterning pallet arrays for cell selection based on high-resolution measurements of fluorescent biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shadpour, Hamed; Zawistowski, Jon S; Herman, Annadele; Hahn, Klaus; Allbritton, Nancy L

    2011-06-24

    Pallet arrays enable cells to be separated while they remain adherent to a surface and provide a much greater range of cell selection criteria relative to that of current technologies. However there remains a need to further broaden cell selection criteria to include dynamic intracellular signaling events. To demonstrate the feasibility of measuring cellular protein behavior on the arrays using high resolution microscopy, the surfaces of individual pallets were modified to minimize the impact of scattered light at the pallet edges. The surfaces of the three-dimensional pallets on an array were patterned with a coating such as fibronectin using a customized stamping tool. Micropatterns of varying shape and size were printed in designated regions on the pallets in single or multiple steps to demonstrate the reliability and precision of patterning molecules on the pallet surface. Use of a fibronectin matrix stamped at the center of each pallet permitted the localization of H1299 and mouse embryonic fibroblast (MEF) cells to the pallet centers and away from the edges. Compared to pallet arrays with fibronectin coating the entire top surface, arrays with a central fibronectin pattern increased the percentage of cells localized to the pallet center by 3-4-fold. Localization of cells to the pallet center also enabled the physical separation of cells from optical artifacts created by the rough pallet side walls. To demonstrate the measurement of dynamic intracellular signaling on the arrays, fluorescence measurements of high spatial resolution were performed using a RhoA GTPase biosensor. This biosensor utilized fluorescence resonance energy transfer (FRET) between cyan fluorescent protein (CFP) and yellow fluorescent protein (YFP) to measure localized RhoA activity in cellular ruffles at the cell periphery. These results demonstrated the ability to perform spatially resolved measurements of fluorescence-based sensors on the pallet arrays. Thus, the patterned pallet arrays

  1. Selective in vitro expansion and efficient retroviral transduction of human CD34(+) CD38(-) haematopoietic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ng, YY; Bloem, AC; van Kessel, B; Lokhorst, H; Logtenberg, T; Staal, FJT

    2002-01-01

    Ex vivo expansion of primitive human haematopoietic stem cells (HSC) is clinically relevant for stem cell transplantation and gene therapy. Here, we demonstrate the selective expansion of CD34(+) CD38(-) cells from purified CD34(+) cells upon stimulation with Flt3-ligand, stem cell factor and thromb

  2. A preliminary study for constructing a bioartificial liver device with induced pluripotent stem cell-derived hepatocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Iwamuro Masaya

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Bioartificial liver systems, designed to support patients with liver failure, are composed of bioreactors and functional hepatocytes. Immunological rejection of the embedded hepatocytes by the host immune system is a serious concern that crucially degrades the performance of the device. Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells are considered a desirable source for bioartificial liver systems, because patient-derived iPS cells are free from immunological rejection. The purpose of this paper was to test the feasibility of a bioartificial liver system with iPS cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells. Methods Mouse iPS cells were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells by a multi-step differentiation protocol via embryoid bodies and definitive endoderm. Differentiation of iPS cells was evaluated by morphology, PCR assay, and functional assays. iPS cell-derived hepatocyte-like cells were cultured in a bioreactor module with a pore size of 0.2 μm for 7 days. The amount of albumin secreted into the circulating medium was analyzed by ELISA. Additionally, after a 7-day culture in a bioreactor module, cells were observed by a scanning electron microscope. Results At the final stage of the differentiation program, iPS cells changed their morphology to a polygonal shape with two nucleoli and enriched cytoplasmic granules. Transmission electron microscope analysis revealed their polygonal shape, glycogen deposition in the cytoplasm, microvilli on their surfaces, and a duct-like arrangement. PCR analysis showed increased expression of albumin mRNA over the course of the differentiation program. Albumin and urea production was also observed. iPS-Heps culture in bioreactor modules showed the accumulation of albumin in the medium for up to 7 days. Scanning electron microscopy revealed the attachment of cell clusters to the hollow fibers of the module. These results indicated that iPS cells were differentiated into hepatocyte-like cells after culture

  3. Isolation of single-base genome-edited human iPS cells without antibiotic selection

    OpenAIRE

    Miyaoka, Yuichiro; Chan, Amanda H.; Luke M Judge; Yoo, Jennie; Huang, Miller; Nguyen, Trieu D.; Lizarraga, Paweena P.; So, Po-Lin; Conklin, Bruce R

    2014-01-01

    Precise editing of human genomes in pluripotent stem cells by homology-driven repair of targeted nuclease-induced cleavage has been hindered by the difficulty of isolating rare clones. We developed an efficient method to capture rare mutational events, enabling isolation of mutant lines with single-base substitutions without antibiotic selection. This method facilitates efficient induction or reversion of mutations associated with human disease in isogenic human induced pluripotent stem cells.

  4. Rapid characterization of the biomechanical properties of drug-treated cells in a microfluidic device

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cell mechanics is closely related to many cell functions. Recent studies have suggested that the deformability of cells can be an effective biomarker to indicate the onset and progression of diseases. In this paper, a microfluidic chip is designed for rapid characterization of the mechanics of drug-treated cells through stretching with dielectrophoresis (DEP) force. This chip was fabricated using PDMS and micro-electrodes were integrated and patterned on the ITO layer of the chip. Leukemia NB4 cells were considered and the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) drug on NB4 cells were examined via the microfluidic chip. To induce a DEP force onto the cell, a relatively weak ac voltage was utilized to immobilize a cell at one side of the electrodes. The applied voltage was then increased to 3.5 V pp and the cell started to be stretched along the applied electric field lines. The elongation of the cell was observed using an optical microscope and the results showed that both types of cells were deformed by the induced DEP force. The strain of the NB4 cell without the drug treatment was recorded to be about 0.08 (time t = 180 s) and the drug-treated NB4 cell was about 0.21 (time t = 180 s), indicating a decrease in the stiffness after drug treatment. The elastic modulus of the cell was also evaluated and the modulus changed from 140 Pa to 41 Pa after drug treatment. This microfluidic chip can provide a simple and rapid platform for measuring the change in the biomechanical properties of cells and can potentially be used as the tool to determine the biomechanical effects of different drug treatments for drug discovery and development applications. (paper)

  5. Rapid characterization of the biomechanical properties of drug-treated cells in a microfluidic device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Xiaofei; Chu, Henry K.; Zhang, Yang; Bai, Guohua; Wang, Kaiqun; Tan, Qiulin; Sun, Dong

    2015-10-01

    Cell mechanics is closely related to many cell functions. Recent studies have suggested that the deformability of cells can be an effective biomarker to indicate the onset and progression of diseases. In this paper, a microfluidic chip is designed for rapid characterization of the mechanics of drug-treated cells through stretching with dielectrophoresis (DEP) force. This chip was fabricated using PDMS and micro-electrodes were integrated and patterned on the ITO layer of the chip. Leukemia NB4 cells were considered and the effect of all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) drug on NB4 cells were examined via the microfluidic chip. To induce a DEP force onto the cell, a relatively weak ac voltage was utilized to immobilize a cell at one side of the electrodes. The applied voltage was then increased to 3.5 V pp and the cell started to be stretched along the applied electric field lines. The elongation of the cell was observed using an optical microscope and the results showed that both types of cells were deformed by the induced DEP force. The strain of the NB4 cell without the drug treatment was recorded to be about 0.08 (time t = 180 s) and the drug-treated NB4 cell was about 0.21 (time t = 180 s), indicating a decrease in the stiffness after drug treatment. The elastic modulus of the cell was also evaluated and the modulus changed from 140 Pa to 41 Pa after drug treatment. This microfluidic chip can provide a simple and rapid platform for measuring the change in the biomechanical properties of cells and can potentially be used as the tool to determine the biomechanical effects of different drug treatments for drug discovery and development applications.

  6. Repurposing a Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin System for the Selective Killing of Oncogenically Stressed Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Mark A; Pimentel, Belén; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Dionne, Isabelle; Turnbull, Alice; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Prokaryotes express intracellular toxins that pass unnoticed to carrying cells until coexpressed antitoxin partners are degraded in response to stress. Although not evolved to function in eukaryotes, one of these toxins, Kid, induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, an effect that is neutralized by its cognate antitoxin, Kis. Here we engineered this toxin-antitoxin pair to create a synthetic system that becomes active in human cells suffering a specific oncogenic stress. Inspired by the way Kid becomes active in bacterial cells, we produced a Kis variant that is selectively degraded in human cells expressing oncoprotein E6. The resulting toxin-antitoxin system functions autonomously in human cells, distinguishing those that suffer the oncogenic insult, which are killed by Kid, from those that do not, which remain protected by Kis. Our results provide a framework for developing personalized anticancer strategies avoiding off-target effects, a challenge that has been hardly tractable by other means thus far. PMID:26230535

  7. Aneuploidy impairs hematopoietic stem cell fitness and is selected against in regenerating tissues in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Sarah J; Silberman, Rebecca E; Knouse, Kristin A; Amon, Angelika

    2016-06-15

    Aneuploidy, an imbalanced karyotype, is a widely observed feature of cancer cells that has long been hypothesized to promote tumorigenesis. Here we evaluate the fitness of cells with constitutional trisomy or chromosomal instability (CIN) in vivo using hematopoietic reconstitution experiments. We did not observe cancer but instead found that aneuploid hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit decreased fitness. This reduced fitness is due at least in part to the decreased proliferative potential of aneuploid hematopoietic cells. Analyses of mice with CIN caused by a hypomorphic mutation in the gene Bub1b further support the finding that aneuploidy impairs cell proliferation in vivo. Whereas nonregenerating adult tissues are highly aneuploid in these mice, HSCs and other regenerative adult tissues are largely euploid. These findings indicate that, in vivo, mechanisms exist to select against aneuploid cells.

  8. Aneuploidy impairs hematopoietic stem cell fitness and is selected against in regenerating tissues in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pfau, Sarah J; Silberman, Rebecca E; Knouse, Kristin A; Amon, Angelika

    2016-06-15

    Aneuploidy, an imbalanced karyotype, is a widely observed feature of cancer cells that has long been hypothesized to promote tumorigenesis. Here we evaluate the fitness of cells with constitutional trisomy or chromosomal instability (CIN) in vivo using hematopoietic reconstitution experiments. We did not observe cancer but instead found that aneuploid hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit decreased fitness. This reduced fitness is due at least in part to the decreased proliferative potential of aneuploid hematopoietic cells. Analyses of mice with CIN caused by a hypomorphic mutation in the gene Bub1b further support the finding that aneuploidy impairs cell proliferation in vivo. Whereas nonregenerating adult tissues are highly aneuploid in these mice, HSCs and other regenerative adult tissues are largely euploid. These findings indicate that, in vivo, mechanisms exist to select against aneuploid cells. PMID:27313317

  9. Repurposing a Prokaryotic Toxin-Antitoxin System for the Selective Killing of Oncogenically Stressed Human Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Preston, Mark A; Pimentel, Belén; Bermejo-Rodríguez, Camino; Dionne, Isabelle; Turnbull, Alice; de la Cueva-Méndez, Guillermo

    2016-07-15

    Prokaryotes express intracellular toxins that pass unnoticed to carrying cells until coexpressed antitoxin partners are degraded in response to stress. Although not evolved to function in eukaryotes, one of these toxins, Kid, induces apoptosis in mammalian cells, an effect that is neutralized by its cognate antitoxin, Kis. Here we engineered this toxin-antitoxin pair to create a synthetic system that becomes active in human cells suffering a specific oncogenic stress. Inspired by the way Kid becomes active in bacterial cells, we produced a Kis variant that is selectively degraded in human cells expressing oncoprotein E6. The resulting toxin-antitoxin system functions autonomously in human cells, distinguishing those that suffer the oncogenic insult, which are killed by Kid, from those that do not, which remain protected by Kis. Our results provide a framework for developing personalized anticancer strategies avoiding off-target effects, a challenge that has been hardly tractable by other means thus far.

  10. Tipping the balance: robustness of tip cell selection, migration and fusion in angiogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Bentley

    2009-10-01

    Full Text Available Vascular abnormalities contribute to many diseases such as cancer and diabetic retinopathy. In angiogenesis new blood vessels, headed by a migrating tip cell, sprout from pre-existing vessels in response to signals, e.g., vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF. Tip cells meet and fuse (anastomosis to form blood-flow supporting loops. Tip cell selection is achieved by Dll4-Notch mediated lateral inhibition resulting, under normal conditions, in an interleaved arrangement of tip and non-migrating stalk cells. Previously, we showed that the increased VEGF levels found in many diseases can cause the delayed negative feedback of lateral inhibition to produce abnormal oscillations of tip/stalk cell fates. Here we describe the development and implementation of a novel physics-based hierarchical agent model, tightly coupled to in vivo data, to explore the system dynamics as perpetual lateral inhibition combines with tip cell migration and fusion. We explore the tipping point between normal and abnormal sprouting as VEGF increases. A novel filopodia-adhesion driven migration mechanism is presented and validated against in vivo data. Due to the unique feature of ongoing lateral inhibition, 'stabilised' tip/stalk cell patterns show sensitivity to the formation of new cell-cell junctions during fusion: we predict cell fates can reverse. The fusing tip cells become inhibited and neighbouring stalk cells flip fate, recursively providing new tip cells. Junction size emerges as a key factor in establishing a stable tip/stalk pattern. Cell-cell junctions elongate as tip cells migrate, which is shown to provide positive feedback to lateral inhibition, causing it to be more susceptible to pathological oscillations. Importantly, down-regulation of the migratory pathway alone is shown to be sufficient to rescue the sprouting system from oscillation and restore stability. Thus we suggest the use of migration inhibitors as therapeutic agents for vascular

  11. Manool, a Salvia officinalis diterpene, induces selective cytotoxicity in cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Oliveira, Pollyanna Francielli; Munari, Carla Carolina; Nicolella, Heloiza Diniz; Veneziani, Rodrigo Cassio Sola; Tavares, Denise Crispim

    2016-10-01

    Manool, a diterpene isolated from Salvia officinalis, was evaluated by the XTT colorimetric assay for cytotoxicity and selectivity against different cancer cell lines: B16F10 (murine melanoma), MCF-7 (human breast adenocarcinoma), HeLa (human cervical adenocarcinoma), HepG2 (human hepatocellular carcinoma), and MO59J, U343 and U251 (human glioblastoma). A normal cell line (V79, Chinese hamster lung fibroblasts) was used to compare the selectivity of the test substance. Manool exhibited higher cytotoxic activity against HeLa (IC50 = 6.7 ± 1.1 µg/mL) and U343 (IC50 = 6.7 ± 1.2 µg/mL) cells. In addition, in the used experimental protocols, the treatment with manool was significantly more cytotoxic for different tumor cell lines than for the normal cell line V79 (IC50 = 49.3 ± 3.3 µg/mL), and showed high selectivity. These results suggest that manool may be used to treat cancer without affecting normal cells.

  12. Cell surface thiol isomerases may explain the platelet-selective action of S-nitrosoglutathione.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Fang; Gordge, Michael P

    2011-10-30

    S-nitrosoglutathione (GSNO) at low concentration inhibits platelet aggregation without causing vasodilation, suggesting platelet-selective nitric oxide delivery. The mechanism of this selectivity is unknown, but may involve cell surface thiol isomerases, in particular protein disulphide isomerase (csPDI) (EC 5.3.4.1). We have now compared csPDI expression and activity on platelets, endothelial cells and vascular smooth muscle cells, and the dependence on thiol reductase activity of these cell types for NO uptake from GSNO. csPDI expression was measured by flow cytometry and its reductase activity using the pseudosubstrate dieosin glutathione disulphide. This activity assay was adapted and validated for 96-well plate format. Flow cytometry revealed csPDI on all three cell types, but percentage positivity of expression was higher on platelets than on vascular cells. Consistent with this, thiol isomerase-related reductase activity was higher on platelets (Pionomycin) increased csPDI activity on both platelets and smooth muscle cells, but not on endothelium. Intracellular NO delivery from GSNO was greater in platelets than in vascular cells (Pselective actions of GSNO and help define its antithrombotic potential. PMID:21642008

  13. Nardosinone improves the proliferation, migration and selective differentiation of mouse embryonic neural stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ze-Hui Li

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated the impact of Nardosinone, a bioactive component in Nardostachys root, on the proliferation and differentiation of neural stem cells. The neural stem cells were isolated from cerebrums of embryonic day 14 CD1 mice. The proliferation of cells was monitored using the cell counting kit-8 assay, bromodeoxyuridine incorporation and cell cycle analysis. Cell migration and differentiation were investigated with the neurosphere assay and cell specific markers, respectively. The results showed that Nardosinone promotes cells proliferation and increases cells migration distance in a dose-dependent manner. Nardosinone also induces the selective differentiation of neural stem cells to neurons and oligodendrocytes, as indicated by the expression of microtubule-associated protein-2 and myelin basic protein, respectively. Nardosinone also increases the expression of phospho-extracellular signal-regulated kinase and phospho-cAMP response element binding protein during proliferation and differentiation. In conclusion, this study reveals the regulatory effects of Nardosinone on neural stem cells, which may have significant implications for the treatment of brain injury and neurodegenerative diseases.

  14. Cold atmospheric plasma jet-generated RONS and their selective effects on normal and carcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Sun Ja; Chung, T H

    2016-01-01

    Cold atmospheric helium plasma jets were fabricated and utilized for plasma-cell interactions. The effect of operating parameters and jet design on the generation of specific reactive oxygen and nitrogen species (RONS) within cells and cellular response were investigated. It was found that plasma treatment induced the overproduction of RONS in various cancer cell lines selectively. The plasma under a relatively low applied voltage induced the detachment of cells, a reduction in cell viability, and apoptosis, while the plasma under higher applied voltage led to cellular necrosis in our case. To determine whether plasma-induced reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation occurs through interfering with mitochondria-related cellular response, we examined the plasma effects on ROS generation in both parental A549 cells and A549 ρ(0) cells. It was observed that cancer cells were more susceptible to plasma-induced RONS (especially nitric oxide (NO) and nitrogen dioxide (NO2(-)) radicals) than normal cells, and consequently, plasma induced apoptotic cell responses mainly in cancer cells.

  15. Molecular mechanisms of apoptosis and cell selectivity of zinc dithiocarbamates functionalized with hydroxyethyl substituents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tan, Yee Seng; Ooi, Kah Kooi; Ang, Kok Pian; Akim, Abdah Md; Cheah, Yoke-Kqueen; Halim, Siti Nadiah Abdul; Seng, Hoi-Ling; Tiekink, Edward R T

    2015-09-01

    In the solid state each of three binuclear zinc dithiocarbamates bearing hydroxyethyl groups, {Zn[S2CN(R)CH2CH2OH]2}2 for R = iPr (1), CH2CH2OH (2), and Me (3), and an all alkyl species, [Zn(S2CNEt2)2]2 (4), features a centrosymmetric {ZnSCS}2 core with a step topology; both 1 and 3 were isolated as monohydrates. All compounds were broadly cytotoxic, specifically against human cancer cell lines compared with normal cells, with greater potency than cisplatin. Notably, some selectivity were indicated with 2 being the most potent against human ovarian carcinoma cells (cisA2780), and 4 being more cytotoxic toward multidrug resistant human breast carcinoma cells (MCF-7R), human colon adenocarcinoma cells (HT-29), and human lung adenocarcinoma epithelial cells (A549). Based on human apoptosis PCR-array analysis, caspase activities, DNA fragmentation, cell apoptotic assays, intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) measurements and human topoisomerase I inhibition, induction of apoptosis in HT-29 cells is demonstrated via both extrinsic and intrinsic pathways. Compounds 2-4 activate the p53 gene while 1 activates both p53 and p73. Cell cycle arrest at the S and G2/M phases correlates with inhibition of HT-29 cell growth. Cell invasion is also inhibited by 1-4 which is correlated with down-regulation of NF-κB. PMID:26086852

  16. Selective local lysis and sampling of live cells for nucleic acid analysis using a microfluidic probe

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kashyap, Aditya; Autebert, Julien; Delamarche, Emmanuel; Kaigala, Govind V.

    2016-01-01

    Heterogeneity is inherent to biology, thus it is imperative to realize methods capable of obtaining spatially-resolved genomic and transcriptomic profiles of heterogeneous biological samples. Here, we present a new method for local lysis of live adherent cells for nucleic acid analyses. This method addresses bottlenecks in current approaches, such as dilution of analytes, one-sample-one-test, and incompatibility to adherent cells. We make use of a scanning probe technology - a microfluidic probe - and implement hierarchical hydrodynamic flow confinement (hHFC) to localize multiple biochemicals on a biological substrate in a non-contact, non-destructive manner. hHFC enables rapid recovery of nucleic acids by coupling cell lysis and lysate collection. We locally lysed ~300 cells with chemical systems adapted for DNA or RNA and obtained lysates of ~70 cells/μL for DNA analysis and ~15 cells/μL for mRNA analysis. The lysates were introduced into PCR-based workflows for genomic and transcriptomic analysis. This strategy further enabled selective local lysis of subpopulations in a co-culture of MCF7 and MDA-MB-231 cells, validated by characteristic E-cadherin gene expression in individually extracted cell types. The developed strategy can be applied to study cell-cell, cell-matrix interactions locally, with implications in understanding growth, progression and drug response of a tumor. PMID:27411740

  17. Intercellular redistribution of cAMP underlies selective suppression of cancer cell growth by connexin26.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anjana Chandrasekhar

    Full Text Available Connexins (Cx, which constitute gap junction intercellular channels in vertebrates, have been shown to suppress transformed cell growth and tumorigenesis, but the mechanism(s still remain largely speculative. Here, we define the molecular basis by which Cx26, but less frequently Cx43 or Cx32, selectively confer growth suppression on cancer cells. Functional intercellular coupling is shown to be required, producing partial blocks of the cell cycle due to prolonged activation of several mitogenic kinases. PKA is both necessary and sufficient for the Cx26 induced growth inhibition in low serum and the absence of anchorage. Activation of PKA was not associated with elevated cAMP levels, but appeared to result from a redistribution of cAMP throughout the cell population, eliminating the cell cycle oscillations in cAMP required for efficient cell cycle progression. Cx43 and Cx32 fail to mediate this redistribution as, unlike Cx26, these channels are closed during the G2/M phase of the cell cycle when cAMP levels peak. Comparisons of tumor cell lines indicate that this is a general pattern, with growth suppression by connexins occurring whenever cAMP oscillates with the cell cycle, and the gap junction remain open throughout the cell cycle. Thus, gap junctional coupling, in the absence of any external signals, provides a general means to limit the mitotic rate of cell populations.

  18. Validation of analytical methods in GMP: the disposable Fast Read 102® device, an alternative practical approach for cell counting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gunetti Monica

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The quality and safety of advanced therapy products must be maintained throughout their production and quality control cycle to ensure their final use in patients. We validated the cell count method according to the International Conference on Harmonization of Technical Requirements for Registration of Pharmaceuticals for Human Use and European Pharmacopoeia, considering the tests’ accuracy, precision, repeatability, linearity and range. Methods As the cell count is a potency test, we checked accuracy, precision, and linearity, according to ICH Q2. Briefly our experimental approach was first to evaluate the accuracy of Fast Read 102® compared to the Bürker chamber. Once the accuracy of the alternative method was demonstrated, we checked the precision and linearity test only using Fast Read 102®. The data were statistically analyzed by average, standard deviation and coefficient of variation percentages inter and intra operator. Results All the tests performed met the established acceptance criteria of a coefficient of variation of less than ten percent. For the cell count, the precision reached by each operator had a coefficient of variation of less than ten percent (total cells and under five percent (viable cells. The best range of dilution, to obtain a slope line value very similar to 1, was between 1:8 and 1:128. Conclusions Our data demonstrated that the Fast Read 102® count method is accurate, precise and ensures the linearity of the results obtained in a range of cell dilution. Under our standard method procedures, this assay may thus be considered a good quality control method for the cell count as a batch release quality control test. Moreover, the Fast Read 102® chamber is a plastic, disposable device that allows a number of samples to be counted in the same chamber. Last but not least, it overcomes the problem of chamber washing after use and so allows a cell count in a clean environment such as that in a

  19. Dynamic Diamond Anvil Cell (dDAC): A novel device for studying the dynamic-pressure properties of materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Evans, W J; Yoo, C; Lee, G W; Cynn, H; Lipp, M J; Visbeck, K

    2007-02-23

    We have developed a unique device, a dynamic diamond anvil cell (dDAC), which repetitively applies a time-dependent load/pressure profile to a sample. This capability allows studies of the kinetics of phase transitions and metastable phases at compression (strain) rates of up to 500 GPa/sec ({approx}0.16 s{sup -1} for a metal). Our approach adapts electromechanical piezoelectric actuators to a conventional diamond anvil cell design, which enables precise specification and control of a time-dependent applied load/pressure. Existing DAC instrumentation and experimental techniques are easily adapted to the dDAC to measure the properties of a sample under the varying load/pressure conditions. This capability addresses the sparsely studied regime of dynamic phenomena between static research (diamond anvil cells and large volume presses) and dynamic shock-driven experiments (gas guns, explosive and laser shock). We present an overview of a variety of experimental measurements that can be made with this device.

  20. Optical diffraction tomography using a digital micromirror device for stable measurements of 4-D refractive index tomography of cells

    CERN Document Server

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Taeho; Yoon, Jonghee; Hong, Kihyun; Park, Jinah; Park, YongKeun

    2016-01-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an interferometric microscopy technique capable of measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of transparent samples. Multiple 2-D holograms of a sample illuminated with various angles are measured, from which 3-D RI map of the sample is reconstructed via the diffraction theory. ODT has been proved as a powerful tool for the study of biological cells, due to its non-invasiveness, label-free and quantitative imaging capability. Recently, our group has demonstrated that a digital micromirror device (DMD) can be exploited for fast and precise control of illumination beams for ODT. In this work, we systematically study the precision and stability of the ODT system equipped with a DMD and present measurements of 3-D and 4-D RI maps of various types of live cells including human red blood cells, white blood cells, hepatocytes, and HeLa cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the effective visualization of 3-D RI maps of live cells utilizing the measured information abou...

  1. Optical diffraction tomography using a digital micromirror device for stable measurements of 4D refractive index tomography of cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Seungwoo; Kim, Kyoohyun; Kim, Taeho; Yoon, Jonghee; Hong, Kihyun; Park, Jinah; Park, YongKeun

    2016-03-01

    Optical diffraction tomography (ODT) is an interferometric microscopy technique capable of measuring 3-D refractive index (RI) distribution of transparent samples. Multiple 2-D holograms of a sample illuminated with various angles are measured, from which 3-D RI map of the sample is reconstructed via the diffraction theory. ODT has been proved as a powerful tool for the study of biological cells, due to its non-invasiveness, label-free and quantitative imaging capability. Recently, our group has demonstrated that a digital micromirror device (DMD) can be exploited for fast and precise control of illumination beams for ODT. In this work, we systematically study the precision and stability of the ODT system equipped with a DMD and present measurements of 3-D and 4-D RI maps of various types of live cells including human red blood cells, white blood cells, hepatocytes, and HeLa cells. Furthermore, we also demonstrate the effective visualization of 3-D RI maps of live cells utilizing the measured information about the values and gradient of RI tomograms.

  2. Dectin-1 agonist selectively induces IgG1 class switching by LPS-activated mouse B cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seo, Beom-Seok; Park, Ha-Yan; Yoon, Hee-Kyung; Yoo, Yung-Choon; Lee, Junglim; Park, Seok-Rae

    2016-10-01

    Heat-killed Saccharomyces cerevisiae (HKSC) is an agonist for Dectin-1, a major fungal cell wall β-glucan receptor. We previously reported that HKSC selectively enhances IgG1 production by LPS-activated mouse B cells. To determine if this IgG1 selectivity is caused by selective IgG1 class switching, we performed RT-PCRs for measuring germline transcripts (GLTs), flow cytometric analyses for detecting Ig-expressing cells, and ELISPOT assays for measuring the number of Ig-secreting cells in HKSC/LPS-stimulated mouse B cell cultures. HKSC selectively enhanced expression of GLTγ1, the number of IgG1-expressing cells, and the number of IgG1-secreting B cells in the presence of LPS stimulation. In addition, HKSC induced the expression of CD69, an activation marker for B lymphocytes, and the expression of surface Dectin-1. Two Dectin-1 antagonists, laminarin and a neutralizing Dectin-1 antibody, selectively diminished HKSC-reinforced IgG1 production by LPS-stimulated B cells. Furthermore, depleted zymosan (dzn), a Dectin-1 agonist with increased selectivity, also selectively enhanced GLTγ1 transcription. The Dectin-1 antagonists blocked dzn-induced IgG1 production by LPS-activated B cells. Collectively, these results suggest that Dectin-1 agonists selectively induce IgG1 class switching by direct stimulation of Dectin-1 on LPS-activated B cells resulting in selective production of IgG1.

  3. Comparison of production methods of a spiral inertial microfluidic cell separation device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robinson, Mitchell; Marks, Haley; Coté, Gerard L.

    2016-03-01

    From the miniaturization of large sample processing machines to the creation of handheld point-of-care devices, microfluidics has the potential to be a powerful tool in the advancement of diagnostic technologies. Here, we compare different prototyping modalities towards the generation of an inertial microfluidic blood filter: i.e. a 'centrifuge-on-a-chip'. While photolithography is currently the method of choice for soft lithography mold fabrication, offering high design fidelity, we believe simpler methods, such as milling or 3D printing, will soon become equally viable options in the field of microfluidic device fabrication. Three modalities for optofluidic PDMS chip fabrication were compared: micromachining, 3D printing, and SU8 photolithography. The filtration efficiency of the chips were tested with whole blood and compared spectroscopically by monitoring the outlet absorbance at the 540 nm peak intrinsic to oxyhemoglobin at the outlet of each filter chip.

  4. Rapid selection and proliferation of CD133+ cells from cancer cell lines: chemotherapeutic implications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah E Kelly

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs are considered a subset of the bulk tumor responsible for initiating and maintaining the disease. Several surface cellular markers have been recently used to identify CSCs. Among those is CD133, which is expressed by hematopoietic progenitor cells as well as embryonic stem cells and various cancers. We have recently isolated and cultured CD133 positive [CD133+] cells from various cancer cell lines using a NASA developed Hydrodynamic Focusing Bioreactor (HFB (Celdyne, Houston, TX. For comparison, another bioreactor, the rotary cell culture system (RCCS manufactured by Synthecon (Houston, TX was used. Both the HFB and the RCCS bioreactors simulate aspects of hypogravity. In our study, the HFB increased CD133+ cell growth from various cell lines compared to the RCCS vessel and to normal gravity control. We observed a +15-fold proliferation of the CD133+ cellular fraction with cancer cells that were cultured for 7-days at optimized conditions. The RCCS vessel instead yielded a (-4.8-fold decrease in the CD133+cellular fraction respect to the HFB after 7-days of culture. Interestingly, we also found that the hypogravity environment of the HFB greatly sensitized the CD133+ cancer cells, which are normally resistant to chemo treatment, to become susceptible to various chemotherapeutic agents, paving the way to less toxic and more effective chemotherapeutic treatment in patients. To be able to test the efficacy of cytotoxic agents in vitro prior to their use in clinical setting on cancer cells as well as on cancer stem cells may pave the way to more effective chemotherapeutic strategies in patients. This could be an important advancement in the therapeutic options of oncologic patients, allowing for more targeted and personalized chemotherapy regimens as well as for higher response rates.

  5. Ultrafast nanolaser device for detecting cancer in a single live cell.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gourley, Paul Lee; McDonald, Anthony Eugene

    2007-11-01

    Emerging BioMicroNanotechnologies have the potential to provide accurate, realtime, high throughput screening of live tumor cells without invasive chemical reagents when coupled with ultrafast laser methods. These optically based methods are critical to advancing early detection, diagnosis, and treatment of disease. The first year goals of this project are to develop a laser-based imaging system integrated with an in- vitro, live-cell, micro-culture to study mammalian cells under controlled conditions. In the second year, the system will be used to elucidate the morphology and distribution of mitochondria in the normal cell respiration state and in the disease state for normal and disease states of the cell. In this work we designed and built an in-vitro, live-cell culture microsystem to study mammalian cells under controlled conditions of pH, temp, CO2, Ox, humidity, on engineered material surfaces. We demonstrated viability of cell culture in the microsystem by showing that cells retain healthy growth rates, exhibit normal morphology, and grow to confluence without blebbing or other adverse influences of the material surfaces. We also demonstrated the feasibility of integrating the culture microsystem with laser-imaging and performed nanolaser flow spectrocytometry to carry out analysis of the cells isolated mitochondria.

  6. Potential of bismuth nanoparticles embedded in a glass matrix for spectral-selective thermo-optical devices

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiménez de Castro, M.; Cabello, F.; Toudert, J.; Serna, R.; Haro-Poniatowski, E.

    2014-09-01

    The optical transmission at a fixed visible wavelength of Bi nanoparticles embedded in a dielectric is known to show a sharp hysteretic evolution as a function of the temperature due to the reversible melting-solidification of the nanoparticles. In this work, we explore the temperature-dependent optical response of Bi nanoparticles embedded in a doped germanate glass (GeO2-Al2O3-Na2O) in a broad range from the visible to the near infrared. The transmission contrast induced by melting of the nanoparticles is shown to be strongly wavelength-dependent and evolves from positive to negative as the wavelength increases. This behaviour is well modelled using effective medium calculations, assuming that the nanoparticles size, shape, and distribution are unmodified upon melting, while their dielectric function turns from that of solid Bi to that of liquid Bi thus modifying markedly their optical response. These results open a route to the spectral tailoring of the thermo-optical response of Bi nanoparticles-based materials, which can be profitable for the engineering of wavelength-selective thermo-optical modulators and filters with optimized amplitude of modulation and wavelength dependence.

  7. Pancratistatin selectively targets cancer cell mitochondria and reduces growth of human colon tumor xenografts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, Carly; Karnik, Aditya; McNulty, James; Pandey, Siyaram

    2011-01-01

    The naturally occurring Amaryllidaceae alkaloid pancratistatin exhibits potent apoptotic activity against a large panel of cancer cells lines and has an insignificant effect on noncancerous cell lines, although with an elusive cellular target. Many current chemotherapeutics induce apoptosis via genotoxic mechanisms and thus have low selectivity. The observed selectivity of pancratistatin for cancer cells promoted us to consider the hypothesis that this alkaloid targets cancer cell mitochondria rather than DNA or its replicative machinery. In this study, we report that pancratistatin decreased mitochondrial membrane potential and induced apoptotic nuclear morphology in p53-mutant (HT-29) and wild-type p53 (HCT116) colorectal carcinoma cell lines, but not in noncancerous colon fibroblast (CCD-18Co) cells. Interestingly, pancratistatin was found to be ineffective against mtDNA-depleted (ρ(0)) cancer cells. Moreover, pancratistatin induced cell death in a manner independent of Bax and caspase activation, and did not alter β-tubulin polymerization rate nor cause double-stranded DNA breaks. For the first time we report the efficacy of pancratistatin in vivo against human colorectal adenocarcinoma xenografts. Intratumor administration of pancratistatin (3 mg/kg) caused significant reduction in the growth of subcutaneous HT-29 tumors in Nu/Nu mice (n = 6), with no apparent toxicity to the liver or kidneys as indicated by histopathologic analysis and terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling. Altogether, this work suggests that pancratistatin may be a novel mitochondria-targeting compound that selectively induces apoptosis in cancer cells and significantly reduces tumor growth. PMID:21220492

  8. The critical role of ERK in death resistance and invasiveness of hypoxia-selected glioblastoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Sun

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The rapid growth of tumor parenchyma leads to chronic hypoxia that can result in the selection of cancer cells with a more aggressive behavior and death-resistant potential to survive and proliferate. Thus, identifying the key molecules and molecular mechanisms responsible for the phenotypic changes associated with chronic hypoxia has valuable implications for the development of a therapeutic modality. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular basis of the phenotypic changes triggered by chronic repeated hypoxia. Methods Hypoxia-resistant T98G (HRT98G cells were selected by repeated exposure to hypoxia and reoxygenation. Cell death rate was determined by the trypan blue exclusion method and protein expression levels were examined by western blot analysis. The invasive phenotype of the tumor cells was determined by the Matrigel invasion assay. Immunohistochemistry was performed to analyze the expression of proteins in the brain tumor samples. The Student T-test and Pearson Chi-Square test was used for statistical analyses. Results We demonstrate that chronic repeated hypoxic exposures cause T98G cells to survive low oxygen tension. As compared with parent cells, hypoxia-selected T98G cells not only express higher levels of anti-apoptotic proteins such as Bcl-2, Bcl-XL, and phosphorylated ERK, but they also have a more invasive potential in Matrigel invasion chambers. Activation or suppression of ERK pathways with a specific activator or inhibitor, respectively, indicates that ERK is a key molecule responsible for death resistance under hypoxic conditions and a more invasive phenotype. Finally, we show that the activation of ERK is more prominent in malignant glioblastomas exposed to hypoxia than in low grade astrocytic glial tumors. Conclusion Our study suggests that activation of ERK plays a pivotal role in death resistance under chronic hypoxia and phenotypic changes related to the invasive phenotype of HRT98G

  9. An efficient strategy for cell-based antibody library selection using an integrated vector system

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoon Hyerim

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell panning of phage-displayed antibody library is a powerful tool for the development of therapeutic and imaging agents since disease-related cell surface proteins in native complex conformation can be directly targeted. Here, we employed a strategy taking advantage of an integrated vector system which allows rapid conversion of scFv-displaying phage into scFv-Fc format for efficient cell-based scFv library selection on a tetraspanin protein, CD9. Results A mouse scFv library constructed by using a phagemid vector, pDR-D1 was subjected to cell panning against stable CD9 transfectant, and the scFv repertoire from the enriched phage pool was directly transferred to a mammalian cassette vector, pDR-OriP-Fc1. The resulting constructs enabled transient expression of enough amounts of scFv-Fcs in HEK293E cells, and flow cytometric screening of binders for CD9 transfectant could be performed simply by using the culture supernatants. All three clones selected from the screening showed correct CD9-specificity. They could immunoprecipitate CD9 molecules out of the transfectant cell lysate and correctly stain endogenous CD9 expression on cancer cell membrane. Furthermore, competition assay with a known anti-CD9 monoclonal antibody (mAb suggested that the binding epitopes of some of them overlap with that of the mAb which resides within the large extracellular loop of CD9. Conclusions This study demonstrates that scFv-Fc from mammalian transient expression can be chosen as a reliable format for rapid screening and validation in cell-based scFv library selection, and the strategy described here will be applicable to efficient discovery of antibodies to diverse cell-surface targets.

  10. Immunochemical identification of human endothelial cells on the lining of a ventricular assist device.

    OpenAIRE

    Frazier, O. H.; Baldwin, R T; Eskin, S G; Duncan, J. M.

    1993-01-01

    We are studying the biologic (pseudointimal) lining that forms in the HeartMate (Thermo Cardiosystems, Inc.; Woburn, Massachusetts, USA), a left ventricular assist device with a pusher-plate blood pump, housed in solid titanium with uniquely textured blood-contacting surfaces. Sintered titanium microspheres cover the rigid surface, and integrally textured polyurethane lines the flexing diaphragm. The texture of the blood-contacting surfaces is designed to encourage formation of a biologic pse...

  11. Fluorouracil Selectively Enriches Stem-like Leukemic Cells in a Leukemic Cell Line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Zhang, Song Yang, Yu-Juan He, Hui-Yuan Shao, Li Wang, Hui Chen, Yu-Jie Gao, Feng-Xian Qing, Xian-Chun Chen, Liu-Yang Zhao, Shi Tan

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies have reported that cancer stem cells (CSCs could be isolated from solid cancer cell lines, in which the purity of CSCs was higher than that from tumor tissues. Separation of CSCs from leukemic cell lines was rarely reported. In this study, CD34+CD38- stem-like cell subsets in human KG-1a leukemic cell line were enriched by cytotoxic agent 5-fluorouracil (5-FU. After 4 days incubation of KG-1a cell line with 5-FU (50 μg/ml, the CD34+CD38- subpopulation of cell lines was enriched more than 10 times. The enriched cells had proliferate potential in vitro, low level of RNA transcription and Hoechst 33342 dye efflux ability, accompanied by high expression of ATP-binding cassette transporter protein ABCG2. Our findings suggest that treatment with 5-FU offers an easy method to isolate leukemic stem-like subpopulation. It can facilitate studies of leukemic stem cell biology and the development of new therapeutic strategies.

  12. Nanostructured Electrocatalysts for PEM Fuel Cells and Redox Flow Batteries: A Selected Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shao, Yuyan; Cheng, Yingwen; Duan, Wentao; Wang, Wei; Lin, Yuehe; Wang, Yong; Liu, Jun

    2015-12-04

    PEM fuel cells and redox flow batteries are two very similar technologies which share common component materials and device design. Electrocatalysts are the key components in these two devices. In this Review, we discuss recent progress of electrocatalytic materials for these two technologies with a focus on our research activities at Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL) in the past years. This includes (1) nondestructive functionalization of graphitic carbon as Pt support to improve its electrocatalytic performance, (2) triple-junction of metal–carbon–metal oxides to promote Pt performance, (3) nitrogen-doped carbon and metal-doped carbon (i.e., metal oxides) to improve redox reactions in flow batteries. A perspective on future research and the synergy between the two technologies are also discussed.

  13. An operational method and device for the determination of an output signal in a selected spatial section of an information processing system

    CERN Document Server

    Zafiris, Oliver

    2009-01-01

    Current strategies in system science with a focus on neuroscience do differ in their methodological approach when exploring and trying to analyze a system in order to detect supposed underlying principle processes in its inherent actions, which one might would call rules or laws. The here suggested procedure and measuring device, performs a mapping of characteristic parameters of the regional output signal, of the supposed structural properties, onto a selected regional part of the information processing system, in which the output signal and its characteristics occur. Explicitly it is pointed out here: Here are not considered input signals, which for instance might have an influence upon (few) nuclear kernels of the atom, electrons, protons, spins of these atomic structures or substructures, or phonons, or which in general represent the physical basis for example of NMR-Physics (NMR = nuclear magnetic resonance) or solid state physics. Examples for the type of input signals considered here are visual, olfact...

  14. Integrated printed circuit board device for cell lysis and nucleic acid extraction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marshall, Lewis A; Wu, Liang Li; Babikian, Sarkis; Bachman, Mark; Santiago, Juan G

    2012-11-01

    Preparation of raw, untreated biological samples remains a major challenge in microfluidics. We present a novel microfluidic device based on the integration of printed circuit boards and an isotachophoresis assay for sample preparation of nucleic acids from biological samples. The device has integrated resistive heaters and temperature sensors as well as a 70 μm × 300 μm × 3.7 cm microfluidic channel connecting two 15 μL reservoirs. We demonstrated this device by extracting pathogenic nucleic acids from 1 μL dispensed volume of whole blood spiked with Plasmodium falciparum. We dispensed whole blood directly onto an on-chip reservoir, and the system's integrated heaters simultaneously lysed and mixed the sample. We used isotachophoresis to extract the nucleic acids into a secondary buffer via isotachophoresis. We analyzed the convective mixing action with micro particle image velocimetry (micro-PIV) and verified the purity and amount of extracted nucleic acids using off-chip quantitative polymerase chain reaction (PCR). We achieved a clinically relevant limit of detection of 500 parasites per microliter. The system has no moving parts, and the process is potentially compatible with a wide range of on-chip hybridization or amplification assays.

  15. Bulk Heterojunction versus Diffused Bilayer: The Role of Device Geometry in Solution p-Doped Polymer-Based Solar Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Loiudice, Anna; Rizzo, Aurora; Biasiucci, Mariano; Gigli, Giuseppe

    2012-01-01

    We exploit the effect of molecular p-type doping of P3HT in diffused bilayer (DB) polymer solar cells. In this alternative device geometry, the p-doping is accomplished in solution by blending the F4-TCNQ with P3HT. The p-doping both increases the film conductivity and reduces the potential barrier at the interface with the electrode. This results in an excellent power conversion efficiency of 4.02%, which is an improvement of ∼48% over the p-doped standard bulk heterojunction ...

  16. Single cell-gap transflective liquid crystal device created by controlling the pretilt angle using a liquid crystalline reactive monomer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeon, Eun-Young; Kim, Ki-Han; Lee, Ji-Hoon; Yoon, Tae-Hoon

    2011-12-01

    We present a single cell-gap transflective liquid crystal (LC) device using a homogeneous alignment polyimide (H-PI) mixed with a liquid crystalline reactive monomer that is able to vertically align the LC. We obtain two different pretilt angles in each pixel through the region by region control of the UV exposure time. The smaller pretilt angle is used to obtain a half-wave phase retardation for the transmissive part, whereas the larger pretilt angle is used to obtain a quarter-wave phase retardation for the reflective part. PMID:22273954

  17. Development of microfluidic cell culture devices towards an in vitro human intestinal barrier model

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tan, Hsih-Yin

    to enable real-time detection of cell responses, adjustment of cellular stimulation etc. leading to establishment of conditional experiments. In this project, microfluidic systems engineering was leveraged to develop an eight chamber multi-layer microchip for intestinal barrier studies. Sandwiched between...... the layers was a modified Teflon porous membrane for cell culture. The novelty lies in modifying the surface of the porous Teflon support membrane using thiol-ene ‘click’ chemistry, thus allowing the modified Teflon membrane to be bonded between the chip layers to form an enclosed microchip. Successful...... application of the multi-layer microchip was demonstrated by integrating the microchip to an existing cell culture fluidic system to culture the human intestinal epithelial cells, Caco-2, for long term studies. Under the continuous low flow conditions, the cells differentiated into columnar cells displaying...

  18. Microfluidic Devices for Terahertz Spectroscopy of Live Cells Toward Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qi Tang

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available THz spectroscopy is an emerging technique for studying the dynamics and interactions of cells and biomolecules, but many practical challenges still remain in experimental studies. We present a prototype of simple and inexpensive cell-trapping microfluidic chip for THz spectroscopic study of live cells. Cells are transported, trapped and concentrated into the THz exposure region by applying an AC bias signal while the chip maintains a steady temperature at 37 °C by resistive heating. We conduct some preliminary experiments on E. coli and T-cell solution and compare the transmission spectra of empty channels, channels filled with aqueous media only, and channels filled with aqueous media with un-concentrated and concentrated cells.

  19. Microfluidic Devices for Terahertz Spectroscopy of Live Cells Toward Lab-on-a-Chip Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Qi; Liang, Min; Lu, Yi; Wong, Pak Kin; Wilmink, Gerald J.; D. Zhang, Donna; Xin, Hao

    2016-01-01

    THz spectroscopy is an emerging technique for studying the dynamics and interactions of cells and biomolecules, but many practical challenges still remain in experimental studies. We present a prototype of simple and inexpensive cell-trapping microfluidic chip for THz spectroscopic study of live cells. Cells are transported, trapped and concentrated into the THz exposure region by applying an AC bias signal while the chip maintains a steady temperature at 37 °C by resistive heating. We conduct some preliminary experiments on E. coli and T-cell solution and compare the transmission spectra of empty channels, channels filled with aqueous media only, and channels filled with aqueous media with un-concentrated and concentrated cells. PMID:27049392

  20. Selective thermal neutron capture therapy of cancer cells using their specific functional differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The theory and the history of selective thermal neutron capture therapy for malignant melanoma, thermal neutron capture therapy which has been developed by authors, synthesis and effects of 10B-compounds accumulating in melanoma cells and absorbing thermal neutron easily, and many experiments concerning this therapy were reviewed and discussed. (Tsunoda, M.)