WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell responses needed

  1. Biosolar cells: global artificial photosynthesis needs responsive matrices with quantum coherent kinetic control for high yield.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Purchase, R L; de Groot, H J M

    2015-06-06

    This contribution discusses why we should consider developing artificial photosynthesis with the tandem approach followed by the Dutch BioSolar Cells consortium, a current operational paradigm for a global artificial photosynthesis project. We weigh the advantages and disadvantages of a tandem converter against other approaches, including biomass. Owing to the low density of solar energy per unit area, artificial photosynthetic systems must operate at high efficiency to minimize the land (or sea) area required. In particular, tandem converters are a much better option than biomass for densely populated countries and use two photons per electron extracted from water as the raw material into chemical conversion to hydrogen, or carbon-based fuel when CO2 is also used. For the average total light sum of 40 mol m(-2) d(-1) for The Netherlands, the upper limits are many tons of hydrogen or carbon-based fuel per hectare per year. A principal challenge is to forge materials for quantitative conversion of photons to chemical products within the physical limitation of an internal potential of ca 2.9 V. When going from electric charge in the tandem to hydrogen and back to electricity, only the energy equivalent to 1.23 V can be stored in the fuel and regained. A critical step is then to learn from nature how to use the remaining difference of ca 1.7 V effectively by triple use of one overpotential for preventing recombination, kinetic stabilization of catalytic intermediates and finally generating targeted heat for the release of oxygen. Probably the only way to achieve this is by using bioinspired responsive matrices that have quantum-classical pathways for a coherent conversion of photons to fuels, similar to what has been achieved by natural selection in evolution. In appendix A for the expert, we derive a propagator that describes how catalytic reactions can proceed coherently by a convergence of time scales of quantum electron dynamics and classical nuclear dynamics. We

  2. Adjusted Particle Size Eliminates the Need of Linkage of Antigen and Adjuvants for Appropriated T Cell Responses in Virus-Like Particle-Based Vaccines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes, Ariane C.; Flace, Anna; Saudan, Philippe; Zabel, Franziska; Cabral-Miranda, Gustavo; Turabi, Aadil El; Manolova, Vania; Bachmann, Martin F.

    2017-01-01

    Since the discovery of the first virus-like particle (VLP) derived from hepatitis B virus in 1980 (1), the field has expanded substantially. Besides successful use of VLPs as safe autologous virus-targeting vaccines, the powerful immunogenicity of VLPs has been also harnessed to generate immune response against heterologous and even self-antigens (2–4). Linking adjuvants to VLPs displaying heterologous antigen ensures simultaneous delivery of all vaccine components to the same antigen-presenting cells. As a consequence, antigen-presenting cells, such as dendritic cells, will process and present the antigen displayed on VLPs while receiving costimulatory signals by the VLP-incorporated adjuvant. Similarly, antigen-specific B cells recognizing the antigen linked to the VLP are simultaneously exposed to the adjuvant. Here, we demonstrate in mice that physical association of antigen, carrier (VLPs), and adjuvant is more critical for B than T cell responses. As a model system, we used the E7 protein from human papilloma virus, which spontaneously forms oligomers with molecular weight ranging from 158 kDa to 10 MDa at an average size of 50 nm. E7 oligomers were either chemically linked or simply mixed with VLPs loaded with DNA rich in non-methylated CG motifs (CpGs), a ligand for toll-like receptor 9. E7-specific IgG responses were strongly enhanced if the antigen was linked to the VLPs. In contrast, both CD4+ and CD8+ T cell responses as well as T cell-mediated protection against tumor growth were comparable for linked and mixed antigen formulations. Therefore, our data show that B cell but not T cell responses require antigen-linkage to the carrier and adjuvant for optimal vaccination outcome.

  3. Transportation needs assessment: Emergency response section

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    NONE

    1989-05-01

    The transportation impacts of moving high level nuclear waste (HLNW) to a repository at Yucca Mountain in Nevada are of concern to the residents of the State as well as to the residents of other states through which the nuclear wastes might be transported. The projected volume of the waste suggests that shipments will occur on a daily basis for some period of time. This will increase the risk of accidents, including a catastrophic incident. Furthermore, as the likelihood of repository construction and operation and waste shipments increase, so will the attention given by the national media. This document is not to be construed as a willingness to accept the HLNW repository on the part of the State. Rather it is an initial step in ensuring that the safety and well-being of Nevada residents and visitors and the State`s economy will be adequately addressed in federal decision-making pertaining to the transportation of HLNW into and across Nevada for disposal in the proposed repository. The Preferred Transportation System Needs Assessment identifies critical system design elements and technical and social issues that must be considered in conducting a comprehensive transportation impact analysis. Development of the needs assessment and the impact analysis is especially complex because of the absence of information and experience with shipping HLNW and because of the ``low probability, high consequence`` aspect of the transportation risk.

  4. Responsibilities and Training Needs of Paraeducators in Physical Education

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Ronald W.; Kotecki, Jerome E.; Harvey, Michael W.; Oliver, Amy

    2007-01-01

    This study describes responsibilities and training needs of paraeducators in physical education. Paraeducators (n = 138) employed in 34 midwestern schools received a 27-item questionnaire. Of the 138 paraeducators contacted, 76 responded, resulting in a 55.1% response rate. Only 16% of the total respondents (n = 76) reported receiving specific…

  5. Assessment of Research Needs for Advanced Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Penner, S.S.

    1985-11-01

    The DOE Advanced Fuel Cell Working Group (AFCWG) was formed and asked to perform a scientific evaluation of the current status of fuel cells, with emphasis on identification of long-range research that may have a significant impact on the practical utilization of fuel cells in a variety of applications. The AFCWG held six meetings at locations throughout the country where fuel cell research and development are in progress, for presentations by experts on the status of fuel cell research and development efforts, as well as for inputs on research needs. Subsequent discussions by the AFCWG have resulted in the identification of priority research areas that should be explored over the long term in order to advance the design and performance of fuel cells of all types. Surveys describing the salient features of individual fuel cell types are presented in Chapters 2 to 6 and include elaborations of long-term research needs relating to the expeditious introduction of improved fuel cells. The Introduction and the Summary (Chapter 1) were prepared by AFCWG. They were repeatedly revised in response to comments and criticism. The present version represents the closest approach to a consensus that we were able to reach, which should not be interpreted to mean that each member of AFCWG endorses every statement and every unexpressed deletion. The Introduction and Summary always represent a majority view and, occasionally, a unanimous judgment. Chapters 2 to 6 provide background information and carry the names of identified authors. The identified authors of Chapters 2 to 6, rather than AFCWG as a whole, bear full responsibility for the scientific and technical contents of these chapters.

  6. Response to ERIS 2014 States' Research Needs Survey

    Science.gov (United States)

    This document is ORD’s response to the states’ needs and priorities, as identified in the 2014 survey. ORD identified existing methods, models, tools and databases on these topics, as well as near-term research and development efforts, that could assist states in thei...

  7. Cell response to surgery.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Ni Choileain, Niamh

    2012-02-03

    OBJECTIVES: To describe the profound alterations in host immunity that are produced by major surgery as demonstrated by experimental and clinical studies, and to evaluate the benefits of therapeutic strategies aimed at attenuating perioperative immune dysfunction. DATA SOURCES: A review of the English-language literature was conducted, incorporating searches of the MEDLINE, EMBASE, and Cochrane collaboration databases to identify laboratory and clinical studies investigating the cellular response to surgery. STUDY SELECTION: Original articles and case reports describing immune dysfunction secondary to surgical trauma were included. DATA EXTRACTION: The results were compiled to show outcomes of different studies and were compared. DATA SYNTHESIS: Current evidence indicates that the early systemic inflammatory response syndrome observed after major surgery that is characterized by proinflammatory cytokine release, microcirculatory disturbance, and cell-mediated immune dysfunction is followed by a compensatory anti-inflammatory response syndrome, which predisposes the patient to opportunistic infection, multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, and death. Because there are currently no effective treatment options for multiple organ dysfunction syndrome, measures to prevent its onset should be initiated at an early stage. Accumulating experimental evidence suggests that targeted therapeutic strategies involving immunomodulatory agents such as interferon gamma, granulocyte colony-stimulating factor, the prostaglandin E(2) antagonist, indomethacin, and pentoxifylline may be used for the treatment of systemic inflammatory response syndrome to prevent the onset of multiple organ dysfunction syndrome. CONCLUSIONS: Surgical trauma produces profound immunological dysfunction. Therapeutic strategies directed at restoring immune homeostasis should aim to redress the physiological proinflammatory-anti-inflammatory cell imbalance associated with major surgery.

  8. Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response training Center needs assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGinnis, K.A. [Westinghouse Hanford Co., Richland, WA (United States); Bolton, P.A. [Pacific Northwest Lab., Richland, WA (United States); Robinson, R.K. [RKR, Inc. (United States)

    1993-09-01

    For the Hanford Site to provide high-quality training using simulated job-site situations to prepare the 4,000 Site workers and 500 emergency responders for known and unknown hazards a Hazardous Materials Management and Emergency Response Training Center is needed. The center will focus on providing classroom lecture as well as hands-on, realistic training. The establishment of the center will create a partnership among the US Department of Energy; its contractors; labor; local, state, and tribal governments; and Xavier and Tulane Universities of Louisiana. This report presents the background, history, need, benefits, and associated costs of the proposed center.

  9. Endothelial progenitor cells and integrins: adhesive needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Caiado Francisco

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the last decade there have been multiple studies concerning the contribution of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs to new vessel formation in different physiological and pathological settings. The process by which EPCs contribute to new vessel formation in adults is termed postnatal vasculogenesis and occurs via four inter-related steps. They must respond to chemoattractant signals and mobilize from the bone marrow to the peripheral blood; home in on sites of new vessel formation; invade and migrate at the same sites; and differentiate into mature endothelial cells (ECs and/or regulate pre-existing ECs via paracrine or juxtacrine signals. During these four steps, EPCs interact with different physiological compartments, namely bone marrow, peripheral blood, blood vessels and homing tissues. The success of each step depends on the ability of EPCs to interact, adapt and respond to multiple molecular cues. The present review summarizes the interactions between integrins expressed by EPCs and their ligands: extracellular matrix components and cell surface proteins present at sites of postnatal vasculogenesis. The data summarized here indicate that integrins represent a major molecular determinant of EPC function, with different integrin subunits regulating different steps of EPC biology. Specifically, integrin α4β1 is a key regulator of EPC retention and/or mobilization from the bone marrow, while integrins α5β1, α6β1, αvβ3 and αvβ5 are major determinants of EPC homing, invasion, differentiation and paracrine factor production. β2 integrins are the major regulators of EPC transendothelial migration. The relevance of integrins in EPC biology is also demonstrated by many studies that use extracellular matrix-based scaffolds as a clinical tool to improve the vasculogenic functions of EPCs. We propose that targeted and tissue-specific manipulation of EPC integrin-mediated interactions may be crucial to further improve the usage of

  10. Chronic Disease Management Programmes: an adequate response to patients’ needs?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijken, Mieke; Bekkema, Nienke; Boeckxstaens, Pauline; Schellevis, François G.; De Maeseneer, Jan M.; Groenewegen, Peter P.

    2012-01-01

    Abstract Background  Inspired by American examples, several European countries are now developing disease management programmes (DMPs) to improve the quality of care for patients with chronic diseases. Recently, questions have been raised whether the disease management approach is appropriate to respond to patient‐defined needs. Objective  In this article we consider the responsiveness of current European DMPs to patients’ needs defined in terms of multimorbidity, functional and participation problems, and self‐management. Method  Information about existing DMPs was derived from a survey among country‐experts. In addition, we made use of international scientific literature. Results  Most European DMPs do not have a solid answer yet to the problem of multimorbidity. Methods of linking DMPs, building extra modules to deal with the most prevalent comorbidities and integration of case management principles are introduced. Rehabilitation, psychosocial and reintegration support are not included in all DMPs, and the involvement of the social environment of the patient is uncommon. Interventions tailored to the needs of specific social or cultural patient groups are mostly not available. Few DMPs provide access to individualized patient information to strengthen self‐management, including active engagement in decision making. Conclusion  To further improve the responsiveness of DMPs to patients’ needs, we suggest to monitor ‘patient relevant outcomes’ that might be based on the ICF‐model. To address the needs of patients with multimorbidity, we propose a generic comprehensive model, embedded in primary care. A goal‐oriented approach provides the opportunity to prioritize goals that really matter to patients. PMID:22712877

  11. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2013-09-16

    This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2013 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2009 BNA, the 2012 BNA document, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures.

  12. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Compliance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, John A. [Lawrence Livermore National Lab. (LLNL), Livermore, CA (United States)

    2016-09-01

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head, James Colson. This document is the second of a two-part analysis on Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2016 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2016 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. The 2013 BNA was approved by NNSA’s Livermore Field Office on January 22, 2014.

  13. Hanford Site emergency response needs, Volumes 1 and 2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Good, D.E.

    1996-04-16

    This report presents the results of a comprehensive third party needs assessment of the Hanford Fire Department (HFD), conducted by Hughes Associates Inc. The assessment was commissioned with the intent of obtaining an unbiased report which could be used as a basis for identifying needed changes/modifications to the fire department and its services. This report serves several functions: (1) it documents current and future site operations and associated hazards and risks identified as a result of document review, site and facility surveys, and interviews with knowledgeable personnel; (2) describes the HFD in terms of organization, existing resources and response capabilities; (3) identifies regulatory and other requirements that are applicable to the HFD and includes a discussion of associated legal liabilities; and (4) provides recommendations based on applicable requirements and existing conditions. Each recommendation is followed by a supporting statement to clarify the intent or justification of the recommendation. This report will be followed by a Master Plan document which will present an implementation method for the recommendations (with associated costs) considered to be essential to maintaining adequate, cost effective emergency services at the Hanford site in the next five to seven years.

  14. Hydrogen Storage Needs for Early Motive Fuel Cell Markets

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kurtz, J.; Ainscough, C.; Simpson, L.; Caton, M.

    2012-11-01

    The National Renewable Energy Laboratory's (NREL) objective for this project is to identify performance needs for onboard energy storage of early motive fuel cell markets by working with end users, manufacturers, and experts. The performance needs analysis is combined with a hydrogen storage technology gap analysis to provide the U.S. Department of Energy (DOE) Fuel Cell Technologies Program with information about the needs and gaps that can be used to focus research and development activities that are capable of supporting market growth.

  15. School Nurse Cultural Competence Needs Assessment: Results and Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matza, Maria; Maughan, Erin; Barrows, Beth M

    2015-11-01

    NASN conducted a needs assessment to learn about the cultural competence skills needed by school nurses. The purpose of this article is to describe the results of the needs assessment and describe actions taken to address cultural competency needs for the U.S. school nurse workforce.

  16. SUSTAINABILITY AND COMPANY’S CORPORATE SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY NEED

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    MONICA VIOLETA ACHIM

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available The company is a living organism, is an entity and its analysis should be made taking into account the whole system. The company is a dynamic environment, which has as a mainly aims to add value for all participants in the economic life. In the organizations, the achievement of the concept of sustainable development is achieved through the concept of societal responsibility of the organizations. For this scope we need to use the term introduced by Elkington namely “The Triple Bottom Line” which involve economic prosperity, environmental compliance and improve social cohesion. [11]. So, “The Triple Bottom Line” can be defined as an approach for measuring the overall performance of an organization according to its triple contribution to the three aspects mentioned above. The new conceptual framework change radically the final aim of a company because it is not anymore maximizing the value of shares held by shareholders, but it is maximizing value for all stakeholders, where shareholders are just another category of stakeholders. Sustainable development and globalization require new performance standards that exceed the economic field, for both national company and international ones. As a consequence, these standards must be integrated into the company's development strategy, to ensure sustainability of activities carried, by the harmonization of economic, social and environmental objectives.

  17. Epithelial stem cells in the esophagus: who needs them?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barker, Nick

    2012-09-07

    In their recent Science publication, Doupé et al. (2012) demonstrate that a single population of proliferating progenitor cells is solely responsible for homeostatic self-renewal and repair of injured esophageal epithelium. These findings argue against an obligate requirement for long-lived (reserve) stem cells in adult epithelia.

  18. DNA damage response in adult stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Insinga, Alessandra; Cicalese, Angelo; Pelicci, Pier Giuseppe

    2014-04-01

    This review discusses the processes of DNA-damage-response and DNA-damage repair in stem and progenitor cells of several tissues. The long life-span of stem cells suggests that they may respond differently to DNA damage than their downstream progeny and, indeed, studies have begun to elucidate the unique stem cell response mechanisms to DNA damage. Because the DNA damage responses in stem cells and progenitor cells are distinctly different, stem and progenitor cells should be considered as two different entities from this point of view. Hematopoietic and mammary stem cells display a unique DNA-damage response, which involves active inhibition of apoptosis, entry into the cell-cycle, symmetric division, partial DNA repair and maintenance of self-renewal. Each of these biological events depends on the up-regulation of the cell-cycle inhibitor p21. Moreover, inhibition of apoptosis and symmetric stem cell division are the consequence of the down-regulation of the tumor suppressor p53, as a direct result of p21 up-regulation. A deeper understanding of these processes is required before these findings can be translated into human anti-aging and anti-cancer therapies. One needs to clarify and dissect the pathways that control p21 regulation in normal and cancer stem cells and define (a) how p21 blocks p53 functions in stem cells and (b) how p21 promotes DNA repair in stem cells. Is this effect dependent on p21s ability to inhibit p53? Such molecular knowledge may pave the way to methods for maintaining short-term tissue reconstitution while retaining long-term cellular and genomic integrity.

  19. Cell-mediated immune response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Meyer, Sonja Izquierdo; Fuglsang, Katrine; Blaakaer, Jan

    2014-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: This clinical review aims to assess the efficacy of human papillomavirus 16/18 (HPV16/18) vaccination on the cell-mediated immune response in women with existing cervical intraepithelial neoplasia or cervical cancer induced by HPV16 or HPV18. DATA SOURCES AND STUDY SELECTION: A focused...... and thorough literature search conducted in five different databases found 996 publications. Six relevant articles were chosen for further review. In total, 154 patients (>18 years of age) were enrolled in prospective study trials with 3-15 months of follow up. The vaccine applications were administered two...... triggered a detectable cell-mediated immune response, some of which were statistically significant. Correlations between immunological response and clinical outcome (histopathology) were not significant, so neoplasms may not be susceptible to vaccine-generated cytotoxic T cells (CD8(+)). CONCLUSIONS...

  20. Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment - Requirements Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2016-10-04

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by LLNL Emergency Management Department Head James Colson. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only addresses emergency response.

  1. Project Responder: technology needs for local emergency response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beakley, Guy; Garwin, Thomas; Pollard, Neal A.; Singley, George T., III; Tuohy, Robert V.; Lupo, Jasper

    2003-09-01

    Since April 2001, the Oklahoma City National Memorial Institute for the Prevention of Terrorism has funded an effort by Hicks &Associates, Inc. and the Terrorism Research Center, Inc., aimed ultimately at improving local, state, and federal emergency responders" capabilities for mitigating the effects of chemical, biological, radiological, nuclear or explosive/ incendiary (CBRNE) terrorism. This effort, titled "Project Responder," began by developing an understanding of how state and local responders view their current capabilities, shortfalls, and needs. This paper discusses some of the results of this first phase of the effort that has resulted in a comprehensive report titled "Emergency Responders" Needs, Goals, and Priorities." This paper addresses two of the capabilities from that report which we believe are of most interest to this conference. There are ten other capabilities discussed in the report, which may also be of interest.

  2. Community matters - why outbreak responses need to integrate health promotion.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kickbusch, Ilona; Reddy, K Srikanth

    2016-03-01

    Communities are characterized by common interests, common ecology, and common social system or structure. These characteristics, qualities, and processes involved in the community affect both health behaviors and health outcomes during disease outbreaks. Hence, health promotion theorists and practitioners emphasize working 'with' rather than 'on' communities. They believe health promotion, with all its experiences in community mobilization, empowerment, and health literacy programs, should be part of disease prevention and control efforts from the very beginning. Health promotion knowledge needs to be fully integrated into infectious disease control, especially in the context of outbreaks.

  3. Fundamental Physics Changes in Response to Evolving NASA Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Israelsson, Ulf

    2004-01-01

    Change continues in the NASA environment. The need for access to space for physicists is growing if we are to fruitfully address today s challenging questions. A new Roadmap is required to demonstrate the importance of our program to stakeholders. Our investigators must continue to advocate the benefits of our program: a) To NASA and Congress; b) To the scientific community; c) To students; d) To the general public. Our investigators must seek ways to use their advanced technology to support a human presence in space and to develop improved Earth applications.

  4. Autoreactive helper T cells alleviate the need for intrinsic TLR signaling in autoreactive B cell activation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giles, Josephine R.; Neves, Adriana Turqueti; Marshak-Rothstein, Ann; Shlomchik, Mark J.

    2017-01-01

    T cells play a significant role in the pathogenesis of systemic autoimmune diseases, including systemic lupus erythematosus; however, there is relatively little information on the nature and specificity of autoreactive T cells. Identifying such cells has been technically difficult because they are likely to be rare and low affinity. Here, we report a method for identifying autoreactive T cell clones that recognize proteins contained in autoantibody immune complexes, providing direct evidence that functional autoreactive helper T cells exist in the periphery of normal mice. These T cells significantly enhanced autoreactive B cell proliferation and altered B cell differentiation in vivo. Most importantly, these autoreactive T cells were able to rescue many aspects of the TLR-deficient AM14 (anti-IgG2a rheumatoid factor) B cell response, suggesting that TLR requirements can be bypassed. This result has implications for the efficacy of TLR-targeted therapy in the treatment of ongoing disease. PMID:28239656

  5. Clinical trials for stem cell transplantation: when are they needed?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Van Pham, Phuc

    2016-04-27

    In recent years, both stem cell research and the clinical application of these promising cells have increased rapidly. About 1000 clinical trials using stem cells have to date been performed globally. More importantly, more than 10 stem cell-based products have been approved in some countries. With the rapid growth of stem cell applications, some countries have used clinical trials as a tool to diminish the rate of clinical stem cell applications. However, the point at which stem cell clinical trials are essential remains unclear. This commentary discusses when stem cell clinical trials are essential for stem cell transplantation therapies.

  6. At least three transporters likely mediate threonine uptake needed for mouse embryonic stem cell proliferation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tara Marie Formisano

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are at the forefront of current regenerative and biomedical research. Thus, there exists an imperative and urgent need to understand the mechanisms that drive stem cell function in order to exploit their use as a therapeutic tool. Amino acids are potent inducers of signaling cascades that drive stem cell proliferation and differentiation. With a focus on mouse embryonic stem (mES cells, Threonine (Thr is the only amino acid required in culture media for mES cell proliferation. Current research associates this need for Thr with threonine dehydrogenase (TDH, which catabolizes Thr to glycine and acetyl-CoA in mES cells. This theory depends, in part, on the ability of 3- hydroxynorvaline (3-HNV to inhibit both TDH and mES cell proliferation. However, the concentration of 3-HNV needed to inhibit mES cell proliferation is more than an order of magnitude less than its apparent Ki for TDH inhibition. Additionally, 3-HNV inhibits human embryonic stem (hES cell proliferation, but hES cells do not express a functional tdh gene. Such findings indicate another mechanism for Thr stimulated mES and hES cell proliferation. Since amino acid transporters may be inducers of signaling cascades, we characterized the Thr transport systems in mES cells. We found that there is a Na+-dependent and a Na+-independent component of substrate-saturable transport, with the Na+-dependent component predominating. We also found that of 20 amino acids tested, the amino acids that were the strongest inhibitors of the Na+-dependent component of radiolabeled Thr transport were Ser, Cys, 4-OH-Pro, Asn, Met, and non-radiolabeled Thr itself. Such findings are consistent with characteristics of the ASC transport system, suggesting that this ASC system is responsible for the majority of Thr transport in mES cells. We confirmed expression of mRNA encoding the ASC system transporters, ASCT1 and ASCT2, in mES cells using RT-PCR. Hence, mES cells probably express at least three

  7. At Least Three Transporters Likely Mediate Threonine Uptake Needed for Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, Tara M.; Van Winkle, Lon J.

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are at the forefront of current regenerative and biomedical research. Thus, there exists an imperative and urgent need to understand the mechanisms that drive stem cell function in order to exploit their use as a therapeutic tool. Amino acids are potent inducers of signaling cascades that drive stem cell proliferation and differentiation. With a focus on mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, Threonine (Thr) is the only amino acid required in culture media for mES cell proliferation. Current research associates this need for Thr with threonine dehydrogenase (TDH), which catabolizes Thr to glycine and acetyl-CoA in mES cells. This theory depends, in part, on the ability of 3- hydroxynorvaline (3-HNV) to inhibit both TDH and mES cell proliferation. However, the concentration of 3-HNV needed to inhibit mES cell proliferation is more than an order of magnitude less than its apparent Ki for TDH inhibition. Additionally, 3-HNV inhibits human embryonic stem (hES) cell proliferation, but hES cells do not express a functional tdh gene. Such findings indicate another mechanism for Thr stimulated mES and hES cell proliferation. Since amino acid transporters may be inducers of signaling cascades, we characterized the Thr transport systems in mES cells. We found that there is a Na+-dependent and a Na+-independent component of substrate-saturable transport, with the Na+-dependent component predominating. We also found that of 20 amino acids tested, the amino acids that were the strongest inhibitors of the Na+-dependent component of radiolabeled Thr transport were Ser, Cys, 4-OH-Pro, Asn, Met, and non-radiolabeled Thr itself. Such findings are consistent with characteristics of the ASC transport system, suggesting that this ASC system is responsible for the majority of Thr transport in mES cells. We confirmed expression of mRNA encoding the ASC system transporters, ASCT1 and ASCT2, in mES cells using RT-PCR. In conclusion, mES cells likely express at least three

  8. At Least Three Transporters Likely Mediate Threonine Uptake Needed for Mouse Embryonic Stem Cell Proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Formisano, Tara M; Van Winkle, Lon J

    2016-01-01

    Stem cells are at the forefront of current regenerative and biomedical research. Thus, there exists an imperative and urgent need to understand the mechanisms that drive stem cell function in order to exploit their use as a therapeutic tool. Amino acids are potent inducers of signaling cascades that drive stem cell proliferation and differentiation. With a focus on mouse embryonic stem (mES) cells, Threonine (Thr) is the only amino acid required in culture media for mES cell proliferation. Current research associates this need for Thr with threonine dehydrogenase (TDH), which catabolizes Thr to glycine and acetyl-CoA in mES cells. This theory depends, in part, on the ability of 3- hydroxynorvaline (3-HNV) to inhibit both TDH and mES cell proliferation. However, the concentration of 3-HNV needed to inhibit mES cell proliferation is more than an order of magnitude less than its apparent Ki for TDH inhibition. Additionally, 3-HNV inhibits human embryonic stem (hES) cell proliferation, but hES cells do not express a functional tdh gene. Such findings indicate another mechanism for Thr stimulated mES and hES cell proliferation. Since amino acid transporters may be inducers of signaling cascades, we characterized the Thr transport systems in mES cells. We found that there is a Na(+)-dependent and a Na(+)-independent component of substrate-saturable transport, with the Na(+)-dependent component predominating. We also found that of 20 amino acids tested, the amino acids that were the strongest inhibitors of the Na(+)-dependent component of radiolabeled Thr transport were Ser, Cys, 4-OH-Pro, Asn, Met, and non-radiolabeled Thr itself. Such findings are consistent with characteristics of the ASC transport system, suggesting that this ASC system is responsible for the majority of Thr transport in mES cells. We confirmed expression of mRNA encoding the ASC system transporters, ASCT1 and ASCT2, in mES cells using RT-PCR. In conclusion, mES cells likely express at least three

  9. Immunolabeling artifacts and the need for live-cell imaging

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schnell, Ulrike; Dijk, Freark; Sjollema, Klaas A.; Giepmans, Ben N. G.

    2012-01-01

    Fluorescent fusion proteins have revolutionized examination of proteins in living cells. Still, studies using these proteins are met with criticism because proteins are modified and ectopically expressed, in contrast to immunofluorescence studies. However, introducing immunoreagents inside cells can

  10. [Why do we need induced pluripotent stem cells in neurobiology?].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liszewska, Ewa; Jaworski, Jacek

    2013-01-01

    Reprogramming of somatic cells made possible to study in vitro inaccessible human cells, such as different types of neurons. Almost immediate consequence of the emergence of this technology was the development of a number of cellular models of the nervous system diseases. They are used both to explore the cellular mechanisms of these diseases and for the development of new pharmacological strategies. Reprogrammed cells are also a potential alternative to embryonic stem cells for transplantation. This article presents the most important achievements in the use of cell reprogramming technology in neurobiology and at the same time points out the limitations of the methodology and the expected directions of its development.

  11. Controlled surface chemistries and quantitative cell response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plant, Anne L.

    2002-03-01

    Living cells experience a large number of signaling cues from their extracellular matrix. As a result of these inputs, a variety of intracellular signaling pathways are apparently initiated simultaneously. The vast array of alternative responses that result from the integration of these inputs suggests that it may be reasonable to look for cellular response not as an 'on' or 'off' condition but as a distribution of responses. A difficult challenge is to determine whether variations in responses from individual cells arise from the complexity of intracellular signals or are due to variations in the cell culture environment. By controlling surface chemistry so that every cell 'sees' the same chemical and physical environment, we can begin to assess how the distribution of cell response is affected strictly by changes in the chemistry of the cell culture surface. Using the gene for green fluorescent protein linked to the gene for the promoter of the extracellular matrix protein, tenascin, we can easily probe the end product in a signaling pathway that is purported to be linked to surface protein chemistry and to cell shape. Cell response to well-controlled, well-characterized, and highly reproducible surfaces prepared using soft lithography techniques are compared with more conventional ways of preparing extracellular matrix proteins for cell culture. Using fluorescence microscopy and image analysis of populations of cells on these surfaces, we probe quantitatively the relationship between surface chemistry, cell shape and variations in gene expression endpoint.

  12. Neural stem cells: the need for a proper orientation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lesage, Bart; Gutierrez, Irene; Martí, Elisa; Gonzalez, Cayetano

    2010-08-01

    Drosophila neuroblasts and mouse radial glial cells can divide asymmetrically to self-renew while producing differentiating daughter cells that contribute to brain growth. Intense research activity in the past few years has started to unveil some of the processes that govern asymmetric division in these two cell types. Here we discuss the case of centrosome asymmetry and the contribution of spindle orientation and non-spindle-related centrosome functions. Although still fragmentary, the emerging picture suggests that both notable parallelisms and striking differences apply.

  13. Less thought, more punishment: need for cognition predicts support for punitive responses to crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sargent, Michael J

    2004-11-01

    Three studies examined the relationship between need for cognition and support for punitive responses to crime. The results of Study 1 (N = 110) indicated that individuals high in need for cognition were less supportive of punitive measures than their low need for cognition counterparts. This finding was replicated in Study 2 (N = 1,807), which employed a nationally representative probability sample and included a more extensive battery of control variables. The purpose of Study 3 (N = 255) was to identify a third variable that might explain this relationship. This final study's results suggest that attributional complexity mediates the relationship between need for cognition and punitiveness. High need for cognition individuals are less supportive of punitive measures because they endorse more complex attributions for human behavior than their low need for cognition peers.

  14. Breast milk cell components and its beneficial effects on neonates: need for breast milk cell banking

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pankaj Kaingade

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Universal breastfeeding has been a stated policy of the American Academy of Pediatrics, the World Health Organization as well as UNICEF. Human milk is considered as the gold standard for infants owing to its colossal nutritional values. However, the presence of various cellular components of breast milk have been gaining more attention in recent years since the first discovery of mammary stem cells in 2007, thereby providing a ray of hope not only for growth and immunity of the neonate but also an insight into its regenerative applicability. In this relation, this article summarizes the cell components of breast milk that have been identified to date. It highlights the beneficial effects of these cells for term and preterm delivered infants along with the need for breast milk and its cell banking.

  15. A NEW VISION IN SALES: SATISFYING CUSTOMER NEEDS AND SOCIAL RESPONSIBILITY

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ion Stancu

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available The new vision in sales requires, among other things, changing the salespeople's position towards the potential client by applying a philosophy that involves taking into consideration the people they come into contact with and providing solutions to address their needs in a disinterested manner, without having to pretend reciprocity. All this must be based on the concept of total sales utility, solutions to solve clients' immediate needs: the urgent ones, those who are directly related to them (financial needs, but also those arising from the use of goods purchased by the seller. The purpose of this article is to analyse how easily we can discover clients' real needs; under what conditions these needs can be satisfied through sales activities, and which the social responsibilities of the salespeople are.

  16. Responses of Cells to Flow in Vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shigehiro Hashimoto

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available The response of cells to a flow has been studied in vitro. The response of cells was examined in two types of flow channels: a circumnutating flow in a donut-shaped open channel in a culture dish, and a one-way flow in a parallelepiped rhombus flow channel. Variation was made on the material of the parallelepiped channel to study on adhesion of cells to the plates: glass and polydimethylsiloxane. Behavior of cells on the plate was observed under a flow of a medium with an inverted phase-contrast-microscope. The shear stress on the plate is calculated with an estimated parabolic distribution of the velocity between the parallel plates. The adhesion of cells was evaluated with the cumulated shear, which is a product of the shear stress and the exposure time. The experimental results show that cells are responsive to the flow, which governs orientation, exfoliation, and differentiation. The response depends on the kinds of cells: endothelial cells orient along the stream line, although myocytes orient perpendicular to the stream line. The adhesion depends on the combination between scaffold and cell: myocytes are more adhesive to glass than cartilage cells, and fibroblasts are more adhesive to oxygenated polydimethylsiloxane than glass.

  17. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection

  18. Conducting research that is both ethical and responsive to the health needs of a developing country

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joon Wah Mak

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available There is no substantial difference in conducting research that is both ethical and responsive to the health needs in developing and developed nations. Differences are in financial constraints, technological expertise in identification and addressing needs, and in the perception of equal partnership of all stakeholders. There will be differences in emphasis of research but this is slowly blurred due to globalisation. Public health emergencies in developing countries need timely and effective global collaborative research to implement control strategies. Research needs should be based on predictive models with learning from past emergencies, technological advances, strategic critical appraisal of local and global health information, and dialogue with all stakeholders. Adequate funding will be challenging and resources from national, international and aid foundations will be needed. Issues associated with such funding include deployment of international rapid response teams, collaborating researchers, transfer of technology, and intellectual property ownership. While all types of research ranging from basic, applied, clinical studies, meta-analysis, and translational research are relevant, the relative importance and specific allocation of resources to these may differ. Is the choice related to responsiveness or based on researchers’ perception of their contributions to evidence-based practice and research? Ethical issues relating to vulnerable groups, risk distribution, quality issues, research integrity and oversight are just as important. Internationally funded research including clinical trials must be sensitive to such issues to avoid allegations of exploitation. Thus the potential of utilisation and buy-in of research findings and recommendations must be considered.

  19. T-cell response in human leishmaniasis

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kharazmi, A; Kemp, K; Ismail, A

    1999-01-01

    In the present communication we provide evidence for the existence of a Th1/Th2 dichotomy in the T-cell response to Leishmania antigens in human leishmaniasis. Our data suggest that the pattern of IL-4 and IFN-gamma response is polarised in these patients. Lymphocytes from individuals recovered...... from cutaneous leishmaniasis (CL) responded by IFN-gamma production following stimulation with Leishmania antigens whereas cells from patients recovered from visceral leishmaniasis (VL) showed a mixed pattern of IFN-gamma and IL-4 responses. The cells producing these cytokines were predominantly CD4......+. Furthermore, IL-10 plays an important role in the development of post kala azar dermal leishmaniasis (PKDL) from VL. The balance between the parasitic-specific T-cell response plays an important regulatory role in determining the outcome of Leishmania infections in humans....

  20. The need for xenotransplantation as a source of organs and cells for clinical transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekser, Burcin; Cooper, David K C; Tector, A Joseph

    2015-11-01

    The limited availability of deceased human organs and cells for the purposes of clinical transplantation remains critical worldwide. Despite the increasing utilization of 'high-risk', 'marginal', or 'extended criteria' deceased donors, in the U.S. each day 30 patients either die or are removed from the waiting list because they become too sick to undergo organ transplantation. In certain other countries, where there is cultural resistance to deceased donation, e.g., Japan, the increased utilization of living donors, e.g., of a single kidney or partial liver, only very partially addresses the organ shortage. For transplants of tissues and cells, e.g., pancreatic islet transplantation for patients with diabetes, and corneal transplantation for patients with corneal blindness (whose numbers worldwide are potentially in the millions), allotransplantation will never prove a sufficient source. There is an urgent need for an alternative source of organs and cells. The pig could prove to be a satisfactory source, and clinical xenotransplantation using pig organs or cells, particularly with the advantages provided by genetic engineering to provide resistance to the human immune response, may resolve the organ shortage. The physiologic compatibilities and incompatibilities of the pig and the human are briefly reviewed.

  1. Collective cell migration during inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Di; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    Wound scratch healing assays of endothelial cell monolayers is a simple model to study collective cell migration as a function of biological signals. A signal of particular interest is the immune response, which after initial wounding in vivo causes the release of various inflammatory factors such as tumor necrosis alpha (TNF-α). TNF-α is an innate inflammatory cytokine that can induce cell growth, cell necrosis, and change cell morphology. We studied the effects of TNF-α on collective cell migration using the wound healing assays and measured several migration metrics, such as rate of scratch closure, velocities of leading edge and bulk cells, closure index, and velocity correlation functions between migrating cells. We observed that TNF-α alters all migratory metrics as a function of the size of the scratch and TNF-α content. The changes observed in migration correlate with actin reorganization upon TNF-α exposure.

  2. Cell mechanics: integrating cell responses to mechanical stimuli.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Janmey, Paul A; McCulloch, Christopher A

    2007-01-01

    Forces are increasingly recognized as major regulators of cell structure and function, and the mechanical properties of cells are essential to the mechanisms by which cells sense forces, transmit them to the cell interior or to other cells, and transduce them into chemical signals that impact a spectrum of cellular responses. Comparison of the mechanical properties of intact cells with those of the purified cytoskeletal biopolymers that are thought to dominate their elasticity reveal the extent to which the studies of purified systems can account for the mechanical properties of the much more heterogeneous and complex cell. This review summarizes selected aspects of current work on cell mechanics with an emphasis on the structures that are activated in cell-cell contacts, that regulate ion flow across the plasma membrane, and that may sense fluid flow that produces low levels of shear stress.

  3. Medical education, social responsibility and praxis: Responding to the needs of all children.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martimianakis, Maria Athina

    2016-01-01

    While poverty is a recognized risk factor for ill health, directly intervening on the effects of poverty has traditionally been considered to fall outside the realm of a physician's daily practice. Yet, to appropriately respond to the health needs of all children, we have the social responsibility to help our trainees become competent health advocates. Experiential learning approaches can be used to aid students in developing identities and competencies as health advocates. Experiencing illness outside the sterility of the clinic, from the patient's point of view, encourages students to seek the knowledge they need to care for patients who are disenfranchised, socially vulnerable and/or marginalized.

  4. Bioluminescence Microscopy as a Method to Measure Single Cell Androgen Receptor Activity Heterogeneous Responses to Antiandrogens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Pallavi; Neveu, Bertrand; Velot, Lauriane; Wu, Lily; Fradet, Yves; Pouliot, Frédéric

    2016-01-01

    Cancer cell heterogeneity is well-documented. Therefore, techniques to monitor single cell heterogeneous responses to treatment are needed. We developed a highly translational and quantitative bioluminescence microscopy method to measure single cell androgen receptor (AR) activity modulation by antiandrogens from fluid biopsies. We showed that this assay can detect heterogeneous cellular response to drug treatment and that the sum of single cell AR activity can mirror the response in the whole cell population. This method may thus be used to monitor heterogeneous dynamic treatment responses in cancer cells. PMID:27678181

  5. Metabolomic Responses of Guard Cells and Mesophyll Cells to Bicarbonate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Misra, Biswapriya B; de Armas, Evaldo; Tong, Zhaohui; Chen, Sixue

    2015-01-01

    Anthropogenic CO2 presently at 400 ppm is expected to reach 550 ppm in 2050, an increment expected to affect plant growth and productivity. Paired stomatal guard cells (GCs) are the gate-way for water, CO2, and pathogen, while mesophyll cells (MCs) represent the bulk cell-type of green leaves mainly for photosynthesis. We used the two different cell types, i.e., GCs and MCs from canola (Brassica napus) to profile metabolomic changes upon increased CO2 through supplementation with bicarbonate (HCO3-). Two metabolomics platforms enabled quantification of 268 metabolites in a time-course study to reveal short-term responses. The HCO3- responsive metabolomes of the cell types differed in their responsiveness. The MCs demonstrated increased amino acids, phenylpropanoids, redox metabolites, auxins and cytokinins, all of which were decreased in GCs in response to HCO3-. In addition, the GCs showed differential increases of primary C-metabolites, N-metabolites (e.g., purines and amino acids), and defense-responsive pathways (e.g., alkaloids, phenolics, and flavonoids) as compared to the MCs, indicating differential C/N homeostasis in the cell-types. The metabolomics results provide insights into plant responses and crop productivity under future climatic changes where elevated CO2 conditions are to take center-stage.

  6. Metabolomic Responses of Guard Cells and Mesophyll Cells to Bicarbonate.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Biswapriya B Misra

    Full Text Available Anthropogenic CO2 presently at 400 ppm is expected to reach 550 ppm in 2050, an increment expected to affect plant growth and productivity. Paired stomatal guard cells (GCs are the gate-way for water, CO2, and pathogen, while mesophyll cells (MCs represent the bulk cell-type of green leaves mainly for photosynthesis. We used the two different cell types, i.e., GCs and MCs from canola (Brassica napus to profile metabolomic changes upon increased CO2 through supplementation with bicarbonate (HCO3-. Two metabolomics platforms enabled quantification of 268 metabolites in a time-course study to reveal short-term responses. The HCO3- responsive metabolomes of the cell types differed in their responsiveness. The MCs demonstrated increased amino acids, phenylpropanoids, redox metabolites, auxins and cytokinins, all of which were decreased in GCs in response to HCO3-. In addition, the GCs showed differential increases of primary C-metabolites, N-metabolites (e.g., purines and amino acids, and defense-responsive pathways (e.g., alkaloids, phenolics, and flavonoids as compared to the MCs, indicating differential C/N homeostasis in the cell-types. The metabolomics results provide insights into plant responses and crop productivity under future climatic changes where elevated CO2 conditions are to take center-stage.

  7. Psychological need satisfaction, intrinsic motivation and affective response to exercise in adolescents

    OpenAIRE

    Schneider, Margaret L.; Kwan, Bethany M.

    2013-01-01

    ObjectivesTo further understanding of the factors influencing adolescents’ motivations for physical activity, the relationship of variables derived from Self-Determination Theory to adolescents’ affective response to exercise was examined.DesignCorrelational.MethodAdolescents (N = 182) self-reported psychological needs satisfaction (perceived competence, relatedness, and autonomy) and intrinsic motivation related to exercise. In two clinic visits, adolescents reported their affect before, dur...

  8. The need for a global robotic response to coal mine rescue

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dessureault, Sean

    2011-02-15

    The author writes about the the lack of effective robotic response specifically designed for mine rescue which would improve worker safety and diminish the risk of international embarrassment by governments and industry. An international consortium is needed in which the major coal mining countries and companies contribute to the development, deployment and maintenance of a global robotic coal mine rescue system. This robotic system should be designed to allow transportation, deployment and maintenance of a global robotic coal mine rescue, the author writes.

  9. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability Baseline Needs Assessment Requirement Document

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This revision of the LLNL Fire Protection Baseline Needs Assessment (BNA) was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and LLNL Division Leader for Fire Protection and reviewed by Martin Gresho, Sandia/CA Fire Marshal. The document follows and expands upon the format and contents of the DOE Model Fire Protection Baseline Capabilities Assessment document contained on the DOE Fire Protection Web Site, but only address emergency response. The original LLNL BNA was created on April 23, 1997 as a means of collecting all requirements concerning emergency response capabilities at LLNL (including response to emergencies at Sandia/CA) into one BNA document. The original BNA documented the basis for emergency response, emergency personnel staffing, and emergency response equipment over the years. The BNA has been updated and reissued five times since in 1998, 1999, 2000, 2002, and 2004. A significant format change was performed in the 2004 update of the BNA in that it was 'zero based.' Starting with the requirement documents, the 2004 BNA evaluated the requirements, and determined minimum needs without regard to previous evaluations. This 2010 update maintains the same basic format and requirements as the 2004 BNA. In this 2010 BNA, as in the previous BNA, the document has been intentionally divided into two separate documents - the needs assessment (1) and the compliance assessment (2). The needs assessment will be referred to as the BNA and the compliance assessment will be referred to as the BNA Compliance Assessment. The primary driver for separation is that the needs assessment identifies the detailed applicable regulations (primarily NFPA Standards) for emergency response capabilities based on the hazards present at LLNL and Sandia/CA and the geographical location of the facilities. The needs assessment also identifies areas where the modification of the requirements in the applicable NFPA standards is appropriate, due to the improved fire protection

  10. [Cognition, needs, satisfaction, and emotional responses for home care in bone marrow transplantation patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheu, L C; Chen, T C; Hwang, S L

    1997-12-01

    Bone marrow transplantation (BMT) is an aggressive treatment which can induce considerable physical and psychological stresses. Patients face various problems in self care and psychological adjustment after discharge from the hospital. The purpose of this study was to explore the cognition, needs, satisfaction, and emotional responses toward home care in BMT patients and the factors influencing them. Forth BMT patients were enrolled from the outpatient clinic of BMT in a medical center. A descriptive research design was adopted. Cognition, needs, satisfaction, anxiety and depression for home care in these patients were collected by questionaires. The results showed that BMT patients had inadequate knowledge about how to care for themselves at home. High need and low satisfaction on disease adjustment and home care were found in these patients. All patients experienced anxiety and depression. Occupation, education, and socioeconomic status were found to affect patient's cognition. Religious belief influenced needs and satisfaction for home care in these patients. Sex and social-economic status emotional reaction of patients. This study will help health personnel understand the cognition, needs and satisfaction for home care in BMT patients. It can be used as a reference for organizing discharge plan and extending the continuity of care for BMT patients.

  11. T cell responses and dengue haemorrhagic fever.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Screaton, Gavin; Mongkolsapaya, Juthathip

    2006-01-01

    The enhancement of severe disease upon secondary infection makes dengue almost unique among infectious pathogens and presents a serious challenge to vaccine design. Several key observations have been made which shed light onto this phenomenon particularly that antibodies can enhance Fc receptor-dependent uptake of virus into macrophages thereby increasing virus replication. Furthermore there seems to be a relationship between the peak virus load and disease severity. However, a second key feature of dengue is that the life-threatening symptoms do not correlate with the period of high viraemia; instead they occur at a time when the virus load is in steep decline. The coincidence of severe disease manifestations with defervescence and virus control suggests that the symptoms may be a consequence of the immune response to the virus rather than virus induced cytopathology. One of the key elements in the immune response to viruses are T cells which can both secrete a host of inflammatory cytokines and also be directly cytotoxic to infected cells. There are a number of experimental models of T cell-induced immunopathology including in responses to viruses. Particularly interesting in this respect are models of RSV-induced immunopathology, which have direct relevance to vaccine design as a formalin-inactivated vaccine to RSV actually enhanced disease in children when they became naturally infected with RSV, an echo of the disease enhancement seen in dengue. We will present an analysis of CD8+ T cell responses to a number of novel T cell epitopes during dengue infection and also analyse the function and cytokine secretion of these cells. We suggest that an exaggerated and partially misdirected T cell response seen in secondary dengue infection may be part of the complex series of events leading to dengue haemorrhagic fever and shock.

  12. T-cell responses in malaria

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hviid, L; Jakobsen, P H; Abu-Zeid, Y A

    1992-01-01

    Malaria is caused by infection with protozoan parasites of the genus Plasmodium. It remains one of the most severe health problems in tropical regions of the world, and the rapid spread of resistance to drugs and insecticides has stimulated intensive research aimed at the development of a malaria...... vaccine. Despite this, no efficient operative vaccine is currently available. A large amount of information on T-cell responses to malaria antigens has been accumulated, concerning antigens derived from all stages of the parasite life cycle. The present review summarizes some of that information......, and discusses factors affecting the responses of T cells to malaria antigens....

  13. In response to need: an analysis of social work roles over time.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerson, Toba Schwaber; McCoyd, Judith L M

    2013-10-01

    In this qualitative research synthesis, interviews with 22 early health-related social workers were reexamined to identify themes that emerged when these social workers discussed the roles and goals of their work. Those interviews, with colleagues of Ida M. Cannon and those leaders in the next generation of social workers who had practiced during the first half of the 20th century, were conducted in 1976. For this study, the themes that emerged from the original interview data as social workers' responses to perceived needs were then compared with data consisting of 80 cases, drawn from four more recent casebooks (1982, 1989, 1996, 2010), that followed a framework of practice in context. The comparison demonstrated that themes remain consistent over time and include responses to needs created by wars, due to new and underserved populations, created by public health crises, created by technological advances, experienced by organizations, and resulting from economic and policy issues, as well as needs of clients. Analysis also suggests that caution is in order to avoid being co-opted by organizations and others in power at the cost of the profession's social justice mission and ethical imperatives.

  14. Assessing bioterrorism preparedness and response of rural veterinarians: experiences and training needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chiehwen Ed; Jacobson, Holly; Feldman, Katherine; Miller, Jerry A; Rodriguez, Lori; Soto Mas, Francisco

    2008-01-01

    Veterinarians play a unique role in emergency preparedness and response, and federal agencies and academic institutions therefore allocate considerable resources to provide training to enhance their readiness. However, the level of preparedness of veterinarians in many rural regions is yet to be improved. This article reports an assessment of the bioterrorism preparedness, specifically the experience and training needs, of rural veterinarians in North Texas. The study employed a cross-sectional design with a study population that included all veterinarians (N = 352) in the 37 counties within Texas Department of State Health Services Regions 2 and 3. Data on veterinarians practicing or residing in the target region were obtained from the Texas State Board of Veterinary Medical Examiners. The response rate was 35% (n = 121). Results indicate that chemical exposure was the condition most frequently seen and treated, followed by botulism and anthrax. The majority (80%) of respondents indicated that they had not previously participated in training related to bioterrorism preparedness, and many (41%) also indicated a willingness to participate in a state health department-initiated bioterrorism response plan. However, only 18% were confident in their ability to diagnose and treat bioterrorism cases. These results suggest that many North Texas veterinarians practicing in rural regions could benefit from additional training in bioterrorism preparedness and response. An area in particular need of further training is the diagnosis and treatment of Category A agents. Federal, state, and local health agencies are urged to increase training opportunities and to make additional efforts to involve veterinarians in bioterrorism preparedness and response.

  15. Nanomaterials for Engineering Stem Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kerativitayanan, Punyavee; Carrow, James K; Gaharwar, Akhilesh K

    2015-08-05

    Recent progress in nanotechnology has stimulated the development of multifunctional biomaterials for tissue engineering applications. Synergistic interactions between nanomaterials and stem cell engineering offer numerous possibilities to address some of the daunting challenges in regenerative medicine, such as controlling trigger differentiation, immune reactions, limited supply of stem cells, and engineering complex tissue structures. Specifically, the interactions between stem cells and their microenvironment play key roles in controlling stem cell fate, which underlines therapeutic success. However, the interactions between nanomaterials and stem cells are not well understood, and the effects of the nanomaterials shape, surface morphology, and chemical functionality on cellular processes need critical evaluation. In this Review, focus is put on recent development in nanomaterial-stem cell interactions, with specific emphasis on their application in regenerative medicine. Further, the emerging technologies based on nanomaterials developed over the past decade for stem cell engineering are reviewed, as well as the potential applications of these nanomaterials in tissue regeneration, stem cell isolation, and drug/gene delivery. It is anticipated that the enhanced understanding of nanomaterial-stem cell interactions will facilitate improved biomaterial design for a range of biomedical and biotechnological applications.

  16. Response to DNA damage: why do we need to focus on protein phosphatases?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Midori eShimada

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Eukaryotic cells are continuously threatened by unavoidable errors during normal DNA replication or various sources of genotoxic stresses that cause DNA damage or stalled replication. To maintain genomic integrity, cells have developed a coordinated signaling network, known as the DNA damage response (DDR. Following DNA damage, sensor molecules detect the presence of DNA damage and transmit signals to downstream transducer molecules. This in turn conveys the signals to numerous effectors, which initiate a large number of specific biological responses, including transient cell cycle arrest mediated by checkpoints, DNA repair, and apoptosis. It is recently becoming clear that dephosphorylation events are involved in keeping DDR factors inactive during normal cell growth. Moreover, dephosphorylation is required to shut off checkpoint arrest following DNA damage and has been implicated in the activation of the DDR. Spatial and temporal regulation of phosphorylation events is essential for the DDR, and fine-tuning of phosphorylation is partly mediated by protein phosphatases. While the role of kinases in the DDR has been well documented, the complex roles of protein dephosphorylation have only recently begun to be investigated. Therefore, it is important to focus on the role of phosphatases and to determine how their activity is regulated upon DNA damage. In this work, we summarize current knowledge on the involvement of serine/threonine phosphatases, especially the protein phosphatase 1, protein phosphatase 2A, and protein phosphatase Mg2+/Mn2+-dependent families, in the DDR.

  17. IDO2 Modulates T Cell-Dependent Autoimmune Responses through a B Cell-Intrinsic Mechanism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlo, Lauren M F; DuHadaway, James B; Grabler, Samantha; Prendergast, George C; Muller, Alexander J; Mandik-Nayak, Laura

    2016-06-01

    Mechanistic insight into how adaptive immune responses are modified along the self-nonself continuum may offer more effective opportunities to treat autoimmune disease, cancer, and other sterile inflammatory disorders. Recent genetic studies in the KRN mouse model of rheumatoid arthritis demonstrate that the immunomodulatory molecule IDO2 modifies responses to self-antigens; however, the mechanisms involved are obscure. In this study, we show that IDO2 exerts a critical function in B cells to support the generation of autoimmunity. In experiments with IDO2-deficient mice, adoptive transplant experiments demonstrated that IDO2 expression in B cells was both necessary and sufficient to support robust arthritis development. IDO2 function in B cells was contingent on a cognate, Ag-specific interaction to exert its immunomodulatory effects on arthritis development. We confirmed a similar requirement in an established model of contact hypersensitivity, in which IDO2-expressing B cells are required for a robust inflammatory response. Mechanistic investigations showed that IDO2-deficient B cells lacked the ability to upregulate the costimulatory marker CD40, suggesting IDO2 acts at the T-B cell interface to modulate the potency of T cell help needed to promote autoantibody production. Overall, our findings revealed that IDO2 expression by B cells modulates autoimmune responses by supporting the cross talk between autoreactive T and B cells.

  18. Regulation of B Cell to Plasma Cell Transition within the Follicular B Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nera, K-P; Kyläniemi, M K; Lassila, O

    2015-09-01

    Persistent humoral immunity depends on the follicular B cell response and on the generation of somatically mutated high-affinity plasma cells and memory B cells. Upon activation by an antigen, cognately activated follicular B cells and follicular T helper (TFH ) cells initiate germinal centre (GC) reaction during which high-affinity effector cells are generated. The differentiation of activated follicular B cells into plasma cells and memory B cells is guided by complex selection events, both at the cellular and molecular level. The transition of B cell into a plasma cell during the GC response involves alterations in the microenvironment and developmental state of the cell, which are guided by cell-extrinsic signals. The developmental cell fate decisions in response to these signals are coordinated by cell-intrinsic gene regulatory network functioning at epigenetic, transcriptional and post-transcriptional levels.

  19. Cell Wall Metabolism in Response to Abiotic Stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyacinthe Le Gall

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available This review focuses on the responses of the plant cell wall to several abiotic stresses including drought, flooding, heat, cold, salt, heavy metals, light, and air pollutants. The effects of stress on cell wall metabolism are discussed at the physiological (morphogenic, transcriptomic, proteomic and biochemical levels. The analysis of a large set of data shows that the plant response is highly complex. The overall effects of most abiotic stress are often dependent on the plant species, the genotype, the age of the plant, the timing of the stress application, and the intensity of this stress. This shows the difficulty of identifying a common pattern of stress response in cell wall architecture that could enable adaptation and/or resistance to abiotic stress. However, in most cases, two main mechanisms can be highlighted: (i an increased level in xyloglucan endotransglucosylase/hydrolase (XTH and expansin proteins, associated with an increase in the degree of rhamnogalacturonan I branching that maintains cell wall plasticity and (ii an increased cell wall thickening by reinforcement of the secondary wall with hemicellulose and lignin deposition. Taken together, these results show the need to undertake large-scale analyses, using multidisciplinary approaches, to unravel the consequences of stress on the cell wall. This will help identify the key components that could be targeted to improve biomass production under stress conditions.

  20. Atypical radiation response of SCID cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chawapun, Nisa

    Murine SCID (severe combined immune deficiency) cells are well known for their defect in DNA double-strand break repair and in variable(diversity)joining [V(D)J] recombination due to a mutation in a catalytic subunit of DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PKcs). As a consequence, scid cells are hypersensitive to ionizing radiation. The present study showed that asynchronous populations of scid cells were about two-fold more sensitive than Balb/c with respect to cell killing and the defect in scid cells was corrected by complementation with human chromosome 8. Analysis of the survival of synchronized populations as a function of the cell cycle revealed that while scid cells were hypersensitive in all cell cycle phases compared to wild-type cells, this hypersensitivity is even more pronounced in G1 phase. The hypersensitivity reduced as the cells progressed into S phase suggested that homologous recombination repair plays a role. The results imply that there are at least two pathways for the repair of DSB DNA, consistent with a model previously proposed by others. The scid cells were also more sensitive to UVC light (254 nm) killing as compared to wild type cells by clonogenic survival. Using a host cell reactivation (HCR) assay to study the nucleotide excision repair (NER) which is the major repair pathway for UV-photoproducts, the results showed that NER in scid cells was not as efficient as CB- 17. This suggests that DNA-PK is involved in NER as well as non-homologous end-joining (NHEJ) DSB repair which is responsible for ionizing radiation sensitivity in scid cells. Repair in scid cells was not totally absent as shown by low dose rate sparing of cell killing after exposure to 137Cs γ-rays at dose rate of 0.6 cGy/h, 1.36 cGy/h, 6 cGy/h as compared to high dose rate at 171 cGy/min, although this phenomenon could be explained partly by proliferation. However, for radiation induced transformation, no significant dose rate effect was seen. A plot of transformation

  1. Cellular immune responses towards regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larsen, Stine Kiær

    2016-01-01

    This thesis describes the results from two published papers identifying spontaneous cellular immune responses against the transcription factors Foxp3 and Foxo3. The tumor microenvironment is infiltrated by cells that hinder effective tumor immunity from developing. Two of these cell types, which have been linked to a bad prognosis for patients, are regulatory T cells (Treg) and tolerogenic dendritic cells (DC). Tregs inhibit effector T cells from attacking the tumor through various mechanisms, including secreted factors and cell-to-cell contact. Tregs express the transcription factor Foxp3, which is necessary for their development and suppressive activities. Tolerogenic DCs participate in creating an environment in the tumor where effector T cells become tolerant towards the tumor instead of attacking it. The transcription factor Foxo3 was recently described to be highly expressed by tolerogenic DCs and to programme their tolerogenic influence. This thesis describes for the first time the existence of spontaneous cellular immune responses against peptides derived from Foxp3 and Foxo3. We have detected the presence of cytotoxic T cells that recognise these peptides in an HLA-A2 restricted manner in cancer patients and for Foxp3 in healthy donors as well. In addition, we have demonstrated that the Foxp3- and Foxo3-specific CTLs recognize Foxp3- and Foxo3-expressing cancer cell lines and importantly, suppressive immune cells, namely Tregs and in vitro generated DCs. Cancer immunotherapy is recently emerging as an important treatment modality improving the survival of selected patients. The current progress is largely owing to targeting of the immune suppressive milieu that is dominating the tumor microenvironment. This is being done through immune checkpoint blockade with CTLA-4 and PD-1/PD-L1 antibodies and through lymphodepleting conditioning of patients and ex vivo activation of TILs in adoptive cell transfer. Several strategies are being explored for depletion of

  2. Assessment of and Response to Data Needs of Clinical and Translational Science Researchers and Beyond

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannah F. Norton

    2016-04-01

    Full Text Available Objective and Setting: As universities and libraries grapple with data management and “big data,” the need for data management solutions across disciplines is particularly relevant in clinical and translational science (CTS research, which is designed to traverse disciplinary and institutional boundaries. At the University of Florida Health Science Center Library, a team of librarians undertook an assessment of the research data management needs of CTS researchers, including an online assessment and follow-up one-on-one interviews. Design and Methods: The 20-question online assessment was distributed to all investigators affiliated with UF’s Clinical and Translational Science Institute (CTSI and 59 investigators responded. Follow-up in-depth interviews were conducted with nine faculty and staff members. Results: Results indicate that UF’s CTS researchers have diverse data management needs that are often specific to their discipline or current research project and span the data lifecycle. A common theme in responses was the need for consistent data management training, particularly for graduate students; this led to localized training within the Health Science Center and CTSI, as well as campus-wide training. Another campus-wide outcome was the creation of an action-oriented Data Management/Curation Task Force, led by the libraries and with participation from Research Computing and the Office of Research. Conclusions: Initiating conversations with affected stakeholders and campus leadership about best practices in data management and implications for institutional policy shows the library’s proactive leadership and furthers our goal to provide concrete guidance to our users in this area.

  3. The need for a systematic approach to disaster psychosocial response: a suggested competency framework.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cox, Robin S; Danford, Taryn

    2014-04-01

    Competency models attempt to define what makes expert performers "experts." Successful disaster psychosocial planning and the institutionalizing of psychosocial response within emergency management require clearly-defined skill sets. This necessitates anticipating both the short- and long-term psychosocial implications of a disaster or health emergency (ie, pandemic) by developing effective and sustained working relationships among psychosocial providers, programs, and other planning partners. The following article outlines recommended competencies for psychosocial responders to enable communities and organizations to prepare for and effectively manage a disaster response. Competency-based models are founded on observable performance or behavioral indicators, attitudes, traits, or personalities related to effective performance in a specific role or job. After analyzing the literature regarding competency-based frameworks, a proposed competency framework that details 13 competency domains is suggested. Each domain describes a series of competencies and suggests behavioral indicators for each competency and, where relevant, associated training expectations. These domains have been organized under three distinct categories or types of competencies: general competency domains; disaster psychosocial intervention competency domains; and disaster psychosocial program leadership and coordination competency domains. Competencies do not replace job descriptions nor should they be confused with performance assessments. What they can do is update and revise job descriptions; orient existing and new employees to their disaster/emergency roles and responsibilities; target training needs; provide the basis for ongoing self-assessment by agencies and individuals as they evaluate their readiness to respond; and provide a job- or role-relevant basis for performance appraisal dimensions or standards and review discussions. Using a modular approach to psychosocial planning, service

  4. NASA Langley developments in response calculations needed for failure and life prediction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Housner, Jerrold M.

    1993-10-01

    NASA Langley developments in response calculations needed for failure and life predictions are discussed. Topics covered include: structural failure analysis in concurrent engineering; accuracy of independent regional modeling demonstrated on classical example; functional interface method accurately joins incompatible finite element models; interface method for insertion of local detail modeling extended to curve pressurized fuselage window panel; interface concept for joining structural regions; motivation for coupled 2D-3D analysis; compression panel with discontinuous stiffener coupled 2D-3D model and axial surface strains at the middle of the hat stiffener; use of adaptive refinement with multiple methods; adaptive mesh refinement; and studies on quantity effect of bow-type initial imperfections on reliability of stiffened panels.

  5. Emergency management: e-learning as an immediate response to veterinary training needs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbara Alessandrini

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Veterinary training plays a crucial role in increasing effectiveness of veterinary response to epidemic and non-epidemic emergencies. Being able to assess learning needs and to deliver training is acknowledged as a strategic priority in veterinary public health activities. The validation of an e-learning system that is able to respond to the urgent needs of veterinary professionals to ensure the despatch of rapid teaching methods on emerging and re-emerging animal diseases and zoonoses was the core of a research project developed in the Mediterranean Basin between 2005 and 2009. The project validated a new transferable, sustainable and repeatable learning model, the main components of which are described. The model is applied to an emergency situation that occurred in Italy in 2008, when West Nile disease outbreaks were reported in northern Italy. Approximately 450 official veterinarians were trained, using an e-learning system that showed adaptability and effectiveness in transferring knowledge, skills and competence to face the situation. The case was used to validate the effectiveness of the model and proved that it can be applied in any emergency situation, i.e. every time that rapid dissemination of knowledge and skills is required.

  6. HIV infection and tuberculosis in South Africa: an urgent need to escalate the public health response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdool Karim, Salim S; Churchyard, Gavin J; Karim, Quarraisha Abdool; Lawn, Stephen D

    2009-09-12

    One of the greatest challenges facing post-apartheid South Africa is the control of the concomitant HIV and tuberculosis epidemics. HIV continues to spread relentlessly, and tuberculosis has been declared a national emergency. In 2007, South Africa, with 0.7% of the world's population, had 17% of the global burden of HIV infection, and one of the world's worst tuberculosis epidemics, compounded by rising drug resistance and HIV co-infection. Until recently, the South African Government's response to these diseases has been marked by denial, lack of political will, and poor implementation of policies and programmes. Nonetheless, there have been notable achievements in disease management, including substantial improvements in access to condoms, expansion of tuberculosis control efforts, and scale-up of free antiretroviral therapy (ART). Care for acutely ill AIDS patients and long-term provision of ART are two issues that dominate medical practice and the health-care system. Decisive action is needed to implement evidence-based priorities for the control of the HIV and tuberculosis epidemics. By use of the framework of the Strategic Plans for South Africa for tuberculosis and HIV/AIDS, we provide prioritised four-step approaches for tuberculosis control, HIV prevention, and HIV treatment. Strong leadership, political will, social mobilisation, adequate human and financial resources, and sustainable development of health-care services are needed for successful implementation of these approaches.

  7. Silicon Carbide Optics for Space Situational Awareness and Responsive Space Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robichaud, J.; Green, J.; Catropa, D.; Rider, B.; Ullathorne, C.

    Over the past 10 years the application of Silicon Carbide (SiC) materials to space based imaging systems has expanded. The aerospace community has long recognized the technical, cost, and schedule benefits associated with the material, and adoption of the technology is facilitated as more successful flight systems are demonstrated. SiC provides a number of technical advantages, as a result of superior material properties. The material can also be manufactured using near-net-shape fabrication processes which provide significant cost and schedule advantages compared with competing material technologies. These technical and manufacturing advantages make SiC uniquely well suited to address the needs associated with Space Situational Awareness (SSA) and Responsive Space (RS) applications. The material has a low coefficient of thermal expansion, and a high thermal conductivity, allowing visible quality imaging in the presence of stressing, and changing, thermal loads. The material's specific stiffness is high, approximately 70% of Beryllium, allowing stiff, lightweight optical systems to be produced. Passively athermal systems have been produced, demonstrating the ability of the material to provide visible quality imaging, without the need for actively controlled focus adjust mechanisms. In addition, SiC structural elements do not outgas, and have no issues with moisture absorption, allowing rapid on-orbit data acquisition. From the manufacturing perspective the material offers dramatic schedule benefits, these come primarily from L-3 SSG's near-net-shape manufacturing process which allows complex, lightweighted optical and structural elements to be produced without the need for costly/time-consuming machining processes. These schedule advantages become more dramatic as the aperture of the system increases, and/or as the number of units increases. In this paper we provide an overview of the technical and manufacturing advantages associated with SiC, provide background

  8. Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory Emergency Response Capability 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Performance Assessment

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sharry, J A

    2009-12-30

    This document was prepared by John A. Sharry, LLNL Fire Marshal and Division Leader for Fire Protection and was reviewed by Sandia/CA Fire Marshal, Martin Gresho. This document is the second of a two-part analysis of Emergency Response Capabilities of Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory. The first part, 2009 Baseline Needs Assessment Requirements Document established the minimum performance criteria necessary to meet mandatory requirements. This second part analyses the performance of Lawrence Livermore Laboratory Emergency Management Department to the contents of the Requirements Document. The document was prepared based on an extensive review of information contained in the 2004 BNA, a review of Emergency Planning Hazards Assessments, a review of building construction, occupancy, fire protection features, dispatch records, LLNL alarm system records, fire department training records, and fire department policies and procedures. On October 1, 2007, LLNL contracted with the Alameda County Fire Department to provide emergency response services. The level of service called for in that contract is the same level of service as was provided by the LLNL Fire Department prior to that date. This Compliance Assessment will evaluate fire department services beginning October 1, 2008 as provided by the Alameda County Fire Department.

  9. Clinical grade iPS cells: need for versatile small molecules and optimal cell sources.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Yan-Ling; Pandian, Ganesh N; Ding, Yan-Ping; Zhang, Wen; Tanaka, Yoshimasa; Sugiyama, Hiroshi

    2013-11-21

    Adult mammals possess limited ability to regenerate their lost tissues or organs. The epoch-making strategy of inducing pluripotency in somatic cells incorporates multiple applications in regenerative medicine. However, concerns about the clinical translation of induced pluripotent stem (iPS) cells still exist because of the occurrence of aberrancies, even in genome integration-free methods. As cellular reprogramming is multi-gene-oriented, versatile, bioactive small molecules could concomitantly modulate the transcriptional machinery and aid the generation of clinical grade iPS cells. The availability of optimal cell sources has additional influence on the clinical translation of iPS cells. Herein we provide a critical overview of methods and cell sources available for iPS cell production. We think the review will be a useful resource for researchers who aim to develop small molecules for speeding up the journey of iPS cells from the laboratory to the clinic.

  10. DNA repair responses in human skin cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hanawalt, P.C.; Liu, S.C.; Parsons, C.S.

    1981-07-01

    Sunlight and some environmental chemical agents produce lesions in the DNA of human skin cells that if unrepaired may interfere with normal functioning of these cells. The most serious outcome of such interactions may be malignancy. It is therefore important to develop an understanding of mechanisms by which the lesions may be repaired or tolerated without deleterious consequences. Our models for the molecular processing of damaged DNA have been derived largely from the study of bacterial systems. Some similarities but significant differences are revealed when human cell responses are tested against these models. It is also of importance to learn DNA repair responses of epidermal keratinocytes for comparison with the more extensive studies that have been carried out with dermal fibroblasts. Our experimental results thus far indicate similarities for the excision-repair of ultraviolet-induced pyrimidine dimers in human keratinocytes and fibroblasts. Both the monoadducts and the interstrand crosslinks produced in DNA by photoactivated 8-methoxypsoralen (PUVA) can be repaired in normal human fibroblasts but not in those from xeroderma pigmentosum patients. The monoadducts, like pyrimidine dimers, are probably the more mutagenic/carcinogenic lesions while the crosslinks are less easily repaired and probably result in more effective blocking of DNA function. It is suggested that a split-dose protocol that maximizes the production of crosslinks while minimizing the yield of monoadducts may be more effective and potentially less carcinogenic than the single ultraviolet exposure regimen in PUVA therapy for psoriasis.

  11. Regulatory T cells in radiotherapeutic responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dörthe eSchaue

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy (RT can extend its influence in cancer therapy beyond what can be attributed to in-field cytotoxicity by modulating the immune system. While complex, these systemic effects can help tip the therapeutic balance in favor of treatment success or failure. Engagement of the immune system is generally through recognition of damage-associated molecules expressed or released as a result of tumor and normal tissue radiation damage. This system has evolved to discriminate pathological from physiological forms of cell death by signaling danger. The multiple mechanisms that can be evoked include a shift towards a pro-inflammatory, pro-oxidant microenvironment that can promote maturation of dendritic cells and, in cancer treatment, the development of effector T cell responses to tumor-associated antigens. Control over these processes is exerted by regulatory T cells (Tregs, suppressor macrophages and immunosuppressive cytokines that act in consort to maintain tolerance to self, limit tissue damage, and re-establish tissue homeostasis. Unfortunately, by the time RT for cancer is initiated the tumor-host relationship has already been sculpted in favor of tumor growth and against immune-mediated mechanisms for tumor regression. Reversing this situation is a major challenge. However, recent data show that removal of Tregs can tip the balance in favor of the generation of radiation-induced anti-tumor immunity. The clinical challenge is to do so without excessive depletion that might precipitate serious autoimmune reactions and increase the likelihood of normal tissue complications. The selective modulation of Treg biology to maintain immune tolerance and control of normal tissue damage, while releasing the brakes on anti-tumor immune responses, is a worthy aim with promise for enhancing the therapeutic benefit of RT for cancer.

  12. Group 2 innate lymphoid cells license dendritic cells to potentiate memory TH2 cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halim, Timotheus Y F; Hwang, You Yi; Scanlon, Seth T; Zaghouani, Habib; Garbi, Natalio; Fallon, Padraic G; McKenzie, Andrew N J

    2016-01-01

    Rapid activation of memory CD4(+) T helper 2 (TH2) cells during allergic inflammation requires their recruitment into the affected tissue. Here we demonstrate that group 2 innate lymphoid (ILC2) cells have a crucial role in memory TH2 cell responses, with targeted depletion of ILC2 cells profoundly impairing TH2 cell localization to the lungs and skin of sensitized mice after allergen re-challenge. ILC2-derived interleukin 13 (IL-13) is critical for eliciting production of the TH2 cell-attracting chemokine CCL17 by IRF4(+)CD11b(+)CD103(-) dendritic cells (DCs). Consequently, the sentinel function of DCs is contingent on ILC2 cells for the generation of an efficient memory TH2 cell response. These results elucidate a key innate mechanism in the regulation of the immune memory response to allergens.

  13. The responsibilities of veterinary educators in responding to emerging needs in veterinary medicine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Halliwell, R E W

    2009-08-01

    It is an unfortunate fact that not only has veterinary education failed to adapt in the face of likely future needs, but it has also failed to respond to societal changes that have already taken place and that have affected the requirements for veterinary services and veterinary capability. The responsibility is primarily that of educators, although vision and foresight require a co-ordinated approach involving national and international veterinary organisations. Once it is accepted by all parties that change is essential, the implementation will fail unless there is a unified programme involving the schools and colleges, the accrediting agencies, the licensing authorities, governments, the professional organisations and corporate veterinary medicine. All have a role to play, and any one can readily block progress. A unified approach is an absolute requirement. The developed countries must take a leading role, but the issues are global, and ways must be found to facilitate change in all parts of the world. Disease knows no boundaries, and any strategy is only as strong as its weakest link.

  14. Thomas Alva Edison—battery and device innovation in response to application's needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salkind, Alvin J.; Israel, Paul

    Thomas Alva Edison, the most prolific inventor in North America, with over 1000 patents, was the descendant of early settlers from the Netherlands to the Hudson Valley region of New York/New Jersey. However, his genealogical trail encompasses many cities, provinces, states, and countries, including Holland, France, Scotland, New Amsterdam, New York, New Jersey, Nova Scotia, Ontario, Ohio, and Michigan. He was motivated to develop and invent in response to perceived needs of commercial devices and was the creator of the concept of an industrial research laboratory. His activities covered a wide-range of chemical, electrical, medical, metallurgical, entertainment, and communication devices and led to the creation of major worldwide industries. However, his expressed underlying concern was the "service it might give others". This presentation reviews commercial developments in comparison with the technologies and motivations of the time and is illustrated by material from the Rutgers University 'Edison Papers Project', Edison's personal notes found in the Edison Battery Factory and preserved by Professor Salkind, and records of The Electrochemical Society.

  15. Epilepsy in India II: Impact, burden, and need for a multisectoral public health response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Senthil Amudhan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy is a common neurological disorder whose consequences are influenced socially and culturally, especially in India. This review (second of the two part series was carried out to understand the social impact and economic burden to develop comprehensive program for control and prevention of epilepsy. Epilepsy is known to have adverse effect on education, employment, marriage, and other essential social opportunities. Economic burden associated with epilepsy is very high with treatment and travel costs emerging as an important contributing factor. A vicious cycle between economic burden and poor disease outcome is clear. There is no significant change in the perception, stigma, and discrimination of epilepsy across the country despite improvement in educational and social parameters over the time. The huge treatment gap and poor quality of life is further worsened by the associated comorbidities and conditions. Thus, a multidisciplinary response is needed to address the burden and impact of epilepsy which calls for an integrated and multipronged approach for epilepsy care, prevention, and rehabilitation. Service delivery, capacity building, integration into the existing program, mobilizing public support, and increasing public awareness will be the hallmarks of such an integrated approach in a public health model.

  16. Cell Culture Assay for Human Noroviruses [response

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Straub, Tim M.; Honer Zu Bentrup, Kerstin; Orosz Coghlan, Patricia; Dohnalkova, Alice; Mayer, Brooke K.; Bartholomew, Rachel A.; Valdez, Catherine O.; Bruckner-Lea, Cindy J.; Gerba, Charles P.; Abbaszadegan, Morteza A.; Nickerson, Cheryl A.

    2007-07-01

    We appreciate the comments provided by Leung et al., in response to our recently published article “In Vitro Cell Culture Infectivity Assay for Human Noroviruses” by Straub et al. (1). The specific aim of our project was to develop an in vitro cell culture infectivity assay for human noroviruses (hNoV) to enhance risk assessments when they are detected in water supplies. Reverse transcription (RT) qualitative or quantitative PCR are the primary assays for waterborne NoV monitoring. However, these assays cannot distinguish between infectious vs. non-infectious virions. When hNoV is detected in water supplies, information provided by our infectivity assay will significantly improve risk assessment models and protect human health, regardless of whether we are propagating NoV. Indeed, in vitro cell culture infectivity assays for the waterborne pathogen Cryptosporidium parvum that supplement approved fluorescent microscopy assays, do not result in amplification of the environmentally resistant hard-walled oocysts (2). However, identification of life cycle stages in cell culture provides evidence of infectious oocysts in a water supply. Nonetheless, Leung et al.’s assertion regarding the suitability of our method for the in vitro propagation of high titers of NoV is valid for the medical research community. In this case, well-characterized challenge pools of virus would be useful for developing and testing diagnostics, therapeutics, and vaccines. As further validation of our published findings, we have now optimized RT quantitative PCR to assess the level of viral production in cell culture, where we are indeed finding significant increases in viral titer. The magnitude and time course of these increases is dependent on both virus strain and multiplicity of infection. We are currently preparing a manuscript that will discuss these findings in greater detail, and the implications this may have for creating viral challenge pools

  17. Plant Cell Adaptive Responses to Microgravity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kordyum, Elizabeth; Kozeko, Liudmyla; Talalaev, Alexandr

    simulated microgravity and temperature elevation have different effects on the small HSP genes belonging to subfamilies with different subcellular localization: cytosol/nucleus - PsHSP17.1-СІІ and PsHSP18.1-СІ, cloroplasts - PsHSP26.2-Cl, endoplasmatic reticulum - PsHSP22.7-ER and mitochondria - PsHSP22.9-M: unlike high temperature, clinorotation does not cause denaturation of cell proteins, that confirms the sHSP chaperone function. Dynamics of investigated gene expression in pea seedlings growing 5 days after seed germination under clinorotation was similar to that in the stationary control. Similar patterns in dynamics of sHSP gene expression in the stationary control and under clinorotation may be one of mechanisms providing plant adaptation to simulated microgravity. It is pointed that plant cell responses in microgravity and under clinorotation vary according to growth phase, physiological state, and taxonomic position of the object. At the same time, the responses have, to some degree, a similar character reflecting the changes in cell organelle functional load. Thus, next certain changes in the structure and function of plant cells may be considered as adaptive: 1) an increase in the unsaturated fatty acid content in the plasmalemma, 2) rearrangements of organelle ultrastructure and an increase in their functional load, 3) an increase in cortical F-actin under destabilization of tubulin microtubules, 4) the level of gene expression and synthesis of heat shock proteins, 5) alterations of the enzyme and antioxidant system activity. The dynamics of these patterns demonstrated that the adaptation occurs on the principle of self-regulating systems in the limits of physiological norm reaction. The very importance of changed expression of genes involved in different cellular processes, especially HSP genes, in cell adaptation to altered gravity is discussed.

  18. The care of Filipino juvenile offenders in residential facilities evaluated using the risk-need-responsivity model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spruit, Anouk; Wissink, Inge B; Stams, Geert Jan J M

    2016-01-01

    According to the risk-need-responsivity model of offender, assessment and rehabilitation treatment should target specific factors that are related to re-offending. This study evaluates the residential care of Filipino juvenile offenders using the risk-need-responsivity model. Risk analyses and criminogenic needs assessments (parenting style, aggression, relationships with peers, empathy, and moral reasoning) have been conducted using data of 55 juvenile offenders in four residential facilities. The psychological care has been assessed using a checklist. Statistical analyses showed that juvenile offenders had a high risk of re-offending, high aggression, difficulties in making pro-social friends, and a delayed socio-moral development. The psychological programs in the residential facilities were evaluated to be poor. The availability of the psychological care in the facilities fitted poorly with the characteristics of the juvenile offenders and did not comply with the risk-need-responsivity model. Implications for research and practice are discussed.

  19. Metabolic features of the cell danger response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naviaux, Robert K

    2014-05-01

    The cell danger response (CDR) is the evolutionarily conserved metabolic response that protects cells and hosts from harm. It is triggered by encounters with chemical, physical, or biological threats that exceed the cellular capacity for homeostasis. The resulting metabolic mismatch between available resources and functional capacity produces a cascade of changes in cellular electron flow, oxygen consumption, redox, membrane fluidity, lipid dynamics, bioenergetics, carbon and sulfur resource allocation, protein folding and aggregation, vitamin availability, metal homeostasis, indole, pterin, 1-carbon and polyamine metabolism, and polymer formation. The first wave of danger signals consists of the release of metabolic intermediates like ATP and ADP, Krebs cycle intermediates, oxygen, and reactive oxygen species (ROS), and is sustained by purinergic signaling. After the danger has been eliminated or neutralized, a choreographed sequence of anti-inflammatory and regenerative pathways is activated to reverse the CDR and to heal. When the CDR persists abnormally, whole body metabolism and the gut microbiome are disturbed, the collective performance of multiple organ systems is impaired, behavior is changed, and chronic disease results. Metabolic memory of past stress encounters is stored in the form of altered mitochondrial and cellular macromolecule content, resulting in an increase in functional reserve capacity through a process known as mitocellular hormesis. The systemic form of the CDR, and its magnified form, the purinergic life-threat response (PLTR), are under direct control by ancient pathways in the brain that are ultimately coordinated by centers in the brainstem. Chemosensory integration of whole body metabolism occurs in the brainstem and is a prerequisite for normal brain, motor, vestibular, sensory, social, and speech development. An understanding of the CDR permits us to reframe old concepts of pathogenesis for a broad array of chronic, developmental

  20. Practitioner Response to Parental Need in Email Consultation: How Do They Match? A Content Analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nieuwboer, Christa C.; Fukkink, Ruben G.; Hermanns, Jo M. A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Single session email consultations in web-based parenting support may be used for a variety of reasons. Parents may be looking for information on developmental needs of children, for suggestions to improve their parenting skills, or for referrals to helpful resources. The way the practitioner meets the needs of parents, choosing a…

  1. Response rates for CBT for anxiety disorders: Need for standardized criteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loerinc, Amanda G; Meuret, Alicia E; Twohig, Michael P; Rosenfield, David; Bluett, Ellen J; Craske, Michelle G

    2015-12-01

    Full appreciation of the effectiveness of cognitive behavioral therapy (CBT) requires both effect size data and individual rates of positive response. Response rates are particularly helpful for clinicians when choosing among treatment options. However, systematic reviews on cross-study response rates have not been conducted, possibly due to the absence of a standardized metric for calculating response rates. We conducted a systematic review of the treatment outcome literature to determine overall response rates to CBT for anxiety disorders and whether current methods of defining treatment response influence overall response rates. Our database search (2000-2014) resulted in 87 studies that reported response rates and included at least one CBT condition. Results showed that overall treatment response rates across anxiety disorders averaged 49.5% at post-treatment and 53.6% at follow-up. Response rates varied significantly as a function of the properties used to define them. Measures that incorporated more than one criterion, the combination of a reliable change index with a clinical cutoff (a clinically significant change), and intent-to-treat samples yielded lower response rates at post-treatment. Blinded independent assessors yielded higher response rates than unblinded assessors. Based on previous empirical and theoretical work, we recommend that future studies use a clinically significant change index, in an intent-to-treat analysis (using a mixed-model approach), reflecting multiple modalities, and assessed by independent blinded assessors. Our results indicate that such measures are likely to reduce response rates, but may result in a less biased and more accurate representation of improvement and achievement of normative functioning.

  2. Light-trapping in solar cells by photonic nanostructures. The need for benchmarking and fabrication assessments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lenzmann, F.O.; Salpakari, J.; Weeber, A.W.; Olson, C.L. [ECN Solar Energy, Petten (Netherlands)

    2013-07-15

    Light-trapping in solar cells by photonic nanostructures, e.g., nano-textured surfaces or metallic and nonmetallic nanoparticles is a research area of great promise. A large multitude of configurations is being explored and there is a rising need for (a set of) assessment elements that help to narrow in on the most viable ones. This paper discusses two examples: benchmark devices and the assessment of fabrication aspects for the nanostructures.

  3. The architects of B and T cell immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lane, Peter J L

    2008-08-15

    Published work links adult lymphoid tissue-inducer cells (LTi) with T cell-dependent antibody responses. In this issue of Immunity, Tsuji et al. (2008) associate LTi with T cell-independent IgA antibody responses in the gut.

  4. Muscarinic responses of gastric parietal cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wilkes, J.M.; Kajimura, M.; Scott, D.R.; Hersey, S.J.; Sachs, G. (Department of Medicine, University of California, Los Angeles (United States))

    1991-06-01

    Isolated rabbit gastric glands were used to study the nature of the muscarinic cholinergic responses of parietal cells. Carbachol stimulation of acid secretion, as measured by the accumulation of aminopyrine, was inhibited by the M1 antagonist, pirenzepine, with an IC50 of 13 microM; by the M2 antagonist, 11,2-(diethylamino)methyl-1 piperidinyl acetyl-5,11-dihydro-6H-pyrido 2,3-b 1,4 benzodiazepin-6-one (AF-DX 116), with an IC50 of 110 microM; and by the M1/M3 antagonist, diphenyl-acetoxy-4-methylpiperidinemethiodide, with an IC50 of 35 nM. The three antagonists displayed equivalent IC50 values for the inhibition of carbachol-stimulated production of 14CO2 from radiolabeled glucose, which is a measure of the turnover of the H,K-ATPase, the final step of acid secretion. Intracellular calcium levels were measured in gastric glands loaded with FURA 2. Carbachol was shown to both release calcium from an intracellular pool and to promote calcium entry across the plasma membrane. The calcium entry was inhibitable by 20 microM La3+. The relative potency of the three muscarinic antagonists for inhibition of calcium entry was essentially the same as for inhibition of acid secretion or pump related glucose oxidation. Image analysis of the glands showed the effects of carbachol, and of the antagonists, on intracellular calcium were occurring largely in the parietal cell. The rise in cell calcium due to release of calcium from intracellular stores was inhibited by 4-DAMP with an IC50 of 1.7 nM, suggesting that the release pathway was regulated by a low affinity M3 muscarinic receptor or state; Ca entry and acid secretion are regulated by a high affinity M3 muscarinic receptor or state, inhibited by higher 4-DAMP concentrations, suggesting that it is the steady-state elevation of Ca that is related to parietal cell function rather than the (Ca)i transient.

  5. Balancing needs and means: the dilemma of the beta-cell in the modern world.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leibowitz, G; Kaiser, N; Cerasi, E

    2009-11-01

    The insulin resistance of type 2 diabetes mellitus (T2DM), although important for its pathophysiology, is not sufficient to establish the disease unless major deficiency of beta-cell function coexists. This is demonstrated by the fact that near-physiological administration of insulin (CSII) achieved excellent blood glucose control with doses similar to those used in insulin-deficient type 1 diabetics. The normal beta-cell adapts well to the demands of insulin resistance. Also in hyperglycaemic states some degree of adaptation does exist and helps limit the severity of disease. We demonstrate here that the mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) system might play an important role in this adaptation, because blocking mTORC1 (complex 1) by rapamycin in the nutritional diabetes model Psammomys obesus caused severe impairment of beta-cell function, increased beta-cell apoptosis and progression of diabetes. On the other hand, under exposure to high glucose and FFA (gluco-lipotoxicity), blocking mTORC1 in vitro reduced endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress and beta-cell death. Thus, according to the conditions of stress, mTOR may have beneficial or deleterious effects on the beta-cell. beta-Cell function in man can be reduced without T2DM/impaired glucose tolerance (IGT). Prospective studies have shown subjects with reduced insulin response to present, several decades later, an increased incidence of IGT/T2DM. From these and other studies we conclude that T2DM develops on the grounds of beta-cells whose adaptation capacity to increased nutrient intake and/or insulin resistance is in the lower end of the normal variation. Inborn and acquired factors that limit beta-cell function are diabetogenic only in a nutritional/metabolic environment that requires high functional capabilities from the beta-cell.

  6. Corporate philanthropic responses to emergent human needs: the role of organizational attention focus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Muller, A.; Whiteman, G.

    2015-01-01

    Research on corporate philanthropy typically focuses on organization-external pressures and aggregated donation behavior. Hence, our understanding of the organization-internal structures that determine whether a given organization will respond philanthropically to a specific human need remains under

  7. The role of the cancer stem cell marker CD271 in DNA damage response and drug resistance of melanoma cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Redmer, T; Walz, I; Klinger, B; Khouja, S; Welte, Y; Schäfer, R; Regenbrecht, C

    2017-01-01

    Several lines of evidence have suggested that stemness and acquired resistance to targeted inhibitors or chemotherapeutics are mechanistically linked. Here we observed high cell surface and total levels of nerve growth factor receptor/CD271, a marker of melanoma-initiating cells, in sub-populations of chemoresistant cell lines. CD271 expression was increased in drug-sensitive cells but not resistant cells in response to DNA-damaging chemotherapeutics etoposide, fotemustine and cisplatin. Comparative analysis of melanoma cells engineered to stably express CD271 or a targeting short hairpin RNA by expression profiling provided numerous genes regulated in a CD271-dependent manner. In-depth analysis of CD271-responsive genes uncovered the association of CD271 with regulation of DNA repair components. In addition, gene set enrichment analysis revealed enrichment of CD271-responsive genes in drug-resistant cells, among them DNA repair components. Moreover, our comparative screen identified the fibroblast growth factor 13 (FGF13) as a target of CD271, highly expressed in chemoresistant cells. Further we show that levels of CD271 determine drug response. Knock-down of CD271 in fotemustine-resistant cells decreased expression of FGF13 and at least partly restored sensitivity to fotemustine. Together, we demonstrate that expression of CD271 is responsible for genes associated with DNA repair and drug response. Further, we identified 110 CD271-responsive genes predominantly expressed in melanoma metastases, among them were NEK2, TOP2A and RAD51AP1 as potential drivers of melanoma metastasis. In addition, we provide mechanistic insight in the regulation of CD271 in response to drugs. We found that CD271 is potentially regulated by p53 and in turn is needed for a proper p53-dependent response to DNA-damaging drugs. In summary, we provide for the first time insight in a CD271-associated signaling network connecting CD271 with DNA repair, drug response and metastasis. PMID

  8. Cell-Cell Interactions Mediate the Response of Vascular Smooth Muscle Cells to Substrate Stiffness

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sazonova, Olga V.; Lee, Kristen L.; Isenberg, Brett C.; Rich, Celeste B.; Nugent, Matthew A.; Wong, Joyce Y.

    2011-01-01

    The vessel wall experiences progressive stiffening with age and the development of cardiovascular disease, which alters the micromechanical environment experienced by resident vascular smooth muscle cells (VSMCs). In vitro studies have shown that VSMCs are sensitive to substrate stiffness, but the exact molecular mechanisms of their response to stiffness remains unknown. Studies have also shown that cell-cell interactions can affect mechanotransduction at the cell-substrate interface. Using flexible substrates, we show that the expression of proteins associated with cell-matrix adhesion and cytoskeletal tension is regulated by substrate stiffness, and that an increase in cell density selectively attenuates some of these effects. We also show that cell-cell interactions exert a strong effect on cell morphology in a substrate-stiffness dependent manner. Collectively, the data suggest that as VSMCs form cell-cell contacts, substrate stiffness becomes a less potent regulator of focal adhesion signaling. This study provides insight into the mechanisms by which VSMCs respond to the mechanical environment of the blood vessel wall, and point to cell-cell interactions as critical mediators of VSMC response to vascular injury. PMID:21806930

  9. Reticence vs. Responsibility: Why Climate Scientists Sometimes Need to Think Like Emergency Room Doctors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peacock, K.

    2013-12-01

    Hansen (2007), Brysse et al (2012), and Oreskes (2013) have drawn attention to the too-frequent reticence of climate scientists---the unwillingness to err on the side of predicting extreme outcomes or recommend strong action to prevent those outcomes. In Hansen's words, this may hinder 'communication with the public about dangers of global warming' and thereby lessen the chance of effective responses to this urgent threat. Scientists may be reticent about the kinds of extreme outcomes that could occur (ice sheet collapse, oceanic anoxia, killer heat waves, etc.), the probabilities of such outcomes, or the options for preventing or mitigating such outcomes. I will review the reasons, some understandable and some regrettable, for such reticence. (The latter could include the 'seepage' into professional discourse of the often-poisonous atmosphere of climate science denialism; Lewandowsky 2013.) My major aim will be to argue that scientists need a clearly defined ethical framework that coheres with the scientific ethos, and I will suggest that the place to look for such an ethical framework is in the realm of professional ethics. I will review key features of the learned professions such as medicine and engineering, where practitioners (such as emergency room physicians) are necessarily attuned to the imperative of making life-or-death decisions and recommendations in real time, under conditions of uncertainty. I hardly mean to suggest that pure science does not have a professional ethos of its own, but research science as such is not a legally constituted profession (like medicine) and it is focussed on the disinterested search for reliable knowledge above all other goals. Medicine and engineering depend upon and contribute to scientific knowledge but they are aimed at practical ends as well---the welfare of patients or protection of the public as a whole. Also, it is in the nature of engineering and other learned professions that (like pure science) they often

  10. Normalization of cell responses in cat striate cortex

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heeger, D. J.

    1992-01-01

    Simple cells in the striate cortex have been depicted as half-wave-rectified linear operators. Complex cells have been depicted as energy mechanisms, constructed from the squared sum of the outputs of quadrature pairs of linear operators. However, the linear/energy model falls short of a complete explanation of striate cell responses. In this paper, a modified version of the linear/energy model is presented in which striate cells mutually inhibit one another, effectively normalizing their responses with respect to stimulus contrast. This paper reviews experimental measurements of striate cell responses, and shows that the new model explains a significantly larger body of physiological data.

  11. Adult stem cell responses to nanostimuli

    OpenAIRE

    Tsimbouri, Penelope

    2015-01-01

    Adult or mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) have been found in different tissues in the body, residing in stem cell microenvironments called “stem cell niches”. They play different roles but their main activity is to maintain tissue homeostasis and repair throughout the lifetime of an organism. Their ability to differentiate into different cell types makes them an ideal tool to study tissue development and to use them in cell-based therapies. This differentiation process is subject to both interna...

  12. Evaluation of Quality of Life and Care Needs of Turkish Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Neslisah Yasar

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available This descriptive study explored the quality of life and care needs of Turkish patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study sample consisted of 100 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Their quality of life was assessed using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant Scale. The mean patient age was 44.99 ± 13.92 years. Changes in sexual functions, loss of hair, loss of taste, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbances were the most common symptoms. The quality of life of transplant patients was moderately affected; the functional well-being and social/family well-being subscales were the most adversely and least negatively affected (12.13 ± 6.88 dimensions, respectively. Being female, being between 50 and 59 years of age, being single, having a chronic disease, and having a history of hospitalization were associated with lower quality of life scores. Interventions to improve functional status, physical well-being, and emotional status of patients during the transplantation process may help patients cope with treatment-related impairments more effectively. Frequent screening and management of patient symptoms in order to help patients adapt to life following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are crucial for meeting care needs and developing strategies to improve their quality of life.

  13. Sensor Needs and Requirements for Fuel Cells and CIDI/SIDI Engines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Glass, R.S.

    2000-03-01

    To reduce U.S. dependence on imported oil, improve urban air quality, and decrease greenhouse gas emissions, the Department of Energy (DOE) is developing advanced vehicle technologies and fuels. Enabling technologies for fuel cell power systems and direct-injection engines are being developed by DOE through the Partnership for a New Generation of Vehicles (PNGV), a government-industry collaboration to produce vehicles having up to three times the fuel economy of conventional mid-size automobiles. Sensors have been identified as a research and development need for both fuel cell and direct-injection systems, because current sensor technologies do not adequately meet requirements. Sensors are needed for emission control, for passenger safety and comfort, to increase system lifetime, and for system performance enhancement through feedback and control. These proceedings document the results of a workshop to define sensor requirements for proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell systems and direct-injection engines for automotive applications. The recommendations from this workshop will be incorporated into the multi-year R&D plan of the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies. The objectives of the workshop were to: define the requirements for sensors; establish R&D priorities; identify the technical targets and technical barriers; and facilitate collaborations among participants. The recommendations from this workshop will be incorporated into the multi-year R&D plan of the DOE Office of Advanced Automotive Technologies.

  14. The need for nano-scale modeling in solid oxide fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryan, E M; Recknagle, K P; Liu, W; Khaleel, M A

    2012-08-01

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are high temperature fuel cells, which are being developed for large scale and distributed power systems. SOFCs promise to provide cleaner, more efficient electricity than traditional fossil fuel burning power plants. Research over the last decade has improved the design and materials used in SOFCs to increase their performance and stability for long-term operation; however, there are still challenges for SOFC researchers to overcome before SOFCs can be considered competitive with traditional fossil fuel burning and renewable power systems. In particular degradation due to contaminants in the fuel and oxidant stream is a major challenge facing SOFCs. In this paper we discuss ongoing computational and experimental research into different degradation and design issues in SOFC electrodes. We focus on contaminants in gasified coal which cause electrochemical and structural degradation in the anode, and chromium poisoning which affects the electrochemistry of the cathode. Due to the complex microstructures and multi-physics of SOFCs, multi-scale computational modeling and experimental research is needed to understand the detailed physics behind different degradation mechanisms, the local conditions within the cell which facilitate degradation, and its effects on the overall SOFC performance. We will discuss computational modeling research of SOFCs at the macro-, meso- and nano-scales which is being used to investigate the performance and degradation of SOFCs. We will also discuss the need for a multi-scale modeling framework of SOFCs, and the application of computational and multi-scale modeling to several degradation issues in SOFCs.

  15. Evaluation of Quality of Life and Care Needs of Turkish Patients Undergoing Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasar, Neslisah

    2016-01-01

    This descriptive study explored the quality of life and care needs of Turkish patients who underwent hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. The study sample consisted of 100 hematopoietic stem cell transplant patients. Their quality of life was assessed using Functional Assessment of Cancer Therapy-Bone Marrow Transplant Scale. The mean patient age was 44.99 ± 13.92 years. Changes in sexual functions, loss of hair, loss of taste, loss of appetite, and sleep disturbances were the most common symptoms. The quality of life of transplant patients was moderately affected; the functional well-being and social/family well-being subscales were the most adversely and least negatively affected (12.13 ± 6.88) dimensions, respectively. Being female, being between 50 and 59 years of age, being single, having a chronic disease, and having a history of hospitalization were associated with lower quality of life scores. Interventions to improve functional status, physical well-being, and emotional status of patients during the transplantation process may help patients cope with treatment-related impairments more effectively. Frequent screening and management of patient symptoms in order to help patients adapt to life following allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation are crucial for meeting care needs and developing strategies to improve their quality of life. PMID:28116155

  16. Lactobacilli Modulate Natural Killer Cell Responses In Vitro

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fink, Lisbeth Nielsen; Christensen, Hanne Risager; Frøkiær, Hanne

    of certain lactic acid bacteria has been shown to increase in vivo NK cytotoxicity. Here, we investigated how human gut flora-derived lactobacilli affect NK cells in vitro, by measuring proliferation and IFN-gamma production of human NK cells upon bacterial stimulation. CD3-CD56+ NK cells were isolated from...... the capacity to activate NK cells in vitro, in a monocyte dependent or independent way. Hence, the encounter of NK cells with lactic acid bacteria will affect NK cell activation. Such activation of NK cells may potentially skew an on-going or subsequent immune response towards a Th1 response........ The IFN-gamma concentration was measured by ELISA. Incubation of NK cells with a Lactobacillus acidophilus strain increased the proliferation of the NK cells and induced IFN-gamma production, both to levels comparable to PHA stimulation. The proliferative response was further enhanced with autologous...

  17. Program Planning and Review to Promote Responsiveness to Public Needs. Report 09-16

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Stacy

    2009-01-01

    State law directs the California Postsecondary Education Commission (CPEC) to review and comment on the need for new degree and certificate programs proposed by the public higher education systems. The California Legislature, the Administration, and the Legislative Analyst's Office consider the review of proposals for new degree and certificate…

  18. Effective Respect for the Rights and Dignity of Migrants: New Needs and Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Migration World Magazine, 1996

    1996-01-01

    Contains the considerations and recommendations for action of the Ferney Round Table, held in February 1996, concerning the fundamental rights and dignity of migrants. Discussions include the root causes of migration; global migration strategy; legal standards and their implementation; regional migration dynamics; and the need for greater…

  19. Fathers of Children with Autism: Perceived Roles, Responsibilities, and Support Needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meadan, Hedda; Stoner, Julia B.; Angell, Maureen E.

    2015-01-01

    Emphasis on families' involvement in the education of children with disabilities is evident in the Individuals with Disabilities Education Act (IDEA) and in published best practices. However, most of the research related to families of children with disabilities has focused on mothers' experiences, involvement, and needs. There is limited…

  20. Is Singapore's School Geography Becoming Too Responsive to the Changing Needs of Society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chew-Hung

    2014-01-01

    In understanding the divergences and commonalities in the representations of geography across different national settings, the case of Singapore is examined through the notion of politicisation of school curricula to meet the needs of "significant power groups". In particular, the development of school geography in Singapore and its…

  1. All Work and No Play? Understanding the Needs of Children with Caring Responsibilities

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aldridge, Jo

    2008-01-01

    This article draws on research with children who provide care for parents with serious mental health problems and signals ongoing research that uses photographic participation methods with these groups of vulnerable children. The intention of this article is to highlight the need to move away from popular and simplistic representations of children…

  2. Is Singapore's School Geography Becoming Too Responsive to the Changing Needs of Society?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chew-Hung

    2014-01-01

    In understanding the divergences and commonalities in the representations of geography across different national settings, the case of Singapore is examined through the notion of politicisation of school curricula to meet the needs of "significant power groups". In particular, the development of school geography in Singapore and its…

  3. Practitioner response to parental need in email consultation: how do they match? A content analysis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwboer, C.C.; Fukkink, R.G.; Hermanns, J.M.A.

    2014-01-01

    Background: Single session email consultations in web-based parenting support may be used for a variety of reasons. Parents may be looking for information on developmental needs of children, for suggestions to improve their parenting skills, or for referrals to helpful resources. The way the practit

  4. Comparison of fundamental physical properties of the model cells (protocells) and the living cells reveals the need in protophysiology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matveev, V. V.

    2017-01-01

    A hypothesis is proposed about potassium ponds being the cradles of life enriches the gamut of ideas about the possible conditions of pre-biological evolution on the primeval Earth, but does not bring us closer to solving the real problem of the origin of life. The gist of the matter lies in the mechanism of making a delimitation between two environments - the intracellular environment and the habitat of protocells. Since the sodium-potassium pump (Na+/K+-ATPase) was discovered, no molecular model has been proposed for a predecessor of the modern sodium pump. This has brought into life the idea of the potassium pond, wherein protocells would not need a sodium pump. However, current notions of the operation of living cells come into conflict with even physical laws when trying to use them to explain the origin and functioning of protocells. Thus, habitual explanations of the physical properties of living cells have become inapplicable to explain the corresponding properties of Sidney Fox's microspheres. Likewise, existing approaches to solving the problem of the origin of life do not see the need for the comparative study of living cells and cell models, assemblies of biological and artificial small molecules and macromolecules under physical conditions conducive to the origin of life. The time has come to conduct comprehensive research into the fundamental physical properties of protocells and create a new discipline - protocell physiology or protophysiology - which should bring us much closer to solving the problem of the origin of life.

  5. Hepatoblastoma: A Need for Cell Lines and Tissue Banks to Develop Targeted Drug Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rishi Raj Rikhi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Limited research exists regarding the most aggressive forms of hepatoblastoma. Cell lines of the rare subtypes of hepatoblastoma with poor prognosis are not only difficult to attain, but are challenging to characterize histologically. A community approach to educating parents and families of the need for donated tissue is necessary for scientists to have access to resources for murine models and drug discovery. Herein we describe the currently available resources, the today’s existing gaps in research, and the path to move forward for uniform cure of hepatoblastoma.

  6. Most oxidative stress response in water samples comes from unknown chemicals: the need for effect-based water quality trigger values.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escher, Beate I; van Daele, Charlotte; Dutt, Mriga; Tang, Janet Y M; Altenburger, Rolf

    2013-07-02

    The induction of adaptive stress response pathways is an early and sensitive indicator of the presence of chemical and non-chemical stressors in cells. An important stress response is the Nrf-2 mediated oxidative stress response pathway where electrophilic chemicals or chemicals that cause the formation of reactive oxygen species initiate the production of antioxidants and metabolic detoxification enzymes. The AREc32 cell line is sensitive to chemicals inducing oxidative stress and has been previously applied for water quality monitoring of organic micropollutants and disinfection byproducts. Here we propose an algorithm for the derivation of effect-based water quality trigger values for this end point that is based on the combined effects of mixtures of regulated chemicals. Mixture experiments agreed with predictions by the mixture toxicity concept of concentration addition. The responses in the AREc32 and the concentrations of 269 individual chemicals were quantified in nine environmental samples, ranging from treated effluent, recycled water, stormwater to drinking water. The effects of the detected chemicals could explain less than 0.1% of the observed induction of the oxidative stress response in the sample, affirming the need to use effect-based trigger values that account for all chemicals present.

  7. Government/industry response to questionnaire on space mechanisms/tribology technology needs

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fusaro, Robert L.

    1991-01-01

    President Bush has proposed that the U.S. undertake an ambitious mission of manned and robotic exploration of the solar system. This mission will require advanced mechanical moving components, such as bearings, gears, seals, lubricants, etc. There has been concern in the NASA community that the current technology level in these mechanical component/tribology areas may not be adequate to meet the goals of such a mission. To attempt to answer this, NASA-Lewis has sent out a questionnaire to government and industry workers (who have been involved in space mechanism research, design, and implementation) to ask their opinion if the current space mechanisms technology (mechanical components/tribology) is adequate to meet future NASA Missions needs and goals. If they deemed that the technology base inadequate, they were asked to specify the areas of greatest need. The unedited remarks of those who responded to the survey are presented.

  8. Implementing a Culturally and Linguistically Responsive Phonics Curriculum That Incorporates Music to Meet the Needs of English Language Learners in the Response to Intervention Process

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Danielle Denise

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to investigate the effect of the Sing, Spell, Read, Write (SSRW) phonics curriculum that uses explicit and systematic methods and incorporates music to teach literacy skills implemented as a tier-two reading intervention in the Response to Intervention process to meet the cultural and linguistic needs of English…

  9. Fluoride inhibits the response of bone cells to mechanical loading

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Willems, H.M.E.; van den Heuvel, E.G.H.M.; Castelein, S.; Keverling Buisman, J.; Bronckers, A.L.J.J.; Bakker, A.D.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2011-01-01

    The response of bone cells to mechanical loading is mediated by the cytoskeleton. Since the bone anabolic agent fluoride disrupts the cytoskeleton, we investigated whether fluoride affects the response of bone cells to mechanical loading, and whether this is cytoskeleton mediated. The mechano-respon

  10. Three-dimensional matrix stiffness and adhesive ligands affect cancer cell response to toxins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zustiak, Silviya Petrova; Dadhwal, Smritee; Medina, Carlos; Steczina, Sonette; Chehreghanianzabi, Yasaman; Ashraf, Anisa; Asuri, Prashanth

    2016-02-01

    There is an immediate need to develop highly predictive in vitro cell-based assays that provide reliable information on cancer drug efficacy and toxicity. Development of biomaterial-based three-dimensional (3D) cell culture models as drug screening platforms has recently gained much scientific interest as 3D cultures of cancer cells have been shown to more adequately mimic the in vivo tumor conditions. Moreover, it has been recognized that the biophysical and biochemical properties of the 3D microenvironment can play key roles in regulating various cancer cell fates, including their response to chemicals. In this study, we employed alginate-based scaffolds of varying mechanical stiffness and adhesive ligand presentation to further explore the role of 3D microenvironmental cues on glioblastoma cell response to cytotoxic compounds. Our experiments suggested the ability of both matrix stiffness and cell-matrix adhesions to strongly influence cell responses to toxins. Cells were found to be more susceptible to the toxins when cultured in softer matrices that emulated the stiffness of brain tissue. Furthermore, the effect of matrix stiffness on differential cell responses to toxins was negated by the presence of the adhesive ligand RGD, but regained when integrin-based cell-matrix interactions were inhibited. This study therefore indicates that both 3D matrix stiffness and cell-matrix adhesions are important parameters in the design of more predictive in vitro platforms for drug development and toxicity screening.

  11. Dendritic Cells are Critical Accessory Cells for Thymus-Dependent Antibody Responses in Mouse and in Man

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inaba, Kayo; Steinman, Ralph M.; van Voorhis, Wesley C.; Muramatsu, Shigeru

    1983-10-01

    We report that dendritic cells (DC) are necessary and potent accessory cells for anti-sheep erythrocyte responses in both mouse and man. In mice, a small number of DC (0.3-1% of the culture) restores the response of B/T-lymphocyte mixtures to that observed in unfractionated spleen. An even lower dose (0.03-0.1% DC) is needed if the T cells have been primed to antigen. Responses are both antigen and T cell dependent. Selective depletion of DC from unfractionated spleen with the monoclonal antibody 33D1 and complement ablates the antibody response. In contrast to DC, purified spleen macrophages are weak or inactive stimulators. However, when mixed with DC, macrophages can increase the yield of antibody-secreting cells about 2-fold. In man, small numbers (0.3-1%) of blood DC stimulate antibody formation in vitro. Purified human monocytes do not stimulate but in low doses (1% of the culture) inhibit the antibody response. Likewise, selective removal of human monocytes with antibody and complement enhances or accelerates the development of antibody-secreting cells. We conclude that DC are required for the development of T-dependent antibody responses by mouse and human lymphocytes in vitro.

  12. Coercive E-government Policy Imposing Harm: The Need for a Responsible E-government Ethics

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berger, Jesper Bull

    2016-01-01

    The value of e-government, services to citizens by public institutions through the internet, is dependent on the mutual adoption of e-government by both the public institution and the citizens. This paper describes a longitudinal study of e-government adoption by municipalities and citizens...... explained much more of the variation in the deficit than the variation in adoption by citizens did. We wish to draw attention to the overly optimistic expectations of savings from e-government and to a need for further research into the governmental processes of e-government....

  13. A True Delphi Approach: Developing a Tailored Curriculum in Response to Local Agriscience Need

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rubenstein, Eric; Thoron, Andrew; Burleson, Sarah

    2012-02-07

    The Delphi approach is a structured communication technique, developed as a systematic, interactive forecasting method which relies on a panel of experts. In this specific case experts from Industry, Education and Extension fields addressed needs for educational programs in a traditional agriculturally-based community, environmentally conscious practices in order to restore environmental integrity and multi-disciplinary approach to solve sustainability problems facing the agricultural industry. The experts were divided into two main groups, (A) Secondary and (B) Post-secondary, and answered questionnaires in three rounds: • 1st Round – Participants generated a list of knowledge, skills, and competencies followed • 2nd Round – Panelists rated each item • 3rd Round – Panelists were given the opportunity to combine and add additional items As a result, top six items from both groups were not found similar, secondary panelists centralized around employment skills and post-secondary panelists focused on content areas. Implications include a need for content-based curriculum for post-secondary graduates, utilization of true-Delphi technique for future curriculum development research and further examination of students that complete secondary and post-secondary programs in biofuels/sustainable agriculture.

  14. Examining demand response, renewable energy and efficiencies to meet growing electricity needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Elliot, N.; Eldridge, M.; Shipley, A.M.; Laitner, J.S.; Nadel, S. [American Council for an Energy-Efficient Economy, Washington, DC (United States); Silverstein, A. [A. Silverstein Consultant (United States); Hedman, B. [Energy and Environmental Analysis Inc., Arlington, VA (United States); Sloan, M. [Virtus Energy Research Associates, Inc. Austin, TX (United States)

    2007-04-15

    While Texas has already taken steps to improve its renewable energy portfolio (RPS), and its energy efficiency improvement program (EEIP), the level of savings that utilities can achieve through the EEIP can be greatly increased. This report estimated the size of energy efficiency and renewable energy resources in Texas, and suggested a range of policy options that might be adopted to further extend EEIP. Current forecasts suggest that peak demand in Texas will increase by 2.3 per cent annually from 2007-2012, a level of growth which is threatening the state's ability to maintain grid reliability at reasonable cost. Almost 70 per cent of installed generating capacity is fuelled by natural gas in Texas. Recent polling has suggested that over 70 per cent of Texans are willing support increased spending on energy efficiency. Demand response measures that may be implemented in the state include incentive-based programs that pay users to reduce their electricity consumption during specific times and pricing programs, where customers are given a price signal and are expected to moderate their electricity usage. By 2023, the widespread availability of time-varying retail electric rates and complementary communications and control methods will permanently change the nature of electricity demand in the state. At present, the integrated utilities in Texas offer a variety of direct load control and time-of-use, curtailable, and interruptible rates. However, with the advent of retail competition now available as a result of the structural unbundling of investor-owned utilities, there is less demand response available in Texas. It was concluded that energy efficiency, demand response, and renewable energy resources can meet the increasing demand for electricity in Texas over the next 15 years. 4 figs.

  15. Rethinking mobile delivery: using Quick Response codes to access information at the point of need.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lombardo, Nancy T; Morrow, Anne; Le Ber, Jeanne

    2012-01-01

    This article covers the use of Quick Response (QR) codes to provide instant mobile access to information, digital collections, educational offerings, library website, subject guides, text messages, videos, and library personnel. The array of uses and the value of using QR codes to push customized information to patrons are explained. A case is developed for using QR codes for mobile delivery of customized information to patrons. Applications in use at the Libraries of the University of Utah will be reviewed to provide readers with ideas for use in their library.

  16. Ptch2 mediates the Shh response in Ptch1-/- cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alfaro, Astrid C; Roberts, Brock; Kwong, Lina; Bijlsma, Maarten F; Roelink, Henk

    2014-09-01

    The Hedgehog (Hh) signaling response is regulated by the interaction of three key components that include the sonic hedgehog (Shh) ligand, its receptor patched 1 (Ptch1) and the pathway activator smoothened (Smo). Under the prevailing model of Shh pathway activation, the binding of Shh to Ptch1 (the key Shh receptor) results in the release of Ptch1-mediated inhibition of Smo, leading to Smo activation and subsequent cell-autonomous activation of the Shh response. Consistent with this model, Ptch1(-/-) cells show a strong upregulation of the Shh response. Our finding that this response can be inhibited by the Shh-blocking antibody 5E1 indicates that the Shh response in Ptch1(-/-) cells remains ligand dependent. Furthermore, we find that Shh induces a strong response in Ptch1(-/-);Shh(-/-) cells, and that Ptch1(-/-) fibroblasts retain their ability to migrate towards Shh, demonstrating that Ptch1(-/-) cells remain sensitive to Shh. Expression of a dominant-negative Ptch1 mutant in the developing chick neural tube had no effect on Shh-mediated patterning, but expression of a dominant-negative form of patched 2 (Ptch2) caused an activation of the Shh response. This indicates that, at early developmental stages, Ptch2 functions to suppress Shh signaling. We found that Ptch1(-/-);Ptch2(-/-) cells cannot further activate the Shh response, demonstrating that Ptch2 mediates the response to Shh in the absence of Ptch1.

  17. Frequency- dependent cell responses to an electromagnetic stimulus

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghian, Toloo; Sheikh, Abdul; Narmoneva, Daria; Kogan, Andrei

    2013-03-01

    External electric field (EF) acting on cells in the ionic environment can trigger a variety of mechanical and chemical cell responses that regulate cell functions, such as adhesion, migration and cell signaling; thus manipulation of EF can be used in therapeutic applications. To optimize this process, realistic studies of EF interaction with cells are essential. We have developed a combined theoretical-experimental approach to study cell response to the external EF in the native configuration. The cell is modeled as a membrane-enclosed hemisphere which is cultured on a substrate and is surrounded by electrolyte. Maxwell's equations are solved numerically (ANSYS-HFSS) to obtain 3D EF distribution inside and near the cell subjected to an external EF. Theoretical results indicate that the cell response is frequency dependent, where at low frequency EF is excluded from the cell interior while EF penetration into the cell increases for higher frequencies. In both regimes the spatial distribution and strength of induced EF in membrane varies with frequency. Experimental results are consistent with theoretical predictions and show frequency-dependent cell response, including both membrane-initiated and intracellular pathway activation and growth factor release. The authors acknowledge the financial support from the NSF (DMR-1206784 & DMR-0804199 to AK); the NIH (1R21 DK078814-01A1 to DN) and the University of Cincinnati (Interdisciplinary Faculty Research Support Grant to DN and AK).

  18. Stem Cells Matter in Response to Fasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Badi Sri Sailaja

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available The molecular processes underlying intestinal adaptation to fasting and re-feeding remain largely uncharacterized. In this issue of Cell Reports, Richmond et al. report that dormant intestinal stem cells are regulated by PTEN and nutritional status.

  19. T cell immune responses in psoriasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zohre Jadali

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available A central role for T cells and their cytokines in the pathogenesis of psoriasis has been proposed; however, there are controversies over the details of this issue. The goal of this study is to summarise currently available data on the importance of T cells in psoriasis pathogenesis. A systematic review of the English medical literature was conducted by searching PubMed, Embase, ISI Web of Knowledge, and Iranian databases including Iranmedex, and SID for studies on associations between the involvement of T cell subsets and psoriasis. The results of the present study indicate that alterations in the number and function of different subsets of T-cells are associated with psoriasis. It appears that studies on T cell subsets contributed to understanding the immunopathogenesis of psoriasis. In addition, it may have provided novel therapeutic opportunities in ameliorating immunopathologies.

  20. Why do we need three levels to understand the molecular optical response?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perez-Moreno, Javier; Clays, Koen; Kuzyk, Mark G.

    2011-10-01

    Traditionally, the nonlinear optical response at the molecular level has been modeled using the two-level approximation, under the assumption that the behavior of the exact sum-over-states (SOS) expressions for the molecular polarizabilities is well represented by the contribution of only two levels. We show how, a rigorous application of the Thomas-Kuhn sum-rules over the SOS expression for the diagonal component of the first-hyperpolarziability proves that the two-level approximation is unphysical. In addition, we indicate how the contributions of potentially infinite number of states to the SOS expressions for the first-hyperpolarizability are well represented by the contributions of a generic three-level system. This explains why the analysis of the three-level model in conjugation with the sum rules has lead to successful paradigms for the optimization of organic chromophores.

  1. Concurrent cerebellar and cervical intramedullary tuberculoma: Paradoxical response on antitubercular chemotherapy and need for surgery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Das, Kuntal Kanti; Jaiswal, Sushila; Shukla, Mukesh; Srivastava, Arun Kumar; Behari, Sanjay; Kumar, Raj

    2014-01-01

    Spinal intramedullary tuberculoma (SIT) is a rare manifestation of neurotuberculosis. Concurrent SIT and intracranial tuberculoma are further unusual. Most of these tuberculomas respond completely to medical therapy, and surgical excision is seldom required. In this report, we describe a 17-year-old boy who developed cervical intramedullary tuberculoma at C3-C6 level with a concurrent lesion involving the right cerebellar hemisphere while on treatment for tubercular meningitis. This patient had paradoxical increase in size of the cervical lesion even though the cerebellar lesion showed regression in size. In this article, we discuss the paradoxical response to anti-tubercular therapy in central nervous system tuberculosis, possible causes of nonresolution of tuberculoma on medical therapy and evaluate the role of surgery in these cases. PMID:25250077

  2. Reinforcing communication skills while registered nurses simultaneously learn course content: a response to learning needs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    DeSimone, B B

    1994-01-01

    This article describes the implementation and evaluation of Integrated Skills Reinforcement (ISR) in a baccalaureate nursing course entitled "Principles of Health Assessment" for 15 registered nurse students. ISR is a comprehensive teaching-learning approach that simultaneously reinforces student writing, reading, speaking, and listening skills while they learn course content. The purpose of this study was to assess the influence of ISR on writing skills and student satisfaction. A learner's guide and teacher's guide, created in advance by the teacher, described specific language activities and assignments that were implemented throughout the ISR course. During each class, the teacher promoted discussion, collaboration, and co-inquiry among students, using course content as the vehicle of exchange. Writing was assessed at the beginning and end of the course. The influence of ISR on the content, organization, sentence structure, tone, and strength of position of student writing was analyzed. Writing samples were scored by an independent evaluator trained in methods of holistic scoring. Ninety-three per cent (14 of 15 students) achieved writing growth from .5 to 1.5 points on a scale of 6 points. Student response to both the ISR approach and specific ISR activities was assessed by teacher-created surveys administered at the middle-end of the course. One hundred per cent of the students at the end of this project agreed that the ISR activities, specifically the writing and reading activities, helped them better understand the course content. These responses differed from evaluations written by the same students at the middle of the course. The ISR approach fostered analysis and communication through active collaboration, behaviors cited as critical for effective participation of nurses in today's complex health care environment.

  3. Airway epithelial cell responses to ozone injury

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leikauf, G.D.; Simpson, L.G.; Zhao, Qiyu [Univ. of Cincinnati Medical Center, OH (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-01

    The airway epithelial cell is an important target in ozone injury. Once activated, the airway epithelium responds in three phases. The initial, or immediate phase, involves activation of constitutive cells, often through direct covalent interactions including the formation of secondary ozonolysis products-hydroxyhydroperoxides, aldehydes, and hydrogen peroxide. Recently, we found hydroxyhydroperoxides to be potent agonists; of bioactive eicosanoid formation by human airway epithelial cells in culture. Other probable immediate events include activation and inactivation of enzymes present on the epithelial surface (e.g., neutral endopeptidase). During the next 2 to 24 hr, or early phase, epithelial cells respond by synthesis and release of chemotactic factors, including chemokines-macrophage inflammatory protein-2, RANTES, and interleukin-8. Infiltrating leukocytes during this period also release elastase, an important agonist of epithelial cell mucus secretion and additional chemokine formation. The third (late) phase of ozone injury is characterized by eosinophil or monocyte infiltration. Cytokine expression leads to alteration of structural protein synthesis, with increases in fibronectin evident by in situ hybridization. Synthesis of epithelial antiproteases, e.g., secretary leukocyte protease inhibitor, may also increase locally 24 to 48 hr after elastase concentrations become excessive. Thus, the epithelium is not merely a passive barrier to ozone injury but has a dynamic role in directing the migration, activating, and then counteracting inflammatory cells. Through these complex interactions, epithelial cells can be viewed as the initiators (alpha) and the receptors (omega) of ozone-induced airway disease. 51 refs., 2 figs., 3 tabs.

  4. System-wide Analysis of the T Cell Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ruxandra Covacu

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The T cell receptor (TCR controls the cellular adaptive immune response to antigens, but our understanding of TCR repertoire diversity and response to challenge is still incomplete. For example, TCR clones shared by different individuals with minimal alteration to germline gene sequences (public clones are detectable in all vertebrates, but their significance is unknown. Although small in size, the zebrafish TCR repertoire is controlled by processes similar to those operating in mammals. Thus, we studied the zebrafish TCR repertoire and its response to stimulation with self and foreign antigens. We found that cross-reactive public TCRs dominate the T cell response, endowing a limited TCR repertoire with the ability to cope with diverse antigenic challenges. These features of vertebrate public TCRs might provide a mechanism for the rapid generation of protective T cell immunity, allowing a short temporal window for the development of more specific private T cell responses.

  5. EU emissions trading. The need for cap adjustment in response to external shocks and unexpected developments?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Diekmann, Jochen [DIW, Berlin (Germany)

    2012-11-15

    In this paper the advantages and disadvantages of the various adaptation options will be discussed from an economic perspective. Firstly, the criteria for identifying a need for potentially legitimate adaptation should be investigated. Furthermore, the issue of appropriate timely intervention points prior to or within the trading period will be discussed. In what periods and scenarios are adjustments to the cap worthwhile from an economic perspective? To what extent could minimum prices or price ranges make sense? What role could a strategic reserve play? By addressing these issues, it will be fundamentally discussed as to how the emissions trading scheme could be further developed and strengthened by greater flexibility. After a brief characterisation of emissions trading in theory and practice in Chapter 2, Chapter 3 will identify potential external shocks and unexpected developments which may impair the functioning of an emissions trading scheme. The current problems of cap setting for the third trading period of the EU ETS will be described in Chapter 4. Against this background, cap adjustments will be discussed in Chapter 5, minimum and maximum prices in Chapter 6 and strategic reserves in emissions trading in Chapter 7. The conclusions are summarised in Chapter 8.

  6. Understanding and Meeting the Needs of Space Scientists in EPO—Survey Results, Responses, and Strategies

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grier, J.; Buxner, S.; Schneider, N.

    2015-11-01

    As science literacy is falling in the United States, our world continues to become more complex. Everyone now requires an understanding of science, technology, and the relationship of interconnected systems in order to successfully navigate the complex issues facing us. Scientists are a critical resource, bringing to the table an understanding of the nature of science as a process, as well as up-to-the-minute scientific content. They can function in a wide range of capacities in education and public outreach (EPO) to meet some of the learning challenges of teachers, students, and the general public. Societies that work directly with scientists, such as the American Astronomical Society (AAS) and the Division for Planetary Sciences (DPS) are interested in understanding how their member scientists view the act of reaching out, how they do it, and how the DPS can continue to support them as they engage with a variety of audiences in an EPO capacity. To this end, we (the NASA Science Mission Directorate Planetary Science Forum and DPS leadership) conducted a series of semi-structured interviews with a subsection of DPS members to learn more about their attitudes and needs, and to begin to pinpoint opportunities and strategies for future consideration. Presented here are our preliminary results and the ideas generated for further conversations.

  7. Ease of counterfactual thought generation moderates the relationship between need for cognition and punitive responses to crime.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Petrocelli, John V; Dowd, Keith

    2009-09-01

    Punitive responses to crime have been linked to a relatively low need for cognition (NFC). Sargent's (2004) findings suggest that this relationship is due to a relatively complex attributional system, employed by high-NFC individuals, which permits them to recognize potential external or situational causes of crime. However, high-NFC individuals may also be more likely to engage in counterfactual thinking, which has been linked to greater judgments of blame and responsibility. Three studies examine the relationship between trait and state NFC and punitiveness in light of counterfactual thinking. Results suggest that the ease of generating upward counterfactuals in response to an unfortunate crime moderates the NFC-punitiveness relationship, such that high-NFC individuals are less punitive than low-NFC individuals only when counterfactual thoughts are relatively difficult to generate. These findings are discussed in light of punishment theory and their possible implications with regard to the legal system.

  8. In vitro mesenchymal stem cell response to a CO{sub 2} laser modified polymeric material

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Waugh, D.G., E-mail: d.waugh@chester.ac.uk [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Chester CH1 4BJ (United Kingdom); Hussain, I. [School of Life Sciences, Brayford Pool, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Lawrence, J.; Smith, G.C. [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Chester CH1 4BJ (United Kingdom); Cosgrove, D. [School of Life Sciences, Brayford Pool, University of Lincoln, Lincoln LN6 7TS (United Kingdom); Toccaceli, C. [Laser Engineering and Manufacturing Research Centre, Faculty of Science and Engineering, University of Chester, Chester CH1 4BJ (United Kingdom)

    2016-10-01

    With an ageing world population it is becoming significantly apparent that there is a need to produce implants and platforms to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. This is needed to meet the socio-economic demands of many countries worldwide. This paper details one of the first ever studies in to the manipulation of stem cell growth on CO{sub 2} laser surface treated nylon 6,6 highlighting its potential as an inexpensive platform to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. Through CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment discrete changes to the surfaces were made. That is, the surface roughness of the nylon 6,6 was increased by up to 4.3 μm, the contact angle was modulated by up to 5° and the surface oxygen content increased by up to 1 atom %. Following mesenchymal stem cell growth on the laser treated samples, it was identified that CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment gave rise to an enhanced response with an increase in viable cell count of up to 60,000 cells/ml when compared to the as-received sample. The effect of surface parameters modified by the CO{sub 2} laser surface treatment on the mesenchymal stem cell response is also discussed along with potential trends that could be identified to govern the mesenchymal stem cell response.

  9. In vitro mesenchymal stem cell response to a CO2 laser modified polymeric material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Waugh, D G; Hussain, I; Lawrence, J; Smith, G C; Cosgrove, D; Toccaceli, C

    2016-10-01

    With an ageing world population it is becoming significantly apparent that there is a need to produce implants and platforms to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. This is needed to meet the socio-economic demands of many countries worldwide. This paper details one of the first ever studies in to the manipulation of stem cell growth on CO2 laser surface treated nylon 6,6 highlighting its potential as an inexpensive platform to manipulate stem cell growth on a pharmaceutical scale. Through CO2 laser surface treatment discrete changes to the surfaces were made. That is, the surface roughness of the nylon 6,6 was increased by up to 4.3μm, the contact angle was modulated by up to 5° and the surface oxygen content increased by up to 1atom %. Following mesenchymal stem cell growth on the laser treated samples, it was identified that CO2 laser surface treatment gave rise to an enhanced response with an increase in viable cell count of up to 60,000cells/ml when compared to the as-received sample. The effect of surface parameters modified by the CO2 laser surface treatment on the mesenchymal stem cell response is also discussed along with potential trends that could be identified to govern the mesenchymal stem cell response.

  10. Vasopressin needs an audience: neuropeptide elicited stress responses are contingent upon perceived social evaluative threats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shalev, Idan; Israel, Salomon; Uzefovsky, Florina; Gritsenko, Inga; Kaitz, Marsha; Ebstein, Richard P

    2011-06-01

    The nonapeptide arginine vasopressin (AVP) plays an important role in hypothalamus-pituitary-adrenal axis regulation and also functions as a social hormone in a wide variety of species, from voles to humans. In the current report we use a variety of stress inducing tasks, including the Trier Social Stress Test (TSST) and intranasal administration of AVP to show that intranasal administration of this neuropeptide leads to a significant increase in salivary cortisol and pulse rate, specifically in conditions where subjects perform tasks in the presence of a social evaluative threat (task performance could be negatively judged by others). In contrast, in conditions without a social evaluative threat (no task condition, modified TSST without audience and bike ergometry), subjects receiving AVP did not differ from subjects receiving placebo. Thus exogenous AVP's influence is contingent upon a circumscribed set of initial conditions that constitute a direct threat to the maintenance of our social selves. Stress evoked by social threat is an integral part of social life and is related to self-esteem and in extreme forms, to poor mental health (e.g., social phobia). Our findings suggest that AVP is a key component in the circuit that interlaces stress and social threat and findings offer inroads to our understanding of individual differences in sociability and in stress response elicited in threatening social situations.

  11. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Need for Research & Potential Applications. It’s status in India

    OpenAIRE

    Shripad D Banavali

    2009-01-01

    Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that through replications have the capabilities of both self-renewal and differentiation into mature specialized cells. Broadly, there are two types of stem cells, embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Embryonic stem cell biology has been associated with ethical controversy and also their growth is difficult to control. Adult stem cells are located in tissues throughout the body and function as a reservoir to replace damaged or aging cells. Embryonic...

  12. B-Cell Response during Protozoan Parasite Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María C. Amezcua Vesely

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In this review, we discuss how protozoan parasites alter immature and mature B cell compartment. B1 and marginal zone (MZ B cells, considered innate like B cells, are activated during protozoan parasite infections, and they generate short lived plasma cells providing a prompt antibody source. In addition, protozoan infections induce massive B cell response with polyclonal activation that leads to hypergammaglobulnemia with serum antibodies specific for the parasites and self and/or non related antigens. To protect themselves, the parasites have evolved unique ways to evade B cell immune responses inducing apoptosis of MZ and conventional mature B cells. As a consequence of the parasite induced-apoptosis, the early IgM response and an already establish humoral immunity are affected during the protozoan parasite infection. Moreover, some trypanosomatides trigger bone marrow immature B cell apoptosis, influencing the generation of new mature B cells. Simultaneously with their ability to release antibodies, B cells produce cytokines/quemokines that influence the characteristic of cellular immune response and consequently the progression of parasite infections.

  13. Classroom Behaviour Management Strategies in Response to Problematic Behaviours of Primary School Children with Special Educational Needs: Views of Special Educational Needs Coordinators

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nye, Elizabeth; Gardner, Frances; Hansford, Lorraine; Edwards, Vanessa; Hayes, Rachel; Ford, Tamsin

    2016-01-01

    Children identified with special educational needs (SEN) and behavioural difficulties present extra challenges to educators and require additional supports in school. This paper presents views from special educational needs coordinators (SENCos) on various strategies used by educators to support children identified with SEN and problematic…

  14. Professional Roles and Responsibilities in Meeting the Needs of Children with Speech, Language and Communication Needs: Joint Working between Educational Psychologists and Speech and Language Therapists

    Science.gov (United States)

    McConnellogue, Sheila

    2011-01-01

    There is a large population of children with speech, language and communication needs who have additional special educational needs (SEN). Whilst professional collaboration between education and health professionals is recommended to ensure an integrated delivery of statutory services for this population of children, formal frameworks should be…

  15. The regulation of CD4+ T cell responses during protozoan infections.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christian eEngwerda

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available CD4+ T cells are critical for defence against protozoan parasites. Intracellular protozoan parasite infections generally require the development of a Th1 cell response, characterised by the production of IFNγ and TNF that are critical for the generation of microbiocidal molecules by phagocytes, as well as the expression of cytokines and cell surface molecules needed to generate cytolytic CD8+ T cells that can recognise and kill infected host cells . Over the past 25 years, much has been learnt about the molecular and cellular components necessary for the generation of Th1 cell responses, and it has become clear that these responses need to by tightly controlled to prevent disease. However, our understanding of the immunoregulatory mechanisms activated during infection is still not complete. Furthermore, it is apparent that although these mechanisms are critical to prevent inflammation, they can also promote parasite persistence and development of disease. Here, we review how CD4+ T cells are controlled during protozoan infections and how these regulatory mechanisms can influence parasite growth and disease outcome.

  16. Cell-mediated responses of immunized vervet monkeys to defined Leishmania T-cell epitopes.

    OpenAIRE

    Curry, A J; Jardim, A; Olobo, J.O.; Olafson, R W

    1994-01-01

    A population of vervet monkeys was immunized with killed parasites and infected with Leishmania major promastigotes either by needle or by infected-fly bite. The responses of recovered monkeys to mitogens, killed parasites, and molecularly defined T-cell epitopes were then compared with those of control animals. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from both naive and recovered animals proliferated strongly in response to both B- and T-cell mitogens, although the responses of the recover...

  17. Circadian control of antigen-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nobis CC

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Chloé C Nobis,1–3 Nathalie Labrecque,2–4 Nicolas Cermakian1,5–8 1Douglas Mental Health University Institute, 2Maisonneuve-Rosemont Hospital Research Centre, 3Department of Microbiology, Infectious Diseases and Immunology, 4Department of Medicine, University of Montreal, 5Department of Psychiatry, 6Department of Microbiology and Immunology, 7Department of Neurology and Neurosurgery, 8Department of Physiology, McGill University, Montreal, QC, Canada Abstract: The immune system is composed of two arms, the innate and the adaptive immunity. While the innate response constitutes the first line of defense and is not specific for a particular pathogen, the adaptive response is highly specific and allows for long-term memory of the pathogen encounter. T lymphocytes (or T cells are central players in the adaptive immune response. Various aspects of T cell functions vary according to the time of day. Circadian clocks located in most tissues and cell types generate 24-hour rhythms of various physiological processes. These clocks are based on a set of clock genes, and this timing mechanism controls rhythmically the expression of numerous other genes. Clock genes are expressed in cells of the immune system, including T cells. In this review, we provide an overview of the circadian control of the adaptive immune response, with emphasis on T cells, including their development, trafficking, response to antigen, and effector functions. Keywords: circadian clock, adaptive immune response, T lymphocyte, antigen, cytokine, proliferation

  18. Bystander responses in low dose irradiated cells treated with plasma from gamma irradiated blood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Acheva, A; Georgieva, R; Rupova, I; Boteva, R [Laboratory Molecular Radiobiology and Epidemiology, National Centre of Radiobiology and Radiation Protection, 132 Kliment Ohridski blvd, Sofia 1756 (Bulgaria); Lyng, F [Radiation and Environmental Science Center, Dublin Institute of Technology, Kevin st, Dublin 8 (Ireland)], E-mail: anjin_a@mail.bg

    2008-02-01

    There are two specific low-dose radiation-induced responses that have been the focus of radiobiologists' interest in recent years. These are the bystander effect in non-irradiated cells and the adaptive response to a challenge dose after prior low dose irradiation. In the present study we have investigated if plasma from irradiated blood can act as a 'challenge dose' on low dose irradiated reporter epithelial cells (HaCaT cell line). The main aim was to evaluate the overall effect of low dose irradiation (0.05 Gy) of reporter cells and the influence of bystander factors in plasma from 0.5 Gy gamma irradiated blood on these cells. The effects were estimated by clonogenic survival of the reporter cells. We also investigated the involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) as potential factors involved in the bystander signaling. Calcium fluxes and mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP) depolarization were also examined as a marker for initiation of apoptosis in the reporter cells. The results show that there are large individual differences in the production of bystander effects and adaptive responses between different donors. These may be due to the specific composition of the donor plasma. The observed effects generally could be divided into two groups: adaptive responses and additive effects. ROS appeared to be involved in the responses of the low dose pretreated reporter cells. In all cases there was a significant decrease in MMP which may be an early event in the apoptotic process. Calcium signaling also appeared to be involved in triggering apoptosis in the low dose pretreated reporter cells. The heterogeneity of the bystander responses makes them difficult to be modulated for medical uses. Specific plasma characteristics that cause these large differences in the responses would need to be identified to make them useful for radiotherapy.

  19. Antibody-Independent Function of Human B Cells Contributes to Antifungal T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rui; Rezk, Ayman; Li, Hulun; Gommerman, Jennifer L; Prat, Alexandre; Bar-Or, Amit

    2017-03-08

    Fungal infections (e.g., Candida albicans) can manifest as serious medical illnesses, especially in the elderly and immune-compromised hosts. T cells are important for Candida control. Whether and how B cells are involved in antifungal immunity has been less clear. Although patients with agammaglobulinemia exhibit normal antifungal immunity, increased fungal infections are reported following B cell-depleting therapy, together pointing to Ab-independent roles of B cells in controlling such infections. To test how human B cells may contribute to fungal-associated human T cell responses, we developed a novel Ag-specific human T cell/B cell in vitro coculture system and found that human B cells could induce C. albicans-associated, MHC class II-restricted responses of naive T cells. Activated B cells significantly enhanced C. albicans-mediated Th1 and Th17 T cell responses, which were both strongly induced by CD80/CD86 costimulation. IL-6(+)GM-CSF(+) B cells were the major responding B cell subpopulation to C. albicans and provided efficient costimulatory signals to the T cells. In vivo B cell depletion in humans resulted in reduced C. albicans-associated T responses. Of note, the decreased Th17, but not Th1, responses could be reversed by soluble factors from B cells prior to depletion, in an IL-6-dependent manner. Taken together, our results implicate an Ab-independent cytokine-defined B cell role in human antifungal T cell responses. These findings may be particularly relevant given the prospects of chronic B cell depletion therapy use in lymphoma and autoimmune disease, as patients age and are exposed to serial combination therapies.

  20. Differential T helper cell response in tuberculous pleuritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prabha C

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: This study was conducted to understand the in vivo and in vitro immune responses and to find whether there exists any difference in the systemic and localized immune responses in tuberculous pleuritis. Methods: The in vivo levels of IFN-γ and IL-4 were compared in plasma (BL and pleural fluid (PF of 47 tuberculous (TB and 31 nontuberculous pleuritis (Non-TB patients. In vitro cytokine response to various mycobacterial antigens was studied in 19 TB patients by ELISA . Both ex vivo and in vitro cytokine responses were further ascertained by intracellular cytokine staining on purified CD4+ T cells from pleural fluid mononuclear cells (PFMC of 10 TB patients. Results: The ex vivo results showed a significant increase in IFN-γ levels and higher IFN-γ + T cells in PF. On the other hand, in vitro results showed simultaneous increase in both IFN-γ and IL-4 levels in the supernatants of antigen stimulated PFMC. Similarly antigen specific increase was observed in both IFN-γ + and IL-4+ T cells in all cultured conditions. However, the percentile increase was more in IL-4 secreting T cells, significant for PPD stimulation ( P < 0.05, indicating that in vitro cellular response was dominated by Th2 type. Conclusions: These results showed a differential T-helper response in TB pleuritis suggestive of predominant Th1 in vivo and mixed response (Th1 and Th2 under in vitro conditions.

  1. The T Cell Response to Actinobacillus actinomycetemcomitans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2006-05-01

    disease (11). Other clinical features of the disease include deep pain on mastication, first molar mobility, distolabial migration of maxillary incisors...transformed into one shot chemically competent E. coli TOP -10 (InVitrogen). 40 .tl from each transformation was grown at 37°C overnight on LB plates...5. Peripheral Blood Mononuclear Cells (PBMCs) isolation The 13 ml vacutainer with SST Gel and Clot Activator, or "Tiger Top ," was centrifuged at 3800

  2. Responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to nanostructured platinum surfaces

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennisi, C. P.; Sevcencu, C.; Dolatshahi-Pirouz, A.; Foss, M.; Lundsgaard Hansen, J.; Nylandsted Larsen, A.; Zachar, V.; Besenbacher, F.; Yoshida, K.

    2009-09-01

    The chronic performance of implantable neural prostheses is affected by the growth of encapsulation tissue onto the stimulation electrodes. Encapsulation is associated with activation of connective tissue cells at the electrode's metallic contacts, usually made of platinum. Since surface nanotopography can modulate the cellular responses to materials, the aim of the present work was to evaluate the 'in vitro' responses of connective tissue cells to platinum strictly by modulating its surface nanoroughness. Using molecular beam epitaxy combined with sputtering, we produced platinum nanostructured substrates consisting of irregularly distributed nanopyramids and investigated their effect on the proliferation, cytoskeletal organization and cellular morphology of primary fibroblasts and transformed glial cells. Cells were cultured on these substrates and their responses to surface roughness were studied. After one day in culture, the fibroblasts were more elongated and their cytoskeleton less mature when cultured on rough substrates. This effect increased as the roughness of the surface increased and was associated with reduced cell proliferation throughout the observation period (4 days). Morphological changes also occurred in glial cells, but they were triggered by a different roughness scale and did not affect cellular proliferation. In conclusion, surface nanotopography modulates the responses of fibroblasts and glial cells to platinum, which may be an important factor in optimizing the tissue response to implanted neural electrodes.

  3. New insights into the unfolded protein response in stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Yanzhou; Cheung, Hoi Hung; Tu, JiaJie; Miu, Kai Kei; Chan, Wai Yee

    2016-08-16

    The unfolded protein response (UPR) is an evolutionarily conserved adaptive mechanism to increase cell survival under endoplasmic reticulum (ER) stress conditions. The UPR is critical for maintaining cell homeostasis under physiological and pathological conditions. The vital functions of the UPR in development, metabolism and immunity have been demonstrated in several cell types. UPR dysfunction activates a variety of pathologies, including cancer, inflammation, neurodegenerative disease, metabolic disease and immune disease. Stem cells with the special ability to self-renew and differentiate into various somatic cells have been demonstrated to be present in multiple tissues. These cells are involved in development, tissue renewal and certain disease processes. Although the role and regulation of the UPR in somatic cells has been widely reported, the function of the UPR in stem cells is not fully known, and the roles and functions of the UPR are dependent on the stem cell type. Therefore, in this article, the potential significances of the UPR in stem cells, including embryonic stem cells, tissue stem cells, cancer stem cells and induced pluripotent cells, are comprehensively reviewed. This review aims to provide novel insights regarding the mechanisms associated with stem cell differentiation and cancer pathology.

  4. T Cell Responses: Naive to Memory and Everything in Between

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennock, Nathan D.; White, Jason T.; Cross, Eric W.; Cheney, Elizabeth E.; Tamburini, Beth A.; Kedl, Ross M.

    2013-01-01

    The authors describe the actions that take place in T cells because of their amazing capacity to proliferate and adopt functional roles aimed at clearing a host of an infectious agent. There is a drastic decline in the T cell population once the primary response is over and the infection is terminated. What remains afterward is a population of T…

  5. Gefitinib: new preparation. Non small-cell lung cancer: stricter assessment needed.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2004-10-01

    (1) Platinum-based chemotherapy is generally used to treat advanced-stage non small-cell lung cancer (stages III and IV), but has only a modest impact on survival. There is no reference treatment. (2) Gefitinib inhibits the tyrosine kinase activity of the receptor for EGF (epidermal growth factor), which is thought to be involved in tumour growth. It has a temporary licence in France and is used on a named-patient basis, but full marketing authorisation has already been granted in Japan, the United States, and elsewhere. (3) Two double-blind dose-finding studies compared two doses of oral gefitinib monotherapy (250 mg/day and 500 mg/day) in patients in whom at least two lines of chemotherapy had failed. The results were favourable, with a median survival of 6 months and a symptomatic improvement in some patients, but they are undermined by the absence of a placebo group and by major protocol violations. (4) Two double-blind trials, each in more than 1000 patients, showed that gefitinib does not increase the efficacy of first-line platinum combinations. (5) About 15% of patients receiving gefitinib monotherapy in clinical trials stopped taking the treatment because of adverse events. The most frequent were gastrointestinal (diarrhea, nausea, vomiting) and cutaneous (rash, acne, dry skin, pruritus). (6) Interstitial pneumonitis occurred in about 1% of patients, and was fatal in about one-third of cases. (7) Gefitinib is metabolised by the cytochrome P450 isoenzyme CYP3A4, so carries a potentially high risk of interactions. (8) In practice, more thorough assessment of gefitinib is needed to determine whether this new drug is beneficial for patients with non small-cell lung cancer. Marketing authorisation is not currently justified.

  6. Assessing T-cell responses in anticancer immunotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Escors, David; Liechtenstein, Therese; Perez-Janices, Noemi; Schwarze, Julia; Dufait, Ines; Goyvaerts, Cleo; Lanna, Alessio; Arce, Frederick; Blanco-Luquin, Idoia; Kochan, Grazyna; Guerrero-Setas, David; Breckpot, Karine

    2013-01-01

    Since dendritic cells operate as professional antigen-presenting cells (APCs) and hence are capable of jumpstarting the immune system, they have been exploited to develop a variety of immunotherapeutic regimens against cancer. In the few past years, myeloid-derived suppressor cells (MDSCs) have been shown to mediate robust immunosuppressive functions, thereby inhibiting tumor-targeting immune responses. Thus, we propose that the immunomodulatory activity of MDSCs should be carefully considered for the development of efficient anticancer immunotherapies. PMID:24244902

  7. The STATs in cell stress-type responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Best James

    2004-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract In the early 1990's, a new cell signaling pathway was described. This new paradigm, now known as the JAK/STAT pathway, has been extensively investigated in immune-type cells in response to interferons and interleukins. However, recent evidence suggests that the JAK/STAT pathway also mediates diverse cellular responses to various forms of biological stress including hypoxia/reperfusion, endotoxin, ultraviolet light, and hyperosmolarity. The current literature describing the JAK/STAT pathway's role in cellular stress responses has been reviewed herein, but it is clear that our knowledge in this area is far from complete.

  8. CD4+ T cell responses in hepatitis C virus infection

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Nasser Semmo; Paul Klenerman

    2007-01-01

    Hepatitis C virus (HCV) infection is a major cause of liver damage, with virus-induced end-stage disease such as liver cirrhosis and hepatocellular carcinoma resulting in a high rate of morbidity and mortality worldwide. Evidence that CD4+ T cell responses to HCV play an important role in the outcome of acute infection has been shown in several studies. However, the mechanisms behind viral persistence and the failure of CD4+ T cell responses to contain virus are poorly understood. During chronic HCV infection, HCV-specific CD4+ T cell responses are relatively weak or absent whereas in resolved infection these responses are vigorous and multispecific. Persons with a T-helper type Ⅰ profile, which promotes cellular effector mechanisms are thought to be more likely to experience viral clearance, but the overall role of these cells in the immunopathogenesis of chronic liver disease is not known. To define this, much more data is required on the function and specificity of virus-specific CD4+ T cells,especially in the early phases of acute disease and in the liver during chronic infection. The role and possible mechanisms of action of CD4+ T cell responses in determining the outcome of acute and chronic HCV infection will be discussed in this review.

  9. Use of comparative genomics approaches to characterize interspecies differences in response to environmental chemicals: Challenges, opportunities, and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Burgess-Herbert, Sarah L., E-mail: sarah.burgess@alum.mit.edu [American Association for the Advancement of Science (AAAS) Science and Technology Policy Fellow at the US Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), 2009–10 (United States); Euling, Susan Y. [National Center for Environmental Assessment, Office of Research and Development, US Environmental Protection Agency, Washington, DC 20460 (United States)

    2013-09-15

    A critical challenge for environmental chemical risk assessment is the characterization and reduction of uncertainties introduced when extrapolating inferences from one species to another. The purpose of this article is to explore the challenges, opportunities, and research needs surrounding the issue of how genomics data and computational and systems level approaches can be applied to inform differences in response to environmental chemical exposure across species. We propose that the data, tools, and evolutionary framework of comparative genomics be adapted to inform interspecies differences in chemical mechanisms of action. We compare and contrast existing approaches, from disciplines as varied as evolutionary biology, systems biology, mathematics, and computer science, that can be used, modified, and combined in new ways to discover and characterize interspecies differences in chemical mechanism of action which, in turn, can be explored for application to risk assessment. We consider how genetic, protein, pathway, and network information can be interrogated from an evolutionary biology perspective to effectively characterize variations in biological processes of toxicological relevance among organisms. We conclude that comparative genomics approaches show promise for characterizing interspecies differences in mechanisms of action, and further, for improving our understanding of the uncertainties inherent in extrapolating inferences across species in both ecological and human health risk assessment. To achieve long-term relevance and consistent use in environmental chemical risk assessment, improved bioinformatics tools, computational methods robust to data gaps, and quantitative approaches for conducting extrapolations across species are critically needed. Specific areas ripe for research to address these needs are recommended.

  10. Mast cells and basophils in cutaneous immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otsuka, A; Kabashima, K

    2015-02-01

    Mast cells and basophils share some functions in common and are generally associated with T helper 2 (Th2) immune responses, but taking basophils as surrogate cells for mast cell research or vice versa for several decades is problematic. Thus far, their in vitro functions have been well studied, but their in vivo functions remained poorly understood. New research tools for their functional analysis in vivo have revealed previously unrecognized roles for mast cells and basophils in several skin disorders. Newly developed mast cell-deficient mice provided evidence that mast cells initiate contact hypersensitivity via activating dendritic cells. In addition, studies using basophil-deficient mice have revealed that basophils were responsible for cutaneous Th2 skewing to haptens and peptide antigens but not to protein antigens. Moreover, human basophils infiltrate different skin lesions and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of skin diseases ranging from atopic dermatitis to autoimmune diseases. In this review, we will discuss the recent advances related to mast cells and basophils in human and murine cutaneous immune responses.

  11. Prostate progenitor cells proliferate in response to castration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xudong Shi

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available Androgen-deprivation is a mainstay of therapy for advanced prostate cancer but tumor regression is usually incomplete and temporary because of androgen-independent cells in the tumor. It has been speculated that these tumor cells resemble the stem/progenitor cells of the normal prostate. The purpose of this study was to examine the response of slow-cycling progenitor cells in the adult mouse prostate to castration. Proliferating cells in the E16 urogenital sinus were pulse labeled by BrdU administration or by doxycycline-controlled labeling of the histone-H2B GFP mouse. A small population of labeled epithelial cells in the adult prostate localized at the junction of the prostatic ducts and urethra. Fluorescence-activated cell sorting (FACS showed that GFP label-retaining cells were enriched for cells co-expressing stem cell markers Sca-1, CD133, CD44 and CD117 (4- marker cells; 60-fold enrichment. FACS showed, additionally, that 4-marker cells were androgen receptor positive. Castration induced proliferation and dispersal of E16 labeled cells into more distal ductal segments. When naïve adult mice were administered BrdU daily for 2 weeks after castration, 16% of 4-marker cells exhibited BrdU label in contrast to only 6% of all epithelial cells (P < 0.01. In sham-castrated controls less than 4% of 4-marker cells were BrdU labeled (P < 0.01. The unexpected and admittedly counter-intuitive finding that castration induced progenitor cell proliferation suggests that androgen deprivation therapy in men with advanced prostate cancer could not only exert pleiotrophic effects on tumor sub-populations but may induce inadvertent expansion of tumor stem cells.

  12. Cutting edge: the mechanism of invariant NKT cell responses to viral danger signals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyznik, Aaron J; Tupin, Emmanuel; Nagarajan, Niranjana A; Her, Min J; Benedict, Chris A; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-10-01

    Invariant NK T (iNKT) cells influence the response to viral infections, although the mechanisms are poorly defined. In this study we show that these innate-like lymphocytes secrete IFN-gamma upon culture with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs) from mouse bone marrow. This requires TLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion by the activated DCs, but it does not require CD1d expression. iNKT cells also produce IFN-gamma in response to mouse CMV infection. Their mechanism of mouse CMV detection is quite similar to that of CpG, requiring both TLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion, while the need for CD1d expression is relatively minor. Consequently, iNKT cells have the ability to respond to a variety of microbes, including viruses, in an Ag-independent manner, suggesting they may play a broad role in antipathogen defenses despite their limited TCR repertoire.

  13. The mechanism of invariant NKT cell responses to viral danger signals1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tyznik, Aaron J.; Tupin, Emmanuel; Nagarajan, Niranjana A.; Her, Min J.; Benedict, Chris A.; Kronenberg, Mitchell

    2008-01-01

    Invariant (i)NKT cells influence the response to viral infections, although the mechanisms are poorly defined. Here we show that these innate-like lymphocytes secrete IFN-γ upon culture with CpG oligodeoxynucleotide-stimulated dendritic cells (DCs) from mouse bone marrow. This requires TLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion by the activated DCs, but does not require CD1d expression. iNKT cells also produce IFN-γ in response to mouse CMV (MCMV) infection. Their mechanism of MCMV detection is quite similar to that of CpG, requiring bothTLR9 signaling and IL-12 secretion, while the need for CD1d expression is relatively minor. Consequently, iNKT cells have the ability to respond to a variety of microbes, including viruses, in an antigen-independent manner, suggesting they may play a broad role in anti-pathogen defenses despite their limited TCR repertoire. PMID:18802047

  14. Assessing the readiness and training needs of non-urban physicians in public health emergency and response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsu, Chiehwen Ed; Mas, Francisco Soto; Jacobson, Holly; Papenfuss, Richard; Nkhoma, Ella T; Zoretic, James

    2005-01-01

    Emergency readiness has become a public health priority for United States communities after the 9/11 attacks. Communities that have a less developed public health infrastructure are challenged to organize preparedness and response efforts and to ensure that health care providers are capable of caring for victims of terrorist acts. A survey was used to assess non-urban physicians' prior experience with and self-confidence in treating, and preferred training needs for responding to chemical, biologic, radiologic, nuclear, and explosive (CBRNE) cases. Data were collected through a mailed and Web-based survey. Although the response rate was calculated at 30%, approximately one third of the surveys were not able to be delivered. Most respondents reported never having seen or treated CBRNE-inflicted cases and were not confident in their ability to diagnose or treat CBRNE cases, but many were willing to participate in a state-led response plan. Almost half of the individuals had not participated in any related training but expressed interest in receiving training in small group workshops or through CD-ROM. These results provide potential direction for strategic preparedness planning for non-urban health care providers.

  15. Radiation response of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow and human pluripotent stem cells

    OpenAIRE

    Islam, Mohammad S; Stemig, Melissa E.; Takahashi, Yutaka; Hui, Susanta K.

    2014-01-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) isolated from human pluripotent stem cells are comparable with bone marrow-derived MSCs in their function and immunophenotype. The purpose of this exploratory study was comparative evaluation of the radiation responses of mesenchymal stem cells derived from bone marrow- (BMMSCs) and from human embryonic stem cells (hESMSCs). BMMSCs and hESMSCs were irradiated at 0 Gy (control) to 16 Gy using a linear accelerator commonly used for cancer treatment. Cells were harv...

  16. BRITER: a BMP responsive osteoblast reporter cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Prem Swaroop Yadav

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: BMP signaling pathway is critical for vertebrate development and tissue homeostasis. High-throughput molecular genetic screening may reveal novel players regulating BMP signaling response while chemical genetic screening of BMP signaling modifiers may have clinical significance. It is therefore important to generate a cell-based tool to execute such screens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We have established a BMP responsive reporter cell line by stably integrating a BMP responsive dual luciferase reporter construct in the immortalized calvarial osteoblast cells isolated from tamoxifen inducible Bmp2; Bmp4 double conditional knockout mouse strain. This cell line, named BRITER (BMP Responsive Immortalized Reporter cell line, responds robustly, promptly and specifically to exogenously added BMP2 protein. The sensitivity to added BMP may be further increased by depleting the endogenous BMP2 and BMP4 proteins. CONCLUSION: As the dynamic range of the assay (for BMP responsiveness is very high for BRITER and as it responds specifically and promptly to exogenously added BMP2 protein, BRITER may be used effectively for chemical or molecular genetic screening for BMP signaling modifiers. Identification of novel molecular players capable of influencing BMP signaling pathway may have clinical significance.

  17. Proteome analysis of proliferative response of bystander cells adjacent to cells exposed to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerashchenko, Bogdan I; Yamagata, Akira; Oofusa, Ken; Yoshizato, Katsutoshi; de Toledo, Sonia M; Howell, Roger W

    2007-06-01

    Recently (Cytometry 2003, 56A, 71-80), we reported that direct cell-to-cell contact is required for stimulating proliferation of bystander rat liver cells (WB-F344) cocultured with irradiated cells, and neither functional gap junction intercellular communication nor long-range extracellular factors appear to be involved in this proliferative bystander response (PBR). The molecular basis for this response is unknown. Confluent monolayers of WB-F344 cells were exposed to 5-Gray (Gy) of gamma-rays. Irradiated cells were mixed with unirradiated cells and co-cultured for 24 h. Cells were harvested and protein expression was examined using 2-DE. Protein expression was also determined in cultures of unirradiated and 5-Gy irradiated cells. Proteins were identified by MS. Nucleophosmin (NPM)-1, a multifunctional nucleolar protein, was more highly expressed in bystander cells than in either unirradiated or 5-Gy irradiated cells. Enolase-alpha, a glycolytic enzyme, was present in acidic and basic variants in unirradiated cells. In bystander and 5-Gy irradiated cells, the basic variant was weakly expressed, whereas the acidic variant was overwhelmingly present. These data indicate that the presence of irradiated cells can affect NPM-1 and enolase-alpha in adjacent bystander cells. These proteins appear to participate in molecular events related to the PBR and suggest that this response may involve cellular defense, proliferation, and metabolism.

  18. Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation: Need for Research & Potential Applications. It’s status in India

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shripad D. Banavali

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are undifferentiated cells that through replications have the capabilities of both self-renewal and differentiation into mature specialized cells. Broadly, there are two types of stem cells, embryonic stem cells and adult stem cells. Embryonic stem cell biology has been associated with ethical controversy and also their growth is difficult to control. Adult stem cells are located in tissues throughout the body and function as a reservoir to replace damaged or aging cells. Embryonic stem cells are by definitions, the master cells capable of differentiating into every type of cells either in-vitro or in-vivo. Several lines of evidence suggests, however, that adult stem cells and even terminally differentiated somatic cells under appropriate micro-environmental cues are able to be reprogrammed and contribute to a much wider spectrum of differentiated progeny than previously anticipated. Hematopoietic Stem Cells (HSCs, for example, from different sources have been shown to cross the tissue boundaries and give rise to the cells of the other germ layers.In the past few years, the plasticity of adult cells in several post-natal tissues has attracted special attention in regenerative medicine. Stem cell therapies represent a new field of biomedical science which could provide in the future the cure for diseases until now considered incurable. The reconstitution of adult stem cells may be promising source for the regeneration of damaged tissues and for the resolution of organ dysfunction. However, there are two major limitations to the use of such cells:- (i They are rare and (ii Only a few types exist that can be isolated without harming the patient.Due to the inability to efficiently and safely harvest or expand stem cells from most adult organs (e.g. liver, gastrointestinal tract, heart, brain, the majority of human stem cell trials have focused on clinical applications for HSCs, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs, or both, which can be easily

  19. Mineralization and Osteoblast Cells Response of Nanograde Pearl Powders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jian-Chih Chen

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The main objective of this study is to characterize the thermal, mineralization, and osteoblast cells response of pearl nanocrystallites. The results obtained from X-ray diffraction, FTIR spectra demonstrate that the pearl nano-crystallites can induce the formation of an HA layer on their surface in SBF, even after only short soaking periods. The in vitro cell response to nano-grade pearl powders is assessed by evaluating the cytotoxicity against a mouse embryonic fibroblast cell line and by characterizing the attachment ability and alkaline phosphatase activity of mouse bone cells (MC3T3-E1, abbreviated to E1 and bone marrow stromal precursor (D1 cells. The cytotoxicities of pearls were tested by the filtration and culture of NIH-3T3 mouse embryonic fibroblast cells. The viability of the cultured cells in media containing pearl crystallites for 24 and 72 h is greater than 90%. The bone cells seen in these micrographs are elongated and align predominately along the pearl specimen. The cells observed in these images also appeared well attached and cover the surface almost completely after 1 h. The pearl nanocrystallites had a positive effect on the osteogenic ability of ALP activity, and this promoted the osteogenic differentiation of MSCs significantly at explanations.

  20. Biomedical Applications of the Cold Atmospheric Plasma: Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Volotskova, Olga

    Current breakthrough research on cold atmospheric plasma (CAP) demonstrates that CAP has great potential in various areas, including medicine and biology, thus providing a new tool for living tissue treatment. Depending on the configuration the cold plasma sources can be used in the following areas: wound healing, skin diseases, hospital hygiene, sterilization, antifungal treatments, dental care, cosmetics targeted cell/tissue removal, and cancer treatments. This dissertation is focused on the studies of biomedical applications of cold atmospheric plasma jet based on helium flow and resultant cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. The studies were carried out on extra-cellular and intra-cellular levels in vitro. The main practical applications are wound healing and alternative to existing cancer therapy methods, areas of great interest and significant challenges. The CAP jet was built in the Micropropulsion and Nanotechnology Laboratory of Dr. Michael Keidar, as a part of multidisciplinary collaboration with the GW Medical School (Dr. M.A. Stepp) concerned with plasma medicine and bioengineering studies. Normal and cancer cells have two fundamental behavioral properties, proliferation and motility, which can be evaluated through cell migration rates and cell cycle progression. Various microscopic, spectroscopic and flow cytometry techniques were used to characterize cell responses to the cold plasma treatment. It was found that CAP effect on the cells is localized within the area of the treatment (of around ˜ 5mm in diameter). The migration rates of the normal skin cells can be reduced up to ˜ 40%. However, depending on the cell type the required treatment time is different, thus differential treatment of various cells presented in tissue is possible. The CAP effect on the migration was explained through the changes of the cell surface proteins/integrins. It was also found that normal and cancer cells respond differently to the CAP treatment under the same

  1. T-cell responses to dengue virus in humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kurane, Ichiro; Matsutani, Takaji; Suzuki, Ryuji; Takasaki, Tomohiko; Kalayanarooj, Siripen; Green, Sharone; Rothman, Alan L; Ennis, Francis A

    2011-12-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is a leading cause of morbidity and mortality in most tropical and subtropical areas of the world. Dengue virus infection induces specific CD4+CD8- and CD8+CD4- T cells in humans. In primary infection, T-cell responses to DENV are serotype cross-reactive, but the highest response is to the serotype that caused the infection. The epitopes recognized by DENV-specific T cells are located in most of the structural and non-structural proteins, but NS3 is the protein that is most dominantly recognized. In patients with dengue hemorrhagic fever (DHF) caused by secondary DENV infection, T cells are highly activated in vivo. These highly activated T cells are DENV-specific and oligoclonal. Multiple kinds of lymphokines are produced by the activated T cells, and it has been hypothesized that these lymphokines are responsible for induction of plasma leakage, one of the most characteristic features of DHF. Thus, T-cells play important roles in the pathogenesis of DHF and in the recovery from DENV infection.

  2. Metabolic monosaccharides altered cell responses to anticancer drugs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Long; Liang, Jun F

    2012-06-01

    Metabolic glycoengineering has been used to manipulate the glycochemistry of cell surfaces and thus the cell/cell interaction, cell adhesion, and cell migration. However, potential application of glycoengineering in pharmaceutical sciences has not been studied until recently. Here, we reported that Ac(4)ManNAc, an analog of N-acetyl-D-mannosamine (ManNAc), could affect cell responses to anticancer drugs. Although cells from different tissues and organs responded to Ac(4)ManNAc treatment differently, treated cells with increased sialic acid contents showed dramatically reduced sensitivity (up to 130 times) to anti-cancer drugs as tested on various drugs with distinct chemical structures and acting mechanisms. Neither increased P-glycoprotein activity nor decreased drug uptake was observed during the course of Ac(4)ManNAc treatment. However, greatly altered intracellular drug distributions were observed. Most intracellular daunorubicin was found in the perinuclear region, but not the expected nuclei in the Ac(4)ManNAc treated cells. Since sialoglycoproteins and gangliosides were synthesized in the Golgi, intracellular glycans affected intracellular signal transduction and drug distributions seem to be the main reason for Ac(4)ManNAc affected cell sensitivity to anticancer drugs. It was interesting to find that although Ac(4)ManNAc treated breast cancer cells (MDA-MB-231) maintained the same sensitivity to 5-Fluorouracil, the IC(50) value of 5-Fluorouracil to the same Ac(4)ManNAc treated normal cells (MCF-10A) was increased by more than 20 times. Thus, this Ac(4)ManNAc treatment enlarged drug response difference between normal and tumor cells provides a unique opportunity to further improve the selectivity and therapeutic efficiency of anticancer drugs.

  3. Orientational Polarizability and Stress Response of Biological Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safran, S. A.; de, R.; Zemel, A.

    We present a theoretical treatment of the orientational response to external stress of active, contractile cells embedded in a gel-like elastic medium. The theory includes random forces as well as forces that arise from the deformation of the matrix and those due to the internal regulation of the stress fibers and focal adhesions of the cell. We calculate both the static and high frequency limits of the orientational response in terms of the cellular polarizability. For systems in which the forces due to regulation and activity dominate the mechanical forces, we show that there is a non-linear dynamical response which, in the high frequency limit, causes the cell to orient nearly perpendicular to the direction of the applied stress.

  4. Studies on responsiveness of hepatoma cells to catecholamines. VI. Characteristics of adrenoceptors and adenylate cyclase response in rat ascites hepatoma cells and human hepatoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanae, F; Kohei, K; Nomura, M; Miyamoto, K

    1992-06-01

    Alpha 1, alpha 2- and beta-Adrenoceptor densities and catecholamine responsiveness in established hepatoma cells, rat ascites hepatoma AH13, AH66, AH66F, AH109A, AH130 and AH7974 cells and human hepatocellular carcinoma HLF and HepG2 cells, were compared with those in normal rat hepatocytes and Chang liver cells. Alpha 1-Adrenoceptor densities measured by [3H]prazosin bindings were not detected in all hepatoma cell lines. Alpha 2-Adrenoceptor densities measured by [3H]clonidine bindings were also barely detected in hepatoma cell lines except for AH130 cells and HepG2 cells. Regarding beta-adrenoceptor, AH109A, AH130 and AH7974 cells had much more [125I]iodocyanopindolol binding sites than normal rat hepatocytes, although we could not detect the binding in HepG2 cells. Adenylate cyclase of normal rat hepatocyte and Chang liver cells were stimulated by beta 2-adrenergic agonist salbutamol, while the cyclase in hepatoma cells had no beta 2-adrenergic response but a beta 1-type response. These findings indicate that the characteristics of adrenergic response in hepatoma cell lines is very different from that in normal hepatocytes, suggesting a participation in the hepatocarcinogenesis and/or the autonomous proliferation of hepatoma cells.

  5. B cells regulate CD4+ T cell responses to papain following B cell receptor-independent papain uptake.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dwyer, Daniel F; Woodruff, Matthew C; Carroll, Michael C; Austen, K Frank; Gurish, Michael F

    2014-07-15

    Papain, a cysteine protease allergen with inherent adjuvant activity, induces potent IL-4 expression by T cells in the popliteal lymph nodes of mice following footpad immunization. In this study, we identify a novel, non-BCR-mediated capacity for B cells to rapidly bind and internalize papain. B cells subsequently regulate the adaptive immune response by enhancing ICOS expression on CD4(+) T cells and amplifying Th2 and follicular helper T cell induction. Ab blockade of ICOS ligand, expressed by popliteal lymph node B cells, but not dendritic cells, at the peak of the response inhibits IL-4 responses in wild-type mice but not B cell-deficient mice. Thus, B cells play a critical role in amplifying adjuvant-dependent Th2 polarization following noncanonical acquisition and internalization of the cysteine protease papain.

  6. Increased proinflammatory responses from asthmatic human airway smooth muscle cells in response to rhinovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    King Nicholas JC

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Exacerbations of asthma are associated with viral respiratory tract infections, of which rhinoviruses (RV are the predominant virus type. Airway smooth muscle is important in asthma pathogenesis, however little is known about the potential interaction of RV and human airway smooth muscle cells (HASM. We hypothesised that rhinovirus induction of inflammatory cytokine release from airway smooth muscle is augmented and differentially regulated in asthmatic compared to normal HASM cells. Methods HASM cells, isolated from either asthmatic or non-asthmatic subjects, were infected with rhinovirus. Cytokine production was assayed by ELISA, ICAM-1 cell surface expression was assessed by FACS, and the transcription regulation of IL-6 was measured by luciferase activity. Results RV-induced IL-6 release was significantly greater in HASM cells derived from asthmatic subjects compared to non-asthmatic subjects. This response was RV specific, as 5% serum- induced IL-6 release was not different in the two cell types. Whilst serum stimulated IL-8 production in cells from both subject groups, RV induced IL-8 production in only asthmatic derived HASM cells. The transcriptional induction of IL-6 was differentially regulated via C/EBP in the asthmatic and NF-κB + AP-1 in the non-asthmatic HASM cells. Conclusion This study demonstrates augmentation and differential transcriptional regulation of RV specific innate immune response in HASM cells derived from asthmatic and non-asthmatics, and may give valuable insight into the mechanisms of RV-induced asthma exacerbations.

  7. Th17 effector cells support B cell responses outside of germinal centres.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Agapitos Patakas

    Full Text Available Th17 cells are pro-inflammatory CD4⁺T cells, which are important in immune responses against fungal pathogens and extracellular bacteria and have also been implicated in various autoimmune syndromes. However, their role in supporting B cell responses in these scenarios remains unclear, representing a significant lapse in our understanding of the role Th17 play in vaccine responses and the regulation of autoimmunity. We employed T cell and B cell receptor transgenic mice specific for model antigens, and adoptive transfer approaches that allowed the tracking of cognate B and T cells in situ and ex vivo using immunological methods. We have found that T cells activated under Th17 polarising conditions have a greater capacity to provide cognate B cell help compared with Th1 polarised populations, supporting higher expansion of antigen specific B cells and enhanced antibody titres. This advantage is associated with the increased persistence of Th17 polarised cells in areas of the lymph nodes where they can provide help (i.e. the B cell follicles. Also the Th17 cells are characterised by their higher expression of ICOS, a costimulatory molecule important for B cell help. Surprisingly, contrary to published reports, Th17 cells were not detected inside germinal centres, although they were found in close proximity to cognate B cells in the follicle early in the genesis of the humoral immune response. These data indicate that, Th17 cells have a more significant role earlier in the initiation/development of the germinal centre response and/or germinal centre-independent events, consistent with their early effector status.

  8. A microfluidic platform reveals differential response of regulatory T cells to micropatterned costimulation arrays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Joung-Hyun; Dustin, Michael L; Kam, Lance C

    2015-11-01

    T cells are key mediators of adaptive immunity. However, the overall immune response is often directed by minor subpopulations of this heterogeneous family of cells, owing to specificity of activation and amplification of functional response. Knowledge of differences in signaling and function between T cell subtypes is far from complete, but is clearly needed for understanding and ultimately leveraging this branch of the adaptive immune response. This report investigates differences in cell response to micropatterned surfaces by conventional and regulatory T cells. Specifically, the ability of cells to respond to the microscale geometry of TCR/CD3 and CD28 engagement is made possible using a magnetic-microfluidic device that overcomes limitations in imaging efficiency associated with conventional microscopy equipment. This device can be readily assembled onto micropatterned surfaces while maintaining the activity of proteins and other biomolecules necessary for such studies. In operation, a target population of cells is tagged using paramagnetic beads, and then trapped in a divergent magnetic field within the chamber. Following washing, the target cells are released to interact with a designated surface. Characterization of this system with mouse CD4(+) T cells demonstrated a 50-fold increase in target-to-background cell purity, with an 80% collection efficiency. Applying this approach to CD4(+)CD25(+) regulatory T cells, it is then demonstrated that these rare cells respond less selectively to micro-scale features of anti-CD3 antibodies than CD4(+)CD25(-) conventional T cells, revealing a difference in balance between TCR/CD3 and LFA-1-based adhesion. PKC-θ localized to the distal pole of regulatory T cells, away from the cell-substrate interface, suggests a mechanism for differential regulation of TCR/LFA-1-based adhesion. Moreover, specificity of cell adhesion to anti-CD3 features was dependent on the relative position of anti-CD28 signaling within the cell

  9. Macrophages in cardiac homeostasis, injury responses and progenitor cell mobilisation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander R. Pinto

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Macrophages are an immune cell type found in every organ of the body. Classically, macrophages are recognised as housekeeping cells involved in the detection of foreign antigens and danger signatures, and the clearance of tissue debris. However, macrophages are increasingly recognised as a highly versatile cell type with a diverse range of functions that are important for tissue homeostasis and injury responses. Recent research findings suggest that macrophages contribute to tissue regeneration and may play a role in the activation and mobilisation of stem cells. This review describes recent advances in our understanding of the role played by macrophages in cardiac tissue maintenance and repair following injury. We examine the involvement of exogenous and resident tissue macrophages in cardiac inflammatory responses and their potential activity in regulating cardiac regeneration.

  10. Ultraviolet responses of a heterojunction Si quantum dot solar cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Hyun; Kwak, Gyea Young; Hong, Songwoung; Kim, Chanhong; Kim, Sung; Kim, Ansoon; Kim, Kyung Joong

    2017-01-20

    We investigated the ultraviolet (UV) responses of a heterojunction Si quantum dot (QD) solar cell consisting of p-type Si-QDs fabricated on a n-type crystalline Si (p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC). The UV responses were compared with a conventional n-type crystalline Si solar cell (n-c-Si SC). The external and internal quantum efficiency results of the p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC exhibited a clear enhancement in the UV responses (300-400 nm), which was not observed in the n-c-Si SC. Based on the results of the cell reflectance and bias-dependent responses, we expect that almost all UV responses occur in the p-Si-QD layer, and the generated carriers can be transported via the Si-QD layer due to the formation of a sufficient electric filed. As a result, a high power conversion efficiency of 14.5% was achieved from the p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC. By reducing the thickness of the n-Si substrate from 650 μm to 300 μm, more enhanced power conversion efficiency of 14.8% was obtained which is the highest value among the reported Si-QD based solar cells to date.

  11. Ultraviolet responses of a heterojunction Si quantum dot solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seong Hyun; Kwak, Gyea Young; Hong, Songwoung; Kim, Chanhong; Kim, Sung; Kim, Ansoon; Kim, Kyung Joong

    2017-01-01

    We investigated the ultraviolet (UV) responses of a heterojunction Si quantum dot (QD) solar cell consisting of p-type Si-QDs fabricated on a n-type crystalline Si (p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC). The UV responses were compared with a conventional n-type crystalline Si solar cell (n-c-Si SC). The external and internal quantum efficiency results of the p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC exhibited a clear enhancement in the UV responses (300–400 nm), which was not observed in the n-c-Si SC. Based on the results of the cell reflectance and bias-dependent responses, we expect that almost all UV responses occur in the p-Si-QD layer, and the generated carriers can be transported via the Si-QD layer due to the formation of a sufficient electric filed. As a result, a high power conversion efficiency of 14.5% was achieved from the p-Si-QD/n-c-Si HJSC. By reducing the thickness of the n-Si substrate from 650 μm to 300 μm, more enhanced power conversion efficiency of 14.8% was obtained which is the highest value among the reported Si-QD based solar cells to date.

  12. The Inflammation Response to DEHP through PPARγ in Endometrial Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Qiansheng Huang

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Epidemiological studies have shown the possible link between phthalates and endometrium-related gynecological diseases, however the molecular mechanism(s behind this is/are still unclear. In the study, both primary cultured endometrial cells and an endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line (Ishikawa were recruited to investigate the effects of di-(2-ethylhexyl phthalate (DEHP at human-relevant concentrations. The results showed that DEHP did not affect the viability of either type of cell, which showed different responses to inflammation. Primary cultured cells showed stronger inflammatory reactions than the Ishikawa cell line. The expression of inflammatory factors was induced both at the mRNA and protein levels, however the inflammation did not induce the progress of epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT as the protein levels of EMT markers were not affected after exposure to either cell type. Further study showed that the mRNA levels of peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ wereup-regulated after exposure. In all, our study showed that human-relevant concentrations of DEHP could elicit the inflammatory response in primary cultured endometrial cells rather than in Ishikawa cell line. PPARγ may act as the mediating receptor in the inflammation reaction.

  13. NK cells require antigen-specific memory CD4+ T cells to mediate superior effector functions during HSV-2 recall responses in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Branson; Lee, Amanda J; Chew, Marianne V; Ashkar, Ali A

    2016-12-14

    Natural killer (NK) cells have an important role in mounting protective innate responses against genital herpes simplex virus type 2 (HSV-2) infections. However their role as effectors in adaptive immune responses against HSV-2 is unclear. Here, we demonstrate that NK cells from C57BL/6 mice in an ex vivo splenocyte culture produce significantly more interferon γ (IFN-γ) upon re-exposure to HSV-2 antigens in a mouse model of genital HSV-2 immunization. We find that naïve NK cells do not require any prior stimulation or priming to be activated to produce IFN-γ. Our results demonstrate that HSV-2-experienced CD4(+) T cells have a crucial role in coordinating NK cell activation and that their presence during HSV-2 antigen presentation is required to activate NK cells in this model of secondary immune response. We also examined the requirement of cell-to-cell contacts for both CD4(+) T cells and NK cells. NK cells are dependent on direct interactions with other HSV-2-experienced splenocytes, and CD4(+) T cells need to be in close proximity to NK cells to activate them. This study revealed that NK cells do not exhibit any memory toward HSV-2 antigens and, in fact, require specific interactions with HSV-2-experienced CD4(+) T cells to produce IFN-γ.

  14. Sensory Transduction of the CO2 Response of Guard Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dr. Eduardo Zeiger

    2003-06-30

    Stomata have a key role in the regulation of gas exchange and intercellular CO2 concentrations of leaves. Guard cells sense internal and external signals in the leaf environment and transduce these signals into osmoregulatory processes that control stomatal apertures. This research proposal addresses the characterization of the sensory transduction of the CO2 signal in guard cells. Recent studies have shown that in Vicia leaves kept at constant light and temperature in a growth chamber, changes in ambient CO2 concentrations cause large changes in guard cell zeaxanthin that are linear with CO2-dependent changes in stomatal apertures. Research proposed here will test the hypothesis that zeaxanthin function as a transducer of CO2 signals in guard cells. Three central aspects of this hypothesis will be investigated: CO2 sensing by the carboxylation reaction of Rubisco in the guard cell chloroplast, which would modulate zeaxanthin concentrations via changes in lumen pH; transduction of the CO2 signal by zeaxanthin via a transducing cascade that controls guard cell osmoregulation; and blue light dependence of the CO2 signal transduction by zeaxanthin, required for the formation of an isomeric form of zeaxanthin that is physiologically active as a transducer. The role of Rubisco in CO2 sensing will be investigated in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 in the Arabidopsis mutants R100 and rca-, which have reduced rates of Rubisco-dependent carboxylation. The role of zeaxanthin as a CO2 transducer will be studied in npq1, a zeaxanthin-less mutant. The blue light-dependence of CO2 sensing will be studied in experiments characterizing the stomatal response to CO2 under red light. Arabidopsis mutants will also be used in further studies of an acclimation of the stomatal response to CO2, and a possible role of the xanthophyll cycle of the guard cell chloroplast in acclimations of the stomatal response to CO2. Studies on the osmoregulatory role of sucrose in

  15. Inclusive Education Reform in Bangladesh: Pre-Service Teachers’ Responses to Include Students with Special Educational Needs in Regular Classrooms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Md. Saiful Malak

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Inclusive education (IE has been recognized as a key strategy to ensure education for all in the developing world for the last two decades. As a developing country, Bangladesh is striving to address IE by undergoing various initiatives such as policy reform, awareness creation and teacher development. This paper based on a qualitative approach attempts to explore pre-service teachers’ responses to include students with special educational needs (SEN in regular classrooms in primary schools. A one-on-one interview was conducted with 20 pre-service teachers who were enrolled in a teacher education program of one public university in Bangladesh. The findings revealed from the study indicate that majority of the pre-service teachers have unfavourable attitudes to include students with SEN in regular classrooms. Misconception and lack of knowledge about disabilities are revealed from most of the pre-service teachers’ responses. Further large class size, high workloads, inflexible curriculum policy of primary education and inadequate experiential learning facilities of teacher education program are identified as barriers to IE reform. Several issues are discussed as implications in order to promote better inclusive practices in regular primary education.

  16. Bystander T cells in human immune responses to dengue antigens

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Suwannasaen Duangchan

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous studies of T cell activation in dengue infection have focused on restriction of specific T cell receptors (TCRs and classical MHC molecules. However, bystander T cell activation, which is TCR independent, occurs via cytokines in other viral infections, both in vitro and in vivo, and enables T cells to bypass certain control checkpoints. Moreover, clinical and pathological evidence has pointed to cytokines as the mediators of dengue disease severity. Therefore, we investigated bystander T cell induction by dengue viral antigen. Results Whole blood samples from 55 Thai schoolchildren aged 13-14 years were assayed for in vitro interferon-gamma (IFN-γ induction in response to inactivated dengue serotype 2 antigen (Den2. The contribution of TCR-dependent and independent pathways was tested by treatment with cyclosporin A (CsA, which inhibits TCR-dependent activation of T cells. ELISA results revealed that approximately 72% of IFN-γ production occurred via the TCR-dependent pathway. The major IFN-γ sources were natural killer (NK (mean ± SE = 55.2 ± 3.3, CD4+T (24.5 ± 3.3 and CD8+T cells (17.9 ± 1.5, respectively, as demonstrated by four-color flow cytometry. Interestingly, in addition to these cells, we found CsA-resistant IFN-γ producing T cells (CD4+T = 26.9 ± 3.6% and CD8+T = 20.3 ± 2.1% implying the existence of activated bystander T cells in response to dengue antigen in vitro. These bystander CD4+ and CD8+T cells had similar kinetics to NK cells, appeared after 12 h and were inhibited by anti-IL-12 neutralization indicating cytokine involvement. Conclusions This study described immune cell profiles and highlighted bystander T cell activation in response to dengue viral antigens of healthy people in an endemic area. Further studies on bystander T cell activation in dengue viral infection may reveal the immune mechanisms that protect or enhance pathogenesis of secondary dengue infection.

  17. Mechanistic insights into aging, cell cycle progression, and stress response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Troy Anthony Alan Harkness

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available The longevity of an organism depends on the health of its cells. Throughout life cells are exposed to numerous intrinsic and extrinsic stresses, such as free radicals, generated through mitochondrial electron transport, and ultraviolet irradiation. The cell has evolved numerous mechanisms to scavenge free radicals and repair damage induced by these insults. One mechanism employed by the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to combat stress utilizes the Anaphase Promoting Complex (APC, an essential multi-subunit ubiquitin-protein ligase structurally and functionally conserved from yeast to humans that controls progression through mitosis and G1. We have observed that yeast cells expressing compromised APC subunits are sensitive to multiple stresses and have shorter replicative and chronological lifespans. In a pathway that runs parallel to that regulated by the APC, members of the Forkhead box (Fox transcription factor family also regulate stress responses. The yeast Fox orthologues Fkh1 and Fkh2 appear to drive the transcription of stress response factors and slow early G1 progression, while the APC seems to regulate chromatin structure, chromosome segregation, and resetting of the transcriptome in early G1. In contrast, under non-stress conditions, the Fkhs play a complex role in cell cycle progression, partially through activation of the APC. Direct and indirect interactions between the APC and the yeast Fkhs appear to be pivotal for lifespan determination. Here we explore the potential for these interactions to be evolutionarily conserved as a mechanism to balance cell cycle regulation with stress responses.

  18. Cell response of anodized nanotubes on titanium and titanium alloys.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minagar, Sepideh; Wang, James; Berndt, Christopher C; Ivanova, Elena P; Wen, Cuie

    2013-09-01

    Titanium and titanium alloy implants that have been demonstrated to be more biocompatible than other metallic implant materials, such as Co-Cr alloys and stainless steels, must also be accepted by bone cells, bonding with and growing on them to prevent loosening. Highly ordered nanoporous arrays of titanium dioxide that form on titanium surface by anodic oxidation are receiving increasing research interest due to their effectiveness in promoting osseointegration. The response of bone cells to implant materials depends on the topography, physicochemistry, mechanics, and electronics of the implant surface and this influences cell behavior, such as adhesion, proliferation, shape, migration, survival, and differentiation; for example the existing anions on the surface of a titanium implant make it negative and this affects the interaction with negative fibronectin (FN). Although optimal nanosize of reproducible titania nanotubes has not been reported due to different protocols used in studies, cell response was more sensitive to titania nanotubes with nanometer diameter and interspace. By annealing, amorphous TiO2 nanotubes change to a crystalline form and become more hydrophilic, resulting in an encouraging effect on cell behavior. The crystalline size and thickness of the bone-like apatite that forms on the titania nanotubes after implantation are also affected by the diameter and shape. This review describes how changes in nanotube morphologies, such as the tube diameter, the thickness of the nanotube layer, and the crystalline structure, influence the response of cells.

  19. Innate lymphoid cells regulate CD4+ T-cell responses to intestinal commensal bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hepworth, Matthew R; Monticelli, Laurel A; Fung, Thomas C; Ziegler, Carly G K; Grunberg, Stephanie; Sinha, Rohini; Mantegazza, Adriana R; Ma, Hak-Ling; Crawford, Alison; Angelosanto, Jill M; Wherry, E John; Koni, Pandelakis A; Bushman, Frederic D; Elson, Charles O; Eberl, Gérard; Artis, David; Sonnenberg, Gregory F

    2013-06-06

    Innate lymphoid cells (ILCs) are a recently characterized family of immune cells that have critical roles in cytokine-mediated regulation of intestinal epithelial cell barrier integrity. Alterations in ILC responses are associated with multiple chronic human diseases, including inflammatory bowel disease, implicating a role for ILCs in disease pathogenesis. Owing to an inability to target ILCs selectively, experimental studies assessing ILC function have predominantly used mice lacking adaptive immune cells. However, in lymphocyte-sufficient hosts ILCs are vastly outnumbered by CD4(+) T cells, which express similar profiles of effector cytokines. Therefore, the function of ILCs in the presence of adaptive immunity and their potential to influence adaptive immune cell responses remain unknown. To test this, we used genetic or antibody-mediated depletion strategies to target murine ILCs in the presence of an adaptive immune system. We show that loss of retinoic-acid-receptor-related orphan receptor-γt-positive (RORγt(+)) ILCs was associated with dysregulated adaptive immune cell responses against commensal bacteria and low-grade systemic inflammation. Remarkably, ILC-mediated regulation of adaptive immune cells occurred independently of interleukin (IL)-17A, IL-22 or IL-23. Genome-wide transcriptional profiling and functional analyses revealed that RORγt(+) ILCs express major histocompatibility complex class II (MHCII) and can process and present antigen. However, rather than inducing T-cell proliferation, ILCs acted to limit commensal bacteria-specific CD4(+) T-cell responses. Consistent with this, selective deletion of MHCII in murine RORγt(+) ILCs resulted in dysregulated commensal bacteria-dependent CD4(+) T-cell responses that promoted spontaneous intestinal inflammation. These data identify that ILCs maintain intestinal homeostasis through MHCII-dependent interactions with CD4(+) T cells that limit pathological adaptive immune cell responses to commensal

  20. Biomechanical changes in endothelial cells result from an inflammatory response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaitkus, Janina; Stroka, Kimberly; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-02-01

    During periods of infection and disease, the immune system induces the release of TNF-α, an inflammatory cytokine, from a variety of cell types, such as macrophages. TNF-α, while circulating in the vasculature, binds to the apical surface of endothelial cells and causes a wide range of biological and mechanical changes to the endothelium. While the biological changes have been widely studied, the biomechanical aspects have been largely unexplored. Here, we investigated the biomechanical changes of the endothelium as a function of TNF-α treatment. First, we studied the traction forces applied by the endothelium, an effect that is much less studied than others. Through the use of traction force microscopy, we found that TNF-α causes an increase in traction forces applied by the endothelial cells as compared to non-treated cells. Then, we investigated cell morphology, cell mechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics. We found that in addition to increasing applied traction forces, TNF-α causes an increase in cell area and aspect ratio on average, as well as a shift in the organization of F-actin filaments within the cell. Combining these findings together, our results show that an inflammatory response heavily impacts the morphology, cell mechanics, migration, cytoskeletal dynamics, and applied traction forces of endothelial cells.

  1. Stromal cells and integrins: conforming to the needs of the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alphonso, Aimee; Alahari, Suresh K

    2009-12-01

    The microenvironment of a tumor is constituted of a heterogenous population of stromal cells, extracellular matrix components, and secreted factors, all of which make the tumor microenvironment distinct from that of normal tissue. Unlike healthy cells, tumor cells require these unique surroundings to metastasize, spread, and form a secondary tumor at a distant site. In this review, we discuss that stromal cells such as fibroblasts and immune cells including macrophages, their secreted factors, such as vascular endothelial growth factor, transforming growth factor beta, and various chemokines, and the integrins that connect the various cell types play a particularly vital role in the survival of a growing tumor mass. Macrophages and fibroblasts are uniquely plastic cells because they are not only able to switch from tumor suppressing to tumor supporting phenotypes but also able to adopt various tumor-supporting functions based on their location within the microenvironment. Integrins serve as the backbone for all of these prometastatic operations because their function as cell-cell and cell-matrix signal transducers are important for the heterogenous components of the microenvironment to communicate.

  2. Initial viral load determines the magnitude of the human CD8 T cell response to yellow fever vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akondy, Rama S; Johnson, Philip L F; Nakaya, Helder I; Edupuganti, Srilatha; Mulligan, Mark J; Lawson, Benton; Miller, Joseph D; Pulendran, Bali; Antia, Rustom; Ahmed, Rafi

    2015-03-10

    CD8 T cells are a potent tool for eliminating intracellular pathogens and tumor cells. Thus, eliciting robust CD8 T-cell immunity is the basis for many vaccines under development. However, the relationship between antigen load and the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell response is not well-described in a human immune response. Here we address this issue by quantifying viral load and the CD8 T-cell response in a cohort of 80 individuals immunized with the live attenuated yellow fever vaccine (YFV-17D) by sampling peripheral blood at days 0, 1, 2, 3, 5, 7, 9, 11, 14, 30, and 90. When the virus load was below a threshold (peak virus load < 225 genomes per mL, or integrated virus load < 400 genome days per mL), the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell response correlated strongly with the virus load (R(2) ∼ 0.63). As the virus load increased above this threshold, the magnitude of the CD8 T-cell responses saturated. Recent advances in CD8 T-cell-based vaccines have focused on replication-incompetent or single-cycle vectors. However, these approaches deliver relatively limited amounts of antigen after immunization. Our results highlight the requirement that T-cell-based vaccines should deliver sufficient antigen during the initial period of the immune response to elicit a large number of CD8 T cells that may be needed for protection.

  3. Responses of cells in plasma-activated medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanaka, Hiromasa; Mizuno, Masaaki; Ishikawa, Kenji; Takeda, Keigo; Hashizume, Hiroshi; Nakamura, Kae; Kajiyama, Hiroaki; Kano, Hiroyuki; Okazaki, Yasumasa; Toyokuni, Shinya; Maruyama, Shoichi; Kodera, Yasuhiro; Terasaki, Hiroko; Adachi, Tetsuo; Kato, Masashi; Kikkawa, Fumitaka; Hori, Masaru

    2015-09-01

    Plasma consists of electrons, ions, radicals, and lights, and produces various reactive species in gas and liquid phase. Cells receive various inputs from their circumstances, and induce several physiological outputs. Our goal is to clarify the relationships between plasma inputs and physiological outputs. Plasma-activated medium (PAM) is a circumstance that plasma provides cells and our previous studies suggest that PAM is a promising tool for cancer therapy. However, the mode of actions remains to be elucidated. We propose survival and proliferation signaling networks as well as redox signaling networks are key factors to understand cellular responses of PAM-treated glioblastoma cells.

  4. Do we need molecular tomography of a cell and how can it be achieved?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yi-Zhang; Chen, Xiao-Ping

    2008-08-01

    1. The spatial relationship between intracellular molecules and their local concentrations are two critical parameters required for a better understanding of protein-protein interactions in the cell. 2. Determination of the local concentration of proteins in individual cells using more sophisticated techniques and determination of the spatial relationship between a molecular platform and its partners is essential for allow us to obtain more convincing and concrete scientific conclusions. 3. As a reasonable goal, development of molecular tomography of the cell is proposed.

  5. Model of cell response to {\\alpha}-particle radiation

    CERN Document Server

    Liu, Longjian

    2012-01-01

    Starting from a general equation for organism (or cell system) growth and attributing additional cell death rate (besides the natural rate) to therapy, we derive an equation for cell response to {\\alpha} radiation. Different from previous models that are based on statistical theory, the present model connects the consequence of radiation with the growth process of a biosystem and each variable or parameter has meaning regarding the cell evolving process. We apply this equation to model the dose response for {\\alpha}-particle radiation. It interprets the results of both high and low linear energy transfer (LET) radiations. When LET is high, the additional death rate is a constant, which implies that the localized cells are damaged immediately and the additional death rate is proportional to the number of cells present. While at low LET, the additional death rate includes a constant term and a linear term of radiation dose, implying that the damage to some cell nuclei has a time accumulating effect. This model ...

  6. Variation in drug sensitivity of malignant mesothelioma cell lines with substantial effects of selenite and bortezomib, highlights need for individualized therapy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Adam Szulkin

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Malignant mesothelioma cells have an epithelioid or sarcomatoid morphology, both of which may be present in the same tumor. The sarcomatoid phenotype is associated with worse prognosis and heterogeneity of mesothelioma cells may contribute to therapy resistance, which is often seen in mesothelioma. This study aimed to investigate differences in sensitivity between mesothelioma cell lines to anti-cancer drugs. We studied two novel drugs, selenite and bortezomib and compared their effect to four conventional drugs. We also investigated the immunoreactivity of potential predictive markers for drug sensitivity; Pgp, MRP-1, ERCC1, RRM1, TS, xCT and proteasome 20S subunit. MATERIALS AND METHODS: We treated six mesothelioma cell lines with selenite, bortezomib, carboplatin, pemetrexed, doxorubicin or gemcitabine as single agents and in combinations. Viability was measured after 24 and 48 hours. Immunocytochemistry was used to detect predictive markers. RESULTS: As a single agent, selenite was effective on four out of six cell lines, and in combination with bortezomib yielded the greatest response in the studied mesothelioma cell lines. Cells with an epithelioid phenotype were generally more sensitive to the different drugs than the sarcomatoid cells. Extensive S-phase arrest was seen in pemetrexed-sensitive cell lines. MRP-1 predicted sensitivity of cell lines to treatment with carboplatin and xCT predicted pemetrexed effect. CONCLUSIONS: The observed heterogeneity in sensitivity of mesothelioma cell lines with different morphology highlights the need for more individualized therapy, requiring development of methods to predict drug sensitivity of individual tumors. Selenite and bortezomib showed a superior effect compared to conventional drugs, motivating clinical testing of these agents as future treatment regime components for patients with malignant mesothelioma.

  7. Responses of Cancer Cells Induced by Photodynamic Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshihiro Kushibiki

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Photodynamic therapy (PDT involves the administration of a photosensitizer, followed by local irradiation of tumor tissues using a laser of an appropriate wavelength to activate the photosensitizer. Since multiple cellular signaling cascades are concomitantly activated in cancer cells exposed to the photodynamic effect, understanding the responses of cancer cells to PDT will aid in the development of new interventions. This review describes the possible cell-death signaling pathways initiated by PDT. In addition, we describe our latest findings regarding the induction of expression of miRNAs specific to apoptosis in cancer cells and the induction of antitumor immunity following PDT against cancer cells. A more detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms related to PDT will potentially improve long-term survival of PDT treated patients.

  8. Biomaterial nanotopography-mediated cell responses: experiment and modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lei Yang

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available The rapid development of fabrication and processing technologies in the past two decades has enabled researchers to introduce nanoscale features into materials which, interestingly, have been shown to greatly regulate the behavior and fate of biological cells. In particular, important cell responses (such as adhesion, proliferation, differentiation, migration, and filopodial growth have all been correlated with material nanotopography. Given its great potential, intensive efforts have been made, both experimentally and theoretically, to understand why and how cells respond to nanoscale surface features, and this article reviews recent progress in this field. Specifically, a brief overview on the fabrication and modification techniques to create nanotopography on different materials is given first. After that, a summary of important experimental findings on the mediation of nanoscale surface topography on the behavior of various cells, as well as the underlying mechanism, is provided. Finally, both classical and recently developed approaches for modeling nanotopography-mediated cell adhesion and filopodial growth are reviewed.

  9. Regulation of germinal center responses, memory B cells and plasma cell formation-an update.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Corcoran, Lynn M; Tarlinton, David M

    2016-04-01

    Progress in understanding humoral immunity has been accelerated by the powerful experimental approaches of genetics, genomics and imaging. Excellent reviews of these advances appeared in 2015 in celebration of the 50th anniversary of the discovery of B cell and T cell lineages in the chicken. Here we provide a contemporary model of B cell differentiation, highlighting recent publications illuminating germinal center (GC), memory B cell and antibody-secreting plasma cell biology. The important contributions of CD4T cells to antibody responses have been thoroughly reviewed elsewhere.

  10. Pellino-1 Selectively Regulates Epithelial Cell Responses to Rhinovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, Julie A; Prince, Lynne R; Parker, Lisa C; Stokes, Clare A; de Bruin, Harold G; van den Berge, Maarten; Heijink, Irene H; Whyte, Moira K; Sabroe, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Pellino-1 has recently been identified as a regulator of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling, but its roles in regulation of responses of human cells to human pathogens are unknown. We investigated the potential roles of Pellino-1 in the airways. We show for the first time that Pellino-1 regulates respon

  11. Pellino-1 selectively regulates epithelial cell responses to rhinovirus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Bennett, Julie A; Prince, Lynne R; Parker, Lisa C; Stokes, Clare A; de Bruin, Harold G; van den Berge, Maarten; Heijink, Irene H; Whyte, Moira K; Sabroe, Ian

    2012-01-01

    Pellino-1 has recently been identified as a regulator of interleukin-1 (IL-1) signaling, but its roles in regulation of responses of human cells to human pathogens are unknown. We investigated the potential roles of Pellino-1 in the airways. We show for the first time that Pellino-1 regulates respon

  12. Analysis of cell-mediated immune responses in support of dengue vaccine development efforts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rothman, Alan L; Currier, Jeffrey R; Friberg, Heather L; Mathew, Anuja

    2015-12-10

    Dengue vaccine development has made significant strides, but a better understanding of how vaccine-induced immune responses correlate with vaccine efficacy can greatly accelerate development, testing, and deployment as well as ameliorate potential risks and safety concerns. Advances in basic immunology knowledge and techniques have already improved our understanding of cell-mediated immunity of natural dengue virus infection and vaccination. We conclude that the evidence base is adequate to argue for inclusion of assessments of cell-mediated immunity as part of clinical trials of dengue vaccines, although further research to identify useful correlates of protective immunity is needed.

  13. Innate immune response to pulmonary contusion: identification of cell type-specific inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoth, J Jason; Wells, Jonathan D; Yoza, Barbara K; McCall, Charles E

    2012-04-01

    Lung injury from pulmonary contusion is a common traumatic injury, predominantly seen after blunt chest trauma, such as in vehicular accidents. The local and systemic inflammatory response to injury includes activation of innate immune receptors, elaboration of a variety of inflammatory mediators, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injured lung. Using a mouse model of pulmonary contusion, we had previously shown that innate immune Toll-like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) mediate the inflammatory response to lung injury. In this study, we used chimeric mice generated by adoptive bone marrow transfer between TLR2 or TLR4 and wild-type mice. We found that, in the lung, both bone marrow-derived and nonmyeloid cells contribute to TLR-dependent inflammatory responses after injury in a cell type-specific manner. We also show a novel TLR2-dependent injury mechanism that is associated with enhanced airway epithelial cell apoptosis and increased pulmonary FasL and Fas expression in the lungs from injured mice. Thus, in addition to cardiopulmonary physiological dysfunction, cell type-specific TLR and their differential response to injury may provide novel specific targets for management of patients with pulmonary contusion.

  14. Mechanical Response of Single Plant Cells to Cell Poking: A Numerical Simulation Model

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Rong Wang; Qun-Ying Jiao; De-Qiang Wei

    2006-01-01

    Cell poking is an experimental technique that is widely used to study the mechanical properties of plant cells. A full understanding of the mechanical responses of plant cells to poking force is helpful for experimental work. The aim of this study was to numerically investigate the stress distribution of the cell wall,cell turgor, and deformation of plant cells in response to applied poking force. Furthermore, the locations damaged during poking were analyzed. The model simulates cell poking, with the cell treated as a spherical,homogeneous, isotropic elastic membrane, filled with incompressible, highly viscous liquid. Equilibrium equations for the contact region and the non-contact regions were determined by using membrane theory.The boundary conditions and continuity conditions for the solution of the problem were found. The forcedeformation curve, turgor pressure and tension of the cell wall under cell poking conditions were obtained.The tension of the cell wall circumference was larger than that of the meridian. In general, maximal stress occurred at the equator around. When cell deformation increased to a certain level, the tension at the poker tip exceeded that of the equator. Breakage of the cell wall may start from the equator or the poker tip,depending on the deformation. A nonlinear model is suitable for estimating turgor, stress, and stiffness,and numerical simulation is a powerful method for determining plant cell mechanical properties.

  15. Small cationic DDA:TDB liposomes as protein vaccine adjuvants obviate the need for TLR agonists in inducing cellular and humoral responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Milicic, Anita; Kaur, Randip; Reyes-Sandoval, Arturo; Tang, Choon-Kit; Honeycutt, Jared; Perrie, Yvonne; Hill, Adrian V S

    2012-01-01

    Most subunit vaccines require adjuvants in order to induce protective immune responses to the targeted pathogen. However, many of the potent immunogenic adjuvants display unacceptable local or systemic reactogenicity. Liposomes are spherical vesicles consisting of single (unilamellar) or multiple (multilamellar) phospholipid bi-layers. The lipid membranes are interleaved with an aqueous buffer, which can be utilised to deliver hydrophilic vaccine components, such as protein antigens or ligands for immune receptors. Liposomes, in particular cationic DDA:TDB vesicles, have been shown in animal models to induce strong humoral responses to the associated antigen without increased reactogenicity, and are currently being tested in Phase I human clinical trials. We explored several modifications of DDA:TDB liposomes--including size, antigen association and addition of TLR agonists--to assess their immunogenic capacity as vaccine adjuvants, using Ovalbumin (OVA) protein as a model protein vaccine. Following triple homologous immunisation, small unilamellar vesicles (SUVs) with no TLR agonists showed a significantly higher capacity for inducing spleen CD8 IFNγ responses against OVA in comparison with the larger multilamellar vesicles (MLVs). Antigen-specific antibody reponses were also higher with SUVs. Addition of the TLR3 and TLR9 agonists significantly increased the adjuvanting capacity of MLVs and OVA-encapsulating dehydration-rehydration vesicles (DRVs), but not of SUVs. Our findings lend further support to the use of liposomes as protein vaccine adjuvants. Importantly, the ability of DDA:TDB SUVs to induce potent CD8 T cell responses without the need for adding immunostimulators would avoid the potential safety risks associated with the clinical use of TLR agonists in vaccines adjuvanted with liposomes.

  16. Homeostatic responses by surviving cortical pyramidal cells in neurodegenerative tauopathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crimins, Johanna L; Rocher, Anne B; Peters, Alan; Shultz, Penny; Lewis, Jada; Luebke, Jennifer I

    2011-11-01

    Cortical neuron death is prevalent by 9 months in rTg(tau(P301L))4510 tau mutant mice (TG) and surviving pyramidal cells exhibit dendritic regression and spine loss. We used whole-cell patch-clamp recordings to investigate the impact of these marked structural changes on spontaneous excitatory and inhibitory postsynaptic currents (sEPSCs and sIPSCs) of layer 3 pyramidal cells in frontal cortical slices from behaviorally characterized TG and non-transgenic (NT) mice at this age. Frontal lobe function of TG mice was intact following a short delay interval but impaired following a long delay interval in an object recognition test, and cortical atrophy and cell loss were pronounced. Surviving TG cells had significantly reduced dendritic diameters, total spine density, and mushroom spines, yet sEPSCs were increased and sIPSCs were unchanged in frequency. Thus, despite significant regressive structural changes, synaptic responses were not reduced in TG cells, indicating that homeostatic compensatory mechanisms occur during progressive tauopathy. Consistent with this idea, surviving TG cells were more intrinsically excitable than NT cells, and exhibited sprouting of filopodia and axonal boutons. Moreover, the neuropil in TG mice showed an increased density of asymmetric synapses, although their mean size was reduced. Taken together, these data indicate that during progressive tauopathy, cortical pyramidal cells compensate for loss of afferent input by increased excitability and establishment of new synapses. These compensatory homeostatic mechanisms may play an important role in slowing the progression of neuronal network dysfunction during neurodegenerative tauopathies.

  17. Signaling pathways in self-renewing hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells : do all stem cells need a niche?

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rizo, Aleksandra; Vellenga, Edo; de Haan, Gerald; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2006-01-01

    Many adult tissue stem cells, such as the cells of the hematopoietic system, gastrointestinal epithelium, brain, epidermis, mammary gland and lung have now been identified, all of them fulfilling a crucial role in supplying organisms with mature cells during normal homeostasis as well as in times of

  18. Fibroblast nemosis induces angiogenic responses of endothelial cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Enzerink, Anna, E-mail: anna.enzerink@helsinki.fi [Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, P.O. BOX 21, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland); Rantanen, Ville, E-mail: ville.rantanen@helsinki.fi [Computational Systems Biology Laboratory, Institute of Biomedicine and Genome-Scale Biology Research Program, University of Helsinki, P.O. BOX 63, 00014 Helsinki (Finland); Vaheri, Antti, E-mail: antti.vaheri@helsinki.fi [Haartman Institute, University of Helsinki, P.O. BOX 21, FIN-00014 Helsinki (Finland)

    2010-03-10

    Increasing evidence points to a central link between inflammation and activation of the stroma, especially of fibroblasts therein. However, the mechanisms leading to such activation mostly remain undescribed. We have previously characterized a novel type of fibroblast activation (nemosis) where clustered fibroblasts upregulated the production of cyclooxygenase-2, secretion of prostaglandins, proteinases, chemotactic cytokines, and hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), and displayed activated nuclear factor-{kappa}B. Now we show that nemosis drives angiogenic responses of endothelial cells. In addition to HGF, nemotic fibroblasts secreted vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF), and conditioned medium from spheroids promoted sprouting and networking of human umbilical venous endothelial cells (HUVEC). The response was partly inhibited by function-blocking antibodies against HGF and VEGF. Conditioned nemotic fibroblast medium promoted closure of HUVEC and human dermal microvascular endothelial cell monolayer wounds, by increasing the motility of the endothelial cells. Wound closure in HUVEC cells was partly inhibited by the antibodies against HGF. The stromal microenvironment regulates wound healing responses and often promotes tumorigenesis. Nemosis offers clues to the activation process of stromal fibroblasts and provides a model to study the part they play in angiogenesis-related conditions, as well as possibilities for therapeutical approaches desiring angiogenesis in tissue.

  19. The Role of the Immune Response in Merkel Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Triozzi, Pierre L., E-mail: triozzp@ccf.org [Taussig Cancer Institute, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States); Fernandez, Anthony P. [Departments of Dermatology and Anatomic Pathology, Cleveland Clinic Foundation, 9500 Euclid Avenue, Cleveland, OH 44195 (United States)

    2013-02-28

    Merkel cell carcinoma (MCC) is an aggressive neuroendocrine skin cancer. The Merkel cell polyomavirus (MCPyV) is implicated in its pathogenesis. Immune mechanisms are also implicated. Patients who are immunosuppressed have an increased risk. There is evidence that high intratumoral T-cell counts and immune transcripts are associated with favorable survival. Spontaneous regressions implicate immune effector mechanisms. Immunogenicity is also supported by observation of autoimmune paraneoplastic syndromes. Case reports suggest that immune modulation, including reduction of immune suppression, can result in tumor regression. The relationships between MCPyV infection, the immune response, and clinical outcome, however, remain poorly understood. Circulating antibodies against MCPyV antigens are present in most individuals. MCPyV-reactive T cells have been detected in both MCC patients and control subjects. High intratumoral T-cell counts are also associated with favorable survival in MCPyV-negative MCC. That the immune system plays a central role in preventing and controlling MCC is supported by several observations. MCCs often develop, however, despite the presence of humoral and cellular immune responses. A better understanding on how MCPyV and MCC evade the immune response will be necessary to develop effective immunotherapies.

  20. New aspects of gravity responses in plant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Soga, Kouichi

    2003-01-01

    Plants show two distinct responses to gravity: gravity-dependent morphogenesis (gravimorphogenesis) and gravity resistance. In gravitropism, a typical mechanism of gravimorphogenesis, gravity is utilized as a signal to establish an appropriate form. The response has been studied in a gravity-free environment, where plant seedlings were found to perform spontaneous morphogenesis, termed automorphogenesis. Automorphogenesis consists of a change in growth direction and spontaneous curvature in dorsiventral directions. The spontaneous curvature is caused by a difference in the capacity of the cell wall to expand between the dorsal and the ventral sides of organs, which originates from the inherent structural anisotropy. Gravity resistance is a response that enables the plant to develop against the gravitational force. To resist the force, the plant constructs a tough body by increasing the cell wall rigidity that suppresses growth. The mechanical properties of the cell wall are changed by modification of the cell wall metabolism and cell wall environment, especially pH. In gravitropism, gravity is perceived by amyloplasts in statocytes, whereas gravity resistance may be mediated by mechanoreceptors on the plasma membrane.

  1. Human dental pulp cells exhibit bone cell-like responsiveness to fluid shear stress

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kraft, D.C.E.; Bindslev, D.A.; Melsen, B.; Klein-Nulend, J.

    2011-01-01

    Background aims. For engineering bone tissue to restore, for example, maxillofacial defects, mechanosensitive cells are needed that are able to conduct bone cell-specific functions, such as bone remodelling. Mechanical loading affects local bone mass and architecture in vivo by initiating a cellular

  2. The stringent response and cell cycle arrest in Escherichia coli.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J Ferullo

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available The bacterial stringent response, triggered by nutritional deprivation, causes an accumulation of the signaling nucleotides pppGpp and ppGpp. We characterize the replication arrest that occurs during the stringent response in Escherichia coli. Wild type cells undergo a RelA-dependent arrest after treatment with serine hydroxamate to contain an integer number of chromosomes and a replication origin-to-terminus ratio of 1. The growth rate prior to starvation determines the number of chromosomes upon arrest. Nucleoids of these cells are decondensed; in the absence of the ability to synthesize ppGpp, nucleoids become highly condensed, similar to that seen after treatment with the translational inhibitor chloramphenicol. After induction of the stringent response, while regions corresponding to the origins of replication segregate, the termini remain colocalized in wild-type cells. In contrast, cells arrested by rifampicin and cephalexin do not show colocalized termini, suggesting that the stringent response arrests chromosome segregation at a specific point. Release from starvation causes rapid nucleoid reorganization, chromosome segregation, and resumption of replication. Arrest of replication and inhibition of colony formation by ppGpp accumulation is relieved in seqA and dam mutants, although other aspects of the stringent response appear to be intact. We propose that DNA methylation and SeqA binding to non-origin loci is necessary to enforce a full stringent arrest, affecting both initiation of replication and chromosome segregation. This is the first indication that bacterial chromosome segregation, whose mechanism is not understood, is a step that may be regulated in response to environmental conditions.

  3. Urogenital epithelial cells as simple markers of estrogen response in infants: methods and applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Margaret A Adgent

    Full Text Available Exposure to estrogen-mimicking chemicals during critical periods of development, such as infancy, may have adverse effects. However, these effects can be difficult to characterize in most epidemiologic studies. For example, growth of reproductive organs may be susceptible to estrogenic chemicals, but measuring it requires skilled ultrasound examination; timing of pubertal onset may be altered, but observing it requires long-term follow up. To address the need for a simple marker of response to estrogenic exposures in infants, we propose a novel application of a classic marker of estrogen response in adult women: cytological evaluation of urogenital epithelial cells. In this cross-sectional study of 34 female and 41 male infants, we demonstrate that epithelial cells can be obtained from swabs of the vaginal introitus (females and urethral meatus (males, as well as from spun urine, and that these cells respond to differential estrogenic conditions, as indicated by the relative abundance of the superficial epithelial cell type. To model varying estrogen exposure, we sampled from infants who were either newborn (highly exposed to maternal estrogens, or 12 weeks old (12 W (negligibly exposed to estrogen. Newborns had a higher percentage of superficial cells (%S, as compared to 12 W (mean ± standard error: 8.3 ± 1.8 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2 (p < 0.01, consistent with an estrogen response. This difference in %S from newborn to 12 W was observed similarly for swab (-7.6 ± 1.7 and urine (-7.3 ± 2.6 specimens and for males (-9.6 ± 2.9 and females (-5.2 ± 2.1. Examination of urogenital epithelial cells can successfully demonstrate estrogen response in both sexes, using cell specimens collected from either swab or urine sampling. In future studies, this simple, non-invasive method may be applied to assess whether estrogen-mimicking chemicals produce an estrogenic response in infants.

  4. Urogenital Epithelial Cells as Simple Markers of Estrogen Response in Infants: Methods and Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adgent, Margaret A.; Flake, Gordon P.; Umbach, David M.; Stallings, Virginia A.; Bernbaum, Judy C.; Rogan, Walter J.

    2013-01-01

    Exposure to estrogen-mimicking chemicals during critical periods of development, such as infancy, may have adverse effects. However, these effects can be difficult to characterize in most epidemiologic studies. For example, growth of reproductive organs may be susceptible to estrogenic chemicals, but measuring it requires skilled ultrasound examination; timing of pubertal onset may be altered, but observing it requires long-term follow up. To address the need for a simple marker of response to estrogenic exposures in infants, we propose a novel application of a classic marker of estrogen response in adult women: cytological evaluation of urogenital epithelial cells. In this cross-sectional study of 34 female and 41 male infants, we demonstrate that epithelial cells can be obtained from swabs of the vaginal introitus (females) and urethral meatus (males), as well as from spun urine, and that these cells respond to differential estrogenic conditions, as indicated by the relative abundance of the superficial epithelial cell type. To model varying estrogen exposure, we sampled from infants who were either newborn (highly exposed to maternal estrogens), or 12 weeks old (12W) (negligibly exposed to estrogen). Newborns had a higher percentage of superficial cells (%S), as compared to 12W (mean ± standard error: 8.3 ± 1.8 vs. 0.9 ± 0.2) (p < 0.01), consistent with an estrogen response. This difference in %S from newborn to 12W was observed similarly for swab (-7.6 ± 1.7) and urine (-7.3 ± 2.6) specimens and for males (-9.6 ± 2.9) and females (-5.2 ± 2.1). Examination of urogenital epithelial cells can successfully demonstrate estrogen response in both sexes, using cell specimens collected from either swab or urine sampling. In future studies, this simple, non-invasive method may be applied to assess whether estrogen-mimicking chemicals produce an estrogenic response in infants. PMID:24146956

  5. B cell activating factor (BAFF) selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, Ning; Zhang, Yu; Liu, Qilin; Wang, Zhiding; Liu, Xiaoling; Zhu, Gaizhi; Yu, Dandan; Han, Gencheng; Chen, Guojiang; Hou, Chunmei; Wang, Tianxiao; Ma, Yuanfang; Shen, Beifen; Li, Yan; Xiao, He; Wang, Renxi

    2017-02-12

    B cell activating factor (BAFF) regulates B cell maturation, survival, function, and plays a critical pathogenic role in autoimmune diseases. It remains unclear how BAFF affects IL-10(-)B cells versus regulatory B cells (Bregs) in inflammatory responses. In this study, we found that IL-10-expressing Bregs decreased in lupus-prone MRL/lpr mice and experimental allergic encephalomyelitis (EAE) mice. On blockade of the effects of BAFF with TACI-IgG, IL-10(+) Bregs were upregulated in MRL/lpr and EAE mice. In addition, BAFF expanded IL-10(+)B cells over IL-10(-)B cells under noninflammatory conditions in vitro, whereas it expanded IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells during inflammatory responses, such as stimulation with autoantigen and LPS. Finally, the selection of IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+)B cells by BAFF was dependent on BAFF receptors (BAFFR, TACI, and BCMA) that were upregulated by inflammatory responses. This study suggests that BAFF selects IL-10(-)B cells over IL-10(+) regulatory B cells via BAFF receptors in inflammatory responses.

  6. Neural progenitor cells from human induced pluripotent stem cells generated less autogenous immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Ke; Liu, PengFei; Li, Xiang; Chen, ShuBin; Wang, LiHui; Qin, Li; Su, ZhengHui; Huang, WenHao; Liu, Juli; Jia, Bei; Liu, Jie; Cai, JingLei; Pei, DuanQing; Pan, GuangJin

    2014-02-01

    The breakthrough development of induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) raises the prospect of patient-specific treatment for many diseases through the replacement of affected cells. However, whether iPSC-derived functional cell lineages generate a deleterious immune response upon auto-transplantation remains unclear. In this study, we differentiated five human iPSC lines from skin fibroblasts and urine cells into neural progenitor cells (NPCs) and analyzed their immunogenicity. Through co-culture with autogenous peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), we showed that both somatic cells and iPSC-derived NPCs do not stimulate significant autogenous PBMC proliferation. However, a significant immune reaction was detected when these cells were co-cultured with allogenous PBMCs. Furthermore, no significant expression of perforin or granzyme B was detected following stimulation of autogenous immune effector cells (CD3(+)CD8(-) T cells, CD3(+)CD8(+) T cells or CD3(-)CD56(+) NK cells) by NPCs in both PBMC and T cell co-culture systems. These results suggest that human iPSC-derived NPCs may not initiate an immune response in autogenous transplants, and thus set a base for further preclinical evaluation of human iPSCs.

  7. Detecting Antigen-Specific T Cell Responses: From Bulk Populations to Single Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chansavath Phetsouphanh

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available A new generation of sensitive T cell-based assays facilitates the direct quantitation and characterization of antigen-specific T cell responses. Single-cell analyses have focused on measuring the quality and breadth of a response. Accumulating data from these studies demonstrate that there is considerable, previously-unrecognized, heterogeneity. Standard assays, such as the ICS, are often insufficient for characterization of rare subsets of cells. Enhanced flow cytometry with imaging capabilities enables the determination of cell morphology, as well as the spatial localization of the protein molecules within a single cell. Advances in both microfluidics and digital PCR have improved the efficiency of single-cell sorting and allowed multiplexed gene detection at the single-cell level. Delving further into the transcriptome of single-cells using RNA-seq is likely to reveal the fine-specificity of cellular events such as alternative splicing (i.e., splice variants and allele-specific expression, and will also define the roles of new genes. Finally, detailed analysis of clonally related antigen-specific T cells using single-cell TCR RNA-seq will provide information on pathways of differentiation of memory T cells. With these state of the art technologies the transcriptomics and genomics of Ag-specific T cells can be more definitively elucidated.

  8. Plasma-Sprayed Titanium Patterns for Enhancing Early Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Yunqi; Xie, Youtao; Pan, Houhua; Zheng, Xuebin; Huang, Liping; Ji, Fang; Li, Kai

    2016-06-01

    Titanium coating has been widely used as a biocompatible metal in biomedical applications. However, the early cell responses and long-term fixation of titanium implants are not satisfied. To obviate these defects, in this paper, micro-post arrays with various widths (150-1000 μm) and intervals (100-300 μm) were fabricated on the titanium substrate by template-assisted plasma spraying technology. In vitro cell culture experiments showed that MC3T3-E1 cells exhibited significantly higher osteogenic differentiation as well as slightly improved adhesion and proliferation on the micro-patterned coatings compared with the traditional one. The cell number on the pattern with 1000 µm width reached 130% after 6 days of incubation, and the expressions of osteopontin (OPN) as well as osteocalcin (OC) were doubled. No obvious difference was found in cell adhesion on various size patterns. The present micro-patterned coatings proposed a new modification method for the traditional plasma spraying technology to enhance the early cell responses and convenience for the bone in-growth.

  9. Cell response to quasi-monochromatic light with different coherence

    Science.gov (United States)

    Budagovsky, A. V.; Solovykh, N. V.; Budagovskaya, O. N.; Budagovsky, I. A.

    2015-04-01

    The problem of the light coherence effect on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is discussed. The origins of ambiguous interpretation of the known experimental results are considered. Using the biological models, essentially differing in anatomy, morphology and biological functions (acrospires of radish, blackberry microsprouts cultivated in vitro, plum pollen), the effect of statistical properties of quasi-monochromatic light (λmax = 633 nm) on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is shown. It is found that for relatively low spatial coherence, the cell functional activity changes insignificantly. The maximal enhancement of growing processes (stimulating effect) is observed when the coherence length Lcoh and the correlation radius rcor are greater than the cell size, i.e., the entire cell fits into the field coherence volume. In this case, the representative indicators (germination of seeds and pollen, the spears length) exceeds those of non-irradiated objects by 1.7 - 3.9 times. For more correct assessment of the effect of light statistical properties on photocontrol processes, it is proposed to replace the qualitative description (coherent - incoherent) with the quantitative one, using the determination of spatial and temporal correlation functions and comparing them with the characteristic dimensions of the biological structures, e.g., the cell size.

  10. Cell response to quasi-monochromatic light with different coherence

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Budagovsky, A V; Solovykh, N V [I.V.Michurin All-Russian Recearch Institute of Fruit Crops Genetics and Breeding (Russian Federation); Budagovskaya, O N [I.V.Michurin All-Russia Research and Development Institute of Gardening, Michurinsk, Tambov region (Russian Federation); Budagovsky, I A [P N Lebedev Physics Institute, Russian Academy of Sciences, Moscow (Russian Federation)

    2015-04-30

    The problem of the light coherence effect on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is discussed. The origins of ambiguous interpretation of the known experimental results are considered. Using the biological models, essentially differing in anatomy, morphology and biological functions (acrospires of radish, blackberry microsprouts cultivated in vitro, plum pollen), the effect of statistical properties of quasi-monochromatic light (λ{sub max} = 633 nm) on the magnitude of the photoinduced cell response is shown. It is found that for relatively low spatial coherence, the cell functional activity changes insignificantly. The maximal enhancement of growing processes (stimulating effect) is observed when the coherence length L{sub coh} and the correlation radius r{sub cor} are greater than the cell size, i.e., the entire cell fits into the field coherence volume. In this case, the representative indicators (germination of seeds and pollen, the spears length) exceeds those of non-irradiated objects by 1.7 – 3.9 times. For more correct assessment of the effect of light statistical properties on photocontrol processes, it is proposed to replace the qualitative description (coherent – incoherent) with the quantitative one, using the determination of spatial and temporal correlation functions and comparing them with the characteristic dimensions of the biological structures, e.g., the cell size. (biophotonics)

  11. Comparison of dendritic cell-mediated immune responses among canine malignant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tamura, Kyoichi; Arai, Hiroyoshi; Ueno, Emi; Saito, Chie; Yagihara, Hiroko; Isotani, Mayu; Ono, Kenichiro; Washizu, Tsukimi; Bonkobara, Makoto

    2007-09-01

    Dendritic cell (DC) vaccination is one of the most attractive immunotherapies for malignancies in dogs. To examine the differences in DC-mediated immune responses from different types of malignancies in dogs, we vaccinated dogs using autologous DCs pulsed with keyhole limpet hemocyanin (KLH) and cell lysate prepared from squamous cell carcinoma SCC2/88 (SCC-KLH-DC), histiocytic sarcoma CHS-5 (CHS-KLH-DC), or B cell leukemia GL-1 (GL-KLH-DC) in vitro. In vivo inductions of immune responses against these tumor cells were compared by the delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) skin test. The DTH response against SCC2/88 cells were observed in dogs vaccinated with autologous SCC-KLH-DC, while the response was undetectable against CHS-5 and GL-1 cells in dogs vaccinated with autologous CHS-KLH-DC and GL-KLH-DC. Skin biopsies taken from DTH challenge sites were then examined for immunohistochemistry, and recruitment of CD8 and CD4 T cells was detected at the site where SCC2/88 cells were inoculated in dogs vaccinated with SCC-KLH-DC. By contrast, neither CD8 nor CD4 T cell infiltration was found at the DTH challenge site in the dogs vaccinated with CHS-KLH-DC or GL-KLH-DC. These findings may reflect that the efficacy of immune induction by DC vaccination varies among tumor types and that immune responses could be inducible in squamous cell carcinoma. Our results encouraged further investigation of therapeutic vaccination for dogs with advanced squamous cell carcinoma in clinical trials.

  12. Human neuronal cell protein responses to Nipah virus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hassan Sharifah

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Nipah virus (NiV, a recently discovered zoonotic virus infects and replicates in several human cell types. Its replication in human neuronal cells, however, is less efficient in comparison to other fully susceptible cells. In the present study, the SK-N-MC human neuronal cell protein response to NiV infection is examined using proteomic approaches. Results Method for separation of the NiV-infected human neuronal cell proteins using two-dimensional polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis (2D-PAGE was established. At least 800 protein spots were resolved of which seven were unique, six were significantly up-regulated and eight were significantly down-regulated. Six of these altered proteins were identified using mass spectrometry (MS and confirmed using MS/MS. The heterogenous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP F, guanine nucleotide binding protein (G protein, voltage-dependent anion channel 2 (VDAC2 and cytochrome bc1 were present in abundance in the NiV-infected SK-N-MC cells in contrast to hnRNPs H and H2 that were significantly down-regulated. Conclusion Several human neuronal cell proteins that are differentially expressed following NiV infection are identified. The proteins are associated with various cellular functions and their abundance reflects their significance in the cytopathologic responses to the infection and the regulation of NiV replication. The potential importance of the ratio of hnRNP F, and hnRNPs H and H2 in regulation of NiV replication, the association of the mitochondrial protein with the cytopathologic responses to the infection and induction of apoptosis are highlighted.

  13. Semiallogenic fusions of MSI+ tumor cells and activated B cells induce MSI-specific T cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Klier Ulrike

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Various strategies have been developed to transfer tumor-specific antigens into antigen presenting cells in order to induce cytotoxic T cell responses against tumor cells. One approach uses cellular vaccines based on fusions of autologous antigen presenting cells and allogeneic tumor cells. The fusion cells combine antigenicity of the tumor cell with optimal immunostimulatory capacity of the antigen presenting cells. Microsatellite instability caused by mutational inactivation of DNA mismatch repair genes results in translational frameshifts when affecting coding regions. It has been shown by us and others that these mutant proteins lead to the presentation of immunogenic frameshift peptides that are - in principle - recognized by a multiplicity of effector T cells. Methods We chose microsatellite instability-induced frameshift antigens as ideal to test for induction of tumor specific T cell responses by semiallogenic fusions of microsatellite instable carcinoma cells with CD40-activated B cells. Two fusion clones of HCT116 with activated B cells were selected for stimulation of T cells autologous to the B cell fusion partner. Outgrowing T cells were phenotyped and tested in functional assays. Results The fusion clones expressed frameshift antigens as well as high amounts of MHC and costimulatory molecules. Autologous T cells stimulated with these fusions were predominantly CD4+, activated, and reacted specifically against the fusion clones and also against the tumor cell fusion partner. Interestingly, a response toward 6 frameshift-derived peptides (of 14 tested could be observed. Conclusion Cellular fusions of MSI+ carcinoma cells and activated B cells combine the antigen-presenting capacity of the B cell with the antigenic repertoire of the carcinoma cell. They present frameshift-derived peptides and can induce specific and fully functional T cells recognizing not only fusion cells but also the carcinoma cells. These

  14. Learner-centered online courses/programs in gerontology and geriatrics: new responses to changing needs of health professionals.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cotter, J James; Welleford, E Ayn; Drain, Cecil B

    2008-01-01

    This article describes recent trends that have led to an emphasis on a learner-centered approach to gerontology and geriatrics education especially in distance-based education. A learner-centered approach to education has combined with technological advances to stimulate distance-enhanced education for students in geriatric and gerontology programs. The technological advances, especially the Internet, that have enhanced the capacity of educational programs to involve students in the learning process even though separated from the instructor by time and distance, are discussed. In response to the needs of health care professionals who were seeking to enhance their skills in research, education, and leadership in their respective professions, including gerontology, the learner-centered Doctoral Program in Health-Related Sciences (DPHRS) was established in the School of Allied Health Professions of Virginia Commonwealth University. The specifics of this distance-enhanced, learner-centered program are described. The article ends with strategies for encouraging a learner-centered experience with special focus on distance-based education.

  15. Small-Cell Lung Cancer: Clinical Management and Unmet Needs New Perspectives for an Old Problem.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lo Russo, Giuseppe; Macerelli, Marianna; Platania, Marco; Zilembo, Nicoletta; Vitali, Milena; Signorelli, Diego; Proto, Claudia; Ganzinelli, Monica; Gallucci, Rosaria; Agustoni, Francesco; Fasola, Gianpiero; de Braud, Filippo; Garassino, Marina Chiara

    2017-01-01

    Small cell lung cancer is a highly aggressive, difficult to treat neoplasm. Among all lung tumors, small cell lung cancers account for about 20%. Patients typically include heavy smokers in 70s age group, presenting with symptoms such as intrathoracic tumors growth, distant spread or paraneoplastic syndromes at the time of diagnosis. A useful and functional classification divides small cell lung cancers into limited disease and extensive disease. Concurrent chemo-radiotherapy is the standard treatment for limited disease, with improved survival when combined with prophylactic cranial irradiation. Platinum compounds (cisplatin/carboplatin) plus etoposide remain the cornerstone for extensive disease. Nevertheless, despite high chemo- and radio-sensitivity of this cancer, nearly all patients relapse within the first two years and the prognosis is extremely poor. A deeper understanding about small cell lung cancer carcinogenesis led to develop and test a considerable number of new and targeted agents but the results are currently weak or insufficient. To date, small cell lung cancer is still a challenge for researchers. In this review, key aspects of small cell lung cancer management and controversial points of standard and new treatments will be discussed.

  16. Helper role of NK cells during the induction of anticancer responses by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalinski, Pawel; Giermasz, Adam; Nakamura, Yutaro; Basse, Per; Storkus, Walter J; Kirkwood, John M; Mailliard, Robbie B

    2005-02-01

    Recent reports demonstrate that natural killer (NK) cells and dendritic cells (DC) support each other's activity in a positive feedback. We observed that activated NK cells induce the maturation of DCs into stable type-1 polarized DCs (DC1), characterized by up to 100-fold enhanced ability to produce IL-12p70 in response to subsequent interaction with Th cells. DC1 induction depends on NK cell-produced IFN-gamma and TNF-alpha, with a possible involvement of additional factors. DC1, induced by NK cells or by NK cell-related soluble factors, are stable, resistant to tumor-related suppressive factors, and show strongly enhanced ability to induce Th1 and CTL responses. In analogy to resting T cells, the induction of "helper" function of NK cells relies on a two-signal activation paradigm. While NKG2D-dependent tumor cell recognition is sufficient to induce the cytotoxic "effector" function of NK cells, the induction of "NK cell help" requires additional signals from type-1 IFNs, products of virally-infected cells, or from IL-2. Compared to non-polarized DCs currently-used in clinical trials, DC1s act as superior inducers of anti-cancer CTL responses during in vitro sensitization. The current data provides rationale for the clinical use of DC1s in cancer and chronic infections (such as HIV), as a new generation DC-based vaccines, uniquely combining fully mature DC status with an elevated, rather than "exhausted" ability to produce bioactive IL-12p70. We are currently implementing stage I/II clinical trials, testing the effectiveness of DC1s induced by NK cells or by NK cell-related factors, as therapeutic vaccines against melanoma.

  17. Dendritic cells a double-edge sword in autoimmune responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giada eAmodio

    2012-08-01

    Full Text Available Dendritic cells (DC are antigen-presenting cells that play a pivotal role in regulating innate and adaptive immune responses. In autoimmunity, DC act as a double-edged sword since on one hand they initiate adaptive self-reactive responses and on the other they play a pivotal role in promoting and maintaining tolerance. Thus, DC are the most important cells in either triggering self-specific responses or in negatively regulating auto-reactive responses. DC in the steady state or specialized subsets of DC, named tolerogenic DC, are involved in the latter function. Clinical and experimental evidence indicate that prolonged presentation of self-antigens by DC is crucial for the development of destructive autoimmune diseases, and defects in tolerogenic DC functions contribute to eradication of self-tolerance. In recent years, DC have emerged as therapeutic targets for limiting their immunogenicity against self-antigens, while tolerogenic DC have been conceived as therapeutic tools to restore tolerance. The purpose of this review is to give a general overview of the current knowledge on the pathogenic role of DC in patients affected by autoimmune diseases. In addition, the protective role of tolerogenic DC will be addressed. The currently applied strategies to block immune activation or to exploit the tolerogenic potential of DC will be discussed.

  18. Epithelial cells, the “switchboard” of respiratory immune defense responses: effects of air pollutants

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müller, Loretta; Jaspers, Ilona

    2015-01-01

    Summary “Epimmunome”, a term introduced recently by Swamy and colleagues, describes all molecules and pathways used by epithelial cells (ECs) to instruct immune cells. Today, we know that ECs are among the first sites within the human body to be exposed to pathogens (such as influenza viruses) and that the release of chemokine and cytokines by ECs is influenced by inhaled agents. The role of the ECs as a switchboard to initiate and regulate immune responses is altered through air pollutant exposure, such as ozone, tobacco smoke and diesel exhaust emissions. The details of the interplay between ECs and immune cells are not yet fully understood and need to be investigated further. Co-culture models, cell specific genetically-modified mice and the analysis of human biopsies provide great tools to gain knowledge about potential mechanisms. Increasing our understanding about the role of ECs in respiratory immunity may yield novel therapeutic targets to modulate downstream diseases. PMID:22851042

  19. Mitochondrial respiration controls lysosomal function during inflammatory T cell responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baixauli, Francesc; Acín-Pérez, Rebeca; Villarroya-Beltrí, Carolina; Mazzeo, Carla; Nuñez-Andrade, Norman; Gabandé-Rodriguez, Enrique; Dolores Ledesma, Maria; Blázquez, Alberto; Martin, Miguel Angel; Falcón-Pérez, Juan Manuel; Redondo, Juan Miguel; Enríquez, Jose Antonio; Mittelbrunn, Maria

    2016-01-01

    Summary The endolysosomal system is critical for the maintenance of cellular homeostasis. However, how endolysosomal compartment is regulated by mitochondrial function is largely unknown. We have generated a mouse model with defective mitochondrial function in CD4+ T lymphocytes by genetic deletion of the mitochondrial transcription factor A (Tfam). Mitochondrial respiration-deficiency impairs lysosome function, promotes p62 and sphingomyelin accumulation and disrupts endolysosomal trafficking pathways and autophagy, thus linking a primary mitochondrial dysfunction to a lysosomal storage disorder. The impaired lysosome function in Tfam-deficient cells subverts T cell differentiation toward pro-inflammatory subsets and exacerbates the in vivo inflammatory response. Restoration of NAD+ levels improves lysosome function and corrects the inflammatory defects in Tfam-deficient T cells. Our results uncover a mechanism by which mitochondria regulate lysosome function to preserve T cell differentiation and effector functions, and identify novel strategies for intervention in mitochondrial-related diseases. PMID:26299452

  20. Stress responses and replication of plasmids in bacterial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wegrzyn Alicja

    2002-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Plasmids, DNA (or rarely RNA molecules which replicate in cells autonomously (independently of chromosomes as non-essential genetic elements, play important roles for microbes grown under specific environmental conditions as well as in scientific laboratories and in biotechnology. For example, bacterial plasmids are excellent models in studies on regulation of DNA replication, and their derivatives are the most commonly used vectors in genetic engineering. Detailed mechanisms of replication initiation, which is the crucial process for efficient maintenance of plasmids in cells, have been elucidated for several plasmids. However, to understand plasmid biology, it is necessary to understand regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to different environmental conditions in which host cells exist. Knowledge of such regulatory processes is also very important for those who use plasmids as expression vectors to produce large amounts of recombinant proteins. Variable conditions in large-scale fermentations must influence replication of plasmid DNA in cells, thus affecting the efficiency of recombinant gene expression significantly. Contrary to extensively investigated biochemistry of plasmid replication, molecular mechanisms of regulation of plasmid DNA replication in response to various environmental stress conditions are relatively poorly understood. There are, however, recently published studies that add significant data to our knowledge on relations between cellular stress responses and control of plasmid DNA replication. In this review we focus on plasmids derived from bacteriophage λ that are among the best investigated replicons. Nevertheless, recent results of studies on other plasmids are also discussed shortly.

  1. Responses to recipient and donor B cells by genetically donor T cells from human haploidentical chimeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schiff, S.; Sampson, H.; Buckley, R.

    1986-03-01

    Following administration of haploidentical stem cells to infants with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), mature T cells of donor karyotype appear later in the recipient without causing graft-versus-host disease. To investigate the effect of the host environment on the responsiveness of these genetically donor T cells, blood B and T lymphocytes from 6 SCID recipients, their parental donors and unrelated controls were purified by double SRBC rosetting. T cells were stimulated by irradiated B cells at a 1:1 ratio in 6 day cultures. Engrafted T cells of donor karyotype gave much smaller responses to irradiated genetically recipient B cells than did fresh donor T cells. Moreover, engrafted T cells of donor karyotype from two of the three SCIDs who are longest post-transplantation responded more vigorously (14,685 and 31,623 cpm) than fresh donor T cells (5141 and 22,709 cpm) to donor B cells. These data indicate that T lymphocytes which have matured from donor stem cells in the recipient microenvironment behave differently from those that have matured in the donor.

  2. CDC27 protein is involved in radiation response in squamous cell cervix carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajkumar, T; Gopal, G; Selvaluxmi, G; Rajalekshmy, K R

    2005-10-01

    In the present study, an attempt was made to identify genes involved in radiation response in cervix carcinoma. Differential display technique was used to study the expression profiles of tumour biopsy samples obtained from patients, responding and not responding to treatment. The samples were obtained prior to radiotherapy and subsequent to treatment with Tele-radiation at 10 Gray (Gy). One of the differentially expressed cDNAs, when sequenced was identified to be CDC27. Immuno-histochemical analysis of pre- and post-treated tumour samples from fifteen patients showed the downregulation of expression of CDC27 protein in seven patients. Down-regulation was associated with poorer response to radiotherapy. Cervical cancer cell lines SiHa and C33A were irradiated and their nuclei were stained for expression of CDC27 and analyzed using fluorescent-activated cell sorting (FACS). Down-regulation of CDC27 protein in the irradiated SiHa cell line was associated with greater survival fraction, compared to the irradiated C33A cell line, which had only slight fall in the level of CDC27 protein. This is the first study to suggest a role for CDC27 in radiation response. However, a larger cohort is needed to further confirm the value of CDC27 protein as a predictive marker, for radiation response in cervix cancer.

  3. Oral microbial biofilm stimulation of epithelial cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, Rebecca; Kirakodu, Sreenatha S; Novak, Karen F; Ebersole, Jeffrey L

    2012-04-01

    Oral bacterial biofilms trigger chronic inflammatory responses in the host that can result in the tissue destructive events of periodontitis. However, the characteristics of the capacity of specific host cell types to respond to these biofilms remain ill-defined. This report describes the use of a novel model of bacterial biofilms to stimulate oral epithelial cells and profile select cytokines and chemokines that contribute to the local inflammatory environment in the periodontium. Monoinfection biofilms were developed with Streptococcus sanguinis, Streptococcus oralis, Streptococcus gordonii, Actinomyces naeslundii, Fusobacterium nucleatum, and Porphyromonas gingivalis on rigid gas-permeable contact lenses. Biofilms, as well as planktonic cultures of these same bacterial species, were incubated under anaerobic conditions with a human oral epithelial cell line, OKF4, for up to 24h. Gro-1α, IL1α, IL-6, IL-8, TGFα, Fractalkine, MIP-1α, and IP-10 were shown to be produced in response to a range of the planktonic or biofilm forms of these species. P. gingivalis biofilms significantly inhibited the production of all of these cytokines and chemokines, except MIP-1α. Generally, the biofilms of all species inhibited Gro-1α, TGFα, and Fractalkine production, while F. nucleatum biofilms stimulated significant increases in IL-1α, IL-6, IL-8, and IP-10. A. naeslundii biofilms induced elevated levels of IL-6, IL-8 and IP-10. The oral streptococcal species in biofilms or planktonic forms were poor stimulants for any of these mediators from the epithelial cells. The results of these studies demonstrate that oral bacteria in biofilms elicit a substantially different profile of responses compared to planktonic bacteria of the same species. Moreover, certain oral species are highly stimulatory when in biofilms and interact with host cell receptors to trigger pathways of responses that appear quite divergent from individual bacteria.

  4. Blockade of Glutamine Synthetase Enhances Inflammatory Response in Microglial Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, Erika M.; Menga, Alessio; Lebrun, Aurore; Hooper, Douglas C.; Butterfield, D. Allan

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Aims: Microglial cells are brain-resident macrophages engaged in surveillance and maintained in a constant state of relative inactivity. However, their involvement in autoimmune diseases indicates that in pathological conditions microglia gain an inflammatory phenotype. The mechanisms underlying this change in the microglial phenotype are still unclear. Since metabolism is an important modulator of immune cell function, we focused our attention on glutamine synthetase (GS), a modulator of the response to lipopolysaccharide (LPS) activation in other cell types, which is expressed by microglia. Results: GS inhibition enhances release of inflammatory mediators of LPS-activated microglia in vitro, leading to perturbation of the redox balance and decreased viability of cocultured neurons. GS inhibition also decreases insulin-mediated glucose uptake in microglia. In vivo, microglia-specific GS ablation enhances expression of inflammatory markers upon LPS treatment. In the spinal cords from experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE), GS expression levels and glutamine/glutamate ratios are reduced. Innovation: Recently, metabolism has been highlighted as mediator of immune cell function through the discovery of mechanisms that (behind these metabolic changes) modulate the inflammatory response. The present study shows for the first time a metabolic mechanism mediating microglial response to a proinflammatory stimulus, pointing to GS activity as a master modulator of immune cell function and thus unraveling a potential therapeutic target. Conclusions: Our study highlights a new role of GS in modulating immune response in microglia, providing insights into the pathogenic mechanisms associated with inflammation and new strategies of therapeutic intervention. Antioxid. Redox Signal. 26, 351–363. PMID:27758118

  5. The responses of immune cells to iron oxide nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yaolin; Sherwood, Jennifer A; Lackey, Kimberly H; Qin, Ying; Bao, Yuping

    2016-04-01

    Immune cells play an important role in recognizing and removing foreign objects, such as nanoparticles. Among various parameters, surface coatings of nanoparticles are the first contact with biological system, which critically affect nanoparticle interactions. Here, surface coating effects on nanoparticle cellular uptake, toxicity and ability to trigger immune response were evaluated on a human monocyte cell line using iron oxide nanoparticles. The cells were treated with nanoparticles of three types of coatings (negatively charged polyacrylic acid, positively charged polyethylenimine and neutral polyethylene glycol). The cells were treated at various nanoparticle concentrations (5, 10, 20, 30, 50 μg ml(-1) or 2, 4, 8, 12, 20 μg cm(-2)) with 6 h incubation or treated at a nanoparticle concentration of 50 μg ml(-1) (20 μg cm(-2)) at different incubation times (6, 12, 24, 48 or 72 h). Cell viability over 80% was observed for all nanoparticle treatment experiments, regardless of surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. The much lower cell viability for cells treated with free ligands (e.g. ~10% for polyethylenimine) suggested that the surface coatings were tightly attached to the nanoparticle surfaces. The immune responses of cells to nanoparticles were evaluated by quantifying the expression of toll-like receptor 2 and tumor necrosis factor-α. The expression of tumor necrosis factor-α and toll-like receptor 2 were not significant in any case of the surface coatings, nanoparticle concentrations and incubation times. These results provide useful information to select nanoparticle surface coatings for biological and biomedical applications.

  6. Dendritic cell-derived IL-15 controls the induction of CD8 T cell immune responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rückert, René; Brandt, Katja; Bulanova, Elena; Mirghomizadeh, Farhad; Paus, Ralf; Bulfone-Paus, Silvia

    2003-12-01

    The development and the differentiation of CD8(+) T cells are dependent on IL-15. Here, we have studied the source and mechanism of how IL-15 modulates CD8(+) T cell-mediated Th1 immune responses by employing two delayed-type hypersensitivity (DTH) models. IL-15-deficient (IL-15(-/-)) mice or mice treated with soluble IL-15Ralpha as an IL-15 antagonist showed significantly reduced CD8(+) T cell-dependent DTH responses, while activation of CD4(+) T cell and B cell functions remained unaffected. Injection of antigen-labeled dendritic cells (DC) from IL-15(+/+), IL-15(-/-) or IL-15Ralpha(-/-) mice revealed that DC-derived IL-15 is an absolute requirement for the initiation of DTH response. The re-establishment of the interaction of IL-15 with the IL-15Ralpha by incubating IL-15(-/-) DC with IL-15 completely restored the capacity to prime T cells for DTH induction in vivo. Moreover, IL-15 also enhanced secretion of pro-inflammatory cytokines by DC and triggered in vitro CD8(+) T cell proliferation and IL-2 release. Taken together, the data suggest that an autocrine IL-15/IL-15Ralpha signaling loop in DC is essential for inducing CD8(+)-dependent Th1 immune responses in mice. Therefore, targeted manipulation of this loop promises to be an effective, novel strategy for therapeutic modulation of clinically relevant DTH reactions.

  7. Respiratory epithelial cell responses to cigarette smoke: the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kelsen, Steven G

    2012-12-01

    Cigarette smoking exposes the respiratory epithelium to highly toxic, reactive oxygen nitrogen species which damage lung proteins in the endoplasmic reticulum (ER), the cell organelle in which all secreted and membrane proteins are processed. Accumulation of damaged or misfolded proteins in the ER, a condition termed ER stress, activates a complex cellular process termed the unfolded protein responses (UPR). The UPR acts to restore cellular protein homeostasis by regulating all aspects of protein metabolism including: protein translation and syntheses; protein folding; and protein degradation. However, activation of the UPR may also induce signaling pathways which induce inflammation and cell apoptosis. This review discusses the role of UPR in the respiratory epithelial cell response to cigarette smoke and the pathogenesis of lung diseases like COPD.

  8. Extracellular Alkalinization as a Defense Response in Potato Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moroz, Natalia; Fritch, Karen R.; Marcec, Matthew J.; Tripathi, Diwaker; Smertenko, Andrei; Tanaka, Kiwamu

    2017-01-01

    A quantitative and robust bioassay to assess plant defense response is important for studies of disease resistance and also for the early identification of disease during pre- or non-symptomatic phases. An increase in extracellular pH is known to be an early defense response in plants. In this study, we demonstrate extracellular alkalinization as a defense response in potatoes. Using potato suspension cell cultures, we observed an alkalinization response against various pathogen- and plant-derived elicitors in a dose- and time-dependent manner. We also assessed the defense response against a variety of potato pathogens, such as protists (Phytophthora infestans and Spongospora subterranea) and fungi (Verticillium dahliae and Colletotrichum coccodes). Our results show that extracellular pH increases within 30 min in proportion to the number of pathogen spores added. Consistently with the alkalinization effect, the higher transcription level of several defense-related genes and production of reactive oxygen species was observed. Our results demonstrate that the alkalinization response is an effective marker to study early stages of defense response in potatoes. PMID:28174578

  9. Killing of Brain Tumor Cells by Hypoxia-Responsive Element Mediated Expression of BAX

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hangjun Ruan

    1999-11-01

    Full Text Available The presence of radioresistant hypoxic cells in human brain tumors limits the overall effectiveness of conventional fractionated radiation therapy. Tumor-specific therapies that target hypoxic cells are clearly needed. We have investigated the expression of suicide genes under hypoxia by a hypoxia-responsive element (HRE, which can be activated through hypoxia-inducible factor-1 (HIF-1. We transfected plasmids containing multiple copies of HIRE into U-87 MG and U-251 MG-NCI human brain tumor cells and tested their ability to induce LacZ gene expression under anoxia. Gene expression under anoxia versus oxia was increased about 12-fold for U-87 MG cells and about fourfold for U-251 MG-NCI cells. At intermediate hypoxic conditions, increased LacZ gene expression in U-87 MG cells was induced by the plasmid that contained three HREs, but not by the plasmid with two HREs. Lastly, when we placed a suicide gene BAX under the control of HREs, cells transfected with the BAX plasmids were preferentially killed through apoptosis under anoxia. Our studies demonstrate that HRE-regulated gene expression is active in brain tumor cells, and that the amount of increased gene expression obtained is dependent on the cell line, the HIRE copy number, and the degree of hypoxia.

  10. Nitric Oxide And Hypoxia Response In Pluripotent Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Estefanía Caballano Infantes

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available The expansion of pluripotent cells (ESCs and iPSCs under conditions that maintain their pluripotency is necessary to implement a cell therapy program. Previously, we have described that low nitric oxide (NO donor diethylenetriamine/nitric oxide adduct (DETA-NO added to the culture medium, promote the expansion of these cell types. The molecular mechanisms are not yet known. We present evidences that ESC and iPSCs in normoxia in presence of low NO triggers a similar response to hypoxia, thus maintaining the pluripotency. We have studied the stability of HIF-1α (Hypoxia Inducible Factor in presence of low NO. Because of the close relationship between hypoxia, metabolism, mitochondrial function and pluripotency we have analyzed by q RT-PCR the expression of genes involved in the glucose metabolism such as: HK2, LDHA and PDK1; besides other HIF-1α target gene. We further analyzed the expression of genes involved in mitochondrial biogenesis such as PGC1α, TFAM and NRF1 and we have observed that low NO maintains the same pattern of expression that in hypoxia. The study of the mitochondrial membrane potential using Mito-Tracker dye showed that NO decrease the mitochondrial function. We will analyze other metabolic parameters, to determinate if low NO regulates mitochondrial function and mimics Hypoxia Response. The knowledge of the role of NO in the Hypoxia Response and the mechanism that helps to maintain self-renewal in pluripotent cells in normoxia, can help to the design of culture media where NO could be optimal for stem cell expansion in the performance of future cell therapies.

  11. Dissecting the Transcriptional Response to Elicitors in Vitis vinifera Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Belchí-Navarro, Sarai; Bru, Roque; Martínez-Zapater, José M.; Lijavetzky, Diego; Pedreño, María A.

    2014-01-01

    The high effectiveness of cyclic oligosaccharides like cyclodextrins in the production of trans-resveratrol in Vitis vinifera cell cultures is enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate. In order to dissect the basis of the interactions among the elicitation responses triggered by these two compounds, a transcriptional analysis of grapevine cell cultures treated with cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate separately or in combination was carried out. The results showed that the activation of genes encoding enzymes from phenylpropanoid and stilbene biosynthesis induced by cyclodextrins alone was partially enhanced in the presence of methyl jasmonate, which correlated with their effects on trans-resveratrol production. In addition, protein translation and cell cycle regulation were more highly repressed in cells treated with cyclodextrins than in those treated with methyl jasmonate, and this response was enhanced in the combined treatment. Ethylene signalling was activated by all treatments, while jasmonate signalling and salicylic acid conjugation were activated only in the presence of methyl jasmonate and cyclodextrins, respectively. Moreover, the combined treatment resulted in a crosstalk between the signalling cascades activated by cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate, which, in turn, provoked the activation of additional regulatory pathways involving the up-regulation of MYB15, NAC and WRKY transcription factors, protein kinases and calcium signal transducers. All these results suggest that both elicitors cause an activation of the secondary metabolism in detriment of basic cell processes like the primary metabolism or cell division. Crosstalk between cyclodextrins and methyl jasmonate-induced signalling provokes an intensification of these responses resulting in a greater trans-resveratrol production. PMID:25314001

  12. Chemical engineering of mesenchymal stem cells to induce a cell rolling response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sarkar, Debanjan; Vemula, Praveen Kumar; Teo, Grace S L; Spelke, Dawn; Karnik, Rohit; Wee, Le Y; Karp, Jeffrey M

    2008-11-19

    Covalently conjugated sialyl Lewis X (SLeX) on the mesenchymal stem cell (MSC) surface through a biotin-streptavidin bridge imparts leukocyte-like rolling characteristics without altering the cell phenotype and the multilineage differentiation potential. We demonstrate that the conjugation of SLeX on the MSC surface is stable, versatile, and induces a robust rolling response on P-selectin coated substrates. These results indicate the potential to increase the targeting efficiency of any cell type to specific tissue.

  13. Antioxidant responses to an acute ultra-endurance exercise: impact on DNA stability and indications for an increased need for nutritive antioxidants in the early recovery phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Neubauer, Oliver; Reichhold, Stefanie; Nics, Lukas; Hoelzl, Christine; Valentini, Judit; Stadlmayr, Barbara; Knasmüller, Siegfried; Wagner, Karl-Heinz

    2010-10-01

    Antioxidant requirements have neither been defined for endurance nor been defined for ultra-endurance athletes. To verify whether an acute bout of ultra-endurance exercise modifies the need for nutritive antioxidants, we aimed (1) to investigate the changes of endogenous and exogenous antioxidants in response to an Ironman triathlon; (2) to particularise the relevance of antioxidant responses to the indices of oxidatively damaged blood lipids, blood cell compounds and lymphocyte DNA and (3) to examine whether potential time-points of increased susceptibility to oxidative damage are associated with alterations in the antioxidant status. Blood that was collected from forty-two well-trained male athletes 2 d pre-race, immediately post-race, and 1, 5 and 19 d later was sampled. The key findings of the present study are as follows: (1) Immediately post-race, vitamin C, α-tocopherol, and levels of the Trolox equivalent antioxidant capacity, the ferric reducing ability of plasma and the oxygen radical absorbance capacity (ORAC) assays increased significantly. Exercise-induced changes in the plasma antioxidant capacity were associated with changes in uric acid, bilirubin and vitamin C. (2) Significant inverse correlations between ORAC levels and indices of oxidatively damaged DNA immediately and 1 d post-race suggest a protective role of the acute antioxidant responses in DNA stability. (3) Significant decreases in carotenoids and γ-tocopherol 1 d post-race indicate that the antioxidant intake during the first 24 h of recovery following an acute ultra-endurance exercise requires specific attention. Furthermore, the present study illustrates the importance of a diversified and well-balanced diet to maintain a physiological antioxidant status in ultra-endurance athletes in reference to recommendations.

  14. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tangliang Li; Zhong-Wei Zhou; Zhenyu Ju; Zhao-Qi Wang

    2016-01-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employ-ing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically reg-ulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  15. The acquisition of cytokine responsiveness by murine B cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poudrier, J; Owens, T

    1994-01-01

    chains and mRNA to levels comparable to those seen in activated T cells. Anti-mu-stimulated B cells responded to IL-2 by incorporation of [3H]thymidine and high rate immunoglobulin (Ig) secretion. Both IL-5 (at optimal concentration) and suboptimal lipopolysaccharide (LPS; 20 ng/ml) induced surface...... expression of IL-2R alpha. The level of expression induced by IL-5 was equivalent to that on anti-Ig-activated B cells. Neither stimulus induced detectable expression of IL-2R beta, and neither induced B cells to respond to IL-2. IL-2R alpha expression was strongly enhanced, and low levels of IL-2R beta...... staining and mRNA were induced by the combination of LPS plus IL-5. LPS+IL-5-treated B cells responded to IL-2 by Ig secretion. This indicates that B cells regulate their responsiveness to IL-2 similarly to T cells, via the combined level of expression of IL-2R beta and IL-2R alpha. The synergy between IL...

  16. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Tangliang; Zhou, Zhong-Wei; Ju, Zhenyu; Wang, Zhao-Qi

    2016-06-01

    Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal) and progenitor progenies (differentiation), which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR) in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  17. DNA Damage Response in Hematopoietic Stem Cell Ageing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tangliang Li

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Maintenance of tissue-specific stem cells is vital for organ homeostasis and organismal longevity. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs are the most primitive cell type in the hematopoietic system. They divide asymmetrically and give rise to daughter cells with HSC identity (self-renewal and progenitor progenies (differentiation, which further proliferate and differentiate into full hematopoietic lineages. Mammalian ageing process is accompanied with abnormalities in the HSC self-renewal and differentiation. Transcriptional changes and epigenetic modulations have been implicated as the key regulators in HSC ageing process. The DNA damage response (DDR in the cells involves an orchestrated signaling pathway, consisting of cell cycle regulation, cell death and senescence, transcriptional regulation, as well as chromatin remodeling. Recent studies employing DNA repair-deficient mouse models indicate that DDR could intrinsically and extrinsically regulate HSC maintenance and play important roles in tissue homeostasis of the hematopoietic system. In this review, we summarize the current understanding of how the DDR determines the HSC fates and finally contributes to organismal ageing.

  18. Interleukin-21 triggers effector cell responses in the gut

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Daniela; De; Nitto; Massimiliano; Sarra; Francesco; Pallone; Giovanni; Monteleone

    2010-01-01

    In the gut of patients with Crohn's disease and patients with ulcerative colitis,the major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases(IBD) in humans,the tissue-damaging immune response is mediated by an active cross-talk between immune and non-immune cells.Accumulating evidence indicates also that cytokines produced by these cells play a major role in initiating and shaping this pathologic process.One such cytokine seems to be interleukin(IL)-21,a member of the common γ-chainreceptor family.IL-21 is produced in e...

  19. Adenoviral transduction of mesenchymal stem cells: in vitro responses and in vivo immune responses after cell transplantation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Oliver Treacy

    Full Text Available Adult mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are non-hematopoietic cells with multi-lineage potential which makes them attractive targets for regenerative medicine applications. However, to date, therapeutic success of MSC-therapy is limited and the genetic modification of MSCs using viral vectors is one option to improve their therapeutic potential. Ex-vivo genetic modification of MSCs using recombinant adenovirus (Ad could be promising to reduce undesired immune responses as Ad will be removed before cell/tissue transplantation. In this regard, we investigated whether Ad-modification of MSCs alters their immunological properties in vitro and in vivo. We found that Ad-transduction of MSCs does not lead to up-regulation of major histocompatibility complex class I and II and co-stimulatory molecules CD80 and CD86. Moreover, Ad-transduction caused no significant changes in terms of pro-inflammatory cytokine expression, chemokine and chemokine receptor and Toll-like receptor expression. In addition, Ad-modification of MSCs had no affect on their ability to suppress T cell proliferation in vitro. In vivo injection of Ad-transduced MSCs did not change the frequency of various immune cell populations (antigen presenting cells, T helper and cytotoxic T cells, natural killer and natural killer T cells neither in the blood nor in tissues. Our results indicate that Ad-modification has no major influence on the immunological properties of MSCs and therefore can be considered as a suitable gene vector for therapeutic applications of MSCs.

  20. Cell wall modification in grapevine cells in response to UV stress investigated by atomic force microscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lesniewska, E.; Adrian, M.; Klinguer, A.; Pugin, A

    2004-08-15

    Despite cell wall reinforcement being a well-known defence mechanism of plants, it remains poorly characterized from a physical point of view. The objective of this work was to further describe this mechanism. Vitis vinifera cv Gamay cells were treated with UV-light (254 nm), a well-known elicitor of defence mechanisms in grapevines, and physical cell wall modifications were observed using the atomic force microscopy (AFM) under native conditions. The grapevine cell suspensions were continuously observed in their culture medium from 30 min to 24 h after elicitation. In the beginning, cellulose fibrils covered by a matrix surrounded the control and treated cells. After 3 h, the elicited cells displayed sprouted expansions around the cell wall that correspond to pectin chains. These expansions were not observed on untreated grapevine cells. The AFM tip was used to determine the average surface elastic modulus of cell wall that account for cell wall mechanical properties. The elasticity is diminished in UV-treated cells. In a comparative study, grapevine cells showed the same decrease in cell wall elasticity when treated with a fungal biotic elicitor of defence response. These results demonstrate cell wall strengthening by UV stress.

  1. Bioreporters: gfp versus lux revisited and single-cell response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kohlmeier, Stefanie; Mancuso, Matthew; Tecon, Robin; Harms, Hauke; van der Meer, Jan Roelof; Wells, Mona

    2007-03-15

    Genetically engineered organisms expressing spectroscopically active reporter molecules in response to chemical effectors display great potential as living transducers in sensing applications. Green fluorescent protein (gfp gene) bioreporters have distinct advantages over luminescent couterparts (lux gene), including applicability at the single-cell level, but are typically less sensitive. Here we describe a gfp-bearing bioreporter that is sensitive to naphthalene (a poorly water soluble pollutant behaving like a large class of hydrophobic compounds), is suitable for use in chemical assays and bioavailability studies, and has detection limits comparable to lux-bearing bioreporters for higher efficiency detection strategies. Simultaneously, we find that the exploitation of population response data from single-cell analysis is not an algorithmic conduit to enhanced signal detection and hence lower effector detection limits, as normally assumed. The assay reported functions to equal effect with or without biocide.

  2. Oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies microbial biofilms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peyyala, R; Kirakodu, S S; Novak, K F; Ebersole, J L

    2013-03-01

    This report describes the use of a novel model of multispecies biofilms to stimulate profiles of cytokines/chemokines from oral epithelial cells that contribute to local inflammation in the periodontium. Streptococcus gordonii (Sg)/S. oralis (So)/S. sanguinis (Ss) and Sg/Fusobacterium nucleatum (Fn)/Porphyromonas gingivalis (Pg) biofilms elicited significantly elevated levels of IL-1α and showed synergistic stimulatory activity compared with an additive effect of the 3 individual bacteria. Only the Sg/Actinomyces naeslundii (An)/Fn multispecies biofilms elicited IL-6 levels above those of control. IL-8 was a primary response to the Sg/An/Fn biofilms, albeit the level was not enhanced compared with a predicted composite level from the monospecies challenges. These results represent some of the first data documenting alterations in profiles of oral epithelial cell responses to multispecies biofilms.

  3. Modeling of Cancer Stem Cell State Transitions Predicts Therapeutic Response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary E Sehl

    Full Text Available Cancer stem cells (CSCs possess capacity to both self-renew and generate all cells within a tumor, and are thought to drive tumor recurrence. Targeting the stem cell niche to eradicate CSCs represents an important area of therapeutic development. The complex nature of many interacting elements of the stem cell niche, including both intracellular signals and microenvironmental growth factors and cytokines, creates a challenge in choosing which elements to target, alone or in combination. Stochastic stimulation techniques allow for the careful study of complex systems in biology and medicine and are ideal for the investigation of strategies aimed at CSC eradication. We present a mathematical model of the breast cancer stem cell (BCSC niche to predict population dynamics during carcinogenesis and in response to treatment. Using data from cell line and mouse xenograft experiments, we estimate rates of interconversion between mesenchymal and epithelial states in BCSCs and find that EMT/MET transitions occur frequently. We examine bulk tumor growth dynamics in response to alterations in the rate of symmetric self-renewal of BCSCs and find that small changes in BCSC behavior can give rise to the Gompertzian growth pattern observed in breast tumors. Finally, we examine stochastic reaction kinetic simulations in which elements of the breast cancer stem cell niche are inhibited individually and in combination. We find that slowing self-renewal and disrupting the positive feedback loop between IL-6, Stat3 activation, and NF-κB signaling by simultaneous inhibition of IL-6 and HER2 is the most effective combination to eliminate both mesenchymal and epithelial populations of BCSCs. Predictions from our model and simulations show excellent agreement with experimental data showing the efficacy of combined HER2 and Il-6 blockade in reducing BCSC populations. Our findings will be directly examined in a planned clinical trial of combined HER2 and IL-6 targeted

  4. Thyroid hormone responsiveness in N-Tera-2 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chan, S; McCabe, C J; Visser, T J; Franklyn, J A; Kilby, M D

    2003-07-01

    N-TERA-2 cl/D1 (NT2) cells, a human embryonal cell line with characteristics of central nervous system precursor cells, were utilised to study thyroid hormone action during early neuronal growth and differentiation. Undifferentiated NT2 cells expressed mRNAs encoding thyroid hormone receptors (TRs) alpha1, alpha2 and beta1, iodothyronine deiodinases types 2 (D2) and 3 (D3) (which act as the pre-receptor regulators), and the thyroid hormone-responsive genes myelin basic protein (MBP) and neuroendocrine specific protein A (NSP-A). When terminally differentiated into post-mitotic neurons (hNT), TRalpha1 and TRbeta1 mRNA expression was decreased by 74% (P=0.05) and 95% (P<0.0001) respectively, while NSP-A mRNA increased 7-fold (P<0.05). However, mRNAs encoding TRalpha2, D2, D3 and MBP did not alter significantly upon neuronal differentiation and neither did activities of D2 and D3. With increasing 3,5,3'-triiodothyronine (T(3)) concentrations, TRbeta1 mRNA expression in cultured NT2 cells increased 2-fold at 10 nM T(3) and 1.3-fold at 100 nM T(3) (P<0.05) compared with that in T(3)-free media but no change was seen with T(3) treatment of hNT cells. D3 mRNA expression in NT2 cells also increased 3-fold at 10 nM T(3) (P=0.01) and 2.4-fold at 100 nM T(3) (P<0.05) compared with control, but there was no change in D3 enzyme activity. In contrast there was a 20% reduction in D3 mRNA expression in hNT cells at 10 nM T(3) (P<0.05) compared with control, with accompanying reductions in D3 activity with increasing T(3) concentrations (P<0.05). There was no significant change in the expression of the TRalpha isoforms, D2, MBP and NSP-A with increasing T(3) concentrations in either NT2 or hNT cells. Undifferentiated NT2 and differentiated hNT cells show differing patterns of T(3)-responsiveness, suggesting that there are different regulatory factors operating within these cell types.

  5. Groundwater Flow Systems and Their Response to Climate Change: A Need for a Water-System View Approach

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joel J. Carrillo-Rivera

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Problem statement: The interest in early hydrogeological studies was the aquifer unit, as it is the physical media that stores and permits groundwater transfers from the recharge zone to the discharge zone, making groundwater available to boreholes for water extraction. Approach: Recently, the aquifer concept has been complemented by the groundwater flow system theory, where groundwater may be defined by local, intermediate and regional flow systems. This implies that groundwater may travel from one aquifer unit to another aquifer unit (or more located above or below the former. Water in a local flow system takes months or several years to travel from the recharge to the discharge zone. These flows usually transfer the best natural quality water, so a reduction in precipitation would lessen recharge and diminish stored water, making them more vulnerable to contamination and variability in climatic conditions. Thus, there is a need to define local flows and to enhance actions to protect them from contamination and inefficient extraction. Results: In contrast to local flows, intermediate and regional flows travel from a region, or country, into another, with their recharge processes usually taking place in a zone located far away from the discharge zone (natural or by boreholes. There is a need of groundwater flow systems evaluation by means of an integrated wide system-view analysis of partial evidence represented by surface (soil and vegetation covers as well as hydraulic, isotopic and chemical groundwater characterization in the related geological media where the depth of actual basement rock is paramount as well as discharge areas. The flow system definition may assist in extraction management strategies to control related issues as subsidence, obtained the water quality change, desiccation of springs and water bodies, soil erosion, flooding response, contamination processes in recharge areas, among others; many of which could be efficiently

  6. MYSM1-dependent checkpoints in B cell lineage differentiation and B cell-mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Förster, Michael; Farrington, Kyo; Petrov, Jessica C; Belle, Jad I; Mindt, Barbara C; Witalis, Mariko; Duerr, Claudia U; Fritz, Jörg H; Nijnik, Anastasia

    2017-03-01

    MYSM1 is a chromatin-binding histone deubiquitinase. MYSM1 mutations in humans result in lymphopenia whereas loss of Mysm1 in mice causes severe hematopoietic abnormalities, including an early arrest in B cell development. However, it remains unknown whether MYSM1 is required at later checkpoints in B cell development or for B cell-mediated immune responses. We analyzed conditional mouse models Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre, Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre, and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre with inactivation of Mysm1 at prepro-B, pre-B, and follicular B cell stages of development. We show that loss of Mysm1 at the prepro-B cell stage in Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre mice results in impaired B cell differentiation, with an ∼2-fold reduction in B cell numbers in the lymphoid organs. Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.mb1-cre B cells also showed increased expression of activation markers and impaired survival and proliferation. In contrast, Mysm1 was largely dispensable from the pre-B cell stage onward, with Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD19-cre and Mysm1(fl/fl)Tg.CD21-cre mice showing no alterations in B cell numbers and largely normal responses to stimulation. MYSM1, therefore, has an essential role in B cell lineage specification but is dispensable at later stages of development. Importantly, MYSM1 activity at the prepro-B cell stage of development is important for the normal programming of B cell responses to stimulation once they complete their maturation process.

  7. The fractional viscoelastic response of human breast tissue cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, B.; Babahosseini, H.; Mahmoodi, S. N.; Agah, M.

    2015-07-01

    The mechanical response of a living cell is notoriously complicated. The complex, heterogeneous characteristics of cellular structure introduce difficulties that simple linear models of viscoelasticity cannot overcome, particularly at deep indentation depths. Herein, a nano-scale stress-relaxation analysis performed with an atomic force microscope reveals that isolated human breast cells do not exhibit simple exponential relaxation capable of being modeled by the standard linear solid (SLS) model. Therefore, this work proposes the application of the fractional Zener (FZ) model of viscoelasticity to extract mechanical parameters from the entire relaxation response, improving upon existing physical techniques to probe isolated cells. The FZ model introduces a new parameter that describes the fractional time-derivative dependence of the response. The results show an exceptional increase in conformance to the experimental data compared to that predicted by the SLS model, and the order of the fractional derivative (α) is remarkably homogeneous across the populations, with a median value of 0.48 ± 0.06 for the malignant population and 0.51 ± 0.07 for the benign. The cells’ responses exhibit power-law behavior and complexity not associated with simple relaxation (SLS, α = 1) that supports the application of a fractional model. The distributions of some of the FZ parameters also preserve the distinction between the malignant and benign sample populations seen from the linear model and previous results while including the contribution of fast-relaxation behavior. The resulting viscosity, measured by a composite relaxation time, exhibits considerably less dispersion due to residual error than the distribution generated by the linear model and therefore serves as a more powerful marker for cell differentiation.

  8. Role of cell-to-cell variability in activating a positive feedback antiviral response in human dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jianzhong Hu

    Full Text Available In the first few hours following Newcastle disease viral infection of human monocyte-derived dendritic cells, the induction of IFNB1 is extremely low and the secreted type I interferon response is below the limits of ELISA assay. However, many interferon-induced genes are activated at this time, for example DDX58 (RIGI, which in response to viral RNA induces IFNB1. We investigated whether the early induction of IFNBI in only a small percentage of infected cells leads to low level IFN secretion that then induces IFN-responsive genes in all cells. We developed an agent-based mathematical model to explore the IFNBI and DDX58 temporal dynamics. Simulations showed that a small number of early responder cells provide a mechanism for efficient and controlled activation of the DDX58-IFNBI positive feedback loop. The model predicted distributions of single cell responses that were confirmed by single cell mRNA measurements. The results suggest that large cell-to-cell variation plays an important role in the early innate immune response, and that the variability is essential for the efficient activation of the IFNB1 based feedback loop.

  9. Enhancement of radiation response in human hepatocarcinoma cells by Metformin

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Ho; Kim, Won Woo; Kim, Joon; Jung, Won Gyun [Division of heavy ion clinical research, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Jeong, Jae Hoon; Jeong, Youn Kyoung; Kim, Mi Sook [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-11-15

    Metformin (1, 1-dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride), the most widely used drug to treat type 2 diabetic patients under benefit good tolerability profile and low cost, has sparked keen interest as potential anticancer agent. Preclinical studies showed that the primary mechanism of action of metformin is through its ability to activate AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK). Metformin inhibits complex 1 in the mitochondrial electron transport chain, leading to an increase in the AMP-to-ATP ratio, then, phospholylated AMPK increase energy generation or suppress energy consumption and then, inhibits cell growth. However, important caveat in direct action theory of metformin is that millimorlar range, effective dose for inhibition tumor cell growth in vitro, cannot be achieved in patients. This is probably because metformin enter cells through the organic cation transporters OCT1 and OCT2, which is lowly expressed in human cells except liver and adipose cells. dependent pathway rather than through direct effects of the tumor cells. We analyzed combination effect of metformin and radiation focusing to HCC cell lines, which theoretically express high organic cation transporters, producing high centration of metformin in tumor cells. The purpose of this study is to investigate whether metformin had anti-tumor effects when combined with radiation as radiosensitizer in HCC. The results showed that metformin increased radiosensitizing efficacy in HCC cells , as well as in Huh7 xenograft mouse models. Interestingly, metformin effectively sensitizes IR-induced apoptosis in HCC through upregulation of cleaved PARP and caspase3 and increase synergically on DNA damage response with combined treatment.HCC, suggesting potential usefulness of combined therapy of metformin together with radiation for HCC cancer therapy.

  10. Review of ocular manifestations of nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome: What an ophthalmologist needs to know

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Judy J Chen

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Nevoid basal cell carcinoma syndrome (NBCCS is a rare, autosomal dominant disorder characterized by multiple basal cell carcinomas (BCCs, odontogenic keratocysts, palmar and/or plantar pits, and ectopic calcifications of the falx cerebri. Myriad ophthalmologic findings are associated with NBCCS, including periocular BCCs, hypertelorism, strabismus, myelinated nerve fibers, and disorders of the retina and retinal pigment epithelium. We performed a literature search in PubMed for articles on the ophthalmologic manifestations of Gorlin syndrome, published between 1984 and 2014. Of 33 papers, 31 were included. Although Gorlin syndrome is due to mutations in a single gene, it displays variable phenotypic expressivity. Therefore, familiarity with this disorder across clinical specialties is necessary to avoid misdiagnosis. The ophthalmologist should be included in the multidisciplinary team for the management of Gorlin syndrome in order to prevent visual loss and improve the quality of life of these patients.

  11. Analysis of H2 storage needs for early market non-motive fuel cell applications.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Johnson, Terry Alan; Moreno, Marcina; Arienti, Marco; Pratt, Joseph William; Shaw, Leo; Klebanoff, Leonard E.

    2012-03-01

    Hydrogen fuel cells can potentially reduce greenhouse gas emissions and the United States dependence on foreign oil, but issues with hydrogen storage are impeding their widespread use. To help overcome these challenges, this study analyzes opportunities for their near-term deployment in five categories of non-motive equipment: portable power, construction equipment, airport ground support equipment, telecom backup power, and man-portable power and personal electronics. To this end, researchers engaged end users, equipment manufacturers, and technical experts via workshops, interviews, and electronic means, and then compiled these data into meaningful and realistic requirements for hydrogen storage in specific target applications. In addition to developing these requirements, end-user benefits (e.g., low noise and emissions, high efficiency, potentially lower maintenance costs) and concerns (e.g., capital cost, hydrogen availability) of hydrogen fuel cells in these applications were identified. Market data show potential deployments vary with application from hundreds to hundreds of thousands of units.

  12. Cell mediated immune response in human antirabies revaccination

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Débora Regina Veiga

    1987-04-01

    Full Text Available The occurrence of secondary cell mediated immune response (CMI in human antirabies immunization was studied. The Puenzalida & Palácios vaccine was used because it is routinely used in Brazil. CMI was evaluated by lymphoblastic transformation indices obtained in whole blood culture in the presence of rabies and control (nervous tissue antigens. Eleven volunteers submitted to revaccination constituted the group under study, while three other volunteers submitted primo vaccination were utilized as control group. A clear secondary CMI to rabies antigen was detected in all the revaccinated volunteers who showed earlier and more intense response than the control group. Response to the control antigen, however, present in all the components of the first group was not detectable in two out of the three primovaccinated and very low in the third one.

  13. Gene expression in epithelial cells in response to pneumovirus infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosenberg Helene F

    2001-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV and pneumonia virus of mice (PVM are viruses of the family Paramyxoviridae, subfamily pneumovirus, which cause clinically important respiratory infections in humans and rodents, respectively. The respiratory epithelial target cells respond to viral infection with specific alterations in gene expression, including production of chemoattractant cytokines, adhesion molecules, elements that are related to the apoptosis response, and others that remain incompletely understood. Here we review our current understanding of these mucosal responses and discuss several genomic approaches, including differential display reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction (PCR and gene array strategies, that will permit us to unravel the nature of these responses in a more complete and systematic manner.

  14. Antigen-Specific B Cells Reactivate an Effective Cytotoxic T Cell Response against Phagocytosed Salmonella through Cross-Presentation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Wit, J.; Souwer, Y.; Jorritsma, T.; Bos, H.; ten Brinke, A.; Neefjes, J.; Ham, S.M.

    2010-01-01

    Background: The eradication of facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens, like Salmonella typhi, requires the concerted action of both the humoral immune response and the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response. Dendritic cells (DCs) are considered to orchestrate the cytotoxic CD8(+) T cell response vi

  15. Who needs RDD? Combining directory listings with cell phone exchanges for an alternative telephone sampling frame

    OpenAIRE

    Guterbock, Thomas; Diop, Abdoulaye; Ellis, James; Trung Le, Kien

    2011-01-01

    Abstract The traditional Random Digit Dialing method (list-assisted RDD using a frame of landline phone numbers) is clearly under threat. The difficulty and costs of completing telephone surveys have increased due to rising rates of refusal and non-contact. The completeness of coverage of list-assisted RDD samples has diminished due to the proliferation of cell-phone only households. The ability of list-assisted RDD to capture young, mobile, unmarried, and minority households is thus dimin...

  16. Human influenza viruses and CD8(+) T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grant, Emma J; Quiñones-Parra, Sergio M; Clemens, E Bridie; Kedzierska, Katherine

    2016-02-01

    Influenza A viruses (IAVs) cause significant morbidity and mortality worldwide, despite new strain-specific vaccines being available annually. As IAV-specific CD8(+) T cells promote viral control in the absence of neutralizing antibodies, and can mediate cross-reactive immunity toward distinct IAVs to drive rapid recovery from both mild and severe influenza disease, there is great interest in developing a universal T cell vaccine. However, despite detailed studies in mouse models of influenza virus infection, there is still a paucity of data on human epitope-specific CD8(+) T cell responses to IAVs. This review focuses on our current understanding of human CD8(+) T cell immunity against distinct IAVs and discusses the possibility of achieving a CD8(+) T cell mediated-vaccine that protects against multiple, distinct IAV strains across diverse human populations. We also review the importance of CD8(+) T cell immunity in individuals highly susceptible to severe influenza infection, including those hospitalised with influenza, the elderly and Indigenous populations.

  17. Modulation of T cell response by Phellinus linteus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Chun-Jung; Lien, Hsiu-Man; Lin, Hwai-Jeng; Huang, Chao-Lu; Kao, Min-Chuan; Chen, Yu-An; Wang, Chien-Kuo; Chang, Hsiao-Yun; Chang, Yin-Kuang; Wu, Hua-Shan; Lai, Chih-Ho

    2016-01-01

    Phellinus linteus, a species of mushroom, has been shown to contribute to health benefits, such as anti-inflammatory activity and immunomodulatory efficacy. The aim of this study was to analyze the most effective constituents of P. linteus fermented broths, polysaccharides, and to evaluate their immunoregulatory effects on T cells. Four fermented broths (PL1-4) and the dialyzate medium (MD) were prepared from P. linteus mycelia, and the polysaccharide contents of each were analyzed. The P. linteus samples were tested for biological activity in the regulation of T cell activation. In T cells, the production of mitogen-induced interleukin (IL)-2 and cell cycle progression were dose-responsively inhibited by PL3 and MD, primarily through cell-cycle arrest in S phase. PL3 broth, which contained large quantities of polysaccharides, significantly decreased the ratio of interferon-gamma (IFN-γ) to interleukin 4 (IL-4) in T cells. Thus, P. linteus fermented broths produced additive effects on the regulation of the Th1/Th2 balance and show promise for the development of immunomodulatory therapeutics.

  18. DNA damage responses in human induced pluripotent stem cells and embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Olga Momcilovic

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Induced pluripotent stem (iPS cells have the capability to undergo self-renewal and differentiation into all somatic cell types. Since they can be produced through somatic cell reprogramming, which uses a defined set of transcription factors, iPS cells represent important sources of patient-specific cells for clinical applications. However, before these cells can be used in therapeutic designs, it is essential to understand their genetic stability. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we describe DNA damage responses in human iPS cells. We observe hypersensitivity to DNA damaging agents resulting in rapid induction of apoptosis after γ-irradiation. Expression of pluripotency factors does not appear to be diminished after irradiation in iPS cells. Following irradiation, iPS cells activate checkpoint signaling, evidenced by phosphorylation of ATM, NBS1, CHEK2, and TP53, localization of ATM to the double strand breaks (DSB, and localization of TP53 to the nucleus of NANOG-positive cells. We demonstrate that iPS cells temporary arrest cell cycle progression in the G(2 phase of the cell cycle, displaying a lack of the G(1/S cell cycle arrest similar to human embryonic stem (ES cells. Furthermore, both cell types remove DSB within six hours of γ-irradiation, form RAD51 foci and exhibit sister chromatid exchanges suggesting homologous recombination repair. Finally, we report elevated expression of genes involved in DNA damage signaling, checkpoint function, and repair of various types of DNA lesions in ES and iPS cells relative to their differentiated counterparts. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: High degrees of similarity in DNA damage responses between ES and iPS cells were found. Even though reprogramming did not alter checkpoint signaling following DNA damage, dramatic changes in cell cycle structure, including a high percentage of cells in the S phase, increased radiosensitivity and loss of DNA damage-induced G(1/S cell cycle arrest, were

  19. Glycoarray Technologies: Deciphering Interactions from Proteins to Live Cell Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tania M. Puvirajesinghe

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Microarray technologies inspired the development of carbohydrate arrays. Initially, carbohydrate array technology was hindered by the complex structures of glycans and their structural variability. The first designs of glycoarrays focused on the HTP (high throughput study of protein–glycan binding events, and subsequently more in-depth kinetic analysis of carbohydrate–protein interactions. However, the applications have rapidly expanded and now achieve successful discrimination of selective interactions between carbohydrates and, not only proteins, but also viruses, bacteria and eukaryotic cells, and most recently even live cell responses to immobilized glycans. Combining array technology with other HTP technologies such as mass spectrometry is expected to allow even more accurate and sensitive analysis. This review provides a broad overview of established glycoarray technologies (with a special focus on glycosaminoglycan applications and their emerging applications to the study of complex interactions between glycans and whole living cells.

  20. A new method to address unmet needs for extracting individual cell migration features from a large number of cells embedded in 3D volumes.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ivan Adanja

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: In vitro cell observation has been widely used by biologists and pharmacologists for screening molecule-induced effects on cancer cells. Computer-assisted time-lapse microscopy enables automated live cell imaging in vitro, enabling cell behavior characterization through image analysis, in particular regarding cell migration. In this context, 3D cell assays in transparent matrix gels have been developed to provide more realistic in vitro 3D environments for monitoring cell migration (fundamentally different from cell motility behavior observed in 2D, which is related to the spread of cancer and metastases. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: In this paper we propose an improved automated tracking method that is designed to robustly and individually follow a large number of unlabeled cells observed under phase-contrast microscopy in 3D gels. The method automatically detects and tracks individual cells across a sequence of acquired volumes, using a template matching filtering method that in turn allows for robust detection and mean-shift tracking. The robustness of the method results from detecting and managing the cases where two cell (mean-shift trackers converge to the same point. The resulting trajectories quantify cell migration through statistical analysis of 3D trajectory descriptors. We manually validated the method and observed efficient cell detection and a low tracking error rate (6%. We also applied the method in a real biological experiment where the pro-migratory effects of hyaluronic acid (HA were analyzed on brain cancer cells. Using collagen gels with increased HA proportions, we were able to evidence a dose-response effect on cell migration abilities. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The developed method enables biomedical researchers to automatically and robustly quantify the pro- or anti-migratory effects of different experimental conditions on unlabeled cell cultures in a 3D environment.

  1. Temporal properties of network-mediated responses to repetitive stimuli are dependent upon retinal ganglion cell type

    Science.gov (United States)

    Im, Maesoon; Fried, Shelley I.

    2016-04-01

    Objective. To provide artificially-elicited vision that is temporally dynamic, retinal prosthetic devices will need to repeatedly stimulate retinal neurons. However, given the diversity of physiological types of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) as well as the heterogeneity of their responses to electric stimulation, temporal properties of RGC responses have not been adequately investigated. Here, we explored the cell type dependence of network-mediated RGC responses to repetitive electric stimulation at various stimulation rates. Approach. We examined responses of ON and OFF types of RGCs in the rabbit retinal explant to five consecutive stimuli with varying inter-stimulus intervals (10-1000 ms). Each stimulus was a 4 ms long monophasic sinusoidal cathodal current, which was applied epiretinally via a conical electrode. Spiking activity of targeted RGCs was recorded using a cell-attached patch electrode. Main results. ON and OFF cells had distinct responses to repetitive stimuli. Consistent with earlier studies, OFF cells always generated reduced responses to subsequent stimuli compared to responses to the first stimulus. In contrast, a new stimulus to ON cells suppressed all pending/ongoing responses from previous stimuli and initiated its own response that was remarkably similar to the response from a single stimulus in isolation. This previously unreported ‘reset’ behavior was observed exclusively and consistently in ON cells. These contrasts between ON and OFF cells created a range of stimulation rates (4-7 Hz) that maximized the ratio of the responses arising in ON versus OFF cells. Significance. Previous clinical testing reported that subjects perceive bright phosphenes (ON responses) and also prefer stimulation rates of 5-7 Hz. Our results suggest that responses of ON cells are weak at high rates of stimulation (> ˜7 Hz) due to the reset while responses of OFF cells are strong at low rates (cells more closely match physiological patterns (Im and Fried 2015

  2. Highly sensitive quantitative imaging for monitoring single cancer cell growth kinetics and drug response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mustafa Mir

    Full Text Available The detection and treatment of cancer has advanced significantly in the past several decades, with important improvements in our understanding of the fundamental molecular and genetic basis of the disease. Despite these advancements, drug-screening methodologies have remained essentially unchanged since the introduction of the in vitro human cell line screen in 1990. Although the existing methods provide information on the overall effects of compounds on cell viability, they are restricted by bulk measurements, large sample sizes, and lack capability to measure proliferation kinetics at the individual cell level. To truly understand the nature of cancer cell proliferation and to develop personalized adjuvant therapies, there is a need for new methodologies that provide quantitative information to monitor the effect of drugs on cell growth as well as morphological and phenotypic changes at the single cell level. Here we show that a quantitative phase imaging modality known as spatial light interference microscopy (SLIM addresses these needs and provides additional advantages over existing proliferation assays. We demonstrate these capabilities through measurements on the effects of the hormone estradiol and the antiestrogen ICI182,780 (Faslodex on the growth of MCF-7 breast cancer cells. Along with providing information on changes in the overall growth, SLIM provides additional biologically relevant information. For example, we find that exposure to estradiol results in rapidly growing cells with lower dry mass than the control population. Subsequently blocking the estrogen receptor with ICI results in slower growing cells, with lower dry masses than the control. This ability to measure changes in growth kinetics in response to environmental conditions provides new insight on growth regulation mechanisms. Our results establish the capabilities of SLIM as an advanced drug screening technology that provides information on changes in proliferation

  3. Cell-cycle radiation response: Role of intracellular factors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blakely, E.; Chang, P.; Lommel, L.; Bjornstad, K.; Dixon, M.; Tobias, C.; Kumar, K.; Blakely, W. F.

    We have been studying variations of radiosensitivity and endogenous cellular factors during the course of progression through the human and hamster cell cycle. After exposure to low-LET radiations, the most radiosensitive cell stages are mitosis and the G1/S interface. The increased activity of a specific antioxidant enzyme such as superoxide dismutase in G1-phase, and the variations of endogenous thiols during cell division are thought to be intracellular factors of importance to the radiation survival response. These factors may contribute to modifying the age-dependent yield of lesions or more likely, to the efficiency of the repair processes. These molecular factors have been implicated in our cellular measurements of the larger values for the radiobiological oxygen effect late in the cycle compared to earlier cell ages. Low-LET radiation also delays progression through S phase which may allow more time for repair and hence contribute to radioresistance in late-S-phase. The cytoplasmic and intranuclear milieu of the cell appears to have less significant effects on lesions produced by high-LET radiation compared to those made by low-LET radiation. High-LET radiation fails to slow progression through S phase, and there is much less repair of lesions evident at all cell ages; however, high-LET particles cause a more profound block in G2 phase than that observed after low-LET radiation. Hazards posed by the interaction of damage from sequential doses of radiations of different qualities have been evaluated and are shown to lead to a cell-cycle-dependent enhancement of radiobiological effects. A summary comparison of various cell-cycle-dependent endpoints measured with low-or high-LET radiations is given and includes a discussion of the possible additional effects introduced by microgravity.

  4. Monosaccharide-responsive phenylboronate-polyol cell scaffolds for cell sheet and tissue engineering applications.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachamalla Maheedhar Reddy

    Full Text Available Analyte-responsive smart polymeric materials are of great interest and have been actively investigated in the field of regenerative medicine. Phenylboronate containing copolymers form gels with polyols under alkaline conditions. Monosaccharides, by virtue of their higher affinity towards boronate, can displace polyols and solubilize such gels. In the present study, we investigate the possibility of utilizing phenylboronate-polyol interactions at physiological pH in order to develop monosaccharide-responsive degradable scaffold materials for systems dealing with cells and tissues. Amine assisted phenylboronate-polyol interactions were employed to develop novel hydrogel and cryogel scaffolds at neutral pH. The scaffolds displayed monosaccharide inducible gel-sol phase transformability. In vitro cell culture studies demonstrated the ability of scaffolds to support cell adhesion, viability and proliferation. Fructose induced gel degradation is used to recover cells cultured on the hydrogels. The cryogels displayed open macroporous structure and superior mechanical properties. These novel phase transformable phenylboronate-polyol based scaffolds displayed a great potential for various cell sheet and tissue engineering applications. Their monosaccharide responsiveness at physiological pH is very useful and can be utilized in the fields of cell immobilization, spheroid culture, saccharide recognition and analyte-responsive drug delivery.

  5. In vivo, multimodal imaging of B cell distribution and response to antibody immunotherapy in mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel L J Thorek

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: B cell depletion immunotherapy has been successfully employed to treat non-Hodgkin's lymphoma. In recent years, increasing attention has been directed towards also using B-cell depletion therapy as a treatment option in autoimmune disorders. However, it appears that the further development of these approaches will depend on a methodology to determine the relation of B-cell depletion to clinical response and how individual patients should be dosed. Thus far, patients have generally been followed by quantification of peripheral blood B cells, but it is not apparent that this measurement accurately reflects systemic B cell dynamics. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Cellular imaging of the targeted population in vivo may provide significant insight towards effective therapy and a greater understanding of underlying disease mechanics. Superparamagnetic iron oxide (SPIO nanoparticles in concert with near infrared (NIR fluorescent dyes were used to label and track primary C57BL/6 B cells. Following antibody mediated B cell depletion (anti-CD79, NIR-only labeled cells were expeditiously cleared from the circulation and spleen. Interestingly, B cells labeled with both SPIO and NIR were not depleted in the spleen. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Whole body fluorescent tracking of B cells enabled noninvasive, longitudinal imaging of both the distribution and subsequent depletion of B lymphocytes in the spleen. Quantification of depletion revealed a greater than 40% decrease in splenic fluorescent signal-to-background ratio in antibody treated versus control mice. These data suggest that in vivo imaging can be used to follow B cell dynamics, but that the labeling method will need to be carefully chosen. SPIO labeling for tracking purposes, generally thought to be benign, appears to interfere with B cell functions and requires further examination.

  6. Human NK cells positively regulate gammadelta T cells in response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ruijun; Zheng, Xiaodong; Li, Baiqing; Wei, Haiming; Tian, Zhigang

    2006-02-15

    The decrease in NK cell activity and the loss of gammadelta T cells in active pulmonary tuberculosis patients have been reported. In this study, we observed that the proliferating response of gammadelta T cells to the heat-treated Ags of Mycobacterium tuberculosis from different individuals was noted to be dependent on the content or function of NK cells in PBMC in a population study. We also found that NK cells were directly rapidly activated by the heat-treated Ags from M. tuberculosis (H37Ra) in vitro; in turn, the activated NK cells improved gammadelta T cell proliferation both by CD54-mediated cell-cell contact through the forming immune synapse and by soluble factors TNF-alpha, GM-CSF, and IL-12, but not IFN-gamma. Our results demonstrated that an interaction between NK cells and gammadelta T cells existed in antituberculosis immunity. Up-regulating the function of NK cells might be beneficial to the prevention and control of pulmonary tuberculosis.

  7. Cells involved in the immune response. XXIX Establishment of optimal conditions for the primary and secondary immune responses by rabbit lymphoid cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richter, M; Behelak, Y

    1975-01-01

    Attempts were made to initiate the primary and secondary humoral immune responses to sheep red blood cells (SRBC) in vitro as determined by the hemolytic plaque-forming cell (PFC) response, with cell suspensions prepared from a variety of lymphoid organs of the rabbit- thymus, bone marrow, spleen, appendix, sacculus rotundus, Peyer's patches, popliteal lymph node and circulating leukocytes. A number of different media and gaseous phases were utilized in order to establish the optimal conditions for the immune response in vitro. The induction of a secondary PFC response was consistently obtained with 'memory' spleen cells obtained from rabbits 3-6 months following intravenous immunization with SRBC but not with cells of any of the other lymphoid organs, and this response probably represents the activity of memory cells which reside in the rabbit spleen. A primary response was observed only with 'normal' spleen cells, and the medium which faciliated the response was different from that which facilitated the induction of the secondary response in vitro. It was also observed, using a medium in which normal spleen cells were incapable of generating PFC', that mixed cultures of normal spleen and normal appendix or bone marrow cells could give a marked PFC reponse in vitro. Whether the PFC response to SRBCs obtained with the lymphoid cells of normal, unimmunized rabbits represent a true primary response, a secondary response, or a response of a different nature as a consequence of continuous subthreshold immunization of the rabbit with enteric microorganisms which cross-react with the antigen, remains to be determined. However, out initial successes with cultures consisting of cells of at least two distinct lymphoid organs in cases where the cells of any one of these organs could not respond, suggest that interaction of at least two functionally distinct cells is required and that the repsonse observed in vitro is probably a primary immune response.

  8. Hemopoietic cell precursor responses to erythropoietin in plasma clot cultures

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kennedy, W.L.

    1979-01-01

    The time dependence of the response of mouse bone marrow cells to erythropoietin (Ep) in vitro was studied. Experiments include studies on the Ep response of marrow cells from normal, plethoric, or bled mice. Results with normal marrow reveal: (1) Not all erythroid precursors (CFU-E) are alike in their response to Ep. A significant number of the precursors develop to a mature erythroid colony after very short Ep exposures, but they account for only approx. 13% of the total colonies generated when Ep is active for 48 hrs. If Ep is active more than 6 hrs, a second population of erythroid colonies emerges at a nearly constant rate until the end of the culture. Full erythroid colony production requires prolonged exposure to erythropoietin. (2) The longer erythropoietin is actively present, the larger the number of erythroid colonies that reach 17 cells or more. Two distinct populations of immediate erythroid precursors are also present in marrow from plethoric mice. In these mice, total colony numbers are equal to or below those obtained from normal mice. However, the population of fast-responding CFU-E is consistently decreased to 10 to 20% of that found in normal marrow. The remaining colonies are formed from plethoric marrow at a rate equal to normal marrow. With increasing Ep exposures, the number of large colonies produced increases. From the marrow of bled mice, total erythroid colony production is equal to or above that of normal marrow. Two populations of colony-forming cells are again evident, with the fast-responding CFU-E being below normal levels. The lack of colonies from this group was compensated in bled mice by rapid colony production in the second population. A real increase in numbers of precursors present in this pool increased the rate of colony production in culture to twice that of normal marrow. The number of large colonies obtained from bled mice was again increased as the Ep exposure was lengthened. (ERB)

  9. Naturally Occurring Extracellular Matrix Scaffolds for Dermal Regeneration: Do They Really Need Cells?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. M. Eweida

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The pronounced effect of extracellular matrix (ECM scaffolds in supporting tissue regeneration is related mainly to their maintained 3D structure and their bioactive components. These decellularized matrix scaffolds could be revitalized before grafting via adding stem cells, fibroblasts, or keratinocytes to promote wound healing. We reviewed the online published literature in the last five years for the studies that performed ECM revitalization and discussed the results of these studies and the related literature. Eighteen articles met the search criteria. Twelve studies included adding cells to acellular dermal matrix (ADM, 3 studies were on small intestinal mucosa (SIS, one study was on urinary bladder matrix (UBM, one study was on amniotic membrane, and one study included both SIS and ADM loaded constructs. We believe that, in chronic and difficult-to-heal wounds, revitalizing the ECM scaffolds would be beneficial to overcome the defective host tissue interaction. This belief still has to be verified by high quality randomised clinical trials, which are still lacking in literature.

  10. Circulating Tumor Cells: A Review of Present Methods and the Need to Identify Heterogeneous Phenotypes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Millner, Lori M.; Linder, Mark W.; Valdes, Roland

    2016-01-01

    The measurement and characterization of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) hold promise for advancing personalized therapeutics. CTCs are the precursor to metastatic cancer and thus have the potential to radically alter patient treatment and outcome. Currently, clinical information provided by the enumeration of CTCs is limited to predicting clinical outcome. Other areas of interest in advancing the practice of pathology include: using CTCs for early detection of potential metastasis, determining and monitoring the efficacy of individualized treatment regimens, and predicting site-specific metastasis. Important hurdles to overcome in obtaining this type of clinical information involve present limitations in defining, detecting, and isolating CTCs. Currently, CTCs are detected using epithelial markers. The definition of what distinguishes a CTC should be expanded to include CTCs with heterogeneous phenotypes, and markers should be identified to enable a more comprehensive capture. Additionally, most methods available for detecting CTCs do not capture functionally viable CTCs. Retaining functional viability would provide a significant advantage in characterizing CTC-subtypes that may predict the site of metastatic invasion and thus assist in selecting effective treatment regimens. In this review we describe areas of clinical interest followed by a summary of current circulating cell-separation technologies and present limitations. Lastly, we provide insight into what is required to overcome these limitations as they relate to applications in advancing the practice of pathology and laboratory medicine. PMID:23884225

  11. Effects of chrysotherapy on cell mediated immune response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lorber, A; Jackson, W H; Simon, T M

    1982-01-01

    Auranofin (AF) differs significantly from gold sodium thiomalate (GSTM) in formulation, i.e., aurous gold is stabilized by dual sulfur and phosphorus ligands, hydrophobic rather than hydrophilic characteristics, and lack of ionic charge. These attributes facilitate: oral absorption of AF, plasma membrane penetration, increase in intracellular lymphocyte gold concentration; and perhaps thereby influence lymphocyte function. AF treated subjects recorded prompt and sharp declines in mitogen-induced lymphoproliferative response (LMR) greater than 80%; suppressed response to skin testing with dinitrochlorobenezene (DNCB) in 11 of 14 subjects; and blebbing of lymphocyte membranes by scanning electron microscopy. In contrast, lymphocytes from a matched group of GSTM treated subjects recorded later onset and less suppression of LMR; normal response to DNCB skin testing; and did not manifest membrane blebbing. Accordingly, the therapeutic action of AF on immune response was observed in the 16 subjects receiving 6 mg/d of an average of 45 weeks to effect primarily cell mediated rather than humoral immune response when compared with a matched group of GSTM treated patients.

  12. Innate immune response to pulmonary contusion: Identification of cell-type specific inflammatory responses

    OpenAIRE

    Hoth, J. Jason; Wells, Jonathan D.; Yoza, Barbara K.; McCall, Charles E.

    2012-01-01

    Lung injury from pulmonary contusion is a common traumatic injury, predominantly seen after blunt chest trauma such as in vehicular accidents. The local and systemic inflammatory response to injury includes activation of innate immune receptors, elaboration of a variety inflammatory mediators, and recruitment of inflammatory cells to the injured lung. Using a mouse model of pulmonary contusion, we had previously shown that innate immune Toll like receptors 2 and 4 (TLR2 and TLR4) mediate the ...

  13. International stem cell tourism and the need for effective regulation. Part I: Stem cell tourism in Russia and India: clinical research, innovative treatment, or unproven hype?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Cynthia B; Cohen, Peter J

    2010-03-01

    Persons with serious and disabling medical conditions have traveled abroad in search of stem cell treatments in recent years. However, weak or nonexistent oversight systems in some countries provide insufficient patient protections against unproven stem cell treatments, raising concerns about exposure to harm and exploitation. The present article, the first of two, describes and analyzes stem cell tourism in Russia and India and addresses several scientific/medical, ethical, and policy issues raised by the provision of unproven stem cell-based treatments within them. The distinction between treatment based on proven clinical research and "innovative treatment" is addressed and the authors conclude that the innovations at issue constitute neither. Regulatory measures need to be developed or strengthened in accord with internationally accepted standards in such countries to protect those seeking stem cell treatments.

  14. SINGLE-CELL LEVEL INVESTIGATION OF CYTOSKELETAL/CELLULAR RESPONSE TO EXTERNAL STIMULI

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hiddessen, A L

    2007-02-26

    A detailed understanding of the molecular mechanisms by which chemical signals control cell behavior is needed if the complex biological processes of embryogenesis, development, health and disease are to be completely understood. Yet, if we are to fully understand the molecular mechanisms controlling cell behavior, measurements at the single cell level are needed to supplement information gained from population level studies. One of the major challenges to accomplishing studies at the single cell level has been a lack of physical tools to complement the powerful molecular biological assays which have provided much of what we currently know about cell behavior. The goal of this exploratory project is the development of an experimental platform that facilitates integrated observation, tracking and analysis of the responses of many individual cells to controlled environmental factors (e.g. extracellular signals). Toward this goal, we developed chemically-patterned microarrays of both adherent and suspension mammalian cell types. A novel chemical patterning methodology, based on photocatalytic lithography, was developed to construct biomolecule and cell arrays that facilitate analysis of biological function. Our patterning techniques rely on inexpensive stamp materials and visible light, and do not necessitate mass transport or specified substrates. Patterned silicon and glass substrates are modified such that there is a non-biofouling polymer matrix surrounding the adhesive regions that target biomolecules and cells. Fluorescence and reflectance microscopy reveal successful patterning of proteins and single to small clusters of mammalian cells. In vitro assays conducted upon cells on the patterned arrays demonstrate the viability of cells interfacing with this synthetic system. Hence, we have successfully established a versatile cell measurement platform which can be used to characterize the molecular regulators of cellular behavior in a variety of important

  15. PKC activation induces inflammatory response and cell death in human bronchial epithelial cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hyunhee Kim

    Full Text Available A variety of airborne pathogens can induce inflammatory responses in airway epithelial cells, which is a crucial component of host defence. However, excessive inflammatory responses and chronic inflammation also contribute to different diseases of the respiratory system. We hypothesized that the activation of protein kinase C (PKC is one of the essential mechanisms of inflammatory response in airway epithelial cells. In the present study, we stimulated human bronchial lung epithelial (BEAS-2B cells with the phorbol ester Phorbol 12, 13-dibutyrate (PDBu, and examined gene expression profile using microarrays. Microarray analysis suggests that PKC activation induced dramatic changes in gene expression related to multiple cellular functions. The top two interaction networks generated from these changes were centered on NFκB and TNF-α, which are two commonly known pathways for cell death and inflammation. Subsequent tests confirmed the decrease in cell viability and an increase in the production of various cytokines. Interestingly, each of the increased cytokines was differentially regulated at mRNA and/or protein levels by different sub-classes of PKC isozymes. We conclude that pathological cell death and cytokine production in airway epithelial cells in various situations may be mediated through PKC related signaling pathways. These findings suggest that PKCs can be new targets for treatment of lung diseases.

  16. Multivalent proteoglycan modulation of FGF mitogenic responses in perivascular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cattaruzza, Sabrina; Ozerdem, Ugur; Denzel, Martin; Ranscht, Barbara; Bulian, Pietro; Cavallaro, Ugo; Zanocco, Daniela; Colombatti, Alfonso; Stallcup, William B; Perris, Roberto

    2013-04-01

    Sprouting of angiogenic perivascular cells is thought to be highly dependent upon autocrine and paracrine growth factor stimulation. Accordingly, we report that corneal angiogenesis induced by ectopic FGF implantation is strongly impaired in NG2/CSPG4 proteoglycan (PG) null mice known to harbour a putative deficit in pericyte proliferation/mobilization. Conversely, no significant differences were seen between wild type and knockout corneas when VEGF was used as an angiocrine factor. Perturbed responsiveness of NG2-deficient pericytes to paracrine and autocrine stimulation by several FGFs could be confirmed in cells isolated from NG2 null mice, while proliferation induced by other growth factors was equivalent in wild type and knockout cells. Identical results were obtained after siRNA-mediated knock-down of NG2 in human smooth muscle-like cell lines, as also demonstrated by the decreased levels of FGF receptor phosphorylation detected in these NG2 deprived cells. Binding assays with recombinant proteins and molecular interactions examined on live cells asserted that FGF-2 bound to NG2 in a glycosaminoglycan-independent, core protein-mediated manner and that the PG was alone capable of retaining FGF-2 on the cell membrane for subsequent receptor presentation. The use of dominant-negative mutant cells, engineered by combined transduction of NG2 deletion constructs and siRNA knock-down of the endogenous PG, allowed us to establish that the FGF co-receptor activity of NG2 is entirely mediated by its extracellular portion. In fact, forced overexpression of the NG2 ectodomain in human smooth muscle-like cells increased their FGF-2-induced mitosis and compensated for low levels of FGF receptor surface expression, in a manner equivalent to that produced by overexpression of the full-length NG2. Upon FGF binding, the cytoplasmic domain of NG2 is phosphorylated, but there is no evidence that this event elicits signal transductions that could bypass the FGFR-mediated ones

  17. Need for optimizing catalyst loading for achieving affordable microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Inderjeet; Chandra, Amreesh

    2013-08-01

    Microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology is a promising technology for electricity production together with simultaneous water treatment. Catalysts play an important role in deciding the MFC performance. In most reports, effect of catalyst - both type and quantity is not optimized. In this paper, synthesis of nanorods of MnO2-catalyst particles for application in Pt-free MFCs is reported. The effect of catalyst loading i.e., weight ratio, with respect to conducting element and binder has been optimized by employing large number of combinations. Using simple theoretical model, it is shown that too high (or low) concentration of catalysts result in loss of MFC performance. The operation of MFC has been investigated using domestic wastewater as source of bio-waste for obtaining real world situation. Maximum power density of ∼61 mW/m(2) was obtained when weight ratio of catalyst and conducting species was 1:1. Suitable reasons are given to explain the outcomes.

  18. iTRAQ-based proteomic profiling of breast cancer cell response to doxorubicin and TRAIL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leong, Sharon; Nunez, Andrea C; Lin, Mike Z; Crossett, Ben; Christopherson, Richard I; Baxter, Robert C

    2012-07-06

    Breast cancer is a molecularly heterogeneous disease, and predicting response to chemotherapy remains a major clinical challenge. To minimize adverse side-effects or cumulative toxicity in patients unlikely to benefit from treatment, biomarkers indicating treatment efficacy are critically needed. iTRAQ labeling coupled with multidimensional LC-MS/MS of the enriched mitochondria and endoplasmic reticulum fraction, key organelles regulating apoptosis, has led to the discovery of several differentially abundant proteins in breast cancer cells treated with the chemotherapeutic agent doxorubicin followed by the death receptor ligand, TRAIL, among 571 and 801 unique proteins identified in ZR-75-1 and MDA-MB-231 breast cancer cell lines, respectively. The differentially abundant proteins represent diverse biological processes associated with cellular assembly and organization, molecular transport, oxidative stress, cell motility, cell death, and cancer. Despite many differences in molecular phenotype between the two breast cancer cell lines, a comparison of their subproteomes following drug treatment revealed three proteins displaying common regulation: PPIB, AHNAK, and SLC1A5. Changes in these proteins, detected by iTRAQ, were confirmed by immunofluorescence, visualized by confocal microscopy. These novel potential biomarkers may have clinical utility for assessing response to cancer treatment and may provide insight into new therapeutic targets for breast cancer.

  19. The circadian response of intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew J Zele

    Full Text Available Intrinsically photosensitive retinal ganglion cells (ipRGC signal environmental light level to the central circadian clock and contribute to the pupil light reflex. It is unknown if ipRGC activity is subject to extrinsic (central or intrinsic (retinal network-mediated circadian modulation during light entrainment and phase shifting. Eleven younger persons (18-30 years with no ophthalmological, medical or sleep disorders participated. The activity of the inner (ipRGC and outer retina (cone photoreceptors was assessed hourly using the pupil light reflex during a 24 h period of constant environmental illumination (10 lux. Exogenous circadian cues of activity, sleep, posture, caffeine, ambient temperature, caloric intake and ambient illumination were controlled. Dim-light melatonin onset (DLMO was determined from salivary melatonin assay at hourly intervals, and participant melatonin onset values were set to 14 h to adjust clock time to circadian time. Here we demonstrate in humans that the ipRGC controlled post-illumination pupil response has a circadian rhythm independent of external light cues. This circadian variation precedes melatonin onset and the minimum ipRGC driven pupil response occurs post melatonin onset. Outer retinal photoreceptor contributions to the inner retinal ipRGC driven post-illumination pupil response also show circadian variation whereas direct outer retinal cone inputs to the pupil light reflex do not, indicating that intrinsically photosensitive (melanopsin retinal ganglion cells mediate this circadian variation.

  20. How B cells shape the immune response against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maglione, Paul J; Chan, John

    2009-03-01

    Extensive work illustrating the importance of cellular immune mechanisms for protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis has largely relegated B-cell biology to an afterthought within the tuberculosis (TB) field. However, recent studies have illustrated that B lymphocytes, through a variety of interactions with the cellular immune response, play previously underappreciated roles in shaping host defense against non-viral intracellular pathogens, including M. tuberculosis. Work in our laboratory has recently shown that, by considering these lymphocytes more broadly within their variety of interactions with cellular immunity, B cells have a significant impact on the outcome of airborne challenge with M. tuberculosis as well as the resultant inflammatory response. In this review, we advocate for a revised view of TB immunology in which roles of cellular and humoral immunity are not mutually exclusive. In the context of our current understanding of host defense against non-viral intracellular infections, we review recent data supporting a more significant role of B cells during M. tuberculosis infection than previously thought.

  1. From microgravity to osmotic conditions: mechanical integration of plant cells in response to stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wojtaszek, Przemyslaw; Kasprowicz, Anna; Michalak, Michal; Janczara, Renata; Volkmann, Dieter; Baluska, Frantisek

    Chemical reactions and interactions between molecules are commonly thought of as being at the basis of Life. Research of recent years, however, is more and more evidently indicating that physical forces are profoundly affecting the functioning of life at all levels of its organiza-tion. To detect and to respond to such forces, plant cells need to be integrated mechanically. Cell walls are the outermost functional zone of plant cells. They surround the individual cells, and also form a part of the apoplast. In cell suspensions, cell walls are embedded in the cul-ture medium which can be considered as a superapoplast. Through physical and chemical interactions they provide a basis for the structural and functional cell wall-plasma membrane-cytoskeleton (WMC) continuum spanning the whole cell. Here, the working of WMC contin-uum, and the participation of signalling molecules, like NO, would be presented in the context of plant responses to stress. In addition, the effects of the changing composition of WMC continuum will be considered, with particular attention paid to the modifications of the WMC components. Plant cells are normally adapted to changing osmotic conditions, resulting from variable wa-ter availability. The appearance of the osmotic stress activates adaptory mechanisms. If the strength of osmotic stress grows relatively slowly over longer period of time, the cells are able to adapt to conditions that are lethal to non-adapted cells. During stepwise adaptation of tobacco BY-2 suspension cells to the presence of various osmotically active agents, cells diverged into independent, osmoticum type-specific lines. In response to ionic agents (NaCl, KCl), the adhe-sive properties were increased and randomly dividing cells formed clumps, while cells adapted to nonionic osmotica (mannitol, sorbitol, PEG) revealed ordered pattern of precisely positioned cell divisions, resulting in the formation of long cell files. Changes in the growth patterns were accompanied by

  2. Comprehensive mapping of antigen specific T cell responses in hepatitis C virus infected patients with or without spontaneous viral clearance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cui, Yuanyuan; Wang, Shasha; Yan, Hongqing; Li, Dongmei; Zhang, Yonghong; Tu, Zhengkun; Hao, Pei; Chen, Xinyue; Zhong, Jin; Niu, Junqi; Jin, Xia

    2017-01-01

    Elucidating protective immunity against HCV is important for the development of a preventative vaccine. We hypothesize that spontaneous resolution of acute HCV infection offers clue to protective immune responses, and that DAA therapy affects the quality and quantity of HCV-specific T cell responses. To test these hypotheses, we performed T cell epitope mapping in 111 HCV-infected individuals including 61 chronically HCV-1b (CHC-1b) infected, 24 chronically HCV-2a (CHC-2a) infected and 26 spontaneously recovered (SPR) patients with 376 overlapping peptides covering the entire HCV polyprotein. Selected T cell epitopes were then used to evaluate T cell responses in another 22 chronically HCV-1b infected patients on DAA therapy. Results showed that SPR had better HCV-specific T cell responses than CHC, as manifested by higher response rate, greater magnitude and broader epitope coverage. In addition, SPR recognized novel epitopes in Core, E1, E2, NS4B, NS5A regions that were not present in the CHC. Furthermore, during the first 24 weeks of DAA therapy, there was no functional immune reconstitution of HCV-specific T cells. These results indicate that T cell responses may be a correlate of protection. Therefore, effective preventative vaccines should elicit a robust T cell response. Although various DAA regimens efficiently cleared viruses from the blood of HCV-infected patients, there was no contemporaneous early T cell immune reconstitution, suggesting that early treatment is needed for preserving the functions of HCV-specific T cells. PMID:28170421

  3. Antigen-specific regulatory T-cell subsets in transplantation tolerance regulatory T-cell subset quality reduces the need for quantity.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koenen, H.J.P.M.; Joosten, I.

    2006-01-01

    Regulatory T cells (Treg) are critical controllers of the immune response. Disturbed Treg function results in autoimmunity, whereas in transplantation Treg are crucial in graft survival and transplant tolerance. Hence therapeutic modalities that influence Treg numbers or function hold great clinical

  4. Persistence of T-cell immune response induced by two acellular pertussis vaccines in children five years after primary vaccination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palazzo, Raffaella; Carollo, Maria; Bianco, Manuela; Fedele, Giorgio; Schiavoni, Ilaria; Pandolfi, Elisabetta; Villani, Alberto; Tozzi, Alberto E; Mascart, Françoise; Ausiello, Clara M

    2016-01-01

    The resurgence of pertussis suggests the need for greater efforts to understand the long-lasting protective responses induced by vaccination. In this paper we dissect the persistence of T memory responses induced by primary vaccination with two different acellular pertussis (aP) vaccines, hexavalent Hexavac® vaccine (Hexavac) (Sanofi Pasteur MSD) and Infanrix hexa® (Infanrix) (Glaxo-SmithKline Biologicals). We evaluated magnitude and duration of T-cell responses to pertussis toxin (PT) by measuring T-cell proliferation, cytokines (IL-2 and IFNγ) production and memory subsets in two groups of children 5 years after primary vaccination. Some of the enrolled children received only primary vaccination, while others had the pre-school boost dose. Positive T-cell responses to PT were detected in 36% of children. Percentage of responsive children, T-cell proliferation and CD4IL-2+ cells were significantly higher in the children primed with Hexavac than in those who received Infanrix vaccine. No major effects of the boost on PT-specific proliferation were observed. Overall, our data documented a persistence of T-cell memory against PT in a minor fraction of children 5 years after primary vaccination. The different responses induced by Hexavac and Infanrix vaccine could rely on differences in PT inactivation process or excipients/adjuvants formulations.

  5. Transient Treg-cell depletion in adult mice results in persistent self-reactive CD4(+) T-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nyström, Sofia N; Bourges, Dorothée; Garry, Sarah; Ross, Ellen M; van Driel, Ian R; Gleeson, Paul A

    2014-12-01

    Depletion of Foxp3(+) CD4(+) regulatory T cells (Treg) in adults results in chronic inflammation and autoimmune disease. However, the impact of transient Treg-cell depletion on self-reactive responses is poorly defined. Here, we studied the effect of transient depletion of Treg cells on CD4(+) T-cell responses to endogenous self-antigens. Short-term ablation of Treg cells in mice resulted in rapid activation of CD4(+) T cells, increased percentage of IFN-γ(+) and Th17 cells in lymphoid organs, and development of autoimmune gastritis. To track self-reactive responses, we analyzed the activation of naïve gastric-specific CD4(+) T cells. There was a dramatic increase in proliferation and acquisition of effector function of gastric-specific T cells in the stomach draining LNs of Treg-cell-depleted mice, compared with untreated mice, either during Treg-cell depletion or after Treg-cell reconstitution. Moreover, the hyperproliferation of gastric-specific T cells in the Treg-cell-ablated mice was predominantly antigen-dependent. Transient depletion of Treg cells resulted in a shift in the ratio of peripheral:thymic Treg cells in the reemerged Treg-cell population, indicating an altered composition of Treg cells. These findings indicate that transient Treg-cell depletion results in ongoing antigen-driven self-reactive T-cell responses and emphasize the continual requirement for an intact Treg-cell population.

  6. Tracking the elusive cytotoxic T cell response in pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jungersen, Gregers; Nielsen, Morten; Overgaard, Nana Haahr;

    Quantitative and qualitative assessment of antigen-specific cytotoxic T cell (CTL) responses in pigs is not a straightforward process. Through the years we have developed a series of reagents, tools and protocols to characterize peptide-specific CTL responses in pigs. The most common recombinant ...... SLA heavy chains were produced and peptide binding motifs were determined by assays measuring the affinity and stability of the peptide-SLA complex (pSLA) interaction. These results have been used to train neural networks to predict the binding of any pSLA (http......://www.cbs.dtu.dk/services/). Recombinant SLA molecules complexed with verified binding peptides can be assembled to SLA multimers for staining of peptide-specific CTLs, and measured by flow cytometry, as we have shown with FMDV and influenza. This, however, requires SLA-matched pigs for which we have developed two methods: a sequence...

  7. Host Cell Autophagy in Immune Response to Zoonotic Infections

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Panagiotis Skendros

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a fundamental homeostatic process in which cytoplasmic targets are sequestered within double-membraned autophagosomes and subsequently delivered to lysosomes for degradation. Accumulating evidence supports the pivotal role of autophagy in host defense against intracellular pathogens implicating both innate and adaptive immunity. Many of these pathogens cause common zoonotic infections worldwide. The induction of the autophagic machinery by innate immune receptors signaling, such as TLRs, NOD1/2, and p62/SQSTM1 in antigen-presenting cells results in inhibition of survival and elimination of invading pathogens. Furthermore, Th1 cytokines induce the autophagic process, whereas autophagy also contributes to antigen processing and MHC class II presentation, linking innate to adaptive immunity. However, several pathogens have developed strategies to avoid autophagy or exploit autophagic machinery to their advantage. This paper focuses on the role of host cell autophagy in the regulation of immune response against intracellular pathogens, emphasizing on selected bacterial and protozoan zoonoses.

  8. Identification of genes responsive to apoptosis in HL-60 cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wei JIN; Le-feng QU; Ping MIN; Shan CHEN; Hong LI; He LU; Yong-tai HOU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To identify genes responsive to apoptosis in HL-60 cells treated by homoharringtonine. METHODS: cDNA microarray technology was used to detect gene expression and the result of microarrays for genes (TIEG and VDUP1) was confirmed by Northern analysis. RESULTS: Seventy-five individual mRNAs whose mass changed significantly were identified. Among these genes (25 were up-regulated and 50 were down-regulated), most are known related to oncogenes and tumor suppressor. Some genes were involved in apoptosis signaling pathways.CONCLUSION: TGFβ and TNF apoptosis signaling pathways were initiated during apoptosis in HL-60 cells.TIEG and VDUP1 play important roles in mediating apoptosis.

  9. In vitro antitumor immune response induced by fusion of dendritic cells and colon cancer cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Feng Xu; Ying-Jiang Ye; Shan Wang

    2004-01-01

    AIM: The prevention of recurrence of colon cancer (CC)after operation is very important for improvement of the prognosis of CC patients, especially those with micrometastasis. The generation of fused cells between dendritic cells (DCs) and tumor cells maybe an effective approach for tumor antigen presentation in immunotherapy. In this study,we fused human colon caner SW480 cells and human peripheral blood - derived DCs to induce an antitumor activity against human CC.METHODS: CC SW480 cells and human peripheral blood derived DCs were fused with 500 mL/L polyethylene glycol (PEG).RESULTS: The specific T cell responses activated by fusion cells (FCs), were observed. About 100 mL/L to 160 mL/L of the PEG-treated non-adherent cells with fluorescences were considered to be dendritomas that highly expressed the key molecules for antigen presentation in our five cases. In vitro studies showed that fusions effectively activated CD8+ T lymphocytes to secrete interferon-γ. The early apoptotic ratio of the colon cancer SW480 cells was higher than that of controls, which was affected by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) stimulated by dendritomas.CONCLUSION: The data indicate that fusion of tumor cells with DCs is an attractive strategy to induce tumor rejection.

  10. Response of a direct methanol fuel cell to fuel change

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leo, T.J. [Dpto de Sistemas Oceanicos y Navales- ETSI Navales, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Avda Arco de la Victoria s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Raso, M.A.; de la Blanca, E. Sanchez [Dpto de Quimica Fisica I- Fac. CC. Quimicas, Univ. Complutense de Madrid, Avda Complutense s/n, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Navarro, E.; Villanueva, M. [Dpto de Motopropulsion y Termofluidodinamica, ETSI Aeronauticos, Univ. Politecnica de Madrid, Pza Cardenal Cisneros 3, 28040 Madrid (Spain); Moreno, B. [Instituto de Ceramica y Vidrio, Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, C/Kelsen 5, Campus de la UAM, 28049 Cantoblanco, Madrid (Spain)

    2010-10-15

    Methanol and ethanol have recently received much attention as liquid fuels particularly as alternative 'energy-vectors' for the future. In this sense, to find a direct alcohol fuel cell that able to interchange the fuel without losing performances in an appreciable way would represent an evident advantage in the field of portable applications. In this work, the response of a in-house direct methanol fuel cell (DMFC) to the change of fuel from methanol to ethanol and its behaviour at different ambient temperature values have been investigated. A corrosion study on materials suitable to fabricate the bipolar plates has been carried out and either 316- or 2205-duplex stainless steels have proved to be adequate for using in direct alcohol fuel cells. Polarization curves have been measured at different ambient temperature values, controlled by an experimental setup devised for this purpose. Data have been fitted to a model taking into account the temperature effect. For both fuels, methanol and ethanol, a linear dependence of adjustable parameters with temperature is obtained. Fuel cell performance comparison in terms of open circuit voltage, kinetic and resistance is established. (author)

  11. Interleukin-21 triggers effector cell responses in the gut.

    Science.gov (United States)

    De Nitto, Daniela; Sarra, Massimiliano; Pallone, Francesco; Monteleone, Giovanni

    2010-08-07

    In the gut of patients with Crohn's disease and patients with ulcerative colitis, the major forms of inflammatory bowel diseases (IBD) in humans, the tissue-damaging immune response is mediated by an active cross-talk between immune and non-immune cells. Accumulating evidence indicates also that cytokines produced by these cells play a major role in initiating and shaping this pathologic process. One such cytokine seems to be interleukin (IL)-21, a member of the common gamma-chain-receptor family. IL-21 is produced in excess in the inflamed intestine of patients with IBD mostly by activated CD4+ T helper cells co-expressing interferon-gamma and follicular T helper cells. Moreover, both in vitro and in vivo studies indicate that excessive IL-21 production leads to the activation of multiple signaling pathways that expand and sustain the ongoing mucosal inflammation. In this article, we review the available data supporting the pathogenic role of IL-21 in IBD.

  12. Influence of cell cycle on responses of MCF-7 cells to benzo[a]pyrene

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giddings Ian

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Benzo[a]pyrene (BaP is a widespread environmental genotoxic carcinogen that damages DNA by forming adducts. This damage along with activation of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AHR induces complex transcriptional responses in cells. To investigate whether human cells are more susceptible to BaP in a particular phase of the cell cycle, synchronised breast carcinoma MCF-7 cells were exposed to BaP. Cell cycle progression was analysed by flow cytometry, DNA adduct formation was assessed by 32P-postlabeling analysis, microarrays of 44K human genome-wide oligos and RT-PCR were used to detect gene expression (mRNA changes and Western blotting was performed to determine the expression of some proteins, including cytochrome P450 (CYP 1A1 and CYP1B1, which are involved in BaP metabolism. Results Following BaP exposure, cells evaded G1 arrest and accumulated in S-phase. Higher levels of DNA damage occurred in S- and G2/M- compared with G0/G1-enriched cultures. Genes that were found to have altered expression included those involved in xenobiotic metabolism, apoptosis, cell cycle regulation and DNA repair. Gene ontology and pathway analysis showed the involvement of various signalling pathways in response to BaP exposure, such as the Catenin/Wnt pathway in G1, the ERK pathway in G1 and S, the Nrf2 pathway in S and G2/M and the Akt pathway in G2/M. An important finding was that higher levels of DNA damage in S- and G2/M-enriched cultures correlated with higher levels of CYP1A1 and CYP1B1 mRNA and proteins. Moreover, exposure of synchronised MCF-7 cells to BaP-7,8-diol-9,10-epoxide (BPDE, the ultimate carcinogenic metabolite of BaP, did not result in significant changes in DNA adduct levels at different phases of the cell cycle. Conclusions This study characterised the complex gene response to BaP in MCF-7 cells and revealed a strong correlation between the varying efficiency of BaP metabolism and DNA damage in different phases of the cell

  13. Non-small-cell lung cancer cells combat epidermal growth factor receptor tyrosine kinase inhibition through immediate adhesion-related responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang HY

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Hsian-Yu Wang,1,2 Min-Kung Hsu,3,4 Kai-Hsuan Wang,1 Ching-Ping Tseng,2,4 Feng-Chi Chen,3,4 John T-A Hsu1,4 1Institute of Biotechnology and Pharmaceutical Research, National Health Research Institutes (NHRI, Zhunan, Miaoli County, 2Institute of Molecular Medicine and Bioengineering, National Chiao Tung University (NCTU, Hsinchu, 3Division of Biostatistics and Bioinformatics, Institute of Population Health Sciences, National Health Research Institutes (NHRI, Zhunan, Miaoli County, 4Department of Biological Science and Technology, National Chiao Tung University (NCTU, Hsinchu, Taiwan, Republic of China Background: Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, such as gefitinib, erlotinib, and afatinib, have greatly improved treatment efficacy in non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC patients with drug-sensitive EGFR mutations. However, in some TKI responders, the benefits of such targeted therapies are limited by the rapid development of resistance, and strategies to overcome this resistance are urgently needed. Studies of drug resistance in cancer cells typically involve long term in vitro induction to obtain stably acquired drug-resistant cells followed by elucidation of resistance mechanisms, but the immediate responses of cancer cells upon drug treatment have been ignored. The aim of this study was to investigate the immediate responses of NSCLC cells upon treatment with EGFR TKIs.Results: Both NSCLC cells, ie, PC9 and H1975, showed immediate enhanced adhesion-related responses as an apoptosis-countering mechanism upon first-time TKI treatment. By gene expression and pathway analysis, adhesion-related pathways were enriched in gefitinib-treated PC9 cells. Pathway inhibition by small-hairpin RNAs or small-molecule drugs revealed that within hours of EGFR TKI treatment, NSCLC cells used adhesion-related responses to combat the drugs. Importantly, we show here that the Src family inhibitor, dasatinib, dramatically inhibits

  14. Approach to a case of multiple irregular red cell antibodies in a liver transplant recipient: Need for developing competence

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ravi C Dara

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver transplant procedure acts as a challenge for transfusion services in terms of specialized blood components, serologic problems, and immunologic effects of transfusion. Red cell alloimmunization in patients awaiting a liver transplant complicate the process by undue delay or unavailability of compatible red blood cell units. Compatible blood units can be provided by well-equipped immunohematology laboratory, which has expertise in resolving these serological problems. This report illustrates resolution of a case with multiple alloantibodies using standard techniques, particularly rare antisera. Our case re-emphasizes the need for universal antibody screening in all patients as part of pretransfusion testing, which helps to identify atypical antibodies and plan for appropriate transfusion support well in time. We recommend that the centers, especially the ones that perform complex procedures like solid organ transplants and hematological transplants should have the necessary immunohematological reagents including rare antisera to resolve complex cases of multiple antibodies as illustrated in this case.

  15. Autophagy in response to photodynamic therapy: cell survival vs. cell death

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oleinick, Nancy L.; Xue, Liang-yan; Chiu, Song-mao; Joseph, Sheeba

    2009-02-01

    Autophagy (or more properly, macroautophagy) is a pathway whereby damaged organelles or other cell components are encased in a double membrane, the autophagosome, which fuses with lysosomes for digestion by lysosomal hydrolases. This process can promote cell survival by removing damaged organelles, but when damage is extensive, it can also be a mechanism of cell death. Similar to the Kessel and Agostinis laboratories, we have reported the vigorous induction of autophagy by PDT; this was found in human breast cancer MCF-7 cells whether or not they were able to efficiently induce apoptosis. One way to evaluate the role of autophagy in PDT-treated cells is to silence one of the essential genes in the pathway. Kessel and Reiners silenced the Atg7 gene of murine leukemia L1210 cells using inhibitory RNA and found sensitization to PDT-induced cell death at a low dose of PDT, implying that autophagy is protective when PDT damage is modest. We have examined the role of autophagy in an epithelium-derived cancer cell by comparing parental and Atg7-silenced MCF-7 cells to varying doses of PDT with the phthalocyanine photosensitizer Pc 4. In contrast to L1210 cells, autophagy-deficient MCF-7 cells were more resistant to the lethal effects of PDT, as judged by clonogenic assays. A possible explanation for the difference in outcome for L1210 vs. MCF-7 cells is the greatly reduced ability of the latter to undergo apoptosis, a deficiency that may convert autophagy into a cell-death process even at low PDT doses. Experiments to investigate the mechanism(s) responsible are in process.

  16. Cell wide responses to low oxygen exposure in Desulfovibriovulgaris Hildenborough

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mukhopadhyay, A.; Redding, A.; Joachimiak, M.; Arkin, A.; Borglin, S.; Dehal, P.; Chakraborty, R.; Geller, J.; Hazen, T.; He, Q.; Joyner, D.; Martin, V.; Wall, J.; Yang, Z.; Zhou, J.; Keasling, J.

    2007-03-11

    The responses of the anaerobic, sulfate-reducing Desulfovibrio vulgaris Hildenborough to low oxygen exposure (0.1% O{sub 2}) were monitored via transcriptomics and proteomics. Exposure to 0.1% O{sub 2} caused a decrease in growth rate without affecting viability. A concerted up regulation in the predicted peroxide stress response regulon (PerR) genes was observed in response to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure. Several of these candidates also showed increases in protein abundance. Among the remaining small number of transcript changes was the up regulation of the predicted transmembrane tetraheme cytochrome c3 complex. Other known oxidative stress response candidates remained unchanged during this low O{sub 2} exposure. To fully understand the results of the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, transcriptomics and proteomics data were collected for exposure to air using a similar experimental protocol. In contrast to the 0.1% O{sub 2} exposure, air exposure was detrimental to both the growth rate and viability and caused dramatic changes at both the transcriptome and proteome levels. Interestingly, the transcripts of the predicted PerR regulon genes were down regulated during air exposure. Our results highlight the differences in the cell wide response to low and high O{sub 2} levels of in D. vulgaris and suggest that while exposure to air is highly detrimental to D. vulgaris, this bacterium can successfully cope with periodic exposure to low O{sub 2} levels in its environment.

  17. Unresolved issues in hematopoietic stem cell transplantation for severe combined immunodeficiency: need for safer conditioning and reduced late effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horn, Biljana; Cowan, Morton J

    2013-05-01

    In this review we discuss recent outcomes of hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) for patients with severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID), including survival, T- and B-cell reconstitution, and late effects, particularly those related to genotype, use of conditioning regimen, and use of alternative donors. We identify the following issues that require additional data, which can be obtained through cooperative studies: outcomes of patients with SCID who did not receive conditioning before alternative donor HCT; outcomes of patients with SCID who did not receive graft-versus-host disease prophylaxis after T cell-replete HCT; late effects of HCT for patients with SCID, including neurocognitive outcomes, growth, and development; and their relationship to genotype and use of alkylating agents for conditioning. Careful follow-up of outcomes of all newborns receiving diagnoses based on newborn screening programs for SCID is essential because data are scarce on the effects of conditioning regimens in very young patients. A consensus on the definition of T- and B-cell recovery, criteria for additional "boosts," pharmacokinetic data of chemotherapy agents used in young children, and uniformity of the use of various chemotherapy agents are needed to compare results among institutions. Finally, development of new nontoxic conditioning regimens for HCT that can be safely used in very young children is required.

  18. DNA damage response signaling in lung adenocarcinoma A549 cells following gamma and carbon beam irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ghosh, Somnath [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Narang, Himanshi, E-mail: himinarang@gmail.com [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India); Sarma, Asitikantha [Radiation Biology Laboratory, Inter University Accelerator Centre, Aruna Asaf Ali Marg, New Delhi 110 067 (India); Krishna, Malini [Radiation Biology and Health Sciences Division, Bhabha Atomic Research Centre, Trombay, Mumbai 400 085 (India)

    2011-11-01

    Carbon beams (5.16 MeV/u, LET = 290 keV/{mu}m) are high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation characterized by higher relative biological effectiveness than low LET radiation. The aim of the current study was to determine the signaling differences between {gamma}-rays and carbon ion-irradiation. A549 cells were irradiated with 1 Gy carbon or {gamma}-rays. Carbon beam was found to be three times more cytotoxic than {gamma}-rays despite the fact that the numbers of {gamma}-H2AX foci were same. Percentage of cells showing ATM/ATR foci were more with {gamma}-rays however number of foci per cell were more in case of carbon irradiation. Large BRCA1 foci were found in all carbon irradiated cells unlike {gamma}-rays irradiated cells and prosurvival ERK pathway was activated after {gamma}-rays irradiation but not carbon. The noteworthy finding of this study is the early phase apoptosis induction by carbon ions. In the present study in A549 lung adenocarcinoma, authors conclude that despite activation of same repair molecules such as ATM and BRCA1, differences in low and high LET damage responses might be due to their distinct macromolecular complexes rather than their individual activation and the activation of cytoplasmic pathways such as ERK, whether it applies to all the cell lines need to be further explored.

  19. In vitro enhancement of dendritic cell-mediated anti-glioma immune response by graphene oxide

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wei; Li, Zhongjun; Duan, Jinhong; Wang, Chen; Fang, Ying; Yang, Xian-Da

    2014-06-01

    Malignant glioma has extremely poor prognosis despite combination treatments with surgery, radiation, and chemotherapy. Dendritic cell (DC)-based immunotherapy may potentially serve as an adjuvant treatment of glioma, but its efficacy generally needs further improvement. Here we explored whether graphene oxide (GO) nanosheets could modulate the DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response in vitro, using the T98G human glioma cell line as the study model. Pulsing DCs with a glioma peptide antigen (Ag) generated a limited anti-glioma response compared to un-pulsed DCs. Pulsing DCs with GO alone failed to produce obvious immune modulation effects. However, stimulating DCs with a mixture of GO and Ag (GO-Ag) significantly enhanced the anti-glioma immune reaction ( p < 0.05). The secretion of interferon gamma (IFN-γ) by the lymphocytes was also markedly boosted by GO-Ag. Additionally, the anti-glioma immune response induced by GO-Ag appeared to be target-specific. Furthermore, at the concentration used in this study, GO exhibited a negligible effect on the viability of the DCs. These results suggested that GO might have potential utility for boosting a DC-mediated anti-glioma immune response.

  20. The Importance of the Nurse Cells and Regulatory Cells in the Control of T Lymphocyte Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    María Guadalupe Reyes García

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available T lymphocytes from the immune system are bone marrow-derived cells whose development and activities are carefully supervised by two sets of accessory cells. In the thymus, the immature young T lymphocytes are engulfed by epithelial “nurse cells” and retained in vacuoles, where most of them (95% are negatively selected and removed when they have an incomplete development or express high affinity autoreactive receptors. The mature T lymphocytes that survive to this selection process leave the thymus and are controlled in the periphery by another subpopulation of accessory cells called “regulatory cells,” which reduce any excessive immune response and the risk of collateral injuries to healthy tissues. By different times and procedures, nurse cells and regulatory cells control both the development and the functions of T lymphocyte subpopulations. Disorders in the T lymphocytes development and migration have been observed in some parasitic diseases, which disrupt the thymic microenvironment of nurse cells. In other cases, parasites stimulate rather than depress the functions of regulatory T cells decreasing T-mediated host damages. This paper is a short review regarding some features of these accessory cells and their main interactions with T immature and mature lymphocytes. The modulatory role that neurotransmitters and hormones play in these interactions is also revised.

  1. Dental pulp response to bacterial cell wall material.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Warfvinge, J; Dahlén, G; Bergenholtz, G

    1985-08-01

    Lipopolysaccharides (LPS) from Bacteroides oralis and Veillonella parvula and cell wall material from Lactobacillus casei were studied for their capacity to induce leukocyte migration in the dental pulp and in an implanted wound chamber. Three adult monkeys were challenged using lyophilized material sealed into buccal Class V cavities prepared in dentin. Pulp tissue responses were observed histologically eight and 72 hours after initiation of the experiment. Subjacent to cut dentinal tubules, bacterial materials induced polymorphonuclear leukocyte (PMN's) infiltration in the pulp tissue of the majority of test teeth examined. Responses were similar for the three bacterial test materials at both time periods. Topical applications of bovine serum albumin (BSA), used as a control, induced significantly less accumulation of PMN's. Assessments of induced exudate volumes and leukocyte densities in chambers implanted in rats showed comparable rankings with pulpal experiment between test (i.e., bacterial) and control (BSA) materials. Analysis of the data indicates that high-molecular-weight complexes of bacterial cell walls may adversely affect pulpal tissue across freshly exposed dentin.

  2. Mammalian stem cells reprogramming in response to terahertz radiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jonathan Bock

    Full Text Available We report that extended exposure to broad-spectrum terahertz radiation results in specific changes in cellular functions that are closely related to DNA-directed gene transcription. Our gene chip survey of gene expression shows that whereas 89% of the protein coding genes in mouse stem cells do not respond to the applied terahertz radiation, certain genes are activated, while other are repressed. RT-PCR experiments with selected gene probes corresponding to transcripts in the three groups of genes detail the gene specific effect. The response was not only gene specific but also irradiation conditions dependent. Our findings suggest that the applied terahertz irradiation accelerates cell differentiation toward adipose phenotype by activating the transcription factor peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARG. Finally, our molecular dynamics computer simulations indicate that the local breathing dynamics of the PPARG promoter DNA coincides with the gene specific response to the THz radiation. We propose that THz radiation is a potential tool for cellular reprogramming.

  3. Differential transcriptional responses to Ebola and Marburg virus infection in bat and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzer, Martin; Krähling, Verena; Amman, Fabian; Barth, Emanuel; Bernhart, Stephan H; Carmelo, Victor A O; Collatz, Maximilian; Doose, Gero; Eggenhofer, Florian; Ewald, Jan; Fallmann, Jörg; Feldhahn, Lasse M; Fricke, Markus; Gebauer, Juliane; Gruber, Andreas J; Hufsky, Franziska; Indrischek, Henrike; Kanton, Sabina; Linde, Jörg; Mostajo, Nelly; Ochsenreiter, Roman; Riege, Konstantin; Rivarola-Duarte, Lorena; Sahyoun, Abdullah H; Saunders, Sita J; Seemann, Stefan E; Tanzer, Andrea; Vogel, Bertram; Wehner, Stefanie; Wolfinger, Michael T; Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan; Grosse, Ivo; Hofacker, Ivo; Hoffmann, Steve; Kaleta, Christoph; Stadler, Peter F; Becker, Stephan; Marz, Manja

    2016-10-07

    The unprecedented outbreak of Ebola in West Africa resulted in over 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths, underlining the need for a better understanding of the biology of this highly pathogenic virus to develop specific counter strategies. Two filoviruses, the Ebola and Marburg viruses, result in a severe and often fatal infection in humans. However, bats are natural hosts and survive filovirus infections without obvious symptoms. The molecular basis of this striking difference in the response to filovirus infections is not well understood. We report a systematic overview of differentially expressed genes, activity motifs and pathways in human and bat cells infected with the Ebola and Marburg viruses, and we demonstrate that the replication of filoviruses is more rapid in human cells than in bat cells. We also found that the most strongly regulated genes upon filovirus infection are chemokine ligands and transcription factors. We observed a strong induction of the JAK/STAT pathway, of several genes encoding inhibitors of MAP kinases (DUSP genes) and of PPP1R15A, which is involved in ER stress-induced cell death. We used comparative transcriptomics to provide a data resource that can be used to identify cellular responses that might allow bats to survive filovirus infections.

  4. Differential transcriptional responses to Ebola and Marburg virus infection in bat and human cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hölzer, Martin; Krähling, Verena; Amman, Fabian; Barth, Emanuel; Bernhart, Stephan H.; Carmelo, Victor A. O.; Collatz, Maximilian; Doose, Gero; Eggenhofer, Florian; Ewald, Jan; Fallmann, Jörg; Feldhahn, Lasse M.; Fricke, Markus; Gebauer, Juliane; Gruber, Andreas J.; Hufsky, Franziska; Indrischek, Henrike; Kanton, Sabina; Linde, Jörg; Mostajo, Nelly; Ochsenreiter, Roman; Riege, Konstantin; Rivarola-Duarte, Lorena; Sahyoun, Abdullah H.; Saunders, Sita J.; Seemann, Stefan E.; Tanzer, Andrea; Vogel, Bertram; Wehner, Stefanie; Wolfinger, Michael T.; Backofen, Rolf; Gorodkin, Jan; Grosse, Ivo; Hofacker, Ivo; Hoffmann, Steve; Kaleta, Christoph; Stadler, Peter F.; Becker, Stephan; Marz, Manja

    2016-01-01

    The unprecedented outbreak of Ebola in West Africa resulted in over 28,000 cases and 11,000 deaths, underlining the need for a better understanding of the biology of this highly pathogenic virus to develop specific counter strategies. Two filoviruses, the Ebola and Marburg viruses, result in a severe and often fatal infection in humans. However, bats are natural hosts and survive filovirus infections without obvious symptoms. The molecular basis of this striking difference in the response to filovirus infections is not well understood. We report a systematic overview of differentially expressed genes, activity motifs and pathways in human and bat cells infected with the Ebola and Marburg viruses, and we demonstrate that the replication of filoviruses is more rapid in human cells than in bat cells. We also found that the most strongly regulated genes upon filovirus infection are chemokine ligands and transcription factors. We observed a strong induction of the JAK/STAT pathway, of several genes encoding inhibitors of MAP kinases (DUSP genes) and of PPP1R15A, which is involved in ER stress-induced cell death. We used comparative transcriptomics to provide a data resource that can be used to identify cellular responses that might allow bats to survive filovirus infections. PMID:27713552

  5. Effects of meal size and composition on incretin, alpha-cell, and beta-cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M; McQuarrie, Kelly; Girman, Cynthia J

    2009-01-01

    of beta-cell function and incremental areas under the curve of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP were calculated. Mixed models and Friedman tests were used to test for differences in meal responses. The large CH-rich meal and fat-rich meal resulted in a slightly larger insulin response......The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate postprandial insulin release from the beta-cells. We investigated the effects of 3 standardized meals with different caloric and nutritional content in terms of postprandial glucose......, insulin, glucagon, and incretin responses. In a randomized crossover study, 18 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 6 healthy volunteers underwent three 4-hour meal tolerance tests (small carbohydrate [CH]-rich meal, large CH-rich meal, and fat-rich meal). Non-model-based and model-based estimates...

  6. Human Bronchial Epithelial Cell Response to Heavy Particle Exposure

    Science.gov (United States)

    Story, Michael; Ding, Liang-Hao; Minna, John; Park, Seong-mi; Peyton, Michael; Larsen, Jill

    2012-07-01

    A battery of non-oncogenically immortalized human bronchial epithelial cells (HBECs) are being used to examine the molecular changes that lead to lung carcinogenesis after exposure to heavy particles found in the free space environment. The goal is to ultimately identify biomarkers of radioresponse that can be used for prediction of carcinogenic risk for fatal lung cancer. Our initial studies have focused on the cell line HBEC3 KT and the isogenic variant HBEC3 KTR53, which overexpresses the RASv12 mutant and where p53 has been knocked down by shRNA, and is considered to be a more oncogenically progressed variant. We have previously described the response of HBEC3 KT at the cellular and molecular level, however, the focus here is on the rate of cellular transformation after HZE radiation exposure and the molecular changes in transformed cells. When comparing the two cell lines we find that there is a maximum rate of cellular transformation at 0.25 Gy when cells are exposed to 1 GeV Fe particles, and, for the HBEC3 KTR53 there are multiple pathways upregulated that promote anchorage independent growth including the mTOR pathway, the TGF-1 pathway, RhoA signaling and the ERK/MAPK pathway as early as 2 weeks after radiation. This does not occur in the HBEC3 KT cell line. Transformed HBEC3 KT cells do not show any morphologic or phenotypic changes when grown as cell cultures. HBEC3 KTR53 cells on the other hand show substantial changes in morphology from a cobblestone epithelial appearance to a mesenchymal appearance with a lack of contact inhibition. This epithelial to mesenchymal change in morphology is accompanied by the expression of vimentin and a reduction in the expression of E-cadherin, which are hallmarks of epithelial to mesenchymal transition. Interestingly, for HBEC3 KT transformed cells there are no mutations in the p53 gene, 2 of 15 clones were found to be heterozygous for the RASV12 mutation, and 3 of 15 clones expressed high levels of BigH3, a TGFB-responsive

  7. Enhancement of Spectral Response of Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Shuai

    Dye-Sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is a class of third-generation solar devices. A notable feature of DSSC is that it can be manufactured by solution-based approach; this non-vacuum processing renders significant reduction in manufacturing costs. Different from conventional solar cells, in a DSSC, mesoporous semiconductor film with large surface areas is utilized for anchoring dye molecules, serving as light absorbing layer. Dye sensitizers play an important role in determining the final performance in DSSCs. Since the first highly-efficient DSSC was reported in 1991 sensitized by a ruthenium-based dye, numerous researchers have been focused on the development and characterization of various kinds of dyes for the applications in DSSCs. These include mainly metal complexes dyes, organic dyes, porphyrins and phthalocyanines dyes. The first part of my thesis work is to develop and test new dyes for DSSCs and a series of phenothiazine-based organic dyes and new porphyrin dyes are reported during the process. It has been realized that extending the response of dye sensitizers to a wider range of the solar spectrum is a key step in further improving the device efficiency. Typically, there are two ways for expanding the strong spectral response of DSSCs from visible to far red/NIR region. One approach is called co-sensitization. Herein, we demonstrate a new co-sensitization concept where small molecules is used to insert the interstitial site of between the pre-adsorbed large molecules. In this case, the co-adsorbed small ones is found to improve the light response and impede the back recombination, finally leading to the power conversion efficiency over 10% in conventional DSSC devices and a record-equaling efficiency of 9.2% in quasi-solid-state devices. I also implemented graphene sheets in the anode films for better charge transfer efficiency and break the energy conversion limit of co-sensitization in DSSCs. The optimal configuration between porphyrin dyes and

  8. Lead Agency Responsibilities to Keep Informed of Personnel Needs in the Food and Agricultural Sciences are not being Fully Met.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1981-12-28

    managers told us that various experiences in hiring and retaining personnel can be attributed to several causes, such as the degree of technology needed...General Foods Corp. - processors of packaged grocery products Hershey Foods Corp. - chocolates and confectionary products and pasta International...Placement Service National Academy of Sciences National Institutes of Health National Science Foundation Office of Technology Assessment Rockefeller

  9. Transient responses of phosphoric acid fuel cell power plant system. Ph.D. Thesis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Cheng-Yi

    1983-01-01

    An analytical and computerized study of the steady state and transient response of a phosphoric acid fuel cell (PAFC) system was completed. Parametric studies and sensitivity analyses of the PAFC system's operation were accomplished. Four non-linear dynamic models of the fuel cell stack, reformer, shift converters, and heat exchangers were developed based on nonhomogeneous non-linear partial differential equations, which include the material, component, energy balance, and electrochemical kinetic features. Due to a lack of experimental data for the dynamic response of the components only the steady state results were compared with data from other sources, indicating reasonably good agreement. A steady state simulation of the entire system was developed using, nonlinear ordinary differential equations. The finite difference method and trial-and-error procedures were used to obtain a solution. Using the model, a PAFC system, that was developed under NASA Grant, NCC3-17, was improved through the optimization of the heat exchanger network. Three types of cooling configurations for cell plates were evaluated to obtain the best current density and temperature distributions. The steady state solutions were used as the initial conditions in the dynamic model. The transient response of a simplified PAFC system, which included all of the major components, subjected to a load change was obtained. Due to the length of the computation time for the transient response calculations, analysis on a real-time computer was not possible. A simulation of the real-time calculations was developed on a batch type computer. The transient response characteristics are needed for the optimization of the design and control of the whole PAFC system. All of the models, procedures and simulations were programmed in Fortran and run on IBM 370 computers at Cleveland State University and the NASA Lewis Research Center.

  10. CD4 T cells mediate both positive and negative regulation of the immune response to HIV infection: complex role of T follicular helper cells and Regulatory T cells in pathogenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chansavath ePhetsouphanh

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available HIV-1 infection results in chronic activation of cells in lymphoid tissue, including T cells, B cells and myeloid lineage cells. The resulting characteristic hyperplasia is an amalgam of proliferating host immune cells in the adaptive response, increased concentrations of innate response mediators due to viral and bacterial products, and homeostatic responses to inflammation. While it is generally thought that CD4 T cells are greatly depleted, in fact, two types of CD4 T cells appear to be increased, namely regulatory T cells (Tregs and T follicular helper cells (Tfh. These cells have opposing roles, but may both be important in the pathogenic process. Whether Tregs are failing in their role to limit lymphocyte activation is unclear, but there is no doubt now that Tfh are associated with B cell hyperplasia and increased germinal centre activity. Antiretroviral therapy (ART may reduce the lymphocyte activation, but not completely, and therefore there is a need for interventions that selectively enhance normal CD4 function without exacerbating Tfh, B cell or Treg dysfunction.

  11. A qualitative exploration of the perceptions and information needs of public health inspectors responsible for food safety

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sargeant Jan M

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In Ontario, local public health inspectors play an important frontline role in protecting the public from foodborne illness. This study was an in-depth exploration of public health inspectors' perceptions of the key food safety issues in public health, and their opinions and needs with regards to food safety information resources. Methods Four focus group discussions were conducted with public health inspectors from the Central West region of Ontario, Canada during June and July, 2008. A questioning route was used to standardize qualitative data collection. Audio recordings of sessions were transcribed verbatim and data-driven content analysis was performed. Results A total of 23 public health inspectors participated in four focus group discussions. Five themes emerged as key food safety issues: time-temperature abuse, inadequate handwashing, cross-contamination, the lack of food safety knowledge by food handlers and food premise operators, and the lack of food safety information and knowledge about specialty foods (i.e., foods from different cultures. In general, participants reported confidence with their current knowledge of food safety issues and foodborne pathogens. Participants highlighted the need for a central source for food safety information, access to up-to-date food safety information, resources in different languages, and additional food safety information on specialty foods. Conclusions The information gathered from these focus groups can provide a basis for the development of resources that will meet the specific needs of public health inspectors involved in protecting and promoting food safety.

  12. Clinical adjuvant combinations stimulate potent B-cell responses in vitro by activating dermal dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katie Matthews

    Full Text Available CD14(+ dermal DCs (CD14(+ DDCs have a natural capacity to activate naïve B-cells. Targeting CD14(+ DDCs is therefore a rational approach for vaccination strategies aimed at improving humoral responses towards poorly immunogenic antigens, for example, HIV-1 envelope glycoproteins (Env. Here, we show that two clinically relevant TLR ligand combinations, Hiltonol plus Resiquimod and Glucopyranosyl lipid A plus Resiquimod, potently activate CD14(+ DDCs, as shown by enhanced expression of multiple cytokines (IL-6, IL-10, IL-12p40 and TNF-α. Furthermore, the responses of CD14(+ DDCs to these TLR ligands were not compromised by the presence of HIV-1 gp120, which can drive immunosuppressive effects in vitro and in vivo. The above TLR ligand pairs were better than the individual agents at boosting the inherent capacity of CD14(+ DDCs to induce naïve B-cells to proliferate and differentiate into CD27(+ CD38(+ B-cells that secrete high levels of immunoglobulins. CD14(+ DDCs stimulated by these TLR ligand combinations also promoted the differentiation of Th1 (IFN-γ-secreting, but not Th17, CD4(+ T-cells. These observations may help to identify adjuvant strategies aimed at inducing better antibody responses to vaccine antigens, including, but not limited to HIV-1 Env.

  13. Intraoperative optical assessment of photodynamic therapy response of superficial oral squamous cell carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohrbach, Daniel J.; Rigual, Nestor; Arshad, Hassan; Tracy, Erin C.; Cooper, Michelle T.; Shafirstein, Gal; Wilding, Gregory; Merzianu, Mihai; Baumann, Heinz; Henderson, Barbara W.; Sunar, Ulas

    2016-01-01

    This study investigated whether diffuse optical spectroscopy (DOS) measurements could assess clinical response to photodynamic therapy (PDT) in patients with head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC). In addition, the correlation between parameters measured with DOS and the crosslinking of signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 (STAT3), a molecular marker for PDT-induced photoreaction, was investigated. Thirteen patients with early stage HNSCC received the photosensitizer 2-[1-hexyloxyethyl]-2-devinylpyropheophorbide-a (HPPH) and DOS measurements were performed before and after PDT in the operating room (OR). In addition, biopsies were acquired after PDT to assess the STAT3 crosslinking. Parameters measured with DOS, including blood volume fraction, blood oxygen saturation (StO2), HPPH concentration (cHPPH), HPPH fluorescence, and blood flow index (BFI), were compared to the pathologic response and the STAT3 crosslinking. The best individual predictor of pathological response was a change in cHPPH (sensitivity=60%, specificity=100%), while discrimination analysis using a two-parameter classifier (change in cHPPH and change in StO2) classified pathological response with 100% sensitivity and 100% specificity. BFI showed the best correlation with the crosslinking of STAT3. These results indicate that DOS-derived parameters can assess the clinical response in the OR, allowing for earlier reintervention if needed.

  14. International stem cell tourism and the need for effective regulation. Part II: Developing sound oversight measures and effective patient support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cohen, Cynthia B; Cohen, Peter J

    2010-09-01

    Part I of this article, published in the March 2010 issue of the Kennedy Institute of Ethics Journal, traces and addresses the provision of unproven stem cell treatments in Russia and India, examines the concept of innovative treatment, and concludes that stronger regulations are needed to protect the health and informed choices of patients. The current paper, Part II, proposes that the regulatory frameworks for the development of safe and efficacious treatments in effect in the United States and the United Kingdom provide examples of strong oversight measures from which countries seeking to obtain international credibility for their biotechnological competence could draw when developing regulations for stem cell treatments. Major sources of information available to persons who consider receiving such unproven treatments are explored in order to understand and address their concerns. The paper concludes with proposed measures to inform those considering the pursuit of unproven stem cell treatments abroad more accurately about their efficacy and safety and provide them with improved medical and social support in their home countries.

  15. Stress responses in flavivirus-infected cells: activation of unfolded protein response and autophagy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana-Belén eBlázquez

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available The Flavivirus is a genus of RNA viruses that includes multiple long known human, animal and zoonotic pathogens such as Dengue virus, yellow fever virus, West Nile virus or Japanese encephalitis virus, as well as other less known viruses that represent potential threats for human and animal health such as Usutu or Zika viruses. Flavivirus replication is based on endoplasmic reticulum-derived structures. Membrane remodeling and accumulation of viral factors induce endoplasmic reticulum stress that results in activation of a cellular signaling response termed unfolded protein response (UPR, which can be modulated by the viruses for their own benefit. Concomitant with the activation of the UPR, an upregulation of the autophagic pathway in cells infected with different flaviviruses has also been described. This review addresses the current knowledge of the relationship between endoplasmic reticulum stress, UPR and autophagy in flavivirus-infected cells and the growing evidences for an involvement of these cellular pathways in the replication and pathogenesis of these viruses.

  16. Thyroiditis in T cell-depleted rats: suppression of the autoallergic response by reconstitution with normal lymphoid cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Penhale, W J; Irvine, W J; Inglis, J R; Farmer, A

    1976-07-01

    Qualititive, quantitative and functional differences were found in lymphoid cells of female thymectomized and irradiated (Tx-X) PVG/c strain rats as compared to normal females of the same strain. Tx-X rats were lymphopenic and had reduced numbers of cells within spleen and cervical lymph nodes, depressed transformation responses of peripheral blood lymphocytes to PHA and lower percentage killing of their spleen cells by anti-T-cell serum and complement. There was an increased percentage of immunoglobulin-bearing cells in the lymph nodes. Reconstitution of Tx-X rats by the intravenous route using syngeneic lymph node cells, spleen cells or thymocytes abrogated the autoimmune responses to thyroid components generally observed in this state. Lymph node and spleen cells, but not thymocytes, also prevented thyroid changes when given intraperitoneally. In contrast, bone marrow cells appeared to give enhanced responses. Quntitative studies showed that the relative proportions of the suppressor or autoregulatory cells in various lymphoid tissues were lymph node greater than spleen greater than thymus. Complete abrogation of the autoimmune responses was possible only when cells were administered within a short time of final dose of irradiation and moderate thyroid change was again seen if transfer was delayed for 14 days post-irradiation. At 28 days reconstitution had no influence on the development of the autoimmune responses. Preliminary characterization studies using an anti-T-cell serum and fractionation of lymph node cells on a linear Ficoll gradient suggested that autoregulatory cell is a large T cell.

  17. Injectable, Biomolecule-Responsive Polypeptide Hydrogels for Cell Encapsulation and Facile Cell Recovery through Triggered Degradation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Qinghua; He, Chaoliang; Zhang, Zhen; Ren, Kaixuan; Chen, Xuesi

    2016-11-16

    Injectable hydrogels have been widely investigated in biomedical applications, and increasing demand has been proposed to achieve dynamic regulation of physiological properties of hydrogels. Herein, a new type of injectable and biomolecule-responsive hydrogel based on poly(l-glutamic acid) (PLG) grafted with disulfide bond-modified phloretic acid (denoted as PLG-g-CPA) was developed. The hydrogels formed in situ via enzymatic cross-linking under physiological conditions in the presence of horseradish peroxidase and hydrogen peroxide. The physiochemical properties of the hydrogels, including gelation time and the rheological property, were measured. Particularly, the triggered degradation of the hydrogel in response to a reductive biomolecule, glutathione (GSH), was investigated in detail. The mechanical strength and inner porous structure of the hydrogel were influenced by the addition of GSH. The polypeptide hydrogel was used as a three-dimensional (3D) platform for cell encapsulation, which could release the cells through triggered disruption of the hydrogel in response to the addition of GSH. The cells released from the hydrogel were found to maintain high viability. Moreover, after subcutaneous injection into rats, the PLG-g-CPA hydrogels with disulfide-containing cross-links exhibited a markedly faster degradation behavior in vivo compared to that of the PLG hydrogels without disulfide cross-links, implying an interesting accelerated degradation process of the disulfide-containing polypeptide hydrogels in the physiological environment in vivo. Overall, the injectable and biomolecule-responsive polypeptide hydrogels may serve as a potential platform for 3D cell culture and easy cell collection.

  18. Unmet Medical Needs in Non-Small-Cell Lung Cancer Treatment: How to Design Pre-Emptive Combination Therapies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Niki Karachaliou

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The rapidly expanding catalogue of human oncogenic mutations, coupled with difficulties in identifying the cellular targets of active compounds in phenotypic screens, has refocused drug discovery efforts on inhibitors of specific cellular proteins. This new ‘target-based’ approach has enjoyed some spectacular successes in several types of tumours, including non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC. Epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR mutations occur in 17% of NSCLC patients, with notable response to single agent therapy. Unfortunately, all patients eventually develop acquired resistance to EGFR tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs, while complete remission rate to EGFR TKIs monotherapy is low. Priming BIM, a proapoptotic signalling BH3-only protein, induces sensitivity to erlotinib [Tarceva®] in EGFR-mutant cell lines. Synthetic lethal approaches and pre-emptive therapies based on the initial expression of BIM may significantly improve treatment outcomes. EGFR mutations result in transient pro-death imbalance of survival and apoptotic signalling in response to EGFR inhibition. Src homology 2 domain-containing phosphatase 2 is essential to the balance between extracellular signal-regulated kinase, phosphoinositide- 3-kinase/protein kinase B and signal transducer and activator of transcription 3 activity. Furthermore, stromal hepatocyte growth factor confers EGFR TKI resistance and induces inter-receptor crosstalk with Ephrin Type-A receptor 2, CDCP1, AXL, and JAK1. A better understanding of the complex cancer molecular biology of EGFR mutant lung cancer is crucial for development of effective treatment and design of successful future clinical studies.

  19. Necdin modulates proliferative cell survival of human cells in response to radiation-induced genotoxic stress

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lafontaine Julie

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The finite replicative lifespan of cells, termed cellular senescence, has been proposed as a protective mechanism against the proliferation of oncogenically damaged cells, that fuel cancer. This concept is further supported by the induction of premature senescence, a process which is activated when an oncogene is expressed in normal primary cells as well as following intense genotoxic stresses. Thus, deregulation of genes that control this process, like the tumor suppressor p53, may contribute to promoting cancer by allowing cells to bypass senescence. A better understanding of the genes that contribute to the establishment of senescence is therefore warranted. Necdin interacts with p53 and is also a p53 target gene, although the importance of Necdin in the p53 response is not clearly understood. Methods In this study, we first investigated Necdin protein expression during replicative senescence and premature senescence induced by gamma irradiation and by the overexpression of oncogenic RasV12. Gain and loss of function experiments were used to evaluate the contribution of Necdin during the senescence process. Results Necdin expression declined during replicative aging of IMR90 primary human fibroblasts or following induction of premature senescence. Decrease in Necdin expression seemed to be a consequence of the establishment of senescence since the depletion of Necdin in human cells did not induce a senescence-like growth arrest nor a flat morphology or SA-β-galactosidase activity normally associated with senescence. Similarly, overexpression of Necdin did not affect the life span of IMR90 cells. However, we demonstrate that in normal human cells, Necdin expression mimicked the effect of p53 inactivation by increasing radioresistance. Conclusion This result suggests that Necdin potentially attenuate p53 signaling in response to genotoxic stress in human cells and supports similar results describing an inhibitory function

  20. A colsed form solution of convective mass transfer model for intracellular calcium response of endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vineet Kumar

    1998-01-01

    concentration, producing prostacyclin, endothelium derived relaxing factor and ecto-enzymes. Three different ecto-enzymes metabolize ATP in three steps (ATP → ADP → AMP → adenosine . Normally experiments with endothelium are carried out in a rectangular flow chamber provided with a cell surface at one of its walls and feed stream containing ATP. The ATP concentration near the cell surface depends upon two factors, rate of its degradation and the rate at which it reaches from upstream. Closed form solutions for the concentration profile of ATP in such a flow chamber indicates that concentration near the cell surface is lower than the bulk concentration depending on the activity of ecto-enzymes and it increases with increase in tangential flow rate (shear stress. This indicates that shear induced response of endothelial cell (at least for low shear rate may be due to change in ATP concentration near the cell surface which is sensed by purinoreceptors instead of a mechanoreceptor. Several workers have tried to investigate this problem analytically. Unfortunately, solutions obtained by these workers have limited success. In the present work, exact solution of the problem has been obtained in terms of a confluent hypergeometric function. Solution of the transformed equation gives accurate results even in the entrance region of the flow chamber which eliminates the need of solutions based on approximate methods like perturbation or finite difference techniques.

  1. The future of human embryonic stem cell research: addressing ethical conflict with responsible scientific research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilbert, David M

    2004-05-01

    Embryonic stem (ES) cells have almost unlimited regenerative capacity and can potentially generate any body tissue. Hence they hold great promise for the cure of degenerative human diseases. But their derivation and the potential for misuse have raised a number of ethical issues. These ethical issues threaten to paralyze pubic funding for ES cell research, leaving experimentation in the hands of the private sector and precluding the public's ability to monitor practices, research alternatives, and effectively address the very ethical issues that are cause for concern in the first place. With new technology being inevitable, and the potential for abuse high, government must stay involved if the public is to play a role in shaping the direction of research. In this essay, I will define levels of ethical conflict that can be delineated by the anticipated advances in technology. From the urgent need to derive new ES cell lines with existing technology, to the most far-reaching goal of deriving genetically identical tissues from an adult patients cells, technology-specific ethical dilemmas can be defined and addressed. This staged approach provides a solid ethical framework for moving forward with ES cell research. Moreover, by anticipating the moral conflicts to come, one can predict the types of scientific advances that could overcome these conflicts, and appropriately direct federal funding toward these goals to offset potentially less responsible research directives that will inevitably go forward via private or foreign funding.

  2. Early dynamics of T helper cell cytokines and T regulatory cells in response to treatment of active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feruglio, S L; Tonby, K; Kvale, D; Dyrhol-Riise, A M

    2015-01-01

    Biomarkers that can identify tuberculosis (TB) disease and serve as markers for efficient therapy are requested. We have studied T cell cytokine production [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α] and degranulation (CD107a) as well as subsets of CD4+ T regulatory cells (Tregs) after in-vitro Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigen stimulation [early secretory antigenic target (ESAT)-6, culture filtrate protein (CFP)-10, antigen 85 (Ag85)] in 32 patients with active tuberculosis (TB) disease throughout 24 weeks of effective TB treatment. A significant decline in the fraction of Mtb-specific total IFN-γ and single IFN-γ-producing T cells was already observed after 2 weeks of treatment, whereas the pool of single IL-2+ cells increased over time for both CD4+ and CD8+ T cells. The Treg subsets CD25highCD127low, CD25highCD147++ and CD25highCD127lowCD161+ expanded significantly after Mtb antigen stimulation in vitro at all time-points, whereas the CD25highCD127lowCD39+ Tregs remained unchanged. The fraction of CD25highCD127low Tregs increased after 8 weeks of treatment. Thus, we revealed an opposing shift of Tregs and intracellular cytokine production during treatment. This may indicate that functional signatures of the CD4+ and CD8+ T cells can serve as immunological correlates of early curative host responses. Whether such signatures can be used as biomarkers in monitoring and follow-up of TB treatment needs to be explored further. PMID:25313008

  3. Early dynamics of T helper cell cytokines and T regulatory cells in response to treatment of active Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feruglio, S L; Tonby, K; Kvale, D; Dyrhol-Riise, A M

    2015-03-01

    Biomarkers that can identify tuberculosis (TB) disease and serve as markers for efficient therapy are requested. We have studied T cell cytokine production [interferon (IFN)-γ, interleukin (IL)-2, tumour necrosis factor (TNF)-α] and degranulation (CD107a) as well as subsets of CD4(+) T regulatory cells (Tregs ) after in-vitro Mycobacterium tuberculosis (Mtb) antigen stimulation [early secretory antigenic target (ESAT)-6, culture filtrate protein (CFP)-10, antigen 85 (Ag85)] in 32 patients with active tuberculosis (TB) disease throughout 24 weeks of effective TB treatment. A significant decline in the fraction of Mtb-specific total IFN-γ and single IFN-γ-producing T cells was already observed after 2 weeks of treatment, whereas the pool of single IL-2(+) cells increased over time for both CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells. The Treg subsets CD25(high) CD127(low) , CD25(high) CD147(++) and CD25(high) CD127(low) CD161(+) expanded significantly after Mtb antigen stimulation in vitro at all time-points, whereas the CD25(high) CD127(low) CD39(+) Tregs remained unchanged. The fraction of CD25(high) CD127(low) Tregs increased after 8 weeks of treatment. Thus, we revealed an opposing shift of Tregs and intracellular cytokine production during treatment. This may indicate that functional signatures of the CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cells can serve as immunological correlates of early curative host responses. Whether such signatures can be used as biomarkers in monitoring and follow-up of TB treatment needs to be explored further.

  4. Nanoscale Properties of Neural Cell Prosthetic and Astrocyte Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Flowers, D. A.; Ayres, V. M.; Delgado-Rivera, R.; Ahmed, I.; Meiners, S. A.

    2009-03-01

    Preliminary data from in-vivo investigations (rat model) suggest that a nanofiber prosthetic device of fibroblast growth factor-2 (FGF-2)-modified nanofibers can correctly guide regenerating axons across an injury gap with aligned functional recovery. Scanning Probe Recognition Microscopy (SPRM) with auto-tracking of individual nanofibers is used for investigation of the key nanoscale properties of the nanofiber prosthetic device for central nervous system tissue engineering and repair. The key properties under SPRM investigation include nanofiber stiffness and surface roughness, nanofiber curvature, nanofiber mesh density and porosity, and growth factor presentation and distribution. Each of these factors has been demonstrated to have global effects on cell morphology, function, proliferation, morphogenesis, migration, and differentiation. The effect of FGF-2 modification on the key nanoscale properties is investigated. Results from the nanofiber prosthetic properties investigations are correlated with astrocyte response to unmodified and FGF-2 modified scaffolds, using 2D planar substrates as a control.

  5. Civil Support: DOD Needs to Clarify Its Roles and Responsibilities for Defense Support of Civil Authorities during Cyber Incidents

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-04-01

    DOD’s DSCA Execute Order directs DSCA operations and identifies force packages and capabilities—such as search and rescue , transportation, and...civil authorities as part of its Defense Support of Civil Authorities (DSCA) mission , but DOD’s guidance does not clearly define its roles and...response concept plan states that U.S. Northern Command would be the supported command for a DSCA mission that may include cyber domain incidents and

  6. Nickel elicits a fast antioxidant response in Coffea arabica cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gomes-Junior, R A; Moldes, C A; Delite, F S; Gratão, P L; Mazzafera, P; Lea, P J; Azevedo, R A

    2006-01-01

    The antioxidant responses of coffee (Coffea arabica L.) cell suspension cultures to nickel (Ni) were investigated. Ni was very rapidly accumulated in the cells and the accumulation could be directly correlated with the increase of NiCl(2) concentration in the medium. At 0.05 mM NiCl(2) growth was stimulated, but at 0.5 mM NiCl(2), the growth rate was reduced. An indication of alterations in the presence of reactive oxygen species was detected by an increase in lipid peroxidation at 0.5 mM NiCl(2). Catalase (CAT; EC 1.11.1.6), glutathione reductase (GR; EC 1.6.4.2), ascorbate peroxidase (APX; EC 1.11.1.11), guaiacol peroxidase (GOPX; EC 1.11.1.7) and superoxide dismutase (SOD; EC 1.15.1.1) activities were increased, particularly at earlier NiCl(2) exposure times and the activities were higher at 0.5 mM NiCl(2) for most of exposure times tested. Non-denaturing PAGE revealed one CAT isoenzyme, nine SOD isoenzymes and four GR isoenzymes. The SOD isoenzymes were differentially affected by NiCl(2) treatment and one GR isoenzyme was increased by NiCl(2). NiCl(2) at 0.05 mM did not induce lipid peroxidation and the main response appeared to be via the induction of SOD, CAT, GOPX and APX activities for the removal of the reactive oxygen species and through the induction of GR to ensure the availability of reduced glutathione.

  7. State of the art: Multi-fuel reformers for automotive fuel cell applications. Problem identification and research needs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westerholm, R. [Stockholm Univ. (Sweden). Dept. of Analytical Chemistry; Pettersson, L.J. [Royal Inst. of Tech., Stockholm (Sweden). Dept. of Chemical Engineering and Technology

    1999-12-01

    On an assignment from the Transport and Communications Research Board (KFB) a literature study and a study trip to the USA and Great Britain have been performed. The literature study and the study trip was made during late spring and autumn 1999.The purpose of the project was to collect available information about the chemical composition of the product gas from a multi-fuel reformer for a fuel cell vehicle. It was furthermore to identify problems and research needs. The report recommends directions for future major research efforts. The results of the literature study and the study trip led to the following general conclusions: With the technology available today it does not seem feasible to develop a highly efficient and reliable multi-fuel reformer for automotive applications, i. e. for applications where all types of fuels ranging from natural gas to heavy diesel fuels can be used. The potential for developing a durable and reliable system is considerably higher if dedicated fuel reformers are used.The authors propose that petroleum-derived fuels should be designed for potential use in mobile fuel cell applications. In the present literature survey and the site visit discussions we found that there are relatively low emissions from fuel cell engines compared to internal combustion engines. However, the major research work on reformers/fuel cells have been performed during steady-state operation. Emissions during start-up, shutdown and transient operation are basically unknown and must be investigated in more detail. The conclusions and findings in this report are based on open/available information, such as discussions at site visits, reports, scientific publications and symposium proceedings.

  8. Treatment of allergic asthma: Modulation of Th2 cells and their responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erb Klaus J

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Atopic asthma is a chronic inflammatory pulmonary disease characterised by recurrent episodes of wheezy, laboured breathing with an underlying Th2 cell-mediated inflammatory response in the airways. It is currently treated and, more or less, controlled depending on severity, with bronchodilators e.g. long-acting beta agonists and long-acting muscarinic antagonists or anti-inflammatory drugs such as corticosteroids (inhaled or oral, leukotriene modifiers, theophyline and anti-IgE therapy. Unfortunately, none of these treatments are curative and some asthmatic patients do not respond to intense anti-inflammatory therapies. Additionally, the use of long-term oral steroids has many undesired side effects. For this reason, novel and more effective drugs are needed. In this review, we focus on the CD4+ Th2 cells and their products as targets for the development of new drugs to add to the current armamentarium as adjuncts or as potential stand-alone treatments for allergic asthma. We argue that in early disease, the reduction or elimination of allergen-specific Th2 cells will reduce the consequences of repeated allergic inflammatory responses such as lung remodelling without causing generalised immunosuppression.

  9. Helicobacter pylori impairs murine dendritic cell responses to infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ya-Hui Wang

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Helicobacter pylori, a human pathogen associated with chronic gastritis, peptic ulcer and gastric malignancies, is generally viewed as an extracellular microorganism. Here, we show that H. pylori replicates in murine bone marrow derived-dendritic cells (BMDCs within autophagosomes. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: A 10-fold increase of CFU is found between 2 h and 6 h p.i. in H. pylori-infected BMDCs. Autophagy is induced around the bacterium and participates at late time points of infection for the clearance of intracellular H. pylori. As a consequence of infection, LC3, LAMP1 and MHC class II molecules are retained within the H. pylori-containing vacuoles and export of MHC class II molecules to cell surface is blocked. However, formalin-fixed H. pylori still maintain this inhibitory activity in BMDC derived from wild type mice, but not in from either TLR4 or TLR2-deficient mice, suggesting the involvement of H. pylori-LPS in this process. TNF-alpha, IL-6 and IL-10 expression was also modulated upon infection showing a TLR2-specific dependent IL-10 secretion. No IL-12 was detected favoring the hypothesis of a down modulation of DC functions during H. pylori infection. Furthermore, antigen-specific T cells proliferation was also impaired upon infection. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: H. pylori can infect and replicate in BMDCs and thereby affects DC-mediated immune responses. The implication of this new finding is discussed for the biological life cycle of H. pylori in the host.

  10. Dendritic cells fused with different pancreatic carcinoma cells induce different T-cell responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andoh Y

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Yoshiaki Andoh,1,2 Naohiko Makino,2 Mitsunori Yamakawa11Department of Pathological Diagnostics, 2Department of Gastroenterology, Yamagata University School of Medicine, Yamagata, JapanBackground: It is unclear whether there are any differences in the induction of cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL and CD4+CD25high regulatory T-cells (Tregs among dendritic cells (DCs fused with different pancreatic carcinomas. The aim of this study was to compare the ability to induce cytotoxicity by human DCs fused with different human pancreatic carcinoma cell lines and to elucidate the causes of variable cytotoxicity among cell lines.Methods: Monocyte-derived DCs, which were generated from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs, were fused with carcinoma cells such as Panc-1, KP-1NL, QGP-1, and KP-3L. The induction of CTL and Tregs, and cytokine profile of PBMCs stimulated by fused DCs were evaluated.Results: The cytotoxicity against tumor targets induced by PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with QGP-1 (DC/QGP-1 was very low, even though PBMCs cocultured with DCs fused with other cell lines induced significant cytotoxicity against the respective tumor target. The factors causing this low cytotoxicity were subsequently investigated. DC/QGP-1 induced a significant expansion of Tregs in cocultured PBMCs compared with DC/KP-3L. The level of interleukin-10 secreted in the supernatants of PBMCs cocultured with DC/QGP-1 was increased significantly compared with that in DC/KP-3L. Downregulation of major histocompatibility complex class I expression and increased secretion of vascular endothelial growth factor were observed with QGP-1, as well as in the other cell lines.Conclusion: The present study demonstrated that the cytotoxicity induced by DCs fused with pancreatic cancer cell lines was different between each cell line, and that the reduced cytotoxicity of DC/QGP-1 might be related to the increased secretion of interleukin-10 and the extensive induction of Tregs

  11. Lipoproteins are Major Targets of the Polyclonal Human T-cell Response to M. tuberculosis1

    OpenAIRE

    2012-01-01

    Most vaccines and basic studies of T cell epitopes in M. tuberculosis emphasize water soluble proteins that are secreted into the extracellular space and presented in the context of MHC Class II. Much less is known about the role of antigens retained within the cell wall. We used polyclonal T cells from infected humans to probe for responses to immunodominant antigens in the M. tuberculosis cell wall. We found that the magnitude of response to secreted or cell wall intrinsic compounds was sim...

  12. Mathematical modeling of the specific T cell response to a viral infection

    OpenAIRE

    Bidot, Caroline

    2006-01-01

    T cell is one of the most important cells in specific immunity. In order to devise a tool for understanding and predicting some mechanisms of the immune system, a model for T cell response is proposed. The T lymphocyte activation by the recognition of a peptide carried by an antigen presenting cell is an essential step of this immune response. T cell activation was modelled by a system of ordinary differential equations of chemical kinetics type, representing the temporal evolution of the con...

  13. Cell type-specific responses of peripheral blood mononuclear cells to silver nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Greulich, C; Diendorf, J; Gessmann, J; Simon, T; Habijan, T; Eggeler, G; Schildhauer, T A; Epple, M; Köller, M

    2011-09-01

    Silver nanoparticles (Ag-NP) are increasingly used in biomedical applications because of their remarkable antimicrobial activity. In biomedicine, Ag-NP are coated onto or embedded in wound dressings, surgical instruments and bone substitute biomaterials, such as silver-containing calcium phosphate cements. Free Ag-NP and silver ions are released from these coatings or after the degradation of a biomaterial, and may come into close contact with blood cells. Despite the widespread use of Ag-NP as an antimicrobial agent, there is a serious lack of information on the biological effects of Ag-NP on human blood cells. In this study, the uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral monocytes and lymphocytes (T-cells) was analyzed, and the influence of nanosilver on cell biological functions (proliferation, the expression of adhesion molecules, cytokine release and the generation of reactive oxygen species) was studied. After cell culture in the presence of monodispersed Ag-NP (5-30μgml(-1) silver concentration), agglomerates of nanoparticles were detected within monocytes (CD14+) but not in T-cells (CD3+) by light microscopy, flow cytometry and combined focused ion beam/scanning electron microscopy. The uptake rate of nanoparticles was concentration dependent, and the silver agglomerates were typically found in the cytoplasm. Furthermore, a concentration-dependent activation (e.g. an increased expression of adhesion molecule CD54) of monocytes at Ag-NP concentrations of 10-15μgml(-1) was observed, and cytotoxicity of Ag-NP-treated monocytes was observed at Ag-NP levels of 25μgml(-1) and higher. However, no modulation of T-cell proliferation was observed in the presence of Ag-NP. Taken together, our results provide the first evidence for a cell-type-specific uptake of Ag-NP by peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) and the resultant cellular responses after exposure.

  14. Contrasting motivational orientation and evaluative coding accounts: On the need to differentiate the effectors of approach/avoidance responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Julia eKozlik

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Several emotion theorists suggest that valenced stimuli automatically trigger motivational orientations and thereby facilitate corresponding behavior. Positive stimuli were thought to activate approach motivational circuits which in turn primed approach-related behavioral tendencies whereas negative stimuli were supposed to activate avoidance motivational circuits so that avoidance-related behavioral tendencies were primed (motivational orientation account. However, recent research suggests that typically observed affective stimulus–response compatibility phenomena might be entirely explained in terms of theories accounting for mechanisms of general action control instead of assuming motivational orientations to mediate the effects (evaluative coding account. In what follows, we explore to what extent this notion is applicable. We present literature suggesting that evaluative coding mechanisms indeed influence a wide variety of affective stimulus–response compatibility phenomena. However, the evaluative coding account does not seem to be sufficient to explain affective S–R compatibility effects. Instead, several studies provide clear evidence in favor of the motivational orientation account that seems to operate independently of evaluative coding mechanisms. Implications for theoretical developments and future research designs are discussed.

  15. Contrasting motivational orientation and evaluative coding accounts: on the need to differentiate the effectors of approach/avoidance responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlik, Julia; Neumann, Roland; Lozo, Ljubica

    2015-01-01

    Several emotion theorists suggest that valenced stimuli automatically trigger motivational orientations and thereby facilitate corresponding behavior. Positive stimuli were thought to activate approach motivational circuits which in turn primed approach-related behavioral tendencies whereas negative stimuli were supposed to activate avoidance motivational circuits so that avoidance-related behavioral tendencies were primed (motivational orientation account). However, recent research suggests that typically observed affective stimulus-response compatibility phenomena might be entirely explained in terms of theories accounting for mechanisms of general action control instead of assuming motivational orientations to mediate the effects (evaluative coding account). In what follows, we explore to what extent this notion is applicable. We present literature suggesting that evaluative coding mechanisms indeed influence a wide variety of affective stimulus-response compatibility phenomena. However, the evaluative coding account does not seem to be sufficient to explain affective S-R compatibility effects. Instead, several studies provide clear evidence in favor of the motivational orientation account that seems to operate independently of evaluative coding mechanisms. Implications for theoretical developments and future research designs are discussed.

  16. Analysis of the T Cell Response to Zika Virus and Identification of a Novel CD8+ T Cell Epitope in Immunocompetent Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pardy, Ryan D.; Rajah, Maaran M.; Taylor, Nathan G.

    2017-01-01

    Zika virus (ZIKV) is an emerging arbovirus of the Flaviviridae family. Although ZIKV infection is typically mild and self-limiting in healthy adults, infection has been associated with neurological symptoms such as Guillain-Barré syndrome, and a causal link has been established between fetal microcephaly and ZIKV infection during pregnancy. These risks, and the magnitude of the ongoing ZIKV pandemic, have created an urgent need for the development of animal models to study the immune response to ZIKV infection. Previous animal models have primarily focused on pathogenesis in immunocompromised mice. In this study, we provide a model of ZIKV infection in wild-type immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, and have provided an analysis of the immune response to infection. We evaluated the activation of several innate immune cell types, and studied the kinetics, phenotype, and functionality of T cell responses to ZIKV infection. Our results demonstrate that ZIKV infection is mild in wild-type immunocompetent C57BL/6 mice, resulting in minimal morbidity. Our data establish that at the peak of the adaptive response, antigen-experienced CD4+ T cells polarize to a Th1 phenotype, and antigen-experienced CD8+ T cells exhibit an activated effector phenotype, producing both effector cytokines and cytolytic molecules. Furthermore, we have identified a novel ZIKV CD8+ T cell epitope in the envelope protein that is recognized by the majority of responding cells. Our model provides an important reference point that will help dissect the impact of polymorphisms in the circulating ZIKV strains on the immune response and ZIKV pathogenesis. In addition, the identification of a ZIKV epitope will allow for the design of tetramers to study epitope-specific T cell responses, and will have important implications for the design and development of ZIKV vaccine strategies. PMID:28231312

  17. Limits of “Skills And Drills” Interventions to Improving Obstetric and Newborn Emergency Response: What More Do We Need to Learn?

    OpenAIRE

    Ricca, Jim

    2016-01-01

    A “skills and drills” intervention in 4 hospitals in Karnataka, India, produced modest improvement in provider knowledge and skills but not in actual response to obstetric and newborn emergencies. We explore possible explanations, which include (1) the need for a more intensive intervention; (2) other weaknesses in the health system; and (3) behavioral or organizational barriers related to hierarchical structures, roles, and team formation.

  18. Studies of cell-mediated immune responses to influenza vaccination in systemic lupus erythematosus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holvast, Albert; Van Assen, Sander; De Haan, Aalzen; Huckriede, Anke; Benne, Cornelis A.; Westra, Johanna; Palache, Abraham; Wilschut, Jan; Kallenberg, Cornelis; Bijl, Marc

    2009-01-01

    Objective. Both antibody and cell-mediated responses are involved in the defense against influenza. In patients with systemic lupus erythematosus (SLE), a decreased antibody response to subunit influenza vaccine has been demonstrated, but cell-mediated responses have not yet been assessed. This stud

  19. Transcriptional profile of Taxus chinensis cells in response to methyl jasmonate

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Shu-tao

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Methyl jasmonate (MeJA has been successfully used as an effective elicitor to enhance production of taxol and other taxanes in cultured Taxus cells. However the mechanism of MeJA-mediated taxane biosynthesis remains unclear. Genomic information for species in the genus Taxus is currently unavailable. Therefore, information about the transcriptome of Taxus cells and specifically, description of changes in gene expression in response to MeJA, is needed for the better exploration of the biological mechanisms of MeJA-mediated taxane biosynthesis. Results In this research, the transcriptome profiles of T. chinensis cells at 16 hours (T16 after MeJA treatment and of mock-treated cells (T0 were analyzed by “RNA-seq” to investigate the transcriptional alterations of Taxus cell in response to MeJA elicitation. More than 58 million reads (200 bp in length of cDNA from both samples were generated, and 46,581 unigenes were found. There were 13,469 genes found to be expressed differentially between the two timepoints, including all of the known jasmonate (JA biosynthesis/JA signaling pathway genes and taxol-related genes. The qRT-PCR results showed that the expression profiles of 12 randomly selected DEGs and 10 taxol biosynthesis genes were found to be consistent with the RNA-Seq data. MeJA appeared to stimulate a large number of genes involved in several relevant functional categories, such as plant hormone biosynthesis and phenylpropanoid biosynthesis. Additionally, many genes encoding transcription factors were shown to respond to MeJA elicitation. Conclusions The results of a transcriptome analysis suggest that exogenous application of MeJA could induce JA biosynthesis/JA signaling pathway/defence responses, activate a series of transcription factors, as well as increase expression of genes in the terpenoid biosynthesis pathway responsible for taxol synthesis. This comprehensive description of gene expression information could

  20. Effects of meal size and composition on incretin, alpha-cell, and beta-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rijkelijkhuizen, Josina M; McQuarrie, Kelly; Girman, Cynthia J; Stein, Peter P; Mari, Andrea; Holst, Jens J; Nijpels, Giel; Dekker, Jacqueline M

    2010-04-01

    The incretins glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1) and glucose-dependent insulinotropic polypeptide (GIP) regulate postprandial insulin release from the beta-cells. We investigated the effects of 3 standardized meals with different caloric and nutritional content in terms of postprandial glucose, insulin, glucagon, and incretin responses. In a randomized crossover study, 18 subjects with type 2 diabetes mellitus and 6 healthy volunteers underwent three 4-hour meal tolerance tests (small carbohydrate [CH]-rich meal, large CH-rich meal, and fat-rich meal). Non-model-based and model-based estimates of beta-cell function and incremental areas under the curve of glucose, insulin, C-peptide, glucagon, GLP-1, and GIP were calculated. Mixed models and Friedman tests were used to test for differences in meal responses. The large CH-rich meal and fat-rich meal resulted in a slightly larger insulin response as compared with the small CH-rich meal and led to a slightly shorter period of hyperglycemia, but only in healthy subjects. Model-based insulin secretion estimates did not show pronounced differences between meals. Both in healthy individuals and in those with diabetes, more CH resulted in higher GLP-1 release. In contrast with the other meals, GIP release was still rising 2 hours after the fat-rich meal. The initial glucagon response was stimulated by the large CH-rich meal, whereas the fat-rich meal induced a late glucagon response. Fat preferentially stimulates GIP secretion, whereas CH stimulates GLP-1 secretion. Differences in meal size and composition led to differences in insulin and incretin responses but not to differences in postprandial glucose levels of the well-controlled patients with diabetes.

  1. The role of unfolded protein response in differentiation of mammary epithelial cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsuchiya, Megumi; Koizumi, Yumiko; Hayashi, Satoko; Hanaoka, Miyuki; Tokutake, Yukako; Yonekura, Shinichi

    2017-03-18

    The accumulation of misfolded proteins in the ER provokes ER stress by increasing the demand for energy, chaperones, and other proteins that are needed to fold client proteins or to degrade unfoldable secretory cargo. This stress activates a signaling network called the unfolded protein response (UPR). However, recent accumulated data suggested that the UPR also provides important signals for regulating cell differentiation and maturation. However, the relationship between UPR and mammary gland development has not been fully elucidated. To define the involvement of the UPR in mammary gland development, mammary glands were collected from non-pregnant mice, at days 5, 10 and 15 of pregnancy, at days 1 and 7 of lactation, and the expression patterns of UPR-related genes were determined by real-time PCR. We found that the mRNA expression of ATF4 and XBP1 significant increased during pregnancy. Moreover, we found that both ATF4 and XBP1 proteins are expressed in mammary epithelial cells by immunohistological analysis. In order to know the role of ATF4 and XBP1 in the differentiation of mammary epithelial cell, we performed gene knockdown experiment using HC11 cells. We found that ATF4 or XBP1 knockdown suppressed the mRNA expression of beta-casein and lactogenic hormone receptor in differentiating HC11 cells. Our results demonstrate that XBP1 and ATF4, which are UPR-related transcription factors, directly or indirectly participate in cell differentiation mechanisms through the regulation of the expression of lactogenic hormone receptors in mouse mammary epithelial cells.

  2. Assessing the detail needed to capture rainfall-runoff dynamics with physics-based hydrologic response simulation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirus, B.B.; Ebel, B.A.; Heppner, C.S.; Loague, K.

    2011-01-01

    Concept development simulation with distributed, physics-based models provides a quantitative approach for investigating runoff generation processes across environmental conditions. Disparities within data sets employed to design and parameterize boundary value problems used in heuristic simulation inevitably introduce various levels of bias. The objective was to evaluate the impact of boundary value problem complexity on process representation for different runoff generation mechanisms. The comprehensive physics-based hydrologic response model InHM has been employed to generate base case simulations for four well-characterized catchments. The C3 and CB catchments are located within steep, forested environments dominated by subsurface stormflow; the TW and R5 catchments are located in gently sloping rangeland environments dominated by Dunne and Horton overland flows. Observational details are well captured within all four of the base case simulations, but the characterization of soil depth, permeability, rainfall intensity, and evapotranspiration differs for each. These differences are investigated through the conversion of each base case into a reduced case scenario, all sharing the same level of complexity. Evaluation of how individual boundary value problem characteristics impact simulated runoff generation processes is facilitated by quantitative analysis of integrated and distributed responses at high spatial and temporal resolution. Generally, the base case reduction causes moderate changes in discharge and runoff patterns, with the dominant process remaining unchanged. Moderate differences between the base and reduced cases highlight the importance of detailed field observations for parameterizing and evaluating physics-based models. Overall, similarities between the base and reduced cases indicate that the simpler boundary value problems may be useful for concept development simulation to investigate fundamental controls on the spectrum of runoff generation

  3. To investigate the necessity of STRA6 upregulation in T cells during T cell immune responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rafik Terra

    Full Text Available Our earlier study revealed that STRA6 (stimulated by retinoic acid gene 6 was up-regulated within 3 h of TCR stimulation. STRA6 is the high-affinity receptor for plasma retinol-binding protein (RBP and mediates cellular vitamin A uptake. We generated STRA6 knockout (KO mice to assess whether such up-regulation was critical for T-cell activation, differentiation and function. STRA6 KO mice under vitamin A sufficient conditions were fertile without apparent anomalies upon visual inspection. The size, cellularity and lymphocyte subpopulations of STRA6 KO thymus and spleen were comparable to those of their wild type (WT controls. KO and WT T cells were similar in terms of TCR-stimulated proliferation in vitro and homeostatic expansion in vivo. Naive KO CD4 cells differentiated in vitro into Th1, Th2, Th17 as well as regulatory T cells in an analogous manner as their WT counterparts. In vivo experiments revealed that anti-viral immune responses to lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus in KO mice were comparable to those of WT controls. We also demonstrated that STRA6 KO and WT mice had similar glucose tolerance. Total vitamin A levels are dramatically lower in the eyes of KO mice as compared to those of WT mice, but the levels in other organs were not significantly affected after STRA6 deletion under vitamin A sufficient conditions, indicating that the eye is the mouse organ most sensitive to the loss of STRA6. Our results demonstrate that 1 in vitamin A sufficiency, the deletion of STRA6 in T cells does no affect the T-cell immune responses so-far tested, including those depend on STAT5 signaling; 2 STRA6-independent vitamin A uptake compensated the lack of STRA6 in lymphoid organs under vitamin A sufficient conditions in mice; 3 STRA6 is critical for vitamin A uptake in the eyes even in vitamin A sufficiency.

  4. Phenotypic differences of CD4(+) T cells in response to red blood cell immunization in transfused sickle cell disease patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vingert, Benoît; Tamagne, Marie; Habibi, Anoosha; Pakdaman, Sadaf; Ripa, Julie; Elayeb, Rahma; Galacteros, Frédéric; Bierling, Philippe; Ansart-Pirenne, Hélène; Bartolucci, Pablo; Noizat-Pirenne, France

    2015-06-01

    Alloimmunization against red blood cells (RBCs) is the main immunological risk associated with transfusion in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD). However, about 50-70% of SCD patients never get immunized despite frequent transfusion. In murine models, CD4(+) T cells play a key role in RBC alloimmunization. We therefore explored and compared the CD4(+) T-cell phenotypes and functions between a group of SCD patients (n = 11) who never became immunized despite a high transfusion regimen and a group of SCD patients (n = 10) who had become immunized (at least against Kidd antigen b) after a low transfusion regimen. We studied markers of CD4(+) T-cell function, including TLR, that directly control lymphocyte function, and their spontaneous cytokine production. We also tested responders for the cytokine profile in response to Kidd antigen b peptides. Low TLR2/TLR3 expression and, unexpectedly, strong expression of CD40 on CD4(+) T cells were associated with the nonresponder status, whereas spontaneous expression of IL-10 by CD4(+) T cells and weak Tbet expression were associated with the responder status. A Th17 profile was predominant in responders when stimulated by Jb(k) . These findings implicate CD4(+) T cells in alloimmunization in humans and suggest that they may be exploited to differentiate responders from nonresponders.

  5. Regulatory T Cells in Tumor-Associated Tertiary Lymphoid Structures Suppress Anti-tumor T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nikhil S; Akama-Garren, Elliot H; Lu, Yisi; Lee, Da-Yae; Chang, Gregory P; Li, Amy; DuPage, Michel; Tammela, Tuomas; Kerper, Natanya R; Farago, Anna F; Robbins, Rebecca; Crowley, Denise M; Bronson, Roderick T; Jacks, Tyler

    2015-09-15

    Infiltration of regulatory T (Treg) cells into many tumor types correlates with poor patient prognoses. However, mechanisms of intratumoral Treg cell function remain to be elucidated. We investigated Treg cell function in a genetically engineered mouse model of lung adenocarcinoma and found that Treg cells suppressed anti-tumor responses in tumor-associated tertiary lymphoid structures (TA-TLSs). TA-TLSs have been described in human lung cancers, but their function remains to be determined. TLSs in this model were spatially associated with >90% of tumors and facilitated interactions between T cells and tumor-antigen-presenting dendritic cells (DCs). Costimulatory ligand expression by DCs and T cell proliferation rates increased in TA-TLSs upon Treg cell depletion, leading to tumor destruction. Thus, we propose that Treg cells in TA-TLSs can inhibit endogenous immune responses against tumors, and targeting these cells might provide therapeutic benefit for cancer patients.

  6. Estimating Contraceptive Needs and Increasing Access to Contraception in Response to the Zika Virus Disease Outbreak--Puerto Rico, 2016.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tepper, Naomi K; Goldberg, Howard I; Bernal, Manuel I Vargas; Rivera, Brenda; Frey, Meghan T; Malave, Claritsa; Renquist, Christina M; Bracero, Nabal Jose; Dominguez, Kenneth L; Sanchez, Ramon E; Shapiro-Mendoza, Carrie K; Rodriguez, Blanca R Cuevas; Simeone, Regina M; Pesik, Nicki T; Barfield, Wanda D; Ko, Jean Y; Galang, Romeo R; Perez-Padilla, Janice; Polen, Kara N D; Honein, Margaret A; Rasmussen, Sonja A; Jamieson, Denise J

    2016-04-01

    Zika virus is a flavivirus transmitted primarily by Aedes species mosquitoes. Increasing evidence links Zika virus infection during pregnancy to adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes, including pregnancy loss, intrauterine growth restriction, eye defects, congenital brain abnormalities, and other fetal abnormalities. The virus has also been determined to be sexually transmitted. Because of the potential risks associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy, CDC has recommended that health care providers discuss prevention of unintended pregnancy with women and couples who reside in areas of active Zika virus transmission and do not want to become pregnant. However, limitations in access to contraception in some of these areas might affect the ability to prevent an unintended pregnancy. As of March 16, 2016, the highest number of Zika virus disease cases in the United States and U.S. territories were reported from Puerto Rico. The number of cases will likely rise with increasing mosquito activity in affected areas, resulting in increased risk for transmission to pregnant women. High rates of unintended and adolescent pregnancies in Puerto Rico suggest that, in the context of this outbreak, access to contraception might need to be improved. CDC estimates that 138,000 women of reproductive age (aged 15-44 years) in Puerto Rico do not desire pregnancy and are not using one of the most effective or moderately effective contraceptive methods, and therefore might experience an unintended pregnancy. CDC and other federal and local partners are seeking to expand access to contraception for these persons. Such efforts have the potential to increase contraceptive access and use, reduce unintended pregnancies, and lead to fewer adverse pregnancy and birth outcomes associated with Zika virus infection during pregnancy. The assessment of challenges and resources related to contraceptive access in Puerto Rico might be a useful model for other areas with active transmission

  7. Erythrophore cell response to food-associated pathogenic bacteria: implications for detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Janine R; Dukovcic, Stephanie R; Dierksen, Karen P; Carlyle, Calvin A; Caldwell, Bruce A; Trempy, Janine E

    2008-09-01

    Cell-based biosensors have been proposed for use as function-based detectors of toxic agents. We report the use of Betta splendens chromatophore cells, specifically erythrophore cells, for detection of food-associated pathogenic bacteria. Evaluation of erythrophore cell response, using Bacillus spp., has revealed that this response can distinguish pathogenic Bacillus cereus from a non-pathogenic B. cereus ΔplcR deletion mutant and a non-pathogenic Bacillus subtilis. Erythrophore cells were exposed to Salmonella enteritidis, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum. Each bacterial pathogen elicited a response from erythrophore cells that was distinguished from the corresponding bacterial growth medium, and this observed response was unique for each bacterial pathogen. These findings suggest that erythrophore cell response has potential for use as a biosensor in the detection and toxicity assessment for food-associated pathogenic bacteria.

  8. Mathematical Modeling of the Heat-Shock Response in HeLa Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-07-01

    Journal 109(2) 182–193 186 Scheff et al. phase of the heat -stress response. The behavior of the prior models showing no free homeostatic HSF, and... chemical reactions (15,43). Because cells respond differently to different types of heat -shock-response-inducing stimuli and different cell types have...Article Mathematical Modeling of the Heat -Shock Response in HeLa Cells Jeremy D. Scheff,1 Jonathan D. Stallings,2 Jaques Reifman,1,* and Vineet

  9. Assessing humoral and cell-mediated immune response in Hawaiian green turtles, Chelonia mydas

    Science.gov (United States)

    Work, T.M.; Balazs, G.H.; Rameyer, R.A.; Chang, S.P.; Berestecky, J.

    2000-01-01

    Seven immature green turtles, Chelonia mydas, captured from Kaneohe Bay on the island of Oahu were used to evaluate methods for assessing their immune response. Two turtles each were immunized intramuscularly with egg white lysozyme (EWL) in Freunda??s complete adjuvant, Gerbu, or ISA-70; a seventh turtle was immunized with saline only and served as a control. Humoral immune response was measured with an indirect enzyme linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA). Cell-mediated immune response was measured using in vitro cell proliferation assays (CPA) using whole blood or peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBM) cultured with concanavalin A (ConA), phytohaemagglutinin (PHA), or soluble egg EWL antigen. All turtles, except for one immunized with Gerbu and the control, produced a detectable humoral immune response by 6 weeks which persisted for at least 14 weeks after a single immunization. All turtles produced an anamnestic humoral immune response after secondary immunization. Antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in PBM was seen in all turtles either after primary or secondary immunization, but it was not as consistent as humoral immune response; antigen specific cell-mediated immune response in whole blood was rarely seen. Mononuclear cells had significantly higher stimulation indices than whole blood regardless of adjuvant, however, results with whole blood had lower variability. Both Gerbu and ISA-70 appeared to potentiate the cell-mediated immune response when PBM or whole blood were cultured with PHA. This is the first time cell proliferation assays have been compared between whole blood and PBM for reptiles. This is also the first demonstration of antigen specific cell-mediated response in reptiles. Cell proliferation assays allowed us to evaluate the cell-mediated immune response of green turtles. However, CPA may be less reliable than ELISA for detecting antigen specific immune response. Either of the three adjuvants appears suitable to safely elicit a

  10. Antigen-specific B cells reactivate an effective cytotoxic T cell response against phagocytosed Salmonella through cross-presentation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jelle de Wit

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The eradication of facultative intracellular bacterial pathogens, like Salmonella typhi, requires the concerted action of both the humoral immune response and the cytotoxic CD8(+ T cell response. Dendritic cells (DCs are considered to orchestrate the cytotoxic CD8(+ T cell response via cross-presentation of bacterial antigens onto MHC class I molecules. Cross-presentation of Salmonella by DCs however, is accompanied by the induction of apoptosis in the DCs. Besides antibody production, B cells are required to clear Salmonella infection for other unknown reasons. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here we show that Salmonella-specific B cells that phagocytose Salmonella upon BCR-ligation reactivate human memory CD8(+ T cells via cross-presentation yielding a Salmonella-specific cytotoxic T cell response. The reactivation of CD8(+ T cells is dependent on CD4(+ T cell help. Unlike the DCs, B cell-mediated cross-presentation of Salmonella does not coincide with apoptosis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: B cells form a new player in the activation of the cytotoxic effector arm of the immune response and the generation of effective adaptive immunity in Salmonella infection.

  11. Growth status significantly affects the response of human lung cancer cells to antitumor polyamine-analogue exposure.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlisle, Diane L; Devereux, Wendy L; Hacker, Amy; Woster, Patrick M; Casero, Robert A

    2002-08-01

    Human solid tumors frequently have a relatively small growth fraction,which interferes with the action of many chemotherapeutic agents that target actively cycling cells. Several polyamine analogues are currently being developed for clinical application against human solid tumors including N1,N11-bis(ethyl)norspermine. Therefore, an effort was made to examine the effects of growth rate on polyamine-analogue efficacy. Low growth fraction (LGF) cell cultures of the human non-small cell lung cancer cell line NCI-H157 were generated to partially mimic solid tumors with low mitotic indices. Log-phase cells were compared with LGF cells with respect to cell survival and biochemical effects after exposure to polyamine analogues. The results demonstrate generally that LGF NCI-H157 cells were sensitive to analogue treatment. However, the dose necessary to elicit a response in LGF cells was an order of magnitude higher than the dose needed in log-phase cells. Additionally, the biochemical effects of analogues were similar between log phase and LGF cells with regard to a down-regulation of polyamine biosynthesis as measured by ornithine decarboxylase activity and an increase in polyamine catabolism as indicated by an increase in spermidine/spermine N1-acetyltransferase activity. However, biochemical effects were less dramatic in the LGF cells than those observed in the log-phase cells. The overall results of these studies suggest that the growth status of solid tumors can significantly affect the response to antitumor polyamine analogues, and growth fraction must be considered in the continued development and use of the polyamine analogues.

  12. Emergence of chemoresistance in a metastatic basal cell carcinoma patient after complete response to hedgehog pathway inhibitor vismodegib (GDC-0449).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meani, Rowena E; Lim, Shueh-Wen; Chang, Anne Lynn S; Kelly, John W

    2014-08-01

    Vismodegib (GDC-0449, Genentech, USA), a small molecule inhibitor of the Hedgehog signalling pathway, has potent anti-tumour activity in advanced basal cell carcinoma (BCC). We report a case of a 67-year-old Australian man with metastatic BCC including pulmonary disease with malignant effusion who showed a dramatic complete response to vismodegib but subsequently experienced a recurrence of pulmonary disease, indicative of chemoresistance to vismodegib. This case is the first to illustrate chemoresistance in a patient with metastatic BCC, and demonstrates the need for closely monitoring metastatic BCC patients even after an apparently complete response.

  13. Analyses of Potential Predictive Markers and Response to Targeted Therapy in Patients with Advanced Clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Yan Song; Jing Huang; Ling Shan; Hong-Tu Zhang

    2015-01-01

    Background:Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted agents are standard treatments in advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC),but biomarkers of activity are lacking.The aim of this study was to investigate the association of Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL) gene status,vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR) or stem cell factor receptor (KIT) expression,and their relationships with characteristics and clinical outcome of advanced ccRCC.Methods:A total of 59 patients who received targeted treatment with sunitinib or pazopanib were evaluated for determination at Cancer Hospital and Institute,Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between January 2010 and November 2012.Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and status of the VHL gene and expression of VEGFR and KIT were determined by VHL sequence analysis and immunohistochemistry.Clinical-pathological features were collected and efficacy such as response rate and Median progression-free survival (PFS) and ovcrall survival (OS) were calculated and then compared based on expression status.The Chi-square test,the KaplanMeier method,and the Lon-rank test were used for statistical analyses.Results:Of 59 patients,objective responses were observed in 28 patients (47.5%).The median PFS was 13.8 months and median OS was 39.9 months.There was an improved PFS in patients with the following clinical features:Male gender,number of metastatic sites 2 or less,VEGFR-2 positive or KIT positive.Eleven patients (18.6%) had evidence of VHL mutation,with an objective response rate of 45.5%,which showed no difference with patients with no VHL mutation (47.9%).VHL mutation status did not correlate with either overall response rate (P =0.938) or PFS (P =0.277).The PFS was 17.6 months and 22.2 months in VEGFR-2 positive patients and KIT positive patients,respectively,which was significantly longer than that of VEGFR-2 or KIT negative patients (P =0.026 and P =0.043).Conclusion:VHL mutation status could not predict

  14. Analyses of Potential Predictive Markers and Response to Targeted Therapy in Patients with Advanced Clear-cell Renal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Song

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Vascular endothelial growth factor-targeted agents are standard treatments in advanced clear-cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC, but biomarkers of activity are lacking. The aim of this study was to investigate the association of Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL gene status, vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR or stem cell factor receptor (KIT expression, and their relationships with characteristics and clinical outcome of advanced ccRCC. Methods: A total of 59 patients who received targeted treatment with sunitinib or pazopanib were evaluated for determination at Cancer Hospital and Institute, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences between January 2010 and November 2012. Paraffin-embedded tumor samples were collected and status of the VHL gene and expression of VEGFR and KIT were determined by VHL sequence analysis and immunohistochemistry. Clinical-pathological features were collected and efficacy such as response rate and Median progression-free survival (PFS and overall survival (OS were calculated and then compared based on expression status. The Chi-square test, the Kaplan-Meier method, and the Lon-rank test were used for statistical analyses. Results: Of 59 patients, objective responses were observed in 28 patients (47.5%. The median PFS was 13.8 months and median OS was 39.9 months. There was an improved PFS in patients with the following clinical features: Male gender, number of metastatic sites 2 or less, VEGFR-2 positive or KIT positive. Eleven patients (18.6% had evidence of VHL mutation, with an objective response rate of 45.5%, which showed no difference with patients with no VHL mutation (47.9%. VHL mutation status did not correlate with either overall response rate (P = 0.938 or PFS (P = 0.277. The PFS was 17.6 months and 22.2 months in VEGFR-2 positive patients and KIT positive patients, respectively, which was significantly longer than that of VEGFR-2 or KIT negative patients (P = 0.026 and P = 0.043. Conclusion

  15. Cellular stress response in Eca-109 cells inhibits apoptosis during early exposure to isorhamnetin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, C; Fan, L Y; Cai, Z; Liu, Y Y; Yang, C L

    2012-01-01

    The flavonol aglycone isorhamnetin shows anti-proliferative activity in a variety of cancer cells. Previous work, from our laboratory showed that isorhamnetin inhibits the proliferation of human esophageal squamous carcinoma Eca-109 cells in vitro, but only after 72 h of exposure. This led us to propose that isorhamnetin exposure induces a cellular stress response that inhibits the antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of the compound during early exposure. To test this hypothesis, the present study examined the effects of isorhamnetin on Eca-109 cells during the first 72 h of exposure. Cell growth was assessed using the trypan blue exclusion assay, and expression of IκBα, NF-κB/p65, NF-κB/p50, phospho-Akt, Bcl-2, COX-2, Mcl-1, Bax, p53 and Id-1 were analyzed by Western blot. During the first 72 h of exposure, NF-κB/p65 and NF-κB/p50 accumulated in nuclei and expression of COX-2, Bcl-2 and Mcl-1 increased. In contrast, expression of IκBα and Bax fell initially but later increased. Expression of phospho-Akt and p53 showed no detectable change during the first 48 h. Pretreatment with the NF-κB inhibitor MG132 before exposure to isorhamnetin blocked the nuclear accumulation of p50 and p65, thereby inhibiting cell proliferation. These results show that during early exposure of Eca-109 cells to isorhamnetin, the NF-κB signaling pathway is activated and COX-2 expression increases, and this increase in expression partially inhibits isorhamnetin-induced apoptosis. Beyond 72 h of exposure, however, the apoptotic effect of isorhamnetin dominates, leading to inhibition of the NF-κB pathway and of cellular proliferation. These results will need to be taken into account when exploring the use of isorhamnetin against cancer in vivo.

  16. Dietary exposure to benzoxazinoids enhances bacteria-induced monokine responses by peripheral blood mononuclear cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Damgaard, Dres; Jensen, Bettina Margrethe; Palarasah, Yaseelan

    2015-01-01

    of monokines, T-cell cytokines and T-helper cell proliferation were assessed. A 3-wk diet with high BX content enhanced IL-1β responses against LPS and P. gingivalis, as well as TNF-α response against P. gingivalis, after 24 h of stimulation. Moreover, IL-6 was found to be increased after 7 days of stimulation...... with LPS. No effect was observed on T-cell cytokines or proliferation. BX levels in serum after a single meal did not modify cytokine responses. CONCLUSION: High dietary intake of BXs enhances bacteria-induced production of pro-inflammatory monokines by PBMCs, but not T-cell responses; presumably due...

  17. Loss of naive T cells and repertoire constriction predict poor response to vaccination in old primates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cicin-Sain, Luka; Smyk-Pearson, Susan; Smyk-Paerson, Sue; Currier, Noreen; Byrd, Laura; Koudelka, Caroline; Robinson, Tammie; Swarbrick, Gwendolyn; Tackitt, Shane; Legasse, Alfred; Fischer, Miranda; Nikolich-Zugich, Dragana; Park, Byung; Hobbs, Theodore; Doane, Cynthia J; Mori, Motomi; Axthelm, Michael K; Axthelm, Michael T; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Nikolich-Zugich, Janko

    2010-06-15

    Aging is usually accompanied by diminished immune protection upon infection or vaccination. Although aging results in well-characterized changes in the T cell compartment of long-lived, outbred, and pathogen-exposed organisms, their relevance for primary Ag responses remain unclear. Therefore, it remains unclear whether and to what extent the loss of naive T cells, their partial replacement by oligoclonal memory populations, and the consequent constriction of TCR repertoire limit the Ag responses in aging primates. We show in this study that aging rhesus monkeys (Macaca mulatta) exhibit poor CD8 T cell and B cell responses in the blood and poor CD8 responses in the lungs upon vaccination with the modified vaccinia strain Ankara. The function of APCs appeared to be maintained in aging monkeys, suggesting that the poor response was likely intrinsic to lymphocytes. We found that the loss of naive CD4 and CD8 T cells, and the appearance of persisting T cell clonal expansions predicted poor CD8 responses in individual monkeys. There was strong correlation between early CD8 responses in the transitory CD28+ CD62L- CD8+ T cell compartment and the peak Ab titers upon boost in individual animals, as well as a correlation of both parameters of immune response to the frequency of naive CD8+ T cells in old but not in adult monkeys. Therefore, our results argue that T cell repertoire constriction and naive cell loss have prognostic value for global immune function in aging primates.

  18. The Reticular Cell Network : A Robust Backbone for Immune Responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Textor, Johannes; Mandl, Judith N; de Boer, Rob J

    2016-01-01

    Lymph nodes are meeting points for circulating immune cells. A network of reticular cells that ensheathe a mesh of collagen fibers crisscrosses the tissue in each lymph node. This reticular cell network distributes key molecules and provides a structure for immune cells to move around on. During inf

  19. Suppression of a Natural Killer Cell Response by Simian Immunodeficiency Virus Peptides

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schafer, Jamie L; Ries, Moritz; Guha, Natasha; Connole, Michelle; Colantonio, Arnaud D; Wiertz, EJ; Wilson, Nancy A; Kaur, Amitinder; Evans, David T

    2015-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cell responses in primates are regulated in part through interactions between two highly polymorphic molecules, the killer-cell immunoglobulin-like receptors (KIRs) on NK cells and their major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I ligands on target cells. We previously reporte

  20. Studies of adaptive response and mutation induction in MCF-10A cells following exposure to chronic or acute ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manesh, Sara Shakeri; Sangsuwan, Traimate; Wojcik, Andrzej; Haghdoost, Siamak

    2015-10-01

    A phenomenon in which exposure to a low adapting dose of radiation makes cells more resistant to the effects of a subsequent high dose exposure is termed radio-adaptive response. Adaptive response could hypothetically reduce the risk of late adverse effects of chronic or acute radiation exposures in humans. Understanding the underlying mechanisms of such responses is of relevance for radiation protection as well as for the clinical applications of radiation in medicine. However, due to the variability of responses depending on the model system and radiation condition, there is a need to further study under what conditions adaptive response can be induced. In this study, we analyzed if there is a dose rate dependence for the adapting dose, assuming that the adapting dose induces DNA response/repair pathways that are dose rate dependent. MCF-10A cells were exposed to a 50mGy adapting dose administered acutely (0.40Gy/min) or chronically (1.4mGy/h or 4.1mGy/h) and then irradiated by high acute challenging doses. The endpoints of study include clonogenic cell survival and mutation frequency at X-linked hprt locus. In another series of experiment, cells were exposed to 100mGy and 1Gy at different dose rates (acutely and chronically) and then the mutation frequencies were studied. Adaptive response was absent at the level of clonogenic survival. The mutation frequencies were significantly decreased in the cells pre-exposed to 50mGy at 1.4mGy/h followed by 1Gy acute exposure as challenging dose. Importantly, at single dose exposures (1 Gy or 100mGy), no differences at the level of mutation were found comparing different dose rates.

  1. Different meningitis-causing bacteria induce distinct inflammatory responses on interaction with cells of the human meninges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, Mark I; Weller, Roy O; Heckels, John E; Christodoulides, Myron

    2004-06-01

    The interactions of bacterial pathogens with cells of the human leptomeninges are critical events in the progression of meningitis. An in vitro model based on the culture of human meningioma cells was used to investigate the interactions of the meningeal pathogens Escherichia coli K1, Haemophilus influenzae, Neisseria meningitidis and Streptococcus pneumoniae. A rank order of association with meningioma cells was observed, with N. meningitidis showing the highest levels of adherence, followed by E. coli, S. pneumoniae and H. influenzae. Neisseria meningitidis and H. influenzae did not invade meningioma cells or induce cell death, but induced a concentration-dependent secretion of inflammatory mediators. Neisseria meningitidis induced higher levels of IL-6, MCP-1, RANTES and GM-CSF than H. influenzae, but there was no significant difference in the levels of IL-8 induced by both pathogens. Streptococcus pneumoniae was also unable to invade meningioma cells, but low concentrations of bacteria failed to stimulate cytokine secretion. However, higher concentrations of pneumococci led to cell death. By contrast, only E. coli K1 invaded meningioma cells directly and induced rapid cell death before an inflammatory response could be induced. These data demonstrate that the interactions of different bacterial pathogens with human meningeal cells are distinct, and suggest that different intervention strategies may be needed in order to prevent the morbidity and mortality associated with bacterial meningitis.

  2. Erythrophore cell response to food‐associated pathogenic bacteria: implications for detection

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutchison, Janine R.; Dukovcic, Stephanie R.; Dierksen, Karen P.; Carlyle, Calvin A.; Caldwell, Bruce A.; Trempy, Janine E.

    2008-01-01

    Summary Cell‐based biosensors have been proposed for use as function‐based detectors of toxic agents. We report the use of Betta splendens chromatophore cells, specifically erythrophore cells, for detection of food‐associated pathogenic bacteria. Evaluation of erythrophore cell response, using Bacillus spp., has revealed that this response can distinguish pathogenic Bacillus cereus from a non‐pathogenic B. cereus ΔplcR deletion mutant and a non‐pathogenic Bacillus subtilis. Erythrophore cells were exposed to Salmonella enteritidis, Clostridium perfringens and Clostridium botulinum. Each bacterial pathogen elicited a response from erythrophore cells that was distinguished from the corresponding bacterial growth medium, and this observed response was unique for each bacterial pathogen. These findings suggest that erythrophore cell response has potential for use as a biosensor in the detection and toxicity assessment for food‐associated pathogenic bacteria. PMID:21261862

  3. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols. PMID:27447484

  4. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katrin Deiser

    Full Text Available The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7 is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+ host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7 therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols.

  5. Interleukin-7 Modulates Anti-Tumor CD8+ T Cell Responses via Its Action on Host Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deiser, Katrin; Stoycheva, Diana; Bank, Ute; Blankenstein, Thomas; Schüler, Thomas

    2016-01-01

    The adoptive transfer of antigen-specific CD8+ T cells is a promising approach for the treatment of chronic viral and malignant diseases. In order to improve adoptive T cell therapy (ATT) of cancer, recent strategies aim at the antibody-based blockade of immunosuppressive signaling pathways in CD8+ T cells. Alternatively, adjuvant effects of immunostimulatory cytokines might be exploited to improve therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses. For example, Interleukin-7 (IL-7) is a potent growth, activation and survival factor for CD8+ T cells that can be used to improve virus- and tumor-specific CD8+ T cell responses. Although direct IL-7 effects on CD8+ T cells were studied extensively in numerous models, the contribution of IL-7 receptor-competent (IL-7R+) host cells remained unclear. In the current study we provide evidence that CD8+ T cell-mediated tumor rejection in response to recombinant IL-7 (rIL-7) therapy is strictly dependent on IL-7R+ host cells. On the contrary, CD8+ T cell expansion is independent of host IL-7R expression. If, however, rIL-7 therapy and peptide vaccination are combined, host IL-7R signaling is crucial for CD8+ T cell expansion. Unexpectedly, maximum CD8+ T cell expansion relies mainly on IL-7R signaling in non-hematopoietic host cells, similar to the massive accumulation of dendritic cells and granulocytes. In summary, we provide evidence that IL-7R+ host cells are major targets of rIL-7 that modulate therapeutic CD8+ T cell responses and the outcome of rIL-7-assisted ATT. This knowledge may have important implications for the design and optimization of clinical ATT protocols.

  6. Needs analysis

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    黄静雅

    2009-01-01

    Though needs analysis has been seen as one of the fundamental defining characteristics of ESP,it is not unknown in GPE.it is a salient stage,especially for the task option and syllabus evaluation.In this essay,the meaning of needs,the importance of needs analysis,and the way to implement needs analysis are subject to analysis.

  7. Bio-inspired Nanomaterials for Biosensing and Cell Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Molly

    2012-02-01

    This talk will provide an overview of our recent developments in bio-inspired nanomaterials for tissue regeneration and sensing. Bio-responsive nanomaterials are of growing importance with potential applications including drug delivery, diagnostics and tissue engineering [1]. DNA-, protein- or peptide-functionalised nanoparticle (NP) aggregates are particularly useful systems since triggered changes in their aggregation states may be readily monitored. Our recent simple conceptually novel approaches to real-time monitoring of protease, lipase and kinase enzyme action using modular peptide functionalized NPs will be presented [2,3,4]. The highly interdisciplinary field of Tissue Engineering (TE) can also benefit from advances in the design of bio-responsive nanomaterials. TE involves the development of artificial scaffold structures on which new cells are encouraged to grow. The ability to control topography and chemistry at the nanoscale offers exciting possibilities for stimulating growth of new tissue through the development of novel nanostructured scaffolds that mimic the nanostructure of the tissues in the body [1,5,6]. Recent developments in this context will be discussed as well as novel approaches to in vivo tissue regeneration of large volumes of highly vascularised and hierarchically organized tissue [7,8,9]. [4pt] [1] MM Stevens, J George. Science 310:1135-1138 (2005)[0pt] [2] A Laromaine, L Koh, M Murugesan, RV Ulijn, MM Stevens. Journal of the American Chemical Society 129:4156-4157 (2007)[0pt] [3] J Ghadiali, MM Stevens. Advanced Materials 20: 4359-4363 (2008); J Ghadiali et al, ACS Nano 4:4915-4919 (2010)[0pt] [4] D Aili, M Mager, D Roche, MM Stevens. Nano Letters 11:1401-1405 (2011) [0pt] [5] E Place, ND Evans, MM Stevens. Nature Materials 8:457-470 (2009)[0pt] [6] MD Mager, V LaPointe, MM Stevens. Nature Chemistry 3:582-589 (2011)[0pt] [7] MM Stevens et. al. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 102:11450-11455 (2005)[0pt] [8] E Gentleman et al. Nature

  8. Research use and support needs, and research activity in social care: a cross-sectional survey in two councils with social services responsibilities in the UK.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cooke, Jo; Bacigalupo, Ruth; Halladay, Linsay; Norwood, Hayley

    2008-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the level of research activity, research use, research interests and research skills in the social care workforce in two UK councils with social service responsibilities (CSSRs). A cross-sectional survey was conducted of the social care workforce in two CSSRs (n = 1512) in 2005. The sample was identified in partnership with the councils, and included employees with professional qualifications (social workers and occupational therapists); staff who have a role to assess, plan and monitor care; service managers; commissioners of services; and those involved with social care policy, information management and training. The survey achieved a response rate of 24% (n = 368). The Internet was reported as an effective source of research information; conversely, research-based guidelines were reported to have a low impact on practice. Significant differences were found in research use, by work location, and postgraduate training. Most respondents saw research as useful for practice (69%), and wanted to collaborate in research (68%), but only 11% were planning to do research within the next 12 months. Having a master's degree was associated with a greater desire to lead or collaborate in research. A range of research training needs, and the preferred modes of delivery were identified. Support to increase research activity includes protected time and mentorship. The study concludes that a range of mechanisms to make research available for the social care workforce needs to be in place to support evidence-informed practice. Continual professional development to a postgraduate level supports the use and production of evidence in the social care workforce, and promotes the development of a research culture. The term research is used to include service user consultations, needs assessment and service evaluation. The findings highlight a relatively large body of the social care workforce willing to collaborate and conduct research

  9. Targeting the gut vascular endothelium induces gut effector CD8 T cell responses via cross-presentation by dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bourges, Dorothee; Zhan, Yifan; Brady, Jamie L; Braley, Hal; Caminschi, Irina; Prato, Sandro; Villadangos, José A; Lew, Andrew M

    2007-11-01

    Systemic delivery of Ag usually induces poor mucosal immunity. To improve the CD8 T cell response at mucosal sites, we targeted the Ag to MAdCAM-1, a mucosal addressin cell adhesion molecule expressed mainly by high endothelial venules (HEV) in mesenteric lymph nodes (MLN) and Peyer's patches of gut-associated lymphoid tissue. When chemical conjugates of anti-MAdCAM-1 Ab and model Ag OVA were injected i.v., a greatly enhanced proliferative response of Ag-specific OT-I CD8 T cells was detected in MLN. This was preceded by prolonged accumulation, up to 2 wk, of the anti-MAdCAM OVA conjugate on HEV of Peyer's patches and MLN. In contrast, nontargeted OVA conjugate was very inefficient in inducing OT-I CD8 T cell proliferation in MLN and required at least 20-fold more Ag to induce a comparable response. In addition, MAdCAM targeting elicits an endogenous OVA-specific CD8 T cell response, evident by IFN-gamma production and target killing. Induced response offers protection against an OVA-expressing B cell lymphoma. We propose that the augmentation of gut CD8 T cell responses by MAdCAM targeting is due to both accumulation of Ag in the HEV and conversion of a soluble Ag to a cell-associated one, allowing cross-presentation by DCs.

  10. SAP expression in invariant NKT cells is required for cognate help to support B-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Detre, Cynthia; Keszei, Marton; Garrido-Mesa, Natividad; Kis-Toth, Katalin; Castro, Wilson; Agyemang, Amma F; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Carroll, Michael C; Tsokos, George C; Wang, Ninghai; Leadbetter, Elizabeth A; Terhorst, Cox

    2012-07-05

    One of the manifestations of X-linked lymphoproliferative disease (XLP) is progressive agammaglobulinemia, caused by the absence of a functional signaling lymphocyte activation molecule (SLAM)-associated protein (SAP) in T, invariant natural killer T (NKT) cells and NK cells. Here we report that α-galactosylceramide (αGalCer) activated NKT cells positively regulate antibody responses to haptenated protein antigens at multiple checkpoints, including germinal center formation and affinity maturation. Whereas NKT cell-dependent B cell responses were absent in SAP(-/-).B6 mice that completely lack NKT cells, the small number of SAP-deficient NKT cells in SAP(-/-).BALB/c mice adjuvated antibody production, but not the germinal center reaction. To test the hypothesis that SAP-deficient NKT cells can facilitate humoral immunity, SAP was deleted after development in SAP(fl/fl).tgCreERT2.B6 mice. We find that NKT cell intrinsic expression of SAP is dispensable for noncognate helper functions, but is critical for providing cognate help to antigen-specific B cells. These results demonstrate that SLAM-family receptor-regulated cell-cell interactions are not limited to T-B cell conjugates. We conclude that in the absence of SAP, several routes of NKT cell-mediated antibody production are still accessible. The latter suggests that residual NKT cells in XLP patients might contribute to variations in dysgammaglobulinemia.

  11. Modulation of T cell responses after cross-talk between antigen presenting cells and T cells: a give-and-take relationship.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wauben, Marca H M; 't Hoen, Esther N M; Taams, Leonie S

    2003-01-01

    T cells presenting antigens in the context of MHC class II can induce anergy. In rat CD4+ T cell clones we have shown that depending on the depth of anergy other T cell responses can be inhibited in the presence of professional antigen presenting cells (APCs). This inhibition is cell-contact dependent, and APCs recovered from co-cultures with suppressive anergic T cells are modulated in their capacity to activate T cells. No changes in cell surface expression of MHC molecules, B7-1/B7-2, and OX40L were detected. Remarkably cell clusters formed by anergic T cells appeared to be more tight than clusters of activated T cells, and after fluorescent cell surface labelling of T cells, transfer of label was more profound in co-cultures of anergic T cells and APCs compared to activated T cells and APCs. Previously, it has been shown that activated T cells can absorb molecules from APCs in a unidirectional process. We now have evidence that also APCs can absorb cell surface molecules from T cells during APC-T cell co-cultures. We speculate that the quantity and quality of molecule reshuffling during cross-talk between T cells and APCs play a role in the regulation of the T cell response.

  12. Relative binding affinity does not predict biological response to xenoestrogens in rat endometrial adenocarcinoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Strunck, E; Stemmann, N; Hopert, A; Wünsche, W; Frank, K; Vollmer, G

    2000-10-01

    The possible adverse effects of the so-called environmental estrogens have raised considerable concern. Developmental, endocrine and reproductive disorders in wildlife animals have been linked to high exposure to persistent environmental chemicals with estrogen-like activity (xenoestrogens); yet, the potential impact of environmental estrogens on human health is currently under debate also due to lack of data. A battery of in vitro assays exist for identifying compounds with estrogenic activity, but only a few models are available to assess estrogenic potency in a multiparametric analysis. We have recently established the endometrial adenocarcinoma cell line RUCA-I; it enables us to compare estrogenic effects both in vitro and in vivo as these cells are estrogen responsive in vitro and grow estrogen sensitive tumors if inoculated in syngeneic animals in vivo. Here we report in vitro data concerning (a) the relative binding affinity of the selected synthetic chemicals Bisphenol A, nonylphenol, p-tert-octylphenol, and o,p-DDT to the estrogen receptor of RUCA-I cells and (b) the relative potency of these compounds in inducing increased production of complement C3, an endogenous estrogen-responsive gene. Competitive Scatchard analysis revealed that xenoestrogens bound with an at least 1000-fold lower affinity to the estrogen receptor of RUCA-I cells than estradiol itself, thereby exhibiting the following affinity ranking, estradiol>nonylphenol>bisphenol A approximately p-tert-octylphenol>o,p-DDT. Despite these low binding affinities, bisphenol A, nonylphenol and p-tert-octylphenol increased production of complement C3 in a dose dependent manner. Compared with estradiol, only 100-fold higher concentrations were needed for all the compounds to achieve similar levels of induction, except o,p-DDT which was by far less potent. Northern blot analyses demonstrated that the increased production of complement C3 was mediated by an increased transcription. In summary, cultured

  13. A response calculus for immobilized T cell receptor ligands

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, P S; Menné, C; Mariuzza, R A

    2001-01-01

    To address the molecular mechanism of T cell receptor (TCR) signaling, we have formulated a model for T cell activation, termed the 2D-affinity model, in which the density of TCR on the T cell surface, the density of ligand on the presenting surface, and their corresponding two-dimensional affini...

  14. Immune Responses of Dendritic Cells Loaded with Antigens from Apoptotic Cholangiocarcinoma Cells Caused by γ-Irradation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WUGang; HANBenli; PEIXuetao

    2002-01-01

    Objective:To investigate the induction cytotoxic T cells(CTLs) with antitumor activity and therapeutic efficacy after dendritic cells(DCs) acquired antigen from apoptotic cholangiocarcinoma cells caused by γ-irradiation. Methods:DCs from peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) that maintain the antigen capturing and processing capacity charateristic of immature cells have been established in vitro, using granulocyte macrophage colony stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin-4 (IL-4). Then, in cholangiocarcinoma cells apoptosis was induced by γ-irradiation. The experimental groups were as follows:(1)coculture of DCs and apoptotic cancer cells and T cells;(2)coculture of DCs and necrotic cancer cells and T cells;(3)coculture of DCs, cultured cancer cell and T cells. They are cocultured for 7 days.DCs and T cells were riched, isolated and their antitumor response was tested. Results:The cells had typical dendritic morphology, expressed high levels of CDla and B7, acquired antigen from apoptotic cells caused by γ-irradiation and induced an increased T cell stimulatory capacity in mixed lymphocyte reactions (MLR). Conclusion:DCs obtained from PBMCs using GM-CSF and IL-4 can efficiently present antigen derived from apoptotic cells caused by γ-irradiation and efficiently induce T cells.This strategy, therefore, may present an effective approach to transduce DCs with antigen.

  15. Adaptive responses to dasatinib-treated lung squamous cell cancer cells harboring DDR2 mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bai, Yun; Kim, Jae-Young; Watters, January M; Fang, Bin; Kinose, Fumi; Song, Lanxi; Koomen, John M; Teer, Jamie K; Fisher, Kate; Chen, Yian Ann; Rix, Uwe; Haura, Eric B

    2014-12-15

    DDR2 mutations occur in approximately 4% of lung squamous cell cancer (SCC) where the tyrosine kinase inhibitor dasatinib has emerged as a new therapeutic option. We found that ERK and AKT phosphorylation was weakly inhibited by dasatinib in DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells, suggesting that dasatinib inhibits survival signals distinct from other oncogenic receptor tyrosine kinases (RTK) and/or compensatory signals exist that dampen dasatinib activity. To gain better insight into dasatinib's action in these cells, we assessed altered global tyrosine phosphorylation (pY) after dasatinib exposure using a mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics approach. Overlaying protein-protein interaction relationships upon this dasatinib-regulated pY network revealed decreased phosphorylation of Src family kinases and their targets. Conversely, dasatinib enhanced tyrosine phosphorylation in a panel of RTK and their signaling adaptor complexes, including EGFR, MET/GAB1, and IGF1R/IRS2, implicating a RTK-driven adaptive response associated with dasatinib. To address the significance of this observation, these results were further integrated with results from a small-molecule chemical library screen. We found that dasatinib combined with MET and insulin-like growth factor receptor (IGF1R) inhibitors had a synergistic effect, and ligand stimulation of EGFR and MET rescued DDR2-mutant lung SCC cells from dasatinib-induced loss of cell viability. Importantly, we observed high levels of tyrosine-phosphorylated EGFR and MET in a panel of human lung SCC tissues harboring DDR2 mutations. Our results highlight potential RTK-driven adaptive-resistant mechanisms upon DDR2 targeting, and they suggest new, rationale cotargeting strategies for DDR2-mutant lung SCC.

  16. The responses of I beta cells to increases in the rate of lung inflation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marino, P L; Davies, R O; Pack, A I

    1981-08-31

    The activity of inspiratory cells in the region of the nucleus of the tractus solitarius (NTS) was recorded extracellularly in paralyzed, artificially ventilated cats either during chloralose-urethane anesthesia or following midcollicular decerebration. Twenty-three of the 68 inspiratory cells recorded in the region of the NTS were classified as I beta cells on the basis of their response to withholding lung inflation. The dynamic sensitivity of I beta cells was determined by studying their response to increases in the rate of lung inflation at constant peak volume. The I beta cells in this study showed 3 distinct patterns of response to increases in the rate of inflation. Five cells showed no change in firing pattern (fixed firing pattern). Ten cells showed an increase in the rate of rise of cell activity but no change in peak frequency (low dynamic sensitivity). Eight cells showed increases in both the rate of rise of cell activity and peak frequency (high dynamic sensitivity). It was concluded that I beta cells are not a functionally homogeneous population, at least in terms of their dynamic sensitivity. Cells showing fixed firing patterns have the characteristics of off-switch neurons. Cells with low levels of dynamic sensitivity may receive afferents from pulmonary stretch receptors. Cells showing a high degree of dynamic sensitivity may receive afferents from rapidly adapting receptors. The fact that I beta cells are not a functionally homogeneous population may explain the many divergent observations reported from studies of these cells.

  17. IκB Kinase ε Is an NFATc1 Kinase that Inhibits T Cell Immune Response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Junjie Zhang

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Activation of nuclear factor of activated T cells (NFAT is crucial for immune responses. IKKε is an IκB kinase (IKK-related kinase, and the function of IKKε remains obscure in T cells, despite its abundant expression. We report that IKKε inhibits NFAT activation and T cell responses by promoting NFATc1 phosphorylation. During T cell activation, IKKε was transiently activated to phosphorylate NFATc1. Loss of IKKε elevated T cell antitumor and antiviral immunity and, therefore, reduced tumor development and persistent viral infection. IKKε was activated in CD8+ T cells of mice bearing melanoma or persistently infected with a model herpesvirus. These results collectively show that IKKε promotes NFATc1 phosphorylation and inhibits T cell responses, identifying IKKε as a crucial negative regulator of T cell activation and a potential target for immunotherapy.

  18. B and T cell crosstalk in anti-bacterial immune responses

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J. de Wit

    2012-01-01

    This thesis shows that phagocytosis of Salmonella by B cells may generate a survival niche and transport vehicle for Salmonella, but that simultaneously Salmonella-infected B cells induce an optimal anti-Salmonella response through activation of multiple arms of the adaptive immune response. The the

  19. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells are capable of modulating the immune response by regulatory T cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunyoung Joo

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Cell therapy for patients who have intractable muscle disorders may require highly regenerative cells from young, healthy allogeneic donors. Mesenchymal stem cells are currently under clinical investigation because they are known to induce muscle regeneration and believed to be immune privileged, thus making them suitable for allogeneic applications. However, it is unclear whether allogeneic and myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells retain their immunomodulatory characteristics. Therefore, our aim was to evaluate the effects of mesenchymal stem cell differentiation on the immune characteristics of cells in vitro. We investigated the immunologic properties of mesenchymal stem cells after myogenic induction. Mesenchymal stem cells were obtained from C57BL/6 mice and the C3H/10T1/2 murine mesenchymal stem cell line. Two different 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine doses (0.5 and 3 µM were evaluated for their effects on mesenchymal stem cell skeletal myogenic differentiation potential, immune antigen expression, and mixed lymphocytic reactions. Using a mixed lymphocytic reaction, we determined the optimal splenocyte proliferation inhibition dose. The induction of regulatory T cells was markedly increased by the addition of 3 µM 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine–treated mesenchymal stem cells. Myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells do not elicit alloreactive lymphocyte proliferative responses and are able to modulate immune responses. These findings support the hypothesis that myogenic-induced mesenchymal stem cells may be transplantable across allogeneic barriers.

  20. Calculation of response of Chinese hamster cells to ions based on track structure theory

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LiuXiao-Wei; ZhangChun-Xiang

    1997-01-01

    Considering biological cells as single target two-hit detectors,an analytic formula to calculate the response of cells to ions is developed based on track structure theory.In the calculation,the splitting deposition energy between ion kill mode and γ kill mode is not used.The results of calculation are in agreement with the experimental data for response of Chinese hamster cells,whose response to γ rays can be described by the response function of single target two hit detector to ions.

  1. Local Microenvironment Controls the Compartmentalization of NK Cell Responses during Systemic Inflammation in Mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasid, Orhan; Ciulean, Ioana Sonya; Fitting, Catherine; Doyen, Noelle; Cavaillon, Jean-Marc

    2016-09-15

    Systemic inflammatory response syndrome is a whole-body reaction to a triggering insult that often results in life-threatening illness. Contributing to the development of this inflammatory cascade are numerous cellular partners, among which NK cells were shown to play a key role. Accumulating evidence points to organ-specific properties of systemic inflammation and NK cells. However, little is known about compartment-specific activation of NK cells during systemic inflammatory response syndrome or the relative contribution of NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues. In this study, we undertook a sequential characterization of NK responses in the spleen, lungs, bone marrow, peritoneum, and blood using a mouse model of endotoxemia. We report that, despite similar systemic dynamics of NK cell responses, expression of activation markers (CD69 and CD25) and effector molecules (IFN-γ, granzyme B, and IL-10) display organ-specific thresholds of maximum activation. Using adoptive transfers of spleen and lung NK cells, we found that these cells have the capacity to quickly adapt to a new environment and adjust their response levels to that of resident NK cells. This functional adaptation occurs without significant alterations in phenotype and independently of subpopulation-specific trafficking. Thus, using a dynamic in vivo-transfer system, to our knowledge our study is the first to report the compartmentalization of NK cells responses during systemic inflammation and to show that NK cell-intrinsic properties and microenvironmental cues are involved in this process, in a sequential manner.

  2. Effects of Lead on Temporal Response Properties of Retinal Ganglion Cells in Developing Rats

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    阮迪云; 汤立新; 赵晨; 郭宇静

    1994-01-01

    Neonatal rats have taken in lead, during the period from their parturition to their weaning, from the milk of dams fed with water containing 0.2% lead acetate solutions. The alterations in the temporal response properties of retinal ganglion cells in adult rats (90 days) following the lead exposure at their developing stage have been studied. The results of this investigation demonstrate that the lead exposure in neonatal rats causes decreases in the optimal temporal frequency, bandwidth at half amplitude, temporal resolution and response phase of the retinal ganglion cells in adult rats. Compared with the sustained cells, the transient cells have a much greater alteration in temporal response properties.

  3. IL-21 optimizes T cell and humoral responses in the central nervous system during viral encephalitis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phares, Timothy W.; DiSano, Krista D.; Hinton, David R.; Hwang, Mihyun; Zajac, Allan J.; Stohlman, Stephen A.; Bergmann, Cornelia C.

    2013-01-01

    Acute coronavirus encephalomyelitis is controlled by T cells while humoral responses suppress virus persistence. This study defines the contribution of interleukin (IL)-21, a regulator of T and B cell function, to central nervous system (CNS) immunity. IL-21 receptor deficiency did not affect peripheral T cell activation or trafficking, but dampened granzyme B, gamma interferon and IL-10 expression by CNS T cells and reduced serum and intrathecal humoral responses. Viral control was already lost prior to humoral CNS responses, but demyelination remained comparable. These data demonstrate a critical role of IL-21 in regulating CNS immunity, sustaining viral persistence and preventing mortality. PMID:23992866

  4. Sustained CD8+ T-cell responses induced after acute parvovirus B19 infection in humans

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norbeck, Oscar; Isa, Adiba; Pöhlmann, Christoph

    2005-01-01

    Murine models have suggested that CD8+ T-cell responses peak early in acute viral infections and are not sustained, but no evidence for humans has been available. To address this, we longitudinally analyzed the CD8+ T-cell response to human parvovirus B19 in acutely infected individuals. We...... observed striking CD8+ T-cell responses, which were sustained or even increased over many months after the resolution of acute disease, indicating that CD8+ T cells may play a prominent role in the control of parvovirus B19 and other acute viral infections of humans, including potentially those generated...

  5. T cell responses against microsatellite instability-induced frameshift peptides and influence of regulatory T cells in colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bauer, Kathrin; Nelius, Nina; Reuschenbach, Miriam; Koch, Moritz; Weitz, Jürgen; Steinert, Gunnar; Kopitz, Jürgen; Beckhove, Philipp; Tariverdian, Mirjam; von Knebel Doeberitz, Magnus; Kloor, Matthias

    2013-01-01

    High-level microsatellite-unstable (MSI-H) colorectal carcinomas (CRC) represent a distinct subtype of tumors commonly characterized by dense infiltration with cytotoxic T cells, most likely due to expression of MSI-H-related frameshift peptides (FSP). The contribution of FSP and classical antigens like MUC1 and CEA to the cellular immune response against MSI-H CRC had not been analyzed so far. We analyzed tumor-infiltrating and peripheral T cells from MSI-H (n = 4 and n = 14, respectively) and microsatellite-stable (MSS) tumor patients (n = 26 and n = 17) using interferon gamma ELISpot assays. Responses against 4 FSP antigens and peptides derived from MUC1 to CEA were compared with and without depletion of regulatory T cells, and the results were related to the presence of the respective antigens in tumor tissue. Preexisting FSP-specific T cell responses were detected in all (4 out of 4) tumor-infiltrating and in the majority (10 out of 14) of peripheral T cell samples from MSI-H CRC patients, but rarely observed in MSS CRC patients. Preexisting T cell responses in MSI-H CRC patients were significantly more frequently directed against FSP tested in the present study than against peptides derived from classical antigens MUC1 or CEA (p = 0.049). Depletion of regulatory T cells increased the frequency of effector T cell responses specific for MUC1/CEA-derived peptides and, to a lesser extent, T cell responses specific for FSP. Our data suggest that the analyzed FSP may represent an immunologically relevant pool of antigens capable of eliciting antitumoral effector T cell responses.

  6. Baseline levels of influenza-specific CD4 memory T-cells affect T-cell responses to influenza vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Song He

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Factors affecting immune responses to influenza vaccines have not been studied systematically. We hypothesized that T-cell and antibody responses to the vaccines are functions of pre-existing host immunity against influenza antigens. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: During the 2004 and 2005 influenza seasons, we have collected data on cellular and humoral immune reactivity to influenza virus in blood samples collected before and after immunization with inactivated or live attenuated influenza vaccines in healthy children and adults. We first used cross-validated lasso regression on the 2004 dataset to identify a group of candidate baseline correlates with T-cell and antibody responses to vaccines, defined as fold-increase in influenza-specific T-cells and serum HAI titer after vaccination. The following baseline parameters were examined: percentages of influenza-reactive IFN-gamma(+ cells in T and NK cell subsets, percentages of influenza-specific memory B-cells, HAI titer, age, and type of vaccine. The candidate baseline correlates were then tested with the independent 2005 dataset. Baseline percentage of influenza-specific IFN-gamma(+ CD4 T-cells was identified as a significant correlate of CD4 and CD8 T-cell responses, with lower baseline levels associated with larger T-cell responses. Baseline HAI titer and vaccine type were identified as significant correlates for HAI response, with lower baseline levels and the inactivated vaccine associated with larger HAI responses. Previously we reported that baseline levels of CD56(dim NK reactivity against influenza virus inversely correlated with the immediate T-cell response to vaccination, and that NK reactivity induced by influenza virus depended on IL-2 produced by influenza-specific memory T-cells. Taken together these results suggest a novel mechanism for the homeostasis of virus-specific T-cells, which involves interaction between memory helper T-cells, CD56(dim NK and DC

  7. Naïve and memory B cells exhibit distinct biochemical responses following BCR engagement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moens, Leen; Kane, Alisa; Tangye, Stuart G

    2016-09-01

    Immunological memory is characterized by the rapid reactivation of memory B cells that produce large quantities of high-affinity antigen-specific antibodies. This contrasts the response of naïve B cells, and the primary immune response, which is much slower and of lower affinity. Memory responses are critical for protection against infectious diseases and form the basis of most currently available vaccines. Although we have known about the phenomenon of long-lived memory for centuries, the biochemical differences underlying these diverse responses of naïve and memory B cells is incompletely resolved. Here we investigated the nature of B-cell receptor (BCR) signaling in human splenic naïve, IgM(+) memory and isotype-switched memory B cells following multivalent BCR crosslinking. We observed comparable rapid and transient phosphorylation kinetics for proximal (phosphotyrosine and spleen tyrosine kinase) and propagation (B-cell linker, phospholipase Cγ2) signaling components in these different B-cell subsets. However, the magnitude of activation of downstream components of the BCR signaling pathway were greater in memory compared with naïve cells. Although no differences were observed in the magnitude of Ca(2+) mobilization between subsets, IgM(+) memory B cells exhibited a more rapid Ca(2+) mobilization and a greater depletion of the Ca(2+) endoplasmic reticulum stores, while IgG(+) memory B cells had a prolonged Ca(2+) uptake. Collectively, our findings show that intrinsic signaling features of B-cell subsets contribute to the robust response of human memory B cells over naïve B cells. This has implications for our understanding of memory B-cell responses and provides a framework to modulate these responses in the setting of vaccination and immunopathologies, such as immunodeficiency and autoimmunity.

  8. Responses of synovial fluid and peripheral blood mononuclear cells to bacterial antigens and autologous antigen presenting cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Klasen, I S; Melief, M J; Swaak, T J; Severijnen, A J; Hazenberg, M P

    1993-01-01

    The specificity of T cells in the inflamed joints of patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) has been the subject of much study. Bacterial antigens are suspect in the aetiology of rheumatic diseases. The responsiveness of the mononuclear cell fraction of peripheral blood and synovial fluid of patients with RA and of patients with rheumatic diseases other than RA to bacterial antigens such as cell wall fragments of the anaerobic intestinal flora, cell wall fragments of Streptococcus pyogenes, intestinal flora derived peptidoglycan polysaccharide complexes, the 65 kilodalton protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, and muramyldipeptide was investigated. No significant difference in response was found to all these bacterial antigens in the synovial fluid of patients with RA compared with the responses in patients with other rheumatic diseases. The highest responsiveness in the synovial fluid of the patients with RA was to the streptococcal cell wall fragments and to the 65 kilodalton protein. Higher responses to several bacterial antigens in the synovial fluid of patients with RA were found compared with peripheral blood from the same patient group. The antigen presenting cell population of the synovial fluid in patients with RA and the patients with other rheumatic diseases was found to be stimulatory for autologous peripheral blood T cells even in the absence of antigen. This suggests an important role for the synovial antigen presenting cell in the aetiology of inflammatory joint diseases. PMID:8447692

  9. Insulin demand regulates β cell number via the unfolded protein response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Rohit B; O'Donnell, Amy C; Stamateris, Rachel E; Ha, Binh; McCloskey, Karen M; Reynolds, Paul R; Arvan, Peter; Alonso, Laura C

    2015-10-01

    Although stem cell populations mediate regeneration of rapid turnover tissues, such as skin, blood, and gut, a stem cell reservoir has not been identified for some slower turnover tissues, such as the pancreatic islet. Despite lacking identifiable stem cells, murine pancreatic β cell number expands in response to an increase in insulin demand. Lineage tracing shows that new β cells are generated from proliferation of mature, differentiated β cells; however, the mechanism by which these mature cells sense systemic insulin demand and initiate a proliferative response remains unknown. Here, we identified the β cell unfolded protein response (UPR), which senses insulin production, as a regulator of β cell proliferation. Using genetic and physiologic models, we determined that among the population of β cells, those with an active UPR are more likely to proliferate. Moreover, subthreshold endoplasmic reticulum stress (ER stress) drove insulin demand-induced β cell proliferation, through activation of ATF6. We also confirmed that the UPR regulates proliferation of human β cells, suggesting that therapeutic UPR modulation has potential to expand β cell mass in people at risk for diabetes. Together, this work defines a stem cell-independent model of tissue homeostasis, in which differentiated secretory cells use the UPR sensor to adapt organ size to meet demand.

  10. Signaling network of dendritic cells in response to pathogens: a community-input supported knowledgebase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nudelman Irina

    2010-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells are antigen-presenting cells that play an essential role in linking the innate and adaptive immune systems. Much research has focused on the signaling pathways triggered upon infection of dendritic cells by various pathogens. The high level of activity in the field makes it desirable to have a pathway-based resource to access the information in the literature. Current pathway diagrams lack either comprehensiveness, or an open-access editorial interface. Hence, there is a need for a dependable, expertly curated knowledgebase that integrates this information into a map of signaling networks. Description We have built a detailed diagram of the dendritic cell signaling network, with the goal of providing researchers with a valuable resource and a facile method for community input. Network construction has relied on comprehensive review of the literature and regular updates. The diagram includes detailed depictions of pathways activated downstream of different pathogen recognition receptors such as Toll-like receptors, retinoic acid-inducible gene-I-like receptors, C-type lectin receptors and nucleotide-binding oligomerization domain-like receptors. Initially assembled using CellDesigner software, it provides an annotated graphical representation of interactions stored in Systems Biology Mark-up Language. The network, which comprises 249 nodes and 213 edges, has been web-published through the Biological Pathway Publisher software suite. Nodes are annotated with PubMed references and gene-related information, and linked to a public wiki, providing a discussion forum for updates and corrections. To gain more insight into regulatory patterns of dendritic cell signaling, we analyzed the network using graph-theory methods: bifan, feedforward and multi-input convergence motifs were enriched. This emphasis on activating control mechanisms is consonant with a network that subserves persistent and coordinated responses to

  11. Human Dental Pulp Cells Responses to Apatite Precipitation from Dicalcium Silicates

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei-Yun Lai

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Unraveling the mechanisms behind the processes of cell attachment and the enhanced proliferation that occurs as a response to the presence of calcium silicate-based materials needs to be better understood so as to expand the applications of silicate-based materials. Ions in the environment may influence apatite precipitation and affect silicate ion release from silicate-based materials. Thus, the involvement of apatite precipitate in the regulation of cell behavior of human dental pulp cells (hDPCs is also investigated in the present study, along with an investigation of the specific role of cell morphology and osteocalcin protein expression cultured on calcium silicate (CS with different Dulbecco’s modified Eagle’s medium (DMEM. The microstructure and component of CS cement immersion in DMEM and P-free DMEM are analyzed. In addition, when hDPCs are cultured on CS with two DMEMs, we evaluate fibronectin (FN and collagen type I (COL secretion during the cell attachment stage. The facilitation of cell adhesion on CS has been confirmed and observed both by scanning with an electron microscope and using immunofluorescence imaging. The results indicate that CS is completely covered by an apatite layer with tiny spherical shapes on the surface in the DMEM, but not in the P-free DMEM. Compared to the P-free DMEM, the lower Ca ion in the DMEM may be attributed to the formation of the apatite on the surfaces of specimens as a result of consumption of the Ca ion from the DMEM. Similarly, the lower Si ion in the CS-soaked DMEM is attributed to the shielding effect of the apatite layer. The P-free DMEM group releases more Si ion increased COL and FN secretion, which promotes cell attachment more effectively than DMEM. This study provides new and important clues regarding the major effects of Si-induced cell behavior as well as the precipitated apatite-inhibited hDPC behavior on these materials.

  12. Lysophosphatidic acid receptor-5 negatively regulates cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong, Yan; Hirane, Miku; Araki, Mutsumi [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Fukushima, Nobuyuki [Division of Molecular Neurobiology, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan); Tsujiuchi, Toshifumi, E-mail: ttujiuch@life.kindai.ac.jp [Division of Cancer Biology and Bioinformatics, Department of Life Science, Faculty of Science and Engineering, Kinki University, 3-4-1, Kowakae, Higashiosaka, Osaka 577-8502 (Japan)

    2014-04-04

    Highlights: • LPA{sub 5} inhibits the cell growth and motile activities of 3T3 cells. • LPA{sub 5} suppresses the cell motile activities stimulated by hydrogen peroxide in 3T3 cells. • Enhancement of LPA{sub 5} on the cell motile activities inhibited by LPA{sub 1} in 3T3 cells. • The expression and activation of Mmp-9 were inhibited by LPA{sub 5} in 3T3 cells. • LPA signaling via LPA{sub 5} acts as a negative regulator of cellular responses in 3T3 cells. - Abstract: Lysophosphatidic acid (LPA) signaling via G protein-coupled LPA receptors (LPA{sub 1}–LPA{sub 6}) mediates a variety of biological functions, including cell migration. Recently, we have reported that LPA{sub 1} inhibited the cell motile activities of mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells. In the present study, to evaluate a role of LPA{sub 5} in cellular responses, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3-L5) cells were generated from 3T3 cells. In cell proliferation assays, LPA markedly stimulated the cell proliferation activities of 3T3-L5 cells, compared with control cells. In cell motility assays with Cell Culture Inserts, the cell motile activities of 3T3-L5 cells were significantly higher than those of control cells. The activity levels of matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) were measured by gelatin zymography. 3T3-L5 cells stimulated the activation of Mmp-2, correlating with the expression levels of Mmp-2 gene. Moreover, to assess the co-effects of LPA{sub 1} and LPA{sub 5} on cell motile activities, Lpar5 knockdown (3T3a1-L5) cells were also established from Lpar1 over-expressing (3T3a1) cells. 3T3a1-L5 cells increased the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells, while the cell motile activities of 3T3a1 cells were significantly lower than those of control cells. These results suggest that LPA{sub 5} may act as a negative regulator of cellular responses in mouse fibroblast 3T3 cells, similar to the case for LPA{sub 1}.

  13. How T follicular helper cells and the germinal centre response change with age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Linterman, Michelle A

    2014-01-01

    Normal ageing is accompanied by a decline in the function of the immune system that causes an increased susceptibility to infections and an impaired response to vaccination in older individuals. This results in an increased disease burden in the aged population, even with good immunisation programmes in place. The decreased response to vaccination is partly due to the diminution of the germinal centre response with age, caused by impaired T-cell help to B cells. Within the germinal centre, T-cell help is provided by a specialised subset of CD4(+) T cells; T follicular helper (Tfh) cells. Tfh cells provide survival and selection signals to germinal centre B cells, allowing them to egress from the germinal centre and become long-live plasma cells or memory B cells, and provide life-long protection against subsequent infection. This review will discuss the cellular and molecular changes in both Tfh cells and germinal centre B cells that occur with advancing age, which result in a smaller germinal centre response and a less effective response to immunisation.

  14. Gene Expression Programs in Response to Hypoxia: Cell Type Specificity and Prognostic Significance in Human Cancers.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    2006-01-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Inadequate oxygen (hypoxia triggers a multifaceted cellular response that has important roles in normal physiology and in many human diseases. A transcription factor, hypoxia-inducible factor (HIF, plays a central role in the hypoxia response; its activity is regulated by the oxygen-dependent degradation of the HIF-1alpha protein. Despite the ubiquity and importance of hypoxia responses, little is known about the variation in the global transcriptional response to hypoxia among different cell types or how this variation might relate to tissue- and cell-specific diseases. METHODS AND FINDINGS: We analyzed the temporal changes in global transcript levels in response to hypoxia in primary renal proximal tubule epithelial cells, breast epithelial cells, smooth muscle cells, and endothelial cells with DNA microarrays. The extent of the transcriptional response to hypoxia was greatest in the renal tubule cells. This heightened response was associated with a uniquely high level of HIF-1alpha RNA in renal cells, and it could be diminished by reducing HIF-1alpha expression via RNA interference. A gene-expression signature of the hypoxia response, derived from our studies of cultured mammary and renal tubular epithelial cells, showed coordinated variation in several human cancers, and was a strong predictor of clinical outcomes in breast and ovarian cancers. In an analysis of a large, published gene-expression dataset from breast cancers, we found that the prognostic information in the hypoxia signature was virtually independent of that provided by the previously reported wound signature and more predictive of outcomes than any of the clinical parameters in current use. CONCLUSIONS: The transcriptional response to hypoxia varies among human cells. Some of this variation is traceable to variation in expression of the HIF1A gene. A gene-expression signature of the cellular response to hypoxia is associated with a significantly poorer prognosis

  15. Cross-talk between cd1d-restricted nkt cells and γδ cells in t regulatory cell response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Sally A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CD1d is a non-classical major histocompatibility class 1-like molecule which primarily presents either microbial or endogenous glycolipid antigens to T cells involved in innate immunity. Natural killer T (NKT cells and a subpopulation of γδ T cells expressing the Vγ4 T cell receptor (TCR recognize CD1d. NKT and Vγ4 T cells function in the innate immune response via rapid activation subsequent to infection and secrete large quantities of cytokines that both help control infection and modulate the developing adaptive immune response. T regulatory cells represent one cell population impacted by both NKT and Vγ4 T cells. This review discusses the evidence that NKT cells promote T regulatory cell activation both through direct interaction of NKT cell and dendritic cells and through NKT cell secretion of large amounts of TGFβ, IL-10 and IL-2. Recent studies have shown that CD1d-restricted Vγ4 T cells, in contrast to NKT cells, selectively kill T regulatory cells through a caspase-dependent mechanism. Vγ4 T cell elimination of the T regulatory cell population allows activation of autoimmune CD8+ effector cells leading to severe cardiac injury in a coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 myocarditis model in mice. CD1d-restricted immunity can therefore lead to either immunosuppression or autoimmunity depending upon the type of innate effector dominating during the infection.

  16. Endocannabinoids and inflammatory response in periodontal ligament cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Burcu Özdemir

    Full Text Available Endocannabinoids are associated with multiple regulatory functions in several tissues. The main endocannabinoids, anandamide (AEA and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG, have been detected in the gingival crevicular fluid of periodontitis patients, but the association between periodontal disease or human periodontal ligament cells (hPdLCs and endocannabinoids still remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of AEA and 2-AG on the proliferation/viability and cytokine/chemokine production of hPdLCs in the presence/absence of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (P. gingivalis LPS. The proliferation/viability of hPdLCs was measured using 3,4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT-assay. Interleukin-6 (IL-6, interleukin-8 (IL-8, and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1 levels were examined at gene expression and protein level by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. AEA and 2-AG did not reveal any significant effects on proliferation/viability of hPdLCs in the absence of P. gingivalis LPS. However, hPdLCs viability was significantly increased by 10-20 µM AEA in the presence of P. gingivalis LPS (1 µg/ml. In the absence of P. gingivalis LPS, AEA and 2-AG did not exhibit any significant effect on the expression of IL-8 and MCP-1 expression in hPdLCs, whereas IL-6 expression was slightly enhanced by 10 µM 2-AG and not affected by AEA. In P.gingivalis LPS stimulated hPdLCs, 10 µM AEA down-regulated gene-expression and protein production of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1. In contrast, 10 µM 2-AG had an opposite effect and induced a significant up-regulation of gene and protein expression of IL-6 and IL-8 (P<0.05 as well as gene-expression of MCP-1 in P. gingivalis LPS stimulated hPdLCs. Our data suggest that AEA appears to have an anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effect on hPdLCs' host response to P.gingivalis LPS, whereas 2-AG appears to promote detrimental inflammatory processes. In conclusion

  17. Endocannabinoids and inflammatory response in periodontal ligament cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Özdemir, Burcu; Shi, Bin; Bantleon, Hans Peter; Moritz, Andreas; Rausch-Fan, Xiaohui; Andrukhov, Oleh

    2014-01-01

    Endocannabinoids are associated with multiple regulatory functions in several tissues. The main endocannabinoids, anandamide (AEA) and 2-arachidonylglycerol (2-AG), have been detected in the gingival crevicular fluid of periodontitis patients, but the association between periodontal disease or human periodontal ligament cells (hPdLCs) and endocannabinoids still remain unclear. The aim of the present study was to examine the effects of AEA and 2-AG on the proliferation/viability and cytokine/chemokine production of hPdLCs in the presence/absence of Porphyromonas gingivalis lipopolysaccharide (P. gingivalis LPS). The proliferation/viability of hPdLCs was measured using 3,4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyl tetrazolium bromide (MTT)-assay. Interleukin-6 (IL-6), interleukin-8 (IL-8), and monocyte chemotactic protein-1 (MCP-1) levels were examined at gene expression and protein level by real-time PCR and ELISA, respectively. AEA and 2-AG did not reveal any significant effects on proliferation/viability of hPdLCs in the absence of P. gingivalis LPS. However, hPdLCs viability was significantly increased by 10-20 µM AEA in the presence of P. gingivalis LPS (1 µg/ml). In the absence of P. gingivalis LPS, AEA and 2-AG did not exhibit any significant effect on the expression of IL-8 and MCP-1 expression in hPdLCs, whereas IL-6 expression was slightly enhanced by 10 µM 2-AG and not affected by AEA. In P.gingivalis LPS stimulated hPdLCs, 10 µM AEA down-regulated gene-expression and protein production of IL-6, IL-8, and MCP-1. In contrast, 10 µM 2-AG had an opposite effect and induced a significant up-regulation of gene and protein expression of IL-6 and IL-8 (P<0.05) as well as gene-expression of MCP-1 in P. gingivalis LPS stimulated hPdLCs. Our data suggest that AEA appears to have an anti-inflammatory and immune suppressive effect on hPdLCs' host response to P.gingivalis LPS, whereas 2-AG appears to promote detrimental inflammatory processes. In conclusion, AEA and 2

  18. Chitin recognition via chitotriosidase promotes pathologic type-2 helper T cell responses to cryptococcal infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Darin L Wiesner

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Pulmonary mycoses are often associated with type-2 helper T (Th2 cell responses. However, mechanisms of Th2 cell accumulation are multifactorial and incompletely known. To investigate Th2 cell responses to pulmonary fungal infection, we developed a peptide-MHCII tetramer to track antigen-specific CD4+ T cells produced in response to infection with the fungal pathogen Cryptococcus neoformans. We noted massive accruement of pathologic cryptococcal antigen-specific Th2 cells in the lungs following infection that was coordinated by lung-resident CD11b+ IRF4-dependent conventional dendritic cells. Other researchers have demonstrated that this dendritic cell subset is also capable of priming protective Th17 cell responses to another pulmonary fungal infection, Aspergillus fumigatus. Thus, higher order detection of specific features of fungal infection by these dendritic cells must direct Th2 cell lineage commitment. Since chitin-containing parasites commonly elicit Th2 responses, we hypothesized that recognition of fungal chitin is an important determinant of Th2 cell-mediated mycosis. Using C. neoformans mutants or purified chitin, we found that chitin abundance impacted Th2 cell accumulation and disease. Importantly, we determined Th2 cell induction depended on cleavage of chitin via the mammalian chitinase, chitotriosidase, an enzyme that was also prevalent in humans experiencing overt cryptococcosis. The data presented herein offers a new perspective on fungal disease susceptibility, whereby chitin recognition via chitotriosidase leads to the initiation of harmful Th2 cell differentiation by CD11b+ conventional dendritic cells in response to pulmonary fungal infection.

  19. Apoptosis and tumor cell death in response to HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hallgren, Oskar; Aits, Sonja; Brest, Patrick; Gustafsson, Lotta; Mossberg, Ann-Kristin; Wullt, Björn; Svanborg, Catharina

    2008-01-01

    HAMLET (human alpha-lactalbumin made lethal to tumor cells) is a molecular complex derived from human milk that kills tumor cells by a process resembling programmed cell death. The complex consists of partially unfolded alpha-lactalbumin and oleic acid, and both the protein and the fatty acid are required for cell death. HAMLET has broad antitumor activity in vitro, and its therapeutic effect has been confirmed in vivo in a human glioblastoma rat xenograft model, in patients with skin papillomas and in patients with bladder cancer. The mechanisms of tumor cell death remain unclear, however. Immediately after the encounter with tumor cells, HAMLET invades the cells and causes mitochondrial membrane depolarization, cytochrome c release, phosphatidyl serine exposure, and a low caspase response. A fraction of the cells undergoes morphological changes characteristic of apoptosis, but caspase inhibition does not rescue the cells and Bcl-2 overexpression or altered p53 status does not influence the sensitivity of tumor cells to HAMLET. HAMLET also creates a state of unfolded protein overload and activates 20S proteasomes, which contributes to cell death. In parallel, HAMLET translocates to tumor cell nuclei, where high-affinity interactions with histones cause chromatin disruption, loss of transcription, and nuclear condensation. The dying cells also show morphological changes compatible with macroautophagy, and recent studies indicate that macroautophagy is involved in the cell death response to HAMLET. The results suggest that HAMLET, like a hydra with many heads, may interact with several crucial cellular organelles, thereby activating several forms of cell death, in parallel. This complexity might underlie the rapid death response of tumor cells and the broad antitumor activity of HAMLET.

  20. PET/CT imaging in response evaluation of patients with small cell lung cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Barbara M; Mortensen, Jann; Langer, Seppo W;

    2006-01-01

    UNLABELLED: There is an increasing amount of evidence on the usability of PET in response evaluation of non-small cell lung cancer. However, data on SCLC is scarce and mainly retrospective. This prospective study assesses the use of PET (positron emission tomography) and PET/CT in response...... evaluation of patients with small cell lung cancer (SCLC). METHODS: Assignment of early and final response was compared between PET, PET/CT, and CT in 20 patients with SCLC. Final response as assigned by CT (RECIST) served as reference. RESULTS: At response evaluation after one cycle of chemotherapy major...

  1. Cell identity regulators link development and stress responses in the Arabidopsis root.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iyer-Pascuzzi, Anjali S; Jackson, Terry; Cui, Hongchang; Petricka, Jalean J; Busch, Wolfgang; Tsukagoshi, Hironaka; Benfey, Philip N

    2011-10-18

    Stress responses in plants are tightly coordinated with developmental processes, but interaction of these pathways is poorly understood. We used genome-wide assays at high spatiotemporal resolution to understand the processes that link development and stress in the Arabidopsis root. Our meta-analysis finds little evidence for a universal stress response. However, common stress responses appear to exist with many showing cell type specificity. Common stress responses may be mediated by cell identity regulators because mutations in these genes resulted in altered responses to stress. Evidence for a direct role for cell identity regulators came from genome-wide binding profiling of the key regulator SCARECROW, which showed binding to regulatory regions of stress-responsive genes. Coexpression in response to stress was used to identify genes involved in specific developmental processes. These results reveal surprising linkages between stress and development at cellular resolution, and show the power of multiple genome-wide data sets to elucidate biological processes.

  2. Cell cycle controls stress response and longevity in C. elegans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dottermusch, Matthias; Lakner, Theresa; Peyman, Tobias; Klein, Marinella; Walz, Gerd; Neumann-Haefelin, Elke

    2016-01-01

    Recent studies have revealed a variety of genes and mechanisms that influence the rate of aging progression. In this study, we identified cell cycle factors as potent regulators of health and longevity in C. elegans. Focusing on the cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (cdk-2) and cyclin E (cye-1), we show that inhibition of cell cycle genes leads to tolerance towards environmental stress and longevity. The reproductive system is known as a key regulator of longevity in C. elegans. We uncovered the gonad as the central organ mediating the effects of cell cycle inhibition on lifespan. In particular, the proliferating germ cells were essential for conferring longevity. Steroid hormone signaling and the FOXO transcription factor DAF-16 were required for longevity associated with cell cycle inhibition. Furthermore, we discovered that SKN-1 (ortholog of mammalian Nrf proteins) activates protective gene expression and induces longevity when cell cycle genes are inactivated. We conclude that both, germline absence and inhibition through impairment of cell cycle machinery results in longevity through similar pathways. In addition, our studies suggest further roles of cell cycle genes beyond cell cycle progression and support the recently described connection of SKN-1/Nrf to signals deriving from the germline. PMID:27668945

  3. Navigating the immune system: Improving CD8+ T cell responses for vaccine design

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Platteel, A.C.M.

    2016-01-01

    Most vaccines rely on the protective effect of the humoral response. In case of intracellular- or rapidly mutating pathogens, humoral responses are less protective and the cellular response, mainly CD8+ T cells, can convey protection. However, vaccine efficacy is hampered by insufficient knowledge o

  4. Increased sequence diversity coverage improves detection of HIV-Specific T cell responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frahm, N.; Kaufmann, D.E.; Yusim, K.

    2007-01-01

    The accurate identification of HIV-specific T cell responses is important for determining the relationship between immune response, viral control, and disease progression. HIV-specific immune responses are usually measured using peptide sets based on consensus sequences, which frequently miss res...

  5. Genomic Modifiers of Natural Killer Cells, Immune Responsiveness and Lymphoid Tissue Remodeling Together Increase Host Resistance to Viral Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gillespie, Alyssa Lundgren; Teoh, Jeffrey; Lee, Heather; Prince, Jessica; Stadnisky, Michael D; Anderson, Monique; Nash, William; Rival, Claudia; Wei, Hairong; Gamache, Awndre; Farber, Charles R; Tung, Kenneth; Brown, Michael G

    2016-02-01

    The MHC class I D(k) molecule supplies vital host resistance during murine cytomegalovirus (MCMV) infection. Natural killer (NK) cells expressing the Ly49G2 inhibitory receptor, which specifically binds D(k), are required to control viral spread. The extent of D(k)-dependent host resistance, however, differs significantly amongst related strains of mice, C57L and MA/My. As a result, we predicted that relatively small-effect modifier genetic loci might together shape immune cell features, NK cell reactivity, and the host immune response to MCMV. A robust D(k)-dependent genetic effect, however, has so far hindered attempts to identify additional host resistance factors. Thus, we applied genomic mapping strategies and multicolor flow cytometric analysis of immune cells in naive and virus-infected hosts to identify genetic modifiers of the host immune response to MCMV. We discovered and validated many quantitative trait loci (QTL); these were mapped to at least 19 positions on 16 chromosomes. Intriguingly, one newly discovered non-MHC locus (Cmv5) controlled splenic NK cell accrual, secondary lymphoid organ structure, and lymphoid follicle development during MCMV infection. We infer that Cmv5 aids host resistance to MCMV infection by expanding NK cells needed to preserve and protect essential tissue structural elements, to enhance lymphoid remodeling and to increase viral clearance in spleen.

  6. Single-Cell Analysis of the Plasmablast Response to Vibrio cholerae Demonstrates Expansion of Cross-Reactive Memory B Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Kauffman, Robert C.; Bhuiyan, Taufiqur R.; Nakajima, Rie; Mayo-Smith, Leslie M.; Rashu, Rasheduzzaman; Hoq, Mohammad Rubel; Chowdhury, Fahima; Khan, Ashraful Islam; Rahman, Atiqur; Bhaumik, Siddhartha K.; Harris, Levelle; O'Neal, Justin T.; Trost, Jessica F.; Alam, Nur Haq; Jasinskas, Algis

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT We characterized the acute B cell response in adults with cholera by analyzing the repertoire, specificity, and functional characteristics of 138 monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) generated from single-cell-sorted plasmablasts. We found that the cholera-induced responses were characterized by high levels of somatic hypermutation and large clonal expansions. A majority of the expansions targeted cholera toxin (CT) or lipopolysaccharide (LPS). Using a novel proteomics approach, we were able...

  7. Interferon-γ Added During Bacillus Calmette-Guerin Induced Dendritic Cell Maturation Stimulates Potent Th1 Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pestano Linda A

    2003-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Dendritic cells (DC are increasingly prepared in vitro for use in immunotherapy trials. Mature DC express high levels of surface molecules needed for T cell activation and are superior at antigen-presentation than immature DC. Bacillus Calmette-Guerin (BCG is one of several products known to induce DC maturation, and interferon (IFN-γ has been shown to enhance the activity of DC stimulated with certain maturation factors. In this study, we investigated the use of IFN-γ in combination with the powerful maturation agent, BCG. The treatment of immature DC with IFN-γ plus BCG led to the upregulation of CD54, CD80, and CD86 in comparison with BCG treatment alone. In MLR or recall immune responses, the addition of IFN-γ at the time of BCG-treatment did not increase the number of antigen-specific T cells but enhanced the development of IFN-γ-producing Th1 cells. In primary immune responses, on the other hand, BCG and IFN-γ co-treated DC stimulated higher proportions of specific T cells as well as IFN-γ secretion by these T cells. Thus the use of IFN-γ during BCG-induced DC maturation differentially affects the nature of recall versus naïve antigen-specific T-cell responses. IFN-γ co-treatment with BCG was found to induce IL-12 and, in some instances, inhibit IL-10 secretion by DC. These findings greatly enhance the potential of BCG-matured dendritic cells for use in cancer immunotherapy.

  8. Acetyl CoA Carboxylase 2 Is Dispensable for CD8+ T Cell Responses.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jang Eun Lee

    Full Text Available Differentiation of T cells is closely associated with dynamic changes in nutrient and energy metabolism. However, the extent to which specific metabolic pathways and molecular components are determinative of CD8+ T cell fate remains unclear. It has been previously established in various tissues that acetyl CoA carboxylase 2 (ACC2 regulates fatty acid oxidation (FAO by inhibiting carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (CPT1, a rate-limiting enzyme of FAO in mitochondria. Here, we explore the cell-intrinsic role of ACC2 in T cell immunity in response to infections. We report here that ACC2 deficiency results in a marginal increase of cellular FAO in CD8+ T cells, but does not appear to influence antigen-specific effector and memory CD8+ T cell responses during infection with listeria or lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus. These results suggest that ACC2 is dispensable for CD8+ T cell responses.

  9. Neural activity control of neural stem cells and SVZ niche response to brain injury

    OpenAIRE

    Páez González, Patricia

    2014-01-01

    Patricia Paez-Gonzalez Kuo Lab, Dept. of Cell Biology, Duke University Medical Center, NC,USA. Date: 11/16/2014 Utilizing stem cells in the adult brain hold great promise for regenerative medicine. Harnessing ability of adult neural stem cells (NSCs) to generate new neurons or other types of brain cells may provide much needed therapies for patients suffering from brain injuries or neuro-degenerative diseases such as Parkinson’s, Scizophrenia, or Alzheimer’s disease. However...

  10. Constitutive CD40L expression on B cells prematurely terminates germinal center response and leads to augmented plasma cell production in T cell areas.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bolduc, Anna; Long, Eugene; Stapler, Dale; Cascalho, Marilia; Tsubata, Takeshi; Koni, Pandelakis A; Shimoda, Michiko

    2010-07-01

    CD40/CD40L engagement is essential to T cell-dependent B cell proliferation and differentiation. However, the precise role of CD40 signaling through cognate T-B interaction in the generation of germinal center and memory B cells is still incompletely understood. To address this issue, a B cell-specific CD40L transgene (CD40LBTg) was introduced into mice with B cell-restricted MHC class II deficiency. Using this mouse model, we show that constitutive CD40L expression on B cells alone could not induce germinal center differentiation of MHC class II-deficient B cells after immunization with T cell-dependent Ag. Thus, some other MHC class II-dependent T cell-derived signals are essential for the generation of germinal center B cells in response to T cell-dependent Ag. In fact, CD40LBTg mice generated a complex Ag-specific IgG1 response, which was greatly enhanced in early, but reduced in late, primary response compared with control mice. We also found that the frequency of Ag-specific germinal center B cells in CD40LBTg mice was abruptly reduced 1 wk after immunization. As a result, the numbers of Ag-specific IgG1 long-lived plasma cells and memory B cells were reduced. By histology, large numbers of Ag-specific plasma cells were found in T cell areas adjacent to Ag-specific germinal centers of CD40LBTg mice, temporarily during the second week of primary response. These results indicate that CD40L expression on B cells prematurely terminated their ongoing germinal center response and produced plasma cells. Our results support the notion that CD40 signaling is an active termination signal for germinal center reaction.

  11. B7h-expressing dendritic cells and plasma B cells mediate distinct outcomes of ICOS costimulation in T cell-dependent antibody responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Larimore Kevin

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The ICOS-B7h costimulatory receptor-ligand pair is required for germinal center formation, the production of isotype-switched antibodies, and antibody affinity maturation in response to T cell-dependent antigens. However, the potentially distinct roles of regulated B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in T cell-dependent antibody responses have not been defined. Results We generated transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression to assess the cell-type specific roles of B7h expression on B cells and dendritic cells in regulating T cell-dependent antibody responses. Our results show that endogenous B7h expression is reduced on B cells after activation in vitro and is also reduced in vivo on antibody-secreting plasma B cells in comparison to both naïve and germinal center B cells from which they are derived. Increasing the level of B7h expression on activated and plasma B cells in B-B7hTg mice led to an increase in the number of antibody-secreting plasma cells generated after immunization and a corresponding increase in the concentration of antigen-specific high affinity serum IgG antibodies of all isotypes, without affecting the number of responding germinal center B cells. In contrast, ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells in DC-B7hTg mice contributed to germinal center formation and selectively increased IgG2a production without affecting the overall magnitude of antibody responses. Conclusions Using transgenic mice with lineage-restricted B7h expression, we have revealed distinct roles of ICOS costimulation mediated by dendritic cells and B cells in the regulation of T cell-dependent antibody responses.

  12. Frequency response for electromotility of isolated outer hair cells of the guinea pig

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Wit, HP; vanDijk, P; Segenhout, HM

    1996-01-01

    Frequency and impulse responses were determined for isolated guinea pig outer hair cells by electrically stimulating the cells between two wire electrodes with white noise. Cells were attached to the bottom of a small culture dish at one end while the other end was freely moving. Results have the ch

  13. CD4 T-helper cell cytokine phenotypes and antibody response following tetanus toxoid booster immunization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Routine methods for enumerating antigen-specific T-helper cells may not identify low-frequency phenotypes such as Th2 cells. We compared methods of evaluating such responses to identify tetanus toxoid- (TT) specific Th1, Th2, Th17 and IL10+ cells. Eight healthy subjects were given a TT booster vacci...

  14. Necrotic cells trigger a sterile inflammatory response through the Nlrp3 inflammasome

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.S. Iyer; W.P. Pulskens; J.J. Sadler; L.M. Butter; G.J. Teske; T.K. Ulland; S.C. Eisenbarth; S. Florquin; R.A. Flavell; J.C. Leemans; F.S. Sutterwala

    2009-01-01

    Dying cells are capable of activating the innate immune system and inducing a sterile inflammatory response. Here, we show that necrotic cells are sensed by the Nlrp3 inflammasome resulting in the subsequent release of the proinflammatory cytokine IL-1 beta. Necrotic cells produced by pressure disru

  15. Exploring opportunities to project a "responsible man" image: gatekeepers views of young men's sexual and reproductive health needs in Uttaranchal, India.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, M E; Mishra, Anurag; Morankar, Sudhakar

    Increase in extramarital sex among youths, gender-based violence, lack of contraceptive knowledge among newly married couples and lack of knowledge of protection against diseases like STIs/HIV are the information and service needs of young people that need to be addressed urgently in order to make them future knowledgeable, responsible, and non-violent partners. In addressing these needs the gatekeepers, including parents, formal and informal community leaders and teachers, play a critical role, by facilitating/hindering access to appropriate and correct information about sexual and reproductive health to young people. The study was conducted in a district of Uttaranchal, India. The specific objective was to understand the social context and gatekeepers' views on family planning and sexual and reproductive health needs of young men. Thirty-two in-depth interviews and four focus group discussions were conducted with parents, formal and informal community leaders, teachers, and selected development officials. The findings indicate that gatekeepers are worried about rapid changes in the aspiration, expectation, and behavior of young men. Most of them were seriously concerned about the increasing drinking habit, use of drugs, and changing values of sexuality leading to various risk behaviors among young men. They felt that many of these changes are consequences of wider societal changes, rising aspirations, explosion of electronic media, and globalization of a new youth culture where extramarital sex, alcohol consumption, and violence are expressions of different facets of masculinity and symbols of the affluent class. Overall, there was a feeling that TV/films and their peers now influence more the socialization of young people and parents are losing control in guidance and mentoring of their children.

  16. Photodynamic response of an endothelial hybridoma cell line using zinc(II) tetrasubstituted phthalocyanines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cruse-Sawyer, Janet E.; Dixon, B.; Roberts, David J.; Griffiths, John; Brown, Stanley B.

    1995-03-01

    The EAhy 926 cell is a hybridoma line derived from human endothelium and A549/8 cells. They display stable endothelial characteristics and may provide an indication of how endothelial cells respond to photodynamic therapy. Cells were grown as monolayers, seeded at a density of 104 cells/35 mm dish, and then incubated with zinc (II) tetrasubstituted phthalocyanines (carboxylated, sulphonated, pyridinium or diethanolamine sulphonamide). After 24 hours, the cells were illuminated with laser light at 680 nm or 692 nm as appropriate. The response to each photosensitizer was evaluated using cell proliferation, clonogenicity, and release of tissue factor.

  17. Pancreatic β- and α-cell adaptation in response to metabolic changes

    OpenAIRE

    Ellenbroek, Johanne Hendrike (Rianne)

    2015-01-01

    Insulin-producing pancreatic β-cells are essential to maintain blood glucose levels within a narrow range. β-cells can adapt to an increased insulin demand by enhancing insulin secretion via increased β-cell function and/or increased β-cell mass. Inadequate β-cell adaptation leads to hyperglycemia and eventually diabetes mellitus. Therefore, it is critical to understand how the β-cell mass is regulated. We investigated β- and α-cell adaptation in response to different metabolic changes. We fo...

  18. Programmed cell death in barley aleurone cells is not directly stimulated by reactive oxygen species produced in response to gibberellin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Nozomi; Ishibashi, Yushi; Kai, Kyohei; Tomokiyo, Reisa; Yuasa, Takashi; Iwaya-Inoue, Mari

    2014-05-01

    The cereal aleurone layer is a secretory tissue that produces enzymes to hydrolyze the starchy endosperm during germination. We recently demonstrated that reactive oxygen species (ROS), produced in response to gibberellins (GA), promoted GAMyb expression, which induces α-amylase expression in barley aleurone cells. On the other hand, ROS levels increase during programmed cell death (PCD) in barley aleurone cells, and GAMyb is involved in PCD of these cells. In this study, we investigated whether the ROS produced in response to GA regulate PCD directly by using mutants of Slender1 (SLN1), a DELLA protein that negatively regulates GA signaling. The wild-type, the sln1c mutant (which exhibits gibberellin-type signaling even in the absence of GA), and the Sln1d mutant (which is gibberellin-insensitive with respect to α-amylase production) all produced ROS in response to GA, suggesting that ROS production in aleurone cells in response to GA is independent of GA signaling through this DELLA protein. Exogenous GA promoted PCD in the wild-type. PCD in sln1c was induced even without exogenous GA (and so without induction of ROS), whereas PCD in Sln1d was not induced in the presence of exogenous GA, even though the ROS content increased significantly in response to GA. These results suggest that PCD in barley aleurone cells is not directly stimulated by ROS produced in response to GA but is regulated by GA signaling through DELLA protein.

  19. CLEC12A-Mediated Antigen Uptake and Cross-Presentation by Human Dendritic Cell Subsets Efficiently Boost Tumor-Reactive T Cell Responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hutten, Tim J A; Thordardottir, Soley; Fredrix, Hanny; Janssen, Lisanne; Woestenenk, Rob; Tel, Jurjen; Joosten, Ben; Cambi, Alessandra; Heemskerk, Mirjam H M; Franssen, Gerben M; Boerman, Otto C; Bakker, Lex B H; Jansen, Joop H; Schaap, Nicolaas; Dolstra, Harry; Hobo, Willemijn

    2016-10-01

    Potent immunotherapies are urgently needed to boost antitumor immunity and control disease in cancer patients. As dendritic cells (DCs) are the most powerful APCs, they are an attractive means to reinvigorate T cell responses. An appealing strategy to use the effective Ag processing and presentation machinery, T cell stimulation and cross-talk capacity of natural DC subsets is in vivo tumor Ag delivery. In this context, endocytic C-type lectin receptors are attractive targeting molecules. In this study, we investigated whether CLEC12A efficiently delivers tumor Ags into human DC subsets, facilitating effective induction of CD4(+) and CD8(+) T cell responses. We confirmed that CLEC12A is selectively expressed by myeloid cells, including the myeloid DC subset (mDCs) and the plasmacytoid DC subset (pDCs). Moreover, we demonstrated that these DC subsets efficiently internalize CLEC12A, whereupon it quickly translocates to the early endosomes and subsequently routes to the lysosomes. Notably, CLEC12A Ab targeting did not negatively affect DC maturation or function. Furthermore, CLEC12A-mediated delivery of keyhole limpet hemocyanin resulted in enhanced proliferation and cytokine secretion by keyhole limpet hemocyanin-experienced CD4(+) T cells. Most importantly, CLEC12A-targeted delivery of HA-1 long peptide resulted in efficient Ag cross-presentation by mDCs and pDCs, leading to strong ex vivo activation of HA-1-specific CD8(+) T cells of patients after allogeneic stem cell transplantation. Collectively, these data indicate that CLEC12A is an effective new candidate with great potential for in vivo Ag delivery into mDCs and pDCs, thereby using the specialized functions and cross-talk capacity of these DC subsets to boost tumor-reactive T cell immunity in cancer patients.

  20. Radiation Induced Apoptosis of Murine Bone Marrow Cells Is Independent of Early Growth Response 1 (EGR1)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oben, Karine Z.; Gachuki, Beth W.; Alhakeem, Sara S.; McKenna, Mary K.; Liang, Ying; St. Clair, Daret K.; Rangnekar, Vivek M.; Bondada, Subbarao

    2017-01-01

    An understanding of how each individual 5q chromosome critical deleted region (CDR) gene contributes to malignant transformation would foster the development of much needed targeted therapies for the treatment of therapy related myeloid neoplasms (t-MNs). Early Growth Response 1 (EGR1) is a key transcriptional regulator of myeloid differentiation located within the 5q chromosome CDR that has been shown to regulate HSC (hematopoietic stem cell) quiescence as well as the master regulator of apoptosis—p53. Since resistance to apoptosis is a hallmark of malignant transformation, we investigated the role of EGR1 in apoptosis of bone marrow cells; a cell population from which myeloid malignancies arise. We evaluated radiation induced apoptosis of Egr1+/+ and Egr1-/- bone marrow cells in vitro and in vivo. EGR1 is not required for radiation induced apoptosis of murine bone marrow cells. Neither p53 mRNA (messenger RNA) nor protein expression is regulated by EGR1 in these cells. Radiation induced apoptosis of bone marrow cells by double strand DNA breaks induced p53 activation. These results suggest EGR1 dependent signaling mechanisms do not contribute to aberrant apoptosis of malignant cells in myeloid malignancies. PMID:28081176

  1. Lipoproteins are major targets of the polyclonal human T cell response to Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seshadri, Chetan; Turner, Marie T; Lewinsohn, David M; Moody, D Branch; Van Rhijn, Ildiko

    2013-01-01

    Most vaccines and basic studies of T cell epitopes in Mycobacterium tuberculosis emphasize water-soluble proteins that are secreted into the extracellular space and presented in the context of MHC class II. Much less is known about the role of Ags retained within the cell wall. We used polyclonal T cells from infected humans to probe for responses to immunodominant Ags in the M. tuberculosis cell wall. We found that the magnitude of response to secreted or cell wall intrinsic compounds was similar among healthy controls, patients with latent tuberculosis, and patients with active tuberculosis. Individual responses to secreted Ags and cell wall extract were strongly correlated (r(2) = 0.495, p = 0.001), suggesting that T cells responding to cell wall and secreted Ags are present at similar frequency. Surprisingly, T cell stimulatory factors intrinsic to the cell wall partition into organic solvents; however, these responses are not explained by CD1-mediated presentation of lipids. Instead, we find that molecules soluble in organic solvents are dependent upon MHC class II and recognized by IFN-γ-secreting CD4(+) T cells. We reasoned that MHC class II-dependent Ags extracting into lipid mixtures might be found among triacylated lipoproteins present in mycobacteria. We used M. tuberculosis lacking prolipoprotein signal peptidase A (lspA), an enzyme required for lipoprotein synthesis, to demonstrate loss of polyclonal T cell responses. Our results demonstrate the use of bacterial genetics to identify lipoproteins as an unexpected and immunodominant class of cell wall-associated Ags targeted by the polyclonal human T cell response to M. tuberculosis.

  2. The localisation of inflammatory cells and expression of associated proteoglycans in response to implanted chitosan.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrugia, Brooke L; Whitelock, John M; Jung, MoonSun; McGrath, Barbara; O'Grady, Robert L; McCarthy, Simon J; Lord, Megan S

    2014-02-01

    Implantation of a foreign material almost certainly results in the formation of a fibrous capsule around the implant however, mechanistic events leading to its formation are largely unexplored. Mast cells are an inflammatory cell type known to play a role in the response to material implants, through the release of pro-inflammatory proteases and cytokines from their α-granules following activation. This study examined the in vivo and in vitro response of mast cells to chitosan, through detection of markers known to be produced by mast cells or involved with the inflammatory response. Mast cells, identified as Leder stained positive cells, were shown to be present in response to material implants. Additionally, the mast cell receptor, c-kit, along with collagen, serglycin, perlecan and chondroitin sulphate were detected within the fibrous capsules, where distribution varied between material implants. In conjunction, rat mast cells (RBL-2H3) were shown to be activated following exposure to chitosan as indicated by the release of β-hexosaminidase. Proteoglycan and glycosaminoglycans produced by the cells showed similar expression and localisation when in contact with chitosan to when chemically activated. These data support the role that mast cells play in the inflammatory host response to chitosan implants, where mediators released from their α-granules impact on the formation of a fibrous capsule by supporting the production and organisation of collagen fibres.

  3. Molecular signatures in response to Isoliquiritigenin in lymphoblastoid cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jae-Eun; Hong, Eun-Jung; Nam, Hye-Young [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of); Hwang, Meeyul [Research Center for Biomedical Resource of Oriental Medicine, Daegu Haany University (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Ji-Hyun [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of); Han, Bok-Ghee, E-mail: bokghee@nih.go.kr [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of); Jeon, Jae-Pil, E-mail: jpjeon@cdc.go.kr [National Biobank of Korea, Center for Genome Science, Korea National Institute of Health, Korea Centers for Disease Control and Prevention (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-10-19

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We identified the inhibitory effect of ISL on cell proliferation of LCLs. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We found ISL-induced genes and miRNAs through microarray approach. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 pathway. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs associated with ISL effect. -- Abstract: Isoliquiritigenin (ISL) has been known to induce cell cycle arrest and apoptosis of various cancer cells. However, genetic factors regulating ISL effects remain unclear. The aim of this study was to identify the molecular signatures involved in ISL-induced cell death of EBV-transformed lymphoblastoid cell lines (LCLs) using microarray analyses. For gene expression and microRNA (miRNA) microarray experiments, each of 12 LCL strains was independently treated with ISL or DMSO as a vehicle control for a day prior to total RNA extraction. ISL treatment inhibited cell proliferation of LCLs in a dose-dependent manner. Microarray analysis showed that ISL-treated LCLs represented gene expression changes in cell cycle and p53 signaling pathway, having a potential as regulators in LCL survival and sensitivity to ISL-induced cytotoxicity. In addition, 36 miRNAs including five miRNAs with unknown functions were differentially expressed in ISL-treated LCLs. The integrative analysis of miRNA and gene expression profiles revealed 12 putative mRNA-miRNA functional pairs. Among them, miR-1207-5p and miR-575 were negatively correlated with p53 pathway- and cell cycle-associated genes, respectively. In conclusion, our study suggests that miRNAs play an important role in ISL-induced cytotoxicity in LCLs by targeting signaling pathways including p53 pathway and cell cycle.

  4. Classification of human natural killer cells based on migration behavior and cytotoxic response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanherberghen, Bruno; Olofsson, Per E; Forslund, Elin; Sternberg-Simon, Michal; Khorshidi, Mohammad Ali; Pacouret, Simon; Guldevall, Karolin; Enqvist, Monika; Malmberg, Karl-Johan; Mehr, Ramit; Önfelt, Björn

    2013-02-21

    Despite intense scrutiny of the molecular interactions between natural killer (NK) and target cells, few studies have been devoted to dissection of the basic functional heterogeneity in individual NK cell behavior. Using a microchip-based, time-lapse imaging approach allowing the entire contact history of each NK cell to be recorded, in the present study, we were able to quantify how the cytotoxic response varied between individual NK cells. Strikingly, approximately half of the NK cells did not kill any target cells at all, whereas a minority of NK cells was responsible for a majority of the target cell deaths. These dynamic cytotoxicity data allowed categorization of NK cells into 5 distinct classes. A small but particularly active subclass of NK cells killed several target cells in a consecutive fashion. These "serial killers" delivered their lytic hits faster and induced faster target cell death than other NK cells. Fast, necrotic target cell death was correlated with the amount of perforin released by the NK cells. Our data are consistent with a model in which a small fraction of NK cells drives tumor elimination and inflammation.

  5. Simulation of the response of the inner hair cell stereocilia bundle to an acoustical stimulus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sonya T Smith

    Full Text Available Mammalian hearing relies on a cochlear hydrodynamic sensor embodied in the inner hair cell stereocilia bundle. It is presumed that acoustical stimuli induce a fluid shear-driven motion between the tectorial membrane and the reticular lamina to deflect the bundle. It is hypothesized that ion channels are opened by molecular gates that sense tension in tip-links, which connect adjacent stepped rows of stereocilia. Yet almost nothing is known about how the fluid and bundle interact. Here we show using our microfluidics model how each row of stereocilia and their associated tip links and gates move in response to an acoustical input that induces an orbital motion of the reticular lamina. The model confirms the crucial role of the positioning of the tectorial membrane in hearing, and explains how this membrane amplifies and synchronizes the timing of peak tension in the tip links. Both stereocilia rotation and length change are needed for synchronization of peak tip link tension. Stereocilia length change occurs in response to accelerations perpendicular to the oscillatory fluid shear flow. Simulations indicate that nanovortices form between rows to facilitate diffusion of ions into channels, showing how nature has devised a way to solve the diffusive mixing problem that persists in engineered microfluidic devices.

  6. The comparison of radiation responses in MCF-7 and HeLa cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Mi Young; Jang, Eun Yeong; Ryu, Tae Ho; Chung, Dong-Min; Kim, Jin Hong; Kim, Jin Kyu [Advanced Radiation Technology Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-11-15

    Activation of this pathway temporarily arrests cells at the G1 or G2 checkpoints of cell cycle, or terminates DNA replication and cell division. The present study was carried out to identify the fate of cells to cope with DNA damage stress. Cellular responses following IR treatment were different depending on the characteristics (origin, organism and genes expressed etc.) of cell line used and extent of genomic injury. p53 expression level was increased in a dose-dependent manner in both cells. IR induced a drastic increase in expression of p21 in MCF-7 compared to that in HeLa cells. Cell cycle analysis using flow cytometry showed a significant accumulation in G2/M phase after treatment of MCF-7 with IR. This study identified that IR-induced cell fates were determined through p53-dependent activation of p21, which resulted in senescence of MCF-7 cells and autophagy of HeLa cells.

  7. Serologic response to cell wall mannoproteins and proteins of Candida albicans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, J P; Gil, M L; López-Ribot, J L; Chaffin, W L

    1998-01-01

    The cell wall of Candida albicans not only is the structure in which many biological functions essential for the fungal cells reside but also is a significant source of candidal antigens. The major cell wall components that elicit a response from the host immune system are proteins and glycoproteins, the latter being predominantly mannoproteins. Both the carbohydrate and protein moieties are able to trigger immune responses. Although cell-mediated immunity is often considered to be the most important line of defense against candidiasis, cell wall protein and glycoprotein components also elicit a potent humoral response from the host that may include some protective antibodies. Proteins and glycoproteins exposed at the most external layers of the wall structure are involved in several types of interactions of fungal cells with the exocellular environment. Thus, coating of fungal cells with host antibodies has the potential to influence profoundly the host-parasite interaction by affecting antibody-mediated functions such as opsonin-enhanced phagocytosis and blocking the binding activity of fungal adhesins for host ligands. In this review, the various members of the protein and glycoprotein fraction of the C. albicans cell wall that elicit an antibody response in vivo are examined. Although a number of proteins have been shown to stimulate an antibody response, for some of these species the response is not universal. On the other hand, some of the studies demonstrate that certain cell wall antigens and anti-cell wall antibodies may be the basis for developing specific and sensitive serologic tests for the diagnosis of candidasis, particularly the disseminated form. In addition, recent studies have focused on the potential for antibodies to cell wall protein determinants to protect the host against infection. Hence, a better understanding of the humoral response to cell wall antigens of C. albicans may provide the basis for the development of (i) effective procedures

  8. Protective Efficacy in Sheep of Adenovirus-Vectored Vaccines against Bluetongue Virus Is Associated with Specific T Cell Responses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín, Verónica; Pascual, Elena; Avia, Miguel; Peña, Lourdes; Valcárcel, Félix; Sevilla, Noemí

    2015-01-01

    Bluetongue virus (BTV) is an economically important Orbivirus of the Reoviridae family that causes a hemorrhagic disease in ruminants. Its control has been achieved by inactivated-vaccines that have proven to protect against homologous BTV challenge although unable to induce long-term immunity. Therefore, a more efficient control strategy needs to be developed. Recombinant adenovirus vectors are lead vaccine candidates for protection of several diseases, mainly because of their potency to induce potent T cell immunity. Here we report the induction of humoral and T-cell mediated responses able to protect animals against BTV challenge by recombinant replication-defective human adenovirus serotype 5 (Ad5) expressing either VP7, VP2 or NS3 BTV proteins. First we used the IFNAR(-/-) mouse model system to establish a proof of principle, and afterwards we assayed the protective efficacy in sheep, the natural host of BTV. Mice were completely protected against BTV challenge, developing humoral and BTV-specific CD8+- and CD4+-T cell responses by vaccination with the different rAd5. Sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP2 and Ad5-BTV-VP7 or only with Ad5-BTV-VP7 and challenged with BTV showed mild disease symptoms and reduced viremia. This partial protection was achieved in the absence of neutralizing antibodies but strong BTV-specific CD8+ T cell responses in those sheep vaccinated with Ad5-BTV-VP7. These data indicate that rAd5 is a suitable vaccine vector to induce T cell immunity during BTV vaccination and provide new data regarding the relevance of T cell responses in protection during BTV infection. PMID:26619062

  9. Zoledronic acid enhances Vδ2 T-lymphocyte antitumor response to human glioma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cimini, E; Piacentini, P; Sacchi, A; Gioia, C; Leone, S; Lauro, G M; Martini, F; Agrati, C

    2011-01-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), the most frequent and aggressive primary brain tumor in humans, responds modestly to treatment: most patients survive less than one year after diagnosis, despite both classical and innovative treatment approaches. A recent paper focused on γδ T-cell response in GBM patients, suggesting the application of an immunomodulating strategy based on γδ T-cells which is already in clinical trials for other tumors. Human Vγ2 T-cells recognize changes in the mevalonate metabolic pathway of transformed cells by activating cytotoxic response, and by cytokine and chemokine release. Interestingly, this activation may also be induced in vivo by drugs, such as zoledronic acid, that induce the accumulation of Vγ2 T-cell ligand Isopentenyl-pyrophosphate by blocking the farnesyl pyrophosphate synthase enzyme. The aim of our work is to confirm whether bisphosphonate treatment would make glioma cell lines more susceptible to lysis by in vitro expanded γδ T-cells, improving their antitumor activity. We expanded in vitro human Vγ2 T-cells by phosphoantigen stimulation and tested their activity against glioma cell lines. Co-culture with glioma cells induced Vγ2 T-cell differentiation in effector/memory cells, killing glioma cells by the release of perforin. Interestingly, glioma cells were directly affected by zoledronic acid; moreover, treatment increased their activating ability on Vγ2 T-cells, inducing an effective antitumor cytotoxic response. Taken together, our results show that aminobisphosphonate drugs may play a dual role against GBM, by directly affecting tumor cells, and by enhancing the antitumor response of Vγ2 T-cells. Our results confirm the practicability of this approach as a new immunotherapeutic strategy for GBM treatment.

  10. Peripheral CD4+ T cell cytokine responses following human challenge and re-challenge with Campylobacter jejuni.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fimlaid, Kelly A; Lindow, Janet C; Tribble, David R; Bunn, Janice Y; Maue, Alexander C; Kirkpatrick, Beth D

    2014-01-01

    Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide; however, our understanding of the human immune response to C. jejuni infection is limited. A previous human challenge model has shown that C. jejuni elicits IFNγ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a response associated with protection from clinical disease following re-infection. In this study, we investigate T lymphocyte profiles associated with campylobacteriosis using specimens from a new human challenge model in which C. jejuni-naïve subjects were challenged and re-challenged with C. jejuni CG8421. Multiparameter flow cytometry was used to investigate T lymphocytes as a source of cytokines, including IFNγ, and to identify cytokine patterns associated with either campylobacteriosis or protection from disease. Unexpectedly, all but one subject evaluated re-experienced campylobacteriosis after re-challenge. We show that CD4+ T cells make IFNγ and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to infection; however, multifunctional cytokine response patterns were not found. Cytokine production from peripheral CD4+ T cells was not enhanced following re-challenge, which may suggest deletion or tolerance. Evaluation of alternative paradigms or models is needed to better understand the immune components of protection from campylobacteriosis.

  11. Peripheral CD4+ T cell cytokine responses following human challenge and re-challenge with Campylobacter jejuni.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly A Fimlaid

    Full Text Available Campylobacter jejuni is a leading cause of human gastroenteritis worldwide; however, our understanding of the human immune response to C. jejuni infection is limited. A previous human challenge model has shown that C. jejuni elicits IFNγ production by peripheral blood mononuclear cells, a response associated with protection from clinical disease following re-infection. In this study, we investigate T lymphocyte profiles associated with campylobacteriosis using specimens from a new human challenge model in which C. jejuni-naïve subjects were challenged and re-challenged with C. jejuni CG8421. Multiparameter flow cytometry was used to investigate T lymphocytes as a source of cytokines, including IFNγ, and to identify cytokine patterns associated with either campylobacteriosis or protection from disease. Unexpectedly, all but one subject evaluated re-experienced campylobacteriosis after re-challenge. We show that CD4+ T cells make IFNγ and other pro-inflammatory cytokines in response to infection; however, multifunctional cytokine response patterns were not found. Cytokine production from peripheral CD4+ T cells was not enhanced following re-challenge, which may suggest deletion or tolerance. Evaluation of alternative paradigms or models is needed to better understand the immune components of protection from campylobacteriosis.

  12. Responsiveness to D-glucose in neurosecretory cells of crustaceans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García, E; Benítez, A; Onetti, C G

    1993-08-01

    1. An electrophysiological study of the D-glucose sensitivity of X-organ (XO) neurosecretory cell bodies in crayfish was carried out with the use of microelectrodes, perforated, and cell-attached patch-clamp techniques. 2. Glucose depolarizes the membrane potential of XO cells in a concentration-dependent manner. 3. Depolarization produced by glucose initiates a change in the pattern of electrical activity. Silent cells began to discharge action potentials. When bursting cells are depolarized by glucose, their action potentials are no longer grouped in bursts or disappear entirely. 4. Although the membrane potential returns to its initial value after removing glucose from the bath, discharge patterns of the cells may remain different. This suggests that besides the depolarizing effect, once the cells have been exposed to glucose, the sugar switches on a process that is maintained for a long time. 5. Glucose produced a reduction of membrane steady-state conductance, and a shift of reversal potential of membrane currents to a more positive value. 6. Depolarization induced by D-glucose appears to be related with a closure of potassium channels. 7. Glucose effect was thought to be generated by a product of metabolism that would act as intracellular mediator.

  13. Peripheral T cell cytokine responses for diagnosis of active tuberculosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes Nemeth

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: A test for diagnosis of active Tuberculosis (TB from peripheral blood could tremendously improve clinical management of patients. METHODS: Of 178 prospectively enrolled patients with possible TB, 60 patients were diagnosed with pulmonary and 27 patients with extrapulmonary TB. The frequencies of Mycobacterium tuberculosis (MTB specific CD4(+ T cells and CD8(+ T cells producing cytokines were assessed using overnight stimulation with purified protein derivate (PPD or early secretory antigenic target (ESAT-6, respectively. RESULTS: Among patients with active TB, an increased type 1 cytokine profile consisting of mainly CD4(+ T cell derived interferon (IFN-γ was detectable. Despite contributing to the cytokine profile as a whole, the independent diagnostic performance of one cytokine producing T cells as well as polyfunctional T cells was poor. IFN-γ/Interleukin(IL-2 cytokine ratios discriminated best between active TB and other diseases. CONCLUSION: T cells producing one cytokine and polyfunctional T cells have a limited role in diagnosis of active TB. The significant shift from a "memory type" to an "effector type" cytokine profile may be useful for further development of a rapid immune-diagnostic tool for active TB.

  14. Atrazine Triggers DNA Damage Response and Induces DNA Double-Strand Breaks in MCF-10A Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Peixin; Yang, John; Ning, Jie; Wang, Michael; Song, Qisheng

    2015-06-24

    Atrazine, a pre-emergent herbicide in the chloro-s-triazine family, has been widely used in crop lands and often detected in agriculture watersheds, which is considered as a potential threat to human health. Although atrazine and its metabolites showed an elevated incidence of mammary tumors in female Sprague-Dawley (SD) rats, no molecular evidence was found relevant to its carcinogenesis in humans. This study aims to determine whether atrazine could induce the expression of DNA damage response-related proteins in normal human breast epithelial cells (MCF-10A) and to examine the cytotoxicity of atrazine at a molecular level. Our results indicate that a short-term exposure of MCF-10A to an environmentally-detectable concentration of atrazine (0.1 µg/mL) significantly increased the expression of tumor necrosis factor receptor-1 (TNFR1) and phosphorylated Rad17 in the cells. Atrazine treatment increased H2AX phosphorylation (γH2AX) and the formation of γH2AX foci in the nuclei of MCF-10A cells. Atrazine also sequentially elevated DNA damage checkpoint proteins of ATM- and RAD3-related (ATR), ATRIP and phospho-Chk1, suggesting that atrazine could induce DNA double-strand breaks and trigger the DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway in MCF-10A cells. Further investigations are needed to determine whether atrazine-triggered DNA double-strand breaks and DNA damage response ATR-Chk1 pathway occur in vivo.

  15. Efficient and reproducible generation of high-expressing, stable human cell lines without need for antibiotic selection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kewes Helmut

    2008-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Human cell lines are the most innovative choice of host cell for production of biopharmaceuticals since they allow for authentic posttranslational modification of therapeutic proteins. We present a new method for generating high and stable protein expressing cell lines based on human amniocytes without the requirement of antibiotic selection. Results Primary amniocytes from routine amniocentesis samples can be efficiently transformed with adenoviral functions resulting in stable human cell lines. Cotransfection of the primary human amniocytes with a plasmid expressing adenoviral E1 functions plus a second plasmid containing a gene of interest resulted in permanent cell lines expressing up to 30 pg/cell/day of a fully glycosylated and sialylated protein. Expression of the gene of interest is very stable for more than 90 passages and, importantly, was achieved in the absence of any antibiotic selection. Conclusion We describe an improved method for developing high protein expressing stable human cell lines. These cell lines are of non-tumor origin, they are immortalized by a function not oncogenic in human and they are from an ethically accepted and easily accessible cell source. Since the cell can be easily adapted to growth in serum-free and chemically defined medium they fulfill the requirements of biopharmaceutical production processes.

  16. Regional variation in the correlation of antibody and T-cell responses to Trypanosoma cruzi.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martin, Diana L; Marks, Morgan; Galdos-Cardenas, Gerson; Gilman, Robert H; Goodhew, Brook; Ferrufino, Lisbeth; Halperin, Anthony; Sanchez, Gerardo; Verastegui, Manuela; Escalante, Patricia; Naquira, Cesar; Levy, Michael Z; Bern, Caryn

    2014-06-01

    Chagas disease, caused by the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi, is a major cause of morbidity and mortality in Central and South America. Geographic variations in the sensitivity of serologic diagnostic assays to T. cruzi may reflect differences in T. cruzi exposure. We measured parasite-specific T-cell responses among seropositive individuals in two populations from South America with widely varying antibody titers against T. cruzi. Antibody titers among seropositive individuals were significantly lower in Arequipa, Peru compared with Santa Cruz, Bolivia. Similarly, the proportion of seropositive individuals with positive T-cell responses was lower in Peru than Bolivia, resulting in overall lower frequencies of interferon-γ (IFNγ)-secreting cells from Peruvian samples. However, the magnitude of the IFNγ response was similar among the IFNγ responders in both locations. These data indicate that immunological discrepancies based on geographic region are reflected in T-cell responses as well as antibody responses.

  17. Fluidization, resolidification, and reorientation of the endothelial cell in response to slow tidal stretches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krishnan, Ramaswamy; Canovic, Elizabeth Peruski; Iordan, Andreea L; Rajendran, Kavitha; Manomohan, Greeshma; Pirentis, Athanassios P; Smith, Michael L; Butler, James P; Fredberg, Jeffrey J; Stamenovic, Dimitrije

    2012-08-15

    Mechanical stretch plays an important role in regulating shape and orientation of the vascular endothelial cell. This morphological response to stretch is basic to angiogenesis, neovascularization, and vascular homeostasis, but mechanism remains unclear. To elucidate mechanisms, we used cell mapping rheometry to measure traction forces in primary human umbilical vein endothelial cells subjected to periodic uniaxial stretches. Onset of periodic stretch of 10% strain amplitude caused a fluidization response typified by attenuation of traction forces almost to zero. As periodic stretch continued, the prompt fluidization response was followed by a slow resolidification response typified by recovery of the traction forces, but now aligned along the axis perpendicular to the imposed stretch. Reorientation of the cell body lagged reorientation of the traction forces, however. Together, these observations demonstrate that cellular reorientation in response to periodic stretch is preceded by traction attenuation by means of cytoskeletal fluidization and subsequent traction recovery transverse to the stretch direction by means of cytoskeletal resolidification.

  18. The role of the microtubular system in the cell response to HGF/SF.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dugina, V B; Alexandrova, A Y; Lane, K; Bulanova, E; Vasiliev, J M

    1995-04-01

    The effects of the microtubular drugs colcemid and taxol on the morphological changes induced by hepatocyte growth factor/scatter factor (HGF/SF) in MDCK cells were studied. Dynamic changes in the area and shape of individual cells were assessed by morphometric methods whereas alterations of the cytoskeleton were assessed by immunomorphological methods. The results suggest that there are two components in the response to HGF/SF: (a) activation of the extension of lamellae leading to cell spreading; and (b) reorganization of microtubules leading to polarization of cell shape. The latter response is highly sensitive to microtubular drugs, especially taxol. HGF/SF induced spreading in taxol-treated MDCK cells but these cells retained a non-polarized discoid shape and a pattern of actin microfilament bundles characteristic of the untreated cells. Colcemid and taxol did not prevent HGF/SF-induced migration of cells in Boyden chambers but completely inhibited the outgrowth of multicellular strands and tubules from cell aggregates in collagen gels. These results show that enhanced lamella formation in response to HGF/SF without polarization of cell shape is sufficient to induce cell motility. In contrast, microtubule-dependent polarization is essential for complex morphogenetic responses such as tubulogenesis in collagen gels.

  19. Modulation of Immune Responses by Exosomes Derived from Antigen-Presenting Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenoda, Botros B.; Ajit, Seena K.

    2016-01-01

    Exosome-mediated signaling is important in mediating the inflammatory response. To exert their biological or pathophysiological functions in the recipient cells, exosomes deliver a diverse array of biomacromolecules including long and short coding and non-coding RNAs, proteins, and lipids. Exosomes secreted by antigen-presenting cells can confer therapeutic benefits by attenuating or stimulating the immune response. Exosomes play a crucial role in carrying and presenting functional major histocompatibility peptide complexes to modulate antigen-specific T cell responses. Exosomes from Dendritic Cells (DCs) can activate T and B cells and have been explored for their immunostimulatory properties in cancer therapy. The immunosuppressive properties of exosomes derived from macrophages and DCs can reduce inflammation in animal models for several inflammatory disorders. This review focuses on the protective role of exosomes in attenuating inflammation or augmenting immune response, emphasizing studies on exosomes derived from DCs and macrophages. PMID:27660518

  20. Dysregulated cytokine production by dendritic cells modulates B cell responses in the NZM2410 mouse model of lupus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sang, Allison; Zheng, Ying-Yi; Yin, Yiming; Dozmorov, Igor; Li, Hao; Hsu, Hui-Chen; Mountz, John D; Morel, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    The breakdown in tolerance of autoreactive B cells in the lupus-prone NZM2410-derived B6.Sle1.Sle2.Sle3 (TC) mice results in the secretion of autoantibodies. TC dendritic cells (DCs) enhance B cell proliferation and antibody secretion in a cytokine-dependent manner. However, the specific cytokine milieu by which TC DCs activate B cells was not known. In this study, we compared TC and C57BL/6 (B6) control for the distribution of DC subsets and for their production of cytokines affecting B cell responses. We show that TC DCs enhanced B cell proliferation through the production of IL-6 and IFN-γ, while antibody secretion was only dependent on IL-6. Pre-disease TC mice showed an expanded PDCA1(+) cells prior to disease onset that was localized to the marginal zone and further expanded with age. The presence of PDCA1(+) cells in the marginal zone correlated with a Type I Interferon (IFN) signature in marginal zone B cells, and this response was higher in TC than B6 mice. In vivo administration of anti-chromatin immune complexes upregulated IL-6 and IFN-γ production by splenic DCs from TC but not B6 mice. The production of BAFF and APRIL was decreased upon TC DC stimulation both in vitro and in vivo, indicating that these B cell survival factors do not play a role in B cell modulation by TC DCs. Finally, TC B cells were defective at downregulating IL-6 expression in response to anti-inflammatory apoptotic cell exposure. Overall, these results show that the TC autoimmune genetic background induces the production of B cell-modulating inflammatory cytokines by DCs, which are regulated by the microenvironment as well as the interplay between DC.

  1. Contribution of Herpesvirus Specific CD8 T Cells to Anti-Viral T Cell Response in Humans

    OpenAIRE

    Elena Sandalova; Diletta Laccabue; Carolina Boni; Tan, Anthony T; Katja Fink; Eng Eong Ooi; Robert Chua; Bahar Shafaeddin Schreve; Carlo Ferrari; Antonio Bertoletti

    2010-01-01

    Herpesviruses infect most humans. Their infections can be associated with pathological conditions and significant changes in T cell repertoire but evidences of symbiotic effects of herpesvirus latency have never been demonstrated. We tested the hypothesis that HCMV and EBV-specific CD8 T cells contribute to the heterologous anti-viral immune response. Volume of activated/proliferating virus-specific and total CD8 T cells was evaluated in 50 patients with acute viral infections: 20 with HBV, 1...

  2. Critical role of constitutive type I interferon response in bronchial epithelial cell to influenza infection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alan C-Y Hsu

    Full Text Available Innate antiviral responses in bronchial epithelial cells (BECs provide the first line of defense against respiratory viral infection and the effectiveness of this response is critically dependent on the type I interferons (IFNs. However the importance of the antiviral responses in BECs during influenza infection is not well understood. We profiled the innate immune response to infection with H3N2 and H5N1 virus using Calu-3 cells and primary BECs to model proximal airway cells. The susceptibility of BECs to influenza infection was not solely dependent on the sialic acid-bearing glycoprotein, and antiviral responses that occurred after viral endocytosis was more important in limiting viral replication. The early antiviral response and apoptosis correlated with the ability to limit viral replication. Both viruses reduced RIG-I associated antiviral responses and subsequent induction of IFN-β. However it was found that there was constitutive release of IFN-β by BECs and this was critical in inducing late antiviral signaling via type I IFN receptors, and was crucial in limiting viral infection. This study characterizes anti-influenza virus responses in airway epithelial cells and shows that constitutive IFN-β release plays a more important role in initiating protective late IFN-stimulated responses during human influenza infection in bronchial epithelial cells.

  3. Carbon anhydrase IX specific immune responses in patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma potentially cured by interleukin-2 based immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Susanne; Donskov, Frede; Pedersen, Johannes W

    2013-01-01

    Abstract The majority of clear-cell renal cell carcinomas (ccRCC) show high and homogeneous expression levels of the tumor associated antigen (TAA) carbonic anhydrase IX (CAIX), and treatment with interleukin-2 (IL-2) based immunotherapy can lead to cure in patients with metastatic renal cell...... of disease (NED) following treatment with IL-2 based immunotherapy, and thus potentially cured. Immune reactivity in these patients was compared with samples from patients with dramatic tumor response obtained immediately at the cessation of therapy, samples from patients that experienced progressive disease...... interest in future cancer vaccines, but more studies are needed to elucidate the immunological mechanisms of action in potentially cured patients treated with an immunotherapeutic agent....

  4. Treatment response in psychotic patients classified according to social and clinical needs, drug side effects, and previous treatment; a method to identify functional remission

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Alenius, Malin; Hammarlund-Udenaes, Margareta; Honoré, Per Gustaf Hartvig;

    2009-01-01

    , fewer psychotic symptoms, and higher rate of workers than those with the worst treatment outcome. CONCLUSION: In the evaluation, CANSEPT showed validity in discriminating the patients of interest and was well tolerated by the patients. CANSEPT could secure inclusion of correct patients in the clinic......; underestimating residual symptoms, negative symptoms, and side effects; or being to open for individual interpretation. The aim of this study was to present and evaluate a new method of classification according to treatment response and, thus, to identify patients in functional remission. METHOD: A naturalistic......, cross-sectional study was performed using patient interviews and information from patient files. The new classification method CANSEPT, which combines the Camberwell Assessment of Need rating scale, the Udvalg for Kliniske Undersøgelser side effect rating scale (SE), and the patient's previous treatment...

  5. Thermal response of photovoltaic cell to laser beam irradiation

    OpenAIRE

    Yuan, Yu-Chen; Wu, Chen-Wu

    2014-01-01

    This paper firstly presents the concept of using dual laser beam to irradiate the photovoltaic cell, so as to investigate the temperature dependency of the efficiency of long distance energy transmission. Next, the model on the multiple reflection and absorption of any monochromatic light in multilayer structure has been established, and the heat generation in photovoltaic cell has been interpreted in this work. Then, the finite element model has been set up to calculate the temperature of ph...

  6. A Single Subset of Dendritic Cells Controls the Cytokine Bias of Natural Killer T Cell Responses to Diverse Glycolipid Antigens

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pooja; Baena, Andres; Yu, Karl O.A.; Saini, Neeraj K.; Kharkwal, Shalu S.; Goldberg, Michael F.; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J.; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M.; Kim, John; Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Lauvau, Gregoire; Chang, Young-tae; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Cox, Liam R.; Jervis, Peter J.; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S.; Porcelli, Steven A.

    2014-01-01

    Summary Many hematopoietic cell types express CD1d and are capable of presenting glycolipid antigens to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). However, the question of which cells are the principal presenters of glycolipid antigens in vivo remains controversial, and it has been suggested that this might vary depending on the structure of a particular glycolipid antigen. Here we have shown that a single type of cell, the CD8α+ DEC-205+ dendritic cell, was mainly responsible for capturing and presenting a variety of different glycolipid antigens, including multiple forms of α-galactosylceramide that stimulate widely divergent cytokine responses. After glycolipid presentation, these dendritic cells rapidly altered their expression of various costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules in a manner that was dependent on the structure of the antigen. These findings show flexibility in the outcome of two-way communication between CD8α+ dendritic cells and iNKT cells, providing a mechanism for biasing toward either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses. PMID:24412610

  7. A single subset of dendritic cells controls the cytokine bias of natural killer T cell responses to diverse glycolipid antigens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arora, Pooja; Baena, Andres; Yu, Karl O A; Saini, Neeraj K; Kharkwal, Shalu S; Goldberg, Michael F; Kunnath-Velayudhan, Shajo; Carreño, Leandro J; Venkataswamy, Manjunatha M; Kim, John; Lazar-Molnar, Eszter; Lauvau, Gregoire; Chang, Young-tae; Liu, Zheng; Bittman, Robert; Al-Shamkhani, Aymen; Cox, Liam R; Jervis, Peter J; Veerapen, Natacha; Besra, Gurdyal S; Porcelli, Steven A

    2014-01-16

    Many hematopoietic cell types express CD1d and are capable of presenting glycolipid antigens to invariant natural killer T cells (iNKT cells). However, the question of which cells are the principal presenters of glycolipid antigens in vivo remains controversial, and it has been suggested that this might vary depending on the structure of a particular glycolipid antigen. Here we have shown that a single type of cell, the CD8α(+) DEC-205(+) dendritic cell, was mainly responsible for capturing and presenting a variety of different glycolipid antigens, including multiple forms of α-galactosylceramide that stimulate widely divergent cytokine responses. After glycolipid presentation, these dendritic cells rapidly altered their expression of various costimulatory and coinhibitory molecules in a manner that was dependent on the structure of the antigen. These findings show flexibility in the outcome of two-way communication between CD8α(+) dendritic cells and iNKT cells, providing a mechanism for biasing toward either proinflammatory or anti-inflammatory responses.

  8. CD8α− Dendritic Cells Induce Antigen-Specific T Follicular Helper Cells Generating Efficient Humoral Immune Responses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Changsik Shin

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Recent studies on T follicular helper (Tfh cells have significantly advanced our understanding of T cell-dependent B cell responses. However, little is known about the early stage of Tfh cell commitment by dendritic cells (DCs, particularly by the conventional CD8α+ and CD8α− DC subsets. We show that CD8α− DCs localized at the interfollicular zone play a pivotal role in the induction of antigen-specific Tfh cells by upregulating the expression of Icosl and Ox40l through the non-canonical NF-κB signaling pathway. Tfh cells induced by CD8α− DCs function as true B cell helpers, resulting in significantly increased humoral immune responses against various human pathogenic antigens, including Yersinia pestis LcrV, HIV Gag, and hepatitis B surface antigen. Our findings uncover a mechanistic role of CD8α− DCs in the initiation of Tfh cell differentiation and thereby provide a rationale for investigating CD8α− DCs in enhancing antigen-specific humoral immune responses for improving vaccines and therapeutics.

  9. Effects of blood products on inflammatory response in endothelial cells in vitro.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Urner

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Transfusing blood products may induce inflammatory reactions within the vascular compartment potentially leading to a systemic inflammatory response. Experiments were designed to assess the inflammatory potential of different blood products in an endothelial cell-based in vitro model and to compare baseline levels of potentially activating substances in transfusion products. METHODS: The inflammatory response from pre-activated (endotoxin-stimulated and non-activated endothelial cells as well as neutrophil endothelial transmigration in response to packed red blood cells (PRBC, platelet concentrates (PC and fresh frozen plasma (FFP was determined. Baseline inflammatory mediator and lipid concentrations in blood products were evaluated. RESULTS: Following incubation with all blood products, an increased inflammatory mediator release from endothelial cells was observed. Platelet concentrates, and to a lesser extent also FFP, caused the most pronounced response, which was accentuated in already pre-stimulated endothelial cells. Inflammatory response of endothelial cells as well as blood product-induced migration of neutrophils through the endothelium was in good agreement with the lipid content of the according blood product. CONCLUSION: Within the group of different blood transfusion products both PC and FFP have a high inflammatory potential with regard to activation of endothelial cells. Inflammation upon blood product exposure is strongly accentuated when endothelial cells are pre-injured. High lipid contents in the respective blood products goes along with an accentuated inflammatory reaction from endothelial cells.

  10. Effects of Cell Type and Culture Media on Interleukin-6 Secretion in Response to Environmental Particles

    OpenAIRE

    Veranth, John M; Cutler, N. Shane; Kaser, Erin G.; Reilly, Christopher A.; Yost, Garold S.

    2007-01-01

    Cultured lung cells provide an alternative to animal exposures for comparing the effects of different types of air pollution particles. Studies of particulate matter in vitro have reported proinflammatory cytokine signaling in response to many types of environmental particles, but there have been few studies comparing identical treatments in multiple cell types or identical cells with alternative cell culture protocols. We compared soil-derived, diesel, coal fly ash, titanium dioxide, and kao...

  11. Endothelial cells undergo morphological, biomechanical, and dynamic changes in response to tumor necrosis factor-α

    OpenAIRE

    Stroka, Kimberly M.; Vaitkus, Janina A.; Aranda-Espinoza, Helim

    2012-01-01

    The immune response triggers a complicated sequence of events, one of which is release of the cytokine tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α) from stromal cells such as monocytes and macrophages. In this work we explored the biophysical effects of TNF-α on endothelial cells (ECs), including changes in cell morphology, biomechanics, migration, and cytoskeletal dynamics. We found that TNF-α induces a wide distribution of cell area and aspect ratio, with these properties increasing on average during tr...

  12. The response of intestinal stem cells and epithelium after alemtuzumab administration

    OpenAIRE

    2011-01-01

    Intestinal stem cells may have important roles in the maintenance of epithelial integrity during tissue repair. Alemtuzumab is a humanized anti-CD52 lymphocytic antibody that is increasingly being used to induce immunosuppression; intestinal barrier function is impaired during treatment with alemtuzumab. We investigated the response of intestinal stem cells to epithelial damage resulting from alemtuzumab treatment. Intestinal epithelial cell loss and abnormal Paneth cell morphology were found...

  13. Effect of Q-switched Laser Surface Texturing of Titanium on Os