WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell porous transport

  1. On effective transport coefficients in PEM fuel cell electrodes: Anisotropy of the porous transport layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pharoah, J. G.; Karan, K.; Sun, W.

    This paper reviews the approach taken in the literature to model the effective transport coefficients - mass diffusivity, electrical conductivity, thermal conductivity and hydraulic permeability - of carbon-fibre based porous electrode of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs). It is concluded that current PEMFC model do not account for the inherent anisotropic microstructure of the fibrous electrodes. Simulations using a 2-D PEMFC cathode model show that neglecting the anisotropic nature and associated transport coefficients of the porous electrodes significantly influences both the nature and the magnitude of the model predictions. This emphasizes the need to appropriately characterize the relevant anisotropic properties of the fibrous electrode.

  2. A Microfluidic Pore Network Approach to Investigate Water Transport in Fuel Cell Porous Transport Layers

    CERN Document Server

    Bazylak, A; Markicevic, B; Sinton, D; Djilali, N

    2008-01-01

    Pore network modelling has traditionally been used to study displacement processes in idealized porous media related to geological flows, with applications ranging from groundwater hydrology to enhanced oil recovery. Very recently, pore network modelling has been applied to model the gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell. Discrete pore network models have the potential to elucidate transport phenomena in the GDL with high computational efficiency, in contrast to continuum or molecular dynamics modelling that require extensive computational resources. However, the challenge in studying the GDL with pore network modelling lies in defining the network parameters that accurately describe the porous media as well as the conditions of fluid invasion that represent realistic transport processes. In this work, we discuss the first stage of developing and validating a GDL-representative pore network model. We begin with a two-dimensional pore network model with a single mobile pha...

  3. Modeling and Diagnostics of Fuel Cell Porous Media for Improving Water Transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Allen, Jeff; M' edici, Ezequiel

    2011-07-01

    When a fuel cell is operating at high current density, water accumulation is a significant cause of performance and component degradation. Investigating the water transport inside the fuel cell is a challenging task due to opacity of the components, the randomness of the porous materials, and the difficulty in gain access to the interior for measurement due to the small dimensions of components. Numerical simulation can provide a good insight of the evolution of the water transport under different working condition. However, the validation of those simulations is remains an issue due the same experimental obstacles associated with in-situ measurements. The discussion herein will focus on pore-network modeling of the water transport on the PTL and the insights gained from simulations as well as in the validation technique. The implications of a recently published criterion to characterize PTL, based on percolation theory, and validate numerical simulation are discussed.

  4. Transport phenomena within the porous cathode for a proton exchange membrane fuel cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Juanfang; Oshima, Nobuyuki; Kurihara, Eru; Saha, Litan Kumar [Graduate School of Engineering, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 060-8628 (Japan)

    2010-10-01

    A two-phase, one-dimensional steady model is developed to analyze the coupled phenomena of cathode flooding and mass-transport limiting for the porous cathode electrode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell. In the model, the catalyst layer is treated not as an interface between the membrane and gas diffusion layer, but as a separate computational domain with finite thickness and pseudo-homogenous structure. Furthermore, the liquid water transport across the porous electrode is driven by the capillary force based on Darcy's law. And the gas transport is driven by the concentration gradient based on Fick's law. Additionally, through Tafel kinetics, the transport processes of gas and liquid water are coupled. From the numerical results, it is found that although the catalyst layer is thin, it is very crucial to better understand and more correctly predict the concurrent phenomena inside the electrode, particularly, the flooding phenomena. More importantly, the saturation jump at the interface of the gas diffusion layer and catalyst layers is captured, when the continuity of the capillary pressure is imposed on the interface. Elsewise, the results show further that the flooding phenomenon in the CL is much more serious than that in the GDL, which has a significant influence on the mass transport of the reactants. Moreover, the saturation level inside the cathode is determined, to a great extent, by the surface overpotential, the absolute permeability of the porous electrode, and the boundary value of saturation at the gas diffusion layer-gas channel interface. In order to prevent effectively flooding, it should remove firstly the liquid water accumulating inside the CL and keep the boundary value of liquid saturation as low as possible. (author)

  5. Porous media geometry and transports

    CERN Document Server

    Adler, Pierre

    1992-01-01

    The goal of ""Porous Media: Geometry and Transports"" is to provide the basis of a rational and modern approach to porous media. This book emphasizes several geometrical structures (spatially periodic, fractal, and random to reconstructed) and the three major single-phase transports (diffusion, convection, and Taylor dispersion).""Porous Media"" serves various purposes. For students it introduces basic information on structure and transports. Engineers will find this book useful as a readily accessible assemblage of al the major experimental results pertaining to single-phase tr

  6. Water Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S. M.

    2015-12-01

    In this work, a recently developed dynamic pore-network model is presented [1]. The model explicitly solves for both water pressure and capillary pressure. A semi-implicit scheme is used in updating water saturation in each pore body, which considerably increases the numerical stability at low capillary number values. Furthermore, a multiple-time-step algorithm is introduced to reduce the computational effort. A number of case studies of water transport in the micro porous layer (MPL) and gas diffusion layer (GDL) are conducted. We illustrate the role of MPL in reducing water flooding in the GDL. Also, the dynamic water transport through the MPL-GDL interface is explored in detail. This information is essential to the reduced continua model (RCM), which was developed for multiphase flow through thin porous layers [2, 3]. C.Z. Qin, Water transport in the gas diffusion layer of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell: dynamic pore-network modeling, J Electrochimical. Soci., 162, F1036-F1046, 2015. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, Multiphase flow through multilayers of thin porous media: general balance equations and constitutive relationships for a solid-gas-liquid three-phase system, Int. J. Heat Mass Transfer, 70, 693-708, 2014. C.Z. Qin and S.M. Hassanizadeh, A new approach to modeling water flooding in a polymer electrolyte fuel cell, Int. J. Hydrogen Energy, 40, 3348-3358, 2015.

  7. Liquid water transport characteristics of porous diffusion media in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells: A review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Xunliang; Peng, Fangyuan; Lou, Guofeng; Wen, Zhi

    2015-12-01

    Fundamental understanding of liquid water transport in gas diffusion media (GDM) is important to improve the material and structure design of polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells. Continuum methods of two-phase flow modeling facilitate to give more details of relevant information. The proper empirical correlations of liquid water transport properties, such as capillary characteristics, water relative permeability and effective contact angle, are crucial to two phase flow modeling and cell performance prediction. In this work, researches on these properties in the last decade are reviewed. Various efforts have been devoted to determine the water transport properties for GDMs. However, most of the experimental studies are ex-situ measurements. In-situ measurements for GDMs and extending techniques available to study the catalyst layer and the microporous layer will be further challenges. Using the Leverett-Udell correlation is not recommended for quantitative modeling. The reliable Leverett-type correlation for GDMs, with the inclusion of the cosine of effective contact angle, is desirable but hard to be established for modeling two-phase flow in GDMs. A comprehensive data set of liquid water transport properties is needed for various GDM materials under different PEM fuel cell operating conditions.

  8. Improved performance of porous bio-anodes in microbial electrolysis cells by enhancing mass and charge transport

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sleutels, T.H.J.A.; Lodder, R.; Hamelers, H.V.M.; Buisman, C.J.N.

    2009-01-01

    To create an efficient MEC high current densities and high coulombic efficiencies are required. The aim of this study was to increase cur-rent densities and coulombic efficiencies by influencing mass and charge transport in porous electrodes by: (i) introduction of a forced flow through the anode to

  9. Transport of subsurface bacteria in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bales, R.C.; Arnold, R.G.; Gerba, C.P.

    1995-02-01

    The primary objective of this study was to develop tools with which to measure the advective transport of microorganisms through porous media. These tools were then applied to investigate the sorptive properties of representative microorganisms that were selected at random from the DOE`s deep subsurface collection of bacterial, maintained at Florida State University. The transport screening procedure that arose from this study was also used to investigate biological factors that affect the transport/sorption of biocolloids during their movement through porous media with the bulk advective flow.

  10. Foam Transport in Porous Media - A Review

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Z. F.; Freedman, Vicky L.; Zhong, Lirong

    2009-11-11

    Amendment solutions with or without surfactants have been used to remove contaminants from soil. However, it has drawbacks such that the amendment solution often mobilizes the plume, and its movement is controlled by gravity and preferential flow paths. Foam is an emulsion-like, two-phase system in which gas cells are dispersed in a liquid and separated by thin liquid films called lamellae. Potential advantages of using foams in sub-surface remediation include providing better control on the volume of fluids injected, uniformity of contact, and the ability to contain the migration of contaminant laden liquids. It is expected that foam can serve as a carrier of amendments for vadose zone remediation, e.g., at the Hanford Site. As part of the U.S. Department of Energy’s EM-20 program, a numerical simulation capability will be added to the Subsurface Transport Over Multiple Phases (STOMP) flow simulator. The primary purpose of this document is to review the modeling approaches of foam transport in porous media. However, as an aid to understanding the simulation approaches, some experiments under unsaturated conditions and the processes of foam transport are also reviewed. Foam may be formed when the surfactant concentration is above the critical micelle concentration. There are two main types of foams – the ball foam (microfoam) and the polyhedral foam. The characteristics of bulk foam are described by the properties such as foam quality, texture, stability, density, surface tension, disjoining pressure, etc. Foam has been used to flush contaminants such as metals, organics, and nonaqueous phase liquids from unsaturated soil. Ball foam, or colloidal gas aphrons, reportedly have been used for soil flushing in contaminated site remediation and was found to be more efficient than surfactant solutions on the basis of weight of contaminant removed per gram of surfactant. Experiments also indicate that the polyhedral foam can be used to enhance soil remediation. The

  11. Porous media fluid transport and pore structure

    CERN Document Server

    Dullien, F A L

    1992-01-01

    This book examines the relationship between transport properties and pore structure of porous material. Models of pore structure are presented with a discussion of how such models can be used to predict the transport properties of porous media. Portions of the book are devoted to interpretations of experimental results in this area and directions for future research. Practical applications are given where applicable, and are expected to be useful for a large number of different fields, including reservoir engineering, geology, hydrogeology, soil science, chemical process engineering, biomedica

  12. Bacteria transport through porous material: Final technical report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, T.F.

    1989-02-13

    The injection and penetration of bacteria into a reservoir is the most problematic and crucial of the steps in microbial enhanced recovery (MEOR). In the last phase of our work valuable information on bacterial transport in porous media was obtained. A great deal of progress was made to determine chemical bonding characteristics between adsorbed bacteria and the rock surfaces. In order to further enhance our knowledge of the effects of surface tensions on bacteria transport through porous media, a new approach was taken to illustrate the effect of liquid surface tension on bacterial transport through a sandpack column. Work in surface charge characterization of reservoir rock as a composite oxide system was also accomplished. In the last section of this report a mathematical model to simulate the simultaneous diffusion and growth of bacteria cells in a nutrient-enriched porous media is proposed.

  13. Highly porous PEM fuel cell cathodes based on low density carbon aerogels as Pt-support: Experimental study of the mass-transport losses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marie, Julien; Chenitz, Regis; Chatenet, Marian; Berthon-Fabry, Sandrine; Cornet, Nathalie; Achard, Patrick

    Carbon aerogels exhibiting high porous volumes and high surface areas, differentiated by their pore-size distributions were used as Pt-supports in the cathode catalytic layer of H 2/air-fed PEM fuel cell. The cathodes were tested as 50 cm 2 membrane electrode assemblies (MEAs). The porous structure of the synthesized catalytic layers was impacted by the nanostructure of the Pt-doped carbon aerogels (Pt/CAs). In this paper thus we present an experimental study aiming at establishing links between the porous structure of the cathode catalytic layers and the MEAs performances. For that purpose, the polarization curves of the MEAs were decomposed in 3 contributions: the kinetic loss, the ohmic loss and the mass-transport loss. We showed that the MEAs made with the different carbon aerogels had similar kinetic activities (low current density performance) but very different mass-transport voltage losses. It was found that the higher the pore-size of the initial carbon aerogel, the higher the mass-transport voltage losses. Supported by our porosimetry (N 2-adsorption and Hg-porosimetry) measurement, we interpret this apparent contradiction as the consequence of the more important Nafion penetration into the carbon aeorogel with larger pore-size. Indeed, the catalytic layers made from the larger pore-size carbon aerogel had lower porosities. We thus show in this work that carbon aerogels are materials with tailored nanostructured structure which can be used as model materials for experimentally testing the optimization of the PEM fuel cell catalytic layers.

  14. Porous carbon nanotubes: Molecular absorption, transport, and separation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yzeiri, Irena; Patra, Niladri; Král, Petr

    2014-03-01

    We use classical molecular dynamics simulations to study nanofluidic properties of porous carbon nanotubes. We show that saturated water vapor condenses on the porous nanotubes, can be absorbed by them and transported in their interior. When these nanotubes are charged and placed in ionic solutions, they can selectively absorb ions in their interior and transport them. Porous carbon nanotubes can also be used as selective molecular sieves, as illustrated on a room temperature separation of benzene and ethanol.

  15. Transport of Graphene Oxide through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Duster, T. A.; Na, C.; Bolster, D.; Fein, J. B.

    2012-12-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) is comprised of anisotropic nanosheets decorated with covalently-bonded epoxide, ketone, and hydroxyl functional groups on the basal planes, and carboxylic and phenolic functional groups at the edges. Individual GO nanosheets are generally two to three micrometers in width, with thicknesses depending on the degree of exfoliation and typically ranging from one to approximately 100 nanometers. As a result of this extraordinarily large surface area-to-mass ratio and the presence of numerous proton-active functional groups, GO nanosheets exhibit a tremendous capacity to adsorb metals and other contaminants from aqueous solutions and are thus often suggested for use in in situ remediation efforts. The potential importance of GO nanosheets as an adsorbent in soil and groundwater necessitates a detailed understanding of their mobility in environmental systems, but this topic remains largely unexplored. Hence, the objective of this study was to investigate the transport behavior of GO nanosheets through well-characterized saturated porous media. In this study, we used replicate glass columns packed with two different sand grain sizes, and within each treatment we varied pH (5.5 to 8.5), ionic strength (electrolyte composition (Na+ and Ca2+ salts), and GO nanosheet exfoliation extent (few-layered and many-layered) to determine the relative influence of both physical and electrochemical properties on GO nanosheet transport in these systems. The break-through of GO nanosheets from each treatment was continuously monitored using a flow-through quartz cuvette and UV-Vis absorbance at 230 nm. GO nanosheet transport through these systems was then modeled using distinct advection-dispersion equations to establish the relative influence of attachment, deposition, and detachment in the overall transport behavior, and a corresponding retardation coefficient was calculated for each treatment. Break-through curves displayed anomalous transport behavior, which was

  16. Dual Transport Process for Targeted Delivery in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, W.; Fan, J.

    2015-12-01

    The targeted delivery in porous media is a promising technology to encapsulate the solute (i.e., the cargo) in colloid-like microcapsules (i.e., the carriers), transport the microcapsules in the targeted location in porous media, and then release the solute. While extensive literatures and applications about the drug delivery in human and animal bodies exist, the targeted delivery using similar delivery carriers in subsurface porous media is not well understood. The dual transport process study is an explorative study for the targeted delivery in porous media. While the colloid transport is dominated by the advection process and the solute transport is dominated by the advection-dispersion, the dual transport process is the process with the first step of carrier transport, which is dominated by advection, and then after the release of cargo, the transport of cargo is dominated by advection-dispersion. By applying the random walk particle tracking (RWPT) approach, we investigate how the carriers transport in porous media and how the cargo release mechanisms affect the cargo distribution for the targeted delivery in various patterns of porous media. The RWPT numerical model will be verified against the experimental results of dual transport process in packed-disk 2D micromodels. The understanding of the mechanism of dual transport process is crucial to achieve the potential applications of targeted delivery in improved oil and gas recovery, CO2 sequestration, environmental remediation, and soil biomediation.

  17. Transport of human adenoviruses in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kokkinos, Petros; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.; Tselepi, Maria A.; Bellou, Maria; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Vantarakis, Apostolos

    2015-04-01

    Groundwater may be contaminated with infective human enteric viruses from various wastewater discharges, sanitary landfills, septic tanks, agricultural practices, and artificial groundwater recharge. Coliphages have been widely used as surrogates of enteric viruses, because they share many fundamental properties and features. Although a large number of studies focusing on various factors (i.e. pore water solution chemistry, fluid velocity, moisture content, temperature, and grain size) that affect biocolloid (bacteria, viruses) transport have been published over the past two decades, little attention has been given toward human adenoviruses (hAdVs). The main objective of this study was to evaluate the effect of pore water velocity on hAdV transport in water saturated laboratory-scale columns packed with glass beads. The effects of pore water velocity on virus transport and retention in porous media was examined at three pore water velocities (0.39, 0.75, and 1.22 cm/min). The results indicated that all estimated average mass recovery values for hAdV were lower than those of coliphages, which were previously reported in the literature by others for experiments conducted under similar experimental conditions. However, no obvious relationship between hAdV mass recovery and water velocity could be established from the experimental results. The collision efficiencies were quantified using the classical colloid filtration theory. Average collision efficiency, α, values decreased with decreasing flow rate, Q, and pore water velocity, U, but no significant effect of U on α was observed. Furthermore, the surface properties of viruses and glass beads were used to construct classical DLVO potential energy profiles. The results revealed that the experimental conditions of this study were unfavorable to deposition and that no aggregation between virus particles is expected to occur. A thorough understanding of the key processes governing virus transport is pivotal for public

  18. Effects of starvation on bacterial transport through porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cunningham, Alfred B.; Sharp, Robert R.; Caccavo, Frank; Gerlach, Robin

    2007-06-01

    A major problem preventing widespread implementation of microbial injection strategies for bioremediation and/or microbially enhanced oil recovery is the tendency of bacteria to strongly adhere to surfaces in the immediate vicinity of the injection point. Long term (weeks to months) nutrient starvation of bacteria prior to injection can decrease attachment and enhance transport through porous media. This paper summarizes results of starvation-enhanced transport experiments in sand columns of 30 cm, 3 m, and 16 m in length. The 16 m column experiments compared transport, breakthrough and distribution of adhered cells for starved and vegetative cultures of Klebsiella oxytoca, a copious biofilm producer. Results from these experiments were subsequently used to design and construct a field-scale biofilm barrier using starved Pseudomonas fluorescens. The 30 cm and 3 m sand columns experiments investigated starvation-enhanced transport of Shewanella algae BrY, a dissimilatory metal-reducing bacterium. In both cases the vegetative cells adsorbed onto the sand in higher numbers than the starved cells, especially near the entrance of the column. These results, taken together with studies cited in the literature, indicate that starved cells penetrate farther (i.e. higher breakthrough concentration) and adsorb more uniformly along the flow path than vegetative cells.

  19. Pore-Network Modeling of Water and Vapor Transport in the Micro Porous Layer and Gas Diffusion Layer of a Polymer Electrolyte Fuel Cell

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, C.; Hassanizadeh, S.M.; van Oosterhout, L.M.

    2016-01-01

    In the cathode side of a polymer electrolyte fuel cell (PEFC), a micro porous layer (MPL) added between the catalyst layer (CL) and the gas diffusion layer (GDL) plays an important role in water management. In this work, by using both quasi-static and dynamic pore-network models, water and vapor tra

  20. Mass transport in a microchannel bioreactor with a porous wall.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiao Bing; Sui, Yi; Lee, Heow Pueh; Bai, Hui Xing; Yu, Peng; Winoto, S H; Low, Hong Tong

    2010-06-01

    A two-dimensional flow model has been developed to simulate mass transport in a microchannel bioreactor with a porous wall. A two-domain approach, based on the finite volume method, was implemented. For the fluid part, the governing equation used was the Navier-Stokes equation; for the porous medium region, the generalized Darcy-Brinkman-Forchheimer extended model was used. For the porous-fluid interface, a stress jump condition was enforced with a continuity of normal stress, and the mass interfacial conditions were continuities of mass and mass flux. Two parameters were defined to characterize the mass transports in the fluid and porous regions. The porous Damkohler number is the ratio of consumption to diffusion of the substrates in the porous medium. The fluid Damkohler number is the ratio of the substrate consumption in the porous medium to the substrate convection in the fluid region. The concentration results were found to be well correlated by the use of a reaction-convection distance parameter, which incorporated the effects of axial distance, substrate consumption, and convection. The reactor efficiency reduced with reaction-convection distance parameter because of reduced reaction (or flux), and smaller local effectiveness factor due to the lower concentration in Michaelis-Menten type reactions. The reactor was more effective, and hence, more efficient with the smaller porous Damkohler number. The generalized results could find applications for the design of bioreactors with a porous wall.

  1. Microbial growth and transport in saturated and unsaturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hron, Pavel; Jost, Daniel; Bastian, Peter; Ippisch, Olaf

    2014-05-01

    There is a considerable ongoing effort aimed at understanding the behavior of microorganisms in porous media. Microbial activity is of significant interest in various environmental applications such as in situ bioremediation, protection of drinking water supplies and for subsurface geochemistry in general. The main limiting factors for bacterial growth are the availability of electron acceptors, nutrients and bio-available water. The capillary fringe, defined - in a wider sense than usual - as the region of the subsurface above the groundwater table, but still dominated by capillary rise, is a region where all these factors are abundantly available. It is thus a region where high microbial activity is to be expected. In a research unit 'Dynamic Capillary Fringes - A Multidisciplinary Approach (DyCap)' founded by the German Research Foundation (DFG), the growth of microorganisms in the capillary fringe was studied experimentally and with numerical simulations. Processes like component transport and diffusion, exchange between the liquid phase and the gas phase, microbial growth and cell attachment and detachment were incorporated into a numerical simulator. The growth of the facultative anaerobic Escherichia coli as a function of nutrient availability and oxygen concentration in the liquid phase is modeled with modified Monod-type models and modifications for the switch between aerobic and anaerobic growth. Laboratory batch experiments with aqueous solutions of bacteria have been carried out under various combinations of oxygen concentrations in the gas phase and added amounts of dissolved organic carbon to determine the growth model parameters by solution of a parameter estimation problem. For the transport of bacteria the adhesion to phase boundaries is also very important. As microorganisms are transported through porous media, they are removed from the pore fluid by physicochemical filtration (attachment to sediment grain surfaces) or are adhering to gas

  2. Coupled electric and transport phenomena in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Li, Shuai

    2014-01-01

    The coupled electrical and transport properties of clay-containing porous media are the topics of interest in this study. Both experimental and numerical (pore network modeling) techniques are employed to gain insight into the macro-scale interaction between electrical and solute transport phenomena

  3. Transport of multiple Escherichia coli strains in saturated porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lutterodt, G.

    2012-01-01

    The deviation of bacteria transport and deposition patterns on grains in porous media from theory has resulted in the inability to accurately predict transport distances in aquifers, with consequences of polluting drinking water sources (springs, boreholes and wells). Due to the importance of Escher

  4. Gas transport in tight porous media Gas kinetic approach

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Wesselingh, Johannes

    2008-01-01

    We describe the flow of gas in a porous medium in the kinetic regime, where the viscous flow structure is not formed in separate pores. Special attention is paid to the dense kinetic regime, where the interactions within the gas are as important as the interaction with the porous medium. The tran....... The role of the thermal gradient in the transport law is clarified. (c) 2007 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved....

  5. Combinatorial model of solute transport in porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    张妙仙; 张丽萍

    2004-01-01

    Modeling of solute transport is a key issue in the area of soil physics and hydrogeology. The most common approach (the convection-dispersion equation) considers an average convection flow rate and Fickian-like dispersion. Here,we propose a solute transport model in porous media of continuously expanding scale, according to the combinatorics principle. The model supposed actual porous media as a combinative body of many basic segments. First, we studied the solute transport process in each basic segment body, and then deduced the distribution of pore velocity in each basic segment body by difference approximation, finally assembled the solute transport process of each basic segment body into one of the combinative body. The simulation result coincided with the solute transport process observed in test. The model provides useful insight into the solute transport process of the non-Fickian dispersion in continuously expanding scale.

  6. Freezing in porous media: Phase behavior, dynamics and transport phenomena

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wettlaufer, John S. [Yale Univ., New Haven, CT (United States)

    2012-12-21

    This research was focused on developing the underlying framework for the mechanisms that control the nature of the solidification of a broad range of porous media. To encompass the scope of porous media under consideration we considered material ranging from a dilute colloidal suspension to a highly packed saturated host matrix with a known geometry. The basic physical processes that occur when the interstitial liquid phase solidifies revealed a host of surprises with a broad range of implications from geophysics to materials science and engineering. We now understand that ostensibly microscopic films of unfrozen liquid control both the equilibrium and transport properties of a highly packed saturated host matrix as well as a rather dilute colloidal suspension. However, our description of the effective medium behavior in these settings is rather different and this sets the stage for the future research based on our past results. Once the liquid phase of a saturated relatively densely packed material is frozen, there is a rich dynamical behavior of particles for example due to the directed motion driven by thermomolecular pressure gradients or the confined Brownian motion of the particles. In quite striking contrast, when one freezes a dilute suspension the behavior can be rather more like that of a binary alloy with the particles playing the role of a ``solute''. We probed such systems quantitatively by (i) using X ray photon correlation spectroscopy (XPCS) and Small Angle X-ray Scattering (SAXS) at the Advanced Photon Source at Argonne (ii) studying the Argonne cell in the laboratory using optical microscopy and imagery (because it is not directly visible while in the vacuum can). (3) analyzed the general transport phenomena within the framework of both irreversible thermodynamics and alloy solidification and (4) applied the results to the study of the redistribution of solid particles in a frozen interstitial material. This research has gone a long way

  7. Modelling of radon transport in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Graaf, E.R.; de Meijer, R.J.; Katase, A; Shimo, M

    1998-01-01

    This paper aims to describe the state of the art of modelling radon transport in soil on basis of multiphase radon transport equations. Emphasis is given to methods to obtain a consistent set of input parameters needed For such models. Model-measurement comparisons with the KVI radon transport Facil

  8. Transport of Polycyclic Aromatic Hydrocarbons in Unsaturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chahal, Maninder; Flury, Markus

    2016-04-01

    Polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs) are complex organic molecules containing 2 or more fused benzene rings. Being hydrophobic and non-polar, PAHs tend to partition to the organic matter in the soil from bulk aqueous phase. Though transport of these contaminants has been well studied in saturated environment, interactive mechanisms of these fluorescent compounds in unsaturated (identified by presence of air-water interface) porous media is still not well understood. We studied is the transport of fluoranthene in unsaturated porous media as facilitated by moving air-water interfaces. Confocal microscopy was used to visualize the interactions of fluoranthene particles in a glass channel packed with quartz glass beads. The packed glass channel was used to mimic a porous media and effects of an advancing and receding capillary fringe on the detachment of fluoranthene.

  9. CMT for transport in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Schwartz, L. [Schlumberger-Doll Research, Ridgefield, CT (United States)

    1997-02-01

    This session is comprised of an outline of uses for x-ray microtomography in the field of petroleum geology. Calculations, diagrams, and color photomicrographs depict the many applications of synchrotron x-ray microtomograpy in determining transport properties and fluid flow characteristics of reservoir rocks, micro-porosity in carbonates, and aspects of multi-phase transport.

  10. RECENT ADVANCES OF UPSCALING METHODS FOR THE SIMULATION OF FLOW TRANSPORT THROUGH HETEROGENEOUS POROUS MEDIA

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Zhiming Chen

    2006-01-01

    We review some of our recent efforts in developing upscaling methods for simulating the flow transport through heterogeneous porous media. In particular, the steady flow transport through highly heterogeneous porous media driven by extraction wells and the flow transport through unsaturated porous media will be considered.

  11. Dissipative particle dynamics model for colloid transport in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Pan, W.; Tartakovsky, A. M.

    2013-08-01

    We present that the transport of colloidal particles in porous media can be effectively modeled with a new formulation of dissipative particle dynamics, which augments standard DPD with non-central dissipative shear forces between particles while preserving angular momentum. Our previous studies have demonstrated that the new formulation is able to capture accurately the drag forces as well as the drag torques on colloidal particles that result from the hydrodynamic retardation effect. In the present work, we use the new formulation to study the contact efficiency in colloid filtration in saturated porous media. Note that the present model include all transport mechanisms simultaneously, including gravitational sedimentation, interception and Brownian diffusion. Our results of contact efficiency show a good agreement with the predictions of the correlation equation proposed by Tufenkji and EliMelech, which also incorporate all transport mechanisms simultaneously without the additivity assumption.

  12. Solute transport through porous media using asymptotic dispersivity

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    P K Sharma; Teodrose Atnafu Abgaze

    2015-08-01

    In this paper, multiprocess non-equilibrium transport equation has been used, which accounts for both physical and chemical non-equilibrium for reactive transport through porous media. An asymptotic distance dependent dispersivity is used to embrace the concept of scale-dependent dispersion for solute transport in heterogeneous porous media. Semi-analytical solution has been derived of the governing equations with an asymptotic distance dependent dispersivity by using Laplace transform technique and the power series method. For application of analytical model, we simulated observed experimental breakthrough curves from 1500 cm long soil column experiments conducted in the laboratory. The simulation results of break-through curves were found to deviate from the observed breakthrough curves for both mobile–immobile and multiprocess non-equilibrium transport with constant dispersion models. However, multiprocess non-equilibrium with an asymptotic dispersion model gives better fit of experimental breakthrough curves through long soil column and hence it is more useful for describing anomalous solute transport through hetero-geneous porous media. The present model is simpler than the stochastic numerical method.

  13. Langevin model for reactive transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tartakovsky, Alexandre M.

    2010-08-01

    Existing continuum models for reactive transport in porous media tend to overestimate the extent of solute mixing and mixing-controlled reactions because the continuum models treat both the mechanical and diffusive mixings as an effective Fickian process. Recently, we have proposed a phenomenological Langevin model for flow and transport in porous media [A. M. Tartakovsky, D. M. Tartakovsky, and P. Meakin, Phys. Rev. Lett. 101, 044502 (2008)10.1103/PhysRevLett.101.044502]. In the Langevin model, the fluid flow in a porous continuum is governed by a combination of a Langevin equation and a continuity equation. Pore-scale velocity fluctuations, the source of mechanical dispersion, are represented by the white noise. The advective velocity (the solution of the Langevin flow equation) causes the mechanical dispersion of a solute. Molecular diffusion and sub-pore-scale Taylor-type dispersion are modeled by an effective stochastic advection-diffusion equation. Here, we propose a method for parameterization of the model for a synthetic porous medium, and we use the model to simulate multicomponent reactive transport in the porous medium. The detailed comparison of the results of the Langevin model with pore-scale and continuum (Darcy) simulations shows that: (1) for a wide range of Peclet numbers the Langevin model predicts the mass of reaction product more accurately than the Darcy model; (2) for small Peclet numbers predictions of both the Langevin and the Darcy models agree well with a prediction of the pore-scale model; and (3) the accuracy of the Langevin and Darcy model deteriorates with the increasing Peclet number but the accuracy of the Langevin model decreases more slowly than the accuracy of the Darcy model. These results show that the separate treatment of advective and diffusive mixing in the stochastic transport model is more accurate than the classical advection-dispersion theory, which uses a single effective diffusion coefficient (the dispersion

  14. The effect of surface transport on water desalination by porous electrodes undergoing capacitive charging

    CERN Document Server

    Shocron, Amit N

    2016-01-01

    Capacitive deionization (CDI) is a technology in which water is desalinated by ion electrosorption into the electric double layers (EDLs) of charging porous electrodes. In recent years significant advances have been made in modeling the charge and salt dynamics in a CDI cell, but the possible effect of surface transport within diffuse EDLs on these dynamics has not been investigated. We here present theory which includes surface transport in describing the dynamics of a charging CDI cell. Through our numerical solution to the presented models, the possible effect of surface transport on the CDI process is elucidated. While at some model conditions surface transport enhances the rate of CDI cell charging, counter-intuitively this additional transport pathway is found to slow down cell charging at other model conditions.

  15. Uranium Oxide Aerosol Transport in Porous Graphite

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Blanchard, Jeremy; Gerlach, David C.; Scheele, Randall D.; Stewart, Mark L.; Reid, Bruce D.; Gauglitz, Phillip A.; Bagaasen, Larry M.; Brown, Charles C.; Iovin, Cristian; Delegard, Calvin H.; Zelenyuk, Alla; Buck, Edgar C.; Riley, Brian J.; Burns, Carolyn A.

    2012-01-23

    The objective of this paper is to investigate the transport of uranium oxide particles that may be present in carbon dioxide (CO2) gas coolant, into the graphite blocks of gas-cooled, graphite moderated reactors. The transport of uranium oxide in the coolant system, and subsequent deposition of this material in the graphite, of such reactors is of interest because it has the potential to influence the application of the Graphite Isotope Ratio Method (GIRM). The GIRM is a technology that has been developed to validate the declared operation of graphite moderated reactors. GIRM exploits isotopic ratio changes that occur in the impurity elements present in the graphite to infer cumulative exposure and hence the reactor’s lifetime cumulative plutonium production. Reference Gesh, et. al., for a more complete discussion on the GIRM technology.

  16. Transient transport processes in deformable porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Cs. Mészáros; (A). Bálint

    2011-01-01

    The basic partial differential equations relevant for convection-diffusion and convection-diffusion-wave phenomena are presented and solved analytically by using the MAPLE symbolic computer algebra system.The possible general nonlinear character of the constitutive equation of the convection-discussion process is replaced by a direct posteriori stochastic refinement of its solution represented for Dirichlet-type boundary conditions.A thermodynamic analysis is performed for connecting the relaxation time constants and Jacobi-determinants of deformations at transient transport processes.Finally,a new procedure for general description of coupled transport processes on the basis of the formalism originally developed for convection-free phenomena is presented by matrix analysis methods in the Fourier space.

  17. Transport properties of porous media from the microstructure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torquato, S. [Princeton Univ., NJ (United States)

    1995-12-31

    The determination of the effective transport properties of a random porous medium remains a challenging area of research because the properties depend on the microstructure in a highly complex fashion. This paper reviews recent theoretical and experimental progress that we have made on various aspects of this problem. A unified approach is taken to characterize the microstructure and the seemingly disparate properties of the medium.

  18. Dynamics of Coupled Contaminant and Microbial Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media: Purdue Component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, J.H.; Madilyn Fletcher

    2000-06-01

    Dynamic microbial attachment/detachment occurs in subsurface systems in response to changing environmental conditions caused by contaminant movement and degradation. Understanding the environmental conditions and mechanisms by which anaerobic bacteria partition between aqueous and solid phases is a critical requirement for designing and evaluating in situ bioremediation efforts. This interdisciplinary research project, of which we report only the Purdue contribution, provides fundamental information on the attachment/detachment dynamics of bacteria in heterogeneous porous media. Fundamental results from the Purdue collaboration are: (a) development of a matched-index method for obtaining 3-D Lagrangian trajectories of microbial sized particles transporting within porous media or microflow cells, (b) application of advanced numerical methods to optimally design a microflow cell for studying anaerobic bacterial attachment/detachment phenomena, (c) development of two types of models for simulating bacterial movement and attachment/detachment in microflow cells and natural porous media, (d) application of stochastic analysis to upscale pore scale microbial attachment/detachment models to natural heterogeneous porous media, and (e) evaluation of the role nonlocality plays in microbial dynamics in heterogeneous porous media

  19. Dynamics of Coupled Contaminant and Microbial Transport in Heterogeneous Porous Media: Purdue Component

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cushman, J.H.

    2000-06-01

    Dynamic microbial attachment/detachment occurs in subsurface systems in response to changing environmental conditions caused by contaminant movement and degradation. Understanding the environmental conditions and mechanisms by which anaerobic bacteria partition between aqueous and solid phases is a critical requirement for designing and evaluating in situ bioremediation efforts. This interdisciplinary research project, of which we report only the Purdue contribution, provides fundamental information on the attachment/detachment dynamics of bacteria in heterogeneous porous media. Fundamental results from the Purdue collaboration are: (a) development of a matched-index method for obtaining 3-D Lagrangian trajectories of microbial sized particles transporting within porous media or microflow cells, (b) application of advanced numerical methods to optimally design a microflow cell for studying anaerobic bacterial attachment/detachment phenomena, (c) development of two types of models for simulating bacterial movement and attachment/detachment in microflow cells and natural porous media, (d) application of stochastic analysis to upscale pore scale microbial attachment/detachment models to natural heterogeneous porous media, and (e) evaluation of the role nonlocality plays in microbial dynamics in heterogeneous porous media.

  20. Predicting release and transport of pesticides from a granular formulation during unsaturated diffusion in porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Paradelo Pérez, Marcos; Soto-Gómez, Diego; Pérez-Rodrígez, Paula

    2014-01-01

    The release and transport of active ingredients (AIs) from controlled-release formulations (CRFs) have potential to reduce groundwater pesticide pollution. These formulations have a major effect on the release rate and subsequent transport to groundwater. Therefore the influence of CRFs should...... be included in modeling non-point source pollution by pesticides. We propose a simplified approach that uses a phase transition equation coupled to the diffusion equation that describes the release rate of AIs from commercial CRFs in porous media; the parameters are as follows: a release coefficient......, the solubility of the AI, and diffusion transport with decay. The model gives acceptable predictions of the pesticides release from commercial CRFs in diffusion cells filled with quartz sand. This approach can be used to study the dynamics of the CRF-porous media interaction. It also could be implemented in fate...

  1. Evaluation of liquid aerosol transport through porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hall, R.; Murdoch, L.; Falta, R.; Looney, B.; Riha, B.

    2016-07-01

    Application of remediation methods in contaminated vadose zones has been hindered by an inability to effectively distribute liquid- or solid-phase amendments. Injection as aerosols in a carrier gas could be a viable method for achieving useful distributions of amendments in unsaturated materials. The objectives of this work were to characterize radial transport of aerosols in unsaturated porous media, and to develop capabilities for predicting results of aerosol injection scenarios at the field-scale. Transport processes were investigated by conducting lab-scale injection experiments with radial flow geometry, and predictive capabilities were obtained by developing and validating a numerical model for simulating coupled aerosol transport, deposition, and multi-phase flow in porous media. Soybean oil was transported more than 2 m through sand by injecting it as micron-scale aerosol droplets. Oil saturation in the sand increased with time to a maximum of 0.25, and decreased with radial distance in the experiments. The numerical analysis predicted the distribution of oil saturation with only minor calibration. The results indicated that evolution of oil saturation was controlled by aerosol deposition and subsequent flow of the liquid oil, and simulation requires including these two coupled processes. The calibrated model was used to evaluate field applications. The results suggest that amendments can be delivered to the vadose zone as aerosols, and that gas injection rate and aerosol particle size will be important controls on the process.

  2. Direct Numerical Simulation of Liquid Transport Through Fibrous Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palakurthi, Nikhil Kumar

    Fluid flow through fibrous media occurs in many industrial processes, including, but not limited, to fuel cell technology, drug delivery patches, sanitary products, textile reinforcement, filtration, heat exchangers, and performance fabrics. Understanding the physical processes involved in fluid flow through fibrous media is essential for their characterization as well as for the optimization and development of new products. Macroscopic porous-media equations require constitutive relations, which account for the physical processes occurring at the micro-scale, to predict liquid transport at the macro-scale. In this study, micro-scale simulations were conducted using conventional computational fluid dynamics (CFD) technique (finite-volume method) to determine the macroscopic constitutive relations. The first part of this thesis deals with the single-phase flow in fibrous media, following which multi-phase flow through fibrous media was studied. Darcy permeability is an important parameter that characterizes creeping flow through a fibrous porous medium. It has a complex dependence on the medium's properties such as fibers' in-plane and through-plane orientation, diameter, aspect ratio, curvature, and porosity. A suite of 3D virtual fibrous structures with a wide range of geometric properties were constructed, and the permeability values of the structures were calculated by solving the 3D incompressible Navier-Stokes equations. The through-plane permeability was found to be a function of only the fiber diameter, the fibers' through-plane orientation, and the porosity of the medium. The numerical results were used to extend a permeability-porosity relation, developed in literature for 3D isotropic fibrous media, to a wide range of fibers' through-plane orientations. In applications where rate of capillary penetration is important, characterization of porous media usually involves determination of either the effective pore radius from capillary penetration experiments

  3. Structural controls on anomalous transport in fractured porous rock

    Science.gov (United States)

    Edery, Yaniv; Geiger, Sebastian; Berkowitz, Brian

    2016-07-01

    Anomalous transport is ubiquitous in a wide range of disordered systems, notably in fractured porous formations. We quantitatively identify the structural controls on anomalous tracer transport in a model of a real fractured geological formation that was mapped in an outcrop. The transport, determined by a continuum scale mathematical model, is characterized by breakthrough curves (BTCs) that document anomalous (or "non-Fickian") transport, which is accounted for by a power law distribution of local transition times ψ>(t>) within the framework of a continuous time random walk (CTRW). We show that the determination of ψ>(t>) is related to fractures aligned approximately with the macroscopic direction of flow. We establish the dominant role of fracture alignment and assess the statistics of these fractures by determining a concentration-visitation weighted residence time histogram. We then convert the histogram to a probability density function (pdf) that coincides with the CTRW ψ>(t>) and hence anomalous transport. We show that the permeability of the geological formation hosting the fracture network has a limited effect on the anomalous nature of the transport; rather, it is the fractures transverse to the flow direction that play the major role in forming the long BTC tail associated with anomalous transport. This is a remarkable result, given the complexity of the flow field statistics as captured by concentration transitions.

  4. Multimodel framework for characterization of transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ciriello, Valentina; Edery, Yaniv; Guadagnini, Alberto; Berkowitz, Brian

    2015-05-01

    We consider modeling approaches to characterize solute transport in porous media, integrating them into a unique theoretical and experimental framework for model evaluation and data interpretation. To date, development of (conservative and reactive chemical) transport models and formulation of model calibration methods grounded on sensitivity-based collection of measurements have been pursued in parallel. Key questions that remain include: For a given set of measurements, which conceptual picture of the transport processes, as embodied in a mathematical model or models, is most appropriate? What are the most valuable space-time locations for solute concentration measurements, depending on the model selected? How is model parameter uncertainty propagated to model output, and how does this propagation affect model calibration? We address these questions by merging parallel streams of research—model formulation, reduction, calibration, sensitivity analysis, and discrimination—offering our view on an emerging framework that guides (i) selection of an appropriate number and location of time-dependent concentration measurements given a transport model and (ii) assessment (through discrimination criteria) of the relative benefit of applying any particular model from a set of several models. Our strategy is to employ metrics to quantify the relative contribution of each uncertain model parameter to the variability of the model output. We evaluate these metrics through construction of a surrogate (or "meta") transport model that has the additional benefit of enabling sensitivity analysis and model calibration at a highly reduced computational cost. We demonstrate the applicability of this framework, focusing on transport of reactive chemicals in laboratory-scale porous media.

  5. Influence of biofilms on transport properties in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davit, Y.

    2015-12-01

    Microbial activity and biofilm growth in porous media can drastically modify transport properties such as permeability, longitudinal and transverse dispersion or effective reaction rates. Understanding these effects has proven to be a considerable challenge. Advances in this field have been hindered by the difficulty of modeling and visualizing these multi-phase non-linear effects across a broad range of spatial and temporal scales. To address these issues, we are developing a strategy that combines imaging techniques based on x-ray micro-tomography with homogenization of pore-scale transport equations. Here, we review recent progress in x-ray imaging of biofilms in porous media, with a particular focus on the contrast agents that are used to differentiate between the fluid and biofilm phases. We further show how the 3D distribution of the different phases can be used to extract specific information about the biofilm and how effective properties can be calculated via the resolution of closure problems. These closure problems are obtained using the method of volume averaging and must be adapted to the problem of interest. In hydrological systems, we show that a generic formulation for reactive solute transport is based on a domain decomposition approach at the micro-scale yielding macro-scale models reminiscent of multi-rate mass transfer approaches.

  6. Numerical investigation of nanoparticles transport in anisotropic porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salama, Amgad; Negara, Ardiansyah; El Amin, Mohamed; Sun, Shuyu

    2015-10-01

    In this work the problem related to the transport of nanoparticles in anisotropic porous media is investigated numerically using the multipoint flux approximation. Anisotropy of porous media properties is an essential feature that exists almost everywhere in subsurface formations. In anisotropic media, the flux and the pressure gradient vectors are no longer collinear and therefore interesting patterns emerge. The transport of nanoparticles in subsurface formations is affected by several complex processes including surface charges, heterogeneity of nanoparticles and soil grain collectors, interfacial dynamics of double-layer and many others. We use the framework of the theory of filtration in this investigation. Processes like particles deposition, entrapment, as well as detachment are accounted for. From the numerical methods point of view, traditional two-point flux finite difference approximation cannot handle anisotropy of media properties. Therefore, in this work we use the multipoint flux approximation (MPFA). In this technique, the flux components are affected by more neighboring points as opposed to the mere two points that are usually used in traditional finite volume methods. We also use the experimenting pressure field approach which automatically constructs the global system of equations by solving multitude of local problems. This approach facilitates to a large extent the construction of the global system. A set of numerical examples is considered involving two-dimensional rectangular domain. A source of nanoparticles is inserted in the middle of the anisotropic layer. We investigate the effects of both anisotropy angle and anisotropy ratio on the transport of nanoparticles in saturated porous media. It is found that the concentration plume and porosity contours follow closely the principal direction of anisotropy of permeability of the central domain.

  7. Numerical investigation of nanoparticles transport in anisotropic porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Salama, Amgad

    2015-07-13

    In this work the problem related to the transport of nanoparticles in anisotropic porous media is investigated numerically using the multipoint flux approximation. Anisotropy of porous media properties are an essential feature that exist almost everywhere in subsurface formations. In anisotropic media, the flux and the pressure gradient vectors are no longer collinear and therefore interesting patterns emerge. The transport of nanoparticles in subsurface formations is affected by several complex processes including surface charges, heterogeneity of nanoparticles and soil grain collectors, interfacial dynamics of double-layer and many others. We use the framework of the theory of filtration in this investigation. Processes like particles deposition, entrapment, as well as detachment are accounted for. From the numerical methods point of view, traditional two-point flux finite difference approximation cannot handle anisotropy of media properties. Therefore, in this work we use the multipoint flux approximation (MPFA). In this technique, the flux components are affected by more neighboring points as opposed to the mere two points that are usually used in traditional finite volume methods. We also use the experimenting pressure field approach which automatically constructs the global system of equations by solving multitude of local problems. This approach facilitates to a large extent the construction of the global system. A set of numerical examples is considered involving two-dimensional rectangular domain. A source of nanoparticles is inserted in the middle of the anisotropic layer. We investigate the effects of both anisotropy angle and anisotropy ratio on the transport of nanoparticles in saturated porous media. It is found that the concentration plume and porosity contours follow closely the principal direction of anisotropy of permeability of the central domain.

  8. Fuel cell with interdigitated porous flow-field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wilson, Mahlon S.

    1997-01-01

    A polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cell is formed with an improved system for distributing gaseous reactants to the membrane surface. A PEM fuel cell has an ionic transport membrane with opposed catalytic surfaces formed thereon and separates gaseous reactants that undergo reactions at the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The fuel cell may also include a thin gas diffusion layer having first and second sides with a first side contacting at least one of the catalytic surfaces. A macroporous flow-field with interdigitated inlet and outlet reactant channels contacts the second side of the thin gas diffusion layer for distributing one of the gaseous reactants over the thin gas diffusion layer for transport to an adjacent one of the catalytic surfaces of the membrane. The porous flow field may be formed from a hydrophilic material and provides uniform support across the backside of the electrode assembly to facilitate the use of thin backing layers.

  9. Bacteria transport through porous media. Annual report, December 31, 1984

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yen, T.F.

    1986-09-01

    The following five chapters in this report have been processed separately for inclusion in the Energy Data Base: (1) theoretical model of convective diffusion of motile and non-motile bacteria toward solid surfaces; (2) interfacial electrochemistry of oxide surfaces in oil-bearing sands and sandstones; (3) effects of sodium pyrophosphate additive on the ''huff and puff''/nutrient flooding MEOR process; (4) interaction of Escherichia coli B, B/4, and bacteriophage T4D with Berea sandstone rock in relation to enhanced oil recovery; and (5) transport of bacteria in porous media and its significance in microbial enhanced oil recovery.

  10. Modelling multiphase flow inside the porous media of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    Transport processes inside polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFC’s) are highly complex and involve convective and diffusive multiphase, multispecies flow through porous media along with heat and mass transfer and electrochemical reactions in conjunction with water transport through an el...

  11. On the transport of emulsions in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cortis, Andrea; Ghezzehei, Teamrat A.

    2007-06-27

    Emulsions appear in many subsurface applications includingbioremediation, surfactant-enhanced remediation, and enhancedoil-recovery. Modeling emulsion transport in porous media is particularlychallenging because the rheological and physical properties of emulsionsare different from averages of the components. Current modelingapproaches are based on filtration theories, which are not suited toadequately address the pore-scale permeability fluctuations and reductionof absolute permeability that are often encountered during emulsiontransport. In this communication, we introduce a continuous time randomwalk based alternative approach that captures these unique features ofemulsion transport. Calculations based on the proposed approach resultedin excellent match with experimental observations of emulsionbreakthrough from the literature. Specifically, the new approach explainsthe slow late-time tailing behavior that could not be fitted using thestandard approach. The theory presented in this paper also provides animportant stepping stone toward a generalizedself-consistent modeling ofmultiphase flow.

  12. Platinum Porous Electrodes for Fuel Cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Shuang Ma

    Fuel cell energy bears the merits of renewability, cleanness and high efficiency. Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell (PEMFC) is one of the most promising candidates as the power source in the near future. A fine management of different transports and electrochemical reactions in PEM fuel cells is...

  13. Modeling of surfactant transport and adsorption in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chung, F.T.H.

    1991-04-01

    When surfactant solution is flowing in a reservoir formation, surfactants will be diluted by flow dispersion, retained in dead-end pores, adsorbed on rock surfaces, or precipitated due to ion exchange. The loss of surfactant will be detrimental to the performance of gas foam. Information of surfactant concentration profiles in reservoir formations is essential for gas foaming technique development. The major objective of this research is to investigate with mathematical models the transport and dynamic adsorption of surfactants in porous media. The mathematical models have taken into account the convection, dispersion, capacitance, and adsorption effects on concentrations of surfactants. Numerical methods and computer programs have been developed which can be used to match experimental results and to determine the characterization parameters in the models. The models can be included in foam simulation programs to calculate surfactant concentration profiles in porous media. A flow experimental method was developed to measure the effluent surfactant concentration, which will be used to determine the model parameters. Commercial foaming agent Alipal CD-128 was used in this study. Equilibrium adsorption and surfactant precipitation have been tested. Tracer solutions with a nonadsorbing solute such as dextrose and sucrose were used to determine the dispersion parameters for the experimental sandpack; thus, the adsorption of the surfactant in the test sand can be identified with an adequate model. 49 refs., 21 figs.

  14. Charge transport in dye-sensitized solar cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yanagida, Masatoshi

    2015-03-01

    The effect of charge transport on the photovoltaic properties of dye-sensitized solar cells (DSCs) was investigated by the experimental results and the ion transport. The short current photocurrent density (Jsc) is determined by the electron transport in porous TiO2 when the diffusion limited current (Jdif) due to the {{I}3}- transport is larger than the photo-generated electron flux (Jg) estimated from the light harvesting efficiency of dye-sensitized porous TiO2 and the solar spectrum. However, the Jsc value is determined by the ion transport in the electrolyte solution at Jdif Nanotechnology IWAMSN2014, 2-6 November, 2014, Ha Long, Vietnam.

  15. Colloid suspension stability and transport through unsaturated porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    McGraw, M.A.; Kaplan, D.I.

    1997-04-01

    Contaminant transport is traditionally modeled in a two-phase system: a mobile aqueous phase and an immobile solid phase. Over the last 15 years, there has been an increasing awareness of a third, mobile solid phase. This mobile solid phase, or mobile colloids, are organic or inorganic submicron-sized particles that move with groundwater flow. When colloids are present, the net effect on radionuclide transport is that radionuclides can move faster through the system. It is not known whether mobile colloids exist in the subsurface environment of the Hanford Site. Furthermore, it is not known if mobile colloids would likely exist in a plume emanating from a Low Level Waste (LLW) disposal site. No attempt was made in this study to ascertain whether colloids would form. Instead, experiments and calculations were conducted to evaluate the likelihood that colloids, if formed, would remain in suspension and move through saturated and unsaturated sediments. The objectives of this study were to evaluate three aspects of colloid-facilitated transport of radionuclides as they specifically relate to the LLW Performance Assessment. These objectives were: (1) determine if the chemical conditions likely to exist in the near and far field of the proposed disposal site are prone to induce flocculation (settling of colloids from suspension) or dispersion of naturally occurring Hanford colloids, (2) identify the important mechanisms likely involved in the removal of colloids from a Hanford sediment, and (3) determine if colloids can move through unsaturated porous media.

  16. Measurement and modeling of engineered nanoparticle transport and aging dynamics in a reactive porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Naftaly, Aviv; Dror, Ishai; Berkowitz, Brian

    2016-07-01

    A continuous time random walk particle tracking (CTRW-PT) method was employed to model flow cell experiments that measured transport of engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) in a reactive porous medium. The experiments involved a water-saturated medium containing negatively charged, polyacrylamide beads, resembling many natural soils and aquifer materials, and having the same refraction index as water. Negatively and positively charged ENPs were injected into a uniform flow field in a 3-D horizontal flow cell, and the spatial and temporal concentrations of the evolving ENP plumes were obtained via image analysis. As a benchmark, and to calibrate the model, Congo red tracer was employed in 1-D column and 3-D flow cell experiments, containing the same beads. Negatively charged Au and Ag ENPs demonstrated migration patterns resembling those of the tracer but were slightly more dispersive; the transport was well represented by the CTRW-PT model. In contrast, positively charged AgNPs displayed an unusual behavior: establishment of an initial plume of essentially immobilized ENPs, followed by development of a secondary, freely migrating plume. The mobile plume was found to contain ENPs that, with aging, exhibited aggregation and charge inversion, becoming negatively charged and mobile. In this case, the CTRW-PT model was modified to include a probabilistic law for particle immobilization, to account for the decreasing tendency (over distance and time) of the positively charged AgNPs to attach to the porous medium. The agreement between experimental results and modeling suggests that the CTRW-PT framework can account for the non-Fickian and surface-charge-dependent transport and aging exhibited by ENPs in porous media.

  17. Humic acid transport in saturated porous media:Influence of flow velocity and influent concentration

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Xiaorong Wei; Mingan Shao; Lina Du; Robert Horton

    2014-01-01

    Understanding the transport of humic acids (HAs) in porous media can provide important and practical evidence needed for accurate prediction of organic/inorganic contaminant transport in different environmental media and interfaces.A series of column transport experiments was conducted to evaluate the transport of HA in different porous media at different flow velocities and influent HA concentrations.Low flow velocity and influent concentration were found to favor the adsorption and deposition of HA onto sand grains packed into columns and to give higher equilibrium distribution coefficients and deposition rate coefficients,which resulted in an increased fraction of HA being retained in columns.Consequently,retardation factors were increased and the transport of HA through the columns was delayed.These results suggest that the transport of HA in porous media is primarily controlled by the attachment of HA to the solid matrix.Accordingly,this attachment should be considered in studies of HA behavior in porous media.

  18. Humic acid transport in saturated porous media: influence of flow velocity and influent concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wei, Xiaorong; Shao, Mingan; Du, Lina; Horton, Robert

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the transport of humic acids (HAs) in porous media can provide important and practical evidence needed for accurate prediction of organic/inorganic contaminant transport in different environmental media and interfaces. A series of column transport experiments was conducted to evaluate the transport of HA in different porous media at different flow velocities and influent HA concentrations. Low flow velocity and influent concentration were found to favor the adsorption and deposition of HA onto sand grains packed into columns and to give higher equilibrium distribution coefficients and deposition rate coefficients, which resulted in an increased fraction of HA being retained in columns. Consequently, retardation factors were increased and the transport of HA through the columns was delayed. These results suggest that the transport of HA in porous media is primarily controlled by the attachment of HA to the solid matrix. Accordingly, this attachment should be considered in studies of HA behavior in porous media.

  19. Window on a microworld: simple microfluidic systems for studying microbial transport in porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Markov, Dmitry A; Samson, Philip C; Schaffer, David K; Dhummakupt, Adit; Wikswo, John P; Shor, Leslie M

    2010-05-03

    Microbial growth and transport in porous media have important implications for the quality of groundwater and surface water, the recycling of nutrients in the environment, as well as directly for the transmission of pathogens to drinking water supplies. Natural porous media is composed of an intricate physical topology, varied surface chemistries, dynamic gradients of nutrients and electron acceptors, and a patchy distribution of microbes. These features vary substantially over a length scale of microns, making the results of macro-scale investigations of microbial transport difficult to interpret, and the validation of mechanistic models challenging. Here we demonstrate how simple microfluidic devices can be used to visualize microbial interactions with micro-structured habitats, to identify key processes influencing the observed phenomena, and to systematically validate predictive models. Simple, easy-to-use flow cells were constructed out of the transparent, biocompatible and oxygen-permeable material poly(dimethyl siloxane). Standard methods of photolithography were used to make micro-structured masters, and replica molding was used to cast micro-structured flow cells from the masters. The physical design of the flow cell chamber is adaptable to the experimental requirements: microchannels can vary from simple linear connections to complex topologies with feature sizes as small as 2 microm. Our modular EcoChip flow cell array features dozens of identical chambers and flow control by a gravity-driven flow module. We demonstrate that through use of EcoChip devices, physical structures and pressure heads can be held constant or varied systematically while the influence of surface chemistry, fluid properties, or the characteristics of the microbial population is investigated. Through transport experiments using a non-pathogenic, green fluorescent protein-expressing Vibrio bacterial strain, we illustrate the importance of habitat structure, flow conditions, and

  20. Transport of carbon-based nanoparticles in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fagerlund, Fritjof; Hedayati, Maryeh; Sharma, Prabhakar; Katyal, Deeksha

    2015-04-01

    Carbon-based nanoparticles (NPs) are commonly occurring, both with origin from natural sources such as fires, and in the form of man-made, engineered nanoparticles, manufactured and widely used in many applications due to their unique properties. Toxicity of carbonbased NPs has been observed, and their release and distribution into the environment is therefore a matter of concern. In this research, transport and retention of three types of carbon-based NPs in saturated porous media were investigated. This included two types of engineered NPs; multi-walled carbon nanotubes (MWCNTs) and C60 with cylindrical and spherical shapes, respectively, and natural carbon NPs in the extinguishing water collected at a site of a building fire. Several laboratory experiments were conducted to study the transport and mobility of NPs in a sand-packed column. The effect of ionic strength on transport of the NPs with different shapes was investigated. Results were interpreted using Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) theory. It was observed that the mobility of the two types of engineered NPs was reduced with an increase in ionic strength from 1.3 mM to 60 mM. However, at ionic strength up to 10.9 mM, C60 was relatively more mobile than MWCNTs but the mobility of MWCNTs became significantly higher than C60 at 60 mM. In comparison with natural particles originating from a fire, both engineered NPs were much less mobile at the selected experimental condition. Inverse modelling was also used to calculate parameters such as attachment efficiency, the longitudinal dispersivity, and capacity of the solid phase for the removal of particles. The simulated results were in good agreement with the observed data.

  1. Pore-network modeling of solute transport and biofilm growth in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Qin, Chao Zhong; Hassanizadeh, S. Majid

    2015-01-01

    In this work, a pore-network (PN) model for solute transport and biofilm growth in porous media was developed. Compared to previous studies of biofilm growth, it has two new features. First, the constructed pore network gives a better representation of a porous medium. Second, instead of using a con

  2. Electrochemical removal of NOx with porous cell stacks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werchmeister, Rebecka Maria Larsen; Kammer Hansen, Kent; Mogensen, Mogens Bjerg

    2010-01-01

    In this study porous cell stacks were investigated for their ability to remove NOx electrochemically. The cell stacks were made from laminated tapes of porous electrolyte Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95 and composite electrodes of La1−xSrxMnO3 (x = 0.15, and 0.5) and ceria doped with Gd or Pr. The cell stacks were...

  3. P type porous silicon resistivity and carrier transport

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ménard, S., E-mail: samuel.menard@st.com [STMicroelectronics, 10, rue Thalès de Milet, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Fèvre, A. [STMicroelectronics, 10, rue Thalès de Milet, 37071 Tours Cedex 2 (France); Université François Rabelais de Tours, CNRS, CEA, INSA CVL, GREMAN UMR 7347, Tours (France); Billoué, J.; Gautier, G. [Université François Rabelais de Tours, CNRS, CEA, INSA CVL, GREMAN UMR 7347, Tours (France)

    2015-09-14

    The resistivity of p type porous silicon (PS) is reported on a wide range of PS physical properties. Al/PS/Si/Al structures were used and a rigorous experimental protocol was followed. The PS porosity (P{sub %}) was found to be the major contributor to the PS resistivity (ρ{sub PS}). ρ{sub PS} increases exponentially with P{sub %}. Values of ρ{sub PS} as high as 1 × 10{sup 9} Ω cm at room temperature were obtained once P{sub %} exceeds 60%. ρ{sub PS} was found to be thermally activated, in particular, when the temperature increases from 30 to 200 °C, a decrease of three decades is observed on ρ{sub PS}. Based on these results, it was also possible to deduce the carrier transport mechanisms in PS. For P{sub %} lower than 45%, the conduction occurs through band tails and deep levels in the tissue surrounding the crystallites. When P{sub %} overpasses 45%, electrons at energy levels close to the Fermi level allow a hopping conduction from crystallite to crystallite to appear. This study confirms the potential of PS as an insulating material for applications such as power electronic devices.

  4. Transport in Porous Fins From Laminar to Turbulent Regime

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coletti, Filippo; Muramatsu, Kenshiro; Furciniti, Brian; Elkins, Chris; Eaton, John

    2012-11-01

    Lotus type porous metal has elongated pores of random size and spatial distribution but a common orientation. Sets of so-called lotus fins are obtained by slicing the metal into thin layers and stacking them in the flow path, forcing the fluid to pass through the pores. Lotus fins represent a promising alternative to metal foam heat exchangers, because they offer higher thermal conductivity and lower pressure drop. We have experimentally analyzed the fluid flow and heat transfer in lotus fins to determine their transport properties in a range of flow regimes. The investigated Reynolds numbers based on the pore diameter and inner velocity ranged from 100 to 4000. Three-dimensional mean velocity fields were obtained by magnetic resonance velocimetry performed on magnified replicas of the fins, allowing determination of the mechanical dispersion imposed by the random structure of the fins. Thermal measurements on non-conductive fins provided the global diffusivity coefficient, which accounts for molecular, mechanical and (at high Reynolds number) turbulent diffusion. The latter contribution was isolated and its relevance assessed as a function of the flow regime.

  5. Selection of bacteria with favorable transport properties through porous rock for the application of microbial-enhanced oil recovery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jang, L K; Chang, P W; Findley, J E; Yen, T F

    1983-11-01

    This paper presents a bench-scale study on the transport in highly permeable porous rock of three bacterial species-Bacillus subtilis, Pseudomonas putida, and Clostridium acetobutylicum-potentially applicable in microbial-enhanced oil recovery processes. The transport of cells during the injection of bacterial suspension and nutrient medium was simulated by a deep bed filtration model. Deep bed filtration coefficients and the maximum capacity of cells in porous rock were measured. Low to intermediate ( approximately 10/ml) injection concentrations of cellular suspensions are recommended because plugging of inlet surface is less likely to occur. In addition to their resistance to adverse environments, spores of clostridia are strongly recommended for use in microbial-enhanced oil recovery processes since they are easiest among the species tested to push through porous rock. After injection, further transport of bacteria during incubation can occur by growth and mobility through the stagnant nutrient medium which fills the porous rock. We have developed an apparatus to study the migration of bacteria through a Berea sandstone core containing nutrient medium.

  6. Process modelling in the porous molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) cathode

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jewulski, J.

    1986-09-01

    An isotropic, one-dimensional, complex model of the porous NiO cathode for a molten carbonate fuel cell (MCFC) is considered with the general assumptions as previously described for the MCFC anode. A reaction mechanism for the NiO cathode is proposed and discussed as well as 'effective' quantities in the porous electrode. Gas phase transport limitations of reagents are discussed on the basis of the 'dusty gas' model. The model equations are solved numerically for half-cell polarizations and the results are in good agreement with different experimental investigations.

  7. Control and optimization of solute transport in a thin porous tube

    KAUST Repository

    Griffiths, I. M.

    2013-03-01

    Predicting the distribution of solutes or particles in flows within porous-walled tubes is essential to inform the design of devices that rely on cross-flow filtration, such as those used in water purification, irrigation devices, field-flow fractionation, and hollow-fibre bioreactors for tissue-engineering applications. Motivated by these applications, a radially averaged model for fluid and solute transport in a tube with thin porous walls is derived by developing the classical ideas of Taylor dispersion. The model includes solute diffusion and advection via both radial and axial flow components, and the advection, diffusion, and uptake coefficients in the averaged equation are explicitly derived. The effect of wall permeability, slip, and pressure differentials upon the dispersive solute behaviour are investigated. The model is used to explore the control of solute transport across the membrane walls via the membrane permeability, and a parametric expression for the permeability required to generate a given solute distribution is derived. The theory is applied to the specific example of a hollow-fibre membrane bioreactor, where a uniform delivery of nutrient across the membrane walls to the extra-capillary space is required to promote spatially uniform cell growth. © 2013 American Institute of Physics.

  8. Pulse-reverse electrodeposition of transparent nickel phosphide film with porous nanospheres as a cost-effective counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Mao-Sung; Wu, Jia-Fang

    2013-12-01

    A Ni2P nanolayer with porous nanospheres was directly coated on fluorine-doped tin oxide glass by pulse-reverse deposition as a low-cost counter electrode catalyst for dye-sensitized solar cells, and the photoelectron conversion efficiency of the cell was increased to 7.32% by using a porous nanosphere catalyst due to the significantly improved ion transport.

  9. Impact of pore size variability and network coupling on electrokinetic transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alizadeh, Shima; Bazant, Martin Z.; Mani, Ali

    2016-11-01

    We have developed and validated an efficient and robust computational model to study the coupled fluid and ion transport through electrokinetic porous media, which are exposed to external gradients of pressure, electric potential, and concentration. In our approach a porous media is modeled as a network of many pores through which the transport is described by the coupled Poisson-Nernst-Planck-Stokes equations. When the pore sizes are random, the interactions between various modes of transport may provoke complexities such as concentration polarization shocks and internal flow circulations. These phenomena impact mixing and transport in various systems including deionization and filtration systems, supercapacitors, and lab-on-a-chip devices. In this work, we present simulations of massive networks of pores and we demonstrate the impact of pore size variation, and pore-pore coupling on the overall electrokinetic transport in porous media.

  10. DNA Transport in Nanoparticle Porous-Wall Nanochannels

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-08-04

    field. Electrode Fluid drop Electrode Nanochannels V V Electrode Electrode Filter Fluorescent light Excitation laser beam CCD the drops in the wells...cross channels and porous layer as separation media . Two layer chips which gave possibility not only to filter but also to collect separated...AGENCY NAME(S) AND ADDRESS (ES) U.S. Army Research Office P.O. Box 12211 Research Triangle Park, NC 27709-2211 nanochannels, porous media , DNA

  11. Seeking New Model Geometry to Predict the Fate and Transport of Colloids in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ma, H.; Johnson, W. P.

    2008-12-01

    Classic colloidal filtration theory (CFT) employed particle tracking approaches in Happel sphere-in-cell model to predict transport and deposition rates of colloids in clean bed porous media. It works well when an energy barrier to deposition is absent, but fails when repulsion exists between the colloid and the collecting surface. Past efforts in modifying CFT, e.g. including a sticking coefficient to account for effect of colloid-collector repulsion on deposition, have not yielded consistently successful predictions. Recent advances in understanding colloidal retention in porous media in the presence of an energy barrier demonstrated two important deposition mechanisms: 1) wedging/straining at grain-to-grain contacts; and 2) retention at secondary energy minima with sufficiently low flow (e.g. flow stagnation zones). These mechanisms are not considered in CFT, partly because the sphere-in-cell model on which CFT is based lacks the necessary pore geometry feature (e.g. grain-to-grain contacts). Here we explore new model geometries that utilize the fluid envelope feature from CFT, but also incorporate grain-to-grain contacts. This presentation describes the testing of these new model geometries in predicting colloidal deposition in the absence of an energy barrier, and then extends to conditions when repulsive energy barriers to deposition are present.

  12. Systematic characterization of porosity and mass transport and mechanical properties of porous polyurethane scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yu-Fu; Barrera, Carlos M; Dauer, Edward A; Gu, Weiyong; Andreopoulos, Fotios; Huang, C-Y Charles

    2017-01-01

    One of the key challenges in porous scaffold design is to create a porous structure with desired mechanical function and mass transport properties which support delivery of biofactors and development of function tissue substitute. In recent years, polyurethane (PU) has become one of the most popular biomaterials in various tissue engineering fields. However, there are no studies fully investigating the relations between porosity and both mass transport and mechanical properties of PU porous scaffolds. In this paper, we fabricated PU scaffolds by combining phase inversion and salt (sodium chloride) leaching methods. The tensile and compressive moduli were examined on PU scaffolds fabricated with different PU concentrations (25%, 20% and 15% w/v) and salt/PU weight ratios (9/1, 6/1, 3/1 and 0/1). The mass transport properties of PU scaffolds including hydraulic permeability and glucose diffusivity were also measured. Furthermore, the relationships between the porosity and mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffold were systemically investigated. The results demonstrated that porosity is a key parameter which governs both mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffolds. With similar pore sizes, the mass transport and mechanical properties of porous PU scaffold can be described as single functions of porosity regardless of initial PU concentration. The relationships between scaffold porosity and properties can be utilized to facilitate porous PU scaffold fabrication with specific mass transport and mechanical properties. The systematic approach established in this study can be applied to characterization of other biomaterials for scaffold design and fabrication.

  13. Flame-made ultra-porous TiO2 layers for perovskite solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayon, Yahuitl Osorio; Duong, The; Nasiri, Noushin; White, Thomas P; Tricoli, Antonio; Catchpole, Kylie R

    2016-12-16

    We report methyl ammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) solar cells with an ultra-porous TiO2 electron transport layer fabricated using sequential flame aerosol and atomic layer depositions of porous and compact TiO2 layers. Flame aerosol pyrolysis allows rapid deposition of nanostructured and ultra-porous TiO2 layers that could be easily scaled-up for high-throughput low-cost industrial solar cell production. An efficiency of 13.7% was achieved with a flame-made nanostructured and ultra-porous TiO2 electrode that was coated with a compact 2 nm TiO2 layer. This demonstrates that MAPbI3 solar cells with a flame-made porous TiO2 layer can have a comparable efficiency to that of the control MAPbI3 solar cell with the well-established spin-coated porous TiO2 layer. The combination of flame aerosol and atomic layer deposition provides precise control of the TiO2 porosity. Notably, the porosity of the as-deposited flame-made TiO2 layers was 97% which was then fine-tuned down to 87%, 56% and 35% by varying the thickness of the subsequent compact TiO2 coating step. The effects of the decrease in porosity on the device performance are discussed. It is also shown that MAPbI3 easily infiltrates into the flame-made porous TiO2 nanostructure thanks to their high porosity and large pore size.

  14. Flame-made ultra-porous TiO2 layers for perovskite solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio Mayon, Yahuitl; Duong, The; Nasiri, Noushin; White, Thomas P.; Tricoli, Antonio; Catchpole, Kylie R.

    2016-12-01

    We report methyl ammonium lead iodide (MAPbI3) solar cells with an ultra-porous TiO2 electron transport layer fabricated using sequential flame aerosol and atomic layer depositions of porous and compact TiO2 layers. Flame aerosol pyrolysis allows rapid deposition of nanostructured and ultra-porous TiO2 layers that could be easily scaled-up for high-throughput low-cost industrial solar cell production. An efficiency of 13.7% was achieved with a flame-made nanostructured and ultra-porous TiO2 electrode that was coated with a compact 2 nm TiO2 layer. This demonstrates that MAPbI3 solar cells with a flame-made porous TiO2 layer can have a comparable efficiency to that of the control MAPbI3 solar cell with the well-established spin-coated porous TiO2 layer. The combination of flame aerosol and atomic layer deposition provides precise control of the TiO2 porosity. Notably, the porosity of the as-deposited flame-made TiO2 layers was 97% which was then fine-tuned down to 87%, 56% and 35% by varying the thickness of the subsequent compact TiO2 coating step. The effects of the decrease in porosity on the device performance are discussed. It is also shown that MAPbI3 easily infiltrates into the flame-made porous TiO2 nanostructure thanks to their high porosity and large pore size.

  15. Elliptic random-walk equation for suspension and tracer transport in porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Shapiro, Alexander; Bedrikovetsky, P. G.

    2008-01-01

    We propose a new approach to transport of the suspensions and tracers in porous media. The approach is based on a modified version of the continuous time random walk (CTRW) theory. In the framework of this theory we derive an elliptic transport equation. The new equation contains the time...

  16. Carbon monoxide as a tracer of gas transport in snow and other natural porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Huwald, H.; Selker, J.S.; Tyler, S.W.; Calaf, M.; Van de Giesen, N.C.; Parlange, M.B.

    2012-01-01

    The movement of air in natural porous media is complex and challenging to measure. Yet gas transport has important implications, for instance, for the evolution of the seasonal snow cover and for water vapor transport in soil. A novel in situmulti-sensor measurement system providing high-resolution

  17. Theoretical analysis of moisture transport in wood as an open porous hygroscopic material

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hozjan, Tomaz; Svensson, Staffan

    2010-01-01

    Moisture transport in an open porous hygroscopic material such as wood is a complex system of coupled processes. For seasoned wood in natural climate three fully coupled processes active in the moisture transport are readily identified: (1) diffusion of vapor in pores; (2) phase change from one...

  18. Modeling tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous porous media by nonlocal moment equations: Anomalous transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morales-Casique, E.; Lezama-Campos, J. L.; Guadagnini, A.; Neuman, S. P.

    2013-05-01

    Modeling tracer transport in geologic porous media suffers from the corrupt characterization of the spatial distribution of hydrogeologic properties of the system and the incomplete knowledge of processes governing transport at multiple scales. Representations of transport dynamics based on a Fickian model of the kind considered in the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) fail to capture (a) the temporal variation associated with the rate of spreading of a tracer, and (b) the distribution of early and late arrival times which are often observed in field and/or laboratory scenarios and are considered as the signature of anomalous transport. Elsewhere we have presented exact stochastic moment equations to model tracer transport in randomly heterogeneous aquifers. We have also developed a closure scheme which enables one to provide numerical solutions of such moment equations at different orders of approximations. The resulting (ensemble) average and variance of concentration fields were found to display a good agreement against Monte Carlo - based simulation results for mildly heterogeneous (or well-conditioned strongly heterogeneous) media. Here we explore the ability of the moment equations approach to describe the distribution of early arrival times and late time tailing effects which can be observed in Monte-Carlo based breakthrough curves (BTCs) of the (ensemble) mean concentration. We show that BTCs of mean resident concentration calculated at a fixed space location through higher-order approximations of moment equations display long tailing features of the kind which is typically associated with anomalous transport behavior and are not represented by an ADE model with constant dispersive parameter, such as the zero-order approximation.

  19. Effects of Heterogeneity on Transport of Graphene Oxide in Saturated and Unsaturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, S.; Sun, Y.; Shi, X.; Wu, J.; Gao, B.

    2015-12-01

    Graphene oxide (GO) has received increasing attention in many fields with its wide applications and rapid growth in production. Therefore, it is expected that GO nanoparticles will inevitably be released into the subsurface and cause the environmental risk subsequently. In view of this, knowledge of the fate for GO in the vadose zone and groundwater systems is indispensable. So far most research has focused on the deposition and transport of GO nanoparticles in one-dimensional homogenous porous media; nonetheless, the complex heterogeneous system is extensively distributed in natural subsurface environment and may not be well represented by the homogeneous packed columns. However, little investigations have been directed toward understanding the transport of GO in heterogeneous porous media. The overarching objective of this study is to advance current understanding of GO transport in structured heterogeneous porous media. The saturated and unsaturated columns packed with different sand combinations and solution ionic strength, were used to examine the breakthrough behavior of GO in heterogeneous porous media. A two-domain model considering GO exchange between zones was developed to describe GO transport in structured, heterogeneous porous media. The experimental data indicate that volumetric moisture content and water flow are the critical factors that control GO transport in heterogeneous porous media. And higher ionic strength decrease the mobility of GO particles in both saturated and unsaturated heterogeneous pore media. Simulations of this two-domain nanoparticle transport model matched experimental breakthrough data well for all the experimental conditions. Experimental and model results show that under saturated conditions, both fast-flow and slow-flow domains affect colloid transport in heterogeneous media. Under unsaturated conditions, however, our results indicate that flows in the fast flow domain dominate the colloid transport and retention processes.

  20. Characterization of thermal, optical and carrier transport properties of porous silicon using the photoacoustic technique

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sheng, Chan Kok [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Mahmood Mat Yunus, W. [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia)], E-mail: mahmood@science.upm.edu.my; Yunus, Wan Md. Zin Wan [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang (Malaysia); Abidin Talib, Zainal [Department of Physics, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang, Selangor (Malaysia); Kassim, Anuar [Department of Chemistry, Faculty of Science, Universiti Putra Malaysia, 43400 UPM Serdang (Malaysia)

    2008-08-01

    In this work, the porous silicon layer was prepared by the electrochemical anodization etching process on n-type and p-type silicon wafers. The formation of the porous layer has been identified by photoluminescence and SEM measurements. The optical absorption, energy gap, carrier transport and thermal properties of n-type and p-type porous silicon layers were investigated by analyzing the experimental data from photoacoustic measurements. The values of thermal diffusivity, energy gap and carrier transport properties have been found to be porosity-dependent. The energy band gap of n-type and p-type porous silicon layers was higher than the energy band gap obtained for silicon substrate (1.11 eV). In the range of porosity (50-76%) of the studies, our results found that the optical band-gap energy of p-type porous silicon (1.80-2.00 eV) was higher than that of the n-type porous silicon layer (1.70-1.86 eV). The thermal diffusivity value of the n-type porous layer was found to be higher than that of the p-type and both were observed to increase linearly with increasing layer porosity.

  1. Slip effects associated with Knudsen transport phenomena in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Frederking, T. H. K.; Hepler, W. A.; Khandhar, P. K.

    1988-01-01

    Porous media used in phase separators and thermomechanical pumps have been the subject of characterization efforts based on the Darcy permeability of laminar continuum flow. The latter is not always observed at low speed, in particular at permeabilities below 10 to the -9th/squared cm. The present experimental and theoretical studies address questions of slip effects associated with long mean free paths of gas flow at room temperature. Data obtained are in good agreement, within data uncertainty, with a simplified asymptotic Knudsen equation proposed for porous plugs on the basis of Knudsen's classical flow equation for long mean free paths.

  2. Homogenization of the Poisson-Nernst-Planck Equations for Ion Transport in Charged Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Schmuck, Markus

    2012-01-01

    Effective Poisson-Nernst-Planck (PNP) equations are derived for macroscopic ion transport in charged porous media. Homogenization analysis is performed for a two-component pe- riodic composite consisting of a dilute electrolyte continuum (described by standard PNP equations) and a continuous dielectric matrix, which is impermeable to the ions and carries a given surface charge. Three new features arise in the upscaled equations: (i) the effective ionic diffusivities and mobilities become tensors, related to the microstructure; (ii) the effective permittivity is also a tensor, depending on the electrolyte/matrix permittivity ratio and the ratio of the Debye screening length to mean pore size; and (iii) the surface charge per volume appears as a continuous "background charge density". The coeffcient tensors in the macroscopic PNP equations can be calculated from periodic reference cell problem, and several examples are considered. For an insulating solid matrix, all gradients are corrected by a single tortuosit...

  3. Compositional multiphase flow and transport in heterogeneous porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huber, R.U.

    2000-07-01

    This work first treats the conceptual models for the description of multiphase flow processes in porous media. The thermodynamic laws are explained and the description and quantification of multi-fluid equilibria are discussed in order to account for fluid composition. The fully and weakly coupled approaches for the mathematical description of such flow processes with respect to systems consisting of two and three fluid phases as well as with respect to compositional single and multiphase systems are assessed. For the discretization of the two-phase flow equations node- and cell-centered finite volume methods and mixed and mixed-hybrid finite element approaches are applied. Based upon these methods five solution algorithms are developed. Four of these algorithms are based on the simultaneous solution of the discretized equations in combination with the Newton-Raphson technique. Methods 1 and 2 treat two- three-phase flow processes, Method 3 applies to the solution of partially miscible three-component systems while Method 4 is created for three-phase three-component systems. The latter method uses a variable substitution dependent on the local presence of the fluid phases. Method 5 is based on the IMPES/IMPESC concept. The time-implicit pressure equation is discretized with the mixed-hybrid finite element method. The saturation and concentration equations, respectively, are solved with a cell-centered finite volume scheme. The developed algorithms are applied to the two- and three-phase Buckley-Leverett problems. A partitioning interwell tracer test is simulated. The propagation behavior of nonaqueous phase liquids (NAPLs) in the saturated and unsaturated ground zone under the influence of heterogeneities are examined. In addition, a larger-scale experiment is simulated, which involves an injection of trichloroethylene into the subsurface and the subsequent distribution. Here, the development of a dissolved contaminant plume as well as the behavior of organic

  4. Multifunctional substrates of thin porous alumina for cell biosensors

    KAUST Repository

    Toccafondi, Chiara

    2014-02-27

    We have fabricated anodic porous alumina from thin films (100/500 nm) of aluminium deposited on technological substrates of silicon/glass, and investigated the feasibility of this material as a surface for the development of analytical biosensors aiming to assess the status of living cells. To this goal, porous alumina surfaces with fixed pitch and variable pore size were analyzed for various functionalities. Gold coated (about 25 nm) alumina revealed surface enhanced Raman scattering increasing with the decrease in wall thickness, with factor up to values of approximately 104 with respect to the flat gold surface. Bare porous alumina was employed for micro-patterning and observation via fluorescence images of dye molecules, which demonstrated the surface capability for a drug-loading device. NIH-3T3 fibroblast cells were cultured in vitro and examined after 2 days since seeding, and no significant (P > 0.05) differences in their proliferation were observed on porous and non-porous materials. The effect on cell cultures of pore size in the range of 50–130 nm—with pore pitch of about 250 nm—showed no significant differences in cell viability and similar levels in all cases as on a control substrate. Future work will address combination of all above capabilities into a single device.

  5. Fuel cells in transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Erdmann, G. [Technische Univ., Berlin (Germany); Hoehlein, B. [Research Center Juelich (Germany)

    1996-12-01

    A promising new power source for electric drive systems is the fuel cell technology with hydrogen as energy input. The worldwide fuel cell development concentrates on basic research efforts aiming at improving this new technology and at developing applications that might reach market maturity in the very near future. Due to the progress achieved, the interest is now steadily turning to the development of overall systems such as demonstration plants for different purposes: electricity generation, drive systems for road vehicles, ships and railroads. This paper does not present results concerning the market potential of fuel cells in transportation but rather addresses some questions and reflections that are subject to further research of both engineers and economists. Some joint effort of this research will be conducted under the umbrella of the IEA Implementing Agreement 026 - Annex X, but there is a lot more to be done in this challenging but also promising fields. (EG) 18 refs.

  6. Unifying diffusion and seepage for nonlinear gas transport in multiscale porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Song, Hongqing; Wang, Yuhe; Wang, Jiulong; Li, Zhengyi

    2016-09-01

    We unify the diffusion and seepage process for nonlinear gas transport in multiscale porous media via a proposed new general transport equation. A coherent theoretical derivation indicates the wall-molecule and molecule-molecule collisions drive the Knudsen and collective diffusive fluxes, and constitute the system pressure across the porous media. A new terminology, nominal diffusion coefficient can summarize Knudsen and collective diffusion coefficients. Physical and numerical experiments show the support of the new formulation and provide approaches to obtain the diffusion coefficient and permeability simultaneously. This work has important implication for natural gas extraction and greenhouse gases sequestration in geological formations.

  7. Gas transport in unsaturated porous media: the adequacy of Fick's law

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thorstenson, D.C.; Pollock, D.W.

    1989-01-01

    The increasing use of natural unsaturated zones as repositories for landfills and disposal sites for hazardous wastes (chemical and radioactive) requires a greater understanding of transport processes in the unsaturated zone. For volatile constituents an important potential transport mechanism is gaseous diffusion. Diffusion, however, cannot be treated as an independent isolated transport mechanism. A complete understanding of multicomponent gas transport in porous media (unsaturated zones) requires a knowledge of Knudsen transport, the molecular and nonequimolar components of diffusive flux, and viscous (pressure driven) flux. This review presents a brief discussion of the underlying principles and interrelationships among each of the above flux mechanisms. -from Authors

  8. Poly(acrylic acid) coating induced 2-line ferrihydrite nanoparticle transport in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiang, Aishuang; Yan, Weile; Koel, Bruce E.; Jaffé, Peter R.

    2013-07-01

    Iron oxide and iron nanoparticles (NPs) have been used effectively for environmental remediation, but are limited in their applications by strong retention in groundwater-saturated porous media. For example, delivery of NPs to large groundwater reservoirs would require large numbers of injection wells. To address this problem, we have explored polymer coatings as a surface engineering strategy to enhance transport of oxide nanoparticles in porous media. We report here on our studies of 2-line ferrihydrite NPs and the influence of poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) polymer coatings on the colloidal stability and transport in natural sand-packed column tests simulating flow in groundwater-saturated porous media. Measurements were also made of zeta potential, hydrodynamic diameter, and polymer adsorption and desorption properties. The coated NPs have a diameter range of 30-500 nm. We found that NP transport was improved by PAA coating and that the transport properties could be tuned by adjusting the polymer concentration. Our results demonstrate that a high stability of oxide particles and improved transport can be achieved in groundwater-saturated porous media by introducing negatively charged polyelectrolytes and optimizing polymer concentrations.

  9. Poly(acrylic acid) coating induced 2-line ferrihydrite nanoparticle transport in saturated porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xiang, Aishuang [Princeton University, Chemical and Biological Engineering Department (United States); Yan, Weile [Texas Tech University, Civil and Environmental Engineering (United States); Koel, Bruce E., E-mail: bkoel@princeton.edu [Princeton University, Chemical and Biological Engineering Department (United States); Jaffe, Peter R., E-mail: jaffe@princeton.edu [Princeton University, Civil and Environmental Engineering Department (United States)

    2013-07-15

    Iron oxide and iron nanoparticles (NPs) have been used effectively for environmental remediation, but are limited in their applications by strong retention in groundwater-saturated porous media. For example, delivery of NPs to large groundwater reservoirs would require large numbers of injection wells. To address this problem, we have explored polymer coatings as a surface engineering strategy to enhance transport of oxide nanoparticles in porous media. We report here on our studies of 2-line ferrihydrite NPs and the influence of poly (acrylic acid) (PAA) polymer coatings on the colloidal stability and transport in natural sand-packed column tests simulating flow in groundwater-saturated porous media. Measurements were also made of zeta potential, hydrodynamic diameter, and polymer adsorption and desorption properties. The coated NPs have a diameter range of 30-500 nm. We found that NP transport was improved by PAA coating and that the transport properties could be tuned by adjusting the polymer concentration. Our results demonstrate that a high stability of oxide particles and improved transport can be achieved in groundwater-saturated porous media by introducing negatively charged polyelectrolytes and optimizing polymer concentrations.

  10. Simulation of Tracer Transport in Porous Media: Application to Bentonites; Simulacion del Transporte de Trazadores en Medios Porosos: Aplicacion al Caso de Arcillas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bru, A.; Casero, D. [CIEMAT, Madrid (Spain)

    2001-07-01

    We present a formal framework to describe tracer transport in heterogeneous media, such as porous media like bentonites. In these media, mean field approximation is not valid because there exist some geometrical constraints and the transport is anomalous. (Author)

  11. Numerical modeling of ground water flow and contaminant transport in a saturated porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Valipour, Mohammad S.; Sadeghi, Masoomeh; Mahmoudi, Amir H.; Shahi, Mina; Gandaghi, Hadi

    2012-05-01

    In this paper, numerical modeling and experimental testing of the distribution of pollutants along the water flow in a porous medium is discussed. Governing equations including overall continuity, momentum and species continuity equations are derived for porous medium. The governing equations have been solved numerical using the Finite Volume Method based on collocated grids. The SIMPLE algorithm has been adopted for the pressure _ velocity linked equations. In order to validate the numerical results, experimental data from laboratory apparatus are applied and there is a good agreement among numerical results and experimental test. Finally, the main affecting parameters on the distribution and transport of pollutants porous medium were investigated. Results indicate that, the domain of pollution rises with increasing dispersion coefficient and the dispersion phenomenon overcomes on pollutant transfer. Reduction of porosity has decreased the pollutant transfer and increased velocity has result in the increasing pollutant transport phenomenon but has reduced the domain of the pollution.

  12. Capillary-driven, spatially-directed liquid transport on and through thin porous substrates

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chatterjee, Souvick; Sinha Mahapatra, Pallab; Ibrahim, Ali; Ganguly, Ranjan; Megaridis, Constantine; Yu, Lisha; Dodge, Richard

    2016-11-01

    Thin porous substrates exhibit good wicking properties for liquid distribution. The low cost of such common substrates often makes them useful for point of care biomedical diagnostics. Isotropic and anisotropic liquid transport through porous media has been studied extensively in literature. Moreover, previous research has demonstrated spatially-directed liquid transport on textured surfaces featuring surface-tension confined track. Combining both these features, here we demonstrate and analyze capillary-driven, directional liquid transport both on the surface of, and through, a wettability-patterned, horizontal porous substrate. The vertical (through) penetration is governed by Darcy's law. The horizontal (on surface) transport is driven by the Laplace pressure gradient caused by the geometry of the meniscus on the wettability-confined track. The transport rate on the substrate is found to far exceed the liquid permeation rate through it. Consequently, the penetration resistance can be estimated using a quasi-static approach. Using a semi-analytical model, we analyze the effect of the liquid curvature on the penetration rate of a sessile drop placed on the substrate. The model accounts for the back pressure caused by the liquid on the opposing side. The transport model is validated against the experiments, and the geometry, wettability and substrate porosity parameters causing fastest transport are identified.

  13. Coupled confinement effect on the photoluminescence and electrical transport in porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ciurea, M.L. E-mail: ciurea@alpha1.infim.ro; Draghici, M.; Iancu, V.; Reshotko, M.; Balberg, I

    2003-05-01

    In this paper we report correlations between the structure, the photoluminescence and the transport properties of luminescent porous silicon. These correlations combined with the observed temperature dependence of tunneling characteristics yield quite a wholesome (pea-pod-like) model for this system.

  14. Analysis of physical mechanisms underlying density-dependent transport in porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Landman, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the interaction between (large) density gradients and flow and transport in porous media is studied. Large gradients in the density of groundwater exist for example near deep salt rock formations, which are considered as possible long-term storage sites for radioactive waste. Further

  15. Modeling of ion transport through a porous separator in vanadium redox flow batteries

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, X. L.; Zhao, T. S.; An, L.; Zeng, Y. K.; Wei, L.

    2016-09-01

    In this work, we develop a two-dimensional, transient model to investigate the mechanisms of ion-transport through a porous separator in VRFBs and their effects on battery performance. Commercial-available separators with pore sizes of around 45 nm are particularly investigated and effects of key separator design parameters and operation modes are explored. We reveal that: i) the transport mechanism of vanadium-ion crossover through available separators is predominated by convection; ii) reducing the pore size below 15 nm effectively minimizes the convection-driven vanadium-ion crossover, while further reduction in migration- and diffusion-driven vanadium-ion crossover can be achieved only when the pore size is reduced to the level close to the sizes of vanadium ions; and iii) operation modes that can affect the pressure at the separator/electrode interface, such as the electrolyte flow rate, exert a significant influence on the vanadium-ion crossover rate through the available separators, indicating that it is critically important to equalize the pressure on each half-cell of a power pack in practical applications.

  16. Analysis of physical mechanisms underlying density-dependent transport in porous media

    OpenAIRE

    Landman, A.J.

    2005-01-01

    In this thesis, the interaction between (large) density gradients and flow and transport in porous media is studied. Large gradients in the density of groundwater exist for example near deep salt rock formations, which are considered as possible long-term storage sites for radioactive waste. Furthermore, density effects play a role in many other groundwater applications, such as salt water intrusion. Density gradients mainly affect the flow field and mass transport in two ways: by fluid volum...

  17. Influence of Dispersion on Transport of Tracer through Unsaturated Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    T Bunsri

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available The dispersion phenomenon has resulted from the various water flow magnitude and direction in porous media. The dissolved tracer tends to spread due to dispersion and then travel time of tracer through the porous media increases. In unsaturated porous media, dispersion coefficient varies with non-linear Darcy’s velocity and the water content. These effects observed in both of the laboratory scale sand and soil columns (20 cm. The unsaturated infiltration column and tracer tests have been used to interpret the relationships between Darcy’s velocity and the water content together with the dispersion coefficient. However, the dispersivity coefficient cannot be measured directly, it has to determine from advection-dispersion equation (ADE, which can be used to model the tracer transport in unsaturated porous media. The model was used to describe the non-linear functions of water contents and dispersivities for both porous media. The simulations have been verified that the dispersion of tracer through soil is higher than sand column and also travel time of tracer through soil is longer than sand column. Even though, soil has very low degree of pore velocity, the high dispersivity is observed in the simulations. The water content and tracer concentration profiles reveal that the increase of dispersivity induces the increase of flow path distance and the decrease of pore velocity. The maximum dispersivity was observed when the water content of porous media is relatively low; this leads the maximum of spreading of tracer.

  18. Fate and Transport of Graphene Oxide in Granular Porous Media: Experimental Results and Modeling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Bin

    2014-05-01

    Although graphene oxide (GO) has been used in many applications to improve human life quality, its environmental fate and behavior are still largely unknown. In this work, a range of laboratory experiments were conducted to explore the aggregation, deposition, and transport mechanisms of GO nano-sheets in porous media under various conditions. Stability experimental data showed that both cation valence and pH showed significant effect on the aggregation of GO sheets. The measured critical coagulation concentrations were in good agreement with the predictions of the extended Schulze-Hardy rule. Sand column experimental results indicated that deposition and transport of GO in porous media were strongly dependent on solution ionic strength. Particularly, GO showed high mobility under low ionic strength conditions in both saturated and unsaturated columns. Increasing ionic strength dramatically increased the retention of GO in porous media, mainly through secondary-minimum deposition. Recovery rates of GO in unsaturated sand columns were lower than that in saturated columns under the same ionic strength conditions, suggesting moisture content also played an important role in the retention of GO in porous media. Findings from the bubble column experiments showed that the GO did not attach to the air-water interface, which is consistent with the XDLVO predictions. Additional retention mechanisms, such as film straining, thus could be responsible to the reduced mobility of GO in unsaturated porous media. The breakthrough curves of GO in saturated and unsaturated columns could be accurately simulated by an advection-dispersion-reaction model.

  19. Experimental investigation on rainfall infiltration and solute transport in layered porous and fractured media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hui-fang; WANG Ming-yu

    2012-01-01

    Layered structures with upper porous and lower fractured media are widely distributed in the world.An experimental investigation on rainfall infiltration and solute transport in such layered structures can provide the necessary foundation for effectively preventing and forecasting water bursting in mines,controlling contamination of mine water,and accomplishing ecological restoration of mining areas.A typical physical model of the layered structures with porous and fractured media was created in this study.Then rainfall infiltration experiments were conducted after salt solution was sprayed on the surface of the layered structure.The volumetric water content and concentration of chlorine ions at different specified positions along the profile of the experiment system were measured in real-time.The experimental results showed that the lower fractured media,with a considerably higher permeability than that of the upper porous media,had significant effects on preventing water infiltration.Moreover,although the porous media were homogeneous statistically in the whole domain,spatial variations in the features of effluent concentrations with regards to time,or so called breakthrough curves,at various sampling points located at the horizontal plane in the porous media near the porous-fractured interface were observed,indicating the diversity of solute transport at small scales.Furthermore,the breakthrough curves of the outflow at the bottom,located beneath the underlying fractured rock,were able to capture and integrate features of the breakthrough curves of both the upper porous and fractured media,which exhibited multiple peaks,while the peak values were reduced one by one with time.

  20. Transport of molecular fluids through three-dimensional porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, Pierre; Pazdniakou, Aliaksei

    2014-05-01

    The main purpose of this study is to extend the analysis which has been made for the double layer theory (summarized by [1]) to situations where the distance between the solid walls is of the order of several molecular diameters. This is of a large interest from a scientific viewpoint and for various engineering applications. The intermolecular forces and their influence on fluid structure and dynamics can be taken into account by using the mesoscopic scale models based on the Boltzmann equation [2]. The numerical methods derived from these models are less demanding in computational resources than conventional molecular dynamics methods and therefore long time evolution of large samples can be considered. Three types of fluid particles are considered, namely the anions, the cations and the solvent. They possess a finite diameter which should be at least a few lattice units. The collision frequency between particles is increased by the pair correlation function for hard spheres. The lattice Boltzmann model is built in three dimensions with 19 velocities; it involves two relaxation times. The particle distribution functions are discretized over a basis of Hermite polynomial tensors. Electric forces are included and a Poisson equation is simultaneously solved by a successive over-relaxation method. The numerical algorithm is detailed; it is devised in order to be able to address any three-dimensional porous media. It involves the determination of the densities of each particle species, of the overall density and of the equilibrium distribution function. Then, the electric forces are determined. Collision operators are applied as well as the boundary conditions. Finally, the propagation step is performed and the algorithm starts a new loop. The influence of parameters can be illustrated by systematic calculations in a plane Poiseuille configuration. The drastic influence of the ratio between the channel width and the particle sizes on the local densities and the

  1. Transport properties of anodic porous alumina for ReRAM

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, S; Nigo, S; Lee, J W; Mihalik, M; Kitazawa, H; Kido, G [National Institute for Materials Science, 1-2-1 Sengen, Tsukuba, Ibaraki, 305-0047 (Japan)], E-mail: KATO.Seiichi@nims.go.jp

    2008-03-15

    A voltage-induced bistable switching effect has been studied for M/AlO{sub x}/Al devices made of the anodic porous alumina with a top electrode of aluminium (or silver) to develop a next generation memory (AlO{sub x}-ReRAM). The resistance state of memory is switched between OFF-state (high resistance) and ON-state (low resistance), where the resistance ratio is higher than 10{sup 4}. In the thermally stimulated current (TSC) measurement, a narrow band was observed around 290 K, indicating the conduction mechanism comes from a kind of impurity band in the energy gap. An anomaly was also observed around 290 K in the temperature dependence of resistance at the ON-state.

  2. RADIONUCLIDE DISPERSION RATES BY AEOLIAN, FLUVIAL, AND POROUS MEDIA TRANSPORT

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    J. Walton; P. Goodell; C. Brashears; D. French; A. Kelts

    2005-07-11

    Radionuclide transport was measured from high grade uranium ore boulders near the Nopal I Site, Chihuahua, Mexico. High grade uranium ore boulders were left behind after removal of a uranium ore stockpile at the Prior High Grade Stockpile (PHGS). During the 25 years when the boulder was present, radionuclides were released and transported by sheetflow during precipitation events, wind blown resuspension, and infiltration into the unsaturated zone. In this study, one of the boulders was removed, followed by grid sampling of the surrounding area. Measured gamma radiation levels in three dimensions were used to derive separate dispersion rates by the three transport mechanisms.

  3. Coulombic interactions and multicomponent ionic dispersion during transport of charged species in heterogeneous porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    Electrochemical cross-coupling plays a significant role for transport of charged species in porous media [1, 2]. In this study we performed flow-through experiments in a quasi two-dimensional setup using dilute solutions of strong electrolytes to study the influence of charge interactions on mass...... transfer of ionic species in saturated porous media. The experiments were carried out under advection-dominated conditions (seepage velocity: 1 and 1.5 m/day) in two well-defined heterogeneous domains where flow diverging around a low-permeability inclusion and flow focusing in high-permeability zones...

  4. Effect of low-concentration rhamnolipid on transport of Pseudomonas aeruginosa ATCC 9027 in an ideal porous medium with hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhong, Hua; Liu, Guansheng; Jiang, Yongbing; Brusseau, Mark L; Liu, Zhifeng; Liu, Yang; Zeng, Guangming

    2016-03-01

    The success of effective bioaugmentation processes for remediation of soil and groundwater contamination requires effective transport of the injected microorganisms in the subsurface environment. In this study, the effect of low concentrations of monorhamnolipid biosurfactant solutions on transport of Pseudomonas aeruginosa in an ideal porous medium (glass beads) with hydrophilic or hydrophobic surfaces was investigated by conducting miscible-displacement experiments. Transport behavior was examined for both glucose-grown and hexadecane-grown cells, with low and high surface hydrophobicity, respectively. A clean-bed colloid deposition model was used for determination of deposition rate coefficients. Results show that cells with high surface hydrophobicity exhibit greater retention than cells with low surface hydrophobicity. Rhamnolipid affects cell transport primarily by changing cell surface hydrophobicity, with an additional minor effect by increasing solution ionic strength. There is a good linear relation between k and rhamnolipid-regulated cell surface hydrophobicity presented as bacterial-adhesion-to-hydrocarbon (BATH) rate of cells (R(2)=0.71). The results of this study show the importance of hydrophobic interaction for transport of bacterial cells in silica-based porous media, and the potential of using low-concentration rhamnolipid solutions for facilitating bacterial transport in bioaugmentation efforts.

  5. Magnetic Resonance Microscopy of Scale Dependent Transport Phenomena and Bioactivity in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seymour, J. D.; Codd, S. L.; Romanenko, K. V.; Hornemann, J. A.; Brosten, T. R.

    2008-05-01

    Magnetic resonance microscopy (MRM) provides the ability to obtain data on the pore scale via imaging and the sample scale by bulk measurement, allowing for connection between microscale dynamics and macroscale transport phenomena. This has led to MRM techniques becoming a preeminent method for characterization of dynamics in porous media. A significant question in modeling transport in porous media is definition of the porous media structure as homogeneous (ordered) or heterogeneous (disordered)[1]. One means of defining the 'complexity' of a porous media is based on the dynamics of the system[2]. The ability of MRM to measure the time dependent statistics of the dynamics [3,4,5] provides quantification of the pre-asymptotic dynamics. The transition from preasymptotic to Gaussian transport consistent with models of homogeneous porous media is clearly visualized. Biological activity in porous media, such as microbial growth, typically manifests itself as biofilms or colonies of microbes that adhere to surfaces and are surrounded by a hydrogel of extracellular polymeric substance (EPS). The biofilm growth introduces complexity into the system structure in generation of physical pore blocking, trapping within the EPS gel, elastic interfaces due to the EPS and generation of channels in which faster flow occur. The hierarchy of length and time scales and multiple physical processes which are introduced by the biofilm growth impacts the porous media transport as reflected in the change in dynamics [6]. The transition can be modeled using statistical mechanical approaches based on continuous time random walk (CTRW) processes that generate fractional differential equations[7]. The bioactivity alters the structure of the porous media from homogeneous to heterogeneous resulting in the transition from a Gaussian to a non Gaussian subdiffusive dispersion process. References 1. M. Quintard and S. Whitaker, Transport in ordered and disordered porous media: Volume averaged

  6. Impact of multicomponent ionic transport on pH fronts propagation in saturated porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-01-01

    Multicomponent ionic interactions have been increasingly recognized as important factors for the displacement of charged species in porous media under both diffusion- [1,2] and advection-dominated flow regimes [3,4]. In this study we investigate the propagation of pH fronts during multicomponent...... ionic transport in saturated porous media under flow-through conditions. By performing laboratory bench-scale experiments combined with numerical modeling we show the important influence of Coulombic effects on proton transport in the presence of ionic admixtures. The experiments were performed...... in a quasi two-dimensional flow-through setup under steady-state flow and transport conditions. Dilute solutions of hydrochloric acid with MgCl2 (1:2 strong electrolyte) were used as tracer solutions to experimentally test the effect of electrochemical cross-coupling on the migration of diffusive...

  7. The Role of Biofilms and Curli in Salmonella Transport Through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salvucci, A. E.; Zhang, W.; Morales, V. L.; Cakmak, M. E.; Hay, A. G.; Steenhuis, T. S.

    2008-12-01

    Microbial pathogens, such as Salmonella and E. coli, are continually deposited in the environment and have been shown to contaminate the groundwater by leaching through the vadose zone. Therefore, understanding the mechanisms controlling the transport of these microbial pathogens through porous media is critical to protecting drinking water supplies. As previous research has shown, retention of microbial pathogens in porous media can be influenced by numerous biological factors. Consequently, this experiment specifically investigated the role of biofilm formation and curli production on the transport of environmental Salmonella through porous media. Environmental Salmonella strains used in the experiment were isolated from tile drains on dairy farms. In addition, two well-characterized E. coli strains with known high and low biofilm and curli producing capabilities were tested as controls alongside the Salmonella isolates throughout the experiment. The isolates were first assayed for their ability to form biofilms and produce curli, and then a subset of these isolates, representing range of high and low biofilm and curli formation capabilities, were simultaneously examined for transport characteristics through packed sand columns. Transport characteristics were tested for correlation with biofilm and curli-forming capabilities. Unlike the E. coli strains in which column retention correlated with biofilm formation and curli production, no obvious correlation between Salmonella phenotypes was observed. The results indicate that while transport of well-characterized laboratory E. coli strains can often be hindered by the presence of curli and biofilms, such assumptions are not fully representative of the behavior exhibited by environmental isolates of Salmonella.

  8. Structure design and fabrication of porous hydroxyapatite microspheres for cell delivery

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Ruijing; Chen, Kexin; Li, Geng; Han, Guoxiang; Yu, Sheng; Yao, Juming; Cai, Yurong

    2016-09-01

    Porous microspheres fabricated from bioceramics have great potential for cell delivery in injectable tissue engineering application. The size and structure of pores in the microspheres are important for the effective protection and transportation of cells. In this study, porous hydroxyapatite microspheres are fabricated through the water-in-oil emulsion method followed by a calcination treatment at the high temperature. Both self-made resorcinol-formaldehyde (RF) composite spheres and camphene are used as pore-forming agents to produce big pores corresponding to the size of RF spheres and connected channel among big pores in hydroxyapatite matrix. The properties of the microspheres are characterized using X-ray diffraction, thermogravimetry analysis, universal material machine, field emission scanning electron microscopy. Cell assays are carried out to evaluate the cellular compatibility of the microspheres. The results showed that the hydroxyapatite microspheres with controllable pore structure and high porosity could be fabricated by this method, which have better strength to resist the compressive force. The microspheres are conducive to support adhesion, proliferation and differentiation of MC3T3-E1 cells. The results indicate that the obtained porous hydroxyapatite microspheres can be a permeable microenvironment for cell delivery in injectable tissue engineering.

  9. Transport Phenomena in Porous Media Aspects of MicroMacro Behaviour

    CERN Document Server

    Ichikawa, Yasuaki

    2012-01-01

    This monograph presents an integrated perspective of the wide range of phenomena and processes applicable to the study of transport of species in porous materials. In order to formulate the entire range of porous media and their uses, this book gives the basics of continuum mechanics, thermodynamics, seepage and consolidation and diffusion, including multiscale homogenization methods. The particular structure of the book has been chosen because it is essential to be aware of the true properties of porous materials particularly in terms of nano, micro and macro mechanisms.  This book is of pedagogical and practical importance to the fields covered by civil, environmental, nuclear and petroleum engineering and also in chemical physics and geophysics as it relates to radioactive waste disposal, geotechnical engineering, mining and petroleum engineering and chemical engineering.

  10. Lattice Boltzmann Method for Diffusion-Reaction-Transport Processes in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    XU You-Sheng; ZHONG Yi-Jun; HUANG Guo-Xiang

    2004-01-01

    Based on the lattice Boltzmann method and general theory of fluids flowing in porous media, a numerical model is presented for the diffusion-reaction-transport (DRT) processes in porous media. As a test, we simulate a DRT process in a two-dimensional horizontal heterogeneous porous medium. The influence of gravitation in this case can be neglected, and the DRT process can be described by a strongly heterogeneous diagnostic test strip or a thin confined piece of soil with stochastically distributing property in horizontal directions. The results obtained for the relations between reduced fluid saturation S, concentration c1, and concentration c2 are shown by using the visualization computing technique. The computational efficiency and stability of the model are satisfactory.

  11. Heat transport and parametric simulation of a porous ceramic combustor in a gas turbine environment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lu, Wei David

    2002-09-01

    This study is to generate basic knowledge of heat transport inside a porous ceramic combustor in a gas turbine combustion environment. This work predicts the peak temperature inside the porous ceramic combustor, which directly affects the combustor life cycle and flame stability characteristics within the ceramic media. The results will help to generate an operating window for the stable operation of the porous ceramic combustor under the operating conditions of a gas turbine. A theoretical model is developed to study the operational characteristics of the combustor. The model used here accounts for both radiative and convective thermal transport between the solid and gas phases. The solid is assumed to absorb, emit, and scatter radiative energy. A one-step global reaction mechanism is used to model the released energy due to combustion. The effects of the properties of the porous material on gas and solid phase temperature distribution, radiative flux distribution, and flame location (as indicated by local temperature) were investigated. The results confirm that radiative heat transfer is a key mechanism in the stable operation of the combustor. For proper functioning of the combustor, the temperature of the porous material (the solid temperature) must be lowered in order to maintain material and structural integrity. Yet, the gas phase temperature has to be high enough so that a stable combustion process can be maintained. A lower value for the porous material temperature of the combustor can be obtained by enhancing the radiative output from the combustor to the downstream sections. This can be achieved by choosing optimized values of porosity and other properties of the porous ceramic matrix. Higher solid phase thermal conductivity enhances the radiative output from the combustor and helps to reduce the porous material's temperature. It is also desirable that the porous layer has an optimized optical thickness so that the radiative output of the combustor is

  12. Matrix-oriented implementation for the numerical solution of the partial differential equations governing flows and transport in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shuyu

    2012-09-01

    In this paper we introduce a new technique for the numerical solution of the various partial differential equations governing flow and transport phenomena in porous media. This method is proposed to be used in high level programming languages like MATLAB, Python, etc., which show to be more efficient for certain mathematical operations than for others. The proposed technique utilizes those operations in which these programming languages are efficient the most and keeps away as much as possible from those inefficient, time-consuming operations. In particular, this technique is based on the minimization of using multiple indices looping operations by reshaping the unknown variables into one-dimensional column vectors and performing the numerical operations using shifting matrices. The cell-centered information as well as the face-centered information are shifted to the adjacent face-center and cell-center, respectively. This enables the difference equations to be done for all the cells at once using matrix operations rather than within loops. Furthermore, for results post-processing, the face-center information can further be mapped to the physical grid nodes for contour plotting and stream lines constructions. In this work we apply this technique to flow and transport phenomena in porous media. © 2012 Elsevier Ltd.

  13. Transport of Escherichia coli in saturated porous media

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foppen, J.W.A.

    2007-01-01

    When wastewater infiltrates into the soil, groundwater may be contaminated. If the distance from source of pollution to point of groundwater abstraction is small, there is a real chance of abstracting pathogenic microorganisms. In this book, the transport of Escherichia coli in aquifers under satura

  14. Laboratory experiments on solute transport in bimodal porous media under cyclic precipitation-evaporation boundary conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cremer, Clemens; Neuweiler, Insa

    2016-04-01

    Flow and solute transport in the shallow subsurface is strongly governed by atmospheric boundary conditions. Erratically varying infiltration and evaporation cycles lead to alternating upward and downward flow, as well as spatially and temporally varying water contents and associated hydraulic conductivity of the prevailing materials. Thus presenting a highly complicated, dynamic system. Knowledge of subsurface solute transport processes is vital to assess e.g. the entry of, potentially hazardous, solutes to the groundwater and nutrient uptake by plant roots and can be gained in many ways. Besides field measurements and numerical simulations, physical laboratory experiments represent a way to establish process understanding and furthermore validate numerical schemes. With the aim to gain a better understanding and to quantify solute transport in the unsaturated shallow subsurface under natural precipitation conditions in heterogeneous media, we conduct physical laboratory experiments in a 22 cm x 8 cm x 1 cm flow cell that is filled with two types of sand and apply cyclic infiltration-evaporation phases at the soil surface. Pressure at the bottom of the domain is kept constant. Following recent studies (Lehmann and Or, 2009; Bechtold et al., 2011a), heterogeneity is introduced by a sharp vertical interface between coarse and fine sand. Fluorescent tracers are used to i) qualitatively visualize transport paths within the domain and ii) quantify solute leaching at the bottom of the domain. Temporal and spatial variations in water content during the experiment are derived from x-ray radiographic images. Monitored water contents between infiltration and evaporation considerably changed in the coarse sand while the fine sand remained saturated throughout the experiments. Lateral solute transport through the interface in both directions at different depths of the investigated soil columns were observed. This depended on the flow rate applied at the soil surface and

  15. Effective Heat and Mass Transport Properties of Anisotropic Porous Ceria for Solar Thermochemical Fuel Generation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sophia Haussener

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available High-resolution X-ray computed tomography is employed to obtain the exact 3D geometrical configuration of porous anisotropic ceria applied in solar-driven thermochemical cycles for splitting H2O and CO2. The tomography data are, in turn, used in direct pore-level numerical simulations for determining the morphological and effective heat/mass transport properties of porous ceria, namely: porosity, specific surface area, pore size distribution, extinction coefficient, thermal conductivity, convective heat transfer coefficient, permeability, Dupuit-Forchheimer coefficient, and tortuosity and residence time distributions. Tailored foam designs for enhanced transport properties are examined by means of adjusting morphologies of artificial ceria samples composed of bimodal distributed overlapping transparent spheres in an opaque medium.

  16. A Twophase Multirate-Mass Transfer Model for Flow and Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dentz, M.; Tecklenburg, J.; Neuweiler, I.; Carrera, J.

    2015-12-01

    We present an upscaled non-local model for two-phase flow and transport in highly heterogeneous porous media. The media under consideration are characterized by sharp contrasts in the hydraulic properties typical for fractured porous media, for example. A two-scale expansion gives an upscaled flow and transport formulation that models multiratemass transfer between mobile (fracture) and immobile (matrix) medium portions. The evolution of saturation due to viscous dominated flow in the mobile domain and mass exchange with the immobile zones through capillary countercurrent flow. The medium heterogeneity is mapped onto the mass transfer parameters, which are encoded in a memory functionthat describes the non-local flux between mobile and immobile zones. The upscaled model is parameterized by the medium heterogeneity and the distribution of hydraulic parameters. Breakthrough of the displaced fluidshows characteristic heavy tails due to fluid retention in immobile zones.

  17. Structure of porous electrodes in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells: An optical reconstruction technique

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berejnov, Viatcheslav; Sinton, David; Djilali, Ned

    Computing flows and phase transport in porous media requires a physically representative geometric model. We present a simple method of digitizing the structure of fibrous porous media commonly used in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, the so-called gas diffusion layer (GDL). Employing an inverted microscope and image recognition software we process images of the GDL surface collected manually at different focal lengths with micrometer accuracy. Processing the series of images allows retrieval of local depths of the salient in-focus structural elements in each of the different images. These elements are then recombined into a depth-map representing the three-dimensional structure of the GDL surface. Superimposition of the in-focus portions of the structural elements distributed throughout the stack of images yields digitized data describing the geometry and structural attributes of the 3D surface of the GDL fibrous material.

  18. Pore-scale Direct Numerical Simulation of Flow and Transport in Porous Media

    OpenAIRE

    Pulloor Kuttanikkad, Sreejith

    2009-01-01

    This dissertation presents research on the pore-scale simulation of flow and transport in porous media and describes the application of a new numerical approach based on the discontinuous Galerkin (DG) finite elements to pore-scale modelling. In this approach, the partial differential equations governing the flow at the pore-scale are solved directly where the main advantage is that it does not require a body fitted grid and works on a structured partition of the domain. Furthermore this appr...

  19. Modeling and simulation of nanoparticles transport in a two-phase flow in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-01-01

    In the current paper, a mathematical model to describe the nanoparticles transport carried by a two-phase flow in a porous medium is presented. Both capillary forces as well as Brownian diffusion are considered in the model. A numerical example of countercurrent water-oil imbibition is considered. We monitor the changing of the fluid and solid properties due to the addition of the nanoparticles using numerical experiments. Variation of water saturation, nanoparticles concentration and porosity ratio are investigated.

  20. On the Mass and Heat Transfer in the Porous Electrode of a Fuel Cell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Revuelta Bayod, A.

    2004-07-01

    In the first part of this report a reduced model of the mass transport in the PEMFC cathode gas diffusion layer is formulated ro an interrogated flow field design of the cathode bipolar plate. The non-dimensional formulation of the problem allows to identify the leading parameters which determines the fundamental species distribution and flow field structure. The effect of the forced convection of the gases into the porous electrode, caused by the interrogated flow field, is quantified through the Peclet numbers of the active species, and the non-dimensional polarization curves are obtained. In the second part, the diffusion-thermal instability is analyzed in a porous gas diffusion layer (GDL) of a fuel cell. The investigation presented provides an initial guideline to future theoretical and experimental investigations on one aspect of the fuel cell performance not previously considered, with impact on the fuel cell life-time. Starting from the simples possible 1D-model of the flow into the porous electrode, the steady solution of the model is presented an analyzed depending on a minimum number of non-dimensional parameters. From this steady solution, a linear stability analysis is formulated, taking into account the temporal-spatial perturbations transversal to the gas flow direction, and the marginal stability regions are determined from the corresponding dispersion relation. (Author) 33 refs.

  1. Mathematical modeling of channel-porous layer interfaces in PEM fuel cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ehrhardt, M.; Fuhrmann, J.; Holzbecher, E.; Linke, A.

    2008-07-01

    In proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells, the transport of the fuel to the active zones, and the removal of the reaction products are realized using a combination of channels and porous diffusion layers. In order to improve existing mathematical and numerical models of PEM fuel cells, a deeper understanding of the coupling of the flow processes in the channels and diffusion layers is necessary. After discussing different mathematical models for PEM fuel cells, the work focuses on the description of the coupling of the free flow in the channel region with the filtration velocity in the porous diffusion layer as well as interface conditions between them. The difficulty in finding effective coupling conditions at the interface between the channel flow and the membrane lies in the fact that often the orders of the corresponding differential operators are different, e.g., when using stationary (Navier-)Stokes and Darcy's equation. Alternatively, using the Brinkman model for the porous media this difficulty does not occur. We review different interface conditions, including the well-known Beavers-Joseph-Saffman boundary condition and its recent improvement by Le Bars and Worster. (orig.)

  2. The effect of inhomogeneous compression on water transport in the cathode of a PEM fuel cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2011-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multi-component, two-fluid model developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS inc.), is used to investigate the effect of porous media compression on transport phenomenon of a PEM Fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC model only consist of the cathode channel, gas diffusion...... layer, micro-porous layer and catalyst layer, excluding the membrane and anode. In the porous media liquid water transport is described by the capillary pressure gradient, momentum loss via the Darcy-Forchheimer equation and mass transfer between phases by a non-equilibrium phase change model...

  3. Dynamic length-scale characterization and nonequilibrium statistical mechanics of transport in open-cell foams.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brosten, Tyler R; Codd, Sarah L; Maier, Robert S; Seymour, Joseph D

    2009-11-20

    Nuclear magnetic resonance measurements of scale dependent dynamics in a random solid open-cell foam reveal a characteristic length scale for transport processes in this novel type of porous medium. These measurements and lattice Boltzmann simulations for a model foam structure indicate dynamical behavior analogous to lower porosity consolidated granular porous media, despite extremely high porosity in solid cellular foams. Scaling by the measured characteristic length collapses data for different foam structures as well as consolidated granular media. The nonequilibrium statistical mechanics theory of preasymptotic dispersion, developed for hierarchical porous media, is shown to model the hydrodynamic dispersive transport in a foam structure.

  4. Some aspects of cellulose ethers influence on water transport and porous structure of cement-based materials

    OpenAIRE

    Pourchez, Jérémie; Ruot, Bertrand; Debayle, Johan; Rouèche-Pourchez, Emilie; Grosseau, Philippe

    2010-01-01

    International audience; This paper evaluates and compares the impact of cellulose ethers (CE) on water transport and porous structure of cement-based materials in both fresh and hardened state. Investigations of the porous network (mercury intrusion porosimetry, apparent density, 2D and 3D observations) emphasize an air-entrained stabilisation depending on CE chemistry. We also highlight that CE chemistry leads to a gradual effect on characteristics of the water transport. The global tendenci...

  5. NREL Studies Carrier Separation and Transport in Perovskite Solar Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    2016-01-01

    NREL scientists studied charge separation and transport in perovskite solar cells by determining the junction structure across the solar device using the nanoelectrical characterization technique of Kelvin probe force microscopy. The distribution of electrical potential across both planar and porous devices demonstrates a p-n junction structure at the interface between titanium dioxide and perovskite. In addition, minority-carrier transport within the devices operates under diffusion/drift. Clarifying the fundamental junction structure provides significant guidance for future research and development. This NREL study points to the fact that improving carrier mobility is a critical factor for continued efficiency gains in perovskite solar cells.

  6. A model for reactive porous transport during re-wetting of hardened concrete

    CERN Document Server

    Chapwanya, Michael; Stockie, John M

    2008-01-01

    We develop a mathematical model that captures the transport of liquid water in hardened concrete, as well as the chemical reactions that occur between the infiltrating water and the residual calcium silicate compounds that reside in the porous concrete matrix. We investigate the hypothesis that the reaction product -- calcium silicate hydrate gel -- clogs the pores within the concrete thereby hindering water transport. Using numerical simulations, we determine the sensitivity of the model solution to changes in various physical parameters, and compare to experimental results available in the literature.

  7. Impact of multicomponent ionic transport on pH fronts propagation in saturated porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    We investigate the propagation of pH fronts during multicomponent ionic transport in saturated porous media under flow-through conditions. By performing laboratory bench-scale experiments combined with numerical modeling, we show the important influence of Coulombic effects on proton transport...... of electrochemical cross coupling on the migration of diffusive/dispersive pH fronts. We focus on two experimental scenarios, with different composition of tracer solutions, causing remarkably different effects on the propagation of the acidic fronts with relative differences in the penetration depth of pH fronts...

  8. Pore scale mechanisms for enhanced vapor transport through partially saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahraeeni, Ebrahim; Or, Dani

    2012-05-01

    Recent theoretical and experimental studies of vapor transport through porous media question the existence and significance of vapor transport enhancement mechanisms postulated by Philip and de Vries. Several enhancement mechanisms were proposed to rectify shortcomings of continuum models and to reconcile discrepancies between predicted and observed vapor fluxes. The absence of direct experimental and theoretical confirmation of these commonly invoked pore scale mechanisms prompted alternate explanations considering the (often neglected) role of transport via capillary connected pathways. The objective of this work was to quantify the specific roles of liquid bridges and of local thermal and capillary gradients on vapor transport at the pore scale. We considered a mechanistic pore scale model of evaporation and condensation dynamics as a building block for quantifying vapor diffusion through partially saturated porous media. Simulations of vapor diffusion in the presence of isolated liquid phase bridges reveal that the so-called enhanced vapor diffusion under isothermal conditions reflects a reduced gaseous diffusion path length. The presence of a thermal gradient may augment or hinder this effect depending on the direction of thermal relative to capillary gradients. As liquid phase saturation increases, capillary transport becomes significant and pore scale vapor enhancement is limited to low water contents as postulated by Philip and deVries. Calculations show that with assistance of a mild thermal gradient water vapor flux could be doubled relative to diffusion of an inert gas through the same system.

  9. Global sensitivity analysis and Bayesian parameter inference for solute transport in porous media colonized by biofilms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Younes, A.; Delay, F.; Fajraoui, N.; Fahs, M.; Mara, T. A.

    2016-08-01

    The concept of dual flowing continuum is a promising approach for modeling solute transport in porous media that includes biofilm phases. The highly dispersed transit time distributions often generated by these media are taken into consideration by simply stipulating that advection-dispersion transport occurs through both the porous and the biofilm phases. Both phases are coupled but assigned with contrasting hydrodynamic properties. However, the dual flowing continuum suffers from intrinsic equifinality in the sense that the outlet solute concentration can be the result of several parameter sets of the two flowing phases. To assess the applicability of the dual flowing continuum, we investigate how the model behaves with respect to its parameters. For the purpose of this study, a Global Sensitivity Analysis (GSA) and a Statistical Calibration (SC) of model parameters are performed for two transport scenarios that differ by the strength of interaction between the flowing phases. The GSA is shown to be a valuable tool to understand how the complex system behaves. The results indicate that the rate of mass transfer between the two phases is a key parameter of the model behavior and influences the identifiability of the other parameters. For weak mass exchanges, the output concentration is mainly controlled by the velocity in the porous medium and by the porosity of both flowing phases. In the case of large mass exchanges, the kinetics of this exchange also controls the output concentration. The SC results show that transport with large mass exchange between the flowing phases is more likely affected by equifinality than transport with weak exchange. The SC also indicates that weakly sensitive parameters, such as the dispersion in each phase, can be accurately identified. Removing them from calibration procedures is not recommended because it might result in biased estimations of the highly sensitive parameters.

  10. Information entropy to measure the spatial and temporal complexity of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Weiyao; Huang, Guanhua; Xiong, Yunwu

    2016-04-01

    The complexity of the spatial structure of porous media, randomness of groundwater recharge and discharge (rainfall, runoff, etc.) has led to groundwater movement complexity, physical and chemical interaction between groundwater and porous media cause solute transport in the medium more complicated. An appropriate method to describe the complexity of features is essential when study on solute transport and conversion in porous media. Information entropy could measure uncertainty and disorder, therefore we attempted to investigate complexity, explore the contact between the information entropy and complexity of solute transport in heterogeneous porous media using information entropy theory. Based on Markov theory, two-dimensional stochastic field of hydraulic conductivity (K) was generated by transition probability. Flow and solute transport model were established under four conditions (instantaneous point source, continuous point source, instantaneous line source and continuous line source). The spatial and temporal complexity of solute transport process was characterized and evaluated using spatial moment and information entropy. Results indicated that the entropy increased as the increase of complexity of solute transport process. For the point source, the one-dimensional entropy of solute concentration increased at first and then decreased along X and Y directions. As time increased, entropy peak value basically unchanged, peak position migrated along the flow direction (X direction) and approximately coincided with the centroid position. With the increase of time, spatial variability and complexity of solute concentration increase, which result in the increases of the second-order spatial moment and the two-dimensional entropy. Information entropy of line source was higher than point source. Solute entropy obtained from continuous input was higher than instantaneous input. Due to the increase of average length of lithoface, media continuity increased, flow and

  11. Heat and Moisture Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media -- A Coupled Model in Terms of Chemical Potential

    CERN Document Server

    Sullivan, Eric

    2013-01-01

    Transport phenomena in porous media are commonplace in our daily lives. Examples and applications include heat and moisture transport in soils, baking and drying of food stuffs, curing of cement, and evaporation of fuels in wild fires. Of particular interest to this study are heat and moisture transport in unsaturated soils. Historically, mathematical models for these processes are derived by coupling classical Darcy's, Fourier's, and Fick's laws with volume averaged conservation of mass and energy and empirically based source and sink terms. Recent experimental and mathematical research has proposed modifications and suggested limitations in these classical equations. The primary goal of this thesis is to derive a thermodynamically consistent system of equations for heat and moisture transport in terms of the chemical potential that addresses some of these limitations. The physical processes of interest are primarily diffusive in nature and, for that reason, we focus on using the macroscale chemical potentia...

  12. Numerical simulation of pollutant transport in fractured vuggy porous karstic aquifers

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, S.

    2011-01-01

    This paper begins with presenting a mathematical model for contaminant transport in the fractured vuggy porous media of a species of contaminant (PCP). Two phases are numerically simulated for a process of contaminant and clean water infiltrated in the fractured vuggy porous media by coupling mixed finite element (MFE) method and finite volume method (FVM), both of which are locally conservative, to approximate the model. A hybrid mixed finite element (HMFE) method is applied to approximate the velocity field for the model. The convection and diffusion terms are approached by FVM and the standard MFE, respectively. The pressure distribution and temporary evolution of the concentration profiles are obtained for two phases. The average effluent concentration on the outflow boundary is obtained at different time and shows some different features from the matrix porous media. The temporal multiscale phenomena of the effluent concentration on the outlet are observed. The results show how the different distribution of the vugs and the fractures impacts on the contaminant transport and the effluent concentration on the outlet. This paper sheds light on certain features of karstic groundwater are obtained.

  13. Numerical Simulation of Pollutant Transport in Fractured Vuggy Porous Karstic Aquifers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiaolin Fan

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper begins with presenting a mathematical model for contaminant transport in the fractured vuggy porous media of a species of contaminant (PCP. Two phases are numerically simulated for a process of contaminant and clean water infiltrated in the fractured vuggy porous media by coupling mixed finite element (MFE method and finite volume method (FVM, both of which are locally conservative, to approximate the model. A hybrid mixed finite element (HMFE method is applied to approximate the velocity field for the model. The convection and diffusion terms are approached by FVM and the standard MFE, respectively. The pressure distribution and temporary evolution of the concentration profiles are obtained for two phases. The average effluent concentration on the outflow boundary is obtained at different time and shows some different features from the matrix porous media. The temporal multiscale phenomena of the effluent concentration on the outlet are observed. The results show how the different distribution of the vugs and the fractures impacts on the contaminant transport and the effluent concentration on the outlet. This paper sheds light on certain features of karstic groundwater are obtained.

  14. Experimental investigation of suspended particles transport through porous media: particle and grain size effect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Quansheng; Cui, Xianze; Zhang, Chengyuan; Huang, Shibing

    2016-01-01

    Particle and grain size may influence the transportation and deposition characteristics of particles within pollutant transport and within granular filters that are typically used in wastewater treatment. We conducted two-dimensional sandbox experiments using quartz powder as the particles and quartz sand as the porous medium to study the response of transportation and deposition formation to changes in particle diameter (ds, with median diameter 18, 41, and 82 μm) and grain diameter (dp, with median diameter 0.36, 1.25, and 2.82 mm) considering a wide range of diameter ratios (ds/dp) from 0.0064 to 0.228. Particles were suspended in deionized water, and quartz sand was used as the porous medium, which was meticulously cleaned to minimize any physicochemical and impurities effects that could result in indeterminate results. After the experiments, the particle concentration of the effluent and particle mass per gram of dry sands were measured to explore changes in transportation and deposition characteristics under different conditions. In addition, a micro-analysis was conducted to better analyse the results on a mesoscopic scale. The experimental observation analyses indicate that different diameter ratios (ds/dp) may lead to different deposit formations. As ds/dp increased, the deposit formation changed from 'Random Deposition Type' to 'Gradient Deposition Type', and eventually became 'Inlet Deposition Type'.

  15. Statistical model for suspension transport in porous media; Modelo estatistico para o transporte de suspensoes em meios porosos

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Santos, Adriano dos; Barros, Paulo [Universidade Federal do Rio Grande do Norte (UFRN), Natal, RN (Brazil)

    2008-07-01

    An analytical model for transport of particulate suspensions in porous medium is discussed. The model takes microscopic rock characteristics into account and considers that size exclusion is the dominant particle retention mechanism. Analytical solutions for suspended and retained particle concentrations are obtained and the inverse problem is solved, allowing the filtration coefficients determination from experiments. The filtration coefficients for the proposed and the classical deep bed filtration models are calculated from experimental data available in the literature and the results are compared. Finally, it is shown that the proposed model tends to the classical deep bed filtration model when the particle retention probability tends to zero. (author)

  16. Fate and Transport of Nanoparticles in Porous Media: A Numerical Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taghavy, Amir

    Understanding the transport characteristics of NPs in natural soil systems is essential to revealing their potential impact on the food chain and groundwater. In addition, many nanotechnology-based remedial measures require effective transport of NPs through soil, which necessitates accurate understanding of their transport and retention behavior. Based upon the conceptual knowledge of environmental behavior of NPs, mathematical models can be developed to represent the coupling of processes that govern the fate of NPs in subsurface, serving as effective tools for risk assessment and/or design of remedial strategies. This work presents an innovative hybrid Eulerian-Lagrangian modeling technique for simulating the simultaneous reactive transport of nanoparticles (NPs) and dissolved constituents in porous media. Governing mechanisms considered in the conceptual model include particle-soil grain, particle-particle, particle-dissolved constituents, and particle- oil/water interface interactions. The main advantage of this technique, compared to conventional Eulerian models, lies in its ability to address non-uniformity in physicochemical particle characteristics. The developed numerical simulator was applied to investigate the fate and transport of NPs in a number of practical problems relevant to the subsurface environment. These problems included: (1) reductive dechlorination of chlorinated solvents by zero-valent iron nanoparticles (nZVI) in dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) source zones; (2) reactive transport of dissolving silver nanoparticles (nAg) and the dissolved silver ions; (3) particle-particle interactions and their effects on the particle-soil grain interactions; and (4) influence of particle-oil/water interface interactions on NP transport in porous media.

  17. Marine phages as excellent tracers for reactive colloidal transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghanem, Nawras; Chatzinotas, Antonis; Harms, Hauke; Wick, Lukas Y.

    2016-04-01

    Question: Here we evaluate marine phages as specific markers of hydrological flow and reactive transport of colloidal particles in the Earth's critical zone (CZ). Marine phages and their bacterial hosts are naturally absent in the CZ, and can be detected with extremely high sensitivity. In the framework of the DFG Collaborative Research Center AquaDiva, we asked the following questions: (1) Are marine phages useful specific markers of hydrological flow and reactive transport in porous media? and (2) Which phage properties are relevant drivers for the transport of marine phages in porous media? Methods: Seven marine phages from different families (as well two commonly used terrestrial phages) were selected based on their morphology, size and physico-chemical surface properties (surface charge and hydrophobicity). Phage properties were assessed by electron microscopy, dynamic light scattering and water contact angle analysis (CA). Sand-filled laboratory percolation columns were used to study transport. The breakthrough curves of the phages were analyzed using the clean bed filtration theory and the XDLVO theory of colloid stability, respectively. Phages were quantified by a modified high- throughput plaque assay and a culture-independent particle counting method approach. Results: Our data show that most marine tested phages exhibited highly variable transport rates and deposition efficiency, yet generally high colloidal stability and viability. We find that size, morphology and hydrophobicity are key factors shaping the transport efficiency of phages. Differing deposition efficiencies of the phages were also supported by calculated XDLVO interaction energy profile. Conclusion: Marine phages have a high potential for the use as sensitive tracers in terrestrial habitats with their surface properties playing a crucial role for their transport. Marine phages however, exhibit differences in their deposition efficiency depending on their morphology, hydrophobicity and

  18. Optimization of Ferritic Steel Porous Supports for Protonic Fuel Cells Working at 600°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Molin, Sebastian; Chen, Ming; Bonanos, Nikolaos

    2014-01-01

    Porous alloys are used as supporting structures in high temperature fuel cells. A novel concept is to fabricate metal supported protonic conducting fuel cells working at 600°C. This fuel cell type offers several advantages for using porous alloy substrate in comparison to an oxygen conducting solid...

  19. Role of chemotaxis in the transport of bacteria through saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, R.M.; Harvey, R.W.

    2007-01-01

    Populations of chemotactic bacteria are able to sense and respond to chemical gradients in their surroundings and direct their migration toward increasing concentrations of chemicals that they perceive to be beneficial to their survival. It has been suggested that this phenomenon may facilitate bioremediation processes by bringing bacteria into closer proximity to the chemical contaminants that they degrade. To determine the significance of chemotaxis in these processes it is necessary to quantify the magnitude of the response and compare it to other groundwater processes that affect the fate and transport of bacteria. We present a systematic approach toward quantifying the chemotactic response of bacteria in laboratory scale experiments by starting with simple, well-defined systems and gradually increasing their complexity. Swimming properties of individual cells were assessed from trajectories recorded by a tracking microscope. These properties were used to calculate motility and chemotaxis coefficients of bacterial populations in bulk aqueous media which were compared to experimental results of diffusion studies. Then effective values of motility and chemotaxis coefficients in single pores, pore networks and packed columns were analyzed. These were used to estimate the magnitude of the chemotactic response in porous media and to compare with dispersion coefficients reported in the field. This represents a compilation of many studies over a number of years. While there are certainly limitations with this approach for ultimately quantifying motility and chemotaxis in granular aquifer media, it does provide insight into what order of magnitude responses are possible and which characteristics of the bacteria and media are expected to be important. ?? 2006 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  20. Impact of multicomponent ionic transport on pH fronts propagation in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muniruzzaman, Muhammad; Rolle, Massimo

    2016-04-01

    Multicomponent ionic interactions have been increasingly recognized as important factors for the displacement of charged species in porous media under both diffusion- [1,2] and advection-dominated flow regimes [3,4]. In this study we investigate the propagation of pH fronts during multicomponent ionic transport in saturated porous media under flow-through conditions. By performing laboratory bench-scale experiments combined with numerical modeling we show the important influence of Coulombic effects on proton transport in the presence of ionic admixtures. The experiments were performed in a quasi two-dimensional flow-through setup under steady-state flow and transport conditions. Dilute solutions of hydrochloric acid with MgCl2 (1:2 strong electrolyte) were used as tracer solutions to experimentally test the effect of electrochemical cross-coupling on the migration of diffusive/dispersive pH fronts. We focus on two experimental scenarios, with different composition of tracer solutions, causing remarkably different effects on the propagation of the acidic fronts with relative differences in the penetration depth of pH fronts of 36% between the two scenarios and of 25% and 15% for each scenario with respect to the transport of ions at liberated state (i.e., without considering the charge effects). Also significant differences in the dilution of the distinct ionic plumes, quantified using the flux-related dilution index at the laboratory bench scale [5], were measured at the outflow of the flow-through system. The dilution of the pH plumes also changed considerably (26% relative difference) in the two flow-through experiments only due to the different composition of the pore water solution and to the electrostatic coupling of the ions in the flow-through setups. Numerical transport simulations were performed to interpret the laboratory experiments. The simulations were based on a multicomponent ionic formulation accurately capturing the Coulombic interactions between

  1. Computational study of pressure-driven methane transport in hierarchical nanostructured porous carbons

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chae, Kisung; Huang, Liping, E-mail: huangL5@rpi.edu [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, Troy, New York 12180 (United States)

    2016-01-28

    Using the reflecting particle method together with a perturbation-relaxation loop developed in our previous work, we studied pressure-driven methane transport in hierarchical nanostructured porous carbons (HNPCs) containing both mesopores and micropores in non-equilibrium molecular dynamics simulations. The surface morphology of the mesopore wall was systematically varied by tuning interaction strength between carbon atoms and the template in a mimetic nanocasting process. Effects of temperature and mesopore size on methane transport in HNPCs were also studied. Our study shows that increased mesopore wall surface roughness changes the character of the gas-wall interaction from specular to diffuse, while the gas-gas interaction is diminished due to the decrease of adsorption density. Effects of the mesopore wall surface morphology are the most significant at low temperatures and in small channels. Our systematic study provides a better understanding of the transport mechanisms of light gases through carbon nanotube composite membranes in experiments.

  2. A whole range hygric material model: Modelling liquid and vapour transport properties in porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Scheffler, Gregor Albrecht; Plagge, Rudolf

    2010-01-01

    This paper addresses the modelling of hygric material coefficients bridging the gap between measured material properties and the non-linear storage and transport coefficients in the transfer equation. The conductivity approach and a bundle of tubes model are the basis. By extending this model...... with a mechanistic treatment of serial and parallel structured transport, a semi-empirical material model is developed. Deriving the transport properties from the pore structure of the material, the model provides a physical basis whereas a high flexibility and adjustability is obtained by the coupling...... with the mechanistic model. The required minimum input data are basic standard material properties. The model is very suitable for sophisticated research as well as for a broad application to porous materials in general....

  3. Porous silicon membrane for micro fuel cell applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torres, N.; Duch, M.; Santander, J.; Sabate, N.; Esquivel, J.P.; Tarancon, A.; Cane, C. [Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Cientificas, Barcelona (Spain). Centro National de Microelectronica

    2009-04-15

    Significant advances have been made in the field of microsystems to offer a wide variety of applications for these devices. However, improvements in powering these devices are needed in order to obtain an autonomous power supply without increasing either the size or the cost of the devices. A promising solution involves the use of micro fuel cells instead of standard batteries, due to their easy portability, high autonomy and fast and inexpensive fuel refilling. Research in this area is based mainly on hybrid approaches consisting of microfabricated silicon parts assembled together with a Nafion thin film as a proton exchange membrane. However, higher functionality of these devices would be achieved by integrating these power sources within the microsystems to be powered. The development of specific technologies based on standard fabrication processes has to be approached and the electrode and the electrolyte will have to be developed with fabrication techniques compatible with microelectronic technologies. Porous silicon has proved to be a promising material to replace traditional Nafion-based proton exchange membranes, as this material provides a porous matrix that can be functionalized for further proton exchange behaviour. This paper presented a study that used different anodization conditions and types of silicon material to characterize the anodization process in bulk silicon. The obtained results were used to fabricate porous membranes suitable for applicability as electrolyte-frame in proton exchange membrane micro fuel cells. It was concluded that further work is needed involving pore filling with a 5 per cent Nafion solution to provide the membrane with a proton exchange capability. Moreover, a proton conductivity characterization of the membrane will be carried out as well as a complete implementation of this membrane in a final device. 10 refs., 1 tab., 6 figs.

  4. Heterogeneous electrocatalysis in porous cathodes of solid oxide fuel cells

    CERN Document Server

    Fu, Y; Bertei, A; Qi, C; Mohanram, A; Pietras, J D; Bazant, M Z

    2014-01-01

    A general physics-based model is developed for heterogeneous electrocatalysis in porous electrodes and used to predict and interpret the impedance of solid oxide fuel cells. This model describes the coupled processes of oxygen gas dissociative adsorption and surface diffusion of the oxygen intermediate to the triple phase boundary, where charge transfer occurs. The model accurately captures the Gerischer-like frequency dependence and the oxygen partial pressure dependence of the impedance of symmetric cathode cells. Digital image analysis of the microstructure of the cathode functional layer in four different cells directly confirms the predicted connection between geometrical properties and the impedance response. As in classical catalysis, the electrocatalytic activity is controlled by an effective Thiele modulus, which is the ratio of the surface diffusion length (mean distance from an adsorption site to the triple phase boundary) to the surface boundary layer length (square root of surface diffusivity div...

  5. Disordered, strongly scattering porous materials as miniature multipass gas cells

    CERN Document Server

    Svensson, Tomas; Lewander, Märta; Xu, Can T; Svanberg, Sune

    2010-01-01

    Spectroscopic gas sensing is both a commercial success and a rapidly advancing scientific field. Throughout the years, massive efforts have been directed towards improving detection limits by achieving long interaction pathlengths. Prominent examples include the use of conventional multipass gas cells, sophisticated high-finesse cavities, gas-filled holey fibers, integrating spheres, and diffusive reflectors. Despite this rich flora of approaches, there is a continuous struggle to reduce size, gas volume, cost and alignment complexity. Here, we show that extreme light scattering in porous materials can be used to realise miniature gas cells. Near-infrared transmission through a 7 mm zirconia (ZrO2) sample with a 49% porosity and subwavelength pore structure (on the order of 100 nm) gives rise to an effective gas interaction pathlength above 5 meters, an enhancement corresponding to 750 passes through a conventional multipass cell. This essentially different approach to pathlength enhancement opens a new route...

  6. Modeling Polymer Stabilized Nano-scale Zero Valent Iron Transport Experiments in Porous Media to Understand the Transport Behavior

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, P.; Krol, M.; Sleep, B. E.

    2015-12-01

    A wide variety of groundwater contaminants can be treated with nano-scale zero valent iron (nZVI). However, delivery of nZVI in the subsurface to the treatment zones is challenging as the bare nZVI particles have a higher tendency to agglomerate. The subsurface mobility of nZVI can be enhanced by stabilizing nZVI with polymer, such as carboxymethyl cellulose (CMC). In this study, numerical simulations were conducted to evaluate CMC stabilized nZVI transport behavior in porous media. The numerical simulations were based on a set of laboratory-scale transport experiments that were conducted in a two-dimensional water-saturated glass-walled sandbox (length - 55 cm; height - 45 cm; width - 1.4 cm), uniformly packed with silica sand. In the transport experiments: CMC stabilized nZVI and a non-reactive dye tracer Lissamine Green B (LGB) were used; water specific discharge and CMC concentration were varied; movements of LGB, and CMC-nZVI in the sandbox were tracked using a camera, a light source and a dark box. The concentrations of LGB, CMC, and CMC-nZVI at the sandbox outlet were analyzed. A 2D multiphase flow and transport model was applied to simulate experimental results. The images from LGB dye transport experiments were used to determine the pore water velocities and media permeabilities in various layers in the sand box. These permeability values were used in the subsequent simulations of CMC-nZVI transport. The 2D compositional simulator, modified to include colloid filtration theory (CFT), treated CMC as a solute and nZVI as a colloid. The simulator included composition dependent viscosity to account for CMC injection and mixing, and attachment efficiency as a fitting parameter for nZVI transport modeling. In the experiments, LGB and CMC recoveries were greater than 95%; however, CMC residence time was significantly higher than the LGB residence time and the higher CMC concentration caused higher pressure drops in the sandbox. The nZVI recovery was lower than 40

  7. Mass transport in a porous microchannel for non-Newtonian fluid with electrokinetic effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mondal, Sourav; De, Sirshendu

    2013-03-01

    Quantification of mass transfer in porous microchannel is of paramount importance in several applications. Transport of neutral solute in presence of convective-diffusive EOF having non-Newtonian rheology, in a porous microchannel was presented in this article. The governing mass transfer equation coupled with velocity field was solved along with associated boundary conditions using a similarity solution method. An analytical solution of mass transfer coefficient and hence, Sherwood number were derived from first principles. The corresponding effects of assisting and opposing pressure-driven flow and EOF were also analyzed. The influence of wall permeation, double-layer thickness, rheology, etc. on the mass transfer was also investigated. Permeation at the wall enhanced the mass transfer coefficient more than five times compared to impervious conduit in case of pressure-driven flow assisting the EOF at higher values of κh. Shear thinning fluid exhibited more enhancement of Sherwood number in presence of permeation compared to shear thickening one. The phenomenon of stagnation was observed at a particular κh (∼2.5) in case of EOF opposing the pressure-driven flow. This study provided a direct quantification of transport of a neutral solute in case of transdermal drug delivery, transport of drugs from blood to target region, etc.

  8. Transport, retention, and size perturbation of graphene oxide in saturated porous media: Effects of input concentration and grain size

    Science.gov (United States)

    Accurately predicting the fate and transport of graphene oxide (GO) in porous media is critical to assess its environmental impact. In this work, sand column experiments were conducted to determine the effect of input concentration and grain size on transport, retention, and size perturbation of GO ...

  9. (abstract) Fundamental Mechanisms of Electrode Kinetics and Alkali Metal Atom Transport at the Alkali Beta'-Alumina/Porous Electrode/Alkali Metal Vapor Three Phase Boundary

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, R. M.; Jeffries-Nakamura, B.; Ryan, M. A.; Underwood, M. L.; O'Connor, D.; Kisor, A.; Kikkert, S. K.

    1993-01-01

    The mechanisms of electrode kinetics and mass transport of alkali metal oxidation and alkali metal cation reduction at the solid electrolyte/porous electrode boundary as well as alkali metal transport through porous metal electrodes has important applications in optimizing device performance in alkali metal thermal to electric converter (AMTEC) cells which are high temperature, high current density electrochemical cells. Basic studies of these processes also affords the opportunity to investigate a very basic electrochemical reaction over a wide range of conditions; and a variety of mass transport modes at high temperatures via electrochemical techniques. The temperature range of these investigations covers 700K to 1240K; the alkali metal vapor pressures range from about 10(sup -2) to 10(sup 2) Pa; and electrodes studied have included Mo, W, Mo/Na(sub 2)MoO(sub 4), W/Na(sub 2)WO(sub 4), WPt(sub x), and WRh(sub x) (1.0 alkali metal vapor and alkali metal vapor/solid electrolyte/vapor cells have been used to characterize the reaction and transport processes. We have previously reported evidence of ionic, free molecular flow, and surface transport of sodium in several types of AMTEC electrodes.

  10. Investigation the Porous Collagen-Chitosan /Glycosaminoglycans for Corneal Cell Culture as Tissue Engineering Scaffold

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Qin-Hua; CHEN Jian-Su

    2005-01-01

    The objective of this study was to produce the porous collagen-chitosan/Glycosanminglycans (GAG) for corneal ceil-seed implant as a three-dimensional tissue engineering scaffold to improve the regeneration corneas. The effect of various content of glycerol as form porous agent to collagen-chitosan/GAG preserved a porous dimensional structure was investigated. The heat-drying was used to prepare porous collagen-chitosan /GAG scaffold. The pore morphology of collagenchitosan/GAG was controlled by changing the concentration of glycerol solution and drying methods. The porous structure morphology was observed by SEM. The diameter of the pores form 10 to 50 μm. The highly porous scaffold had interconnecting pores. The corneal cell morphology was observed under the light microscope. These results suggest that collagen-chitosan/GAG showed that corneal cell have formed confluent layers and resemble the surface of normal corneal cell surface.

  11. High-performance porous silicon solar cell development. Final report, October 1, 1993--September 30, 1995

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Maruska, P [Spire Corp., Bedford, MA (United States)

    1996-09-01

    The goal of the program was to demonstrate use of porous silicon in new solar cell structures. Porous silicon technology has been developed at Spire for producing visible light-emitting diodes (LEDs). The major aspects that they have demonstrated are the following: porous silicon active layers have been made to show photovoltaic action; porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings to improve the performance of single-crystal silicon solar cells; and porous silicon surface layers can act as antireflection coatings on polycrystalline silicon solar cells. One problem with the use of porous silicon is to achieve good lateral conduction of electrons and holes through the material. This shows up in terms of poor blue response and photocurrents which increase with increasing reverse bias applied to the diode.

  12. Dual-tracer transport experiments in a physically and chemically heterogeneous porous aquifer: effective transport parameters and spatial variability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ptak, T.; Schmid, G.

    1996-08-01

    In order to investigate the effects of reactive transport processes within a heterogeneous porous aquifer, two small-scale forced gradient tracer tests were conducted at the 'Horkheimer Insel' field site. During the experiments, two fluorescent tracers were injected simultaneously in the same fully penetrating groundwater monitoring well, located approximately 10 m from the pumping well. Fluoresceine and Rhodamine WT were used to represent the classes of practically non-sorbing and sorbing solutes, respectively. Multilevel breakthrough curves with a temporal resolution of 1 min were measured for both tracers at different depths within the pumping well using fibre-optic fluorimeters. This paper presents the tracer test design, the fibre-optic fluorimetry instrumentation, the experimental results and the interpretation of the measured multilevel breakthrough curves in terms of temporal moments and effective transport parameters. Significant sorption of Rhodamine WT is apparent from the effective retardation factors. Furthermore, an enhanced tailing of Rhodamine WT breakthrough curves is observed, which is possibly caused by a variability of aquifer sorption properties. The determined effective parameters are spatially variable, suggesting that a complex numerical flow and transport modelling approach within a stochastic framework will be needed to adequately describe the transport behaviour observed in the two experiments. Therefore, the tracer test results will serve in future work for the validation of numerical stochastic transport simulations taking into account the spatial variability of hydraulic conductivity and sorption-related aquifer properties.

  13. Transport of Lactate-modified Nanoscale Iron Particles in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, K. R.

    2012-12-01

    Nanoscale iron particles (NIP) have recently shown to be effective for dehalogenation of recalcitrant organic contaminants such as pentachlorphenol (PCP) and dinitrotoluene (DNT) in the environment. However, effective transport of NIP into the contaminated subsurface zones is crucial for the success of in-situ remediation. Previous studies showed that the transport of NIP in soils is very limited and surface-modification of NIP is required to achieve adequate transport. This paper investigates the transport of NIP and lactate-modified NIP (LMNIP) through four different porous media (sands with different particle size and distribution). A series of laboratory column experiments was conducted to quantify the transport of NIP and LMNIP at two different slurry concentrations of 1 g/L and 4 g/L under two different flow velcoities. NIP used in this study possessed magentic properties, thus a magnetic susceptibility sensor system was used to monitor the changes in magnetic susceptibility (MS) along the length of the column at different times during the experiments. At the end of testing, the distribution of total Fe in the sand column was measured. Results showed a linear correlation between the Fe concentration and MS and it was used to assess the transient transport of NIP and LMNIP in the sand columns. Results showed that LMNIP transported better than bare NIP and higher concentration of 4 g/L LMNIP exhibited unform and greater transport compared to other tested conditions. Transport of NIP increased in the order from fine Ottawa sand > medium field sand > coarse field sand > coarse Ottawa sand. Filtration theory and advective-dispersion equation with reaction were applied to capture the transport response of NIP and LMNIP in the sand columns.

  14. Transport and Reactivity of Engineered Nanoparticles in Partially Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dror, I.; Yecheskel, Y.; Berkowitz, B.

    2015-12-01

    Engineered nanoparticles (ENPs) are being produced in increasing amounts and have numerous applications in a variety of products and industrial processes. The same properties that make these substances so appealing may also cause them to act as persistent and toxic pollutants. The post-use release of ENPs to the environment is inevitable and soil appears to be one of the largest sinks of these potential contaminants. To date, despite the significant attention that ENP behavior in the environment has received, only a few studies have considered the fate and transport of ENPs in partially saturated systems. Here, we report measurements on the transport and fate of three commonly used ENPs - silver (Ag), gold (Au) and zinc oxide (ZnO) - in partially saturated porous media. The results show that ENP interactions with the solid matrix and solution components affect the fate of the ENPs and their transport. The negatively charged ENPs (AgNPs and AuNPs) are shown to be mobile in sand (which is also negatively charged) under various conditions, including water saturation levels and inlet concentration, with transport behavior resembling conservative tracer movement. Various aging scenarios were considered and the interaction of AgNPs with sulfides, chlorides, and calcium ions, all of which are known to interact and change AgNP properties, are shown to affect AgNP fate; however, in some cases, the changed particles remained suspended in solution and mobile. The positively charged ZnO showed very low mobility, but when humic acid was present in the inlet solution, interactions leading to enhanced mobility were observed. The presence of humic acid also changes ENP size and surface charge, transforming them to negatively charged larger aggregates that can be transported through the sand. Finally, remobilization of particles that were retained in the porous media was also demonstrated for ZnO ENPs, indicating possible release of entrapped ENPs upon changes in solution chemistry.

  15. Non-conjugate potential-stepping phenothiazine and phenoxazine based polymer hole-transport material for dye-sensitized solar cells & increasing void space in porous titanium dioxide: To study diffusion properties of a cobalt mediator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Persson, Kristoffer

    As energy demands increase so has the search for alternative sources of energy. Although, fossil fuels have proven useful in energy production, they are also detrimental due to the negative impact on our environment. Considering the current alternative energy sources, such as wind, hydroelectric, biofuels, etc, one source of alternative energy shines above the rest, solar energy. Solar energy provides a possible solution to the energy demands of our modern world with little effect on the environment. The only waste produced from the solar cell industry is from producing and recycling the cells. After production, solar cells require no resources to function other than solar radiation, and no waste is produced. The sun has been powering life on this planet for billions of years, and bombards the earth with 3x1024 J of energy per year. Only 0.02% of this energy is currently needed to power the world, thus making the sun a viable solution to energy demands, while decreasing current pollution issues. This thesis focuses on dye sensitized solar cell (DSSCs), in particular, the Grätzel cell, which incorporates thin films of TiO2 as the semiconductor, DSSC's work very similarly to a battery, but instead of using chemical energy to drive electrons through the circuit, it uses photons. Several issues have arisen with these types of solar cells and their use in the modern world. One particular problem is that the iodide/triiodide (I -/I3-) mediator, which currently produces the most efficient DSSCs, is corrosive and volatile. To address this and other issues, a conductive phenothiazine (PTZ) and phenoxazine (POZ) based polymer is hypothesized to be a suitable replacement for the mediator and solvent by acting as a charge separator and hole transport material, without any volatile or corrosive problems. This polymer would hypothetically function similarly to proposed electron transport in DNA. When charges are injected into a DNA strand they are transferred through

  16. Porous matrix structures for alkaline electrolyte fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vine, R. W.; Narsavage, S. T.

    1975-01-01

    A number of advancements have been realized by a continuing research program to develop higher chemically stable porous matrix structures with high bubble pressure (crossover resistance) for use as separators in potassium hydroxide electrolyte fuel cells. More uniform, higher-bubble-pressure asbestos matrices were produced by reconstituting Johns-Manville asbestos paper; Fybex potassium titanate which was found compatible with 42% KOH at 250 F for up to 3000 hr; good agreement was found between bubble pressures predicted by an analytical study and those measured with filtered structures; Teflon-bonded Fybex matrices with bubble pressures greater than 30 psi were obtained by filtering a water slurry of the mixture directly onto fuel cell electrodes; and PBI fibers have satisfactory compatibility with 42% KOH at 250 F.

  17. Cell-Culture Reactor Having a Porous Organic Polymer Membrane

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koontz, Steven L. (Inventor)

    2000-01-01

    A method for making a biocompatible polymer article using a uniform atomic oxygen treatment is disclosed. The substrate may be subsequently optionally grated with a compatibilizing compound. Compatibilizing compounds may include proteins, phosphory1choline groups, platelet adhesion preventing polymers, albumin adhesion promoters, and the like. The compatibilized substrate may also have a living cell layer adhered thereto. The atomic oxygen is preferably produced by a flowing afterglow microwave discharge, wherein the substrate resides in a sidearm out of the plasma. Also, methods for culturing cells for various purposes using the various membranes are disclosed as well. Also disclosed are porous organic polymers having a distributed pore chemistry (DPC) comprising hydrophilic and hydrophobic regions, and a method for making the DPC by exposing the polymer to atomic oxygen wherein the rate of hydrophilization is greater than the rate of mass loss.

  18. A time-asymptotic one equation non-equilibrium model for reactive transport in a two phase porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yohan, D.; Gerald, D.; Magali, G.; Michel, Q.

    2008-12-01

    The general problem of transport and reaction in multiphase porous media has been a subject of extensive studies during the last decades. For example, biologically mediated porous media have seen a long history of research from the environmental engineering point of view. Biofilms (aggregate of microorganisms coated in a polymer matrix generated by bacteria) have been particularly examined within the context of bioremediation in the subsurface zone. Five types of models may be used to describe these kinds of physical system: 1) one-equation local mass equilibrium models when the assumption of local mass equilibrium is valid 2) two equations models when the assumption of local mass equilibrium is not valid 3) one equation non-equilibrium models 4) mixed models coupling equations solved at two different scales 5) one equation time-asymptotic models. In this presentation, we use the method of volume averaging with closure to extend the time- asymptotic model at the Darcy scale to the reactive case. Closure problems are solved for simple unit cells, and the macro-scale model is validated against pore-scale simulations.

  19. A new numerical benchmark for variably saturated variable-density flow and transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guevara, Carlos; Graf, Thomas

    2016-04-01

    In subsurface hydrological systems, spatial and temporal variations in solute concentration and/or temperature may affect fluid density and viscosity. These variations could lead to potentially unstable situations, in which a dense fluid overlies a less dense fluid. These situations could produce instabilities that appear as dense plume fingers migrating downwards counteracted by vertical upwards flow of freshwater (Simmons et al., Transp. Porous Medium, 2002). As a result of unstable variable-density flow, solute transport rates are increased over large distances and times as compared to constant-density flow. The numerical simulation of variable-density flow in saturated and unsaturated media requires corresponding benchmark problems against which a computer model is validated (Diersch and Kolditz, Adv. Water Resour, 2002). Recorded data from a laboratory-scale experiment of variable-density flow and solute transport in saturated and unsaturated porous media (Simmons et al., Transp. Porous Medium, 2002) is used to define a new numerical benchmark. The HydroGeoSphere code (Therrien et al., 2004) coupled with PEST (www.pesthomepage.org) are used to obtain an optimized parameter set capable of adequately representing the data set by Simmons et al., (2002). Fingering in the numerical model is triggered using random hydraulic conductivity fields. Due to the inherent randomness, a large number of simulations were conducted in this study. The optimized benchmark model adequately predicts the plume behavior and the fate of solutes. This benchmark is useful for model verification of variable-density flow problems in saturated and/or unsaturated media.

  20. Physical factors affecting the transport and fate of colloids in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bradford, Scott A.; Yates, Scott R.; Bettahar, Mehdi; Simunek, Jirka

    2002-12-01

    Saturated soil column experiments were conducted to explore the influence of colloid size and soil grain size distribution characteristics on the transport and fate of colloid particles in saturated porous media. Stable monodispersed colloids and porous media that are negatively charged were employed in these studies. Effluent colloid concentration curves and the final spatial distribution of retained colloids by the porous media were found to be highly dependent on the colloid size and soil grain size distribution. Relative peak effluent concentrations decreased and surface mass removal by the soil increased when the colloid size increased and the soil median grain size decreased. These observations were attributed to increased straining of the colloids; i.e., blocked pores act as dead ends for the colloids. When the colloid size is small relative to the soil pore sizes, straining becomes a less significant mechanism of colloid removal and attachment becomes more important. Mathematical modeling of the colloid transport experiments using traditional colloid attachment theory was conducted to highlight differences in colloid attachment and straining behavior and to identify parameter ranges that are applicable for attachment models. Simulated colloid effluent curves using fitted first-order attachment and detachment parameters were able to describe much of the effluent concentration data. The model was, however, less adequate at describing systems which exhibited a gradual approach to the peak effluent concentration and the spatial distribution of colloids when significant mass was retained in the soil. Current colloid filtration theory did not adequately predict the fitted first-order attachment coefficients, presumably due to straining in these systems.

  1. Correlation between porous texture and cell seeding efficiency of gas foaming and microfluidic foaming scaffolds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Costantini, Marco; Colosi, Cristina; Mozetic, Pamela; Jaroszewicz, Jakub; Tosato, Alessia; Rainer, Alberto; Trombetta, Marcella; Święszkowski, Wojciech; Dentini, Mariella; Barbetta, Andrea

    2016-05-01

    In the design of scaffolds for tissue engineering applications, morphological parameters such as pore size, shape, and interconnectivity, as well as transport properties, should always be tailored in view of their clinical application. In this work, we demonstrate that a regular and ordered porous texture is fundamental to achieve an even cell distribution within the scaffold under perfusion seeding. To prove our hypothesis, two sets of alginate scaffolds were fabricated using two different technological approaches of the same method: gas-in-liquid foam templating. In the first one, foam was obtained by insufflating argon in a solution of alginate and a surfactant under stirring. In the second one, foam was generated inside a flow-focusing microfluidic device under highly controlled and reproducible conditions. As a result, in the former case the derived scaffold (GF) was characterized by polydispersed pores and interconnects, while in the latter (μFL), the porous structure was highly regular both with respect to the spatial arrangement of pores and interconnects and their monodispersity. Cell seeding within perfusion bioreactors of the two scaffolds revealed that cell population inside μFL scaffolds was quantitatively higher than in GF. Furthermore, seeding efficiency data for μFL samples were characterized by a lower standard deviation, indicating higher reproducibility among replicates. Finally, these results were validated by simulation of local flow velocity (CFD) inside the scaffolds proving that μFL was around one order of magnitude more permeable than GF.

  2. An Iterative Implicit Scheme for Nanoparticles Transport with Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2016-06-01

    In this paper, we introduce a mathematical model to describe the nanoparticles transport carried by a two-phase flow in a porous medium including gravity, capillary forces and Brownian diffusion. Nonlinear iterative IMPES scheme is used to solve the flow equation, and saturation and pressure are calculated at the current iteration step and then the transport equation is solved implicitly. Therefore, once the nanoparticles concentration is computed, the two equations of volume of the nanoparticles available on the pore surfaces and the volume of the nanoparticles entrapped in pore throats are solved implicitly. The porosity and the permeability variations are updated at each time step after each iteration loop. Numerical example for regular heterogenous permeability is considered. We monitor the changing of the fluid and solid properties due to adding the nanoparticles. Variation of water saturation, water pressure, nanoparticles concentration and porosity are presented graphically.

  3. Effect of Temperature Wave on the Gas Transport in Liquid-Saturated Porous Media

    CERN Document Server

    Goldobin, Denis S

    2013-01-01

    We study the effect of surface temperature oscillations on gas mass transport through liquid-saturated porous media. Temperature wave induced by these oscillations and decaying deep in the massif creates the gas solubility wave along with the corresponding solute diffusion flux wave. When bubbles are immobilized by the surface tension force the only remaining mechanisms of gas mass transport are related to solute flux through liquid in pores. We evaluate analytically the generated time-average mass flux for the case of medium everywhere littered with gas bubbles and reveal the significant effect of the temperature wave on the gas release from the massif and bubble mass redistribution within the massif. Analytical theory is validated with numerical calculations.

  4. Diffusion, Coulombic interactions and multicomponent ionic transport of charged species in saturated porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolle, Massimo; Muniruzzaman, Muhammad

    Diffusion and compound-specific mixing significantly affect conservative and reactive transport in groundwater at different scales, not only under diffusion-dominated regimes but also under advection-dominated flow through conditions [1]. When dissolved species are charged, besides the magnitude...... of their aqueous diffusion coefficients also the electrostatic interactions significantly affect solute displacement. We investigated electrostatic interactions between ionic species under flow-through conditions resulting in multicomponent ionic dispersion: the dispersive fluxes of the different ions in the pore...... water are cross-coupled due to the effects of Coulombic interactions. Such effects are illustrated in flow-through experiments in saturated porous media. Simple strong electrolytes (i.e., salts and strong acid solutions) were selected as tracers and their transport was studied under different advection...

  5. Transport study in unsaturated porous media by tracer experiment in a dichromatic X-ray experimental device

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Néel M.C.

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available Estimating contaminant migration in the context of waste disposal and/or environmental remediation of polluted soils requires a complete understanding of the underlying transport processes. In unsaturated porous media, water content is one of the most determining parameters to describe solute migration because it impacts directly on solute pore velocity. However, numerous studies are satisfied with only a global or a partial spatial distribution of water content within the studied porous media. Therefore, distribution of water content in porous media must be precisely achieved to optimize transport processes modeling. Tracer experiments with downward flow were performed on the BEETI experimental device equipped with a sand column. Water content and concentration profiles of tracer (KI were measured along the column during experiment. The relative dispersion of water content, calculated along the column, gives an idea of influence of this parameter on transport properties. A relationship between pore velocity, Darcy flow velocity and water content is proposed.

  6. Transport study in unsaturated porous media by tracer experiment in a dichromatic X-ray experimental device

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latrille, C.; Néel, M. C.

    2013-05-01

    Estimating contaminant migration in the context of waste disposal and/or environmental remediation of polluted soils requires a complete understanding of the underlying transport processes. In unsaturated porous media, water content is one of the most determining parameters to describe solute migration because it impacts directly on solute pore velocity. However, numerous studies are satisfied with only a global or a partial spatial distribution of water content within the studied porous media. Therefore, distribution of water content in porous media must be precisely achieved to optimize transport processes modeling. Tracer experiments with downward flow were performed on the BEETI experimental device equipped with a sand column. Water content and concentration profiles of tracer (KI) were measured along the column during experiment. The relative dispersion of water content, calculated along the column, gives an idea of influence of this parameter on transport properties. A relationship between pore velocity, Darcy flow velocity and water content is proposed.

  7. Saturated Particle Transport in Porous Media: An Investigation into the Influence of Flow Direction and Particle Size Distribution

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-06-28

    rough glass beads under different flow directions. A kinetic particle transport model was developed, which assumed both reversible and irreversible...Release; Distribution Unlimited UU UU UU UU 28-06-2015 1-May-2010 30-Apr-2014 Final Report: Saturated Particle Transport in Porous Media: An...Media, Colloid Transport , Flow Direction REPORT DOCUMENTATION PAGE 11. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S REPORT NUMBER(S) 10. SPONSOR/MONITOR’S ACRONYM(S) ARO 8

  8. Influence of graphene oxide on the transport and deposition behaviors of colloids in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peng, Shengnan; Wu, Dan; Ge, Zhi; Tong, Meiping; Kim, Hyunjung

    2017-03-30

    The effects of graphene oxide (GO) on the transport and deposition behaviors of colloids with different sizes in packed quartz sand were investigated in both NaCl (10 and 50 mM) and CaCl2 solutions (1 and 5 mM) at pH 6. Fluorescent carboxylate-modified polystyrene latex microspheres (CMLs) with size ranging from 0.2 to 2 μm were utilized as model colloids. Both breakthrough curves and retained profiles of colloids in the presence and absence of GO in suspensions under all examined solution conditions were analyzed. The breakthrough curves of all three different-sized CMLs with GO were higher yet the retained profiles were lower than those without GO at both examined ionic strengths in NaCl solutions. The observation showed that GO increased the transport and decreased the deposition of all three different-sized CMLs in NaCl solutions. However, in CaCl2 solutions, opposite observation was achieved at two different ionic strength conditions. Specifically, the presence of GO increased the transport and decreased the deposition of all three different-sized CMLs in 1 mM CaCl2 solutions, whereas, it decreased the transport and increased the deposition of all three different-sized CMLs in 5 mM CaCl2 solutions. Comparison the breakthrough curves and retained profiles of CMLs versus those of GO yielded that the overall transport and deposition behaviors of all three different-sized CMLs with GO copresent in suspensions agreed well with the transport and deposition behaviors of GO under all examined conditions. The transport and deposition behaviors of CMLs in packed porous media clearly were controlled by those of GO under the conditions investigated in present study due to the adsorption of CMLs onto GO surfaces. Our study showed that once released into natural environment, GO would adsorb (interact with) different types of colloids and thus have significant influence on the fate and transport of colloids in porous media.

  9. Effects of solution chemistry on the transport of graphene oxide in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lanphere, Jacob D; Luth, Corey J; Walker, Sharon L

    2013-05-07

    A transport study was performed in saturated porous media through a packed bed column to simulate fate of graphene oxide nanoparticles (GONPs) in the subsurface environment. Transport experiments, along with mass balances and column dissections, were conducted as a function of ionic strength (IS, 10(-3)-10(-1) M). Additionally, an extensive evaluation of the electrokinetic properties and hydrodynamic diameters of GONPs were determined as a function of IS and pH. The measured hydrodynamic diameter and the electrophoretic mobility (EPM) of GONPs indicated an insensitivity to pH, although IS did play a role. Results from a stability study indicated that the hydrodynamic diameter of GONPs was stable and unchanging at the lower range of IS (10(-3) and 10(-2) M) then became unstable when IS ≥ 10(-1.5) M KCl was achieved. Specifically, for IS ≥ 10(-1.5) M KCl, the hydrodynamic diameter became greater and showed a larger size range of particles than at the lower IS range (10(-3) and 10(-2) M). In addition, the EPM of GONPs became less negative over the IS range of 10(-3) and 10(-2) M KCl. Furthermore, GONPs were found to be increasingly mobile for IS ≤ 10(-2) M KCl. When GONPs were passed through the packed bed column at 10(-2) and 10(-1) M KCl, 5% and 100% of the GONPs were retained in the column, respectively. Finally, mass balances and column dissections revealed that in the first cm of the column 7% and 95% of the GONPs were deposited at 10(-2) and 10(-1) M KCl, respectively, confirming that the transport of GONPs is a function of IS. The fraction of GONPs eluted during the transport experiments provides insight into the contribution of aggregation and reversibly bound fraction of GONPs in saturated porous media.

  10. Modeling of the Transport and Retention of Fullerene C60 Aggregates in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Y.; Wang, Y.; Pennell, K.; Abriola, L.

    2008-12-01

    Buckminster fullerene (C60) has recently gained wide application in many commercial products. Given its widespread use, release of C60 into the environment during manufacture, transportation, and/or application is likely. Although C60 has negligible solubility in water, it is capable of acquiring charge and form highly stable nano-scale aggregates (nC60) in aqueous systems. In recent years, several laboratory research efforts have been devoted to studying the potential fate and transport of nC60 in porous media representative of the natural subsurface environment. Traditional clean-bed filtration theory is typically applied to analyze the experimental results. Far less attention has focused on the applicability of filtration theory to nC60 transport under different soil and solution conditions. In this work, we simulate column transport of nC60 under progressively more complex conditions and compare with laboratory observations. For nC60 transport in columns packed with Ottawa sand and simple electrolyte solutions, i.e. 1mM CaCl2 and 1mM NaCl, simulation results reveal that traditional clean-bed filtration theory is not sufficient to model the asymmetric breakthrough curves and relatively flat retention profiles observed in these systems. Modification of the filtration model, incorporating a maximum retention capacity term, can provide remarkably improved modeling results. The second application is for transport of nC60 in Ottawa sand coated with surfactant. The observed retention profiles in these experiments exhibit a hyper-exponential feature. Modeling results demonstrate that coupled simulation of both surfactant and nC60 transport is required to correctly capture the hyper-exponential retention profile in these systems. Finally, efforts to model the transport of nC60 in real soils, including Appling and Webster soils, are presented, suggesting that modification of filtration theory is also necessary in this case, to capture the shape of the observed retention

  11. The effects of surface aging on nanoparticle fate and transport in natural and engineered porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mittelman, Anjuliee M.

    Nanomaterials will be subjected to various surface transformations in the environment and within water and wastewater treatment systems. A comprehensive understanding of the fate and transport behavior of "aged" nanomaterials in both natural and engineered porous media is required in order to accurately quantify ecological and human health risks. This research sought to (1) evaluate the impact of ultraviolet (UV) light aging on nanoparticle transport in water-saturated porous media; and (2) assess the effects of influent water quality on silver nanoparticle retention and dissolution in ceramic water filters. Additionally, the value of quartz crystal microbalance (QCM-D) data in nanoparticle fate and transport studies was evaluated by comparing deposition behavior in complementary QCM-D and sand columns experiments. Silver (nAg) and iron oxide nanoparticles exposed to UV light were up to 50% more strongly retained in porous media compared with freshly prepared suspensions due to less negative surface charge and larger aggregate sizes. UV-aged nAg were more prone to dissolution in sand columns, resulting in effluent Ag+ concentrations as high as 1.2 mg/L. In ceramic water filters, dissolution and cation exchange processes controlled silver release into treated water. The use of acidic, high salinity, or high hardness water accelerated oxidative dissolution of the silver coating and resulted in effluent silver concentrations 5-10 times above international drinking water guidelines. Results support the recommendation for a regular filter replacement or silver re-application schedule to ensure ongoing efficacy. Taken in concert, these research findings suggest that oxidative aging of nanomaterial surfaces (either through exposure to UV light or aggressive water chemistries) will alter the fate of nanomaterials in the environment and may decrease the effective lifetime of devices which utilize nanotechnology. Corresponding QCM-D and column experiments revealed that

  12. Fast simulation of transport and adaptive permeability estimation in porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Berre, Inga

    2005-07-01

    The focus of the thesis is twofold: Both fast simulation of transport in porous media and adaptive estimation of permeability are considered. A short introduction that motivates the work on these topics is given in Chapter 1. In Chapter 2, the governing equations for one- and two-phase flow in porous media are presented. Overall numerical solution strategies for the two-phase flow model are also discussed briefly. The concepts of streamlines and time-of-flight are introduced in Chapter 3. Methods for computing streamlines and time-of-flight are also presented in this chapter. Subsequently, in Chapters 4 and 5, the focus is on simulation of transport in a time-of-flight perspective. In Chapter 4, transport of fluids along streamlines is considered. Chapter 5 introduces a different viewpoint based on the evolution of isocontours of the fluid saturation. While the first chapters focus on the forward problem, which consists in solving a mathematical model given the reservoir parameters, Chapters 6, 7 and 8 are devoted to the inverse problem of permeability estimation. An introduction to the problem of identifying spatial variability in reservoir permeability by inversion of dynamic production data is given in Chapter 6. In Chapter 7, adaptive multiscale strategies for permeability estimation are discussed. Subsequently, Chapter 8 presents a level-set approach for improving piecewise constant permeability representations. Finally, Chapter 9 summarizes the results obtained in the thesis; in addition, the chapter gives some recommendations and suggests directions for future work. Part II In Part II, the following papers are included in the order they were completed: Paper A: A Streamline Front Tracking Method for Two- and Three-Phase Flow Including Capillary Forces. I. Berre, H. K. Dahle, K. H. Karlsen, and H. F. Nordhaug. In Fluid flow and transport in porous media: mathematical and numerical treatment (South Hadley, MA, 2001), volume 295 of Contemp. Math., pages 49

  13. Cell response to single-walled carbon nanotubes in hybrid porous collagen sponges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mao, Hongli; Kawazoe, Naoki; Chen, Guoping

    2015-02-01

    Three-dimensional (3D) porous collagen sponges incorporated with single-walled carbon nanotubes (SWCNTs) were prepared and used for 3D culture of bovine articular chondrocytes (BACs). The pore structures of the sponges were controlled by using ice particulates as a porogen material. The responses of cells to SWCNTs were investigated in this 3D cell culture system by evaluation of cell functions and cellular uptake of SWCNTs. The results showed that cells adhered and spatially distributed in the porous sponges. The incorporation of SWCNTs in the porous sponges promoted cell proliferation and production of sulfated glycosaminoglycans (sGAG). Confocal Raman imaging revealed that SWCNTs could be internalized by cells. The hybrid porous sponges not only provided nanostructured pore surfaces to facilitate cell proliferation and extracellular matrix (ECM) secretion but also supplied nanomaterials for cellular uptake which may be useful for biomedical applications.

  14. Internal Domains of Natural Porous Media Revealed: Critical Locations for Transport, Storage, and Chemical Reaction

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zachara, John M.; Brantley, Susan L.; Chorover, Jon D.; Ewing, Robert P.; Kerisit, Sebastien N.; Liu, Chongxuan; Perfect, E.; Rother, Gernot; Stack, Andrew G.

    2016-03-16

    Internal pore domains exist within rocks, lithic fragments, subsurface sediments and soil aggregates. These domains, which we term internal domains in porous media (IDPM), contain a significant fraction of their porosity as nanopores, dominate the reactive surface area of diverse porous media types, and are important locations for chemical reactivity and hydrocarbon storage. Traditionally difficult to interrogate, advances in instrumentation and imaging methods are providing new insights on the physical structures and chemical attributes of IDPM. In this review we: discuss analytical methods to characterize IDPM, evaluate what has been learned about their size distributions, connectivity, and extended structures; determine whether they exhibit unique chemical reactivity; and assess potential for their inclusion in reactive transport models. Three key findings are noteworthy. 1) A combination of methods now allows complete characterization of the porosity spectrum of natural materials and its connectivity; while imaging microscopies are providing three dimensional representations of the interconnected pore network. 2) Chemical reactivity in pores <10 nm is expected to be different from micro and macropores, yet research performed to date is inconclusive on the nature, direction, and magnitude of effect. 3) Existing continuum reactive transport models treat IDPM as a sub-grid feature with average, empirical, scale-dependent parameters; and are not formulated to include detailed information on pore networks. Overall we find that IDPM are key features controlling hydrocarbon release from shales in hydrofracking systems, organic matter stabilization and recalcitrance in soil, weathering and soil formation, and long term inorganic and organic contaminant behavior in the vadose zone and groundwater. We conclude with an assessment of impactful research opportunities to advance understanding of IDPM, and to incorporate their important effects in reactive transport models

  15. Upscaling of solute transport in disordered porous media by wavelet transformations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moslehi, Mahsa; de Barros, Felipe P. J.; Ebrahimi, Fatemeh; Sahimi, Muhammad

    2016-10-01

    Modeling flow and solute transport in large-scale (e.g.) on the order of 103 m heterogeneous porous media involves substantial computational burden. A common approach to alleviate the problem is to utilize an upscaling method that generates models that require less intensive computations. The method must also preserve the important properties of the spatial distribution of the hydraulic conductivity (K) field. We use an upscaling method based on the wavelet transformations (WTs) that coarsens the computational grid based on the spatial distribution of K. The technique is applied to a porous formation with broadly distributed and correlated K values, and the governing equation for solute transport in the formation is solved numerically. The WT upscaling preserves the resolution of the initial highly-resolved computational grid in the high K zones, as well as that of the zones with sharp contrasts between the neighboring K, whereas the low-K zones are averaged out. To demonstrate the accuracy of the method, we simulate fluid flow and nonreactive solute transport in both the high-resolution and upscaled grids, and compare the concentration profiles and the breakthrough times. The results indicate that the WT upscaling of a K field generates non-uniform upscaled grids with a number of grid blocks that on average is about two percent of the number of the blocks in the original high-resolution computational grids, while the concentration profiles, the breakthrough times and the second moment of the concentration distribution, computed for both models, are virtually identical. A systematic parametric study is also carried out in order to investigate the sensitivity of the method to the broadness of the K field, the nature of the correlations in the field (positive versus negative), and the size of the computational grid. As the broadness of the K field and the size of the computational domain increase, better agreement between the results for the high-resolution and

  16. A streamline splitting pore-network approach for computationally inexpensive and accurate simulation of transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mehmani, Yashar; Oostrom, Mart; Balhoff, Matthew T.

    2014-03-01

    Several approaches have been developed in the literature for solving flow and transport at the pore scale. Some authors use a direct modeling approach where the fundamental flow and transport equations are solved on the actual pore-space geometry. Such direct modeling, while very accurate, comes at a great computational cost. Network models are computationally more efficient because the pore-space morphology is approximated. Typically, a mixed cell method (MCM) is employed for solving the flow and transport system which assumes pore-level perfect mixing. This assumption is invalid at moderate to high Peclet regimes. In this work, a novel Eulerian perspective on modeling flow and transport at the pore scale is developed. The new streamline splitting method (SSM) allows for circumventing the pore-level perfect-mixing assumption, while maintaining the computational efficiency of pore-network models. SSM was verified with direct simulations and validated against micromodel experiments; excellent matches were obtained across a wide range of pore-structure and fluid-flow parameters. The increase in the computational cost from MCM to SSM is shown to be minimal, while the accuracy of SSM is much higher than that of MCM and comparable to direct modeling approaches. Therefore, SSM can be regarded as an appropriate balance between incorporating detailed physics and controlling computational cost. The truly predictive capability of the model allows for the study of pore-level interactions of fluid flow and transport in different porous materials. In this paper, we apply SSM and MCM to study the effects of pore-level mixing on transverse dispersion in 3-D disordered granular media.

  17. Two-dimensional modeling of electrochemical and transport phenomena in the porous structures of a PEMFC

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sahraoui, Melik [Institut Preparatoire aux Etudes d' Ingenieurs de Tunis (IPEIT) (Tunisia); Kharrat, Chafik; Halouani, Kamel [UR: Micro-Electro-Thermal Systems (METS-ENIS), Industrial Energy Systems Group, Institut Preparatoire aux Etudes d' Ingenieurs de Sfax (IPEIS), University of Sfax, B.P: 1172, 3018 Sfax (Tunisia)

    2009-04-15

    A two-dimensional CFD model of PEM fuel cell is developed by taking into account the electrochemical, mass and heat transfer phenomena occurring in all of its regions simultaneously. The catalyst layers and membrane are each considered as distinct regions with finite thickness and calculated properties such as permeability, local protonic conductivity, and local dissolved water diffusion. This finite thickness model enables to model accurately the protonic current in these regions with higher accuracy than using an infinitesimal interface. In addition, this model takes into account the effect of osmotic drag in the membrane and catalyst layers. General boundary conditions are implemented in a way taking into consideration any given species concentration at the fuel cell inlet, such as water vapor which is a very important parameter in determining the efficiency of fuel cells. Other operating parameters such as temperature, pressure and porosity of the porous structure are also investigated to characterize their effect on the fuel cell efficiency. (author)

  18. Analytic solutions for colloid transport with time- and depth-dependent retention in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leij, Feike J.; Bradford, Scott A.; Sciortino, Antonella

    2016-12-01

    Elucidating and quantifying the transport of industrial nanoparticles (e.g. silver, carbon nanotubes, and graphene oxide) and other colloid-size particles such as viruses and bacteria is important to safeguard and manage the quality of the subsurface environment. Analytic solutions were derived for aqueous and solid phase colloid concentrations in a porous medium where colloids were subject to advective transport and reversible time and/or depth-dependent retention. Time-dependent blocking and ripening retention were described using a Langmuir-type equation with a rate coefficient that respectively decreased and increased linearly with the retained concentration. Depth-dependent retention was described using a rate coefficient that is a power-law function of distance. The stream tube modeling concept was employed to extend these analytic solutions to transport scenarios with two different partitioning processes (i.e., two types of retention sites). The sensitivity of concentrations was illustrated for the various time- and/or depth-dependent retention model parameters. The developed analytical models were subsequently used to describe breakthrough curves and, in some cases, retention profiles from several published column studies that employed nanoparticle or pathogenic microorganisms. Simulations results provided valuable insights on causes for many observed complexities associated with colloid transport and retention, including: increasing or decreasing effluent concentrations with continued colloid application, delayed breakthrough, low concentration tailing, and retention profiles that are hyper-exponential, exponential, linear, or non-monotonic with distance.

  19. Sepia ink as a surrogate for colloid transport tests in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soto-Gómez, Diego; Pérez-Rodríguez, Paula; López-Periago, J. Eugenio; Paradelo, Marcos

    2016-08-01

    We examined the suitability of the ink of Sepia officinalis as a surrogate for transport studies of microorganisms and microparticles in porous media. Sepia ink is an organic pigment consisted on a suspension of eumelanin, and that has several advantages for its use as a promising material for introducing the frugal-innovation in the fields of public health and environmental research: very low cost, non-toxic, spherical shape, moderate polydispersivity, size near large viruses, non-anomalous electrokinetic behavior, low retention in the soil, and high stability. Electrokinetic determinations and transport experiments in quartz sand columns and soil columns were done with purified suspensions of sepia ink. Influence of ionic strength on the electrophoretic mobility of ink particles showed the typical behavior of polystyrene latex spheres. Breakthrough curve (BTC) and retention profile (RP) in quartz sand columns showed a depth dependent and blocking adsorption model with an increase in adsorption rates with the ionic strength. Partially saturated transport through undisturbed soil showed less retention than in quartz sand, and matrix exclusion was also observed. Quantification of ink in leachate fractions by light absorbance is direct, but quantification in the soil profile with moderate to high organic matter content was rather cumbersome. We concluded that sepia ink is a suitable cheap surrogate for exploring transport of pathogenic viruses, bacteria and particulate contaminants in groundwater, and could be used for developing frugal-innovation related with the assessment of soil and aquifer filtration function, and monitoring of water filtration systems in low-income regions.

  20. Recirculation zones induce non-Fickian transport in three-dimensional periodic porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crevacore, Eleonora; Tosco, Tiziana; Sethi, Rajandrea; Boccardo, Gianluca; Marchisio, Daniele L.

    2016-11-01

    In this work, the influence of pore space geometry on solute transport in porous media is investigated performing computational fluid dynamics pore-scale simulations of fluid flow and solute transport. The three-dimensional periodic domains are obtained from three different pore structure configurations, namely, face-centered-cubic (fcc), body-centered-cubic (bcc), and sphere-in-cube (sic) arrangements of spherical grains. Although transport simulations are performed with media having the same grain size and the same porosity (in fcc and bcc configurations), the resulting breakthrough curves present noteworthy differences, such as enhanced tailing. The cause of such differences is ascribed to the presence of recirculation zones, even at low Reynolds numbers. Various methods to readily identify recirculation zones and quantify their magnitude using pore-scale data are proposed. The information gained from this analysis is then used to define macroscale models able to provide an appropriate description of the observed anomalous transport. A mass transfer model is applied to estimate relevant macroscale parameters (hydrodynamic dispersion above all) and their spatial variation in the medium; a functional relation describing the spatial variation of such macroscale parameters is then proposed.

  1. Reactive silica transport in fractured porous media: Analytical solutions for a system of parallel fractures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Jianwen

    2012-04-01

    A general analytical solution is derived by using the Laplace transformation to describe transient reactive silica transport in a conceptualized 2-D system involving a set of parallel fractures embedded in an impermeable host rock matrix, taking into account of hydrodynamic dispersion and advection of silica transport along the fractures, molecular diffusion from each fracture to the intervening rock matrix, and dissolution of quartz. A special analytical solution is also developed by ignoring the longitudinal hydrodynamic dispersion term but remaining other conditions the same. The general and special solutions are in the form of a double infinite integral and a single infinite integral, respectively, and can be evaluated using Gauss-Legendre quadrature technique. A simple criterion is developed to determine under what conditions the general analytical solution can be approximated by the special analytical solution. It is proved analytically that the general solution always lags behind the special solution, unless a dimensionless parameter is less than a critical value. Several illustrative calculations are undertaken to demonstrate the effect of fracture spacing, fracture aperture and fluid flow rate on silica transport. The analytical solutions developed here can serve as a benchmark to validate numerical models that simulate reactive mass transport in fractured porous media.

  2. Transport of zero-valent iron nanoparticles in carbonate-rich porous aquifers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laumann, S.; Micic, V.; Hofmann, T.

    2012-04-01

    Use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) for in situ dechlorination of chlorinated solvents in groundwater is a promising remediation technology, due to a high dechlorination efficiency of nZVI and possible applications in e.g., great depth or under above-ground infrastructure. The success of the in situ nZVI dechlorination strongly depends on the particle delivery to the contaminants. Previous studies reported a limited transport of nZVI through porous media (cm- to dm-range) and this has been recognized as one of the major obstacles in a widespread utilization of this technology (TRATNYEK & JOHNSON, 2006). Factors that limit the transport are particle aggregation and deposition onto the aquifer solids. Both depend on particle properties (e.g., size, shape, iron content, surface coating, surface charge), on concentrations of suspensions, and on site-specific parameters, such as the groundwater chemistry and the properties and inhomogeneity of the aquifer material. Adsorbed anionic polyelectrolyte coatings provide electrostatic double layer repulsions between negatively charged nZVI particles (SALEH ET AL., 2007), hindering their aggregation and also deposition on the negatively charged quartz surfaces (usually prevailing in aquifers). However, it is shown that the presence of surface charge heterogeneities in the aquifer effects the particle transport (JOHNSON ET AL., 1996). Carbonates, iron oxides, and the edges of clay minerals, for instance, carry a positive surface charge at neutral pH (often encountered in groundwater). This leads to a favorable deposition of negatively charged nZVI particles onto carbonates, metal oxide impurities or clay edges, and finally to a decreased particle transport. Considering the high proportion of carbonates commonly encountered in Alpine porous aquifers, in this study we aimed to evaluate the transport of commercially available polyelectrolyte coated nZVI (polyacrylic acid coated-nZVI, NANOIRON s.r.o., CZ) in both quartz and

  3. Characterization of Nano-scale Aluminum Oxide Transport Through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norwood, Sasha Norien

    Land application of biosolids has become common practice in the United States as an alternative to industrial fertilizers. Although nutrient rich, biosolids have been found to contain high concentrations of unregulated and/or unrecognized emerging contaminants (e.g., pharmaceuticals, personal care products) while containing a significant fraction of inorganic nano-scale colloidal materials such as oxides of iron, titanium, and aluminum. Given their reactivity and small size, there are many questions concerning the potential migration of these nano-sized colloidal materials through the soil column and into our surface and groundwater bodies. Transport of emerging pollutants of concern through the soil column, at minimum, is impacted by colloidal properties (e.g., chemical composition, shape, aggregation kinetics), solution chemistry (e.g., pH, ionic strength, natural organic matter), and water flow velocity. The purpose of this current research was to characterize the long-term transport behavior of aluminum oxide nanoparticles (Al 2O3) through a natural porous media with changes in pH, aqueous-phase concentration, pore-water velocity and electrolyte valence. Additionally, deposition rates during the initial stages of deposition were compared to several models developed based on colloid filtration theory and DLVO stability theory. Benchtop column laboratory experiments showed that, under environmentally relevant groundwater conditions, Al2O3 nanoparticles are mobile through saturated porous media. Mobility increased under conditions in which the nanoparticles and porous media were of like charge (pH 9). Changes in linear pore water velocity, under these same high pH conditions, showed similar transport behavior with little mass retained in the system. Deposition is believed to be kinetically controlled at pH 9, as evidenced by the slightly earlier breakthrough as flow rate increased and was further supported by observed concentration effects on the arrival wave

  4. An upscaled two-equation model of transport in porous media through unsteady-state closure of volume averaged formulations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chaynikov, S.; Porta, G.; Riva, M.; Guadagnini, A.

    2012-04-01

    We focus on a theoretical analysis of nonreactive solute transport in porous media through the volume averaging technique. Darcy-scale transport models based on continuum formulations typically include large scale dispersive processes which are embedded in a pore-scale advection diffusion equation through a Fickian analogy. This formulation has been extensively questioned in the literature due to its inability to depict observed solute breakthrough curves in diverse settings, ranging from the laboratory to the field scales. The heterogeneity of the pore-scale velocity field is one of the key sources of uncertainties giving rise to anomalous (non-Fickian) dispersion in macro-scale porous systems. Some of the models which are employed to interpret observed non-Fickian solute behavior make use of a continuum formulation of the porous system which assumes a two-region description and includes a bimodal velocity distribution. A first class of these models comprises the so-called ''mobile-immobile'' conceptualization, where convective and dispersive transport mechanisms are considered to dominate within a high velocity region (mobile zone), while convective effects are neglected in a low velocity region (immobile zone). The mass exchange between these two regions is assumed to be controlled by a diffusive process and is macroscopically described by a first-order kinetic. An extension of these ideas is the two equation ''mobile-mobile'' model, where both transport mechanisms are taken into account in each region and a first-order mass exchange between regions is employed. Here, we provide an analytical derivation of two region "mobile-mobile" meso-scale models through a rigorous upscaling of the pore-scale advection diffusion equation. Among the available upscaling methodologies, we employ the Volume Averaging technique. In this approach, the heterogeneous porous medium is supposed to be pseudo-periodic, and can be represented through a (spatially) periodic unit cell

  5. Dual control cell reaction ensemble molecular dynamics: A method for simulations of reactions and adsorption in porous materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lísal, Martin; Brennan, John K.; Smith, William R.; Siperstein, Flor R.

    2004-09-01

    We present a simulation tool to study fluid mixtures that are simultaneously chemically reacting and adsorbing in a porous material. The method is a combination of the reaction ensemble Monte Carlo method and the dual control volume grand canonical molecular dynamics technique. The method, termed the dual control cell reaction ensemble molecular dynamics method, allows for the calculation of both equilibrium and nonequilibrium transport properties in porous materials such as diffusion coefficients, permeability, and mass flux. Control cells, which are in direct physical contact with the porous solid, are used to maintain the desired reaction and flow conditions for the system. The simulation setup closely mimics an actual experimental system in which the thermodynamic and flow parameters are precisely controlled. We present an application of the method to the dry reforming of methane reaction within a nanoscale reactor model in the presence of a semipermeable membrane that was modeled as a porous material similar to silicalite. We studied the effects of the membrane structure and porosity on the reaction species permeability by considering three different membrane models. We also studied the effects of an imposed pressure gradient across the membrane on the mass flux of the reaction species. Conversion of syngas (H2/CO) increased significantly in all the nanoscale membrane reactor models considered. A brief discussion of further potential applications is also presented.

  6. Individual and Co Transport Study of Titanium Dioxide NPs and Zinc Oxide NPs in Porous Media.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jyoti Kumari

    Full Text Available The impact of pH and ionic strength on the mobility (individual and co-transport and deposition kinetics of TiO2 and ZnO NPs in porous media was systematically investigated in this study. Packed column experiments were performed over a series of environmentally relevant ionic strengths with both NaCl (0.1-10 mM and CaCl2 (0.01-0.1mM solutions and at pH 5, 7, and 9. The transport of TiO2 NPs at pH 5 was not significantly affected by ZnO NPs in solution. At pH 7, a decrease in TiO2 NP transport was noted with co-existence of ZnO NPs, while at pH 9 an increase in the transport was observed. At pH 5 and 7, the transport of ZnO NPs was decreased when TiO2 NPs was present in the solution, and at pH 9, an increase was noted. The breakthrough curves (BTC were noted to be sensitive to the solution chemistries; the decrease in the breakthrough plateau with increasing ionic strength was observed under all examined pH (5, 7, and 9. The retention profiles were the inverse of the plateaus of BTCs, as expected from mass balance considerations. Overall, the results from this study suggest that solution chemistries (ionic strength and pH are likely the key factors that govern the individual and co-transport behavior of TiO2 and ZnO NPs in sand.

  7. Detailed Observation of Cell Junction in Anodic Porous Alumina with Square Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asoh, Hidetaka; Ono, Sachiko; Hirose, Tomohito; Takatori, Ikuo; Masuda, Hideki

    2004-09-01

    The local structure of a cell junction in anodic porous alumina with square cells was studied by transmission electron microscopy (TEM), field-emission scanning electron microscopy (FE-SEM) and atomic force microscopy (AFM). The initiation of a square lattice pattern, which is different from a normal hexagonal cell arrangement, induced the characteristic growth of a porous structure. The obtained oxide film was formed by a close-packed array of square cells following the initiation. The shape of the pores changed from circular to square corresponding to the transformation of the cell structure at the steady state. The incorporation of unoxidized aluminum into the oxide film and the generation of voids were observed at the fourfold point of the cell junction. The height of the protrusions of the aluminum substrate at the cell junction was considerably larger than that of protrusions formed in naturally occurring anodic porous alumina with hexagonal cells. These specific features were thought to be caused by the inhomogeneous distribution of current at the square pore base.

  8. MS-2 and poliovirus transport in porous media: Hydrophobic effects and chemical perturbations

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bales, Roger C.; Li, Shimin; Maguire, Kimberly M.; Yahya, Moyasar T.; Gerba, Charles P.

    1993-04-01

    In a series of pH 7 continuous-flow column experiments, removal of the bacteriophage MS-2 by attachment to silica beads had a strong, systematic dependence on the amount of hydrophobic surface present on the beads. With no hydrophobic surface, removal of phage at pH 5 was much greater than at pH 7. Release of attached phage at both pH values did occur, but was slow; breakthrough curves exhibited tailing. Poliovirus attached to silica beads at pH 5.5 much more than at pH 7.0, and attachment was also slowly reversible. Time scales for phage and poliovinis attachment were of the order of hours. The sticking efficiency factor (α), reflecting microscaie physicochemical influences on virus attachment, was in the range of 0.0007-0.02. Phage release was small but measurable under steady state conditions. Release was enhanced by lowering ionic strength and by introducing beef extract, a high-ionic-strength protein solution. Results show that viruses experience reversible attachment/detachment (sometimes termed sorption), that large chemical perturbations are needed to induce rapid virus detachment, and that viruses should be quite mobile in sandy porous media. Even small amounts of hydrophobic organic material in the porous media (≥0.001%) can retard virus transport.

  9. A model for ion transport during drying of a porous medium

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guglielmini, Laura; Gontcharov, Alexandre; Aldykiewicz, Antonio; Stone, Howard

    2007-11-01

    Salt crystallization at the surface or in the body of a porous medium has been recognized as a major mechanism in the deterioration of construction materials and historical monuments. Crystal formations on the surface of bricks, concrete, stones, called efflorescences, lead to fast obsolescence of building and monuments finishing, while crystal growth inside the material, called subflorescences, causes crack formation, which may lead to major structural damages. A number of studies have been devoted to the analysis of crystal growth in an elementary pore and aim at explaining the stress generated by crystallization. From a fluid mechanical point of view the physics of water transport and salt distribution in the porous medium turns out to be quite complex, since it is a function of the pore structure and wettability characteristics, of granule size and of the thermal properties of the material. It also depends on the transient environmental conditions the surface is exposed to and on the effective diffusivity of salt at different saturation conditions. We present here a simple theoretical model of the first phase of the drying process, during which water is uniformly distributed throughout the medium and often efflorescences occurs, which aims at characterizing the physics involved in the process.

  10. Reactive Transport Modeling of Induced Calcite Precipitation Reaction Fronts in Porous Media Using A Parallel, Fully Coupled, Fully Implicit Approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, L.; Huang, H.; Gaston, D.; Redden, G. D.; Fox, D. T.; Fujita, Y.

    2010-12-01

    to homogeneous and heterogeneous porous media, respectively. In 1D columns, calcium carbonate mineral precipitation was driven by urea hydrolysis catalyzed by urease enzyme, and in 2D flow cells, calcium carbonate mineral forming reactants were injected sequentially, forming migrating reaction fronts that are typically highly nonuniform. The RAT simulation results for the spatial and temporal distributions of precipitates, reaction rates and major species in the system, and also for changes in porosity and permeability, were compared to both laboratory experimental data and computational results obtained using other reactive transport simulators. The comparisons demonstrate the ability of RAT to simulate complex nonlinear systems and the advantages of fully coupled approaches, over de-coupled methods, for accurate simulation of complex, dynamic processes such as engineered mineral precipitation in subsurface environments.

  11. Simulation of contaminant transport in fractured porous media on triangular meshes

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Chen

    2010-12-01

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods, i.e. mixed finite element (MFE) and the finite volume (FV) methods. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocities field for both the fractures and matrix which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The FV method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms respectively. Numerical examples in a medium containing fracture network illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model. © 2010 IEEE.

  12. Band edge discontinuities and carrier transport in c-Si/porous silicon heterojunctions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Islam, Md Nazrul [QAED-SRG, Space Applications Centre (ISRO), Ahmedabad - 380015 (India); Ram, Sanjay K [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur - 208016 (India); Kumar, Satyendra [Department of Physics, Indian Institute of Technology, Kanpur - 208016 (India)

    2007-10-07

    We have prepared light emitting nanocrystallline porous silicon (PS) layers by electrochemical anodization of crystalline silicon (c-Si) wafer and characterized the c-Si/PS heterojunctions using temperature dependence of dark current-voltage (I-V) characteristics. The reverse bias I-V characteristics of c-Si/PS heterojunctions are found to behave like the Schottky junctions where carrier transport is mainly governed by the carrier generation-recombination in the depletion region formed on the PS side. Fermi level of c-Si gets pinned to the defect levels at the interface resulting in ln(I) {approx} V{sup 1/2}. The barrier height in the reverse bias condition is shown to be equal to the band offset at the conduction band edges. An energy band diagram for the c-Si/PS heterojunction is proposed.

  13. Modelling Simultaneous transport of Bioreative Solutes and Microorganisms in Porous Media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Y.TAN; LIZHENGAO

    1998-01-01

    Recent years have the development of a number of mathematical models for the descrption of the simultaneous transport of microorganisms and bioreactive solutes in porous media.Most models are based on the advection-dispersion equation,with terms added to account for interactions with the surfaces of the soild matrix ,transformations and microbial activties.Those models based on the advection-dispersion equation have all been shown to represent laboratory experimental data adequately altough various assumption have been made concerning the pore-scale distribution of bacteria.This paper provides an overview o the recent work on modelling the trasport and fate of microorganisms and bioreactive solutes in prous media and examines the different assumptions regarding the pore scale distrbution of microorganisms.

  14. Assessment model validity document. NAMMU: A program for calculating groundwater flow and transport through porous media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cliffe, K.A.; Morris, S.T.; Porter, J.D. [AEA Technology, Harwell (United Kingdom)

    1998-05-01

    NAMMU is a computer program for modelling groundwater flow and transport through porous media. This document provides an overview of the use of the program for geosphere modelling in performance assessment calculations and gives a detailed description of the program itself. The aim of the document is to give an indication of the grounds for having confidence in NAMMU as a performance assessment tool. In order to achieve this the following topics are discussed. The basic premises of the assessment approach and the purpose of and nature of the calculations that can be undertaken using NAMMU are outlined. The concepts of the validation of models and the considerations that can lead to increased confidence in models are described. The physical processes that can be modelled using NAMMU and the mathematical models and numerical techniques that are used to represent them are discussed in some detail. Finally, the grounds that would lead one to have confidence that NAMMU is fit for purpose are summarised.

  15. Transport and Deposition of Variably Charged Soil Colloids in Saturated Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sharma, Anu; Kawmoto, Ken; Møldrup, Per;

    2012-01-01

    A series of column experiments was conducted to investigate the transport and deposition of variably charged colloids in saturated porous media. Soil colloids with diameters colloids) and a red-yellow soil from...... Okinawa (RYS colloids) in Japan. The VAS colloids exhibited a negative surface charge with a high pH dependency, whereas the RYS colloids exhibited a negative surface charge with less pH dependency. The soil colloids were applied as colloidal suspensions to 10-cm-long saturated sand columns packed....... Breakthrough curves and deposition profiles for soil colloids were strong functions of the hydrodynamics, solution pH, and surface charge of the colloids and sand grains. Greater deposition was typical for lower flow rates and lower pH. The deposition of VAS colloids in both sands under low-pH conditions...

  16. Pore network and pore scale modeling of reactive transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Adler, P. M.; Vu, T. M.; Varloteaux, C.; Bekri, S.

    2012-12-01

    The study of the evolution of a porous medium where a reactive fluid flows is conditioned by the accurate determination of three macroscopic parameters governing the solute displacement, namely the solute velocity, dispersion and mean reaction rate. Of course, a possible application of such studies is CO2 sequestration. This presentation proposes to approach the determination of these parameters by two different ways and to compare them; both are on the pore scale. In the first one called PNM (for pore-network model), a pore-network is extracted from micro tomography images of a real porous medium. This network is composed of spherical pores joined by circular tubes; it is used to calculate transport macroscopic parameters and porosity-permeability evolution during the reactive transport flow as functions of dimensionless numbers representing the reaction and flow rate regimes. The flow is calculated by using Kirchhoff laws. Transport is determined in the asymptotic regime where the solute concentration undergoes an exponential evolution with time. In the second approach called PSM (for pore scale model), the pore-network model is used as a three dimensional medium which is discretized by the Level Set Method. The Stokes equations are solved in order to determine the local flow field and the corresponding permeability. The solute concentration is obtained by solving the local convection-diffusion equation in the 3D pore-network; numerical dispersion is reduced by a Flux Limiting Scheme. Two different geometries of porous media are addressed by both numerical codes. The first pore-network geometry is used to validate the PNM assumptions, whereas the second pore-network is defined for a better understanding of the dominant solute distribution. One of the main results obtained with the first pore-network is the dependence of the concentration profile on the Péclet number Pe in the pore-bodies. When this number increases, one has to switch from an assumption of

  17. Enhanced transport of zerovalent iron nanoparticles in saturated porous media by guar gum

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Sethi, Rajandrea, E-mail: rajandrea.sethi@polito.i [Politecnico di Torino, DITAG - Dipartimento di Ingegneria del Territorio, dell' Ambiente e delle Geotecnologie (Italy)

    2009-04-15

    In order to ensure adequate mobility of zerovalent iron nanoparticles in natural aquifers, the use of a stabilizing agent is necessary. Polymers adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface will give rise to electrosteric stabilization and will decrease attachment to the surface soil grains. Water saturated sand-packed columns were used in this study to investigate the transport of iron nanoparticle suspensions, bare or modified with the green polymer guar gum. The suspensions were prepared at 154 mg/L particle concentration and 0.5 g/L polymer concentration. Transport experiments were conducted by varying the ionic strength, ionic composition, and approach velocity of the fluid. Nanoparticle deposition rates, attachment efficiencies, and travel distances were subsequently calculated based on the classical particle filtration theory. It was found that bare iron nanoparticles are basically immobile in sandy porous media. In contrast, guar gum is able to ensure significant nanoparticle transport at the tested conditions, regardless of the chemistry of the solution. Attachment efficiency values for guar gum-coated nanoparticles under the various conditions tested were smaller than 0.066. Although the calculated travel distances may not prove satisfactory for field application, the investigation attested the promising role of guar gum to ensure mobility of iron nanoparticles in the subsurface environment.

  18. Enhanced transport of zerovalent iron nanoparticles in saturated porous media by guar gum

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tiraferri, Alberto; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2009-04-01

    In order to ensure adequate mobility of zerovalent iron nanoparticles in natural aquifers, the use of a stabilizing agent is necessary. Polymers adsorbed on the nanoparticle surface will give rise to electrosteric stabilization and will decrease attachment to the surface soil grains. Water saturated sand-packed columns were used in this study to investigate the transport of iron nanoparticle suspensions, bare or modified with the green polymer guar gum. The suspensions were prepared at 154 mg/L particle concentration and 0.5 g/L polymer concentration. Transport experiments were conducted by varying the ionic strength, ionic composition, and approach velocity of the fluid. Nanoparticle deposition rates, attachment efficiencies, and travel distances were subsequently calculated based on the classical particle filtration theory. It was found that bare iron nanoparticles are basically immobile in sandy porous media. In contrast, guar gum is able to ensure significant nanoparticle transport at the tested conditions, regardless of the chemistry of the solution. Attachment efficiency values for guar gum-coated nanoparticles under the various conditions tested were smaller than 0.066. Although the calculated travel distances may not prove satisfactory for field application, the investigation attested the promising role of guar gum to ensure mobility of iron nanoparticles in the subsurface environment.

  19. A global method for coupling transport with chemistry in heterogeneous porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Laila, Amir; 10.1007/s10596-009-9162-x

    2009-01-01

    Modeling reactive transport in porous media, using a local chemical equilibrium assumption, leads to a system of advection-diffusion PDE's coupled with algebraic equations. When solving this coupled system, the algebraic equations have to be solved at each grid point for each chemical species and at each time step. This leads to a coupled non-linear system. In this paper a global solution approach that enables to keep the software codes for transport and chemistry distinct is proposed. The method applies the Newton-Krylov framework to the formulation for reactive transport used in operator splitting. The method is formulated in terms of total mobile and total fixed concentrations and uses the chemical solver as a black box, as it only requires that on be able to solve chemical equilibrium problems (and compute derivatives), without having to know the solution method. An additional advantage of the Newton-Krylov method is that the Jacobian is only needed as an operator in a Jacobian matrix times vector product...

  20. Modeling and Simulation of Nanoparticle Transport in Multiphase Flows in Porous Media: CO2 Sequestration

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2012-09-03

    Geological storage of anthropogenic CO2 emissions in deep saline aquifers has recently received tremendous attention in the scientific literature. Injected CO2 plume buoyantly accumulates at the top part of the deep aquifer under a sealing cap rock, and some concern that the high-pressure CO2 could breach the seal rock. However, CO2 will diffuse into the brine underneath and generate a slightly denser fluid that may induce instability and convective mixing. Onset times of instability and convective mixing performance depend on the physical properties of the rock and fluids, such as permeability and density contrast. The novel idea is to adding nanoparticles to the injected CO2 to increase density contrast between the CO2-rich brine and the underlying resident brine and, consequently, decrease onset time of instability and increase convective mixing. As far as it goes, only few works address the issues related to mathematical and numerical modeling aspects of the nanoparticles transport phenomena in CO2 storages. In the current work, we will present mathematical models to describe the nanoparticles transport carried by injected CO2 in porous media. Buoyancy and capillary forces as well as Brownian diffusion are important to be considered in the model. IMplicit Pressure Explicit Saturation-Concentration (IMPESC) scheme is used and a numerical simulator is developed to simulate the nanoparticles transport in CO2 storages.

  1. A nonequilibrium model for reactive contaminant transport through fractured porous media: Model development and semianalytical solution

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joshi, Nitin; Ojha, C. S. P.; Sharma, P. K.

    2012-10-01

    In this study a conceptual model that accounts for the effects of nonequilibrium contaminant transport in a fractured porous media is developed. Present model accounts for both physical and sorption nonequilibrium. Analytical solution was developed using the Laplace transform technique, which was then numerically inverted to obtain solute concentration in the fracture matrix system. The semianalytical solution developed here can incorporate both semi-infinite and finite fracture matrix extent. In addition, the model can account for flexible boundary conditions and nonzero initial condition in the fracture matrix system. The present semianalytical solution was validated against the existing analytical solutions for the fracture matrix system. In order to differentiate between various sorption/transport mechanism different cases of sorption and mass transfer were analyzed by comparing the breakthrough curves and temporal moments. It was found that significant differences in the signature of sorption and mass transfer exists. Applicability of the developed model was evaluated by simulating the published experimental data of Calcium and Strontium transport in a single fracture. The present model simulated the experimental data reasonably well in comparison to the model based on equilibrium sorption assumption in fracture matrix system, and multi rate mass transfer model.

  2. A new methodology for determination of macroscopic transport parameters in drying porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Attari Moghaddam, A.; Kharaghani, A.; Tsotsas, E.; Prat, M.

    2015-12-01

    Two main approaches have been used to model the drying process: The first approach considers the partially saturated porous medium as a continuum and partial differential equations are used to describe the mass, momentum and energy balances of the fluid phases. The continuum-scale models (CM) obtained by this approach involve constitutive laws which require effective material properties, such as the diffusivity, permeability, and thermal conductivity which are often determined by experiments. The second approach considers the material at the pore scale, where the void space is represented by a network of pores (PN). Micro- or nanofluidics models used in each pore give rise to a large system of ordinary differential equations with degrees of freedom at each node of the pore network. In this work, the moisture transport coefficient (D), the pseudo desorption isotherm inside the network and at the evaporative surface are estimated from the post-processing of the three-dimensional pore network drying simulations for fifteen realizations of the pore space geometry from a given probability distribution. A slice sampling method is used in order to extract these parameters from PN simulations. The moisture transport coefficient obtained in this way is shown in Fig. 1a. The minimum of average D values demonstrates the transition between liquid dominated moisture transport region and vapor dominated moisture transport region; a similar behavior has been observed in previous experimental findings. A function is fitted to the average D values and then is fed into the non-linear moisture diffusion equation. The saturation profiles obtained from PN and CM simulations are shown in Fig. 1b. Figure 1: (a) extracted moisture transport coefficient during drying for fifteen realizations of the pore network, (b) average moisture profiles during drying obtained from PN and CM simulations.

  3. On the validity of effective formulations for transport through heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Dreuzy, Jean-Raynald; Carrera, Jesus

    2016-04-01

    Geological heterogeneity enhances spreading of solutes and causes transport to be anomalous (i.e., non-Fickian), with much less mixing than suggested by dispersion. This implies that modeling transport requires adopting either stochastic approaches that model heterogeneity explicitly or effective transport formulations that acknowledge the effects of heterogeneity. A number of such formulations have been developed and tested as upscaled representations of enhanced spreading. However, their ability to represent mixing has not been formally tested, which is required for proper reproduction of chemical reactions and which motivates our work. We propose that, for an effective transport formulation to be considered a valid representation of transport through heterogeneous porous media (HPM), it should honor mean advection, mixing and spreading. It should also be flexible enough to be applicable to real problems. We test the capacity of the multi-rate mass transfer (MRMT) model to reproduce mixing observed in HPM, as represented by the classical multi-Gaussian log-permeability field with a Gaussian correlation pattern. Non-dispersive mixing comes from heterogeneity structures in the concentration fields that are not captured by macrodispersion. These fine structures limit mixing initially, but eventually enhance it. Numerical results show that, relative to HPM, MRMT models display a much stronger memory of initial conditions on mixing than on dispersion because of the sensitivity of the mixing state to the actual values of concentration. Because MRMT does not restitute the local concentration structures, it induces smaller non-dispersive mixing than HPM. However long-lived trapping in the immobile zones may sustain the deviation from dispersive mixing over much longer times. While spreading can be well captured by MRMT models, in general non-dispersive mixing cannot.

  4. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    OpenAIRE

    Yong Wang; Wenzheng Yue; Mo Zhang

    2016-01-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those ...

  5. Convective transport in a porous medium layer saturated with a Maxwell nanofluid

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J.C. Umavathi

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available A linear and weakly non-linear stability analys is has been carried out to study the onset of convection in a horizontal layer of a porous medium saturated with a Maxwell nanofluid. To simulate the momentum equation in porous media, a modified Darcy–Maxwell nanofluid model incorporating the effects of Brownian motion and thermophoresis has been used. A Galerkin method has been employed to investigate the stationary and oscillatory convections; the stability boundaries for these cases are approximated by simple and useful analytical expressions. The stability of the system is investigated by varying various parameters viz., nanoparticle concentration Rayleigh number, Lewis number, modified diffusivity ratio, porosity, thermal capacity ratio, viscosity ratio, conductivity ratio, Vadász number and relaxation parameter. A representation of Fourier series method has been used to study the heat and mass transport on the non-linear stability analysis. The effect of transient heat and mass transport on various parameters is also studied. It is found that for stationary convection Lewis number, viscosity ratio and conductivity ratio have a stabilizing effect while nanoparticle concentration Rayleigh number Rn destabilizes the system. For oscillatory convection we observe that the conductivity ratio stabilizes the system whereas nanoparticle concentration Rayleigh number, Lewis number, Vadász number and relaxation parameter destabilize the system. The viscosity ratio increases the thermal Rayleigh number for oscillatory convection initially thus delaying the onset of convection and later decreases thus advancing the onset of convection hence showing a dual effect. For steady finite amplitude motions, the heat and mass transport decreases with an increase in the values of nanoparticle concentration Rayleigh number, Lewis number, viscosity ratio and conductivity ratio. The mass transport increases with an increase in Vadász number and relaxation

  6. Interdisciplinary Research to Elucidate Mechanisms Governing Silver Nanoparticle Fate and Transport in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pennell, K. D.; Mittleman, A.; Taghavy, A.; Fortner, J.; Lantagne, D.; Abriola, L. M.

    2015-12-01

    Interdisciplinary Research to Elucidate Mechanisms Governing Silver Nanoparticle Fate and Transport in Porous Media Anjuliee M. Mittelman, Amir Taghavy, Yonggang Wang, John D. Fortner, Daniele S. Lantagne, Linda M. Abriola and Kurt D. Pennell* Detailed knowledge of the processes governing nanoparticle transport and reactivity in porous media is essential for accurate predictions of environmental fate, water and wastewater treatment system performance, and assessment of potential risks to ecosystems and water supplies. To address these issues, an interdisciplinary research team combined experimental and mathematical modeling studies to investigate the mobility, dissolution, and aging of silver nanoparticles (nAg) in representative aquifer materials and ceramic filters. Results of one-dimensional column studies, conducted with water-saturated sands maintained at pH 4 or 7 and three levels of dissolved oxygen (DO), revealed that fraction of silver mass eluted as Ag+ increased with increasing DO level, and that the dissolution of attached nAg decreased over time as a result of surface oxidation. A hybrid Eulerain-Lagragian nanoparticle transport model, which incorporates DO-dependent dissolution kinetics and particle aging, was able to accurately simulate nAg mobility and Ag+ release measured in the column experiments. Model sensitivity analysis indicated that as the flow velocity and particle size decrease, nAg dissolution and Ag+ transport processes increasingly govern silver mobility. Consistent results were obtained in studies of ceramic water filters treated with nAg, where silver elution was shown to be governed by nAg dissolution to form Ag+ and subsequent cation exchange reactions. Recent studies explored the effects of surface coating aging on nAg aggregation, mobility and dissolution. Following ultraviolet light, nAg retention in water saturated sand increased by 25-50%, while up to 50% of the applied mass eluted as Ag+ compared to less than 1% for un-aged n

  7. Gas transport through porous media; Sur le transport des gaz a travers les milieux poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Breton, J.P. [Commissariat a l' Energie Atomique Saclay (France). Centre d' Etudes Nucleaires

    1968-06-01

    In the first part of this work we derive a rigorous transport theory for a mixture of gases passing through a bed of spheres, when the temperature is uniform. We solve the Boltzmann equation, putting boundary conditions in the solution. Two different methods are used, according to the nature of the flow. The second part deals with the experimental work: measurements of permeability, of separation and of interdiffusion. In the last part, with the help of the new theory presented here, we are for the first time able to explain all the experimental data. (author) [French] Dans la premiere partie de ce travail nous developpons une theorie rigoureuse du transport d'un melange de gaz a travers un lit de spheres, quand la temperature est uniforme. Nous integrons l'equation de Boltzmann en introduisant des conditions aux limites dans la solution. Nous utilisons deux methodes differentes selon le regime d'ecoulement. La seconde partie est consacree a l'etude experimentale: mesures de permeametrie, de separation et d'interdiffusion. Dans la derniere partie, a l'aide de la nouvelle theorie developpee ici, nous expliquons tous les resultats experimentaux, ce qui n'avait pas ete fait jusque la. (auteur)

  8. Capillary-Driven Solute Transport and Precipitation in Porous Media during Dry-Out

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ott, Holger; Andrew, Matthew; Blunt, Martin; Snippe, Jeroen

    2014-05-01

    The injection of dry or under-saturated gases or supercritical (SC) fluids into water bearing formations might lead to a formation dry-out in the vicinity of the injection well. The dry-out is caused by the evaporation/dissolution of formation water into the injected fluid and the subsequent transport of dissolved water in the injected fluid away from the injection well. Dry-out results in precipitation from solutes of the formation brine and consequently leads to a reduction of the rock's pore space (porosity) and eventually to a reduction of permeability near the injection well, or even to the loss of injectivity. Recently evidence has been found that the complexity of the pore space and the respective capillary driven solute transport plays a key role. While no effective-permeability (Keff) reduction was observed in a single-porosity sandstone, multi porosity carbonate rocks responded to precipitation with a strong reduction of Keff. The reason for the different response of Keff to salt precipitation is suspected to be in the exact location of the precipitate (solid salt) in the pore space. In this study, we investigate dry-out and salt precipitation due to supercritical CO2 injection in single and multi-porosity systems under near well-bore conditions. We image fluid saturation changes by means of μCT scanning during desaturation. We are able to observe capillary driven transport of the brine phase and the respective transport of solutes on the rock's pore scale. Finally we have access to the precipitated solid-salt phase and their distribution. The results can proof the thought models behind permeability porosity relationships K(φ) for injectivity modeling. The topic and the mechanisms we show are of general interest for drying processes in porous material such as soils and paper.

  9. Transport in Porous Media of Poly(Acrylic Acid) Coated Ferrihydrite Nanoparticles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffe, P. R.; Xiang, A.; Koel, B. E.

    2012-12-01

    Augmentation of soils with iron to enhance biological processes such as uranium reduction via iron reducing bacteria, e.g., Geobacter sp., might be achieved via the injection of iron nanoparticles into the subsurface. The challenge is to make these nanoparticles transportable in the subsurface while not affecting the iron bioavailability. Poorly crystallized 2-line ferrihydrite iron oxide nanoparticles were synthesized and coated with different amounts of poly(acrylic acid) polymers (Na-PAA6K or Na-PAA140K). Analyses were then performed on these particles, including sorption/desorption of the polymer onto the iron nanoparticles, particle size, zeta potential, transport in sand and soil columns, and bioavailabity of the Fe(III) in the absence and presence of the coating to iron reducing organisms. Results showed that at pH values of environmental relevance, the zeta potential of the particles varied from about 3 mV (pH=8.2) for the non-coated particles to about -30 mV for the particles coated with the polymers to their highest sorption capacity. The coated particle diameter was shown to be in the range of 200 nm. Column transport experiments showed that for the highest polymer coating the nanoparticle breakthrough was virtually identical to that of bromide, while significant filtration was observed for particles with an intermediate coating, and complete particle removal via filtration was observed for the non-coated particles. These results held for sand as well as for soil, which had been previously characterized, from a field site at Rifle, CO. Bioavailability experiments showed no difference in the iron reduction rate between the untreated and treated nanoparticles. These results show that it is possible to manufacture iron nanoparticles to enhance biological iron reduction, and that the transport properties of these treated particles is tunable so that a desired retention in the porous medium can be achieved.

  10. Transport of Cryptosporidium oocysts in porous media: Role of straining and physicochemical filtration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufenkji, N.; Miller, G.F.; Ryan, J.N.; Harvey, R.W.; Elimelech, M.

    2004-01-01

    The transport and filtration behavior of Cryptosporidium parvum oocysts in columns packed with quartz sand was systematically examined under repulsive electrostatic conditions. An increase in solution ionic strength resulted in greater oocyst deposition rates despite theoretical predictions of a significant electrostatic energy barrier to deposition. Relatively high deposition rates obtained with both oocysts and polystyrene latex particles of comparable size at low ionic strength (1 mM) suggest that a physical mechanism may play a key role in oocyst removal. Supporting experiments conducted with latex particles of varying sizes, under very low ionic strength conditions where physicochemical filtration is negligible, clearly indicated that physical straining is an important capture mechanism. The results of this study indicate that irregularity of sand grain shape (verified by SEM imaging) contributes considerably to the straining potential of the porous medium. Hence, both straining and physicochemical filtration are expected to control the removal of C. parvum oocysts in settings typical of riverbank filtration, soil infiltration, and slow sand filtration. Because classic colloid filtration theory does not account for removal by straining, these observations have important implications with respect to predictions of oocyst transport.

  11. Modeling the effects of water content on TiO2 nanoparticles transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toloni, Ivan; Lehmann, François; Ackerer, Philippe

    2016-08-01

    The transport of manufactured titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticles (NP) in porous media was investigated by metric scale column experiments under different water saturation and ionic strength (IS) conditions. The NP breakthrough curves showed that TiO2 NP retention on the interface between air and water (AWI) and the interface between the solid and the fluid (SWI) is insignificant for an IS equal to or smaller than 3 mM KCl. For larger IS, the retention is depending on the water content and the fluid velocity. The experiments, conducted with an IS of 5 mM KCl, showed a significantly higher retention of NP than that observed under saturated conditions and very similar experimental conditions. Water flow was simulated using the standard Richards equation. The hydrodynamic model parameters for unsaturated flow were estimated through independent drainage experiments. A new mathematical model was developed to describe TiO2 NP transport and retention on SWI and AWI. The model accounts for the variation of water content and water velocity as a function of depth and takes into account the presence of the AWI and its role as a NP collector. Comparisons with experimental data showed that the suggested modeled processes can be used to quantify the NPs retentions at the AWI and SWI. The suggested model can be used for both saturated and unsaturated conditions and for a rather large range of velocities.

  12. Nanoparticle transport in heterogeneous porous media with particle tracking numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngoc H.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2017-01-01

    In this article, transport and retention of nanoparticles that flow in suspension through packed beds with unconsolidated spheres and through consolidated Berea sandstone are numerically explored. The surfaces exhibit electrical charge heterogeneity where particles can deposit blocking the surrounding surface deposition sites. The lattice Boltzmann method with Lagrangian particle tracking are the techniques employed. Four ideal patterns of surface charge heterogeneity are adopted for the packed sphere beds, while a real distribution of charge heterogeneity is determined for the Berea core through micro-CT image segmentation. It is found that particle breakthrough curves do not reach a plateau, unless the pore surfaces are completely saturated. Surface saturation also enhances particle propagation because of the surface blocking mechanism, reducing the effective particle deposition rate. In addition, surface saturation mitigates the effect of the pattern of heterogeneity on particle retention, which might be pronounced when blocking is not taken into account. It is also observed from the case of Berea core that the heterogeneity of the mineralogical surfaces disturbs particle transport depending on the physicochemical properties of the surfaces. Likewise, similarity of the mineralogical surface properties is a prerequisite for the commonly used patch-wise model with Langmuirian blocking to reproduce nanoparticle breakthrough in such porous media.

  13. Localization of the porous partition responsible for pressurized gas transport in Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchel, H B; Grosse, W

    1990-09-01

    The pressurized gas transport which improves the oxygen supply of the roots of the wetland tree black alder (Alnus glutinosa (L.) Gaertn.), is based on the existence of a thermo-osmotically active porous tissue partition in the lower part of the trunk with pore diameters in the range of, or smaller than, the mean free path length of the gas molecules (e.g., 70 nm for O(2) at 20 degrees C and 100 kPa). Anatomical studies have shown that only the cambial layer or the phellogen of the lenticels have intercellular spaces small enough to be responsible for thermo-osmotic activity. The final localization of the thermo-osmotically active partition and the determination of the pore sizes were done by diffusion and effusion experiments with basal trunk pieces of 3- to 4-year-old trees. The mean pore sizes of the intercellular system were not smaller than 100 nm in diameter in the cambial layer separating the bark from the wood, but 14 +/- 7 nm in diameter in the phellogen underlying the lenticels. Because of these small pores, the phellogen of the lenticels is the significant thermo-osmotically active partition for the transport of air to the root system in black alder.

  14. Design and optimization of porous ceramic supports for asymmetric ceria-based oxygen transport membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kaiser, Andreas; Foghmoes, Søren Preben Vagn; Pećanac, G.

    2016-01-01

    content from 11 vol% to 16 vol%, the gas permeabilities increased by a factor of 5 when support tapes were sintered to comparable densities. The improved permeabilities were due to a more favourable microstructure with larger interconnected pores at a porosity of 45% and a fracture strength of 47±2 MPa (m......The microstructure, mechanical properties and gas permeability of porous supports of Ce0.9Gd0.1O1.95−δ (CGO) were investigated as a function of sintering temperature and volume fraction of pore former for use in planar asymmetric oxygen transport membranes (OTMs). With increasing the pore former......=7). The achieved gas permeability of 2.25×10−15 m2 for a 0.4 mm thick support will not limit the gas transport for oxygen production but in partial oxidation of methane to syngas at higher oxygen fluxes. For integration of the CGO support layer into a flat, asymmetric CGO membrane, the sintering...

  15. Nanoparticle transport in heterogeneous porous media with particle tracking numerical methods

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Ngoc H.; Papavassiliou, Dimitrios V.

    2016-08-01

    In this article, transport and retention of nanoparticles that flow in suspension through packed beds with unconsolidated spheres and through consolidated Berea sandstone are numerically explored. The surfaces exhibit electrical charge heterogeneity where particles can deposit blocking the surrounding surface deposition sites. The lattice Boltzmann method with Lagrangian particle tracking are the techniques employed. Four ideal patterns of surface charge heterogeneity are adopted for the packed sphere beds, while a real distribution of charge heterogeneity is determined for the Berea core through micro-CT image segmentation. It is found that particle breakthrough curves do not reach a plateau, unless the pore surfaces are completely saturated. Surface saturation also enhances particle propagation because of the surface blocking mechanism, reducing the effective particle deposition rate. In addition, surface saturation mitigates the effect of the pattern of heterogeneity on particle retention, which might be pronounced when blocking is not taken into account. It is also observed from the case of Berea core that the heterogeneity of the mineralogical surfaces disturbs particle transport depending on the physicochemical properties of the surfaces. Likewise, similarity of the mineralogical surface properties is a prerequisite for the commonly used patch-wise model with Langmuirian blocking to reproduce nanoparticle breakthrough in such porous media.

  16. Porous medium convection at large Rayleigh number: Studies of coherent structure, transport, and reduced dynamics

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Baole

    Buoyancy-driven convection in fluid-saturated porous media is a key environmental and technological process, with applications ranging from carbon dioxide storage in terrestrial aquifers to the design of compact heat exchangers. Porous medium convection is also a paradigm for forced-dissipative infinite-dimensional dynamical systems, exhibiting spatiotemporally chaotic dynamics if not "true" turbulence. The objective of this dissertation research is to quantitatively characterize the dynamics and heat transport in two-dimensional horizontal and inclined porous medium convection between isothermal plane parallel boundaries at asymptotically large values of the Rayleigh number Ra by investigating the emergent, quasi-coherent flow. This investigation employs a complement of direct numerical simulations (DNS), secondary stability and dynamical systems theory, and variational analysis. The DNS confirm the remarkable tendency for the interior flow to self-organize into closely-spaced columnar plumes at sufficiently large Ra (up to Ra ≃ 105), with more complex spatiotemporal features being confined to boundary layers near the heated and cooled walls. The relatively simple form of the interior flow motivates investigation of unstable steady and time-periodic convective states at large Ra as a function of the domain aspect ratio L. To gain insight into the development of spatiotemporally chaotic convection, the (secondary) stability of these fully nonlinear states to small-amplitude disturbances is investigated using a spatial Floquet analysis. The results indicate that there exist two distinct modes of instability at large Ra: a bulk instability mode and a wall instability mode. The former usually is excited by long-wavelength disturbances and is generally much weaker than the latter. DNS, strategically initialized to investigate the fully nonlinear evolution of the most dangerous secondary instability modes, suggest that the (long time) mean inter-plume spacing in

  17. Impact of microbial growth on water flow and solute transport in unsaturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yarwood, R. R.; Rockhold, M. L.; Niemet, M. R.; Selker, J. S.; Bottomley, P. J.

    2006-10-01

    A novel analytical method was developed that permitted real-time, noninvasive measurements of microbial growth and associated changes in hydrodynamic properties in porous media under unsaturated flowing conditions. Salicylate-induced, lux gene-based bioluminescence was used to quantify the temporal and spatial development of colonization over a 7-day time course. Water contents were determined daily by measuring light transmission through the system. Hydraulic flow paths were determined daily by pulsing a bromophenol blue dye solution through the colonized region of the sand. Bacterial growth and accumulation had a significant impact on the hydraulic properties of the porous media. Microbial colonization caused localized drying within the colonized zone, with decreases in saturation approaching 50% of antecedent values, and a 25% lowering of the capillary fringe height. Flow was retarded within the colonized zone and diverted around it concurrent with the expansion of the colonized zone between days 3 and 6. The location of horizontal dispersion corresponded with the cell densities of 1-3 × 109 cells g-1 dry sand. The apparent solute velocity through the colonized region was reduced from 0.41 cm min-1 (R2 = 0.99) to 0.25 cm min-1 (R2 = 0.99) by the sixth day of the experiment, associated with population densities that would occupy approximately 7% of the available pore space within the colonized region. Changes in the extent of colonization occurred over the course of the experiment, including upward migration against flow. The distribution of cells was not determined by water flow alone, but rather by a dynamic interaction between water flow and microbial growth. This experimental system provides rich data sets for the testing of conceptualizations expressed through numerical modeling.

  18. Evaporation-driven transport and precipitation of salt in porous-media: A multi-domain approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jambhekar, Vishal Arun; Schmid, Karen Sophie; Helmig, Rainer

    2014-05-01

    Introduction: Evaporative salinization a major concern worldwide is observed across many environmental, agricultural and engineering applications. In the context of agriculture, salinization caused due to excess irrigation and use of artificial fertilizers in last few decades deteriorated productive land to a large extent. Many scientists have conducted experimental and numerical studies related to evaporative salinization [1, 2]. However, to our knowledge most of the performed numerical studies neglect the influence of atmospheric processes and free-flow pours-media interaction, which could play a significant role for salinization in a natural system. With our model concept we attempt to study and analyze the influence of atmospheric processes on dissolved salt transport, evaporation dynamics and salt-precipitation. Evaporation is mainly driven by diffusion, related to the vapor pressure gradient across liquid-air interface and advection, related to the tangential wind velocity at the soil surface. Moreover, it is also affected by the complex interactions between the flow and transport processes in the atmosphere and the porous-medium. On the atmosphere side, it is influenced by wind velocity, air temperature, humidity, radiation etc. On the porous-medium side, it is strongly related to the advective and diffusive fluxes, heterogeneity in salinity distribution (causes osmosis) and salt precipitation (causes pore clogging). As discussed in [1] evaporation of saline solutions can be explained into three different stages. Model: Our model is capable to handle coupled single-phase-compositional free and three-phase-compositional porous-media flow and transport. It is based on a two-domain approach, where non-isothermal sub-models are used for free-flow and porous-media sub-domains [3]. The sub-models are coupled using interface conditions ensuring continuity of mass, momentum and energy. This facilitates to describe evaporation independent of any boundary condition at

  19. An Equation-Type Approach for the Numerical Solution of the Partial Differential Equations Governing Transport Phenomena in Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Sun, Shuyu

    2012-06-02

    A new technique for the numerical solution of the partial differential equations governing transport phenomena in porous media is introduced. In this technique, the governing equations as depicted from the physics of the problem are used without extra manipulations. In other words, there is no need to reduce the number of governing equations by some sort of mathematical manipulations. This technique enables the separation of the physics part of the problem and the solver part, which makes coding more robust and could be used in several other applications with little or no modifications (e.g., multi-phase flow in porous media). In this method, one abandons the need to construct the coefficient matrix for the pressure equation. Alternatively, the coefficients are automatically generated within the solver routine. We show examples of using this technique to solving several flow problems in porous media.

  20. Effect of porous silicon on the performances of silicon solar cells during the porous silicon-based gettering procedure

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nouri, H.; Bessais, B. [Laboratoire de Nanomateriaux et des Systemes pour l' Energie, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Bouaicha, M. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, des Semi-conducteurs et des Nanostructures, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2009-10-15

    In this work we analyse the effect of porous silicon on the performances of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells during the porous silicon-based gettering procedure. This procedure consists of forming PS layers on both front and back sides of the mc-Si wafers followed by an annealing in an infrared furnace under a controlled atmosphere at different temperatures. Three sets of samples (A, B and C) have been prepared; for samples A and B, the PS films were removed before and after annealing, respectively. In order to optimize the annealing temperature, we measure the defect density at a selected grain boundary (GB) using the dark current-voltage (I-V) characteristics across the GB itself. The annealing temperature was optimized to 1000 C. The effect of these treatments on the performances of mc-Si solar cells was studied by means of the current-voltage characteristic (at AM 1.5) and the internal quantum efficiency (IQE). The results obtained for cell A and cell B were compared to those obtained on a reference cell (C). (author)

  1. Parameterizing the Transport Pathways for Cell Invasion in Complex Scaffold Architectures

    OpenAIRE

    Ashworth, Jennifer C; Mehr, Marco; Buxton, Paul G.; Best, Serena M.; Cameron, Ruth E.

    2016-01-01

    Interconnecting pathways through porous tissue engineering scaffolds play a vital role in determining nutrient supply, cell invasion, and tissue ingrowth. However, the global use of the term “interconnectivity” often fails to describe the transport characteristics of these pathways, giving no clear indication of their potential to support tissue synthesis. This article uses new experimental data to provide a critical analysis of reported methods for the description of scaffold transport pathw...

  2. Simulation of Solute Flow and Transport in a Geostatistically Generated Fractured Porous System

    Science.gov (United States)

    Assteerawatt, A.; Helmig, R.; Haegland, H.; Bárdossy, A.

    2007-12-01

    Fractured aquifer systems have provided important natural resources such as petroleum, gas, water and geothermal energy and have also been recently under investigation for their suitability as storage sites for high-level nuclear waste. The resource exploitation and potential utilization have led to extensive studies aiming of understanding, characterizing and finally predicting the behavior of fractured aquifer systems. By applying a discrete model approach to study flow and transport processes, fractures are determined discretely and the effect of individual fractures can be explicitly investigated. The critical step for the discrete model is the generation of a representative fracture network since the development of flow paths within a fractured system strongly depends on its structure. The geostatistical fracture generation (GFG) developed in this study aims to create a representative fracture network, which combines the spatial structures and connectivity of a fracture network, and the statistical distribution of fracture geometries. The spatial characteristics are characterized from indicator fields, which are evaluated from fracture trace maps. A global optimization, Simulated annealing, is utilized as a generation technique and the spatial characteristics are formulated to its objective function. We apply the GFG to a case study at a Pliezhausen field block, which is a sandstone of a high fracture density. The generated fracture network from the GFG are compared with the statistically generated fracture network in term of structure and hydraulic behavior. As the GFG is based on a stochastic concept, several realizations of the same descriptions can be generated, hence, an overall behavior of the fracture-matrix system have to be investigated from various realizations which leads to a problem of computational demand. In order to overcome this problem, a streamline method for a solute transport in a fracture porous system is presented. The results obtained

  3. Contaminant flow and transport simulation in cracked porous media using locally conservative schemes

    KAUST Repository

    Song, Pu

    2012-10-25

    The purpose of this paper is to analyze some features of contaminant flow passing through cracked porous medium, such as the influence of fracture network on the advection and diffusion of contaminant species, the impact of adsorption on the overall transport of contaminant wastes. In order to precisely describe the whole process, we firstly build the mathematical model to simulate this problem numerically. Taking into consideration of the characteristics of contaminant flow, we employ two partial differential equations to formulate the whole problem. One is flow equation; the other is reactive transport equation. The first equation is used to describe the total flow of contaminant wastes, which is based on Darcy law. The second one will characterize the adsorption, diffusion and convection behavior of contaminant species, which describes most features of contaminant flow we are interested in. After the construction of numerical model, we apply locally conservative and compatible algorithms to solve this mathematical model. Specifically, we apply Mixed Finite Element (MFE) method to the flow equation and Discontinuous Galerkin (DG) method for the transport equation. MFE has a good convergence rate and numerical accuracy for Darcy velocity. DG is more flexible and can be used to deal with irregular meshes, as well as little numerical diffusion. With these two numerical means, we investigate the sensitivity analysis of different features of contaminant flow in our model, such as diffusion, permeability and fracture density. In particular, we study K d values which represent the distribution of contaminant wastes between the solid and liquid phases. We also make omparisons of two different schemes and discuss the advantages of both methods. © 2012 Global Science Press.

  4. Advances in colloid and biocolloid transport in porous media: particle size-dependent dispersivity and gravity effects

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos V.; Manariotis, Ioannis D.; Syngouna, Vasiliki I.

    2014-05-01

    Accurate prediction of colloid and biocolloid transport in porous media relies heavily on usage of suitable dispersion coefficients. The widespread procedure for dispersion coefficient determination consists of conducting conservative tracer experiments and subsequently fitting the collected breakthrough data with a selected advection-dispersion transport model. The fitted dispersion coefficient is assumed to characterize the porous medium and is often used thereafter to analyze experimental results obtained from the same porous medium with other solutes, colloids, and biocolloids. The classical advection-dispersion equation implies that Fick's first law of diffusion adequately describes the dispersion process, or that the dispersive flux is proportional to the concentration gradient. Therefore, the above-described procedure inherently assumes that the dispersive flux of all solutes, colloids and biocolloids under the same flow field conditions is exactly the same. Furthermore, the available mathematical models for colloid and biocoloid transport in porous media do not adequately account for gravity effects. Here an extensive laboratory study was undertaken in order to assess whether the dispersivity, which traditionally has been considered to be a property of the porous medium, is dependent on colloid particle size, interstitial velocity and length scale. The breakthrough curves were successfully simulated with a mathematical model describing colloid and biocolloid transport in homogeneous, water saturated porous media. The results demonstrated that the dispersivity increases very slowly with increasing interstitial velocity, and increases with column length. Furthermore, contrary to earlier results, which were based either on just a few experimental observations or experimental conditions leading to low mass recoveries, dispersivity was positively correlated with colloid particle size. Also, transport experiments were performed with biocolloids (bacteriophages:

  5. Charge transport in dye-sensibilized porous zinc oxide films; Ladungstransport in farbstoffsensibilisierten poroesen Zinkoxidfilmen

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Reemts, J.

    2006-05-18

    During the last decades, zinc oxide has attracted a lot of attention as an important material in various electrical, chemical, and optical applications. In the present work results are discussed gained from investigations of highly porous electrochemically deposited zinc oxide, which is a promising electrode material both in the area of solar energy conversion and sensor technology. The films were prepared by adding detergents during the electrodeposition process. The detergents have a structure-directing influence during the film deposition and, therefore, on the morphology of the films. The obtained electrodes can easily be sensitized for light or different chemicals by a simple adsorption of different molecules. In the present work I discuss the fundamental charge transport properties of electrochemically deposited zinc oxide films. Temperature-dependent measurements of the current-voltage characteristics are carried out and the spectral response of the photoconductivity is investigated. In order to understand the charge transport properties of this highly porous material, it is necessary to get a deeper insight in the electrode morphology. Therefore, different optical and scanning probe microscopy methods are used to characterize the inner structure of the electrodes. The electrical conductivity of the zinc oxide films can be seen as a thermally activated process, which can be explained by electronic transitions from the valence band of the zinc oxide to two shallow impurity levels. The current-voltage characteristic unveils a nonlinear behavior which can be explained by a space-charge-limited current model with traps distributed in energy. Upon excitation with different wavelengths, the conductivity of the zinc oxide increases already under sub-band gap illumination due to widely distributed trap states within the band gap. The transients of the photoconductivity follow a stretched exponential law with time scales in the range of several hours, either if the

  6. Influence of porous silicon formation on the performance of multi-crystalline silicon solar cells

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    M Saad; M Naddaf

    2015-06-01

    The effect of formation of porous silicon on the performance of multi-crystalline silicon (mc-Si) solar cells is presented. Surface treatment of mc-Si solar cells was performed by electrochemical etching in HF-based solution. The effect of etching is viewed through scanning electron microscope (SEM) photographs that indicated the formation of a porous layer on the surface. Total reflection spectroscopy measurements on solar cells revealed reduced reflection after etching. In order to demonstrate the effect of this porous layer on the solar cell performance, illumination-dependent – characteristics and spectral response measurements were performed and analysed before and after etching. At all illumination intensities, short-circuit current density and open-circuit voltage values for the etched solar cell were higher than those before etching, whereas fill factor values were lower for the etched cell at high illumination intensities. An interpretation of these findings is presented.

  7. Simulation of experimental breakthrough curves using multiprocess non-equilibrium model for reactive solute transport in stratified porous media

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Deepak Swami; P K Sharma; C S P Ojha

    2014-12-01

    In this paper, we have studied the behaviour of reactive solute transport through stratified porous medium under the influence of multi-process nonequilibrium transport model. Various experiments were carried out in the laboratory and the experimental breakthrough curves were observed at spatially placed sampling points for stratified porous medium. Batch sorption studies were also performed to estimate the sorption parameters of the material used in stratified aquifer system. The effects of distance dependent dispersion and tailing are visible in the experimental breakthrough curves. The presence of physical and chemical non-equilibrium are observed from the pattern of breakthrough curves. Multi-process non-equilibrium model represents the combined effect of physical and chemical non-ideality in the stratified aquifer system. The results show that the incorporation of distance dependent dispersivity in multi-process non-equilibrium model provides best fit of observed data through stratified porous media. Also, the exponential distance dependent dispersivity is more suitable for large distances and at small distances, linear or constant dispersivity function can be considered for simulating reactive solute in stratified porous medium.

  8. Effective grid-dependent dispersion coefficient for conservative and reactive transport simulations in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cortinez, J. M.; Valocchi, A. J.; Herrera, P. A.

    2013-12-01

    Because of the finite size of numerical grids, it is very difficult to correctly account for processes that occur at different spatial scales to accurately simulate the migration of conservative and reactive compounds dissolved in groundwater. In one hand, transport processes in heterogeneous porous media are controlled by local-scale dispersion associated to transport processes at the pore-scale. On the other hand, variations of velocity at the continuum- or Darcy-scale produce spreading of the contaminant plume, which is referred to as macro-dispersion. Furthermore, under some conditions both effects interact, so that spreading may enhance the action of local-scale dispersion resulting in higher mixing, dilution and reaction rates. Traditionally, transport processes at different spatial scales have been included in numerical simulations by using a single dispersion coefficient. This approach implicitly assumes that the separate effects of local-dispersion and macro-dispersion can be added and represented by a unique effective dispersion coefficient. Moreover, the selection of the effective dispersion coefficient for numerical simulations usually do not consider the filtering effect of the grid size over the small-scale flow features. We have developed a multi-scale Lagragian numerical method that allows using two different dispersion coefficients to represent local- and macro-scale dispersion. This technique considers fluid particles that carry solute mass and whose locations evolve according to a deterministic component given by the grid-scale velocity and a stochastic component that corresponds to a block-effective macro-dispersion coefficient. Mass transfer between particles due to local-scale dispersion is approximated by a meshless method. We use our model to test under which transport conditions the combined effect of local- and macro-dispersion are additive and can be represented by a single effective dispersion coefficient. We also demonstrate that for

  9. Multiphase Transport in Porous Media: Gas-Liquid Separation Using Capillary Pressure Gradients International Space Station (ISS) Flight Experiment Development

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wheeler, Richard R., Jr.; Holtsnider, John T.; Dahl, Roger W.; Deeks, Dalton; Javanovic, Goran N.; Parker, James M.; Ehlert, Jim

    2013-01-01

    Advances in the understanding of multiphase flow characteristics under variable gravity conditions will ultimately lead to improved and as of yet unknown process designs for advanced space missions. Such novel processes will be of paramount importance to the success of future manned space exploration as we venture into our solar system and beyond. In addition, because of the ubiquitous nature and vital importance of biological and environmental processes involving airwater mixtures, knowledge gained about fundamental interactions and the governing properties of these mixtures will clearly benefit the quality of life here on our home planet. The techniques addressed in the current research involving multiphase transport in porous media and gas-liquid phase separation using capillary pressure gradients are also a logical candidate for a future International Space Station (ISS) flight experiment. Importantly, the novel and potentially very accurate Lattice-Boltzmann (LB) modeling of multiphase transport in porous media developed in this work offers significantly improved predictions of real world fluid physics phenomena, thereby promoting advanced process designs for both space and terrestrial applications.This 3-year research effort has culminated in the design and testing of a zero-g demonstration prototype. Both the hydrophilic (glass) and hydrophobic (Teflon) media Capillary Pressure Gradient (CPG) cartridges prepared during the second years work were evaluated. Results obtained from ground testing at 1-g were compared to those obtained at reduced gravities spanning Martian (13-g), Lunar (16-g) and zero-g. These comparisons clearly demonstrate the relative strength of the CPG phenomena and the efficacy of its application to meet NASAs unique gas-liquid separation (GLS) requirements in non-terrestrial environments.LB modeling software, developed concurrently with the zero-g test effort, was shown to accurately reproduce observed CPG driven gas-liquid separation

  10. Porous chitosan scaffold cross-linked by chemical and natural procedure applied to investigate cell regeneration

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yao, Chih-Kai [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Liao, Jiunn-Der, E-mail: jdliao@mail.ncku.edu.tw [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Center of Micro/Nano Science and Technology, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chung, Chia-Wei; Sung, Wei-I. [Department of Materials Science and Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China); Chang, Nai-Jen [Institute of Biomedical Engineering, National Cheng Kung University, No. 1, University Road, Tainan 70101, Taiwan (China)

    2012-12-01

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Polymeric scaffolds, made from chitosan-based films fixed by chemical (citrate) or natural method (genipin), were developed. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Nano-indentation with a constant harmonic frequency was applied on porous scaffolds to explore their surface mechanics. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer The relationship between surface mechanical property and cell-surface interactions of scaffold materials was demonstrated. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Porous scaffolds cross-linked by genipin showed adequate cell affinity, non-toxicity, and suitable mechanical properties. - Abstract: Porous chitosan scaffold is used for tissue engineering and drug delivery, but is limited as a scaffold material due to its mechanical weakness, which restrains cell adhesion on the surface. In this study, a chemical reagent (citrate) and a natural reagent (genipin) are used as cross-linkers for the formation of chitosan-based films. Nanoindentation technique with a continuous stiffness measurement system is particularly applied on the porous scaffold surface to examine the characteristic modulus and nanohardness of a porous scaffold surface. The characteristic modulus of a genipin-cross-linked chitosan surface is Almost-Equal-To 2.325 GPa, which is significantly higher than that of an uncross-linked one ( Almost-Equal-To 1.292 GPa). The cell-scaffold surface interaction is assessed. The cell morphology and results of an MTS assay of 3T3-fibroblast cells of a genipin-cross-linked chitosan surface indicate that the enhancement of mechanical properties induced cell adhesion and proliferation on the modified porous scaffold surface. The pore size and mechanical properties of porous chitosan film can be tuned for specific applications such as tissue regeneration.

  11. Reactive solute transport in physically and chemically heterogeneous porous media with multimodal reactive mineral facies: The Lagrangian approach

    CERN Document Server

    Soltanian, Mohamad Reza; Dai, Zhenxue; Huang, Chaocheng

    2014-01-01

    Physical and chemical heterogeneities have a large impact on reactive transport in porous media. Examples of heterogeneous attributes affecting reactive mass transport are the hydraulic conductivity (K), and the equilibrium sorption distribution coefficient (Kd). This paper uses the Deng et al. (2013) conceptual model for multimodal reactive mineral facies and a Lagrangian-based stochastic theory in order to analyze the reactive solute dispersion in three-dimensional anisotropic heterogeneous porous media with hierarchical organization of reactive minerals. An example based on real field data is used to illustrate the time evolution trends of reactive solute dispersion. The results show that the correlation between the hydraulic conductivity and the equilibrium sorption distribution coefficient does have a significant effect on reactive solute dispersion. The anisotropy ratio does not have a significant effect on reactive solute dispersion. Furthermore, through a sensitivity analysis we investigate the impact...

  12. Use of the generalized integral transform method for solving equations of solute transport in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chongxuan; Szecsody, Jim E.; Zachara, John M.; Ball, William P.

    The generalized integral transform technique (GITT) is applied to solve the one-dimensional advection-dispersion equation (ADE) in heterogeneous porous media coupled with either linear or nonlinear sorption and decay. When both sorption and decay are linear, analytical solutions are obtained using the GITT for one-dimensional ADEs with spatially and temporally variable flow and dispersion coefficient and arbitrary initial and boundary conditions. When either sorption or decay is nonlinear the solutions to ADEs with the GITT are hybrid analytical-numerical. In both linear and nonlinear cases, the forward and inverse integral transforms for the problems described in the paper are apparent and straightforward. Some illustrative examples with linear sorption and decay are presented to demonstrate the application and check the accuracy of the derived analytical solutions. The derived hybrid analytical-numerical solutions are checked against a numerical approach and demonstratively applied to a nonlinear transport example, which simulates a simplified system of iron oxide bioreduction with nonlinear sorption and nonlinear reaction kinetics.

  13. Flow and Reactive Transport of Miscible and Immiscible Solutions in Fractured & Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ryerson, F. J.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Antoun, T.

    2012-12-01

    Miscible and immiscible flows are important phenomena encountered in many industrial and engineering applications such as hydrothermal systems, oil and gas reservoirs, salt/water intrusion, geological carbon sequestration etc… Under the influence of gravity, the flow of fluids with sufficiently large density ratios may become unstable leading to instabilities, mixing and in some instances reactions at the interfacial contact between fluids. Flow is governed by a combination of momentum and mass conservation equations that describe the flow of the fluid phase and a convection-diffusion equation describing the change of concentration in the fluid phase. When hydrodynamic instabilities develop it may be difficult to use standard grid-based methods to model miscible/immiscible flow because the domains occupied by fluids evolve constantly with time. In the current study, adaptive mesh refinement finite elements method has been used to solve for flow and transport equations. Furthermore, a particle tracking scheme has also been implemented to track the kinematics of swarm of particles injected into the porous fractured media to quantify surface area, sweeping zones, and their impact on porosity changes. Spatial and temporal moments of the fingering instabilities and the development of reaction zones and the impact of kinetic reaction at the fluid/solution interfaces have also been analyzed. This work performed under the auspices of the U.S. Department of Energy by Lawrence Livermore National Laboratory under Contract DE-AC52-07NA27344.

  14. Computing and Comparing Effective Properties for Flow and Transport in Computer-Generated Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Allen, Rebecca

    2017-02-13

    We compute effective properties (i.e., permeability, hydraulic tortuosity, and diffusive tortuosity) of three different digital porous media samples, including in-line array of uniform shapes, staggered-array of squares, and randomly distributed squares. The permeability and hydraulic tortuosity are computed by solving a set of rescaled Stokes equations obtained by homogenization, and the diffusive tortuosity is computed by solving a homogenization problem given for the effective diffusion coefficient that is inversely related to diffusive tortuosity. We find that hydraulic and diffusive tortuosity can be quantitatively different by up to a factor of ten in the same pore geometry, which indicates that these tortuosity terms cannot be used interchangeably. We also find that when a pore geometry is characterized by an anisotropic permeability, the diffusive tortuosity (and correspondingly the effective diffusion coefficient) can also be anisotropic. This finding has important implications for reservoir-scale modeling of flow and transport, as it is more realistic to account for the anisotropy of both the permeability and the effective diffusion coefficient.

  15. Porous Pd nanoparticles with high photothermal conversion efficiency for efficient ablation of cancer cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Jia-Wen; Fan, Shi-Xuan; Wang, Feng; Sun, Ling-Dong; Zheng, Xiao-Yu; Yan, Chun-Hua

    2014-04-21

    Nanoparticle (NP) mediated photothermal effect shows great potential as a noninvasive method for cancer therapy treatment, but the development of photothermal agents with high photothermal conversion efficiency, small size and good biocompatibility is still a big challenge. Herein, we report Pd NPs with a porous structure exhibiting enhanced near infrared (NIR) absorption as compared to Pd nanocubes with a similar size (almost two-fold enhancement with a molar extinction coefficient of 6.3 × 10(7) M(-1) cm(-1)), and the porous Pd NPs display monotonically rising absorbance from NIR to UV-Vis region. When dispersed in water and illuminated with an 808 nm laser, the porous Pd NPs give a photothermal conversion efficiency as high as 93.4%, which is comparable to the efficiency of Au nanorods we synthesized (98.6%). As the porous Pd NPs show broadband NIR absorption (650-1200 nm), this allows us to choose multiple laser wavelengths for photothermal therapy. In vitro photothermal heating of HeLa cells in the presence of porous Pd NPs leads to 100% cell death under 808 nm laser irradiation (8 W cm(-2), 4 min). For photothermal heating using 730 nm laser, 70% of HeLa cells were killed after 4 min irradiation at a relative low power density of 6 W cm(-2). These results demonstrated that the porous Pd nanostructure is an attractive photothermal agent for cancer therapy.

  16. Facilitated transport of titanium dioxide nanoparticles by humic substances in saturated porous media under acidic conditions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Ruichang [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science (China); Zhang, Haibo; Tu, Chen; Hu, Xuefeng; Li, Lianzhen [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Coastal Environmental Processes and Ecological Remediation, Yantai Institute of Coastal Zone Research (China); Luo, Yongming, E-mail: ymluo@yic.ac.cn; Christie, Peter [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Key Laboratory of Soil Environment and Pollution Remediation, Institute of Soil Science (China)

    2015-04-15

    The transport behavior of titanium dioxide nanoparticles (TiO{sub 2} NPs, 30 nm in diameter) was studied in well-defined porous media composed of clean quartz sand over a range of solution chemistry under acidic conditions. Transport of TiO{sub 2} NPs was dramatically enhanced by humic substances (HS) at acidic pH (4.0, 5.0 and 6.0), even at a low HS concentration of 0.5 mg L{sup −1}. Facilitated transport of TiO{sub 2} NPs was likely attributable to the increased stability of TiO{sub 2} NPs and repulsive interaction between TiO{sub 2} NPs and quartz sands due to the adsorbed HS. The mobility of TiO{sub 2} NPs was also increased with increasing pH from 4.0 to 6.0. Although transport of TiO{sub 2} NPs was insensitive to low ionic strength, it was significantly inhibited by high concentrations of NaCl and CaCl{sub 2}. In addition, calculated Derjaguin–Landau–Verwey–Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energy indicated that high energy barriers were responsible for the high mobility of TiO{sub 2} NPs, while the secondary energy minimum could play an important role in the retention of TiO{sub 2} NPs at 100 mmol L{sup −1} NaCl. Straining and gravitational settlement of larger TiO{sub 2} NPs aggregates at 1 mg L{sup −1} HS, pH 5.0, and 2 mmol L{sup −1} CaCl{sub 2} could be responsible for the significant retention even in the presence of high energy barriers. Moreover, more favorable interaction between approaching TiO{sub 2} NPs and TiO{sub 2} NPs that had been already deposited on the collector resulted in a ripening-shape breakthrough curve at 2 mmol L{sup −1} CaCl{sub 2}. Overall, a combination of mechanisms including DLVO-type force, straining, and physical filtration was involved in the retention of TiO{sub 2} NPs over the range of solution chemistry examined in this study.

  17. Particle sorting in Filter Porous Media and in Sediment Transport: A Numerical and Experimental Study

    Science.gov (United States)

    Glascoe, L. G.; Ezzedine, S. M.; Kanarska, Y.; Lomov, I. N.; Antoun, T.; Smith, J.; Hall, R.; Woodson, S.

    2014-12-01

    Understanding the flow of fines, particulate sorting in porous media and fractured media during sediment transport is significant for industrial, environmental, geotechnical and petroleum technologies to name a few. For example, the safety of dam structures requires the characterization of the granular filter ability to capture fine-soil particles and prevent erosion failure in the event of an interfacial dislocation. Granular filters are one of the most important protective design elements of large embankment dams. In case of cracking and erosion, if the filter is capable of retaining the eroded fine particles, then the crack will seal and the dam safety will be ensured. Here we develop and apply a numerical tool to thoroughly investigate the migration of fines in granular filters at the grain scale. The numerical code solves the incompressible Navier-Stokes equations and uses a Lagrange multiplier technique. The numerical code is validated to experiments conducted at the USACE and ERDC. These laboratory experiments on soil transport and trapping in granular media are performed in constant-head flow chamber filled with the filter media. Numerical solutions are compared to experimentally measured flow rates, pressure changes and base particle distributions in the filter layer and show good qualitative and quantitative agreement. To further the understanding of the soil transport in granular filters, we investigated the sensitivity of the particle clogging mechanism to various parameters such as particle size ratio, the magnitude of hydraulic gradient, particle concentration, and grain-to-grain contact properties. We found that for intermediate particle size ratios, the high flow rates and low friction lead to deeper intrusion (or erosion) depths. We also found that the damage tends to be shallower and less severe with decreasing flow rate, increasing friction and concentration of suspended particles. We have extended these results to more realistic heterogeneous

  18. Transport of Oil-in-Water Emulsions Designed to Deliver Reactive Iron Particles in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Crocker, J. J.; Berge, N. D.; Ramsburg, C. A.

    2007-05-01

    Treatment of subsurface regions contaminated with DNAPL is a significant challenge to environmental restoration. The focus of remediation has recently shifted from technologies that recover the contamination to technologies that destroy the contamination in situ. One method of in situ contaminant destruction employs nano- or submicron-size particles of reactive iron metal. Application of iron-based destruction technologies is currently limited by poor delivery of the reactive particles (i.e., lack of contact between the iron particles and the DNAPL). Encapsulation of the reactive particles within an oil-in-water emulsion is a novel approach that may facilitate delivery. The goal of this project was to investigate the transport behavior of emulsions (Tallow oil, Tween 80, and Span 80) within porous media. One-dimensional column experiments were conducted to evaluate pore-clogging when emulsions containing encapsulated reactive particles were passed through two homogeneous sands with an order of magnitude difference in intrinsic permeability. In these experiments, passing an emulsion through the sand column (4.8 cm i.d.) at a constant flow rate (0.86 mL/min) increased the hydraulic gradient by a factor of approximately three. The hydraulic gradient in each experiment was observed to stabilize after one pore volume of emulsion. Subsequent flushing with water recovered the initial hydraulic gradient. Together, these observations indicate that conductivity reductions during emulsion flushing were the result of viscosity and not the result of extensive pore-clogging. Analysis of effluent samples confirmed that there was minimal retention of the emulsion within the sand column. Results from these experiments suggest that emulsion encapsulation may be an effective means for transporting reactive iron particles within the subsurface environment.

  19. Equivalent Porous Media (EPM) Simulation of Groundwater Hydraulics and Contaminant Transport in Karst Aquifers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghasemizadeh, Reza; Yu, Xue; Butscher, Christoph; Hellweger, Ferdi; Padilla, Ingrid; Alshawabkeh, Akram

    2015-01-01

    Karst aquifers have a high degree of heterogeneity and anisotropy in their geologic and hydrogeologic properties which makes predicting their behavior difficult. This paper evaluates the application of the Equivalent Porous Media (EPM) approach to simulate groundwater hydraulics and contaminant transport in karst aquifers using an example from the North Coast limestone aquifer system in Puerto Rico. The goal is to evaluate if the EPM approach, which approximates the karst features with a conceptualized, equivalent continuous medium, is feasible for an actual project, based on available data and the study scale and purpose. Existing National Oceanic Atmospheric Administration (NOAA) data and previous hydrogeological U. S. Geological Survey (USGS) studies were used to define the model input parameters. Hydraulic conductivity and specific yield were estimated using measured groundwater heads over the study area and further calibrated against continuous water level data of three USGS observation wells. The water-table fluctuation results indicate that the model can practically reflect the steady-state groundwater hydraulics (normalized RMSE of 12.4%) and long-term variability (normalized RMSE of 3.0%) at regional and intermediate scales and can be applied to predict future water table behavior under different hydrogeological conditions. The application of the EPM approach to simulate transport is limited because it does not directly consider possible irregular conduit flow pathways. However, the results from the present study suggest that the EPM approach is capable to reproduce the spreading of a TCE plume at intermediate scales with sufficient accuracy (normalized RMSE of 8.45%) for groundwater resources management and the planning of contamination mitigation strategies.

  20. Mass transfer model of nanoparticle-facilitated contaminant transport in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johari, Wan Lutfi Wan; Diamessis, Peter J; Lion, Leonard W

    2010-02-01

    A one-dimensional model has been evaluated for transport of hydrophobic contaminants, such as polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbon (PAH) compounds, facilitated by synthetic amphiphilic polyurethane (APU) nanoparticles in porous media. APU particles synthesized from poly(ethylene glycol)-modified urethane acrylate (PMUA) precursor chains have been shown to enhance the desorption rate and mobility of phenanthrene (PHEN) in soil. A reversible process governed by attachment and detachment rates was considered to describe the PMUA binding in soil in addition to PMUA transport through advection and dispersion. Ultimately, an irreversible second-order PMUA attachment rate in which the fractional soil saturation capacity with PMUA was a rate control was found to be adequate to describe the retention of PMUA particles. A gamma-distributed site model (GS) was used to describe the spectrum of physical/chemical constraints for PHEN transfer from solid to aqueous phases. Instantaneous equilibrium was assumed for PMUA-PHEN interactions. The coupled model for PMUA and PHEN behavior successfully described the enhanced elution profile of PHEN by PMUA. Sensitivity analysis was performed to analyze the significance of model parameters on model predictions. The adjustable parameter alpha in the gamma-distribution shapes the contaminant desorption distribution profile as well as elution and breakthrough curves. Model simulations show the use of PMUA can be also expected to improve the release rate of PHEN in soils with higher organic carbon content. The percentage removal of PHEN mass over time is shown to be influenced by the concentration of PMUA added and this information can be used to optimize cost and time require to accomplish a desired remediation goal.

  1. Hierarchical Porous Carbon Counter Electrode for Dye-Sensitized Solar Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Gui-Qiang; HUANG Cong-Gong; XING Wei; ZHUO Shu-Ping

    2011-01-01

    Hierarchical porous carbon is prepared by a combination of self-organization and chemical activation and explored as counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells.Pore structure analysis shows that micropores generated within the mesopore wall and the pristine mesopore structure of mesoporous carbon are preserved during KOH activation. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy studies demonstrate a relatively high electrocatalytic activity of hierarchical porous carbon electrode for triiodide reduction, as compared with a pristine mesoporous carbon electrode. This enhanced electrocatalytic activity is beneficial for improving the photovoltaic performance of dyesensitized solar cells. The overall conversion efficiency of dye-sensitized solar cells with the hierarchical porous carbon electrode increased by 11.5% compared with that of the cell with a pristine mesoporous carbon electrode.

  2. A Simple Expression for the Tortuosity of Gas Transport Paths in Solid Oxide Fuel Cells’ Porous Electrodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei Kong

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Based on the three-dimensional (3D cube packing model, a simple expression for the tortuosity of gas transport paths in solid oxide fuel cells’ (SOFC porous electrodes is developed. The proposed tortuosity expression reveals the dependence of the tortuosity on porosity, which is capable of providing results that are very consistent with the experimental data in the practical porosity range of SOFC. Furthermore, for the high porosity (>0.6, the proposed tortuosity expression is also accurate. This might be helpful for understanding the physical mechanism for the tortuosity of gas transport paths in electrodes and the optimization electrode microstructure for reducing the concentration polarization.

  3. Towards a rigorous mesoscale modeling of reactive flow and transport in an evolving porous medium and its applications to soil science

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ray, Nadja; Rupp, Andreas; Knabner, Peter

    2016-04-01

    Soil is arguably the most prominent example of a natural porous medium that is composed of a porous matrix and a pore space. Within this framework and in terms of soil's heterogeneity, we first consider transport and fluid flow at the pore scale. From there, we develop a mechanistic model and upscale it mathematically to transfer our model from the small scale to that of the mesoscale (laboratory scale). The mathematical framework of (periodic) homogenization (in principal) rigorously facilitates such processes by exactly computing the effective coefficients/parameters by means of the pore geometry and processes. In our model, various small-scale soil processes may be taken into account: molecular diffusion, convection, drift emerging from electric forces, and homogeneous reactions of chemical species in a solvent. Additionally, our model may consider heterogeneous reactions at the porous matrix, thus altering both the porosity and the matrix. Moreover, our model may additionally address biophysical processes, such as the growth of biofilms and how this affects the shape of the pore space. Both of the latter processes result in an intrinsically variable soil structure in space and time. Upscaling such models under the assumption of a locally periodic setting must be performed meticulously to preserve information regarding the complex coupling of processes in the evolving heterogeneous medium. Generally, a micro-macro model emerges that is then comprised of several levels of couplings: Macroscopic equations that describe the transport and fluid flow at the scale of the porous medium (mesoscale) include averaged time- and space-dependent coefficient functions. These functions may be explicitly computed by means of auxiliary cell problems (microscale). Finally, the pore space in which the cell problems are defined is time- and space dependent and its geometry inherits information from the transport equation's solutions. Numerical computations using mixed finite

  4. Reactive transport modeling in variably saturated porous media with OGS-IPhreeqc

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, W.; Beyer, C.; Fleckenstein, J. H.; Jang, E.; Kalbacher, T.; Shao, H.; Wang, W.; Kolditz, O.

    2014-12-01

    Worldwide, sustainable water resource management becomes an increasingly challenging task due to the growth of population and extensive applications of fertilizer in agriculture. Moreover, climate change causes further stresses to both water quantity and quality. Reactive transport modeling in the coupled soil-aquifer system is a viable approach to assess the impacts of different land use and groundwater exploitation scenarios on the water resources. However, the application of this approach is usually limited in spatial scale and to simplified geochemical systems due to the huge computational expense involved. Such computational expense is not only caused by solving the high non-linearity of the initial boundary value problems of water flow in the unsaturated zone numerically with rather fine spatial and temporal discretization for the correct mass balance and numerical stability, but also by the intensive computational task of quantifying geochemical reactions. In the present study, a flexible and efficient tool for large scale reactive transport modeling in variably saturated porous media and its applications are presented. The open source scientific software OpenGeoSys (OGS) is coupled with the IPhreeqc module of the geochemical solver PHREEQC. The new coupling approach makes full use of advantages from both codes: OGS provides a flexible choice of different numerical approaches for simulation of water flow in the vadose zone such as the pressure-based or mixed forms of Richards equation; whereas the IPhreeqc module leads to a simplification of data storage and its communication with OGS, which greatly facilitates the coupling and code updating. Moreover, a parallelization scheme with MPI (Message Passing Interface) is applied, in which the computational task of water flow and mass transport is partitioned through domain decomposition, whereas the efficient parallelization of geochemical reactions is achieved by smart allocation of computational workload over

  5. Optimization of Ferritic Steel Porous Supports for Protonic Fuel Cells Working at 600°C

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Venkatachalam, Vinothini; Molin, Sebastian; Chen, Ming

    2014-01-01

    Metal supported protonic fuel cells (PCFC) offer one major advantage over standard solid oxide fuel cells (SOFC) with oxygen conducting electrolytes, namely that the product, water, is produced on the cathode (air) side. This feature simplifies the engineering of the stack, boosts efficiency......, and is particularly helpful for a porous metal supported cell because it limits the corrosion of the metal by exposure to water vapor in the anode gas. In this work, we show the effect of composition and microstructure on the high temperature corrosion and phase stability (formation of sigma phase/Laves phase......) of porous alloys. Alloys in the compositional range Fe-20%Cr to Fe-32%Cr were evaluated and the effects of surface modification on corrosion resistance were studied using thermogravimetry, x-ray diffractometry and electron microscopy. The results show that surface modified porous ferritic steels are very...

  6. A mathematical model and computational framework for three-dimensional chondrocyte cell growth in a porous tissue scaffold placed inside a bi-directional flow perfusion bioreactor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shakhawath Hossain, Md; Bergstrom, D J; Chen, X B

    2015-12-01

    The in vitro chondrocyte cell culture for cartilage tissue regeneration in a perfusion bioreactor is a complex process. Mathematical modeling and computational simulation can provide important insights into the culture process, which would be helpful for selecting culture conditions to improve the quality of the developed tissue constructs. However, simulation of the cell culture process is a challenging task due to the complicated interaction between the cells and local fluid flow and nutrient transport inside the complex porous scaffolds. In this study, a mathematical model and computational framework has been developed to simulate the three-dimensional (3D) cell growth in a porous scaffold placed inside a bi-directional flow perfusion bioreactor. The model was developed by taking into account the two-way coupling between the cell growth and local flow field and associated glucose concentration, and then used to perform a resolved-scale simulation based on the lattice Boltzmann method (LBM). The simulation predicts the local shear stress, glucose concentration, and 3D cell growth inside the porous scaffold for a period of 30 days of cell culture. The predicted cell growth rate was in good overall agreement with the experimental results available in the literature. This study demonstrates that the bi-directional flow perfusion culture system can enhance the homogeneity of the cell growth inside the scaffold. The model and computational framework developed is capable of providing significant insight into the culture process, thus providing a powerful tool for the design and optimization of the cell culture process.

  7. Ion conductivity and transport by porous coordination polymers and metal-organic frameworks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Horike, Satoshi; Umeyama, Daiki; Kitagawa, Susumu

    2013-11-19

    Ion conduction and transport in solids are both interesting and useful and are found in widely distinct materials, from those in battery-related technologies to those in biological systems. Scientists have approached the synthesis of ion-conductive compounds in a variety of ways, in the areas of organic and inorganic chemistry. Recently, based on their ion-conducting behavior, porous coordination polymers (PCPs) and metal-organic frameworks (MOFs) have been recognized for their easy design and the dynamic behavior of the ionic components in the structures. These PCP/MOFs consist of metal ions (or clusters) and organic ligands structured via coordination bonds. They could have highly concentrated mobile ions with dynamic behavior, and their characteristics have inspired the design of a new class of ion conductors and transporters. In this Account, we describe the state-of-the-art of studies of ion conductivity by PCP/MOFs and nonporous coordination polymers (CPs) and offer future perspectives. PCP/MOF structures tend to have high hydrophilicity and guest-accessible voids, and scientists have reported many water-mediated proton (H(+)) conductivities. Chemical modification of organic ligands can change the hydrated H(+) conductivity over a wide range. On the other hand, the designable structures also permit water-free (anhydrous) H(+) conductivity. The incorporation of protic guests such as imidazole and 1,2,4-triazole into the microchannels of PCP/MOFs promotes the dynamic motion of guest molecules, resulting in high H(+) conduction without water. Not only the host-guest systems, but the embedding of protic organic groups on CPs also results in inherent H(+) conductivity. We have observed high H(+) conductivities under anhydrous conditions and in the intermediate temperature region of organic and inorganic conductors. The keys to successful construction are highly mobile ionic species and appropriate intervals of ion-hopping sites in the structures. Lithium (Li

  8. The use of laboratory experiments for the study of conservative solute transport in heterogeneous porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silliman, S. E.; Zheng, L.; Conwell, P.

    Laboratory experiments on heterogeneous porous media (otherwise known as intermediate scale experiments, or ISEs) have been increasingly relied upon by hydrogeologists for the study of saturated and unsaturated groundwater systems. Among the many ongoing applications of ISEs is the study of fluid flow and the transport of conservative solutes in correlated permeability fields. Recent advances in ISE design have provided the capability of creating correlated permeability fields in the laboratory. This capability is important in the application of ISEs for the assessment of recent stochastic theories. In addition, pressure-transducer technology and visualization methods have provided the potential for ISEs to be used in characterizing the spatial distributions of both hydraulic head and local water velocity within correlated permeability fields. Finally, various methods are available for characterizing temporal variations in the spatial distribution (and, thereby, the spatial moments) of solute concentrations within ISEs. It is concluded, therefore, that recent developments in experimental techniques have provided an opportunity to use ISEs as important tools in the continuing study of fluid flow and the transport of conservative solutes in heterogeneous, saturated porous media. Résumé Les hydrogéologues se sont progressivement appuyés sur des expériences de laboratoire sur des milieux poreux hétérogènes (connus aussi par l'expression "Expériences àéchelle intermédiaire", ISE) pour étudier les zones saturées et non saturées des aquifères. Parmi les nombreuses applications en cours des ISE, il faut noter l'étude de l'écoulement de fluide et le transport de solutés conservatifs dans des champs aux perméabilités corrélées. Les récents progrès du protocole des ISE ont donné la possibilité de créer des champs de perméabilités corrélées au laboratoire. Cette possibilité est importante dans l'application des ISE pour l'évaluation des th

  9. Pore-Scale Investigation of Micron-Size Polyacrylamide Elastic Microspheres (MPEMs) Transport and Retention in Saturated Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Yao, Chuanjin

    2014-05-06

    Knowledge of micrometer-size polyacrylamide elastic microsphere (MPEM) transport and retention mechanisms in porous media is essential for the application of MPEMs as a smart sweep improvement and profile modification agent in improving oil recovery. A transparent micromodel packed with translucent quartz sand was constructed and used to investigate the pore-scale transport, surface deposition-release, and plugging deposition-remigration mechanisms of MPEMs in porous media. The results indicate that the combination of colloidal and hydrodynamic forces controls the deposition and release of MPEMs on pore-surfaces; the reduction of fluid salinity and the increase of Darcy velocity are beneficial to the MPEM release from pore-surfaces; the hydrodynamic forces also influence the remigration of MPEMs in pore-throats. MPEMs can plug pore-throats through the mechanisms of capture-plugging, superposition-plugging, and bridge-plugging, which produces resistance to water flow; the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring in the interior of porous media can enhance the plugging effect of MPEMs; while the interception with MPEM particulate filters occurring at the surface of low-permeability layer can prevent the low-permeability layer from being damaged by MPEMs. MPEMs can remigrate in pore-throats depending on their elasticity through four steps of capture-plugging, elastic deformation, steady migration, and deformation recovery. © 2014 American Chemical Society.

  10. Passivation of the surface of rear contact solar cells by porous silicon

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nichiporuk, O. [Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko National University, 64 Vladimirskaya, 01033, Kiev (Ukraine) and Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere, UMR 5511, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France)]. E-mail: oleksiy.nichiporuk@insa-lyon.fr; Kaminski, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere, UMR 5511, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Lemiti, M. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere, UMR 5511, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Fave, A. [Laboratoire de Physique de la Matiere, UMR 5511, INSA de Lyon, Bat. Blaise Pascal, 7 avenue Jean Capelle, 69621 Villeurbanne Cedex (France); Litvinenko, S. [Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko National University, 64 Vladimirskaya, 01033, Kiev (Ukraine); Skryshevsky, V. [Radiophysics Department, Taras Shevchenko National University, 64 Vladimirskaya, 01033, Kiev (Ukraine)

    2006-07-26

    In this paper we analyse the passivation of the front surface of p-Si interdigitated rear contacts solar cell (IBC) by a thin porous silicon (PS) layer. Effectively, an efficiency improvement of 87% in relative was observed after porous silicon layer formation on the front surface of the IBC cell. The origin of surface passivation by the PS layer was studied by Laser Beam Induced Current (LBIC) method. The front surface of rear contacts cell with thin porous silicon layer was scanned by a modulated red laser beam in presence of a permanent light with different wavelengths and intensities. It was shown that without permanent illumination, the photocurrent of the cell with PS layer is very low, even lower than for a cell with unpassivated surface. However with short permanent wavelength illumination a strong increase of photocurrent was observed (8-10 times{exclamation_point}). The light-dependent porous silicon passivation phenomenon is explained by a significant negative charge accumulation at the PS/p-Si interface traps under illumination. This leads to the formation of a hi-low (p{sup +}/p) junction at the front surface of the cell and to the reduction of the front surface recombination rate, like in Front Surface Field Solar Cell.

  11. Stochastic-convective transport with nonlinear reaction and mixing: application to intermediate-scale experiments in aerobic biodegradation in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ginn, T. R.; Murphy, E. M.; Chilakapati, A.; Seeboonruang, U.

    2001-03-01

    Aerobic biodegradation of benzoate by Pseudomonas cepacia sp. in a saturated heterogeneous porous medium was simulated using the stochastic-convective reaction (SCR) approach. A laboratory flow cell was randomly packed with low permeability silt-size inclusions in a high permeability sand matrix. In the SCR upscaling approach, the characteristics of the flow field are determined by the breakthrough of a conservative tracer. Spatial information on the actual location of the heterogeneities is not used. The mass balance equations governing the nonlinear and multicomponent reactive transport are recast in terms of reactive transports in each of a finite number of discrete streamtubes. The streamtube ensemble members represent transport via a steady constant average velocity per streamtube and a conventional Fickian dispersion term, and their contributions to the observed breakthroughs are determined by flux-averaging the streamtube solute concentrations. The resulting simulations were compared to those from a high-resolution deterministic simulation of the reactive transport, and to alternative ensemble representations involving (i) effective Fickian travel time distribution function, (ii) purely convective streamtube transport, and (iii) streamtube ensemble subset simulations. The results of the SCR simulation compare favorably to that of a sophisticated high-resolution deterministic approach.

  12. Thermoforming techniques for manufacturing porous scaffolds for application in 3D cell cultivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borowiec, Justyna; Hampl, Jörg; Gebinoga, Michael; Elsarnagawy, Tarek; Elnakady, Yasser A; Fouad, Hassan; Almajhadi, Fahd; Fernekorn, Uta; Weise, Frank; Singh, Sukhdeep; Elsarnagawy, Dief; Schober, Andreas

    2015-04-01

    Within the scientific community, there is an increasing demand to apply advanced cell cultivation substrates with increased physiological functionalities for studying spatially defined cellular interactions. Porous polymeric scaffolds are utilized for mimicking an organ-like structure or engineering complex tissues and have become a key element for three-dimensional (3D) cell cultivation in the meantime. As a consequence, efficient 3D scaffold fabrication methods play an important role in modern biotechnology. Here, we present a novel thermoforming procedure for manufacturing porous 3D scaffolds from permeable materials. We address the issue of precise thermoforming of porous polymer foils by using multilayer polymer thermoforming technology. This technology offers a new method for structuring porous polymer foils that are otherwise available for non-porous polymers only. We successfully manufactured 3D scaffolds from solvent casted and phase separated polylactic acid (PLA) foils and investigated their biocompatibility and basic cellular performance. The HepG2 cell culture in PLA scaffold has shown enhanced albumin secretion rate in comparison to a previously reported polycarbonate based scaffold with similar geometry.

  13. The effect of a concentration-dependent viscosity on particle transport in a channel flow with porous walls

    KAUST Repository

    Herterich, James G.

    2014-02-02

    The transport of a dilute suspension of particles through a channel with porous walls, accounting for the concentration dependence of the viscosity, is analyzed. In particular, we study two cases of fluid permeation through the porous channel walls: (1) at a constant flux and (2) dependent on the pressure drop across the wall. We also consider the effect of mixing the suspension first compared with point injection by considering inlet concentration distributions of different widths. We find that a pessimal inlet distribution width exists that maximizes the required hydrodynamic pressure for a constant fluid influx. The effect of an external hydrodynamic pressure, to compensate for the reduced transmembrane pressure difference due to osmotic pressure, is investigated. © 2014 American Institute of Chemical Engineers.

  14. Graphite and PMMA as pore formers for thermoplastic extrusion of porous 3Y-TZP oxygen transport membrane supports

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørnetun Haugen, Astri; Gurauskis, Jonas; Kaiser, Andreas

    2016-01-01

    A gas permeable porous support is a crucial part of an asymmetric oxygen transport membrane (OTM). Here, we develop feedstocks for thermoplastic extrusion of tubular, porous 3Y-TZP (partially stabilized zirconia polycrystals, (Y2O3)0.03(ZrO2)0.97)) ceramics, using graphite and/or polymethyl...... methacrylate (PMMA) as pore formers. The influence of pore former content and type, 3Y-TZP particle size and support sintering temperature on the microstructure, porosity and gas permeability were studied. Using at least 40 vol% pore former, consisting of graphite and PMMA in the volume ratio 2:1, tubes...... with gas permeability exceeding the target of 10−14m2 are obtained. In the temperature range 1250–1400°C the support gas permeability is insensitive to the sintering temperature, and the feedstocks shrink more than 15% during sintering, making them ideal for co-sintering with functional OTM layers...

  15. Transport Studies and Modeling in PEM Fuel Cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mittelsteadt, Cortney K. [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States); Xu, Hui [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States); Brawn, Shelly [Giner, Inc., Auburndale, MA (United States)

    2014-07-30

    This project’s aim was to develop fuel cell components (i.e. membranes, gas-diffusion media (GDM), bipolar plates and flow fields) that possess specific properties (i.e. water transport and conductivity). A computational fluid dynamics model was developed to elucidate the effect of certain parameters on these specific properties. Ultimately, the model will be used to determine sensitivity of fuel cell performance to component properties to determine limiting components and to guide research. We have successfully reached our objectives and achieved most of the milestones of this project. We have designed and synthesized a variety of hydrocarbon block polymer membranes with lower equivalent weight, structure, chemistry, phase separation and process conditions. These membranes provide a broad selection with optimized water transport properties. We have also designed and constructed a variety of devices that are capable of accurately measuring the water transport properties (water uptake, water diffusivity and electro-osmatic drag) of these membranes. These transport properties are correlated to the membranes’ structures derived from X-ray and microscopy techniques to determine the structure-property relationship. We successfully integrated hydrocarbon membrane MEAs with a current distribution board (CBD) to study the impact of hydrocarbon membrane on water transport in fuel cells. We have designed and fabricated various GDM with varying substrate, diffusivity and micro-porous layers (MPL) and characterized their pore structure, tortuosity and hydrophobicity. We have derived a universal chart (MacMullin number as function of wet proofing and porosity) that can be used to characterize various GDM. The abovementioned GDMs have been evaluated in operating fuel cells; their performance is correlated to various pore structure, tortuosity and hydrophobicity of the GDM. Unfortunately, determining a universal relationship between the MacMullin number and these properties

  16. A complete two-phase model of a porous cathode of a PEM fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hwang, J. J.

    This paper has developed a complete two-phase model of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell by considering fluid flow, heat transfer and current simultaneously. In fluid flow, two momentum equations governing separately the gaseous-mixture velocity (u g) and the liquid-water velocity (u w) illustrate the behaviors of the two-phase flow in a porous electrode. Correlations for the capillary pressure and the saturation level connect the above two-fluid transports. In heat transfer, a local thermal non-equilibrium (LTNE) model accounting for intrinsic heat transfer between the reactant fluids and the solid matrices depicts the interactions between the reactant-fluid temperature (T f) and the solid-matrix temperature (T s). The irreversibility heating due to electrochemical reactions, Joule heating arising from Ohmic resistance, and latent heat of water condensation/evaporation are considered in the present non-isothermal model. In current, Ohm's law is applied to yield the conservations in ionic current (i m) and electronic current (i s) in the catalyst layer. The Butler-Volmer correlation describes the relation of the potential difference (overpotential) and the transfer current between the electrolyte (such as Nafion™) and the catalyst (such as Pt/C).

  17. A Weakly Non Linear Stability Analysis of Heat Transport in Anisotropic Porous Cavity Under Time PeriodicTemperature Modulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amit kumar Mishra

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we have analyzed the effect of time periodic temperature modulation on convective stability in anisotropic porous cavity. The cavity is heated from below and cooled from above. A weakly non-linear stability analysis is done to find Nusselt number governing the heat transport. The infinitely small disturbances are expanded in terms of power series of amplitude of modulation. Analytically the nonautonomous Ginzburg- landau amplitude equation is obtained for the stationary mode of convection. The effects of various parameters like Vadasz number, mechanical and thermal anisotropic parameters, amplitude of oscillations, frequency of modulation and aspect ratio of the cavity on heat transport is studied and plotted graphically. It is observed that the heat transport can also be controlled by suitably adjusting the external and internal parameters of the system.

  18. The Effect of Inhomogeneous Compression on Water Transport in the Cathode of a Proton Exchange Membrane Fuel Cell

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Olesen, Anders Christian; Berning, Torsten; Kær, Søren Knudsen

    2012-01-01

    A three-dimensional, multicomponent, two-fluid model developed in the commercial CFD package CFX 13 (ANSYS Inc.) is used to investigate the effect of porous media compression on water transport in a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The PEMFC model only consist of the cathode channel, gas...... diffusion layer, microporous layer, and catalyst layer, excluding the membrane and anode. In the porous media liquid water transport is described by the capillary pressure gradient, momentum loss via the Darcy-Forchheimer equation, and mass transfer between phases by a nonequilibrium phase change model...

  19. An O2 transport study in porous materials within the Li-O2 - system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schied, Thomas; Ehrenberg, Helmut; Eckert, Jürgen; Oswald, Steffen; Hoffmann, Martin; Scheiba, Frieder

    2014-12-01

    The research on lithium-oxygen batteries faces a number of issues ranging from design problems to elementary reaction kinetics. Depending on solvent, lithium salt and electrode materials several chemical reaction pathways of lithium and oxygen have been proposed. Oxygen solubility and transport are among the most pressing issues that limit the battery performance. In this work purging oxygen through an electrolyte soaked gas diffusion layer (GDL) was investigated as a possible route towards improving the availability of oxygen to the cell reaction. Additionally based on the findings, a method to estimating the absorption constant of oxygen into the electrolyte is proposed.

  20. Experimental Study and Numerical Solution of Poly Acrylic Acid Supported Magnetite Nanoparticles Transport in a One-Dimensional Porous Media

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Golzar

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, iron nanoparticles have attracted more attention for groundwater remediation due to its potential to reduce subsurface contaminants such as PCBs, chlorinated solvents, and heavy metals. The magnetic properties of iron nanoparticles cause to attach to each other and form bigger colloid particles of iron nanoparticles with more rapid sedimentation rate in aqueous environment. Using the surfactants such as poly acrylic acid (PAA prevents iron nanoparticles from forming large flocs that may cause sedimentation and so increases transport distance of the nanoparticles. In this study, the transport of iron oxide nanoparticles (Fe3O4 stabilized with PAA in a one-dimensional porous media (column was investigated. The slurries with concentrations of 20,100 and 500 (mg/L were injected into the bottom of the column under hydraulic gradients of 0.125, 0.375, and 0.625. The results obtained from experiments were compared with the results obtained from numerical solution of advection-dispersion equation based on the classical colloid filtration theory (CFT. The experimental and simulated breakthrough curves showed that CFT is able to predict the transport and fate of iron oxide nanoparticles stabilized with PAA (up to concentration 500 ppm in a porous media.

  1. Transport of Algal Cells in Hyporheic Sediments of the River Elbe (Germany)

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kloep, Frank; Röske, Isolde

    2004-01-01

    The advective transport of algal cells into the interstices of the hyporheic zone of the River Elbe was spatially and temporally heterogenous. Even deep sediment layers were reached by large phytoplankton species. Therefore, it is suggested that (i) the advective interstitial transport patterns vary between different algal sizes and morphotypes and (ii) sediment characteristics, expressed by the permeability coefficient kf of porous media, affect retention and retardation of surface water algae during subsurface transport. The transport behaviour of different green algae (Chlorella sp., Scenedesmus acuminatus, Desmodesmus communis, and Pediastrum duplex) and algal sized microspheres was tested in flow-through column experiments with hyporheic sediments. The algal cell transport was directly related to the permeability of the column sediments. (

  2. Mechanical properties of regular porous biomaterials made from truncated cube repeating unit cells: Analytical solutions and computational models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, R; Sadighi, M; Mohammadi-Aghdam, M; Zadpoor, A A

    2016-03-01

    Additive manufacturing (AM) has enabled fabrication of open-cell porous biomaterials based on repeating unit cells. The micro-architecture of the porous biomaterials and, thus, their physical properties could then be precisely controlled. Due to their many favorable properties, porous biomaterials manufactured using AM are considered as promising candidates for bone substitution as well as for several other applications in orthopedic surgery. The mechanical properties of such porous structures including static and fatigue properties are shown to be strongly dependent on the type of the repeating unit cell based on which the porous biomaterial is built. In this paper, we study the mechanical properties of porous biomaterials made from a relatively new unit cell, namely truncated cube. We present analytical solutions that relate the dimensions of the repeating unit cell to the elastic modulus, Poisson's ratio, yield stress, and buckling load of those porous structures. We also performed finite element modeling to predict the mechanical properties of the porous structures. The analytical solution and computational results were found to be in agreement with each other. The mechanical properties estimated using both the analytical and computational techniques were somewhat higher than the experimental data reported in one of our recent studies on selective laser melted Ti-6Al-4V porous biomaterials. In addition to porosity, the elastic modulus and Poisson's ratio of the porous structures were found to be strongly dependent on the ratio of the length of the inclined struts to that of the uninclined (i.e. vertical or horizontal) struts, α, in the truncated cube unit cell. The geometry of the truncated cube unit cell approaches the octahedral and cube unit cells when α respectively approaches zero and infinity. Consistent with those geometrical observations, the analytical solutions presented in this study approached those of the octahedral and cube unit cells when

  3. A realistic transport model with pressure dependent parameters for gas flow in tight porous media with application to determining shale rock properties

    CERN Document Server

    Ali, Iftikhar

    2016-01-01

    Shale gas recovery has seen a major boom in recent years due to the increasing global energy demands; but the extraction technologies are very expensive. It is therefore important to develop realistic transport modelling and simulation methods, for porous rocks and porous media, that can compliment the field work. Here, a new nonlinear transport model for single phase gas flow in tight porous media is derived, incorporating many important physical processes that occur in such porous systems: continuous flow, transition flow, slip flow, Knudsen diffusion, adsorption and desorption in to and out of the rock material, and a correction for high flow rates (turbulence). This produces a nonlinear advection-diffusion type of partial differential equation (PDE) with pressure dependent model parameters and associated compressibility coefficients, and highly nonlinear apparent convective flux (velocity) and apparent diffusivity. An important application is to the determination of shale rock properties, such as porosity...

  4. Processing and characterization of porous electrochemical cells for flue gas purification

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    He, Zeming; Andersen, Kjeld Bøhm; Keel, Li;

    2009-01-01

    In the present work, porous electrode materials lanthanum strontium manganate (LSM)-gadolinium-doped cerium oxide (CGO) and electrochemical cells LSM-CGO + CGO were fabricated via the processes of slurry preparation, tape casting and lamination, and sintering. Graphite, wheat starch, and polyamide...

  5. Dye-sensitized solar cells based on porous conjugated polymer counter electrodes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Torabi, Naeimeh; Behjat, Abbas, E-mail: abehjat@yazd.ac.ir; Jafari, Fatemeh

    2014-12-31

    In this paper, we report platinum-free dye-sensitized solar cells that were fabricated using a grown porous poly-3-methyl-thiophene (P3MT) counter electrode. The growing of the porous P3MT was performed by an electrochemical deposition method. This method is easy and affordable unlike the common expensive deposition methods. The morphology of P3MT films was studied by scanning electron microscopy images. It was observed that polymer layers grown with a current density of 2 mA/cm{sup 2} have a clear porous and rough structure as compared to layers grown with a lower current density. To understand the reaction kinetics and the catalytic activities of the counter electrodes with P3MT for 3I{sup −}/I{sub 3}{sup −} redox reaction, cyclic voltammetry (CV) was performed. Based on the analysis of CV, it was shown that this layer can be used as a counter electrode for dye-sensitized solar cells. The electro deposition conditions during the growth of polymer layers such as current density, the morphology of polymer films and the duration of polymerization have a significant role in the current–voltage characterization of the fabricated solar cells. The performance of the fabricated solar cells was improved by optimization of these parameters. The highest efficiency of 2.76% was obtained by using porous P3MT in the counter electrode. - Highlights: • Poly-3-methyl-thiophene (P3MT) layers were grown using electrochemical deposition method. • By controlling the growth conditions, porous P3MT can be produced. • Grown P3MT layers can be used as counter electrodes in dye-sensitized solar cells. • The growth rate of P3MT layers plays an essential role in the cell performance.

  6. Durability of symmetrically and asymmetrically porous polybenzimidazole membranes for high temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jheng, Li-Cheng; Chang, Wesley Jen-Yang; Hsu, Steve Lien-Chung; Cheng, Po-Yang

    2016-08-01

    Two types of porous polybenzimidazole (PBI) membranes with symmetric and asymmetric morphologies were fabricated by the template-leaching method and characterized by scanning electron microscope (SEM). Their physicochemical properties were compared in terms of acid-doping level, proton conductivity, mechanical strength, and oxidative stability. The durability of fuel cell operation is one of the most challenging for the PBI based membrane electrode assembly (MEA) used in high-temperature proton exchange membrane fuel cells (HT-PEMFCs). In the present work, we carried out a long-term steady-state fuel cell test to compare the effect of membrane structure on the cell voltage degradation. It has also been demonstrated that the asymmetrically porous PBI could bring some notable improvements on the durability of fuel cell operation, the fuel crossover problem, and the phosphoric acid leakage.

  7. Transport and retention of carbon-based engineered and natural nanoparticles through saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hedayati, Maryeh; Sharma, Prabhakar; Katyal, Deeksha; Fagerlund, Fritjof

    2016-03-01

    Carbon-based engineered nanoparticles have been widely used due to their small size and unique physical and chemical properties. At the same time, the toxic effects of these nanoparticles on human and fish cells have also been observed; therefore, their release and distribution into the surface and subsurface environment is a subject of concern. The aim of this research is to evaluate and compare the transports and retentions of two types of engineered nanoparticles (multiwalled carbon nanotubes and C60) and the natural carbon nanoparticles collected from a fire accident. Several laboratory experiments were conducted to observe the transport behavior of nanoparticles through a column packed with silica sand. The column experiments were intended to monitor the effect of ionic strength on transport of nanoparticles as a function of their shapes. It was observed that the mobilities of both types of engineered nanoparticles were reduced with the increasing ionic strength from 1.34 to 60 mM. However, at ionic strengths up to 10.89 mM, spherical nanoparticles were more mobile than cylindrical nanoparticles, but the mobility of the cylindrical nanoparticles became significantly higher than spherical nanoparticles at the ionic strength of 60 mM. In comparison with natural fire-born nanoparticles, both types of engineered nanoparticles were much less mobile under the selected experimental condition in this study. Furthermore, inverse modeling was used to calculate parameters such as attachment efficiency, the longitudinal dispersivity, and capacity of the solid phase for the attachment of nanoparticles. The results indicate that the combination of the shape and the solution chemistry of the NPs are responsible for the transport and the retention of nanoparticles in natural environment; however, fire-burned nanoparticles can be highly mobile at the natural groundwater chemistry.

  8. Interactions between laponite and microbial biofilms in porous media: implications for colloid transport and biofilm stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leon-Morales, C Felipe; Leis, Andrew P; Strathmann, Martin; Flemming, Hans-Curt

    2004-09-01

    Quartz sand columns and sand-filled microscope flow cells were used to investigate the transport characteristics of the clay colloid laponite, and a biofilm-forming bacterium, Pseudomonas aeruginosa SG81. Separate experiments were performed with each particle to determine their individual transport characteristics in clean sand columns. In a second set of experiments, bacterial biofilms were formed prior to introduction of the clay colloids. In the independent transport experiments, bacteria and laponite each conformed to known physicochemical principles. A sodium chloride concentration of 7 x 10(-2) M caused complete retention of the laponite within the sand columns. P. aeruginosa SG81 was generally less influenced by ionic strength effects; it showed relatively low mobility at all ionic strengths tested and some (albeit reduced) mobility when introduced to the columns in 1M NaCl, the highest concentration tested, but nevertheless showed reproducible trends. Under conditions favourable to laponite retention and biofilm stability (7 x 10(-2) MNaCl), laponite suspensions were able to remobilise a portion of the attached bacterial biomass. At low ionic strength, the profile of laponite elution was also altered in the presence of a P. aeruginosa biofilm. These observations suggest that while a reduction in ionic strength has a dominant influence on the mobilisation of biological and inorganic colloids, the presence of laponite and biomass can have a distinct influence on the mobility of both types of colloids. Since these events are likely to occur in subsurface environments, our results suggest that colloid-biofilm interactions will have implications for colloid-bound contaminant transport and the remobilisation of pathogens.

  9. Transportation of MHD nanofluid free convection in a porous semi annulus using numerical approach

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheikholeslami, M.; Ganji, D. D.

    2017-02-01

    Nanofluid free convection in presence of Lorentz forces in a permeable semi annulus is simulated using Control Volume based Finite Element Method. Impact of porous media on governing equations is considered by means of Darcy law. Brownian motion impact on properties of nanofluid is taken into account using Koo-Kleinstreuer-Li (KKL) model. Important parameters are inclination angle (ξ) , CuO-water volume fraction (ϕ) , Hartmann (Ha) and Rayleigh (Ra) numbers for porous medium. A formula for Nuave is provided. Results indicated that temperature gradient detracts with enhance of Ha but it enhances with rise of ξ, Ra . Heat transfer augmentation enhances with rise of Lorentz forces.

  10. Resolving the Impact of Biological Processes on DNAPL Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media Through Nuclear Magnetic Resonance Relaxation Time Measurements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hertzog, R. C.; Geesey, G.; White, T.; Oram, L.; Seymour, J.; Codd, S.; Straley, C.; Bryar, T.

    2003-12-01

    This research leads to a better understanding of how physical and biological properties of porous media influence water and dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) distributions under saturated and unsaturated conditions. Knowing how environmental properties affect DNAPL solvent flow in the subsurface is essential for developing models of flow and transport needed for designing remediation and long-term stewardship strategies. We investigate the capability and limitations of low-field nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) relaxation decay-rate measurements for determining environmental properties affecting DNAPL solvent flow in the subsurface. For in-situ subsurface environmental applications, low-field proton NMR measurements are preferred to conventional high-field techniques commonly used to obtain chemical shift data, because low field measurements are much less degraded by magnetic susceptibility variations between rock grains and pore fluids that significantly interfere with high-field NMR measurements. The research scope includes discriminating DNAPLs in water-wet or solvent-wet environments and the impact of biological processes on their transport mechanisms in porous media. Knowledge of the in situ flow properties and pore distributions of organic contaminants are critical to understanding where and when these fluids will enter subsurface aquifers. Experiments determined that commonly found subsurface DNAPLs containing hydrogen, such as trichloroethylene and dichloroethylene, are detectable and distinguished from water in soils. Related experiments concern the effects of bacterial accumulation in saturated and unsaturated porous media on water and DNAPL pore-size distributions. These include synthetic bio-film matrix as a surrogate bio-film and sand, biological agents to grow biofilms, and multiple pore sizes to determine if bio-films prefer certain pore-size ranges. NMR microscopy focused on imaging a single biofilm in a 1 mm capillary reactor. This system

  11. Interactions between bacteria and solid surfaces in relation to bacterial transport in porous media.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Rijnaarts, H.H.M.

    1994-01-01

    Interactions between bacteria and solid surfaces strongly influence the behaviour of bacteria in natural and engineered ecosystems. Many biofilm reactors and terrestrial environments are porous media. The purpose of the research presented in this thesis is to gain a better insight into the basic mec

  12. Measurement of water vapour transport through a porous non-hygroscopic material in a temperature gradient

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Thor; Padfield, Tim; Hansen, Kurt Kielsgaard

    2014-01-01

    This was an experiment to identify the driving potential for water vapour diffusion through porous materials in a temperature gradient. The specimen of mineral fibre insulation was placed between a space with controlled temperature and relative humidity and a space with a controlled, higher...

  13. Development of RWHet to Simulate Contaminant Transport in Fractured Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong; LaBolle, Eric; Reeves, Donald M; Russell, Charles

    2012-07-01

    spacing is small, and thus it tends to erroneously predict breakthrough curves (BTCs) for the parallel fracture system. Finally, we adopted the transient range approach proposed by Pan and Bodvarsson [2002] in RWHet. In this method, particle transfer between fractures and matrix blocks can be resolved without using very small time steps. It does not use any truncation of the first passage time distribution for particles. Hence it does not have the limitation identified above for the DNS-Reflective method and the DNS-Roubinet method. Numerical results were checked against analytical solutions, and also compared to DCPTV2.0 [Pan, 2002]. This version of RWHet (called RWHet-Pan&Bodvarsson in this report) can accurately capture contaminant transport in fractured porous media for a full range of parameters without any practical or theoretical limitations.

  14. Numerical Modeling of Nanoparticles Transport with Two-Phase Flow in Porous Media Using Iterative Implicit Method

    CERN Document Server

    El-Amin, M F; Sun, Shuyu; Salama, Amgad

    2013-01-01

    In this paper, we introduce a mathematical model to describe the nanoparticles transport carried by a two-phase flow in a porous medium including gravity, capillary forces and Brownian diffusion. Nonlinear iterative IMPES scheme is used to solve the flow equation, and saturation and pressure are calculated at the current iteration step and then the transport equation is soved implicitly. Therefore, once the nanoparticles concentration is computed, the two equations of volume of the nanoparticles available on the pore surfaces and the volume of the nanoparticles entrapped in pore throats are solved implicitly. The porosity and the permeability variations are updated at each time step after each iteration loop. Two numerical examples, namely, regular heterogeneous permeability and random permeability are considered. We monitor the changing of the fluid and solid properties due to adding the nanoparticles. Variation of water saturation, water pressure, nanoparticles concentration and porosity are presented graph...

  15. On the importance of aqueous diffusion and electrostatic interactions in advection-dominated transport in saturated porous media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rolle, Massimo

    2015-01-01

    Diffusion and compound-specific mixing significantly affect conservative and reactive transport in groundwater. The variability of diffusion coefficients for different solutes has a relevant impact on their displacement at different scales, not only under diffusion-dominated regimes but also under...... advection-dominated flow through conditions. When the solutes are charged species, besides the magnitude of their aqueous diffusion coefficients also their electrostatic interactions play a significant role in the displacement of the different species. Under flow-through conditions this leads...... to multicomponent ionic dispersion: the dispersive fluxes of the different ions are cross-coupled due to the effects of Coulombic interactions. Such effects are illustrated in flow-through experiments in saturated porous media. Simple strong electrolytes were selected as tracers and their transport was studied...

  16. Fate and transport of elemental copper (Cu0) nanoparticles through saturated porous media in the presence of organic materials.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jones, Edward H; Su, Chunming

    2012-05-01

    Column experiments were performed to assess the fate and transport of nanoscale elemental copper (Cu(0)) particles in saturated quartz sands. Both effluent concentrations and retention profiles were measured over a broad range of physicochemical conditions, which included pH, ionic strength, the presence of natural organic matter (humic and fulvic acids) and an organic buffer (Trizma). At neutral pHs, Cu(0) nanoparticles were positively charged and essentially immobile in porous media. The presence of natural organic matter, trizma buffer, and high pH decreased the attachment efficiency facilitating elemental copper transport through sand columns. Experimental results suggested the presence of both favourable and unfavourable nanoparticle interactions causes significant deviation from classical colloid filtration theory.

  17. Software package r{sup 3}t. Model for transport and retention in porous media. Final report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Fein, E. (ed.)

    2004-07-01

    In long-termsafety analyses for final repositories for hazardous wastes in deep geological formations the impact to the biosphere due to potential release of hazardous materials is assessed for relevant scenarios. The model for migration of wastes from repositories to men is divided into three almost independent parts: the near field, the geosphere, and the biosphere. With the development of r{sup 3}t the feasibility to model the pollutant transport through the geosphere for porous or equivalent porous media in large, three-dimensional, and complex regions is established. Furthermore one has at present the ability to consider all relevant retention and interaction effects which are important for long-term safety analyses. These are equilibrium sorption, kinetically controlled sorption, diffusion into immobile pore waters, and precipitation. The processes of complexing, colloidal transport and matrix diffusion may be considered at least approximately by skilful choice of parameters. Speciation is not part of the very recently developed computer code r{sup 3}t. With r{sup 3}t it is possible to assess the potential dilution and the barrier impact of the overburden close to reality.

  18. Three-dimensional micro-scale flow simulation and colloid transport modeling in saturated soil porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Charmaine; Gao, Hui; Fan, Dimin; Jin, Yan; Wang, Lian-Ping

    2008-11-01

    Adequate understanding of the mechanism of colloid retention by soil porous media is essential to the prediction and monitoring of the transport of contaminants by groundwater in the subsurface environment. Preliminary studies reveal that pore-scale processes are governed by colloid-grain and colloid-colloid interactions. In this talk, we focus on the assessment of their effects using a computational approach. First, micro-scale viscous flow in a model porous medium, i.e., a square channel filled with spherical grains, is simulated by simultaneously applying a mesoscopic lattice Boltzmann equation and a Navier-Stokes based hybrid approach, for rigorous cross-validation of the simulated flow. Lagrangian tacking of individual colloids is then conducted by solving colloids equation of motion including local hydrodynamic effects and physicochemical forces. Analysis of colloid transport will encompass effects of flow straining, depth-dependent spatial distribution, and retention of colloids under different solution ionic strengths, flow speeds, and packing configurations. Comparison with parallel experimental results using confocal microscopy will be briefly discussed.

  19. Fabrication of uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds using a gas-in-liquid templating technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takei, Takayuki; Aokawa, Ryuta; Shigemitsu, Takamasa; Kawakami, Koei; Yoshida, Masahiro

    2015-11-01

    Design of porous scaffolds in tissue engineering field was challenging. Uniform immobilization of cells in the scaffolds with high porosity was essential for homogeneous tissue formation. The present study was aimed at fabricating uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds with porosity >74% using the gas-in-liquid foam templating technique. To this end, we used gelatin, microbial transglutaminase and argon gas as a scaffold material, cross-linker of the protein and porogen of scaffold, respectively. We confirmed that a porosity of >74% could be achieved by increasing the gas volume delivered to a gelatin solution. Pore size in the scaffold could be controlled by stirring speed, stirring time and the pore size of the filter through which the gas passed. The foaming technique enabled us to uniformly immobilize a human hepatoblastoma cell line in scaffold. Engraftment efficiency of the cell line entrapped within the scaffold in nude mice was higher than that of cells in free-form. These results showed that the uniformly cell-laden porous scaffolds were promising for tissue engineering.

  20. Biomimetic apatite-coated porous PVA scaffolds promote the growth of breast cancer cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ye, Mao; Mohanty, Pravansu; Ghosh, Gargi, E-mail: gargi@umich.edu

    2014-11-01

    Recapitulating the native environment of bone tissue is essential to develop in vitro models of breast cancer bone metastasis. The bone is a composite material consisting of organic matrix and inorganic mineral phase, primarily hydroxyapatite. In this study, we report the mineralization of porous poly vinyl alcohol (PVA) scaffolds upon incubation in modified Hanks' Balanced Salt Solution (HBSS) for 14 days. Scanning electron microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray analysis, and X-ray diffraction analysis revealed that the deposited minerals have composition similar to hydroxyapatite. The study demonstrated that the rate of nucleation and growth of minerals was faster on surfaces of less porous scaffolds. However, upon prolonged incubation, formation of mineral layer was observed on the surface of all the scaffolds. In addition, the study also demonstrated that 3D mineralization only occurred for scaffolds with highly interconnected porous networks. The mineralization of the scaffolds promoted the adsorption of serum proteins and consequently, the adhesion and proliferation of breast cancer cells. - Highlights: • Porous PVA scaffolds fabricated via mechanical agitation followed by freeze-drying. • Mineralization of the scaffold was carried out by utilizing biomimetic approach. • Mineralization resulted in increased protein adsorption on the scaffold. • Increased breast cancer cell growth was observed on mineralized scaffolds.

  1. Porous niobium coatings fabricated with selective laser melting on titanium substrates: Preparation, characterization, and cell behavior.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Sheng; Cheng, Xian; Yao, Yao; Wei, Yehui; Han, Changjun; Shi, Yusheng; Wei, Qingsong; Zhang, Zhen

    2015-08-01

    Nb, an expensive and refractory element with good wear resistance and biocompatibility, is gaining more attention as a new metallic biomaterial. However, the high price of the raw material, as well as the high manufacturing costs because of Nb's strong oxygen affinity and high melting point have limited the widespread use of Nb and its compounds. To overcome these disadvantages, porous Nb coatings of various thicknesses were fabricated on Ti substrate via selective laser melting (SLM), which is a 3D printing technique that uses computer-controlled high-power laser to melt the metal. The morphology and microstructure of the porous Nb coatings, which had pores ranging from 15 to 50 μm in size, were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The average hardness of the coating, which was measured with the linear intercept method, was 392±37 HV. In vitro tests of the porous Nb coating which was monitored with SEM, immunofluorescence, and CCK-8 counts of cells, exhibited excellent cell morphology, attachment, and growth. The simulated body fluid test also proved the bioactivity of the Nb coating. Therefore, these new porous Nb coatings could potentially be used for enhanced early biological fixation to bone tissue. In addition, this study has shown that SLM technique could be used to fabricate coatings with individually tailored shapes and/or porosities from group IVB and VB biomedical metals and their alloys on stainless steel, Co-Cr, and other traditional biomedical materials without wasting raw materials.

  2. Intracellular transport of cholesterol in mammalian cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Brasaemle, D.L.

    1989-01-01

    The erythrocyte was selected as a simple cell for the study of transbilayer movement of cholesterol. Cholesterol oxidase was used to measure the distribution of ({sup 3}H)cholesterol across the erythrocyte membrane. Cholesterol oxidase was also used to estimate the rate of transport of low density lipoprotein (LDL) cholesterol to the plasma membrane of cultured Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) fibroblasts; the half-time of this process was 42 minutes. The rate of transport of LDL cholesterol to the plasma membrane was confirmed by a second procedure using amphotericin B. Amphotericin B was also used to estimate the rate of transport of endogenously synthesized cholesterol to the plasma membrane of CHO cells. New methodology was developed including improvements of the previously published cholesterol oxidase assay for plasma membrane cholesterol. A new method for detecting transport of cholesterol to the plasma membrane in cultured cells was developed using amphotericin B. Preliminary studies investigated the use of fluorescent polyenes, pimaricin and etruscomycin, as probes for plasma membrane cholesterol in transport studies. Finally, a modification of a previously published cell staining protocol yielded a simple, quantitative assay for cell growth.

  3. Transport and Retention of Metal Oxide Nanoparticles in Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben Moshe, T.; Dror, I.; Berkowitz, B.

    2009-12-01

    We investigate the behavior of four types of untreated metal oxide nanoparticles in saturated porous media. The transport and retention of Fe3O4, TiO2, CuO, and ZnO were measured in a series of column experiments. Vertical columns, 20 cm in height, were packed with uniform, spherical glass beads. Initial experiments demonstrated that when nanoparticles were introduced to the column as a dry powder, placed on the inlet surface with an hydraulic head being built up above them, the nanoparticles remained virtually immobile, with complete retention at the top 5 mm near the column inlet. All subsequent experiments were carried out with an inlet flow condition that introduced nanoparticles as a pulse suspended in aqueous solutions. Breakthrough curves of nanoparticles were measured using UV-vis spectrometry; the experiments proved to be highly reproducible in repeated tests. Following completion of some experiments, the mass of nanoparticles retained in each column was measured to ensure consistency. Different factors affecting the mobility of the nanoparticles such as ionic strength, addition of organic matter (humic acid), flow rate and pH were investigated. The experiments showed that mobility varies strongly among the nanoparticles, with TiO2 demonstrating the highest mobility. For example, at solution concentrations of 0.01 M NaCl, TiO2 had the highest mobility, with 62% of the nanoparticles exiting the column; 52%, 16% and only 1.4% of the CuO, Fe3O4, and ZnO nanoparticles reached the column outlet. But nanoparticle mobility is also strongly affected by the experimental conditions. Increasing the ionic strength to 0.1 M NaCl, only 13%, 8.3%, 6.2% and 1.2% of the TiO2, CuO, Fe3O4 and ZnO nanoparticles, respectively, emerged from the columns. This behavior can be attributed to the suppression of the electrical double layer by the added ions. Under conditions of higher ionic strength, attractive van der Waals forces are dominant over repulsive electrostatic

  4. Porous niobium coatings fabricated with selective laser melting on titanium substrates: Preparation, characterization, and cell behavior

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Sheng [Science and Technology on Power Beam Processes Laboratory, Beijing Aeronautical Manufacturing Technology Research Institute (BAMTRI), Beijing 100024 (China); State Key Lab of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Cheng, Xian; Yao, Yao; Wei, Yehui [Department of Stomatology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China); Han, Changjun; Shi, Yusheng [State Key Lab of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Wei, Qingsong, E-mail: wqs_xn@163.com [State Key Lab of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Zhang, Zhen, E-mail: zhangzhentitanium@163.com [State Key Lab of Materials Processing and Die & Mould Technology, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430074 (China); Department of Stomatology, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, Wuhan 430022 (China)

    2015-08-01

    Nb, an expensive and refractory element with good wear resistance and biocompatibility, is gaining more attention as a new metallic biomaterial. However, the high price of the raw material, as well as the high manufacturing costs because of Nb's strong oxygen affinity and high melting point have limited the widespread use of Nb and its compounds. To overcome these disadvantages, porous Nb coatings of various thicknesses were fabricated on Ti substrate via selective laser melting (SLM), which is a 3D printing technique that uses computer-controlled high-power laser to melt the metal. The morphology and microstructure of the porous Nb coatings, which had pores ranging from 15 to 50 μm in size, were characterized with scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The average hardness of the coating, which was measured with the linear intercept method, was 392 ± 37 HV. In vitro tests of the porous Nb coating which was monitored with SEM, immunofluorescence, and CCK-8 counts of cells, exhibited excellent cell morphology, attachment, and growth. The simulated body fluid test also proved the bioactivity of the Nb coating. Therefore, these new porous Nb coatings could potentially be used for enhanced early biological fixation to bone tissue. In addition, this study has shown that SLM technique could be used to fabricate coatings with individually tailored shapes and/or porosities from group IVB and VB biomedical metals and their alloys on stainless steel, Co–Cr, and other traditional biomedical materials without wasting raw materials. - Highlights: • Porous Nb coating was firstly fabricated on Ti substrate by SLM technique. • Morphology, microstructure and hardness of the coating were characterized. • In vitro test of the coating showed good cell attachment, morphology and growth.

  5. Fuel cell development for transportation: Catalyst development

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Doddapaneni, N. [Sandia National Lab., Albuquerque, NM (United States)

    1996-04-01

    Fuel cells are being considered as alternate power sources for transportation and stationary applications. With proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells the fuel crossover to cathodes causes severe thermal management and cell voltage drop due to oxidation of fuel at the platinized cathodes. The main goal of this project was to design, synthesize, and evaluate stable and inexpensive transition metal macrocyclic catalysts for the reduction of oxygen and be electrochemically inert towards anode fuels such as hydrogen and methanol.

  6. Modeling reactive transport in deformable porous media using the theory of interacting continua.

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Turner, Daniel Zack

    2012-01-01

    This report gives an overview of the work done as part of an Early Career LDRD aimed at modeling flow induced damage of materials involving chemical reactions, deformation of the porous matrix, and complex flow phenomena. The numerical formulation is motivated by a mixture theory or theory of interacting continua type approach to coupling the behavior of the fluid and the porous matrix. Results for the proposed method are presented for several engineering problems of interest including carbon dioxide sequestration, hydraulic fracturing, and energetic materials applications. This work is intended to create a general framework for flow induced damage that can be further developed in each of the particular areas addressed below. The results show both convincing proof of the methodologies potential and the need for further validation of the models developed.

  7. Low cost porous MgO substrates for oxygen transport membranes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kothanda Ramachandran, Dhavanesan; Søgaard, Martin; Clemens, F.

    2016-01-01

    This paper delineates the fabrication of porous magnesium oxide (MgO) ceramics with high porosity and gas permeability by warm pressing using pre-calcined MgO powder and fugitive pore former (combination of graphite and polymethyl methacrylate). Effect of pore former on the microstructure develop......O substrates were measured and correlated. Economic analysis of the MgO substrates was performed and it was found that MgO was much cheaper compared to perovskite and fluorite materials...

  8. Micro-Scale Simulation of Water Transport in Porous Media Coupled with Phase Change

    Science.gov (United States)

    Etemad, Sahand; Behrang, Arash; Mohammadmoradi, Peyman; Hejazi, Hossein; Kantzas, Apostolos

    2015-11-01

    Sub-pore scale modeling of flow in porous media is gaining momentum. The concept of Digital Core Analysis deals with measurements of virtual core and the purpose of such modeling is to replace conventional and special core analysis when the latter are not feasible. Single phase flow phenomena are nowadays fairly easy to model given a good representation of the porous medium by its digital counterpart. Two phase flow modeling has proven more difficult to represent due to the complexities introduced by the insert of interfaces. These problems were at least partially overcome by the implementation of the ``Volume of Fluid'' method. OpenFOAM is the CFD package of choice in this work. The aforementioned approach is currently being extended in the modeling of phase change within a porous medium. Surface roughness is introduced by the incorporation of wedges of variable density and amplitude on the pore surface. A further introduced complication is that the individual grains are of different mineralogy and thus of different wettability. The problem of steam condensation in such media is addressed. It is observed that steam condenses first in the smallest of wedges, which act a nucleation sites. Water spreads on water-wet surfaces. Snap-off is observed in several cases leading to temporary trapping of vapor. Grid size effects are also addressed. The application of this modeling effort is the condensation of steam in thermal recovery methods.

  9. Multiphase transport in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gauthier, Eric D.

    Polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) enable efficient conversion of fuels to electricity. They have enormous potential due to the high energy density of the fuels they utilize (hydrogen or alcohols). Power density is a major limitation to wide-scale introduction of PEMFCs. Power density in hydrogen fuel cells is limited by accumulation of water in what is termed fuel cell `flooding.' Flooding may occur in either the gas diffusion layer (GDL) or within the flow channels of the bipolar plate. These components comprise the electrodes of the fuel cell and balance transport of reactants/products with electrical conductivity. This thesis explores the role of electrode materials in the fuel cell and examines the fundamental connection between material properties and multiphase transport processes. Water is generated at the cathode catalyst layer. As liquid water accumulates it will utilize the largest pores in the GDL to go from the catalyst layer to the flow channels. Water collects to large pores via lateral transport at the interface between the GDL and catalyst layer. We have shown that water may be collected in these large pores from several centimeters away, suggesting that we could engineer the GDL to control flooding with careful placement and distribution of large flow-directing pores. Once liquid water is in the flow channels it forms slugs that block gas flow. The slugs are pushed along the channel by a pressure gradient that is dependent on the material wettability. The permeable nature of the GDL also plays a major role in slug growth and allowing bypass of gas between adjacent channels. Direct methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) have analogous multiphase flow issues where carbon dioxide bubbles accumulate, `blinding' regions of the fuel cell. This problem is fundamentally similar to water management in hydrogen fuel cells but with a gas/liquid phase inversion. Gas bubbles move laterally through the porous GDL and emerge to form large bubbles within the

  10. Electrically Conductive, Hydrophilic Porous Membrane for Fuel Cell Applications Project

    Data.gov (United States)

    National Aeronautics and Space Administration — This Phase I effort seeks to produce a conductive polyethersulfone (PES) microporous membrane for fuel cell water management applications. This membrane will...

  11. A 3D FINITE ELEMENT ANALYSIS OF INCOMPRESSIBLE FLUID FLOW AND CONTAMINANT TRANSPORT THROUGH A POROUS LANDFILL

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ADEGUN, I. K.

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available The paper investigated the flow of incompressible fluid and contaminant transport through a Porous Landfill using a numerical technique. A threedimensional finite element analysis technique was adopted for the solution. The problem was based on the Darcy’s Law and the Advection-Dispersion equation. The solutions of the Darcy’s and Advection-Dispersion equations were generated using Finite Element Analysis Software known as COMSOL Multiphysics. This simulation tool tracked the contaminant transport in the Landfill for 360 days at 10 days interval. It first modeled steady-state fluid flow by employing the Darcy’s Law Application Mode and then followed up with a transient solute-transport simulation by employing the Solute-Transport Application Mode from the Earth Science Module of COMSOL. The solution results obtained from this model were found to be in close agreement with reallife data obtained at the 130- million ton Bukit Tagar Mega Sanitary Landfill site, Selangor near Kuala Lumpur, Malaysia. This showed that the model can effectively predict the trends in the distributions of pollutants from a Municipal Solid Waste Landfill into nearby land and water sources. The model is thus applicable to the issues of environmental protection and safety of groundwater.

  12. Comparative assessment of continuum-scale models of bimolecular reactive transport in porous media under pre-asymptotic conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Porta, G. M.; Ceriotti, G.; Thovert, J.-F.

    2016-02-01

    We compare the ability of various continuum-scale models to reproduce the key features of a transport setting associated with a bimolecular reaction taking place in the fluid phase and numerically simulated at the pore-scale level in a disordered porous medium. We start by considering a continuum-scale formulation which results from formal upscaling of this reactive transport process by means of volume averaging. The resulting (upscaled) continuum-scale system of equations includes nonlocal integro-differential terms and the effective parameters embedded in the model are quantified directly through computed pore-scale fluid velocity and pore space geometry attributes. The results obtained through this predictive model formulation are then compared against those provided by available effective continuum models which require calibration through parameter estimation. Our analysis considers two models recently proposed in the literature which are designed to embed incomplete mixing arising from the presence of fast reactions under advection-dominated transport conditions. We show that best estimates of the parameters of these two models heavily depend on the type of data employed for model calibration. Our upscaled nonlocal formulation enables us to reproduce most of the critical features observed through pore-scale simulation without any model calibration. As such, our results clearly show that embedding into a continuum-scale model the information content associated with pore-scale geometrical features and fluid velocity yields improved interpretation of typically available continuum-scale transport observations.

  13. Fabrication and Characterization of Porous CdS/Dye Sensitized Solar Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Haider Abdulelah

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs are fabricated from porous cadmium sulfide (CdS nanocrystalline thin films. The porous CdS nanostructured thin films are deposited onto FTO/glass substrates by the chemical bath deposition (CBD method. The surface morphology, crystalline structure, and optical properties of the prepared nanocrystalline thin films are investigated. Rhodamine B, Malachite green, Eosin methylene blue, and Cresyl violet dyes are used to fabricate the DSSC devices. Comparing the absorption spectra of porous CdS nanocrystalline films, all dyes show an absorption peak in the transparent range of CdS thin films indicating that they are suitable for the preparation of DSSCs with CdS. Current-voltage (I-V characteristics show that the solar cell that is fabricated using Malachite green dye shows the highest conversion efficiency of 0.83% while using Rhodamine B dye produces a solar cell with lowest efficiency of 0.38%. However, heat treatment of the fabricated solar cells causes significant enhancement in the output of all devices.

  14. Biomimetic Coating on Porous Alumina for Tissue Engineering: Characterisation by Cell Culture and Confocal Microscopy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elizabeth Kolos

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available In this study porous alumina samples were prepared and then coated using the biomimetic coating technique using a five times Simulated Body Fluid (5.0SBF as the growth solution. A coating was achieved after pre-treatment with concentrated acid. From elemental analysis, the coating contained calcium and phosphorous, but also sodium and chlorine. Halite was identified by XRD, a sodium chloride phase. Sintering was done to remove the halite phase. Once halite was burnt off, the calcium phosphate crystals were not covered with halite and, therefore, the apatite phases can be clearly observed. Cell culturing showed sufficient cell attachment to the less porous alumina, Sample B, that has more calcium phosphate growth, while the porous alumina, Sample A, with minimal calcium phosphate growth attained very little cell attachment. This is likely due to the contribution that calcium phosphate plays in the attachment of bone-like cells to a bioinert ceramic such as alumina. These results were repeated on both SEM and confocal microscopy analysis. Confocal microscopy was a novel characterisation approach which gave useful information and was a visual aid.

  15. Networks of neuroblastoma cells on porous silicon substrates reveal a small world topology

    KAUST Repository

    Marinaro, Giovanni

    2015-01-01

    The human brain is a tightly interweaving network of neural cells where the complexity of the network is given by the large number of its constituents and its architecture. The topological structure of neurons in the brain translates into its increased computational capabilities, low energy consumption, and nondeterministic functions, which differentiate human behavior from artificial computational schemes. In this manuscript, we fabricated porous silicon chips with a small pore size ranging from 8 to 75 nm and large fractal dimensions up to Df ∼ 2.8. In culturing neuroblastoma N2A cells on the described substrates, we found that those cells adhere more firmly to and proliferate on the porous surfaces compared to the conventional nominally flat silicon substrates, which were used as controls. More importantly, we observed that N2A cells on the porous substrates create highly clustered, small world topology patterns. We conjecture that neurons with a similar architecture may elaborate information more efficiently than in random or regular grids. Moreover, we hypothesize that systems of neurons on nano-scale geometry evolve in time to form networks in which the propagation of information is maximized. This journal is

  16. Mechanisms of Pathogen and Surrogate Transport in Porous Media: Concurrent Effects of Grain Characteristics, NOM and Ionic Strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Emelko, M. B.; Stimson, J.; McLellan, N.; Tufenkji, N.

    2009-05-01

    It is widely accepted that riverbank filtration (RBF) can provide substantial reductions in the concentrations of both microbial and chemical contaminants while providing more consistent water quality to subsequent treatment processes. Factors such as experimental scale, subsurface heterogeneity, and variable flow paths and fluxes have made it difficult to relate laboratory outcomes to field performance. Field studies have been plagued with inadequate consideration of ground water flow, reliance on unproven "surrogate" parameters, non-detects at the extraction well, and limited sampling. As a result, a treatment-technique type of approach has been utilized to describe subsurface and operational conditions that result in effective RBF. While it is generally understood that parameters such as ionic strength, the presence of natural organic matter (NOM), and media size and shape characteristics affect pathogen transport in porous media, one major limiting factor in the development of regulatory credits and predictive models is the lack of understanding of the concurrent effects of such parameters. To provide guidance for assessing the efficacy of RBF processes, the present investigation is focused on evaluating the concurrent effects of these parameters on pathogen transport in RBF environments. This work details the complete outcomes of a factorial experimental investigation of the concurrent impacts of the four parameters: ionic strength, NOM concentration, grain size, and uniformity coefficient on pathogen and surrogate transport in porous media. Duplicate column studies have been conducted to evaluate the transport of Cryptosporidium oocysts and Salmonella typhimurium bacteria in saturated sandy environments; PR772 bacteriophage, and 4.5 μm and 1.5 μm microspheres are also being used as surrogates for pathogen transport. The strain of Salmonella was selected due to the direct link to human illness in the Grand River watershed. Preliminary results indicate that

  17. DOE perspective on fuel cells in transportation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kost, R.

    1996-04-01

    Fuel cells are one of the most promising technologies for meeting the rapidly growing demand for transportation services while minimizing adverse energy and environmental impacts. This paper reviews the benefits of introducing fuel cells into the transportation sector; in addition to dramatically reduced vehicle emissions, fuel cells offer the flexibility than use petroleum-based or alternative fuels, have significantly greater energy efficiency than internal combustion engines, and greatly reduce noise levels during operation. The rationale leading to the emphasis on proton-exchange-membrane fuel cells for transportation applications is reviewed as are the development issues requiring resolution to achieve adequate performance, packaging, and cost for use in automobiles. Technical targets for power density, specific power, platinum loading on the electrodes, cost, and other factors that become increasingly more demanding over time have been established. Fuel choice issues and pathways to reduced costs and to a renewable energy future are explored. One such path initially introduces fuel cell vehicles using reformed gasoline while-on-board hydrogen storage technology is developed to the point of allowing adequate range (350 miles) and refueling convenience. This scenario also allows time for renewable hydrogen production technologies and the required supply infrastructure to develop. Finally, the DOE Fuel Cells in Transportation program is described. The program, whose goal is to establish the technology for fuel cell vehicles as rapidly as possible, is being implemented by means of the United States Fuel Cell Alliance, a Government-industry alliance that includes Detroit`s Big Three automakers, fuel cell and other component suppliers, the national laboratories, and universities.

  18. Nano-hydroxyapatite colloid suspension coated on chemically modified porous silicon by cathodic bias: a suitable surface for cell culture

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sanchez, Alejandra [Escuela de Quimica, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Centro de Electroquimica y Energia Quimica de la Universidad de Costa Rica (CELEQ), Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Gonzalez, Jerson [Escuela de Quimica, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Garcia-Pineres, Alfonso [Escuela de Quimica, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Centro de Investigacion en Biologia Celular y Molecular (CIBCM), Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Montero, Mavis L. [Escuela de Quimica, Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Centro de Electroquimica y Energia Quimica de la Universidad de Costa Rica (CELEQ), Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica); Centro de Ciencia e Ingenieria en Materiales (CICIMA), Universidad de Costa Rica, 2060 (Costa Rica)

    2011-06-15

    The properties of porous silicon make it an interesting material for biological applications. However, porous silicon is not an appropriate surface for cell growth. Surface modification is an alternative that could afford a bioactive material. In this work, we report a method to yield materials by modification of the porous silicon surface with hydroxyapatite of nanometric dimensions, produced using an electrochemical process and coated on macroporous silicon substrates by cathodic bias. The chemical nature of the calcium phosphate deposited on the substrates after the experimental process and the amount of cell growth on these surfaces were characterized. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. Effects of starvation on the transport of Escherichia coli K12 in saturated porous media are dependent on pH and ionic strength

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, S.; Walczak, J. J.; Wang, L.; Bardy, S. L.; Li, J.

    2010-12-01

    In this research, we investigate the effects of starvation on the transport of E. coli K12 in saturated porous media. Particularly, we examine the relationship between such effects and the pH and ionic strength of the electrolyte solutions that were used to suspend bacterial cells. E. coli K12 (ATCC 10798) cells were cultured using either Luria-Bertani Miller (LB-Miller) broth (10 g trypton, 5 g yeast extract and 10 g NaCl in 1 L of deionized water) or LB-Luria broth (10 g tryptone, 5 g yeast extract and 0.5 g NaCl in 1 L of deionized water). Both broths had similar pH (~7.1) but differed in ionic strength (LB-Miller: ~170 mM, LB-Luria: ~ 8 mM). The bacterial cells were then harvested and suspended using one of the following electrolyte solutions: phosphate buffered saline (PBS) (pH ~7.2; ionic strength ~170 mM), 168 mM NaCl (pH ~5.7), 5% of PBS (pH ~ 7.2; ionic strength ~ 8 mM) and 8 mM NaCl (pH ~ 5.7). Column transport experiments were performed at 0, 21 and 48 hours following cell harvesting to evaluate the change in cell mobility over time under “starvation” conditions. Our results showed that 1) starvation increased the mobility of E. coli K12 cells; 2) the most significant change in mobility occurred when bacterial cells were suspended in an electrolyte solution that had different pH and ionic strength (i.e., LB-Miller culture suspended in 8 mM NaCl and LB-Luria culture suspended in 168 mM Nacl); and 3) the change in cell mobility primarily occurred within the first 21 hours. The size of the bacterial cells was measured and the surface properties (e.g., zeta potential, hydrophobicity, cell-bound protein, LPS sugar content, outer membrane protein profiles) of the bacterial cells were characterized. We found that the measured cell surface properties could not fully explain the observed changes in cell mobility caused by starvation.

  20. Initial stem cell adhesion on porous silicon surface: molecular architecture of actin cytoskeleton and filopodial growth

    Science.gov (United States)

    Collart-Dutilleul, Pierre-Yves; Panayotov, Ivan; Secret, Emilie; Cunin, Frédérique; Gergely, Csilla; Cuisinier, Frédéric; Martin, Marta

    2014-10-01

    The way cells explore their surrounding extracellular matrix (ECM) during development and migration is mediated by lamellipodia at their leading edge, acting as an actual motor pulling the cell forward. Lamellipodia are the primary area within the cell of actin microfilaments (filopodia) formation. In this work, we report on the use of porous silicon (pSi) scaffolds to mimic the ECM of mesenchymal stem cells from the dental pulp (DPSC) and breast cancer (MCF-7) cells. Our atomic force microscopy (AFM), fluorescence microscopy, and scanning electron microscopy (SEM) results show that pSi promoted the appearance of lateral filopodia protruding from the DPSC cell body and not only in the lamellipodia area. The formation of elongated lateral actin filaments suggests that pores provided the necessary anchorage points for protrusion growth. Although MCF-7 cells displayed a lower presence of organized actin network on both pSi and nonporous silicon, pSi stimulated the formation of extended cell protrusions.

  1. Plant Production Systems for Microgravity: Critical Issues in Water, Air, and Solute Transport Through Unsaturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinberg, Susan L. (Editor); Ming, Doug W. (Editor); Henninger, Don (Editor)

    2002-01-01

    This NASA Technical Memorandum is a compilation of presentations and discussions in the form of minutes from a workshop entitled 'Plant Production Systems for Microgravity: Critical Issues in Water, Air, and Solute Transport Through Unsaturated Porous Media' held at NASA's Johnson Space Center, July 24-25, 2000. This workshop arose from the growing belief within NASA's Advanced Life Support Program that further advances and improvements in plant production systems for microgravity would benefit from additional knowledge of fundamental processes occurring in the root zone. The objective of the workshop was to bring together individuals who had expertise in various areas of fluid physics, soil physics, plant physiology, hardware development, and flight tests to identify, discuss, and prioritize critical issues of water and air flow through porous media in microgravity. Participants of the workshop included representatives from private companies involved in flight hardware development and scientists from universities and NASA Centers with expertise in plant flight tests, plant physiology, fluid physics, and soil physics.

  2. Effect of radiation and magnetic field on peristaltic transport of nanofluids through a porous space in a tapered asymmetric channel

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kothandapani, M., E-mail: mkothandapani@gmail.com [Department of Mathematics, University College of Engineering Arni, (A Constituent College of Anna University Chennai), Arni 632326, Tamil Nadu (India); Prakash, J., E-mail: prakashjayavel@yahoo.co.in [Department of Mathematics, Arulmigu Meenakshi Amman College of Engineering, Vadamavandal 604410, Tamil Nadu (India)

    2015-03-15

    Theoretical analyses on the effect of radiation and MHD on the peristaltic flow of a nanofluid through a porous medium in a two dimensional tapered asymmetric channel has been made. The nanofluid is assumed to be electrically conducting in the presence of a uniform magnetic field. The transport equation accounts the both Brownian motion and thermophoresis along with the radiation reaction. The problem has been further simplified with the authentic assumptions of long wavelength and small Reynolds number. The analytical expressions obtained for the axial velocity, stream function, temperature field, nanoparticle fraction field and pressure gradient provide satisfactory explanation. Influence of various parameters on the flow characteristics have been discussed with the help of graphical results. The trapping phenomenon has also been discussed in detail. - Highlights: • Combine effect of thermal radiation and MHD on the peristaltic flow of a Newtonian nanofluid are discussed. • This work may be first attempt dealing the study of Newtonian nanofluid flow in the porous tapered asymmetric channel. • The velocity, stream function, temperature field and nanoparticle fraction field provide satisfactory explanation with help of graphs.

  3. Fuel cell assembly with electrolyte transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chi, Chang V.

    1983-01-01

    A fuel cell assembly wherein electrolyte for filling the fuel cell matrix is carried via a transport system comprising a first passage means for conveying electrolyte through a first plate and communicating with a groove in a second plate at a first point, the first and second plates together sandwiching the matrix, and second passage means acting to carry electrolyte exclusively through the second plate and communicating with the groove at a second point exclusive of the first point.

  4. Influence of Motility and Chemotaxis on Transport Properties for Swimming Bacteria in Porous Media under Static and Flow Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, J.; Long, T.; Ford, R. M.

    2009-12-01

    In-situ bioremediation is an effective method to reduce groundwater contamination. Understanding bacterial swimming behaviors in the subsurface can facilitate its application and improve the remediation efficiency. Many motile bacteria that are able to degrade chemical contaminants in groundwater are also able to sense increasing concentrations of these chemicals and swim preferentially towards sources of the contamination, a phenomenon known as chemotaxis. According to several published studies, a single bacterium appears to idle near the granular surface for an extended period of time exhibiting no translational motion until it reorients in a direction that allows itself to swim away from the surface. In this study, the bacterial breakthrough curves (BTCs) measured from a packed column with 1 m/day averaged linear velocity revealed that the motile smooth-swimming mutants E. coli HCB437 displayed BTCs with greater retardation than the motile wild-type bacterial strains E. coli HCB1, which were more retarded than those of the non-motile control E. coli HCB137, as these three bacterial strains exhibit a decreasing degree of surface association with the solid particles. To investigate bacterial chemotaxis within porous media without flow, a modified capillary assay was conducted to observe the migration behaviors of wild-type bacterial strain E. coli HCB1 at the interface between an aqueous solution and a Gelrite particulate suspension, the model porous medium, which contained 0.1 mM α-methylaspartate as the chemoattractant. The experimental results indicated that chemotactic bacteria not only had a larger accumulation at the porous media interface but also exhibited a more significant degree of penetration into the porous media region than in the experiments performed without chemoattractants. In addition, computer simulations using a Monte Carlo algorithm further revealed that chemotactic bacteria were inclined to be less associated with the solid surface in the

  5. Study on hydraulics and transport in heterogeneous porous media (III). 1998 annual report of advanced engineering research

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jinno, K. [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan). Faculty of Engineering; Nakagawa, Tosao [Kyushu Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Hosokawa, Kei [Kyushu Industrial Univ., Fukuoka (Japan); Hatanaka, K.; Ijiri, Yuji; Uchida, M. [Japan Nuclear Cycle Development Inst., Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan); Watari, S. [CRC Research Inst. Inc., Tokyo (Japan); Kanazawa, Y. [IDC, Tokai, Ibaraki (Japan)

    1999-06-01

    In computerized simulation for nuclide migration in an underground disposal system of high-level radioactive wastes, one of the key parameters is macroscopic dispersion coefficients which is known to depend on local hydraulic parameters such as permeability. This study aims to clarify fundamental aspect of effective diffusive flows of contaminants in heterogeneously permeable media. A cooperative study between Kyushu University and JNC started in 1996, The report describes the validity of the present numerical calculation model for transport behaviors using laboratory data, the applicability of the present method to geological environments of heterogeneous porous media having different permeability, and the comparison of numerical results obtained using the present method with the results reported from the field test held at Horkheimer Insel, Germany, using tracer injection technique and measurements at several observation wells. (S. Ohno)

  6. Numerical modeling of contaminant transport in fractured porous media using mixed finite-element and finitevolume methods

    KAUST Repository

    Dong, Chen

    2011-01-01

    A mathematical model for contaminant species passing through fractured porous media is presented. In the numerical model, we combine two locally conservative methods; i.e., the mixed finite-element (MFE) method and the finite-volume method. Adaptive triangle mesh is used for effective treatment of the fractures. A hybrid MFE method is employed to provide an accurate approximation of velocity fields for both the fractures and matrix, which are crucial to the convection part of the transport equation. The finite-volume method and the standard MFE method are used to approximate the convection and dispersion terms, respectively. The temporary evolution for the pressure distributions, streamline fields, and concentration profiles are obtained for six different arrangements of fractures. The results clearly show the distorted concentration effects caused by the ordered and disordered (random) patterns of the fractures and illustrate the robustness and efficiency of the proposed numerical model. © 2011 by Begell House Inc.

  7. Dynamic wettability alteration in immiscible two-phase flow in porous media: Effect on transport properties and critical slowing down

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vegard eFlovik

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available The change in contact angles due to the injection of low salinity water or any other wettability altering agent in an oil-rich porous medium is modeled by a network model of disordered pores transporting two immiscible fluids. We introduce a dynamic wettability altering mechanism, where the time dependent wetting property of each pore is determined by the cumulative flow of water through it. Simulations are performed to reach steady-state for different possible alterations in the wetting angle (θ. We find that deviation from oil-wet conditions re-mobilizes the stuck clusters and increases the oil fractional flow. However, the rate of increase in the fractional flow depends strongly on θ and as θ → 90◦ , a critical angle, the system shows critical slowing down which is characterized by two dynamic critical exponents.

  8. Dynamic wettability alteration in immiscible two-phase flow in porous media: Effect on transport properties and critical slowing down

    CERN Document Server

    Flovik, Vegard; Hansen, Alex

    2015-01-01

    The change in contact angles due to the injection of low salinity water or any other wettability altering agent in an oil-rich porous medium is modeled by a network model of disordered pores transporting two immiscible fluids. We introduce a dynamic wettability altering mechanism, where the time dependent wetting property of each pore is determined by the cumulative flow of water through it. Simulations are performed to reach steady-state for different possible alterations in the wetting angle ($\\theta$). We find that deviation from oil-wet conditions re-mobilizes the stuck clusters and increases the oil fractional flow. However, the rate of increase in the fractional flow depends strongly on $\\theta$ and as $\\theta\\to 90^\\circ$, a critical angle, the system shows critical slowing down which is characterized by two dynamic critical exponents.

  9. Role of non-ideality for the ion transport in porous media: derivation of the macroscopic equations using upscaling

    CERN Document Server

    Allaire, Gregoire; Dufreche, Jean-Francois; Mikelic, Andro; Piatnitski, Andrey

    2013-01-01

    This paper is devoted to the homogenization (or upscaling) of a system of partial differential equations describing the non-ideal transport of a N-component electrolyte in a dilute Newtonian solvent through a rigid porous medium. Realistic non-ideal effects are taken into account by an approach based on the mean spherical approximation (MSA) model which takes into account finite size ions and screening effects. We first consider equilibrium solutions in the absence of external forces. In such a case, the velocity and diffusive fluxes vanish and the equilibrium electrostatic potential is the solution of a variant of Poisson-Boltzmann equation coupled with algebraic equations. Contrary to the ideal case, this nonlinear equation has no monotone structure. However, based on invariant region estimates for Poisson-Boltzmann equation and for small characteristic value of the solute packing fraction, we prove existence of at least one solution. To our knowledge this existence result is new at this level of generality...

  10. Ionic Diffusion and Kinetic Homogeneous Chemical Reactions in the Pore Solution of Porous Materials with Moisture Transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Johannesson, Björn

    2009-01-01

    Results from a systematic continuum mixture theory will be used to establish the governing equations for ionic diffusion and chemical reactions in the pore solution of a porous material subjected to moisture transport. The theory in use is the hybrid mixture theory (HMT), which in its general form...... general description of chemical reactions among constituents is described. The Petrov – Galerkin approach are used in favour of the standard Galerkin weighting in order to improve the solution when the convective part of the problem is dominant. A modified type of Newton – Raphson scheme is derived...... for the non-linear global matrix formulation. The developed model and its numerical solution procedure are checked by running test examples which results demonstrates robustness of the proposed approach....

  11. Transport and Retention of TiO2 Rutile Nanoparticles in Saturated Porous Media: Influence of Solution pH, Ionic Strength, and the Presence of Humic Acid

    Science.gov (United States)

    The influence of solution pH, ionic strength, and varying concentrations of the Suwannee River Humic Acid (SRHA) on the transport of titanium dioxide (TiO2, rutile) nanoparticle aggregates (nTiO2) in saturated porous media was investigated through systematically examining the tra...

  12. Development of Modeling Methods and Tools for Predicting Coupled Reactive Transport Processes in Porous Media at Multiple Scales

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Clement, T Prabhakar; Barnett, Mark O; Zheng, Chunmiao; Jones, Norman L

    2010-05-05

    DE-FG02-06ER64213: Development of Modeling Methods and Tools for Predicting Coupled Reactive Transport Processes in Porous Media at Multiple Scales Investigators: T. Prabhakar Clement (PD/PI) and Mark O. Barnett (Auburn), Chunmiao Zheng (Univ. of Alabama), and Norman L. Jones (BYU). The objective of this project was to develop scalable modeling approaches for predicting the reactive transport of metal contaminants. We studied two contaminants, a radioactive cation [U(VI)] and a metal(loid) oxyanion system [As(III/V)], and investigated their interactions with two types of subsurface materials, iron and manganese oxyhydroxides. We also developed modeling methods for describing the experimental results. Overall, the project supported 25 researchers at three universities. Produced 15 journal articles, 3 book chapters, 6 PhD dissertations and 6 MS theses. Three key journal articles are: 1) Jeppu et al., A scalable surface complexation modeling framework for predicting arsenate adsorption on goethite-coated sands, Environ. Eng. Sci., 27(2): 147-158, 2010. 2) Loganathan et al., Scaling of adsorption reactions: U(VI) experiments and modeling, Applied Geochemistry, 24 (11), 2051-2060, 2009. 3) Phillippi, et al., Theoretical solid/solution ratio effects on adsorption and transport: uranium (VI) and carbonate, Soil Sci. Soci. of America, 71:329-335, 2007

  13. Some robust numerical methods for flow and transport in porous media; Quelques methodes numeriques robustes pour l'ecoulement et le transport en milieu poreux

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sboui, A

    2007-01-15

    The aim of this thesis is to model and develop numerical tools adapted to study underground water flow and the propagation of pollutants in a porous medium. The main motivation of this work is a benchmark from GDR Momas and ANDRA to simulate the 3-D propagation of radionuclides around a deep disposal of nuclear waste. Firstly, we construct a new mixed finite elements method suitable for general hexahedral meshes. Convergence of the method is proved and shown in numerical experiments. Secondly, we present a method of time discretization for the advection equation which allows for the use of different time steps in different sub-domains in order to take into account of strong heterogeneities. Finally a numerical method for the calculation of the transport of contaminants is proposed. The techniques above were implemented in a 3-D code and simulation results are shown on the 3-D far field benchmark from GDR Momas and ANDRA. (author)

  14. Use of Electrophoresis for Transporting Nano-Iron in Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Research was conducted to evaluate if electrophoresis could transport surface stabilized nanoscale zero-valent iron (nZVI) through fine grained sand with the intent of remediating a contaminant in situ. The experimental procedure involved determining the transport rates of poly...

  15. Influence Of pH On The Transport Of Nanoscale Zinc Oxide In Saturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Widespread use of nanoscale zinc oxide (nZnO) in various fields causes subsurface environment contamination. Even though the transport of dissolved zinc ions in subsurface environments such as soils and sediments has been widely studied, the transport mechanism of nZnO in such e...

  16. Additively Manufactured Open-Cell Porous Biomaterials Made from Six Different Space-Filling Unit Cells: The Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Ahmadi, S.M.; Yavari, S.A.; Wauthle, R.; Pouran, B.; Schrooten, J.; Weinans, H.; Zadpoor, A.A.

    2015-01-01

    It is known that the mechanical properties of bone-mimicking porous biomaterials are a function of the morphological properties of the porous structure, including the configuration and size of the repeating unit cell from which they are made. However, the literature on this topic is limited, primari

  17. Fast Response, Open-Celled Porous, Shape Memory Effect Actuators with Integrated Attachments

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jardine, Andrew Peter (Inventor)

    2015-01-01

    This invention relates to the exploitation of porous foam articles exhibiting the Shape Memory Effect as actuators. Each foam article is composed of a plurality of geometric shapes, such that some geometric shapes can fit snugly into or around rigid mating connectors that attach the Shape Memory foam article intimately into the load path between a static structure and a moveable structure. The foam is open-celled, composed of a plurality of interconnected struts whose mean diameter can vary from approximately 50 to 500 microns. Gases and fluids flowing through the foam transfer heat rapidly with the struts, providing rapid Shape Memory Effect transformations. Embodiments of porous foam articles as torsional actuators and approximately planar structures are disposed. Simple, integral connection systems exploiting the ability to supply large loads to a structure, and that can also supply hot and cold gases and fluids to effect rapid actuation are also disposed.

  18. Mechanical grooving of oxidized porous silicon to reduce the reflectivity of monocrystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zarroug, A.; Dimassi, W.; Ouertani, R.; Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, Centre des Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, BP. 95, Hammam-Lif 2050 (Tunisia)

    2012-10-15

    In this work, we are interested to use oxidized porous silicon (ox-PS) as a mask. So, we display the creating of a rough surface which enhances the absorption of incident light by solar cells and reduces the reflectivity of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si). It clearly can be seen that the mechanical grooving enables us to elaborate the texturing of monocrystalline silicon wafer. Results demonstrated that the application of a PS layer followed by a thermal treatment under O2 ambient easily gives us an oxide layer of uniform size which can vary from a nanometer to about ten microns. In addition, the Fourier transform infrared (FTIR) spectroscopy investigations of the PS layer illustrates the possibility to realize oxide layer as a mask for porous silicon. We found also that this simple and low cost method decreases the total reflectivity (copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  19. A monolithic integrated micro direct methanol fuel cell based on sulfo functionalized porous silicon

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, M.; Lu, Y. X.; Liu, L. T.; Wang, X. H.

    2016-11-01

    In this paper, we demonstrate a monolithic integrated micro direct methanol fuel cell (μDMFC) for the first time. The monolithic integrated μDMFC combines proton exchange membrane (PEM) and Pt nanocatalysts, in which PEM is achieved by the functionalized porous silicon membrane and 3D Pt nanoflowers being synthesized in situ on it as catalysts. Sulfo groups functionalized porous silicon membrane serves as a PEM and a catalyst support simultaneously. The μDMFC prototype achieves an open circuit voltage of 0.3 V, a maximum power density of 5.5 mW/cm2. The monolithic integrated μDMFC offers several desirable features such as compatibility with micro fabrication techniques, an undeformable solid PEM and the convenience of assembly.

  20. Porous polylactic acid-silica hybrids: preparation, characterization, and study of mesenchymal stem cell osteogenic differentiation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandis, Christos; Trujillo, Sara; Matos, Joana; Madeira, Sara; Ródenas-Rochina, Joaquín; Kripotou, Sotiria; Kyritsis, Apostolos; Mano, João F; Gómez Ribelles, José Luis

    2015-02-01

    A novel approach to reinforce polymer porous membranes is presented. In the prepared hybrid materials, the inorganic phase of silica is synthesized in-situ and inside the pores of aminolyzed polylactic acid (PLA) membranes by sol-gel reactions using tetraethylorthosilicate (TEOS) and glycidoxypropyltrimethoxysilane (GPTMS) as precursors. The hybrid materials present a porous structure with a silica layer covering the walls of the pores while GPTMS serves also as coupling agent between the organic and inorganic phase. The adjustment of silica precursors ratio allows the modulation of the thermomechanical properties. Culture of mesenchymal stem cells on these supports in osteogenic medium shows the expression of characteristic osteoblastic markers and the mineralization of the extracellular matrix.

  1. Controlled skeletal progenitor cell migration on nanostructured porous silicon/silicon micropatterns

    Science.gov (United States)

    Torres-Costa, V.; Sánchez-Vaquero, V.; Muñoz-Noval, Á.; González-Méndez, L.; Punzón-Quijorna, E.; Gallach-Pérez, D.; Manso-Silván, M.; Martínez-Muñoz, G.; Climent-Font, A.; García-Ruiz, J. P.; Martín-Palma, R. J.

    2011-10-01

    In this work nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) was used for the fabrication of surface micropatterns aiming at controlling cell adhesion and migration. In particular, surface patterns of nanoPS and Si were engineered by high-energy ion-beam irradiation and subsequent anodization. It was found that human skeletal progenitor cells are sensitive to oneand two-dimensional patterns and that focal adhesion is inhibited on nanoPS areas. In spite of this anti-fouling characteristics, studies on patterns with reduced Si areas show that cells conform to nanoPS pathways favoring migration through cell protrusion, body translocation and tail retraction from two parallel Si traction rails. Moreover, migration can be blocked and cells tend to arrange when grid patterns with the appropriate dimensions are fabricated. The experimental results confirm that progenitor cells are able to exploit nanoPS anti-fouling designs by adapting to it for migration purposes.

  2. Data on bone marrow stem cells delivery using porous polymer scaffold

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramasatyaveni Geesala

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available Low bioavailability and/or survival at the injury site of transplanted stem cells necessitate its delivery using a biocompatible, biodegradable cell delivery vehicle. In this dataset, we report the application of a porous biocompatible, biodegradable polymer network that successfully delivers bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs at the wound site of a murine excisional splint wound model. In this data article, we are providing the additional data of the reference article “Porous polymer scaffold for on-site delivery of stem cells – protects from oxidative stress and potentiates wound tissue repair” (Ramasatyaveni et al., 2016 [1]. This data consists of the characterization of bone marrow stem cells (BMSCs showing the pluripotency and stem cell-specific surface markers. Image analysis of the cellular penetration into PEG–PU polymer network and the mechanism via enzymatic activation of MMP-2 and MMP-13 are reported. In addition, we provide a comparison of various routes of transplantation-mediated BMSCs engraftment in the murine model using bone marrow transplantation chimeras. Furthermore, we included in this dataset the engraftment of BMSCs expressing Sca-1+Lin−CD133+CD90.2+ in post-surgery day 10.

  3. Superfast non-linear diffusion: Capillary transport in particulate porous media

    CERN Document Server

    Lukyanov, A V; Baines, M J; Theofanous, T G

    2013-01-01

    The migration of liquids in porous media, such as sand, has been commonly considered at high saturation levels with liquid pathways at pore dimensions. In this letter we reveal a low saturation regime observed in our experiments with droplets of extremely low volatility liquids deposited on sand. In this regime the liquid is mostly found within the grain surface roughness and in the capillary bridges formed at the contacts between the grains. The bridges act as variable-volume reservoirs and the flow is driven by the capillary pressure arising at the wetting front according to the roughness length scales. We propose that this migration (spreading) is the result of interplay between the bridge volume adjustment to this pressure distribution and viscous losses of a creeping flow within the roughness. The net macroscopic result is a special case of non-linear diffusion described by a superfast diffusion equation (SFDE) for saturation with distinctive mathematical character. We obtain solutions to a moving bounda...

  4. Transepithelial transport of aliphatic carboxylic acids studied in Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, M J; Adson, A; Kezdy, F J

    1990-04-01

    Transport of 14C-labeled acetic, propionic (PA), butyric, valeric, heptanoic (HA), and octanoic (OA) acids across the Madin Darby canine kidney (MDCK) epithelial cell monolayer grown on a porous polycarbonate membrane was studied in Hanks' balanced salt solution (HBSS) at 37 degrees C in both apical-to-basolateral and basolateral-to-apical directions. At micromolar concentrations of solutes, metabolic decomposition was significant as evidenced by [14C]CO2 production during the OA transport. The apparent permeability (Pe) indicates that as lipophilicity increases, diffusion across the "unstirred" boundary layer becomes rate limiting. In support of this notion, transport of OA and HA was enhanced by agitation, showed an activation energy of 3.7 kcal/mol for OA, and resulted in identical Pe values for both transport directions. Analysis of Pe changes with varying alkyl chain length resulted in a delta G of -0.68 +/- 0.09 kcal/mol for -CH2-group transfer from an aqueous phase to the MDCK cells. When the intercellular tight junctions were opened by the divalent chelator EGTA in Ca2+/Mg2(+)-free HBSS, transport of the fluid-phase marker Lucifer yellow greatly increased because of paracellular leakage. PA transport also showed a significant increase, but OA transport was independent of EGTA. Although albumin also undergoes paracellular transport in the presence of EGTA and OA binds strongly to albumin, OA transport in EGTA solution was unchanged by albumin. These observations indicate that transmembrane transport is the major mechanism for lipophilic substances. The present study, together with earlier work on the transport of polar substances, shows that the MDCK cell monolayer is an excellent model of the transepithelial transport barrier.

  5. Real-time sensing of epithelial cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions by impedance spectroscopy on porous substrates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mondal, D.; RoyChaudhuri, C., E-mail: chirosreepram@yahoo.com [Department of Electronics and Telecommunication Engineering, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India); Pal, D. [Department of Aerospace Engineering and Applied Mechanics, Indian Institute of Engineering Science and Technology, Shibpur, Howrah 711103 (India)

    2015-07-28

    Oxidized porous silicon (PS) is a common topographical biocompatible substrate that potentially provides a distinct in vitro environment for better understanding of in vivo behavior. But in the reported studies on oxidized PS, cell-cell and cell-substrate interactions have been detected only by fluorescent labeling. This paper is the first attempt to investigate real-time sensing of these interactions on HaCaT cells by label-free impedance spectroscopy on oxidized PS of two pore diameters (50 and 500 nm). One of the major requirements for successful impedance spectroscopy measurement is to restrict the channeling of electric field lines through the pores. To satisfy this criterion, we have designed the pore depths after analyzing the penetration of the medium by using computational fluid dynamics simulation. A distributed electrical model was also developed for estimating the various cellular attributes by considering a pseudorandom distribution of pores. It is observed from the impedance measurements and from the model that the proliferation rate increases for 50 nm pores but decreases for 500 nm pores compared to that for planar substrates. The rate of decrease in cell substrate separation (h) in the initial stage is more than the rate of increase in cell-cell junction resistance (R{sub b}) corresponding to the initial adhesion phase of cells. It is observed that R{sub b} and h are higher for 50 nm pores than those for planar substrates, corresponding to the fact that substrates more conducive toward cell adhesion encourage cell-cell interactions than direct cell-substrate interactions. Thus, the impedance spectroscopy coupled with the proposed theoretical framework for PS substrates can sense and quantify the cellular interactions.

  6. Solute transport predicts scaling of surface reaction rates in porous media: Applications to silicate weathering

    CERN Document Server

    Hunt, Allen G; Ghanbarian, Behzad

    2013-01-01

    We apply our theory of conservative solute transport, based on concepts from percolation theory, directly and without modification to reactive solute transport. This theory has previously been shown to predict the observed range of dispersivity values for conservative solute transport over ten orders of magnitude of length scale. We now show that the temporal dependence derived for the solute velocity accurately predicts the time-dependence for the weathering of silicate minerals over nine orders of magnitude of time scale, while its predicted length dependence agrees with data obtained for reaction rates over five orders of magnitude of length scale. In both cases, it is possible to unify lab and field results. Thus, net reaction rates appear to be limited by solute transport velocities. We suggest the possible relevance of our results to landscape evolution of the earth's terrestrial surface.

  7. Experimental study on the two phase flow behavior in PEM fuel cell parallel channels with porous media inserts

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Jixin [Mechanical and Aerospace Engineering, University of California, Irvine, Irvine, CA 92697-3975 (United States)

    2010-02-15

    In this study, the air-water two phase flow behavior in PEM fuel cell parallel channels with porous media inserts was experimentally investigated using a self-designed and manufactured transparent assembly. The visualization images of the two phase flow in channels with porous media inserts were presented and three patterns were summarized. Compared with the traditional hollow channel design, the novel configuration featured less severe two phase flow mal-distribution and self-adjustment to water amount in channels, although a higher pressure drop was introduced due to the porous media inserts. The dominant frequency of pressure drop signal was found to be a diagnostic tool for water behavior in channels. The novel flow channel design with porous media inserts may become a solution to the water management problem in PEM fuel cells. (author)

  8. Experimental study on the two phase flow behavior in PEM fuel cell parallel channels with porous media inserts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jixin

    In this study, the air-water two phase flow behavior in PEM fuel cell parallel channels with porous media inserts was experimentally investigated using a self-designed and manufactured transparent assembly. The visualization images of the two phase flow in channels with porous media inserts were presented and three patterns were summarized. Compared with the traditional hollow channel design, the novel configuration featured less severe two phase flow mal-distribution and self-adjustment to water amount in channels, although a higher pressure drop was introduced due to the porous media inserts. The dominant frequency of pressure drop signal was found to be a diagnostic tool for water behavior in channels. The novel flow channel design with porous media inserts may become a solution to the water management problem in PEM fuel cells.

  9. Solid-Oxide Fuel Cell Electrode Microstructures: Making Sense of the Internal Framework Affecting Gas Transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hanna, Jeffrey

    Optimal electrodes for solid-oxide fuel cells will combine high porosity for gas diffusion, high phase connectivity for ion and electron conduction, and high surface area for chemical and electrochemical reactions. Tracer-diffusion simulations are used to gain a better understanding of the interplay between microstructure and transport in porous materials. Results indicate that the coefficient of diffusion through a porous medium is a function of the details of the internal geometry (microscopic) and porosity (macroscopic). I report that current solid-oxide fuel cell electrodes produced from high-temperature sintering of ceramic powders severely hinder gas transport because the resulting structures are highly tortuous, complex three-dimensional networks. In addition, poor phase connectivities will assuredly limit ion and electron transport, as well as the density of active sites for power-producing reactions. With new access to a wide range of technologies, micro- and nano-fabrication capabilities, and high-performance materials, there is a new ability to engineer the fuel cell electrode architecture, optimizing the physical processes within, increasing performance, and greatly reducing cost per kilowatt. Even simple packed-sphere and inverse-opal architectures will increase gas diffusion by an order of magnitude, and provide a higher level of connectivity than traditional powder-based structures.

  10. PHT3D-UZF: A reactive transport model for variably-saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wu, Ming Zhi; Post, Vincent E. A.; Salmon, S. Ursula; Morway, Eric; Prommer, H.

    2016-01-01

    A modified version of the MODFLOW/MT3DMS-based reactive transport model PHT3D was developed to extend current reactive transport capabilities to the variably-saturated component of the subsurface system and incorporate diffusive reactive transport of gaseous species. Referred to as PHT3D-UZF, this code incorporates flux terms calculated by MODFLOW's unsaturated-zone flow (UZF1) package. A volume-averaged approach similar to the method used in UZF-MT3DMS was adopted. The PHREEQC-based computation of chemical processes within PHT3D-UZF in combination with the analytical solution method of UZF1 allows for comprehensive reactive transport investigations (i.e., biogeochemical transformations) that jointly involve saturated and unsaturated zone processes. Intended for regional-scale applications, UZF1 simulates downward-only flux within the unsaturated zone. The model was tested by comparing simulation results with those of existing numerical models. The comparison was performed for several benchmark problems that cover a range of important hydrological and reactive transport processes. A 2D simulation scenario was defined to illustrate the geochemical evolution following dewatering in a sandy acid sulfate soil environment. Other potential applications include the simulation of biogeochemical processes in variably-saturated systems that track the transport and fate of agricultural pollutants, nutrients, natural and xenobiotic organic compounds and micropollutants such as pharmaceuticals, as well as the evolution of isotope patterns.

  11. Column experiments to investigate transport of colloidal humic acid through porous media during managed aquifer recharge

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Dan; Zhou, Jingjing; Zhang, Wenjing; Huan, Ying; Yu, Xipeng; Li, Fulin; Chen, Xuequn

    2016-09-01

    Colloids act as vectors for pollutants in groundwater, thereby creating a series of environmental problems. While managed aquifer recharge plays an important role in protecting groundwater resources and controlling land subsidence, it has a significant effect on the transport of colloids. In this study, particle size and zeta potential of colloidal humic acid (HA) have been measured to determine the effects of different hydrochemistry conditions. Column experiments were conducted to examine the effects on the transport of colloidal HA under varying conditions of pH (5, 7, 9), ionic strength (<0.0005, 0.02, 0.05 M), cation valence (Na+, Ca2+) and flow rate (0.1, 0.2, 0.4 ml/min) through collectors (glass beads) to model the properties and quality of artificial recharge water and changes in the hydrodynamic field. Breakthrough curves showed that the behavior of colloidal HA being transported varied depending on the conditions. Colloid transport was strongly influenced by hydrochemical and hydrodynamic conditions. With decreasing pH or increasing ionic strength, a decrease in the peak effluent concentration of colloidal HA and increase in deposition could be clearly seen. Comparison of different cation valence tests indicated that changes in transport and deposition were more pronounced with divalent Ca2+ than with monovalent Na+. Changes in hydrodynamic field (flow rate) also had an impact on transportation of colloidal HA. The results of this study highlight the need for further research in this area.

  12. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Amin Yavari, S; Chai, Y C; Böttger, A J; Wauthle, R; Schrooten, J; Weinans, H; Zadpoor, A A

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20V anodizing time: 30min to 3h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500°C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500°C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium.

  13. Analytical solutions Of three-dimensional contaminant transport in uniform flow field in porous media: A library

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hongtao WANG; Huayong WU

    2009-01-01

    The purpose of this study is to present a library of analytical solutions for the three-dimensional contam-inant transport in uniform flow field in porous media with the first-order decay, linear sorption, and zero-order pro-duction. The library is constructed using Green's function method (GFM) in combination with available solutions.The library covers a wide range of solutions for various conditions. The aquifer can be vertically finite, semi-infin-itive or infinitive, and laterally semi-infinitive or infinitive.The geometry of the sources can be of point, line, plane or volumetric body; and the source release can be continuous,instantaneous, or by following a given function over time.Dimensionless forms of the solutions are also proposed. A computer code FlowCAS is developed to calculate the solutions. Calculated results demonstrate the correctness of the presented solutions. The library is widely applicable to solve contaminant transport problems of one- or multiple- dimensions in uniform flow fields.

  14. Review of pore network modelling of porous media: Experimental characterisations, network constructions and applications to reactive transport

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiong, Qingrong; Baychev, Todor G.; Jivkov, Andrey P.

    2016-09-01

    Pore network models have been applied widely for simulating a variety of different physical and chemical processes, including phase exchange, non-Newtonian displacement, non-Darcy flow, reactive transport and thermodynamically consistent oil layers. The realism of such modelling, i.e. the credibility of their predictions, depends to a large extent on the quality of the correspondence between the pore space of a given medium and the pore network constructed as its representation. The main experimental techniques for pore space characterisation, including direct imaging, mercury intrusion porosimetry and gas adsorption, are firstly summarised. A review of the main pore network construction techniques is then presented. Particular focus is given on how such constructions are adapted to the data from experimentally characterised pore systems. Current applications of pore network models are considered, with special emphasis on the effects of adsorption, dissolution and precipitation, as well as biomass growth, on transport coefficients. Pore network models are found to be a valuable tool for understanding and predicting meso-scale phenomena, linking single pore processes, where other techniques are more accurate, and the homogenised continuum porous media, used by engineering community.

  15. Numerical research on the anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media with micron X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yong; Yue, Wenzheng; Zhang, Mo

    2016-06-01

    The anisotropic transport of thermal neutron in heterogeneous porous media is of great research interests in many fields. In this paper, it is the first time that a new model based on micron X-ray computed tomography (CT) has been proposed to simultaneously consider both the separation of matrix and pore and the distribution of mineral components. We apply the Monte Carlo method to simulate thermal neutrons transporting through the model along different directions, and meanwhile detect those unreacted thermal neutrons by an array detector on the other side of the model. Therefore, the anisotropy of pore structure can be imaged by the amount of received thermal neutrons, due to the difference of rock matrix and pore-filling fluids in the macroscopic reaction cross section (MRCS). The new model has been verified by the consistent between the simulated data and the pore distribution from X-ray CT. The results show that the evaluation of porosity can be affected by the anisotropy of media. Based on the research, a new formula is developed to describe the correlation between the resolution of array detectors and the quality of imaging. The formula can be further used to analyze the critical resolution and the suitable number of thermal neutrons emitted in each simulation. Unconventionally, we find that a higher resolution cannot always lead to a better image.

  16. Colloid-Mediated Transport of Pharmaceutical and Personal Care Products through Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xing, Yingna; Chen, Xijuan; Chen, Xin; Zhuang, Jie

    2016-10-01

    Pharmaceutical and personal care products (PPCPs) enter soils through reclaimed water irrigation and biosolid land applications. Colloids, such as clays, that are present in soil may interact with PPCPs and thus affect their fate and transport in the subsurface environment. This study addresses the influence of soil colloids on the sorption and transport behaviors of PPCPs through laboratory column experiments. Results show that the affinities of PPCPs for colloids vary with their molecular chemistry and solution ionic strength. The presence of colloids promotes the breakthrough of ciprofloxacin (over 90% sorbed on colloids) from ~4% to 30–40%, and the colloid-facilitated effect was larger at lower ionic strength (e.g., 2 mM). In comparison, the net effect of colloids on the transport of tetracycline (~50% sorbed on colloids) could be facilitation or inhibition, depending on solution chemistry. This dual effect of colloids is primarily due to the opposite response of migration of dissolved and colloid-bound tetracycline to the change in solution ionic strength. Colloids could also facilitate the transport of ibuprofen (~10% sorbed on colloids) by ~50% due likely to exclusion of dispersion pathways by colloid straining. This study suggests that colloids are significant carriers or transport promoters of some PPCPs in the subsurface environment and could affect their off-site environmental risks.

  17. Throughflow and Gravity Modulation Effects on Heat Transport in a Porous Medium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palle Kiran

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The effect of vertical throughflow and time-periodic gravity field has been investigated on Darcy convection. The amplitude of gravity modulation is considered to be very small and the disturbances are expanded in terms of power series of amplitude of convection. A weak nonlinear stability analysis has been performed for the stationary mode of convection. As a consequence heat transport evaluated in terms of the Nusselt number, which is governed by the non-autonomous Ginzburg-Landau equation. Throughflow can stabilize or destabilize the system for stress free and isothermal boundary conditions. The amplitude and frequency of modulation, Prandtl Darcy number on heat transport have been analyzed and depicted graphically. Further, the study establishes that the heat transport can be controlled effectively by a mechanism that is external to the system. Finally flow patterns are presented in terms of streamlines and isotherms.

  18. Nonequilibrium Thermodynamics of Porous Electrodes

    CERN Document Server

    Ferguson, Todd R

    2012-01-01

    We review classical porous electrode theory and extend it to non-ideal active materials, including those capable of phase transformations. Using principles of non-equilibrium thermodynamics, we relate the cell voltage, ionic fluxes, and Faradaic charge-transfer kinetics to the variational electrochemical potentials of ions and electrons. The Butler-Volmer exchange current is consistently expressed in terms of the activities of the reduced, oxidized and transition states, and the activation overpotential is defined relative to the local Nernst potential. We also apply mathematical bounds on effective diffusivity to estimate porosity and tortuosity corrections. The theory is illustrated for a Li-ion battery with active solid particles described by a Cahn-Hilliard phase-field model. Depending on the applied current and porous electrode properties, the dynamics can be limited by electrolyte transport, solid diffusion and phase separation, or intercalation kinetics. In phase-separating porous electrodes, the model...

  19. Nanostructured porous silicon: The winding road from photonics to cell scaffolds. A review.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jacobo eHernandez-Montelongo

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available For over 20 years nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS has found a vast number of applications in the broad fields of photonics and optoelectronics, triggered by the discovery of its photoluminescent behavior in 1990. Besides, its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and bioresorbability make porous silicon (PSi an appealing biomaterial. These properties are largely a consequence of its particular susceptibility to oxidation, leading to the formation of silicon oxide which is readily dissolved by body fluids. This paper reviews the evolution of the applications of PSi and nanoPS from photonics through biophotonics, to their use as cell scaffolds, whether as an implantable substitute biomaterial, mainly for bony and ophthalmological tissues, or as an in-vitro cell conditioning support, especially for pluripotent cells. For any of these applications, PSi/nanoPS can be used directly after synthesis from Si wafers, upon appropriate surface modification processes, or as a composite biomaterial. Unedited studies of fluorescently active PSi structures for cell culture are brought to evidence the margin for new developments.

  20. Nanostructured Porous Silicon: The Winding Road from Photonics to Cell Scaffolds – A Review

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hernández-Montelongo, Jacobo; Muñoz-Noval, Alvaro; García-Ruíz, Josefa Predestinación; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Martín-Palma, Raul J.; Manso-Silván, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    For over 20 years, nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) has found a vast number of applications in the broad fields of photonics and optoelectronics, triggered by the discovery of its photoluminescent behavior in 1990. Besides, its biocompatibility, biodegradability, and bioresorbability make porous silicon (PSi) an appealing biomaterial. These properties are largely a consequence of its particular susceptibility to oxidation, leading to the formation of silicon oxide, which is readily dissolved by body fluids. This paper reviews the evolution of the applications of PSi and nanoPS from photonics through biophotonics, to their use as cell scaffolds, whether as an implantable substitute biomaterial, mainly for bony and ophthalmological tissues, or as an in vitro cell conditioning support, especially for pluripotent cells. For any of these applications, PSi/nanoPS can be used directly after synthesis from Si wafers, upon appropriate surface modification processes, or as a composite biomaterial. Unedited studies of fluorescently active PSi structures for cell culture are brought to evidence the margin for new developments. PMID:26029688

  1. Modeling contaminant transport in homogeneous porous media with fractional advection-dispersion equation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HUANG; Guanhua; HUANG; Quanzhong; ZHAN; Hongbin

    2005-01-01

    The newly developed Fractional Advection-Dispersion Equation (FADE), which is FADE was extended and used in this paper for modelling adsorbing contaminant transport by adding an adsorbing term. A parameter estimation method and its corresponding FORTRAN based program named FADEMain were developed on the basis of Nonlinear Least Square Algorithm and the analytical solution for one-dimensional FADE under the conditions of step input and steady state flow. Data sets of adsorbing contaminants Cd and NH4+-N transport in short homogeneous soil columns and conservative solute NaCI transport in a long homogeneous soil column, respectively were used to estimate the transport parameters both by FADEMain and the advection-dispersion equation (ADE) based program CXTFIT2.1. Results indicated that the concentration simulated by FADE agreed well with the measured data. Compared to the ADE model, FADE can provide better simulation for the concentration in the initial lower concentration part and the late higher concentration part of the breakthrough curves for both adsorbing contaminants. The dispersion coefficients for ADE were from 0.13 to 7.06 cm2/min, while the dispersion coefficients for FADE ranged from 0.119 to 3.05 cm1.856/min for NaCI transport in the long homogeneous soil column. We found that the dispersion coefficient of FADE increased with the transport distance, and the relationship between them can be quantified with an exponential function. Less scale-dependent was also found for the dispersion coefficient of FADE with respect to ADE.

  2. Exposure-time based modeling of nonlinear reactive transport in porous media subject to physical and geochemical heterogeneity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Amos, Richard T; Finkel, Michael; Blowes, David W; Cirpka, Olaf A

    2016-09-01

    Transport of reactive solutes in groundwater is affected by physical and chemical heterogeneity of the porous medium, leading to complex spatio-temporal patterns of concentrations and reaction rates. For certain cases of bioreactive transport, it could be shown that the concentrations of reactive constituents in multi-dimensional domains are approximately aligned with isochrones, that is, lines of identical travel time, provided that the chemical properties of the matrix are uniform. We extend this concept to combined physical and chemical heterogeneity by additionally considering the time that a water parcel has been exposed to reactive materials, the so-called exposure time. We simulate bioreactive transport in a one-dimensional domain as function of time and exposure time, rather than space. Subsequently, we map the concentrations to multi-dimensional heterogeneous domains by means of the mean exposure time at each location in the multi-dimensional domain. Differences in travel and exposure time at a given location are accounted for as time difference. This approximation simplifies reactive-transport simulations significantly under conditions of steady-state flow when reactions are restricted to specific locations. It is not expected to be exact in realistic applications because the underlying assumption, such as neglecting transverse mixing altogether, may not hold. We quantify the error introduced by the approximation for the hypothetical case of a two-dimensional, binary aquifer made of highly-permeable, non-reactive and low-permeable, reactive materials releasing dissolved organic matter acting as electron donor for aerobic respiration and denitrification. The kinetically controlled reactions are catalyzed by two non-competitive bacteria populations, enabling microbial growth. Even though the initial biomass concentrations were uniform, the interplay between transport, non-uniform electron-donor supply, and bio-reactions led to distinct spatial patterns of

  3. Exposure-time based modeling of nonlinear reactive transport in porous media subject to physical and geochemical heterogeneity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sanz-Prat, Alicia; Lu, Chuanhe; Amos, Richard T.; Finkel, Michael; Blowes, David W.; Cirpka, Olaf A.

    2016-09-01

    Transport of reactive solutes in groundwater is affected by physical and chemical heterogeneity of the porous medium, leading to complex spatio-temporal patterns of concentrations and reaction rates. For certain cases of bioreactive transport, it could be shown that the concentrations of reactive constituents in multi-dimensional domains are approximately aligned with isochrones, that is, lines of identical travel time, provided that the chemical properties of the matrix are uniform. We extend this concept to combined physical and chemical heterogeneity by additionally considering the time that a water parcel has been exposed to reactive materials, the so-called exposure time. We simulate bioreactive transport in a one-dimensional domain as function of time and exposure time, rather than space. Subsequently, we map the concentrations to multi-dimensional heterogeneous domains by means of the mean exposure time at each location in the multi-dimensional domain. Differences in travel and exposure time at a given location are accounted for as time difference. This approximation simplifies reactive-transport simulations significantly under conditions of steady-state flow when reactions are restricted to specific locations. It is not expected to be exact in realistic applications because the underlying assumption, such as neglecting transverse mixing altogether, may not hold. We quantify the error introduced by the approximation for the hypothetical case of a two-dimensional, binary aquifer made of highly-permeable, non-reactive and low-permeable, reactive materials releasing dissolved organic matter acting as electron donor for aerobic respiration and denitrification. The kinetically controlled reactions are catalyzed by two non-competitive bacteria populations, enabling microbial growth. Even though the initial biomass concentrations were uniform, the interplay between transport, non-uniform electron-donor supply, and bio-reactions led to distinct spatial patterns of

  4. Numerical and dimensional analysis of nanoparticles transport with two-phase flow in porous media

    KAUST Repository

    El-Amin, Mohamed

    2015-04-01

    In this paper, a mathematical model and numerical simulation are developed to describe the imbibition of nanoparticles-water suspension into two-phase flow in a porous medium. The flow system may be changed from oil-wet to water-wet due to nanoparticles (which are also water-wet) deposition on surface of the pores. So, the model is extended to include the negative capillary pressure and mixed-wet relative permeability correlations to fit with the mixed-wet system. Moreover, buoyancy and capillary forces as well as Brownian diffusion and mechanical dispersion are considered in the mathematical model. An example of countercurrent imbibition in a core of small scale is considered. A dimensional analysis of the governing equations is introduced to examine contributions of each term of the model. Several important dimensionless numbers appear in the dimensionless equations, such as Darcy number Da, capillary number Ca, and Bond number Bo. Throughout this investigation, we monitor the changing of the fluids and solid properties due to addition of the nanoparticles using numerical experiments.

  5. Failure mechanisms of additively manufactured porous biomaterials: Effects of porosity and type of unit cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kadkhodapour, J; Montazerian, H; Darabi, A Ch; Anaraki, A P; Ahmadi, S M; Zadpoor, A A; Schmauder, S

    2015-10-01

    Since the advent of additive manufacturing techniques, regular porous biomaterials have emerged as promising candidates for tissue engineering scaffolds owing to their controllable pore architecture and feasibility in producing scaffolds from a variety of biomaterials. The architecture of scaffolds could be designed to achieve similar mechanical properties as in the host bone tissue, thereby avoiding issues such as stress shielding in bone replacement procedure. In this paper, the deformation and failure mechanisms of porous titanium (Ti6Al4V) biomaterials manufactured by selective laser melting from two different types of repeating unit cells, namely cubic and diamond lattice structures, with four different porosities are studied. The mechanical behavior of the above-mentioned porous biomaterials was studied using finite element models. The computational results were compared with the experimental findings from a previous study of ours. The Johnson-Cook plasticity and damage model was implemented in the finite element models to simulate the failure of the additively manufactured scaffolds under compression. The computationally predicted stress-strain curves were compared with the experimental ones. The computational models incorporating the Johnson-Cook damage model could predict the plateau stress and maximum stress at the first peak with less than 18% error. Moreover, the computationally predicted deformation modes were in good agreement with the results of scaling law analysis. A layer-by-layer failure mechanism was found for the stretch-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the cubic unit cell, while the failure of the bending-dominated structures, i.e. structures made from the diamond unit cells, was accompanied by the shearing bands of 45°.

  6. Reactive/Adsorptive transport in (partially-) saturated porous media: from pore scale to core scale

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Raoof, A.

    2011-01-01

    Pore-scale modeling provides opportunities to study transport phenomena in fundamental ways because detailed information is available at the microscopic pore scale. This offers the best hope for bridging the traditional gap that exists between pore scale and macro (lab) scale description of the proc

  7. Use of 1 H NMR to study transport processes in porous biosystems

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    As, van H.; Lens, P.N.L.

    2001-01-01

    The operation of bioreactors and the metabolism of microorganisms in biofilms or soil/sediment systems are strongly dictated by the transport processes therein. Nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) spectroscopy or magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) allow nondestructive and noninvasive quantification and v

  8. BACTERIOPHAGE AND MICROSPHERE TRANSPORT IN SATURATED POROUS MEDIA: FORCED-GRADIENT EXPERIMENT AT BORDEN, ONTARIO

    Science.gov (United States)

    A two-well forced-gradient experiment involving virus and microsphere transport was carried out in a sandy aquifer in Borden, Ontario, Canada. Virus traveled at least a few meters in the experiment, but virus concentrations at observation points 1 and 2.54 m away from the injecti...

  9. Optical biosensing of bacteria and cells using porous silicon based, photonic lamellar gratings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirsky, Y.; Nahor, A.; Edrei, E.; Massad-Ivanir, N.; Bonanno, L. M.; Segal, E.; Sa'ar, A.

    2013-07-01

    We report on a method to extend the optical sensing capabilities of conventional RIFTS (reflective interferometric Fourier transform spectroscopy) biosensors for real-time detection of large microorganisms, such as bacteria and cells. Using macro porous silicon based 2D arrays of phase (lamellar) grating, we demonstrate that the zero-order optical reflectivity exhibits a similar interference pattern to that obtained for ordinary RIFTS biosensors, which can be Fourier transformed into optical thickness and exploited for biosensing. The sensing capabilities are demonstrated for Escherichia coli bacteria that were captured inside the macro-pores. The entrapment process is monitored and verified by confocal laser scanning microscopy.

  10. Porous ZnO nanosheet arrays constructed on weaved metal wire for flexible dye-sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dai, Hui; Zhou, Yong; Chen, Liang; Guo, Binglei; Li, Aidong; Liu, Jianguo; Yu, Tao; Zou, Zhigang

    2013-06-07

    Porous zinc oxide (ZnO) nanosheet (NS) arrays constructed by connected nanocrystallites were built on weaved metal wire (WMW) via hydrothermal treatment followed by calcination, and used as photoanodes for flexible dye-sensitized solar cells (DSSCs). An overall light-to-electricity conversion efficiency (η) of 2.70% was achieved for the DSSC under 100 mW cm(-2) illumination, and this η was found to be much higher than that of the DSSC with ZnO nanowire (NW) as the photoanode (0.71%). The far superior performance of the DSSC with ZnO-NS is essentially attributed to: (i) the film consisting of nanosheets with interconnected nanocrystallites can allow relatively direct pathways for the transportation of electrons as the nanosheets have a regular structure with the sheets being oriented to the electrode; (ii) the nanocrystallites assembly and porous character of the nanosheets can provide a large surface area for dye adsorption, which is in favor of enhancing the light absorption and the light propagation; (iii) the nanopores embedded in the nanosheet can act as "branch lines" for more efficient electrolyte diffusion into the interstice of the densely packed nanosheets in the array. A further improvement in the efficiency of the DSSC with ZnO-NS was achieved through the atomic layer deposition (ALD) of an ultrathin titanium oxide (TiO2) layer onto the ZnO-NS layer. The larger charge transfer resistance along with the introduction of a TiO2 shell is thought to reduce the surface recombination and thus contribute to the increase in the open circuit voltage (Voc) of the DSCs and higher conversion efficiency (3.09%).

  11. Reactive transport in porous media for CO2 sequestration: Pore scale modeling using the lattice Boltzmann method

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Jinfang; Xing, Huilin; Tian, Zhiwei; Pearce, Julie K.; Sedek, Mohamed; Golding, Suzanne D.; Rudolph, Victor

    2017-01-01

    Injection of CO2 subsurface may lead to chemical reactivity of rock where CO2 is dissolved in groundwater. This process can modify pore networks to increase or decrease porosity through mineral dissolution and precipitation. A lattice Boltzmann (LB) based computational model study on the pore scale reactive transport in three dimensional heterogeneous porous media (sandstone consisting of both reactive and non-reactive minerals) is described. This study examines how fluid transport in porous materials subject to reactive conditions is affected by unsteady state local reactions and unstable dissolution fronts. The reaction of a calcite cemented core sub-plug from the Hutton Sandstone of the Surat Basin, Australia, is used as a study case. In particular, the work studies the interaction of acidic fluid (an aqueous solution with an elevated concentration of carbonic acid) with reactive (e.g. calcite) and assumed non-reactive (e.g. quartz) mineral surfaces, mineral dissolution and mass transfer, and resultant porosity change. The proposed model is implemented in our custom LBM code and suitable for studies of multiple mineral reactions with disparate reaction rates. A model for carbonic acid reaction with calcite cemented sandstone in the CO2-water-rock system is verified through laboratory experimental data including micro-CT characterization before and after core reaction at reservoir conditions. The experimentally validated model shows: (1) the dissolution of calcite cement forms conductive channels at the pore scale, and enables the generation of pore throats and connectivity; (2) the model is able to simulate the reaction process until the reaction equilibrium status is achieved (around 1440 days); (3) calcite constituting a volume of around 9.6% of the whole core volume is dissolved and porosity is consequently increased from 1.1% to 10.7% on reaching equilibrium; (4) more than a third of the calcite (constituting 7.4% of the total core volume) is unaffected

  12. Light stability tests of CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells using porous carbon counter electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ito, Seigo; Mizuta, Gai; Kanaya, Shusaku; Kanda, Hiroyuki; Nishina, Tomoya; Nakashima, Seiji; Fujisawa, Hironori; Shimizu, Masaru; Haruyama, Yuichi; Nishino, Hitoshi

    2016-10-21

    The CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells have been fabricated using three-porous-layered electrodes as, 〈glass/F-doped tin oxide (FTO)/dense TiO2/porous TiO2-perovskite/porous ZrO2-perovskite/porous carbon-perovskite〉 for light stability tests. Without encapsulation in air, the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite solar cells maintained 80% of photoenergy conversion efficiency from the initial value up to 100 h under light irradiation (AM 1.5, 100 mW cm(-2)). Considering the color variation of the CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite layer, the significant improvement of light stability is due to the moisture-blocking effect of the porous carbon back electrodes. The strong interaction between carbon and CH3NH3PbI3 perovskite was proposed by the measurements of X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy and X-ray diffraction of the porous carbon-perovskite layers.

  13. A novel ethanol/oxygen microfluidic fuel cell with enzymes immobilized onto cantilevered porous electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Desmaële, D.; Nguyen-Boisse, T. T.; Renaud, L.; Tingry, S.

    2016-11-01

    This paper introduces a novel design of membraneless microfluidic biofuel cell that incorporates three-dimensional porous electrodes containing immobilized enzymes to catalyze redox reactions occurring in the presence of ethanol/O2 co-laminar flows. In order to maximize the penetration depth of the reactants inside the porous medium, we report on the preliminary evaluation of cantilevered bioelectrodes, namely the fibrous electrodes protrude along the internal walls of the miniature electrochemical chamber. As a first proof-of-concept, we demonstrate the integration of a bioanode and a biocathode into a lamination-based microfluidic cell fabricated via rapid prototyping. With enzymes deposited into the fibrous structure of 25 mm long, 1 mm wide and 0.11 mm thick carbon paper electrodes, the volumetric power density reached 1.25 mW cm-3 at 0.43 V under a flow rate of 50 μL min-1. An advantage of the presented microfluidic biofuel cell is that it can be adapted to include a larger active electrode volume via the vertical stacking of multiple thin bioelectrodes. We therefore envision that our design would be amenable to reach the level of net power required to supply energy to a plurality of low-consumption electronic devices.

  14. Bacterial Trapping in Porous Media Flows

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dehkharghani, Amin; Waisbord, Nicolas; Dunkel, Jörn; Guasto, Jeffrey

    2016-11-01

    Swimming bacteria inhabit heterogeneous, microstructured environments that are often characterized by complex, ambient flows. Understanding the physical mechanisms underlying cell transport in these systems is key to controlling important processes such as bioremediation in porous soils and infections in human tissues. We study the transport of swimming bacteria (Bacillus subtilis) in quasi-two-dimensional porous microfluidic channels with a range of periodic microstructures and flow strengths. Measured cell trajectories and the local cell number density reveal the formation of filamentous cell concentration patterns within the porous structures. The local cell densification is maximized at shear rates in the range 1-10 s-1, but widely varies with pore geometry and flow topology. Experimental observations are complemented by Langevin simulations to demonstrate that the filamentous patterns result from a coupling of bacterial motility to the complex flow fields via Jeffery orbits, which effectively 'trap' the bacteria on streamlines. The resulting microscopic heterogeneity observed here suppresses bacterial transport and likely has implications for both mixing and cell nutrient uptake in porous media flows. NSF CBET-1511340.

  15. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anthony Finoli

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications.

  16. Open-Porous Hydroxyapatite Scaffolds for Three-Dimensional Culture of Human Adult Liver Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Finoli, Anthony; Schmelzer, Eva; Over, Patrick; Nettleship, Ian; Gerlach, Joerg C

    2016-01-01

    Liver cell culture within three-dimensional structures provides an improved culture system for various applications in basic research, pharmacological screening, and implantable or extracorporeal liver support. Biodegradable calcium-based scaffolds in such systems could enhance liver cell functionality by providing endothelial and hepatic cell support through locally elevated calcium levels, increased surface area for cell attachment, and allowing three-dimensional tissue restructuring. Open-porous hydroxyapatite scaffolds were fabricated and seeded with primary adult human liver cells, which were embedded within or without gels of extracellular matrix protein collagen-1 or hyaluronan. Metabolic functions were assessed after 5, 15, and 28 days. Longer-term cultures exhibited highest cell numbers and liver specific gene expression when cultured on hydroxyapatite scaffolds in collagen-1. Endothelial gene expression was induced in cells cultured on scaffolds without extracellular matrix proteins. Hydroxyapatite induced gene expression for cytokeratin-19 when cells were cultured in collagen-1 gel while culture in hyaluronan increased cytokeratin-19 gene expression independent of the use of scaffold in long-term culture. The implementation of hydroxyapatite composites with extracellular matrices affected liver cell cultures and cell differentiation depending on the type of matrix protein and the presence of a scaffold. The hydroxyapatite scaffolds enable scale-up of hepatic three-dimensional culture models for regenerative medicine applications.

  17. Transport of Organic Oil Components from Immobile and Bypassed Oil in Heterogeneous Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Huseby, O.; Haugan, A.; Sagen, J.; Muller, J.; Bennett, B.; Larter, S.; Kikkinides, E.S.; Stubos, A.K.; Yousefian, F.; Thovert, J.-F.; Adler, P.M.

    2001-12-01

    An experimental study, as well as theoretical and numerical models, are used to validate a methodology to exploit conventional geochemical data with regard to the concentration profiles of organic components occurring naturally in hydrocarbon reservoir oils. The experiment was designed to study transport of organic compounds from immobile oil during water injection. A homogeneous oil-filled core sample was made heterogeneous by drilling a hole through its central axis and filling it with a highly permeable material. Under the present conditions, diffusion coefficients are the most important parameters controlling the transport, and the effect of partitioning could be accounted for by a simple normalization. The experimental results are well described by a simple 2-D analytical model which assumes instantaneous removal of solutes from the oil-water interface. The experimental results are also well described by two numerical models, of which one is a full featured reservoir scale model, suitable for applications of the methodology to reservoir scale cases. (author)

  18. Signature of non-Fickian solute transport in complex heterogeneous porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bijeljic, Branko; Mostaghimi, Peyman; Blunt, Martin J

    2011-11-11

    We simulate transport of a solute through three-dimensional images of different rock samples, with resolutions of a few microns, representing geological media of increasing pore-scale complexity: a sandpack, a Berea sandstone, and a Portland limestone. We predict the propagators (concentration as a function of distance) measured on similar cores in nuclear magnetic resonance experiments and the dispersion coefficient as a function of Péclet number and time. The behavior is explained using continuous time random walks with a truncated power-law distribution of travel times: transport is qualitatively different for the complex limestone compared to the sandstone or sandpack, with long tailing, an almost immobile peak concentration, and a very slow approach to asymptotic dispersion.

  19. Correlating Gas Transport Parameters and X-ray Computed Tomography Measurements in Porous Media

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Naveed, Muhammad; Hamamoto, Shoichiro; Kawamoto, Ken

    2013-01-01

    -dried and partially saturated conditions. Gas transport parameters including gas dispersivity (α), diffusivity (DP/D0), and permeability (ka) were measured using a unified measurement system (UMS). The 3DMA-Rock computational package was used for analysis of three-dimensional CT data. A strong linear relationship...... was found between α and tortuosity calculated from gas transport parameters (Equation (Uncited) Image Tools), indicating that gas dispersivity has a linear and inverse relationship with gas diffusivity. A linear relationship was also found between ka and d50/TUMS2, indicating a strong dependency of ka...... on mean particle size and direct correlation with gas diffusivity. Tortuosity (TMFX) and equivalent pore diameter (deq.MFX) analyzed from microfocus X-ray CT increased linearly with increasing d50 for both Granusil and Accusand and further showing no effect of particle shape. The TUMS values showed...

  20. In vitro cell tests of pancreatic malignant tumor cells by photothermotherapy based on DMSO porous silicon colloids.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Chanseok; Lee, Chongmu

    2014-01-01

    Dimethyl sulfoxide porous silicon (DMSO-PSi) colloid in which DMSO was used as a surfactant suitable for inhibiting the agglomeration of PSi nanoparticles was prepared for use in cancer photothermotherapy. The photothermal effect of the DMSO-PSi colloid was found to be high enough to destroy cancer cells (T = ∼52 °C). The mean particle size of the PSi nanoparticles in the DMSO-PSi colloid was 67 nm, which is low enough to flow through blood vessels without causing a blockage. The DMSO-PSi colloid in combination with an NIR laser resulted in a cell viability of 5.70%, which is a sufficiently high cytotoxic effect.

  1. Transport and Retention of Concentrated Oil-in-Water Emulsions in Sandy Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muller, K.; Esahani, S. G.; Steven, C. C.; Ramsburg, A.

    2015-12-01

    Oil-in-water emulsions are widely employed to promote biotic reduction of contaminants; however, emulsions can also be used to encapsulate and deliver active ingredients required for long-term subsurface treatment. Our research focuses on encapsulating alkalinity-releasing particles in oil-in-water emulsions for sustained control of subsurface pH. Typical characteristics of these emulsions include kinetically stable for >20 hr; 20% soybean oil; 1 g/mL density; 8-10 cP viscosity; and 1.5 μm droplet d50, with emulsions developed for favorable subsurface delivery. The viscosity of the oil-in-water emulsions was found to be a function of oil content. Ultimately we aim to model both emulsion delivery and alkalinity release (from retained emulsion droplets) to provide a description of pH treatment. Emulsion transport and retention was investigated via a series of 1-d column experiments using varying particle size fractions of Ottawa sand. Emulsions were introduced for approximately two pore volumes followed by a flush of background solution (approx. ρ=1 g/mL; μ=1cP). Emulsion breakthrough curves exhibit an early fall on the backside of the breakthrough curve along with tailing. Deposition profiles are found to be hyper-exponential and unaffected by extended periods of background flow. Particle transport models established for dilute suspensions are unable to describe the transport of the concentrated emulsions considered here. Thus, we explore the relative importance of additional processes driving concentrated droplet transport and retention. Focus is placed on evaluating the role of attachment-detachment-straining processes, as well as the influence of mixing from both viscous instabilities and variable water saturation due to deposited mass.

  2. Eliminating micro-porous layer from gas diffusion electrode for use in high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Su, Huaneng; Xu, Qian; Chong, Junjie; Li, Huaming; Sita, Cordellia; Pasupathi, Sivakumar

    2017-02-01

    In this work, we report a simple strategy to improve the performance of high temperature polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (HT-PEMFC) by eliminating the micro-porous layer (MPL) from its gas diffusion electrodes (GDEs). Due to the absence of liquid water and the general use of high amount of catalyst, the MPL in a HT-PEMFC system works limitedly. Contrarily, the elimination of the MPL leads to an interlaced micropore/macropore composited structure in the catalyst layer (CL), which favors gas transport and catalyst utilization, resulting in a greatly improved single cell performance. At the normal working voltage (0.6 V), the current density of the GDE eliminated MPL reaches 0.29 A cm-2, and a maximum power density of 0.54 W cm-2 at 0.36 V is obtained, which are comparable to the best results yet reported for the HT-PEMFCs with similar Pt loading and operated using air. Furthermore, the MPL-free GDE maintains an excellent durability during a preliminary 1400 h HT-PEMFC operation, owing to its structure advantages, indicating the feasibility of this electrode for practical applications.

  3. Nature of the elements transporting long-chain fatty acids through the red cell membrane

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojesen, Inge Norby; Bojesen, Eigil

    1998-01-01

    Docosahexaenoic acid, linoleic acid, red cell membrane, transporting elements, transport kinetics, fatty acid transport......Docosahexaenoic acid, linoleic acid, red cell membrane, transporting elements, transport kinetics, fatty acid transport...

  4. Increasing The Efficiency of Silicon Solar Cells via an Anti-reflecting Nano-porous Surface Layer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coskuner, Ahmet; Gokce, Aisha; Altunay, Omer; Skarlatos, Yani; Ozatay, Ozhan

    2015-03-01

    Electrochemical etching of silicon in a controlled environment results in a porous surface that has many application areas from drug delivery to optoluminescent devices. There is vast interest in implementing porous silicon in silicon solar cells to increase light absorption and therefore the efficiency. Here we demonstrate successful formation of a nano-porous surface on mono-crystalline Si wafers as well as doped Si solar cells. Our results show that pre-cleaning and post-drying is crucial to acquire a smooth, non-cracked topography. We also find that under similar conditions, smaller pores in a denser arrangement and with shorter depths form in p-n junction type Si wafers compared to n-type or p-type Si. In ITO coated porous Si solar cells with Al back contacts, the measured efficiency increase is almost 50% of those without a porous surface. This is a promising result to further enhance the performance of Si solar cell devices.

  5. Efficient transparent thin dye solar cells based on highly porous 1D photonic crystals

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Colodrero, Silvia; Lopez-Lopez, Carmen; Miguez, Hernan [Instituto de Ciencia de Materiales de Sevilla (CSIC-US), Centro de Investigaciones Cientificas Isla de la Cartuja, C/Americo Vespucio 49, 41092 Sevilla (Spain); Forneli, Amparo; Pelleja, Laia [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) Avda., Paisos Catalans 16, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Palomares, Emilio [Institute of Chemical Research of Catalonia (ICIQ) Avda., Paisos Catalans 16, 43007 Tarragona (Spain); Institucio Catalana de Recerca i Estudis Avancats (ICREA), Avda. Lluis Companys 23, 08010 Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-03-21

    A working electrode design based on a highly porous 1D photonic crystal structure that opens the path towards high photocurrents in thin, transparent, dye-sensitized solar cells is presented. By enlarging the average pore size with respect to previous photonic crystal designs, the new working electrode not only increases the device photocurrent, as predicted by theoretical models, but also allows the observation of an unprecedented boost of the cell photovoltage, which can be attributed to structural modifications caused during the integration of the photonic crystal. These synergic effects yield conversion efficiencies of around 3.5% by using just 2 {mu}m thick electrodes, with enhancements between 100% and 150% with respect to reference cells of the same thickness. (Copyright copyright 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim)

  6. Effects of grain size and structural heterogeneity on the transport and retention of nano-TiO2 in saturated porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lv, Xueyan; Gao, Bin; Sun, Yuanyuan; Dong, Shunan; Wu, Jichun; Jiang, Beilei; Shi, Xiaoqing

    2016-09-01

    Accurately predicting the fate and transport of nano-TiO2 in porous media is critical to assess its environmental impact. This study was designed to understand the effects of gain size and structural heterogeneity under different ionic strength (IS) on the fate and transport of nano-TiO2 in saturated porous media. In the columns packed homogenously with sand of different grain sizes (920, 550, 390, and 275μm), the transport of nano-TiO2 decreased when the IS increased from 0.1 to 1 or 10mM. For all the three IS conditions, the retention of the nano-TiO2 particles in the columns increased when the gain size decreased, and the mobility of the nano-TiO2 was the lowest in the sand at size of 275μm with recovery rates of 0.30% to 1.72%. The mass recovery rates of TiO2 in other homogeneous columns were higher and ranged from 0.37% to 59.9%. Structural heterogeneity created two flow domains for the retention and transport of nano-TiO2 particles in the saturated porous media. The fast-flow domain dominated the flow and transport processes of the nano-TiO2 in the heterogeneous columns under the tested conditions. As a result, the transport of nano-TiO2 in the heterogeneous porous media was faster and higher than that in the homogeneous columns under similar experimental conditions. Because of the dominance of the fast-flow domain, the recovery rates of the nano-TiO2 in the heterogeneous columns were similar and ranged from 59.8% to 66.9%. These results reflected the importance of preferential flow to the fate and transport of nano-TiO2 particle in porous media. Simulations from a two-domain model matched the experimental breakthrough curves very well.

  7. Application of a dual deposition mode model to evaluate transport of Escherichia coli D21 in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tufenkji, Nathalie

    2006-12-01

    Controlled laboratory-scale column deposition experiments were conducted using a well-characterized mutant of the Escherichia coli (E. coli) K12 strain to obtain insight into the mechanisms that give rise to the observed deviation from classical colloid filtration theory (CFT). Both the suspended effluent bacteria concentration and the spatial distribution of retained bacteria were systematically measured over a wide range of solution conditions using columns packed with spherical glass beads. Calculations of Derjaguin-Landau-Verwey-Overbeek (DLVO) interaction energies based on measured cell zeta potentials indicated that the bacteria should experience considerable repulsive interaction forces when approaching the glass bead surface. In spite of these predictions, bacterial adhesion was observed even at the lowest solution ionic strength investigated (3 mM) and increased with solution salt concentration. Comparison of these results with measurements obtained using model colloidal particles (polystyrene latex microspheres) and a different microbe (Cryptosporidium parvum) suggested that another non-DLVO-type interaction may be contributing to the observed deposition behavior. Furthermore, predictions based on a discrete dual deposition mode (DDM) model disagreed with measured fractions of released cells. Taken together, the experimental and modeling results suggest that the deposition behavior of bacteria in saturated porous media is influenced by additional interaction mechanism(s) or factors not considered in classical DLVO theory, such as local charge heterogeneities of the cell membrane and surface biomolecule-specific interactions.

  8. Multi-region Transport and Competitive Ion Exchange in Partially Saturated Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yabusaki, Steven B.(BATTELLE (PACIFIC NW LAB)); Gamerdinger, Amy P.(WASHINGTON STATE UNIV TC); S.M. Hassanizadeh, R.J. Schotting, et al.

    2002-01-01

    In most natural subsurface settings cesium sorbs very strongly to sediments, effectively limiting its transport. At the Hanford Site in Washington State (USA), vadose zone migration of 137Cs from subsurface high-level radioactive waste tanks has been detected over 40 meters below the ground surface. Batch and saturated laboratory column studies provided the basis for a quantitative multisite, multicomponent ion exchange model of Cs+ competition with Na+, K+, Ca++, and Mg++ in a composite Hanford soil. The validity of this model under unsaturated conditions was examined in a series of reactive transport column experiments performed in an ultracentrifuge at different liquid saturations. For each experiment, a constant, uniform saturation was maintained using a steady influx of a 5 M sodium nitrate solution with 5.4E-5 M cesium iodide. Of interest was the potential for enhanced cesium transport due to the presence of immobile liquid and/or bypassed regions. Mobile and immobile fluid fractions, dispersion, and the rate of mass transfer between mobile and immobile regions were determined from the tracer breakthrough. At higher saturations ({approx} 65%), the tracer and cesium behavior could be predicted to a large degree using a single mobile region with the previously developed multicomponent ion exchange model. At lower saturations ({approx} 23%), however, the tracer breakthrough indicated a relatively large immobile fluid fraction, which could be described with a multi-region approach. In this experiment, cesium broke through earlier and at higher concentrations than predicted by multi-region theory combined with the existing cesium ion exchange model. This behavior is consistent with a higher density of exchange sites in the immobile fluid region.

  9. Laboratory analysis of fluid flow and solute transport through a variably saturated fracture embedded in porous tuff

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chuang, Y.; Haldeman, W.R.; Rasmussen, T.C.; Evans, D.D. [Arizona Univ., Tucson, AZ (USA). Dept. of Hydrology and Water Resources

    1990-02-01

    Laboratory techniques are developed that allow concurrent measurement of unsaturated matrix hydraulic conductivity and fracture transmissivity of fractured rock blocks. Two Apache Leap tuff blocks with natural fractures were removed from near Superior, Arizona, shaped into rectangular prisms, and instrumented in the laboratory. Porous ceramic plates provided solution to block tops at regulated pressures. Infiltration tests were performed on both test blocks. Steady flow testing of the saturated first block provided estimates of matrix hydraulic conductivity and fracture transmissivity. Fifteen centimeters of suction applied to the second block top showed that fracture flow was minimal and matrix hydraulic conductivity was an order of magnitude less than the first block saturated matrix conductivity. Coated-wire ion-selective electrodes monitored aqueous chlorided breakthrough concentrations. Minute samples of tracer solution were collected with filter paper. The techniques worked well for studying transport behavior at near-saturated flow conditions and also appear to be promising for unsaturated conditions. Breakthrough curves in the fracture and matrix, and a concentration map of chloride concentrations within the fracture, suggest preferential flows paths in the fracture and substantial diffusion into the matrix. Average travel velocity, dispersion coefficient and longitudinal dispersivity in the fracture are obtained. 67 refs., 54 figs., 23 tabs.

  10. Development and Characterization of Non-Conventional Micro-Porous Layers for PEM Fuel Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Riccardo Balzarotti

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Gas diffusion medium (GDM is a crucial component in proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs. Being composed of a gas diffusion layer (GDL with a micro-porous layer (MPL coated onto it, it ensures a proper water management due to the highly hydrophobic materials employed in cell assembly. In current commercial applications, the desired water repellent behaviour is usually obtained by using polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE. In this work, Fluorolink® P56 (Solvay Specialty Polymers, Milan, Italy, a commercially available, anionic, segmented high molecular weight polyfluorourethane with perfluoropolyether groups was extensively evaluated as an alternative to PTFE for micro-porous layer hydrophobization. A change in polymer used is desirable in order to simplify the production process, both in terms of ink formulation and thermal treatment, as well as to get a higher hydrophobicity and, consequently, more efficient water management. Innovative prepared samples were compared to a PTFE-based GDM, in order to assess differences both from morphological and from an electrochemical point of view.

  11. Optoelectronic enhancement of monocrystalline silicon solar cells by porous silicon-assisted mechanical grooving

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben Rabha, Mohamed; Mohamed, Seifeddine Belhadj; Dimassi, Wissem; Gaidi, Mounir; Ezzaouia, Hatem; Bessais, Brahim [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2011-03-15

    One of the most important factors influencing silicon solar cells performances is the front side reflectivity. Consequently, new methods for efficient reduction of this reflectivity are searched. This has always been done by creating a rough surface that enables incident light of being absorbed within the solar cell. Combination of texturization-porous silicon surface treatment was found to be an attractive technical solution for lowering the reflectivity of monocrystalline silicon (c-Si). The texturization of the monocrystalline silicon wafer was carried out by means of mechanical grooving. A specific etching procedure was then applied to form a thin porous silicon layer enabling to remove mechanical damages. This simple and low cost method reduces the total reflectivity from 29% to 7% in the 300 - 950 nm wavelength range and enhances the diffusion length of the minority carriers from 100 {mu}m to 790 {mu}m (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  12. The Effect of Surface Roughness on Fluid Configuration and Solute Transport in Unsaturated Porous Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kibbey, T. C.

    2013-12-01

    When describing the configuration of water in unsaturated media, a distinction is often made between water that is held by capillary forces between grains (capillary water), and water associated with adsorbed films on solid surfaces (film water). The objective of this work was to better understand the nature of the water associated with solid surfaces, with emphasis on understanding the configuration of water on rough natural surfaces. Stereoscopic SEM was used to determine elevation maps on a range of different natural solid surfaces. A computational technique was then developed to calculate the configuration of water on the surfaces as a function of capillary pressure. Calculations of fluid configurations show that, except at extremely high capillary pressures, fluid configuration is dominated by bridging of surface roughness features, even for extremely smooth surfaces. Results suggest that true adsorbed films are likely extremely rare in the environment except under near-dry, ultra-high capillary pressure conditions. This result has significant implications for understanding fate and transport within the unsaturated zone. Preliminary simulations exploring the impact on transport will be discussed.

  13. Uncertainty estimation in one-dimensional heat transport model for heterogeneous porous medium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ching-Min; Yeh, Hund-Der

    2014-01-01

    In many practical applications, the rates for ground water recharge and discharge are determined based on the analytical solution developed by Bredehoeft and Papadopulos (1965) to the one-dimensional steady-state heat transport equation. Groundwater flow processes are affected by the heterogeneity of subsurface systems; yet, the details of which cannot be anticipated precisely. There exists a great deal of uncertainty (variability) associated with the application of Bredehoeft and Papadopulos' solution (1965) to the field-scale heat transport problems. However, the quantification of uncertainty involved in such application has so far not been addressed, which is the objective of this wok. In addition, the influence of the statistical properties of log hydraulic conductivity field on the variability in temperature field in a heterogeneous aquifer is also investigated. The results of the analysis demonstrate that the variability (or uncertainty) in the temperature field increases with the correlation scale of the log hydraulic conductivity covariance function and the variability of temperature field also depends positively on the position.

  14. Evaluation of Three-Dimensional Porous Iron-Cross-Linked Alginate as a Scaffold for Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Machida-Sano, Ikuko; Ogawa, Sakito; Hirakawa, Makoto; Namiki, Hideo

    2014-01-01

    We investigated the efficacy of three-dimensional porous ferric-ion-cross-linked alginate (Fe-alginate) gels as cell scaffolds, in comparison with calcium-ion-cross-linked alginate (Ca-alginate) gels. In a previous study, we had demonstrated that two-dimensional Fe-alginate film was an efficient material for use as a scaffold, allowing good cell adhesion and proliferation, unlike Ca-alginate film. In the present study, we fabricated three-dimensional porous Fe- and Ca-alginate gels by freeze-...

  15. Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM): A general, coupled, nonisothermal multiphase flow, reactive transport, and porous medium alteration simulator, Version 2 user's guide

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    DH Bacon; MD White; BP McGrail

    2000-03-07

    The Hanford Site, in southeastern Washington State, has been used extensively to produce nuclear materials for the US strategic defense arsenal by the Department of Energy (DOE) and its predecessors, the US Atomic Energy Commission and the US Energy Research and Development Administration. A large inventory of radioactive and mixed waste has accumulated in 177 buried single- and double shell tanks. Liquid waste recovered from the tanks will be pretreated to separate the low-activity fraction from the high-level and transuranic wastes. Vitrification is the leading option for immobilization of these wastes, expected to produce approximately 550,000 metric tons of Low Activity Waste (LAW) glass. This total tonnage, based on nominal Na{sub 2}O oxide loading of 20% by weight, is destined for disposal in a near-surface facility. Before disposal of the immobilized waste can proceed, the DOE must approve a performance assessment, a document that described the impacts, if any, of the disposal facility on public health and environmental resources. Studies have shown that release rates of radionuclides from the glass waste form by reaction with water determine the impacts of the disposal action more than any other independent parameter. This report describes the latest accomplishments in the development of a computational tool, Subsurface Transport Over Reactive Multiphases (STORM), Version 2, a general, coupled non-isothermal multiphase flow and reactive transport simulator. The underlying mathematics in STORM describe the rate of change of the solute concentrations of pore water in a variably saturated, non-isothermal porous medium, and the alteration of waste forms, packaging materials, backfill, and host rocks.

  16. The method of distributions for dispersive transport in porous media with uncertain hydraulic properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boso, Francesca; Tartakovsky, Daniel M.

    2016-06-01

    Predictions of solute transport in subsurface environments are notoriously unreliable due to aquifer heterogeneity and uncertainty about the values of hydraulic parameters. Probabilistic framework, which treats the relevant parameters and solute concentrations as random fields, allows for quantification of this predictive uncertainty. By providing deterministic equations for either probability density function or cumulative distribution function (CDF) of predicted concentrations, the method of distributions enables one to estimate, e.g., the probability of a contaminant's concentration exceeding a safe dose. We derive a deterministic equation for the CDF of solute concentration, which accounts for uncertainty in flow velocity and initial conditions. The coefficients in this equation are expressed in terms of the mean and variance of concentration. The accuracy and robustness of the CDF equations are analyzed by comparing their predictions with those obtained with Monte Carlo simulations and an assumed beta CDF.

  17. Hierarchical porous photoanode based on acid boric catalyzed sol for dye sensitized solar cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maleki, Khatereh; Abdizadeh, Hossein; Golobostanfard, Mohammad Reza; Adelfar, Razieh

    2017-02-01

    The hierarchical porous photoanode of the dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC) is synthesized through non-aqueous sol-gel method based on H3BO3 as an acid catalyst and the efficiencies of the fabricated DSSC based on these photoanodes are compared. The sol parameters of 0.17 M, water mole ratio of 4.5, acid mole ratio of 0.45, and solvent type of ethanol are introduced as optimum parameters for photoanode formation without any detectable cracks. The optimized hierarchical photoanode mainly contains anatase phase with slight shift toward higher angles, confirming the doping of boron into titania structure. Moreover, the porous structure involves two ranges of average pore sizes of 20 and 635 nm. The diffuse reflectance spectroscopy (DRS) shows the proper scattering and blueshift in band gap. The paste parameters of solid:liquid, TiO2:ethyl cellulose, and terpineol:ethanol equal to 11:89, 3.5:7.5, and 25:64, respectively, are assigned as optimized parameters for this novel paste. The photovoltaic properties of short circuit current density, open circuit voltage, fill factor, and efficiency of 5.89 mA/cm2, 703 mV, 0.7, and 2.91% are obtained for the optimized sample, respectively. The relatively higher short circuit current of the main sample compared to other samples is mainly due to higher dye adsorption in this sample corresponding to its higher surface area and presumably higher charge transfer confirmed by low RS and Rct in electrochemical impedance spectroscopy data. Boric acid as a catalyst in titania sol not only forms hierarchical porous structure, but also dopes the titania lattice, which results in appreciated performance in this device.

  18. Modeling Bimolecular Reactions and Transport in Porous Media Via Particle Tracking

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dong Ding; David Benson; Amir Paster; Diogo Bolster

    2012-01-01

    We use a particle-tracking method to simulate several one-dimensional bimolecular reactive transport experiments. In this numerical method, the reactants are represented by particles: advection and dispersion dominate the flow, and molecular diffusion dictates, in large part, the reactions. The particle/particle reactions are determined by a combination of two probabilities dictated by the physics of transport and energetics of reaction. The first is that reactant particles occupy the same volume over a short time interval. The second is the conditional probability that two collocated particles favorably transform into a reaction. The first probability is a direct physical representation of the degree of mixing in an advancing displacement front, and as such lacks empirical parameters except for the user-defined number of particles. This number can be determined analytically from concentration autocovariance, if this type of data is available. The simulations compare favorably to two physical experiments. In one, the concentration of product, 1,2-naphthoquinoe-4-aminobenzene (NQAB) from reaction between 1,2-naphthoquinone-4-sulfonic acid (NQS) and aniline (AN), was measured at the outflow of a column filled with glass beads at different times. In the other, the concentration distribution of reactants (CuSO_4 and EDTA^{4-}) and products (CuEDTA^{4-}) were quantified by snapshots of transmitted light through a column packed with cryloite sand. The thermodynamic rate coefficient in the latter experiment was 10^7 times greater than the former experiment, making it essentially instantaneous. When compared to the solution of the advection-dispersion-reaction equation (ADRE) with the well-mixed reaction coefficient, the experiments and the particle-tracking simulations showed on the order of 20% to 40% less overall product, which is attributed to poor mixing. The poor mixing also leads to higher product concentrations on the edges of the mixing zones, which the particle

  19. Osteogenic potential of human adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal cells cultured on 3D-printed porous structured titanium.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lewallen, Eric A; Jones, Dakota L; Dudakovic, Amel; Thaler, Roman; Paradise, Christopher R; Kremers, Hilal M; Abdel, Matthew P; Kakar, Sanjeev; Dietz, Allan B; Cohen, Robert C; Lewallen, David G; van Wijnen, Andre J

    2016-05-01

    Integration of porous metal prosthetics, which restore form and function of irreversibly damaged joints, into remaining healthy bone is critical for implant success. We investigated the biological properties of adipose-tissue-derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cells (AMSCs) and addressed their potential to alter the in vitro microenvironment of implants. We employed human AMSCs as a practical source for musculoskeletal applications because these cells can be obtained in large quantities, are multipotent, and have trophic paracrine functions. AMSCs were cultured on surgical-grade porous titanium disks as a model for orthopedic implants. We monitored cell/substrate attachment, cell proliferation, multipotency, and differentiation phenotypes of AMSCs upon osteogenic induction. High-resolution scanning electron microscopy and histology revealed that AMSCs adhere to the porous metallic surface. Compared to standard tissue culture plastic, AMSCs grown in the porous titanium microenvironment showed differences in temporal expression for genes involved in cell cycle progression (CCNB2, HIST2H4), extracellular matrix production (COL1A1, COL3A1), mesenchymal lineage identity (ACTA2, CD248, CD44), osteoblastic transcription factors (DLX3, DLX5, ID3), and epigenetic regulators (EZH1, EZH2). We conclude that metal orthopedic implants can be effectively seeded with clinical-grade stem/stromal cells to create a pre-conditioned implant.

  20. Effect of convective transport in porous media on the conditions of organic matter maturation and generation of hydrocarbons in trap rocks complexes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yurie Khachay, Professor; Mindubaev, Mansur

    2016-04-01

    One of the main problems of the study of the intrusion thermal effects on the maturation of the organic matter is to estimate the volume, intensity, thermal effects of the intrusion and its redistribution in porous media by convection. A numerical algorithm for solving the problem of the developed convection in two-dimensional and three-dimensional models of the porous medium depending on the incline angle is developed. It is defined that the convective stability in the medium decreases with increasing incline angle. It was found that depending on the incline angle the structure of convection from many cells for a flat horizontal layer changes and it transfers to more elongated structures along the layer. It is shown that depending on the incline angles, invading sill and imbedding volume of the porous medium it can be realized either stationary or non-stationary convection that provides a principal different thermal conditions of hydrocarbons maturation in the motherboard porous medium. We give numerical examples of the influence of the incline angle on the flow structure inside the porous inclusion. By the stationary convection the volume of the boundary layers between the convective sells increases. That can lead to increasing of the part of motherboard rocks that are outer the temperature conditions of oil catalysis and as a consequence to the overestimation of the deposits.

  1. Laser-beam-induced current mapping evaluation of porous silicon-based passivation in polycrystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabha, M. Ben; Bessais, B. [Laboratoire de Nanomateriaux et des Systemes pour l' Energie, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie - Technopole de Borj-Cedria BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia); Dimassi, W.; Bouaicha, M.; Ezzaouia, H. [Laboratoire de photovoltaique, des semiconducteurs et des nanostructures, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie - Technopole de Borj-Cedria BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2009-05-15

    In the present work, we report on the effect of introducing a superficial porous silicon (PS) layer on the performance of polycrystalline silicon (pc-Si) solar cells. Laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) mapping shows that the PS treatment on the emitter of pc-Si solar cells improves their quantum response and reduce the grain boundaries (GBs) activity. After the porous silicon treatment, mapping investigation shows an enhancement of the LBIC and the internal quantum efficiency (IQE), due to an improvement of the minority carrier diffusion length and the passivation of recombination centers at the GBs as compared to the reference substrate. It was quantitatively shown that porous silicon treatment can passivate both the grains and GBs. (author)

  2. Development of RWHet to Simulate Contaminant Transport in Fractured Porous Media

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Yong; LaBolle, Eric; Reeves, Donald M; Russell, Charles

    2012-07-01

    Accurate simulation of matrix diffusion in regional-scale dual-porosity and dual-permeability media is a critical issue for the DOE Underground Test Area (UGTA) program, given the prevalence of fractured geologic media on the Nevada National Security Site (NNSS). Contaminant transport through regional-scale fractured media is typically quantified by particle-tracking based Lagrangian solvers through the inclusion of dual-domain mass transfer algorithms that probabilistically determine particle transfer between fractures and unfractured matrix blocks. UGTA applications include a wide variety of fracture aperture and spacing, effective diffusion coefficients ranging four orders of magnitude, and extreme end member retardation values. This report incorporates the current dual-domain mass transfer algorithms into the well-known particle tracking code RWHet [LaBolle, 2006], and then tests and evaluates the updated code. We also develop and test a direct numerical simulation (DNS) approach to replace the classical transfer probability method in characterizing particle dynamics across the fracture/matrix interface. The final goal of this work is to implement the algorithm identified as most efficient and effective into RWHet, so that an accurate and computationally efficient software suite can be built for dual-porosity/dual-permeability applications. RWHet is a mature Lagrangian transport simulator with a substantial user-base that has undergone significant development and model validation. In this report, we also substantially tested the capability of RWHet in simulating passive and reactive tracer transport through regional-scale, heterogeneous media. Four dual-domain mass transfer methodologies were considered in this work. We first developed the empirical transfer probability approach proposed by Liu et al. [2000], and coded it into RWHet. The particle transfer probability from one continuum to the other is proportional to the ratio of the mass entering the other

  3. Ricin transport into cells: studies of endocytosis and intercellular transport

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sandvig, Kirsten; Grimmer, S.; Iversen, T.G.

    2000-01-01

    Cell Biology, ricin, endocytosis, Golgi apparatus, cholesterol, clathrin, toxin, Rab, endoplasmic reticulum......Cell Biology, ricin, endocytosis, Golgi apparatus, cholesterol, clathrin, toxin, Rab, endoplasmic reticulum...

  4. Neutron scattering studies of structure, hydrothermal stability and transport in porous silica catalyst supports

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pollock, Rachel A.

    Mesoporous materials are interesting as catalyst supports, because molecules can move efficiently in and out of the pore network, but they must be stable in water if they are to be used for the production of biofuels. Before investigating hydrothermal stability and transport properties, the pore structure of SBA-15 was characterized using small angle neutron scattering (SANS) and non-local density functional theory (NLDFT) analysis of nitrogen sorption isotherms. A new Contrast Matching SANS method, using a range of probe molecules to directly probe the micropore size, gave a pore size distribution onset of 6 ± 0.2 Å, consistent with cylindrical pores formed from polymer template strands that unravel into the silica matrix. Diffraction intensity analysis of SANS measurements, combined with pore size distributions calculated from NLDFT, showed that the secondary pores are distributed relatively uniformly throughout the silica framework. The hydrothermal stability of SBA-15 was evaluated using a post-calcination hydrothermal treatment in both liquid and vapor phase water. The results were consistent with a degradation mechanism in which silica dissolves from regions of small positive curvature, e.g. near the entrance to the secondary pores, and is re-deposited deeper into the framework. Under water treatment at 115 °C, the mesopore diameter increases and the intra-wall void fraction decreases significantly. The behavior is similar for steam treatment, but occurs more slowly, suggesting that transport is faster when condensation occurs in the pores. Quasielastic neutron scattering (QENS) measurements of methane in SBA-15 probed the rotational and translational motion as a function of temperature and loading. A qualitative analysis of the QENS data suggested that for the initial dose of methane at 100 K, the self diffusion constant is similar in magnitude to literature values for methane in ZSM-5 and Y-zeolite, showing that the secondary pores trap methane and limit

  5. Dynamics and mass transport of solutal convection in a closed porous media system

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Baole; Akhbari, Daria; Hesse, Marc

    2016-11-01

    Most of the recent studies of CO2 sequestration are performed in open systems where the constant partial pressure of CO2 in the vapor phase results in a time-invariant saturated concentration of CO2 in the brine (Cs). However, in some closed natural CO2 reservoirs, e.g., Bravo Dome in New Mexico, the continuous dissolution of CO2 leads to a pressure drop in the gas that is accompanied by a reduction of Cs and thereby affects the dynamics and mass transport of convection in the brine. In this talk, I discuss the characteristics of convective CO2 dissolution in a closed system. The gas is assumed to be ideal and its solubility given by Henry's law. An analytical solution shows that the diffusive base state is no longer self-similar and that diffusive mass transfer declines rapidly. Scaling analysis reveals that the volume ratio of brine and gas η determines the behavior of the system. DNS show that no constant flux regime exists for η > 0 nevertheless, the quantity F /Cs2 remains constant, where F is the dissolution flux. The onset time is only affected by η when the Rayleigh number Ra is small. In this case, the drop in Cs during the initial diffusive regime significantly reduces the effective Ra and therefore delays the onset.

  6. Modeling structure-function relationships for diffusive drug transport in inert porous geopolymer matrices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jämstorp, Erik; Strømme, Maria; Frenning, Göran

    2011-10-01

    A unique structure-function relationship investigation of mechanically strong geopolymer drug delivery vehicles for sustained release of potent substances is presented. The effect of in-synthesis water content on geopolymer pore structure and diffusive drug transport is investigated. Scanning electron microscopy, N2 gas adsorption, mercury intrusion porosimetry, compression strength test, drug permeation, and release experiments are performed. Effective diffusion coefficients are measured and compared with corresponding theoretical values as derived from pore size distribution and connectivity via pore-network modeling. By solely varying the in-synthesis water content, mesoporous and mechanically strong geopolymers with porosities of 8%-45% are obtained. Effective diffusion coefficients of the model drugs Saccharin and Zolpidem are observed to span two orders of magnitude (∼1.6-120 × 10(-8) cm(2) /s), comparing very well to theoretical estimations. The ability to predict drug permeation and release from geopolymers, and materials alike, allows future formulations to be tailored on a structural and chemical level for specific applications such as controlled drug delivery of highly potent substances.

  7. Nanoparticle transport in water-unsaturated porous media: effects of solution ionic strength and flow rate

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prédélus, Dieuseul; Lassabatere, Laurent; Louis, Cédric; Gehan, Hélène; Brichart, Thomas; Winiarski, Thierry; Angulo-Jaramillo, Rafael

    2017-03-01

    This paper presents the influence of ionic strength and flow on nanoparticle (NP) retention rate in an unsaturated calcareous medium, originating from a heterogeneous glaciofluvial deposit of the region of Lyon (France). Laboratory columns 10 cm in diameter and 30 cm in length were used. Silica nanoparticles (Au-SiO2-FluoNPs), with hydrodynamic diameter ranging from 50 to 60 nm and labeled with fluorescein derivatives, were used to simulate particle transport, and bromide was used to characterize flow. Three flow rates and five different ionic strengths were tested. The transfer model based on fractionation of water into mobile and immobile fractions was coupled with the attachment/detachment model to fit NPs breakthrough curves. The results show that increasing flow velocity induces a decrease in nanoparticle retention, probably as the result of several physical but also geochemical factors. The results show that NPs retention increases with ionic strength. However, an inversion of retention occurs for ionic strength >5.10-2 M, which has been scarcely observed in previous studies. The measure of zeta potential and DLVO calculations show that NPs may sorb on both solid-water and air-water interfaces. NPs size distribution shows the potential for nanoparticle agglomeration mostly at low pH, leading to entrapment in the soil pores. These mechanisms are highly sensitive to both hydrodynamic and geochemical conditions, which explains their high sensitivity to flow rates and ionic strength.

  8. Temperature dependency of virus and nanoparticle transport and retention in saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasidharan, Salini; Torkzaban, Saeed; Bradford, Scott A.; Cook, Peter G.; Gupta, Vadakattu V. S. R.

    2017-01-01

    The influence of temperature on virus (PRD1 and ΦX174) and carboxyl-modified latex nanoparticle (50 and 100 nm) attachment was examined in sand-packed columns under various physiochemical conditions. When the solution ionic strength (IS) equaled 10 and 30 mM, the attachment rate coefficient (katt) increased up to 109% (p 50 mM. An explanation for these observations was obtained from extended interaction energy calculations that considered nanoscale roughness and chemical heterogeneity on the sand surface. Interaction energy calculations demonstrated that the energy barrier to attachment in the primary minimum (∆Φa) decreased with increasing IS, chemical heterogeneity, and temperature, especially in the presence of small amounts of nanoscale roughness (e.g., roughness fraction of 0.05 and height of 20 nm in the zone of influence). Temperature had a negligible effect on katt and Sf when the IS = 1 mM because of the large energy barrier, and at IS = 50 mM because of the absence of an energy barrier. Conversely, temperature had a large influence on katt and Sf when the IS was 10 and 30 mM because of the presence of a small ∆Φa on sand with nanoscale roughness and a chemical (positive zeta potential) heterogeneity. This has large implications for setting parameters for the accurate modeling and transport prediction of virus and nanoparticle contaminants in ground water systems.

  9. Ceramic-like open-celled geopolymer foam as a porous substrate for water treatment catalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kovářík, T.; Křenek, T.; Pola, M.; Rieger, D.; Kadlec, J.; Franče, P.

    2017-02-01

    This paper presents results from experimental study on microstructural and mechanical properties of geopolymer-based foam filters. The process for making porous ceramic-like geopolymer body was experimentally established, consists of (a) geopolymer paste synthesis, (b) ceramic filler incorporation, (c) coating of open-celled polyurethane foam with geopolymer mixture, (d) rapid setting procedure, (e) thermal treatment. Geopolymer paste was based on potassium silicate solution n(SiO2)/n(K2O)=1.6 and powder mixture of calcined kaolin and precipitated silica. Various types of ceramic granular filler (alumina, calcined schistous clay and cordierite) were tested in relation to aggregate gradation design and particle size distribution. The small amplitude oscillatory rheometry in strain controlled regime 0.01% with angular frequency 10 rad/s was applied for determination of rheology behavior of prepared mixtures. Thermal treatment conditions were applied in the temperature range 1100 – 1300 °C. The developed porous ceramic-like foam effectively served as a substrate for highly active nanoparticles of selected Fe+2 spinels. Such new-type of nanocomposite was tested as a heterogeneous catalyst for technological process of advanced oxidative degradation of resistive antibiotics occurring in waste waters.

  10. A miniature microbial fuel cell with conducting nanofibers-based 3D porous biofilm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Huawei; Halverson, Larry J.; Dong, Liang

    2015-12-01

    Miniature microbial fuel cell (MFC) technology has received growing interest due to its potential applications in high-throughput screening of bacteria and mutants to elucidate mechanisms of electricity generation. This paper reports a novel miniature MFC with an improved output power density and short startup time, utilizing electrospun conducting poly(3,4-ethylenedioxythiophene) (PEDOT) nanofibers as a 3D porous anode within a 12 μl anolyte chamber. This device results in 423 μW cm-3 power density based on the volume of the anolyte chamber, using Shewanella oneidensis MR-1 as a model biocatalyst without any optimization of bacterial culture. The device also excels in a startup time of only 1hr. The high conductivity of the electrospun nanofibers makes them suitable for efficient electron transfer. The mean pore size of the conducting nanofibers is several micrometers, which is favorable for bacterial penetration and colonization of surfaces of the nanofibers. We demonstrate that S. oneidensis can fully colonize the interior region of this nanofibers-based porous anode. This work represents a new attempt to explore the use of electrospun PEDOT nanofibers as a 3D anode material for MFCs. The presented miniature MFC potentially will provide a high-sensitivity, high-throughput tool to screen suitable bacterial species and mutant strains for use in large-size MFCs.

  11. Magnetic resonance imaging reveals detailed spatial and temporal distribution of iron-based nanoparticles transported through water-saturated porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cuny, Laure; Herrling, Maria Pia; Guthausen, Gisela; Horn, Harald; Delay, Markus

    2015-11-01

    The application of engineered nanoparticles (ENP) such as iron-based ENP in environmental systems or in the human body inevitably raises the question of their mobility. This also includes aspects of product optimization and assessment of their environmental fate. Therefore, the key aim was to investigate the mobility of iron-based ENP in water-saturated porous media. Laboratory-scale transport experiments were conducted using columns packed with quartz sand as model solid phase. Different superparamagnetic iron oxide nanoparticles (SPION) were selected to study the influence of primary particle size (dP = 20 nm and 80 nm) and surface functionalization (plain, -COOH and -NH2 groups) on particle mobility. In particular, the influence of natural organic matter (NOM) on the transport and retention behaviour of SPION was investigated. In our approach, a combination of conventional breakthrough curve (BTC) analysis and magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) to non-invasively and non-destructively visualize the SPION inside the column was applied. Particle surface properties (surface functionalization and resulting zeta potential) had a major influence while their primary particle size turned out to be less relevant. In particular, the mobility of SPION was significantly increased in the presence of NOM due to the sorption of NOM onto the particle surface resulting in a more negative zeta potential. MRI provided detailed spatially resolved information complementary to the quantitative BTC results. The approach can be transferred to other porous systems and contributes to a better understanding of particle transport in environmental porous media and porous media in technical applications.

  12. Numerical study of cell performance and local transport phenomena in PEM fuel cells with various flow channel area ratios

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong; Duan, Yuan-Yuan; Yan, Wei-Mon

    Three-dimensional models of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with parallel and interdigitated flow channel designs were developed including the effects of liquid water formation on the reactant gas transport. The models were used to investigate the effects of the flow channel area ratio and the cathode flow rate on the cell performance and local transport characteristics. The results reveal that at high operating voltages, the cell performance is independent of the flow channel designs and operating parameters, while at low operating voltages, both significantly affect cell performance. For the parallel flow channel design, as the flow channel area ratio increases the cell performance improves because fuel is transported into the diffusion layer and the catalyst layer mainly by diffusion. A larger flow channel area ratio increases the contact area between the fuel and the diffusion layer, which allows more fuel to directly diffuse into the porous layers to participate in the electrochemical reaction which enhances the reaction rates. For the interdigitated flow channel design, the baffle forces more fuel to enter the cell and participate in the electrochemical reaction, so the flow channel area ratio has less effect. Forced convection not only increases the fuel transport rates but also enhances the liquid water removal, thus interdigitated flow channel design has higher performance than the parallel flow channel design. The optimal performance for the interdigitated flow channel design occurs for a flow channel area ratio of 0.4. The cell performance also improves as the cathode flow rate increases. The effects of the flow channel area ratio and the cathode flow rate on cell performance are analyzed based on the local current densities, oxygen flow rates and liquid water concentrations inside the cell.

  13. Numerical study of cell performance and local transport phenomena in PEM fuel cells with various flow channel area ratios

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Xiao-Dong [Department of Thermal Engineering, School of Mechanical Engineering, University of Science and Technology Beijing, Beijing 100083 (China); Duan, Yuan-Yuan [Key Laboratory of Thermal Science and Power Engineering of MOE, Tsinghua University, Beijing 100084 (China); Yan, Wei-Mon [Department of Mechatronic Engineering, Huafan University, Shih-Ting 22305 (China)

    2007-10-11

    Three-dimensional models of proton exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) with parallel and interdigitated flow channel designs were developed including the effects of liquid water formation on the reactant gas transport. The models were used to investigate the effects of the flow channel area ratio and the cathode flow rate on the cell performance and local transport characteristics. The results reveal that at high operating voltages, the cell performance is independent of the flow channel designs and operating parameters, while at low operating voltages, both significantly affect cell performance. For the parallel flow channel design, as the flow channel area ratio increases the cell performance improves because fuel is transported into the diffusion layer and the catalyst layer mainly by diffusion. A larger flow channel area ratio increases the contact area between the fuel and the diffusion layer, which allows more fuel to directly diffuse into the porous layers to participate in the electrochemical reaction which enhances the reaction rates. For the interdigitated flow channel design, the baffle forces more fuel to enter the cell and participate in the electrochemical reaction, so the flow channel area ratio has less effect. Forced convection not only increases the fuel transport rates but also enhances the liquid water removal, thus interdigitated flow channel design has higher performance than the parallel flow channel design. The optimal performance for the interdigitated flow channel design occurs for a flow channel area ratio of 0.4. The cell performance also improves as the cathode flow rate increases. The effects of the flow channel area ratio and the cathode flow rate on cell performance are analyzed based on the local current densities, oxygen flow rates and liquid water concentrations inside the cell. (author)

  14. A review on solar cells from Si-single crystals to porous materials and quantum dots.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badawy, Waheed A

    2015-03-01

    Solar energy conversion to electricity through photovoltaics or to useful fuel through photoelectrochemical cells was still a main task for research groups and developments sectors. In this article we are reviewing the development of the different generations of solar cells. The fabrication of solar cells has passed through a large number of improvement steps considering the technological and economic aspects. The first generation solar cells were based on Si wafers, mainly single crystals. Permanent researches on cost reduction and improved solar cell efficiency have led to the marketing of solar modules having 12-16% solar conversion efficiency. Application of polycrystalline Si and other forms of Si have reduced the cost but on the expense of the solar conversion efficiency. The second generation solar cells were based on thin film technology. Thin films of amorphous Si, CIS (copper-indium-selenide) and t-Si were employed. Solar conversion efficiencies of about 12% have been achieved with a remarkable cost reduction. The third generation solar cells are based on nano-crystals and nano-porous materials. An advanced photovoltaic cell, originally developed for satellites with solar conversion efficiency of 37.3%, based on concentration of the solar spectrum up to 400 suns was developed. It is based on extremely thin concentration cells. New sensitizer or semiconductor systems are necessary to broaden the photo-response in solar spectrum. Hybrids of solar and conventional devices may provide an interim benefit in seeking economically valuable devices. New quantum dot solar cells based on CdSe-TiO2 architecture have been developed.

  15. A review on solar cells from Si-single crystals to porous materials and quantum dots

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Waheed A. Badawy

    2015-03-01

    Full Text Available Solar energy conversion to electricity through photovoltaics or to useful fuel through photoelectrochemical cells was still a main task for research groups and developments sectors. In this article we are reviewing the development of the different generations of solar cells. The fabrication of solar cells has passed through a large number of improvement steps considering the technological and economic aspects. The first generation solar cells were based on Si wafers, mainly single crystals. Permanent researches on cost reduction and improved solar cell efficiency have led to the marketing of solar modules having 12–16% solar conversion efficiency. Application of polycrystalline Si and other forms of Si have reduced the cost but on the expense of the solar conversion efficiency. The second generation solar cells were based on thin film technology. Thin films of amorphous Si, CIS (copper–indium–selenide and t-Si were employed. Solar conversion efficiencies of about 12% have been achieved with a remarkable cost reduction. The third generation solar cells are based on nano-crystals and nano-porous materials. An advanced photovoltaic cell, originally developed for satellites with solar conversion efficiency of 37.3%, based on concentration of the solar spectrum up to 400 suns was developed. It is based on extremely thin concentration cells. New sensitizer or semiconductor systems are necessary to broaden the photo-response in solar spectrum. Hybrids of solar and conventional devices may provide an interim benefit in seeking economically valuable devices. New quantum dot solar cells based on CdSe–TiO2 architecture have been developed.

  16. Effects of anodizing parameters and heat treatment on nanotopographical features, bioactivity, and cell culture response of additively manufactured porous titanium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Amin Yavari, S., E-mail: s.aminyavari@tudelft.nl [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Chai, Y.C. [Prometheus, Division of Skeletal Tissue Engineering, Bus 813, O& N1, Herestraat 49, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Tissue Engineering Laboratory, Skeletal Biology and Engineering Research Center, Bus 813, O& N1, Herestraat 49, KU Leuven, 3000 Leuven (Belgium); Department of Biomedical Engineering, Faculty of Engineering, University of Malaya, 50603 Kuala Lumpur (Malaysia); Böttger, A.J. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Wauthle, R. [KU Leuven, Department of Mechanical Engineering, Section Production Engineering, Machine Design and Automation (PMA), Celestijnenlaan 300B, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); 3D Systems — LayerWise NV, Grauwmeer 14, 3001 Leuven (Belgium); Schrooten, J. [Department of Metallurgy and Materials Engineering, KU Leuven, Kasteelpark Arenberg 44 — PB2450, B-3001 Heverlee (Belgium); Weinans, H. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands); Department of Orthopedics and Dept. Rheumatology, UMC Utrecht, Heidelberglaan100, 3584CX Utrecht (Netherlands); Zadpoor, A.A. [Faculty of Mechanical, Maritime, and Materials Engineering, Delft University of Technology (TU Delft), Mekelweg 2, 2628 CD Delft (Netherlands)

    2015-06-01

    Anodizing could be used for bio-functionalization of the surfaces of titanium alloys. In this study, we use anodizing for creating nanotubes on the surface of porous titanium alloy bone substitutes manufactured using selective laser melting. Different sets of anodizing parameters (voltage: 10 or 20 V anodizing time: 30 min to 3 h) are used for anodizing porous titanium structures that were later heat treated at 500 °C. The nanotopographical features are examined using electron microscopy while the bioactivity of anodized surfaces is measured using immersion tests in the simulated body fluid (SBF). Moreover, the effects of anodizing and heat treatment on the performance of one representative anodized porous titanium structures are evaluated using in vitro cell culture assays using human periosteum-derived cells (hPDCs). It has been shown that while anodizing with different anodizing parameters results in very different nanotopographical features, i.e. nanotubes in the range of 20 to 55 nm, anodized surfaces have limited apatite-forming ability regardless of the applied anodizing parameters. The results of in vitro cell culture show that both anodizing, and thus generation of regular nanotopographical feature, and heat treatment improve the cell culture response of porous titanium. In particular, cell proliferation measured using metabolic activity and DNA content was improved for anodized and heat treated as well as for anodized but not heat-treated specimens. Heat treatment additionally improved the cell attachment of porous titanium surfaces and upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. Anodized but not heat-treated specimens showed some limited signs of upregulated expression of osteogenic markers. In conclusion, while varying the anodizing parameters creates different nanotube structure, it does not improve apatite-forming ability of porous titanium. However, both anodizing and heat treatment at 500 °C improve the cell culture response of porous titanium

  17. Correspondence Between One- and Two-Equation Models for Solute Transport in Two-Region Heterogeneous Porous Media

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2012-07-26

    In this work, we study the transient behavior of homogenized models for solute transport in two-region porous media. We focus on the following three models: (1) a time non-local, two-equation model (2eq-nlt). This model does not rely on time constraints and, therefore, is particularly useful in the short-time regime, when the timescale of interest (t) is smaller than the characteristic time (τ 1) for the relaxation of the effective macroscale parameters (i. e., when t ≤ τ 1); (2) a time local, two-equation model (2eq). This model can be adopted when (t) is significantly larger than (τ 1) (i.e., when t≫τ 1); and (3) a one-equation, time-asymptotic formulation (1eq ∞). This model can be adopted when (t) is significantly larger than the timescale (τ 2) associated with exchange processes between the two regions (i. e., when t≫τ 2). In order to obtain insight into this transient behavior, we combine a theoretical approach based on the analysis of spatial moments with numerical and analytical results in several simple cases. The main result of this paper is to show that there is only a weak asymptotic convergence of the solution of (2eq) towards the solution of (1eq ∞) in terms of standardized moments but, interestingly, not in terms of centered moments. The physical interpretation of this result is that deviations from the Fickian situation persist in the limit of long times but that the spreading of the solute is eventually dominating these higher order effects. © 2012 Springer Science+Business Media B.V.

  18. Microbially Induced Calcite Precipitation (MICP) - A Technology for Managing Flow and Transport in Porous and Fractured Media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Phillips, A. J.; Hiebert, R.; Kirksey, J.; Lauchnor, E. G.; Rothman, A.; Spangler, L.; Esposito, R.; Gerlach, R.; Cunningham, A. B.

    2014-12-01

    Certain microorganisms e.g., Sporosarcina pasteurii contribute enzymes that catalyze reactions which in the presence of calcium, can create saturation conditions favorable for calcium carbonate precipitation (microbially-induced calcium carbonate precipitation (MICP)). MICP can be used for a number of engineering applications including securing geologic storage of CO2 or other fluids by sealing fractures, improving wellbore integrity, and stabilizing fractured and unstable porous media. MICP treatment has the advantage of the use of small microorganisms, ~2μm, suggesting applicability to treatment of small aperture fractures not accessible to traditional treatments, for example the use of fine cement. The promotion of MICP in the subsurface is a complex reactive transport problem coupling microbial, abiotic (geochemical), geomechanical and hydrodynamic processes. In the laboratory, MICP has been demonstrated to cement together heavily fractured shale and reduce the permeability of fractures in shale and sandstone cores up to five orders of magnitude under both ambient and subsurface relevant pressure conditions (Figure 1). Most recently, a MICP fracture treatment field study was performed at a well at the Southern Company Gorgas Steam Generation Plant (Alabama) (Figure 1). The Fayetteville Sandstone at approximately 1120' below ground surface was hydraulically fractured prior to MICP treatment. After 4 days of injection of 24 calcium pulses and 6 microbial inoculations, injectivity of brine into the formation was significantly reduced. The experiment also resulted in a reduction in pressure decay which is a measure of improved wellbore integrity. These promising results suggest the potential for MICP treatment to seal fractured pathways at the field scale to improve the long-term security of geologically-stored carbon dioxide or prevent leakage of shale gas or hydraulic fracturing fluids into functional overlying aquifers, reducing environmental impacts.

  19. Quantification of tracer plume transport parameters in 2D saturated porous media by cross-borehole ERT imaging

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lekmine, G.; Auradou, H.; Pessel, M.; Rayner, J. L.

    2017-04-01

    Cross-borehole ERT imaging was tested to quantify the average velocity and transport parameters of tracer plumes in saturated porous media. Seven tracer tests were performed at different flow rates and monitored by either a vertical or horizontal dipole-dipole ERT sequence. These sequences were tested to reconstruct the shape and temporally follow the spread of the tracer plumes through a background regularization procedure. Data sets were inverted with the same inversion parameters and 2D model sections of resistivity ratios were converted to tracer concentrations. Both array types provided an accurate estimation of the average pore velocity vz. The total mass Mtot recovered was always overestimated by the horizontal dipole-dipole and underestimated by the vertical dipole-dipole. The vertical dipole-dipole was however reliable to quantify the longitudinal dispersivity λz, while the horizontal dipole-dipole returned better estimation for the transverse component λx. λ and Mtot were mainly influenced by the 2D distribution of the cumulated electrical sensitivity and the Shadow Effects induced by the third dimension. The size reduction of the edge of the plume was also related to the inability of the inversion process to reconstruct sharp resistivity contrasts at the interface. Smoothing was counterbalanced by a non-realistic rise of the ERT concentrations around the centre of mass returning overpredicted total masses. A sensitivity analysis on the cementation factor m and the porosity ϕ demonstrated that a change in one of these parameters by 8% involved non negligible variations by 30 and 40% of the dispersion coefficients and mass recovery.

  20. Inkjet-Printed Porous Silver Thin Film as a Cathode for a Low-Temperature Solid Oxide Fuel Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Chen-Chiang; Baek, Jong Dae; Su, Chun-Hao; Fan, Liangdong; Wei, Jun; Liao, Ying-Chih; Su, Pei-Chen

    2016-04-27

    In this work we report a porous silver thin film cathode that was fabricated by a simple inkjet printing process for low-temperature solid oxide fuel cell applications. The electrochemical performance of the inkjet-printed silver cathode was studied at 300-450 °C and was compared with that of silver cathodes that were fabricated by the typical sputtering method. Inkjet-printed silver cathodes showed lower electrochemical impedance due to their porous structure, which facilitated oxygen gaseous diffusion and oxygen surface adsorption-dissociation reactions. A typical sputtered nanoporous silver cathode became essentially dense after the operation and showed high impedance due to a lack of oxygen supply. The results of long-term fuel cell operation show that the cell with an inkjet-printed cathode had a more stable current output for more than 45 h at 400 °C. A porous silver cathode is required for high fuel cell performance, and the simple inkjet printing technique offers an alternative method of fabrication for such a desirable porous structure with the required thermal-morphological stability.

  1. Vertical electric field stimulated neural cell functionality on porous amorphous carbon electrodes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jain, Shilpee; Sharma, Ashutosh; Basu, Bikramjit

    2013-12-01

    We demonstrate the efficacy of amorphous macroporous carbon substrates as electrodes to support neuronal cell proliferation and differentiation in electric field mediated culture conditions. The electric field was applied perpendicular to carbon substrate electrode, while growing mouse neuroblastoma (N2a) cells in vitro. The placement of the second electrode outside of the cell culture medium allows the investigation of cell response to electric field without the concurrent complexities of submerged electrodes such as potentially toxic electrode reactions, electro-kinetic flows and charge transfer (electrical current) in the cell medium. The macroporous carbon electrodes are uniquely characterized by a higher specific charge storage capacity (0.2 mC/cm(2)) and low impedance (3.3 kΩ at 1 kHz). The optimal window of electric field stimulation for better cell viability and neurite outgrowth is established. When a uniform or a gradient electric field was applied perpendicular to the amorphous carbon substrate, it was found that the N2a cell viability and neurite length were higher at low electric field strengths (≤ 2.5 V/cm) compared to that measured without an applied field (0 V/cm). While the cell viability was assessed by two complementary biochemical assays (MTT and LDH), the differentiation was studied by indirect immunostaining. Overall, the results of the present study unambiguously establish the uniform/gradient vertical electric field based culture protocol to either enhance or to restrict neurite outgrowth respectively at lower or higher field strengths, when neuroblastoma cells are cultured on porous glassy carbon electrodes having a desired combination of electrochemical properties.

  2. Application of lattice Boltzmann method to a micro-scale flow simulation in the porous electrode of a PEM fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.; Matsubara, M.; Li, X.

    The electrode of a PEM fuel cell is a porous medium generally made of carbon cloth or paper. Such a porous electrode has been widely modeled as a homogeneous porous medium with a constant permeability in the literature of PEM fuel cell. In fact, most of gas diffusion media are not homogeneous having non-isotropic permeability. In case of carbon cloth, the porous structure consists of carbon fiber tows, the bundles of carbon fiber, and void spaces among tows. The combinational effect of the void space and tow permeability results in the effective permeability of the porous electrode. In this work, the lattice Boltzmann method is applied to the simulation of the flow in the electrode of a PEM fuel cell. The electrode is modeled as void space and porous region which has certain permeability and the Stokes and Brinkman equations are solved in the flow field using the lattice Boltzmann model. The effective permeability of the porous medium is calculated and compared to an analytical calculation showing a good agreement. It has been shown that the permeability of porous medium is strongly dependant on the fiber tow orientation in three-dimensional simulations. The lattice Boltzmann method is an efficient and effective numerical scheme to analyze the flow in a complicated geometry such as the porous medium.

  3. Additively Manufactured Open-Cell Porous Biomaterials Made from Six Different Space-Filling Unit Cells: The Mechanical and Morphological Properties

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seyed Mohammad Ahmadi

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available It is known that the mechanical properties of bone-mimicking porous biomaterials are a function of the morphological properties of the porous structure, including the configuration and size of the repeating unit cell from which they are made. However, the literature on this topic is limited, primarily because of the challenge in fabricating porous biomaterials with arbitrarily complex morphological designs. In the present work, we studied the relationship between relative density (RD of porous Ti6Al4V EFI alloy and five compressive properties of the material, namely elastic gradient or modulus (Es20–70, first maximum stress, plateau stress, yield stress, and energy absorption. Porous structures with different RD and six different unit cell configurations (cubic (C, diamond (D, truncated cube (TC, truncated cuboctahedron (TCO, rhombic dodecahedron (RD, and rhombicuboctahedron (RCO were fabricated using selective laser melting. Each of the compressive properties increased with increase in RD, the relationship being of a power law type. Clear trends were seen in the influence of unit cell configuration and porosity on each of the compressive properties. For example, in terms of Es20–70, the structures may be divided into two groups: those that are stiff (comprising those made using C, TC, TCO, and RCO unit cell and those that are compliant (comprising those made using D and RD unit cell.

  4. Micro-Computed Tomography and Finite Element Method Study of Open-Cell Porous Materials

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wejrzanowski Tomasz

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In the present paper the characterization of structure and properties of open-cell porous materials by high-resolution x-ray micro-computed tomography (μCT and finite element method (FEM is addressed. The unique properties of open porosity foams make them interesting in a range of applications in science and engineering such as energy absorbers, lightweight construction materials or heat insulators. Consequently, a detailed knowledge of structure as well as mechanical properties (i.e. Young’s Modulus, Poisson’s Ratio of such foams is essential. The resulting pixel size of the μCT was 40 μm, which enabled satisfactory visualization of the complex foam structure and quantitative characterization. Foam morphology was studied on post-processed computed tomography images, while mechanical properties were analyzed with use of the finite element method on numerical model obtained from μCT results.

  5. Differential photoacoustic cell to study the wetting process during porous silicon formation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    German Espinosa-Arbelaez, Diego [Instituto de Investigaciones en Materiales, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Posgrado en Ciencia e Ingenieria de Materiales, Edificio de Posgrado, Coyoacan, CP 04530, Mexico D. F. (Mexico); Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Blvd Juriquilla 3001, Campus Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico); Velazquez-Hernandez, Ruben [Division de Investigacion y Posgrado, Facultad de Ingenieria, Universidad Autonoma de Queretaro, Cerro de las Campanas, CP 76010, Queretaro, Qro (Mexico); Petricioli-Carranco, Julio; Quintero-Torres, Rafael; Rodriguez-Garcia, Mario Enrique [Departamento de Nanotecnologia, Centro de Fisica Aplicada y Tecnologia Avanzada, Universidad Nacional Autonoma de Mexico, Blvd Juriquilla 3001, Campus Juriquilla, CP 76230, Queretaro, Qro. (Mexico)

    2011-06-15

    This paper shows the in-situ study of the wetting process in Silicon during anodization process using an electrochemical Differential photoacoustic Cell (DPC). The Photoacoustic amplitude and phase signals were obtained for samples in air, ethanol, ethanol/HF and finally air. According to these results ethanol is responsible for a mechanical contact reducing the superficial tension and ethanol/HF produce the removing of the SiO{sub x} and SiO{sub 2}species on the Silicon surface. It was found that the DPC is a powerful technique to study the wet surface before the formation of the porous silicon layer (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  6. Characterisation of porous carbon electrode materials used in proton exchange membrane fuel cells via gas adsorption

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watt-Smith, M. J.; Rigby, S. P.; Ralph, T. R.; Walsh, F. C.

    Porous carbon materials are typically used in both the substrate (typically carbon paper) and the electrocatalyst supports (often platinised carbon) within proton exchange membrane fuel cells. Gravimetric nitrogen adsorption has been studied at a carbon paper substrate, two different Pt-loaded carbon paper electrodes and three particulate carbon blacks. N 2 BET surface areas and surface fractal dimensions were determined using the fractal BET and Frenkel-Halsey-Hill models for all but one of the materials studied. The fractal dimensions of the carbon blacks obtained from gas adsorption were compared with those obtained independently by small angle X-ray scattering and showed good agreement. Density functional theory was used to characterise one of the carbon blacks, as the standard BET model was not applicable.

  7. Highly Porous Carbon Derived from MOF-5 as a Support of ORR Electrocatalysts for Fuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Khan, Inayat Ali; Qian, Yuhong; Badshah, Amin; Nadeem, Muhammad Arif; Zhao, Dan

    2016-07-13

    The development of highly competent electrocatalysts for the sluggish oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) at cathodes of proton-exchange membrane fuel cells (PEMFCs) is extremely important for their long-term operation and wide applications. Herein, we present highly efficient ORR electrocatalysts based on Pt/Ni bimetallic nanoparticles dispersed on highly porous carbon obtained via pyrolysis of a metal-organic framework MOF-5. In comparison to the commercial Pt/C (20%), the electrocatalyst Pt-Ni/PC 950 (15:15%) in this study exhibits a pronounced positive shift of 90 mV in Eonset. In addition, it also demonstrates excellent long-term stability and durability during the 500-cycle continue-oxygen-supply (COS) accelerating durability tests (ADTs). The significantly improved activity and stability of Pt-Ni/PC 950 (15:15%) can be attributed to the Pt electron interaction with Ni and carbon support as has been proved in X-ray and microscopic analysis.

  8. A nonlinear effective slip interface law for transport phenomena between a fracture flow and a porous medium

    CERN Document Server

    Marciniak-Czochra, Anna

    2013-01-01

    We present modeling of an incompressible viscous flow through a fracture adjacent to a porous medium. We consider a fast stationary flow, predominantly tangential to the porous medium. Slow flow in such setting can be described by the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman slip. For fast flows, a nonlinear filtration law in the porous medium and a non- linear interface law are expected. In this paper we rigorously derive a quadratic effective slip interface law which holds for a range of Reynolds numbers and fracture widths. The porous medium flow is described by the Darcys law. The result shows that the interface slip law can be nonlinear, independently of the regime for the bulk flow. Since most of the interface and boundary slip laws are obtained via upscaling of complex systems, the result indicates that studying the inviscid limits for the Navier-Stokes equations with linear slip law at the boundary should be rethought.

  9. Three-dimensional benchmark for variable-density flow and transport simulation: matching semi-analytic stability modes for steady unstable convection in an inclined porous box

    Science.gov (United States)

    Voss, Clifford I.; Simmons, Craig T.; Robinson, Neville I.

    2010-01-01

    This benchmark for three-dimensional (3D) numerical simulators of variable-density groundwater flow and solute or energy transport consists of matching simulation results with the semi-analytical solution for the transition from one steady-state convective mode to another in a porous box. Previous experimental and analytical studies of natural convective flow in an inclined porous layer have shown that there are a variety of convective modes possible depending on system parameters, geometry and inclination. In particular, there is a well-defined transition from the helicoidal mode consisting of downslope longitudinal rolls superimposed upon an upslope unicellular roll to a mode consisting of purely an upslope unicellular roll. Three-dimensional benchmarks for variable-density simulators are currently (2009) lacking and comparison of simulation results with this transition locus provides an unambiguous means to test the ability of such simulators to represent steady-state unstable 3D variable-density physics.

  10. A repeatedly refuelable mediated biofuel cell based on a hierarchical porous carbon electrode

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fujita, Shuji; Yamanoi, Shun; Murata, Kenichi; Mita, Hiroki; Samukawa, Tsunetoshi; Nakagawa, Takaaki; Sakai, Hideki; Tokita, Yuichi

    2014-05-01

    Biofuel cells that generate electricity from renewable fuels, such as carbohydrates, must be reusable through repeated refuelling, should these devices be used in consumer electronics. We demonstrate the stable generation of electricity from a glucose-powered mediated biofuel cell through multiple refuelling cycles. This refuelability is achieved by immobilizing nicotinamide adenine dinucleotide (NAD), an electron-transfer mediator, and redox enzymes in high concentrations on porous carbon particles constituting an anode while maintaining their electrochemical and enzymatic activities after the immobilization. This bioanode can be refuelled continuously for more than 60 cycles at 1.5 mA cm-2 without significant potential drop. Cells assembled with these bioanodes and bilirubin-oxidase-based biocathodes can be repeatedly used to power a portable music player at 1 mW cm-3 through 10 refuelling cycles. This study suggests that the refuelability within consumer electronics should facilitate the development of long and repeated use of the mediated biofuel cells as well as of NAD-based biosensors, bioreactors, and clinical applications.

  11. A porous Si-emitter crystalline-Si solar cell with 18.97% efficiency

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Xing; Zhou, Zhi-Quan; Hao, Hong-Chen; Lu, Ming

    2016-10-01

    A p-n junction was made on p-type Si wafer (15 × 15 × 0.2 mm3 in size) via phosphorous diffusion at 900 °C. Porous Si (PSi) with ultralow reflectivity (cells found in the literature, this PSi one possessed the feature of a graded band gap, which helped to suppress the surface recombination. In addition, the preparation method was readily applicable on large-scale-sized Si wafers. Also, the PSi acted as a down-shifter that absorbed the ultraviolet/violet light to which the Si solar cell responded poorly, and emitted a red one to which the cell responded well. Front and rear surface passivations were conducted by using SiO2 and Al2O3, respectively, to suppress the surface recombination and to facilitate the charge transfer. Indium-tin-oxide was used as the front electrode that was in good contact with the PSi, and Al was used as the rear one. For such a PSi-emitter crystalline-Si solar cell, enhancements of the photovoltaic responses from the ultraviolet to near-infrared regimes were observed; the open-circuit voltage was 606.8 mV, the short-circuit current density was 40.13 mA cm-2, the fill factor was 0.779 and the conversion efficiency was 18.97%.

  12. PEM fuel cell bipolar plate material requirements for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Borup, R.L.; Stroh, K.R.; Vanderborgh, N.E. [Los Alamos National Lab., NM (United States)] [and others

    1996-04-01

    Cost effective bipolar plates are currently under development to help make proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells commercially viable. Bipolar plates separate individual cells of the fuel cell stack, and thus must supply strength, be electrically conductive, provide for thermal control of the fuel stack, be a non-porous materials separating hydrogen and oxygen feed streams, be corrosion resistant, provide gas distribution for the feed streams and meet fuel stack cost targets. Candidate materials include conductive polymers and metal plates with corrosion resistant coatings. Possible metals include aluminium, titanium, iron/stainless steel and nickel.

  13. Characterization of the nanosized porous structure of black Si solar cells fabricated via a screen printing process

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Tang Yehua; Fei Jianming; Cao Hongbin; Zhou Chunlan; Wang Wenjing; Zhou Su; Zhao Yan; Zhao Lei; Li Hailing; Yan Baojun; Chen Jingwei

    2012-01-01

    A silicon (Si) surface with a nanosized porous structure was formed via simple wet chemical etching catalyzed by gold (Au) nanoparticles on p-type Cz-Si (100).The average reflectivity from 300 to 1200 nm was less than 1.5%.Black Si solar cells were then fabricated using a conventional production process.The results reflected the output characteristics of the cells fabricated using different etching depths and emitter dopant profiles.Heavier dopants and shallower etching depths should be adopted to optimize the black Si solar cell output characteristics.The efficiency at the optimized etching time and dopant profile was 12.17%.However,surface passivation and electrode contact due to the nanosized porous surface structure are still obstacles to obtaining high conversion efficiency for the black Si solar cells.

  14. Biocompatibility of nanometre scale porous anodic aluminium oxide membranes towards the RK 13 epithelial cell line: A preliminary study

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    G and eacute;rrard Eddy Jai Poinern

    2015-07-01

    Results: Cell proliferation over a 48 h period indicated that the AAO membranes were more than comparable with the glass control substrates. Subsequent microscopy observations revealed evidence of focal adhesion sites and cellular extensions interacting with the underlining porous membrane surface structure. Conclusions: The study has shown that AAO membranes have the potential to culture RK-13 cells and indicate a possible tissue engineering technique for producing tissues. [Int J Res Med Sci 2015; 3(7.000: 1583-1588

  15. Disulfiram-loaded porous PLGA microparticle for inhibiting the proliferation and migration of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Chenhui; Yang, Jiebing; Han, Haobo; Chen, Jiawen; Wang, Yudi; Li, Quanshun; Wang, Yanbo

    2017-01-01

    In this study, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid) (PLGA) was used as a carrier to construct disulfiram-loaded porous microparticle through the emulsion solvent evaporation method, using ammonium bicarbonate as a porogen. The microparticle possessed highly porous surface, suitable aerodynamic diameter for inhalation (8.31±1.33 µm), favorable drug loading (4.09%±0.11%), and sustained release profile. The antiproliferation effect of release supernatant was detected through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay using non-small-cell lung cancer A549 as a model, with only 13.3% of cell viability observed for the release supernatant at 7 days. The antiproliferation mechanism was elucidated to be associated with the enhanced induction of cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at S phase through flow cytometry and Western blotting analysis. Finally, wound healing and transwell migration assay showed that they could efficiently inhibit the cell migration. These results demonstrated that disulfiram-loaded porous PLGA microparticle could achieve favorable antitumor efficiency, implying the potential of treating non-small-cell lung cancer in a pulmonary administration. PMID:28182125

  16. Energy storage capability of the dye sensitized solar cells via utilization of highly porous carbon electrodes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rahimi, Fatemeh; Takshi, Arash

    2016-09-01

    Dye sensitized solar cells (DSSCs) have shown promising results in the field of renewable energy owing to their low cost and portable features. In practical applications, their harvested energy could be stored in a supercapacitor once it exceeds the regular consumption. Various methods of manipulation of the active electrode have been examined to facilitate the energy storage of the system, whereas the counter electrode has always been known for its catalytic functionality and its contribution to the capacitive response of the device left a well-oriented study to be desired. In this work, the substitution of the platinum electrode with a specific porous electrode resulted in a supercapacitive behavior of the device. The photoactive electrode was fabricated using zinc oxide nanowires (ZnO) grown on a conductive transparent substrate with hydrothermal deposition method. The electrode was used to make a standard DSSC using a ruthenium dye, iodide/triiodide standard redox electrolyte, and a platinum counter electrode. The cyclic voltammetry (CV) study of the device showed a low capacitance with 350 mV open circuit voltage. Replacing the platinum counter electrode with a particularly designed porous paper-based carbon nanotube electrode resulted in a considerable difference in the CV response. A capacitive behavior was observed due to the large surface area of the counter electrode and the ZnO nanostructures on the photoactive electrode. Due to the large capacitance and relatively small photocurrent, the change in the open circuit voltage was limited. However, enhancement of the photocurrent could improve both the energy harvesting and charge storage in the device.

  17. Scaling percolation in thin porous layers

    Science.gov (United States)

    Médici, E. F.; Allen, J. S.

    2011-12-01

    Percolation in porous media is a complex process that depends on the flow rate, material, and fluids properties as well as the boundary conditions. Traditional methods of characterizing percolation rely upon visual observation of a flow pattern or a pressure-saturation relation valid only in the limit of no flow. In this paper, the dynamics of fluid percolation in thin porous media is approached through a new scaling. This new scaling in conjunction with the capillary number and the viscosity ratio has resulted in a linear non-dimensional correlation of the percolation pressure and wetted area in time unique to each porous media. The effect of different percolation flow patterns on the dynamic pressure-saturation relation can be condensed into a linear correlation using this scaling. The general trend and implications of the scaling have been analyzed using an analytical model of a fluid percolating between two parallel plates and by experimental testing on thin porous media. Cathode porous transport layers (PTLs), also known as gas diffusion layers, of a proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cell having different morphological and wetting properties were tested under drainage conditions. Images of the fluid percolation evolution and the percolation pressure in the PTLs were simultaneously recorded. A unique linear correlation is obtained for each type of PTL samples using the new scaling. The correlation derived from this new scaling can be used to quantitatively characterize porous media with respect to percolation. While the characterization method discussed herein was developed for the study of porous materials used in PEM fuel cells, the method and scaling are applicable to any porous media.

  18. Pulsed laser deposited porous nano-carpets of indium tin oxide and their use as charge collectors in core-shell structures for dye sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garvey, Timothy R; Farnum, Byron H; Lopez, Rene

    2015-02-14

    Porous In2O3:Sn (ITO) films resembling from brush carpets to open moss-like discrete nanostructures were grown by pulsed laser deposition under low to high background gas pressures, respectively. The charge transport properties of these mesoporous substrates were probed by pulsed laser photo-current and -voltage transient measurements in N719 dye sensitized devices. Although the cyclic voltammetry and dye adsorption measurements suggest a lower proportion of electro-active dye molecules for films deposited at the high-end background gas pressures, the transient measurements indicate similar electron transport rates within the films. Solar cell operation was achieved by the deposition of a conformal TiO2 shell layer by atomic layer deposition (ALD). Much of the device improvement was shown to be due to the TiO2 shell blocking the recombination of photoelectrons with the electrolyte as recombination lifetimes increased drastically from a few seconds in uncoated ITO to over 50 minutes in the ITO with a TiO2 shell layer. Additionally, an order of magnitude increase in the electron transport rate in ITO/TiO2 (core/shell) films was observed, giving the core-shell structure a superior ratio of recombination/transport times.

  19. Disulfiram-loaded porous PLGA microparticle for inhibiting the proliferation and migration of non-small-cell lung cancer

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wang C

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Chenhui Wang,1,2,* Jiebing Yang,1,3,* Haobo Han,3 Jiawen Chen,3 Yudi Wang,3 Quanshun Li,3 Yanbo Wang1 1Department of Urology, First Hospital of Jilin University, 2Innovative Drug Research Centre, School of Pharmacy, Chongqing University, Chongqing, 3Key Laboratory for Molecular Enzymology and Engineering of Ministry of Education, School of Life Sciences, Jilin University, Changchun, People’s Republic of China *These authors contributed equally to this work Abstract: In this study, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid (PLGA was used as a carrier to construct disulfiram-loaded porous microparticle through the emulsion solvent evaporation method, using ammonium bicarbonate as a porogen. The microparticle possessed highly porous surface, suitable aerodynamic diameter for inhalation (8.31±1.33 µm, favorable drug loading (4.09%±0.11%, and sustained release profile. The antiproliferation effect of release supernatant was detected through 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay using non-small-cell lung cancer A549 as a model, with only 13.3% of cell viability observed for the release supernatant at 7 days. The antiproliferation mechanism was elucidated to be associated with the enhanced induction of cell apoptosis and cell cycle arrest at S phase through flow cytometry and Western blotting analysis. Finally, wound healing and transwell migration assay showed that they could efficiently inhibit the cell migration. These results demonstrated that disulfiram-loaded porous PLGA microparticle could achieve favorable antitumor efficiency, implying the potential of treating non-small-cell lung cancer in a pulmonary administration. Keywords: disulfiram, poly(lactic-co-glycolic acid, porous microparticle, non-small-cell lung cancer, antiproliferation, antimigration

  20. Hydrodynamic dispersion within porous biofilms

    KAUST Repository

    Davit, Y.

    2013-01-23

    Many microorganisms live within surface-associated consortia, termed biofilms, that can form intricate porous structures interspersed with a network of fluid channels. In such systems, transport phenomena, including flow and advection, regulate various aspects of cell behavior by controlling nutrient supply, evacuation of waste products, and permeation of antimicrobial agents. This study presents multiscale analysis of solute transport in these porous biofilms. We start our analysis with a channel-scale description of mass transport and use the method of volume averaging to derive a set of homogenized equations at the biofilm-scale in the case where the width of the channels is significantly smaller than the thickness of the biofilm. We show that solute transport may be described via two coupled partial differential equations or telegrapher\\'s equations for the averaged concentrations. These models are particularly relevant for chemicals, such as some antimicrobial agents, that penetrate cell clusters very slowly. In most cases, especially for nutrients, solute penetration is faster, and transport can be described via an advection-dispersion equation. In this simpler case, the effective diffusion is characterized by a second-order tensor whose components depend on (1) the topology of the channels\\' network; (2) the solute\\'s diffusion coefficients in the fluid and the cell clusters; (3) hydrodynamic dispersion effects; and (4) an additional dispersion term intrinsic to the two-phase configuration. Although solute transport in biofilms is commonly thought to be diffusion dominated, this analysis shows that hydrodynamic dispersion effects may significantly contribute to transport. © 2013 American Physical Society.

  1. Rn3D: A finite element code for simulating gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. User`s manual, Version 1.0

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Holford, D.J.

    1994-01-01

    This document is a user`s manual for the Rn3D finite element code. Rn3D was developed to simulate gas flow and radon transport in variably saturated, nonisothermal porous media. The Rn3D model is applicable to a wide range of problems involving radon transport in soil because it can simulate either steady-state or transient flow and transport in one-, two- or three-dimensions (including radially symmetric two-dimensional problems). The porous materials may be heterogeneous and anisotropic. This manual describes all pertinent mathematics related to the governing, boundary, and constitutive equations of the model, as well as the development of the finite element equations used in the code. Instructions are given for constructing Rn3D input files and executing the code, as well as a description of all output files generated by the code. Five verification problems are given that test various aspects of code operation, complete with example input files, FORTRAN programs for the respective analytical solutions, and plots of model results. An example simulation is presented to illustrate the type of problem Rn3D is designed to solve. Finally, instructions are given on how to convert Rn3D to simulate systems other than radon, air, and water.

  2. Tailoring hierarchically porous graphene architecture by carbon nanotube to accelerate extracellular electron transfer of anodic biofilm in microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zou, Long; Qiao, Yan; Wu, Xiao-Shuai; Li, Chang Ming

    2016-10-01

    To overcoming their respective shortcomings of graphene and carbon nanotube, a hierarchically porous multi-walled carbon nanotube@reduced graphene oxide (MWCNT@rGO) hybrid is fabricated through a versatile and scalable solvent method, in which the architecture is tailored by inserting MWCNTs as scaffolds into the rGO skeleton. An appropriate amount of inserted 1-D MWCNTs not only effectively prevent the aggregation of rGO sheets but also act as bridges to increase multidirectional connections between 2-D rGO sheets, resulting in a 3-D hierarchically porous structure with large surface area and excellent biocompatibility for rich bacterial biofilm and high electron transfer rate. The MWCNT@rGO1:2/biofilm anode delivers a maximum power density of 789 mW m-2 in Shewanella putrefaciens CN32 microbial fuel cells, which is much higher than that of individual MWCNT and rGO, in particular, 6-folder higher than that of conventional carbon cloth. The great enhancement is ascribed to a synergistic effect of the integrated biofilm and hierarchically porous structure of MWCNT@rGO1:2/biofilm anode, in which the biofilm provides a large amount of bacterial cells to raise the concentration of local electron shuttles for accelerating the direct electrochemistry on the 3-D hierarchically porous structured anodes.

  3. Hyaluronic acid concentration-mediated changes in structure and function of porous carriers for corneal endothelial cell sheet delivery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lai, Jui-Yang

    2016-02-01

    In this study, the effects of hyaluronic acid (HA) concentrations (0.05-1.25wt.%) on the properties of porous carriers for corneal endothelial tissue engineering were investigated. The pore size and porosity gradually increased with decreasing solid content. However, at relatively low HA concentration (i.e., 0.05wt.%), the material samples contained small interior pores and a dense surface skin layer, probably due to no gas bubble effect on the stirring processing of porous microstructures of freeze-dried polysaccharide hydrogels. The carriers prepared from 0.25wt.% HA solution had the highest freezable water content and oxygen and glucose permeability among the samples evaluated. Results of cell viability assays and quantitative real-time reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction analyses showed that the HA concentration-related alteration of porous microstructure dictates the compatibility of biopolymer carriers with corneal endothelial cell (CEC) cultures. In vivo studies demonstrated that the CEC sheet/HA carrier construct implants are therapeutically efficacious in the reconstruction of endothelial scrape-wounded corneas. It is concluded that the polysaccharide concentration is the major factor for affecting the processing of carriers and their structure and function. Porous hydrogels prepared from 0.25wt.% HA solution are capable of delivering bioengineered CEC sheets to the posterior surface of cornea.

  4. Mean kinetic energy transport and event classification in a model wind turbine array versus an array of porous disks: Energy budget and octant analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Camp, Elizabeth H.; Cal, Raúl Bayoán

    2016-08-01

    An array of model rotating wind turbines is compared experimentally to an array of static porous disks in order to quantify the similarities and differences in the mean kinetic energy transport within the wakes produced in these two cases. Stereo particle image velocimetry measurements are done in a wind tunnel bracketing the center turbine in the fourth row of a 4 ×3 array of model turbines. Equivalent sets of rotors and porous disks are created by matching their respective induction factors. The primary difference in the mean velocity components is found in the spanwise mean velocity component, which is as much as 190% different between the rotor and disk case. Horizontal averages of mean kinetic energy transport terms in the region where rotation is most important show percent differences in the range 3%-41%, which decrease to 1%-6% at streamwise coordinates where rotation is less important. Octant analysis is performed on the most significant term related to vertical mean kinetic energy flux u'v' ¯U . The average percent difference between corresponding octants is as much as 68% different in the near wake and as much as 17% different in the far wake. Furthermore, octant analysis elucidates the three-dimensional nature of sweeps and ejections in the near wake of the rotor case. Together, these results imply that a stationary porous disk adequately represents the mean kinetic energy transport of a rotor in the far wake where rotation is less important, while significant discrepancies exist at streamwise locations where rotation is a key phenomenon. This comparison has implications in the use of an actuator disk to model the wind turbine rotor in computational simulations specifically for studies where Reynolds stresses, turbulence intensity, or interactions with the atmosphere are of interest.

  5. Water transport in gas diffusion media for PEM fuel cells. Experimental and numerical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Joerg

    2010-08-20

    The water flux in partially saturated hydrophobic carbon fibre paper for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell applications is investigated and compared with the frequently used constitutive two-phase flow model based on Darcy's law. Further, the first steps towards a math-based material design for gas diffusion media are explored in this thesis. Two self-developed ex-situ experiments to investigate the liquid water transport are introduced. The first is a newly developed buoyancy-based measurement of the pressuresaturation relationship on thin porous material with an accuracy of 0.5 kPa for the pressure and {+-} 5% for the saturation. The second experiment measures the pressure drop in dependence of flow rates down to magnitudes of {mu}L/s across the partially saturated thin porous material. This flow rate is relevant for the fuel cell application. The liquid water transport through Toray 060 carbon fibre paper, impregnated with 7% and 10% PTFE is investigated at wet and dry boundary conditions. The experiments are also accompanied by analytical and numerical free surface modelling with the consideration of the material morphology and liquid-solid interaction. The imbibing and draining cases of an arrangement of six fibres at varying solid-liquid interaction and boundary conditions are studied with 'Surface Evolver'. In order to evaluate the findings of ex-situ and modelling work for applicability to water transport in fuel cell operation, the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging is assessed. The focus is on the visualisation of 2D and 3D water distribution in the operating fuel cell. The compatibility of the NMR experiment with fuel cell operation in relation to material selection, operating temperature, and current density is addressed. NMR imaging is employed for different current densities, stoichiometries, and fuel cell arrangements. The fuel cell arrangements differ by the cathode diffusion medium. Plain, hydrophobic, and

  6. Dynamics of water droplets detached from porous surfaces of relevance to PEM fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Theodorakakos, A; Ous, T; Gavaises, M; Nouri, J M; Nikolopoulos, N; Yanagihara, H

    2006-08-15

    The detachment of liquid droplets from porous material surfaces used with proton exchange membrane (PEM) fuel cells under the influence of a cross-flowing air is investigated computationally and experimentally. CCD images taken on a purpose-built transparent fuel cell have revealed that the water produced within the PEM is forming droplets on the surface of the gas-diffusion layer. These droplets are swept away if the velocity of the flowing air is above a critical value for a given droplet size. Static and dynamic contact angle measurements for three different carbon gas-diffusion layer materials obtained inside a transparent air-channel test model have been used as input to the numerical model; the latter is based on a Navier-Stokes equations flow solver incorporating the volume of fluid (VOF) two-phase flow methodology. Variable contact angle values around the gas-liquid-solid contact-line as well as their dynamic change during the droplet shape deformation process, have allowed estimation of the adhesion force between the liquid droplet and the solid surface and successful prediction of the separation line at which droplets loose their contact from the solid surface under the influence of the air stream flowing around them. Parametric studies highlight the relevant importance of various factors affecting the detachment of the liquid droplets from the solid surface.

  7. Laser fabrication of porous silicon-based platforms for cell culturing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peláez, Ramón-J; Afonso, Carmen-N; Vega, Fidel; Recio-Sánchez, Gonzalo; Torres-Costa, Vicente; Manso-Silván, Miguel; García-Ruiz, Josefa-P; Martín-Palma, Raúl-J

    2013-11-01

    In this study, we explore the selective culturing of human mesenchymal stem cells (hMSCs) on Si-based diffractive platforms. We demonstrate a single-step and flexible method for producing platforms on nanostructured porous silicon (nanoPS) based on the use of single pulses of an excimer laser to expose phase masks. The resulting patterns are typically 1D patterns formed by fringes or 2D patterns formed by circles. They are formed by alternate regions of almost unmodified nanoPS and regions where the nanoPS surface has melted and transformed into Si nanoparticles. The patterns are produced in relatively large areas (a few square millimeters) and can have a wide range of periodicities and aspect ratios. Direct binding, that is, with no previous functionalization of the pattern, alignment, and active polarization of hMSCs are explored. The results show the preferential direct binding of the hMSCs along the transformed regions whenever their width compares with the dimensions of the cells and they escape from patterns for smaller widths suggesting that the selectivity can be tailored through the pattern period.

  8. 3D chitosan-gelatin-chondroitin porous scaffold improves osteogenic differentiation of mesenchymal stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Machado, C B [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais (Brazil); Ventura, J M G [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Lemos, A F [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Ferreira, J M F [Department of Ceramics and Glass Engineering, University of Aveiro (Portugal); Leite, M F [Department of Physiology and Biophysics, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais (Brazil); Goes, A M [Department of Biochemistry and Immunology, Institute of Biological Sciences, Federal University of Minas Gerais (Brazil)

    2007-06-01

    A porous 3D scaffold was developed to support and enhance the differentiation process of mesenchymal stem cells (MSC) into osteoblasts in vitro. The 3D scaffold was made with chitosan, gelatin and chondroitin and it was crosslinked by EDAC. The scaffold physicochemical properties were evaluated. SEM revealed the high porosity and interconnection of pores in the scaffold; rheological measurements show that the scaffold exhibits a characteristic behavior of strong gels. The elastic modulus found in compressive tests of the crosslinked scaffold was about 50 times higher than the non-crosslinked one. After 21 days, the 3D matrix submitted to hydrolytic degradation loses above 40% of its weight. MSC were collected from rat bone marrow and seeded in chitosan-gelatin-chondroitin 3D scaffolds and in 2D culture plates as well. MSC were differentiated into osteoblasts for 21 days. Cell proliferation and alkaline phosphatase activity were followed weekly during the osteogenic process. The osteogenic differentiation of MSC was improved in 3D culture as shown by MTT assay and alkaline phosphatase activity. On the 21st day, bone markers, osteopontin and osteocalcin, were detected by the PCR analysis. This study shows that the chitosan-gelatin-chondroitin 3D structure provides a good environment for the osteogenic process and enhances cellular proliferation.

  9. Direct Numerical Simulation of turbulent flow in a porous, face centered cubic cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    He, Xiaoliang; Apte, Sourabh; Wood, Brian

    2014-11-01

    DNS of flow through a 3D, periodic, face centered cubic (FCC) unit cell geometry at Re = 300 , 550, and 950 based on diameter is performed. This low porosity arrangement of spheres is characterized by rapid flow expansions and contractions, and thus features an early onset to turbulence. The simulations are performed using a fictitious domain approach [Apte et al., J. Comp. Physics 2009], which uses non-body conforming Cartesian grids, with resolution up to D / Δ = 250 (3543 cells total). The results are used to investigate the structure of turbulence in the Eulerian and Lagrangian frames, the distribution and budget of turbulent kinetic energy, and the characteristics of the energy spectrum in complex packed beds and porous media. The porescale flow physics, which are important to properties such as bulk mixing performance and permeability, are investigated. Specifically, the data generated is being used to understand the important turbulence characteristics in low porosity packed beds of relevance for heat tranfer applications in chemical/nuclear reactors. Funding: NSF Project Number 1336983.

  10. Combination of silicon nitride and porous silicon induced optoelectronic features enhancement of multicrystalline silicon solar cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rabha, Mohamed Ben; Dimassi, Wissem; Gaidi, Mounir; Ezzaouia, Hatem; Bessais, Brahim [Laboratoire de Photovoltaique, Centre de Recherches et des Technologies de l' Energie, Technopole de Borj-Cedria, BP 95, 2050 Hammam-Lif (Tunisia)

    2011-06-15

    The effects of antireflection (ARC) and surface passivation films on optoelectronic features of multicrystalline silicon (mc-Si) were investigated in order to perform high efficiency solar cells. A double layer consisting of Plasma Enhanced Chemical Vapor Deposition (PECVD) of silicon nitride (SiN{sub x}) on porous silicon (PS) was achieved on mc-Si surfaces. It was found that this treatment decreases the total surface reflectivity from about 25% to around 6% in the 450-1100 nm wavelength range. As a result, the effective minority carrier diffusion length, estimated from the Laser-beam-induced current (LBIC) method, was found to increase from 312 {mu}m for PS-treated cells to about 798 {mu}m for SiN{sub x}/PS-treated ones. The deposition of SiN{sub x} was found to impressively enhance the minority carrier diffusion length probably due to hydrogen passivation of surface, grain boundaries and bulk defects. Fourier Transform Infrared Spectroscopy (FTIR) shows that the vibration modes of the highly suitable passivating Si-H bonds exhibit frequency shifts toward higher wavenumber, depending on the x ratio of the introduced N atoms neighbors. (copyright 2011 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH and Co. KGaA, Weinheim) (orig.)

  11. Biomimetic alginate/polyacrylamide porous scaffold supports human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and chondrogenesis

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Guo, Peng [Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, EENT Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, 210029 (China); Yuan, Yasheng, E-mail: yuanyasheng@163.com [Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, EENT Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, 210029 (China); Eaton-Peabody Laboratory, Massachusetts Eye and Ear Infirmary, Harvard Medical School, Boston, MA 02114 (United States); Chi, Fanglu [Department of ENT-Head and Neck Surgery, EENT Hospital, Shanghai 200031 (China); Shanghai Medical School, Fudan University, 210029 (China)

    2014-09-01

    We describe the development of alginate/polyacrylamide (ALG/PAAm) porous hydrogels based on interpenetrating polymer network structure for human mesenchymal stem cell proliferation and chondrogenesis. Three ALG/PAAm hydrogels at molar ratios of 10/90, 20/80, and 30/70 were prepared and characterized with enhanced elastic and rubbery mechanical properties, which are similar to native human cartilage tissues. Their elasticity and swelling properties were also studied under different physiological pH conditions. Finally, in vitro tests demonstrated that human mesenchymal stem cells could proliferate on the as-synthesized hydrogels with improved alkaline phosphatase activities. These results suggest that ALG/PAAm hydrogels may be a promising biomaterial for cartilage tissue engineering. - Highlights: • ALG/PAAm hydrogels were prepared at different molar ratios for cartilage tissue engineering. • ALG/PAAm hydrogels feature an interpenetrating polymer network structure. • ALG/PAAm hydrogels demonstrate strengthened elastic and rubbery mechanical properties. • hMSCs could be cultured on the ALG/PAAm hydrogels for proliferation and chondrogenesis.

  12. A porous Si-emitter crystalline-Si solar cell with 18.97% efficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Liang-Xing; Zhou, Zhi-Quan; Hao, Hong-Chen; Lu, Ming

    2016-10-21

    A p-n junction was made on p-type Si〈100〉 wafer (15 × 15 × 0.2 mm(3) in size) via phosphorous diffusion at 900 °C. Porous Si (PSi) with ultralow reflectivity (Si emitter in a solution of HF, H2O2 and H2O. The PSi was found to mainly consist of Si nanocrystallites with bandgap widths larger than that of bulk Si. Compared to other micro- or nanostructured Si-based crystalline-Si solar cells found in the literature, this PSi one possessed the feature of a graded band gap, which helped to suppress the surface recombination. In addition, the preparation method was readily applicable on large-scale-sized Si wafers. Also, the PSi acted as a down-shifter that absorbed the ultraviolet/violet light to which the Si solar cell responded poorly, and emitted a red one to which the cell responded well. Front and rear surface passivations were conducted by using SiO2 and Al2O3, respectively, to suppress the surface recombination and to facilitate the charge transfer. Indium-tin-oxide was used as the front electrode that was in good contact with the PSi, and Al was used as the rear one. For such a PSi-emitter crystalline-Si solar cell, enhancements of the photovoltaic responses from the ultraviolet to near-infrared regimes were observed; the open-circuit voltage was 606.8 mV, the short-circuit current density was 40.13 mA cm(-2), the fill factor was 0.779 and the conversion efficiency was 18.97%.

  13. Impact of heat and mass transfer during the transport of nitrogen in coal porous media on coal mine fires.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shi, Bobo; Zhou, Fubao

    2014-01-01

    The application of liquid nitrogen injection is an important technique in the field of coal mine fire prevention. However, the mechanism of heat and mass transfer of cryogenic nitrogen in the goaf porous medium has not been well accessed. Hence, the implementation of fire prevention engineering of liquid nitrogen roughly relied on an empirical view. According to the research gap in this respect, an experimental study on the heat and mass transfer of liquid nitrogen in coal porous media was proposed. Overall, the main mechanism of liquid nitrogen fire prevention technology in the coal mine is the creation of an inert and cryogenic atmosphere. Cryogenic nitrogen gas vapor cloud, heavier than the air, would cause the phenomenon of "gravity settling" in porous media firstly. The cryogen could be applicable to diverse types of fires, both in the openings and in the enclosures. Implementation of liquid nitrogen open-injection technique in Yangchangwan colliery achieved the goals of fire prevention and air-cooling. Meanwhile, this study can also provide an essential reference for the research on heat and mass transfer in porous media in the field of thermal physics and engineering.

  14. Potential of porous Co3O4 nanorods as cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction in microbial fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumar, Ravinder; Singh, Lakhveer; Zularisam, A W; Hai, Faisal I

    2016-11-01

    This study aims to investigate the potential of porous Co3O4 nanorods as the cathode catalyst for oxygen reduction reaction (ORR) in aqueous air cathode microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The porous Co3O4 nanorods were synthesized by a facile and cost-effective hydrothermal method. Three different concentrations (0.5mg/cm(2), 1mg/cm(2), and 2mg/cm(2)) of Co3O4 nanorods coated on graphite electrodes were used to test its performance in MFCs. The results showed that the addition of porous Co3O4 nanorods enhanced the electrocatalytic activity and ORR kinetics significantly and the overall resistance of the system was greatly reduced. Moreover, the MFC with a higher concentration of the catalyst achieved a maximum power density of 503±16mW/m(2), which was approximately five times higher than the bare graphite electrode. The improved catalytic activity of the cathodes could be due to the porous properties of Co3O4 nanorods that provided the higher number of active sites for oxygen.

  15. Micro solid oxide fuel cell fabricated on porous stainless steel: a new strategy for enhanced thermal cycling ability

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Kun Joong; Park, Byung Hyun; Kim, Sun Jae; Lee, Younki; Bae, Hongyeul; Choi, Gyeong Man

    2016-03-01

    Miniaturized solid oxide fuel cells (micro-SOFCs) are being extensively studied as a promising alternative to Li batteries for next generation portable power. A new micro-SOFC is designed and fabricated which shows enhanced thermal robustness by employing oxide-based thin-film electrode and porous stainless steel (STS) substrate. To deposit gas-tight thin-film electrolyte on STS, nano-porous composite oxide is proposed and applied as a new contact layer on STS. The micro-SOFC fabricated on composite oxide- STS dual layer substrate shows the peak power density of 560 mW cm-2 at 550 °C and maintains this power density during rapid thermal cycles. This cell may be suitable for portable electronic device that requires high power-density and fast thermal cycling.

  16. Increased production of recombinant prourokinase with porous microcarrier cell culture by periodic pressure oscillation in a stirred tank reactor

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hu Xianwen; Gao Lihua; Li Zuohu; Xiao Chengzu; Xu Zhaoping

    2006-01-01

    An rCHO cell line expressing recombinant human prourokinase (pro-UK at the level of 5μg/106cells/d was cultivated on Cytopore cellulose porous microcarriers in a 7.5L Biostat CT stirred tank reactor. A periodic pressure oscillation of 0.04 MPa and 0.04 Hz was adopted to introduce a physical stimulus on the rCHO cells and to improve mass transfer characteristic between cells and medium in the process of porous microcarrier CHO cell culture. Compared to constant pressure culture, the oscillation culture didn't influence specific cell growth rate significantly, but could enhance the pro-UK specific production by 10%~40%, and reduce production of lactate by 10%~30%. In the perfusion culture of recombinant CHO cell with serum-free medium for 67 days, cell density could reach 2.64×107/ml, the maximal prourokinase concentration in harvested supernatant was about 118mg/L, a total of 21.1 grams of prourokinase was produced in 313 liters of supernatant. In conclusion, the perfusion cell culture with periodic pressure oscillation can enhance the production of recombinant protein and increase the reactor specific productivity.

  17. Hydroxytyrosol increases norepinephrine transporter function in pheochromocytoma cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Luzon-Toro, Berta [Institute of Parasitology and Biomedicine ' Lopez-Neyra' , Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), 18100 Granada (Spain); Geerlings, Arjan [Puleva Biotech, 18004 Granada (Spain); Hilfiker, Sabine [Institute of Parasitology and Biomedicine ' Lopez-Neyra' , Spanish National Research Council (CSIC), 18100 Granada (Spain)], E-mail: sabine.hilfiker@ipb.csic.es

    2008-10-15

    Introduction: The norepinephrine transporter is responsible for the intracellular uptake of {sup 131}I- iodometaiodobenzylguanidine ({sup 131}I-MIBG), which is used for the diagnostic localization and treatment of pheochromocytomas as well as other tumors such as neuroblastomas and carcinoids. This agent is variably delivered into tumor cells by the norepinephrine transporter, but few studies have shown treatments that work to increase norepinephrine transporter activity. The objective of the present study was to test the possible beneficial effects of hydroxytyrosol in enhancing norepinephrine transporter function, which may have implications for its combined use with {sup 131}I-MIBG in the diagnosis and treatment of pheochromocytomas. Methods: Rat pheochromocytoma PC12 cells were labeled with [{sup 3}H]-norepinephrine in the presence or absence of different concentrations of hydroxytyrosol, a naturally occurring compound with strong antioxidant properties, followed by measurements of uptake and release of radiolabeled norepinephrine. Results: Hydroxytyrosol pronouncedly increased norepinephrine transporter activity, with the rapid onset excluding effects on norepinephrine transporter expression levels. Concomitant with increased norepinephrine transporter activity, hydroxytyrosol caused a decrease of both spontaneous and evoked norepinephrine release, indicating that it affects pre-existing plasma membrane-associated norepinephrine transporter, rather than the incorporation of novel norepinephrine transporter molecules into the plasma membrane. Conclusion: Hydroxytyrosol potently enhances norepinephrine transporter activity in pheochromocytoma PC12 cells, suggesting that combinatorial therapy employing hydroxytyrosol may improve the effectiveness of {sup 131}I-MIBG as a diagnosis and treatment modality.

  18. Guar gum solutions for improved delivery of iron particles in porous media (Part 2): Iron transport tests and modeling in radial geometry

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tosco, Tiziana; Gastone, Francesca; Sethi, Rajandrea

    2014-10-01

    In the present work column transport tests were performed in order to study the mobility of guar-gum suspensions of microscale zero-valent iron particles (MZVI) in porous media. The results were analyzed with the purpose of implementing a radial model for the design of full scale interventions. The transport tests were performed using several concentrations of shear thinning guar gum solutions as stabilizer (1.5, 3 and 4 g/l) and applying different flow rates (Darcy velocity in the range 1 · 10- 4 to 2 · 10- 3 m/s), representative of different distances from the injection point in the radial domain. Empirical relationships, expressing the dependence of the deposition and release parameters on the flow velocity, were derived by inverse fitting of the column transport tests using a modified version of E-MNM1D (Tosco and Sethi, 2010) and the user interface MNMs (www.polito.it/groundwater/software). They were used to develop a comprehensive transport model of MZVI suspensions in radial coordinates, called E-MNM1R, which takes into account the non Newtonian (shear thinning) rheological properties of the dispersant fluid and the porous medium clogging associated with filtration and sedimentation in the porous medium of both MZVI and guar gum residual undissolved particles. The radial model was run in forward mode to simulate the injection of MZVI dispersed in guar gum in conditions similar to those applied in the column transport tests. In a second stage, we demonstrated how the model can be used as a valid tool for the design and the optimization of a full scale intervention. The simulation results indicated that several concurrent aspects are to be taken into account for the design of a successful delivery of MZVI/guar gum slurries via permeation injection, and a compromise is necessary between maximizing the radius of influence of the injection and minimizing the injection pressure, to guarantee a sufficiently homogeneous distribution of the particles around the

  19. Experimental dissection of oxygen transport resistance in the components of a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oh, Hwanyeong; Lee, Yoo il; Lee, Guesang; Min, Kyoungdoug; Yi, Jung S.

    2017-03-01

    Oxygen transport resistance is a major obstacle for obtaining high performance in a polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). To distinguish the major components that inhibit oxygen transport, an experimental method is established to dissect the oxygen transport resistance of the components of the PEMFC, such as the substrate, micro-porous layer (MPL), catalyst layer, and ionomer film. The Knudsen numbers are calculated to determine the types of diffusion mechanisms at each layer by measuring the pore sizes with either mercury porosimetry or BET analysis. At the under-saturated condition where condensation is mostly absent, the molecular diffusion resistance is dissected by changing the type of inert gas, and ionomer film permeation is separated by varying the inlet gas humidity. Moreover, the presence of the MPL and the variability of the substrate thickness allow the oxygen transport resistance at each component of a PEMFC to be dissected. At a low relative humidity of 50% and lower, an ionomer film had the largest resistance, while the contribution of the MPL was largest for the other humidification conditions.

  20. Software for fitting and simulating fate and transport of dense colloids and biocolloids in one-dimensional porous media: Re-introducing ColloidFit.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Katzourakis, Vasileios; Chrysikopoulos, Constantinos

    2016-04-01

    The present work re-introduces ColloidFit, which is an autonomous, modular, multipurpose fitting software for dense colloid and biocolloid transport phenomena in porous media. The initial version of ColloidFit, introduced by Sim and Chrysikopoulos (1995), was substantially improved and combined with a relatively intuitive and easy to use graphical user interface. The re-introduced ColloidFit can simulate the migration of suspended colloid or biocolloid particles in one-dimensional, water saturated, homogeneous porous media with uniform flow, accounting for non-equilibrium attachment onto the solid matrix, as well as gravitational effects. Furthermore, the improved ColloidFit software employs a variety of non-equilibrium, linear and nonlinear models for the simulation of colloid attachment onto a solid matrix under batch experimental conditions. The re-introduced ColloidFit uses the state of the art fitting software "Pest" to estimate unknown model parameter values, together with their 95% confidence intervals. Pest is a model-independent parameter estimation software capable of adjusting model parameters, so that discrepancies between model-generated data and the corresponding experimental measurements are reduced to a user preselected minimum. The fitting process is graphed and displayed in real time. The user is allowed to overview every step of the fitting progress, and if needed to change the initial parameter values. The re-introduced ColloidFit software is expected to make the fitting process of colloid and biocolloid transport data, just a simple task.

  1. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chih-Hao Chang

    Full Text Available Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w. Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity.

  2. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Chih-Yang; Liu, Fwu-Hsing; Chen, Mark Hung-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity.

  3. 3D Printing Bioceramic Porous Scaffolds with Good Mechanical Property and Cell Affinity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Chih-Hao; Lin, Chih-Yang; Liu, Fwu-Hsing; Chen, Mark Hung-Chih; Lin, Chun-Pin; Ho, Hong-Nerng; Liao, Yunn-Shiuan

    2015-01-01

    Artificial bone grafting is widely used in current orthopedic surgery for bone defect problems. Unfortunately, surgeons remain unsatisfied with the current commercially available products. One of the major complaints is that these products cannot provide sufficient mechanical strength to support the human skeletal structure. In this study, we aimed to develop a bone scaffold with better mechanical property and good cell affinity by 3D printing (3DP) techniques. A self-developed 3D printer with laser-aided gelling (LAG) process was used to fabricate bioceramic scaffolds with inter-porous structures. To improve the mechanical property of the bioceramic parts after heating, CaCO3 was added to the silica ceramic slurry. CaCO3 was blended into a homogenous SiO2-sol dispersion at weight ratios varying from 0/100 to 5/95 to 9/91 (w/w). Bi-component CaCO3/SiO2-sol was prepared as a biocomposite for the 3DP scaffold. The well-mixed biocomposite was used to fabricate the bioceramic green part using the LAG method. The varied scaffolds were sintered at different temperatures ranging from 900 to 1500°C, and the mechanical property was subsequently analyzed. The scaffolds showed good property with the composite ratio of 5:95 CaCO3:SiO2 at a sintering temperature of 1300°C. The compressive strength was 47 MPa, and the porosity was 34%. The topography of the sintered 3DP bioceramic scaffold was examined by SEM, EDS and XRD. The silica bioceramic presented no cytotoxicity and good MG-63 osteoblast-like cell affinity, demonstrating good biocompatibility. Therefore, the new silica biocomposite is viable for fabricating 3DP bone bioceramics with improved mechanical property and good cell affinity. PMID:26618362

  4. Why Cells are Microscopic: A Transport-Time Perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soh, Siowling; Banaszak, Michal; Kandere-Grzybowska, Kristiana; Grzybowski, Bartosz A

    2013-03-21

    Physical-chemical reasoning is used to demonstrate that the sizes of both prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells are such that they minimize the times needed for the macromolecules to migrate throughout the cells and interact/react with one another. This conclusion does not depend on a particular form of the crowded-medium diffusion model, as thus points toward a potential optimization principle of cellular organisms. In eukaryotes, size optimality renders the diffusive transport as efficient as active transport - in this way, the cells can conserve energetic resources that would otherwise be expended in active transport.

  5. Long Term Stability Investigation of Solid Oxide Electrolysis Cell with Infiltrated Porous YSZ Air Electrode Under High Current

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Veltzé, Sune; Ovtar, Simona; Simonsen, Søren Bredmose

    2015-01-01

    activity, due to high surface area of catalyst nano particles. Advantage of infiltration is also separate production of electrolyte backbone structure with good ionic connectivity and mechanical properties. With this study we present the results of a solid oxide cell with infiltrated porous yttria...... and the backbone, and perovskite catalyst material. Cobalt doped lanthanum nickelate was used as the perovskite catalyst due to its excellent performance. The cell was tested in steam electrolysis for at least 2000h. This initial test indicate that a stable air electrode was formed, and that the cell performance...

  6. Three-dimensional porous carbon nanotube sponges for high-performance anodes of microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Erbay, Celal; Yang, Gang; de Figueiredo, Paul; Sadr, Reza; Yu, Choongho; Han, Arum

    2015-12-01

    Highly-porous, light-weight, and inexpensive three-dimensional (3D) sponges consisting of interconnected carbon nanotubes (CNTs) without base materials are synthesized with a facile and scalable one-step chemical vapor deposition process as anode of microbial fuel cells (MFCs). The MFCs generates higher power densities of 2150 W m-3 (per anode volume) or 170 W m-3 (per anode chamber volume), comparable to those of commercial 3D carbon felt electrodes under the same conditions. The high performances are due to excellent charge transfer between CNTs and microbes owing to 13 times lower charge transfer resistance compared to that of carbon felt. The material cost of producing these CNT sponge estimates to be ∼0.1/gCNT, significantly lower than that of other methods. In addition, the high production rate of about 3.6 g h-1 compared to typical production rate of 0.02 g h-1 of other CNT-based materials makes this process economically viable. The one-step synthesis method allowing self-assembly of 3D CNT sponges as they grow is low cost and scalable, making this a promising method for manufacturing high-performance anodes of MFCs, with broad applicability to microbial electrochemical systems in general.

  7. Ultra-low reflection porous silicon nanowires for solar cell applications

    KAUST Repository

    Najar, Adel

    2012-01-01

    High density vertically aligned Porous Silicon NanoWires (PSiNWs) were fabricated on silicon substrate using metal assisted chemical etching process. A linear dependency of nanowire length to the etching time was obtained and the change in the growth rate of PSiNWs by increasing etching durations was shown. A typical 2D bright-field TEM image used for volume reconstruction of the sample shows the pores size varying from 10 to 50 nm. Furthermore, reflectivity measurements show that the 35% reflectivity of the starting silicon wafer drops to 0.1% recorded for more than 10 μm long PSiNWs. Models based on cone shape of nanowires located in a circular and rectangular bases were used to calculate the reflectance employing the Transfert Matrix Formalism (TMF) of the PSiNWs layer. Using TMF, the Bruggeman model was used to calculate the refractive index of PSiNWs layer. The calculated reflectance using circular cone shape fits better the measured reflectance for PSiNWs. The remarkable decrease in optical reflectivity indicates that PSiNWs is a good antireflective layer and have a great potential to be utilized in radial or coaxial p-n heterojunction solar cells that could provide orthogonal photon absorption and enhanced carrier collection. ©2012 Optical Society of America.

  8. Micro-tubular solid oxide fuel cell based on a porous yttria-stabilized zirconia support.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Panthi, Dhruba; Tsutsumi, Atsushi

    2014-08-29

    Solid oxide fuel cells (SOFCs) are promising electrochemical energy conversion devices owing to their high power generation efficiency and environmentally benign operation. Micro-tubular SOFCs, which have diameters ranging from a few millimeters to the sub-millimeter scale, offer several advantages over competing SOFCs such as high volumetric power density, good endurance against thermal cycling, and flexible sealing between fuel and oxidant streams. Herein, we successfully realized a novel micro-tubular SOFC design based on a porous yttria-stabilized zirconia (YSZ) support using multi-step dip coating and co-sintering methods. The micro-tubular SOFC consisted of Ni-YSZ, YSZ, and strontium-doped lanthanum manganite (LSM)-YSZ as the anode, electrolyte, and cathode, respectively. In addition, to facilitate current collection from the anode and cathode, Ni and LSM were applied as an anode current collector and cathode current collector, respectively. Micro-crystalline cellulose was selected as a pore former to achieve better shrinkage behavior of the YSZ support so that the electrolyte layer could be densified at a co-sintering temperature of 1300 °C. The developed micro-tubular design showed a promising electrochemical performance with maximum power densities of 525, 442, and 354 mW cm(-2) at 850, 800, and 750 °C, respectively.

  9. Ultrasensitive detection of superoxide anion released from living cells using a porous Pt-Pd decorated enzymatic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Xiang; Liu, Tingting; Zhao, Hongli; Shi, Libo; Li, Xiaoqing; Lan, Minbo

    2016-05-15

    Considering the critical roles of superoxide anion (O2(∙-)) in pathological conditions, it is of great urgency to establish a reliable and durable approach for real-time determination of O2(∙-). In this study, we propose a porous Pt-Pd decorated superoxide dismutase (SOD) sensor for qualitative and quantitative detection O2(∙-). The developed biosensor exhibits a fast, selective and linear amperometric response upon O2(∙-) in the concentration scope of 16 to 1,536 μM (R(2)=0.9941), with a detection limit of 0.13 μM (S/N=3) and a low Michaelis-Menten constant of 1.37 μM which indicating a high enzymatic activity and affinity to O2(∙-). Inspiringly, the proposed sensor possesses an ultrahigh sensitivity of 1270 μA mM(-1)cm(-2). In addition, SOD/porous Pt-Pd sensor exhibits excellent anti-interference property, reproducibility and long-term storage stability. Beyond our expectation, the trace level of O2(∙-) released from living cells has also been successfully captured. These satisfactory results are mainly ascribed to (1) the porous interface with larger surface area and more active sites to provide a biocompatible environment for SOD (2) the specific biocatalysis of SOD towards O2(∙-) and (3) porous Pt-Pd nanomaterials fastening the electron transfer. The superior electrochemical performance makes SOD/porous Pt-Pd sensor a promising candidate for monitoring the dynamic changes of O2(∙-)in vivo.

  10. Micro-particle transporting system using galvanotactically stimulated apo-symbiotic cells of Paramecium bursaria.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Furukawa, Shunsuke; Karaki, Chiaki; Kawano, Tomonori

    2009-01-01

    It is well known that Paramecium species including green paramecia (Paramecium bursaria) migrate towards the anode when exposed to an electric field in a medium. This type of a cellular movement is known as galvanotaxis. Our previous study revealed that an electric stimulus given to P bursaria is converted to a galvanotactic cellular movement by involvement of T-type calcium channel on the plasma membrane [Aonuma et al. (2007), Z. Naturforsch. 62c, 93-102]. This phenomenon has attracted the attention of bioengineers in the fields of biorobotics or micro-robotics in order to develop electrically controllable micromachineries. Here, we demonstrate the galvanotactic controls of the cellular migration of P bursaria in capillary tubes (diameter, 1-2 mm; length, 30-240 mm). Since the Paramecium cells take up particles of various sizes, we attempted to use the electrically stimulated cells of P bursaria as the vehicle for transportation of micro-particles in the capillary system. By using apo-symbiotic cells of P bursaria obtained after forced removal of symbiotic algae, the uptake of the particles could be maximized and visualized. Then, electrically controlled transportations of particle-filled apo-symbiotic P bursaria cells were manifested. The particles transported by electrically controlled cells (varying in size from nm to /m levels) included re-introduced green algae, fluorescence-labeled polystyrene beads, magnetic microspheres, emerald green fluorescent protein (EmGFP)-labeled cells of E. coli, Indian ink, and crystals of zeolite (hydrated aluminosilicate minerals with a micro-porous structure) and some metal oxides. Since the above demonstrations were successful, we concluded that P bursaria has a potential to be employed as one of the micro-biorobotic devices used in BioMEMS (biological micro-electro-mechanical systems).

  11. Moisture Transport in Wood

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Astrup, T.; Hansen, K. K.; Hoffmeyer, P.;

    2005-01-01

    Modelling of moisture transport in wood is of great importance as most mechanical and physical properties of wood depend on moisture content. Moisture transport in porous materials is often described by Ficks second law, but several observations indicate that this does not apply very well to wood....... Recently at the Technical University of Denmark, Department of Civil Engineering, a new model for moisture transport in wood has been developed. The model divides the transport into two phases, namely water vapour in the cell lumens and bound water in the cell walls....

  12. Three-dimensional phase segregation of micro-porous layers for fuel cells by nano-scale X-ray computed tomography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andisheh-Tadbir, Mehdi; Orfino, Francesco P.; Kjeang, Erik

    2016-04-01

    Modern hydrogen powered polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) utilize a micro-porous layer (MPL) consisting of carbon nanoparticles and polytetrafluoroethylene (PTFE) to enhance the transport phenomena and performance while reducing cost. However, the underlying mechanisms are not yet completely understood due to a lack of information about the detailed MPL structure and properties. In the present work, the 3D phase segregated nanostructure of an MPL is revealed for the first time through the development of a customized, non-destructive procedure for monochromatic nano-scale X-ray computed tomography visualization. Utilizing this technique, it is discovered that PTFE is situated in conglomerated regions distributed randomly within connected domains of carbon particles; hence, it is concluded that PTFE acts as a binder for the carbon particles and provides structural support for the MPL. Exposed PTFE surfaces are also observed that will aid the desired hydrophobicity of the material. Additionally, the present approach uniquely enables phase segregated calculation of effective transport properties, as reported herein, which is particularly important for accurate estimation of electrical and thermal conductivity. Overall, the new imaging technique and associated findings may contribute to further performance improvements and cost reduction in support of fuel cell commercialization for clean energy applications.

  13. Investigation on the origin of diffusion impedance in the porous cathode of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC) via electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mainka, J.; Maranzana, G.; Dillet, J.; Didierjean, S.; Lottin, O. [Nancy Univ., Centre national de la recherche scientifique, Vandoeuvre les Nancy (France). Laboratoire d' Energetique et de Mecanique Theorique et Appliquee

    2009-07-01

    This study provided a preliminary examination of the impact of gas flow rate on the impedance characteristics of a proton exchange membrane fuel cell (PEMFC). The mass transport phenomena within the porous cathode of PEMFCs can be analyzed through electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS). The geometrical description of the electrodes chosen to complete the EIS interpretations is a form of the agglomerate model, where the agglomerates are a mixture of carbon powder and catalyst particles, whereas the electrolyte is assumed to cover only the pore surfaces. Therefore, the reactants access the active catalyst sites by passing successively through the gas diffusion layer (GDL), the pores of the electrode, and finally through a thin electrolyte layer. The fuel cell equivalent electrical circuit is based on a Butler-Volmer formalism that takes into consideration oxygen diffusion in the pores of the GDL and/or the active layer through a Warburg element. The results reveal that in the cathode, the mass transfer limiting layer is most likely the active layer, provided liquid water is present within the pores. Under normal operating conditions, the mass transport resistance of the gas diffusion layer is negligible, as is the fine electrolyte layer coating the agglomerate.

  14. Explicit analytical solutions of transport equations considering non-Fourier and non-Fick effects in porous media

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GOU Chenhua; CAI Ruixian; ZHANG Na

    2005-01-01

    Based on the method of separation variables with addition developed in recent years, new methods of separation variables are proposed, and two algebraically explicit analytical solutions to the general partial differential equation set of non-Fourier and non-Fick heat and mass transfer in porous media drying are derived. The physical meaning of these solutions is simple and clear, and they are valuable for computational heat and mass transfer as benchmark solutions.

  15. Transcellular transport of 4-iodo-L-meta-tyrosine via system L across monolayers of kidney epithelial cell line LLC-PK{sub 1}

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Shikano, Naoto E-mail: sikano@ipu.ac.jp; Kawai, Keiichi; Nakajima, Syuichi; Kubodera, Akiko; Kubota, Nobuo; Ishikawa, Nobuyoshi; Saji, Hideo

    2004-05-01

    The substance 4-[{sup 125}I]iodo-L-meta-tyrosin (4-[{sup 125}I]mTyr) is a radioiodinated amino acid that exhibits high in vivo stability and rapid renal elimination in vivo. We investigated transport of 4-[{sup 125}I]mTyr in LLC-PK{sub 1} (porcine kidney epithelial cell line) monolayers grown on collagen-coated, micro-porous membrane filters. We found that 4-[{sup 125}I]mTyr transport in LLC-PK{sub 1} cells was carrier-mediated and sodium-independent, and that 4-[{sup 125}I]mTyr transport was similar to that of L-Tyr and 3-iodo-{alpha}-methyl-L-tyrosine. The results of the inhibition experiments suggest that 4-[{sup 125}I]mTyr transport is predominantly mediated by a L-type amino acid transporter 1-like porcine homologue (a component of system L) in both basolateral and apical membrane.

  16. Peristaltic transport of MHD Williamson fluid in an inclined asymmetric channel through porous medium with heat transfer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    K. Ramesh; M. Devakar

    2015-01-01

    The intention of this investigation is to study the effects of heat transfer and inclined magnetic field on the peristaltic flow of Williamson fluid in an asymmetric channel through porous medium. The governing two-dimensional equations are simplified under the assumption of long wavelength approximation. The simplified equations are solved for the stream function, temperature, and axial pressure gradient by using a regular perturbation method. The expression for pressure rise is computed numerically. The profiles of velocity, pressure gradient, temperature, heat transfer coefficient and stream function are sketched and interpreted for various embedded parameters and also the behavior of stream function for various wave forms is discussed through graphs. It is observed that the peristaltic velocity increases from porous medium to non-porous medium, the magnetic effects have increasing effect on the temperature, and the size of the trapped bolus decreases with the increasing of magnetic effects while the trend is reversed with the increasing of Darcy number. Moreover, limiting solutions of our problem are in close agreement with the corresponding results of the Newtonian fluid model.

  17. Modeling the Liquid Water Transport in the Gas Diffusion Layer for Polymer Electrolyte Membrane Fuel Cells Using a Water Path Network

    OpenAIRE

    Dietmar Gerteisen; Robert Alink

    2013-01-01

    In order to model the liquid water transport in the porous materials used in polymer electrolyte membrane (PEM) fuel cells, the pore network models are often applied. The presented model is a novel approach to further develop these models towards a percolation model that is based on the fiber structure rather than the pore structure. The developed algorithm determines the stable liquid water paths in the gas diffusion layer (GDL) structure and the transitions from the paths to the subsequent ...

  18. Magma Generation and Transport in Subduction Zones: Numerical Simulations of Chemical, Thermal and Mechanical Coupling During Magma Ascent by Porous Flow

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arcay, D.; Gerya, T.; Tackley, P.

    2007-12-01

    Most subduction zones are characterized by significant magmatic activity responsible for building trench-parallel volcanic arcs above descending slabs. High magma production rates observed within the arcs result from infiltration of water-rich fluids released by slab dehydration. The released water triggers hydrous melting of hot mantle wedges located above the cold slabs. However, the process of magma transport from the melt generation region located above the hydrated slab surface at 100-300 km depth to the magma extraction zone at the volcanic arc surface, and its influence on mantle wedge deformation, are not well known. In particular, during basaltic liquid ascent through the mantle wedge, decreasing pressure and temperature changes are likely to induce significant compositional variations, especially in terms of dissolved water content. Relationships between melt transport and mantle wedge deformation are also not clearly understood. We present a numerical model of magma generation and transport in subduction zones, that simulates chemical, thermal, and mechanical interactions between fluids and solid rocks along the magma ascent pathway. Magma migration is modelled by a porous flow across a constant permeability matrix, while the solid downward current associated with subduction in the mantle wedge, is included. The heat advected by the percolating liquid phase as well as latent heat effect associated with melting will be included. Water exchanges between the molten rock and the solid matrix are computed as a function of pressure, temperature, and solubilities laws in melt. We will first present benchmark results to validate the porous flow modelling as well as the ernery equation resolution for a two- phase flow. The aqueous and magmatic fluid repartition within the mantle wedge will then be presented. Magma productivity rates, varying along the magma ascent path way, will be discussed as a function of magma viscosity.

  19. Singlet oxygen generation using a porous monolithic polymer supported photosensitizer: potential application to the photodynamic destruction of melanoma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burguete, M Isabel; Galindo, Francisco; Gavara, Raquel; Luis, Santiago V; Moreno, Miguel; Thomas, Paul; Russell, David A

    2009-01-01

    Photogeneration of singlet oxygen (1O2) by rose bengal is improved through the use of a porous monolithic polymer (PMP) as a support, as compared to a classic gel-type resin matrix. This type of monolithic polymeric matrix can be made at a multigram scale in quantitative yields enabling the preparation of large amounts of supported photosensitizer at low cost. The singlet oxygen induced oxidation of 9,10-diphenylanthracene has been used as a benchmark reaction, and a comparative study using rose bengal in solution, entrapped within gel-type derived polymer and entrapped within a porous monolithic polymer (PMP) has been performed. The enhanced photoreactivity of the PMP-rose bengal conjugates has been utilised for the successful photodynamic therapy (PDT) of melanoma cells.

  20. Recent advance in fabricating monolithic 3D porous graphene and their applications in biosensing and biofuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Qiu, Hua-Jun; Guan, Yongxin; Luo, Pan; Wang, Yu

    2017-03-15

    Graphene shows great potential in biosensing and bioelectronics. To facilitate graphene's applications and enhance its performance, recently, three-dimensional (3D) graphene-based materials especially free-standing porous graphene with tunable pore size and void space, have attracted increasing attention for bio-related applications owing to their special features. 3D graphene usually shows the following merits such as an interconnected porous network, a high electronic conductivity, a large active surface area, good chemical/thermal stability and can be more easily handled compared with dispersed graphene sheets. With modified surface properties, graphene can also be bio-friendly. These properties make 3D graphene a perfect candidate as high-performance electrode materials in bioelectronics devices. In this review, we discuss recent advance in fabricating monolithic 3D graphene and their applications in biosensing and biofuel cells.

  1. The effect of coupled mass transport and internal reforming on modeling of solid oxide fuel cells part II: Benchmarking transient response and dynamic model fidelity assessment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Kevin J.; Braun, Robert J.

    2016-02-01

    One- and 'quasi' two-dimensional (2-D) dynamic, interface charge transport models of a solid oxide fuel cell (SOFC) developed previously in a companion paper, are benchmarked against other models and simulated to evaluate the effects of coupled transport and chemistry. Because the reforming reaction can distort the concentration profiles of the species within the anode, a 'quasi' 2-D model that captures porous media mass transport and electrochemistry is required. The impact of a change in concentration at the triple-phase boundary is twofold wherein the local Nernst potential and anode exchange current densities are influenced, thereby altering the current density and temperature distributions of the cell. Thus, the dynamic response of the cell models are compared, and benchmarked against previous channel-level models to gauge the relative importance of capturing in-situ reforming phenomena on cell performance. Simulation results indicate differences in the transient electrochemical response for a step in current density where the 'quasi' 2-D model predicts a slower rise and fall in cell potential due to the additional volume of the porous media and mass transport dynamics. Delays in fuel flow rate are shown to increase the difference observed in the electrochemical response of the cells.

  2. Transport of sucrose-modified nanoscale zero-valent iron in saturated porous media: role of media size, injection rate and input concentration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Hui; Zhao, Yong-sheng; Han, Zhan-tao; Hong, Mei

    2015-01-01

    The growing use of nanoscale zero-valent iron (NZVI) in the remediation of contaminated groundwater raises concerns regarding its transport in aquifers. Laboratory-scale sand-packed column experiments were conducted with bare and sucrose-modified NZVI (SM-NZVI) to improve our understanding of the transport of the nanoparticles in saturated porous media, as well as the role of media size, suspension injection rate and concentration on the nanoparticle behavior. As the main indicative parameters, the normalized effluent concentration was measured and the deposition rate coefficient (k) was calculated for different simulated conditions. Overall, compared to the high retention of bare NZVI in the saturated silica column, SM-NZVI suspension could travel through the coarse sand column easily. However, the transport of SM-NZVI particles was not very satisfactory in a smaller size granular matrix especially in fine silica sand. Furthermore, the value of k regularly decreased with the increasing injection rate of suspension but increased with suspension concentration, which could reflect the role of these factors in the SM-NZVI travel process. The calculation of k-value at the tests condition adequately described the experimental results from the point of deposition dynamics, which meant the assumption of first-order deposition kinetics for the transport of NZVI particles was reasonable and feasible.

  3. Influence of mineral colloids and humic substances on uranium(VI) transport in water-saturated geologic porous media.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Qing; Cheng, Tao; Wu, Yang

    2014-12-01

    Mineral colloids and humic substances often co-exist in subsurface environment and substantially influence uranium (U) transport. However, the combined effects of mineral colloids and humic substances on U transport are not clear. This study is aimed at quantifying U transport and elucidating geochemical processes that control U transport when both mineral colloids and humic acid (HA) are present. U-spiked solutions/suspensions were injected into water-saturated sand columns, and U and colloid concentrations in column effluent were monitored. We found that HA promoted U transport via (i) formation of aqueous U-HA complexes, and (ii) competition against aqueous U for surface sites on transport media. Illite colloids had no influence on U transport at pH5 in the absence of HA due to low mobility of the colloids. At pH9, U desorbed from mobile illite and the presence of illite decreased U transport. At pH5, high U transport occurred when both illite colloids and HA were present, which was attributed to enhanced U adsorption to illite colloids via formation of ternary illite-HA-U surface complexes, and enhanced illite transport due to HA attachment to illite and transport media. This study demonstrates that the combined effects of mineral colloids and HA on contaminant transport is different from simple addition of the individual effect.

  4. Nanocrystalline porous TiO2 electrode with ionic liquid impregnated solid polymer electrolyte for dye sensitized solar cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Pramod K; Kim, Kang-Wook; Kim, Ki-Il; Park, Nam-Gyu; Rhee, Hee-Woo

    2008-10-01

    This communication reports the detailed fabrication of electrodes and solid polymer electrolyte with ionic liquid (IL) as an electrolyte for dye sensitized solar cell (DSSC). Thick porous TiO2 film has been obtained by spreading and sintering TiO2 colloidal paste using "doctor blade" and characterized by SEM, TEM and XRD. The polymer electrolyte was PEO:KI/I2 incorporated with 1-ethyl 3-methylimidazolium thiocyanate (EMImSCN) as IL. Dispersal of IL in the polymer electrolyte improved the ionic conductivity and cell efficiency.

  5. The transport behaviour of elemental mercury DNAPL in saturated porous media: Analysis of field observations and two-phase flow modelling

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sweijen, Thomas; Hartog, Niels; Marsman, Annemieke; Keijzer, Thomas J. S.

    2014-06-01

    Mercury is a contaminant of global concern. The use of elemental mercury in various (former) industrial processes, such as chlorine production at chlor-alkali plants, is known to have resulted in soil and groundwater contaminations worldwide. However, the subsurface transport behaviour of elemental mercury as an immiscible dense non-aqueous phase liquid (DNAPL) in porous media has received minimal attention to date. Even though, such insight would aid in the remediation effort of mercury contaminated sites. Therefore, in this study a detailed field characterization of elemental mercury DNAPL distribution with depth was performed together with two-phase flow modelling, using STOMP. This is to evaluate the dynamics of mercury DNAPL migration and the controls on its distribution in saturated porous media. Using a CPT-probe mounted with a digital camera, in-situ mercury DNAPL depth distribution was obtained at a former chlor-alkali-plant, down to 9 m below ground surface. Images revealing the presence of silvery mercury DNAPL droplets were used to quantify its distribution, characteristics and saturation, using an image analysis method. These field-observations with depth were compared with results from a one-dimensional two-phase flow model simulation for the same transect. Considering the limitations of this approach, simulations reasonably reflected the variability and range of the mercury DNAPL distribution. To further explore the impact of mercury's physical properties in comparison with more common DNAPLs, the migration of mercury and PCE DNAPL in several typical hydrological scenarios was simulated. Comparison of the simulations suggest that mercury's higher density is the overall controlling factor in controlling its penetration in saturated porous media, despite its higher resistance to flow due to its higher viscosity. Based on these results the hazard of spilled mercury DNAPL to cause deep contamination of groundwater systems seems larger than for any other

  6. Nanoparticle transport across in vitro olfactory cell monolayers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gartziandia, Oihane; Egusquiaguirre, Susana Patricia; Bianco, John; Pedraz, José Luis; Igartua, Manoli; Hernandez, Rosa Maria; Préat, Véronique; Beloqui, Ana

    2016-02-29

    Drug access to the CNS is hindered by the presence of the blood-brain barrier (BBB), and the intranasal route has risen as a non-invasive route to transport drugs directly from nose-to-brain avoiding the BBB. In addition, nanoparticles (NPs) have been described as efficient shuttles for direct nose-to-brain delivery of drugs. Nevertheless, there are few studies describing NP nose-to-brain transport. Thus, the aim of this work was (i) to develop, characterize and validate in vitro olfactory cell monolayers and (ii) to study the transport of polymeric- and lipid-based NPs across these monolayers in order to estimate NP access into the brain using cell penetrating peptide (CPPs) moieties: Tat and Penetratin (Pen). All tested poly(d,l-lactide-co-glycolide) (PLGA) and nanostructured lipid carrier (NLC) formulations were stable in transport buffer and biocompatible with the olfactory mucosa cells. Nevertheless, 0.7% of PLGA NPs was able to cross the olfactory cell monolayers, whereas 8% and 22% of NLC and chitosan-coated NLC (CS-NLC) were transported across them, respectively. Moreover, the incorporation of CPPs to NLC surface significantly increased their transport, reaching 46% of transported NPs. We conclude that CPP-CS-NLC represent a promising brain shuttle via nose-to-brain for drug delivery.

  7. Water transport in gas diffusion media for PEM fuel cells. Experimental and numerical investigation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roth, Joerg

    2010-08-20

    The water flux in partially saturated hydrophobic carbon fibre paper for polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cell applications is investigated and compared with the frequently used constitutive two-phase flow model based on Darcy's law. Further, the first steps towards a math-based material design for gas diffusion media are explored in this thesis. Two self-developed ex-situ experiments to investigate the liquid water transport are introduced. The first is a newly developed buoyancy-based measurement of the pressuresaturation relationship on thin porous material with an accuracy of 0.5 kPa for the pressure and {+-} 5% for the saturation. The second experiment measures the pressure drop in dependence of flow rates down to magnitudes of {mu}L/s across the partially saturated thin porous material. This flow rate is relevant for the fuel cell application. The liquid water transport through Toray 060 carbon fibre paper, impregnated with 7% and 10% PTFE is investigated at wet and dry boundary conditions. The experiments are also accompanied by analytical and numerical free surface modelling with the consideration of the material morphology and liquid-solid interaction. The imbibing and draining cases of an arrangement of six fibres at varying solid-liquid interaction and boundary conditions are studied with 'Surface Evolver'. In order to evaluate the findings of ex-situ and modelling work for applicability to water transport in fuel cell operation, the technique of nuclear magnetic resonance (NMR) imaging is assessed. The focus is on the visualisation of 2D and 3D water distribution in the operating fuel cell. The compatibility of the NMR experiment with fuel cell operation in relation to material selection, operating temperature, and current density is addressed. NMR imaging is employed for different current densities, stoichiometries, and fuel cell arrangements. The fuel cell arrangements differ by the cathode diffusion medium. Plain, hydrophobic, and

  8. Unidirectional P-body transport during the yeast cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Garmendia-Torres

    Full Text Available P-bodies belong to a large family of RNA granules that are associated with post-transcriptional gene regulation, conserved from yeast to mammals, and influence biological processes ranging from germ cell development to neuronal plasticity. RNA granules can also transport RNAs to specific locations. Germ granules transport maternal RNAs to the embryo, and neuronal granules transport RNAs long distances to the synaptic dendrites. Here we combine microfluidic-based fluorescent microscopy of single cells and automated image analysis to follow p-body dynamics during cell division in yeast. Our results demonstrate that these highly dynamic granules undergo a unidirectional transport from the mother to the daughter cell during mitosis as well as a constrained "hovering" near the bud site half an hour before the bud is observable. Both behaviors are dependent on the Myo4p/She2p RNA transport machinery. Furthermore, single cell analysis of cell size suggests that PBs play an important role in daughter cell growth under nutrient limiting conditions.

  9. Hepatic Differentiation of Human Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells in a Perfused 3D Porous Polymer Scaffold for Liver Tissue Engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hemmingsen, Mette; Muhammad, Haseena Bashir; Mohanty, Soumyaranjan

    A huge shortage of liver organs for transplantation has motivated the research field of tissue engineering to develop bioartificial liver tissue and even a whole liver. The goal of NanoBio4Trans is to create a vascularized bioartificial liver tissue, initially as a liver-support system. Due...... to limitations of primary hepatocytes regarding availability and maintenance of functionality, stem cells and especially human induced pluripotent stem cells (hIPS cells) are an attractive cell source for liver tissue engineering. The aim of this part of NanoBio4Trans is to optimize culture and hepatic...... differentiation of hIPS-derived definitive endoderm (DE) cells in a 3D porous polymer scaffold built-in a perfusable bioreactor. The use of a microfluidic bioreactor array enables the culture of 16 independent tissues in one experimental run and thereby an optimization study to be performed....

  10. Effective pressure interface law for transport phenomena between an unconfined fluid and a porous medium using homogenization

    CERN Document Server

    Marciniak-Czochra, Anna

    2012-01-01

    We present modeling of the incompressible viscous flows in the domain containing an unconfined fluid and a porous medium. For such setting a rigorous derivation of the Beavers-Joseph-Saffman interface condition was undertaken by J\\"ager and Mikeli\\'c [SIAM J. Appl. Math. \\rm 60 (2000), p. 1111-1127] using the homogenization method. So far the interface law for the pressure was conceived and confirmed only numerically. In this article we justify rigorously the pressure jump condition using the corresponding boundary layer.

  11. FCTESTNET - Testing fuel cells for transportation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Winkel, R.G.; Foster, D.L.; Smokers, R.T.M.

    2006-01-01

    FCTESTNET (Fuel Cell Testing and Standardization Network) is an ongoing European network project within Framework Program 5. It is a three-year project that commenced January 2003, with 55 partners from European research centers, universities, and industry, working in the field of fuel cell R and D.

  12. Notes on HP1 a software package for simulating variably-saturated water flow, heat transport, solute transport, and biogeochemistry in porous media. HP1 Version 2.2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jacques, D.; Simunek, J.

    2010-01-15

    HP1 is a comprehensive modeling tool in terms of processes and reactions for simulating reactive transport and biogeochemical processes in variably-saturated porous media. HP1 results from coupling the water and solute transport model HYDRUS-1D (Simunek et al., 2009a) and PHREEQC-2 (Parkhurst and Appelo, 1999). This note provides an overview of how to set up and execute a HP1 project using version 2.2.002 of HP1 and version 4.13 of the graphical user interface (GUI) of HYDRUS-1D. A large part of this note are step-by-step instructions for selected examples involving mineral dissolution and precipitation, cation exchange, surface complexation and kinetic degradation networks. The implementation of variably-saturated flow conditions, changing boundary conditions, a layered soil profile or immobile water is also illustrated.

  13. On direct and indirect methanol fuel cells for transportation applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gottesfield, S.

    1996-04-01

    Research on direct oxidation methanol fuel cells (DMFCs) and polymer electrolyte fuel cells (PEFCs) is discussed. Systems considered for transportation applications are addressed. The use of platinum/ruthenium anode electrocatalysts and platinum cathode electrocatalysts in polymer electrolyte DMFCs has resulted in significant performance enhancements.

  14. Self-Template Synthesis of Porous Perovskite Titanate Solid and Hollow Submicrospheres for Photocatalytic Oxygen Evolution and Mesoscopic Solar Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pan, Jia Hong; Shen, Chao; Ivanova, Irina; Zhou, Na; Wang, Xingzhu; Tan, Wee Chong; Xu, Qing-Hua; Bahnemann, Detlef W; Wang, Qing

    2015-07-15

    We describe a general synthesis strategy, which combines sol-gel and hydrothermal processes, for the large-scale synthesis of porous perovskite titanates spheres with tunable particle size and inner structures. Amorphous hydrous TiO2 solid spheres (AHTSS) are first synthesized by a sol-gel method and are then used as precursor and template for the subsequent hydrothermal reaction with alkaline earth metal ions in an alkaline medium. This strategy can be generalized to synthesize porous spheres of various perovskite titanates (i.e., SrTiO3, BaTiO3, and CaTiO3) consisting of single-crystalline nanocubes. By controlling the textural properties (i.e., size, porosity, and structure) of AHTSS, perovskite titanates with tunable size and inner structures are selectively synthesized. The underlying formation mechanism is manifested by XRD and TEM to involve in situ crystallization or Ostwald ripening during the hydrothermal process. The obtained porous SrTiO3 spheres present superior performance in photocatalytic oxygen evolution and CdSe-sensitized mesos