WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell radiation resistance

  1. High Radiation Resistance IMM Solar Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Noren

    2015-01-01

    Due to high launch costs, weight reduction is a key driver for the development of new solar cell technologies suitable for space applications. This project is developing a unique triple-junction inverted metamorphic multijunction (IMM) technology that enables the manufacture of very lightweight, low-cost InGaAsP-based multijunction solar cells. This IMM technology consists of indium (In) and phosphorous (P) solar cell active materials, which are designed to improve the radiation-resistant properties of the triple-junction solar cell while maintaining high efficiency. The intrinsic radiation hardness of InP materials makes them of great interest for building solar cells suitable for deployment in harsh radiation environments, such as medium Earth orbit and missions to the outer planets. NASA Glenn's recently developed epitaxial lift-off (ELO) process also will be applied to this new structure, which will enable the fabrication of the IMM structure without the substrate.

  2. Phytosphingosine can overcome resistance to ionizing radiation in ionizing radiation-resistant cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Moon Taek; Choi, Jung A; Kim, Min Jeong; Bae, Sang Woo; Kang, Chang Mo; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yun Sil; Lee, Su Jae [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kang, Seong Man [Graduate School of Biotechnology, Korea University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Chung, Hee Yong [College of Medicine, Hanyang University, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2004-07-01

    Although the majority of cancer cells are killed by inonizing radiation, certain types show resistance to it. We previously reported that phytosphingosine also induces apoptotic cell death in caspase dependent pathway in human cancer cells. In the present study, we examined whether phytosphingosine could overcome radiation resistance in the variant Jurkat clones. We first selected radiation-resistant Jurkat clones and examined cross-responsiveness of the clones between radiation and phytosphingosine. Treatment with phytosphingosine significantly did not affect apoptosis in all the clones, indicating that there seemed to be cross-resistance between radiation and phytosphingosine. Nevertheless, combined treatment of phytosphingosine with radiation synergistically enhanced killing of radiation-resistant cells, compared to radiation or phytosphingosine alone. The pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not completely inhibit the synergistic cell killing induced by combined treatment of ionizing radiation and phytosphingosine. These results demonstrated that apoptosis induced by combined treatment of radiation and phytosphingosine in radiation-resistant cells was associated with caspase independent pathway. We also found that apoptotic cell death induced by combined treatment of ionizing radiation and phytosphingosine correlated to the increases of ROS. The enhancement of ROS generation induced the loss of mitochondria transmembrane potential. In conclusion, ROS generation in combined treatment of phytosphingosine with radiation significantly induced the translocation of AIF to nucleus from mitochondria, suggesting a potential clinical application of combination treatment of radiation and phytosphingosine to radiation-resistant cancer cells.

  3. Phytosphingosine can overcome resistance to ionizing radiation in ionizing radiation-resistant cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Moon Taek; Choi, Jung A; Kim, Min Jeong; Bae, Sang Woo; Kang, Chang Mo; Cho, Chul Koo; Lee, Yun Sil; Lee, Su Jae; Park, Moon Taek; Choi, Jung A; Kim, Min Jeong; Kang, Seong Man; Chung, Hee Yong

    2004-01-01

    Although the majority of cancer cells are killed by inonizing radiation, certain types show resistance to it. We previously reported that phytosphingosine also induces apoptotic cell death in caspase dependent pathway in human cancer cells. In the present study, we examined whether phytosphingosine could overcome radiation resistance in the variant Jurkat clones. We first selected radiation-resistant Jurkat clones and examined cross-responsiveness of the clones between radiation and phytosphingosine. Treatment with phytosphingosine significantly did not affect apoptosis in all the clones, indicating that there seemed to be cross-resistance between radiation and phytosphingosine. Nevertheless, combined treatment of phytosphingosine with radiation synergistically enhanced killing of radiation-resistant cells, compared to radiation or phytosphingosine alone. The pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk did not completely inhibit the synergistic cell killing induced by combined treatment of ionizing radiation and phytosphingosine. These results demonstrated that apoptosis induced by combined treatment of radiation and phytosphingosine in radiation-resistant cells was associated with caspase independent pathway. We also found that apoptotic cell death induced by combined treatment of ionizing radiation and phytosphingosine correlated to the increases of ROS. The enhancement of ROS generation induced the loss of mitochondria transmembrane potential. In conclusion, ROS generation in combined treatment of phytosphingosine with radiation significantly induced the translocation of AIF to nucleus from mitochondria, suggesting a potential clinical application of combination treatment of radiation and phytosphingosine to radiation-resistant cancer cells

  4. Radiation resistant passivation of silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Swanson, R.M.; Gan, J.Y.; Gruenbaum, P.E.

    1991-01-01

    This patent describes a silicon solar cell having improved stability when exposed to concentrated solar radiation. It comprises a body of silicon material having a major surface for receiving radiation, a plurality of p and n conductivity regions in the body for collecting electrons and holes created by impinging radiation, and a passivation layer on the major surface including a first layer of silicon oxide in contact with the body and a polycrystalline silicon layer on the first layer of silicon oxide

  5. Optical imaging of radiation-induced metabolic changes in radiation-sensitive and resistant cancer cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alhallak, Kinan; Jenkins, Samir V.; Lee, David E.; Greene, Nicholas P.; Quinn, Kyle P.; Griffin, Robert J.; Dings, Ruud P. M.; Rajaram, Narasimhan

    2017-06-01

    Radiation resistance remains a significant problem for cancer patients, especially due to the time required to definitively determine treatment outcome. For fractionated radiation therapy, nearly 7 to 8 weeks can elapse before a tumor is deemed to be radiation-resistant. We used the optical redox ratio of FAD/(FAD+NADH) to identify early metabolic changes in radiation-resistant lung cancer cells. These radiation-resistant human A549 lung cancer cells were developed by exposing the parental A549 cells to repeated doses of radiation (2 Gy). Although there were no significant differences in the optical redox ratio between the parental and resistant cell lines prior to radiation, there was a significant decrease in the optical redox ratio of the radiation-resistant cells 24 h after a single radiation exposure (p=0.01). This change in the redox ratio was indicative of increased catabolism of glucose in the resistant cells after radiation and was associated with significantly greater protein content of hypoxia-inducible factor 1 (HIF-1α), a key promoter of glycolytic metabolism. Our results demonstrate that the optical redox ratio could provide a rapid method of determining radiation resistance status based on early metabolic changes in cancer cells.

  6. Tumourigenicity and radiation resistance of mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo P; Horsman, Michael Robert; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    . Nontumourigenic (TERT4) and tumourigenic (TRET20) cell lines, from an immortalised mesenchymal stem cell line, were grown in culture prior to irradiation and gene expression analysis. Radiation resistance was measured using a clonogenic assay. Differences in gene expression between the two cell lines, both under...

  7. Radiation resistance of amorphous silicon alloy solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hanak, J.J.; Chen, E.; Myatt, A.; Woodyard, J.R.

    1987-01-01

    The radiation resistance of a-Si alloy solar cells when bombarded by high energy particles is reviewed. The results of investigations of high energy proton radiation resistance of a-Si alloy thin film photovoltaic cells are reported. Irradiations were carried out with 200 keV and 1.00 MeV protons with fluences ranging betweeen 1E11 and 1E15 cm-2. Defect generation and passivation mechanisms were studied using the AM1 conversion efficiency and isochronal anneals. It is concluded that the primary defect generation mechanism results from the knock-on of Si and Ge in the intrinsic layer of the cells. The defect passivation proceeds by the complex annealing of Si and Ge defects and not by the simple migration of hydrogen

  8. Radiation resistance of solar cells for space application, 1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitsui, Hiroshi; Tanaka, Ryuichi; Sunaga, Hiromi

    1989-07-01

    A 50-μm thick ultrathin silicon solar cell and a 280-μm thick high performance AlGaAs/GaAs solar cell with high radiation resistance have been recently developed by National Space Development Agency of Japan (NASDA). In order to study the radiation resistance of these cells, a joint research was carried out between Japan Atomic Energy Research Institute (JAERI) and NASDA from 1984 through 1987. In this research, the irradiation method of electron beams, the effects of the irradiation conditions on the deterioration of solar cells by electron beams, and the annealing effects of the radiation damage in solar cells were investigated. This paper is the first one of a series of reports of the joint research. In this paper, the space radiation environment which artificial satellites will encounter, the solar cells used, and the experimental methods are described. In addition to these, the results of the study on the irradiation procedure of electron beams are reported. In the study of the irradiation method of electron beams, three methods, that is, the fixed irradiation method, the moving irradiation method, and the spot irradiation method were examined. In the fixed irradiation method and moving one, stationary solar cells and solar cells moving by conveyer were irradiated by scanning electron beams, respectively. On the other hand, in the spot irradiation method, stationary solar cells were irradiated by non-scanning steady electron beams. It was concluded that the fixed irradiation method was the most proper method. In addition to this, in this study, some pieces of information were obtained with respect to the changes in the electrical characteristics of solar cells caused by the irradiation of electron beams. (author) 52 refs

  9. DNA from radiation resistant human tumor cells transfers resistance to NIH/3T3 cells with varying degrees of penetrance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kasid, U.; Dritschilo, A.; Weichselbaum, R.

    1987-01-01

    Experimental evidence suggests that clinical radiation resistance may correlate with in vitro radiation survival parameters. Specifically, they isolated several cell lines from radioresistant head and neck carcinomas with D/sub 0/ values greater than 2 Gy. The authors co-transfected DNA from cell line SQ2OB (D/sub 0/ = 2.4 Gy) with the rhoSVNeO plasmid into NIH/3T3 cells (D/sub 0/ = 1.7 Gy). Antibiotic G418 resistant, transformed clones were isolated and confirmed by Southern blotting to contain human alu, as well as rhoSVNeO sequences. Screening for radiation resistance with 8Gy (Cs-137) revealed that 3 of 4 tested hybrid clones show a radiation survival intermediate between NIH/3T3 and SQ2OB. This suggests that radiation resistance is a dominant, transfectable phenotype of mammalian cells and can be expressed in more sensitive cells. Karyotyping of resistant hybrid clones shows the presence of double minute chromosomes. Secondary transfection results and experiments to clone the genetic factors responsible for radiation resistance are in progress and results will be reported

  10. Materials That Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiadong; Wang, Haorong

    2012-01-01

    A thin layer (approximately 10 microns) of a novel "transparent" fluorescent material is applied to existing solar cells or modules to effectively block and convert UV light, or other lower solar response waveband of solar radiation, to visible or IR light that can be more efficiently used by solar cells for additional photocurrent. Meanwhile, the layer of fluorescent coating material remains fully "transparent" to the visible and IR waveband of solar radiation, resulting in a net gain of solar cell efficiency. This innovation alters the effective solar spectral power distribution to which an existing cell gets exposed, and matches the maximum photovoltaic (PV) response of existing cells. By shifting a low PV response waveband (e.g., UV) of solar radiation to a high PV response waveband (e.g. Vis-Near IR) with novel fluorescent materials that are transparent to other solar-cell sensitive wavebands, electrical output from solar cells will be enhanced. This approach enhances the efficiency of solar cells by converting UV and high-energy particles in space that would otherwise be wasted to visible/IR light. This innovation is a generic technique that can be readily implemented to significantly increase efficiencies of both space and terrestrial solar cells, without incurring much cost, thus bringing a broad base of economical, social, and environmental benefits. The key to this approach is that the "fluorescent" material must be very efficient, and cannot block or attenuate the "desirable" and unconverted" waveband of solar radiation (e.g. Vis-NIR) from reaching the cells. Some nano-phosphors and novel organometallic complex materials have been identified that enhance the energy efficiency on some state-of-the-art commercial silicon and thin-film-based solar cells by over 6%.

  11. Ultraviolet radiation-induced tumors do not arise from a subpopulation of ultraviolet-resistant cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fisher, M.S.

    1981-01-01

    A study was designed to determine whether UV-induced tumors have a selective growth advantage in the autochthonous host by virtue of possessing a heritable resistance to UV-induced lethality. Several fibrosarcomas were induced either by repeated exposure of C3H mice to UV radiation from FS40 sunlamps or by subcutaneous injection of C3H mice with a chemical carcinogen (methylcholanthrene). Tissue culture lines of these tumors were tested in vitro for susceptibility to the lethal effects of UV radiation from an FS40 sunlamp. Lethality was assessed by measuring colony formation as a function of increasing dose of radiation. Cells from the UV-induced fibrosarcomas were not more resistant to the lethal effects of UV radiation than cells from methylcholanthrene-induced fibrosarcomas or cells from a nontumorigenic C3H fibroblast cell line. This suggests that UV-induced tumors do not arise from a subpopulation of UV-resistant cells. (author)

  12. Breast cancers radiation-resistance: key role of the cancer stem cells marker CD24

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bensimon, Julie

    2013-01-01

    This work focuses on the characterization of radiation-resistant breast cancer cells, responsible for relapse after radiotherapy. The 'Cancer Stem Cells' (CSC) theory describes a radiation-resistant cellular sub-population, with enhanced capacity to induce tumors and proliferate. In this work, we show that only the CSC marker CD24-/low defines a radiation resistant cell population, able to transmit the 'memory' of irradiation, expressed as long term genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells. We show that CD24 is not only a marker, but is an actor of radiation-response. So, CD24 expression controls cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, and ROS level before and after irradiation. As a result, CD24-/low cells display enhanced radiation-resistance and genomic stability. For the first time, our results attribute a role to CD24-/low CSCs in the transmission of genomic instability. Moreover, by providing informations on tumor intrinsic radiation-sensitivity, CD24- marker could help to design new radiotherapy protocols. (author)

  13. Cancer stem cell overexpression of nicotinamide N-methyltransferase enhances cellular radiation resistance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D’Andrea, Filippo P.; Safwat, Akmal; Kassem, Moustapha

    2011-01-01

    BackgroundCancer stem cells are thought to be a radioresistant population and may be the seeds for recurrence after radiotherapy. Using tumorigenic clones of retroviral immortalized human mesenchymal stem cell with small differences in their phenotype, we investigated possible genetic expression...... that could explain cancer stem cell radiation resistance. MethodsTumorigenic mesenchymal cancer stem cell clones BB3 and CE8 were irradiated at varying doses and assayed for clonogenic surviving fraction. Altered gene expression before and after 2Gy was assessed by Affymetric exon chip analysis and further...... found the genes involved in cancer, proliferation, DNA repair and cell death. ConclusionsThe higher radiation resistance in clone CE8 is likely due to NNMT overexpression. The higher levels of NNMT could affect the cellular damage resistance through depletion of the accessible amounts of nicotinamide...

  14. Transfection of rat embryo cells with mutant p53 increases the intrinsic radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pardo, F.S.; Su, M.; Gerweck, L.; Schmidt, E.V.; Borek, C.; Preffer, F.; Dombkowski, D.

    1994-01-01

    Dominant oncogenic sequences have been shown to modulate the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of cells of both human and murine tumor cell lines. Whether transfection with candidate tumor-suppressor genes can modulate intrinsic radiation sensitivity is unknown. The data presented here demonstrate that transfection of rat embryo cells with a mutant p53 allele can increase the intrinsic radiation resistance of cells in vitro. First, transfection with mutant p53 resulted in transformed cellular morphology. Second, the transfected clone and the corresponding pooled population of transfected clones were more resistant to ionizing radiation in vitro. Last, analyses of the parameters of cell kinetics suggested that the radiobiological effects were unlikely to be due to altered parameters of cell kinetics at the time of irradiation, suggesting that mutant p53 altered the intrinsic radiation resistance of transfected cells by a more direct mechanism. Further experimentation will be necessary to develop a mechanistic approach for the study of these alterations. 29 refs., 3 figs., 2 tabs

  15. Acquired Tumor Cell Radiation Resistance at the Treatment Site Is Mediated Through Radiation-Orchestrated Intercellular Communication

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Aravindan, Natarajan, E-mail: naravind@ouhsc.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Aravindan, Sheeja; Pandian, Vijayabaskar; Khan, Faizan H.; Ramraj, Satish Kumar; Natt, Praveen [Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Oklahoma Health Sciences Center, Oklahoma City, Oklahoma (United States); Natarajan, Mohan [Department of Pathology, The University of Texas Health Science Center at San Antonio, San Antonio, Texas (United States)

    2014-03-01

    Purpose: Radiation resistance induced in cancer cells that survive after radiation therapy (RT) could be associated with increased radiation protection, limiting the therapeutic benefit of radiation. Herein we investigated the sequential mechanistic molecular orchestration involved in radiation-induced radiation protection in tumor cells. Results: Radiation, both in the low-dose irradiation (LDIR) range (10, 50, or 100 cGy) or at a higher, challenge dose IR (CDIR), 4 Gy, induced dose-dependent and sustained NFκB-DNA binding activity. However, a robust and consistent increase was seen in CDIR-induced NFκB activity, decreased DNA fragmentation, apoptosis, and cytotoxicity and attenuation of CDIR-inhibited clonal expansion when the cells were primed with LDIR prior to challenge dose. Furthermore, NFκB manipulation studies with small interfering RNA (siRNA) silencing or p50/p65 overexpression unveiled the influence of LDIR-activated NFκB in regulating CDIR-induced DNA fragmentation and apoptosis. LDIR significantly increased the transactivation/translation of the radiation-responsive factors tumor necrosis factor-α (TNF-α), interleukin-1α (IL-1α), cMYC, and SOD2. Coculture experiments exhibit LDIR-influenced radiation protection and increases in cellular expression, secretion, and activation of radiation-responsive molecules in bystander cells. Individual gene-silencing approach with siRNAs coupled with coculture studies showed the influence of LDIR-modulated TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 in induced radiation protection in bystander cells. NFκB inhibition/overexpression studies coupled with coculture experiments demonstrated that TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 are selectively regulated by LDIR-induced NFκB. Conclusions: Together, these data strongly suggest that scattered LDIR-induced NFκB-dependent TNF-α, IL-1α, cMYC, and SOD2 mediate radiation protection to the subsequent challenge dose in tumor cells.

  16. Endogenous superoxide dismutase and catalase activities and radiation resistance in mouse cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Davy, C.A.; Tesfay, Z.; Jones, J.; Rosenberg, R.C.; McCarthy, C.; Ostrand-Rosenberg, S.

    1988-01-01

    The relationship between the endogenous cytoplasmic levels of the enzymes superoxide dismutase and catalase and the inhibition of cell proliferation by γ-radiation has been studied in 11 mouse cell lines. The resistance of these mouse cell lines to radiation was found to vary by over 25-fold. No correlation was found between the cytoplasmic level of CuZn-superoxide dismutase or catalase and the resistance to radiation as measured by extrapolation number (EN), quasi-threshold dose (Dsub(q)), or Dsub(o). None of the cell lines had detectable cytoplasmic Mn-superoxide dismutase. The apparent Ksub(i) of potassium cyanide for mouse CuZn-superoxide dismutase was determined (Ksub(i) = 6.5 μmol dm -3 ). (author)

  17. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents in gemcitabine-resistant human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bree, Chris van; Kreder, Natasja Castro; Loves, Willem J.P.; Franken, Nicolaas A.P.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Haveman, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine cross-resistance to anti-tumor treatments in 2',2'difluorodeoxycytidine (dFdC, gemcitabine)-resistant human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells SW-1573 (SWp) were made resistant to dFdC (SWg). Sensitivity to cisplatin (cDDP), paclitaxel, 5-fluorouracil (5-FU), methotrexate (MTX), cytarabine (ara-C), and dFdC was measured by a proliferation assay. Radiosensitivity and radioenhancement by dFdC of this cell panel and the human ovarian carcinoma cell line A2780 and its dFdC-resistant variant AG6000 were determined by clonogenic assay. Bivariate flowcytometry was performed to study cell cycle changes. Results: In the SWg, a complete deoxycytidine kinase (dCK) deficiency was found on mRNA and protein level. This was accompanied by a 10-fold decrease in dCK activity which resulted in the >1000-fold resistance to dFdC. Sensitivity to other anti-tumor drugs was not altered, except for ara-C (>100-fold resistance). Radiosensitivity was not altered in the dFdC-resistant cell lines SWg and AG6000. High concentrations (50-100 μM dFdC) induced radioenhancement in the dFdC-resistant cell lines similar to the radioenhancement obtained at lower concentrations (10 nM dFdC) in the parental lines. An early S-phase arrest was found in all cell lines after dFdC treatment where radioenhancement was achieved. Conclusions: In the dFdC-resistant lung tumor cell line SWg, the deficiency in dCK is related to the resistance to dFdC and ara-C. No cross-resistance was observed to other anti-tumor drugs used for the treatment in lung cancer. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation was not altered in two different dFdC-resistant cell lines. Resistance to dFdC does not eliminate the ability of dFdC to sensitize cells to radiation

  18. Dual responsive promoters to target therapeutic gene expression to radiation-resistant hypoxic tumor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chadderton, Naomi; Cowen, Rachel L.; Sheppard, Freda C.D.; Robinson, Suzanne; Greco, Olga; Scott, Simon D.; Stratford, Ian J.; Patterson, Adam V.; Williams, Kaye J.

    2005-01-01

    Purpose: Tumor hypoxia is unequivocally linked to poor radiotherapy outcome. This study aimed to identify enhancer sequences that respond maximally to a combination of radiation and hypoxia for use in genetic radiotherapy approaches. Methods and materials: The influence of radiation (5 Gy) and hypoxia (1% O 2 ) on reporter-gene expression driven by hypoxia (HRE) and radiation (Egr-1) responsive elements was evaluated in tumor cells grown as monolayers or multicellular spheroids. Hypoxia-inducible factor-1α (HIF-1α) and HIF-2α protein expression was monitored in parallel. Results: Of the sequences tested, an HRE from the phosphoglycerate kinase-1 gene (PGK-18[5+]) was maximally induced in response to hypoxia plus radiation in all 5 cell lines tested. The additional radiation treatment afforded a significant increase in the induction of PGK-18[5+] compared with hypoxia alone in 3 cell lines. HIF-1α/2α were induced by radiation but combined hypoxia/radiation treatment did not yield a further increase. The dual responsive nature of HREs was maintained when spheroids were irradiated after delivery of HRE constructs in a replication-deficient adenovirus. Conclusions: Hypoxia-responsive enhancer element sequences are dually responsive to combined radiation and hypoxic treatment. Their use in genetic radiotherapy in vivo could maximize expression in the most radio-resistant population at the time of radiation and also exploit microenvironmental changes after radiotherapy to yield additional switch-on

  19. Theory of the high base resistivity n(+)pp(+) silicon solar cell and its application to radiation damage effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goradia, C.; Weinberg, I.

    1985-01-01

    Particulate radiation in space is a principal source of silicon solar cell degradation, and an investigation of cell radiation damage at higher base resistivities appears to have implication toward increasing solar cell and, therefore, useful satellite lifetimes in the space environment. However, contrary to expectations, it has been found that for cells with resistivities of 84 and 1250 ohm cm, the radiation resistance decreases as cell base resistivity increases. An analytical solar-cell computer model was developed with the objective to determine the reasons for this unexpected behavior. The present paper has the aim to describe the analytical model and its use in interpreting the behavior, under irradiation, of high-resistivity solar cells. Attention is given to boundary conditions at the space-charge region edges, cell currents, cell voltages, the generation of the theoretical I-V characteristic, experimental results, and computer calculations.

  20. RAD18 mediates resistance to ionizing radiation in human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xie, Chen; Wang, Hongwei; Cheng, Hongbin; Li, Jianhua; Wang, Zhi; Yue, Wu

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in glioma cell lines. • RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis. • The elevated expression of RAD18 is associated with recurrent GBM who underwent IR therapy. - Abstract: Radioresistance remains a major challenge in the treatment of glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). RAD18 a central regulator of translesion DNA synthesis (TLS), has been shown to play an important role in regulating genomic stability and DNA damage response. In the present study, we investigate the relationship between RAD18 and resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) and examined the expression levels of RAD18 in primary and recurrent GBM specimens. Our results showed that RAD18 is an important mediator of the IR-induced resistance in GBM. The expression level of RAD18 in glioma cells correlates with their resistance to IR. Ectopic expression of RAD18 in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells confers significant resistance to IR treatment. Conversely, depletion of endogenous RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells sensitized these cells to IR treatment. Moreover, RAD18 overexpression confers resistance to IR-mediated apoptosis in RAD18-low A172 glioma cells, whereas cells deficient in RAD18 exhibit increased apoptosis induced by IR. Furthermore, knockdown of RAD18 in RAD18-high glioma cells disrupts HR-mediated repair, resulting in increased accumulation of DSB. In addition, clinical data indicated that RAD18 was significantly higher in recurrent GBM samples that were exposed to IR compared with the corresponding primary GBM samples. Collectively, our findings reveal that RAD18 may serve as a key mediator of the IR response and may function as a potential target for circumventing IR resistance in human GBM

  1. Modulation of DNA methylation levels sensitizes doxorubicin-resistant breast adenocarcinoma cells to radiation-induced apoptosis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzhna, Lidia [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, AB, Canada T1K 3M4 (Canada); Kovalchuk, Olga, E-mail: olga.kovalchuk@uleth.ca [Department of Biological Sciences, University of Lethbridge, AB, Canada T1K 3M4 (Canada)

    2010-02-05

    Chemoresistant tumors often fail to respond to other cytotoxic treatments such as radiation therapy. The mechanisms of chemo- and radiotherapy cross resistance are not fully understood and are believed to be epigenetic in nature. We hypothesize that MCF-7 cells and their doxorubicin-resistant variant MCF-7/DOX cells may exhibit different responses to ionizing radiation due to their dissimilar epigenetic status. Similar to previous studies, we found that MCF-7/DOX cells harbor much lower levels of global DNA methylation than MCF-7 cells. Furthermore, we found that MCF-7/DOX cells had lower background apoptosis levels and were less responsive to radiation than MCF-7 cells. Decreased radiation responsiveness correlated to significant global DNA hypomethylation in MCF-7/DOX cells. Here, for the first time, we show that the radiation resistance of MCF-7/DOX cells can be reversed by an epigenetic treatment - the application of methyl-donor SAM. SAM-mediated reversal of DNA methylation led to elevated radiation sensitivity in MCF-7/DOX cells. Contrarily, application of SAM on the radiation sensitive and higher methylated MCF-7 cells resulted in a decrease in their radiation responsiveness. This data suggests that a fine balance of DNA methylation is needed to insure proper radiation and drug responsiveness.

  2. Radiation resistant modified polypropylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bojarski, J.; Zimek, Z.

    1997-01-01

    Radiation technology for production of radiation resistant polypropylene for medical use has been presented. The method consists in radiation induced copolymerization of polypropylene with ethylene and addition of small amount of copolymer of polyethylene and vinyl acetate. The material of proposed composition has a very good mechanical properties and elevated radiation resistivity decided on possibility of radiosterilization of products made of this material and designed for medical use. 3 figs, 3 tabs

  3. Radiation resistant low bandgap InGaAsP solar cell for multi-junction solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khan, Aurangzeb; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Dharmaras, Nathaji; Yamada, Takashi; Tanabe, Tatsuya; Takagishi, Shigenori; Itoh, Hisayoshi; Ohshima, Takeshi

    2001-01-01

    We have explored the superior radiation tolerance of metal organic chemical vapor deposition (MOCVD) grown, low bandgap, (0.95eV) InGaAsP solar cells as compared to GaAs-on-Ge cells, after 1 MeV electron irradiation. The minority carrier injection due to forward bias and light illumination under low concentration ratio, can lead to enhanced recovery of radiation damage in InGaAsP n + -p junction solar cells. An injection anneal activation energy (0.58eV) of the defects involved in damage/recovery of the InGaAsP solar cells has been estimated from the resultant recovery of the solar cell properties following minority carrier injection. The results suggest that low bandgap radiation resistant InGaAsP (0.95eV) lattice matched to InP substrates provide an alternative to use as bottom cells in multi-junction solar cells instead of less radiation ressitant conventional GaAs based solar cells for space applications. (author)

  4. Biological improvement of radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chun, K. J.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J

    2000-08-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of gene action related to the radiation resistance in microorganisms could be essentially helpful for the development of radiation protectants and hormeric effects of low dose radiation. This book described isolation of radiation-resistant microorganisms, induction of radiation-resistant and functionally improved mutants by gamma-ray radiation, cloning and analysis of the radiation resistance related genes and analysis of the expressed proteins of the radiation resistant related genes.

  5. Biological improvement of radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chun, K. J.; Lee, Y. K.; Kim, J. S.; Kim, J. K.; Lee, S. J.

    2000-08-01

    To investigate the mechanisms of gene action related to the radiation resistance in microorganisms could be essentially helpful for the development of radiation protectants and hormeric effects of low dose radiation. This book described isolation of radiation-resistant microorganisms, induction of radiation-resistant and functionally improved mutants by gamma-ray radiation, cloning and analysis of the radiation resistance related genes and analysis of the expressed proteins of the radiation resistant related genes

  6. Characterization and radiation response of a heat-resistant variant of V79 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Campbell, S.D.; Kruuv, J.; Lepock, J.R.

    1983-01-01

    A thermoresistant variant of the established cell line V79-S171-W1 was isolated after treatment with nitrosoguanidine and repeated heat treatments at 42.6 to 43 degrees C, and showed an enhanced ability to survive at 42.6, 43.5, and 44.5 degrees C. The rates of inactivation of the normal and heat-resistant lines differed by approximately a factor of 2 over this temperature range. This level of thermoresistance was stable for the first 80 doublings, but was lost by 120 doublings. This may have been due to a reversion to the normal V79 line since there was no continuous selection pressure and the thermoresistant variant, which was designated at HR7, had a longer average doubling time. Transient thermotolerance was induced in both the V79 and HR7 cells by a 10-min exposure to 44.5 degrees C. After 3 hr incubation at 37 degrees C, both cell lines had an identical sensitivity to further exposure to 44.5 degrees C. Thus the long-term thermoresistance of the HR7 cells may be due to a permanent induction of a low level of thermotolerance. The (ionizing) radiation survival curves and the ability to repair sublethal radiation damage were identical for the thermoresistant variant and the parent cell line

  7. Up-regulation of DNA-dependent protein kinase correlates with radiation resistance in oral squamous cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shintani, Satoru; Mihara, Mariko; Li, Chunnan; Nakahara Yuuji; Hino, Satoshi; Nakashiro, Koh-ichi; Hamakawa, Hiroyuki

    2003-01-01

    DNA-PK is a nuclear protein with serine/threonine kinase activity and forms a complex consisting of the DNA-PKcs and a heterodimer of Ku70 and Ku80 proteins. Recent laboratory experiments have demonstrated that the DNA-PK complex formation is one of the major pathways by which mammalian cells respond to DNA double-strand breaks induced by ionizing radiation. In this study, we evaluated the relationship between expression levels of DNA-PKcs, Ku70 and Ku80 proteins and radiation sensitivity in oral squamous cell carcinoma (OSCC) cell lines and in OSCC patients treated with preoperative radiation therapy. The OSCC cell lines greatly differed in their response to irradiation, as assessed by a standard colony formation assay. However, the expression levels of the DNA-PK complex proteins were all similar, and there was no association between the magnitude of their expression and the tumor radiation sensitivity. Expression of DNA-PK complex proteins increased after radiation treatment, and the increased values correlated with the tumor radiation resistance. Expression of DNA-PKcs and Ku70 after irradiation was increased in the surviving cells of OSCC tissues irradiated preoperatively. These results suggest that up-regulation of DNA-PK complex protein, especially DNA-PKcs, after radiation treatment correlates to radiation resistance. DNA-PKcs might be a molecular target for a novel radiation sensitization therapy of OSCC. (author)

  8. Nicotinamide and other benzamide analogs as agents for overcoming hypoxic cell radiation resistance in tumours

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Horsman, M.

    1996-01-01

    Oxygen deficient hypoxic cells, which are resistant to sparsely ionising radiation, have now been identified in most animal and some human solid tumours and will influence the response of those tumours to radiation treatment. This hypoxia can be either chronic, arising from an oxygen diffusion limitation, or acute, resulting from transient stoppages in microregional blood flow. Extensive experimental studies, especially in the last decade, have shown that nicotinamide and structurally related analogs can effectively sensitize murine tumours to both single and fractionated radiation treatments and that they do so in preference to the effects seen in mouse normal tissues. The earliest studies suggested that this enhancement of radiation damage was the result of an inhibition of the repair mechanisms. However, recent studies in mouse tumours have shown that these drugs prevent transient cessations in blood flow, thus inhibiting the development of acute hypoxia. This novel discovery led to the suggestion that the potential role of these agents as radiosensitizers would be when combined with treatments that overcame chronic hypoxia. The combined nicotinamide with hyperthermia proved that the enhancement of radiation damage by both agents together was greater than that seen with each agent alone. Similar results were later seen for nicotinamide combined with a perfluorochemical emulsion, carbogen breathing, and pentoxifylline, and in all these studies the effects in tumours were always greater than those seen in appropriate normal tissues. Of all the analogs, it is nicotinamide itself which has been the most extensively studied as a radiosensitizer in vivo and the one that shows the greatest effect in animal tumours. It is also an agent that has been well established clinically, with daily doses of up to 6 g, associated with a low incidence of side effects. This human dose is equivalent to 100-200 mg/kg in mice and such doses will maximally sensitize murine tumours to

  9. Adriamycin resistance and radiation response

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Belli, J.A.; Harris, J.R.

    1979-01-01

    Mammalian cells (V79) in culture developed resistance to Adriamycin during continuous exposure to low levels of drug. This resistance was accompanied by change in x-ray survival properties which, in turn, depended upon the isolation of subpopulations from resistant sub lines. These changes in x-ray survival properties were characterized by reduced D/sub Q/ values and a decrease in the D/sub O/. However, these changes were not observed together in the same cell sub line. Adriamycin-resistant cells did not appear to be radiation damage repair deficient. Other phenotypic changes (cell morphology, DNA content and chromosome number) suggested mutational events coincident with the development of Adriamycin resistance

  10. Sensitivity to ionizing radiation and chemotherapeutic agents in gemcitabine-resistant human tumor cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Bree, Chris; Castro Kreder, Natasja; Loves, Willem J. P.; Franken, Nicolaas A. P.; Peters, Godefridus J.; Haveman, Jaap

    2002-01-01

    Purpose: To determine cross-resistance to anti-tumor treatments in 2',2'difluorodeoxycytidine (dFdC, gemcitabine)-resistant human tumor cells. Methods and Materials: Human lung carcinoma cells SW-1573 (SWp) were made resistant to dFdC (SWg). Sensitivity to cisplatin (cDDP), paclitaxel,

  11. Analysis of radiation resistance of InGaP/GaAs dual-junction thin-film space solar cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Ohshima, Takeshi; Takamoto, Tatsuya

    2010-01-01

    Thin-film III-V multi-junction solar cells can realize the advantages of being high-efficiency and light-weight, as such these cells meets the requirement for higher specific power and lower stowage volume solar panels. Here we report the development results of an InGaP/GaAs thin-film dual-junction (TF2J) solar cell. In this paper, we study the radiation resistance of the TF2J cells with efficiency of 20-23% under AM0.1 sun at 25degC. The cells were subjected to proton irradiation with an energy range of 100keV-10MeV. The results were compared with the radiation resistance of a conventional InGaP/GaAs/Ge triple-junction (3J) cell. In the proton energy range of 200-400keV, radiation resistance of the TF2J cell is superior to that of the 3J cell. Particularly, the 1sc of the TF2J cell is significantly higher than that of the 3J cell after exposure to 380keV protons, which results in higher remaining factor of Pmax for the TF2J cell. In additions, Voc of the cells after the irradiations are almost equivalent, even though the TF2J cell is a dual-junction structure. The higher 1sc of the TF2J cell after irradiation is due to higher radiation resistance of the GaAs subcell according to the comparison of the spectral response. (author)

  12. Ionizing Radiation Potentiates High Fat Diet-Induced Insulin Resistance and Reprograms Skeletal Muscle and Adipose Progenitor Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nylander, Vibe; Ingerslev, Lars R; Andersen, Emil

    2016-01-01

    Exposure to ionizing radiation increases the risk of chronic metabolic disorders such as insulin resistance and type 2 diabetes later in life. We hypothesized that irradiation reprograms the epigenome of metabolic progenitor cells, which could account for impaired metabolism after cancer treatment...... mice. Mice subjected to total body irradiation showed alterations in glucose metabolism and, when challenged with HFD, marked hyperinsulinemia. Insulin signaling was chronically disrupted in skeletal muscle and adipose progenitor cells collected from irradiated mice and differentiated in culture...

  13. Radiation resistance of thin-film solar cells for space photovoltaic power

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woodyard, James R.; Landis, Geoffrey A.

    1991-01-01

    Copper indium diselenide, cadmium telluride, and amorphous silicon alloy solar cells have achieved noteworthy performance and are currently being studied for space power applications. Cadmium sulfide cells had been the subject of much effort but are no longer considered for space applications. A review is presented of what is known about the radiation degradation of thin film solar cells in space. Experimental cadmium telluride and amorphous silicon alloy cells are reviewed. Damage mechanisms and radiation induced defect generation and passivation in the amorphous silicon alloy cell are discussed in detail due to the greater amount of experimental data available.

  14. Role of tumour initiating cells in the radiation resistance of osteosarcoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Klymenko, Olena

    2014-02-26

    In the present study we confirm that mouse osteosarcoma (MOS) cells lines possess a subset of cells with Tumour Initiating Cells (TICs) properties. We found that isolated TICs are not inherently radioresistant compared to non-TICs. On the other hand, we found that the fraction of TICs correlates well with the radiosensitivity of MOS cell lines measured using clonogenic cell survival assay. We conclude from our study that the TICs contribute to the tumour radiation response due to their interaction with their tumour surrounding environmental (niche).

  15. Role of tumour initiating cells in the radiation resistance of osteosarcoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Klymenko, Olena

    2014-01-01

    In the present study we confirm that mouse osteosarcoma (MOS) cells lines possess a subset of cells with Tumour Initiating Cells (TICs) properties. We found that isolated TICs are not inherently radioresistant compared to non-TICs. On the other hand, we found that the fraction of TICs correlates well with the radiosensitivity of MOS cell lines measured using clonogenic cell survival assay. We conclude from our study that the TICs contribute to the tumour radiation response due to their interaction with their tumour surrounding environmental (niche).

  16. Microbial cells can cooperate to resist high-level chronic ionizing radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Shuryak, Igor; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Tkavc, Rok; Grichenko, Olga; Klimenkova, Polina; Volpe, Robert P.; Daly, Michael J.

    2017-01-01

    Understanding chronic ionizing radiation (CIR) effects is of utmost importance to protecting human health and the environment. Diverse bacteria and fungi inhabiting extremely radioactive waste and disaster sites (e.g. Hanford, Chernobyl, Fukushima) represent new targets of CIR research. We show that many microorganisms can grow under intense gamma-CIR dose rates of 13–126 Gy/h, with fungi identified as a particularly CIR-resistant group of eukaryotes: among 145 phylogenetically diverse strain...

  17. Resistance of human and mouse myeloid leukemia cells to UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poljak-Blazi, M.; Osmak, M.; Hadzija, M.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of mouse bone marrow and myeloid leukemia cells and sensitivity of human myeloid leukemia cells to UV light was tested. Criteria were the in vivo colony-forming ability of UV exposed cells and the inhibition of DNA synthesis during post-irradiation incubation for 24 h in vitro. Mouse bone marrow cells irradiated with a small dose of UV light (5 J/m 2 ) and injected into x-irradiated animals did not form hemopoietic colonies on recipient's spleens, and recipients died. However, mouse leukemia cells, after irradiation with higher doses of UV light, retained the ability to form colonies on the spleens, and all recipient mice died with typical symptoms of leukemia. In vitro, mouse bone marrow cells exhibited high sensitivity to UV light compared to mouse myeloid leukemia cells. Human leukemia cells were also resistant to UV light, but more sensitive than mouse leukemia cells. (author)

  18. Mutation to ouabain-resistance in Chinese hamster cells: induction by ethyl methanesulphonate and lack of induction by ionising radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thacker, J.; Stephens, M.A.; Stretch, A.

    1978-01-01

    The spontaneous frequency of mutants resistant to growth inhibition by ouabian (OUAsup(R) mutants) was found to be about 5.10 -5 per viable cell in uncloned cultures of Chinese hamster V79-4 cells. In freshly-isolated clones or cultures started from a few cells this frequency was initially reduced to about 1.10 -6 in 1 mM ouabain. No increase in the frequency of OUAsup(R) mutants was found in cultures treated with γ-rays despite exploration of such variables as radiation dose, ouabain concentration, post-treatment interval before selection, cell density in selective medium, and clonal state of the cells at the time of adding ouabain (in situ vs. respreading method). A similar negative result was found for accelerated helium ions, for which the mutagenic effectiveness per unit dose has been shown to be about 10 times higher than γ-rays for the induction of thioguanine-resistant mutants in these cells. Recent evidence is reviewed in support of the suggestion that ionising radiation is unable to induce OUAsup(R) mutants because of the severity of the genetic damage it causes. (Auth.)

  19. Lin28 mediates radiation resistance of breast cancer cells via regulation of caspase, H2A.X and Let-7 signaling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linbo Wang

    Full Text Available Resistance to radiation therapy is a major obstacle for the effective treatment of cancers. Lin28 has been shown to contribute to breast tumorigenesis; however, the relationship between Lin28 and radioresistance remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the association of Lin28 with radiation resistance and identified the underlying mechanisms of action of Lin28 in human breast cancer cell lines. The results showed that the expression level of Lin28 was closely associated with resistance to radiation treatment. The T47D cancer cell line, which highly expresses Lin28, is more resistant to radiation than MCF7, Bcap-37 or SK-BR-3 cancer cell lines, which have low-level Lin28 expression. Transfection with Lin28 siRNA significantly led to an increase of sensitivity to radiation. By contrast, stable expression of Lin28 in breast cancer cells effectively attenuated the sensitivity to radiation treatment. Stable expression of Lin28 also significantly inhibited radiation-induced apoptosis. Moreover, further studies have shown that caspases, H2A.X and Let-7 miRNA were the molecular targets of Lin28. Stable expression of Lin28 and treatment with radiation induced H2AX expression, while inhibited p21 and γ-H2A.X. Overexpression of Let-7 enhanced the sensitivities to radiation in breast cancer cells. Taken together, these results indicate that Lin28 might be one mechanism underlying radiation resistance, and Lin28 could be a potential target for overcoming radiation resistance in breast cancer.

  20. A study of radiation sensitivity and drug-resistance by DNA methylation in human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jung, Il Lae; Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan

    2009-12-01

    It has recently been known that functional loss of tumor suppressive genes may com from DNA methylation on the chromosome. This kind of tumorigenesis has became one of the major field related to the epigenetics, whose study would be an important fundamental approach in cancer therapy market. In this study, we firstly selected two radiation-resistant mutant H460 cells, which doesn't show any significant cytotoxic effect compared to their parental wild type H460. We found that the two mutants has decreased level of PTEN, whose expression has known to be related to the cell differentiation and growth. We also found that the level of PTEN was greatly different in two lung adenocarcinoma, H460 and A549, in which more radiation-resistant A549 cells showed the decreased PTEN expression. This difference in PTEN expression between two cells was resulted from their different methylation on 5 CpG islands. We expect to know more profoundly through investigating the PTEN-related downstream genes

  1. Co-expression of CD147 and GLUT-1 indicates radiation resistance and poor prognosis in cervical squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xin-Qiong; Chen, Xiang; Xie, Xiao-Xue; Zhou, Qin; Li, Kai; Li, Shan; Shen, Liang-Fang; Su, Juan

    2014-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate the association of CD147 and GLUT-1, which play important roles in glycolysis in response to radiotherapy and clinical outcomes in patients with locally advanced cervical squamous cell carcinoma (LACSCC). The records of 132 female patients who received primary radiation therapy to treat LACSCC at FIGO stages IB-IVA were retrospectively reviewed. Forty-seven patients with PFS (progression-free survival) of less than 36 months were regarded as radiation-resistant. Eighty-five patients with PFS longer than 36 months were regarded as radiation-sensitive. Using pretreatment paraffin-embedded tissues, we evaluated CD147 and GLUT-1 expression by immunohistochemistry. Overexpression of CD147, GLUT-1, and CD147 and GLUT-1 combined were 44.7%, 52.9% and 36.5%, respectively, in the radiation-sensitive group, and 91.5%, 89.4% and 83.0%, respectively, in the radiation-resistant group. The 5-year progress free survival (PFS) rates in the CD147-low, CD147-high, GLUT-1-low, GLUT-1-high, CD147- and/or GLUT-1-low and CD147- and GLUT-1- dual high expression groups were 66.79%, 87.10%, 52.78%, 85.82%, 55.94%, 82.90% and 50.82%, respectively. CD147 and GLUT-1 co-expression, FIGO stage and tumor diameter were independent poor prognostic factors for patients with LACSCC in multivariate Cox regression analysis. Patients with high expression of CD147 alone, GLUT-1 alone or co-expression of CD147 and GLUT-1 showed greater resistance to radiotherapy and a shorter PFS than those with low expression. In particular, co-expression of CD147 and GLUT-1 can be considered as a negative independent prognostic factor.

  2. SU-E-T-565: RAdiation Resistance of Cancer CElls Using GEANT4 DNA: RACE

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Perrot, Y; Payno, H; Delage, E; Maigne, L [Clermont Universite, CNRS/IN2P3, Laboratoire de Physique Corpusculaire de Clermont-Ferrand, Aubiere (France); Incerti, S [Universite Bordeaux 1, CNRS/IN2P3, Centres d' Etudes Nucleaires de Bordeaux-Gradignan, Gradignan (France); Debiton, E; Peyrode, C; Chezal, J; Miot-Noirault, E; Degoul, F [Clermont Universite, Universite d' Auvergne, Imagerie Moleculaire et Therapie Vectorisee, INSERM U990, Centre Jean Perrin, Clermont-Ferrand (France)

    2014-06-01

    Purpose: The objective of the RACE project is to develop a comparison between Monte Carlo simulation using the Geant4-DNA toolkit and measurements of radiation damage on 3D melanoma and chondrosarcoma culture cells coupled with gadolinium nanoparticles. We currently expose the status of the developments regarding simulations. Methods: Monte Carlo studies are driven using the Geant4 toolkit and the Geant4-DNA extension. In order to model the geometry of a cell population, the opensource CPOP++ program is being developed for the geometrical representation of 3D cell populations including a specific cell mesh coupled with a multi-agent system. Each cell includes cytoplasm and nucleus. The correct modeling of the cell population has been validated with confocal microscopy images of spheroids. The Geant4 Livermore physics models are used to simulate the interactions of a 250 keV X-ray beam and the production of secondaries from gadolinium nanoparticles supposed to be fixed on the cell membranes. Geant4-DNA processes are used to simulate the interactions of charged particles with the cells. An atomistic description of the DNA molecule, from PDB (Protein Data Bank) files, is provided by the so-called PDB4DNA Geant4 user application we developed to score energy depositions in DNA base pairs and sugar-phosphate groups. Results: At the microscopic level, our simulations enable assessing microscopic energy distribution in each cell compartment of a realistic 3D cell population. Dose enhancement factors due to the presence of gadolinium nanoparticles can be estimated. At the nanometer scale, direct damages on nuclear DNA are also estimated. Conclusion: We successfully simulated the impact of direct radiations on a realistic 3D cell population model compatible with microdosimetry calculations using the Geant4-DNA toolkit. Upcoming validation and the future integration of the radiochemistry module of Geant4-DNA will propose to correlate clusters of ionizations with in vitro

  3. Metastasis of breast cancer cells to the bone, lung, and lymph nodes promotes resistance to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hara, Takamitsu; Iwadate, Manabu; Tachibana, Kazunoshin; Waguri, Satoshi; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2017-01-01

    Metastasis represents the leading cause of breast cancer deaths, necessitating strategies for its treatment. Although radiotherapy is employed for both primary and metastatic breast cancers, the difference in their ionizing radiation response remains incompletely understood. This study is the first to compare the radioresponse of a breast cancer cell line with its metastatic variants and report that such metastatic variants are more radioresistant. A luciferase expressing cell line was established from human basal-like breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 and underwent in vivo selections, whereby a cycle of inoculations into the left cardiac ventricle or the mammary fat pad of athymic nude mice, isolation of metastases to the bone, lung and lymph nodes visualized with bioluminescence imaging, and expansion of obtained cells was repeated twice or three times. The established metastatic cell lines were assessed for cell proliferation, wound healing, invasion, clonogenic survival, and apoptosis. The established metastatic cell lines possessed an increased proliferative potential in vivo and were more chemotactic, invasive, and resistant to X-ray-induced clonogenic inactivation and apoptosis in vitro. Breast cancer metastasis to the bone, lung, and lymph nodes promotes radioresistance. (orig.) [de

  4. Metastasis of breast cancer cells to the bone, lung, and lymph nodes promotes resistance to ionizing radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hara, Takamitsu; Iwadate, Manabu; Tachibana, Kazunoshin; Waguri, Satoshi; Takenoshita, Seiichi; Hamada, Nobuyuki

    2017-10-01

    Metastasis represents the leading cause of breast cancer deaths, necessitating strategies for its treatment. Although radiotherapy is employed for both primary and metastatic breast cancers, the difference in their ionizing radiation response remains incompletely understood. This study is the first to compare the radioresponse of a breast cancer cell line with its metastatic variants and report that such metastatic variants are more radioresistant. A luciferase expressing cell line was established from human basal-like breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 and underwent in vivo selections, whereby a cycle of inoculations into the left cardiac ventricle or the mammary fat pad of athymic nude mice, isolation of metastases to the bone, lung and lymph nodes visualized with bioluminescence imaging, and expansion of obtained cells was repeated twice or three times. The established metastatic cell lines were assessed for cell proliferation, wound healing, invasion, clonogenic survival, and apoptosis. The established metastatic cell lines possessed an increased proliferative potential in vivo and were more chemotactic, invasive, and resistant to X‑ray-induced clonogenic inactivation and apoptosis in vitro. Breast cancer metastasis to the bone, lung, and lymph nodes promotes radioresistance.

  5. Radiation-resistant camera tube

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwahata, Takao; Manabe, Sohei; Makishima, Yasuhiro

    1982-01-01

    It was a long time ago that Toshiba launched on manufacturing black-and-white radiation-resistant camera tubes employing nonbrowning face-plate glass for ITV cameras used in nuclear power plants. Now in compliance with the increasing demand in nuclear power field, the Company is at grips with the development of radiation-resistant single color-camera tubes incorporating a color-stripe filter for color ITV cameras used under radiation environment. Herein represented are the results of experiments on characteristics of materials for single color-camera tubes and prospects for commercialization of the tubes. (author)

  6. Radiation-resistant beamline components at LAMPF

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Macek, R.J.; Grisham, D.L.; Lambert, J.e.; Werbeck, R.

    1983-01-01

    A variety of highly radiation-resistant beamline components have been successfully developed at LAMPF primarily for use in the target cells and beam stop area of the intense proton beamline. Design features and operating experience are reviewed for magnets, instrumentation, targets, vacuum seals, vacuum windows, collimators, and beam stops

  7. Adriamycin resistance, heat resistance and radiation response in Chinese hamster fibroblasts

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wallner, K.; Li, G.

    1985-01-01

    Previous investigators have demonstrated synergistic interaction between hyperthermia and radiation or Adriamycin (ADR), using cell lines that are sensitive to heat or ADR alone. The authors investigated the effect of heat, radiation or ADR on Chinese hamster fibroblasts (HA-1), their heat resistant variants and their ADR resistant variants. Heat for ADR resistance did not confer cross resistance to radiation. Cells resistant to heat did show cross resistance to ADR. While cells selected for ADR resistance were not cross resistant to heat, they did not exhibit drug potentiation by hyperthermia, characteristic of ADR sensitive cells. Cytofluorometric measurement showed decreased ADR uptake in both heat and ADR resistant cells. The possibility of cross resistance between heat and ADR should be considered when designing combined modality trials

  8. Effects of combinations of chemotherapy and radiation on the emergence of drug resistant cells in 9L rat brain tumor spheroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tofilon, P.J.; Arundel, C.; Vines, C.M.

    1987-01-01

    Repeated administration of antineoplastic chemotherapeutic agents is generally considered to induce and/or select for drug resistant cells. The authors recently begun to investigate whether chemotherapy interdigitated with radiation can minimize or eliminate the emergence of drug resiistent cells in 9L rat brain tumor spheroids grown from defined mixtures of cells sensitive (9L) and resistant (R/sub 3/) to BCNU. In this experimental system, the sister chromatid exchange (SCE) assay is used to quantitate the proportions of sensitive and resistant cells within the spheroids. While 9L and R/sub 3/ cell have different sensitivities to BCNU, they are equally sensitive to radiation. Mixed-cell spheroids consisting of 1% R/sub 3/ cells were treated with three doses of BCNU (10 μM) every 72 hr resulting in a shift in the 9L to R/sub 3/ ratio to greater than 50% R/sub 3/ cells. The combined protocols to be investigated will involve γ rays administered either 36 hr before or after each BCNU treatment. By initiating these combined protocols on spheroids of different sizes, the effectiveness of each protocol is evaluated with respect to the number of resistant cells present

  9. The influence of the stem cell marker ALDH and the EGFR-PI3 kinase act signaling pathway on the radiation resistance of human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mihatsch, Julia

    2014-01-01

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in industriated nations. Besides surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy (RT) is an important approach by which about 60% of patients are treated. The response of these patients to RT is very heterogenous. On the one hand, there are patients with tumors which are radiosensitive and can be cured, but on the other hand patients bear tumors which are quite resistant to radiotherapy. A Radioresistant phenotype of tumor cells causes treatment failure consequently leading to a limited response to radiotherapy. It is proposed, that radiotherapy outcome mainly depends on the potential of radiation on controlling growth, proliferation and survival of a specific population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells. Based on experimental studies so far reported it is assumed that the population of CSC varies in tumors from different entities and is relatively low compared to the tumor bulk cells in general. According to the CSC hypothesis, it might be concluded that the differential response of tumors to radiotherapy depends on CSC populations, since these supposedly slow replicating cells are able to initiate a tumor, to self renew indefinitely and to generate the differentiated progeny of a tumor. Besides the role of cancer stem cells in radiotherapy response, ionizing radiation (IR) activates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream signaling pathways such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Janus kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways. Among these pathways, PI3K/Akt is one of the most important pathways involved in post-irradiation survival: Activation of Akt results in activation of DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). DNA-PKcs is a core enzyme involved in repair of IR-induced DNA-double strand breaks (DNA-DSB) through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The aim of the

  10. Research of radiation-resistant microbial organisms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Dongho; Lim, Sangyong; Joe, Minho; Park, Haejoon; Song, Hyunpa; Im, Seunghun; Kim, Haram; Kim, Whajung; Choi, Jinsu; Park, Jongchun

    2012-01-01

    Many extremophiles including radiation-resistant bacteria Deinococcus radiodurans have special characteristics such as novel enzymes and physiological active substances different from known biological materials and are being in the spotlight of biotechnology science. In this research, basic technologies for the production of new genetic resources and microbial strains by a series of studies in radiation-resistant microbial organisms were investigated and developed. Mechanisms required for radiation-resistant in Deinococcus radiodurans were partly defined by analyzing the function of dinB, pprI, recG, DRA 0 279, pprM, and two-component signal transduction systems. To apply genetic resource and functional materials from Deinococcus species, omics analysis in response to cadmium, construction of macroscopic biosensor, and characterization of carotenoids and chaperon protein were performed. Additionally, potential use of D. geothermalis in monosaccharide production from non-biodegradable plant materials was evaluated. Novel radiation resistant yeasts and bacteria were isolated and identified from environmental samples to obtain microbial and genomic resources. An optimal radiation mutant breeding method was set up for efficient and rapid isolation of target microbial mutants. Furthermore, an efficient ethanol producing mutant strain with high production yield and productivity was constructed using the breeding method in collaboration with Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology. Three Deinococcal bioindicators for radiation dosage confirmation after radiation sterilization process were developed. These results provide a comprehensive information for novel functional genetic elements, enzymes, and physiological active substances production or application. Eventually, industrial microbial cell factories based on radiation resistant microbial genomes can be developed and the technologies can be diffused to bioindustry continuously by this project

  11. Bacterial and archaeal resistance to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Confalonieri, F; Sommer, S

    2011-01-01

    Organisms living in extreme environments must cope with large fluctuations of temperature, high levels of radiation and/or desiccation, conditions that can induce DNA damage ranging from base modifications to DNA double-strand breaks. The bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is known for its resistance to extremely high doses of ionizing radiation and for its ability to reconstruct a functional genome from hundreds of radiation-induced chromosomal fragments. Recently, extreme ionizing radiation resistance was also generated by directed evolution of an apparently radiation-sensitive bacterial species, Escherichia coli. Radioresistant organisms are not only found among the Eubacteria but also among the Archaea that represent the third kingdom of life. They present a set of particular features that differentiate them from the Eubacteria and eukaryotes. Moreover, Archaea are often isolated from extreme environments where they live under severe conditions of temperature, pressure, pH, salts or toxic compounds that are lethal for the large majority of living organisms. Thus, Archaea offer the opportunity to understand how cells are able to cope with such harsh conditions. Among them, the halophilic archaeon Halobacterium sp and several Pyrococcus or Thermococcus species, such as Thermococcus gammatolerans, were also shown to display high level of radiation resistance. The dispersion, in the phylogenetic tree, of radioresistant prokaryotes suggests that they have independently acquired radioresistance. Different strategies were selected during evolution including several mechanisms of radiation byproduct detoxification and subtle cellular metabolism modifications to help cells recover from radiation-induced injuries, protection of proteins against oxidation, an efficient DNA repair tool box, an original pathway of DNA double-strand break repair, a condensed nucleoid that may prevent the dispersion of the DNA fragments and specific radiation-induced proteins involved in

  12. Resistive Memory Devices for Radiation Resistant Non-Volatile Memory

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Ionizing radiation in space can damage electronic equipment, corrupting data and even disabling computers. Radiation resistant (rad hard) strategies must be employed...

  13. Development of TRAIL Resistance by Radiation-Induced Hypermethylation of DR4 CpG Island in Recurrent Laryngeal Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Jong Cheol [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Biomedical Research Center, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Won Hyeok [Department of Biomedical Research Center, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Min, Young Joo [Department of Biomedical Research Center, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Department of Internal Medicine, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Cha, Hee Jeong [Department of Pathology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Han, Myung Woul [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Ulsan University Hospital, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Ulsan (Korea, Republic of); Chang, Hyo Won [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sun-A [Department of Pathology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Choi, Seung-Ho [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Seong Who, E-mail: swhokim@gmail.com [Department of Biochemistry and Molecular Biology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Sang Yoon, E-mail: sykim3715@gmail.com [Department of Otolaryngology, Asan Medical Center, University of Ulsan College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Biomedical Research Institute, Korea Institute of Science and Technology, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-04-01

    Purpose: There are limited therapeutic options for patients with recurrent head and neck cancer after radiation therapy failure. To assess the use of tumor necrosis factor–related apoptosis-inducing ligand (TRAIL) as a salvage chemotherapeutic agent for recurrent cancer after radiation failure, we investigated the effect of clinically relevant cumulative irradiation on TRAIL-induced apoptosis. Methods and Materials: Using a previously established HN3 cell line from a laryngeal carcinoma patient, we generated a chronically irradiated HN3R isogenic cell line. Viability and apoptosis in HN3 and HN3R cells treated with TRAIL were analyzed with MTS and PI/annexin V-FITC assays. Western blotting and flow cytometry were used to determine the underlying mechanism of TRAIL resistance. DR4 expression was semiquantitatively scored in a tissue microarray with 107 laryngeal cancer specimens. Methylation-specific polymerase chain reaction and bisulfite sequencing for DR4 were performed for genomic DNA isolated from each cell line. Results: HN3R cells were more resistant than HN3 cells to TRAIL-induced apoptosis because of significantly reduced levels of the DR4 receptor. The DR4 staining score in 37 salvage surgical specimens after radiation failure was lower in 70 surgical specimens without radiation treatment (3.03 ± 2.75 vs 5.46 ± 3.30, respectively; P<.001). HN3R cells had a methylated DR4 CpG island that was partially demethylated by the DNA demethylating agent 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine. Conclusion: Epigenetic silencing of the TRAIL receptor by hypermethylation of a DR4 CpG island might be an underlying mechanism for TRAIL resistance in recurrent laryngeal carcinoma treated with radiation.

  14. Novel Materials that Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells, Phase II

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Spacecrafts rely on arrays of solar cells to generate electrical power. It is an on-going challenge to maximize electrical power available to spacecraft while...

  15. Novel Materials that Enhance Efficiency and Radiation Resistance of Solar Cells, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Solar cell is the key device in generating electrical power for spacecrafts. It is an on-going challenge in maximizing electrical power available to spacecraft while...

  16. Studies on the relationship between the radiation resistance and glutathione content of human and rodent cells after treatment with dexamethasone in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Millar, B.C.; Jinks, S.

    1985-01-01

    a 20 pre-treatment of human cells from normal (foetal lung) or malignant origin (glioma, lines U118 MG and U251 MG and bladder carcinoma, line EJ) with dexamethasone failed to increase their radiation resistance in vitro despite a 2-fold increase in the GSH content of a glioma cell line, U251 MG, and a small but significant increase in the GSH content of EJ bladder carcinoma cells. In contrast, there was a correlation between an increase in radiation resistance and an elevated GSH content of rodent cells (Chinese hamster lung, line V-79-379A; ovary, line CHO; rat hepatoma line HTC, and mouse neuroblastoma, line NB413A) after a similar pre-treatment. The results suggest that enhancement of radiation resistance cannot be directly ascribed to an elevated GSH content in steroid-treated cells. On the bases of these data it is unlikely that the efficacy of radiotherapy will be diminished amongst patients receiving concomitant treatment with dexamethasone. However, in vivo testing is required to confirm these findings. (author)

  17. Ligand bound beta1 integrins inhibit procaspase-8 for mediating cell adhesion-mediated drug and radiation resistance in human leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Doris Estrugo

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Chemo- and radiotherapeutic responses of leukemia cells are modified by integrin-mediated adhesion to extracellular matrix. To further characterize the molecular mechanisms by which beta1 integrins confer radiation and chemoresistance, HL60 human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells stably transfected with beta1 integrin and A3 Jurkat T-lymphoma cells deficient for Fas-associated death domain protein or procaspase-8 were examined. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Upon exposure to X-rays, Ara-C or FasL, suspension and adhesion (fibronectin (FN, laminin, collagen-1; 5-100 microg/cm(2 coating concentration cultures were processed for measurement of apoptosis, mitochondrial transmembrane potential (MTP, caspase activation, and protein analysis. Overexpression of beta1 integrins enhanced the cellular sensitivity to X-rays and Ara-C, which was counteracted by increasing concentrations of matrix proteins in association with reduced caspase-3 and -8 activation and MTP breakdown. Usage of stimulatory or inhibitory anti beta1 integrin antibodies, pharmacological caspase or phosphatidylinositol-3 kinase (PI3K inhibitors, coprecipitation experiments and siRNA-mediated beta1 integrin silencing provided further data showing an interaction between FN-ligated beta1 integrin and PI3K/Akt for inhibiting procaspase-8 cleavage. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The presented data suggest that the ligand status of beta1 integrins is critical for their antiapoptotic effect in leukemia cells treated with Ara-C, FasL or ionizing radiation. The antiapoptotic actions involve formation of a beta1 integrin/Akt complex, which signals to prevent procaspase-8-mediated induction of apoptosis in a PI3K-dependent manner. Antagonizing agents targeting beta1 integrin and PI3K/Akt signaling in conjunction with conventional therapies might effectively reduce radiation- and drug-resistant tumor populations and treatment failure in hematological malignancies.

  18. Metastasis of breast cancer cells to the bone, lung, and lymph nodes promotes resistance to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hara, Takamitsu [Gunma Prefectural College of Health Sciences, Department of Radiological Technology, School of Radiological Technology, Gunma, Maebashi (Japan); Iwadate, Manabu [Fukushima Medical University, Department of Thyroid and Endocrinology, School of Medicine, Fukushima (Japan); Tachibana, Kazunoshin [Fukushima Medical University, Department of Breast Surgery, School of Medicine, Fukushima (Japan); Waguri, Satoshi [Fukushima Medical University, Department of Anatomy and Histology, School of Medicine, Fukushima (Japan); Takenoshita, Seiichi [Fukushima Medical University, Advanced Clinical Research Center, Fukushima Global Medical Science Center, School of Medicine, Fukushima (Japan); Hamada, Nobuyuki [Central Research Institute of Electric Power Industry (CRIEPI), Radiation Safety Research Center, Nuclear Technology Research Laboratory, Tokyo, Komae (Japan)

    2017-10-15

    Metastasis represents the leading cause of breast cancer deaths, necessitating strategies for its treatment. Although radiotherapy is employed for both primary and metastatic breast cancers, the difference in their ionizing radiation response remains incompletely understood. This study is the first to compare the radioresponse of a breast cancer cell line with its metastatic variants and report that such metastatic variants are more radioresistant. A luciferase expressing cell line was established from human basal-like breast adenocarcinoma MDA-MB-231 and underwent in vivo selections, whereby a cycle of inoculations into the left cardiac ventricle or the mammary fat pad of athymic nude mice, isolation of metastases to the bone, lung and lymph nodes visualized with bioluminescence imaging, and expansion of obtained cells was repeated twice or three times. The established metastatic cell lines were assessed for cell proliferation, wound healing, invasion, clonogenic survival, and apoptosis. The established metastatic cell lines possessed an increased proliferative potential in vivo and were more chemotactic, invasive, and resistant to X-ray-induced clonogenic inactivation and apoptosis in vitro. Breast cancer metastasis to the bone, lung, and lymph nodes promotes radioresistance. (orig.) [German] Metastasierung ist die Hauptursache fuer den toedlichen Verlauf von Brustkrebserkrankungen. Darauf muessen spezifische Behandlungsstrategien ausgerichtet werden. Sowohl primaere als auch metastatische Brustkrebsarten koennen mit einer Strahlentherapie behandelt werden, allerdings sind die Unterschiede in der Reaktion auf ionisierende Strahlung bis heute nicht vollstaendig verstanden. In dieser Studie wird zum ersten Mal die Strahlenantwort einer Brustkrebszelllinie mit der ihrer metastatischen Varianten verglichen und die erhoehte Strahlenresistenz der metastatischen Varianten gezeigt. Eine Luciferase-exprimierende Zelllinie wurde aus humanen basaloiden Brustadenokarzinomen

  19. Resistance of hypoxic cells to ionizing radiation is influenced by homologous recombination status.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sprong, D.; Janssen, H.L.K.; Vens, C.; Begg, A.C.

    2006-01-01

    PURPOSE: To determine the role of DNA repair in hypoxic radioresistance. METHODS AND MATERIALS: Chinese hamster cell lines with mutations in homologous recombination (XRCC2, XRCC3, BRAC2, RAD51C) or nonhomologous end-joining (DNA-PKcs) genes were irradiated under normoxic (20% oxygen) and hypoxic

  20. Radiation resistant ceramic matrix composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jones, R.H.; Steiner, D.; Heinisch, H.L.; Newsome, G.A.; Kerch, H.M.

    1997-01-01

    Ceramic matrix composites are of interest for nuclear applications because of their high-temperature properties, corrosion resistance, fracture toughness relative to monolithic ceramics, and low neutron activation and after heat. Evaluations of the radiation resistance of commercially available SiC/SiC composites have revealed their promise for this application, but also the need for further development to achieve the desired performance. This paper summarizes the results of a workshop cosponsored by the Offices of Fusion Energy and Basic Energy Sciences of the US Department of Energy and Lockheed-Martin Corporation with forty attendees from national laboratories, universities and industry. A number of promising routes for optimizing the radiation stability of ceramic matrix composites were identified at this workshop. These routes included the newer, more stoichiometric fibers and alternate fiber/matrix interfaces and matrix processing routes. (orig.)

  1. Some resistance mechanisms to ultraviolet radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Alcantara D, D.

    2002-12-01

    The cyclical exposure of bacterial cells to the ultraviolet light (UV) it has as consequence an increment in the resistance to the lethal effects of this type of radiation, increment that happens as a result of a selection process of favorable genetic mutations induced by the same UV light. With object to study the reproducibility of the genetic changes and the associate mechanisms to the resistance to UV in the bacteria Escherichia coli, was irradiated cyclically with UV light five different derived cultures of a single clone, being obtained five stumps with different resistance grades. The genetic mapping Hfr revealed that so much the mutation events like of selection that took place during the adaptation to the UV irradiation, happened of random manner, that is to say, each one of the resistant stumps it is the result of the unspecified selection of mutations arisen at random in different genes related with the repair and duplication of the DNA. (Author)

  2. Radiation-resistant cancer stem-like cell properties are regulated by PTEN through the activity of nuclear β-catenin in nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Gong; Wang, Wenjun; Yao, Chunxiao; Zhang, Shuping; Liang, Lili; Han, Muyuan; Ren, Jinjin; Qi, Xiurong; Zhang, Xiaofeng; Wang, Shuye; Li, Lei

    2017-09-26

    Radiotherapy is the primary and most important treatment for nasopharyngeal carcinoma (NPC). Cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) have been shown to be resistant to radiation. The phosphatase and tensin homolog deleted on chromosome 10 (PTEN) tumor suppressor gene has been suggested to play a role in stem cell self-renewal. In the present study, we sorted PTEN-/+ cells using a flow cytometer. The clone formation assay showed that PTEN- cells were more radioresistant than PTEN+ NPC cells. We found that PTEN- cells demonstrated a significant increase in tumorsphere formation and CSCs markers compared with PTEN+ cells. Silencing the expression of PTEN with siRNA resulted in increased expression of p-AKT, active β-catenin and Nanog. siPTEN cells irradiated showed more radioresistant and DNA damage than parental cells. We also confirmed that down-regulation of β-catenin expression with shRNA resulted in a reduced percentage of side population cells and expression of Nanog. shβ-catenin cells significantly decreased survivin expression at 4 Gy irradiation in PTEN- cells compared with PTEN+ cells. In siPTEN cells, β-catenin staining shifted from the cytoplasmic membrane to the nucleus. Furthermore, immunofluorescence showed that following irradiation of PTEN- cells, at 4 Gy, active β-catenin was mainly found in the nucleus. Immunohistochemistry analysis also demonstrated that the PTEN-/p-AKT+/β-catenin+/Nanog+ axis may indicate poor prognosis and radioresistance in clinical NPC specimens. Thus, our findings strongly suggest that PTEN- cells have CSCs properties that are resistant to radiation in NPC. PTEN exerts these effects through the downstream effector PI3K/AKT/β-catenin/Nanog axis which depends on nuclear β-catenin accumulation.

  3. Fibronectin and laminin increase resistance to ionizing radiation and the cytotoxic drug Ukrain in human tumour and normal cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cordes, N; Blaese, M A; Plasswilm, L; Rodemann, H P; Van Beuningen, D

    2003-09-01

    Cell-extracellular matrix (ECM) interactions are thought to mediate drug and radiation resistance. Dependence of cell survival, beta1-integrin expression and cell cycling on the ECM proteins and beta1-integrin ligands fibronectin (FN) and laminin (LA) were examined in malignant and normal cells exposed to the cytotoxic drug Ukrain plus/minus irradiation. Human A549 lung cancer and MDAMB231 (MDA231) breast cancer cells and normal fibroblasts (HSF1) grown on FN, LA, bovine serum albumin (BSA) or polystyrene were treated with Ukrain (1 microg ml(-1), 24 h) plus/minus irradiation (2-8 Gy) and the effects studied using colony formation assays, flow cytometry (beta1-integrin, DNA analysis) and adhesion assays. FN and LA reduced the cytotoxic effect of single Ukrain treatment compared with polystyrene and BSA. FN and LA also abolished Ukrain-dependent radiosensitization in A549 cells and decreased the radiosensitivity of MDA231 and HSF1 cells. Single Ukrain exposure on polystyrene significantly reduced beta1-integrin expression and promoted G2-phase accumulation of A549 cells. In contrast, Ukrain-treated MDA231 and HSF1 cells showed elevated beta1-integrin expression and no Ukrain-specific cell cycle effect. Under Ukrain-radiation exposure, irradiation, FN or LA abolished Ukrain-mediated reduction of beta1-integrin expression and G2-phase accumulation in A549 cells, whereas in MDA231 cells and fibroblasts beta1-integrin expression and cell cycle distribution were stabilized. Cell adhesion to FN or LA was significantly impaired (A549) or improved (MDA231, HSF1) upon Ukrain treatment. The data corroborate the findings of other groups that cell adhesion-mediated resistance to either single or combined drug and radiation exposure is tightly correlated to specific ECM proteins. By demonstrating a strong modulatory impact of FN and LA on the radiosensitivity-modifying activity of the drug Ukrain, the set findings are also highly important for the assessment of drug and

  4. Sci—Fri AM: Mountain — 04: Label-free Raman spectroscopy of single tumour cells detects early radiation-induced glycogen synthesis associated with increased radiation resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Matthews, Q; Lum, JJ [BC Cancer Agency — Vancouver Island Centre (Canada); Isabelle, M; Harder, S; Jirasek, A [Physics and Astronomy, University of Victoria (Australia); Brolo, AG [Chemistry, University of Victoria (Australia)

    2014-08-15

    Purpose: To use label-free Raman spectroscopy (RS) for early treatment monitoring of tumour cell radioresistance. Methods: Three human tumour cell lines, two radioresistant (H460, SF{sub 2} = 0.57 and MCF7, SF{sub 2} = 0.70) and one radiosensitive (LNCaP, SF{sub 2} = 0.36), were irradiated with single fractions of 2, 4, 6, 8 or 10 Gy. In additional experiments, H460 and MCF7 cells were irradiated under co-treatment with the anti-diabetic drug metformin, a known radiosensitizing agent. Treated and control cultures were analyzed with RS daily for 3 days post-treatment. Single-cell Raman spectra were acquired from 20 live cells per sample, and experiments were repeated in triplicate. The combined data sets were analyzed with principal component analysis using standard algorithms. Cells from each culture were also subjected to standard assays for viability, proliferation, cell cycle, and radiation clonogenic survival. Results: The radioresistant cells (H460, MCF7) exhibited a RS molecular radiation response signature, detectable as early as 1 day post-treatment, of which radiation-induced glycogen synthesis is a significant contributor. The radiosensitive cells (LNCaP) exhibited negligible glycogen synthesis. Co-treatment with metformin in MCF7 cells blocked glycogen synthesis, reduced viability and proliferation, and increased radiosensitivity. Conversely, metformin co-treatment in H460 cells did not produce these same effects; importantly, both radiation-induced synthesis of glycogen and radiosensitivity were unaffected. Conclusions: Label-free RS can detect early glycogen synthesis post-irradiation, a previously undocumented metabolic mechanism associated with tumour cell radioresistance that can be targeted to increase radiosensitivity. RS monitoring of intratumoral glycogen may provide new opportunities for personalized combined modality radiotherapy treatments.

  5. Radiation survival parameters of antineoplastic drug-sensitive and -resistant human ovarian cancer cell lines and their modification by buthionine sulfoximine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Louie, K.G.; Behrens, B.C.; Kinsella, T.J.; Hamilton, T.C.; Grotzinger, K.R.; McKoy, W.M.; Winker, M.A.; Ozols, R.F.

    1985-01-01

    The optimum integration of chemotherapy and irradiation is of potential clinical significance in the treatment of ovarian cancer. A series of human ovarian cancer cell lines have been developed in which dose-response relationships to standard anticancer drugs have been determined, and the patterns of cross-resistance between these drugs and irradiation have been established. By stepwise incubation with drugs, sublines of A2780, a drug-sensitive cell line, have been made 100-fold, 10-fold, and 10-fold more resistant to Adriamycin (2780AD), melphalan (2780ME), and cisplatin (2780CP). Two additional cell lines, NIH:OVCAR-3nu(Ag+) and NIH:OVCAR-4(Ag+), were established from drug-refractory patients. 2780ME, 2780CP, OVCAR-3nu(Ag+), and OVCAR-4(Ag+) are all cross-resistant to irradiation, with DOS of 146, 187, 143, and 203, respectively. However, 2780AD remains sensitive to radiation, with a DO of 111, which is similar to that of A2780 (101). Glutathione (GSH) levels are elevated in 2780ME, 2780CP, OVCAR-3nu(Ag+), and OVCAR-4(Ag+) to 4.58, 6.13, 12.10, and 15.14 nmol/10(6) cells as compared to A2780, with 1.89 nmol/10(6) cells. However, the GSH level in 2780AD is only minimally higher than that in A2780 (2.94 nmol/10(6) cells). Buthionine sulfoximine, a specific inhibitor of GSH synthesis, significantly increases the radiation sensitivity of 2780ME (changing the DO from 143 to 95) and 2780CP to a lesser extent, suggesting that intracellular GSH levels may play an important role in the radiation response of certain neoplastic cells

  6. Plant breeding by using radiation mutation - Selection of herbicide-resistant cell lines by using {gamma}-rays

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Hyo Yeon [Sunchun University, Sunchun (Korea); Seo, Yong Weon [Korea University, Seoul (Korea)

    2000-04-01

    In order to develop the herbicide resistant cell lines, micro calli derived from rice anther culture and mature seed of wheat cultivars were irradiated with gamma rays. 1) The callus was dedifferentiated by 7 or 21 day pretreatment at 7 deg. C in two rice cultivars, Ilpumbyeo ad Dongjinbyeo. 2) To check the optimum concentration of herbicide, three herbicides were tested with micro calli. 3) The optimum dose of gamma ray to seeds of wheat seemed to be from 100 to 150 Gy. 4) AFLP and RAPD technique were established to develope herbicide resistant molecular marker in rice. 34 refs., 10 figs., 5 tabs. (Author)

  7. Development of ultra radiation-resistant cables

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, Shun-ichi; Handa, Katsue; Kubo, Masaji; Tsutsumi, Yukihiro; Seguchi, Tadao.

    1990-01-01

    For the purpose of using in the environment where the exposure to the radiation of large dose occurs, the ultra radiation-resistant cables using acenaphthylene bromide condensation product Con-BACN were developed, and it was already reported. However, since the Con-BACN is the mixture of condensation products, the bromine content, the condensed composition and the effect of giving radiation resistance tended to change widely. In this paper, the review of the method of synthesizing Con-BACN, the composition of the obtained condensation product, the mechanism that the Con-BACN gives the effect of radiation resistance and the characteristics of the ultra radiation-resistant cables using the Con-BACN are reported. The new reaction for synthesizing Con-BACN was developed, which solved the difficulty in the old process. The optimum condensation composition was decided in view of the characteristics of radiation resistance. Also the yield of Con-BACN was improved to 70-90%. It was predicted that graft reaction exerted influence to the effect of giving radiation resistance. The radiation resistance, environment resistance and incombustibility of the ultra radiation-resistant cables are reported. (K.I.)

  8. Solar cell radiation handbook

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, H. Y.; Carter, J. R., Jr.; Anspaugh, B. E.; Downing, R. G.

    1982-01-01

    The handbook to predict the degradation of solar cell electrical performance in any given space radiation environment is presented. Solar cell theory, cell manufacturing and how they are modeled mathematically are described. The interaction of energetic charged particles radiation with solar cells is discussed and the concept of 1 MeV equivalent electron fluence is introduced. The space radiation environment is described and methods of calculating equivalent fluences for the space environment are developed. A computer program was written to perform the equivalent fluence calculations and a FORTRAN listing of the program is included. Data detailing the degradation of solar cell electrical parameters as a function of 1 MeV electron fluence are presented.

  9. Predicted solar cell edge radiation effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gates, M.T.

    1993-01-01

    The Advanced Solar Cell Orbital Test (ASCOT) will test six types of solar cells in a high energy proton environment. During the design of the experiment a question was raised about the effects of proton radiation incident on the edge of the solar cells and whether edge radiation shielding was required. Historical geosynchronous data indicated that edge radiation damage is not detectable over the normal end of life solar cell degradation; however because the ASCOT radiation environment has a much higher and more energetic fluence of protons, considerably more edge damage is expected. A computer analysis of the problem was made by modeling the expected radiation damage at the cell edge and using a network model of small interconnected solar cells to predict degradation in the cell's electrical output. The model indicated that the deepest penetration of edge radiation was at the top of the cell near the junction where the protons have access to the cell through the low density cell/cover adhesive layer. The network model indicated that the cells could tolerate high fluences at their edge as long as there was high electrical resistance between the edge radiated region and the contact system on top of the cell. The predicted edge radiation related loss was less than 2% of maximum power for GaAs/Ge solar cells. As a result, no edge radiation protection was used for ASCOT

  10. Extreme Ionizing-Radiation-Resistant Bacterium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaishampayan, Parag A.; Venkateswaran, Kasthuri J.; Schwendner, Petra

    2013-01-01

    potential for transfer, and subsequent proliferation, on another solar body such as Mars and Europa. These organisms are more likely to escape planetary protection assays, which only take into account presence of spores. Hence, presences of extreme radiation-resistant Deinococcus in the cleanroom facility where spacecraft are assembled pose a serious risk for integrity of life-detection missions. The microorganism described herein was isolated from the surfaces of the cleanroom facility in which the Phoenix Lander was assembled. The isolated bacterial strain was subjected to a comprehensive polyphasic analysis to characterize its taxonomic position. This bacterium exhibits very low 16SrRNA similarity with any other environmental isolate reported to date. Both phenotypic and phylogenetic analyses clearly indicate that this isolate belongs to the genus Deinococcus and represents a novel species. The name Deinococcus phoenicis was proposed after the Phoenix spacecraft, which was undergoing assembly, testing, and launch operations in the spacecraft assembly facility at the time of isolation. D. phoenicis cells exhibited higher resistance to ionizing radiation (cobalt-60; 14 kGy) than the cells of the D. radiodurans (5 kGy). Thus, it is in the best interest of NASA to thoroughly characterize this organism, which will further assess in determining the potential for forward contamination. Upon the completion of genetic and physiological characteristics of D. phoenicis, it will be added to a planetary protection database to be able to further model and predict the probability of forward contamination.

  11. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili, E-mail: commasll@163.com; Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-04-17

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3′-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity. - Highlights: • miR-21 is highly expressed in HR-HPV (+) radioresistant cervical cancer patients. • miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells. • miR-21 can decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. • miR-21 modulates radiosensitivity cervical cancer cell by directly targeting LATS1.

  12. miR-21 modulates resistance of HR-HPV positive cervical cancer cells to radiation through targeting LATS1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Liu, Shikai; Song, Lili; Zhang, Liang; Zeng, Saitian; Gao, Fangyuan

    2015-01-01

    Although multiple miRNAs are found involved in radioresistance development in HR-HPV positive (+) cervical cancer, only limited studies explored the regulative mechanism of the miRNAs. miR-21 is one of the miRNAs significantly upregulated in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer is also significantly associated with radioresistance. However, the detailed regulative network of miR-21 in radioresistance is still not clear. In this study, we confirmed that miR-21 overexpression was associated with higher level of radioresistance in HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer patients and thus decided to further explore its role. Findings of this study found miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells and decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. By using dual luciferase assay, we verified a binding site between miR-21 and 3′-UTR of large tumor suppressor kinase 1 (LATS1). Through direct binding, miR-21 can regulate LATS1 expression in cervical cancer cells. LATS1 overexpression can reverse miR-21 induced higher colony formation rate and also reduced miR-21 induced S phase accumulation and G2/M phase block reduction under radiation treatment. These results suggested that miR-21-LATS1 axis plays an important role in regulating radiosensitivity. - Highlights: • miR-21 is highly expressed in HR-HPV (+) radioresistant cervical cancer patients. • miR-21 can negatively affect radiosensitivity of HR-HPV (+) cervical cancer cells. • miR-21 can decrease radiation induced G2/M block and increase S phase accumulation. • miR-21 modulates radiosensitivity cervical cancer cell by directly targeting LATS1

  13. Incorporating Cancer Stem Cells in Radiation Therapy Treatment Response Modeling and the Implication in Glioblastoma Multiforme Treatment Resistance

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Victoria Y.; Nguyen, Dan; Pajonk, Frank; Kupelian, Patrick; Kaprealian, Tania; Selch, Michael; Low, Daniel A.; Sheng, Ke, E-mail: ksheng@mednet.ucla.edu

    2015-03-15

    Purpose: To perform a preliminary exploration with a simplistic mathematical cancer stem cell (CSC) interaction model to determine whether the tumor-intrinsic heterogeneity and dynamic equilibrium between CSCs and differentiated cancer cells (DCCs) can better explain radiation therapy treatment response with a dual-compartment linear-quadratic (DLQ) model. Methods and Materials: The radiosensitivity parameters of CSCs and DCCs for cancer cell lines including glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), non–small cell lung cancer, melanoma, osteosarcoma, and prostate, cervical, and breast cancer were determined by performing robust least-square fitting using the DLQ model on published clonogenic survival data. Fitting performance was compared with the single-compartment LQ (SLQ) and universal survival curve models. The fitting results were then used in an ordinary differential equation describing the kinetics of DCCs and CSCs in response to 2- to 14.3-Gy fractionated treatments. The total dose to achieve tumor control and the fraction size that achieved the least normal biological equivalent dose were calculated. Results: Smaller cell survival fitting errors were observed using DLQ, with the exception of melanoma, which had a low α/β = 0.16 in SLQ. Ordinary differential equation simulation indicated lower normal tissue biological equivalent dose to achieve the same tumor control with a hypofractionated approach for 4 cell lines for the DLQ model, in contrast to SLQ, which favored 2 Gy per fraction for all cells except melanoma. The DLQ model indicated greater tumor radioresistance than SLQ, but the radioresistance was overcome by hypofractionation, other than the GBM cells, which responded poorly to all fractionations. Conclusion: The distinct radiosensitivity and dynamics between CSCs and DCCs in radiation therapy response could perhaps be one possible explanation for the heterogeneous intertumor response to hypofractionation and in some cases superior outcome from

  14. Gravitational radiation resistance, radiation damping and field fluctuations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schaefer, G.

    1981-01-01

    Application is made of two different generalised fluctuation-dissipation theorems and their derivations to the calculation of the gravitational quadrupole radiation resistance using the radiation-reaction force given by Misner, Thorne and Wheeler (Gravitation (San Francisco: Freeman) ch 36,37 (1973)) and the usual tidal force on one hand and the tidal force and the free gravitational radiation field on the other hand. The quantum-mechanical version (including thermal generalisations) of the well known classical quadrupole radiation damping formula is obtained as a function of the radiation resistance. (author)

  15. Ultraviolet radiation resistance in Halobacterium salinarium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristoff, S.R.

    1985-01-01

    An obvious characteristic of wild type H. salinarium is its red pigmentation. A non-pigmented mutant was isolated to test the role of pigmentation in UV radiation resistance. Survival curves of UV-irradiated wild type and mutant cells show that pigmentation does not play a direct role in protecting DNA from UV damage. Pigmentation does play a role, however, in repairing UV damage. UV-irradiated wild type cells show more efficient recovery by photoreactivation with 405 nm light than do UV-irradiated non-pigmented mutants. High internal cation concentrations found in H. salinarium may also be partly responsible for the relative resistance of H. salinarium to UV radiation by causing the DNA to assume a conformation less conducive to the production of pyrimidine dimers. In vitro irradiation of DNA extracted from H. salinarium, dissolved in solutions of different ionic strengths, indicate that pyrimidine dimers may not form as readily in DNA which is in an environment with high salt concentration

  16. Response to high LET radiation 12C (LET, 295 keV/microm) in M5 cells, a radio resistant cell strain derived from Chinese hamster V79 cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pathak, R; Sarma, A; Sengupta, B; Dey, S K; Khuda-Bukhsh, A R

    2007-01-01

    To study the effects of 12C-beam of 295 keV/microm (57.24 MeV) on M5 and Chinese hamster V79 cells by using cytogenetic assays like micronuclei (MN) induction, chromosomal aberrations (CA) and apoptosis. Additionally, the relative survival of these two cell lines was tested by the colony forming ability of the cells, with a view to understanding the mechanism of cellular damages that lead to difference in cell survival. Confluent cells were irradiated with 12C-beam at various doses using 15UD Pelletron accelerator. Cell survival was studied by the colony forming ability of cells. MN assay was done by fluorescent staining. Different types of chromosomal aberrations in metaphase cells were scored at 12 h after irradiation. Apoptosis was measured at different post irradiation times as detected by nuclear fragmentation and DNA ladder was prepared after 48 h of incubation. Dose-dependent decrease in surviving fractions was found in both the cell lines. However, the surviving fractions were higher in M5 cells in comparison to V79 cells when exposed to the same radiation doses. On the other hand, induced MN frequencies, CA frequencies and apoptosis percentages were less in M5 cells than V79 cells. Very good correlations between surviving fractions and induced MN frequencies or induced total CA or induced apoptosis percentages were obtained in this study. The cell strain M5 showed relatively more radio-resistance to 12C-beam compared to Chinese hamster V79 cells in this study. As the MN formation, CA and apoptosis induction were less in M5 cells as compared to parental V79 cells, the higher cell survival in the former could possibly be attributed to their better repairing ability leading to higher cell survival.

  17. Cell death induced by ionizing radiations in human radio-resistant tumours: in-vitro and in-vivo study of mechanisms involved in its induction by different types of radiations and pharmacological modulation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altmeyer, Anais

    2010-01-01

    Whereas chemo-radiotherapy protocols revealed to be very efficient when taking tumours into care, the treatment of some tumours remains very limited due to their critical location or to the weak radio-sensitivity to conventional radiations. One way to work around this problem is to use high linear energy transfer radiations or hadron therapy, in combination with radio-sensitizers. This research thesis reports the assessment of radio-sensitizer effects of different molecules on human radio-resistant cell lines and more particularly the SK-Hep1 line from a hepatocellular carcinoma. In vitro studies have been performed and then in vivo studies by using fast neutron irradiation on a mice liver sample. Observations made by optic fibre confocal microscopy and transmission electronic microscopy confirmed in vitro observations: the prevailing cell death after such an irradiation is the autophagic cell death. It shows the importance of the autophagic phenomenon induced by radiations with high linear transfer energy. This could lead to new therapeutic protocols for radio-resistant cancers [fr

  18. Effect of radiation decontamination on drug-resistant bacteria

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ito, Hitoshi

    2006-01-01

    More than 80% of food poisoning bacteria such as Salmonella are reported as antibiotic-resistant to at least one type antibiotic, and more than 50% as resistant to two or more. For the decontamination of food poisoning bacteria in foods, radiation resistibility on drug-resistant bacteria were investigated compared with drug-sensitive bacteria. Possibility on induction of drug-resistant mutation by radiation treatment was also investigated. For these studies, type strains of Escherichia coli S2, Salmonella enteritidis YK-2 and Staphylococcus aureus H12 were used to induce drug-resistant strains with penicillin G. From the study of radiation sensitivity on the drug-resistant strain induced from E. coli S2, D 10 value was obtained to be 0.20 kGy compared with 0.25 kGy at parent strain. On S. enteritidis YK-2, D 10 value was obtained to be 0.14 kGy at drug-resistant strain compared with 0.16 kGy at parent strain. D 10 value was also obtained to be 0.15 kGy at drug-resistant strain compared with 0.21 kGy at parent strain of St. aureus H12. Many isolates of E. coli 157:H7 or other type of E. coli from meats such as beef were resistant to penicillin G, and looked to be no relationship on radiation resistivities between drug-resistant strains and sensitive strains. On the study of radiation sensitivity on E. coli S2 at plate agars containing antibiotics, higher survival fractions were obtained at higher doses compared with normal plate agar. The reason of higher survival fractions at higher doses on plate agar containing antibiotics should be recovery of high rate of injured cells by the relay of cell division, and drug-resistant strains by mutation are hardly induced by irradiation. (author)

  19. Reversed dose-rate effect and RBE of 252-californium radiation in the induction of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutations in mouse L5178Y cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, N; Sawada, S

    1988-09-01

    The effects of californium-252 radiation (average neutron energy E = 2.13 MeV) were investigated using mouse leukemia L5178Y cells. No dose-rate effect was detected for cell killing, but a 'reversed' dose-rate effect was observed for mutation induction. The frequency of 6-thioguanine-resistant mutations increased linearly up to 100 cGy (1 Gy = 100 rad), then began to level off at a dose rate of 1.2 cGy/min, while it increased continuously up to 200 cGy at a reduced dose rate of 0.16 cGy/min. Compared with results obtained using 60Co gamma-rays, the ratio of the initial slope of each dose-response curve was 4-5 for cell killing, and more than 11 for mutagenesis. Since one-third of 252Cf radiation consists of gamma-rays, the relative biological effectiveness (RBE) of 252Cf neutrons would be even greater, 16 or more, for mutation induction in the present assay.

  20. Radiation-resistant fibre for particle accelerator

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Radiation-resistant optical fibre is being used by CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, in the world's largest particle accelerator, the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) near Geneva." (1 page)

  1. CERN selects Fujikura's radiation resistant fiber

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Fujikura Europe Ltd. (search for Fujikura Europe) today announced that its radiation resistant singlemode optical fiber has been selected by CERN to provide communicaton links within the world's largest particle accelerator..."(2/3 page)

  2. TSPYL5 is involved in cell growth and the resistance to radiation in A549 cells via the regulation of p21WAF1/Cip1 and PTEN/AKT pathway

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Eun Jin; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Tae Rim; Choi, Soo Im; Cho, Eun Wie; Kim, Kug Chan; Kim, In Gyu

    2010-01-01

    TSPYL5, encoding testis-specific Y-like protein, has been postulated to be a tumor suppressor gene, and its hypermethylation is often associated with human disease, especially cancer. In this study, we report that the TSPYL5 gene was less methylated (30%) in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells, which are relatively resistant to γ-radiation, than in H460 lung cancer cells, in which the TSPYL5 gene was hypermethylated (95%); thus, the expression level of TSPYL5 is much higher in A549 cells than in H460 cells. We showed that TSPYL5 suppression with silencing RNA in A549 cells up-regulated cellular PTEN, followed by down-regulation of AKT activation. Therefore, blockage of TSPYL5 sensitized A549 cells to cytotoxic agents such as γ-radiation. In addition, TSPYL5 suppression also showed an increased level of p21 WAF1/Cip1 and subsequently induced inhibition of cell growth in A549 cells. The overexpression of TSPYL5 in H460 cells showed the opposite effects. This study provides the first demonstration that TSPYL5 modulates cell growth and sensitization of cells to the detrimental effects of damaging agents via regulation of p21 WAF1/Cip1 and PTEN/AKT pathway.

  3. TSPYL5 is involved in cell growth and the resistance to radiation in A549 cells via the regulation of p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} and PTEN/AKT pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Eun Jin; Lee, So Yong; Kim, Tae Rim; Choi, Soo Im [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Cho, Eun Wie [Systemic Proteomics Research Center, Korea Research Institute of Bioscience and Biotechnology, P.O. Box 115, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-333 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, Kug Chan [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of); Kim, In Gyu, E-mail: igkim@kaeri.re.kr [Department of Radiation Biology, Environmental Radiation Research Group, Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, P.O. Box 105, Yuseong, Daejeon 305-600 (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-02-12

    TSPYL5, encoding testis-specific Y-like protein, has been postulated to be a tumor suppressor gene, and its hypermethylation is often associated with human disease, especially cancer. In this study, we report that the TSPYL5 gene was less methylated (30%) in A549 lung adenocarcinoma cells, which are relatively resistant to {gamma}-radiation, than in H460 lung cancer cells, in which the TSPYL5 gene was hypermethylated (95%); thus, the expression level of TSPYL5 is much higher in A549 cells than in H460 cells. We showed that TSPYL5 suppression with silencing RNA in A549 cells up-regulated cellular PTEN, followed by down-regulation of AKT activation. Therefore, blockage of TSPYL5 sensitized A549 cells to cytotoxic agents such as {gamma}-radiation. In addition, TSPYL5 suppression also showed an increased level of p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} and subsequently induced inhibition of cell growth in A549 cells. The overexpression of TSPYL5 in H460 cells showed the opposite effects. This study provides the first demonstration that TSPYL5 modulates cell growth and sensitization of cells to the detrimental effects of damaging agents via regulation of p21{sup WAF1/Cip1} and PTEN/AKT pathway.

  4. Radiation Enhances Regulatory T Cell Representation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kachikwu, Evelyn L.; Iwamoto, Keisuke S.; Liao, Yu-Pei; DeMarco, John J.; Agazaryan, Nzhde; Economou, James S.; McBride, William H.; Schaue, Dörthe

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: Immunotherapy could be a useful adjunct to standard cytotoxic therapies such as radiation in patients with micrometastatic disease, although successful integration of immunotherapy into treatment protocols will require further understanding of how standard therapies affect the generation of antitumor immune responses. This study was undertaken to evaluate the impact of radiation therapy (RT) on immunosuppressive T regulatory (Treg) cells. Methods and Materials: Treg cells were identified as a CD4 + CD25 hi Foxp3 + lymphocyte subset, and their fate was followed in a murine TRAMP C1 model of prostate cancer in mice with and without RT. Results: CD4 + CD25 hi Foxp3 + Treg cells increased in immune organs after local leg or whole-body radiation. A large part, but not all, of this increase after leg-only irradiation could be ascribed to radiation scatter and Treg cells being intrinsically more radiation resistant than other lymphocyte subpopulations, resulting in their selection. Their functional activity on a per-cell basis was not affected by radiation exposure. Similar findings were made with mice receiving local RT to murine prostate tumors growing in the leg. The importance of the Treg cell population in the response to RT was shown by systemic elimination of Treg cells, which greatly enhanced radiation-induced tumor regression. Conclusions: We conclude that Treg cells are more resistant to radiation than other lymphocytes, resulting in their preferential increase. Treg cells may form an important homeostatic mechanism for tissues injured by radiation, and in a tumor context, they may assist in immune evasion during therapy. Targeting this population may allow enhancement of radiotherapeutic benefit through immune modulation.

  5. Radiation resistance and injury of Yersinia enterocolitica

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    El-Zawahry, Y.A.; Rowley, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    The D values of Yersinia enterocolitica strains IP134, IP107, and WA, irradiated at 25/sup 0/C in Trypticase soy broth, ranged from 9.7 to 11.8 krad. When irradiated in ground beef at 25 and -30/sup 0/C, the D value of strain IP107 and 19.5 and 38.8 krad, respectively. Cells suspended in Trypticase soy broth were more sensitive to storage at -20/sup 0/C than those mixed in ground beef. The percentages of inactivation and of injury (inability to form colonies in the presence of 3.0% NaCl) of cells stored in ground beef for 10 days at -20/sup 0/C were 70 and 23%, respectively. Prior irradiation did not alter the cell's sensitivity to storage at -20/sup 0/C, nor did storage at -20/sup 0/C alter the cell's resistance to irradiation at 25/sup 0/C. Added NaCl concentrations of up to 4.0% in Trypticase soy agar (TSA) (which contains 0.5% NaCl) had little effect on colony formation at 36/sup 0/C of unirradiated Y. enterocolitica. With added 4.0% NaCl, 79% of the cells formed colonies at 36/sup 0/C; with 5.0% NaCl added, no colonies were formed. Although 2.5% NaCl added to ground beef did not sensitize Y. enterocolitica cells to irradiation, when added to TSA it reduced the number of apparent radiation survivors. Cells uninjured by irradiation formed colonies on TSA when incubated at either 36 or 5/sup 0/C. More survivors of an exposure to 60 krad were capable of recovery and forming colonies on TSA when incubated at 36/sup 0/C for 1 day than at 5/sup 0/C for 14 days. This difference in count was considered a manifestation of injury to certain survivors of irradiation.

  6. Radiation resistance and injury of Yersinia enterocolitica

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Zawahry, Y.A.; Rowley, D.B.

    1979-01-01

    The D values of Yersinia enterocolitica strains IP134, IP107, and WA, irradiated at 25 0 C in Trypticase soy broth, ranged from 9.7 to 11.8 krad. When irradiated in ground beef at 25 and -30 0 C, the D value of strain IP107 and 19.5 and 38.8 krad, respectively. Cells suspended in Trypticase soy broth were more sensitive to storage at -20 0 C than those mixed in ground beef. The percentages of inactivation and of injury (inability to form colonies in the presence of 3.0% NaCl) of cells stored in ground beef for 10 days at -20 0 C were 70 and 23%, respectively. Prior irradiation did not alter the cell's sensitivity to storage at -20 0 C, nor did storage at -20 0 C alter the cell's resistance to irradiation at 25 0 C. Added NaCl concentrations of up to 4.0% in Trypticase soy agar (TSA) (which contains 0.5% NaCl) had little effect on colony formation at 36 0 C of unirradiated Y. enterocolitica. With added 4.0% NaCl, 79% of the cells formed colonies at 36 0 C; with 5.0% NaCl added, no colonies were formed. Although 2.5% NaCl added to ground beef did not sensitize Y. enterocolitica cells to irradiation, when added to TSA it reduced the number of apparent radiation survivors. Cells uninjured by irradiation formed colonies on TSA when incubated at either 36 or 5 0 C. More survivors of an exposure to 60 krad were capable of recovery and forming colonies on TSA when incubated at 36 0 C for 1 day than at 5 0 C for 14 days. This difference in count was considered a manifestation of injury to certain survivors of irradiation

  7. Final Report for Radiation Resistant Magnets II

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A. F. Zeller

    2005-01-01

    Report on techniques for the fabrication of radiation resistant magnets for the RIA Fragment Separator. The development of magnet designs capable of reasonable life times in high-radiation environments and having reasonable performance is of paramount importance for RIA as well as other high-intensity projects under consideration, such as the Neutrino Factory and FAIR project at GSI. Several approaches were evaluated for radiation resistant superconducting magnets. One approach was to simply use a more radiation resistant epoxy for the coil fabrication. Another approach for cryostable magnets, like the S800 Spectrograph dipole, is the use of all-inorganic materials. The final approach was the development of radiation resistant Cable-In-Conduit-Conductor (CICC) like that used in fusion magnets; though these are not radiation resistant because an organic insulator is used. Simulations have shown that the nuclear radiation heating of the first quadrupoles in the RIA Fragment Separator will be so large that cold mass minimization will be necessary with the magnet iron being at room temperature. Three different types of conductor for radiation resistant superconducting magnets have been built and successfully tested. The cyanate ester potted coils will work nicely for magnets where the lifetime dose is a factor of 20 less than the end of life of the superconductor and the rate of energy deposition is below the heat-removal limit of the coil. The all-inorganic cryostable coil and the metal oxide insulated CICC will provide conductor that will work up to the life of the superconductor and have the ability to remove large quantities of nuclear heating. Obviously, more work needs to be done on the CICC to increase the current density and to develop different insulations; and on the cyanate esters to increase the heat transfer

  8. Development of radiation resistant PEEK insulation cable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mio, Keigo; Ogiwara, Norio; Hikichi, Yusuke; Furukori, Hisayoshi; Arai, Hideyuki; Nishizawa, Daiji; Nishidono, Toshiro

    2009-04-01

    Material characterization and development has been carried out for cable insulation suitable for use in the J-PARC 3-GeV RCS radiation environment. In spite of its high cost, PEEK (polyether-ether-ketone) has emerged as the leading candidate satisfying requirements of being non-halogen based, highly incombustible and with radiation resistant at least 10 MGy, along with the usual mechanical characteristics such as good elongation at break, which are needed in a cable insulation. Gamma-ray irradiation tests have been done in order to study radiation resistance of PEEK cable. Further, mechanical, electrical and fire retardant characteristics of a complete cable such as would be used at the J-PARC RCS were investigated. As a result, PEEK cables were shown to be not degraded by radiation up to at least 10 MGy, and thus could be expected to operate stably under the 3-GeV RCS radiation environment. (author)

  9. Ionizing radiation induces stemness in cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Ghisolfi

    Full Text Available The cancer stem cell (CSC model posits the presence of a small number of CSCs in the heterogeneous cancer cell population that are ultimately responsible for tumor initiation, as well as cancer recurrence and metastasis. CSCs have been isolated from a variety of human cancers and are able to generate a hierarchical and heterogeneous cancer cell population. CSCs are also resistant to conventional chemo- and radio-therapies. Here we report that ionizing radiation can induce stem cell-like properties in heterogeneous cancer cells. Exposure of non-stem cancer cells to ionizing radiation enhanced spherogenesis, and this was accompanied by upregulation of the pluripotency genes Sox2 and Oct3/4. Knockdown of Sox2 or Oct3/4 inhibited radiation-induced spherogenesis and increased cellular sensitivity to radiation. These data demonstrate that ionizing radiation can activate stemness pathways in heterogeneous cancer cells, resulting in the enrichment of a CSC subpopulation with higher resistance to radiotherapy.

  10. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation. [Annual report, 1989

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, F.J.

    1989-12-31

    The very reactive superoxide anion O{sub 2} is generated during cell respiration as well as during exposure to ionizing radiation. Organisms have evolved different mechanisms to protect against the deleterious effects of reduced oxygen species. The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is a eukaryotic cytoplasmic enzyme that protects the cell by scavenging superoxide radicals and dismutating them to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen: 20{sub 2}{sup {minus}} + 2H {yields} H{sub 2}O{sub 2} + O{sub 2}. SOD had been shown to protect against ionizing radiation damage to DNA, viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells, whole mice, and Drosophila. Evidence that genetic differences may affect sensitivity to ionizing radiation has been shown in Drosophila since differences have been shown to exist between strains and resistance to radiation can evolve under natural selection.

  11. Radiation resistance of plastic solid

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moriyama, Noboru; Dojiri, Shigeru; Wadachi, Yoshiki

    1985-01-01

    The radiation from nucleides contained in solidified wates have some effects on the degradation of the solidification materials. This report deals with effects of such radiation on the mechanical strength of waste-plastics composites and on the generation of gasses. It is shown that the mechanical strength of polyethylene and polyester solids will not decrease at a total absorbed dose of 10 6 rad, a dose which a low-level waste composite is expected to receive during an infinite period of time. Rather, it increases in the case of polyethylene. The amount of gas generated from degraded polyethylene is about three times as large as that from polyester, namely, about 6 l per 200 l drum can at 10 6 rad. Hydrogen accounts for about 80 % of the total gas generated from polyethylene. On the other hand, the gas from polyester solid mainly contains hydrogen, carbon dioxide, carbon monoxide and methane, with a composition greatly dependent on the type of the waste contained. It is concluded from these results that plastic materials can serve satisfactorily as for as the effects of radiation on their mechanical strength and gas generation are concerned. A more important problem still remaining to be solved is the effects of radiation on the leaching of radioactive nuclides. (Nogami, K.)

  12. On the honeybee resistance to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Courtois, G.; Lecomte, J.

    1960-01-01

    The honeybee, when irradiated by gamma radiations from a cobalt-60 source can stand a 18000 r dose without any apparent harm. Noticeable harm is observed for 90000 r. while immediate death of 100% of the individuals is obtained with a 200000 r dose. The physiological condition of the honeybee plays an important role in its resistance to gamma radiation. Reprint of a paper published in Annales de l'abeille, IV, 1959, p. 285-290 [fr

  13. Radiation-resistant characteristics of epoxyresins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saito, Toshio; Seguchi, Tadao.

    1985-01-01

    For the evaluation of radiation resistivity under the condition of low level irradiation in the atmospheric environment, oxidation and deterioration of several kinds of epoxy resins were examined by the acceleration method with 2.7 kGy/h, 2 MGy of 60 Co-γ irradiation and 3 MPa of oxygen pressure, and with 0.88 kGy/h, 2 MGy of irradiation and 4 MPa of oxygen pressure, to simulate 18 Gy/h, 12 years and 4.5 Gy/h, 50 years of atmospheric deterioration respectively. Bending strength emitted gas component, diffusion and solubility coefficients, oxidized layer thickness, gel fraction and dynamic visco-elasticity were determined for the irradiated epoxy resins. As for the radiation resistivity, epoxy resins of acid anhydride hardening agent showed superior quality to those of amine-type hardening agent, and the former showed no deterioration enen after irradiation in vacuum. From the above-mentioned understandings and also from data of exhausted gas analysis, gel fraction determination and visco-elasticity testing, it was clarified that the radiation resistivity of main components of epoxy resins were superior for Epikote 828, ether radical, tertiary amine to ester radical followed by hydroxyl radical. It was also clarified that heat resitivity was significantly lowered in the deteriorated resins and that thickness of oxidized layer was decreased with radiation dose. It was concluded that radiation resistivity of epoxy resins depended on their hardening agent significantly. (Takagi, S.)

  14. Radiation resistance of the ATLAS pixel sensors

    CERN Document Server

    D'Auria, S D

    1999-01-01

    This work describes the R and D work on radiation resistant silicon sensors for the ATLAS pixel detector: the technological choices and the design will be illustrated. Some sensor prototypes have been characterised and tested with unirradiated front-end electronics before and after high energy proton irradiation, showing that we can achieve the required radiation resistance to fluences of 1*10/sup 15/ cm/sup -2/ using n/sup +/ on n sensors with the p-spray isolation technology. (16 refs).

  15. Oncogenes and radiation resistance - a review

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dritschilo, A.

    1992-01-01

    Oncogenes exert their effects on the genetic programs of cells by regulating signal transduction pathways, resulting in multi-factorial genetic responses. By such actions, the genetic elements responsible for the cellular responses to ionizing radiation may be affected. Reports implicating the association of oncogene expression with modulation of the radiation response include the ras, raf, and myc genes. Experiments overexpressing H-ras and c-raf-1 using genetically engineered constructs result in enhanced post-radiation cellular survival. Conversely, inhibition of raf gene expression has resulted in relative radiation sensitization and delay of human squamous cell carcinoma tumor growth in nude mice. There appears to be a potential strategy for therapeutic intervention. The identification of genes that confer survival advantage following radiation exposure, and understanding their mechanisms of action, may permit a genetically based intervention for radiation sensitization. One such approach employs oligo-deoxynucleotides complementary to oncogene-encoded in RNA's (antisense DNA). (author)

  16. Radiation therapy for resistant sternal hydatid disease

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ulger, S.; Barut, H.; Tunc, M.; Aydinkarahaliloglu, E.; Aydin, E.; Karaoglanoglu, N.; Gokcek, A.

    2013-01-01

    Hydatid disease is a zoonotic infectious disease for which there are known treatment procedures and effective antibiotics; however, there are resistant cases that do not respond to medication or surgery. We report a case diagnosed as hydatid disease of the chest wall and treated with radiation therapy (RT) after medical and surgical therapy had failed. In conclusion, RT represents an alternative treatment modality in resistant cases. (orig.)

  17. Design of online testing system of material radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wan Junsheng; He Shengping; Gao Xinjun

    2014-01-01

    The capability of radiation resistance is important for some material used in some specifically engineering fields. It is the same principal applied in all existing test system that compares the performance parameter after radiation to evaluate material radiation resistance. A kind of new technique on test system of material radiation resistance is put forward in this paper. Experimentation shows that the online test system for material radiation resistance works well and has an extending application outlook. (authors)

  18. Human Genetic Marker for Resistance to Radiation and Chemicals

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, Howard B.

    2001-01-01

    TO characterize the human HRDAD9 gene and evaluate its potential as a biomarker to predict susceptibility to the deleterious health effects potentially caused by exposure to radiations or chemicals present at DOE hazardous waste cleanup sites. HRAD9 is a human gene that is highly conserved throughout evolution. Related genes have been isolated from yeasts and mice, underscoring its biological significance. Most of our previous work involved characterization of the yeast gene cognate, wherein it was determined that the corresponding protein plays a significant role in promoting resistance of cells to radiations and chemicals, and in particular, controlling cell growth in response to DNA damage

  19. CERN selects Fujikura's radiation resistant fiber

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Fujikura recently announced that its radiation resistant single mode optical fiber has been selected by CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, to provide communication links within the world's largest particle accelerator - the Large Hadron Collider (LHC) - near Geneva, Switzerland." (1/2 page)

  20. CERN selects Fujikura's radiation resistant fibre

    CERN Multimedia

    2007-01-01

    "Fujikura today announced that its radiation resistant single mode optical fibre has been selected by CERN, the European Laboratory for Particle Physics, to provide communication links within the world's largest particle accelerator - the Large hadron Collider (LHC) - near Genevan, Switzerland. (1/2 page)

  1. Sustainably Sourced, Thermally Resistant, Radiation Hard Biopolymer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pugel, Diane

    2011-01-01

    This material represents a breakthrough in the production, manufacturing, and application of thermal protection system (TPS) materials and radiation shielding, as this represents the first effort to develop a non-metallic, non-ceramic, biomaterial-based, sustainable TPS with the capability to also act as radiation shielding. Until now, the standing philosophy for radiation shielding involved carrying the shielding at liftoff or utilizing onboard water sources. This shielding material could be grown onboard and applied as needed prior to different radiation landscapes (commonly seen during missions involving gravitational assists). The material is a bioplastic material. Bioplastics are any combination of a biopolymer and a plasticizer. In this case, the biopolymer is a starch-based material and a commonly accessible plasticizer. Starch molecules are composed of two major polymers: amylase and amylopectin. The biopolymer phenolic compounds are common to the ablative thermal protection system family of materials. With similar constituents come similar chemical ablation processes, with the potential to have comparable, if not better, ablation characteristics. It can also be used as a flame-resistant barrier for commercial applications in buildings, homes, cars, and heater firewall material. The biopolymer is observed to undergo chemical transformations (oxidative and structural degradation) at radiation doses that are 1,000 times the maximum dose of an unmanned mission (10-25 Mrad), indicating that it would be a viable candidate for robust radiation shielding. As a comparison, the total integrated radiation dose for a three-year manned mission to Mars is 0.1 krad, far below the radiation limit at which starch molecules degrade. For electron radiation, the biopolymer starches show minimal deterioration when exposed to energies greater than 180 keV. This flame-resistant, thermal-insulating material is non-hazardous and may be sustainably sourced. It poses no hazardous

  2. Effect of physiological age on radiation resistance of some bacteria that are highly radiation resistant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keller, L.C.; Maxcy, R.B.

    1984-01-01

    Physiological age-dependent variation in radiation resistance was studied for three bacteria that are highly radiation resistant: Micrococcus radiodurans, Micrococcus sp. isolate C-3, and Moraxella sp. isolate 4. Stationary-phase cultures of M. radiodurans and isolate C-3 were much more resistant to gamma radiation than were log-phase cultures. This pattern of relative resistance was reversed for isolate 4. Resistance of isolate 4 to UV light was also greater during log phase, although heat resistance and NaCl tolerance after heat stresses were greater during stationary phase. Radiation-induced injury of isolate 4 compared with injury of Escherichia coli B suggested that the injury process, as well as the lethal process, was affected by growth phase. The hypothesis that growth rate affects radiation resistance was tested, and results were interpreted in light of the probable confounding effect of methods used to alter growth rates of bacteria. These results indicate that dose-response experiments should be designed to measure survival during the most resistant growth phase of the organism under study. The timing is particularly important when extrapolations of survival results might be made to potential irradiation processes for foods. 17 references

  3. Radiation resistant characteristics of optical fibers

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakasuji, Masaaki; Tanaka, Gotaro; Watanabe, Minoru; Kyodo, Tomohisa; Mukunashi, Hiroaki

    1983-01-01

    It is required to develop the optical fibers with good radiation resistivity because the fibers cause the increase of transmission loss due to glass colouring when they are used under the presence of radiation such as γ-ray. Generally, it is known that SI (step index) fibers are more resistive to radiation than GI (graded index) fibers. However, since a wide band can not be obtained with SI fibers, the development of radiation resistive GI optical fibers is desirable. In this report, the production for trial of the GI fibers of fluorine-doped silica core, the examination of radiation effect on their optical transmission loss by exposing them to γ-ray, thermal and fast neutron beams and also of mechanical strength are described. The GI fibers of fluorine-doped silica core show better radiation resistivity than Ge-doped ones. The B- and F-doped GI fibers show small increase of loss due to γ-ray, but large increase of loss due to thermal neutron beam. This is supposed to be caused by the far greater neutron absorption cross-section of boron than that of other elements. Significant increase of loss was not recognized when 14 MeV fast neutrons (8.6 x 10 4 n/cm 2 .s) were applied by 1.8 x 10 9 n/cm 2 . It was found that ETFE-covered fiber cores generated fluorine-containing gas due to γ irradiation, and the strength was remarkably lowered, but the lowering of strength can be prevented by adding titanium-white to the covering material. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  4. Therapeutic Implications for Overcoming Radiation Resistance in Cancer Therapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Byeong Mo Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation (IR, such as X-rays and gamma (γ-rays, mediates various forms of cancer cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence. Among them, apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe are the main mechanisms of IR action. DNA damage and genomic instability contribute to IR-induced cancer cell death. Although IR therapy may be curative in a number of cancer types, the resistance of cancer cells to radiation remains a major therapeutic problem. In this review, we describe the morphological and molecular aspects of various IR-induced types of cell death. We also discuss cytogenetic variations representative of IR-induced DNA damage and genomic instability. Most importantly, we focus on several pathways and their associated marker proteins responsible for cancer resistance and its therapeutic implications in terms of cancer cell death of various types and characteristics. Finally, we propose radiation-sensitization strategies, such as the modification of fractionation, inflammation, and hypoxia and the combined treatment, that can counteract the resistance of tumors to IR.

  5. Therapeutic Implications for Overcoming Radiation Resistance in Cancer Therapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Byeong Mo; Hong, Yunkyung; Lee, Seunghoon; Liu, Pengda; Lim, Ji Hong; Lee, Yong Heon; Lee, Tae Ho; Chang, Kyu Tae; Hong, Yonggeun

    2015-01-01

    Ionizing radiation (IR), such as X-rays and gamma (γ)-rays, mediates various forms of cancer cell death such as apoptosis, necrosis, autophagy, mitotic catastrophe, and senescence. Among them, apoptosis and mitotic catastrophe are the main mechanisms of IR action. DNA damage and genomic instability contribute to IR-induced cancer cell death. Although IR therapy may be curative in a number of cancer types, the resistance of cancer cells to radiation remains a major therapeutic problem. In this review, we describe the morphological and molecular aspects of various IR-induced types of cell death. We also discuss cytogenetic variations representative of IR-induced DNA damage and genomic instability. Most importantly, we focus on several pathways and their associated marker proteins responsible for cancer resistance and its therapeutic implications in terms of cancer cell death of various types and characteristics. Finally, we propose radiation-sensitization strategies, such as the modification of fractionation, inflammation, and hypoxia and the combined treatment, that can counteract the resistance of tumors to IR. PMID:26569225

  6. Radiation resistance of optical fibers, (10)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsunoda, Tsunemi; Ara, Katsuyuki; Morimoto, Naoki; Sanada, Kazuo; Inada, Koichi.

    1991-01-01

    Optical fibers have many excellent characteristics such as the light weight of the material, insulation, the noninductivity of electromagnetic interference noise, the wide band of signal transmission, and small loss. Also in the field of atomic energy, the utilization of optical fibers is positively expanded, and the research on the method of application and so on has been advanced. However in optical fibers, there is the problem that color centers are formed at the relatively low level of radiation, and they are colored. Accordingly, for effectively utilizing optical fibers in radiation environment, it is indispensable to improve their radiation resistance. For the purpose of solving this problem, the authors have carried out the basic research on the effect that radiation exerts to optical fibers and the development of the optical fibers having excellent radiation resistance. For the purpose of expanding the range of application of GeO 2 -doped silica core fibers including GI type in radiation regions, the transmission characteristics of the fibers during irradiation were examined by using the Cl content as the parameter. Therefore, the results are reported. The fibers put to the test, the testing method and the results are described. (K.I.)

  7. Resistance to the ionizing radiation in cells of human melanoma. Role of the antioxidant enzymes and of the free radicals of the oxygen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Medina, V.; Cricco, G.; Massari, N.; Nunez, M.; Martin, G.; Mohanad, N.; Gutierrez, A.; Bergoc, R.; Rivera, E.; Crescenti, E.; Croci, M.

    2006-01-01

    The malignant melanoma is a highly aggressive and potentially lethal type of skin cancer. Previously we have reported that the cellular human lines of melanoma WM35 and M15 are resistant to the ionizing radiation (IR). The histamine (HA) although it has a regulator effect of the cellular proliferation in these lines, it is not capable of to modify the response to the IR like it makes with other malignant cellular lines. To investigate the bases of the radioresistance of the melanoma lines we have studied in the WM35 the production of free radicals of oxygen (ROS), the activity of the antioxidant enzymes and their modifications by action of the IR and of the HA. In studies in vitro the cells were treated with HA 10 μM from 20 hs before being irradiated with a dose of 2 Gy (source 137 Cs, dose rate 7.7 Gy/min). The ROS levels, superoxide anion (O 2 - ) and hydrogen peroxide (H 2 O 2 ) its were measured by flow cytometry using fluorescent coloring and the activity of dismutase superoxide (SOD), Catalase (CAT) and Glutathion Peroxidase (GPx) its were determined by spectrophotometric techniques and the protein levels by Western blot. The results indicate that in the cells WM35 the HA increases the production of H 2 O 2 in 96% and it diminishes lightly (17%) the levels of O 2 - . On the contrary, the IR diminishes the levels of H 2 O-2 in 47% and it increases in 46% those of O 2 - . In the irradiated cells the HA power the decrease of H 2 O 2 produced by the IR. The variation of the enzymes activity is coincident with these changes in the levels of ROS: the treatment with HA increases the activity of SOD and it diminishes that of CAT in cells without irradiating; on the other hand, in the irradiated cells the HA it diminishes the SOD significantly. On the base of these results we can conclude that the levels of H 2 O 2 are directly related with the sensitivity of the cells WM35 to the IR. The HA is able to modulate the activity of the antioxidant enzymes and the levels

  8. Paraquat increases superoxide dismutase activity and radiation resistance in two mouse lymphoma L5178Y cell strains of different radiosensitivities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jaworska, A.; Rosiek, O.

    1991-01-01

    It is shown that paraquat treatment (1 h, 1 x 10 -5 mol/l) increases the activity of superoxide dismutase (SOD) in L5178Y (LY) R and S cells by about three times. When combined with X-irradiation, 0.5 h of treatment preceding irradiation increased the SOD activity two-fold and the α/β ratio three-fold, as estimated from the X-ray survival curves. LY-S cells were more sensitive than LY-R cells to treatment with paraquat alone. These results indicate that SOD may be a radioprotective enzyme in LY strains and that LY-S cells are particularly sensitive to superoxide radicals as a result of a relatively low SOD activity. This explains their sensitivity to paraquat, which generates O 2 - , and to X-rays. The low SOD level may also explain the higher initial DNA damage in X-irradiated LY-S than LY-R cells. (author)

  9. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalz, Philip G.R.; Shen, Michael J.; Park, John K.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed

  10. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, Kira S. [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Omelchenko, Marina [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Gaidamakova, Elena [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Matrosova, Vera [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Vasilenko, Alexander [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Zhai, Min [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS); Lapidus, Alla L. [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Copeland, A [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Kim, Edwin [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Land, Miriam L [ORNL; Mavromatis, K [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Pitluck, Samual [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Richardson, P M [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Detter, J. Chris [U.S. Department of Energy, Joint Genome Institute; Brettin, Tom [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Saunders, Elizabeth H [Los Alamos National Laboratory (LANL); Lai, Barry [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Ravel, Bruce [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Kemner, Kenneth M [Argonne National Laboratory (ANL); Wolf, Yuri [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Sorokin, Alexei [Genetique Microbienne; Gerasimova, Anna [Research Institute of Genetics and Selection of Industrial Microorganisms, Mosco; Gelfand, Mikhail [Moscow State University; Fredrickson, James K [Pacific Northwest National Laboratory (PNNL); Koonin, Eugene [National Center for Biotechnology Information; Daly, Michael [Uniformed Services University of the Health Sciences (USUHS)

    2007-01-01

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  11. Deinococcus geothermalis: The Pool of Extreme Radiation Resistance Genes Shrinks

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Makarova, Kira S.; Omelchenko, Marina V.; Gaidamakova, Elena K.; Matrosova, Vera Y.; Vasilenko, Alexander; Zhai, Min; Lapidus, Alla; Copeland, Alex; Kim, Edwin; Land, Miriam; Mavrommatis, Konstantinos; Pitluck, Samuel; Richardson, Paul M.; Detter, Chris; Brettin, Thomas; Saunders, Elizabeth; Lai, Barry; Ravel, Bruce; Kemner, Kenneth M.; Wolf, Yuri I.; Sorokin, Alexander; Gerasimova, Anna V.; Gelfand, Mikhail S.; Fredrickson, James K.; Koonin, Eugene V.; Daly, Michael J.

    2007-07-24

    Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR), ultraviolet light (UV) and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at itsoptimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and contribute to

  12. Deinococcus geothermalis: the pool of extreme radiation resistance genes shrinks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kira S Makarova

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Bacteria of the genus Deinococcus are extremely resistant to ionizing radiation (IR, ultraviolet light (UV and desiccation. The mesophile Deinococcus radiodurans was the first member of this group whose genome was completely sequenced. Analysis of the genome sequence of D. radiodurans, however, failed to identify unique DNA repair systems. To further delineate the genes underlying the resistance phenotypes, we report the whole-genome sequence of a second Deinococcus species, the thermophile Deinococcus geothermalis, which at its optimal growth temperature is as resistant to IR, UV and desiccation as D. radiodurans, and a comparative analysis of the two Deinococcus genomes. Many D. radiodurans genes previously implicated in resistance, but for which no sensitive phenotype was observed upon disruption, are absent in D. geothermalis. In contrast, most D. radiodurans genes whose mutants displayed a radiation-sensitive phenotype in D. radiodurans are conserved in D. geothermalis. Supporting the existence of a Deinococcus radiation response regulon, a common palindromic DNA motif was identified in a conserved set of genes associated with resistance, and a dedicated transcriptional regulator was predicted. We present the case that these two species evolved essentially the same diverse set of gene families, and that the extreme stress-resistance phenotypes of the Deinococcus lineage emerged progressively by amassing cell-cleaning systems from different sources, but not by acquisition of novel DNA repair systems. Our reconstruction of the genomic evolution of the Deinococcus-Thermus phylum indicates that the corresponding set of enzymes proliferated mainly in the common ancestor of Deinococcus. Results of the comparative analysis weaken the arguments for a role of higher-order chromosome alignment structures in resistance; more clearly define and substantially revise downward the number of uncharacterized genes that might participate in DNA repair and

  13. Role of free radicals in an adriamycin-resistant human small cell lung cancer cell line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Meijer, C.; Mulder, N H; Timmer-Bosscha, H; Zijlstra, J G; de Vries, E G

    1987-01-01

    In two Adriamycin (Adr) resistant sublines (GLC4-Adr1 and GLC4-Adr2) of a human small cell lung carcinoma cell line, GLC4, cross-resistance for radiation was found. GLC4-Adr1 has an acquired Adr resistance factor of 44 after culturing without Adr for 20 days and GLC4-Adr2, the same subline cultured

  14. Radiation hard solar cell and array

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Russell, R.L.

    1975-01-01

    A power generating solar cell for a spacecraft solar array is hardened against transient response to nuclear radiation while permitting normal operation of the cell in a solar radiation environment by shunting the cell with a second solar cell whose contacts are reversed relative to the power cell to form a cell module, exposing the power cell only to the solar radiation in a solar radiation environment to produce an electrical output at the module terminals, and exposing both cells to the nuclear radiation in a nuclear radiation environment so that the radiation induced currents generated by the cells suppress one another

  15. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, F.J.

    1989-01-01

    The very reactive superoxide anion O[sub 2] is generated during cell respiration as well as during exposure to ionizing radiation. Organisms have evolved different mechanisms to protect against the deleterious effects of reduced oxygen species. The copper-zinc superoxide dismutase is a eukaryotic cytoplasmic enzyme that protects the cell by scavenging superoxide radicals and dismutating them to hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen: 20[sub 2][sup [minus

  16. Performance of new polymeric materials with high radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, D.J.T.; O'Donnell, J.H.; Pomery, P.J.

    1994-01-01

    The resistance to radiation of polymeric materials with high modulus and strength, high service temperatures, high resistance to thermal oxidation, and high chemical resistance is evaluated. Different methods of assessment are considered, which require radiation doses from 0.01 to 10 MGy. It is demonstrated that the resistance of high performance polymers to radiation depends on the nature and frequency of occurence of aromatic and non-aromatic components of the molecular structure. 3 refs., 2 figs

  17. Effects of T cell depletion in radiation bone marrow chimeras. II. Requirement for allogeneic T cells in the reconstituting bone marrow inoculum for subsequent resistance to breaking of tolerance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sykes, M.; Sheard, M.A.; Sachs, D.H.

    1988-01-01

    The ability of normal recipient-type lymphocytes to break tolerance in long-term allogenic radiation chimeras has been investigated. Reconstitution of lethally irradiated mice with a mixture of syngeneic and allogeneic T cell-depleted (TCD) bone marrow (BM) has previously been shown to lead to mixed chimerism and permanent, specific tolerance to donor and host alloantigen (3-5). If allogeneic T cells are not depleted from the reconstituting inoculum, complete allogeneic chimerism results; however, no clinical evidence for GVHD is observed, presumably due to the protective effect provided by syngeneic TCD BM. This model has now been used to study the effects of allogenic T cells administered in reconstituting BM inocula on stability of long-term tolerance. We have attempted to break tolerance in long-term chimeras originally reconstituted with TCD or non-TCD BM by challenging them with inocula containing normal, nontolerant recipient strain lymphocytes. tolerance was broken with remarkable ease in recipients of mixed marrow inocula in which both original BM components were TCD. In contrast, tolerance in chimeras originally reconstituted with non-TCD allogeneic BM was not affected by such inocula. Susceptibility to loss of chimerism and tolerance was not related to initial levels of chimerism per se, but rather to T cell depletion of allogeneic BM, since chimeras reconstituted with TCD allogeneic BM alone (mean level of allogeneic chimerism 98%) were as susceptible as mixed chimeras to the tolerance-breaking effects of such inocula. The possible contribution of GVH reactivity to this resistance was investigated using an F1 into parent strain combination. In these animals, the use of non-TCD F1 BM inocula for reconstitution did not lead to resistance to the tolerance-breaking effects of recipient strain splenocytes

  18. Chinese hamster pleiotropic multidrug-resistant cells are not radioresistant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mitchell, J.B.; Gamson, J.; Russo, A.; Friedman, N.; DeGraff, W.; Carmichael, J.; Glatstein, E.

    1988-01-01

    The inherent cellular radiosensitivity of a Chinese hamster ovary pleiotropic cell line that is multidrug resistant (CHRC5) was compared to that of its parental cell line (AuxB1). Radiation survival curve parameters n and D0 were 4.5 and 1.1 Gy, respectively, for the CHRC5 line and 5.0 and 1.2 Gy, respectively, for the parental line. Thus, the inherent radiosensitivity of the two lines was similar even though key intracellular free radical scavenging and detoxifying systems employing glutathione, glutathione transferase, and catalase produced enzyme levels that were 2.0-, 1.9-, and 1.9-fold higher, respectively, in the drug-resistant cell line. Glutathione depletion by buthionine sulfoximine resulted in the same extent of aerobic radiosensitization in both lines (approximately 10%). Incorporation of iododeoxyuridine into cellular DNA sensitized both cell lines to radiation. These studies indicate that pleiotropic drug resistance does not necessarily confer radiation resistance

  19. Target cells in radiation pneumopathy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Trott, Klaus Ruediger; Herrmann, Thomas; Kasper, Michael

    2004-01-01

    Radiation pneumopathy is the reaction of the organ lung to radiation effects in various target cells. It starts as an exudative inflammation, with the clinical picture of interstitial pneumonia 6-12 weeks after irradiation, and proceeds to a productive chronic inflammation lasting several months and terminating, as other chronic inflammations do, in scar formation, called lung fibrosis. Lung fibrosis is the common end point after lung damage from a wide range of damaging agents. The pathogenetic process leading to the signs and symptoms of radiation pneumopathy is an integrated response of the complex organization of lung tissue. Clinical and pathologic data in patients do not support the hypothesis that the early inflammatory phase of radiation 'pneumonitis' and late 'radiation fibrosis' are independent pathogenetic processes in the same way as acute radiodermatitis and subcutaneous fibrosis are separate pathologic entities. The target cell population that initiates the pathogenetic process in the lung is not known, and it has been suggested that no single identifiable target exists. The entire process is the result of complex functional alterations in endothelial cells, pneumocytes, macrophages, and other resident and transient cells. No evidence has been found for a role of stem cell sterilization, for impaired transit cell proliferation, or for hypoplasia, which is the hallmark of other acute inflammatory normal tissue damage (i.e., in the mucosa). The radiobiologic concepts developed in cellular radiobiology are not adequate for the quantitative analysis of radiation pneumopathy. A new analytical framework based on structurally defined intercellular interaction by signaling molecules and their activation needs to be developed. This would not be only an abstract radiobiologic paradigm but would be the key to the development of potential therapeutic interventions in irradiated patients

  20. Isolation and identification of radiation resistant yeasts from sea water

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Cheon; Jeong, Yong Uk; Kim, Du Hong; Jo, Eun A

    2011-12-01

    This study was conducted to isolate radiation-resistant yeasts from sea water for development of application technology of radiation-resistant microorganism. · Isolation of 656 yeasts from sea water and selection of 2 radiation-resistant yeasts (D 10 value >3) · Identification of isolated yeasts as Filobasidium elegans sharing 99% sequence similarity · Characterization of isolated yeast with ability to repair of the DNA damage and membrane integrity to irradiation

  1. Radiation resistant modified polypropylene; Polipropylen modyfikowany odporny radiacyjnie

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bojarski, J.; Zimek, Z. [Institute of Nuclear Chemistry and Technology, Warsaw (Poland)

    1997-10-01

    Radiation technology for production of radiation resistant polypropylene for medical use has been presented. The method consists in radiation induced copolymerization of polypropylene with ethylene and addition of small amount of copolymer of polyethylene and vinyl acetate. The material of proposed composition has a very good mechanical properties and elevated radiation resistivity decided on possibility of radiosterilization of products made of this material and designed for medical use. 3 figs, 3 tabs.

  2. Radiation resistance of microorganisms on unsterilized infusion sets

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Christensen, E. Ahrensburg; Kristensen, H.; Hoborn, J.

    1991-01-01

    Three different methods were used for detecting and isolating microorganisms with high radiation resistance from the microbial contamination on infusion sets prior to sterilization. By all three methods, microorganisms with a radiation resistance high enough to be a critical factor in a steriliza......Three different methods were used for detecting and isolating microorganisms with high radiation resistance from the microbial contamination on infusion sets prior to sterilization. By all three methods, microorganisms with a radiation resistance high enough to be a critical factor...

  3. Radiation resistance of organic azo dyes in aqueous solutions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khabarov, V.N.; Kozlov, L.L.

    1987-01-01

    The resistance to the action of the ionizing radiation of aqueous and aqueous-alcoholic solutions of organic mono- and diazo dyes was studied. The radiation chemical yield of decolorization of the dye, determined from the kinetic decolorization curves served as a quantitative criterion of the radiation resistance. The influence of pH, addition of ethanol, hydroquinone, thiourea, glucose and oxygen on the radiation resistance of the azo dyes was studied. An attempt was made to relate the efficiency of radiation decolorization to the chemical nature of the dye

  4. Cell fusion by ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khair, M.B.

    1993-08-01

    The relevance and importance of cell fusion are illustrated by the notion that current interest in this phenomenon is shared by scientists in quite varied disciplines. The diversity of cellular membrane fusion phenomena could provoke one to think that there must be a multitude of mechanisms that can account for such diversity. But, in general, the mechanism for the fusion reaction itself could be very similar in many, or even all, cases. Cell fusion can be induced by several factors such as virus Sendai, polyethylene glycol, electric current and ionizing radiation. This article provides the reader with short view of recent progress in research on cell fusion and gives some explanations about fusion mechanisms. This study shows for the first time, the results of the cell fusion induced by ionizing radiations that we have obtained in our researches and the work performed by other groups. (author). 44 refs

  5. Cell Phone RF Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdul-Razzaq, Wathiq

    2015-01-01

    In a recent article in "Physics Today," Meredith and Redish emphasized the need to make introductory physics courses beneficial for life sciences majors. In this study, a lab activity is proposed to measure the intensity of electromagnetic waves emitted by cell phones and connect these measurements to various standards, biological…

  6. Isolation of radiation-resistant bacteria without exposure to irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, S.W.; Maxcy, R.B.

    1979-01-01

    Resistance to desiccation was utilized in the selection of highly radiation-resistant asporogenous bacteria from nonirradiated sources. A bacterial suspension in phosphate buffer was dried in a thin film at 25 0 C and 33% relative humidity. Storage under these conditions for 15 days or more reduced the number of radiation-sensitive bacteria. Further selection for radiation-resistant bacteria was obtained by irradiation of bacteria on velveteen in the replication process, therby avoiding the toxic effect of irradiated media. The similarity of radiation resistance and identifying characteristics in irradiated and non-irradiated isolates should allay some concerns that highly radiation-resistance bacteria have been permanently altered by radiation selection

  7. Archway for Radiation and Micrometeorite Occurrence Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Giersch, Louis R.

    2012-01-01

    The environmental conditions of the Moon require mitigation if a long-term human presence is to be achieved for extended periods of time. Radiation, micrometeoroid impacts, high-velocity debris, and thermal cycling represent threats to crew, equipment, and facilities. For decades, local regolith has been suggested as a candidate material to use in the construction of protective barriers. A thickness of roughly 3m is sufficient protection from both direct and secondary radiation from cosmic rays and solar protons; this thickness is sufficient to reduce radiation exposure even during solar flares. NASA has previously identified a need for innovations that will support lunar habitats using lightweight structures because the reduction of structural mass translates directly into additional up and down mass capability that would facilitate additional logistics capacity and increased science return for all mission phases. The development of non-pressurized primary structures that have synergy with the development of pressurized structures is also of interest. The use of indigenous or in situ materials is also a well-known and active area of research that could drastically improve the practicality of human exploration beyond low-Earth orbit. The Archway for Radiation and Micrometeorite Occurrence Resistance (ARMOR) concept is a new, multifunctional structure that acts as radiation shielding and micrometeorite impact shielding for long-duration lunar surface protection of humans and equipment. ARMOR uses a combination of native regolith and a deployed membrane jacket to yield a multifunctional structure. ARMOR is a robust and modular system that can be autonomously assembled on-site prior to the first human surface arrival. The system provides protection by holding a sufficiently thick (3 m) archshaped shell of local regolith around a central cavity. The regolith is held in shape by an arch-shaped jacket made of strong but deployable material. No regolith processing is

  8. Influence of mutations in some structural genes of heat-shock proteins on radiation resistance of Escherichia coli

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Verbenko, V.N.; Kuznetsova, L.V.; Bikineeva, E.G.; Kalinin, V.L.

    1992-01-01

    Lethal effects of γ-irradiation were studied in Escherichia coli strains with normal repair genotype and in radiation-resistant Gam r strains, both carrying additional mutations in the structural genes dnaK, grpE, groES or groEL. The null mutation ΔdnaK52::Cm r enhanced radiation sensitivity of wild-type cells and abolished the effect of heat induced rediation-resistance (ETIRR) and elevated radiation resistance of the Gam r strains

  9. Genetic resistance in experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis. I. Analysis of the mechanism of LeR resistance using radiation chimeras

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pelfrey, C.M.; Waxman, F.J.; Whitacre, C.C.

    1989-01-01

    Experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis (EAE) is a cell-mediated autoimmune disease of the central nervous system that has been extensively studied in the rat. The Lewis rat is highly susceptible to the induction of EAE, while the Lewis resistant (LeR) rat is known to be resistant. In this paper, we demonstrate that the LeR rat, which was derived from the Lewis strain by inbreeding of fully resistant animals, is histocompatible with the Lewis strain. Radiation chimeras, a tool for distinguishing between immunologic and nonimmunologic resistance mechanisms, were utilized to analyze the cellular mechanisms involved in genetic resistance to EAE. By transplanting bone marrow cells from LeR rats into irradiated Lewis recipients, Lewis rats were rendered resistant to EAE induction. Likewise, transplanting Lewis bone marrow cells into irradiated LeR recipients rendered LeR rats susceptible. Mixed lymphoid cell chimeras using bone marrow, spleen, and thymus cells in Lewis recipient rats revealed individual lymphoid cell types and cell interactions that significantly affected the incidence and severity of EAE. Our results suggest that LeR resistance is mediated by hematopoietic/immune cells, and that cells located in the spleen appear to play a critical role in the resistance/susceptibility to EAE induction. Depletion of splenic adherent cells did not change the patterns of EAE resistance. In vivo cell mixing studies suggested the presence of a suppressor cell population in the LeR spleen preparations which exerted an inhibitory effect on Lewis autoimmune responses. Thus, the mechanism of LeR resistance appears to be different from that in other EAE-resistant animals

  10. Radiation resistance of wide band gap n+/p AlInGaP solar cell for high-efficient multijunction space solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Hae-Seok; Yamaguchi, Masafumi; Ekins-Daukes, Nicholas J.; Khan, Aurangzeb; Takamoto, Tatsuya; Imaizumi, Mitsuru; Ohshima, Takeshi; Itoh, Hisayoshi

    2007-01-01

    The effects of 30 keV proton irradiation on n + /p AlInGaP solar cells are presented here. As the proton fluence increases to more than 1x10 10 cm -2 , the maximum power P max of the cell decreases markedly due to the introduction of defects by proton irradiation. From the changes in minority-carrier diffusion length determined by quantum efficiency modeling as a function of fluence, the damage constant K L for p-AlInGaP was estimated to be about 5.0x10 -5 . This value is comparable to that observed from 3 MeV proton-irradiated p-InGaP whereas it is lower than that observed from 3 MeV proton-irradiated p-InGaAsP and p-InGaAs cells. The maximum power recovery of the cell was observed by minority-carrier-injection-enhanced annealing (1 A/cm 2 ), and the annealing activation energy for 30 keV proton-irradiation-induced defects in p-AlInGaP was determined as ΔE=0.42 eV. (author)

  11. Combination immunotherapy with radiation and CpG-based tumor vaccination for the eradication of radio- and immuno-resistant lung carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chamoto, Kenji; Wakita, Daiko; Takeshima, Tsuguhide

    2009-01-01

    Unmethylated cytosine-phosphorothioate-guanine containing oligodeoxynucleotides (CpG-ODN) is known as a ligand of toll-like receptor 9 (TLR9), which selectively activates type-1 immunity. We have already reported that the vaccination of tumor-bearing mice with liposome-CpG coencapsulated with model-tumor antigen, ovalbumin (OVA) (CpG+OVA-liposome) caused complete cure of the mice bearing OVA-expressing EG-7 lymphoma cells. However, the same therapy was not effective to eradicate Lewis lung carcinoma (LLC)-OVA-carcinoma. To overcome the refractoriness of LLC-OVA, we tried the combination therapy of radiation with CpG-based tumor vaccination. When LLC-OVA-carcinoma intradermally (i.d.) injected into C57BL/6 became palpable (7-8 mm), the mice were irradiated twice with a dose of 14 Gy at intervals of 24 h. After the second radiation, CpG+OVA-liposome was i.d. administered near the draining lymph node (DLN) of the tumor mass. The tumor growth of mice treated with radiation plus CpG+OVA-liposome was greatly inhibited and approximately 60% of mice treated were completely cured. Moreover, the combined therapy with radiation and CpG+OVA-liposome allowed the augmented induction of OVA-tetramer + LLC-OVA-specific cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) in DLN of tumor-bearing mice. These results indicate that the combined therapy of radiation with CpG-based tumor vaccine is a useful strategy to eradicate intractable carcinoma. (author)

  12. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ayala, F.J.

    1991-01-01

    We proposed an investigation of genetically-determined individual differences in sensitivity to ionizing radiation. The model organism is Drosophila melanogaster. The gene coding for Cu,Zn superoxide dismutase (SOD) is the target locus, but the effects of variation in other components of the genome that modulate SOD levels are also taken into account. SOD scavenges oxygen radicals generated during exposure to ionizing radiation. It has been shown to protect against ionizing radiation damage to DNA, viruses, bacteria, mammalian cells, whole mice, and Drosophila. Two alleles, S and F, are commonly found in natural populations of D. melanogaster; in addition we have isolated from a natural population ''null'' (CA1) mutant that yields only 3.5% of normal SOD activity. The S, F, and CA1 alleles provide an ideal model system to investigate SOD-dependent radioresistance, because each allele yields different levels of SOD, so that S > F >> CA1. The roles of SOD level in radioresistance are being investigated in a series of experiments that measure the somatic and germ-line effects of increasing doses of ionizing radiation. In addition, we have pursued an unexpected genetic event-namely the nearly simultaneous transformation of several lines homozygous for the SOD ''null'' allele into predominately S lines. Using specifically designed probes and DNA amplification by means of the Tag polymerase chain reaction (PCR) we have shown that (1) the null allele was still present in the transformed lines, but was being gradually replaced by the S allele as a consequence of natural selection; and (2) that the transformation was due to the spontaneous deletion of a 0.68 Kb truncated P-element, the insertion of which is characteristic of the CA1 null allele

  13. Studies on the radiation resistances of bioburden for medical devices

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sekiguchi, Masayuki; Tabei, Masae

    1997-01-01

    Radiation resistances of reference bacteria strains and the bioburden obtained from hypodermic needles were estimated with gamma- and electron- irradiators calibrated with NPL (National Physics Laboratory) alanine dosimeter. Radiation resistances of the TSB-bacteria suspension samples dried on glass test tubes showed about two times higher than those of the water-bacteria suspension dried on glass fiber paper or paper filter. Radiation resistances of the dried TSB-bacteria suspension samples irradiated by both gamma rays and electron beams were fluctuated. The overall increase ratio of radiation resistance was estimated by dividing D-values of TSB-bacteria suspension samples by that of water-bacteria suspension samples for individual bacteria. Then, the survival curve of hypodermic needle bioburden revised by the increase ratio was obtained, and which compared with that of standard distribution of radiation resistances of ISO(SDR). (author)

  14. Comparison of gamma radiation - induced effects in two human prostate cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Vucic, V.; Adzic, M.; Ruzdijic, S.; Radojcic, M.B. . E-mail address of corresponding author: vesnav@vin.bg.ac.yu; Vucic, V.)

    2005-01-01

    In this study, the effects of gamma radiation on two hormone refractory human prostate cancer cell lines, DU 145 and PC-3, were followed. It was shown that gamma radiation induced significant inhibition of cell proliferation and viability in dose dependent manner. Antiproliferative effects of radiation were similar in both cell lines, and more pronounced than cytotoxic effects. In addition to that, PC-3 cell line was more resistant to radiation -induced cytotoxicity. (author)

  15. At the Crossroads of Cancer Stem Cells, Radiation Biology, and Radiation Oncology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gerweck, Leo E; Wakimoto, Hiroaki

    2016-03-01

    Reports that a small subset of tumor cells initiate and sustain tumor growth, are resistant to radiation and drugs, and bear specific markers have led to an explosion of cancer stem cell research. These reports imply that the evaluation of therapeutic response by changes in tumor volume is misleading, as volume changes reflect the response of the sensitive rather than the resistant tumorigenic cell population. The reports further suggest that the marker-based selection of the tumor cell population will facilitate the development of radiation treatment schedules, sensitizers, and drugs that specifically target the resistant tumorigenic cells that give rise to treatment failure. This review presents evidence that contests the observations that cancer stem cell markers reliably identify the subset of tumor cells that sustain tumor growth and that the marker-identified population is radioresistant relative to the marker-negative cells. Experimental studies show that cells and tumors that survive large radiation doses are not more radioresistant than unirradiated cells and tumors, and also show that the intrinsic radiosensitivity of unsorted colony-forming tumor cells, in combination with the fraction of unsorted tumor cells that are tumor initiating, predicts tumor radiocurability. ©2016 American Association for Cancer Research.

  16. Genetic variation in resistance to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ayala, F.J.

    1992-01-01

    Results of an investigation of the gene coding for Cu, Zn superoxide dismutase (Sod) in Drosophila melanogaster seeking to understand the enzyme's role in cell protection against ionizing radiation are reported. Components of the investigation include molecular characterization of the gene; measuring the response of different genotypes to increasing levels of radiation; and investigation of the processes that maintain the Sod polymorphism in populations. While two alleles, S and F, are commonly found at the Sod locus in natural populations of D. melanogaster we have isolated from a natural population a null (CA1) mutant that yields only 3.5% of normal SOD activity. The S, F, and CA1 alleles provide a model system to investigate SOD-dependent radioresistance, because each allele yields different levels of SOD, so that S > F >> CAl. The radioprotective effects of SOD can be established by showing protective effects for the various genotypes that correspond to those inequalities. Because the allele variants studied are derived from natural populations, the proposed investigation avoids problems that arise when mutants obtained my mutagenesis are used. Moreover, each allele is studied in multiple genetic backgrounds, so that we correct for effects attributable to other loci by randomizing these effects.

  17. Development of radiation-resisting high molecular-weight materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakagawa, Tsutomu

    1976-01-01

    The excellent radiation-resisting polyvinyl chloride developed at the opportunity of the research on the relationships between the protection of living body and the polymer-technological protection from radiation is reviewed. The report is divided into four main parts, namely 1) the change in the molecular arrangement of market-available, high molecular-weight materials by gamma-ray irradiation, 2) the protection of high molecular-weight materials from radiation, 3) the relationships between the biological radiation-protective substances and the change to radiation-resisting property of synthesized high molecular-weight substances, and 4) the development of the radiation-resisting high molecular-weight materials as metal-collecting agents. Attention is paid to the polyvinyl chloride having N-methyl-dithio-carbamate radical (PMD), synthesized by the author et. al., that has excellent radiation-resisting property. PMD has some possibility to form thiol- and amino-radicals necessary to protect living things from radiation. It is believed that the protection effects of N-methyl-dithio-carbamate radical are caused by the relatively stable S radical produced by the energy transfer. PMD film is suitable for the irradiation of foods, because it hardly changes the permeability of oxygen and carbon dioxide. PMD produces mercaptide or chelate. A new metal-collecting agent (PSDC) having reactivity with the metallic ions with radiation-resisting property was developed, which is derived from polyvinyl chloride and sodium N-methyl-N-carboxy-methyl-dithio-carbamate. (Iwakiri, K.)

  18. Heat resistant/radiation resistant cable and incore structure test device for FBR type reactor

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tanimoto, Hajime; Shiono, Takeo; Sato, Yoshimi; Ito, Kazumi; Sudo, Shigeaki; Saito, Shin-ichi; Mitsui, Hisayasu.

    1995-01-01

    A heat resistant/radiation resistant coaxial cable of the present invention comprises an insulation layer, an outer conductor and a protection cover in this order on an inner conductor, in which the insulation layer comprises thermoplastic polyimide. In the same manner, a heat resistant/radiation resistant power cable has an insulation layer comprising thermoplastic polyimide on a conductor, and is provided with a protection cover comprising braid of alamide fibers at the outer circumference of the insulation layer. An incore structure test device for an FBR type reactor comprises the heat resistant/radiation resistant coaxial cable and/or the power cable. The thermoplastic polyimide can be extrusion molded, and has excellent radiation resistant by the extrusion, as well as has high dielectric withstand voltage, good flexibility and electric characteristics at high temperature. The incore structure test device for the FBR type reactor of the present invention comprising such a cable has excellent reliability and durability. (T.M.)

  19. Multidrug resistance in tumour cells: characterisation of the multidrug resistant cell line K562-Lucena 1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    VIVIAN M. RUMJANEK

    2001-03-01

    Full Text Available Multidrug resistance to chemotherapy is a major obstacle in the treatment of cancer patients. The best characterised mechanism responsible for multidrug resistance involves the expression of the MDR-1 gene product, P-glycoprotein. However, the resistance process is multifactorial. Studies of multidrug resistance mechanisms have relied on the analysis of cancer cell lines that have been selected and present cross-reactivity to a broad range of anticancer agents. This work characterises a multidrug resistant cell line, originally selected for resistance to the Vinca alkaloid vincristine and derived from the human erythroleukaemia cell K562. This cell line, named Lucena 1, overexpresses P-glycoprotein and have its resistance reversed by the chemosensitisers verapamil, trifluoperazine and cyclosporins A, D and G. Furthermore, we demonstrated that methylene blue was capable of partially reversing the resistance in this cell line. On the contrary, the use of 5-fluorouracil increased the resistance of Lucena 1. In addition to chemotherapics, Lucena 1 cells were resistant to ultraviolet A radiation and hydrogen peroxide and failed to mobilise intracellular calcium when thapsigargin was used. Changes in the cytoskeleton of this cell line were also observed.A resistência a múltiplos fármacos é o principal obstáculo no tratamento de pacientes com câncer. O mecanismo responsável pela resistência múltipla mais bem caracterizado envolve a expressão do produto do gene MDR-1, a glicoproteína P. Entretanto, o processo de resistência tem fatores múltiplos. Estudos de mecanismos de resistência m��ltipla a fármacos têm dependido da análise de linhagens celulares tumorais que foram selecionadas e apresentam reatividade cruzada a uma ampla faixa de agentes anti-tumorais. Este trabalho caracteriza uma linhagem celular com múltipla resistência a fármacos, selecionada originalmente pela resistência ao alcalóide de Vinca vincristina e derivado

  20. Some physiological and morphological aspects of radiation-resistant bacteria and a new method for their isolation from food

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sanders, S.W.

    1978-01-01

    A study was undertaken to help clarify the taxonomic positions and mechanisms of radiation resistance of radiation-resistant asporogenous bacteria found in foods. Determinations of DNA base compositions of highly resistant Moroxella-Acinetobacter (M-A) strains indicated that they were atypical, having percent guanine plus cytosine contents exceeding the values for true Moraxella or Acinetobacter spp. By direct observation of dividing cells, the resistant M-A were found to undergo multiple-plane division. Electron micrographs revealed unusually thick cell walls in the M-A as compared with gram-negative bacteria, indicating a possible role of the cell wall in radiation resistance. Resistance to desiccation was utilized in the selection of highly radiation-resistant bacteria from non-irradiated sources. Bacteria from a food or other source were suspended in dilute phosphate buffer and dried in a thin film at 25 C and 33% relative humidity. Storage under these conditions for 15 days or more reduced the numbers of radiation-sensitive bacteria. Further selection of the most radiation-resistant bacteria was obtained by irradiation of bacteria on velveteen in the replication process, thereby allowing the isolation of highly resistant bacteria that had not been irradiated. The similarity of radiation-resistance and identifying characteristics between irradiated and non-irradiated isolates indicated that highly radiation-resistant bacteria are not altered by radiation selection. Irradiated Plate Count Agar and Tryptic Soy Agar were found to be very toxic to radiation-resistant bacteria. This phenomenon may be important in food irradiation, where the ability to survive and grow in a product may depend partly on the sensitivity to bacteriocidal products formed during irradiation

  1. Radiation and temperature effects in gallium arsenide, indium phosphide, and silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Swartz, C. K.; Hart, R. E., Jr.; Statler, R. L.

    1987-01-01

    The effects of radiation on performance are determined for both n+p and p+n GaAs and InP cells and for silicon n+p cells. It is found that the radiation resistance of InP is greater than that of both GaAs and Si under 1-MeV electron irradiation. For silicon, the observed decreased radiation resistance with decreased resistivity is attributed to the presence of a radiation-induced boron-oxygen defect. Comparison of radiation damage in both p+n and n+p GaAs cells yields a decreased radiation resistance for the n+p cell attributable to increased series resistance, decreased shunt resistance, and relatively greater losses in the cell's p-region. For InP, the n+p configuration is found to have greater radiation resistance than the p+n cell. The increased loss in this latter cell is attributed to losses in the cell's emitter region. Temperature dependency results are interpreted using a theoretical relation for dVoc/dT, which predicts that increased Voc should result in decreased numerical values for dPm/dT. The predicted correlation is observed for GaAs but not for InP, a result which is attributed to variations in cell processing.

  2. Utilization of SRNL-developed radiation-resistant polymer in high radiation environments

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Skibo, A. [Savannah River Site (SRS), Aiken, SC (United States). Savannah River National Lab. (SRNL)

    2017-09-27

    The radiation-resistant polymer developed by the Savannah River National Laboratory is adaptable for multiple applications to enhance polymer endurance and effectiveness in radiation environments. SRNL offers to collaborate with TEPCO in evaluation, testing, and utilization of SRNL’s radiation-resistant polymer in the D&D of the Fukushima Daiichi NPS. Refinement of the scope and associated costs will be conducted in consultation with TECPO.

  3. Radiation sensitivity of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koch, C.J.

    1985-01-01

    The authors tested various aspects of the so-called ''competition'' model for radiation sensitization/protection. In this model, sensitizers and/or protectors react in first order chemical reactions with radiation-induced target radicals in the cell, producing damage fixation or repair respectively. It is only because of these parallel, first-order competing reactions that they may assign net amounts of damage on the basis of the chemical reactivity of the sentiziers/protectors with the radicals. It might be expected that such a simple model could not explain all aspects of cellular radiosensitivity and this has indeed been found to be true. However, one is able, with the simple model, to pose quite specific questions, and obtain quantitative information with respect to the relative agreement between experiment and theory. Many experiments by several investigators have found areas of disagreement with the competition theory, particularly with respect to the follow items: 1) role of cellular glutathione as the most important endogeneous radiation protector 2) characteristics of various sensitizers which cause them to behave differently from each other 3) methods relating to the quantitative kinetic analysis of experimenal results. This paper addresses these specific areas of disagreement from both an experimental and theoretical basis

  4. Radiation effects on membranes - 1. Cellular permeability and cell survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khare, S.; Jayakumar, A.; Trivedi, A.; Kesavan, P.C.; Prasad, R.

    1982-01-01

    The effect of various doses of γ radiation (5-60 krad) on the membrane permeability and cell survival of Candida albicans, a pathogenic yeast, was investigated. A reduction in the cell survival and in the accumulation of amino acids (proline, glycine, lysine, and glutamic acid) was observed following irradiation. The rate of oxygen uptake, which is often associated with transport, was also reduced. There was no damage to available sulfhydryl groups following the exposure of cells to various doses of γ radiation. The membrane lipid composition of C. albicans cells can be altered by growing them in alkanes of varying chain lengths. The effects of such altered lipid composition on radiosensitivity was examined. It was observed that C. albicans cells with altered lipid content acquire resistance to γ radiation

  5. Pulse radiolysis studies on radiation resistance of epoxy resin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tagawa, S.; Washio, M.; Hayashi, N.; Tabata, Y.

    1985-01-01

    The mechanisms of radiation damage in epoxy resin, especially the primary processes, have been studied by a time-resolved spectroscopic technique (pulse radiolysis). The difference between the radiation resistance of aromatic and aliphatic amine curing epoxy resin is explained by internal radiation protection effects due to energy and charge transfer on the basis of the time-resolved spectroscopic data of reactive intermediate (excited states and ions) in an irradiated epoxy resin. (orig.)

  6. Intestinal endocrine cells in radiation enteritis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pietroletti, R.; Blaauwgeers, J.L.; Taat, C.W.; Simi, M.; Brummelkamp, W.H.; Becker, A.E.

    1989-01-01

    In this study, the intestinal endocrine cells were investigated in 13 surgical specimens affected by radiation enteritis. Endocrine cells were studied by means of Grimelius' silver staining and immunostaining for chromogranin, a general marker of endocrine cells. Positively stained cells were quantified by counting their number per unit length of muscularis mucosa. Results in radiation enteritis were compared with matched control specimens by using Student's t test. Chromogranin immunostaining showed a statistically significant increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis specimens compared with controls both in small and large intestine (ileum, 67.5 +/- 23.5 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 17.0 +/- 6.1 in controls; colon, 40.9 +/- 13.7 cells per unit length of muscularis mucosa in radiation enteritis versus 9.5 +/- 4.1 in controls--p less than 0.005 in both instances). Increase of endocrine cells was demonstrated also by Grimelius' staining; however, without reaching statistical significance. It is not clear whether or not the increase of endocrine cells in radiation enteritis reported in this study is caused by a hyperplastic response or by a sparing phenomenon. We should consider that increased endocrine cells, when abnormally secreting their products, may be involved in some of the clinical features of radiation enteropathy. In addition, as intestinal endocrine cells produce trophic substances to the intestine, their increase could be responsible for the raised risk of developing carcinoma of the intestine in long standing radiation enteritis

  7. Radiation hard memory cell and array thereof

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gunckel, T.L. II; Rovell, A.; Nielsen, R.L.

    1978-01-01

    A memory cell configuration that is implemented to be relatively hard to the adverse effects of a nuclear event is discussed. The presently disclosed memory cell can be interconnected with other like memory cells to form a high speed radiation hard register file. Information is selectively written into and read out of a memory cell comprising the register file, which memory cell preserves previously stored data without alteration in the event of exposure to high levels of nuclear radiation

  8. Radiation-resistant composite for biological shield of personnel

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barabash, D. E.; Barabash, A. D.; Potapov, Yu B.; Panfilov, D. V.; Perekalskiy, O. E.

    2017-10-01

    This article presents the results of theoretical and practical justification for the use of polymer concrete based on nonisocyanate polyurethanes in biological shield structures. We have identified the impact of ratio: polymer - radiation-resistant filling compound on the durability and protection properties of polymer concrete. The article expounds regression dependence of the change of basic properties of the aforementioned polymer concrete on the absorbed radiation dose rate. Synergy effect in attenuation of radioactivity release in case of conjoint use of hydrogenous polymer base and radiation-resistant powder is also addressed herein.

  9. Radiation Effects of Commercial Resistive Random Access Memories

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Dakai; LaBel, Kenneth A.; Berg, Melanie; Wilcox, Edward; Kim, Hak; Phan, Anthony; Figueiredo, Marco; Buchner, Stephen; Khachatrian, Ani; Roche, Nicolas

    2014-01-01

    We present results for the single-event effect response of commercial production-level resistive random access memories. We found that the resistive memory arrays are immune to heavy ion-induced upsets. However, the devices were susceptible to single-event functional interrupts, due to upsets from the control circuits. The intrinsic radiation tolerant nature of resistive memory makes the technology an attractive consideration for future space applications.

  10. A Novel Radiation-Resistant Yeast, Filobasidium elegans RRY1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Singh, Harinder; Kim, Ha Ram; Song, Hyun Pa; Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Jeongeup (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-05-15

    The tolerance to ionizing radiation stress is present among different classes and species of organisms. As listed by Rainey et al., ionizing radiation resistant organisms were isolated from a variety of different sources like processed/canned food items, paper industry, soil and water samples. Apart from extensively reported bacteria and Archea group, many fungal species like Aspergillus, Curvularia, Alternaria, Cryptococcus, and Ustilago maydis have been found to be resistant to ionizing radiation. However, different environmental sources are constantly been explored for novel radioresistant organisms, which can help in understanding the molecular mechanism behind these extreme stress responses. On the basis of this, present study was initiated to find novel radiation resistant yeast from sea water source

  11. A Novel Radiation-Resistant Yeast, Filobasidium elegans RRY1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Singh, Harinder; Kim, Ha Ram; Song, Hyun Pa; Lim, Sang Yong; Kim, Dong Ho

    2012-01-01

    The tolerance to ionizing radiation stress is present among different classes and species of organisms. As listed by Rainey et al., ionizing radiation resistant organisms were isolated from a variety of different sources like processed/canned food items, paper industry, soil and water samples. Apart from extensively reported bacteria and Archea group, many fungal species like Aspergillus, Curvularia, Alternaria, Cryptococcus, and Ustilago maydis have been found to be resistant to ionizing radiation. However, different environmental sources are constantly been explored for novel radioresistant organisms, which can help in understanding the molecular mechanism behind these extreme stress responses. On the basis of this, present study was initiated to find novel radiation resistant yeast from sea water source

  12. Radiation Resistant Magnets for the RIA Fragment Separator

    CERN Document Server

    Zeller, Al; Gupta, Ramesh C; Ronningen, Reginald; Sherrill, Bradley

    2005-01-01

    The high radiation fields around the production target and the beam dump in the fragment separator at the Rare Isotope Accelerator requires that radiation resistant magnets be used. Because large apertures and high gradients are required for the quadrupoles and similar demanding requirements for the dipole and sextupoles, resistive coils are difficult to justify. The radiation heating of any materials at liquid helium temperatures also requires that superconducting versions of the magnets have low cold-masses. The final optical design has taken the practical magnets limits into account and sizes and fields adjusted to what is believed to be achievable with technology that is possible with sufficient R&D. Designs with higher obtainable current densities and having good radiation tolerances that use superconducting coils are presented, as well as the radiation transport calculations that drive the material parameters.

  13. Radiation resistant polymers and coatings for nuclear fuel reprocessing plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kamachi Mudali, U.; Mallika, C.; Lawrence, Falix

    2014-01-01

    Polymer based materials are extensively used in the nuclear industry for the reprocessing of spent fuels in highly radioactive and corrosive environment. Hence, these polymer materials are susceptible to damage by ionizing radiation, resulting in the degradation in properties. Polymers containing aromatic molecules generally possess higher resistance to radiation degradation than the aliphatic polymers. For improving the radiation resistance of polymers various methods are reported in the literature. Among the aromatic polymers, polyetheretherketone (PEEK) has the radiation tolerance up to 10 Mega Grey (MGy). To explore the possibility of enhancing the radiation resistance of PEEK, a study was initiated to develop PEEK - ceramic composites and evaluate the effect of radiation on the properties of the composites. PEEK and PEEK - alumina (micron size) composites were irradiated in a gamma chamber using 60 Co source and the degradation in mechanical, structural, electrical and thermal properties, gel fraction, coefficient of friction and morphology were investigated. The degradation in the mechanical properties owing to radiation could be reduced by adding alumina filler to PEEK. Nano alumina filler was observed to be more effective in suppressing the damage caused by radiation on the polymer, when compared to micron alumina filler. For the protection of aluminium components in the manipulators and the rotors and stators of the motors of the centrifugal extractors employed in the plant from the attack by nitric acid vapour, PEEK coating based on liquid dispersion was developed, which has resistance to radiation, chemicals and wear. The effect of radiation and chemical vapour on the properties of the PEEK coating was estimated. The performance of the coating in the plant was evaluated and the coating was found to give adequate protection to the motors of centrifugal extractors against corrosion. (author)

  14. SU-C-303-01: Activation-Induced Cytidine Deaminase Confers Cancer Resistance to Radiation Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yi, S; La Count, S; Liu, J; Bai, X; Lu, L

    2015-01-01

    Purpose: To study the role of activation-induced cytidine deaminase (AID) in malignant cell resistance to radiation therapy. Methods: We first developed several small devices that could be used to adopt radiation beams from clinical high dose rate brachy therapy (HDR) or linac-based megavoltage machines to perform pre-clinical cell and mouse experiments. Then we used these devices to deliver radiation to AID-positive and AID-silenced cancer cells or tumors formed by these cells in mice. Cells and mice bearing tumors received the same dose under the same experimental conditions. For cells, we observed the apoptosis and the cell survival rate over time. For mice bearing tumors, we measured and recorded the tumor sizes every other day for 4 weeks. Results: For cell experiments, we found that the AID-positive cells underwent much less apoptosis compared with AID-silenced cells upon radiation. And for mouse experiments, we found that AID-positive tumors grew significantly faster than the AID-silenced tumors despite of receiving the same doses of radiation. Conclusion: Our study suggests that AID may confer cancer resistance to radiation therapy, and AID may be a significant biomarker predicting cancer resistance to radiation therapy for certain cancer types

  15. Radiation Changes the Metabolic Profiling of Melanoma Cell Line B16.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lige Wu

    Full Text Available Radiation therapy can be an effective way to kill cancer cells using ionizing radiation, but some tumors are resistant to radiation therapy and the underlying mechanism still remains elusive. It is therefore necessary to establish an appropriate working model to study and monitor radiation-mediated cancer therapy. In response to cellular stress, the metabolome is the integrated profiling of changes in all metabolites in cells, which can be used to investigate radiation tolerance mechanisms and identify targets for cancer radiation sensibilization. In this study, using 1H nuclear magnetic resonance for untargeted metabolic profiling in radiation-tolerant mouse melanoma cell line B16, we comprehensively investigated changes in metabolites and metabolic network in B16 cells in response to radiation. Principal component analysis and partial least squares discriminant analysis indicated the difference in cellular metabolites between the untreated cells and X-ray radiated cells. In radiated cells, the content of alanine, glutamate, glycine and choline was increased, while the content of leucine, lactate, creatine and creatine phosphate was decreased. Enrichment analysis of metabolic pathway showed that the changes in metabolites were related to multiple metabolic pathways including the metabolism of glycine, arginine, taurine, glycolysis, and gluconeogenesis. Taken together, with cellular metabolome study followed by bioinformatic analysis to profile specific metabolic pathways in response to radiation, we deepened our understanding of radiation-resistant mechanisms and radiation sensibilization in cancer, which may further provide a theoretical and practical basis for personalized cancer therapy.

  16. Radiation curable resistant coatings and their preparation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brack, K.

    1976-01-01

    A prepolymer containing unsaturated hydrocarbon groups is prepared and mixed on a roller mill with one or more acrylic ester monomers and various additives to make a coating formulation of a desired viscosity. In general, low viscosity formulations are used for overprint varnishes, on paper or foil, or with pigments, for certain types of printing inks. Higher viscosity formulations are used to apply thick films on panels, tiles, or other bodies. Thin films are cured to hardness by brief exposure to ultraviolet light. Thicker films require more energetic radiation such as plasma arc and electron beam radiation. The prepolymers particularly useful for making such radiation curable coatings are the reaction products of polyether polyols and bis- or polyisocyanates and hydroxy alkenes or acrylic (or methacrylic) hydroxy esters, and, likewise, reactive polyamides modified with dicarboxy alkenes, their anhydrides or esters. A small amount of wax incorporated in the coating formulations results in coatings with release characteristics similar to those of PTFE coatings. 10 claims

  17. Functional genetic research for radiation and drug resistant adenocarcinoma and its application

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, In Gyu; Kim, Kug Chan; Jung, Il Lae; Chul, Shin Byung; Kook, Park Hyo; Lee, Hee Min

    2012-01-01

    The work scope of 'Functional genetic research for radiation and drug resistant adenocarcinoma and its application' had contained the research about effect of transgelin(SM22a), neurotensin, metallothionein-1G transgelin-2 genes on the cell death triggered ionizing radiation, cisplatin, MMS, luteolin and H 2 O 2 (toxic agents), which are highly expressed in radiation-induced mutant cells. In this study, to elucidate the role of these proteins in the ionizing radiation (toxic chemicals)-induced cell death, we utilized sensed (or antisense, small interference RNA) cells, which overexpress (or down-regulate) RNAs associated with these proteins biosynthesis, and investigated the effects of these genes on the cytotoxicity caused by ionizing radiation, H 2 O 2 and toxic chemicals. We also investigated the functions of downstream target genes of transgelin such as IGF-1Rβ/PI3K/AKT pathway and transgelin/metallothioneine in A-549 and HepG2 cells because such target genes are able to potentiate the cell-killing or cell protecting effects against radiation

  18. Role of Mn2+ and compatible solutes in the radiation resistance of thermophilic bacteria and archaea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Webb, Kimberly M; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn(2+)-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  19. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kimberly M. Webb

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-myo-inositol phosphate in the radiation resistance of aerobic and anaerobic thermophiles. We found that the IR resistance of the thermophilic bacteria Rubrobacter xylanophilus and Rubrobacter radiotolerans was highly correlated to the accumulation of high intracellular concentration of trehalose in association with Mn, supporting the model of Mn2+-dependent ROS scavenging in the aerobes. In contrast, the hyperthermophilic archaea Thermococcus gammatolerans and Pyrococcus furiosus did not contain significant amounts of intracellular Mn, and we found no significant antioxidant activity from mannosylglycerate and di-myo-inositol phosphate in vitro. We therefore propose that the low levels of IR-generated ROS under anaerobic conditions combined with highly constitutively expressed detoxification systems in these anaerobes are key to their radiation resistance and circumvent the need for the accumulation of Mn-antioxidant complexes in the cell.

  20. Metal-nanotube composites as radiation resistant materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    González, Rafael I.; Valencia, Felipe; Mella, José; Kiwi, Miguel, E-mail: m.kiwi.t@gmail.com [Departamento de Física, Facultad de Ciencias, CEDENNA, Universidad de Chile, Casilla 653, Santiago 7800024 (Chile); Duin, Adri C. T. van [Department of Mechanical and Nuclear Engineering, The Pennsylvania State University, University Park, Pennsylvania 16802 (United States); So, Kang Pyo; Li, Ju [Department of Nuclear Science and Engineering and Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, Massachusetts 02139 (United States); Bringa, Eduardo M. [CONICET and Facultad de Ciencias Exactas y Naturales, Universidad Nacional de Cuyo, Mendoza 5500 (Argentina)

    2016-07-18

    The improvement of radiation resistance in nanocomposite materials is investigated by means of classical reactive molecular dynamics simulations. In particular, we study the influence of carbon nanotubes (CNTs) in an Ni matrix on the trapping and possible outgassing of He. When CNTs are defect-free, He atoms diffuse alongside CNT walls and, although there is He accumulation at the metal-CNT interface, no He trespassing of the CNT wall is observed, which is consistent with the lack of permeability of a perfect graphene sheet. However, when vacancies are introduced to mimic radiation-induced defects, He atoms penetrate CNTs, which play the role of nano-chimneys, allowing He atoms to escape the damaged zone and reduce bubble formation in the matrix. Consequently, composites made of CNTs inside metals are likely to display improved radiation resistance, particularly when radiation damage is related to swelling and He-induced embrittlement.

  1. Repair of radiation damage in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Setlow, R.B.

    1981-01-01

    The responses, such as survival, mutation, and carcinogenesis, of mammalian cells and tissues to radiation are dependent not only on the magnitude of the damage to macromolecular structures - DNA, RNA, protein, and membranes - but on the rates of macromolecular syntheses of cells relative to the half-lives of the damages. Cells possess a number of mechanisms for repairing damage to DNA. If the repair systems are rapid and error free, cells can tolerate much larger doses than if repair is slow or error prone. It is important to understand the effects of radiation and the repair of radiation damage because there exist reasonable amounts of epidemiological data that permits the construction of dose-response curves for humans. The shapes of such curves or the magnitude of the response will depend on repair. Radiation damage is emphasized because: (a) radiation dosimetry, with all its uncertainties for populations, is excellent compared to chemical dosimetry; (b) a number of cancer-prone diseases are known in which there are defects in DNA repair and radiation results in more chromosomal damage in cells from such individuals than in cells from normal individuals; (c) in some cases, specific radiation products in DNA have been correlated with biological effects, and (d) many chemical effects seem to mimic radiation effects. A further reason for emphasizing damage to DNA is the wealth of experimental evidence indicating that damages to DNA can be initiating events in carcinogenesis

  2. Radiation-resistant micro-organisms isolated from textiles

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kristensen, H.; Christensen, E.A.

    1981-01-01

    Towels from private homes and public offices and underwear contaminated by being used by employees at a public health laboratory were examined for occurrence of radiation-resistant bacteria and fungi. Three different methods were used for isolation of the most resistant organisms, one with multiplication of the microbial population prior to an irradiation used for selection, and two witout this multiplication and with the organisms placed on membrane filters or in situ on the textiles, respectively. A total of 44 different strains were isolated. Differences in the three methods used for selection of the most radiation-resistant microorganisms were not reflected in the results. 16 pigmentproducing Gram-positive cocci, tentatively classified as Micrococcus radiodurans, were the most radiation-resistant and were isolated in about half of the examinations. Other Gram-positive cocci, nonspore forming rods, some Nocardia and Candida parapsilosis strains and two Bacillus strains constituted the rest of the collection. With few exceptions dose-response curves for the strains were upward convex. D-6 values determined to be between 1.5 megarad for the most radiation sensitive, a Candida, and 5.7 megarad for the most resistant, tentatively classified as M. radiodurans. The D-6 values for the Bacillus strains were in both cases 1.8 megarad, consistent with a D-value of 0.3 megarad. The same resistance is reported to be the maximum resistance for B. pumilus, strain E601, commonly used as reference strain in the literature on radiation sterilization of medical devices and supplies. (author)

  3. Insulating materials resistance in intense radiation beams

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oproiu, Constantin; Martin, Diana; Scarlat, Florin; Timus, Dan; Brasoveanu, Mirela; Nemtanu, Monica

    2002-01-01

    The paper emphasizes the main changes of the mechanical and electrical properties of some organic insulating materials exposed to accelerated electron beams. These materials are liable to be used in nuclear plants and particle accelerators. The principal mechanical and electrical properties analyzed were: tensile strength, fracture strength, tearing on fracture, dielectric strength, electrical resistivity, dielectric constant and tangent angle of dielectric losses. (authors)

  4. Drug resistance in cancer cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Mehta, Kapil, Dr; Siddik, Zahid H

    2009-01-01

    ... from disappointment with the drug resistance reversal strategies that were carried out in the 1990s using pump inhibitors to block drug resistance mediated by P-glycoprotein, product of the MDR-1 gene. However, if one takes the larger definition - multidrug resistance as simultaneous resistance to multiple structurally unrelated anticancer therapies - its...

  5. Basal cell carcinoma after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shimbo, Keisuke; Terashi, Hiroto; Ishida, Yasuhisa; Tahara, Shinya; Osaki, Takeo; Nomura, Tadashi; Ejiri, Hirotaka

    2008-01-01

    We reported two cases of basal cell carcinoma (BCC) that developed after radiation therapy. A 50-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy for the treatment of intracranial germinoma at the age of 22, presented with several tumors around the radiation ulcer. All tumors showed BCC. A 33-year-old woman, who had received an unknown amount of radiation therapy on the head for the treatment of leukemia at the age of 2, presented with a black nodule within the area of irradiation. The tumor showed BCC. We discuss the occurrence of BCC after radiation therapy. (author)

  6. Haemopoietic cell renewal in radiation fields

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fliedner, T. M.; Nothdurft, W.; Tibken, B.; Hofer, E.; Weiss, M.; Kindler, H.

    1994-10-01

    Space flight activities are inevitably associated with a chronic exposure of astronauts to a complex mixture of ionising radiation. Although no acute radiation consequences are to be expected as a rule, the possibility of Solar Particle Events (SPE) associated with relatively high doses of radiation (1 or more Gray) cannot be excluded. It is the responsibility of physicians in charge of the health of astronauts to evaluate before, during and after space flight activities the functional status of haemopoietic cell renewal. Chronic low level exposure of dogs indicate that daily gamma-exposure doses below about 2 cGy are tolerated for several years as far as blood cell concentrations are concerned. However, the stem cell pool may be severely affected. The maintenance of sufficient blood cell counts is possible only through increased cell production to compensate for the radiation inflicted excess cell loss. This behaviour of haemopoietic cell renewal during chronic low level exposure can be simulated by bioengineering models of granulocytopoiesis. It is possible to define a ``turbulence region'' for cell loss rates, below which an prolonged adaptation to increased radiation fields can be expected to be tolerated. On the basis of these experimental results, it is recommended to develop new biological indicators to monitor haemopoietic cell renewal at the level of the stem cell pool using blood stem cells in addition to the determination of cytokine concentrations in the serum (and other novel approaches). To prepare for unexpected haemopoietic effects during prolonged space missions, research should be increased to modify the radiation sensitivity of haemopoietic stem cells (for instance by the application of certain regulatory molecules). In addition, a ``blood stem cell bank'' might be established for the autologous storage of stem cells and for use in space activities keeping them in a radiation protected container.

  7. Ways of providing radiation resistance of magnetic field semiconductor sensors

    CERN Document Server

    Bolshakova, I A; Holyaka, R; Matkovskii, A; Moroz, A

    2001-01-01

    Hall magnetic field sensors resistant to hard ionizing irradiation are being developed for operation under the radiation conditions of space and in charged particle accelerators. Radiation resistance of the sensors is first determined by the properties of semiconductor materials of sensitive elements; we have used microcrystals and thin layers of III-V semiconductors. Applying complex doping by rare-earth elements and isovalent impurities in certain proportions, we have obtained magnetic field sensors resistant to irradiation by fast neutrons and gamma-quanta. Tests of their radiation resistance were carried out at IBR-2 at the Joint Institute for Nuclear Research (Dubna). When exposed to neutrons with E=0.1-13 MeV and intensity of 10 sup 1 sup 0 n cm sup - sup 2 s sup - sup 1 , the main parameter of the sensors - their sensitivity to magnetic fields - changes by no more than 0.1% up to fluences of 10 sup 1 sup 4 n cm sup - sup 2. Further improvement of radiation resistance of sensor materials is expected by ...

  8. Radiation-resistant acquired immunity of vaccinated mice to Schistosoma mansoni

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aitken, R.; Coulson, P.S.; Dixon, B.; Wilson, R.A.

    1987-01-01

    Vaccination of mice with attenuated cercariae of Schistosoma mansoni induces specific acquired resistance to challenge infection. This resistance is immunologically-mediated, possibly via a delayed-type hypersensitivity. Studies of parasite migration have shown that the protective mechanism operates most effectively in the lungs of vaccinated mice. We have probed the mechanism by exposing mice to 500 rads of gamma radiation before challenge infection. Our results show that the effector mechanism operative against challenge larvae is resistant to radiation. In contrast, classical immune responses are markedly suppressed by the same treatment. While leukocyte populations in the blood fall dramatically after irradiation, numbers of cells recoverable by bronchoalveolar lavage are unaffected. We suggest that vaccination with attenuated cercariae establishes populations of sensitized cells in the lungs which trigger the mechanism of resistance when challenge schistosomula migrate through pulmonary capillary beds. Although the cells may be partially disabled by irradiation, they remain responsive to worm antigens and thereby capable of initiating the elimination mechanism. This hypothesis would explain the radiation resistance of vaccine-induced immunity to S. mansoni

  9. Expression of Ku correlates with radiation sensitivities in the head and neck cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Sang Wook; Yu, Eun Sil; Yi, So Lyoung; Son, Se Hee; Kim, Jong Hoon; Ahn, Seung Do; Shin, Seong Soo; Choi, Eun Kyung

    2004-01-01

    DNA-dependent protein kinase (DNA-PK) is a serine/threonine kinase consisting of a 470 kDa catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs) and a heterodimeric regulatory complex, called Ku, which is composed of 70 kDa (Ku 70) and 86 kDa (Ku 80) proteins. The DNA-PK has been shown to play a pivotal role in rejoining DNA double-strand-breaks (dsb) in mammalian cells. The purpose of this study is to examine the relationship between the level of Ku expression and radiation sensitivity. Nine head and neck, cancer cell lines showed various intrinsic radiation sensitivities. Among the nine, AMC-HN-3 cell was the most sensitive for X-ray irradiation and AMC-HN-9 cell was the most resistance. The most sensitive and resistant cell lines were selected and the test sensitivity of radiation and expression of Ku were measured. Radiation sensitivity was obtained by colony forming assay and Ku protein expression using Western blot analysis. Ku80 increased expression by radiation, wheras Ku70 did not. Overexpression of Ku80 protein increased radiation resistance in AMC-HN9 cell line. There was a correlation between Ku80 expression and radiation resistance. Ku80 was shown to play an important role in radiation damage response. Induction of Ku80 expression had an important role in DNA damage repair by radiation. Ku80 expression may be an effective predictive assay of radiosensitivity on head and neck cancer

  10. Radiation resistance of clinical Acinetobacter spp.: A need for concern

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Christensen, E.A.; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Kristensen, H.

    1991-01-01

    As part of an epidemiological investigation of hospital infections caused by Acinetobacter spp. the radiation resistance of 15 clinical isolates and four reference strains was assessed. The radiation resistance (in D-6 values, viz. the dose necessary for reducing the initial number of colony forming units by a factor of 10(6)) was, in general, higher in the isolates of A. radioresistens than in the isolates of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex and of A. lwoffi. However, the least resistant isolates of A. radioresistens had a D-6 value equal to or lower than the most resistant isolates of the other groups. The lowest D-6 values found were for two of the reference strains. The highest D-6 value was 35 kGy. Three isolates of A. johnsonii could not survive long enough in a dried preparation to make an assessment of the D-6 values possible. The radiation resistance of the 15 clinical isolates in the present study was higher than the resistance found in a study of similar isolates in 1970

  11. Radiation resistance of clinical Acinetobacter spp. : A need for concern

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Christensen, E.A.; Gerner-Smidt, P.; Kristensen, H. (Control Department, Statens Seruminstitut, Copenhagen (Denmark))

    1991-06-01

    As part of an epidemiological investigation of hospital infections caused by Acinetobacter spp. the radiation resistance of 15 clinical isolates and four reference strains was assessed. The radiation resistance (in D-6 values, viz. the dose necessary for reducing the initial number of colony forming units by a factor of 10(6)) was, in general, higher in the isolates of A. radioresistens than in the isolates of the A. calcoaceticus-A. baumannii complex and of A. lwoffi. However, the least resistant isolates of A. radioresistens had a D-6 value equal to or lower than the most resistant isolates of the other groups. The lowest D-6 values found were for two of the reference strains. The highest D-6 value was 35 kGy. Three isolates of A. johnsonii could not survive long enough in a dried preparation to make an assessment of the D-6 values possible. The radiation resistance of the 15 clinical isolates in the present study was higher than the resistance found in a study of similar isolates in 1970.

  12. Determination of radiation resistant of electronic components in robot system

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kang, Hee Dong [Kyungpook National University, Taegu (Korea); Kim, Do Sung [Taegu University, Taegu (Korea); Woo, Hong [Kyungsan University, Kyungsan (Korea)

    1998-04-01

    We investigated the characteristic change for the electronic components of the systems which were used in radiation area, when those were exposured by gamma rays. Bipolar transistor, FET, TTL, CMOS, operational amplifier, some capacitors, and several electronic components were selected for experiment. We applied irradiated gamma ray to the electronic components in the range of 10{sup 6} rad, by {sup 6}0Co(KAERI). We made up appropriate assessment circuit for each electronic component during the performance test, and assessed the reliability and radiation-resistance of them for the each radiation irradiation. (author). 59 refs., 35 figs., 8 tabs.

  13. Cells, targets, and molecules in radiation biology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Elkind, M.M.

    1979-01-01

    Cellular damage and repair are discussed with regard to inactivation models, dose-effect curves and cancer research, repair relative to damage accumulation, potentially lethal damage, repair of potentially lethal vs. sublethal damage, cell killing and DNA damage due to nonionizing radiation, and anisotonicity vs. lethality due to nonionizing radiation. Other topics discussed are DNA damage and repair in cells exposed to ionizing radiation, kinetics of repair of single-strand DNA breaks, effects of actinomycin D on x-ray survival curve of hamster cells, misrepair and lethality, and perspective and prospects

  14. The radiation response of cells recovering after chronic hypoxia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kwok, T.T.; Sutherland, R.M.

    1989-01-01

    Experiments were performed to study the influence of hypoxic pretreatment on the radiation response of A431 human squamous carcinoma cells. Reaeration for 10 min after chronic hypoxia (greater than 2 h) was found to enhance the radiosensitivity of A431 cells, and the maximal effect was seen for those cells reaerated after 12 h of hypoxia. The radiosensitivity enhancement for reaerated cells after 12 h of hypoxia was maximized by 5 min after the return to aerobic conditions and reached the control level by 12 h of reaeration. This enhanced radiosensitive state was characterized by a reduced shoulder region and increased slope of the radiation dose-response curve for cells in both the exponential and plateau phases of growth. There was a slight increase in the number of G1 and decrease in the number of S and G2 + M cells for both exponential- and plateau-phase cultures following 12 h hypoxic treatment. Although growth inhibition induced by 12 h of hypoxia was seen for cells in the exponential phase, there was no cell number change in the plateau-phase culture after hypoxia. Plating efficiency (PE) of cells in both growth phases was reduced by 30% after hypoxia. Furthermore, in the exponential-phase culture, the extent of reduction in PE after hypoxia was similar among cells in different phases of the cell cycle. Although S-phase cells in exponentially growing cultures were relatively more resistant to radiation than G1 and G2 + M cells, the cell age-response pattern was the same whether the cells had been aerobic or hypoxic before reaeration and irradiation. Furthermore, the enhancement ratio associated with reaeration after 12 h of hypoxia for these three subpopulations of cells was 1.3. Our results indicate that the increase in radiosensitivity due to reaeration after chronic hypoxia is unlikely to be related to the changes of cell cycle stage and growth phase during hypoxic treatment

  15. The link between bacterial radiation resistance and cold adaptation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 27; Issue 2. Clipboard: The link between bacterial radiation resistance and cold adaptation. M K Chattopadhyay. Volume 27 Issue 2 March 2002 pp 71-73. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: https://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/jbsc/027/02/0071-0073 ...

  16. Clipboard: The link between bacterial radiation resistance and cold ...

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Journal of Biosciences; Volume 27; Issue 2. Clipboard: The link between bacterial radiation resistance and cold adaptation. M K Chattopadhyay. Volume 27 Issue 2 March 2002 pp 71-73 ... Author Affiliations. M K Chattopadhyay1. Centre for Cellular and Molecular Biology, Hyderabad 500 007, India ...

  17. ICAM-3, radiation resistance gene, activates PI3K/Akt-CREB-MMPs pathway and promotes migration/invasion of the human non-small cell lung cancer cell NCI-H1299

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Jong Kuk; Park, Seon Ho; Hong, Sung Hee; Um, Hong Duck; Yoo, Young Do

    2008-01-01

    Cancer cell is characterized by various distinctive functions difference from normal cell. The one of specific properties of cancer is invasion and metastasis. Invasion and metastasis is a multi-step process involving over-expression of proteolytic enzymes such as matrix metalloproteinases (MMPs) and critically dependent on the ability of cells to move away from the primary tumor to gain access to the vascular or lymphatic systems which disperses cells to distant sites, where they can grow in a permissive microenvironment at a secondary location. All of these processes are critically dependent upon the ability of cancer cells to breach the basement membrane and to migrate through neighboring tissues. Cancer cell invasion is an important, tightly regulated process that is related with development, immune response and wound healing. This invasive response is dependent on activation of signaling pathways that result in both short-term and long-term cellular responses. The gene expressions of the cancer cell invasion related-proteolytic enzymes are regulated at the transcriptional level (through AP-1 and NF-kB via mitogen activated protein kinases (MAPKs) and PI3K-Akt pathways) and post-transcriptional levels, and the protein level via their activators or inhibitors, and their cell surface localization. Therefore, the related proteins such as MMPs, MAPK, PI3K, Akt and their regulatory pathway have been considered as promising targets for anti-cancer drugs. In previous reports, Intercellular adherin molecule-3 (ICAM-3) showed increase of radio-resistance and proliferation. We have made ICAM-3 overexpressed cancer cells which shows elevated level of invasion compared with normal cancer cells and its invasion capacity was down regulated with treatment of specific inhibitor for PI3K. These results suggest that ICAM-3 related invasion is associated with PI3K signaling pathway

  18. Development of application technology of radiation-resistant microorganism

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Dong Ho; Lim, Sang Yong; Joe, Min Ho; Jung, Jin Woo; Jung, Sun Wook; Song, Du Sup; Choi, Young Ji [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of)

    2009-02-15

    The scope of the project is divided into of three parts; (i) to define the survival strategy of radiation-resistant microbes, especially Deinococcus (ii) acquisition of gene resources encoding the novel protein and related with the production of functional materials (iii) development of control technology against radiation-resistant microbes. To this aim, first, the whole transcriptional response of the D. radiodurans strain haboring pprI mutation, which plays an important role in radiation resistance, was analyzed by cDNA microarray. The anti-oxidant activity of the major carotenoid of D. radiodurans, deinoxanthin, was analyzed and the strain was constructed, in which the gene necessary for bio- synthesis of deinoxanthin is deleted. The response to cadmium of D. radiodurans was also investigated through cDNA microarray analysis. Radiogenic therapy, one of the cancer treatments, is designed to use radiation-inducible gene for the treatment. To develop the gene-transfer vehicle for radiogenic therapy, we have investigated the virulence mechanism of Salmonella, which is tumor-targeting bacteria and studied the synergistic effect of some anti-cancer agents on radiation treatment for cancer. Finally, we confirmed that irradiation could decompose a fungus toxin, patulin, into various harmless by-products.

  19. The myth of cell phone radiation

    OpenAIRE

    Natarajan, Vasant

    2012-01-01

    We discuss the purported link between cell-phone radiation and cancer. We show that it is inconsistent with the photoelectric effect, and that epidemiological studies of any link have no scientific basis.

  20. Shielding ability of lead loaded radiation resistant gloves

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawano, Takao; Ebihara, Hiroshi

    1990-01-01

    The shielding ability of radiation resistant gloves were examined. The gloves are made of lead loaded (as PbO 2 ) polyvinyl chloride resin and are about 0.4 mm of thickness (70 mg/cm 2 ). Eleven test pieces were sampled from each of three gloves (total were thirty three) and the transmission rates for radiations (X-ray or γ-ray) through the test pieces were measured with radiation sources, 99m Tc, 57 Co, 133 Ba, 133 Xe and 241 Am. The differences of the transmission rate for radiations by the positions of the gloves were smaller than 15%, and the differences by three gloves were smaller than 5% in the case of 60 keV and 141 keV radiations. The average transmission rates for radiations in thirty three test pieces were about 40% for 30 keV radiation, about 90% for 80 keV and 140 keV radiations. The shielding characteristic of the gloves could be equivalent to about 0.026 mm thick lead plate. (author)

  1. Phenotypical and biochemical characterisation of resistance for parasitic weed (Orobanche foetida Poir.) in radiation-mutagenised mutants of chickpea.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brahmi, Ines; Mabrouk, Yassine; Brun, Guillaume; Delavault, Philippe; Belhadj, Omrane; Simier, Philippe

    2016-12-01

    Some radiation-mutagenised chickpea mutants potentially resistant to the broomrape, Orobanche foetida Poir., were selected through field trials. The objectives of this work were to confirm resistance under artificial infestation, in pots and mini-rhizotron systems, and to determine the developmental stages of broomrape affected by resistance and the relevant resistance mechanisms induced by radiation mutagenesis. Among 30 mutants tested for resistance to O. foetida, five shared strong resistance in both pot experiments and mini-rhizotron systems. Resistance was not complete, but the few individuals that escaped resistance displayed high disorders of shoot development. Results demonstrated a 2-3-fold decrease in stimulatory activity of root exudates towards broomrape seed germination in resistant mutants in comparison with non-irradiated control plants and susceptible mutants. Resistance was associated with an induction of broomrape necrosis early during infection. When infested, most of the resistant mutants shared enhanced levels of soluble phenolic contents, phenylalanine ammonia lyase activity, guaiacol peroxidase activity and polyphenol oxidase activity, in addition to glutathione and notably ascorbate peroxidase gene expression in roots. Results confirmed enhanced resistance in chickpea radiation-mutagenised mutants, and demonstrated that resistance is based on alteration of root exudation, presumed cell-wall reinforcement and change in root oxidative status in response to infection. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry. © 2016 Society of Chemical Industry.

  2. Isolation of Radiation-Resistant Bacteria from Mars Analog Antarctic Dry Valleys by Preselection, and the Correlation between Radiation and Desiccation Resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Musilova, Michaela; Wright, Gary; Ward, John M; Dartnell, Lewis R

    2015-12-01

    Extreme radiation-resistant microorganisms can survive doses of ionizing radiation far greater than are present in the natural environment. Radiation resistance is believed to be an incidental adaptation to desiccation resistance, as both hazards cause similar cellular damage. Desert soils are, therefore, promising targets to prospect for new radiation-resistant strains. This is the first study to isolate radiation-resistant microbes by using gamma-ray exposure preselection from the extreme cold desert of the Antarctic Dry Valleys (a martian surface analogue). Halomonads, identified by 16S rRNA gene sequencing, were the most numerous survivors of the highest irradiation exposures. They were studied here for the first time for both their desiccation and irradiation survival characteristics. In addition, the association between desiccation and radiation resistance has not been investigated quantitatively before for a broad diversity of microorganisms. Thus, a meta-analysis of scientific literature was conducted to gather a larger data set. A strong correlation was found between desiccation and radiation resistance, indicating that an increase in the desiccation resistance of 5 days corresponds to an increase in the room-temperature irradiation survival of 1 kGy. Irradiation at -79°C (representative of average martian surface temperatures) increases the microbial radiation resistance 9-fold. Consequently, the survival of the cold-, desiccation-, and radiation-resistant organisms isolated here has implications for the potential habitability of dormant or cryopreserved life on Mars. Extremophiles-Halomonas sp.-Antarctica-Mars-Ionizing radiation-Cosmic rays.

  3. Radiation sensitivity of Salmonella isolates relative to resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol or gentamicin

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niemira, Brendan A.; Lonczynski, Kelly A.; Sommers, Christopher H.

    2006-01-01

    Antibiotic resistance of inoculated bacteria is a commonly used selective marker. Bacteria resistant to the antibiotic nalidixic acid have been shown to have an increased sensitivity to irradiation. The purpose of this research was to screen a collection of Salmonella isolates for antibiotic resistance and determine the association, if any, of antibiotic resistance with radiation sensitivity. Twenty-four clinical isolates of Salmonella were screened for native resistance to multiple concentrations of ampicillin (Amp), chloramphenicol (Chl), or gentamicin (Gm). Test concentrations were chosen based on established clinical minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels, and isolates were classified as either sensitive or resistant based on their ability to grow at or above the MIC. Salmonella cultures were grown overnight at (37 o C) in antibiotic-amended tryptic soy broth (TSB). Native resistance to Gm was observed with each of the 24 isolates (100%). Eight isolates (33%) were shown to be resistant to Amp, while seven isolates (29%) were shown to be resistant to Chl. In separate experiments, Salmonella cultures were grown overnight (37 o C) in TSB, centrifuged, and the cell pellets were re-suspended in phosphate buffer. The samples were then gamma irradiated at doses up to 1.0 kGy. The D 10 values (the ionizing radiation dose required to reduce the viable number of microorganisms by 90%) were determined for the 24 isolates and they ranged from 0.181 to 0.359 kGy. No correlation was found between the D 10 value of the isolate and its sensitivity or resistance to each of the three antibiotics. Resistance to Amp or Chl is suggested as appropriate resistance marker for Salmonella test strains to be used in studies of irradiation

  4. Radiation sensitivity of Salmonella isolates relative to resistance to ampicillin, chloramphenicol or gentamicin

    Science.gov (United States)

    Niemira, Brendan A.; Lonczynski, Kelly A.; Sommers, Christopher H.

    2006-09-01

    Antibiotic resistance of inoculated bacteria is a commonly used selective marker. Bacteria resistant to the antibiotic nalidixic acid have been shown to have an increased sensitivity to irradiation. The purpose of this research was to screen a collection of Salmonella isolates for antibiotic resistance and determine the association, if any, of antibiotic resistance with radiation sensitivity. Twenty-four clinical isolates of Salmonella were screened for native resistance to multiple concentrations of ampicillin (Amp), chloramphenicol (Chl), or gentamicin (Gm). Test concentrations were chosen based on established clinical minimum inhibitory concentration (MIC) levels, and isolates were classified as either sensitive or resistant based on their ability to grow at or above the MIC. Salmonella cultures were grown overnight at (37 °C) in antibiotic-amended tryptic soy broth (TSB). Native resistance to Gm was observed with each of the 24 isolates (100%). Eight isolates (33%) were shown to be resistant to Amp, while seven isolates (29%) were shown to be resistant to Chl. In separate experiments, Salmonella cultures were grown overnight (37 °C) in TSB, centrifuged, and the cell pellets were re-suspended in phosphate buffer. The samples were then gamma irradiated at doses up to 1.0 kGy. The D10 values (the ionizing radiation dose required to reduce the viable number of microorganisms by 90%) were determined for the 24 isolates and they ranged from 0.181 to 0.359 kGy. No correlation was found between the D10 value of the isolate and its sensitivity or resistance to each of the three antibiotics. Resistance to Amp or Chl is suggested as appropriate resistance marker for Salmonella test strains to be used in studies of irradiation.

  5. Ethacrynic acid: a novel radiation enhancer in human carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Khil, Mark S.; Sang, Hie Kim; Pinto, John T.; Jae, Ho Kim

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Because agents that interfere with thiol metabolism and glutathione S-transferase (GST) functions have been shown to enhance antitumor effects of alkylating agents in vitro and in vivo, the present study was conceived on the basis that an inhibitor of GST would enhance the radiation response of some selected human carcinoma cells. Ethacrynic acid (EA) was chosen for the study because it is an effective inhibitor of GST and is a well known diuretic in humans. Methods and Materials: Experiments were carried out with well-established human tumor cells in culture growing in Eagle's minimum essential medium (MEM) supplemented with 10% fetal calf serum (FCS). Cell lines used were MCF-7, MCF-7 adriamycin resistant (AR) cells (breast carcinoma), HT-29 cells (colon carcinoma), DU-145 cells (prostate carcinoma), and U-373 cells (malignant glioma). Cell survival following the exposure of cells to drug alone, radiation alone, and a combined treatment was assayed by determining the colony-forming ability of single plated cells in culture to obtain dose-survival curves. The drug enhancement ratio was correlated with levels of GST. Results: The cytotoxicity of EA was most pronounced in MCF-7, U-373, and DU-145 cells compared to MCF-7 AR and HT-29 cells. The levels of GST activity were found to be lower in those EA-sensitive cells. A significant radiation enhancement was obtained with EA-sensitive cells exposed to nontoxic concentrations of the drug immediately before or after irradiation. The sensitizer enhancement ratio (SER) of MCF-7 cells was 1.55 with EA (20 μg/ml), while the SER of MCF-7 AR was less than 1.1. Based on five different human tumor cells, a clear inverse relationship was demonstrated between the magnitude of SER and GST levels of tumor cells prior to the combined treatment. Conclusion: The present results suggest that EA, which acts as both a reversible and irreversible inhibitor of GST activity, could significantly enhance the radiation response of

  6. Effect of melanin on radiation response of CHO cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hopwood, L.E. (Medical Coll. of Wisconsin, Milwaukee (USA). Dept. of Radiation Oncology); Swartz, H.M. (Illinois Univ., Urbana (USA). Coll. of Medicine); Pajak, S. (Uniwersytet Jagiellonski, Krakow (Poland))

    1985-05-01

    The effect of the presence of melanin on the response of mammalian cells to ionizing radiation was investigated in a model system utilizing the ability of Chinese hamster ovary cells to incorporate melanin by endocytosis. Cells were incubated in monolayer cultures from 2 to 20 hours with melanin prepared from 'beef eye' or synthesized by air oxidation of 3,4-dihydroxyphenylalanine. For asynchronous cultures, the survival curve parameters for cells incubated with both types of melanin were indistinguishable from those of the same cells without added melanin. The radiation response to fractionated doses of 6 Gy separated by various periods did not indicate any effect of melanin on the extent or kinetics of repair of sublethal damage. Likewise, the repair of potentially lethal damage in plateau phase cultures was unaffected by the presence of melanin. Thus the explanation for the clinical radiation resistance of melanomas in the absence of a direct radiation effect might more likely be found in consideration of other factors such as the role of melanin in oxygen consumption or in differentiation.

  7. Radiation resistance of wide-bandgap semiconductor power transistors

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hazdra, Pavel; Popelka, Stanislav [Department of Microelectronics, Czech Technical University in Prague (Czech Republic)

    2017-04-15

    Radiation resistance of state-of-the-art commercial wide-bandgap power transistors, 1700 V 4H-SiC power MOSFETs and 200 V GaN HEMTs, to the total ionization dose was investigated. Transistors were irradiated with 4.5 MeV electrons with doses up to 2000 kGy. Electrical characteristics and introduced defects were characterized by current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V), and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. Results show that already low doses of 4.5 MeV electrons (>1 kGy) cause a significant decrease in threshold voltage of SiC MOSFETs due to embedding of the positive charge into the gate oxide. On the other hand, other parameters like the ON-state resistance are nearly unchanged up to the dose of 20 kGy. At 200 kGy, the threshold voltage returns back close to its original value, however, the ON-state resistance increases and transconductance is lowered. This effect is caused by radiation defects introduced into the low-doped drift region which decrease electron concentration and mobility. GaN HEMTs exhibit significantly higher radiation resistance. They keep within the datasheet specification up to doses of 2000 kGy. Absence of dielectric layer beneath the gate and high concentration of carriers in the two dimensional electron gas channel are the reasons of higher radiation resistance of GaN HEMTs. Their degradation then occurs at much higher doses due to electron mobility degradation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  8. Radiation resistance of wide-bandgap semiconductor power transistors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hazdra, Pavel; Popelka, Stanislav

    2017-01-01

    Radiation resistance of state-of-the-art commercial wide-bandgap power transistors, 1700 V 4H-SiC power MOSFETs and 200 V GaN HEMTs, to the total ionization dose was investigated. Transistors were irradiated with 4.5 MeV electrons with doses up to 2000 kGy. Electrical characteristics and introduced defects were characterized by current-voltage (I-V), capacitance-voltage (C-V), and deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) measurements. Results show that already low doses of 4.5 MeV electrons (>1 kGy) cause a significant decrease in threshold voltage of SiC MOSFETs due to embedding of the positive charge into the gate oxide. On the other hand, other parameters like the ON-state resistance are nearly unchanged up to the dose of 20 kGy. At 200 kGy, the threshold voltage returns back close to its original value, however, the ON-state resistance increases and transconductance is lowered. This effect is caused by radiation defects introduced into the low-doped drift region which decrease electron concentration and mobility. GaN HEMTs exhibit significantly higher radiation resistance. They keep within the datasheet specification up to doses of 2000 kGy. Absence of dielectric layer beneath the gate and high concentration of carriers in the two dimensional electron gas channel are the reasons of higher radiation resistance of GaN HEMTs. Their degradation then occurs at much higher doses due to electron mobility degradation. (copyright 2016 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  9. The influence of the stem cell marker ALDH and the EGFR-PI3 kinase act signaling pathway on the radiation resistance of human tumor cell lines; Der Einfluss des Stammzellmarkers ALDH und des EGFR-PI3 Kinase-Akt Signalwegs auf die Strahlenresistenz humaner Tumorzelllinien

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mihatsch, Julia

    2014-07-14

    Cancer is the second leading cause of death in industriated nations. Besides surgery and chemotherapy, radiotherapy (RT) is an important approach by which about 60% of patients are treated. The response of these patients to RT is very heterogenous. On the one hand, there are patients with tumors which are radiosensitive and can be cured, but on the other hand patients bear tumors which are quite resistant to radiotherapy. A Radioresistant phenotype of tumor cells causes treatment failure consequently leading to a limited response to radiotherapy. It is proposed, that radiotherapy outcome mainly depends on the potential of radiation on controlling growth, proliferation and survival of a specific population of tumor cells called cancer stem cells (CSCs) or tumor-initiating cells. Based on experimental studies so far reported it is assumed that the population of CSC varies in tumors from different entities and is relatively low compared to the tumor bulk cells in general. According to the CSC hypothesis, it might be concluded that the differential response of tumors to radiotherapy depends on CSC populations, since these supposedly slow replicating cells are able to initiate a tumor, to self renew indefinitely and to generate the differentiated progeny of a tumor. Besides the role of cancer stem cells in radiotherapy response, ionizing radiation (IR) activates the epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR) and its downstream signaling pathways such as phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt, mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK) and Janus kinase/Signal Transducer and Activator of Transcription (JAK/STAT) pathways. Among these pathways, PI3K/Akt is one of the most important pathways involved in post-irradiation survival: Activation of Akt results in activation of DNA-dependent protein kinase, catalytic subunit (DNA-PKcs). DNA-PKcs is a core enzyme involved in repair of IR-induced DNA-double strand breaks (DNA-DSB) through non-homologous end joining (NHEJ). The aim of the

  10. Cell kinetics and radiation biology (review)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Denekamp, J.

    1986-01-01

    Variation in radiosensitivity around the cell cycle, and the extent of radiation-induced delay in cell cycle progression result in variable time of expression of radiation injury in normal tissues, ranging from a few days in intestine to weeks, months or years in slowly proliferating tissues. Radiosensitivity of tumours, to single doses, is dominated by hypoxic cells arising from the imbalance between tumour cell production and the proliferation and branching of blood vessels needed to bring oxygen and other nutrients to each cell. Response to fractionated radiotherapy schedules is also influenced by the cell kinetic parameters of the cells comprising each tissue or tumour. Slowly cycling cells show much more dramatic changes with fractionation, dose rate or l.e.t. Rapidly cycling cells redistribute around the cell cycle when the cells in sensitive phases have been killed, experiencing less mitotic delay than slowly proliferating cells. Reoxygenation seems more effective in tumours with rapidly cycling cells and high natural cell loss rates. Compensatory repopulation within a treatment schedule may spare skin and mucosa but not slowly proliferating tissues. Tumour cell proliferation during fractionated radiotherapy may be an important limiting factor of treatment success. (U.K.)

  11. Vacuum gauge cable with long-term resistance to radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Saeki, Hiroshi [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Kohto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)]. E-mail: saeki@sp8sun.spring8.or.jp; Magome, Tamotsu [Japan Synchrotron Radiation Research Institute, SPring-8, Kohto 1-1-1, Sayo, Hyogo 679-5198 (Japan)

    2006-12-15

    After 426 Ah (0.55 MGy) of operation in the SPring-8 storage ring, vacuum gauge cables were found to be damaged by radiation. To obtain a vacuum gauge cable resistant to long-term radiation, a vacuum gauge cable insulated with glass-fiber, which had an electric and mechanical quality better than that of a mineral insulated vacuum gauge cable, was newly designed and tested. As the result, the quality of the newly designed vacuum gauge cable remained unchanged after irradiation of about 1 MGy using a cobalt 60 source.

  12. Isolation of radiation resistant fungal strains from highly radioactive field

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Adam, Y.M.; Aziz, N.H.; Attaby, H.S.H.

    1995-01-01

    This study examined the radiation resistance of fungal flora isolated from the hot-lab around the radiation sources, cobalt 137 and radium 226 . The predominant mould species were: Aspergillus flavus, A. Niger, penicillium chrysogenum, cladosporium herbarum, fusarium oxysporum and alternaria citri. The D 10 values of F. Oxysporum; 2.00 KGy, A. Flavus; 1.40 KGy, P. chrysogenum; 1.15 KGy, and A. citri; 0.95 KGy, are about 1.67, 3.10, 1.92 and 1.36 folds as the D 1 0 values of the same isolates recovered from soil

  13. Development of high energy radiation resistant elastomeric composites

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, C.; Patni, M.J.; Pandya, M.V.; Desai, M.R.

    1992-01-01

    Stabilizer formulations are developed for the elastomeric composites which can withstand high energy radiations to the total dose of 200 MRads. The elastomeric materials used are general purpose formulations based on Ethylene propylene diene (EPDM) and Chlorosulfonated polyethylene (CSP). The stabilizers are synthesized from highly aromatic ring compounds in the oligomeric and polymeric form, in the laboratory. The polymeric stabilizers are found to have better radiation resistance compared to the former one when the performance was evaluated using standard methodology. Dielectric analysis, FTIR and wide angle x-ray diffraction are used to follow the physico-chemical changes taking place in the bulk when subjected to the performance test

  14. Tumour microenvironment and radiation response in sarcomas originating from tumourigenic human mesenchymal stem cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    D'Andrea, Filippo P; Safwat, Akmal Ahmed; Burns, Jorge S

    2012-01-01

    Background: Resistance to radiation therapy remains a serious impediment to cancer therapy. We previously reported heterogeneity for clonogenic survival when testing in vitro radiation resistance among single-cell derived clones from a human mesenchymal cancer stem cell model (hMSC). Here we aimed...... to determine whether this heterogeneity persisted in tumours established from these clones, and whether the response to radiation treatment was principally governed by cell-intrinsic qualities or by factors pertaining to the tumour microenvironment, such as the degree of hypoxia and vascularization. Methods......: Immune-deficient female mice were implanted on the backs with cells from one of the clones. The subsequent tumours were subjected to either radiation treatment or had the tumour microenvironment assayed, when they reached 400 mm(3). Radiation was given as a single fraction of 0-15 Gy and the degree...

  15. Distributed series resistance effects in solar cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Lars Drud

    1982-01-01

    A mathematical treatment is presented of the effects of one-dimensional distributed series resistance in solar cells. A general perturbation theory is developed, including consistently the induced spatial variation of diode current density and leading to a first-order equivalent lumped resistance...

  16. Chemo Resistance of Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Wicha, Max S

    2006-01-01

    .... Development of this new tool will greatly facilitate future studies. Preliminary results both in xenograft models as well as in neoadjuvant trial are providing strong support for our hypothesis for resistance of cancer cells to chemotherapy...

  17. Somatic cell genetics and the radiation biology of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Puck, T.T.

    1984-01-01

    Early application of somatic cell genetics to mammalian cell radiobiology provided a definitive measurement of the mean lethal dose of ionizing radiation for mammalian cells and re-defined cellular radiosensitivity in a quantitative fashion with important implications in radiotherapy. These studies demonstrated that the killing of mammalian cells by ionizing radiation is due to damage to the DNA. They first established the fundamental role of cell turnover in determining some of the major pathological effects of the mammalian radiation syndrome. They made possible production and study of many kinds of mutant and hybrid cells including radiation-repair deficient mutants. Methods of genetic-biochemical analysis of mutants and hybrids have been devised which make possible identification of specific metabolic effects resulting from irradiation and similar actions. These studies have demonstrated that X-irradiated cells can be used as feeder layers for nourishing other cells dependent on specific cell-cell interactions for their growth. More recently, new applications have provided improved detection and quantitation of effects of low levels of radiation and other mutagens, and have made possible fine structure mapping of human genes

  18. The essential role of the Deinococcus radiodurans ssb gene in cell survival and radiation tolerance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J Scott Lockhart

    Full Text Available Recent evidence has implicated single-stranded DNA-binding protein (SSB expression level as an important factor in microbial radiation resistance. The genome of the extremely radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans contains genes for two SSB homologs: the homodimeric, canonical Ssb, encoded by the gene ssb, and a novel pentameric protein encoded by the gene ddrB. ddrB is highly induced upon exposure to radiation, and deletions result in decreased radiation-resistance, suggesting an integral role of the protein in the extreme resistance exhibited by this organism. Although expression of ssb is also induced after irradiation, Ssb is thought to be involved primarily in replication. In this study, we demonstrate that Ssb in D. radiodurans is essential for cell survival. The lethality of an ssb deletion cannot be complemented by providing ddrB in trans. In addition, the radiation-sensitive phenotype conferred by a ddrB deletion is not alleviated by providing ssb in trans. By altering expression of the ssb gene, we also show that lower levels of transcription are required for optimal growth than are necessary for high radiation resistance. When expression is reduced to that of E. coli, ionizing radiation resistance is similarly reduced. UV resistance is also decreased under low ssb transcript levels where growth is unimpaired. These results indicate that the expression of ssb is a key component of both normal cellular metabolism as well as pathways responsible for the high radiation tolerance of D. radiodurans.

  19. CERTIFICATION OF THE RADIATION RESISTANCE OF COIL INSULATION MATERIAL

    CERN Document Server

    Polinski, J; Bogdan, P

    2013-01-01

    The goal of the WP 7.2.1 sub-task of the EuCARD program has been to determine the Nb$_{3}$Sn based accelerator magnet coil electrical insulation resistance against irradiation, which will occur in future accelerators. The scope of the certification covers determination of mechanical, electrical and thermal properties changes due to irradiation. The report presents a selection of the insulation material candidates for future accelerator magnets as well as the definition of the radiation certification methodology with respect of radiation type, energy, doses and irradiation conditions. The test methods and results of the electrical and mechanical insulation materials properties degradation due to irradiation are presented. Thermal conductivity and Kapitza resistance at temperature range from 1.5 K to 2.0 K (superfluid helium conditions) are given.

  20. High resistance of some oligotrophic bacteria to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nikitin, D.I.; Tashtemirova, M.A.; Pitryuk, I.A.; Sorokin, V.V.; Oranskaya, M.S.; Nikitin, L.E.

    1994-01-01

    The resistance of seven cultures of eutrophic and oligotrophic bacteria to gamma radiation (at doses up to 360 Gy) was investigated. The bacteria under study were divided into three groups according to their survival ability after irradiation. Methylobacterium organophilum and open-quotes Pedodermatophilus halotoleransclose quotes (LD 50 = 270 Gy) were highly tolerant. By their tolerance, these organisms approached Deinococcus radiodurans. Aquatic ring-shaped (toroidal) bacteria Flectobacillus major and open-quotes Arcocella aquaticaclose quotes (LD 5 = 173 and 210 Gy, respectively) were moderately tolerant. Eutrophic Pseudomonas fluorescens and Escherichia coli (LD 50 = 43 and 38 Gy, respectively) were the most sensitive. X-ray microanalysis showed that in tolerant bacteria the intracellular content of potassium increased and the content of calcium decreased after irradiation. No changes in the element composition of the eutrophic bacterium E. coli were detected. Possible mechanisms of the resistance of oligotrophic bacteria to gamma radiation are discussed

  1. miR-145 Antagonizes SNAI1-Mediated Stemness and Radiation Resistance in Colorectal Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Yun; Wang, Cindy; Becker, Scott A; Hurst, Katie; Nogueira, Lourdes M; Findlay, Victoria J; Camp, E Ramsay

    2018-03-07

    Epithelial-to-mesenchymal transition (EMT) has been closely linked with therapy resistance and cancer stem cells (CSCs). However, EMT pathways have proven challenging to therapeutically target. MicroRNA 145 (miR-145) targets multiple stem cell transcription factors and its expression is inversely correlated with EMT. Therefore, we hypothesized that miR-145 represents a therapeutic target to reverse snail family transcriptional repressor 1 (SNAI1)-mediated stemness and radiation resistance (RT). Stable expression of SNAI1 in DLD1 and HCT116 cells (DLD1-SNAI1; HCT116-SNAI1) increased expression of Nanog and decreased miR-145 expression compared to control cells. Using a miR-145 luciferase reporter assay, we determined that ectopic SNAI1 expression significantly repressed the miR-145 promoter. DLD1-SNAI1 and HCT116-SNAI1 cells demonstrated decreased RT sensitivity and, conversely, miR-145 replacement significantly enhanced RT sensitivity. Of the five parental colon cancer cell lines, SW620 cells demonstrated relatively high endogenous SNAI1 and low miR-145 levels. In the SW620 cells, miR-145 replacement decreased CSC-related transcription factor expression, spheroid formation, and radiation resistance. In rectal cancer patient-derived xenografts, CSC identified by EpCAM+/aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)+ demonstrated high expression of SNAI1, c-Myc, and Nanog compared with non-CSCs (EpCAM+/ALDH-). Conversely, patient-derived CSCs demonstrated low miR-145 expression levels relative to non-CSCs. These results suggest that the SNAI1:miR-145 pathway represents a novel therapeutic target in colorectal cancer to overcome RT resistance. Copyright © 2018 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Study of decontamination and radiation resistance properties of Indian paints

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Shah, S.M.; Gopinathan, E.; Bhagwath, A.M.

    1976-01-01

    A brief introduction to the study of contamination and radiation resistance properties of Indian paints used as coating for structural materials in the nuclear industry is given. The general composition of paints such as epoxy, vinyl, alkyd, phenolic, chlesimated rubber, etc. is given. Method of sample preparation, processing and actual evaluation of decontaminability are described. The results have been discussed in terms of decontamination factors. Some recommendations based on the performance of the paints studied are also included. (K.B.)

  3. The radiation effects on the living cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sage, E.; Dutrillaux, B.; Soussi, Th.; Boiteux, S.; Lopez, B.; Feunteun, J.

    1999-06-01

    This publication is a presentation of particular points discussed during the colloquium of the 15-18 june 1999, for which scientific researches are performed at the CEA/CNRS. They deal with the radiobiology, for the radiation effects on living matter; with the DNA, for the knowledge and repair mechanisms on cells submitted to ionizing radiations; with the exposition to UV in correlation with neoplasms; with the P53 gene which is a tumour suppressor. (A.L.B.)

  4. Tumor necrosis factor alpha selectively sensitizes human immunodeficiency virus-infected cells to heat and radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wong, G.H.; McHugh, T.; Weber, R.; Goeddel, D.V.

    1991-01-01

    We report here that infection of the human T-cell line HUT-78 with human immunodeficiency virus (HIV) increases its sensitivity to heat and radiation toxicity. A possible explanation for this result may be the reduced expression of manganous superoxide dismutase (MnSOD) in HIV-infected cells compared to uninfected cells. Tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-alpha) further sensitizes HIV-infected cells but not uninfected cells to heat and radiation. This is consistent with the ability of TNF-alpha to induce the expression of MnSOD in uninfected but not in HIV-infected cells. HIV-infected HUT-78 cell lines engineered to overexpress MnSOD are more resistant to heat and radiation than HIV-infected cells that do not overexpress MnSOD. However, treatment with TNF-alpha still sensitizes these cells to heat and radiation

  5. Radiation resistant polypropylene blended with mobilizer, antioxidants and nucleating agent

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shamshad, A.; Basfar, A.A. E-mail: abasfar@kacst.edu.sa

    2000-03-01

    Post-irradiation storage of medical disposables prepared from isotactic polypropylene renders them brittle due to degradation. To avoid this, isotactic polypropylene [(is)PP] was blended with a mobilizer, dioctyl pthallate (DOP), three antioxidants (hindered amines and a secondary antioxidant) and benzoic acid to obtain radiation-resistant, thermally-stable and transparent material. Different formulations prepared were subjected to gamma radiation to doses of 25 and 50 kGy. Tests of breakage on bending after ageing in an oven at 70 deg. C up to 12 months have shown that the addition of DOP and the antioxidants imparts improved radiation and thermal stability as compared to (is)PP alone or its blend with DOP. All the formulations irradiated or otherwise demonstrated excellent colour stability even after accelerated ageing at 70 deg. C for prolonged periods. (author)

  6. Radiation resistant polypropylene blended with mobilizer,. antioxidants and nucleating agent

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shamshad, A.; Basfar, A. A.

    2000-03-01

    Post-irradiation storage of medical disposables prepared from isotactic polypropylene renders them brittle due to degradation. To avoid this, isotactic polypropylene [(is)PP] was blended with a mobilizer, dioctyl pthallate (DOP), three antioxidants (hindered amines and a secondary antioxidant) and benzoic acid to obtain radiation-resistant, thermally-stable and transparent material. Different formulations prepared were subjected to gamma radiation to doses of 25 and 50 kGy. Tests of breakage on bending after ageing in an oven at 70°C up to 12 months have shown that the addition of DOP and the antioxidants imparts improved radiation and thermal stability as compared to (is)PP alone or its blend with DOP. All the formulations irradiated or otherwise demonstrated excellent colour stability even after accelerated ageing at 70°C for prolonged periods.

  7. Resistance of Salmonella enteritidis variety typhimurium to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Norberg, A.N.; Maliska, C.

    1988-01-01

    The use of ionizing radiations to kill microrganisms responsible for food deterioration, and toxinfections is an example of peaceful use of nuclear energy. Food toxinfections are, amongus, produced mostly by Salmonella enteritidis var. typhimurium. Due to the pauncity of information on the resistance to gamma radiation of Salmonella enteritidis var. typhimurium this paper has the aim to define the 60-Cobalt gamma radiation lethal dose to these bacteria, in experimentally contaminated milk by samples recovered from our geographycal area. One hundred nineteen samples of milk containing about 150.000 bacteria per ml were irradiated with doses ranging from 100 to 1.100 Gy. Two samples of surving bacteria were again irradiated by doses up to 2.500 Gy. The bacteria not previously irradiated were killed by doses of 1.100 Gy. It was concluded that the 60-Cobalt gamma radiation minimal lethal dose to Salmonella enteritidis var. typhimurium is 1.200 Gy. The surviving strains to smaller doses than 1.200 Gy when re-irradiated prompt the forthcoming of more radio-resistant germs. (author) [pt

  8. Molecular mechanisms of bortezomib resistant adenocarcinoma cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Erika Suzuki

    Full Text Available Bortezomib (Velcade™ is a reversible proteasome inhibitor that is approved for the treatment of multiple myeloma (MM. Despite its demonstrated clinical success, some patients are deprived of treatment due to primary refractoriness or development of resistance during therapy. To investigate the role of the duration of proteasome inhibition in the anti-tumor response of bortezomib, we established clonal isolates of HT-29 adenocarcinoma cells adapted to continuous exposure of bortezomib. These cells were ~30-fold resistant to bortezomib. Two novel and distinct mutations in the β5 subunit, Cys63Phe, located distal to the binding site in a helix critical for drug binding, and Arg24Cys, found in the propeptide region were found in all resistant clones. The latter mutation is a natural variant found to be elevated in frequency in patients with MM. Proteasome activity and levels of both the constitutive and immunoproteasome were increased in resistant cells, which correlated to an increase in subunit gene expression. These changes correlated with a more rapid recovery of proteasome activity following brief exposure to bortezomib. Increased recovery rate was not due to increased proteasome turnover as similar findings were seen in cells co-treated with cycloheximide. When we exposed resistant cells to the irreversible proteasome inhibitor carfilzomib we noted a slower rate of recovery of proteasome activity as compared to bortezomib in both parental and resistant cells. Importantly, carfilzomib maintained its cytotoxic potential in the bortezomib resistant cell lines. Therefore, resistance to bortezomib, can be overcome with irreversible inhibitors, suggesting prolonged proteasome inhibition induces a more potent anti-tumor response.

  9. Some resistance mechanisms to ultraviolet radiation; Algunos mecanismos de resistencia a radiacion ultravioleta

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Alcantara D, D. [ININ, 52045 Ocoyoacac, Estado de Mexico (Mexico)

    2002-12-15

    The cyclical exposure of bacterial cells to the ultraviolet light (UV) it has as consequence an increment in the resistance to the lethal effects of this type of radiation, increment that happens as a result of a selection process of favorable genetic mutations induced by the same UV light. With object to study the reproducibility of the genetic changes and the associate mechanisms to the resistance to UV in the bacteria Escherichia coli, was irradiated cyclically with UV light five different derived cultures of a single clone, being obtained five stumps with different resistance grades. The genetic mapping Hfr revealed that so much the mutation events like of selection that took place during the adaptation to the UV irradiation, happened of random manner, that is to say, each one of the resistant stumps it is the result of the unspecified selection of mutations arisen at random in different genes related with the repair and duplication of the DNA. (Author)

  10. Radiation resistivity of pure silica core image guides for industrial fiberscopes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okamoto, Shinichi; Ohnishi, Tokuhiro; Kanazawa, Tamotsu; Tsuji, Yukio; Hayami, Hiroyuki; Ishitani, Tadayoshi; Akutsu, Takeji; Suzuki, Koichi.

    1991-01-01

    Industrial fiberscopes incorporating pure silica core image guides have been extensively used for remote visual inspection in radiation fields including nuclear power plants, owing to their superior radiation resistivity. The authors have been intensively conducting R and D on improving radiation resistivity of pure silica core image guides. This paper reports the results of experiments to compare the effects of core materials on radiation resistivity and to investigate the dependence of radiation resistivity on total dose, does rate, and support pipe material. The results confirmed the superior radiation resistivity of the core material containing fluorine at any irradiation condition and indicated the existence of a critical dose rate at which radiation-induced deterioration was stabilized. No difference in radiation resistivity attributable to support layer material was observed. (author)

  11. Assessment of Resistance of Bacillus Horneckiae Endospores to UV Radiation and Function of Their Extraneous Layer in Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zachariah, Malcolm M.; Vaishampayan, Parag

    2011-01-01

    Spore-forming microbes are highly resistant to various physical and chemical conditions, which include ionizing and UV radiation, desiccation and oxidative stress, and the harsh environment of outer space or planetary surfaces. The spore's resistance might be due to their metabolically dormant state, and/or by the presence of a series of protective structures that encase the interior-most compartment, the core, which houses the spore chromosome. These spores have multiple layers surrounding the cell that are not found in vegetative cells, and some species have an outer layer of proteins and glycoproteins termed the "exosporium" or a fibrous "extraneous layer" (EL). Bacillus horneckiae is an EL-producing novel sporeformer isolated from a Phoenix spacecraft assembly clean room, and it has previously demonstrated resistance to UV radiation up to 1000 J/m(sup 2). The EL appears to bind B. horneckiae spores into large aggregations, or biofilms, and may confer some UV resistance to the spores. Multiple culturing and purification schemes were tried to achieve high purity spores because vegetative cells would skew UV resistance results. An ethanol-based purification scheme produced high purity spores. Selective removal of the EL from spores was attempted with two schemes: a chemical extraction method and physical extraction (sonication). Results from survival rates in the presence and absence of the external layer will provide a new understanding of the role of biofilms and passive resistance that may favor survival of biological systems in aggressive extra-terrestrial environments. The chemical extraction method decreased viable counts of spores and lead to an inconclusive change UV resistance relative to non-extracted spores. The physical extraction method lead to non-aggregated spores and did not alter viability; however, it produced UV resistance profiles similar to non-extracted spores. In addition to the EL-removal study, samples of B. horneckiae spores dried on

  12. The Survival and Resistance of Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Halococcus hamelinensis, and Halococcus morrhuae to Simulated Outer Space Solar Radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leuko, S; Domingos, C; Parpart, A; Reitz, G; Rettberg, P

    2015-11-01

    Solar radiation is among the most prominent stress factors organisms face during space travel and possibly on other planets. Our analysis of three different halophilic archaea, namely Halobacterium salinarum NRC-1, Halococcus morrhuae, and Halococcus hamelinensis, which were exposed to simulated solar radiation in either dried or liquid state, showed tremendous differences in tolerance and survivability. We found that Hcc. hamelinensis is not able to withstand high fluences of simulated solar radiation compared to the other tested organisms. These results can be correlated to significant differences in genomic integrity following exposure, as visualized by random amplified polymorphic DNA (RAPD)-PCR. In contrast to the other two tested strains, Hcc. hamelinensis accumulates compatible solutes such as trehalose for osmoprotection. The addition of 100 mM trehalose to the growth medium of Hcc. hamelinensis improved its survivability following exposure. Exposure of cells in liquid at different temperatures suggests that Hbt. salinarum NRC-1 is actively repairing cellular and DNA damage during exposure, whereas Hcc. morrhuae exhibits no difference in survival. For Hcc. morrhuae, the high resistance against simulated solar radiation may be explained with the formation of cell clusters. Our experiments showed that these clusters shield cells on the inside against simulated solar radiation, which results in better survival rates at higher fluences when compared to Hbt. salinarum NRC-1 and Hcc. hamelinensis. Overall, this study shows that some halophilic archaea are highly resistant to simulated solar radiation and that they are of high astrobiological significance. Halophiles-Solar radiation-Stress resistance-Survival.

  13. Radiation Therapy of Suprasellar Germ Cell Tumors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Woo Yoon; Choi, Doo Ho; Choi, Eun Kyung; Kim, Il Han; Ha, Sung Whan; Park, Charn Il

    1988-01-01

    A retrospective study was performed on 15 patients with suprasellar germ cell tumors treated by megavoltage external beam irradiation between Feb. 1979 and Dec. 1985. Follow-up period of survivors was 30 to 91 months. Histologic diagnosis was obtained before radiation therapy in 10 patients (9 germinomas and 1 mixed). Five patients were treated without histologic verification. In 9 patients with biopsy-proven germinomas radiation therapy was delivered to the craniospinal axis in 6, to the whole brain in 3. In 5 patients with mixed germ cell tumor or elevated tumor marker, irradiation was delivered to the craniospinal axis in 2, to the whole brain in 2, and to the primary site only in 1. Total doses ranged from 5,000 to 5,500 cGy to the primary site, 3,000 to 4,400 cGy to the whole brain, and 1,300 to 3,000 cGy to the spine. In these 14, local tumor was controlled and primary or spinal failure was not observed. One patient without elevated tumor marker was treated to the whole brain, The tumor was not controlled and he had spinal recurrence. It is proven that radiation therapy is an effective treatment for suprasellar germ cell tumors. The neuroendocrinologic presentation, tumor marker status, early response to radiation measured on CT seem to be useful means for selecting patients for radiation therapy when tissue diagnosis is not available

  14. Radiation effects in mammalian cells in vitro

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, C.K.; Han, A.; Elkind, M.M.; Wells, R.L.; Buess, E.M.; Lin, C.M.

    1985-01-01

    The purpose of this research effort is to elucidate the mechanisms for the radiation-induced changes in mammalian cells that lead to cell death, mutation, neoplastic transformation, DNA damage, and chromosomal alterations. Of particular interest are the effects of low-dose-rate and fractionated irradiation on these end points with respect to the mechanisms whereby these effects are influenced by cellular repair processes, inhibitors, and promoters that act at the genetic or biochemical level. 17 refs

  15. Radiation-resistant extremophiles and their potential in biotechnology and therapeutics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gabani, Prashant; Singh, Om V

    2013-02-01

    Extremophiles are organisms able to thrive in extreme environmental conditions. Microorganisms with the ability to survive high doses of radiation are known as radioresistant or radiation-resistant extremophiles. Excessive or intense exposure to radiation (i.e., gamma rays, X-rays, and particularly UV radiation) can induce a variety of mutagenic and cytotoxic DNA lesions, which can lead to different forms of cancer. However, some populations of microorganisms thrive under different types of radiation due to defensive mechanisms provided by primary and secondary metabolic products, i.e., extremolytes and extremozymes. Extremolytes (including scytonemin, mycosporine-like amino acids, shinorine, porphyra-334, palythine, biopterin, and phlorotannin, among others) are able to absorb a wide spectrum of radiation while protecting the organism's DNA from being damaged. The possible commercial applications of extremolytes include anticancer drugs, antioxidants, cell-cycle-blocking agents, and sunscreens, among others. This article aims to review the strategies by which microorganisms thrive in extreme radiation environments and discuss their potential uses in biotechnology and the therapeutic industry. The major challenges that lie ahead are also discussed.

  16. Optical emission behavior and radiation resistance of epoxy resins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kawanishi, Shunichi; Udagawa, Akira; Hagiwara, Miyuki

    1987-11-01

    To make clear a mechanism of radiation resistance of epoxy resin systems, a role of energy trapping site induced in bisphenol A type epoxy resins cured with 4 kinds of aromatic amines (Φ N ) was studied in comparison with the case of aliphatic amine curing system through a measurement of optical emission. In the system of the epoxy resin cured with DETA, the optical emission from an excited state of bisphenol A unit of epoxy resin and a charge transfer complex was observed. On the other hand, the optical emission from Φ N was observed in the aromatic amine curing system. Their excitation spectrum consists of peaks of absorption spectrum of BA and those of Φ N , showing that the excited state of Φ N is formed through the excitation of both BA and Φ N . Therefore, the excited energy of BA transfers to the excited state of Φ N . Emission intensity of Φ N band was 20 ∼ 100 times as large as that of BA. These results indicate that the radiation energy is effectively released as an optical emission from excited state of Φ N in the epoxy resin when cured with aromatic amine. It can be concluded from the above results that aromatic amine hardeners contribute to enhancement of the radiation resistance of epoxy resin by acting as an energy transfer agent. (author)

  17. The Myth of Cell Phone Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    IAS Admin

    We discuss the purported link between cell phone radiation and cancer. We show that it is inconsis- tent with the photoelectric effect, and that epi- demiological studies of any link have no scientific basis. Albert Einstein, arguably the greatest scientist in the history of mankind, won the Nobel Prize not for his work on Relativity ...

  18. The Myth of Cell Phone Radiation

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Home; Journals; Resonance – Journal of Science Education; Volume 17; Issue 11. The Myth of Cell Phone Radiation. Vasant Natarajan. General Article Volume 17 Issue 11 November 2012 pp 1048-1053. Fulltext. Click here to view fulltext PDF. Permanent link: http://www.ias.ac.in/article/fulltext/reso/017/11/1048-1053 ...

  19. Characterization of radiation-resistant vegetative bacteria in beef

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Welch, A.B.; Maxcy, R.B.

    1975-01-01

    Ground beef contains numerous microorganisms of various types. The commonly recognized bacteria are associated with current problems of spoilage. Irradiation, however, contributes a new factor through selective destruction of the microflora. The residual microorganisms surviving a nonsterilizing dose are predominantly gram-negative coccobacilli. Various classifications have been given, e.g., Moraxella, Acinetobacter, Achromobacter, etc. For a more detailed study of these radiation-resistant bacteria occurring in ground beef, an enrichment procedure was used for isolation. By means of morphological and biochemical tests, most of the isolates were found to be Moraxella, based on current classifications. The range of growth temperatures was from 2 to 50 C. These bacteria were relatively heat sensitive, e.g., D 10 of 5.4 min at 70 0 C or less. The radiation resistance ranged from D 10 values of 273 to 2,039 krad. Thus, some were more resistant than any presently recognized spores. A reference culture of Moraxella osloensis was irradiated under conditions comparable to the enrichment procedure used with the ground beef. The only apparent changes were in morphology and penicillin sensitivity. However, after a few subcultures these bacteria reverted to the characteristics of the parent strain. Thus, it is apparent that these isolates are a part of the normal flora of ground beef and not aberrant forms arising from the irradiation procedure. The significance, if any, of these bacteria is not presently recognized. (auth)

  20. The Effects of Ionizing Radiation on Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biaglow, John E.

    1981-01-01

    Discusses the effects of radiation on dividing cells and factors influencing these effects; also briefly reviews the radical mechanism for radiation damage. Emphasizes the importance of oxygen in radiation effects. (CS)

  1. Resistance of platelet proteins to effects of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prodouz, K.N.; Habraken, J.W.; Moroff, G.

    1990-01-01

    Gamma irradiation of blood components prevents lymphocyte-induced graft-versus-host disease after transfusion in immunocompromised individuals. In this report we demonstrate the resistance of blood platelet proteins to gamma radiation-induced protein cleavage and aggregate formation when platelet concentrates were treated with a dose of 5000 rad. Results of one- and two-dimensional sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis of total platelet protein and cytoskeletal protein preparations indicate that platelet proteins are neither cleaved nor cross-linked under these conditions of irradiation. These results support those of a previous study that documented the lack of any adverse effect of 5000 rad gamma radiation on in vitro platelet properties

  2. Improvement of radiation resistance for polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE) by radiation cross-linking

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oshima, Akihiro; Tabata, Yoneho; Ikeda, Shigetoshi; Seguchi, Tadao.

    1996-01-01

    The crosslinked polytetrafluoroethylene(PTFE) was prepared by electron beams irradiation technique in the molten state at 340degC ± 3degC in inert gas atmosphere. The crosslinking density was changed by the irradiation dose. The radiation resistance of crosslinked PTFE was investigated on the mechanical properties after irradiation by γ-rays at room temperature under vacuum and in air. The dose at half value of elongation at break was about 1MGy for 500kGy-crosslinked PTFE, while the dose for non-crosslinked PTFE was only 3.5kGy. It was found that the radiation resistance of PTFE was extremely improved by crosslinking. (author)

  3. Study on radiation chemistry of fluorinated polymers for EUV resist

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nomura, Naoya; Okamoto, Kazumasa; Yamamoto, Hiroki; Kozawa, Takahiro; Fujiyoshi, Ryoko; Umegaki, Kikuo

    2015-06-01

    The fluorination of a chemically amplified resist is an effective method for use in EUV lithography. However, it has been suggested that the fluorination of the base polymer of the chemically amplified resist induces the electron scavenging reaction by the base polymer and reduces the acid yield. In this study, we clarified the formation of transient species and the acid yields of fluorinated polymers after exposure to the ionizing radiations. The acid yields of fluorinated polymers with hydroxyl groups were lower than that of poly(4-hydroxystyrene) (PHS). The lower acid generation efficiency in fluorinated polymers was due to not only the reaction between fluorinated polymers and electrons but also the lower deprotonation efficiency of the radical cation of the fluorinated polymer.

  4. Gallium Arsenide solar cell radiation damage experiment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, R. H.; Kinnison, J. D.; Herbert, G. A.; Meulenberg, A.

    1991-01-01

    Gallium arsenide (GaAs) solar cells for space applications from three different manufactures were irradiated with 10 MeV protons or 1 MeV electrons. The electrical performance of the cells was measured at several fluence levels and compared. Silicon cells were included for reference and comparison. All the GaAs cell types performed similarly throughout the testing and showed a 36 to 56 percent power areal density advantage over the silicon cells. Thinner (8-mil versus 12-mil) GaAs cells provide a significant weight reduction. The use of germanium (Ge) substrates to improve mechanical integrity can be implemented with little impact on end of life performance in a radiation environment.

  5. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of ..cap alpha..-tocopherol for 30 min at 37/sup 0/C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05% Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t/sub 50%/). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t/sub 50%/ values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt/sub 50%/) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  6. Resistance of human erythrocytes containing elevated levels of vitamin E to radiation-induced hemolysis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brown, M.A.

    1983-08-01

    Human erythrocytes were isolated from the blood of healthy donors and then incubated in the presence of suspensions of alpha-tocopherol for 30 min at 37 degrees C. Unabsorbed tocopherol was removed by centrifugation using several washes of isotonic phosphate-buffered saline. Washed erythrocytes were resuspended to 0.05%. Hct and exposed to hemolyzing doses of /sup 60/Co gamma radiation, and hemolysis was monitored continuously by light scattering at 700 nm in a recording spectrophotometer. The extent of hemolysis with time was sigmoid and data analysis was carried out on the time taken for 50% hemolysis to occur (t50%). The vitamin E content of erythrocytes was significantly elevated by the incubation procedure and resulted in the cells exhibiting a significantly increased resistance to hemolysis as reflected by the extended t50% values. Oral supplementation of 500 IU of vitamin E per day to eight normal human subjects for a period of 16 days also resulted in their washed erythrocytes exhibiting a significant increase in resistance to radiation-induced hemolysis. When comparing vitamin E incubated cells with control cells, both the dose-reducing factor (DRF) and the time for 50% hemolysis quotient (Qt50%) were observed to increase with increasing radiation dose.

  7. Unraveling Fungal Radiation Resistance Regulatory Networks through the Genome-Wide Transcriptome and Genetic Analyses of Cryptococcus neoformans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jung, Kwang-Woo; Yang, Dong-Hoon; Kim, Min-Kyu; Seo, Ho Seong

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT The basidiomycetous fungus Cryptococcus neoformans has been known to be highly radiation resistant and has been found in fatal radioactive environments such as the damaged nuclear reactor at Chernobyl. To elucidate the mechanisms underlying the radiation resistance phenotype of C. neoformans, we identified genes affected by gamma radiation through genome-wide transcriptome analysis and characterized their functions. We found that genes involved in DNA damage repair systems were upregulated in response to gamma radiation. Particularly, deletion of recombinase RAD51 and two DNA-dependent ATPase genes, RAD54 and RDH54, increased cellular susceptibility to both gamma radiation and DNA-damaging agents. A variety of oxidative stress response genes were also upregulated. Among them, sulfiredoxin contributed to gamma radiation resistance in a peroxiredoxin/thioredoxin-independent manner. Furthermore, we found that genes involved in molecular chaperone expression, ubiquitination systems, and autophagy were induced, whereas genes involved in the biosynthesis of proteins and fatty acids/sterols were downregulated. Most importantly, we discovered a number of novel C. neoformans genes, the expression of which was modulated by gamma radiation exposure, and their deletion rendered cells susceptible to gamma radiation exposure, as well as DNA damage insults. Among these genes, we found that a unique transcription factor containing the basic leucine zipper domain, named Bdr1, served as a regulator of the gamma radiation resistance of C. neoformans by controlling expression of DNA repair genes, and its expression was regulated by the evolutionarily conserved DNA damage response protein kinase Rad53. Taken together, the current transcriptome and functional analyses contribute to the understanding of the unique molecular mechanism of the radiation-resistant fungus C. neoformans. PMID:27899501

  8. No impact on P-gp level in radio-resistant Mcf-7 cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Madhu, L.N.; Rao, Shama; Sarojini, B.K.

    2016-01-01

    Cancer has become the leading cause of human death worldwide. One possible cause for therapeutic failure is that residual tumor cells are reminiscent of stem cells, which ultimately give rise to secondary tumors or distant metastasis. The property of resistance to radiation therapy or chemotherapy might be the major clinical criterion to characterize 'cancer stem cells (CSCs)'. In the process of radiotherapy, the radiosensitive cancer will become a radioresistant one. Such radio-resistance cells might also show the characters of multi drug resistance (MRD) properties which may affect the chemotherapy process. The present study was carried out to know the expression level of P-gp, a MRD protein in radioresistance breast cancer cells. The study conducted by exposing the MCF-7 cells to 4Gy of gamma radiation

  9. The behavior of electrochemical cell resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ritley, K.A.; Dull, P.M.; Weber, M.H.; Carroll, M.; Hurst, J.J.; Lynn, K.G.

    1990-01-01

    Knowledge of the basic electrochemical behavior found in typical cold fusion experiments is important to understanding and preventing experimental errors. For a Pd/LiOH(D)/Pt electrochemical cell, the applied cell voltage/current relationship (the effective cell resistance) does not obey Ohm's law directly, but instead exhibits a complicated response to the current, voltage, temperature, electrolyte conductance, and other factors. Failure to properly consider this response can possibly result in errors that could affect the heat balance in calorimetry and temperature measurement experiments. Measurements of this response under varying voltage, temperature, and electrolyte conductivity conditions are reported. A plausible scenario in which the temperature dependence of the effective cell resistance can either exaggerate or ameliorate novel exothermic processes is suggested

  10. Gallium arsenide solar cell radiation damage study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maurer, R. H.; Herbert, G. A.; Kinnison, J. D.; Meulenberg, A.

    1989-01-01

    A thorough analysis has been made of electron- and proton- damaged GaAs solar cells suitable for use in space. It is found that, although some electrical parametric data and spectral response data are quite similar, the type of damage due to the two types of radiation is different. An I-V analysis model shows that electrons damage the bulk of the cell and its currents relatively more, while protons damage the junction of the cell and its voltages more. It is suggested that multiple defects due to protons in a strong field region such as a p/n junction cause the greater degradation in cell voltage, whereas the individual point defects in the quasi-neutral minority-carrier-diffusion regions due to electrons cause the greater degradation in cell current and spectral response.

  11. Transfer of innate resistance and susceptibility to Leishmania donovani infection in mouse radiation bone marrow chimaeras

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Crocker, P.R.; Blackwell, J.M.; Bradley, D.J. (London School of Hygiene and Tropical Medicine (UK))

    1984-07-01

    Reciprocal radiation bone marrow chimaeras were made between H-2-compatible strains of mice innately resistant or susceptible to visceral leishmaniasis. In initial experiments, susceptibility but not resistance to Leishmania donovani could be transferred with donor bone marrow into irradiated recipients. In subsequent experiments it was possible to transfer both resistance and susceptibility. This was achieved either by selecting more radiosensitive mouse strains as susceptible recipients, or alternatively by increasing the irradiation dose for the susceptible recipients used in the initial experiments. Using the higher irradiation dose, successful transfer of resistance and susceptibility between congenic mice carrying the Lshsup(r) and Lshsup(s) alleles on the more radioresistant B10 genetic background provided firm evidence that the results obtained in this study were specifically related to expression of the Lsh gene. It is concluded that Lsh gene-controlled resistance and susceptibility to L. donovani is determined by bone marrow-derived cells. The cell type(s) involved is likely to be of the macrophage lineage.

  12. Radiation resistance of paralytic shellfish poison (PSP) toxins

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    San Juan, Edith M.

    2000-04-01

    Radiation resistance of paralytic shellfish poison (PSP) toxins, obtained from Pyrodinium bahamense var. compressum in shellstocks of green mussels, was determined by subjecting the semi-purified toxin extract as well as the shellstocks of green mussels to high doses of ionizing radiation of 5, 10, 15 and 20 kGy. The concentration of the PSP toxins was determined by the Standard Mouse Bioassay (SMB) method. The radiation assistance of the toxins was determined by plotting the PSP toxin concentration versus applied dose in a semilog paper. The D 10 value or decimal reduction dose was obtained from the straight line which is the dose required to reduce the toxicity level by 90%. The effects of irradiation on the quality of green mussels in terms of its physico-chemical, microbiological and sensory attributes were also conducted. The effect of irradiation on the fatty acid components of green mussels was determined by gas chromatography. Radiation resistance of the PSP toxins was determined to be lower in samples with initially high toxicity level as compared with samples with initially low toxicity level. The D 10 values of samples with initially high PSP level were 28.5 kGy in shellstocks of green musssels and 17.5 kGy in the semi-purified toxin extract. When the PSP level was low initially, the D 10 values were as high as 57.5 and 43.5 kGy in shellstocks of green mussels for the two trials, and 43.0 kGy in semi-purified toxin extract. The microbial load of the irradiated mussels was remarkably reduced. No differnce in color and odor characteristics were observed in the mussel samples subjected to varying doses of ionizing radiation. There was darkening in the color of mussel meat and its juice. The concentration of the fatty acid components in the fresh green mussels were considerably higher as compared with those present in the irradiated mussels, though some volatile fatty acids were detected as a result of irradiation. (Author)

  13. Induction of radiation resistance and radio-protective mechanism. On the reactive oxygen and free radical

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yukawa, Osami [National Inst. of Radiological Sciences, Chiba (Japan). Research Center for Radiation Safety

    2003-03-01

    Radical scavenging system for reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to radio-protection is reviewed on findings in animals, tissues and cells. Protection against oxygen toxicity in evolution can be seen in anaerobes' superoxide dismutase (SOD) over 3500 million years ago. ROS is generated endogenously and also by radiation. However, the intracellular sites of the generated ROS are different depending on its cause. The protection is done through enzymes like SOD, peroxidase, catalase, glutathione-related enzymes and through substances like GSH, {alpha}-tocopherol, ascorbic acid etc. Induction of ROS scavenging substances related with radio-resistance includes the responses to the low dose radiation (5-50 cGy) in those enzymes described above; to middle to high dose radiation (1-30 Gy) in a similar and in other unknown mechanisms; to exposure of ROS like H{sub 2}O{sub 2} at low concentration; and to antioxidant treatment. The cross-resistance between radiation and drugs suggests necessity of this induction. (N.I.)

  14. Induction of radiation resistance and radio-protective mechanism. On the reactive oxygen and free radical

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yukawa, Osami

    2003-01-01

    Radical scavenging system for reactive oxygen species (ROS) leading to radio-protection is reviewed on findings in animals, tissues and cells. Protection against oxygen toxicity in evolution can be seen in anaerobes' superoxide dismutase (SOD) over 3500 million years ago. ROS is generated endogenously and also by radiation. However, the intracellular sites of the generated ROS are different depending on its cause. The protection is done through enzymes like SOD, peroxidase, catalase, glutathione-related enzymes and through substances like GSH, α-tocopherol, ascorbic acid etc. Induction of ROS scavenging substances related with radio-resistance includes the responses to the low dose radiation (5-50 cGy) in those enzymes described above; to middle to high dose radiation (1-30 Gy) in a similar and in other unknown mechanisms; to exposure of ROS like H 2 O 2 at low concentration; and to antioxidant treatment. The cross-resistance between radiation and drugs suggests necessity of this induction. (N.I.)

  15. GaAs quantum dot solar cell under concentrated radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sablon, K.; Little, J. W.; Hier, H.; Li, Y.; Mitin, V.; Vagidov, N.; Sergeev, A.

    2015-01-01

    Effects of concentrated solar radiation on photovoltaic performance are investigated in well-developed GaAs quantum dot (QD) solar cells with 1-Sun efficiencies of 18%–19%. In these devices, the conversion processes are enhanced by nanoscale potential barriers and/or AlGaAs atomically thin barriers around QDs, which prevent photoelectron capture to QDs. Under concentrated radiation, the short circuit current increases proportionally to the concentration and the open circuit voltage shows the logarithmic increase. In the range up to hundred Suns, the contributions of QDs to the photocurrent are proportional to the light concentration. The ideality factors of 1.1–1.3 found from the V OC -Sun characteristics demonstrate effective suppression of recombination processes in barrier-separated QDs. The conversion efficiency shows the wide maximum in the range of 40–90 Suns and reaches 21.6%. Detailed analysis of I-V-Sun characteristics shows that at low intensities, the series resistance decreases inversely proportional to the concentration and, at ∼40 Suns, reaches the plateau determined mainly by the front contact resistance. Improvement of contact resistance would increase efficiency to above 24% at thousand Suns

  16. Radiation resistance of epoxy resins and their composistes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sonoda, Katsumi; Hayashi, Osamu; Tanaka, Takao; Hirabayashi, Shoji; Amakawa, Tadashi.

    1984-01-01

    In the electric equipment installed inside containment vessels in nuclear power plants, many epoxy resins have been employed as insulating materials. However, there are very few reports on the investigation of their properties in such environment, specifically under LOCA (Loss-of-Coolant Accident) conditions. This paper investigates on the electrical and mechanical properties of the epoxy resins supposed to be applicable to the actual equipment, by LOCA simulation. The epoxy resins used for the experiment were the following three types: (1) typical epoxy resin, bisphenol A group; (2) novolak group epoxy resins in consideration of improving humidity resistance; and (3) triazine group epoxy resins for the purpose of giving radiation, humidity and heat resistances. The last one includes the composites with Nomex and with laminated mica. After LOCA simulation which is composed of up to 2 MGy irradiation of 60 Co γ-ray at the dose rate of 10 4 Gy/h and the exposure to high temperature saturated steam, the electrical properties of dielectric tangent, insulation breakdown voltage (BDV) and conductivity and the mechanical properties of bending strength and viscoelasticity were measured. In the paper, the experimental results are described in detail. Of these, the triazine group epoxy/Nomex composite did not show swelling, but demonstrated stable radiation resistance. It is excellent in the electrical and mechanical properties, and also shows good dimension-stability. In LOCA simulation, its bending strength was reduced than that for only γ-irradiation of 2 MGy, but still had the residual strength of about 80 %. (Wakatsuki, Y.)

  17. Radiation and Heat Resistance of Moraxella-Acinetobacter in Meats

    Science.gov (United States)

    1978-01-23

    mechanism of resistance and their significance in food spoilage . MATERIALS AND EXPERIMENTAL PROCEDURES Plating and counting The plating and counting...appear to be important. They are not associated with food spoilage in presently accepted methods of processing, distribution, and storage. They only...1977. Comparative viability of unirradiated and gamma irradiated bacterial cells. J. Food Sei. 42: 1056. Maxcy, R. B., and N. P. Tiwari. 1973

  18. Effects of radiation on cultured fish cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Etoh, Hisami; Suyama, Ippei

    1980-01-01

    A new fibroblastic cell line was established in our laboratory from the caudal fin of the goldfish, C. auratus. The cells, designated CAF, have been subcultured over 80 passages since initiation in August, 1977. A brief description of cell cultivation and colony formation is presented. The plating efficiency obtained was considerably higher than those reported for other fish cell lines. CAF cells were irradiated with 250, 500, 1,000, 2,000, and 3,000 R of x-rays at a dose rate of 80 R/min in air. The survival parameters changed when the number of passages of culture increased. Values for D 0 , D sub(q), and n obtained from cells irradiated at the 70th passage were calculated to be 650 R, 700 R, and 2.7 respectively. Thus CAF cells would be several times as resistant in general as cultured mammalian cells. The cells irradiated with 1,000 R of x-rays received a second dose from 250 to 2,000 R at intervals of 3, 6, and 24 hr. The cells kept at 26 0 C showed a pronounced recovery from sublethal damage during the intervals between two doses. Magnitude of recovery was larger if the interval was longer under the present experimental conditions. These results may indicate that the recovery observed at an individual level accounts partly for that in vitro. (author)

  19. Radiation Resistant Hybrid Lotus Effect Photoelectrocatalytic Self-Cleaning Anti-Contamination Coatings, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop radiation resistant hybrid Lotus Effect photoelectrocatalytic self-cleaning anti-contamination coatings for application to Lunar...

  20. Radiation Resistant Hybrid Lotus Effect Photoelectrocatalytic Self-Cleaning Anti-Contamination Coatings Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This project will develop radiation resistant hybrid Lotus Effect photoelectrocatalytic self-cleaning anti-contamination coatings for application to Lunar...

  1. Low-temperature radiation-resistant material for ball-bearing retainers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desau, P. O.; Emmons, W. F.

    1970-01-01

    Radiation resistant material, made of polyimide polymers and S-glass cloth, is used in ball bearing retainers for extreme environments. Material displays satisfactory wear resistance, lubricity, and stability. Results of comparative tests with fluorocarbon materials are given.

  2. Space Radiation Effect on Si Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jae-Jin Lee

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available High energy charged particles are trapped by geomagnetic field in the region named Van Allen Belt. These particles can move to low altitude along magnetic field and threaten even low altitude spacecraft. Space Radiation can cause equipment failures and on occasions can even destroy operations of satellites in orbit. Sun sensors aboard Science and Technology Satellite (STSAT-1 was designed to detect sun light with silicon solar cells which performance was degraded during satellite operation. In this study, we try to identify which particle contribute to the solar cell degradation with ground based radiation facilities. We measured the short circuit current after bombarding electrons and protons on the solar cells same as STSAT-1 sun sensors. Also we estimated particle flux on the STSAT-1 orbit with analyzing NOAA POES particle data. Our result clearly shows STSAT-1 solar cell degradation was caused by energetic protons which energy is about 700 keV to 1.5 MeV. Our result can be applied to estimate solar cell conditions of other satellites.

  3. Human genetic marker for resistance to radiations and chemicals. 1998 annual progress report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lieberman, H.B.

    1998-01-01

    'The broad objective of the project is to understand the molecular basis for the response of cells to radiations and chemicals, with the pragmatic goal of being able to identify human subpopulations that are exceptionally sensitive to DNA damaging agents. The project focuses on HRAD9, a human orthologue of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe gene rad9. S. pombe rad9::ura4+ mutant cells are highly sensitive to ionizing radiation, UV and many chemicals, such as the DNA synthesis inhibitor hydroxyurea. They also lack the ability to delay cycling transiently in S phase or in G2 following a block in DNA replication or after incurring DNA damage, respectively -i.e., they lack checkpoint controls. The attempt by mutant cells to progress through mitosis in the absence of fully intact DNA accounts at least in part for their sensitivity to DNA damaging agents. Cells bearing rad9::ura4+ also aberrantly regulate UVDE, an enzyme that participates in a secondary DNA excision repair pathway. The key role played by S. pombe rad9 in promoting resistance to chemicals and radiations suggests that the evolutionarily conserved human cognate also has important functions in mammals. The first set of aims in this proposal centers on characterizing the structure and expression of HRAD9, to assess structure/function relationships and potentially link protein activity to a specific tissue. The next set of aims focuses on determining the role of HRAD9 in radio/chemoresponsiveness and cancer.'

  4. DNA conformation of Chinese hamster V79 cells and sensitivity to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, P.L.; Hilton, J.; Durand, R.E.

    1986-01-01

    Chinese hamster V79 cells grown for 20 h in suspension culture form small clusters of cells (spheroids) which are more resistant to killing by ionizing radiation than V79 cells grown as monolayers. This resistance appears to be due to the greater capacity of cells grown in contact to repair radiation damage. Attempts to relate this ''contact effect'' to differences in DNA susceptibility or DNA repair capacity have provided conflicting results. Two techniques, alkaline sucrose gradient sedimentation and alkaline elution, show no difference in the amounts of radiation-induced DNA single-strand breakage or its repair between suspension or monolayer cells. However, using the alkali-unwinding assay, the rate of DNA unwinding is much slower for suspension cells than for monolayer cells. Interestingly, a decrease in salt concentration or in pH of the unwinding solution eliminates these differences in DNA unwinding kinetics. A fourth assay, sedimentation of nucleoids on neutral sucrose gradients, also shows a significant decrease in radiation damage produced in suspension compared to monolayer cultures. It is believed that this assay measures differences in DNA conformation (supercoiling) as well as differences in DNA strand breakage. We conclude from these four assays that the same number of DNA strand breaks/Gy is produced in monolayer and spheroid cells. However, changes in DNA conformation or packaging occur when cells are grown as spheroids, and these changes are responsible for reducing DNA damage by ionizing radiation

  5. [Establishment of 5 resistant ovarian cancer cell strains and expression of resistance-related genes].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luan, Ying-zi; Li, Li; Li, Dang-rong; Zhang, Wei; Tang, Bu-jian

    2004-06-01

    To investigate expression difference of several drug resistance related genes between sensitive and resistant ovarian carcinoma cells. Cell lines resistant to cisplatin, carboplatin and taxol were established from ovarian carcinoma cell lines of SKOV3 and A2780, and their biological features were detected. The expressions of several genes related to drug resistance were measured by RT-PCR method. (1) The values of resistance index (RI) of resistant cells to relevant drugs were elevated 3 times or more, with different degrees of cross-resistance to several other drugs (RI 2 approximately 20). They grew more slowly than primary cells (Td elongated 1.4 approximately 2.4 times, P 0.05). Intracellular concentrations of relevant drugs were reduced 2.0 approximately 8.5 times in resistant cells (P p53, lung resistance protein-1 (LRP-1), multiple drug resistance related protein-1 (MRP-1) genes were expressed at lower levels in resistant cells than in sensitive cells; while protein kinase C (PKC), topoisomerase (topo) I, and topo II beta were expressed higher, no obvious alterations were found concerning glutathione S transferase-pi (GST-pi), and topo II alpha. Expression of multiple drug resistance-1 (MDR-1) gene was either elevated or reduced in different cells. The expressions of resistance related genes were widely different in different kinds of resistant cells, suggesting more than one pathway leading to resistance transformation. This adds more difficulties for clinical management.

  6. Study on production of useful metabolites by development of advanced cell culture techniques using radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Kim, Jinhong; Lee, Seung Sik; Bai, Hyounwoo; An, Byung Chull; Lee, Eun Mi; Lee, Jae Taek; Kim, Mi Ja

    2010-12-01

    The purpose of this project is improvement of investigation, materialization and evaluation techniques on effectiveness for functional natural compounds throughout development of tissue/cell culture techniques for mass production of useful metabolites using radiation. Research scope includes Development of a technique for radiation tissue and cell culture, Database construction for radiation response in plants and radiation effects, Construction of general-purpose national based techniques of cell culture technique using radiation. Main results are as follow: Isolation and identification of radiation induced basI gene; Determination of stresses sensitivities by transformating basI gene into arabidopsis; Isolation and identification of radiation induced chaperon proteins (PaAhpC and yPrxII) from Pseudomonas and yeast, and structural and functional analysis of the proteins; Determination of oxidative and heat resistance by transformating PaAhpC; Isolation and identification of maysin and its derivatives from centipedgrass; Investigation of enhancement technique for improving maysin and its derivatives production using radiation; Investigation of removing undesirable color in maysin and its derivatives using radiation; Determination of the effect of radiation on physiological functions of centipedgrass extracts; Identification of H 2 O 2 removing enzyme in radiation irradiated plant (Spinach); Determination of the effects of centipedgrass extracts on anti-obesity and anti-cancer activities

  7. Combined action of radiation, salts of copper and nickel on cell viability in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D. D. Gapeenko

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Experimental study of the combined action of heavy metals and ionizing radiation on the viability of cells in culture was made. We established a significant toxic effect of copper and nickel in the proliferative and mitotic activity of cells in vitro. Under the combined effects of radiation and copper ions on cells we observed the mor-phological changes in morphologically-functional properties of cells that were determined by or radiation dose or by concentration of copper ions. While incubation of irradiated cells with nickel ions we observed sensitiza-tion of cells by nickel ions under the irradiation dose of 0.5 and 5.0 Gy, and the resistance of cells to exposure to sublethal dose of 10.0 Gy.

  8. Radiation response of rodent neural precursor cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Limoli, C.L.; Fike, J.R.

    2003-01-01

    Full text: Therapeutic irradiation of the brain can cause cognitive dysfunction that is not treatable or well understood. Several lines of evidence from our laboratory suggest that radiation induced inhibition of neurogenesis in the hippocampus may be involved. To understand the mechanisms underlying these observations, we initiated studies using neural precursor cells isolated from the adult rat hippocampus. Cells were cultured exponentially and analyzed for acute (0-24h) and chronic (3-33 day) changes in apoptosis and oxidative stress following exposure to X-rays. Oxidative stress was measured using a dye sensitive to reactive oxygen species (ROS) and apoptosis was measured using annexin V binding; each endpoint was quantified by fluorescent automated cell sorting (FACS). Following exposure to X-rays, neural precursor cells exhibit a dose-responsive increase in the level of ROS and apoptosis over acute and chronic time frames. ROS and apoptosis were maximal at 12h, increasing 35 and 37% respectively over that of unirradiated controls. ROS and apoptosis peaked again at 24h, increasing 31 and 21% respectively over controls. Chronic levels of ROS and apoptosis were persistently elevated in a dose-dependent manner. ROS showed significant increases (34-180%) over a 3-4 week interval, while increases in apoptosis were less dramatic, rising 45% by week one before dropping to background. Irradiation of rat neural precursor cells was associated with an increase in p53 protein levels, and the activation of G1/S and G2/M checkpoints. These data suggest that the apoptotic and ROS responses may be tied to p53 dependent regulation of cell cycle control and stress activated pathways. We propose that oxidative stress plays a critical role in the radiation response of neural precursor cells, and discuss how this might contribute to the inhibition of neurogenesis and the cognitive impairment observed in the irradiated CNS

  9. Overcoming Multidrug Resistance in Cancer Stem Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Karobi Moitra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The principle mechanism of protection of stem cells is through the expression of ATP-binding cassette (ABC transporters. These transporters serve as the guardians of the stem cell population in the body. Unfortunately these very same ABC efflux pumps afford protection to cancer stem cells in tumors, shielding them from the adverse effects of chemotherapy. A number of strategies to circumvent the function of these transporters in cancer stem cells are currently under investigation. These strategies include the development of competitive and allosteric modulators, nanoparticle mediated delivery of inhibitors, targeted transcriptional regulation of ABC transporters, miRNA mediated inhibition, and targeting of signaling pathways that modulate ABC transporters. The role of ABC transporters in cancer stem cells will be explored in this paper and strategies aimed at overcoming drug resistance caused by these particular transporters will also be discussed.

  10. Platelet-Activating Factor Receptor Ligands Protect Tumor Cells from Radiation-Induced Cell Death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ildefonso Alves da Silva-Junior

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Irradiation generates oxidized phospholipids that activate platelet-activating factor receptor (PAFR associated with pro-tumorigenic effects. Here, we investigated the involvement of PAFR in tumor cell survival after irradiation. Cervical cancer samples presented higher levels of PAF-receptor gene (PTAFR when compared with normal cervical tissue. In cervical cancer patients submitted to radiotherapy (RT, the expression of PTAFR was significantly increased. Cervical cancer-derived cell lines (C33, SiHa, and HeLa and squamous carcinoma cell lines (SCC90 and SCC78 express higher levels of PAFR mRNA and protein than immortalized keratinocytes. Gamma radiation increased PAFR expression and induced PAFR ligands and prostaglandin E2 (PGE2 in these tumor cells. The blocking of PAFR with the antagonist CV3938 before irradiation inhibited PGE2 and increased tumor cells death. Similarly, human carcinoma cells transfected with PAFR (KBP were more resistant to radiation compared to those lacking the receptor (KBM. PGE2 production by irradiated KBP cells was also inhibited by CV3988. These results show that irradiation of carcinoma cells generates PAFR ligands that protect tumor cells from death and suggests that the combination of RT with a PAFR antagonist could be a promising strategy for cancer treatment.

  11. Modulating Radiation Resistance: Novel Protection Paradigms Based on Defenses against Ionizing Radiation in the Extrempohile Deinococcus radiodurans

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-01

    human cells the ability to survive extreme cellular insults caused by ionizing radiation. Treatment of human Jurkat T cells with native D. radiodurans...complex conferred on Jurkat T cells the ability to survive 100 Gy [Lamkin, T., Pangburn, H. et al., AFOSR, unpublished]. These radiation survival

  12. Cisplatin and low dose rate irradiation in cisplatin resistant and sensitive human glioma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wilkins, David E.; Cheng, E. Ng; Raaphorst, G. Peter

    1996-01-01

    Purpose: Human glioma cell lines resistant (U373MG CP ) and sensitive (U373MG) to cisplatin were used to evaluate the effect of cisplatin as a sensitizer to low dose rate irradiation (LDRI). Methods and Materials: A cisplatin resistant glioma cell line U373MG CP was developed by chronic exposure of parental U373MG cells to cisplatin. Plateau phase cells were treated with cisplatin, high dose rate (HDR) irradiation (1.12 Gy/min), LDRI (0.0088 Gy/min), or cisplatin concurrent with LDRI. Cell survival was determined by the colony forming assay. Results: Both cell lines showed increased resistance to radiation at LDR compared with HDR, with Dose Modifying Factors (DMF at 10% survival level) of 1.7 for U373MG and 2.5 for U373MG CP . The increased LDR sparing effect in the cisplatin resistant U373MG CP cells indicates increased repair proficiency. The resistant cell line showed a fourfold increase in resistance to cisplatin cytotoxicity at the 10% survival level compared with the parental U373MG cells. Cisplatin enhanced the response of both cell lines to LDRI. The DMFs were 1.2, 1.2, and 1.7, respectively, for the sensitive U373MG cell line given 1 μg/ml, and the resistant cell line given 3 or 6 μg/ml cisplatin treatments concurrent with LDRI. Conclusions: These data show that cisplatin can be an effective sensitizer to LDRI in both cisplatin resistant and sensitive glioma cell lines. However, in the resistant cell line, higher concentrations of cisplatin were necessary to achieve the same level of sensitization as in the sensitive cell line

  13. Cell cycle regulation and radiation-induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Favaudon, V.

    2000-01-01

    Tight control of cell proliferation is mandatory to prevent cancer formation as well as to normal organ development and homeostasis. This occurs through checkpoints that operate in both time and space and are involved in the control of numerous pathways including DNA replication and transcription, cell cycle progression, signal transduction and differentiation. Moreover, evidence has accumulated to show that apoptosis is tightly connected with the regulation of cell cycle progression. In this paper we describe the main pathways that determine checkpoints in the cell cycle and apoptosis. It is also recalled that in solid tumors radiation-induced cell death occurs most frequently through non-apoptotic mechanisms involving oncosis, and mitotic or delayed cell death. (author)

  14. Potential for a pluripotent adult stem cell treatment for acute radiation sickness.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodgerson, Denis O; Reidenberg, Bruce E; Harris, Alan G; Pecora, Andrew L

    2012-06-20

    Accidental radiation exposure and the threat of deliberate radiation exposure have been in the news and are a public health concern. Experience with acute radiation sickness has been gathered from atomic blast survivors of Hiroshima and Nagasaki and from civilian nuclear accidents as well as experience gained during the development of radiation therapy for cancer. This paper reviews the medical treatment reports relevant to acute radiation sickness among the survivors of atomic weapons at Hiroshima and Nagasaki, among the victims of Chernobyl, and the two cases described so far from the Fukushima Dai-Ichi disaster. The data supporting the use of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation and the new efforts to expand stem cell populations ex vivo for infusion to treat bone marrow failure are reviewed. Hematopoietic stem cells derived from bone marrow or blood have a broad ability to repair and replace radiation induced damaged blood and immune cell production and may promote blood vessel formation and tissue repair. Additionally, a constituent of bone marrow-derived, adult pluripotent stem cells, very small embryonic like stem cells, are highly resistant to ionizing radiation and appear capable of regenerating radiation damaged tissue including skin, gut and lung.

  15. The effect of cellular carotenoid levels in micrococcus luteus on resistance to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Al-Wandawi, K. H.

    2000-01-01

    In the present study, a biological system was developed to link the cellular carotenoid levels to Gamma radiation resistance in bacteria for the frst time. thus, in a non-photosynrhetic bacterium, in Micrococcus Luteus an inverse relationship was found between the increase in diphenylamine (DPA) concentration (5.25 μg/ml culture) and the polar cellular carotenoid pigments (C-45 and C-50 carotenoids and their glucosides). It was also found that irradiation of cells with different carotenoid concentrations with doses of γ-radiation in the range of (0.2500 gray) under oxic, air and hypoxic conditions showed that carotenoid pigments offer no significant protection as they usually do in case of visible light. (author).15 refs., 5 figs., 3 tabs

  16. Radiation hardening and irradiation testing of in-cell electronics for MA23/APM

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Friant, A.

    1988-09-01

    We relate briefly the radiation hardening method used to guarantee a gamma resistance of 10 Mrad for the whole electronic equipment associated with the slave arm of MA23 M servomanipulator which will be set up in cell 404 in Marcoule (APM). We describe the radiation testing of electronic devices and of the various subsystems designed by the D. LETI groups involved in the MA23/APM project

  17. Genetic analysis of resistance to radiation lymphomagenesis and interphase death of thymocytes in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumoto, Masaaki; Mori, Nobuko; Nishikawa, Ryosuke

    1992-01-01

    Induction of lymphomas by radiation in mice is controlled by genetic factors. We have analyzed genetic controls of radiation lymphomagenesis and the radiosensitivities for antibody-forming ability and interphase death (apoptosis) of thymocytes in BALB/cHeA, STS/A, crosses and the CXS series of recombinant inbred strains. Fractionated X-irradiation induced lymphomas at an extremely low incidence in STS/A mice, while it induced the disease at a high incidence in BALB/cHeA mice. The best concordance between strain distribution patterns of genetic markers and resistance to radiation lymphomagenesis in the recombinant inbred strains was observed in a region with the b and Ifa genes on chromosome 4. This indicates that one major locus controlling the resistance is probably located in this region. Decrease in the number of splenic plaque-forming cells (PFC) obtained by Jerne's method after 3 Gy X-irradiation of BALB/cHeA mice was greater by more than one order of magnitude than that of STS/A mice. Results observed in recombinant inbred strains suggest that one locus controlling the radiosensitivity of lymphoid cells for antibody-forming ability exists in the region containing Igh locus on chromosome 12. Thymocytes of BALB/cHeA mice were much more sensitive to induction of interphase death than those of STS/A mice both in vitro and in vivo. In F 1 hybrids, a resistant phenotype similar to STS/A mice appeared dominantly. Segregation pattern in the backcrosses indicated that radiosensitivity of the interphase death of thymocytes was controlled by one major autosomal allele. (author)

  18. Cancer Stem Cell Plasticity Drives Therapeutic Resistance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary R. Doherty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The connection between epithelial-mesenchymal (E-M plasticity and cancer stem cell (CSC properties has been paradigm-shifting, linking tumor cell invasion and metastasis with therapeutic recurrence. However, despite their importance, the molecular pathways involved in generating invasive, metastatic, and therapy-resistant CSCs remain poorly understood. The enrichment of cells with a mesenchymal/CSC phenotype following therapy has been interpreted in two different ways. The original interpretation posited that therapy kills non-CSCs while sparing pre-existing CSCs. However, evidence is emerging that suggests non-CSCs can be induced into a transient, drug-tolerant, CSC-like state by chemotherapy. The ability to transition between distinct cell states may be as critical for the survival of tumor cells following therapy as it is for metastatic progression. Therefore, inhibition of the pathways that promote E-M and CSC plasticity may suppress tumor recurrence following chemotherapy. Here, we review the emerging appreciation for how plasticity confers therapeutic resistance and tumor recurrence.

  19. Irradiation tests of radiation resistance optical fibers for fusion diagnostic application

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kakuta, Tsunemi; Shikama, Tatsuo; Nishitani, Takeo; Yamamoto, Shin; Nagata, Shinji; Tsuchiya, Bun; Toh, Kentaro; Hori, Junichi

    2002-11-01

    To promote development of radiation-resistant core optical fibers, the ITER-EDA (International Thermonuclear Experimental Reactor-Engineering Design Activity) recommended carrying out international round-robin irradiation tests of optical fibers to establish a reliable database for their applications in the ITER plasma diagnostics. Ten developed optical fibers were irradiation-tested in a Co-60 gamma cell, a Japan Materials Testing Reactor (JMTR). Also, some of them were irradiation tested in a fast neutron irradiation facility of FNS (Fast Neutron Source), especially to study temperature dependence of neutron-associated irradiation effects. Included were several Japanese fluorine doped fibers and one Japanese standard fiber (purified and undoped silica core), as well as seven Russian fibers. Some of Russian fibers were drawn by Japanese manufactures from Russian made pre-form rods to study effects of manufacturing processes to radiation resistant properties. The present paper will describe behaviors of growth of radiation-induced optical transmission loss in the wavelength range of 350-1750nm. Results indicate that role of displacement damages by fast neutrons are very important in introducing permanent optical transmission loss. Spectra of optical transmission loss in visible range will depend on irradiation temperatures and material parameters of optical fibers.

  20. Study on production of useful metabolites by development of advanced cell culture techniques using radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, Byung Yeoup; Lee, Seung Sik; Bai, Hyounwoo; Singh, Sudhir; Lee, Eun Mi; Hong, Sung Hyun; Park, Chul Hong; Srilatha, B.; Kim, Mi Ja; Lee, Ohchul

    2012-01-15

    The purpose of this project is improvement of investigation, materialization and evaluation techniques on effectiveness for functional natural compounds throughout development of tissue/cell culture techniques for mass production of useful metabolites using radiation. Research scope includes Development of a technique for radiation tissue and cell culture, Database construction for radiation response in plants and radiation effects, Construction of general-purpose national based techniques of cell culture technique using radiation. Main results are as follow: Development of a technique for radiation tissue and cell culture for Erigeron breviscapus (Vant.) Hand. Mazz.; Identification and functional analysis of AtTDX (chaperone and peroxidase activities); Functional analysis of radiation(gamma ray, electron beam, and proton beam) induced chaperon protein activities (AtTDX); Determine the action mechanism of yPrx2; Development of transgenic plant with bas I gene from Arabidopsis; Development of transgenic plant with EoP gene from centipedegrass; Identification of radiation induced multi functional compounds from Aloe; Determination of the effects of radiation on removing undesirable color and physiological activities (Schizandra chinensis baillon, centipedegrass); Determine the action mechanism of transgenic plant with 2-Cys Prx for heat stress resistance; Determination of the effects of centipedegrass extracts on anti-cancer activities; Functional analysis of centipedegrass extracts (anti-virus effects)

  1. Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility, Phase I

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — We propose to develop a Cell/Tissue Culture Radiation Exposure Facility (CTC-REF) to enable radiobiologists to investigate the real-time radiation effects on...

  2. Estimation of interface resistivity in bonded Si for the development of high performance radiation detectors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanno, Ikuo; Yamashita, Makoto; Nomiya, Seiichiro; Onabe, Hideaki

    2007-01-01

    For the development of high performance radiation detectors, direct bonding of Si wafers would be an useful method. Previously, p-n bonded Si were fabricated and they showed diode characteristics. The interface resistivity was, however, not investigated in detail. For the study of interface resistivity, n-type Si wafers with different resistivities were bonded. The resistivity of bonded Si wafers were measured and the interface resistivity was estimated by comparing with the results of model calculations. (author)

  3. Cell kinetic studies on radiation induced leukemogenesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakao, Isamu; Suzuki, Gen; Imai, Yasufumi; Kawase, Yoshiko; Nose, Masako; Hirashima, Kunitake; Bessho, Masami

    1989-01-01

    The purpose of this study was threefold: (1) to determine the clonal origin of radiation-induced thymic lymphoma in mice with cellular mosaicism for phosphoglycerate kinase; (2) to determine the incidence and latent period of myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma induced by whole-body exposure to median doses (3.0 Gy or less) in RFM/MsNrs-2 mice; and (3) to examine the influence of human recombinant interleukin-2 (hrIL-2). Thymic lymphoma was of a single cell origin. The incidence of radiation-induced myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma in RFM mice increased in a dose dependent fashion. Mean latent periods of both myeloid leukemia and thymic lymphoma after irradiation became shorter in proportion to radiation doses. When hrIL-2 was injected to RFM mice receiving 3.0 Gy, mean survivals were shorter in thymoma-bearing mice than the control mice. This suggested that hrIL-2 shortens the promotion step of thymoma. Administration of hrIL-2 failed to alter the incidence of myeloid leukemia or the mean survival of mice having myeloid leukemia, indicating that the protocol of hrIL-2 administration was not so sufficient as to alter the myeloid leukemogenesis. (Namekawa, K)

  4. Effects of Radiation on Proteasome Function in Prostate Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    2012-02-01

    radiation treatment may ultimately improve curability and may allow for de -escalation of the total radiation doses currently given to breast cancer ...Radiation-induced cancer stem cells 15 Figure 3. Radiation induces de novo generation of functional CSCs. ZsGreen-cODC-negative cells...advanced cancer of the uterine cervix . Cancer Res 1996;56(19):4509–4515. 98 Brizel DM, Scully SP, Harrelson JM et al. Tumor oxygenation pre- dicts for

  5. Role of Mn2+ and Compatible Solutes in the Radiation Resistance of Thermophilic Bacteria and Archaea

    OpenAIRE

    Webb, Kimberly M.; DiRuggiero, Jocelyne

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-resistant bacteria have garnered a great deal of attention from scientists seeking to expose the mechanisms underlying their incredible survival abilities. Recent analyses showed that the resistance to ionizing radiation (IR) in the archaeon Halobacterium salinarum is dependent upon Mn-antioxidant complexes responsible for the scavenging of reactive oxygen species (ROS) generated by radiation. Here we examined the role of the compatible solutes trehalose, mannosylglycerate, and di-m...

  6. Acquired-resistance of bevacizumab treatment for radiation brain necrosis: a case report

    OpenAIRE

    Zhuang, Hongqing; Yuan, Xiangkun; Sun, Dayong; Bian, Jianliang; Chang, Joe Y.; Yuan, Zhiyong; Wang, Ping

    2016-01-01

    The case study reported on acquired bevacizumab resistance in one patient receiving re-treatment with bevacizumab following radiation brain necrosis progression after bevacizumab was discontinued. This case offers novel and additional insight for bevacizumab treatment. Low-dose bevacizumab is effective for radiation brain necrosis, and radiation brain necrosis may progress after bevacizumab discontinuation, whereas too many cycles of bevacizumab treatment may induce drug-resistance and re-tre...

  7. Basal DNA repair machinery is subject to positive selection in ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria

    OpenAIRE

    Sghaier, Haïtham; Ghedira, Kaïs; Benkahla, Alia; Barkallah, Insaf

    2008-01-01

    Abstract Background Ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria (IRRB) show a surprising capacity for adaptation to ionizing radiation and desiccation. Positive Darwinian selection is expected to play an important role in this trait, but no data are currently available regarding the role of positive adaptive selection in resistance to ionizing-radiation and tolerance of desiccation. We analyzed the four known genome sequences of IRRB (Deinococcus geothermalis, Deinococcus radiodurans, Kineococcus r...

  8. Investigation of terahertz radiation influence on rat glial cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovkova, Mariia; Serebriakova, Maria; Fedorov, Viacheslav; Sedykh, Egor; Vaks, Vladimir; Lichutin, Alexander; Salnikova, Alina; Khodzitsky, Mikhail

    2016-01-01

    We studied an influence of continuous terahertz (THz) radiation (0.12 – 0.18 THz, average power density of 3.2 mW/cm2) on a rat glial cell line. A dose-dependent cytotoxic effect of THz radiation is demonstrated. After 1 minute of THz radiation exposure a relative number of apoptotic cells increased in 1.5 times, after 3 minutes it doubled. This result confirms the concept of biological hazard of intense THz radiation. Diagnostic applications of THz radiation can be restricted by the radiation power density and exposure time. PMID:28101417

  9. The effect of radiation intensity on diode characteristics of silicon solar cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Asgerov, Sh.Q; Agayev, M.N; Hasanov, M.H; Pashayev, I.G

    2008-01-01

    In order to explore electro-physical properties of silicon solar cells, diode characteristics and ohmic properties of Al - Ni / (n+) - Si contact has been studied. Diode characteristics have been studied on a wide temperature range and on various radiation intensity, so this gives us the ability to observe the effect of the radiation and the temperature on electro-physical properties of under study solar cells. Volt-Ampere characteristics of the ohmic contacts of the silicon solar cells have been presented. As well as contact resistance and mechanism of current transmission has been identified.

  10. Photodynamic responsiveness of human leukemia Jurkat/A4 cells with multidrug resistant phenotype.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philchenkov, A A; Shishko, E D; Zavelevich, M P; Kuiava, L M; Miura, K; Blokhin, D Y; Shton, I O; Gamaleia, N F

    2014-12-01

    Photodynamic therapy (PDT) is considered as a possible alternative approach to overcoming multidrug resistance (MDR). Analysis of cross-resistance to PDT in cells with different MDR pathways and resistance levels seems to be advantageous for elucidating the general mechanisms of cancer cell resistance to various treatment modalities. The aim of the study was to clarify whether the Jurkat/A4 leukemia cells with MDR phenotype are cross-resistant to PDT. Human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia line Jurkat and Jurkat/A4 subline with MDR phenotype were used. 5-Aminolevulinic acid (ALA) and Photolon (a complex of chlorine-e6 and polyvinylpyrrolidone; PL) or gold nanocomposite of PL were applied as photosensitizers. The cells were pretreated with photosensitizers and exposed to laser radiation at corresponding wavelengths. The phototoxicity was assessed in trypan blue exclusion test. The hypodiploid cell fraction was analyzed by flow cytometry of propidium iodide-stained cells. Expression of genes related to PDT resistance was analyzed by microarray technique with Affymetrix U133A chips. ALA-mediated PDT resulted in dose-dependent cell death in both lines, the relative photodynamic efficacy in Jurkat/A4 cells being inferior to that in the parental Jurkat cells. There was no correlation between phototoxicity and apoptosis induction both in Jurkat and Jurkat/A4 cells. PL-mediated general phototoxicity in Jurkat cells amounted up to 75% at the maximal photosensitizer dose with about 40% of apoptotic death fraction. PL-phototoxicity in Jurkat/A4 cells was considerably lower. In contrast to Jurkat cells, PL-gold composite did not increase the efficacy of photosensitization as compared to free PL in Jurkat/A4 cells. Multidrug-resistant Jurkat/A4 cells exhibit reduced sensitivity to phototoxic effect in comparison with parental Jurkat cells independently of nature of the photosensitizer being assayed.

  11. Radiation resistance of bacterial populations, isolated from the environment of the radiation sterilization plant type JS-6900, Debrecen

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gazso, L.; Igali, S.; Daroczy, E.

    1978-01-01

    The radiation resistance of bacterial populations isolated from the air of an industrial sterilization plant loaded with an activity of 250000 Ci was investigated before loading and a year after loading with 60 Co. The mean D 10 value of the 23 strains isolated before loading was 73 krad with a maximum of 173 krad. The mean D 10 value of the 26 strains isolated a year after loading was 32 krad with a maximum of 156 krad. It was not possible to detect any increase in radiation resistance of bacterial populations isolated from the irradiation room after one year of running radiation sterilization of disposable medical supplies. (author)

  12. The Radiation Effect on Peripheral Blood Cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Tae June; Kwon, Hyoung Cheol; Kim, Jung Soo; Im, Sun Kyun; Choi, Ki Chul

    1988-01-01

    To evaluate radiation effect on the hematopoietic system, we analyzed 44 patients who were treated with conventionally fractionated radiation therapy (RT) at Chonbuk National University Hospital. According to the treatment sites, we classified them into three groups: group I as head and neck, group II as thorax, and group III as pelvis. White blood cell, lymphocyte, platelet and hemoglobin were checked before and during RT The results were as follow; 1. White blood cell (WBC) and lymphocyte count were declined from the first week of RT to the third week, and then slightly recovered after the third or fourth week. There was prominent decrease in lymphocyte counts than WBC. 2. Platelet counts were declined until the second week of the RT, showed slight recovery at fourth week in all groups. Hemoglobin values were slightly decreased in the first week and then recovered the level of pretreatment value, gradually. 3. Lymphocyte count were declined significantly on group III(p<0.01), WBC and platelet counts were decreased on group II but statistically not significant

  13. Radiolabeled blood cells: radiation dosimetry and significance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Thakur, M.L.

    1986-01-01

    Over the past few years blood cells labeled with In-111 have become increasingly useful in clinical diagnosis and biomedical research. Indium-111 by the virtue of its physical characteristics and ability to bind to cell cytoplasmic components, provides an excellent cell tracer and thereby, allows investigators to monitor in vivo cell distribution by external imaging and help determine a course of regimen in treating life threatening diseases. Due to natural phenomena such as margination, blood pool, and reticuloendothelial cell activity, in the normal state, depending upon the cell type and the quality of cell preparations, 30%-50% of the administered radioactivity is immediately distributed in the liver, spleen and bone marrow. Over a period of time the radioactivity in these organs slightly increases and decays with a physical half-life of In-111. The resulting radiation dose to these organs ranges between 1-25 rads/mCi In-111 administered. The authors have developed a new In-111 labeling technique which preserves platelet ultrastructure and shown that human lymphocytes labeled with In-111 in mixed leukocytes preparations a) are only 0.003% of the total -body lymphocytes population and b) are killed. The consequence if any may be considered insignificant, particularly because 5.6% metaphases from normal men and 6.5% metaphases from normal women in the US have at least one chromosome aberration. Calculations have shown that the risk of fatal hematological malignancy, over a 30 year period, in recipients of 100 million lymphocytes labeled with 100 μCi In-111 is 1/million patients studied. This risk is less than 0.025% of the 1981 spontaneous cancer patient rate in the country. 32 references, 10 tables

  14. Radiation-hard, high efficiency InP solar cell and panel development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Keavney, C.J.; Vernon, S.M.; Haven, V.E.; Nowlan, M.J.; Walters, R.J.; Slatter, R.L.; Summers, G.P.

    1991-01-01

    Indium phosphide solar cells with efficiencies over 19% (Air mass zero, 25 degrees C) and area of 4 cm 2 have been made and incorporated into prototype panels. The panels will be tested in space to confirm the high radiation resistance expected from InP solar cells, which makes the material attractive for space use, particularly in high-radiation orbits. Laboratory testing indicated an end-of-life efficiency of 15.5% after 10 15 1 MeV electrons, and 12% after 10 16 . These cells are made by metalorganic chemical vapor deposition, and have a shallow homojunction structure. The manufacturing process is amendable to scale-up to larger volumes; more than 200 cells were produced in the laboratory operation. Cell performance, radiation degradation, annealing behavior, and results of deep level transient spectroscopy studies are presented in this paper

  15. Radiation responses of stem cells: targeted and non-targeted effects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kavanagh, J.N.; Waring, E.J.; Prise, K.M.

    2015-01-01

    Stem cells are fundamental to the development of any tissue or organism via their ability to self-renew, which is aided by their unlimited proliferative capacity and their ability to produce fully differentiated offspring, often from multiple lineages. Stems cells are long lived and have the potential to accumulate mutations, including in response to radiation exposure. It is thought that stem cells have the potential to be induced into a cancer stem cell phenotype and that these may play an important role in resistance to radiotherapy. For radiation-induced carcinogenesis, the role of targeted and non-targeted effects is unclear with tissue or origin being important. Studies of genomic instability and bystander responses have shown consistent effects in haematopoietic models. Several models of radiation have predicted that stem cells play an important role in tumour initiation and that bystander responses could play a role in proliferation and self-renewal. (authors)

  16. [Impact of cell phone radiation on male reproduction].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kang, Ning; Shang, Xue-Jun; Huang, Yu-Feng

    2010-11-01

    With the popularized use cell phones, more and more concern has been aroused over the effects of their radiation on human health, particularly on male reproduction. Cell phone radiation may cause structural and functional injuries of the testis, alteration of semen parameters, reduction of epididymal sperm concentration and decline of male fertility. This article presents an overview on the impact of cell phone radiation on male reproduction.

  17. Molecular exploration of the highly radiation resistant cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badri, Hanène; Leys, Natalie; Wattiez, Ruddy

    Arthrospira (Spirulina) is a photosynthetic cyanobacterium able to use sunlight to release oxygen from water and remove carbon dioxide and nitrate from water. In addition, it is suited for human consumption (edible). For these traits, the cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was selected by the European Space Agency (ESA) as part of the life support system MELiSSA for recycling oxygen, water, and food during future long-haul space missions. However, during such extended missions, Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 will be exposed to continuous artificial illumination and harmful cosmic radiation. The aim of this study was to investigate how Arthrospira will react and behave when exposed to such stress environment. The cyanobacterium Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 was exposed to high gamma rays doses in order to unravel in details the response of this bacterium following such stress. Test results showed that after acute exposure to high doses of 60Co gamma radiation upto 3200 Gy, Arthrospira filaments were still able to restart photosynthesis and proliferate normally. Doses above 3200 Gy, did have a detrimental effect on the cells, and delayed post-irradiation proliferation. The photosystem activity, measured as the PSII quantum yield immediately after irradiation, decreased significantly at radiation doses above 3200 Gy. Likewise through pigment content analysis a significant decrease in phycocyanin was observed following exposure to 3200 Gy. The high tolerance of this bacterium to 60Co gamma rays (i.e. ca. 1000x more resistant than human cells for example) raised our interest to investigate in details the cellular and molecular mechanisms behind this amazing resistance. Optimised DNA, RNA and protein extraction methods and a new microarray chip specific for Arthrospira sp. PCC 8005 were developed to identify the global cellular and molecular response following exposure to 3200 Gy and 5000 Gy A total of 15,29 % and 30,18 % genes were found differentially expressed in RNA

  18. Transient elevation of glycolysis confers radio-resistance by facilitating DNA repair in cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Chauhan, Ankit; Khanna, Suchit; Rai, Yogesh; Singh, Saurabh; Soni, Ravi; Kalra, Namita; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S

    2015-01-01

    Cancer cells exhibit increased glycolysis for ATP production (the Warburg effect) and macromolecular biosynthesis; it is also linked with therapeutic resistance that is generally associated with compromised respiratory metabolism. Molecular mechanisms underlying radio-resistance linked to elevated glycolysis remain incompletely understood. We stimulated glycolysis using mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs viz. di-nitro phenol, DNP; Photosan-3, PS3; Methylene blue, MB) in established human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1). Glucose utilization and lactate production, levels of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes were investigated as indices of glycolysis. Clonogenic survival, DNA repair and cytogenetic damage were studied as parameters of radiation response. MRMs induced the glycolysis by enhancing the levels of two important regulators of glucose metabolism GLUT-1 and HK-II and resulted in 2 fold increase in glucose consumption and lactate production. This increase in glycolysis resulted in resistance against radiation-induced cell death (clonogenic survival) in different cell lines at an absorbed dose of 5 Gy. Inhibition of glucose uptake and glycolysis (using fasentin, 2-deoxy-D-glucose and 3-bromopyruvate) in DNP treated cells failed to increase the clonogenic survival of irradiated cells, suggesting that radio-resistance linked to inhibition of mitochondrial respiration is glycolysis dependent. Elevated glycolysis also facilitated rejoining of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to a reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. These findings suggest that enhanced glycolysis generally observed in cancer cells may be responsible for the radio-resistance, partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage

  19. Transient elevation of glycolysis confers radio-resistance by facilitating DNA repair in cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhatt, Anant Narayan; Chauhan, Ankit; Khanna, Suchit; Rai, Yogesh; Singh, Saurabh; Soni, Ravi; Kalra, Namita; Dwarakanath, Bilikere S

    2015-05-01

    Cancer cells exhibit increased glycolysis for ATP production (the Warburg effect) and macromolecular biosynthesis; it is also linked with therapeutic resistance that is generally associated with compromised respiratory metabolism. Molecular mechanisms underlying radio-resistance linked to elevated glycolysis remain incompletely understood. We stimulated glycolysis using mitochondrial respiratory modifiers (MRMs viz. di-nitro phenol, DNP; Photosan-3, PS3; Methylene blue, MB) in established human cell lines (HEK293, BMG-1 and OCT-1). Glucose utilization and lactate production, levels of glucose transporters and glycolytic enzymes were investigated as indices of glycolysis. Clonogenic survival, DNA repair and cytogenetic damage were studied as parameters of radiation response. MRMs induced the glycolysis by enhancing the levels of two important regulators of glucose metabolism GLUT-1 and HK-II and resulted in 2 fold increase in glucose consumption and lactate production. This increase in glycolysis resulted in resistance against radiation-induced cell death (clonogenic survival) in different cell lines at an absorbed dose of 5 Gy. Inhibition of glucose uptake and glycolysis (using fasentin, 2-deoxy-D-glucose and 3-bromopyruvate) in DNP treated cells failed to increase the clonogenic survival of irradiated cells, suggesting that radio-resistance linked to inhibition of mitochondrial respiration is glycolysis dependent. Elevated glycolysis also facilitated rejoining of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks by activating both non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination (HR) pathways of DNA double strand break repair leading to a reduction in radiation-induced cytogenetic damage (micronuclei formation) in these cells. These findings suggest that enhanced glycolysis generally observed in cancer cells may be responsible for the radio-resistance, partly by enhancing the repair of DNA damage.

  20. Effect of radiation on the induction of cell death in melanoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Notcovich, C; Delgado Gonzalez, D; Salguero, N; Bracalente, C; Molinari, B; Duran H

    2012-01-01

    Apoptosis is one of the desired effects of radiation during tumor treatment with radiotherapy. However, cutaneous melanoma cells are highly resistant to this kind of treatment. In order to understand the impact of radiation on melanoma cells apoptosis, the aim of this study was to characterize the radiobiological response of human melanoma cells, and to study whether a correlation between intrinsic radiosensitivity and apoptosis exists. The human melanoma cell lines A375, MELJ and SB2 were gamma-irradiated ( 137 Cs) and their radiosensitivity was evaluated through the α parameter and surviving fraction at 2 Gy (SF2) of a clonogenic assay, adjusted to the Linear-Quadratic (LQ) survival model. MELJ resulted the most radioresistant (α= 0,150±0,034 SF2= 0,71), while A375 and SB2 were the most sensitive (α=0,45±0,028 SF2=0,29 and α=0,41±0,004 SF2=0,21 respectively). Apoptotic process was evaluated at 0, 2, 6, 24 and 48 hs post irradiation at 2 and 4 Gy. Nuclear morphology was analyzed by Hoechst staining, and PARP-1 cleavage by western blot. The three cell lines nucleus with apoptotic morphology were found, being A375 and SB2 percentage of apoptotic nucleus higher than MELJ (p<0.01%). Besides, PARP-1 western blot showed for MEL-J a low presence of the cleaved forms (apoptosis indicator) compared to A375 and SB2 cell lines. Our results indicate that MELJ, the most radioresistant cell line in this study, is the less radiation induced apoptotic, demonstrating a correlation between cellular intrinsic radiosensitivity and apoptosis. Understanding melanoma radioresistance mechanism becomes extremely important in the search of new therapeutic targets that allow cell sensitization to radiotherapy (author)

  1. Design principles for radiation-resistant solid solutions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schuler, Thomas; Trinkle, Dallas R.; Bellon, Pascal; Averback, Robert

    2017-05-01

    We develop a multiscale approach to quantify the increase in the recombined fraction of point defects under irradiation resulting from dilute solute additions to a solid solution. This methodology provides design principles for radiation-resistant materials. Using an existing database of solute diffusivities, we identify Sb as one of the most efficient solutes for this purpose in a Cu matrix. We perform density-functional-theory calculations to obtain binding and migration energies of Sb atoms, vacancies, and self-interstitial atoms in various configurations. The computed data informs the self-consistent mean-field formalism to calculate transport coefficients, allowing us to make quantitative predictions of the recombined fraction of point defects as a function of temperature and irradiation rate using homogeneous rate equations. We identify two different mechanisms according to which solutes lead to an increase in the recombined fraction of point defects; at low temperature, solutes slow down vacancies (kinetic effect), while at high temperature, solutes stabilize vacancies in the solid solution (thermodynamic effect). Extension to other metallic matrices and solutes are discussed.

  2. Radiation performance of AlGaAs concentrator cells and expected performance of cascade structures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Curtis, H.B.; Swartz, C.K.; Hart, R.E. Jr.

    1987-01-01

    Aluminum gallium arsenide, GaAs, silicon and InGaAs cells have been irradiated with 1 MeV electrons and 37 MeV protons. These cells are candidates for individual cells in a cascade structure. Data is presented for both electron and proton irradiation studies for one sun and a concentration level of 100X AMO. Results of calculations on the radiation resistance of cascade cell structures based on the individual cell data are also presented. Both series connected and separately connected structures are investigated

  3. Radiation targeted TNF gene therapy in TNF-resistant prostate cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chung, Theodore D.K.; Mauceri, Helena J.; Hallahan, Dennis E.; Yu, Jenny; Yajnik, Santosh; Weichselbaum, Ralph R.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objectives: Control of gene transcription by ionizing radiation represents a novel method of spatial and temporal regulation of genetic-based medical treatment. We previously reported improved tumor control using this approach in the radioresistant, TNF-sensitive squamous cell carcinoma, SQ-20B. Histopathologic evaluation of treated tumor specimens demonstrated tumor necrosis and vascular obstruction suggesting that the combined TNF and radiation treatment inhibits tumor growth through both direct and indirect mechanisms. The purpose of the present study was to determine the therapeutic potential of this approach in a TNF-resistant prostate cancer xenograft. Materials and Methods: The hormone-refractory human prostate cancer cell line PC-3 was transfected with Ad.Egr-TNF (adenovirus type 5 vector expressing TNFα under the transcriptional regulation of the radiation-inducible Egr-1 promoter) and TNF production was quantified by ELISA. TNF-induced cytotoxicity and radiosensitization were studied using rhTNF and PC-3 in an MTT assay and standard clonogenic survival assays. PC-3 xenografts were established approximately 2 weeks after injecting 2 x 10 7 cells S.C. in the right hind limb of female nude mice. Animals were treated with intratumoral injections of either Ad.Egr-TNF or buffer. Xenografts were irradiated with 5 Gy/fx 4 times per week to a total dose of 40 Gy using a Maxitron 250 x-ray generator (1.88 Gy/min). Results: TNF production in vitro. PC-3 cells infected with Ad.Egr-TNF released >1000 pg/ml TNF. Uninfected cells did not produce detectable levels of TNF. TNF mediated cytotoxicity in vitro. PC-3 cells were highly resistant to rhTNF with 78% cell survival observed at the highest concentration tested (10,000 U/ml). TNF mediated radiosensitization in vitro. rhTNF (1000 U/ml) had no significant effect on clonogenic survival of PC-3 cells following irradiation (D 0 =1.5). Combined Ad.Egr-TNF and 40 Gy in vivo. Combined treatment of PC-3 xenografts

  4. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table.

  5. Mechanisms of radiation-induced neoplastic cell transformation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, T.C.H.; Tobias, C.A.

    1984-04-01

    Studies with cultured mammalian cells demonstrated clearly that radiation can transform cells directly and can enhance the cell transformation by oncogenic DNA viruses. In general, high-LET heavy-ion radiation can be more effective than X and gamma rays in inducing neoplastic cell transformation. Various experimental results indicate that radiation-induced DNA damage, most likely double-strand breaks, is important for both the initiation of cell transformation and for the enhancement of viral transformation. Some of the transformation and enhancement lesions can be repaired properly in the cell, and the amount of irrepairable lesions produced by a given dose depends on the quality of radiation. An inhibition of repair processes with chemical agents can increase the transformation frequency of cells exposed to radiation and/or oncogenic viruses, suggesting that repair mechanisms may play an important role in the radiation transformation. The progression of radiation-transformed cells appears to be a long and complicated process that can be modulated by some nonmutagenic chemical agents, e.g., DMSO. Normal cells can inhibit the expression of transforming properties of tumorigenic cells through an as yet unknown mechanism. The progression and expression of transformation may involve some epigenetic changes in the irradiated cells. 38 references, 15 figures, 1 table

  6. Ionizing-radiation resistance in the desiccation-tolerant cyanobacterium Chroococcidiopsis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Billi, D.; Friedmann, E. I.; Hofer, K. G.; Caiola, M. G.; Ocampo-Friedmann, R.

    2000-01-01

    The effect of X-ray irradiation on cell survival, induction, and repair of DNA damage was studied by using 10 Chroococcidiopsis strains isolated from desert and hypersaline environments. After exposure to 2.5 kGy, the percentages of survival for the strains ranged from 80 to 35%. In the four most resistant strains, the levels of survival were reduced by 1 or 2 orders of magnitude after irradiation with 5 kGy; viable cells were recovered after exposure to 15 kGy but not after exposure to 20 kGy. The severe DNA damage evident after exposure to 2.5 kGy was repaired within 3 h, and the severe DNA damage evident after exposure to 5 kGy was repaired within 24 h. The increase in trichloroacetic acid-precipitable radioactivity in the culture supernatant after irradiation with 2.5 kGy might have been due to cell lysis and/or an excision process involved in DNA repair. The radiation resistance of Chroococcidiopsis strains may reflect the ability of these cyanobacteria to survive prolonged desiccation through efficient repair of the DNA damage that accumulates during dehydration.

  7. The advancement of stem cells in radiation medicine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guo Li; Fan Hongxue

    2003-01-01

    It may result in acute radiation syndrome after body is exposed to ionizing radiation. The one of long-term effects of irradiation injury is leukemia. The bone marrow cells (BMC) transplantation including stem cells is the only effective therapy for acute radiation syndrome patients. Recently, with the advancement of stem cell research that the stem cells have multipotential and can convert each other, it may supply the new stem source for the irradiation injury patients. At the same time with the further research of radioprotective reagents, the hematopoietic stem cells proliferation after irradiation injury is promoted

  8. Effects of radiation on T regulatory cells in normal states and cancer: mechanisms and clinical implications.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Shu; Sun, Xiangdong; Luo, Jinhua; Zhu, Hongcheng; Yang, Xi; Guo, Qing; Song, Yaqi; Sun, Xinchen

    2015-01-01

    Radiation remains an important component of cancer treatment. In addition to inducing tumor cell death through direct cytotoxic effects, radiation can also promote the regression of tumor via augment of immune response. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) are a unique subpopulation of CD4 positive cells, which are characterized by expression of the forkhead box P3 (Foxp3) transcription factor and high levels of CD25. Mounting evidence has shown that Tregs are implicated in the development and progression of various types of cancer, which makes Tregs an important target in cancer therapeutics. Generally, lymphocytes are regarded as radiosensitive. However, Tregs have been demonstrated to be relatively resistant to radiotherapy, which is partly mediated by downregulation of pro-apoptotic proteins and upregulation of anti-apoptotic proteins. Moreover, radiotherapy can increase the production of Tregs and the recruitment of Tregs to local tumor microenvironment. Tregs can attenuate radiation-induced tumor death, which cause the resistance of tumor to radiotherapy. Recent experimental studies and clinical trails have demonstrated that the combination of radiation with medications that target Tregs is promising in the treatment of several types of neoplasms. In this review, we discussed the effect of radiation on Tregs in physiological states and cancer. Further, we presented an overview of therapies that target Tregs to enhance the efficacy of radiation in cancer therapeutics.

  9. Heavy ion radiation effects on TiN/HfO2/W resistive random access memory

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoli; Geer, Robert E.

    Resistive random access memory (ReRAM) is an attractive candidate for application in next-generation nonvolatile memory (NVM) devices for both aerospace and conventional commercial applications. ReRAM has several intrinsic advantages over other NVM technologies due to its simple metal-insulator-metal structure, high storage density, low power consumption, high switching speed, and high endurance. Most importantly, there are indications that ReRAM is an intrinsically radiation-hard device due to its defect-moderated, resistive switching mechanism and potentially well suited for applications in aerospace or other radiation intensive environments. We present a study of the effects of radiation on TiN/HfO2/W ReRAM devices carried out with a variety of ion sources, including He, N, Ne, and Ar, at fluences ranging from 1012 to 1015 cm- 2. Multiple (15- 16) devices were employed in each irradiation experiment. Half of the devices were programmed into high resistance states (HRS, off states) and the other half were programmed into low resistance states (LRS, on states) before radiation exposure. After radiation, the resistance of ReRAM devices in each state decreased with higher influence and with heavier ions. We observed spontaneous switching of the high resistance states of all devices to low resistance states following Ne and Ar radiation at a fluence of 1015 cm- 2. However, most devices remained functional after radiation. Forming voltage and initial resistance of fresh non-formed devices were also compared with non-irradiated devices. The effects of radiation on ReRAM switching are attributed to modified defect distributions within the conducting filament. The radiation-induced defect densities and the associated dependence on ion mass are discussed in terms of current defect-mediated switching models for TiN/HfO2/W ReRAM devices.

  10. Radiation-Induced Glycogen Accumulation Detected by Single Cell Raman Spectroscopy Is Associated with Radioresistance that Can Be Reversed by Metformin.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Quinn Matthews

    Full Text Available Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of tumor cells and contributes to a host of properties associated with resistance to radiotherapy. Detection of radiation-induced biochemical changes can reveal unique metabolic pathways affecting radiosensitivity that may serve as attractive therapeutic targets. Using clinically relevant doses of radiation, we performed label-free single cell Raman spectroscopy on a series of human cancer cell lines and detected radiation-induced accumulation of intracellular glycogen. The increase in glycogen post-irradiation was highest in lung (H460 and breast (MCF7 tumor cells compared to prostate (LNCaP tumor cells. In response to radiation, the appearance of this glycogen signature correlated with radiation resistance. Moreover, the buildup of glycogen was linked to the phosphorylation of GSK-3β, a canonical modulator of cell survival following radiation exposure and a key regulator of glycogen metabolism. When MCF7 cells were irradiated in the presence of the anti-diabetic drug metformin, there was a significant decrease in the amount of radiation-induced glycogen. The suppression of glycogen by metformin following radiation was associated with increased radiosensitivity. In contrast to MCF7 cells, metformin had minimal effects on both the level of glycogen in H460 cells following radiation and radiosensitivity. Our data demonstrate a novel approach of spectral monitoring by Raman spectroscopy to assess changes in the levels of intracellular glycogen as a potential marker and resistance mechanism to radiation therapy.

  11. Radiation-Induced Glycogen Accumulation Detected by Single Cell Raman Spectroscopy Is Associated with Radioresistance that Can Be Reversed by Metformin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matthews, Quinn; Isabelle, Martin; Harder, Samantha J; Smazynski, Julian; Beckham, Wayne; Brolo, Alexandre G; Jirasek, Andrew; Lum, Julian J

    2015-01-01

    Altered cellular metabolism is a hallmark of tumor cells and contributes to a host of properties associated with resistance to radiotherapy. Detection of radiation-induced biochemical changes can reveal unique metabolic pathways affecting radiosensitivity that may serve as attractive therapeutic targets. Using clinically relevant doses of radiation, we performed label-free single cell Raman spectroscopy on a series of human cancer cell lines and detected radiation-induced accumulation of intracellular glycogen. The increase in glycogen post-irradiation was highest in lung (H460) and breast (MCF7) tumor cells compared to prostate (LNCaP) tumor cells. In response to radiation, the appearance of this glycogen signature correlated with radiation resistance. Moreover, the buildup of glycogen was linked to the phosphorylation of GSK-3β, a canonical modulator of cell survival following radiation exposure and a key regulator of glycogen metabolism. When MCF7 cells were irradiated in the presence of the anti-diabetic drug metformin, there was a significant decrease in the amount of radiation-induced glycogen. The suppression of glycogen by metformin following radiation was associated with increased radiosensitivity. In contrast to MCF7 cells, metformin had minimal effects on both the level of glycogen in H460 cells following radiation and radiosensitivity. Our data demonstrate a novel approach of spectral monitoring by Raman spectroscopy to assess changes in the levels of intracellular glycogen as a potential marker and resistance mechanism to radiation therapy.

  12. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Part 2. Physical radiations and biological significance. Final report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fluke, D.J.

    1984-08-01

    The report comprises a teaching text, encompassing all physical radiations likely to be of biological interest, and the relevant biological effects and their significance. Topics include human radiobiology, delayed effects, radiation absorption in organisms, aqueous radiation chemistry, cell radiobiology, mutagenesis, and photobiology

  13. Epigenetic cell response to an influence of ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikheev, A.N.; Gushcha, N.I.; Malinovskij, Yu.Yu.

    1999-01-01

    Importance of radiation modification of epigenetic activity in the general mechanism of radiobiological reactions is proved. Inheritable epigenetic changes induced by irradiation are one of the basic reasons of formation of the remote radiation pathology. It is noted that epigenetic inheritable changes of cells have the determined character distinguishing them mutation changes, being individual and not directed. It is underlined the ability of ionizing radiation to modify level of spontaneous genetic instability inherited in a number of cell generations on epigenetic mechanism [ru

  14. Multidrug-resistant hepatocellular carcinoma cells are enriched for ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Chemotherapy is a main treatment for cancer, while multidrug-resistance is the main reason for chemotherapy failure, and tumor relapse and metastasis. Cancer stem cells or cancer stem-like cells (CSCs) are a small subset of cancer cells, which may be inherently resistant to the cytotoxic effect of chemotherapy.

  15. Decreased cisplatin uptake by resistant L1210 leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hromas, R.A.; North, J.A.; Burns, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance remains poorly understood compared to other forms of anti-neoplastic drug resistance. In this report radiolabelled cisplatin and rapid separation techniques were used to compare drug uptake by L1210 leukemia cells that are sensitive (K25) or resistant (SCR9) to cisplatin. Uptake of cisplatin by both cell lines was linear without saturation kinetics up to 100 μM. The resistant ZCR9 cells had 36-60% reduced drug uptake as compared to its sensitive parent line, K25. In contrast, there was no difference in the rate of efflux. We conclude that a decreased rate of uptake is one possible mechanism of cellular cisplatin resistance. (Author)

  16. Combination therapeutics of Nilotinib and radiation in acute lymphoblastic leukemia as an effective method against drug-resistance.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamran Kaveh

    2017-07-01

    Full Text Available Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is characterized by a very poor prognosis and a high likelihood of acquired chemo-resistance. Although tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI therapy has improved clinical outcome, most ALL patients relapse following treatment with TKI due to the development of resistance. We developed an in vitro model of Nilotinib-resistant Ph+ leukemia cells to investigate whether low dose radiation (LDR in combination with TKI therapy overcome chemo-resistance. Additionally, we developed a mathematical model, parameterized by cell viability experiments under Nilotinib treatment and LDR, to explain the cellular response to combination therapy. The addition of LDR significantly reduced drug resistance both in vitro and in computational model. Decreased expression level of phosphorylated AKT suggests that the combination treatment plays an important role in overcoming resistance through the AKT pathway. Model-predicted cellular responses to the combined therapy provide good agreement with experimental results. Augmentation of LDR and Nilotinib therapy seems to be beneficial to control Ph+ leukemia resistance and the quantitative model can determine optimal dosing schedule to enhance the effectiveness of the combination therapy.

  17. Investigation of Radiation Resistant Materials for Developing Space-Hardened Polymer Modulators

    National Research Council Canada - National Science Library

    Taylor, Edward

    2004-01-01

    An investigation of the radiation resistance of polymer based electro-optic modulators was conducted by the International Photonics Consultants for the Air Force Research Laboratory Photonics Technology Branch (SNDP...

  18. Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Signaling Pathway in Cisplatin-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sun Yunguang; Zheng Siyuan; Torossian, Artour; Speirs, Christina K.; Schleicher, Stephen; Giacalone, Nicholas J.; Carbone, David P.; Zhao Zhongming; Lu Bo

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: The development of drug-resistant phenotypes has been a major obstacle to cisplatin use in non–small-cell lung cancer. We aimed to identify some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie cisplatin resistance using microarray expression analysis. Methods and Materials: H460 cells were treated with cisplatin. The differences between cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells and parental H460 cells were studied using Western blot, MTS, and clonogenic assays, in vivo tumor implantation, and microarray analysis. The cisplatin-R cells were treated with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 and siRNA targeting IGF-1 receptor. Results: Cisplatin-R cells illustrated greater expression of the markers CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, more rapid in vivo tumor growth, more resistance to cisplatin- and etoposide-induced apoptosis, and greater survival after treatment with cisplatin or radiation than the parental H460 cells. Also, cisplatin-R demonstrated decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and increased activation of IGF-1 receptor signaling compared with parental H460 cells in the presence of IGF-1. Human recombinant IGF binding protein-3 reversed cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-R cells and targeting of IGF-1 receptor using siRNA resulted in sensitization of cisplatin-R-cells to cisplatin and radiation. Conclusions: The IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to cisplatin-R to cisplatin and radiation. Thus, this pathway represents a potential target for improved lung cancer response to treatment.

  19. Role of Insulin-Like Growth Factor-1 Signaling Pathway in Cisplatin-Resistant Lung Cancer Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sun Yunguang [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Zheng Siyuan [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Torossian, Artour; Speirs, Christina K.; Schleicher, Stephen; Giacalone, Nicholas J. [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Carbone, David P. [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Zhao Zhongming, E-mail: zhongming.zhao@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Biomedical Informatics, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States); Lu Bo, E-mail: bo.lu@vanderbilt.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, Vanderbilt University Medical Center, Nashville, TN (United States)

    2012-03-01

    Purpose: The development of drug-resistant phenotypes has been a major obstacle to cisplatin use in non-small-cell lung cancer. We aimed to identify some of the molecular mechanisms that underlie cisplatin resistance using microarray expression analysis. Methods and Materials: H460 cells were treated with cisplatin. The differences between cisplatin-resistant lung cancer cells and parental H460 cells were studied using Western blot, MTS, and clonogenic assays, in vivo tumor implantation, and microarray analysis. The cisplatin-R cells were treated with human recombinant insulin-like growth factor (IGF) binding protein-3 and siRNA targeting IGF-1 receptor. Results: Cisplatin-R cells illustrated greater expression of the markers CD133 and aldehyde dehydrogenase, more rapid in vivo tumor growth, more resistance to cisplatin- and etoposide-induced apoptosis, and greater survival after treatment with cisplatin or radiation than the parental H460 cells. Also, cisplatin-R demonstrated decreased expression of insulin-like growth factor binding protein-3 and increased activation of IGF-1 receptor signaling compared with parental H460 cells in the presence of IGF-1. Human recombinant IGF binding protein-3 reversed cisplatin resistance in cisplatin-R cells and targeting of IGF-1 receptor using siRNA resulted in sensitization of cisplatin-R-cells to cisplatin and radiation. Conclusions: The IGF-1 signaling pathway contributes to cisplatin-R to cisplatin and radiation. Thus, this pathway represents a potential target for improved lung cancer response to treatment.

  20. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Xiao, Fei; Fofana, Isabel; Heydmann, Laura

    2014-01-01

    . In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs) in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV...... genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host......-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs) was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission...

  1. Radiation up-regulated the expression of VEGF in a canine oral melanoma cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flickinger, I.; Rütgen, B.C.; Gerner, W.; Tichy, A.; Saalmüller, A.; Kleiter, M.; Calice, I.

    2013-01-01

    To evaluate radiosensitivity and the effects of radiation on the expression of vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF) and VEGF receptors in the canine oral melanoma cell line, TLM 1, cells were irradiated with doses of 0, 2, 4, 6, 8 and 10 Gray (Gy). Survival rates were then determined by a MTT assay, while vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1 and -2 expression was measured by flow cytometry and apoptotic cell death rates were investigated using an Annexin assay. Additionally, a commercially available canine VEGF ELISA kit was used to measure VEGF. Radiosensitivity was detected in TLM 1 cells, and mitotic and apoptotic cell death was found to occur in a radiation dose dependent manner. VEGF was secreted constitutively and significant up-regulation was observed in the 8 and 10 Gy irradiated cells. In addition, a minor portion of TLM 1 cells expressed vascular endothelial growth factor receptor (VEGFR)-1 intracellularly. VEGFR-2 was detected in the cytoplasm and was down-regulated following radiation with increasing dosages. In TLM 1 cells, apoptosis plays an important role in radiation induced cell death. It has also been suggested that the significantly higher VEGF production in the 8 and 10 Gy group could lead to tumour resistance. (author)

  2. Oxygen radical detoxification enzymes in doxorubicin-sensitive and -resistant P388 murine leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ramu, A.; Cohen, L.; Glaubiger, D.

    1984-01-01

    One of the proposed mechanisms for the cytotoxic effects of anthracycline compounds suggests that the effect is mediated through the formation of intracellular superoxide radicals. It is therefore possible that doxorubicin resistance is associated with increased intracellular enzyme capacity to convert these superoxide radicals to inactive metabolites. We have measured the relative activities of superoxide dismutase, glutathione peroxidase, and catalase in P388 mouse leukemia cells and in a doxorubicin-resistant subline. Since oxygen-reactive metabolites also play a role in mediating the cytotoxicity of ionizing radiation, the radiosensitivity of both cell lines was also studied. No significant differences in superoxide dismutase activity between these cell lines was observed, indicating that they have a similar capacity to convert superoxide anion radicals to hydrogen peroxide. P388 cells that are resistant to doxorubicin have 1.5 times the glutathione content and 1.5 times the activity of glutathione peroxidase measured in drug-sensitive P388 cells. However, incubation with 1-chloro-2,4-dinitrobenzene, which covalently binds glutathione, had no effect on the sensitivity of either cell line to doxorubicin. Measured catalase activity in drug-resistant P388 cells was one-third of the activity measured in doxorubicin-sensitive P388 cells. The activity of this enzyme was much higher than that of glutathione peroxidase in terms of H 2 O 2 deactivation in both cell lines. It is therefore unlikely that doxorubicin-resistant P388 cells have an increased ability to detoxify reactive oxygen metabolites when compared to drug-sensitive cells. Doxorubicin-resistant P388 cells were significantly more sensitive to X-irradiation than were drug-sensitive P388 cells. These observations suggest that the difference in catalase activity in these cell lines may be associated with the observed differences in radiosensitivity

  3. Occurrence of BOOP outside radiation field after radiation therapy for small cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hamanishi, Tohru; Oida, Kazukiyo; Morimatu, Takafumi

    2001-01-01

    We report a case of bronchiolitis obliterans organizing pneumonia (BOOP) that occurred outside the radiation field after radiation therapy for small cell lung cancer. A 74-year-old woman received chemotherapy and a total of 60 Gy of radiation therapy to the right hilum and mediastinum for small cell carcinoma of the suprahilar area of the right lung. Radiation pneumonitis developed within the radiation port 3 months after the completion of radiation therapy. She complained of cough and was admitted 7 months after completion of the radiation therapy. Chest radiography and computed tomography demonstrated peripheral alveolar opacities outside the radiation field on the side contralateral to that receiving the radiation therapy. Bronchoalveolar lavage showed that the total cell count was increased, with a markedly increased percentage of lymphocytes. Transbronchial lung biopsy revealed a histologic pattern consistent with BOOP. Treatment with corticosteroids resulted in rapid improvement of the symptoms and complete resolution of the radiographic abnormalities of the left lung. Although some cases of BOOP following radiation therapy for breast cancer have been reported, none of BOOP after radiation therapy for lung cancer have appeared in the literature. (author)

  4. Hepatitis C virus cell-cell transmission and resistance to direct-acting antiviral agents.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fei Xiao

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is transmitted between hepatocytes via classical cell entry but also uses direct cell-cell transfer to infect neighboring hepatocytes. Viral cell-cell transmission has been shown to play an important role in viral persistence allowing evasion from neutralizing antibodies. In contrast, the role of HCV cell-cell transmission for antiviral resistance is unknown. Aiming to address this question we investigated the phenotype of HCV strains exhibiting resistance to direct-acting antivirals (DAAs in state-of-the-art model systems for cell-cell transmission and spread. Using HCV genotype 2 as a model virus, we show that cell-cell transmission is the main route of viral spread of DAA-resistant HCV. Cell-cell transmission of DAA-resistant viruses results in viral persistence and thus hampers viral eradication. We also show that blocking cell-cell transmission using host-targeting entry inhibitors (HTEIs was highly effective in inhibiting viral dissemination of resistant genotype 2 viruses. Combining HTEIs with DAAs prevented antiviral resistance and led to rapid elimination of the virus in cell culture model. In conclusion, our work provides evidence that cell-cell transmission plays an important role in dissemination and maintenance of resistant variants in cell culture models. Blocking virus cell-cell transmission prevents emergence of drug resistance in persistent viral infection including resistance to HCV DAAs.

  5. Resistance to DNA denaturation in irradiated Chinese hamster V79 fibroblasts is linked to cell shape

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Olive, P.L.; Vanderbyl, S.; MacPhail, S.H.

    1991-01-01

    Exponentially growing Chinese hamster V79-171b lung fibroblasts seeded at high density on plastic (approximately 7 x 10(3) cells/cm2) flatten, elongate, and produce significant amounts of extracellular fibronectin. When lysed in weak alkali/high salt, the rate of DNA denaturation following exposure to ionizing radiation is exponential. Conversely, cells plated at low density (approximately 7 x 10(2) cells/cm2) on plastic are more rounded 24 h later, produce little extracellular fibronectin, and display unusual DNA denaturation kinetics after X-irradiation. DNA in these cells resists denaturation, as though constraints to DNA unwinding have developed. Cell doubling time and distribution of cells in the growth cycle are identical for both high and low density cultures as is cell survival in response to radiation damage. The connection between DNA conformation and cell shape was examined further in low density cultures grown in conditioned medium. Under these conditions, cells at low density were able to elongate, and DNA denaturation of low density cultures was identical to that of high density cultures. Conversely, cytochalasin D, which interferes with actin polymerization causing cells to round up and release fibronectin, allowed development of constraints in high density cultures. These results suggest that DNA conformation is sensitive to changes in cell shape which result when cells are grown in different environments. However, these changes in DNA conformation detected by the DNA unwinding assay do not appear to play a direct role in radiation-induced cell killing

  6. Altruistic cell suicide in relation to radiation hormesis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kondo, Sohei

    1988-01-01

    The high radiosensitivity to killing of undifferentiated primordial cells (Bergonie and Tribondeau 1906) can be described as a manifestation of the suicide of injured cells for the benefit of an organism as a whole if their suicide stimulates proliferation of healthy cells to replace them, resulting in complete elimination of injury. This process is called cell-replacement repair, to distinguish it from DNA repair which is rarely complete. 'Cell suicide', 'programmed death' and 'apoptosis' are terms used for the same type of active cell death. Cell suicide is not always altruistic. Altruistic suicide in Drosophila, mice, humans, plants, and E. coli is reviewed in this paper to illustrate its widely different facets. The hypothesis that in animals, radiation hormesis results from altruistic cell suicide is proposed. This hypothesis can explain the hormetic effect of low doses of radiation on the immune system in mice. In contrast, in plants, radiation hormesis seems to be mainly due to non-altruistic cell death. (author)

  7. Carboplatin- and cisplatin-induced potentiation of moderate-dose radiation cytotoxicity in human lung cancer cell lines

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Groen, H. J.; Sleijfer, S.; Meijer, C.; Kampinga, H. H.; Konings, A. W. T.; de Vries, E. G. E.; Mulder, N. H.

    1995-01-01

    The interaction between moderate-dose radiation and cisplatin or carboplatin was studied in a cisplatin-sensitive (GLC(4)) and -resistant (GLC(4)-CDDP) human small-cell lung cancer cell line. Cellular toxicity was analysed under oxic conditions with the microculture tetrazolium assay. For the

  8. /TiN Resistive RAM (RRAM) Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Z. X.; Fang, Z.; Wang, Y.; Yang, Y.; Kamath, A.; Wang, X. P.; Singh, N.; Lo, G.-Q.; Kwong, D.-L.; Wu, Y. H.

    2014-11-01

    We present a study of Ni silicide as the bottom electrode in HfO2-based resistive random-access memory cells. Various silicidation conditions were used for each device, yielding different Ni concentrations within the electrode. A higher concentration of Ni in the bottom electrode was found to cause a parasitic SET operation during certain RESET operation cycles, being attributed to field-assisted Ni cation migration creating a Ni filament. As such, the RESET is affected unless an appropriate RESET voltage is used. Bottom electrodes with lower concentrations of Ni were able to switch at ultralow currents (RESET current <1 nA) by using a low compliance current (<500 nA). The low current is attributed to the tunneling barrier formed by the native SiO2 at the Ni silicide/HfO2 interface.

  9. Cyanobacteria: photosynthetic factories combining biodiversity, radiation resistance, and genetics to facilitate drug discovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cassier-Chauvat, Corinne; Dive, Vincent; Chauvat, Franck

    2017-02-01

    Cyanobacteria are ancient, abundant, and widely diverse photosynthetic prokaryotes, which are viewed as promising cell factories for the ecologically responsible production of chemicals. Natural cyanobacteria synthesize a vast array of biologically active (secondary) metabolites with great potential for human health, while a few genetic models can be engineered for the (low level) production of biofuels. Recently, genome sequencing and mining has revealed that natural cyanobacteria have the capacity to produce many more secondary metabolites than have been characterized. The corresponding panoply of enzymes (polyketide synthases and non-ribosomal peptide synthases) of interest for synthetic biology can still be increased through gene manipulations with the tools available for the few genetically manipulable strains. In this review, we propose to exploit the metabolic diversity and radiation resistance of cyanobacteria, and when required the genetics of model strains, for the production and radioactive ( 14 C) labeling of bioactive products, in order to facilitate the screening for new drugs.

  10. Radiation effects on regeneration and T-cell-inducing function of the thymus

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirokawa, K.; Sado, T.

    1984-01-01

    Radiation effects on regeneration and T-cell-inducing function of the thymus were studied in three sets of experiments. When TXB mice were grafted with 1-week-old thymus which had been previously irradiated at various doses, an exponential decrease was observed in the morphological regeneration of the thymus grafts and in their T-cell-inducing function at doses of 600 R and over, showing about 10% that of the control at 1500 R. When in situ thymus of adult mice was locally irradiated, the radiation effect on T-cell-inducing function was less pronounced as compared with the first experiment; i.e., about 40% of the control at 1797 R. When in situ thymus of 1-day-old newborn mice was locally irradiated, regeneration potential of 1-day-old newborn thymus was highly resistant to radiation exposure and no effect on immunological functions was observed even by local irradiation of 2000 R

  11. Concomitant low dose-rate irradiation and cisplatin treatment in ovarian carcinoma cell lines sensitive and resistant to cisplatin treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Wang, G.; Stewart, D.; Ng, C.E.

    1996-01-01

    Human ovarian carcinoma parental and cisplatin-resistant cells were evaluated for their radiation sensitivity to high and low dose-rate irradiation and for the effectiveness of cisplatin in radiosensitization. The cisplatin resistant variant A2780 cp showed increased radiation resistance for both low dose-rate (LDRI) and high dose-rate irradiation. For cisplatin treatment for 1 h before and after HDRI there was radiosensitization in only the cisplatin-resistant variant. Concomitant cisplatin treatment during LDRI resulted in radiosensitization in both cell lines with dose-modifying factors ranging from 1.6 to 5.8. In this case greater radiosensitization was achieved in the parental cell line. In both cell lines the dose-modifying factors were larger when the cisplatin was refreshed every 6 h instead of 12 h during LDRI. These data show that cisplatin may be a very effective radiosensitizer when given during LDRI which is used in brachytherapy. (author)

  12. The importance of bystander effects in radiation therapy in melanoma skin-cancer cells and umbilical-cord stromal stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gómez-Millán, Jaime; Katz, Iana Suly Santos; Farias, Virgínea de Araujo; Linares-Fernández, Jose-Luis; López-Peñalver, Jesús; Ortiz-Ferrón, Gustavo; Ruiz-Ruiz, Carmen; Oliver, Francisco Javier; Ruiz de Almodóvar, José Mariano

    2012-01-01

    Purpose: To examine direct and bystander radiation-induced effects in normal umbilical-cord stromal stem cell (HCSSC) lines and in human cancer cells. Materials and methods: The UCSSC lines used in this study were obtained in our laboratory. Two cell lines (UCSSC 35 and UCSSC 37) and two human melanoma skin-cancer cells (A375 and G361) were exposed to ionizing radiation to measure acute radiation-dosage cell-survival curves and radiation-induced bystander cell-death response. Normal cells, although extremely sensitive to ionizing radiation, were resistant to the bystander effect whilst tumor cells were sensitive to irradiated cell-conditioned media, showing a dose–response relationship that became saturated at relatively low doses. We applied a biophysical model to describe bystander cell-death through the binding of a ligand to the cells. This model allowed us to calculate the maximum cell death (χ max ) produced by the bystander effect together with its association constant (K By ) in terms of dose equivalence (Gy). The values obtained for K By in A375 and G361 cells were 0.23 and 0.29 Gy, respectively. Conclusion: Our findings help to understand how anticancer therapy could have an additional decisive effect in that the response of sub-lethally hit tumor cells to damage might be required for therapy to be successful because the survival of cells communicating with irradiated cells is reduced.

  13. Gene targeting associated with the radiation sensitivity in squamous cell carcinoma by using microarray analysis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nimura, Yoshinori; Kumagai, Ken; Kouzu, Yoshinao; Higo, Morihiro; Kato, Yoshikuni; Seki, Naohiko; Yamada, Shigeru

    2005-01-01

    In order to identify a set of genes related to radiation sensitivity of squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) and establish a predictive method, we compared expression profiles of radio-sensitive/radio-resistant SCC cell lines, using the in-house cDNA microarray consisting of 2,201 human genes derived from full-length enriched SCC cDNA libraries and the Human oligo chip 30 K (Hitachi Software Engineering). Surviving fractions (SF) after irradiation of heavy iron were calculated by colony formation assay. Three pairs (TE2-TE13, YES5-YES6, and HSC3-HSC2), sensitive (SF1 0.6), were selected for the microarray analysis. The results of cDNA microarray analysis showed that 20 genes in resistant cell lines and 5 genes in sensitive cell lines were up regulated more than 1.5-fold compared with sensitive and resistant cell lines respectively. Fourteen out of 25 genes were confirmed the gene expression profiles by real-time polymerase chain reaction (PCR). Twenty-seven genes identified by Human oligo chip 30 K are candidate for the markers to distinguish radio-sensitive from radio-resistant. These results suggest that the isolated 27 genes are the candidates that might be used as specific molecular markers to predict radiation sensitivity. (author)

  14. In vitro radiation and chemotherapy sensitivity of established cell lines of human small cell lung cancer and its large cell morphological variants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carney, D.N.; Mitchell, J.B.; Kinsella, T.J.

    1983-01-01

    The in vitro response to radiation and chemotherapeutic drugs of cell lines established from 7 patients with small cell (SC) lung cancer were tested using a soft agarose clonogenic assay. Five cell lines retained the typical morphological and biochemical amine precursor uptake decarboxylation characteristics of SC, while two cell lines had undergone ''transformation'' to large cell (LC) morphological variants with loss of amine precursor uptake decarboxylation cell characteristics of SC. The radiation survival curves for the SC lines were characterized by D0 values ranging from 51 to 140 rads and extrapolation values (n) ranging from 1.0 to 3.3. While the D0 values of the radiation survival curves of the LC variants were similar (91 and 80 rads), the extrapolation values were 5.6 and 11.1 In vitro chemosensitivity testing of the cell lines revealed an excellent correlation between prior treatment status of the patient and in vitro sensitivity or resistance. No correlation was observed between in vitro chemosensitivity and radiation response. These data suggest that transformation of SC to LC with loss of amine precursor uptake and decarboxylation characteristics is associated with a marked increase in radiation resistance (n) in vitro. The observation of a 2- to 5-fold increase in survival of the LC compared to the SC lines following 200 rads suggests that the use of larger daily radiation fractions and/or radiation-sensitizing drugs might lead to a significantly greater clinical response in patients with LC morphology. This clinical approach may have a major impact on patient response and survival

  15. Interactions between carbo-platin, cisplatin and ionising radiation in an human ovarian cancer cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Scalliet, P.

    1999-01-01

    Cisplatin (CDDP) and radiotherapy are frequently used concomitantly in the treatment of various malignant conditions. Because of its toxicity, cisplatin tends to be replaced by carbo-platin (CBDCA) in several indications. Available data regarding the combined effects of cisplatin and carbo-platin with ionising radiation are contradictory. Various concentrations of cisplatin and carbo-platin and various timing of association with radiation have been tested in vitro in a human ovarian cancer cell line. The parental cell line (AOvC-0) and a cisplatin-resistant stable sub-line (AOvC-CDDP/O) (De Pooter et al., Cn Res, 1991) were exposed to carbo-platin (2.5, 5 and 10 M) and to CDDP (1, 2.5 and 5 M), 16 h and 4 h before and 4 h and 16 h after irradiation, respectively. Cell survival was evaluated by a classical clonogenic assay. Exposure of AOvC-0 to 5M CBDCA and of AOvC-CDDDP/O to 10 M CBDCA, before or shortly after radiation exposure, increased cell lethality in a clear supra-additive way, with the highest DEF in the shoulder region of the survival curve and at radiation doses relevant to clinical radiotherapy. In the sensitive cell line, 5 M carbo-platin resulted in an additional lethality equivalent to 4.5 Gy; in the resistant cells, 10M carbo-platin was equivalent to 3.6 Gy. Replacing carbo-platin by cisplatin in an identical set-up demonstrated exclusively simple additivity (DEF = 1). These data suggest that carbo-platin and cisplatin delivered at equi-toxic doses interact with radiation a different way and that, in the present set-up, only carbo-platin enhanced the effects of radiation. Carbo-platin might consequently be a better candidate than cisplatin in some concomitant combinations with radiotherapy. (authors)

  16. Heterogeneity in induced thermal resistance of rat tumor cell clones

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tomasovic, S.P.; Rosenblatt, P.L.; Heitzman, D.

    1983-01-01

    Four 13762NF rat mammary adenocarcinoma clones were examined for their survival response to heating under conditions that induced transient thermal resistance (thermotolerance). Clones MTC and MTF7 were isolated from the subcutaneous locally growing tumor, whereas clones MTLn2 and MTLn3 were derived from spontaneous lung metastases. There was heterogeneity among these clones in thermotolerance induced by either fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating, but the order of sensitivity was not necessarily the same. The clones developed thermal resistance at different rates and to different degrees within the same time intervals. There was heterogeneity between clones isolated from within either the primary site or metastatic lesions. However, clones derived from metastatic foci did not intrinsically acquire more or less thermotolerance to fractionated 45 0 C or continuous 42 0 C heating than did clones from the primary tumor. Further, there was no apparent relationship between any phenotypic properties that conferred more or less thermotolerance in vitro and any phenotypic properties that conferred enhanced metastatic success of these same clones by spontaneous (subcutaneous) or experimental (intravenous) routes in vivo. These tumor clones also differ in their karyotype, metastatic potential, cell surface features, sensitivity to x-irradiation and drugs, and ability to repair sublethal radiation damage. These results provide further credence to the concept that inherent heterogeneity within tumors may be as important in therapeutic success as other known modifiers of outcome such as site and treatment heterogeneity

  17. A comparison of cell survival and heat shock protein expression after radiation in normal dermal fibroblasts, microvascular endothelial cells, and different head and neck squamous carcinoma cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muschter, Dominique; Geyer, Fabian; Bauer, Richard; Ettl, Tobias; Schreml, Stephan; Haubner, Frank

    2018-01-06

    Head and neck squamous cell carcinoma (HNSCC) shows increased radioresistance due to the manipulation of homeostatic mechanisms like the heat shock response. This study intended to comparatively analyze effects of ionizing radiation on different HNSCC cell lines (PCI) and normal human dermal fibroblasts (NHFs) and human dermal microvascular endothelial cells (HDMECs) to uncover differences in radiation coping strategies. Proliferation (BrdU assay), apoptosis (caspase 3/7) and intracellular protein expression of heat shock protein (HSP)-70, and phosphorylated and total HSP27, determined by enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), were analyzed after exposure to increasing doses of ionizing radiation (2, 6, and 12 Gray, Gy). Cell count decreased dose-dependently, but PCI cell lines consistently showed higher numbers compared to NHF and HDMEC. Likewise, high doses reduced cell proliferation, but low-dose radiation (2 Gy) instead increased proliferation in PCI 9 and 52. Apoptosis was not detectable in PCI cell lines. Basic HSP70 expression was high in PCI cells with little additional increase by irradiation. PCI cells yielded high basic total HSP27 concentrations but irradiation dose-dependently increased HSP27 in HDMEC, NHF, and PCI cells. Phosphorylated HSP27 concentrations were highest in NHF. PCI cell lines showed higher resistance to dose-dependent reduction in cell number, proliferation, and protection from apoptosis compared to NHF and HDMEC. In parallel, we observed a high basic and radiation-induced expression of intracellular HSP70 leading to the assumption that the radioresistance of PCI cells is conferred by HSP70. HNSCC use HSP to escape radiation-induced apoptosis and certain subtypes might increase proliferation after low-dose irradiation.

  18. Epidermal stem cells response to radiative genotoxic stress

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Marie, Melanie

    2013-01-01

    Human skin is the first organ exposed to various environmental stresses, which requires the development by skin stem cells of specific mechanisms to protect themselves and to ensure tissue homeostasis. As stem cells are responsible for the maintenance of epidermis during individual lifetime, the preservation of genomic integrity in these cells is essential. My PhD aimed at exploring the mechanisms set up by epidermal stem cells in order to protect themselves from two genotoxic stresses, ionizing radiation (Gamma Rays) and ultraviolet radiation (UVB). To begin my PhD, I have taken part of the demonstration of protective mechanisms used by keratinocyte stem cells after ionizing radiation. It has been shown that these cells are able to rapidly repair most types of radiation-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, we demonstrated that this repair is activated by the fibroblast growth factor 2 (FGF2). In order to know if this protective mechanism is also operating in cutaneous carcinoma stem cells, we investigated the response to gamma Rays of carcinoma stem cells isolated from a human carcinoma cell line. As in normal keratinocyte stem cells, we demonstrated that cancer stem cells could rapidly repair radio-induced DNA damage. Furthermore, fibroblast growth factor 2 also mediates this repair, notably thanks to its nuclear isoforms. The second project of my PhD was to study human epidermal stem cells and progenitors responses to UVB radiation. Once cytometry and irradiation conditions were set up, the toxicity of UVB radiation has been evaluate in the primary cell model. We then characterized UVB photons effects on cell viability, proliferation and repair of DNA damage. This study allowed us to bring out that responses of stem cells and their progeny to UVB are different, notably at the level of part of their repair activity of DNA damage. Moreover, progenitors and stem cells transcriptomic responses after UVB irradiation have been study in order to analyze the global

  19. Tumor cell heterogeneity: impact on mechanisms of therapeutic drug resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, Mary E.; Siemann, Dietmar W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The aim of these studies was to determine whether chemotherapy-resistant tumor cell sublines derived from a single starting cell population with identical treatment protocols, have the same mechanism of resistance. Methods and Materials: Twelve cyclophosphamide-resistant sublines were derived from KHT-iv murine sarcoma cells by repeated exposures to 2, 4, or 8 μg/ml doses of 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4-OOHCP). To investigate possible mechanisms of resistance, glutathione (GSH) levels, glutathione S-transferase (GST) activity, and aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity were determined. In addition, studies with the GSH depletor buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) and the ALDH inhibitor diethylamino-benzaldehyde (DEAB) were undertaken. Results: Resistant factors to 4-OOHCP, assessed at 10% clonogenic cell survival, ranged from 1.5-7.0 for the various cell lines. Crossresistance to melphalan and adriamycin also were commonly observed. Increased GSH levels, GST activity and ALDH activity were detected in the sublines but not all exhibited the same pattern of biochemical alterations. The response to GSH and ALDH inhibitors also varied among the sublines; the resistance being reversible in some cell lines but not others. Conclusion: The present results indicate that when resistant sublines are derived simultaneously from the same starting cell population, the observed mechanisms of resistance may not be the same in each of the variants. These findings support the hypothesis that preexisting cellular heterogeneity may affect mechanisms of acquired resistance

  20. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States); Chen, D.S. [Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology

    1993-02-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  1. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M. (Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)); Chen, D.S. (Rochester Univ., NY (United States). Dept. of Radiation Oncology)

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population.

  2. DNA repair and radiation sensitivity in mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, D.J.C.; Stackhouse, M.; Chen, D.S.

    1993-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces various types of damage in mammalian cells including DNA single-strand breaks, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB), DNA-protein cross links, and altered DNA bases. Although human cells can repair many of these lesions there is little detailed knowledge of the nature of the genes and the encoded enzymes that control these repair processes. We report here on the cellular and genetic analyses of DNA double-strand break repair deficient mammalian cells. It has been well established that the DNA double-strand break is one of the major lesions induced by ionizing radiation. Utilizing rodent repair-deficient mutant, we have shown that the genes responsible for DNA double-strand break repair are also responsible for the cellular expression of radiation sensitivity. The molecular genetic analysis of DSB repair in rodent/human hybrid cells indicate that at least 6 different genes in mammalian cells are responsible for the repair of radiation-induced DNA double-strand breaks. Mapping and the prospect of cloning of human radiation repair genes are reviewed. Understanding the molecular and genetic basis of radiation sensitivity and DNA repair in man will provide a rational foundation to predict the individual risk associated with radiation exposure and to prevent radiation-induced genetic damage in the human population

  3. Mutant p53 transfection of astrocytic cells results in altered cell cycle control, radiation sensitivity, and tumorigenicity

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kanady, Kirk E.; Mei Su; Proulx, Gary; Malkin, David M.; Pardo, Francisco S.

    1995-01-01

    Introduction: Alterations in the p53 tumor suppressor gene are one of the most frequent genetic alterations in malignant gliomas. An understanding of the molecular genetic events leading to glial tumor progression would aid in designing therapeutic vectors for controlling these challenging tumor types. We investigated whether mutations in coding exons of the p53 gene result in functional changes altering cell cycle 'checkpoint' control and the intrinsic radiation sensitivity of glial cells. Methods: An astrocytic cell line was derived from a low grade astrocytoma and characterized to be of human karyotype and GFAP positivity. Additionally, the cellular population has never formed tumors in immune-deficient mice. At early passage ( 2 as parameters. Cell kinetic analyses after 2, 5, and 10 Gy of ionizing radiation were conducted using propidium iodide FACS analyses. Results: Overall levels of p53 expression were increased 5-10 fold in the transfected cellular populations. Astrocytic cellular populations transfected with mutant p53 revealed a statistically significant increase in levels of resistance to ionizing radiation in vitro (2-tailed test, SF2, MID). Astrocytic cellular populations transfected with mutant p53, unlike the parental cells, were tumorigenic in SCID mice. Cell kinetic analyses indicated that the untransfected cell line demonstrated dose dependent G1 and G2 arrests. Following transfection, however, the resultant cellular population demonstrated a predominant G2 arrest. Conclusions: Astrocytic cellular populations derived from low grade astrocytomas, are relatively radiation sensitive, non-tumorigenic, and have intact cell cycle ''checkpoints.'' Cellular populations resulting upon transfection of parental cells with a dominant negative p53 mutation, are relatively radiation resistant, when compared to both parental and mock-transfected cells. Transfected cells demonstrate abnormalities of cell cycle control at the G1/S checkpoint, increases in levels

  4. Radiation sensitivity of human lung cancer cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carmichael, J.; Degraff, W.G.; Gamson, J.; Russo, G.; Mitchell, J.B.; Gazdar, A.F.; Minna, J.D.; Levitt, M.L.

    1989-01-01

    X-Ray survival curves were determined using a panel of 17 human lung cancer cell lines, with emphasis on non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). In contrast to classic small cell lung cancer (SCLC) cell lines, NSCLC cell lines were generally less sensitive to radiation as evidenced by higher radiation survival curve extrapolation numbers, surviving fraction values following a 2Gy dose (SF2) and the mean inactivation dose values (D) values. The spectrum of in vitro radiation responses observed was similar to that expected in clinical practice, although mesothelioma was unexpectedly sensitive in vitro. Differences in radiosensitivity were best distinguished by comparison of SF2 values. Some NSCLC lines were relatively sensitive, and in view of this demonstrable variability in radiation sensitivity, the SF2 value may be useful for in vitro predictive assay testing of clinical specimens. (author)

  5. Radiation resistance and molecular structure of poly(arylene ether sulphone)s

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hill, D.J.T.; Lewis, D.A.; O' Donnell, J.H.; Pomery, P.J. (Queensland Univ., St. Lucia (Australia). Dept. of Chemistry); Hedrick, J.L.; McGrath, J.E. (Virginia Polytechnic Inst. and State Univ., Blacksburg, VA (United States). Dept. of Chemistry)

    1991-02-01

    The radiation resistance of a series of aromatic polysulfones comprising alternating units of diphenyl sulfone and various aromatic diols has been investigated by measuring volatile products, soluble fractions and electron spin resonance (ESR) spectra. The yields of radicals at 77 K observed by ESR and of SO{sub 2} at 423 K have indicated that biphenol gives enhanced resistance to {gamma} radiation, and tetramethyl bisphenol-A decreased resistance, relative to bisphenol-A, bisphenol-S and hydroquinone. The protective effect of biphenol was confirmed by lower scission and crosslinking yields determined from the soluble fractions after high doses. (author).

  6. Carboplatin treatment of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde S; Yde, Christina Westmose; Christensen, Ib J

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major clinical problem in current breast cancer treatment. Therefore, biomarkers and new treatment options for antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer are needed. In this study, we investigated whether antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer cell lines have increased...... sensitivity to carboplatin, as it was previously shown with cisplatin, and whether low Bcl-2 expression levels have a potential value as marker for increased carboplatin sensitivity. Breast cancer cells resistant to the pure antiestrogen fulvestrant, and two out of four cell lines resistant...... to the antiestrogen tamoxifen, were more sensitive to carboplatin treatment compared to the parental MCF-7 cell line. This indicates that carboplatin may be an advantageous treatment in antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer; however, a marker for increased sensitivity would be needed. Low Bcl-2 expression...

  7. Effect of troglitazone on radiation sensitivity in cervix cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    An, Zheng Zhe; Liu, Xian Guang; Song, Hye Jin; Choi, Chi Hwan; Kim, Won Dong; Park, Woo Yoon [Chungbuk National University College of Medicine, Cheongju (Korea, Republic of); Yu, Jae Ran [Konkuk University College of Medicine, Chungju (Korea, Republic of)

    2012-06-15

    Troglitazone (TRO) is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor {gamma} (PPAR{gamma} ) agonist. TRO has antiproliferative activity on many kinds of cancer cells via G1 arrest. TRO also increases Cu{sup 2+}/Zn{sup 2+} -superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and catalase. Cell cycle, and SOD and catalase may affect on radiation sensitivity. We investigated the effect of TRO on radiation sensitivity in cancer cells in vitro. Three human cervix cancer cell lines (HeLa, Me180, and SiHa) were used. The protein expressions of SOD and catalase, and catalase activities were measured at 2-10 {mu}M of TRO for 24 hours. Cell cycle was evaluated with flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. Cell survival by radiation was measured with clonogenic assay. By 5 {mu}M TRO for 24 hours, the mRNA, protein expression and activity of catalase were increased in all three cell lines. G0- G1 phase cells were increased in HeLa and Me180 by 5 {mu}M TRO for 24 hours, but those were not increased in SiHa. By pretreatment with 5 {mu}M TRO radiation sensitivity was increased in HeLa and Me180, but it was decreased in SiHa. In Me180, with 2 {mu}M TRO which increased catalase but not increased G0-G1 cells, radiosensitization was not observed. ROS produced by radiation was decreased with TRO. TRO increases radiation sensitivity through G0-G1 arrest or decreases radiation sensitivity through catalasemediated ROS scavenging according to TRO dose or cell types. The change of radiation sensitivity by combined with TRO is not dependent on the PPAR {gamma} expression level.

  8. Effect of troglitazone on radiation sensitivity in cervix cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    An, Zheng Zhe; Liu, Xian Guang; Song, Hye Jin; Choi, Chi Hwan; Kim, Won Dong; Park, Woo Yoon; Yu, Jae Ran

    2012-01-01

    Troglitazone (TRO) is a peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor γ (PPARγ ) agonist. TRO has antiproliferative activity on many kinds of cancer cells via G1 arrest. TRO also increases Cu 2+ /Zn 2+ -superoxide dismutase (CuZnSOD) and catalase. Cell cycle, and SOD and catalase may affect on radiation sensitivity. We investigated the effect of TRO on radiation sensitivity in cancer cells in vitro. Three human cervix cancer cell lines (HeLa, Me180, and SiHa) were used. The protein expressions of SOD and catalase, and catalase activities were measured at 2-10 μM of TRO for 24 hours. Cell cycle was evaluated with flow cytometry. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) was measured using 2',7'-dichlorofluorescin diacetate. Cell survival by radiation was measured with clonogenic assay. By 5 μM TRO for 24 hours, the mRNA, protein expression and activity of catalase were increased in all three cell lines. G0- G1 phase cells were increased in HeLa and Me180 by 5 μM TRO for 24 hours, but those were not increased in SiHa. By pretreatment with 5 μM TRO radiation sensitivity was increased in HeLa and Me180, but it was decreased in SiHa. In Me180, with 2 μM TRO which increased catalase but not increased G0-G1 cells, radiosensitization was not observed. ROS produced by radiation was decreased with TRO. TRO increases radiation sensitivity through G0-G1 arrest or decreases radiation sensitivity through catalasemediated ROS scavenging according to TRO dose or cell types. The change of radiation sensitivity by combined with TRO is not dependent on the PPAR γ expression level.

  9. Pro-inflammatory agents LPS and IL-6 protect monocytic cell line RAW264.7 from radiation induced cell death

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neeraj Kumari; Rai, Yogesh; Pathak, Richa; Kalra, Namita; Sharma, Anjali; Dwarakanath, B.S.; Bhatt, Anant Narayan

    2014-01-01

    Our earlier studies have shown that increased glycolysis protects cells from radiation induced cell death. Pro-inflammatory molecules like LPS have been shown to reduce radiation induced gastro-intestinal syndrome, while IL-6 protects cardiomyocytes from ischemia induced oxidative stress. Interestingly, both pro-inflammatory molecules, LPS and IL-6 induce glycolysis in cells and mimic the high glycolytic phenotype. Therefore, we hypothesize that LPS and IL-6 can protect the hematopoietic cells from radiation induced cell death by inducing glycolysis. To validate our hypothesis, we investigated the response of RAW264.7 cells stimulated with LPS (10 ng/ml) and IL-6 (1 ng/ml), 2 hours prior to irradiation (2 Gy, gamma rays, 60 Co). Both LPS and IL-6 protected cells from radiation induced growth inhibition with > 50% increase in cell number as compared to radiation alone. Under these conditions, IL-6 showed more than 2 fold increase in glycolysis, measured by lactate production, which correlated with increased cell number. To understand the mechanisms underlying IL-6 induced radio-resistance, we examined the effects of IL-6 on anti-oxidant defence and mitochondrial status in irradiated cells. Cells treated with IL-6 showed nearly 40% reduced levels of radiation induced delayed reactive oxygen species (ROS), measured at 24 hours after exposure using DCFH2-DA. The decrease in ROS was linked to increased mitochondrial membrane potential (MMP), thereby suggesting that IL-6 induced reduction in ROS levels and high MMP protects the cell from radiation induced cell death. Our results show that both mitochondrial uncouplers and pro-inflammatory molecules (LPS and IL-6) lead to similar metabolic shift in the form of increased glycolysis leading to enhanced radio-resistance. Therefore, we propose that stimulation of glycolysis can be an useful radioprotective strategy, irrespective of the nature of stimulants. Further studies to understand mechanisms underlying IL-6 induced

  10. Overexpression of metallothionein in CHO cells and its effect on cell killing by ionizing radiation and alkylating agents

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lohrer, H.; Robson, T.

    1989-01-01

    Metallothionein protein protects cells from the toxic effects of heavy metal ions. To establish its protective function against ionizing radiation and alkylating agents, a model system was created by transfecting two CHO cell lines (wild-type, K1-2 and X-ray sensitive, xrs-2 subclone Bc11) with the human metallothionein II-A (hMTII-A) gene integrated in a bovine papilloma derived autonomously replicating vector. The isolated transfectants are cadmium-resistant (Cd 1 ), due to the overexpression of the hMTII-A gene. Their steady-state level of hMTII-A mRNA can be increased up to 40-fold after Cd treatment and 20-fold after induction with ionizing radiation. The transfected cell lines proved to be as sensitive as the recipient cell lines to ionizing radiation and bleomycin but the transfectants were significantly more resistant to N-methyl-nitro-nitrosoguanidine (MNNG) and mitomycin C (MMC). These results lead to the conclusion that the MT protein does provide a defence mechanism to protect cells from monofunctional alkylating and cross-linking agents but not from free radicals. (author)

  11. Cytostatic resistance profile of the sulfur mustard resistant keratinocyte cell line HaCaT/SM.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schmidt, Annette; Wolf, Markus; Rothmiller, Simone; Worek, Franz; Steinritz, Dirk; Thiermann, Horst

    2018-03-15

    The cell line HaCaT/SM was developed as a sulfur mustard (SM) resistant cell line from the human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT. This cell line was established to learn more about the effect of SM and possible therapeutic approaches to counteract the cytotoxic effects of SM. The aim of this study was to clarify whether the SM-resistant cell line HaCaT/SM exhibit also resistance to other alkylating agents or cytotoxic drugs with different mechanism of action. The chemosensitivity of SM-resistant human keratinocyte cell line HaCaT/SM and the original cell line HaCaT were tested using the XTT assay. Nine cytotoxic drugs from five different substance groups were investigated. HaCaT/SM showed a significant increase in resistance against all tested drugs. From the substance class of the alkylating agents, HaCaT/SM showed the strongest resistance increase against chlorambucil (1.7 fold increase). Whereas over all substances strongest increase was observed against cisplatin (5.1 fold increase). The highest resistance was observed for cisplatin. The SM resistant cells revealed changes in the miRNA profile as described before. The resistance to cisplatin is also connected to a specific miRNA profile. Interestingly, changes of miRNA-203 and miRNA-21 levels were found in HaCaT/SM as well as in cisplatin resistant cells. It is therefore conceivable that the same resistance pathways are involved for both substances. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  12. Radiation damage and repair in cells and cell components. Progress report, 1978-1979

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fluke, D.J.; Pollard, E.C.

    1979-01-01

    Special work during the year concentrated on induced repair of cellular radiation damage in a number of strains of Escherchia coli. Ultraviolet and x-radiation are considered for induction of cell damage. (PCS)

  13. Primary radiation damage and disturbance in cell divisions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Lee, Yun-Jong; Kim, Jae-Hun; Petin, Vladislav G.; Nili, Mohammad

    2008-01-01

    Survived cells from a homogeneous population exposed to ionizing radiation form various colonies of different sizes and morphology on a solid nutrient medium, which appear at different time intervals after irradiation. Such a phenomenon agrees well with the modern theory of microdosimetry and classical hit-and-target models of radiobiology. According to the hit-principle, individual cells exposed to the same dose of radiation are damaged in different manners. It means that the survived cells can differ in the content of sublethal damage (hits) produced by the energy absorbed into the cell and which is not enough to give rise to effective radiation damage which is responsible for cell killing or inactivation. In diploid yeast cells, the growth rate of cells from 250 colonies of various sizes appeared at different time intervals after irradiation with 600 Gy of gamma radiation from a 60 Co isotopic source was analyzed. The survival rate after irradiation was 20%. Based on the analyses results, it was possible to categorize the clones grown from irradiated cells according to the number of sub-lesions from 1 to 4. The clones with various numbers of sub-lesions were shown to be different in their viability, radiosensitivity, sensitivity to environmental conditions, and the frequency of recombination and respiratory deficient mutations. Cells from unstable clones exhibited an enhanced radiosensitivity, and an increased portion of morphologically changed cells, nonviable cells and respiration mutants, as well. The degree of expression of the foregoing effects was higher if the number of primary sublethal lesions was greater in the originally irradiated cell. Disturbance in cell division can be characterized by cell inactivation or incorrect distribution of mitochondria between daughter cells. Thus, the suggested methodology of identification of cells with a definite number of primary sublethal lesions will promote further elucidation of the nature of primary radiation

  14. Study of heat and radiation response of a malignant, melanin-producing cell line derived from C3H 10T1/2 cells transformed in culture by radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Raaphorst, G.P.; Vadasz, J.; Azzam, E.I.

    1986-12-01

    The mouse C3H 10T1/2 cell line was transformed to the malignant state using ionizing radiation. One of the transformed lines (R25) that was isolated, displayed some properties similar to malignant melanoma cells. The cells became dark and pigmented after prolonged time in culture and this cell line produced tumors in C3H mice. The radiation survival curve of R25 had a large shoulder which was also observed for human melanoma cell lines. R25 was more resistant to heating at 45.0 degrees C than the normal cell line. Heating at 45.0 degrees C before irradiation resulted in a reduction of the survival curve shoulder. The heat and radiation sensitivity of R25 did not appear to be related to the melanin content of these cells.

  15. Radiation-Induced Apoptosis in Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    1995-09-21

    This project is designed to investigate the possible role of apoptosis as a mode of cell death in irradiated and tamoxifen-treated breast cancer cells and to study the potential for using therapeutic manipulations to enhance this cell killing as a means of improving radiation therapy for treatment of breast cancer.

  16. Ionizing radiation sensitivity of DNA polymerase lambda-deficient cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vermeulen, C.; Bertocci, B.; Begg, A.C.; Vens, C.

    2007-01-01

    Ionizing radiation induces a diverse spectrum of DNA lesions, including strand breaks and oxidized bases. In mammalian cells, ionizing radiation-induced lesions are targets of non-homologous end joining, homologous recombination, and base excision repair. In vitro assays show a potential involvement

  17. Synergism of UV Radiation and Heat for Cell Inactivation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin-Kyu; Lee, Yun-Jong; Lee, Ju-Woon; Kim, Su-Hyoun; Petin, Vladislav G.

    2006-01-01

    Organisms including human beings are constantly exposed to UV radiation. The potential hazards of UV radiation have risen due to a depletion of the protective ozone layer in the stratosphere and the formation of ozone holes. Moreover, the effect of UV radiation may greatly increase due to synergistic interaction of UV radiation with other environmental factors. Fluence rate is known to constitute a very important parameter in photobiology. While it is generally accepted that lowering the UV radiation fluence rate results in a decrease of the cell killing or mutagenesis efficiency per unit dose, the matter is still unclear with regards to the synergistic interaction of UV radiation and another environmental agent. It is of great interest to investigate whether or not the synergistic interaction can take place at low intensities of such environmental factors. Heat is known to be an important modifier of UV radiation sensitivity. Exposure of skin to UV radiation is often encountered at hot ambient temperatures. Therefore, the elucidation of new fundamental aspects of the simultaneous action of UV radiation and heat is an actual task. Thus, the purpose of the present work was to establish whether the UV fluence rate alters the synergistic interaction between heat and UV radiation for cell inactivation

  18. Collection of radiation resistant characteristics reports for instruments and materials in high dose rate environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kusano, Joichi

    2008-03-01

    This document presents the collected official reports of radiation irradiation study for the candidate materials to be used in high dose rate environment as J-PARC facility. The effect of radiation damage by loss-beam or secondary particle beam of the accelerators influences the performance and the reliability of various instruments. The knowledge on the radiation resistivity of the materials is important to estimate the life of the equipments, the maintenance interval and dose evaluation for the personnel at the maintenance period. The radiation damage consists with mechanical property, electrical property and gas-evolution property. (author)

  19. Radiation induced bystander effects in modification of cellular radio-sensitivity in human cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pandey, B.N.

    2012-01-01

    Radiation-induced Bystander Effect is manifestation of radiation effects in non-irradiated cells in the population. The phenomenon may have significant implication in risk of radiation induced cancer incidence and outcome of cancer radiotherapy. To understand the bystander interaction in tumor cells, we have studied secretion of diffusible factors from control and irradiated tumor cells of different origin. Our results showed a good correlation between magnitude of secretion of diffusible factors and survival of tumor cells. These diffusible factors are shown to affect proliferation and survival of tumor cells involving regulation of kinases and genes/proteins involved in apoptotic machinery. Our experiments using pharmacological inhibitors showed involvement of activating transcription factor 2 (ATF-2) signaling in survival of tumor cells after treatment with diffusible factors. These factors seem to be involved in exerting radio-resistance in tumor cells. Furthermore, in proton microbeam irradiation studies showed induction of double strand break measured as gH2AX foci in human lung carcinoma cells, which was found to propagate to bystander tumor cells during post-irradiation incubation. Implication of these observations in outcome of cancer radiotherapy scenario would be discussed. (author)

  20. FtsZ from radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans is different from its characterized homologues

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mehta, Kruti P.; Misra, H.S.

    2012-01-01

    Polymerization/depolymerization dynamics of FtsZ and its GTPase activity are interdependent and the regulation of these processes determines the growth rate in a bacterium. Deinococcus radiodurans R1 that is best known for its extraordinary radiation resistance and efficient DNA double strand break repair is a comparatively slow growing bacterium and its growth gets arrested in response to gamma radiation. Mechanisms of cell division and its regulation under gamma stressed growth condition would be worth investigating. Genome of this bacterium encodes at least all the known components of divisome. Recombinant FtsZ of D. radiodurans (drFtsZ) preferred Mg 2+ for its GTPase activity. Relatively a very low GTPase activity was observed in presence of Mn 2+ , Co 2+ and Ni 2+ while release of inorganic phosphate could not be detected in presence of other divalent ions including Ca 2+ . GTPase activity of drFtsZ was lower than E. coli but higher than Mycobacterium and it required both Mg 2+ and GTP for its polymerization. Its GTPase activity did not increase with increasing concentration of Mg 2+ and correlates with the bundling of protofilaments. Results obtained from transmission electron microscopy and sedimentation analysis supported the reciprocal correlation of polymerization/depolymerization with the levels of GTPase activity. Dynamic light scattering in presence of 5mM or higher concentration of Mg 2+ and Mn 2 showed a characteristic cyclic change in light scattering without addition of extra metal ion or GTP

  1. Engineering hot-cell windows for radiation protection

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ferguson, K.R.; Courtney, J.C.

    1983-01-01

    Radiation protection considerations in the design and construction of hot-cell windows are discussed. The importance of evaluating the potential gamma spectra and neutron source terms is stressed. 11 references

  2. Membrane phospholipids and radiation-induced death of mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolters, H.

    1987-01-01

    Radiation-induced cell killing is generally believed to be a consequence of residual DNA damage or damage that is mis-repaired. However, besides this DNA damage, damage to other molecules or structures of the cell may be involved in the killing. Especially membranes have been suggested as a determinant in cellular radiosensitivity. In this thesis experiments are described, dealing with the possible involvement of membranes in radiation-induced killing of mammalian cells. A general treatise of membrane structure is followed by information concerning deleterious effects of radiation on membranes. Consequences of damage to structure and function of membranes are reviewed. Thereafter evidence relating to the possible involvement of membranes in radiation-induced cell killing is presented. (Auth.)

  3. Open cell conducting foams for high synchrotron radiation accelerators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    S. Petracca

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The possible use of open cell conductive foams in high synchrotron radiation particle accelerators is considered. Available materials and modeling tools are reviewed, potential pros and cons are discussed, and preliminary conclusions are drawn.

  4. Radiation Response of Cultured Human Cells Is Unaffected by Johrei

    OpenAIRE

    Hall, Zach; Luu, Tri; Moore, Dan; Yount, Garret

    2007-01-01

    Johrei has been credited with healing thousands from radiation wounds after the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs in 1945. This alternative medical therapy is becoming increasingly popular in the United States, as are other Energy Medicine modalities that purport to influence a universal healing energy. Human brain cells were cultured and exposed to increasing doses of ionizing radiation. Experienced Johrei practitioners directed healing intentionality toward the cells for 30 min from a distance o...

  5. Proteasome inhibitor MG132 enhances the antigrowth and antimetastasis effects of radiation in human nonsmall cell lung cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Jing; Shen, Wenhao; Tang, Yiting; Zhou, Jundong; Li, Ming; Zhu, Wei; Yang, Hongying; Wu, Jinchang; Zhang, Shuyu; Cao, Jianping

    2014-08-01

    The current treatment for advanced nonsmall cell lung cancer (NSCLC) remains unsatisfactory due to resistance to chemotherapy and ionizing radiation. The ubiquitin-proteasome system (UPS) regulates multiple cellular processes that are crucial for the proliferation and survival of all kinds of cells. Carbobenzoxyl-leucinyl-leucinyl-leucinal-H (MG132), a specific and selective reversible inhibitor of the 26S proteasome, represents a novel approach for cancer therapy. However, whether MG132 can potentiate the effect of radiation against the growth and metastasis of NSCLC is not clear. We found that MG132 inhibited the proliferation of human NSCLC cell lines (A549 and H1299) in a dose- and time-dependent manner by 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay. Then MG132 at a nontoxic dose (100 nM) was selected for following studies. Pretreatment of A549 and H1299 cells with 100 nM MG132 before ionizing radiation (IR) potentiated the anticancer effect of IR. Moreover, pretreatment with 100 nM MG132 before IR-enhanced radiation induced cell cycle arrest by decreased CyclinD1 but increased Wee1 expression in A549 and H1299 cells. In addition, pretreatment of MG132 combined with IR significantly suppressed cell migration and invasion abilities in NSCLC cell lines, which was accompanied by decreased expression of matrix metalloproteinase (MMP)-2 and MMP-9 in NSCLC cell lines. Taken together, our results demonstrate that MG132 enhances the antigrowth and antimetastatic effects of irradiation in NSCLC cells by modulating expression of cell cycle and invasion- related genes.

  6. Basal DNA repair machinery is subject to positive selection in ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sghaier, Haïtham; Ghedira, Kaïs; Benkahla, Alia; Barkallah, Insaf

    2008-06-21

    Ionizing-radiation-resistant bacteria (IRRB) show a surprising capacity for adaptation to ionizing radiation and desiccation. Positive Darwinian selection is expected to play an important role in this trait, but no data are currently available regarding the role of positive adaptive selection in resistance to ionizing-radiation and tolerance of desiccation. We analyzed the four known genome sequences of IRRB (Deinococcus geothermalis, Deinococcus radiodurans, Kineococcus radiotolerans, and Rubrobacter xylanophilus) to determine the role of positive Darwinian selection in the evolution of resistance to ionizing radiation and tolerance of desiccation. We used the programs MultiParanoid and DnaSP to deduce the sets of orthologs that potentially evolved due to positive Darwinian selection in IRRB. We find that positive selection targets 689 ortholog sets of IRRB. Among these, 58 ortholog sets are absent in ionizing-radiation-sensitive bacteria (IRSB: Escherichia coli and Thermus thermophilus). The most striking finding is that all basal DNA repair genes in IRRB, unlike many of their orthologs in IRSB, are subject to positive selection. Our results provide the first in silico prediction of positively selected genes with potential roles in the molecular basis of resistance to gamma-radiation and tolerance of desiccation in IRRB. Identification of these genes provides a basis for future experimental work aimed at understanding the metabolic networks in which they participate.

  7. UVA radiation augments cytotoxic activity of psoralens in melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wrześniok, Dorota; Beberok, Artur; Rok, Jakub; Delijewski, Marcin; Hechmann, Anna; Oprzondek, Martyna; Rzepka, Zuzanna; Bacler-Żbikowska, Barbara; Buszman, Ewa

    2017-07-01

    Melanoma is an aggressive form of skin cancer. The aim of the study was to evaluate the influence of UVA radiation and psoralens: 5-methoxypsoralen (5-MOP) or 8-methoxypsoralen (8-MOP) on melanoma cells viability. The amelanotic C32 and melanotic COLO829 human melanoma cell lines were exposed to increasing concentrations of psoralens (0.1-100 μM) in the presence or absence of UVA radiation. Cell viability was evaluated by the WST-1 assay. We demonstrated that 8-MOP, in contrast to 5-MOP, has no cytotoxic effect on both melanoma cell lines. Simultaneous exposure of cells to 8-MOP and UVA radiation caused significant cytotoxic response in C32 cells where the EC 50 value was estimated to be 131.0 μM (UVA dose: 1.3 J/cm 2 ) and 105.3 μM (UVA dose: 2.6 J/cm 2 ). The cytotoxicity of 5-MOP on both C32 and COLO829 cells was significantly augmented by UVA radiation - the EC 50 was estimated to be 22.7 or 7.9 μM (UVA dose: 1.3 J/cm 2 ) and 24.2 or 7.0 μM (UVA dose: 2.6 J/cm 2 ), respectively. The demonstrated high cytotoxic response after simultaneous exposure of melanoma cells to psoralens and UVA radiation in vitro suggests the usefulness of PUVA therapy to treat melanoma in vivo.

  8. Collateral methotrexate resistance in cisplatin-selected murine leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bhushan A.

    1999-01-01

    Full Text Available Resistance to anticancer drugs is a major cause of failure of many therapeutic protocols. A variety of mechanisms have been proposed to explain this phenomenon. The exact mechanism depends upon the drug of interest as well as the tumor type treated. While studying a cell line selected for its resistance to cisplatin we noted that the cells expressed a >25,000-fold collateral resistance to methotrexate. Given the magnitude of this resistance we elected to investigate this intriguing collateral resistance. From a series of investigations we have identified an alteration in a membrane protein of the resistant cell as compared to the sensitive cells that could be the primary mechanism of resistance. Our studies reviewed here indicate decreased tyrosine phosphorylation of a protein (molecular mass = 66 in the resistant cells, which results in little or no transfer of methotrexate from the medium into the cell. Since this is a relatively novel function for tyrosine phosphorylation, this information may provide insight into possible pharmacological approaches to modify therapeutic regimens by analyzing the status of this protein in tumor samples for a better survival of the cancer patients.

  9. The role of protective systems in cell homeostasis upon gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zasuxina, Q.D.

    2002-01-01

    There are a number of parameters that are used for the estimation of cell defence against radiation and chemicals: induced initial DNA damage, residual damage after a period of repair, rate and fidelity of repair, endpoint (chromosomal changes and cell survival). Antioxidant enzymes are main pathway of cell defence: superoxide dismutase (SOD), catalase, glutatione peroxidase, glutatione-S-transferase et al. Key enzyme is SOD which naturalizes reactive oxygen species (ROS). ROS are main damaging component of the radiation and some chemical action. Glutatione-S-transferase (GST) conjugates ROS to glutatione prior to their excretion from the body. The GST M1 null (one from family of GST) genotype is found in about 50% Europeans, Japanese, but only one-quarter of Afro-Americans. Lack of this enzyme may result in deficient detoxification leading to increase sensitivity to mutagens and in risk of cancer. Another system of cell defence involves enzymes taking part in DNA repair: base excision repair, nucleotide excision repair, mismatch repair et al. A radio adaptive response (RAR) also can serve as cell defence system. RAR forms a cell resistance to gamma-radiation after cell pretreatment with low doses of radiation and some incubation (3-4 hours). Purpose of our investigation: 1) to estimate the role of SOD in human cells isolated from healthy donors, children with some repair-deficient diseases (Bloom syndrome, Marfan syndrome) and children from area with an increased level of radiation; 2) to compare SOD activity in human cells and human cells during RAR; 3) to study a possible link between cell survival and initial damage of DNA after treatment with TRIEN - inhibitor of SOD - and with garlic extract - natural anti mutagen. We found the increased level of damage of DNA in trien-pretreated cells (healthy and repair-deficient cells). However this level was similar in lymphocytes of children from areas with an increased level of radiation without and with trien

  10. Mechanism of radiation tolerance in higher plants. Radiation damage of DNA in cultured tobacco BY-2 cells and implication from its repair process

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yokota, Yuichiro; Narumi, Issay; Funayama, Tomoo; Kobayashi, Yasuhiko; Tanaka, Jun; Inoue, Masayoshi

    2007-01-01

    This paper describes the mechanism of radiation tolerance at the cellular level in higher plants, of which fundamental study basis is rather poor, in cultured cells in the title (BY-2 cells, Nicotiana tabacum L., allotetraploid). When compared with LD 50 of radiation in higher animals (2.4-8.6 Gy), higher plants are generally tolerant to radiation (known LD 50 , >360-2000 Gy). Authors have made unicellular BY-2 cells (protoplasts) by enzyme treatment to see their colony forming ability (CFA) and have found those cells are also resistant to radiation: D 10 (10% CFA dose) (Gy) is found to be 8.2-47.2 by radiation with various linear energy transfer (LET)s like gamma ray and heavy ion beams, in contrast to human D 10 (1.17-8.12, by X-ray and carbon beam). Double strand break (DSB) of DNA by radiation per one BY-2 cell initially occurs 7-10 times more frequently than mammalian cells (CHO-K1). However, DSB repair in BY-2 cells is found only as efficient as in mammalian cells: a slow repair relative to DSB number. Checkpoint mechanism of DNA damage is found poorly working in BY-cells, which results in frequent chromosome aberration like micronucleus. Authors consider that, for an herbaceous plant, to precede the cell cycle rather than to recover from the genomic instability can be profitable for growing more rapidly to have more sunlight energy than other individuals. Improvement of plants by gene technological approach with such a mean as mutation by radiation is conceivably important from aspects of food supply and of ecological environment. (R.T.)

  11. Optimal Radiation Therapy for Small Cell Lung Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gensheimer, Michael F; Loo, Billy W

    2017-04-01

    Radiation therapy plays an important role in the management of both limited stage and extensive stage small cell lung cancer. For limited stage disease, there has been a trend toward reduced size of thoracic radiation fields, which has the potential to reduce toxicity. FDG-PET staging helps make this possible by more accurately identifying areas of nodal and metastatic involvement. Trials have demonstrated similar outcomes using a range of radiation fractionation schedules, allowing flexibility in individualizing treatment. Using advanced radiation therapy techniques such as intensity-modulated radiation therapy, it may be possible to deliver fewer, higher dose fractions and achieve similar results to the hyperfractionated regimen. For extensive stage disease, consolidative thoracic radiation therapy after chemotherapy was recently shown to improve overall survival in certain patient subsets. Prophylactic cranial irradiation continues to play an important role in management of all stages of small cell lung cancer. Debate continues about the neurocognitive effects of this treatment, and whether MRI surveillance is an acceptable alternative. Strategies such as hippocampal avoidance may reduce the cognitive effects of prophylactic cranial irradiation in the future. Finally, in the last few years stereotactic ablative radiation therapy followed by chemotherapy has emerged as a promising treatment for stage I small cell lung cancer. This radiation treatment is usually given over 1-5 fractions and appears to provide a good rate of local control with a low rate of serious toxicity.

  12. The Involvement of Mitochondrial Membrane Potential in Cross-Resistance Between Radiation and Docetaxel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwahara, Yoshikazu [Department of Radiation Biology and Medicine, Faculty of Medicine, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sendai (Japan); Department of Pathology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Roudkenar, Mehryar Habibi; Suzuki, Masatoshi; Urushihara, Yusuke; Fukumoto, Motoi [Department of Pathology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Saito, Yohei [Department of Radiopharmacy, Tohoku Medical and Pharmaceutical University, Sendai (Japan); Fukumoto, Manabu, E-mail: manabu.fukumoto.a8@tohoku.ac.jp [Department of Pathology, Institute of Development, Aging and Cancer, Tohoku University, Sendai (Japan); Department of Molecular Pathology, Tokyo Medical University, Tokyo (Japan)

    2016-11-01

    Purpose: To understand the molecular mechanisms underlying cancer cell radioresistance, clinically relevant radioresistant (CRR) cells that continue to proliferate during exposure to 2 Gy/day X-rays for more than 30 days were established. A modified high-density survival assay for anticancer drug screening revealed that CRR cells were resistant to an antimicrotubule agent, docetaxel (DTX). The involvement of reactive oxygen species (ROS) from mitochondria (mtROS) in the cross-resistance to X-rays and DTX was studied. Methods and Materials: Sensitivity to anticancer agents was determined by a modified high-density cell survival or water-soluble tetrazolium salt assay. DTX-induced mtROS generation was determined by MitoSOX red staining. JC-1 staining was used to visualize mitochondrial membrane potential. DTX-induced DNA double-strand breaks were determined by γ-H2AX staining. To obtain mitochondrial DNA-lacking (ρ{sup 0}) cells, the cells were cultured for 3 to 4 weeks in medium containing ethidium bromide. Results: Treatment with DTX increased mtROS in parental cells but not in CRR cells. DTX induced DNA double-strand breaks in parental cells. The mitochondrial membrane potential of CRR cells was lower in CRR cells than in parental cells. Depletion of mtDNA induced DTX resistance in parental cells. Treatment with dimethyl sulfoxide also induced DTX resistance in parental cells. Conclusions: The mitochondrial dysfunction observed in CRR cells contributes to X-ray and DTX cross-resistance. The activation of oxidative phosphorylation in CRR cells may represent an effective approach to overcome radioresistant cancers. In general, the overexpression of β-tubulin or multidrug efflux pumps is thought to be involved in DTX resistance. In the present study, we discovered another DTX resistant mechanism by investigating CRR cells.

  13. Role of Autophagy in Cisplatin Resistance in Ovarian Cancer Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Juan; Wu, Gen Sheng

    2014-01-01

    Cisplatin-based treatment is the first line chemotherapy for several cancers including ovarian cancer. The development of cisplatin resistance results in treatment failure, but the underlying mechanisms are not fully understood. Here we show that the induction of autophagy plays an important role in cisplatin resistance in ovarian cancer cells. Specifically, we show that cisplatin resistance is correlated with autophagy induction in a panel of ovarian cancer cells but not in immortalized human ovarian surface epithelial cells. Mechanistically, cisplatin treatment activates ERK and subsequently promotes autophagy. The inhibition of ERK activation with MEK inhibitors or knockdown of ERK expression with siRNA decreases cisplatin-induced autophagy and subsequently sensitizes ovarian cancer cells to cisplatin-induced apoptosis. In ovarian cancer cells that have developed acquired cisplatin resistance, both ERK activation and autophagy induction are increased. Importantly, knockdown of ERK or inhibition of autophagy promotes cisplatin-induced apoptosis in acquired cisplatin-resistant cells. Collectively, our data indicate that ERK-mediated autophagy can lead to cisplatin resistance and suggest that cisplatin resistance can be overcome by inhibition of autophagy in ovarian cancer cells. PMID:24794870

  14. Breast cancer cells with acquired antiestrogen resistance are sensitized to cisplatin-induced cell death

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yde, Christina Westmose; Gyrd-Hansen, Mads; Lykkesfeldt, Anne E

    2007-01-01

    for future breast cancer treatment. In this study, we have investigated the effect of the chemotherapeutic compound cisplatin using a panel of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cell lines established from the human breast cancer cell line MCF-7. We show that the antiestrogen-resistant cells...... with parental MCF-7 cells. Our data show that Bcl-2 can protect antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells from cisplatin-induced cell death, indicating that the reduced expression of Bcl-2 in the antiestrogen-resistant cells plays a role in sensitizing the cells to cisplatin treatment.......Antiestrogens are currently used for treating breast cancer patients who have estrogen receptor-positive tumors. However, patients with advanced disease will eventually develop resistance to the drugs. Therefore, compounds effective on antiestrogen-resistant tumors will be of great importance...

  15. Radiation-Induced Notch Signaling in Breast Cancer Stem Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lagadec, Chann [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Vlashi, Erina [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States); Alhiyari, Yazeed; Phillips, Tiffany M.; Bochkur Dratver, Milana [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Pajonk, Frank, E-mail: fpajonk@mednet.ucla.edu [Department of Radiation Oncology, David Geffen School of Medicine at University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA), Los Angeles, California (United States); Jonsson Comprehensive Cancer Center at UCLA, Los Angeles, California (United States)

    2013-11-01

    Purpose: To explore patterns of Notch receptor and ligand expression in response to radiation that could be crucial in defining optimal dosing schemes for γ-secretase inhibitors if combined with radiation. Methods and Materials: Using MCF-7 and T47D breast cancer cell lines, we used real-time reverse transcription–polymerase chain reaction to study the Notch pathway in response to radiation. Results: We show that Notch receptor and ligand expression during the first 48 hours after irradiation followed a complex radiation dose–dependent pattern and was most pronounced in mammospheres, enriched for breast cancer stem cells. Additionally, radiation activated the Notch pathway. Treatment with a γ-secretase inhibitor prevented radiation-induced Notch family gene expression and led to a significant reduction in the size of the breast cancer stem cell pool. Conclusions: Our results indicate that, if combined with radiation, γ-secretase inhibitors may prevent up-regulation of Notch receptor and ligand family members and thus reduce the number of surviving breast cancer stem cells.

  16. Immobilization of yeast cells by radiation-induced polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fujimura, T.; Kaetsu, I.

    1982-01-01

    Radiation-induced polymerization method was applied to the immobilization of yeast cells. The effects of irradiation, cooling and monomer, which are neccessary for polymerization, were recovered completely by subsequent aerobical incubation of yeast cells. The ethanol productive in immobilized yeast cells increased with the increase of aerobical incubation period. The growth of yeast cells in immobilized yeast cells was indicated. The maximum ethanol productivity in immobilized yeast cell system was around three times as much as that in free yeast cell system. (orig.)

  17. Squamous cell carcinoma following radiation therapy for the infiltrative thymoma

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ozawa, Shinji; Kitao, Takeshi (Kitagata National Sanatorium, Fukui (Japan))

    1992-02-01

    This report represents one case of infiltrative thymoma followed by squamous cell carcinoma of the lungs. A 69-year-old man suffered from infiltrative thymoma which reduced by the radiation therapy. Seven years later its replase and the onset of squamous cell carcinoma were found simultaneously. Infiltrative thymoma metastasized not only to the mediastinum but also to the liver and bronchus. Squamous cell carcinoma developed in the right upper lobe. In spite of chemotherapy against them, the patient died. There are many cases in which infiltrative thymoma is accompanied by squamous cell carcinoma of the lung simultaneously; however, secondary onset of squamous cell carcinoma after the radiation therapy of infiltrative thymoma is rare. Secondary carcinogenesis of this case was considered to be closely related with immunological abnormalities caused by thymoma, effects of radiation, smoking and so on. (author).

  18. Squamous cell carcinoma following radiation therapy for the infiltrative thymoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ozawa, Shinji; Kitao, Takeshi

    1992-01-01

    This report represents one case of infiltrative thymoma followed by squamous cell carcinoma of the lungs. A 69-year-old man suffered from infiltrative thymoma which reduced by the radiation therapy. Seven years later its replase and the onset of squamous cell carcinoma were found simultaneously. Infiltrative thymoma metastasized not only to the mediastinum but also to the liver and bronchus. Squamous cell carcinoma developed in the right upper lobe. In spite of chemotherapy against them, the patient died. There are many cases in which infiltrative thymoma is accompanied by squamous cell carcinoma of the lung simultaneously; however, secondary onset of squamous cell carcinoma after the radiation therapy of infiltrative thymoma is rare. Secondary carcinogenesis of this case was considered to be closely related with immunological abnormalities caused by thymoma, effects of radiation, smoking and so on. (author)

  19. Troglitazone reverses the multiple drug resistance phenotype in cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gerald F Davies

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Gerald F Davies1, Bernhard HJ Juurlink2, Troy AA Harkness11Department of Anatomy and Cell Biology, College of Medicine, University of Saskatchewan, Saskatoon, Canada; 2College of Medicine, Alfaisal University, Riyadh, Kingdom of Saudi ArabiaAbstract: A major problem in treating cancer is the development of drug resistance. We previously demonstrated doxorubicin (DOX resistance in K562 human leukemia cells that was associated with upregulation of glyoxalase 1 (GLO-1 and histone H3 expression. The thiazolidinedione troglitazone (TRG downregulated GLO-1 expression and further upregulated histone H3 expression and post-translational modifications in these cells, leading to a regained sensitivity to DOX. Given the pleiotropic effects of epigenetic changes in cancer development, we hypothesized that TRG may downregulate the multiple drug resistance (MDR phenotype in a variety of cancer cells. To test this, MCF7 human breast cancer cells and K562 cells were cultured in the presence of low-dose DOX to establish DOX-resistant cell lines (K562/DOX and MCF7/DOX. The MDR phenotype was confirmed by Western blot analysis of the 170 kDa P-glycoprotein (Pgp drug efflux pump multiple drug resistance protein 1 (MDR-1, and the breast cancer resistance protein (BCRP. TRG markedly decreased expression of both MDR-1 and BCRP in these cells, resulting in sensitivity to DOX. Silencing of MDR-1 expression also sensitized MCF7/DOX cells to DOX. Use of the specific and irreversible peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor gamma (PPARγ inhibitor GW9662 in the nanomolar range not only demonstrated that the action of TRG on MCF/DOX was PPARγ-independent, but indicated that PPARγ may play a role in the MDR phenotype, which is antagonized by TRG. We conclude that TRG is potentially a useful adjunct therapy in chemoresistant cancers. Keywords: chemotherapy, doxorubicin, breast cancer resistance protein-1, multiple drug resistance, multiple drug resistance protein 1

  20. Radiation-induced cell death in embryogenic cells of coniferous plants

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Watanabe, Yoshito; Homma-Takeda, Shino; Yukawa, Masae; Nishimura, Yoshikazu; Sasamoto, Hamako; Takahagi, Masahiko

    2004-01-01

    Reproductive processes are particularly radiosensitive in plant development, which was clearly illustrated in reduction of seed formation in native coniferous plants around Chernobyl after the nuclear accident. For the purpose to investigate the effects of ionizing radiation on embryonic formation in coniferous plants, we used an embryo-derived embryogenic cell culture of a Japanese native coniferous plant, Japanese cedar (Cryplomeria japonica). The embryogenic cells were so radiosensitive that most of the cells died by X-ray irradiation of 5 Gy. This indicated that the embryogenic cells are as radiosensitive as some mammalian cells including lymphocytes. We considered that this type of radiosensitive cell death in the embryogenic cells should be responsible for reproductive damages of coniferous plants by low dose of ionizing radiation. The cell death of the embryogenic cells was characteristic of nuclear DNA fragmentation, which is typically observed in radiation-induced programmed cell death, i.e. apoptosis, in mammalian cells. On the other hand, cell death with nuclear DNA fragmentation did not develop by X-ray irradiation in vegetative cells including meristematic cells of Japanese cedar. This suggests that an apoptosis-like programmed cell death should develop cell-specifically in embryogenic cells by ionizing radiation. The abortion of embryogenic cells may work to prevent transmission of radiation-induced genetic damages to the descendants. (author)

  1. Characterization of the multiple drug resistance phenotype expressed by tumour cells following in vitro exposure to fractionated X-irradiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hill, B.T.; McClean, S.; Hosking, L.; Shellard, S.; Dempke, W.; Whelan, R.

    1992-01-01

    The major clinical problem of the emergence of drug resistant tumor cell populations is recognized in patients previously treated with antitumor drugs and with radiotherapy. It is proposed that, although radiation-induced vascular fibrosis may limit drug delivery to the tumor, exposure to radiation may 'induce' or 'select for' drug resistance. This hypothesis was examined by establishing in vitro model systems to investigate the resistance phenotype of tumor cells following exposure to X-rays. Characteristically tumor cells surviving exposure to a series of fractions of X-irradiation are shown to have consistently expressed resistance to multiple drugs, including the Vinca alkaloids and the epipodophyllotoxins. Currently this research is aimed at determining whether distinctive resistance mechanisms operate depending on whether resistance results following drug or X-ray exposure. Initial results indicate that whilst some common mechanisms operate, drug resistant tumor cells identified following exposure to X-irradiation appear to exhibit a novel multidrug resistance phenotype. (author). 13 refs., 1 tab

  2. Helicity-dependent photocurrent in the resistive Ag/Pd films excited by IR laser radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mikheev, G M; Saushin, A S; Vanyukov, V V [Institute of Mechanics, Ural Branch of the Russian Academy of Sciences, Izhevsk (Russian Federation)

    2015-07-31

    It is shown that in resistive Ag/Pd films manufactured according to the thick-film technology, in the case of oblique incidence of laser radiation of nanosecond duration at a wavelengths of 1350 – 2100 nm, a photon-drag photocurrent arises in the direction perpendicular to the plane of incidence, dependent on the ellipticity and sign of circular polarisation of incident radiation. This photocurrent consists of the so-called circular and linear contributions, which are, respectively, dependent on and independent of the sign of circular polarisation. In this wavelength range, the amplitude of the circular contribution is many times greater than that of the linear contribution. The results allow the use of resistive Ag/Pd films for the development and manufacture of innovative sensors of the sign of circular polarisation of pulsed laser radiation, operating in a wide spectral range. (interaction of laser radiation with matter. laser plasma)

  3. Radiation related basic cancer research : research for radiation induced tumor cell killing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Hong, Seok Il; Cho, Kyung Ja; Kim, Byung Gi; Lee, Kee Ho; Nam, Myung Jin

    1999-04-01

    The radioresistant clones was established from human U251 glioblastoma cell line through intermittently exposed to 3 Gy gamma-radiation for six months. Treatment of SNU-16 cells with various doses of radiation, TNF alpha and PMA resulted in a decrease in cell viability. The results prove that cell death of SNU16 is a apoptosis mediated by caspase-3. We have examined the expression of bcl-2 and c-myc in cervical cancer specimens and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to determine the role of coexpression of bcl-3 and c-myc during progression into cervical cancer. The frequent alterations in FHIT expression in many cervical carcinomas and their cell lines suggest that FHIT gene alterations are pla a role in cervical tumorigenesis. According to these correlation between the viability and apoptosis of RD cells, the proper range of the dosage for the investigation of differentiation potency in RD cells was assessed as 1 to 3Gy.

  4. Radiation related basic cancer research : research for radiation induced tumor cell killing

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Seung Hoon; Hong, Seok Il; Cho, Kyung Ja; Kim, Byung Gi; Lee, Kee Ho; Nam, Myung Jin

    1999-04-01

    The radioresistant clones was established from human U251 glioblastoma cell line through intermittently exposed to 3 Gy gamma-radiation for six months. Treatment of SNU-16 cells with various doses of radiation, TNF alpha and PMA resulted in a decrease in cell viability. The results prove that cell death of SNU16 is a apoptosis mediated by caspase-3. We have examined the expression of bcl-2 and c-myc in cervical cancer specimens and cervical intraepithelial neoplasia (CIN) to determine the role of coexpression of bcl-3 and c-myc during progression into cervical cancer. The frequent alterations in FHIT expression in many cervical carcinomas and their cell lines suggest that FHIT gene alterations are pla a role in cervical tumorigenesis. According to these correlation between the viability and apoptosis of RD cells, the proper range of the dosage for the investigation of differentiation potency in RD cells was assessed as 1 to 3Gy

  5. Effects of ionizing radiation on differentiation of murine bone marrow cells into mast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Murakami, Sho; Yoshino, Hironori; Ishikawa, Junya; Yamaguchi, Masaru; Tsujiguchi, Takakiyo; Nishiyama, Ayaka; Yokoyama, Kouki; Kashiwakura, Ikuo

    2015-01-01

    Mast cells, immune effector cells produced from bone marrow cells, play a major role in immunoglobulin E–mediated allergic responses. Ionizing radiation affects the functions of mast cells, which are involved in radiation-induced tissue damage. However, whether ionizing radiation affects the differential induction of mast cells is unknown. Here we investigated whether bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells. To induce mast cells, bone marrow cells from X-irradiated and unirradiated mice were cultured in the presence of cytokines required for mast cell induction. Although irradiation at 0.5 Gy and 2 Gy decreased the number of bone marrow cells 1 day post-irradiation, the cultured bone marrow cells of X-irradiated and unirradiated mice both expressed mast cell–related cell-surface antigens. However, the percentage of mast cells in the irradiated group was lower than in the unirradiated group. Similar decreases in the percentage of mast cells induced in the presence of X-irradiation were observed 10 days post irradiation, although the number of bone marrow cells in irradiated mice had recovered by this time. Analysis of mast cell function showed that degranulation of mast cells after immunoglobulin E–mediated allergen recognition was significantly higher in the X-irradiated group compared with in the unirradiated group. In conclusion, bone marrow cells of X-irradiated mice differentiated into mast cells, but ionizing radiation affected the differentiation efficiency and function of mast cells. (author)

  6. Volatile resistance states in electrochemical metallization cells enabling non-destructive readout of complementary resistive switches

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Van den Hurk, Jan; Linn, Eike; Waser, Rainer; Zhang, Hehe; Valov, Ilia

    2014-01-01

    Redox-based resistive memory cells exhibit changes of OFF or intermediate resistance values over time and even ON states can be completely lost in certain cases. The stability of these resistance states and the time until resistance loss strongly depends on the materials system. On the basis of electrical measurements and chemical analysis we found a viable explanation for these volatile resistance states (VRSs) in Ag-GeS x -based electrochemical metallization memory cells and identified a technological application in the field of crossbar memories. Complementary resistive switches usually suffer from the necessity of a destructive read-out procedure increasing wear and reducing read-out speed. From our analysis we deduced a solution to use the VRS as an inherent selector mechanism without the need for additional selector devices. (paper)

  7. Investigation of radiation-resistant polyolefin materials used in power reactors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Cong; Song Jianbin

    2006-01-01

    It was forecasted that China would spend more than 40 billion US dollars on power reactors with a total of 27 million-kilowatt generation by 2020. This will require a huge quantity of cables and heat-shrinkable materials in the nuclear power stations, as an average GW nuclear power station needs one or two million US dollars of cables and accessories with radiation-resistant insulations. These materials must be heat resistant, radiation resistant, LOCA resistant, low smoke, halogen-free and flame retardant. Typical performance requirements are as follows: 1) Thermal aging experiments: 300 h at 138 degree C according to US standard for 40 years lifetime in power reactors. 2) Irradiation experiments: irradiated by 60 Co γ-rays after aging to 700 kGy under mild surrounding conditions and 1500 kGy under rigor conditions, according to US standard. 3) LOCA-Helb experimental simulation: the cables are subjected to repeated tests in a vessel under regulated temperature and vapor pressure in different period of time, with simultaneous spraying of chemical solution (typically 1.5% boracic acid solution of pH=10.5 adjusted by NaOH) in a flux of 34.2 L·min -1 ·m -2 in the horizontal projection surface. 4) Flame retardant: the oxygen index of low smoke and halogen-free materials is ≥25 for cable insulation, and ≥27 for cable sheath. Our research is aimed at achieving the aging resistance performance with radiation crosslinking. Polyethylene and ethylene-propylene rubber are mixed with selected radiation-resistant reagents and the radiation resistant mechanisms are investigated. In addition, halogen-free flame retardant materials and surface treatment of the inorganic reagents are studied for making cables and heat-shrinkable cable accessories for nuclear power applications. They will meet technical requirements of the LOCA test, with desirable performances on low smoke halogen-free and flame retardant. (authors)

  8. Radiation crosslinked block copolymer blends with improved impact resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Saunders, F.L.; Pelletier, R.R.

    1976-01-01

    Polymer blends having high impact resistance after mechanical working are produced by blending together a non-elastomeric monovinylidene aromatic polymer such as polystyrene with an elastomeric copolymer, such as a block copolymer of styrene and butadiene, in the form of crosslinked, colloidal size particles

  9. Light scattering on PHA granules protects bacterial cells against the harmful effects of UV radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaninova, Eva; Sedlacek, Petr; Mravec, Filip; Mullerova, Lucie; Samek, Ota; Koller, Martin; Hesko, Ondrej; Kucera, Dan; Marova, Ivana; Obruca, Stanislav

    2018-02-01

    Numerous prokaryotes accumulate polyhydroxyalkanoates (PHA) in the form of intracellular granules. The primary function of PHA is the storage of carbon and energy. Nevertheless, there are numerous reports that the presence of PHA granules in microbial cells enhances their stress resistance and fitness when exposed to various stress factors. In this work, we studied the protective mechanism of PHA granules against UV irradiation employing Cupriavidus necator as a model bacterial strain. The PHA-accumulating wild type strain showed substantially higher UV radiation resistance than the PHA non-accumulating mutant. Furthermore, the differences in UV-Vis radiation interactions with both cell types were studied using various spectroscopic approaches (turbidimetry, absorption spectroscopy, and nephelometry). Our results clearly demonstrate that intracellular PHA granules efficiently scatter UV radiation, which provides a substantial UV-protective effect for bacterial cells and, moreover, decreases the intracellular level of reactive oxygen species in UV-challenged cells. The protective properties of the PHA granules are enhanced by the fact that granules specifically bind to DNA, which in turn provides shield-like protection of DNA as the most UV-sensitive molecule. To conclude, the UV-protective action of PHA granules adds considerable value to their primary storage function, which can be beneficial in numerous environments.

  10. INFLUENCE OF INCUBATION TIME, GAMMA RAYS AND ELECTRON BEAM ON RADIATION RESISTANCE OF SOME SELECTED PATHOGENS

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    EL-HIFNAWI, H.N.; EL-TABLAWY, S.Y.

    2009-01-01

    The effect of different growth phases on the radiation resistance, antibiotic susceptibility and pathogenicity of certain selected pathogens (Escherichia coli, Candida albicans and Staphylococcus aureus) was studied in mice. The obtained results showed that Escherichia coli was slightly more resistant to gamma radiation in 18 h than 24 h or 48 h but it was relatively more resistant to electron beam in 24 h and 48 h than 18 h. Candida albicans showed radiation resistance nearly the same in all incubation times in the case of gamma radiation while for electron beam, its radiation resistance was slightly more in 24 h and 48 h than in 18 h. On the other hand, Staphylococcus aureus recorded much more resistance to gamma radiation in the 48 h than in 24 h or 18 h whereas in the case of electron beam, it was slightly more resistant in 18 h than in 24 h and 48 h.The antibiotic susceptibility of Escherichia coli reported that the exposure to gamma radiation at 3 kGy and electron beam at 6 kGy increase the susceptibility to the nalidixic acid and nitrofurantoin. When Candida albicans was exposed to 3 kGy gamma radiation and 6 kGy electron beam, the same sensitivity to nystatin was observed in comparison with the unexposed one while the sensitivity of Staphylococcus aureus to some antibiotics (amoxicillin, nitrofurantoin and tetracycline) was decreased after exposure to gamma radiation at 0.75 and 2 kGy and electron beam at 6 kGy, but for other antibiotics (trimethoprim/ sulfamethoxazole), the sensitivity was increased at 6 kGy electron beam.The lethality percent recorded after the oral ingestion of the mice with the unexposed Escherichia coli and Candida albicans were 25% and 100%, respectively, and for 6 kGy exposure to electron beam was 0% . The cotaneous disease and abscesses caused by the intradermal injection of the mice with unexposed Staphylococcus aureus was 75% and for 6 kGy exposure to electron beam was 25%.

  11. Role of the plant cell wall in gravity resistance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoson, Takayuki; Wakabayashi, Kazuyuki

    2015-04-01

    Gravity resistance, mechanical resistance to the gravitational force, is a principal graviresponse in plants, comparable to gravitropism. The cell wall is responsible for the final step of gravity resistance. The gravity signal increases the rigidity of the cell wall via the accumulation of its constituents, polymerization of certain matrix polysaccharides due to the suppression of breakdown, stimulation of cross-link formation, and modifications to the wall environment, in a wide range of situations from microgravity in space to hypergravity. Plants thus develop a tough body to resist the gravitational force via an increase in cell wall rigidity and the modification of growth anisotropy. The development of gravity resistance mechanisms has played an important role in the acquisition of responses to various mechanical stresses and the evolution of land plants. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Haplopappus gracilis cell strains resistant to pyrimidine analogues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, G E; Hann, J

    1979-03-01

    Strains of Haplopappus gracilis (Nutt.) Gray cells resistant to 6-azauracil have been isolated from cultures of diploid cells. These strains are also resistant to 8-azaguanine, as is their parent. The variants are 100- to 125-fold more resistant to 6-azauracil than their parent, and they exhibit different spectra of cross resistance to other pyrimidine analogues. The phenotype of each variant is stable in the absence of selection. The majority of cells in cultures of the variants are diploid; all others examined were tetraploid. Initial rates of uptake of uracil are not reduced in the variants. Fluorouracil, to which two variants are resistant, is taken up by one of them as well as by the parent. Responses of the other two to fluorouracil are not correlated with decreased ability to accumulate this analogue.

  13. Study on the behavior of resistance strain gages in nuclear radiation environments

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumagai, Katsuaki; Yokoo, Hiroshi; Kitahara, Tanemichi; Kaieda, Keisuke

    1975-08-01

    A series of irradiation experiments were carried out on the behavior of resistance strain gages in nuclear radiation environments. The gages made of bakelite base and advance (nickel-copper alloy) wire were bonded to stainless-steel or aluminium-alloy plates. They were inserted into an in-pile helium loop TLG-1 installed in the JRR-2 reactor, and irradiated at 80 0 C for nearly 300 hours, during which the apparent strain and the leakage current through the base material between the resistance wire and the plate were measured. The results are summarized in the following: (1) The sensitivity change and the insulation-resistance deterioration of the gage are hardly observed. (2) The apparent strain observed can be divided into two components; one dependent on the radiation intensity and the other on the radiation fluence. Both of them indicate the decrease of the gage resistance. (3) The former apparent strain is possibly due to the leakage current through the base material induced by gamma-rays. The latter may be ascribed to the decrease of the wire resistance caused by the radiation damage. (4) Either the half-bridge or full-bridge method makes it possible to compensate the apparent strain and to measure static strain for a few days satisfactorily as well as dynamic strain. (auth.)

  14. Temporary corneal stem cell dysfunction after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hiroshi, Fujishima; Kazuo, Tsubota

    1996-01-01

    Radiation therapy can cause corneal and conjuctival abnormalities that sometimes require surgical treatment. Corneal stem cell dysfunction is described, which recovered after the cessation of radiation. Methods - A 44-year-old man developed a corneal epithelial abnormality associated with conjuctival and corneal inflammation following radiation therapy for maxillary cancer. Examination of brush cytology samples showed goblet cells in the upper and lower parts of the cornea, which showed increased fluorescein permeability, and intraepithelial lymphocytes. Impression cytology showed goblet cells in the same part of the cornea. Specular microscopy revealed spindle type epithelial cells. Patient follow up included artificial tears and an antibiotic ophthalmic ointment. The corneal abnormalities resolved after 4 months with improved visual acuity without any surgical intervention, but the disappearance of the palisades of Vogt did not recover at 1 year after radiation. Radiation therapy in this patient caused temporary stem cell dysfunction which resulted in conjunctivalisation in a part of the cornea. Although limbal stem cell function did not fully recover, this rare case suggested that medical options should be considered before surgery. (Author)

  15. Characterisation and Manipulation of Docetaxel Resistant Prostate Cancer Cell Lines

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    O'Neill, Amanda J

    2011-10-07

    Abstract Background There is no effective treatment strategy for advanced castration-resistant prostate cancer. Although Docetaxel (Taxotere®) represents the most active chemotherapeutic agent it only gives a modest survival advantage with most patients eventually progressing because of inherent or acquired drug resistance. The aims of this study were to further investigate the mechanisms of resistance to Docetaxel. Three Docetaxel resistant sub-lines were generated and confirmed to be resistant to the apoptotic and anti-proliferative effects of increasing concentrations of Docetaxel. Results The resistant DU-145 R and 22RV1 R had expression of P-glycoprotein and its inhibition with Elacridar partially and totally reversed the resistant phenotype in the two cell lines respectively, which was not seen in the PC-3 resistant sublines. Resistance was also not mediated in the PC-3 cells by cellular senescence or autophagy but multiple changes in pro- and anti-apoptotic genes and proteins were demonstrated. Even though there were lower basal levels of NF-κB activity in the PC-3 D12 cells compared to the Parental PC-3, docetaxel induced higher NF-κB activity and IκB phosphorylation at 3 and 6 hours with only minor changes in the DU-145 cells. Inhibition of NF-κB with the BAY 11-7082 inhibitor reversed the resistance to Docetaxel. Conclusion This study confirms that multiple mechanisms contribute to Docetaxel resistance and the central transcription factor NF-κB plays an immensely important role in determining docetaxel-resistance which may represent an appropriate therapeutic target.

  16. Radiation resistance testing of high-density polyethylene

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dougherty, D.R.; Adams, J.W.

    1983-01-01

    Mechanical tests following gamma inrradiation and creep tests during irradiation have been conducted on high-density polyethylene (HDPE) to assess the adequacy of this material for use in high-integrity containers (HICs). These tests were motivated by experience in nuclear power plants in which polyethylene electrical insulation detoriorated more rapidly than expected due to radiation-induced oxidation. This suggested that HDPE HICs used for radwaste disposal might degrade more rapidly than would be expected in the absence of the radiation field. Two types of HDPE, a highly cross-linked rotationally molded material and a non-cross-linked blow molded material, were used in these tests. Gamma-ray irradiations were performed at several dose rates in environments of air, Barnwell and Hanford backfill soils, and ion-exchange resins. The results of tensile and bend testing on these materials following irradiation will be presented along with preliminary results on creep during irradiation

  17. Flame-retardant EPDM compounds containing phenanthrene to enhance radiation resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jian; Huang, Wei; Jiang, Shu-Bin; Li, Xiao-Yan; An, You; Li, Chuang; Gao, Xiao-Ling; Chen, Hong-Bing

    2017-01-01

    Ethylene propylene diene monomer (EPDM) compounds with good flame-retardant and γ-ray radiation resistant properties were prepared by adding complex flame retardants and phenathrene. The resultant EPDM formulations have a long time to ignition (TTI >46 s), a low peak heat release rate (PHRR 341 kW/m2) and a high limited oxygen index (LOI >30). Effects of γ-ray radiation on the resultant flame-retardant EPDM was investigated. The formulated EPDM is a crosslinking dominated polymer under γ-ray radiation. The γ-ray radiation resistant property of EPDM was enhanced by adding phenanthrene. Elongation at break of EPDM formulated with phenanthrene could retain 91% after being irradiated to 0.3 MGy and still retains 40% elongation even after being irradiated to 0.9 MGy, which is much better the control. It is expected that the formulated flame-retardant and radiation resistant EPDM materials could meet the requirements for use in radiation environments.

  18. Cone Penetrometer Load Cell Temperature and Radiation Testing Results

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Follett, Jordan R.

    2013-08-28

    This report summarizes testing activities performed at the Pacific Northwest National Laboratory to verify the cone penetrometer load cell can withstand the tank conditions present in 241-AN-101 and 241-AN-106. The tests demonstrated the load cell device will operate under the elevated temperature and radiation levels expected to be encountered during tank farm deployment of the device.

  19. Neoplastic transformation of human thyroid epithelial cells by ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Herceg, Zdenko

    Neoplastic transformation of human thyroid epithelial cells has been investigated following exposure to ionizing radiation in vitro. The effects of radiation type, irradiation regime, and postirradiation passaging were examined using a human thyroid epithelial cell line, designated HToriS, which was previously immortalized with SV40 genome. Exponentially growing HToriS cells were irradiated with graded doses of 137 Cs gamma- and 238pu alpha-irradiation. Cells were irradiated with either a single or multiple doses of 0.5, 1, 2, 3, or 4 Gy gamma-radiation, or single doses of 0.125, 0.25, 0.5, 1, or 1.5 Gy gamma-radiation. Following passaging, the cells were transplanted into the athymic nude mice, and the animals were screened for tumour formation. Statistically significant increases in tumour incidence were obtained with both gamma- and alpha-irradiation and with both single and multiple irradiation regimes as compared with the un-irradiated group. Regardless of radiation type and or radiation regime there appears to be a trend, with increasing doses of radiation, in which tumour incidence increases and reaches a maximum, after which the tumour incidence decreases. Tumours were characterized by histopathological examination as undifferentiated carcinomas. Investigation of expression time following irradiation demonstrated that post-irradiation passaging, generally regarded as a critical step for expression of radiation-induced DNA damage, was not a prerequisite for the neoplastic conversion of irradiated cells with this system. Cell lines were established from the tumours and their identification and characterization carried out. All cell lines established were determined to be derived from the parent HTori3 cells by DNA fingerprinting, karyotype analysis, cytokeratin staining, and SV40 large T-antigen staining. Tumorigenicity of the cell lines was confirmed by retransplantation. Comparison of the morphology in vitro showed that the tumour cell lines retained the

  20. Immobilization of Mortierella vinacea cells by radiation polymerization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kumakura, M.; Kaetsu, I.

    1983-01-01

    Immobilization of Mortierella vinacea cells, which contain active α-galactosidase, by radiation polymerization at low temperatures was studied. The durability of the enzymatic activity of the immobilized cells obtained with hydrophilic monomers was affected by the concentrations of the cells and monomer in which optimum conditions were observed. The enzymatic activity of the immobilized cells obtained with hydrophilic monomers was compared to that of hydrophobic monomers. Michaelis constants of the immobilized cells varied with monomer concentration. The effect of addition of porous solid substances on the immobilization of the cells was studied

  1. Radiation Interaction with Therapeutic Drugs and Cell Membranes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Martin, Diana I.; Manaila, Elena N.; Matei, Constantin I.; Iacob, Nicusor I.; Ighigeanu, Daniel I.; Craciun, Gabriela D.; Moisescu, Mihaela I.; Savopol, Tudor D.; Kovacs, Eugenia A.; Cinca, Sabin A.; Margaritescu, Irina D.

    2007-01-01

    This transient permeabilized state of the cell membrane, named the 'cell electroporation' (CE) can be used to increase cells uptake of drugs that do not readily pass cell membrane, thus enabling their cytotoxicity. The anticancer drugs, such as bleomycin (BL) and cisplatin, are the most candidates for the combined use with ionizing and non-ionizing radiation fields. The methods and installations for the cell electroporation by electron beam (EB) and microwave (MW) irradiation are presented. The viability tests of the human leukocytes under EB and MW exposure with/without the BL in the cell cultures are discussed

  2. Low-level radiation effects on immune cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Makinodan, T.

    1995-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to characterize the effects of chronic low-dose ionizing radiation (LDR) on murine immune cells. Previously, it had been reported that LDR enhances the proliferative activity of T cells in vitro and delays the growth of transplantable immunogenic tumors in vivo. This suggests that LDR eliminates immune suppressor cells, which downregulates immune response and/or adoptively upregulates the responsiveness of immune effector cells. It had also been reported that human lymphocytes become refractive to high dose radiation-induced chromosomal aberrations by pretreating mitotically active lymphocytes in vitro with very low doses of ionizing radiation, and the adaptive effect can be abrogated by cycloheximide. This suggests that protein synthesis is required for lymphocytes to respond adoptively to LDR

  3. Mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation: structural and biochemical aspects

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sabanero, M.; Flores V, L. L.; Azorin V, J. C.; Vallejo, M. A.; Cordova F, T.; Sosa A, M.; Castruita D, J. P.; Barbosa S, G.

    2015-10-01

    Acute or chronic exposure to ionizing radiation is a factor that may be hazardous to health. It has been reported that exposure to low doses of radiation (less than 50 mSv / year) and subsequently exposure to high doses have greater effects in people. However, it is unknown molecular and biochemical level alteration. This study, analyzes the susceptibility of a biological system (HeLa Atcc CCL-2 human cervix cancer cell line) to ionizing radiation (6 and 60 mSv/ 90). Our evaluate multiple variables such as: total protein profile, mitochondrial metabolic activity (XTT assay), cell viability (Trypan blue exclusion assay), cytoskeleton (actin micro filaments), nuclei (D API), genomic DNA. The results indicate, that cells exposed to ionizing radiation structurally show alterations in nuclear phenotype and aneuploidy, further disruption in the tight junctions and consequently on the distribution of actin micro filaments. Similar alterations were observed in cells treated with a genotoxic agent (200μM H 2 O 2 /1 h). In conclusion, this multi-criteria assessment enables precise comparisons of the effects of radiation between any biological systems. However, it is necessary to determine stress markers for integration of the effects of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  4. Combined effects of hyperthermia and radiation in cultured mammalian cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ben-Hur, E.; Elkind, M.M.; Riklis, E.

    1977-01-01

    Hyperthermia (temperatures of 39 0 C or higher) enhances the killing of mammalian cells by ionizing radiation (fission-spectrum neutrons and x-rays). The nature and the magnitude of the enhanced radiation killing varies with temperature and for a fixed temperature during irradiation, the enhanced lethality varies inversely with dose rate. For temperatures up to 41 0 C, dose fractionation measurements indicate that hyperthermia inhibits the repair of sublethal damage. At higher temperatures, the expression of potentially lethal damage is enhanced. Since the effect of heat is greatest in cells irradiated during DNA synthesis, the radiation age-response pattern is flattened by hyperthermia. In addition to the enhanced cell killing described above, three other features of the effect of hyperthermia are important in connection with the radiation treatment of cancer. The first is that heat selectively sensitizes S-phase cells to radiation. The second is that it takes radiation survivors 10 to 20 hrs after a modest heat treatment to recover their ability to repair sublethal damage. And the third is that hyperthermia reduces the magnitude of the oxygen enhancement ratio. Thus, heat if applied selectively, could significantly increase the margin of damage between tumors and normal tissues

  5. Mammalian cells exposed to ionizing radiation: structural and biochemical aspects

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sabanero, M.; Flores V, L. L. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Biologia, DCNE, Noria Alta s/n, 36250 Guanajuato, Gto. (Mexico); Azorin V, J. C.; Vallejo, M. A.; Cordova F, T.; Sosa A, M. [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Ingenieria Fisica, DCI, Loma del Bosque 103, Col. Lomas del Campestre, 37150 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico); Castruita D, J. P. [Universidad de Guadalajara, Departamento de Ecologia, CUCBA, Las Agujas, 45100 Zapopan, Jalisco (Mexico); Barbosa S, G., E-mail: myrna.sabanero@gmail.com [Universidad de Guanajuato, Departamento de Ciencias Medicas, DCS, 20 de Enero No. 929, Col. Obregon, 37000 Leon, Guanajuato (Mexico)

    2015-10-15

    Acute or chronic exposure to ionizing radiation is a factor that may be hazardous to health. It has been reported that exposure to low doses of radiation (less than 50 mSv / year) and subsequently exposure to high doses have greater effects in people. However, it is unknown molecular and biochemical level alteration. This study, analyzes the susceptibility of a biological system (HeLa Atcc CCL-2 human cervix cancer cell line) to ionizing radiation (6 and 60 mSv/ 90). Our evaluate multiple variables such as: total protein profile, mitochondrial metabolic activity (XTT assay), cell viability (Trypan blue exclusion assay), cytoskeleton (actin micro filaments), nuclei (D API), genomic DNA. The results indicate, that cells exposed to ionizing radiation structurally show alterations in nuclear phenotype and aneuploidy, further disruption in the tight junctions and consequently on the distribution of actin micro filaments. Similar alterations were observed in cells treated with a genotoxic agent (200μM H{sub 2}O{sub 2}/1 h). In conclusion, this multi-criteria assessment enables precise comparisons of the effects of radiation between any biological systems. However, it is necessary to determine stress markers for integration of the effects of ionizing radiation. (Author)

  6. Natural killer T cells in adipose tissue prevent insulin resistance

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schipper, H.S.; Rakhshandehroo, M.; Graaf, van de S.F.J.; Venken, K.; Koppen, A.; Stienstra, R.; Prop, S.; Meerding, J.; Hamers, N.; Besra, G.S.; Boon, den L.; Nieuwenhuis, E.E.S.; Elewaut, D.; Prakken, B.; Kersten, A.H.; Boes, M.; Kalkhoven, E.

    2012-01-01

    Lipid overload and adipocyte dysfunction are key to the development of insulin resistance and can be induced by a high-fat diet. CD1d-restricted invariant natural killer T (iNKT) cells have been proposed as mediators between lipid overload and insulin resistance, but recent studies found decreased

  7. Transcriptome-wide studies of prostate cancer cell lines in the context of medical radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hammer, Paul

    2012-01-01

    The use of radiotherapy in addition to chemotherapy and surgical removal is the most powerful instrument in the fight against malignant tumors in cancer medicine. After cardiovascular diseases, cancer is the second leading cause of death in the western world, in which prostate cancer is the most frequent male cancer. Despite continuous technological improvements in radiological instruments and prognosis, it may occur a recurrence up to many years after radiotherapy due to a high resistance capability of individual malignant cells of the locally occurring tumor. Although modern radiation biology has studied many aspects of the resistance mechanisms, questions are largely unanswered especially in regards to prognostic terms and time response of tumor cells to ionizing radiation. As cellular models four prostate cancer cell lines with different radiation sensitivities (PC3, DuCaP, DU-145, RWPE-1) were cultured and tested for their ability to survive after exposure to ionizing radiation by a trypane blue and MTT viability assay. The proliferative capacity of the four cell lines was determined using a colony formation assay. The PC3 cell line (radiation-resistant) and the DuCaP cell line (radiation-sensitive) showed the maximal differences in terms of radiation sensitivity. Based on these results the two cell lines were selected to allow identification of potential prognostic marker for predicting the effectiveness of radiation therapy via their transcriptome-wide gene expression. Furthermore, a time series experiment with the radiation-resistant PC3 cell line was performed. At 8 different time points, during the period from 00:00 - 42:53 (hh:mm) after exposure with 1 Gy, the mRNA was quantified by next generation sequencing to investigate the dynamic behavior of time-delayed gene expression and to discover resistance mechanisms. Of 10,966 expressed genes 730 were significant differentially expressed, determined by setting a fold change threshold in conjunction with a P

  8. BMI-1 Promotes Self-Renewal of Radio- and Temozolomide (TMZ)-Resistant Breast Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Yanfang; Wang, Ying; Zhao, Pengxin; Ma, Weiyuan; Hu, Zhigang; Zhang, Kaili

    2017-12-01

    Breast cancer is a hormone-dependent malignancy and is the most prevalent cause of cancer-related mortality among females. Radiation therapy and chemotherapy are common treatments of breast cancer. However, tumor relapse and metastasis following therapy are major clinical challenges. The importance of B-lymphoma Moloney murine leukemia virus insertion region-1 (BMI-1) was implicated in cell proliferation, stem cell maintenance, and tumor initiation. We established radio- and temozolomide (TMZ)-resistant (IRC-R) MCF-7 and MDA-MB-231 cell lines to investigate the mechanism involved in therapeutic resistance. Cell proliferation and sphere number were dramatically elevated, and BMI-1 was remarkably upregulated, in IRC-R cells compared to parental cells. Silencing BMI-1 by RNA interference only affected the cell proliferation of IRC-R but not parental cells, suggesting the critical role of BMI-1 in radio- and TMZ resistance. We used a xenograft mice model to elucidate that BMI-1 was necessary in tumor development by assessing tumor volume and Ki67 expression. We found that Hedgehog (Hhg) signaling exerted synergized functions together with BMI-1, implicating the importance of BMI-1 in Hhg signaling. Downregulation of BMI-1 could be an effective strategy to suppress tumor growth, which supports the potential clinical use of targeting BMI-1 in breast cancer treatment.

  9. Radiation-induced apoptosis in human tumor cell lines: adaptive response and split-dose effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Filippovich, I V; Sorokina, N I; Robillard, N; Lisbona, A; Chatal, J F

    1998-07-03

    Irradiation of human ovarian carcinoma cells (OVCAR 3) and myeloma cells (RPMI 8226) with graded doses of 137Cs-gamma-rays led to a 35-40% increase in time-dependent apoptosis 72 hr after 6-8 Gy irradiation. Large individual variations in sensitivity to radiation-induced apoptosis were noted in human lymphocytes obtained from 5 donors. Pretreatment of OVCAR 3 and RPMI 8226 cells with 0.01 Gy increased their resistance to apoptosis after subsequent 6 Gy irradiation several hours or 48 and 72 hr later. A dose of 4 or 8 Gy given in 2 equal fractions at an interval of a few hours produced a low level of apoptosis compared to that resulting from a single administration of the same total dose. Adaptive response was demonstrated in 2 out of 3 samples of human lymphocytes isolated from different donors, and no split-dose effect for apoptosis was noted in 2 other donors. In split-dose experiments, there was no correlation between the sensitivity of cells to apoptosis and their position in the cell cycle, after the first half-dose. No G1 block was observed in irradiated cell lines. Adaptive response and split-dose effect were prevented by 3-aminobenzamide and okadaic acid which inhibit poly(ADP-ribose)polymerase and protein phosphatase, respectively. These results imply a common mechanism for acquired resistance to radiation-induced apoptosis in adaptive response and the split-dose effect.

  10. CD133 expression in chemo-resistant Ewing sarcoma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kovar Heinrich

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Some human cancers demonstrate cellular hierarchies in which tumor-initiating cancer stem cells generate progeny cells with reduced tumorigenic potential. This cancer stem cell population is proposed to be a source of therapy-resistant and recurrent disease. Ewing sarcoma family tumors (ESFT are highly aggressive cancers in which drug-resistant, relapsed disease remains a significant clinical problem. Recently, the cell surface protein CD133 was identified as a putative marker of tumor-initiating cells in ESFT. We evaluated ESFT tumors and cell lines to determine if high levels of CD133 are associated with drug resistance. Methods Expression of the CD133-encoding PROM1 gene was determined by RT-PCR in ESFT tumors and cell lines. CD133 protein expression was assessed by western blot, FACS and/or immunostaining. Cell lines were FACS-sorted into CD133+ and CD133- fractions and proliferation, colony formation in soft agar, and in vivo tumorigenicity compared. Chemosensitivity was measured using MTS (3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-5-(3-carboxy-methoxyphenyl-2-(4-sulfophenyl-2H-tetrazolium assays. Results PROM1 expression was either absent or extremely low in most tumors. However, PROM1 was highly over-expressed in 4 of 48 cases. Two of the 4 patients with PROM1 over-expressing tumors rapidly succumbed to primary drug-resistant disease and two are long-term, event-free survivors. The expression of PROM1 in ESFT cell lines was similarly heterogeneous. The frequency of CD133+ cells ranged from 2-99% and, with one exception, no differences in the chemoresistance or tumorigenicity of CD133+ and CD133- cell fractions were detected. Importantly, however, the STA-ET-8.2 cell line was found to retain a cellular hierarchy in which relatively chemo-resistant, tumorigenic CD133+ cells gave rise to relatively chemo-sensitive, less tumorigenic, CD133- progeny. Conclusions Up to 10% of ESFT express high levels of PROM1. In some tumors and cell

  11. New Modeling Approaches to Investigate Cell Signaling in Radiation Response

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plante, Ianik; Cucinotta, Francis A.; Ponomarev, Artem L.

    2011-01-01

    Ionizing radiation damages individual cells and tissues leading to harmful biological effects. Among many radiation-induced lesions, DNA double-strand breaks (DSB) are considered the key precursors of most early and late effects [1] leading to direct mutation or aberrant signal transduction processes. In response to damage, a flow of information is communicated to cells not directly hit by the radiation through signal transduction pathways [2]. Non-targeted effects (NTE), which includes bystander effects and genomic instability in the progeny of irradiated cells and tissues, may be particularly important for space radiation risk assessment [1], because astronauts are exposed to a low fluence of heavy ions and only a small fraction of cells are traversed by an ion. NTE may also have important consequences clinical radiotherapy [3]. In the recent years, new simulation tools and modeling approaches have become available to study the tissue response to radiation. The simulation of signal transduction pathways require many elements such as detailed track structure calculations, a tissue or cell culture model, knowledge of biochemical pathways and Brownian Dynamics (BD) propagators of the signaling molecules in their micro-environment. Recently, the Monte-Carlo simulation code of radiation track structure RITRACKS was used for micro and nano-dosimetry calculations [4]. RITRACKS will be used to calculate the fraction of cells traversed by an ion and delta-rays and the energy deposited in cells in a tissue model. RITRACKS also simulates the formation of chemical species by the radiolysis of water [5], notably the .OH radical. This molecule is implicated in DNA damage and in the activation of the transforming growth factor beta (TGF), a signaling molecule involved in NTE. BD algorithms for a particle near a membrane comprising receptors were also developed and will be used to simulate trajectories of signaling molecules in the micro-environment and characterize autocrine

  12. Radiation response of cultured human cells is unaffected by Johrei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, Zach; Luu, Tri; Moore, Dan; Yount, Garret

    2007-06-01

    Johrei has been credited with healing thousands from radiation wounds after the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs in 1945. This alternative medical therapy is becoming increasingly popular in the United States, as are other Energy Medicine modalities that purport to influence a universal healing energy. Human brain cells were cultured and exposed to increasing doses of ionizing radiation. Experienced Johrei practitioners directed healing intentionality toward the cells for 30 min from a distance of 20 cm and the fate of the cells was observed by computerized time-lapse microscopy. Cell death and cell divisions were tallied every 30 min before, during and after Johrei treatment for a total of 22.5 h. An equal number of control experiments were conducted in which cells were irradiated but did not receive Johrei treatment. Samples were assigned to treatment conditions randomly and data analysis was conducted in a blinded fashion. Radiation exposure decreased the rate of cell division (cell cycle arrest) in a dose-dependent manner. Division rates were estimated for each 30 min and averaged over 8 independent experiments (4 control and 4 with Johrei treatment) for each of 4 doses of X-rays (0, 2, 4 and 8 Gy). Because few cell deaths were observed, pooled data from the entire observation period were used to estimate death rates. Analysis of variance did not reveal any significant differences on division rate or death rate between treatment groups. Only radiation dose was statistically significant. We found no indication that the radiation response of cultured cells is affected by Johrei treatment.

  13. Radiation Response of Cultured Human Cells Is Unaffected by Johrei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zach Hall

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Johrei has been credited with healing thousands from radiation wounds after the Hiroshima and Nagasaki bombs in 1945. This alternative medical therapy is becoming increasingly popular in the United States, as are other Energy Medicine modalities that purport to influence a universal healing energy. Human brain cells were cultured and exposed to increasing doses of ionizing radiation. Experienced Johrei practitioners directed healing intentionality toward the cells for 30 min from a distance of 20 cm and the fate of the cells was observed by computerized time-lapse microscopy. Cell death and cell divisions were tallied every 30 min before, during and after Johrei treatment for a total of 22.5 h. An equal number of control experiments were conducted in which cells were irradiated but did not receive Johrei treatment. Samples were assigned to treatment conditions randomly and data analysis was conducted in a blinded fashion. Radiation exposure decreased the rate of cell division (cell cycle arrest in a dose-dependent manner. Division rates were estimated for each 30 min and averaged over 8 independent experiments (4 control and 4 with Johrei treatment for each of 4 doses of X-rays (0, 2, 4 and 8 Gy. Because few cell deaths were observed, pooled data from the entire observation period were used to estimate death rates. Analysis of variance did not reveal any significant differences on division rate or death rate between treatment groups. Only radiation dose was statistically significant. We found no indication that the radiation response of cultured cells is affected by Johrei treatment.

  14. Enhanced radiation response in radioresistant MCF-7 cells by targeting peroxiredoxin II

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diaz AJG

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Anthony Joseph Gomez Diaz,1 Daniel Tamae,2 Yun Yen,3 JianJian Li,4 Tieli Wang1 1Department of Chemistry and Biochemistry, California State University at Dominguez Hills, Carson, CA, 2Center of Excellence in Environmental Toxicology, Department of Pharmacology, University of Pennsylvania, Philadelphia, PA, 3Department of Clinical and Molecular Pharmacology, Beckman Research Institute of City of Hope National Medical Center, Duarte, CA, 4Department of Radiation Oncology, University of California Davis, Sacramento, CA, USA Abstract: In our previous study, we identified that a protein target, peroxiredoxin II (PrxII, is overexpressed in radioresistant MCF+FIR3 breast-cancer cells and found that its expression and function is associated with breast-cancer radiation sensitivity or resistance. Small interference RNA (siRNA targeting PrxII gene expression was able to sensitize MCF+FIR3 radioresistant breast-cancer cells to ionizing radiation. The major focus of this work was to investigate how the radiation response of MCF+FIR3 radioresistant cells was affected by the siRNA that inhibits PrxII gene expression. Our results, presented here, show that silencing PrxII gene expression increased cellular toxicity by altering cellular thiol status, inhibiting Ca2+ efflux from the cells, and perturbing the intracellular Ca2+ homeostasis. By combining radiotherapy and siRNA technology, we hope to develop new therapeutic strategies that may have potential to enhance the efficacy of chemotherapeutic agents due to this technology's property of targeting to specific cancer-related genes. Keywords: siRNA, PrxII, radiation resistance, Ca2+, MCF+FIR3

  15. Cellular heredity in haploid cultures of somatic cells. Comprehensive report, April 1975--June 1977. [UV radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Freed, J.J.

    1977-07-01

    This report reviews genetic studies carried out since 1975 on a haploid cultured cell line from frog embryos (ICR 2A). Although a single chromosome set would be expected to facilitate recovery of recessive mutants, experiments suggested that cell culture variants might arise through processes more complex than the selection of simple mutational changes. Therefore, the objectives of the work reported here have been to throw light on just how cell culture variants arise in this system. First, we have continued to characterize the ICR 2A line, with emphasis on stability of karyotype and DNA content. Second, we have studied in detail the origin of two classes of drug-resistant variants. Bromodeoxyuridine resistance of the thymidine deficiency type has been shown to arise through sequential loss of two forms of thymidine-phosphorylating enzyme; loss of the second form of enzyme is complex, suggesting that changes more complex than simple recessive mutations may be involved. Another form of resistance, in which tolerance of high levels of bromodeoxyuridine is found in cells that continue to express thymidine kinase, remains under study. Variants resistant to microtubule inhibitors were isolated. It was found that these haploid strains have properties distinguishing them from analogous resistant strains isolated from diploid mammalian cell cultures in other laboratories. In order to understand better how mutagens are involved in the origin of cell culture variants, we have examined the effect of different forms of DNA repair on the frequency of drug-resistant colonies induced by ultraviolet radiation. Preliminary experiments suggest that the frequency of such colonies is greater when repair takes place through (presumably error-prone) dark repair than when (error-free) photoreversal is allowed to occur. Such experiments can determine whether new phenotypes arise from alterations in DNA, and thus whether, in a broad sense, they are likely to be mutational in nature.

  16. Development of materials for fuel cell application by radiation technology

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rhee, Chang Kyu; Lee, Min Ku; Park, Junju; Lee, Gyoungja; Lee, Byung Cheol; Shin, Junhwa; Nho, Youngchang; Kang, Philhyun; Sohn, Joon Yong; Rang, Uhm Young

    2012-06-01

    The development of the single cell of SOFC with low operation temperature at and below 650 .deg. C(above 400 mW/cm 2 ) Ο The development of fabrication method for the single cell of solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) by dip-coating of nanoparticles such as NiO, YSZ, Ag, and Ag/C, etc. Ο The optimization of the preparation and performance of SOFC by using nanoparticles. Ο The preparation of samples for SOFC with large dimension. The development of fluoropolymer-based fuel cell membranes with crosslinked structure by radiation grafting technique Ο The development of fuel cell membranes with low methanol permeability via the introduction of novel monomers (e. g. vinylbenzyl chloride and vinylether chloride) by radiation grafting technique Ο The development of hydrocarbon fuel cell membrane by radiation crosslinking technique Ο The structure analysis and the evaluations of the property, performance, and radiation effect of the prepared membranes Ο The optimization of the preparation and performance of DMFC fuel cell membrane via the structure-property analysis (power: above 130 mW/cm 2 /50 cm 2 at 5M methanol) Ο The preparation of samples for MEA stack assembly

  17. Coniferyl Aldehyde Ameliorates Radiation Intestine Injury via Endothelial Cell Survival

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jeong, Ye Ji; Jung, Myung Gu; Lee, Yoonjin; Lee, Haejune [Korea Institute of Radiological and Medical Sciences, Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Lee, Yunsil [Ewha Woman' s Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of); Ko, Younggyu [Korea Univ., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2014-05-15

    Cancer treatments related gastrointestinal toxicity has also been recognized as a significant economic burden. Especially, extensive apoptosis of microvascular endothelial cell of the lamina propria is the primary lesion initiating intestinal radiation damage after abdominal radiation therapy. Coniferyl aldehyde (CA) is phenolic compounds isolated from cork stoppers, and one of the major pyrolysis products of lignin. Shi H. was support for the empirical use of CA as a medicinal food for cardiovascular diseases. CA has positive effect in broad way but there is no consequence in radiation induced intestine damage. Here, we investigate effect of CA on small intestine after abdominal IR to mice in this study. In this study, CA increased the survival rate in C3H mice against 13.5 Gy abdominal IR. We found CA protects small intestine via preventing endothelial cell apoptosis and enhancing their angiogenic activity. CA also showed protective effect on crypt cell survival. Endothelial cell survival may affect crypt cell protection against IR. From this data, we concluded that CA is effective for protection against abdominal radiation injury. CA could ameliorate side-effect of radiation therapy.

  18. Effects of radiation on metastasis and tumor cell migration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vilalta, Marta; Rafat, Marjan; Graves, Edward E

    2016-08-01

    It is well known that tumor cells migrate from the primary lesion to distant sites to form metastases and that these lesions limit patient outcome in a majority of cases. However, the extent to which radiation influences this process and to which migration in turn alters radiation response remains controversial. There are preclinical and clinical reports showing that focal radiotherapy can both increase the development of distant metastasis, as well as that it can induce the regression of established metastases through the abscopal effect. More recently, preclinical studies have suggested that radiation can attract migrating tumor cells and may, thereby, facilitate tumor recurrence. In this review, we summarize these phenomena and their potential mechanisms of action, and evaluate their significance for modern radiation therapy strategies.

  19. Radiation-induced spindle cell sarcoma: A rare case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khan Mubeen

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation has been known to induce malignant transformation in human beings. Radiation-induced sarcomas are a late sequel of radiation therapy. Most sarcomas have been reported to occur after exposure to a radiation dose of 55 Gray (Gy and above, with a dose ranging from 16 to 112 Gys. Spindle cell sarcomas, arising after radiotherapy given to treat the carcinoma of head and neck region is a very uncommon sequel. This is a rare case report of spindle cell sarcoma of left maxilla, in a 24-year-old male, occurring as a late complication of radiotherapy with Cobalt-60 given for the treatment of retinoblastoma of the left eye 21 years back.

  20. Carbon glass-ceramics and their radiation resistance

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Virgil'ev, Yu. S.

    1995-01-01

    Structural carbon materials (SCMs) hold great promise for use in numerous plasma-facing components of fusion reactors. One possible candidate for this use is carbon glass-ceramic. Therefore, it is not surprising that there is considerable interest in studying its properties and their variations upon exposure to different radiations, such as neutrons, high-energy electrons, and light ions (H + , D + , and He + ). Here, the authors summarize data accumulated to date on the structure and properties of commercial carbon glass-ceramics and their behavior under irradiation with neutrons, electrons, and some ions

  1. High LET radiation enhances apoptosis in mutated p53 cancer cells through Caspase-9 activation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yamakawa, Nobuhiro; Takahashi, Akihisa; Mori, Eiichiro; Imai, Yuichiro; Ohnishi, Ken; Kirita, Tadaaki; Ohnishi, Takeo; Furusawa, Yoshiya

    2008-01-01

    Although mutations in the p53 gene can lead to resistance to radiotherapy, chemotherapy and thermotherapy, high linear energy transfer (LET) radiation induces apoptosis regardless of p53 gene status in cancer cells. The aim of this study was to clarify the mechanisms involved in high LET radiation-induced apoptosis. Human gingival cancer cells (Ca9-22 cells) containing a mutated p53 (mp53) gene were irradiated with X-rays, C-ion (13-100 KeV/μm), or Fe-ion beams (200 KeV/μm). Cellular sensitivities were determined using colony forming assays. Apoptosis was detected and quantified with Hoechst 33342 staining. The activity of Caspase-3 was analyzed with Western blotting and flow cytometry. Cells irradiated with high LET radiation showed a high sensitivity with a high frequency of apoptosis induction. The relative biological effectiveness (RBE) values for the surviving fraction and apoptosis induction increased in a LET-dependent manner. Both RBE curves reached a peak at 100 KeV/μm, and then decreased at values over 100 KeV/μm. When cells were irradiated with high LET radiation, Caspase-3 was cleaved and activated, leading to poly (ADP-ribose) polymerase (PARP) cleavage. In addition, Caspase-9 inhibitor suppressed Caspase-3 activation and apoptosis induction resulting from high LET radiation to a greater extent than Caspase-8 inhibitor. These results suggest that high LET radiation enhances apoptosis by activation of Caspase-3 through Caspase-9, even in the presence of mp53. (author)

  2. Changes in T-cell subsets after radiation therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, S.J.; Rafla, S.; Youssef, E.; Selim, H.; Salloum, N.; Chuang, J.Y.

    1988-01-01

    The T-cell subsets of 129 patients with cancer were counted before and after radiation therapy. The cells were labeled with monoclonal antibodies that were specific for each type of T cell. Significant changes after therapy were decreases in the proportion of T-helper/inducer cells, pan-T cells, and in the ratio of T-helper/inducer to T-suppressor/cytotoxic cells. There was an increase in the percentage of T-suppressor/cytotoxic cells. When the site of the primary cancer was considered, genitourinary cancer and cancer of the head and neck both showed a decreased percentage of T-helper/inducer cells and a reduced ratio of T-helper/inducer to T-suppressor/cytotoxic cells. The percentage of pan-T cells in head and neck cancer and the ratio of T-helper/inducer to T-suppressor/cytotoxic cells in breast cancer were decreased. The percentage of T-helper cells was particularly decreased by radiation therapy in advanced stages of cancer, in higher grade tumors, and in larger tumors. The absolute numbers of various T-cell subsets were decreased in all groups

  3. Pluripotent cells display enhanced resistance to mutagenesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel J. Cooper

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent cells have been reported to exhibit lower frequencies of point mutations and higher levels of DNA repair than differentiated cells. This predicts that pluripotent cells are less susceptible to mutagenic exposures than differentiated cells. To test this prediction, we used a lacI mutation-reporter transgene system to assess the frequency of point mutations in multiple lines of mouse pluripotent embryonic stem cells and induced pluripotent cells, as well as in multiple lines of differentiated fibroblast cells, before and after exposure to a moderate dose of the mutagen, methyl methanesulfonate. We also measured levels of key enzymes in the base excision repair (BER pathway in each cell line before and after exposure to the mutagen. Our results confirm that pluripotent cells normally maintain lower frequencies of point mutations than differentiated cells, and show that differentiated cells exhibit a large increase in mutation frequency following a moderate mutagenic exposure, whereas pluripotent cells subjected to the same exposure show no increase in mutations. This result likely reflects the higher levels of BER proteins detectable in pluripotent cells prior to exposure and supports our thesis that maintenance of enhanced genetic integrity is a fundamental characteristic of pluripotent cells.

  4. Determinates of tumor response to radiation: Tumor cells, tumor stroma and permanent local control

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li, Wende; Huang, Peigen; Chen, David J.; Gerweck, Leo E.

    2014-01-01

    Background and purpose: The causes of tumor response variation to radiation remain obscure, thus hampering the development of predictive assays and strategies to decrease resistance. The present study evaluates the impact of host tumor stromal elements and the in vivo environment on tumor cell kill, and relationship between tumor cell radiosensitivity and the tumor control dose. Material and methods: Five endpoints were evaluated and compared in a radiosensitive DNA double-strand break repair-defective (DNA-PKcs −/− ) tumor line, and its DNA-PKcs repair competent transfected counterpart. In vitro colony formation assays were performed on in vitro cultured cells, on cells obtained directly from tumors, and on cells irradiated in situ. Permanent local control was assessed by the TCD 50 assay. Vascular effects were evaluated by functional vascular density assays. Results: The fraction of repair competent and repair deficient tumor cells surviving radiation did not substantially differ whether irradiated in vitro, i.e., in the absence of host stromal elements and factors, from the fraction of cells killed following in vivo irradiation. Additionally, the altered tumor cell sensitivity resulted in a proportional change in the dose required to achieve permanent local control. The estimated number of tumor cells per tumor, their cloning efficiency and radiosensitivity, all assessed by in vitro assays, were used to predict successfully, the measured tumor control doses. Conclusion: The number of clonogens per tumor and their radiosensitivity govern the permanent local control dose

  5. Case of basal cell epithelioma occurring on chronic radiation dermatitis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kase, Kayoko; Matsuoka, Yoshitaka; Urushibata, Osamu; Nishiwaki, Soichi (Toho Univ. Ohashi Hosp., Tokyo (Japan))

    1989-05-01

    A 52-year-old woman had been treated with radiation therapy for lymphoid tuberculosis on the right side of the neck 40 years before. Chronic radiation dermatitis occurred on that site. Blackish small mass has appeared 2 years before on the central part of the dermatitis. Histological examination revealed thinning of the epidermis, swelling of the dermal collagen fibers, and follicular clusters composed of basaloid cells from the epidermis to the upper layer of the dermis. (Namekawa, K).

  6. High linear-energy-transfer radiation can overcome radioresistance of glioma stem-like cells to low linear-energy-transfer radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirota, Yuki; Masunaga, Shin-Ichiro; Kondo, Natsuko; Kawabata, Shinji; Hirakawa, Hirokazu; Yajima, Hirohiko; Fujimori, Akira; Ono, Koji; Kuroiwa, Toshihiko; Miyatake, Shin-Ichi

    2014-01-01

    Ionizing radiation is applied as the standard treatment for glioblastoma multiforme (GBM). However, radiotherapy remains merely palliative, not curative, because of the existence of glioma stem cells (GSCs), which are regarded as highly radioresistant to low linear-energy-transfer (LET) photons. Here we analyzed whether or not high-LET particles can overcome the radioresistance of GSCs. Glioma stem-like cells (GSLCs) were induced from the GBM cell line A172 in stem cell culture medium. The phenotypes of GSLCs and wild-type cells were confirmed using stem cell markers. These cells were irradiated with (60)Co gamma rays or reactor neutron beams. Under neutron-beam irradiation, high-LET proton particles can be produced through elastic scattering or nitrogen capture reaction. Radiosensitivity was assessed by a colony-forming assay, and the DNA double-strand breaks (DSBs) were assessed by a histone gamma-H2AX focus detection assay. In stem cell culture medium, GSLCs could form neurosphere-like cells and express neural stem cell markers (Sox2 and Musashi) abundantly in comparison with their parental cells. GSLCs were significantly more radioresistant to gamma rays than their parental cells, but neutron beams overcame this resistance. There were significantly fewer gamma-H2AX foci in the A172 GSLCs 24 h after irradiation with gamma rays than in their parental cultured cells, while there was no apparent difference following neutron-beam irradiation. High-LET radiation can overcome the radioresistance of GSLCs by producing unrepairable DNA DSBs. High-LET radiation therapy might have the potential to overcome GBM's resistance to X-rays in a clinical setting.

  7. Low dose ionizing radiation treated lymphoblastoid cells

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — Irradiated cell lines exposed to 1-10 Gy 2 Lymphoblastoid cell lines (GM15510 and GM15036) irradiated 1 2.5 5 7.5 10 Gy RNA is isolated and labeled using a T7...

  8. Radiation biology of human mammary epithelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, H.S.; Yang, T.C.; Stampfer, M.R.; Hackett, A.J.

    1982-01-01

    Techniques have been developed for growing mass cultures of normal mammary epithelial cells (from reduction mammoplasties) and, most recently, for growing mammary epithelial cells in a highly efficient clonal assay. The availability of this clonal assay has enabled us to examine the dose-response curves for x rays

  9. Aurora kinase B is important for antiestrogen resistant cell growth and a potential biomarker for tamoxifen resistant breast cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Sarah L; Yde, Christina W.; Laenkholm, Anne-Vibeke

    2015-01-01

    resistant T47D breast cancer cell lines. Compared with parental cells, phosphorylation of Aurora kinase B was higher in the fulvestrant resistant T47D cells. Barasertib induced degradation of Aurora kinase B, caused mitotic errors, and induced apoptotic cell death as measured by accumulation of SubG1 cells...... and PARP cleavage in the fulvestrant resistant cells. Barasertib also exerted preferential growth inhibition of tamoxifen resistant T47D cell lines. Finally, high percentage of Aurora kinase B positive tumor cells was significantly associated with reduced disease-free and overall survival in 261 ER...

  10. Genetic analysis of resistance to radiation lymphomagenesis with recombinant inbred strains of mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okumoto, M.; Nishikawa, R.; Imai, S.; Hilgers, J.

    1990-01-01

    Induction of lymphomas by radiation in mice is controlled by genetic factors. We analyzed the genetic control of radiation lymphomagenesis using the CXS series of recombinant inbred strains derived from two progenitor strains: one highly susceptible to radiation induction of lymphoma [BALB/cHeA (C)] and one extremely resistant [STS/A (S)]. The best concordances between strain distribution patterns of genetic markers and resistance (or susceptibility) to radiation lymphomagenesis were observed in a region with the b and Ifa genes on chromosome 4. This indicates that one major locus controls the incidence of radiogenic lymphomas in mice. We designated this locus as the Lyr (lymphoma resistance) locus. Backcrosses of (CXS)F1 to the two progenitor strains showed an intermediate incidence of lymphomas between their parental mice and did not significantly differ from (CXS)F1 mice. This and previous observations that (CXS)F1 mice also showed an intermediate incidence, differing from both progenitor strains, indicate that more genes are involved in the resistance (or susceptibility) to lymphoma induced by irradiation

  11. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on water-logging resistance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the water-logging resistance of Tibetan peach (Amygdalus mira Koehne) remains unclear. In this study, Tibetan peach seedlings were subjected to 9-days of UV-B (280 - 320 nm) supplementation, water-logging or the combination of both, and the growth indicated by leaf number, net ...

  12. Radiation resistance of polymer materials. Degradation evaluation by accelerated testing for application condition

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Seguchi, Tadao; Tamura, Kiyotoshi; Sorimachi, Masami

    2010-02-01

    This paper presents re-evaluated radiation resistance property data of polymer materials, which had been tested in past times in TAKASAKI Quantum Beam Science Directorate, for the future study of ageing evaluation of low voltage electric cable insulation materials used in light-water nuclear reactors. The radiation resistance of 25 types of plastics and rubbers materials applied in practical environments was evaluated by the accelerated testing of gamma-ray irradiation under oxygen pressure, and was compared with the radiation resistance determined from the traditional testing by irradiation with a high dose rate in air. The polymer materials were formulated to be similar or equivalent to practical materials, and the most of formulation (chemical compounds and quantities) were described. For all materials, the tensile properties (elongation at break, ultimate strength, 100% or 200% modulus), electric resistivity, gel-fraction, and density were measured after irradiation in oxidation conditions and irradiation in air with a high dose rate (non-oxidation conditions). The data of relations between each properties and total dose at various conditions were compiled, and the relations among the changes of mechanical properties, electrical properties, and radiation induced chemical reactions were discussed. (author)

  13. Identifying the Proteins that Mediate the Ionizing Radiation Resistance of Deinococcus Radiodurans R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Battista, John R

    2010-02-22

    The primary objectives of this proposal was to define the subset of proteins required for the ionizing radiation (IR) resistance of Deinococcus radiodurans R1, characterize the activities of those proteins, and apply what was learned to problems of interest to the Department of Energy.

  14. The effect of ultraviolet radiation on water-logging resistance in ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    PRECIOUS

    2009-12-01

    Dec 1, 2009 ... The effect of ultraviolet (UV) radiation on the water-logging resistance of Tibetan peach (Amygdalus mira Koehne) remains unclear. In this study, Tibetan peach seedlings were subjected to 9-days of UV-B. (280 - 320 nm) supplementation, water-logging or the combination of both, and the growth indicated ...

  15. Development of EPDM based thermoplastic elastomers for oil resistant applications: optimization of radiation grafting parameters

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chaudhari, C.V.; Dubey, K.A.; Bhardwaj, Y.K.; Sabharwal, S.

    2008-01-01

    Full text: Ethylene-propylene diene terpolymer (EPDM) is currently among the most industrially useful elastomers because of its certain unique properties like excellent heat resistance, resistance towards ozone deterioration, high impact strength. However EPDM has a serious drawback of weak adhesion properties and tendency to swell in contact with paraffin oil and aromatic hydrocarbons. Blending EPDM with suitable polar elastomers or grafting polar polymer chains onto EPDM is an easy method to overcome this drawback. Radiation grafting of Acrylonitrile (ACN) on EPDM provides an easy and effective method of incorporating ACN uniformly on the EPDM backbone. Grafting of ACN on EPDM is expected to result grafted copolymer with better oil resistance, hardness and better compatibility with polar polymer matrices. In the present study radiation induced grafting of ACN onto EPDM rubber film was investigated by mutual radiation grafting technique. Effect of experimental variables viz. radiation dose, dose rate, types of solvents and monomer content on extent of grafting was studied. The solvent composition of Acetone:CCl 4 (20:80) was found to be the optimum mixture which resulted in highest degree of grafting. It was found that the degree of grafting increases with radiation dose, monomer content and decreases with dose rate

  16. Breast Cancer Stem Cells in Antiestrogen Resistance

    Science.gov (United States)

    2014-10-01

    Schafer JIM ,O’Regan RM, Jordan VC. Antitumor action of physiological estradiol on tamox- ifen stimulated breast tumors grown in athymic mice. Clin. Cancer...JS, Crowe DL (2009) Tumor initiating cancer stem cells from human breast cancer cell lines. Int J Oncol 34:1449–1453. 10. Woodward WA, Chen MS... Crowe DL (2009) Tumor initiating cancer stem cells from human breast cancer cell lines. Int J Oncol 34: 1449–1453. 49. Woodward WA, Chen MS, Behbod F

  17. In vitro cell culture lethal dose submitted to gamma radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Moreno, Carolina S.; Rogero, Sizue O.; Rogero, Jose Roberto; Ikeda, Tamiko I.; Cruz, Aurea S.

    2009-01-01

    The present study was designed to evaluate the in vitro effect of gamma radiation in cell culture of mouse connective tissue exposed to different doses of gamma radiation and under several conditions. The cell viability was analyzed by neutral red uptake methodology. This assay was developed for establish a methodology to be used in the future in the study of resveratrol radioprotection. Resveratrol (3,4',5- trihydroxystilbene), a phenolic phytoalexin that occurs naturally in some spermatophytes, such as grapevines, in response to injury as fungal infections and exposure to ultraviolet light. In the wines this compound is found at high levels and is considered one of the highest antioxidant constituents. The intense antioxidant potential of resveratrol provides many pharmacological activities including cardioprotection, chemoprevention and anti-tumor effects. Our results demonstrated that 60 Co gamma radiation lethal dose (LD50) on NCTC clone 929 cells was about 340Gy. (author)

  18. DNA damage response in a radiation resistant bacterium Deinococcus radiodurans: a paradigm shift

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Misra, H.S.

    2015-01-01

    Deinococcusradiodurans is best known for its extraordinary resistance to gamma radiation with its D 10 12kGy, and several other DNA damaging agents including desiccation to less than 5% humidity and chemical xenotoxicants. An efficient DNA double strand break (DSB) repair and its ability to protect biomolecules from oxidative damage are a few mechanisms attributed to these phenotypes in this bacterium. Although it regulates its proteome and transcriptome in response to DNA damage for its growth and survival, it lacks LexA mediated classical SOS response mechanism. Since LexA mediated damages response mechanism is highly and perhaps only, characterized DNA damage response processes in prokaryotes, this bacterium keeps us guessing how it responds to extreme doses of DNA damage. Interestingly, this bacterium encodes a large number of eukaryotic type serine threonine/tyrosine protein kinases (eST/YPK), phosphatases and response regulators and roles of eST/YPKs in cellular response to DNA damage and cell cycle regulations are well established in eukaryotes. Here, we characterized an antioxidant and DNA damage inducible eST/YPK (RqkA) and established its role in extraordinary radioresistance and DSB repair in this bacterium. We identified native phosphoprotein substrates for this kinase and demonstrated the involvement of some of these proteins phosphorylation in the regulation of DSB repair and growth under radiation stress. Findings suggesting the possible existence of eST/YPK mediated DNA damage response mechanism as an alternate to classical SOS response in this prokaryote would be discussed. (author)

  19. Estramustine: A novel radiation enhancer in human carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ryu, S.; Gabel, M.; Khil, M.S.

    1994-01-01

    Estramustine (EM), an antimicrotubule agent, binds microtubule-associated proteins, causes spindle disassembly, and arrests cells at the late G 2 /M phase of the cell cycle. Since cells in the G 2 /M phase are the most radiosensitive and some human cancer cells contain high level of EM-binding protein, experiments were carried out to determine whether radiation sensitization could be obtained in human carcinoma cells. Cells containing a high level of EM-binding protein such as prostate carcinoma (DU-145), breast carcinoma (MCF-7), and malignant glioma (U-251) were used to demonstrate radiosensitization. Cervical carcinoma (HeLa-S 3 ) and colon carcinoma (HT-29) cells which are not known to contain EM-binding protein were also employed. Cell survival was assayed by the colony forming ability of single plated cells in culture to obtain dose-survival curves. Pretreatment of DU-145, MCF-7, and U-251 cells to a nontoxic concentration (5 μM) of EM for more than one cell cycle time, substantially enhanced the radiation-induced cytotoxicity. The sensitizer enhancement ratio of these cells ranged from 1.35-1.52. The magnitude of the enhancement was dependent on the drug concentration and exposure time. The rate of cell accumulation in G 2 /M phase, as determined by flow cytometry, increased with longer treatment time in the cell lines which showed radiosensitization. Other antimicrotubule agents such as taxol and vinblastine caused minimal or no radiosensitization at nontoxic concentrations. The data provide a radiobiological basis for using EM as a novel radiation enhancer, with the property of tissue selectivity. 29 refs., 4 figs., 1 tab

  20. Radiation resistance of lactobacilli isolated from radurized meat relative to growth and environment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hastings, J.W.; Holzapfel, W.H.; Niemand, J.G.

    1986-01-01

    Of 113 lactobacilli isolated from radurized (5 kGy) minced meat, 7 Lactobacillus sake strains, 1 L. curvatus strain, and 1 L. farciminis strain were used for radiation resistance studies in a semisynthetic substrate (i.e., modified MRS broth). Five reference Lactobacillus spp. one Staphylococcus aureus strain, and one Salmonella typhimurium strain were used for comparative purposes. All L. sake isolates exhibited the phenomenon of being more resistant to gamma-irradiation in the exponential (log) phase than in the stationary phase of their growth cycles by a factor of 28%. Four reference strains also exhibited this phenomenon, with L. sake (DSM 20017) showing a 68% increase in resistance in the log phase over the stationary phase. This phenomenon was not common to all bacteria tested and is not common to all strains with high radiation resistance. Four L. sake isolates and three reference strains were used in radiation sensitivity testing in a natural food system (i.e., meat). The bacteria were irradiated in minced meat and packaged under four different conditions (air, vacuum, CO 2 , and N 2 ). Organisms exhibited the highest death rate (lowest D 10 values [doses required to reduce the logarithm of the bacterial population by 1] under CO 2 packaging conditions, but resistance to irradiation was increased under N 2 . The D 10 values of the isolates were generally greater than those of the reference strains. The D 10 values were also higher (approximately two times) in meat than in a semisynthetic growth medium

  1. Experiment of radiation-resistant materials for nuclear powers generating station

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Choe, J.H.; Lee, C.K.; Kong, Y.K.; Chang, H.S.

    1981-01-01

    The properties of polyethylene materials exhibit good insulation and radiation resistance, but exhibit poor flame resistance. Flame retardant properties of the polyethylene were improved by the radiation induced grafting, coating or cross-linking. When the various flame retardants were fixed onto polyethylene, the amount of fixation in grafting or coating was increased with the increase of radiation dosages. In the case of grafting, it is necessary for high grafting yield that the polyethylene films were swelled before irradiation with γ-rays or electron beams. It is the suitable method for the fixation of flame retardant that polyethylene samples were blended with various flame retardants at 125 0 C and then blended polymers were crosslinked by the electron beams at room temperature

  2. ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2016-05-01

    Award  Number:    W81XWH-10-1-0582 TITLE:      ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer...5a.  CONTRACT  NUMBER   ETS Gene Fusions as Predictive Biomarkers of Resistance to Radiation Therapy for Prostate Cancer 5b.  GRANT  NUMBER   W81XWH...ramifications,  particularly  in  the  context  of   radiation   therapy ,   which  represents  a  primary  treatment  modality  for  localized  prostate

  3. Ras Labs.-CASIS-ISS NL experiment for synthetic muscle: resistance to ionizing radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rasmussen, Lenore; Sandberg, Eric; Albers, Leila N.; Rodriguez, Simone; Gentile, Charles A.; Meixler, Lewis D.; Ascione, George; Hitchner, Robert; Taylor, James; Hoffman, Dan; Cylinder, David; Moy, Leon; Mark, Patrick S.; Prillaman, Daniel L.; Nordarse, Robert; Menegus, Michael J.; Ratto, Jo Ann; Thellen, Christopher; Froio, Danielle; Furlong, Cosme; Razavi, Payam; Valenza, Logan; Hablani, Surbhi; Fuerst, Tyler; Gallucci, Sergio; Blocher, Whitney; Liffland, Stephanie

    2016-04-01

    In anticipation of deep space travel, new materials are being explored to assist and relieve humans in dangerous environments, such as high radiation, extreme temperature, and extreme pressure. Ras Labs Synthetic Muscle - electroactive polymers (EAPs) that contract and expand at low voltages - which mimic the unique gentle-yet-strong nature of human tissue, is a potential asset to manned space travel through protective gear and human assist robotics and for unmanned space exploration through deep space. Generation 3 Synthetic Muscle was proven to be resistant to extreme temperatures, and there were indications that these materials may also be radiation resistant. The purpose of the Ras Labs-CASIS-ISS Experiment is to test the radiation resistivity of the third and fourth generation of these EAPs, as well as to make them even more radiation resistant or radiation hardened. On Earth, exposure of the Generation 3 and Generation 4 EAPs to a Cs-137 radiation source for 47.8 hours with a total dose of 305.931 kRad of gamma radiation was performed at the US Department of Energy's Princeton Plasma Physics Laboratory (PPPL) at Princeton University, followed by pH, peroxide, Shore Hardness Durometry, and electroactivity testing to determine the inherent radiation resistivity of these contractile EAPs and to determine whether the EAPs could be made even more radiation resistant through the application of appropriate additives and coatings. The on Earth preliminary tests determined that selected Ras Labs EAPs were not only inherently radiation resistant, but with the appropriate coatings and additives, could be made even more radiation resistant. Gforce testing to over 10 G's was performed at US Army's ARDEC Labs, with excellent results, in preparation for space flight to the International Space Station National Laboratory (ISS-NL). Selected samples of Generation 3 and Generation 4 Synthetic Muscle™, with various additives and coatings, were launched to the ISS-NL on April

  4. Cellular automaton model of cell response to targeted radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richard, M.; Kirkby, K.J.; Webb, R.P.; Kirkby, N.F.

    2009-01-01

    It has been shown that the response of cells to low doses of radiation is not linear and cannot be accurately extrapolated from the high dose response. To investigate possible mechanisms involved in the behaviour of cells under very low doses of radiation, a cellular automaton (CA) model was created. The diffusion and consumption of glucose in the culture dish were computed in parallel to the growth of cells. A new model for calculating survival probability was introduced; the communication between targeted and non-targeted cells was also included. Early results on the response of non-confluent cells to targeted irradiation showed the capability of the model to take account for the non-linear response in the low-dose domain

  5. Effects of radiation on solar cells as photovoltaic generators

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Radosavljević Radovan Lj.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The growing need for obtaining electrical energy through renewable energy sources such as solar energy have lead to significant technological developments in the production of the basic element of PV conversion, the solar cell. Basically, a solar cell is a p-n junction whose characteristics have a great influence on its output parameters, primarily efficiency. Defects and impurities in the basic material, especially if located within the energy gap, may be activated during its lifetime, becoming traps for optically produced electron-hole pairs and, thus, decreasing the output power of the cell. All of the said effects could be induced in many ways over a lifetime of a solar cell and are consistent with the effects that radiation produces in semiconductor devices. The aim of this paper is to investigate changes in the main characteristics of solar cells, such as efficiency, output current and power, due to the exposure of solar systems to different (hostile radiation environments.

  6. Next Generation Radiation Hard IMM Space Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sharps P.

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available High efficiency space solar cells based on the GaInP2/InGaAs/Ge triple junction lattice matched device with 1 sun, AM0 efficiencies of approximately 30% are commercially available from several companies. Multiple approaches have been suggested for significantly surpassing the 30% efficiency level, but achieving this in a commercially viable cell has not been easy. We review those approaches, pointing out the advantages and challenges of each. SolAero has been focused on developing the inverted metamorphic multi-junction (IMM solar cell, and has recently demonstrated a radiation hard version. We present the most recent performance data, including the response to particle radiation. The IMM cell can be used in a number of rigid or flexible configurations, and considerable effort has been focused on cell packaging and panel integration. The IMM device is ready to start qualification to the ECSS and AIAA standards.

  7. Radiation damage of gallium arsenide production cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardesich, N.; Joslin, D.; Garlick, J.; Lillington, D.; Gillanders, M.; Cavicchi, B.; Scott-Monck, J.; Kachare, R.; Anspaugh, B.

    1987-01-01

    High efficiency liquid phase epitaxy (LPE) gallium arsenide cells were irradiated with 1 Mev electrons up to fluences of 1 times 10 to the 16th power cm-2. Measurements of spectral response and dark and illuminated I-V data were made at each fluence and then, using computer codes, the experimental data was fitted to gallium arsenide cell models. In this way it was possible to determine the extent of the damage, and hence damage coefficients in both the emitter and base of the cell.

  8. Myeloid-derived cells in tumors: effects of radiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vatner, Ralph E; Formenti, Silvia C

    2015-01-01

    The discrepancy between the in vitro and in vivo response to radiation is readily explained by the fact that tumors do not exist independently of the host organism; cancer cells grow in the context of a complex microenvironment composed of stromal cells, vasculature, and elements of the immune system. As the antitumor effect of radiotherapy depends in part on the immune system, and myeloid-derived cells in the tumor microenvironment modulate the immune response to tumors, it follows that understanding the effect of radiation on myeloid cells in the tumor is likely to be essential for comprehending the antitumor effects of radiotherapy. In this review, we describe the phenotype and function of these myeloid-derived cells, and stress the complexity of studying this important cell compartment owing to its intrinsic plasticity. With regard to the response to radiation of myeloid cells in the tumor, evidence has emerged demonstrating that it is both model and dose dependent. Deciphering the effects of myeloid-derived cells in tumors, particularly in irradiated tumors, is key for attempting to pharmacologically modulate their actions in the clinic as part of cancer therapy. Copyright © 2015 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. The effects of lithium counterdoping on radiation damage and annealing in n(+)p silicon solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weinberg, I.; Brandhorst, H. W., Jr.; Mehta, S.; Swartz, C. K.

    1984-01-01

    Boron-doped silicon n(+)p solar cells were counterdoped with lithium by ion implantation and the resultant n(+)p cells irradiated by 1 MeV electrons. Performance parameters were determined as a function of fluence and a deep level transient spectroscopy (DLTS) study was conducted. The lithium counterdoped cells exhibited significantly increased radiation resistance when compared to boron doped control cells. Isochronal annealing studies of cell performance indicate that significant annealing occurs at 100 C. Isochronal annealing of the deep level defects showed a correlation between a single defect at E sub v + 0.43 eV and the annealing behavior of short circuit current in the counterdoped cells. The annealing behavior was controlled by dissociation and recombination of this defect. The DLTS studies showed that counterdoping with lithium eliminated three deep level defects and resulted in three new defects. The increased radiation resistance of the counterdoped cells is due to the interaction of lithium with oxygen, single vacancies and divacancies. The lithium-oxygen interaction is the most effective in contributing to the increased radiation resistance.

  10. Resistance to the ionizing radiation in cells of human melanoma. Role of the antioxidant enzymes and of the free radicals of the oxygen; Resistencia a la radiacion ionizante en celulas de melanoma humano. Papel de las enzimas antioxidantes y de los radicales libres del oxigeno

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Medina, V.; Cricco, G.; Massari, N.; Nunez, M.; Martin, G.; Mohanad, N.; Gutierrez, A.; Bergoc, R.; Rivera, E. [Laboratorio de Radioisotopos, Facultad de Farmacia y Bioquimica, Universidad de Buenos Aires, Junin 956, Buenos Aires (Argentina); Crescenti, E.; Croci, M. [Instituto de Inmunooncologia, Cordoba 3200, Buenos Aires (Argentina)]. e-mail: vmedina@ffyb.uba.ar

    2006-07-01

    The malignant melanoma is a highly aggressive and potentially lethal type of skin cancer. Previously we have reported that the cellular human lines of melanoma WM35 and M15 are resistant to the ionizing radiation (IR). The histamine (HA) although it has a regulator effect of the cellular proliferation in these lines, it is not capable of to modify the response to the IR like it makes with other malignant cellular lines. To investigate the bases of the radioresistance of the melanoma lines we have studied in the WM35 the production of free radicals of oxygen (ROS), the activity of the antioxidant enzymes and their modifications by action of the IR and of the HA. In studies in vitro the cells were treated with HA 10 {mu}M from 20 hs before being irradiated with a dose of 2 Gy (source {sup 137}Cs, dose rate 7.7 Gy/min). The ROS levels, superoxide anion (O{sub 2}{sup -}) and hydrogen peroxide (H{sub 2}O{sub 2}) its were measured by flow cytometry using fluorescent coloring and the activity of dismutase superoxide (SOD), Catalase (CAT) and Glutathion Peroxidase (GPx) its were determined by spectrophotometric techniques and the protein levels by Western blot. The results indicate that in the cells WM35 the HA increases the production of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} in 96% and it diminishes lightly (17%) the levels of O{sub 2}{sup -} . On the contrary, the IR diminishes the levels of H{sub 2}O-2 in 47% and it increases in 46% those of O{sub 2}{sup -}. In the irradiated cells the HA power the decrease of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} produced by the IR. The variation of the enzymes activity is coincident with these changes in the levels of ROS: the treatment with HA increases the activity of SOD and it diminishes that of CAT in cells without irradiating; on the other hand, in the irradiated cells the HA it diminishes the SOD significantly. On the base of these results we can conclude that the levels of H{sub 2}O{sub 2} are directly related with the sensitivity of the cells WM35 to the IR. The HA

  11. Vasculatures in Tumors Growing From Preirradiated Tissues: Formed by Vasculogenesis and Resistant to Radiation and Antiangiogenic Therapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Fang-Hsin; Chiang, Chi-Shiun; Wang, Chun-Chieh; Fu, Sheng-Yung; Tsai, Chien-Sheng; Jung, Shih-Ming; Wen, Chih-Jen; Lee, Chung-Chi; Hong, Ji-Hong

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To investigate vasculatures and microenvironment in tumors growing from preirradiated tissues (pre-IR tumors) and study the vascular responses of pre-IR tumors to radiation and antiangiogenic therapy. Methods and Materials: Transgenic adenocarcinoma of the mouse prostate C1 tumors were implanted into unirradiated or preirradiated tissues and examined for vascularity, hypoxia, and tumor-associated macrophage (TAM) infiltrates by immunohistochemistry. The origin of tumor endothelial cells was studied by green fluorescent protein-tagged bone marrow (GFP-BM) transplantation. The response of tumor endothelial cells to radiation and antiangiogenic agent was evaluated by apoptotic assay. Results: The pre-IR tumors had obvious tumor bed effects (TBE), with slower growth rate, lower microvascular density (MVD), and more necrotic and hypoxic fraction compared with control tumors. The vessels were dilated, tightly adhered with pericytes, and incorporated with transplanted GFP-BM cells. In addition, hypoxic regions became aggregated with TAM. As pre-IR tumors developed, the TBE was overcome at the tumor edge where the MVD increased, TAM did not aggregate, and the GFP-BM cells did not incorporate into the vessels. The vessels at tumor edge were more sensitive to the following ionizing radiation and antiangiogenic agent than those in the central low MVD regions. Conclusions: This study demonstrates that vasculatures in regions with TBE are mainly formed by vasculogenesis and resistant to radiation and antiangiogenic therapy. Tumor bed effects could be overcome at the edge of larger tumors, but where vasculatures are formed by angiogenesis and sensitive to both treatments. Vasculatures formed by vasculogenesis should be the crucial target for the treatment of recurrent tumors after radiotherapy.

  12. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chiaro, Christopher; Lazarova, Darina L.; Bordonaro, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. ► Tcf3 modulates butyrate’s effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. ► Tcf3 modulation of butyrate’s effects differ by cell context. ► Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. ► Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G 1 to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that prevent or reverse butyrate resistance.

  13. Tcf3 and cell cycle factors contribute to butyrate resistance in colorectal cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chiaro, Christopher, E-mail: cchiaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Lazarova, Darina L., E-mail: dlazarova@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States); Bordonaro, Michael, E-mail: mbordonaro@tcmedc.org [Department of Basic Sciences, The Commonwealth Medical College, 525 Pine Street, Scranton, PA 18509 (United States)

    2012-11-09

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer We investigate mechanisms responsible for butyrate resistance in colon cancer cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulates butyrate's effects on Wnt activity and cell growth in resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tcf3 modulation of butyrate's effects differ by cell context. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Cell cycle factors are overexpressed in the resistant cells. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Reversal of altered gene expression can enhance the anti-cancer effects of butyrate. -- Abstract: Butyrate, a fermentation product of dietary fiber, inhibits clonal growth in colorectal cancer (CRC) cells dependent upon the fold induction of Wnt activity. We have developed a CRC cell line (HCT-R) that, unlike its parental cell line, HCT-116, does not respond to butyrate exposure with hyperactivation of Wnt signaling and suppressed clonal growth. PCR array analyses revealed Wnt pathway-related genes, the expression of which differs between butyrate-sensitive HCT-116 CRC cells and their butyrate-resistant HCT-R cell counterparts. We identified overexpression of Tcf3 as being partially responsible for the butyrate-resistant phenotype, as this DNA-binding protein suppresses the hyperinduction of Wnt activity by butyrate. Consequently, Tcf3 knockdown in HCT-R cells restores their sensitivity to the effects of butyrate on Wnt activity and clonal cell growth. Interestingly, the effects of overexpressed Tcf3 differ between HCT-116 and HCT-R cells; thus, in HCT-116 cells Tcf3 suppresses proliferation without rendering the cells resistant to butyrate. In HCT-R cells, however, the overexpression of Tcf3 inhibits Wnt activity, and the cells are still able to proliferate due to the higher expression levels of cell cycle factors, particularly those driving the G{sub 1} to S transition. Knowledge of the molecular mechanisms determining the variable sensitivity of CRC cells to butyrate may assist in developing approaches that

  14. Influence on cell proliferation of background radiation or exposure to very low, chronic gamma radiation. [Paramecium tetraurelia; Synechococcus lividus

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Planel, H.; Soleilhavoup, J.P.; Tixador, R.; Richoilley, G.; Conter, A.; Croute, F.; Caratero, C.; Gaubin, Y.

    1987-05-01

    Investigations carried out on the protozoan Paramecium tetraurelia and the cyanobacteria Synechococcus lividus, which were shielded against background radiation or exposed to very low doses of gamma radiation, demonstrated that radiation can stimulate the proliferation of these two single-cell organisms. Radiation hormesis depends on internal factors (age of starting cells) and external factors (lighting conditions). The stimulatory effect occurred only in a limited range of doses and disappeared for dose rates higher than 50 mGy/y.

  15. High temperature creep strength of Advanced Radiation Resistant Oxide Dispersion Strengthened Steels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Noh, Sanghoon; Kim, Tae Kyu

    2014-01-01

    Austenitic stainless steel may be one of the candidates because of good strength and corrosion resistance at the high temperatures, however irradiation swelling well occurred to 120dpa at high temperatures and this leads the decrease of the mechanical properties and dimensional stability. Compared to this, ferritic/martensitic steel is a good solution because of excellent thermal conductivity and good swelling resistance. Unfortunately, the available temperature range of ferritic/martensitic steel is limited up to 650 .deg. C. ODS steel is the most promising structural material because of excellent creep and irradiation resistance by uniformly distributed nano-oxide particles with a high density which is extremely stable at the high temperature in ferritic/martensitic matrix. In this study, high temperature strength of advanced radiation resistance ODS steel was investigated for the core structural material of next generation nuclear systems. ODS martensitic steel was designed to have high homogeneity, productivity and reproducibility. Mechanical alloying, hot isostactic pressing and hot rolling processes were employed to fabricate the ODS steels, and creep rupture test as well as tensile test were examined to investigate the behavior at high temperatures. ODS steels were fabricated by a mechanical alloying and hot consolidation processes. Mechanical properties at high temperatures were investigated. The creep resistance of advanced radiation resistant ODS steels was more superior than those of ferritic/ martensitic steel, austenitic stainless steel and even a conventional ODS steel

  16. Role of 14-3-3σ in poor prognosis and in radiation and drug resistance of human pancreatic cancers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cui Ping

    2010-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Pancreatic cancer is the fourth leading cause of death in the US. Unlike other solid tumors such as testicular cancer which are now curable, more than 90% of pancreatic cancer patients die due to lack of response to therapy. Recently, the level of 14-3-3σ mRNA was found to be increased in pancreatic cancers and this increased expression may contribute to the failure in treatment of pancreatic cancers. In the present study, we tested this hypothesis. Methods Western blot analysis was used to determine 14-3-3σ protein level in fresh frozen tissues and was correlated to clinical outcome. A stable cell line expressing 14-3-3σ was established and the effect of 14-3-3σ over-expression on cellular response to radiation and anticancer drugs were tested using SRB assay and clonogenic assays. Cell cycle distribution and apoptosis analyses were performed using propidium iodide staining and PARP cleavage assays. Results We found that 14-3-3σ protein level was increased significantly in about 71% (17 of 24 of human pancreatic cancer tissues and that the 14-3-3σ protein level in cancers correlated with lymph node metastasis and poor prognosis. Furthermore, we demonstrated that over-expression of 14-3-3σ in a pancreatic cancer cell line caused resistance to γ-irradiation as well as anticancer drugs by causing resistance to treatment-induced apoptosis and G2/M arrest. Conclusion The increased level of 14-3-3σ protein likely contributes to the poor clinical outcome of human pancreatic cancers by causing resistance to radiation and anticancer drugs. Thus, 14-3-3σ may serve as a prognosis marker predicting survival of pancreatic cancer patients and guide the clinical treatment of these patients.

  17. Radiation resistance of some microorganisms isolated from irradiated herbs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Bazza, Z.E.; Shihab, A.; Farrag, H.A.; El-Sayed, Z.G.; Mahmoud, M.I.

    1997-01-01

    Three types of Egyptian medicinal herbs, sweet marjoram, spearmint and thyme were used in this study. The tested herbs were exposed to gamma radiation doses ranging from 1.0 to 10,0 kGy. The sublethal doses of radioresistant molds ranged from 1.0 to 2.0 kGy and the sublethal doses of radioresistant bacteria ranged from 7.0 to 8.0 kGy. The radioresistant molds isolated from sweet marjoram and spearmint herbs were identified as Aspergillus, whereas that isolated from thyme was identified as Aspergillus ochraceus. The radioresistant bacteria isolated from sweet marjoram, spearmint and thyme were identified as Bacillus megaterium, B.pantothenticus and B. brevis, respectively. All the radioresistant molds exhibited an exponential response. The D 15 v alue of Asp. ochraceus was 0.33 kGy, while that of Asp. niger were 0.45 and 0.5 kGy, respectively. All the bacterial species exhibited non-exponential response. The D 10 -values for B.megaterium, B. pantothenticus and B. brevis were found to be 2.58, 3.0 and 1.63 kGy, respectively

  18. Radiation resistance of sequencing chips for in situ life detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carr, Christopher E; Rowedder, Holli; Lui, Clarissa S; Zlatkovsky, Ilya; Papalias, Chris W; Bolander, Jarie; Myers, Jason W; Bustillo, James; Rothberg, Jonathan M; Zuber, Maria T; Ruvkun, Gary

    2013-06-01

    Life beyond Earth may be based on RNA or DNA if such life is related to life on Earth through shared ancestry due to meteoritic exchange, such as may be the case for Mars, or if delivery of similar building blocks to habitable environments has biased the evolution of life toward utilizing nucleic acids. In this case, in situ sequencing is a powerful approach to identify and characterize such life without the limitations or expense of returning samples to Earth, and can monitor forward contamination. A new semiconductor sequencing technology based on sensing hydrogen ions released during nucleotide incorporation can enable massively parallel sequencing in a small, robust, optics-free CMOS chip format. We demonstrate that these sequencing chips survive several analogues of space radiation at doses consistent with a 2-year Mars mission, including protons with solar particle event-distributed energy levels and 1 GeV oxygen and iron ions. We find no measurable impact of irradiation at 1 and 5 Gy doses on sequencing quality nor on low-level hardware characteristics. Further testing is required to study the impacts of soft errors as well as to characterize performance under neutron and gamma irradiation and at higher doses, which would be expected during operation in environments with significant trapped energetic particles such as during a mission to Europa. Our results support future efforts to use in situ sequencing to test theories of panspermia and/or whether life has a common chemical basis.

  19. Use of gamma radiation for inducing rust resistance in soybean

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smutkupt, Sumit; Wongpiyasatid, Arunee; Lamseejan, Siranut; Naritoom, Kruik

    1982-01-01

    Experiments on induced mutations for rust resistance in 11 soybean cultivars were started in the rainy season of 1979. M 1 seeds were grown at Farm Suwan, Pak Chong, Nakorn Rajchasima Province. Six plods from each of 4,438 control and 43,907 M 1 plants were randomly harvested. M 2 seeds of each cultivar of different doses were bulked. In addition, 270 good M 1 plants were selected and threshed singly. M 2 -bulk and M 2 -single seeds were advanced to M 3 . Both of M 3 -bulk and M 3 -single plants together with M 2 -bulk plants derived from remnant M 2 seeds were screened for rust resistance in the rainy season of 1980. The IWGSR rust rating system was used. Based on the slow growth of rust reaction on the plant (323,333) compared with the average IWGSR rust rating notation of the rates (343) in the same row, 121 plants were selected. Among them, six were selected from a total of 2802 control plants, and 115 from a total of 28,834 M 2 and M 3 plants. Seeds of each selection harvested. Only 88 lines of M 4 and M 5 were available for further rust evaluation in the rainy season of 1981. The results were as follows: At 77 days after planting, 82 selected lines were rated 333, 323 in comparison with 87 out of 137 rows of control S.J.1, S.J.2, S.J.4 and T.K.5 were rated 343. At 86 days after planting, most of the selections reached the diseased level 343. However, six lines which were derived from G8586 were still rated 333. In addition, a plant with slow growth of rust (323) from Taichung N No. 81-1-032 was selected. The six selected lines having characteristics of slow growth of rust reaction on the plants will be further tested. The high yielding selections among 82 selected lines having low percentage of shrivelled seeds will be used for further yield evaluation in the rainy season of 1982

  20. Radiation induction of multiaberrant cells in Allium cepa L.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kutsokon, N.K.; Rashydov, N.M.; Grodzinsky, D.M.

    2008-07-01

    'Rogue' cells determined by human geneticists as the cells with many chromosome aberrations. The main enigma of this phenomenon is its levels are unexpected higher in many studies. Frequently, these cells emergence in human are linked with radiation or viruses. 'Rogue' cells supposed to be very important in mutagenesis, oncogenesis and even in evolution process. We use plant assay (Allium cepa L.) to analyze the induction of cells with many chromosome aberration of different types. Cytogenetic damage of gamma-irradiation as frequency of multiaberrant cells in the root tip cells of Allium was determined. The empiric numbers of cells with many aberrations were compared with those expected in theoretical distributions (Poisson, geometric and Pascal). The frequency of multiaberrant cells in root tip cells was increased up to 83,33 +- 10,76 % under gamma-irradiation in various doses. Gamma-irradiation induced more multiaberrant cells in A. cepa meristems than expected in theoretical distributions. We supposed dependency of chromosome aberrations origin in the same cell after irradiation. The data obtained elucidate that under gamma-irradiation accumulation of aberrations in aberrant cells are not random, the appearance of one aberration in cell induced the appearance of others in the same cell. (author)

  1. Radiation-hard silicon gate bulk CMOS cell family

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gibbon, C.F.; Habing, D.H.; Flores, R.S.

    1980-01-01

    A radiation-hardened bulk silicon gate CMOS technology and a topologically simple, high-performance dual-port cell family utilizing this process have been demonstrated. Additional circuits, including a random logic circuit containing 4800 transistors on a 236 x 236 mil die, are presently being designed and processed. Finally, a joint design-process effort is underway to redesign the cell family in reduced design rules; this results in a factor of 2.5 cell size reduction and a factor of 3 decrease in chip interconnect area. Cell performance is correspondingly improved

  2. Parathyroid hormone resistance and B cell lymphopenia in propionic acidemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Griffin, T A; Hostoffer, R W; Tserng, K Y; Lebovitz, D J; Hoppel, C L; Mosser, J L; Kaplan, D; Kerr, D S

    1996-07-01

    The mechanisms of hypocalcemia, recurrent infections and hypogammaglobulinemia associated with metabolic decompensation of propionic acidemia due to propionyl-CoA carboxylase deficiency have not been defined. A 7-week-old infant with this disorder presented with severe hypocalcemia and B cell lymphopenia during an episode of metabolic acidosis and hyperammonemia. Hypocalcemia (1.1 mmol l-1) was associated with elevated serum intact parathyroid hormone (122 ng l-1), hyperphosphatemia, hypophosphaturia and hypercalcuria, indicating parathyroid hormone resistance. B cell lymphopenia (20 cells microliters-1) was associated with transient neutropenia, anemia and subsequent hypogamma-globulinemia (IgG < 294 mg dl-1, IgM < 8 mg dl-1, IgA < 8 mg dl-1), while T cells were normal. Parathyroid hormone resistance and B cell lymphopenia resolved following treatment with hemodialysis, diet and carnitine. These complications may be due to interference with parathyroid hormone renal tubular action and B cell maturation/proliferation by accumulated organic acids.

  3. Identification of cellular responses to low-dose radiation by antibody array in human B-lymphoblasts IM-9 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Eom, Hyeon Soo; Kim, Ji Young; Nam, Seon Young [Low-dose Radiation Research Team, Radiation Health Institute, Korea Hydro and Nuclear Power Co. LTD., Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2017-04-15

    The low-dose radiation (LDR)-induced various responses can reduce genetic mutation, enhance cell survival, and increase infection resistance (1). The antibody array for global analysis of phosphorylated proteins might be very useful to study signaling networks of LDR-induced cellular responses (2). Therefore, global analysis of phospho- proteins in cells exposed to radiation is important to understand the signaling mechanisms induced by changes of protein phosphorylation which lead to various biological effects by radiation. The aim is to explore the possibility of LDR-specific signaling for various beneficial effects and elucidate the potential signaling pathways representing LDR responses. Our results suggest that LDR did not affect cell death and that the increased proteins phosphorylation by LDR might be involved in various cellular responses for cell homeostasis. These results might be useful to further studies aimed at investigating potential regulatory markers that represent responses to LDR.

  4. Handling technique of spore-forming bacteria in radiation sterilization. 2. Determination of numbers and radiation resistance of spores

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Koshikawa, Tomihiko

    1994-01-01

    Stepwise ten-fold dilution of bacterial solution is required in the determination of bacterial spores. For this, the selection of diluted solution is important according to the purpose of experiment. First, the preparation of suspension of bacterial spores and selection of diluted solution are presented. Then, a method for determining the number of bacterial spores in materials is outlined in terms of dilution methods of bacterial solution (shaking and homogenization) and application method of diluted solution to the plating medium. Finally, a method for determining radiation resistance of spore-forming bacteria is explained according to the measurement conditions (suspension of bacterial spores and filters applied with bacterial spores). (N.K.)

  5. Handling technique of spore-forming bacteria in radiation sterilization. 2. Determination of numbers and radiation resistance of spores

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Koshikawa, Tomihiko [Japan Radioisotope Association, Shiga (Japan). Koka Laboratory

    1994-12-01

    Stepwise ten-fold dilution of bacterial solution is required in the determination of bacterial spores. For this, the selection of diluted solution is important according to the purpose of experiment. First, the preparation of suspension of bacterial spores and selection of diluted solution are presented. Then, a method for determining the number of bacterial spores in materials is outlined in terms of dilution methods of bacterial solution (shaking and homogenization) and application method of diluted solution to the plating medium. Finally, a method for determining radiation resistance of spore-forming bacteria is explained according to the measurement conditions (suspension of bacterial spores and filters applied with bacterial spores). (N.K.).

  6. Studies of antibiotic resistant mutants of Bacteroides fragilis obtained by Cs-137 ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Azghani, A.O.

    1986-01-01

    The genus Bacteroides is an obligate anaerobic bacillus normally found in the upper respiratory tract, the colon, and the genitourinary system. The project reported here was undertaken because of the high frequency of hospital infections attributed to B. fragilis, and the increased resistance of the bacteria to commonly used antibiotics. Cs-137 gamma irradiation was used to induce antibiotic resistant mutants in B. fragilis in the presence of Escherichia coli B/r membrane fragments, employed as reducing agent. Based on a dose-survival curve, an effective radiation dose of 1.54 x 10 4 R (3.99 C/Kg) was used to induce mutations to rifampicin and tetracycline resistance in the test organism. The antibiotic resistant mutants of B. fragilis were utilized to reveal the mechanism by which this group of organisms becomes resistant to select chemotherapeutic agents. Studies on tetracycline resistant mutants of B. fragilis isolated after irradiation, suggest that the resistance to this antibiotic is associated with the outer membrane permeability. The difference in inhibitory action of rifampicin on RNA polymerase activity, from rifampicin sensitive and resistant strains of B. fragilis, reveals that this enzyme is a possible suitable target for inhibition of bacterial growth in anaerobes by rifampicin

  7. Targeting the Mechanisms of Resistance to Chemotherapy and Radiotherapy with the Cancer Stem Cell Hypothesis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryan Morrison

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite advances in treatment, cancer remains the 2nd most common cause of death in the United States. Poor cure rates may result from the ability of cancer to recur and spread after initial therapies have seemingly eliminated detectable signs of disease. A growing body of evidence supports a role for cancer stem cells (CSCs in tumor regrowth and spread after initial treatment. Thus, targeting CSCs in combination with traditional induction therapies may improve treatment outcomes and survival rates. Unfortunately, CSCs tend to be resistant to chemo- and radiation therapy, and a better understanding of the mechanisms underlying CSC resistance to treatment is necessary. This paper provides an update on evidence that supports a fundamental role for CSCs in cancer progression, summarizes potential mechanisms of CSC resistance to treatment, and discusses classes of drugs currently in preclinical or clinical testing that show promise at targeting CSCs.

  8. Sunlight-exposed biofilm microbial communities are naturally resistant to chernobyl ionizing-radiation levels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ragon, Marie; Restoux, Gwendal; Moreira, David; Møller, Anders Pape; López-García, Purificación

    2011-01-01

    The Chernobyl accident represents a long-term experiment on the effects of exposure to ionizing radiation at the ecosystem level. Though studies of these effects on plants and animals are abundant, the study of how Chernobyl radiation levels affect prokaryotic and eukaryotic microbial communities is practically non-existent, except for a few reports on human pathogens or soil microorganisms. Environments enduring extreme desiccation and UV radiation, such as sunlight exposed biofilms could in principle select for organisms highly resistant to ionizing radiation as well. To test this hypothesis, we explored the diversity of microorganisms belonging to the three domains of life by cultivation-independent approaches in biofilms developing on concrete walls or pillars in the Chernobyl area exposed to different levels of radiation, and we compared them with a similar biofilm from a non-irradiated site in Northern Ireland. Actinobacteria, Alphaproteobacteria, Bacteroidetes, Acidobacteria and Deinococcales were the most consistently detected bacterial groups, whereas green algae (Chlorophyta) and ascomycete fungi (Ascomycota) dominated within the eukaryotes. Close relatives to the most radio-resistant organisms known, including Rubrobacter species, Deinococcales and melanized ascomycete fungi were always detected. The diversity of bacteria and eukaryotes found in the most highly irradiated samples was comparable to that of less irradiated Chernobyl sites and Northern Ireland. However, the study of mutation frequencies in non-coding ITS regions versus SSU rRNA genes in members of a same actinobacterial operational taxonomic unit (OTU) present in Chernobyl samples and Northern Ireland showed a positive correlation between increased radiation and mutation rates. Our results show that biofilm microbial communities in the most irradiated samples are comparable to non-irradiated samples in terms of general diversity patterns, despite increased mutation levels at the single

  9. Responses of human embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny to ionizing radiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zou, Ying; Zhang, Ningzhe; Ellerby, Lisa M.; Davalos, Albert R.; Zeng, Xianmin; Campisi, Judith [Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, CA 94945 (United States); Desprez, Pierre-Yves, E-mail: pydesprez@cpmcri.org [Buck Institute for Research on Aging, Novato, CA 94945 (United States); California Pacific Medical Center, Research Institute, San Francisco, CA 94107 (United States)

    2012-09-14

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer hESCs and their progeny, NSCs and neurons, were exposed to ionizing radiation. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Upon irradiation, most hESCs died within 5-7 h. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surviving NSCs underwent senescence and displayed features of astrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Surviving NSCs did not display the secretory phenotype expressed by pure astrocytes. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer This study is to better understand the stress-responses of hESCs and their progeny. -- Abstract: Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold promise for the treatment of many human pathologies. For example, hESCs and the neuronal stem cells (NSCs) and neurons derived from them have significant potential as transplantation therapies for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Two concerns about the use of hESCs and their differentiated derivatives are their ability to function and their ability to resist neoplastic transformation in response to stresses that inevitably arise during their preparation for transplantation. To begin to understand how these cells handle genotoxic stress, we examined the responses of hESCs and derived NSCs and neurons to ionizing radiation (IR). Undifferentiated hESCs were extremely sensitive to IR, with nearly all the cells undergoing cell death within 5-7 h. NSCs and neurons were substantially more resistant to IR, with neurons showing the most resistant. Of interest, NSCs that survived IR underwent cellular senescence and acquired astrocytic characteristics. Unlike IR-treated astrocytes, however, the NSC-derived astrocytic cells that survived IR did not display the typical pro-inflammatory, pro-carcinogenic senescence-associated secretory phenotype. These findings suggest distinct genotoxic stress-responses of hESCs and derived NSC and neuronal populations, and suggest that damaged NSCs, while failing to function, may not cause local inflammation.

  10. Responses of human embryonic stem cells and their differentiated progeny to ionizing radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zou, Ying; Zhang, Ningzhe; Ellerby, Lisa M.; Davalos, Albert R.; Zeng, Xianmin; Campisi, Judith; Desprez, Pierre-Yves

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► hESCs and their progeny, NSCs and neurons, were exposed to ionizing radiation. ► Upon irradiation, most hESCs died within 5–7 h. ► Surviving NSCs underwent senescence and displayed features of astrocytes. ► Surviving NSCs did not display the secretory phenotype expressed by pure astrocytes. ► This study is to better understand the stress-responses of hESCs and their progeny. -- Abstract: Human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) hold promise for the treatment of many human pathologies. For example, hESCs and the neuronal stem cells (NSCs) and neurons derived from them have significant potential as transplantation therapies for a variety of neurodegenerative diseases. Two concerns about the use of hESCs and their differentiated derivatives are their ability to function and their ability to resist neoplastic transformation in response to stresses that inevitably arise during their preparation for transplantation. To begin to understand how these cells handle genotoxic stress, we examined the responses of hESCs and derived NSCs and neurons to ionizing radiation (IR). Undifferentiated hESCs were extremely sensitive to IR, with nearly all the cells undergoing cell death within 5–7 h. NSCs and neurons were substantially more resistant to IR, with neurons showing the most resistant. Of interest, NSCs that survived IR underwent cellular senescence and acquired astrocytic characteristics. Unlike IR-treated astrocytes, however, the NSC-derived astrocytic cells that survived IR did not display the typical pro-inflammatory, pro-carcinogenic senescence-associated secretory phenotype. These findings suggest distinct genotoxic stress-responses of hESCs and derived NSC and neuronal populations, and suggest that damaged NSCs, while failing to function, may not cause local inflammation.

  11. Intercellular Communication of Tumor Cells and Immune Cells after Exposure to Different Ionizing Radiation Qualities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sebastian Diegeler

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Ionizing radiation can affect the immune system in many ways. Depending on the situation, the whole body or parts of the body can be acutely or chronically exposed to different radiation qualities. In tumor radiotherapy, a fractionated exposure of the tumor (and surrounding tissues is applied to kill the tumor cells. Currently, mostly photons, and also electrons, neutrons, protons, and heavier particles such as carbon ions, are used in radiotherapy. Tumor elimination can be supported by an effective immune response. In recent years, much progress has been achieved in the understanding of basic interactions between the irradiated tumor and the immune system. Here, direct and indirect effects of radiation on immune cells have to be considered. Lymphocytes for example are known to be highly radiosensitive. One important factor in indirect interactions is the radiation-induced bystander effect which can be initiated in unexposed cells by expression of cytokines of the irradiated cells and by direct exchange of molecules via gap junctions. In this review, we summarize the current knowledge about the indirect effects observed after exposure to different radiation qualities. The different immune cell populations important for the tumor immune response are natural killer cells, dendritic cells, and CD8+ cytotoxic T-cells. In vitro and in vivo studies have revealed the modulation of their functions due to ionizing radiation exposure of tumor cells. After radiation exposure, cytokines are produced by exposed tumor and immune cells and a modulated expression profile has also been observed in bystander immune cells. Release of damage-associated molecular patterns by irradiated tumor cells is another factor in immune activation. In conclusion, both immune-activating and -suppressing effects can occur. Enhancing or inhibiting these effects, respectively, could contribute to modified tumor cell killing after radiotherapy.

  12. Sensitivity to radiation and cycle-active drugs as a function of stem cell compartment repletion

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Degowin, R.L.; Gibson, D.P.

    1976-01-01

    We have studied the sensitivity of normal mouse hemopoietic tissue to radiation and cycle-active drugs in relation to stem cell compartment repletion. Recovery of erythropoiesis in endogenous spleen colonies, blood reticulocytes, and 30-day survivals were determined in mice after an initial large dose of partial-body irradiation. We found that the normal stem cell compartment is more sensitive to cycle-independent modes of therapy, like radiation and cyclophosphamide, than it is to cycle-active agents like cytosine arabinoside and methotrexate. The depleted stem cell compartment exhibits marked sensitivity to cycle-independent agents but less to cycle-active agents, which, however, suppress its recovery more than they do the normal. The overshoot phase of recovery is relatively resistant to either cycle-independent or cycle-active agents. A reticulocytosis following a reticulocytopenia signals the overshoot phase of stem cell compartment recovery and relatively increased resistance. These findings may prove useful in designing chemotherapy regimens and in anticipating marrow recovery in planning for supportive care in patients with neoplastic disease

  13. Models for cell survival with low LET radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Payne, M.G.; Garrett, W.R.

    1975-01-01

    A model for cell survival under low LET irradiation was developed in which the cell is considered to have N 0 -independent sensitive sites, each of which can exist in either an undamaged state (state A) or one of two damaged states. Radiation can change the sensitive sites from the undamaged state to either of two damaged states. The first damaged state (state B) can either be repaired or be promoted on the second damaged state (state C), which is irreparable. The promotion from the first damaged state to the second can occur due to any of the following: (1) further radiation damage, (2) an abortive attempt to repair the site, or (3) the arrival at a part of the cell cycle where the damage is ''fixed.'' Subject to the further assumptions that radiation damage can occur either indirectly (i.e., through radiation products) or due to direct interaction, and that repair of the first damaged state is a one-step process, expressions can be derived for P(N/sub A/, N/sub B/,t) = probability that after time t a cell will have N/sub A/ sites in state A and N/sub B/ in state B. The problem of determining P(N/sub A/, N/sub B/, t) is formulated for arbitrary time dependences of the radiation field and of all rate coefficients. A large family of cell-survival models can be described by interpreting the sensitive sites in different ways and by making different choices of rate coefficients and of the combinations of numbers of sites in different states that will lead to cell death. (U.S.)

  14. Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Modulates Resistance to Cisplatin in the A549/DDP Cell Line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Lili; Du, Chunjuan; Wu, Lei; Yu, Jinpu; An, Xiumei; Yu, Wenwen; Cao, Shui; Li, Hui; Ren, Xiubao

    2017-01-01

    Background Cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells can potentially enhance the tumor-killing activity of chemotherapy. Objective This study aimed to evaluate the effects of CIK cells on cisplatin (DDP) resistance in the human lung adenocarcinoma cell line A549/DDP. Methods The detect resistance index, drug resistance related-genes and cytokine secretion of A549/DDP co-cultured with CIK cells were assayed in vitro . Results After A549/DDP co-culture with CIK cells, the DDP resistance of A549/DDP significantly decreased in a time-dependent manner. The DDP resistance of A549/DDP co-cultured with CIK cells for 20 h decreased 4.93-fold compared with that of A549/DDP cells cultured alone ( P A549/DDP significantly decreased after co-culture with CIK cells ( P A549/DDP with CIK cells. The expression of GST-π was restored by adding the neutralizing IFN-γ. Conclusion CIK cells can reverse the drug resistance of A549/DDP in a time-dependent manner by reducing GST-π expression to increase the accumulation of DDP. The effect of CIK cells on re-sensitizing lung cancer cells to the chemotherapy drug was partially dependent on the secretion of IFN-γ.

  15. Response of sensitive human ataxia and resistant T-1 cell lines to accelerated heavy ions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tobias, C.A.; Blakely, E.A.; Chang, P.Y.; Lommel, L.; Roots, R.

    1983-07-01

    The radiation dose responses of fibroblast from a patient with Ataxia telangiectasis (AT-2SF) and an established line of human T-1 cells were studied. Nearly monoenergetic accelerated neon and argon ions were used at the Berkeley Bevalac with various residual range values. The LET of the particles varied from 30 keV/..mu..m to over 1000 keV/..mu..m. All Ataxia survival curves were exponential functions of the dose. Their radiosensitivity reached peak values at 100 to 200 keV/..mu..m. Human T-1 cells have effective sublethal damage repair as has been evidenced by split dose experiments, and they are much more resistant to low LET than to high LET radiation. The repair-misrepair model has been used to interpret these results. We have obtained mathematical expressions that describe the cross sections and inactivation coefficients for both human cell lines as a function of the LET and the type of particle used. The results suggest either that high-LET particles induce a greater number of radiolesions per track or that heavy-ions at high LET induce lesions that kill cells more effectively and that are different from those produced at low LET. We assume that the lesions induced in T-1 and Ataxia cells are qualitatively similar and that each cell line attempts to repair these lesions. The result in most irradiated Ataxia cells, however, is either lethal misrepair or incomplete repair leading to cell death. 63 references, 10 figures, 1 table.

  16. Radiation resistance of pyrocarbon-boned fuel and absorbing elements for HTGR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gurin, V.A.; Konotop, Yu.F.; Odejchuk, N.P.; Shirochenkov, S.D.; Yakovlev, V.K.; Aksenov, N.A.; Kuprienko, V.A.; Lebedev, I.G.; Samsonov, B.V.

    1990-01-01

    In choosing the reactor type, problems of nuclear and radiation safety are outstanding. The analysis of the design and experiments show that HTGR type reactors helium cooled satisfy all the safety requirements. It has been planned in the Soviet Union to construct two HTGR plants, VGR-50 and VG-400. Later it was decided to construct an experimental plant with a low power high temperature reactor (VGM). Spherical uranium-graphite fuel elements with coated fuel particles are supposed to be used in HTGR core. A unique technology for producing spherical pyrocarbon-bound fuel and absorbing elements of monolithic type has been developed. Extended tests were done to to investigate fuel elements behaviour: radiation resistance of coated fuel particles with different types of fuel; influence of the coated fuel particles design on gaseous fission products release; influence of non-sphericity on coated fuel particle performance; dependence of gaseous fission products release from fuel elements on the thickness of fuel-free cans; confining role of pyrocarbon as a factor capable of diminishing the rate of fission products release; radiation resistance of spherical fuel elements during burnup; radiation resistance of spherical absorbing elements to fast neutron fluence and boron burnup

  17. Loratadine dysregulates cell cycle progression and enhances the effect of radiation in human tumor cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Soule, Benjamin P; Simone, Nicole L; DeGraff, William G; Choudhuri, Rajani; Cook, John A; Mitchell, James B

    2010-01-01

    The histamine receptor-1 (H1)-antagonist, loratadine has been shown to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenografts in part due to cell cycle arrest in G2/M. Since this is a radiation sensitive phase of the cell cycle, we sought to determine if loratadine modifies radiosensitivity in several human tumor cell lines with emphasis on human colon carcinoma (HT29). Cells were treated with several doses of loratadine at several time points before and after exposure to radiation. Radiation dose modifying factors (DMF) were determined using full radiation dose response survival curves. Cell cycle phase was determined by flow cytometry and the expression of the cell cycle-associated proteins Chk1, pChk1 ser345 , and Cyclin B was analyzed by western blot. Loratadine pre-treatment of exponentially growing cells (75 μM, 24 hours) increased radiation-induced cytotoxicity yielding a radiation DMF of 1.95. However, treatment of plateau phase cells also yielded a DMF of 1.3 suggesting that mechanisms other than cell cycle arrest also contribute to loratadine-mediated radiation modification. Like irradiation, loratadine initially induced G2/M arrest and activation of the cell-cycle associated protein Chk1 to pChk1 ser345 , however a subsequent decrease in expression of total Chk1 and Cyclin B correlated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint. Analysis of DNA repair enzyme expression and DNA fragmentation revealed a distinct pattern of DNA damage in loratadine-treated cells in addition to enhanced radiation-induced damage. Taken together, these data suggest that the observed effects of loratadine are multifactorial in that loratadine 1) directly damages DNA, 2) activates Chk1 thereby promoting G2/M arrest making cells more susceptible to radiation-induced DNA damage and, 3) downregulates total Chk1 and Cyclin B abrogating the radiation-induced G2/M checkpoint and allowing cells to re-enter the cell cycle despite the persistence of damaged DNA. Given this unique possible

  18. Loratadine dysregulates cell cycle progression and enhances the effect of radiation in human tumor cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cook John A

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The histamine receptor-1 (H1-antagonist, loratadine has been shown to inhibit growth of human colon cancer xenografts in part due to cell cycle arrest in G2/M. Since this is a radiation sensitive phase of the cell cycle, we sought to determine if loratadine modifies radiosensitivity in several human tumor cell lines with emphasis on human colon carcinoma (HT29. Methods Cells were treated with several doses of loratadine at several time points before and after exposure to radiation. Radiation dose modifying factors (DMF were determined using full radiation dose response survival curves. Cell cycle phase was determined by flow cytometry and the expression of the cell cycle-associated proteins Chk1, pChk1ser345, and Cyclin B was analyzed by western blot. Results Loratadine pre-treatment of exponentially growing cells (75 μM, 24 hours increased radiation-induced cytotoxicity yielding a radiation DMF of 1.95. However, treatment of plateau phase cells also yielded a DMF of 1.3 suggesting that mechanisms other than cell cycle arrest also contribute to loratadine-mediated radiation modification. Like irradiation, loratadine initially induced G2/M arrest and activation of the cell-cycle associated protein Chk1 to pChk1ser345, however a subsequent decrease in expression of total Chk1 and Cyclin B correlated with abrogation of the G2/M checkpoint. Analysis of DNA repair enzyme expression and DNA fragmentation revealed a distinct pattern of DNA damage in loratadine-treated cells in addition to enhanced radiation-induced damage. Taken together, these data suggest that the observed effects of loratadine are multifactorial in that loratadine 1 directly damages DNA, 2 activates Chk1 thereby promoting G2/M arrest making cells more susceptible to radiation-induced DNA damage and, 3 downregulates total Chk1 and Cyclin B abrogating the radiation-induced G2/M checkpoint and allowing cells to re-enter the cell cycle despite the persistence of

  19. Electrical resistance behavior with gamma radiation dose in bulk carbon nanostrutured samples

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lage, J.; Leyva, A.; Pinnera, I.; Desdin, L. F.; Abreu, Y.; Cruz, C. M.; Leyva, D.; Toledo, C.

    2013-01-01

    The aim of this paper is to study the effects of 60 Co gamma radiation on the electrical resistance and V-I characteristic of bulk carbon nano structured samples obtained by electric arc discharge in water method. Images of pristine samples obtained with scanning electron, and the results in graphical form of the electrical characterization of irradiated samples are presented in the text. It was observed that the electrical resistance vs. dose behavior shows an initial increment reaching the maximum at approximately 135 kGy, followed by a drop of the resistance values. These behaviors are associated with the progressive generation of radiation induced defects in the sample, whose number increases to reach saturation at 135 kGy. From this dose, defects could lead to cross-links between different nano structures present in the sample conducting to a gradually drop in electrical resistance. The measured V-I curves show that, increasing exposure to the 60 Co gamma radiation, the electrical properties of the studied samples transit from a semiconductor towards a predominantly metallic behavior. These results were compared with those obtained for a sample of graphite powder irradiated under the same conditions. (Author)

  20. Insulin resistance in vascular endothelial cells promotes intestinal tumour formation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wang, X; Häring, M-F; Rathjen, Thomas

    2017-01-01

    The risk of several cancers, including colorectal cancer, is increased in patients with obesity and type 2 diabetes, conditions characterised by hyperinsulinaemia and insulin resistance. Because hyperinsulinaemia itself is an independent risk factor for cancer development, we examined tissue...... did not change intestinal tumour number or size distribution on either a low or high-fat diet. We therefore asked whether cells in the tumour stroma might explain the association between tumour formation and insulin resistance. To this end, we generated Apc(Min/+) mice with loss of insulin receptors...... and increased the frequency of neutrophils in tumours. We conclude that although insulin is mitogenic for intestinal tumour cells in vitro, impaired insulin action in the tumour microenvironment may be more important in conditions where hyperinsulinaemia is secondary to insulin resistance. Insulin resistance...

  1. Radiation improves gene transfer into human ovarian carcinoma cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Canaday, Daniel; Zeng Ming; Cerniglia, George; Stevens, Craig W.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose/Objective: Poor gene transfer is the major stumbling block to successful gene therapy today. We hypothesized that ionizing radiation might activate cellular recombination, and so improve stable gene transfer. During studies to quantitate radiation activated recombination, we also found that both plasmid and adenoviral vector transduction could be increased by irradiation. The studies presented here describe the effects of irradiation on gene transduction efficiency (both transient and stable transduction) in several human ovarian carcinoma lines, as a prelude to in vivo animal studies. Materials and Methods: The effect of irradiation on stable gene transfer efficiency was determined in human ovarian carcinoma cell lines (SKOV3, CAOV3 and PA1). Either irradiated or unirradiated cells were transfected with pRSVZ plasmid (containing a LacZ expression cassette) in either the supercoiled and linearized (XmnI) forms and β-galactosidase expression followed with time. Transfection efficiency was measured by flow cytometry following FDG staining at 0, 48, and 96 hours after irradiation. FDG is converted to a fluorescent metabolite by LacZ, and thus reflects the transfection efficiency of the LacZ containing vector. Vector quantitation was also performed by southern hybridization. Stable transduction efficiency was measured 14 -35 days after irradiation. Optimization of the time of irradiation with respect to transfection was performed. Since cells demonstrated increased stable recombination for as long as 96 hours after irradiation, continuous low dose rate and multiple radiation fractions were also tested. These experiments were repeated using the Ad5CMVlacZ. Dividing cells were exposed to Ad5CMVlacZ at an MOI of 0.1,1,5,10 and 100 to determine optimum transfection concentration. Transduction efficiency was again measured at various intervals to determine the radiation dose and interval post transfection which provides the maximum increase in transfection

  2. Curve Fitting Solar Cell Degradation Due to Hard Particle Radiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gaddy, Edward M.; Cikoski, Rebecca; Mekadenaumporn, Danchai

    2003-01-01

    This paper investigates the suitability of the equation for accurately defining solar cell parameter degradation as a function of hard particle radiation. The paper also provides methods for determining the constants in the equation and compares results from this equation to those obtained by the more traditionally used.

  3. Effect of sunitinib combined with ionizing radiation on endothelial cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Haiping; Jiao Xiaodong; Li Rui; Wang Jiejun; Takayama, Koichi; Su Bo

    2011-01-01

    The aims of present study were to evaluate the efficacy of combining sunitinib with ionizing radiation (IR) on endothelial cells in vitro and in vivo. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVECs) were exposed to IR with or without sunitinib pretreatment. Apoptosis assay and cell cycle distribution were analyzed by flow cytometry. Clonogenic survival assay at 3 Gy dose with or without sunitinib was performed. The activity of phosphatidylinositol 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt signal pathway was detected by Western immunoblot. Lewis lung carcinoma mouse model was built to examine the effect of combination therapy on endothelial cells in vivo. Microvasculature changes were detected by immunohistochemistry using anti-CD31 antibody. Our results showed combination therapy of sunitinib and IR significantly increased apoptosis of endothelial cells and inhibited colony formation compared to sunitinib or radiotherapy alone. It also resulted in cell cycle redistribution (decreasing cells in S phase and increasing cells in G2/M phase). The activity of PI3K/Akt signal pathway was inhibited, which could be the potential mechanisms that accoun