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Sample records for cell networks yeast

  1. Boolean network model predicts cell cycle sequence of fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria I Davidich

    Full Text Available A Boolean network model of the cell-cycle regulatory network of fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces Pombe is constructed solely on the basis of the known biochemical interaction topology. Simulating the model in the computer faithfully reproduces the known activity sequence of regulatory proteins along the cell cycle of the living cell. Contrary to existing differential equation models, no parameters enter the model except the structure of the regulatory circuitry. The dynamical properties of the model indicate that the biological dynamical sequence is robustly implemented in the regulatory network, with the biological stationary state G1 corresponding to the dominant attractor in state space, and with the biological regulatory sequence being a strongly attractive trajectory. Comparing the fission yeast cell-cycle model to a similar model of the corresponding network in S. cerevisiae, a remarkable difference in circuitry, as well as dynamics is observed. While the latter operates in a strongly damped mode, driven by external excitation, the S. pombe network represents an auto-excited system with external damping.

  2. Connectivity in the yeast cell cycle transcription network: inferences from neural networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher E Hart

    2006-12-01

    Full Text Available A current challenge is to develop computational approaches to infer gene network regulatory relationships based on multiple types of large-scale functional genomic data. We find that single-layer feed-forward artificial neural network (ANN models can effectively discover gene network structure by integrating global in vivo protein:DNA interaction data (ChIP/Array with genome-wide microarray RNA data. We test this on the yeast cell cycle transcription network, which is composed of several hundred genes with phase-specific RNA outputs. These ANNs were robust to noise in data and to a variety of perturbations. They reliably identified and ranked 10 of 12 known major cell cycle factors at the top of a set of 204, based on a sum-of-squared weights metric. Comparative analysis of motif occurrences among multiple yeast species independently confirmed relationships inferred from ANN weights analysis. ANN models can capitalize on properties of biological gene networks that other kinds of models do not. ANNs naturally take advantage of patterns of absence, as well as presence, of factor binding associated with specific expression output; they are easily subjected to in silico "mutation" to uncover biological redundancies; and they can use the full range of factor binding values. A prominent feature of cell cycle ANNs suggested an analogous property might exist in the biological network. This postulated that "network-local discrimination" occurs when regulatory connections (here between MBF and target genes are explicitly disfavored in one network module (G2, relative to others and to the class of genes outside the mitotic network. If correct, this predicts that MBF motifs will be significantly depleted from the discriminated class and that the discrimination will persist through evolution. Analysis of distantly related Schizosaccharomyces pombe confirmed this, suggesting that network-local discrimination is real and complements well-known enrichment of

  3. Funneled landscape leads to robustness of cell networks: yeast cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin Wang

    2006-11-01

    Full Text Available We uncovered the underlying energy landscape for a cellular network. We discovered that the energy landscape of the yeast cell-cycle network is funneled towards the global minimum (G0/G1 phase from the experimentally measured or inferred inherent chemical reaction rates. The funneled landscape is quite robust against random perturbations. This naturally explains robustness from a physical point of view. The ratio of slope versus roughness of the landscape becomes a quantitative measure of robustness of the network. The funneled landscape can be seen as a possible realization of the Darwinian principle of natural selection at the cellular network level. It provides an optimal criterion for network connections and design. Our approach is general and can be applied to other cellular networks.

  4. A yeast-based genomic strategy highlights the cell protein networks altered by FTase inhibitor peptidomimetics

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Porcu Giampiero

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Farnesyltransferase inhibitors (FTIs are anticancer agents developed to inhibit Ras oncoprotein activities. FTIs of different chemical structure act via a conserved mechanism in eukaryotic cells. They have low toxicity and are active on a wide range of tumors in cellular and animal models, independently of the Ras activation state. Their ultimate mechanism of action, however, remains undetermined. FTase has hundred of substrates in human cells, many of which play a pivotal role in either tumorigenesis or in pro-survival pathways. This lack of knowledge probably accounts for the failure of FTIs at clinical stage III for most of the malignancies treated, with the notable exception of haematological malignancies. Understanding which cellular pathways are the ultimate targets of FTIs in different tumor types and the basis of FTI resistance is required to improve the efficacy of FTIs in cancer treatment. Results Here we used a yeast-based cellular assay to define the transcriptional changes consequent to FTI peptidomimetic administration in conditions that do not substantially change Ras membrane/cytosol distribution. Yeast and cancer cell lines were used to validate the results of the network analysis. The transcriptome of yeast cells treated with FTase inhibitor I was compared with that of untreated cells and with an isogenic strain genetically inhibited for FTase activity (Δram1. Cells treated with GGTI-298 were analyzed in a parallel study to validate the specificity of the FTI response. Network analysis, based on gene ontology criteria, identified a cell cycle gene cluster up-regulated by FTI treatment that has the Aurora A kinase IPL1 and the checkpoint protein MAD2 as hubs. Moreover, TORC1-S6K-downstream effectors were found to be down-regulated in yeast and mammalian FTI-treated cells. Notably only FTIs, but not genetic inhibition of FTase, elicited up-regulation of ABC/transporters. Conclusions This work provides a view

  5. Stabilizing Motifs in Autonomous Boolean Networks and the Yeast Cell Cycle Oscillator

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Volkan; Gong, Xinwei; Socolar, Joshua

    2009-03-01

    Synchronously updated Boolean networks are widely used to model gene regulation. Some properties of these model networks are known to be artifacts of the clocking in the update scheme. Autonomous updating is a less artificial scheme that allows one to introduce small timing perturbations and study stability of the attractors. We argue that the stabilization of a limit cycle in an autonomous Boolean network requires a combination of motifs such as feed-forward loops and auto-repressive links that can correct small fluctuations in the timing of switching events. A recently published model of the transcriptional cell-cycle oscillator in yeast contains the motifs necessary for stability under autonomous updating [1]. [1] D. A. Orlando, et al. Nature (London), 4530 (7197):0 944--947, 2008.

  6. Dynamics of Cdc42 network embodies a Turing-type mechanism of yeast cell polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goryachev, Andrew B; Pokhilko, Alexandra V

    2008-04-30

    Complex biochemical networks can be understood by identifying their principal regulatory motifs and mode of action. We model the early phase of budding yeast cellular polarization and show that the biochemical processes in the presumptive bud site comprise a Turing-type mechanism. The roles of the prototypical activator and substrate are played by GTPase Cdc42 in its active and inactive states, respectively. We demonstrate that the nucleotide cycling of Cdc42 converts cellular energy into a stable cluster of activated Cdc42. This energy drives a continuous membrane-cytoplasmic exchange of the cluster components to counteract diffusive spread of the cluster. This exchange explains why only one bud forms per cell cycle, because the winner-takes-all competition of candidate sites inevitably selects a single site. PMID:18381072

  7. A Model of Yeast Cell-Cycle Regulation Based on a Standard Component Modeling Strategy for Protein Regulatory Networks

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laomettachit, Teeraphan; Chen, Katherine C.; Baumann, William T.

    2016-01-01

    To understand the molecular mechanisms that regulate cell cycle progression in eukaryotes, a variety of mathematical modeling approaches have been employed, ranging from Boolean networks and differential equations to stochastic simulations. Each approach has its own characteristic strengths and weaknesses. In this paper, we propose a “standard component” modeling strategy that combines advantageous features of Boolean networks, differential equations and stochastic simulations in a framework that acknowledges the typical sorts of reactions found in protein regulatory networks. Applying this strategy to a comprehensive mechanism of the budding yeast cell cycle, we illustrate the potential value of standard component modeling. The deterministic version of our model reproduces the phenotypic properties of wild-type cells and of 125 mutant strains. The stochastic version of our model reproduces the cell-to-cell variability of wild-type cells and the partial viability of the CLB2-dbΔ clb5Δ mutant strain. Our simulations show that mathematical modeling with “standard components” can capture in quantitative detail many essential properties of cell cycle control in budding yeast. PMID:27187804

  8. Fission Yeast Germinal Center (GC) Kinase Ppk11 Interacts with Pmo25 and Plays an Auxiliary Role in Concert with the Morphogenesis Orb6 Network (MOR) in Cell Morphogenesis*

    OpenAIRE

    Goshima, Tetsuya; Kume, Kazunori; Koyano, Takayuki; Ohya, Yoshikazu; Toda, Takashi; Hirata, Dai

    2010-01-01

    How cell morphology and the cell cycle are coordinately regulated is a fundamental subject in cell biology. In fission yeast, 2 germinal center kinases (GCKs), Sid1 and Nak1, play an essential role in septation/cytokinesis and cell separation/cell polarity control, respectively, as components of the septation initiation network (SIN) and the morphogenesis Orb6 network (MOR). Here we show that a third GCK, Ppk11, is also required for efficient cell separation particularly, at a high temperatur...

  9. Comet assay on tetraploid yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rank, Jette; Syberg, Kristian; Jensen, Klara

    2009-01-01

    Tetraploid yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) were used in the comet assay with the intention of developing a new, fast and easy assay for detecting environmental genotoxic agents without using higher organisms. Two DNA-damaging chemicals, H2O2 and acrylamide, together with wastewater from...... three municipal treatment plants were tested for their effect on the yeast-cell DNA. The main problem with using yeast in the comet assay is the necessity to degrade the cell wall. This was achieved by using Zymolase 100 T twice during the procedure, since Zymolase 20 T did not open the cell wall....... Analytical problems that arose due to the small amount of DNA in the yeast nuclei in haploid and diploid cells, which contain 13 Mbp and 26 Mbp DNA per cell, respectively, were solved by using tetraploid yeast cells (52 Mbp) instead. DNA damage was shown after exposure to H2O2 and acrylamide. The lowest dose...

  10. Uniform yeast cell assembly via microfluidics

    OpenAIRE

    Chang, Ya-Wen; He, Peng; Marquez, Samantha M.; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2012-01-01

    This paper reports the use of microfluidic approaches for the fabrication of yeastosomes (yeast-celloidosomes) based on self-assembly of yeast cells onto liquid-solid or liquid-gas interfaces. Precise control over fluidic flows in droplet- and bubble-forming microfluidic devices allows production of monodispersed, size-selected templates. The general strategy to organize and assemble living cells is to tune electrostatic attractions between the template (gel or gas core) and the cells via sur...

  11. Dynamical Analysis of Protein Regulatory Network in Budding Yeast Nucleus

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    LI Fang-Ting; JIA Xun

    2006-01-01

    @@ Recent progresses in the protein regulatory network of budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae have provided a global picture of its protein network for further dynamical research. We simplify and modularize the protein regulatory networks in yeast nucleus, and study the dynamical properties of the core 37-node network by a Boolean network model, especially the evolution steps and final fixed points. Our simulation results show that the number of fixed points N(k) for a given size of the attraction basin k obeys a power-law distribution N(k)∝k-2.024. The yeast network is more similar to a scale-free network than a random network in the above dynamical properties.

  12. Ethanol tolerance of immobilized brewers' yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Norton, S; Watson, K; D'Amore, T

    1995-04-01

    A method based on the survival of yeast cells subjected to an ethanol or heat shock was utilized to compare the stress resistance of free and carrageenan-immobilized yeast cells. Results demonstrated a significant increase of yeast survival against ethanol for immobilized cells as compared to free cells, while no marked difference in heat resistance was observed. When entrapped cells were released by mechanical disruption of the gel beads and submitted to the same ethanol stress, they exhibited a lower survival rate than entrapped cells, but a similar or slightly higher survival rate than free cells. The incidence of ethanol- or heat-induced respiratory-deficient mutants of entrapped cells was equivalent to that of control or non-stressed cells (1.3 +/- 0.5%) whereas ethanol- and heat-shocked free and released cells exhibited between 4.4% and 10.9% average incidence of respiration-deficient mutants. It was concluded that the carrageenan gel matrix provided a protection against ethanol, and that entrapped cells returned to normal physiological behaviour as soon as they were released. The cell growth rate was a significant factor in the resistance of yeast to high ethanol concentrations. The optimum conditions to obtain reliable and reproducible results involved the use of slow-growing cells after exhaustion of the sugar substrate.

  13. Yeast systems biology to unravel the network of life

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mustacchi, Roberta; Hohmann, S; Nielsen, Jens

    2006-01-01

    of advanced cell factories for production of fuels, chemicals, food ingredients and pharmaceuticals. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae represents an excellent model system; the density of biological information available on this organism allows it to serve as a eukaryotic model for studying human diseases....... Furthermore, it serves as an industrial workhorse for production of a wide range of chemicals and pharmaceuticals. Systems biology involves the combination of novel experimental techniques from different disciplines as well as functional genomics, bioinformatics and mathematical modelling, and hence no single...... appropriate guidelines, establish an appropriate infrastructure for the network and organize courses, meetings and conferences that will consolidate the network and promote systems biology. This paper discusses the impacts of systems biology and how YSBN may play a role in the future development of the field...

  14. Yeast fuel cell: Application for desalination

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mardiana, Ummy; Innocent, Christophe; Cretin, Marc; Buchari, Buchari; Gandasasmita, Suryo

    2016-02-01

    Yeasts have been implicated in microbial fuel cells as biocatalysts because they are non-pathogenic organisms, easily handled and robust with a good tolerance in different environmental conditions. Here we investigated baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae through the oxidation of glucose. Yeast was used in the anolyte, to transfer electrons to the anode in the presence of methylene blue as mediator whereas K3Fe(CN)6 was used as an electron acceptor for the reduction reaction in the catholyte. Power production with biofuel cell was coupled with a desalination process. The maximum current density produced by the cell was 88 mA.m-2. In those conditions, it was found that concentration of salt was removed 64% from initial 0.6 M after 1-month operation. This result proves that yeast fuel cells can be used to remove salt through electrically driven membrane processes and demonstrated that could be applied for energy production and desalination. Further developments are in progress to improve power output to make yeast fuel cells applicable for water treatment.

  15. Networking for proteins : A yeast two-hybrid and RNAi profiling approach to uncover C. elegans cell polarity regulators

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Koorman, T.

    2016-01-01

    Cell polarity is a near universal trait of life and guides many aspects of animal development. Although a number of key polarity proteins have been identified, many interactions with proteins acting downstream likely remain to be elucidated. Mutations in polarity proteins or deregulation of polarity

  16. Sirtuins as regulators of the yeast metabolic network

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    Markus eRalser

    2012-03-01

    Full Text Available There is growing evidence that the metabolic network is an integral regulator of cellularphysiology. Dynamic changes in metabolite concentrations, metabolic flux, or networktopology act as reporters of biological or environmental signals, and are required for the cellto trigger an appropriate biological reaction. Changes in the metabolic network are recognizedby specific sensory macromolecules and translated into a transcriptional or translationalresponse. The protein family of sirtuins, discovered more than 30 years ago as regulators ofsilent chromatin, seems to fulfill the role of a metabolic sensor during aging and conditions ofcaloric restriction. NAD+/NADH interconverting metabolic enzymes glyceraldehyde-3-phosphate dehydrogenase and alcohol dehydrogenase, as well as enzymes involved inNAD(H, synthesis provide or deprive NAD+ in close proximity to Sir2. This influence sirtuinactivity, and facilitates a dynamic response of the metabolic network to changes inmetabolism with effects on physiology and aging. The molecular network downstream Sir2,however, is complex. In just two orders, Sir2’s metabolism-related interactions span half ofthe yeast proteome, and are connected with virtually every physiological process. Thus,although it is fundamental to analyze single molecular mechanisms, it is at the same timecrucial to consider this genome-scale complexity when correlating single molecular eventswith phenotypes such as aging, cell growth, or stress resistance.

  17. Cell biology of homologous recombination in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eckert-Boulet, Nadine Valerie; Rothstein, Rodney; Lisby, Michael

    2011-01-01

    Homologous recombination is an important pathway for error-free repair of DNA lesions, such as single- and double-strand breaks, and for rescue of collapsed replication forks. Here, we describe protocols for live cell imaging of single-lesion recombination events in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevi...

  18. Uniform yeast cell assembly via microfluidics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chang, Ya-Wen; He, Peng; Marquez, Samantha M; Cheng, Zhengdong

    2012-06-01

    This paper reports the use of microfluidic approaches for the fabrication of yeastosomes (yeast-celloidosomes) based on self-assembly of yeast cells onto liquid-solid or liquid-gas interfaces. Precise control over fluidic flows in droplet- and bubble-forming microfluidic devices allows production of monodispersed, size-selected templates. The general strategy to organize and assemble living cells is to tune electrostatic attractions between the template (gel or gas core) and the cells via surface charging. Layer-by-Layer (LbL) polyelectrolyte deposition was employed to invert or enhance charges of solid surfaces. We demonstrated the ability to produce high-quality, monolayer-shelled yeastosome structures under proper conditions when sufficient electrostatic driving forces are present. The combination of microfluidic fabrication with cell self-assembly enables a versatile platform for designing synthetic hierarchy bio-structures. PMID:22655026

  19. Effect of Yeast Cell Morphology, Cell Wall Physical Structure and Chemical Composition on Patulin Adsorption.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Luo

    Full Text Available The capability of yeast to adsorb patulin in fruit juice can aid in substantially reducing the patulin toxic effect on human health. This study aimed to investigate the capability of yeast cell morphology and cell wall internal structure and composition to adsorb patulin. To compare different yeast cell morphologies, cell wall internal structure and composition, scanning electron microscope, transmission electron microscope and ion chromatography were used. The results indicated that patulin adsorption capability of yeast was influenced by cell surface areas, volume, and cell wall thickness, as well as 1,3-β-glucan content. Among these factors, cell wall thickness and 1,3-β-glucan content serve significant functions. The investigation revealed that patulin adsorption capability was mainly affected by the three-dimensional network structure of the cell wall composed of 1,3-β-glucan. Finally, patulin adsorption in commercial kiwi fruit juice was investigated, and the results indicated that yeast cells could adsorb patulin from commercial kiwi fruit juice efficiently. This study can potentially simulate in vitro cell walls to enhance patulin adsorption capability and successfully apply to fruit juice industry.

  20. Topological basis of signal integration in the transcriptional-regulatory network of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    OpenAIRE

    Chennubhotla Chakra; Wu Chuang; Farkas Illés J; Bahar Ivet; Oltvai Zoltán N

    2006-01-01

    Abstract Background Signal recognition and information processing is a fundamental cellular function, which in part involves comprehensive transcriptional regulatory (TR) mechanisms carried out in response to complex environmental signals in the context of the cell's own internal state. However, the network topological basis of developing such integrated responses remains poorly understood. Results By studying the TR network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that an intermediate l...

  1. Synchronization of glycolytic oscillations in a yeast cell population

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dano, S.; Hynne, F.; De Monte, Silvia;

    2001-01-01

    The mechanism of active phase synchronization in a suspension of oscillatory yeast cells has remained a puzzle for almost half a century. The difficulty of the problem stems from the fact that the synchronization phenomenon involves the entire metabolic network of glycolysis and fermentation......, and consequently it cannot be addressed at the level of a single enzyme or a single chemical species. In this paper it is shown how this system in a CSTR (continuous flow stirred tank reactor) can be modelled quantitatively as a population of Stuart-Landau oscillators interacting by exchange of metabolites through...

  2. Mediated Electrochemical Measurements of Intracellular Catabolic Activities of Yeast Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jin Sheng ZHAO; Zhen Yu YANG; Yao LU; Zheng Yu YANG

    2005-01-01

    Coupling with the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide, microelectrode voltammetric measurements were undertaken to detect the ferrocyanide accumulations arising from the mediated reduction of ferricyanide by yeast cells. The results indicate that the dual mediator system menadione/ferricyanide could be used as a probe to detect cellular catabolic activities in yeast cells and the electrochemical response has a positive relationship with the specific growth rate of yeast cells.

  3. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast

  4. Dielectric modelling of cell division for budding and fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asami, Koji; Sekine, Katsuhisa

    2007-02-01

    The frequency dependence of complex permittivity or the dielectric spectrum of a system including a cell in cell division has been simulated by a numerical technique based on the three-dimensional finite difference method. Two different types of cell division characteristic of budding and fission yeast were examined. The yeast cells are both regarded as a body of rotation, and thus have anisotropic polarization, i.e. the effective permittivity of the cell depends on the orientation of the cell to the direction of an applied electric field. In the perpendicular orientation, where the rotational axis of the cell is perpendicular to the electric field direction, the dielectric spectra for both yeast cells included one dielectric relaxation and its intensity depended on the cell volume. In the parallel orientation, on the other hand, two dielectric relaxations appeared with bud growth for budding yeast and with septum formation for fission yeast. The low-frequency relaxation was shifted to a lower frequency region by narrowing the neck between the bud and the mother cell for budding yeast and by increasing the degree of septum formation for fission yeast. After cell separation, the low-frequency relaxation disappeared. The simulations well interpreted the oscillation of the relative permittivity of culture broth found for synchronous cell growth of budding yeast.

  5. The Cell Biology of Fission Yeast Septation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    García Cortés, Juan C; Ramos, Mariona; Osumi, Masako; Pérez, Pilar; Ribas, Juan Carlos

    2016-09-01

    In animal cells, cytokinesis requires the formation of a cleavage furrow that divides the cell into two daughter cells. Furrow formation is achieved by constriction of an actomyosin ring that invaginates the plasma membrane. However, fungal cells contain a rigid extracellular cell wall surrounding the plasma membrane; thus, fungal cytokinesis also requires the formation of a special septum wall structure between the dividing cells. The septum biosynthesis must be strictly coordinated with the deposition of new plasma membrane material and actomyosin ring closure and must occur in such a way that no breach in the cell wall occurs at any time. Because of the high turgor pressure in the fungal cell, even a minor local defect might lead to cell lysis and death. Here we review our knowledge of the septum structure in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe and of the recent advances in our understanding of the relationship between septum biosynthesis and actomyosin ring constriction and how the two collaborate to build a cross-walled septum able to support the high turgor pressure of the cell. In addition, we discuss the importance of the septum biosynthesis for the steady ingression of the cleavage furrow.

  6. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luo, Yumei; Chen, Zikai; Zhu, Detu; Tu, Haitao; Pan, Shen Quan

    2015-01-01

    The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT) can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C); knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells.

  7. Yeast Actin-Related Protein ARP6 Negatively Regulates Agrobacterium-Mediated Transformation of Yeast Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yumei Luo

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The yeasts, including Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris, are single-cell eukaryotic organisms that can serve as models for human genetic diseases and hosts for large scale production of recombinant proteins in current biopharmaceutical industry. Thus, efficient genetic engineering tools for yeasts are of great research and economic values. Agrobacterium tumefaciens-mediated transformation (AMT can transfer T-DNA into yeast cells as a method for genetic engineering. However, how the T-DNA is transferred into the yeast cells is not well established yet. Here our genetic screening of yeast knockout mutants identified a yeast actin-related protein ARP6 as a negative regulator of AMT. ARP6 is a critical member of the SWR1 chromatin remodeling complex (SWR-C; knocking out some other components of the complex also increased the transformation efficiency, suggesting that ARP6 might regulate AMT via SWR-C. Moreover, knockout of ARP6 led to disruption of microtubule integrity, higher uptake and degradation of virulence proteins, and increased DNA stability inside the cells, all of which resulted in enhanced transformation efficiency. Our findings have identified molecular and cellular mechanisms regulating AMT and a potential target for enhancing the transformation efficiency in yeast cells.

  8. Stem Cell Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Werner, Eric

    2016-01-01

    We present a general computational theory of stem cell networks and their developmental dynamics. Stem cell networks are special cases of developmental control networks. Our theory generates a natural classification of all possible stem cell networks based on their network architecture. Each stem cell network has a unique topology and semantics and developmental dynamics that result in distinct phenotypes. We show that the ideal growth dynamics of multicellular systems generated by stem cell ...

  9. Effect of salt hyperosmotic stress on yeast cell viability

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Logothetis Stelios

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available During fermentation for ethanol production, yeasts are subjected to different kinds of physico-chemical stresses such as: initially high sugar concentration and low temperature; and later, increased ethanol concentrations. Such conditions trigger a series of biological responses in an effort to maintain cell cycle progress and yeast cell viability. Regarding osmostress, many studies have been focused on transcriptional activation and gene expression in laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The overall aim of this present work was to further our understanding of wine yeast performance during fermentations under osmotic stress conditions. Specifically, the research work focused on the evaluation of NaCl-induced stress responses of an industrial wine yeast strain S. cerevisiae (VIN 13, particularly with regard to yeast cell growth and viability. The hypothesis was that osmostress conditions energized specific genes to enable yeast cells to survive under stressful conditions. Experiments were designed by pretreating cells with different sodium chloride concentrations (NaCl: 4%, 6% and 10% w/v growing in defined media containing D-glucose and evaluating the impact of this on yeast growth and viability. Subsequent fermentation cycles took place with increasing concentrations of D-glucose (20%, 30%, 40% w/v using salt-adapted cells as inocula. We present evidence that osmostress induced by mild salt pre-treatments resulted in beneficial influences on both cell viability and fermentation performance of an industrial wine yeast strain.

  10. An insight into the complex prion-prion interaction network in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Du, Zhiqiang; Valtierra, Stephanie; Li, Liming

    2014-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a valuable model system for studying prion-prion interactions as it contains multiple prion proteins. A recent study from our laboratory showed that the existence of Swi1 prion ([SWI(+)]) and overproduction of Swi1 can have strong impacts on the formation of 2 other extensively studied yeast prions, [PSI(+)] and [PIN(+)] ([RNQ(+)]) (Genetics, Vol. 197, 685-700). We showed that a single yeast cell is capable of harboring at least 3 heterologous prion elements and these prions can influence each other's appearance positively and/or negatively. We also showed that during the de novo [PSI(+)] formation process upon Sup35 overproduction, the aggregation patterns of a preexisting inducer ([RNQ(+)] or [SWI(+)]) can undergo significant remodeling from stably transmitted dot-shaped aggregates to aggregates that co-localize with the newly formed Sup35 aggregates that are ring/ribbon/rod- shaped. Such co-localization disappears once the newly formed [PSI(+)] prion stabilizes. Our finding provides strong evidence supporting the "cross-seeding" model for prion-prion interactions and confirms earlier reports that the interactions among different prions and their prion proteins mostly occur at the initiation stages of prionogenesis. Our results also highlight a complex prion interaction network in yeast. We believe that elucidating the mechanism underlying the yeast prion-prion interaction network will not only provide insight into the process of prion de novo generation and propagation in yeast but also shed light on the mechanisms that govern protein misfolding, aggregation, and amyloidogenesis in higher eukaryotes.

  11. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mollinedo, Faustino

    2012-01-01

    The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Cryptococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na(+), K(+), and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  12. Lipid raft involvement in yeast cell growth and death

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faustino eMollinedo

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The notion that cellular membranes contain distinct microdomains, acting as scaffolds for signal transduction processes, has gained considerable momentum. In particular, a class of such domains that is rich in sphingolipids and cholesterol, termed as lipid rafts, is thought to compartmentalize the plasma membrane, and to have important roles in survival and cell death signaling in mammalian cells. Likewise, yeast lipid rafts are membrane domains enriched in sphingolipids and ergosterol, the yeast counterpart of mammalian cholesterol. Sterol-rich membrane domains have been identified in several fungal species, including the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe as well as the pathogens Candida albicans and Crytococcus neoformans. Yeast rafts have been mainly involved in membrane trafficking, but increasing evidence implicates rafts in a wide range of additional cellular processes. Yeast lipid rafts house biologically important proteins involved in the proper function of yeast, such as proteins that control Na+, K+ and pH homeostasis, which influence many cellular processes, including cell growth and death. Membrane raft constituents affect drug susceptibility, and drugs interacting with sterols alter raft composition and membrane integrity, leading to yeast cell death. Because of the genetic tractability of yeast, analysis of yeast rafts could be an excellent model to approach unanswered questions of mammalian raft biology, and to understand the role of lipid rafts in the regulation of cell death and survival in human cells. A better insight in raft biology might lead to envisage new raft-mediated approaches to the treatment of human diseases where regulation of cell death and survival is critical, such as cancer and neurodegenerative diseases.

  13. Yeast cell factories for fine chemical and API production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Glieder Anton

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract This review gives an overview of different yeast strains and enzyme classes involved in yeast whole-cell biotransformations. A focus was put on the synthesis of compounds for fine chemical and API (= active pharmaceutical ingredient production employing single or only few-step enzymatic reactions. Accounting for recent success stories in metabolic engineering, the construction and use of synthetic pathways was also highlighted. Examples from academia and industry and advances in the field of designed yeast strain construction demonstrate the broad significance of yeast whole-cell applications. In addition to Saccharomyces cerevisiae, alternative yeast whole-cell biocatalysts are discussed such as Candida sp., Cryptococcus sp., Geotrichum sp., Issatchenkia sp., Kloeckera sp., Kluyveromyces sp., Pichia sp. (including Hansenula polymorpha = P. angusta, Rhodotorula sp., Rhodosporidium sp., alternative Saccharomyces sp., Schizosaccharomyces pombe, Torulopsis sp., Trichosporon sp., Trigonopsis variabilis, Yarrowia lipolytica and Zygosaccharomyces rouxii.

  14. Biomineralization of iron phosphate nanoparticles in yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amorphous iron phosphate nanoparticles mineralized in yeast cells are studied by transmission electron microscopy, Fourier transform infrared spectrograph and micro electrophoresis. Iron phosphate nanoparticles in yeast cells show uniform morphology with extensive surface roughness and disperse well. The size distribution of iron phosphate is about 50-200 nm. Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy (FT-IR) is used to analyze the chemical bond linkages between iron phosphate nanoparticles with protein macromolecules in yeast cells. The mechanism of biomineralization was simply discussed by chemical bonds and surface charges.

  15. Yeast cell factories on the horizon

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jens

    2015-01-01

    For thousands of years, yeast has been used for making beer, bread, and wine. In modern times, it has become a commercial workhorse for producing fuels, chemicals, and pharmaceuticals such as insulin, human serum albumin, and vaccines against hepatitis virus and human papillomavirus. Yeast has also...... been engineered to make chemicals at industrial scale (e.g., succinic acid, lactic acid, resveratrol) and advanced biofuels (e.g., isobutanol) (1). On page 1095 of this issue, Galanie et al. (2) demonstrate that yeast can now be engineered to produce opioids (2), a major class of compounds used...... for treating severe pain. Their study represents a tour de force in the metabolic engineering of yeast, as it involved the expression of genes for more than 20 enzymatic activities from plants, mammals, bacteria, and yeast itself. It clearly represents a breakthrough advance for making complex natural products...

  16. An integrative model and analysis of cell cycle in fission yeast

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    TENG Hu; HUANG Xun; XIU Zhilong; FENG Enmin

    2005-01-01

    According to the recent investigation on cell cycle of fission yeast, a mathematical dynamic model is formulated. Four cyclins, e.g. Puc1, Cig1, Cig2 and Cdc13, are investigated here. The interacting networks between the cyclins and the process of cell cycle are mathematically described. The functions of these cyclins are particularly analyzed. Comparison among different mutants indicates that the cyclins play an important role in cell cycle.

  17. A consensus yeast metabolic network reconstruction obtained from a community approach to systems biology

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Herrgard, Markus; Swainston, Neil; Dobson, Paul;

    2008-01-01

    and content, and use different terminologies to describe the same chemical entities. This makes comparisons between them difficult and underscores the desirability of a consolidated metabolic network that collects and formalizes the 'community knowledge' of yeast metabolism. We describe how we have produced...... of yeast. Similar strategies should benefit communities studying genome-scale metabolic networks of other organisms....

  18. Anhydrobiosis in yeast: cell wall mannoproteins are important for yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistance to dehydration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borovikova, Diana; Teparić, Renata; Mrša, Vladimir; Rapoport, Alexander

    2016-08-01

    The state of anhydrobiosis is linked with the reversible delay of metabolism as a result of strong dehydration of cells, and is widely distributed in nature. A number of factors responsible for the maintenance of organisms' viability in these conditions have been revealed. This study was directed to understanding how changes in cell wall structure may influence the resistance of yeasts to dehydration-rehydration. Mutants lacking various cell wall mannoproteins were tested to address this issue. It was revealed that mutants lacking proteins belonging to two structurally and functionally unrelated groups (proteins non-covalently attached to the cell wall, and Pir proteins) possessed significantly lower cell resistance to dehydration-rehydration than the mother wild-type strain. At the same time, the absence of the GPI-anchored cell wall protein Ccw12 unexpectedly resulted in an increase of cell resistance to this treatment; this phenomenon is explained by the compensatory synthesis of chitin. The results clearly indicate that the cell wall structure/composition relates to parameters strongly influencing yeast viability during the processes of dehydration-rehydration, and that damage to cell wall proteins during yeast desiccation can be an important factor leading to cell death. Copyright © 2016 John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  19. Topological basis of signal integration in the transcriptional-regulatory network of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chennubhotla Chakra

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Signal recognition and information processing is a fundamental cellular function, which in part involves comprehensive transcriptional regulatory (TR mechanisms carried out in response to complex environmental signals in the context of the cell's own internal state. However, the network topological basis of developing such integrated responses remains poorly understood. Results By studying the TR network of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae we show that an intermediate layer of transcription factors naturally segregates into distinct subnetworks. In these topological units transcription factors are densely interlinked in a largely hierarchical manner and respond to external signals by utilizing a fraction of these subnets. Conclusion As transcriptional regulation represents the 'slow' component of overall information processing, the identified topology suggests a model in which successive waves of transcriptional regulation originating from distinct fractions of the TR network control robust integrated responses to complex stimuli.

  20. Monitoring of yeast cell concentration using a micromachined impedance sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krommenhoek, E.E.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Bomer, J.G.; Berg, van den A.; Li, X.; Ottens, M.; Wielen, van der L.A.M.; Dedem, van G.W.K.; Leeuwen, M.; Gulik, van W.M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2005-01-01

    The paper describes the design, modelling and experimental characterization of a micromachined impedance sensor for on-line monitoring of the viable yeast cell concentration (biomass) in a miniaturized cell assay. Measurements in a Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell culture show that the permittivity of

  1. Monitoring of yeast cell concentration using a micromachnined impedance sensor

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Krommenhoek, E.E.; Gardeniers, J.G.E.; Bomer, J.G.; Berg, van den A.; Li, X.; Ottens, M.; Wielen, van der L.A.M.; Dedem, van G.W.K.; Leeuwen, van M.; Gulik, van W.M.; Heijnen, J.J.

    2006-01-01

    This paper describes the design, modeling and experimental characterization of a micromachined impedance sensor for on-line monitoring of the viable yeast cell concentration (biomass) in a miniaturized cell assay. Measurements in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell culture show that the characteristic fre

  2. Investigation of zinc biosorption by brewer's yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dodić Siniša N.

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available The highest amount of zinc (= 90% is bound after 3 hrs of contact at low initial (total concentrations of zinc in suspension of yeast, 10-100 mg/l at 10-30°C. The equilibrium between bound and free zinc ions is established after 6 hrs of contact time, independently on the total zinc concentration in yeast milk. No bigger changes of content of zinc bound to brewer's yeast cells was determined at temperatures 10°C and 30°C. 40% of bound zinc in the equilibrium state is bound during the first 15 min of contact of zinc ions and brewer's yeast cells at all initial (total zinc concentrations in suspension of yeast both at 10°C and 30°C. The "KEKAM" equation can be used for the description of kinetics of zinc biosorption by waste brewer's yeast cells, for the ranges of zinc concentration 10-100 mg/l at 30°C (mean correlation coefficient 0,96 and 60,0-100 mg/l at 10°C (mean correlation coefficient 0,95.

  3. Differential Adsorption of Ochratoxin A and Anthocyanins by Inactivated Yeasts and Yeast Cell Walls during Simulation of Wine Aging

    OpenAIRE

    Leonardo Petruzzi; Antonietta Baiano; Antonio De Gianni; Milena Sinigaglia; Maria Rosaria Corbo; Antonio Bevilacqua

    2015-01-01

    The adsorption of ochratoxin A (OTA) by yeasts is a promising approach for the decontamination of musts and wines, but some potential competitive or interactive phenomena between mycotoxin, yeast cells, and anthocyanins might modify the intensity of the phenomenon. The aim of this study was to examine OTA adsorption by two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (the wild strain W13, and the commercial isolate BM45), previously inactivated by heat, and a yeast cell wall preparation. Experiments w...

  4. Cell surface recycling in yeast: mechanisms and machineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    MacDonald, Chris; Piper, Robert C

    2016-04-15

    Sorting internalized proteins and lipids back to the cell surface controls the supply of molecules throughout the cell and regulates integral membrane protein activity at the surface. One central process in mammalian cells is the transit of cargo from endosomes back to the plasma membrane (PM) directly, along a route that bypasses retrograde movement to the Golgi. Despite recognition of this pathway for decades we are only beginning to understand the machinery controlling this overall process. The budding yeastSaccharomyces cerevisiae, a stalwart genetic system, has been routinely used to identify fundamental proteins and their modes of action in conserved trafficking pathways. However, the study of cell surface recycling from endosomes in yeast is hampered by difficulties that obscure visualization of the pathway. Here we briefly discuss how recycling is likely a more prevalent process in yeast than is widely appreciated and how tools might be built to better study the pathway.

  5. Aroma formation by immobilized yeast cells in fermentation processes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nedović, V; Gibson, B; Mantzouridou, T F; Bugarski, B; Djordjević, V; Kalušević, A; Paraskevopoulou, A; Sandell, M; Šmogrovičová, D; Yilmaztekin, M

    2015-01-01

    Immobilized cell technology has shown a significant promotional effect on the fermentation of alcoholic beverages such as beer, wine and cider. However, genetic, morphological and physiological alterations occurring in immobilized yeast cells impact on aroma formation during fermentation processes. The focus of this review is exploitation of existing knowledge on the biochemistry and the biological role of flavour production in yeast for the biotechnological production of aroma compounds of industrial importance, by means of immobilized yeast. Various types of carrier materials and immobilization methods proposed for application in beer, wine, fruit wine, cider and mead production are presented. Engineering aspects with special emphasis on immobilized cell bioreactor design, operation and scale-up potential are also discussed. Ultimately, examples of products with improved quality properties within the alcoholic beverages are addressed, together with identification and description of the future perspectives and scope for cell immobilization in fermentation processes.

  6. The Use of Yeast Surface Display in Biofuel Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szczupak, Alon; Alfonta, Lital

    2015-01-01

    Biofuel cells are electrochemical devices which convert chemical energy to electricity using biochemical pathways and redox enzymes. In enzymatic fuel cells purified redox enzymes catalyze the reactions in the anode and cathode compartments whereas in microbial fuel cells (MFCs) the entire metabolism of the microorganisms is exploited. Here, a hybrid biofuel cell concept is presented, which is based on yeast surface display (YSD) of redox enzymes to catalyze the different cell reactions. PMID:26060081

  7. Biocavity laser spectroscopy of genetically altered yeast cells and isolated yeast mitochondria

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gourley, Paul L.; Hendricks, Judy K.; McDonald, Anthony E.; Copeland, R. Guild; Naviaux, Robert K.; Yaffe, Michael P.

    2006-02-01

    We report an analysis of 2 yeast cell mutants using biocavity laser spectroscopy. The two yeast strains differed only by the presence or absence of mitochondrial DNA. Strain 104 is a wild-type (ρ +) strain of the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Strain 110 was derived from strain 104 by removal of its mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA). Removal of mtDNA causes strain 110 to grow as a "petite" (ρ -), named because it forms small colonies (of fewer cells because it grows more slowly) on agar plates supplemented with a variety of different carbon sources. The absence of mitochondrial DNA results in the complete loss of all the mtDNA-encoded proteins and RNAs, and loss of the pigmented, heme-containing cytochromes a and b. These cells have mitochondria, but the mitochondria lack the normal respiratory chain complexes I, III, IV, and V. Complex II is preserved because its subunits are encoded by genes located in nuclear DNA. The frequency distributions of the peak shifts produced by wild-type and petite cells and mitochondria show striking differences in the symmetry and patterns of the distributions. Wild-type ρ + cells (104) and mitochondria produced nearly symmetric, Gaussian distributions. The ρ - cells (110) and mitochondria showed striking asymmetry and skew that appeared to follow a Poisson distribution.

  8. Antigenicity and immunogenicity of an extract from the cell wall and cell membrane of Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Gómez, A M; Rhodes, J C; Deepe, G S

    1991-01-01

    In order to identify T-cell antigens from Histoplasma capsulatum yeast cells, we prepared a detergent extract of the cell wall and cell membrane of yeast-phase H. capsulatum G217B and analyzed its antigenicity and immunogenicity. Mice injected with viable H. capsulatum yeast cells or with 500 or 1,000 micrograms of the extract mounted a delayed-type hypersensitivity response to solubilized cell wall and cell membrane. Vaccination with this antigenic preparation conferred a protective immune r...

  9. A systems-level approach for metabolic engineering of yeast cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Il-Kwon; Roldão, António; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2012-03-01

    The generation of novel yeast cell factories for production of high-value industrial biotechnological products relies on three metabolic engineering principles: design, construction, and analysis. In the last two decades, strong efforts have been put on developing faster and more efficient strategies and/or technologies for each one of these principles. For design and construction, three major strategies are described in this review: (1) rational metabolic engineering; (2) inverse metabolic engineering; and (3) evolutionary strategies. Independent of the selected strategy, the process of designing yeast strains involves five decision points: (1) choice of product, (2) choice of chassis, (3) identification of target genes, (4) regulating the expression level of target genes, and (5) network balancing of the target genes. At the construction level, several molecular biology tools have been developed through the concept of synthetic biology and applied for the generation of novel, engineered yeast strains. For comprehensive and quantitative analysis of constructed strains, systems biology tools are commonly used and using a multi-omics approach. Key information about the biological system can be revealed, for example, identification of genetic regulatory mechanisms and competitive pathways, thereby assisting the in silico design of metabolic engineering strategies for improving strain performance. Examples on how systems and synthetic biology brought yeast metabolic engineering closer to industrial biotechnology are described in this review, and these examples should demonstrate the potential of a systems-level approach for fast and efficient generation of yeast cell factories. PMID:22188344

  10. The price of independence: cell separation in fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martín-García, Rebeca; Santos, Beatriz

    2016-04-01

    The ultimate goal of cell division is to give rise to two viable independent daughter cells. A tight spatial and temporal regulation between chromosome segregation and cytokinesis ensures the viability of the daughter cells. Schizosaccharomyces pombe, commonly known as fission yeast, has become a leading model organism for studying essential and conserved mechanisms of the eukaryotic cell division process. Like many other eukaryotic cells it divides by binary fission and the cleavage furrow undergoes ingression due to the contraction of an actomyosin ring. In contrast to mammalian cells, yeasts as cell-walled organisms, also need to form a division septum made of cell wall material to complete the process of cytokinesis. The division septum is deposited behind the constricting ring and it will constitute the new ends of the daughter cells. Cell separation also involves cell wall degradation and this process should be precisely regulated to avoid cell lysis. In this review, we will give a brief overview of the whole cytokinesis process in fission yeast, from the positioning and assembly of the contractile ring to the final step of cell separation, and the problems generated when these processes are not precise. PMID:26931605

  11. Discrete dynamical system modelling for gene regulatory networks of 5-hydroxymethylfural tolerance for ethanologenic yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Composed of linear difference equations, a discrete dynamic system model was designed to reconstruct transcriptional regulations in gene regulatory networks in response to 5-hydroxymethylfurfural, a bioethanol conversion inhibitor for ethanologenic yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The modeling aims ...

  12. Inactivation cross section of yeast cells irradiated by heavy ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    1999-01-01

    Inactivation cross sections for haploid yeast cell strain211a have been calculated as 1-hit detector based on the tracktheory in an extended target mode and a numerical calculation ofradial dose distribution. In the calculations, characteristic dose D0 is a fitted parameter which is obtained to be 42 Gy, and "radius"of hypothetical target a0 is chosen to be 0.5μm which is about the sizeof nucleus of yeast cells for obtaining an overall agreement withexperimental cross sections. The results of the calculations are inagreement with the experimental data in high LET (linear energy transfer) including the thindown region.

  13. Nonlinear Dielectric Properties of Yeast Cells Cultured in Different Environmental Conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kawanishi, Gomon; Fukuda, Naoki; Muraji, Masafumi

    The harmonics of the electric current through yeast suspensions, the nonlinear dielectric properties of yeast cells, have particular patterns according to the biological activity of the cells and the measurement of these patterns is a technique for determining the activity of living cells. The concentration of glucose and oxygen in yeast culture medium influences the manifestation of fermentation or respiration of yeast cells. Measurements were made with yeast cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cultured aerobically and anaerobically in sufficient glucose concentration, aerobic fermentation and anaerobic fermentation, and aerobically in limited glucose concentration, respiration. The results showed that the harmonics were barely apparent for yeast cells in aerobic fermentation and respiratory; however, cells in the anaerobic fermentation displayed substantial third and fifth harmonics. We can say that environmental condition affects the yeast cells' nonlinear properties, from another viewpoint, the measurements of the nonlinear properties are available to determine the activity of yeast cells adjusted to the conditions of their cultivation.

  14. Networks in Cell Biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Buchanan, Mark; Caldarelli, Guido; De Los Rios, Paolo; Rao, Francesco; Vendruscolo, Michele

    2010-05-01

    Introduction; 1. Network views of the cell Paolo De Los Rios and Michele Vendruscolo; 2. Transcriptional regulatory networks Sarath Chandra Janga and M. Madan Babu; 3. Transcription factors and gene regulatory networks Matteo Brilli, Elissa Calistri and Pietro Lió; 4. Experimental methods for protein interaction identification Peter Uetz, Björn Titz, Seesandra V. Rajagopala and Gerard Cagney; 5. Modeling protein interaction networks Francesco Rao; 6. Dynamics and evolution of metabolic networks Daniel Segré; 7. Hierarchical modularity in biological networks: the case of metabolic networks Erzsébet Ravasz Regan; 8. Signalling networks Gian Paolo Rossini; Appendix 1. Complex networks: from local to global properties D. Garlaschelli and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 2. Modelling the local structure of networks D. Garlaschelli and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 3. Higher-order topological properties S. Ahnert, T. Fink and G. Caldarelli; Appendix 4. Elementary mathematical concepts A. Gabrielli and G. Caldarelli; References.

  15. A cell-free extract from yeast cells for studying mRNA turnover.

    OpenAIRE

    Vreken, P.; Buddelmeijer, N.; Raué, H A

    1992-01-01

    We have isolated a cell-free extract from yeast cells that reproduces the differences observed in vivo in the rate of turnover of individual yeast mRNAs. Detailed analysis of the degradation of yeast phosphoglycerate kinase (PGK) mRNA in this system demonstrated that both natural and synthetically prepared PGK transcripts are degraded by the same pathway previously established by us in vivo, consisting of endonucleolytic cleavage at a number of 5'-GGUG-3' sequence motifs within a short target...

  16. Virtual mutagenesis of the yeast cyclins genetic network reveals complex dynamics of transcriptional control networks.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eliska Vohradska

    Full Text Available Study of genetic networks has moved from qualitative description of interactions between regulators and regulated genes to the analysis of the interaction dynamics. This paper focuses on the analysis of dynamics of one particular network--the yeast cyclins network. Using a dedicated mathematical model of gene expression and a procedure for computation of the parameters of the model from experimental data, a complete numerical model of the dynamics of the cyclins genetic network was attained. The model allowed for performing virtual experiments on the network and observing their influence on the expression dynamics of the genes downstream in the regulatory cascade. Results show that when the network structure is more complicated, and the regulatory interactions are indirect, results of gene deletion are highly unpredictable. As a consequence of quantitative behavior of the genes and their connections within the network, causal relationship between a regulator and target gene may not be discovered by gene deletion. Without including the dynamics of the system into the network, its functional properties cannot be studied and interpreted correctly.

  17. The digestion of yeast cell wall polysaccharides in veal calves

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gaillard, B.D.E.; Weerden, van E.J.

    1976-01-01

    1. The digestibility of the cell wall polysaccharides of an alkane-grown yeast in different parts of the digestive tract of two veal calves fitted with re-entrant cannulas at the end of the ileum was studied by replacing part of the skim-milk powder of their ‘normal’, milk-substitute (all-milk-prote

  18. Non-interferometric quantitative phase imaging of yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poola, Praveen K.; Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Real-time imaging of live cells is quite difficult without the addition of external contrast agents. Various methods for quantitative phase imaging of living cells have been proposed like digital holographic microscopy and diffraction phase microscopy. In this paper, we report theoretical and experimental results of quantitative phase imaging of live yeast cells with nanometric precision using transport of intensity equations (TIE). We demonstrate nanometric depth sensitivity in imaging live yeast cells using this technique. This technique being noninterferometric, does not need any coherent light sources and images can be captured through a regular bright-field microscope. This real-time imaging technique would deliver the depth or 3-D volume information of cells and is highly promising in real-time digital pathology applications, screening of pathogens and staging of diseases like malaria as it does not need any preprocessing of samples.

  19. Symmetric cell division in pseudohyphae of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    OpenAIRE

    Kron, S J; Styles, C. A.; Fink, G R

    1994-01-01

    Laboratory strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae are dimorphic; in response to nitrogen starvation they switch from a yeast form (YF) to a filamentous pseudohyphal (PH) form. Time-lapse video microscopy of dividing cells reveals that YF and PH cells differ in their cell cycles and budding polarity. The YF cell cycle is controlled at the G1/S transition by the cell-size checkpoint Start. YF cells divide asymmetrically, producing small daughters from full-sized mothers. As a result, mothers and d...

  20. Systems Level Modeling of the Cell Cycle Using Budding Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.R. Kim

    2007-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins involved in the regulation of the cell cycle are highly conserved across all eukaryotes, and so a relatively simple eukaryote such as yeast can provide insight into a variety of cell cycle perturbations including those that occur in human cancer. To date, the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has provided the largest amount of experimental and modeling data on the progression of the cell cycle, making it a logical choice for in-depth studies of this process. Moreover, the advent of methods for collection of high-throughput genome, transcriptome, and proteome data has provided a means to collect and precisely quantify simultaneous cell cycle gene transcript and protein levels, permitting modeling of the cell cycle on the systems level. With the appropriate mathematical framework and suffi cient and accurate data on cell cycle components, it should be possible to create a model of the cell cycle that not only effectively describes its operation, but can also predict responses to perturbations such as variation in protein levels and responses to external stimuli including targeted inhibition by drugs. In this review, we summarize existing data on the yeast cell cycle, proteomics technologies for quantifying cell cycle proteins, and the mathematical frameworks that can integrate this data into representative and effective models. Systems level modeling of the cell cycle will require the integration of high-quality data with the appropriate mathematical framework, which can currently be attained through the combination of dynamic modeling based on proteomics data and using yeast as a model organism.

  1. A network of yeast basic helix–loop–helix interactions

    OpenAIRE

    Robinson, Kelly A.; Koepke, Jay I.; Kharodawala, Murtaza; Lopes, John M.

    2000-01-01

    The Ino4 protein belongs to the basic helix–loop–helix (bHLH) family of proteins. It is known to form a dimer with Ino2p, which regulates phospholipid biosynthetic genes. Mammalian bHLH proteins have been shown to form multiple dimer combinations. However, this flexibility in dimerization had not been documented for yeast bHLH proteins. Using the yeast two-hybrid assay and a biochemical assay we show that Ino4p dimerizes with the Pho4p, Rtg1p, Rtg3p and Sgc1p bHLH proteins. Screening a yeast ...

  2. Yeast 5 – an expanded reconstruction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolic network

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heavner Benjamin D

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Efforts to improve the computational reconstruction of the Saccharomyces cerevisiae biochemical reaction network and to refine the stoichiometrically constrained metabolic models that can be derived from such a reconstruction have continued since the first stoichiometrically constrained yeast genome scale metabolic model was published in 2003. Continuing this ongoing process, we have constructed an update to the Yeast Consensus Reconstruction, Yeast 5. The Yeast Consensus Reconstruction is a product of efforts to forge a community-based reconstruction emphasizing standards compliance and biochemical accuracy via evidence-based selection of reactions. It draws upon models published by a variety of independent research groups as well as information obtained from biochemical databases and primary literature. Results Yeast 5 refines the biochemical reactions included in the reconstruction, particularly reactions involved in sphingolipid metabolism; updates gene-reaction annotations; and emphasizes the distinction between reconstruction and stoichiometrically constrained model. Although it was not a primary goal, this update also improves the accuracy of model prediction of viability and auxotrophy phenotypes and increases the number of epistatic interactions. This update maintains an emphasis on standards compliance, unambiguous metabolite naming, and computer-readable annotations available through a structured document format. Additionally, we have developed MATLAB scripts to evaluate the model’s predictive accuracy and to demonstrate basic model applications such as simulating aerobic and anaerobic growth. These scripts, which provide an independent tool for evaluating the performance of various stoichiometrically constrained yeast metabolic models using flux balance analysis, are included as Additional files 1, 2 and 3. Additional file 1 Function testYeastModel.m.m. Click here for file Additional file 2 Function model

  3. Quantifying yeast chronological life span by outgrowth of aged cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Murakami, Christopher; Kaeberlein, Matt

    2009-01-01

    The budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has proven to be an important model organism in the field of aging research. The replicative and chronological life spans are two established paradigms used to study aging in yeast. Replicative aging is defined as the number of daughter cells a single yeast mother cell produces before senescence; chronological aging is defined by the length of time cells can survive in a non-dividing, quiescence-like state. We have developed a high-throughput method for quantitative measurement of chronological life span. This method involves aging the cells in a defined medium under agitation and at constant temperature. At each age-point, a sub-population of cells is removed from the aging culture and inoculated into rich growth medium. A high-resolution growth curve is then obtained for this sub-population of aged cells using a Bioscreen C MBR machine. An algorithm is then applied to determine the relative proportion of viable cells in each sub-population based on the growth kinetics at each age-point. This method requires substantially less time and resources compared to other chronological lifespan assays while maintaining reproducibility and precision. The high-throughput nature of this assay should allow for large-scale genetic and chemical screens to identify novel longevity modifiers for further testing in more complex organisms. PMID:19421136

  4. [Cisplatin influence on: the radiosensitivity and recovery of yeast cells].

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-01-01

    The effect of the simultaneous combined action of ionizing radiation and cisplatin on the radiosensitivity and liquid holding recovery (LHR) of diploid yeast cells was studied. It was shown that regardless of the cisplatin concentration (0; 0.002; 0.01; 0.02 g/ml) the radiosensitivity of cells was increased by 1.3 times. The ability of a cell to the LHR was progressively decreased with the increasing cisplatin concentration up to the complete inhibition. It was shown that the LHR of yeast cells after a combined action of ionizing radiation and chemical agents is mainly inhibited due to formation of a greater proportion of irreversible damage. The con- stant of recovery, characterizing the probability of recovery per a unit of time, was independent on cisplatine concentration. PMID:25508873

  5. An improved, bias-reduced probabilistic functional gene network of baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Insuk Lee

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Probabilistic functional gene networks are powerful theoretical frameworks for integrating heterogeneous functional genomics and proteomics data into objective models of cellular systems. Such networks provide syntheses of millions of discrete experimental observations, spanning DNA microarray experiments, physical protein interactions, genetic interactions, and comparative genomics; the resulting networks can then be easily applied to generate testable hypotheses regarding specific gene functions and associations. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: We report a significantly improved version (v. 2 of a probabilistic functional gene network of the baker's yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We describe our optimization methods and illustrate their effects in three major areas: the reduction of functional bias in network training reference sets, the application of a probabilistic model for calculating confidences in pair-wise protein physical or genetic interactions, and the introduction of simple thresholds that eliminate many false positive mRNA co-expression relationships. Using the network, we predict and experimentally verify the function of the yeast RNA binding protein Puf6 in 60S ribosomal subunit biogenesis. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: YeastNet v. 2, constructed using these optimizations together with additional data, shows significant reduction in bias and improvements in precision and recall, in total covering 102,803 linkages among 5,483 yeast proteins (95% of the validated proteome. YeastNet is available from http://www.yeastnet.org.

  6. Effects of gamma radiation on Sporothrix schenckii yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic infection caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Zoonotic transmission can occur after scratches or bites of animals, mainly cats, rodents, and armadillos. Up to the moment, no approved vaccine was reported for S. schenckii or to any important pathogenic fungi infection in humans, indicating the need to expand the research in this field and to explore new alternatives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation in the viability, metabolic activity and reproductive ability of S. schenckii yeast cells for further studies on the development of a vaccine for immunization of cats and dogs. The culture of S. schenckii, in solid medium, was irradiated at doses ranging from 1.0 to 9.0 kGy. After each dose the reproductive capacity, viability and protein synthesis were estimated. The results showed that a reduction of 6 log10 cycles in the number of colonies was achieved at 6.0 kGy and after 8.0 kGy no colonies could be recovered. The viability analysis indicated that yeast cells remained viable up to 9.0 kGy. The results of protein synthesis analysis showed that the yeast cells, irradiated up to 9.0 kGy, were able to synthesize proteins. Our preliminary results indicated that for the yeast cells of S. schenckii, it is possible to find an absorbed dose in which the pathogen loses its reproductive ability, while retaining its viability, a necessary condition for the development of a radioattenuated yeast vaccine. (author)

  7. Effects of gamma radiation on Sporothrix schenckii yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lacerda, Camila M. de Sousa; Martins, Estefania Mara Nascimento; Andrade, Antero S.R. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN/CNEN-MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: cmsl@cdtn.br, e-mail: estefaniabio@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: antero@cdtn.br; Resende, Maria Aparecida de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: maressend@mono.icb.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    Sporotrichosis is a subacute or chronic infection caused by the fungus Sporothrix schenckii. Zoonotic transmission can occur after scratches or bites of animals, mainly cats, rodents, and armadillos. Up to the moment, no approved vaccine was reported for S. schenckii or to any important pathogenic fungi infection in humans, indicating the need to expand the research in this field and to explore new alternatives. The aim of this study was to evaluate the effects of gamma radiation in the viability, metabolic activity and reproductive ability of S. schenckii yeast cells for further studies on the development of a vaccine for immunization of cats and dogs. The culture of S. schenckii, in solid medium, was irradiated at doses ranging from 1.0 to 9.0 kGy. After each dose the reproductive capacity, viability and protein synthesis were estimated. The results showed that a reduction of 6 log{sub 10} cycles in the number of colonies was achieved at 6.0 kGy and after 8.0 kGy no colonies could be recovered. The viability analysis indicated that yeast cells remained viable up to 9.0 kGy. The results of protein synthesis analysis showed that the yeast cells, irradiated up to 9.0 kGy, were able to synthesize proteins. Our preliminary results indicated that for the yeast cells of S. schenckii, it is possible to find an absorbed dose in which the pathogen loses its reproductive ability, while retaining its viability, a necessary condition for the development of a radioattenuated yeast vaccine. (author)

  8. High power density yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganguli, Rahul

    Microbial fuel cells leverage whole cell biocatalysis to convert the energy stored in energy-rich renewable biomolecules such as sugar, directly to electrical energy at high efficiencies. Advantages of the process include ambient temperature operation, operation in natural streams such as wastewater without the need to clean electrodes, minimal balance-of-plant requirements compared to conventional fuel cells, and environmentally friendly operation. These make the technology very attractive as portable power sources and waste-to-energy converters. The principal problem facing the technology is the low power densities compared to other conventional portable power sources such as batteries and traditional fuel cells. In this work we examined the yeast catalyzed microbial fuel cell and developed methods to increase the power density from such fuel cells. A combination of cyclic voltammetry and optical absorption measurements were used to establish significant adsorption of electron mediators by the microbes. Mediator adsorption was demonstrated to be an important limitation in achieving high power densities in yeast-catalyzed microbial fuel cells. Specifically, the power densities are low for the length of time mediator adsorption continues to occur. Once the mediator adsorption stops, the power densities increase. Rotating disk chronoamperometry was used to extract reaction rate information, and a simple kinetic expression was developed for the current observed in the anodic half-cell. Since the rate expression showed that the current was directly related to microbe concentration close to the electrode, methods to increase cell mass attached to the anode was investigated. Electrically biased electrodes were demonstrated to develop biofilm-like layers of the Baker's yeast with a high concentration of cells directly connected to the electrode. The increased cell mass did increase the power density 2 times compared to a non biofilm fuel cell, but the power density

  9. Construction of a large synthetic human Fab antibody library on yeast cell surface by optimized yeast mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baek, Du-San; Kim, Yong-Sung

    2014-03-28

    Yeast surface-displayed antibody libraries provide an efficient and quantitative screening resource for given antigens, but suffer from typically modest library sizes owing to low yeast transformation efficiency. Yeast mating is an attractive method for overcoming the limit of yeast transformation to construct a large, combinatorial antibody library, but the optimal conditions have not been reported. Here, we report a large synthetic human Fab (antigen binding fragment) yeast surface-displayed library generated by stepwise optimization of yeast mating conditions. We first constructed HC (heavy chain) and LC (light chain) libraries, where all of the six CDRs (complementarity-determining regions) of the variable domains were diversified mimicking the human germline antibody repertoires by degenerate codons, onto single frameworks of VH3-23 and Vkappa1-16 germline sequences, in two haploid cells of opposite mating types. Yeast mating conditions were optimized in the order of cell density, media pH, and cell growth phase, yielding a mating efficiency of ~58% between the two haploid cells carrying HC and LC libraries. We constructed two combinatorial Fab libraries with CDR-H3 of 9 or 11 residues in length with colony diversities of more than 10(9) by one round of yeast mating between the two haploid HC and LC libraries, with modest diversity sizes of ~10(7). The synthetic human Fab yeast-displayed libraries exhibited relative amino acid compositions in each position of the six CDRs that were very similar to those of the designed repertoires, suggesting that they are a promising source for human Fab antibody screening.

  10. A Method to Design Synthetic Cell-Cycle Networks

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    MIAO Ke-Ke

    2009-01-01

    The interactions among proteins, DNA and RNA in an organism form elaborate cell-cycle networks which govern cell growth and proliferation. Understanding the common structure of ce11-cycle networks will be of great benefit to science research. Here, inspired by the importance of the cell-cycle regulatory network of yeast which has been studied intensively, we focus on small networks with 11 nodes, equivalent to that of the cell-cycle regulatory network used by Li et al. [Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. USA 101(2004)4781] Using a Boolean model, we study the correlation between structure and function, and a possible common structure. It is found that cascade-like networks with a great number of interactions between nodes are stable. Based on these findings, we are able to construct synthetic networks that have the same functions as the cell-cycle regulatory network.

  11. Inactivation cross sectiopn of yeast cells irradiated by heavy ions

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    ZHANGChunxiang; LUODaling

    1999-01-01

    Inactivation cross sections for haploid yeast cell strain 211a have been calculated as 1-ht detector based on the track theory in an extended target mode and a numerical calculation of radial dose distribution.In the calculations,characteristic dose D0 is a fitted parameter which is obtained to be 42Gy,and “radius” of hypothetical target a0 is chosen to be 0.5μm which is about the size of nucleus of yeast cells for obtaining an overall agreement with experimental cross sections.The results of the calculations are in agreement with the experimental data in igh LEF(linear energy transfer)including the thindown region.

  12. Mathematical model of the cell division cycle of fission yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Novak, Bela; Pataki, Zsuzsa; Ciliberto, Andrea; Tyson, John J.

    2001-03-01

    Much is known about the genes and proteins controlling the cell cycle of fission yeast. Can these molecular components be spun together into a consistent mechanism that accounts for the observed behavior of growth and division in fission yeast cells? To answer this question, we propose a mechanism for the control system, convert it into a set of 14 differential and algebraic equations, study these equations by numerical simulation and bifurcation theory, and compare our results to the physiology of wild-type and mutant cells. In wild-type cells, progress through the cell cycle (G1→S→G2→M) is related to cyclic progression around a hysteresis loop, driven by cell growth and chromosome alignment on the metaphase plate. However, the control system operates much differently in double-mutant cells, wee1- cdc25Δ, which are defective in progress through the latter half of the cell cycle (G2 and M phases). These cells exhibit "quantized" cycles (interdivision times clustering around 90, 160, and 230 min). We show that these quantized cycles are associated with a supercritical Hopf bifurcation in the mechanism, when the wee1 and cdc25 genes are disabled.

  13. Salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA

    OpenAIRE

    Qiuqiang Gao; Liang-Chun Liou; Qun Ren; Xiaoming Bao; Zhaojie Zhang

    2015-01-01

    The yeast cell wall plays an important role in maintaining cell morphology, cell integrity and response to environmental stresses. Here, we report that salt stress causes cell wall damage in yeast cells lacking mitochondrial DNA (ρ0). Upon salt treatment, the cell wall is thickened, broken and becomes more sensitive to the cell wall-perturbing agent sodium dodecyl sulfate (SDS). Also, SCW11 mRNA levels are elevated in ρ0 cells. Deletion of SCW11 significantly decreases the sensitivity of ρ0 c...

  14. Budding yeast colony growth study based on circular granular cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprianti, Devi; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-08-01

    Yeast colony growth can be modelled by using circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. The bud growth angle can be set to regulate cell budding pattern. Cohesion force, contact force and Stokes force were adopted to accommodate the behaviour and interactions among cells. Simulation steps are divided into two steps, the explicit step is due to cell growing and implicit step for the cell rearrangement. Only in explicit step that time change was performed. In this study, we examine the influence of cell diameter growth time and reproduction time combination toward the growth of cell number and colony formation. We find a commutative relation between the cell diameter growth time and reproduction time to the specific growth rate. The greater value of the multiplication of the parameters, the smaller specific growth rate is obtained. It also shows a linear correlation between the specific growth rate and colony diameter growth rate.

  15. Apple can act as anti-aging on yeast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Vanessa Palermo; Fulvio Mattivi; Romano Silvestri; Giuseppe La Regina; Claudio Falcone; Cristina Mazzoni

    2012-01-01

    International audience In recent years, epidemiological and biochemical studies have shown that eating apples is associated with reduction of occurrence of cancer, degenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. This association is often attributed to the presence of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C) and polyphenols. The substances that hinder the presence of free radicals are also able to protect cells from aging. In our laboratory we used yeast, a unicellular eukaryotic organism,...

  16. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otabe, E. S.; Kuroki, S.; Nikawa, J.; Matsumoto, Y.; Ooba, T.; Kiso, K.; Hayashi, H.

    2009-03-01

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  17. Yeast cells proliferation on various strong static magnetic fields and temperatures

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The effect of strong magnetic fields on activities of yeast cells were investigated. Experimental yeast cells were cultured in 5 ml of YPD(Yeast extract Peptone Dextrose) for the number density of yeast cells of 5.0 ±0.2 x 106/ml with various temperatures and magnetic fields up to 10 T. Since the yeast cells were placed in the center of the superconducting magnet, the effect of magnetic force due to the diamagnetism and magnetic gradient was negligibly small. The yeast suspension was opened to air and cultured in shaking condition. The number of yeast cells in the yeast suspension was counted by a counting plate with an optical microscope, and the time dependence of the number density of yeast cells was measured. The time dependence of the number density of yeast cells, ρ, of initial part is analyzed in terms of Malthus equation as given by ρ = ρo exp(kt), where k is the growth coefficient. It is found that, the growth coefficient under the magnetic field is suppressed compared with the control. The growth coefficient decreasing as increasing magnetic field and is saturated at about 5 T. On the other hand, it is found that the suppression of growth of yeast cells by the magnetic field is diminished at high temperatures.

  18. Unidirectional P-body transport during the yeast cell cycle.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cecilia Garmendia-Torres

    Full Text Available P-bodies belong to a large family of RNA granules that are associated with post-transcriptional gene regulation, conserved from yeast to mammals, and influence biological processes ranging from germ cell development to neuronal plasticity. RNA granules can also transport RNAs to specific locations. Germ granules transport maternal RNAs to the embryo, and neuronal granules transport RNAs long distances to the synaptic dendrites. Here we combine microfluidic-based fluorescent microscopy of single cells and automated image analysis to follow p-body dynamics during cell division in yeast. Our results demonstrate that these highly dynamic granules undergo a unidirectional transport from the mother to the daughter cell during mitosis as well as a constrained "hovering" near the bud site half an hour before the bud is observable. Both behaviors are dependent on the Myo4p/She2p RNA transport machinery. Furthermore, single cell analysis of cell size suggests that PBs play an important role in daughter cell growth under nutrient limiting conditions.

  19. Detection of Active Yeast Cells (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) in Frozen Dough Sections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Autio, K; Mattila-Sandholm, T

    1992-07-01

    A new method based on fluorescence microscopy was developed to detect active yeast cells in cryosections of wheat dough. The sections were stained with 4',6-diamidino-2-phenylindole (DAPI) and counterstained with Evans blue. The active yeast cells in the sections appeared brilliant yellow and were readily distinguished from the red dough matrix. The dead cells allowed penetration of the Evans blue through the cell membrane, which interfered with the DAPI staining and caused the dead cells to blend into the red environment. The number of active yeast cells in fermenting dough sections containing different proportions of living and dead yeast cells correlated well with the gas-forming capability of the yeast in the dough but not with the results of the conventional plate count method. The new method allows the study of yeast activity not only during the different stages of frozen dough processing but also during the fermentation of doughs. PMID:16348731

  20. Cell wall staining with Trypan blue enables quantitative analysis of morphological changes in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Liesche, Johannes; Marek, Magdalena; Günther-Pomorski, Thomas

    2015-01-01

    staining with fluorescent dyes is a valuable tool. Furthermore, cell wall staining is used to facilitate sub-cellular localization experiments with fluorescently-labeled proteins and the detection of yeast cells in non-fungal host tissues. Here, we report staining of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell wall......Yeast cells are protected by a cell wall that plays an important role in the exchange of substances with the environment. The cell wall structure is dynamic and can adapt to different physiological states or environmental conditions. For the investigation of morphological changes, selective...... with Trypan Blue, which emits strong red fluorescence upon binding to chitin and yeast glucan; thereby, it facilitates cell wall analysis by confocal and super-resolution microscopy. The staining pattern of Trypan Blue was similar to that of the widely used UV-excitable, blue fluorescent cell wall stain...

  1. Pulse-transmission Oscillators: Autonomous Boolean Models and the Yeast Cell Cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sevim, Volkan; Gong, Xinwei; Socolar, Joshua

    2010-03-01

    Models of oscillatory gene expression typically involve a constitutively expressed or positively autoregulated gene which is repressed by a negative feedback loop. In Boolean representations of such systems, which include the repressilator and relaxation oscillators, dynamical stability stems from the impossibility of satisfying all of the Boolean rules at once. We consider a different class of networks, in which oscillations are due to the transmission of a pulse of gene activation around a ring. Using autonomous Boolean modeling methods, we show how the circulating pulse can be stabilized by decoration of the ring with certain feedback and feed-forward motifs. We then discuss the relation of these models to ODE models of transcriptional networks, emphasizing the role of explicit time delays. Finally, we show that a network recently proposed as a generator of cell cycle oscillations in yeast contains the motifs required to support stable transmission oscillations.

  2. Linkage between Fitness of Yeast Cells and Adenylate Kinase Catalysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tükenmez, Hasan; Magnussen, Helge Magnus; Kovermann, Michael; Byström, Anders; Wolf-Watz, Magnus

    2016-01-01

    Enzymes have evolved with highly specific values of their catalytic parameters kcat and KM. This poses fundamental biological questions about the selection pressures responsible for evolutionary tuning of these parameters. Here we are address these questions for the enzyme adenylate kinase (Adk) in eukaryotic yeast cells. A plasmid shuffling system was developed to allow quantification of relative fitness (calculated from growth rates) of yeast in response to perturbations of Adk activity introduced through mutations. Biophysical characterization verified that all variants studied were properly folded and that the mutations did not cause any substantial differences to thermal stability. We found that cytosolic Adk is essential for yeast viability in our strain background and that viability could not be restored with a catalytically dead, although properly folded Adk variant. There exist a massive overcapacity of Adk catalytic activity and only 12% of the wild type kcat is required for optimal growth at the stress condition 20°C. In summary, the approach developed here has provided new insights into the evolutionary tuning of kcat for Adk in a eukaryotic organism. The developed methodology may also become useful for uncovering new aspects of active site dynamics and also in enzyme design since a large library of enzyme variants can be screened rapidly by identifying viable colonies. PMID:27642758

  3. Binding kinetics of magnetic nanoparticles on latex beads and yeast cells studied by magnetorelaxometry

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The ion exchange mediated binding of magnetic nanoparticles (MNP) to modified latex spheres and yeast cells was quantified using magnetorelaxometry. By fitting subsequently recorded relaxation curves, the kinetics of the binding reactions was extracted. The signal of MNP with weak ion exchanger groups bound to latex and yeast cells scales linearly with the concentration of latex beads or yeast cells whereas that of MNP with strong ion exchanger groups is proportional to the square root of concentration. The binding of the latter leads to a much stronger aggregation of yeast cells than the former MNP

  4. Nutrient depletion modifies cell wall adsorption activity of wine yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sidari, R; Caridi, A

    2016-06-01

    Yeast cell wall is a structure that helps yeasts to manage and respond to many environmental stresses. The mannosylphosphorylation is a modification in response to stress that provides the cell wall with negative charges able to bind compounds present in the environment. Phenotypes related to the cell wall modification such as the filamentous growth in Saccharomyces cerevisiae are affected by nutrient depletion. The present work aimed at describing the effect of carbon and/or nitrogen limitation on the aptitude of S. cerevisiae strains to bind coloured polyphenols. Carbon- and nitrogen-rich or deficient media supplemented with grape polyphenols were used to simulate different grape juice conditions-early, mid, 'adjusted' for nitrogen, and late fermentations. In early fermentation condition, the R+G+B values range from 106 (high adsorption, strain Sc1128) to 192 (low adsorption, strain Σ1278b), in mid-fermentation the values range from 111 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 258 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306), in 'adjusted' for nitrogen conditions the values range from 105 (high adsorption, strain Sc1321) to 194 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306) while in late fermentation conditions the values range from 101 (high adsorption, strain Sc384) to 293 (low adsorption, strain Sc2306). The effect of nutrient availability is not univocal for all the strains and the different media tested modified the strains behaviour. In all the media the strains show significant differences. Results demonstrate that wine yeasts decrease/increase their parietal adsorption activity according to the nutrient availability. The wide range of strain variability observed could be useful in selecting wine starters. PMID:27116955

  5. Cell wall trapping of autocrine peptides for human G-protein-coupled receptors on the yeast cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jun Ishii

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs regulate a wide variety of physiological processes and are important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery. Here, we describe a unique concept based on yeast cell-surface display technology to selectively track eligible peptides with agonistic activity for human GPCRs (Cell Wall Trapping of Autocrine Peptides (CWTrAP strategy. In our strategy, individual recombinant yeast cells are able to report autocrine-positive activity for human GPCRs by expressing a candidate peptide fused to an anchoring motif. Following expression and activation, yeast cells trap autocrine peptides onto their cell walls. Because captured peptides are incapable of diffusion, they have no impact on surrounding yeast cells that express the target human GPCR and non-signaling peptides. Therefore, individual yeast cells can assemble the autonomous signaling complex and allow single-cell screening of a yeast population. Our strategy may be applied to identify eligible peptides with agonistic activity for target human GPCRs.

  6. Modularity in the evolution of yeast protein interaction network

    OpenAIRE

    Ogishima, Soichi; Tanaka, Hiroshi; Nakaya, Jun

    2015-01-01

    Protein interaction networks are known to exhibit remarkable structures: scale-free and small-world and modular structures. To explain the evolutionary processes of protein interaction networks possessing scale-free and small-world structures, preferential attachment and duplication-divergence models have been proposed as mathematical models. Protein interaction networks are also known to exhibit another remarkable structural characteristic, modular structure. How the protein interaction netw...

  7. The yeast Sks1p kinase signaling network regulates pseudohyphal growth and glucose response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cole Johnson

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergoes a dramatic growth transition from its unicellular form to a filamentous state, marked by the formation of pseudohyphal filaments of elongated and connected cells. Yeast pseudohyphal growth is regulated by signaling pathways responsive to reductions in the availability of nitrogen and glucose, but the molecular link between pseudohyphal filamentation and glucose signaling is not fully understood. Here, we identify the glucose-responsive Sks1p kinase as a signaling protein required for pseudohyphal growth induced by nitrogen limitation and coupled nitrogen/glucose limitation. To identify the Sks1p signaling network, we applied mass spectrometry-based quantitative phosphoproteomics, profiling over 900 phosphosites for phosphorylation changes dependent upon Sks1p kinase activity. From this analysis, we report a set of novel phosphorylation sites and highlight Sks1p-dependent phosphorylation in Bud6p, Itr1p, Lrg1p, Npr3p, and Pda1p. In particular, we analyzed the Y309 and S313 phosphosites in the pyruvate dehydrogenase subunit Pda1p; these residues are required for pseudohyphal growth, and Y309A mutants exhibit phenotypes indicative of impaired aerobic respiration and decreased mitochondrial number. Epistasis studies place SKS1 downstream of the G-protein coupled receptor GPR1 and the G-protein RAS2 but upstream of or at the level of cAMP-dependent PKA. The pseudohyphal growth and glucose signaling transcription factors Flo8p, Mss11p, and Rgt1p are required to achieve wild-type SKS1 transcript levels. SKS1 is conserved, and deletion of the SKS1 ortholog SHA3 in the pathogenic fungus Candida albicans results in abnormal colony morphology. Collectively, these results identify Sks1p as an important regulator of filamentation and glucose signaling, with additional relevance towards understanding stress-responsive signaling in C. albicans.

  8. Coupling Binding to Catalysis – Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence activated cell sorting.

  9. Coupling Binding to Catalysis: Using Yeast Cell Surface Display to Select Enzymatic Activities.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Keya; Bhuripanyo, Karan; Wang, Yiyang; Yin, Jun

    2015-01-01

    We find yeast cell surface display can be used to engineer enzymes by selecting the enzyme library for high affinity binding to reaction intermediates. Here we cover key steps of enzyme engineering on the yeast cell surface including library design, construction, and selection based on magnetic and fluorescence-activated cell sorting. PMID:26060080

  10. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Research highlights: → We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. → We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. → We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  11. Single-particle tracking of quantum dot-conjugated prion proteins inside yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsuji, Toshikazu; Kawai-Noma, Shigeko [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Pack, Chan-Gi [Cellular Informatics Laboratory, RIKEN Advanced Science Institute, Wako-shi, Saitama 351-0198 (Japan); Terajima, Hideki [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan); Yajima, Junichiro; Nishizaka, Takayuki [Department of Physics, Gakushuin University, 1-5-1 Mejiro, Toshima-ku, Tokyo 171-8588 (Japan); Kinjo, Masataka [Laboratory of Molecular Cell Dynamics, Graduate School of Life Sciences, Hokkaido University, Sapporo 001-0021 (Japan); Taguchi, Hideki, E-mail: taguchi@bio.titech.ac.jp [Department of Biomolecular Engineering, Graduate School of Biosciences and Biotechnology, Tokyo Institute of Technology, B56, 4259 Nagatsuta, Midori-ku, Yokohama 226-8501 (Japan)

    2011-02-25

    Research highlights: {yields} We develop a method to track a quantum dot-conjugated protein in yeast cells. {yields} We incorporate the conjugated quantum dot proteins into yeast spheroplasts. {yields} We track the motions by conventional or 3D tracking microscopy. -- Abstract: Yeast is a model eukaryote with a variety of biological resources. Here we developed a method to track a quantum dot (QD)-conjugated protein in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We chemically conjugated QDs with the yeast prion Sup35, incorporated them into yeast spheroplasts, and tracked the motions by conventional two-dimensional or three-dimensional tracking microscopy. The method paves the way toward the individual tracking of proteins of interest inside living yeast cells.

  12. Reconstruction of the yeast protein-protein interaction network involved in nutrient sensing and global metabolic regulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nielsen Jens

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Several protein-protein interaction studies have been performed for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using different high-throughput experimental techniques. All these results are collected in the BioGRID database and the SGD database provide detailed annotation of the different proteins. Despite the value of BioGRID for studying protein-protein interactions, there is a need for manual curation of these interactions in order to remove false positives. Results Here we describe an annotated reconstruction of the protein-protein interactions around four key nutrient-sensing and metabolic regulatory signal transduction pathways (STP operating in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. The reconstructed STP network includes a full protein-protein interaction network including the key nodes Snf1, Tor1, Hog1 and Pka1. The network includes a total of 623 structural open reading frames (ORFs and 779 protein-protein interactions. A number of proteins were identified having interactions with more than one of the protein kinases. The fully reconstructed interaction network includes all the information available in separate databases for all the proteins included in the network (nodes and for all the interactions between them (edges. The annotated information is readily available utilizing the functionalities of network modelling tools such as Cytoscape and CellDesigner. Conclusions The reported fully annotated interaction model serves as a platform for integrated systems biology studies of nutrient sensing and regulation in S. cerevisiae. Furthermore, we propose this annotated reconstruction as a first step towards generation of an extensive annotated protein-protein interaction network of signal transduction and metabolic regulation in this yeast.

  13. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems.

  14. Novel and improved yeast cell factories for biosustainable processes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Workman, Mhairi

    2014-01-01

    utilizing traditionally applied cell factories are generally based on a limited range of substrates (mainly glucose). However, a wider diversity in substrate range is highly desirable in developing biorefinery scenarios where feed-stocks containing a number of carbon sources are typically employed....... In addition to plant biomass hydrolysates, glycerol is of interest here, being available in amounts relevant for industrial scale bioprocesses due to increased production of biodiesel. The well characterised cell factory Saccharomyces cerevisiae exhibits a clear preference for glucose as a carbon source...... with relevant applications as cell factories (including Pichia spp. and Yarrowia lipolytica) and other less well characterized strains (e.g. Pachysolen tannophilus). This presentation will address how we evaluate cellular performance with a view to utilizing yeast species in industrial biotechnology...

  15. Yeast surface display of dehydrogenases in microbial fuel-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gal, Idan; Schlesinger, Orr; Amir, Liron; Alfonta, Lital

    2016-12-01

    Two dehydrogenases, cellobiose dehydrogenase from Corynascus thermophilus and pyranose dehydrogenase from Agaricus meleagris, were displayed for the first time on the surface of Saccharomyces cerevisiae using the yeast surface display system. Surface displayed dehydrogenases were used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs. Surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase has demonstrated a midpoint potential of -28mV (vs. Ag/AgCl) at pH=6.5 and was used in a mediator-less anode compartment of a microbial fuel cell producing a power output of 3.3μWcm(-2) using lactose as fuel. Surface-displayed pyranose dehydrogenase was used in a microbial fuel cell and generated high power outputs using different substrates, the highest power output that was achieved was 3.9μWcm(-2) using d-xylose. These results demonstrate that surface displayed cellobiose dehydrogenase and pyranose dehydrogenase may successfully be used in microbial bioelectrochemical systems. PMID:27459246

  16. Mining a Yeast Library for Brain Endothelial Cell-Binding Antibodies

    OpenAIRE

    Wang, Xin Xiang; Cho, Yong Ku; Shusta, Eric V.

    2007-01-01

    We describe the use of yeast surface display for the identification of antibodies that bind the plasma membranes of living cells. Yeast panning with a nonimmune human single-chain antibody library identified 34 unique lead antibodies that bind (Kd = 82 ± 15 nM) and in some cases internalize into rat brain endothelial cells. In addition, a novel yeast display immunoprecipitation procedure was employed for initial characterization of the cognate antigens.

  17. Prediction of quantitative phenotypes based on genetic networks: a case study in yeast sporulation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shen Li

    2010-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An exciting application of genetic network is to predict phenotypic consequences for environmental cues or genetic perturbations. However, de novo prediction for quantitative phenotypes based on network topology is always a challenging task. Results Using yeast sporulation as a model system, we have assembled a genetic network from literature and exploited Boolean network to predict sporulation efficiency change upon deleting individual genes. We observe that predictions based on the curated network correlate well with the experimentally measured values. In addition, computational analysis reveals the robustness and hysteresis of the yeast sporulation network and uncovers several patterns of sporulation efficiency change caused by double gene deletion. These discoveries may guide future investigation of underlying mechanisms. We have also shown that a hybridized genetic network reconstructed from both temporal microarray data and literature is able to achieve a satisfactory prediction accuracy of the same quantitative phenotypes. Conclusions This case study illustrates the value of predicting quantitative phenotypes based on genetic network and provides a generic approach.

  18. Yeast Replicator: A High-Throughput Multiplexed Microfluidics Platform for Automated Measurements of Single-Cell Aging

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ping Liu

    2015-10-01

    Full Text Available The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a model organism for replicative aging studies; however, conventional lifespan measurement platforms have several limitations. Here, we present a microfluidics platform that facilitates simultaneous lifespan and gene expression measurements of aging yeast cells. Our multiplexed high-throughput platform offers the capability to perform independent lifespan experiments using different yeast strains or growth media. Using this platform in minimal media environments containing glucose, we measured the full lifespan of individual yeast cells in wild-type and canonical gene deletion backgrounds. Compared to glucose, in galactose we observed a 16.8% decrease in replicative lifespan accompanied by an ∼2-fold increase in single-cell oxidative stress levels reported by PSOD1-mCherry. Using PGAL1-YFP to measure the activity of the bistable galactose network, we saw that OFF and ON cells are similar in their lifespan. Our work shows that aging cells are committed to a single phenotypic state throughout their lifespan.

  19. Yeast modulation of human dendritic cell cytokine secretion: an in vitro study.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ida M Smith

    Full Text Available Probiotics are live microorganisms which when administered in adequate amounts confer a health benefit on the host. The concept of individual microorganisms influencing the makeup of T cell subsets via interactions with intestinal dendritic cells (DCs appears to constitute the foundation for immunoregulatory effects of probiotics, and several studies have reported probiotic strains resulting in reduction of intestinal inflammation through modulation of DC function. Consequent to a focus on Saccharomyces boulardii as the fundamental probiotic yeast, very little is known about hundreds of non-Saccharomyces yeasts in terms of their interaction with the human gastrointestinal immune system. The aim of the present study was to evaluate 170 yeast strains representing 75 diverse species for modulation of inflammatory cytokine secretion by human DCs in vitro, as compared to cytokine responses induced by a S. boulardii reference strain with probiotic properties documented in clinical trials. Furthermore, we investigated whether cytokine inducing interactions between yeasts and human DCs are dependent upon yeast viability or rather a product of membrane interactions regardless of yeast metabolic function. We demonstrate high diversity in yeast induced cytokine profiles and employ multivariate data analysis to reveal distinct clustering of yeasts inducing similar cytokine profiles in DCs, highlighting clear species distinction within specific yeast genera. The observed differences in induced DC cytokine profiles add to the currently very limited knowledge of the cross-talk between yeasts and human immune cells and provide a foundation for selecting yeast strains for further characterization and development toward potentially novel yeast probiotics. Additionally, we present data to support a hypothesis that the interaction between yeasts and human DCs does not solely depend on yeast viability, a concept which may suggest a need for further classifications

  20. Industrial systems biology and its impact on synthetic biology of yeast cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fletcher, Eugene; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-06-01

    Engineering industrial cell factories to effectively yield a desired product while dealing with industrially relevant stresses is usually the most challenging step in the development of industrial production of chemicals using microbial fermentation processes. Using synthetic biology tools, microbial cell factories such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be engineered to express synthetic pathways for the production of fuels, biopharmaceuticals, fragrances, and food flavors. However, directing fluxes through these synthetic pathways towards the desired product can be demanding due to complex regulation or poor gene expression. Systems biology, which applies computational tools and mathematical modeling to understand complex biological networks, can be used to guide synthetic biology design. Here, we present our perspective on how systems biology can impact synthetic biology towards the goal of developing improved yeast cell factories. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2016;113: 1164-1170. © 2015 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  1. Microbiology and Epidemiology of Oral Yeast Colonization in Hemopoietic Progenitor Cell Transplant Recipients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Westbrook, Steven D.; Kirkpatrick, William R.; Wiederhold, Nathan P.; Freytes, Cesar O.; Toro, Juan J.; Patterson, Thomas F.; Redding, Spencer W.

    2012-01-01

    Objective We monitored the epidemiology and microbiology of oral yeast colonization in patients undergoing hemopoietic progenitor cell transplantation (HPCT) to examine associations between yeast colonization and oral mucositis. Study Design One hundred twenty-one consecutive HPCT patients were sampled for oral yeasts prior to fluconazole (FLC) prophylaxis, at transplant, and weekly until discharge. Clinical oral mucositis screenings were performed tri-weekly. Results Yeast colonization was evident at 216 of 510 total visits. Candida albicans and C. glabrata were the predominate organisms. Eight patients showed elevated MICs to FLC. One patient developed fungal septicemia. Patients with OMAS mucositis scores <20 had higher colonization rates than those with higher scores. Conclusions FLC is very effective in controlling a variety of oral yeasts in HPCT recipients. FLC resistant yeasts do emerge and can be the source of fungal sepsis. A positive association was not shown between yeast colonization and presence or severity of oral mucositis. PMID:23312542

  2. Hydrothermal decomposition of yeast cells for production of proteins and amino acids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    This study examines hydrothermal decomposition of Baker's yeast cells, used as a model for spent Brewer's yeast waste, into protein and amino acids. The reaction was carried out in a closed batch reactor at various temperatures between 100 and 250 deg. C. The reaction products were separated into water-soluble and solid residue. The results demonstrated that the amount of yeast residue decreased with increasing hydrolysis temperature. After 20 min reaction in water at 250 deg. C, 78% of yeast was decomposed. The highest amount of protein produced was also obtained at this condition and was found to be 0.16 mg/mg dry yeast. The highest amount of amino acids (0.063 mg/mg dry yeast) was found at the lowest temperature tested after 15 min. The hydrolysis product obtained at 200 deg. C was tested as a nutrient source for yeast growth. The growth of yeast cells in the culture medium containing 2 w/v% of this product was comparable to that of the cells grown in the medium containing commercial yeast extract at the same concentration. These results demonstrated the feasibility of using subcritical water to potentially decompose proteinaceous waste such as spent Brewer's yeast while recovering more useful products

  3. Cell-based screens and phenomics with fission yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rallis, Charalampos; Bähler, Jürg

    2016-01-01

    Next-generation sequencing approaches have considerably advanced our understanding of genome function and regulation. However, the knowledge of gene function and complex cellular processes remains a challenge and bottleneck in biological research. Phenomics is a rapidly emerging area, which seeks to rigorously characterize all phenotypes associated with genes or gene variants. Such high-throughput phenotyping under different conditions can be a potent approach toward gene function. The fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe (S. pombe) is a proven eukaryotic model organism that is increasingly used for genomewide screens and phenomic assays. In this review, we highlight current large-scale, cell-based approaches used with S. pombe, including computational colony-growth measurements, genetic interaction screens, parallel profiling using barcodes, microscopy-based cell profiling, metabolomic methods and transposon mutagenesis. These diverse methods are starting to offer rich insights into the relationship between genotypes and phenotypes. PMID:26523839

  4. Sterol-Rich Membrane Domains Define Fission Yeast Cell Polarity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makushok, Tatyana; Alves, Paulo; Huisman, Stephen Michiel; Kijowski, Adam Rafal; Brunner, Damian

    2016-05-19

    Cell polarization is crucial for the functioning of all organisms. The cytoskeleton is central to the process but its role in symmetry breaking is poorly understood. We study cell polarization when fission yeast cells exit starvation. We show that the basis of polarity generation is de novo sterol biosynthesis, cell surface delivery of sterols, and their recruitment to the cell poles. This involves four phases occurring independent of the polarity factor cdc42p. Initially, multiple, randomly distributed sterol-rich membrane (SRM) domains form at the plasma membrane, independent of the cytoskeleton and cell growth. These domains provide platforms on which the growth and polarity machinery assembles. SRM domains are then polarized by the microtubule-dependent polarity factor tea1p, which prepares for monopolar growth initiation and later switching to bipolar growth. SRM polarization requires F-actin but not the F-actin organizing polarity factors for3p and bud6p. We conclude that SRMs are key to cell polarization. PMID:27180904

  5. Fission yeast MO25 protein is localized at SPB and septum and is essential for cell morphogenesis

    OpenAIRE

    Kanai, Muneyoshi; Kume, Kazunori; Miyahara, Kohji; Sakai, Keisuke; Nakamura, Keigo; Leonhard, Klaus; David J. Wiley; Verde, Fulvia; Toda, Takashi; Hirata, Dai

    2005-01-01

    Cell morphogenesis is of fundamental significance in all eukaryotes for development, differentiation, and cell proliferation. In fission yeast, Drosophila Furry-like Mor2 plays an essential role in cell morphogenesis in concert with the NDR/Tricornered kinase Orb6. Mutations of these genes result in the loss of cell polarity. Here we show that the conserved proteins, MO25-like Pmo25, GC kinase Nak1, Mor2, and Orb6, constitute a morphogenesis network that is important for polarity control and ...

  6. Biosynthesis of amorphous mesoporous aluminophosphates using yeast cells as templates

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Amorphous aluminophosphates can take place using yeast as template. ► A mesoporous material was obtained. ► The specific surface area after calcinations ranged between 176 and 214 m2 g−1. -- Abstract: In this study aluminophosphates have been synthesized from aluminum isopropoxide and phosphoric acid solutions using yeast cells as template. The physicochemical characterization was carried out by thermogravimetric analysis; X-ray diffraction; Fourier transform infrared; N2 adsorption–desorption isotherms; scanning electron microscopy; transmission electron microscopy and potentiometric titration with N-butylamine for determination of: thermal stability; crystalline structure; textural properties; morphology and surface acidity, respectively. The calcined powders consisted of an intimate mixture of amorphous and crystallized AlPO particles with sizes between 23 and 30 nm. The average pore size observed is 13–16 nm and the specific surface area after calcinations (at 650 °C) ranged between 176 and 214 m2 g−1.

  7. Biosynthesis of amorphous mesoporous aluminophosphates using yeast cells as templates

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Sifontes, Ángela B., E-mail: asifonte@ivic.gob.ve [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); González, Gema [Centro de Ingeniería de Materiales y Nanotecnología, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Tovar, Leidy M.; Méndez, Franklin J. [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Gomes, Maria E. [Centro de Ingeniería de Materiales y Nanotecnología, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Cañizales, Edgar [Área de Análisis Químico Inorgánico, PDVSA, INTEVEP, Los Teques 1070-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Niño-Vega, Gustavo; Villalobos, Hector [Centro de Microbiología y Biología Celular, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of); Brito, Joaquin L. [Centro de Química, Instituto Venezolano de Investigaciones Científicas, Apartado 20632, Caracas 1020-A (Venezuela, Bolivarian Republic of)

    2013-02-15

    Graphical abstract: Display Omitted Highlights: ► Amorphous aluminophosphates can take place using yeast as template. ► A mesoporous material was obtained. ► The specific surface area after calcinations ranged between 176 and 214 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}. -- Abstract: In this study aluminophosphates have been synthesized from aluminum isopropoxide and phosphoric acid solutions using yeast cells as template. The physicochemical characterization was carried out by thermogravimetric analysis; X-ray diffraction; Fourier transform infrared; N{sub 2} adsorption–desorption isotherms; scanning electron microscopy; transmission electron microscopy and potentiometric titration with N-butylamine for determination of: thermal stability; crystalline structure; textural properties; morphology and surface acidity, respectively. The calcined powders consisted of an intimate mixture of amorphous and crystallized AlPO particles with sizes between 23 and 30 nm. The average pore size observed is 13–16 nm and the specific surface area after calcinations (at 650 °C) ranged between 176 and 214 m{sup 2} g{sup −1}.

  8. Yeast cells with impaired drug resistance accumulate glycerol and glucose.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dikicioglu, Duygu; Oc, Sebnem; Rash, Bharat M; Dunn, Warwick B; Pir, Pınar; Kell, Douglas B; Kirdar, Betul; Oliver, Stephen G

    2014-01-01

    Multiple drug resistance (MDR) in yeast is effected by two major superfamilies of membrane transporters: the major facilitator superfamily (MFS) and the ATP-binding cassette (ABC) superfamily. In the present work, we investigated the cellular responses to disruptions in both MFS (by deleting the transporter gene, QDR3) and ABC (by deleting the gene for the Pdr3 transcription factor) transporter systems by growing diploid homozygous deletion yeast strains in glucose- or ammonium-limited continuous cultures. The transcriptome and the metabolome profiles of these strains, as well as the flux distributions in the optimal solution space, reveal novel insights into the underlying mechanisms of action of QDR3 and PDR3. Our results show how cells rearrange their metabolism to cope with the problems that arise from the loss of these drug-resistance genes, which likely evolved to combat chemical attack from bacterial or fungal competitors. This is achieved through the accumulation of intracellular glucose, glycerol, and inorganic phosphate, as well as by repurposing genes that are known to function in other parts of metabolism in order to minimise the effects of toxic compounds. PMID:24157722

  9. Raman scattering evidence of hydrohalite formation on frozen yeast cells

    CERN Document Server

    Okotrub, K A

    2012-01-01

    We studied yeast cells in physiological solution during freezing by Raman microspectroscopy technique. The purpose was to find out the origin of a sharp peak near ~3430 cm^-1 in Raman spectrum of frozen mammalian cells, observed earlier (J. Dong et al, Biophys. J., 99 (2010) 2453), which presumably could be used as an indicator of intracellar ice appearance. We have shown that this line (actually doublet of 3408 and 3425 cm^-1) corresponds to Raman spectrum of hydrohalite (NaCl-2H2O), which is formed as the result of the eutectic crystallization of the liquid solution around the cells. We also show that the spatial distribution of hydrohalite in the sample significantly depends on the cooling rate. At lower cooling rate (1{\\deg}C/min), products of eutectic crystallization form layer on the cell surface which thickness varies for different cells and can reach ~1 {\\mu}m in thickness. At higher cooling rate (20{\\deg}C/min), the hydrohalite distribution appears more homogeneous, in the sample, and the eutectic cr...

  10. Yeast cell surface display for lipase whole cell catalyst and its applications

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Liu, Yun; Zhang, Rui; Lian, Zhongshuai; Wang, Shihui; Wright, Aaron T.

    2014-08-01

    The cell surface display technique allows for the expression of target proteins or peptides on the microbial cell surface by fusing an appropriate protein as an anchoring motif. Yeast display systems, such as Pichia pastoris, Yarowia lipolytica and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, are ideal, alternative and extensive display systems with the advantage of simple genetic manipulation and post-translational modification of expressed heterologous proteins. Engineered yeasts show high performance characteristics and variant utilizations. Herein, we comprehensively summarize the variant factors affecting lipase whole cell catalyst activity and display efficiency, including the structure and size of target proteins, screening anchor proteins, type and chain length of linkers, and the appropriate matching rules among the above-mentioned display units. Furthermore, we also address novel approaches to enhance stability and activity of recombinant lipases, such as VHb gene co-expression, multi-enzyme co-display technique, and the micro-environmental interference and self-assembly techniques. Finally, we represent the variety of applications of whole cell surface displayed lipases on yeast cells in non-aqueous phases, including synthesis of esters, PUFA enrichment, resolution of chiral drugs, organic synthesis and biofuels. We demonstrate that the lipase surface display technique is a powerful tool for functionalizing yeasts to serve as whole cell catalysts, and increasing interest is providing an impetus for broad application of this technique.

  11. Tombusvirus-yeast interactions identify conserved cell-intrinsic viral restriction factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna eSasvari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To combat viral infections, plants possess innate and adaptive immune pathways, such as RNA silencing, R gene and recessive gene-mediated resistance mechanisms. However, it is likely that additional cell-intrinsic restriction factors (CIRF are also involved in limiting plant virus replication. This review discusses novel CIRFs with antiviral functions, many of them RNA-binding proteins or affecting the RNA binding activities of viral replication proteins. The CIRFs against tombusviruses have been identified in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is developed as an advanced model organism. Grouping of the identified CIRFs based on their known cellular functions and subcellular localization in yeast reveals that TBSV replication is limited by a wide variety of host gene functions. Yeast proteins with the highest connectivity in the network map include the well-characterized Xrn1p 5’-3’ exoribonuclease, Act1p actin protein and Cse4p centromere protein. The protein network map also reveals an important interplay between the pro-viral Hsp70 cellular chaperone and the antiviral co-chaperones, and possibly key roles for the ribosomal or ribosome-associated factors. We discuss the antiviral functions of selected CIRFs, such as the RNA binding nucleolin, ribonucleases, WW-domain proteins, single- and multi-domain cyclophilins, TPR-domain co-chaperones and cellular ion pumps. These restriction factors frequently target the RNA-binding region in the viral replication proteins, thus interfering with the recruitment of the viral RNA for replication and the assembly of the membrane-bound viral replicase. Although many of the characterized CIRFs act directly against TBSV, we propose that the TPR-domain co-chaperones function as guardians of the cellular Hsp70 chaperone system, which is subverted efficiently by TBSV for viral replicase assembly in the absence of the TPR-domain co-chaperones.

  12. Apple Can Act as Anti-Aging on Yeast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vanessa Palermo

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available In recent years, epidemiological and biochemical studies have shown that eating apples is associated with reduction of occurrence of cancer, degenerative, and cardiovascular diseases. This association is often attributed to the presence of antioxidants such as ascorbic acid (vitamin C and polyphenols. The substances that hinder the presence of free radicals are also able to protect cells from aging. In our laboratory we used yeast, a unicellular eukaryotic organism, to determine in vivo efficacy of entire apples and their components, such as flesh, skin and polyphenolic fraction, to influence aging and oxidative stress. Our results indicate that all the apple components increase lifespan, with the best result given by the whole fruit, indicating a cooperative role of all apple components.

  13. A System for Predicting Subcellular Localization of Yeast Genome Using Neural Network

    CERN Document Server

    Thampi, Sabu M

    2007-01-01

    The subcellular location of a protein can provide valuable information about its function. With the rapid increase of sequenced genomic data, the need for an automated and accurate tool to predict subcellular localization becomes increasingly important. Many efforts have been made to predict protein subcellular localization. This paper aims to merge the artificial neural networks and bioinformatics to predict the location of protein in yeast genome. We introduce a new subcellular prediction method based on a backpropagation neural network. The results show that the prediction within an error limit of 5 to 10 percentage can be achieved with the system.

  14. Systematic genetic analysis of transcription factors to map the fission yeast transcription-regulatory network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chua, Gordon

    2013-12-01

    Mapping transcriptional-regulatory networks requires the identification of target genes, binding specificities and signalling pathways of transcription factors. However, the characterization of each transcription factor sufficiently for deciphering such networks remains laborious. The recent availability of overexpression and deletion strains for almost all of the transcription factor genes in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe provides a valuable resource to better investigate transcription factors using systematic genetics. In the present paper, I review and discuss the utility of these strain collections combined with transcriptome profiling and genome-wide chromatin immunoprecipitation to identify the target genes of transcription factors.

  15. Construction of the yeast whole-cell Rhizopus oryzae lipase biocatalyst with high activity

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Mei-ling CHEN; Qin GUO; Rui-zhi WANG; Juan XU; Chen-wei ZHOU; Hui RUAN; Guo-qing HE

    2011-01-01

    Surface display is effectively utilized to construct a whole-cell biocatalyst.Codon optimization has been proven to be effective in maximizing production of heterologous proteins in yeast.Here,the cDNA sequence of Rhizopus oryzae lipase (ROL) was optimized and synthesized according to the codon bias of Saccharomyces cerevisiae,and based on the Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell surface display system with α-agglutinin as an anchor,recombinant yeast displaying fully codon-optimized ROL with high activity was successfully constructed.Compared with the wild-type ROL-displaying yeast,the activity of the codon-optimized ROL yeast whole-cell biocatalyst (25 U/g dried cells) was 12.8-fold higher in a hydrolysis reaction using p-nitrophenyl palmitate (pNPP) as the substrate.To our knowledge,this was the first attempt to combine the techniques of yeast surface display and codon optimization for whole-cell biocatalyst construction.Consequently,the yeast whole-cell ROL biocatalyst was constructed with high activity.The optimum pH and temperature for the yeast whole-cell ROL biocatalyst were pH 7.0 and 40 ℃.Furthermore,this whole-cell biocatalyst was applied to the hydrolysis of tributyrin and the resulted conversion of butyric acid reached 96.91% after 144 h.

  16. The role of docking interactions in mediating signaling input, output, and discrimination in the yeast MAPK network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reményi, Attila; Good, Matthew C; Bhattacharyya, Roby P; Lim, Wendell A

    2005-12-22

    Cells use a network of mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) to coordinate responses to diverse extracellular signals. Here, we examine the role of docking interactions in determining connectivity of the yeast MAPKs Fus3 and Kss1. These closely related kinases are activated by the common upstream MAPK kinase Ste7 yet generate distinct output responses, mating and filamentous growth, respectively. We find that docking interactions are necessary for communication with the kinases and that they can encode subtle differences in pathway-specific input and output. The cell cycle arrest mediator Far1, a mating-specific substrate, has a docking motif that selectively binds Fus3. In contrast, the shared partner Ste7 has a promiscuous motif that binds both Fus3 and Kss1. Structural analysis reveals that Fus3 interacts with specific and promiscuous peptides in conformationally distinct modes. Induced fit recognition may allow docking peptides to achieve discrimination by exploiting subtle differences in kinase flexibility. PMID:16364919

  17. Efficient flotation of yeast cells grown in batch culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palmieri, M C; Greenhalf, W; Laluce, C

    1996-05-01

    A fast flotation assay was used to select new floating yeast strains. The flotation ability did not seem to be directly correlated to total extracellular protein concentration of the culture. However, the hydrophobicity of the cell was definitely correlated to the flotation capacity. The Saccharomyces strains (FLT strains) were highly hydrophobic and showed an excellent flotation performance in batch cultures without additives (flotation agents) and with no need for a special flotation chamber or flotation column. A stable and well-organized structure was evident in the dried foam as shown by scanning electron microscopy which revealed its unique structure showing mummified cells (dehydrated) attached to each other. The attachment among the cells and the high protein concentration of the foams indicated that proteins might be involved in the foam formation. The floating strains (strains FLT) which were not flocculent and showed no tendency to aggregate, were capable of growing and producing ethanol in a synthetic medium containing high glucose concentration as a carbon source. The phenomenon responsible for flotation seems to be quite different from the flocculation phenomenon. PMID:18626952

  18. Construction of cell surface-engineered yeasts displaying antigen to detect antibodies by immunofluorescence and yeast-ELISA.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Yu Qian; Han, Shuang Yan; Zheng, Hong; Wu, Lin; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Wang, Xiao Ning; Lin, Ying

    2008-07-01

    In order to detect monoclonal antibodies (MAbs) from insufficient and unavailable human proteins, yeast cells were engineered to display human antigens on their surface and consequently endowed with the ability to specifically bind antibodies. Thus, a fusion gene for the expression of the human proteasome subunit alpha 6 (hPSA6) and human profilin I (hProI) were assembled, respectively, with a His.tag marker at the C-terminal and displayed on yeast surface. With anti-His.tag MAb as the primary antibody and the fluorescein isothiocyanate-conjugated goat anti-mouse Immunoglobulin G as the second antibody, the surface display of hPSA6 and hProI were verified by immunofluorescence labeling. The antigen-displayed yeast particles were used for MAbs detection from ascites through both immunofluorescence and yeast-enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) methods. The results were verified by Western blotting and indirect ELISA. By improving the sensitivity, the novel MAbs detection can be applied in the generation and screening of positive hybridoma. It is suggested that by combining the DNA immunization, the present study can evolve into a quick and protein-free way of MAbs production for insufficient and unavailable antigen. PMID:18542951

  19. Yeast cell wall and live yeast products and their combination in broiler diets formulated with weekly ingredient variations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fowler, J; Hashim, M; Haq, A; Bailey, C A

    2015-10-01

    A 6-week broiler study was conducted to evaluate whether subjecting the intestinal microflora of broilers to the effect of weekly variations in feed ingredients could be ameliorated by the inclusion of yeast-derived feed additives: a yeast cell wall extract (YCW), live yeast culture (LY) or their combination (YCW + LY). Recent changes in ingredient prices have motivated producers to formulate diets not necessarily based primarily on corn and soya bean meal. Intestinal microflora in birds can vary significantly based on the ingredient composition of their diet, and the make-up of the flora can influence overall bird performance. Within the three nutrient phases of this study, birds were fed either a traditional corn-soya ingredient profile or a variable-ingredient regimen, which had weekly changes in the ingredient composition. There were consistent ameliorative effects of the yeast treatments in both the corn-soya and the variable-ingredient groups throughout all 6 weeks, with the YCW + LY combination showing a reduced effect when compared to either product fed alone. The effectiveness of YCW and LY on ameliorating the effects of weekly ingredient variations appeared most effective during the starter and grower phases, but was less significant during the sixth week.

  20. Networks in Cell Biology = Modelling cell biology with networks

    OpenAIRE

    Buchanan, Mark; Caldarelli, Guido; De Los Rios, Paolo; Rao, Francesco; Vendruscolo, M.

    2010-01-01

    The science of complex biological networks is transforming research in areas ranging from evolutionary biology to medicine. This is the first book on the subject, providing a comprehensive introduction to complex network science and its biological applications. With contributions from key leaders in both network theory and modern cell biology, this book discusses the network science that is increasingly foundational for systems biology and the quantitative understanding of living systems. It ...

  1. A yeast surface display system for the discovery of ligands that trigger cell activation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cho, B K; Kieke, M C; Boder, E T; Wittrup, K D; Kranz, D M

    1998-11-01

    Opposing cells often communicate signalling events using multivalent interactions between receptors present on their cell surface. For example, T cells are typically activated when the T cell receptor (TCR) and its associated costimulatory molecules are multivalently engaged by the appropriate ligands present on an antigen presenting cell. In this report, yeast expressing high cell-surface levels of a TCR ligand (a recombinant antibody to the TCR Vbeta domain) were shown to act as 'pseudo' antigen presenting cells and induce T cell activation as monitored by increased levels of CD25 and CD69 and by downregulation of cell surface TCR. Similar levels of T cell activation could occur even when a 30-fold excess of irrelevant yeast was present, suggesting that such a yeast display system, by virtue of its ability to present ligands multivalently, may be used in highly sensitive procedures to identify novel polypeptides that interact multivalently with cell surface receptors and thereby trigger specific cellular responses.

  2. Differential adherence of hydrophobic and hydrophilic Candida albicans yeast cells to mouse tissues.

    OpenAIRE

    Hazen, K C; Brawner, D L; Riesselman, M H; Jutila, M A; Cutler, J E

    1991-01-01

    Using an ex vivo binding assay, we previously demonstrated that yeast cells grown at 37 degrees C display binding specificity in mouse spleen, lymph node, and kidney tissues. In spleen and lymph node tissues, binding was predominantly in regions rich in macrophages. Here, we tested the possibility that hydrophobic and hydrophilic cells bind differentially to host tissues. Hydrophobic and hydrophilic yeast cells of four Candida albicans strains were incubated for 15 min at 4 degrees C with cry...

  3. The flavoprotein Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nishimura, Akira; Kawahara, Nobuhiro [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan); Takagi, Hiroshi, E-mail: hiro@bs.naist.jp [Graduate School of Biological Sciences, Nara Institute of Science and Technology, 8916-5 Takayama, Ikoma, Nara 630-0192 (Japan)

    2013-01-04

    Highlights: Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer NO is produced from L-arginine in response to elevated temperature in yeast. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18 was first identified as the yeast protein involved in NO synthesis. Black-Right-Pointing-Pointer Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers tolerance to high-temperature on yeast cells. -- Abstract: Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. In the unicellular eukaryote yeast, NO may be involved in stress response pathways, but its role is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian NO synthase (NOS) orthologues. Previously, we have proposed the oxidative stress-induced L-arginine synthesis and its physiological role under stress conditions in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Here, our experimental results indicated that increased conversion of L-proline into L-arginine led to NO production in response to elevated temperature. We also showed that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously reported to transfer electrons to the Fe-S cluster protein Dre2, was involved in NO synthesis in yeast. Gene knockdown analysis demonstrated that Tah18-dependent NO synthesis confers high-temperature stress tolerance on yeast cells. As it appears that such a unique cell protection mechanism is specific to yeasts and fungi, it represents a promising target for antifungal activity.

  4. Timing robustness in the budding and fission yeast cell cycles.

    KAUST Repository

    Mangla, Karan

    2010-02-01

    Robustness of biological models has emerged as an important principle in systems biology. Many past analyses of Boolean models update all pending changes in signals simultaneously (i.e., synchronously), making it impossible to consider robustness to variations in timing that result from noise and different environmental conditions. We checked previously published mathematical models of the cell cycles of budding and fission yeast for robustness to timing variations by constructing Boolean models and analyzing them using model-checking software for the property of speed independence. Surprisingly, the models are nearly, but not totally, speed-independent. In some cases, examination of timing problems discovered in the analysis exposes apparent inaccuracies in the model. Biologically justified revisions to the model eliminate the timing problems. Furthermore, in silico random mutations in the regulatory interactions of a speed-independent Boolean model are shown to be unlikely to preserve speed independence, even in models that are otherwise functional, providing evidence for selection pressure to maintain timing robustness. Multiple cell cycle models exhibit strong robustness to timing variation, apparently due to evolutionary pressure. Thus, timing robustness can be a basis for generating testable hypotheses and can focus attention on aspects of a model that may need refinement.

  5. A 220-kilodalton glycoprotein in yeast extract inhibits Staphylococcus aureus adherence to human endothelial cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Elliott, D.A.; Hatcher, V B; Lowy, F D

    1991-01-01

    A 220-kDa glycoprotein from yeast extract causes a twofold decrease in S. aureus adherence to human endothelial cells in vitro. Medium constituents can have a significant effect on bacterial adherence interactions.

  6. How do yeast cells become tolerant to high ethanol concentrations?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snoek, Tim; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Voordeckers, Karin

    2016-08-01

    The brewer's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays a much higher ethanol tolerance compared to most other organisms, and it is therefore commonly used for the industrial production of bioethanol and alcoholic beverages. However, the genetic determinants underlying this yeast's exceptional ethanol tolerance have proven difficult to elucidate. In this perspective, we discuss how different types of experiments have contributed to our understanding of the toxic effects of ethanol and the mechanisms and complex genetics underlying ethanol tolerance. In a second part, we summarize the different routes and challenges involved in obtaining superior industrial yeasts with improved ethanol tolerance. PMID:26758993

  7. Tolerance of yeast biofilm cells towards systemic antifungals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bojsen, Rasmus Kenneth

    Fungal infections have become a major problem in the hospital sector in the past decades due to the increased number of immune compromised patients susceptible to mycosis. Most human infections are believed to be associated with biofilm forming cells that are up to 1000-fold more tolerant to anti...... that complex sphingolipids were involved in fungicidal activity of LTX-109. The sphingolipids may therefore represent a unique antifungal target with therapeutic potential for future drug development....... to antimicrobial agents compared to their planktonic counterparts. Antifungal treatment of biofilms will therefore often result in treatment failure. Consequently, there is a basic requirement to understand the underlying tolerance mechanisms and to development of novel anti-biofilm treatment strategies. The focus...... of this thesis has been to explore the tolerance mechanisms of yeast biofilms to systemic antifungal agents and to identify the molecular target of a novel peptidomimetic with anti-biofilm activity. The genetic tractable S. cerevisiae was used as biofilm model system for the pathogenic Candida species...

  8. Yeast Golgi-localized, gamma-Ear-containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins are but adaptor protein-1 is not required for cell-free transport of membrane proteins from the trans-Golgi network to the prevacuolar compartment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazeed, Mohamed E; Fuller, Robert S

    2008-11-01

    Golgi-localized, gamma-Ear-containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins (GGAs) and adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) mediate clathrin-dependent trafficking of transmembrane proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes. In yeast, the vacuolar sorting receptor Vps10p follows a direct pathway from the TGN to the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC), whereas, the processing protease Kex2p partitions between the direct pathway and an indirect pathway through the early endosome. To examine the roles of the Ggas and AP-1 in TGN-PVC transport, we used a cell-free assay that measures delivery to the PVC of either Kex2p or a chimeric protein (K-V), in which the Vps10p cytosolic tail replaces the Kex2p tail. Either antibody inhibition or dominant-negative Gga2p completely blocked K-V transport but only partially blocked Kex2p transport. Deletion of APL2, encoding the beta subunit of AP-1, did not affect K-V transport but partially blocked Kex2p transport. Residual Kex2p transport seen with apl2Delta membranes was insensitive to dominant-negative Gga2p, suggesting that the apl2Delta mutation causes Kex2p to localize to a compartment that precludes Gga-dependent trafficking. These results suggest that yeast Ggas facilitate the specific and direct delivery of Vps10p and Kex2p from the TGN to the PVC and that AP-1 modulates Kex2p trafficking through a distinct pathway, presumably involving the early endosome. PMID:18784256

  9. Yeast Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-Ribosylation Factor-binding Proteins Are but Adaptor Protein-1 Is Not Required for Cell-free Transport of Membrane Proteins from the Trans-Golgi Network to the Prevacuolar Compartment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abazeed, Mohamed E.

    2008-01-01

    Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins (GGAs) and adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) mediate clathrin-dependent trafficking of transmembrane proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes. In yeast, the vacuolar sorting receptor Vps10p follows a direct pathway from the TGN to the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC), whereas, the processing protease Kex2p partitions between the direct pathway and an indirect pathway through the early endosome. To examine the roles of the Ggas and AP-1 in TGN–PVC transport, we used a cell-free assay that measures delivery to the PVC of either Kex2p or a chimeric protein (K-V), in which the Vps10p cytosolic tail replaces the Kex2p tail. Either antibody inhibition or dominant-negative Gga2p completely blocked K-V transport but only partially blocked Kex2p transport. Deletion of APL2, encoding the β subunit of AP-1, did not affect K-V transport but partially blocked Kex2p transport. Residual Kex2p transport seen with apl2Δ membranes was insensitive to dominant-negative Gga2p, suggesting that the apl2Δ mutation causes Kex2p to localize to a compartment that precludes Gga-dependent trafficking. These results suggest that yeast Ggas facilitate the specific and direct delivery of Vps10p and Kex2p from the TGN to the PVC and that AP-1 modulates Kex2p trafficking through a distinct pathway, presumably involving the early endosome. PMID:18784256

  10. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of menadione-glutathione conjugate export from yeast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Mauzeroll, Janine; Bard, Allen J.

    2004-01-01

    The uptake of menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), which is toxic to yeast cells, and its expulsion as a glutathione complex were studied by scanning electrochemical microscopy. The progression of the in vitro reaction between menadione and glutathione was monitored electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry and correlated with the spectroscopic (UV–visible) behavior. By observing the scanning electrochemical microscope tip current of yeast cells suspended in a menadione-containing solution,...

  11. Using network component analysis to dissect regulatory networks mediated by transcription factors in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun Ye

    2009-03-01

    Full Text Available Understanding the relationship between genetic variation and gene expression is a central question in genetics. With the availability of data from high-throughput technologies such as ChIP-Chip, expression, and genotyping arrays, we can begin to not only identify associations but to understand how genetic variations perturb the underlying transcription regulatory networks to induce differential gene expression. In this study, we describe a simple model of transcription regulation where the expression of a gene is completely characterized by two properties: the concentrations and promoter affinities of active transcription factors. We devise a method that extends Network Component Analysis (NCA to determine how genetic variations in the form of single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs perturb these two properties. Applying our method to a segregating population of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we found statistically significant examples of trans-acting SNPs located in regulatory hotspots that perturb transcription factor concentrations and affinities for target promoters to cause global differential expression and cis-acting genetic variations that perturb the promoter affinities of transcription factors on a single gene to cause local differential expression. Although many genetic variations linked to gene expressions have been identified, it is not clear how they perturb the underlying regulatory networks that govern gene expression. Our work begins to fill this void by showing that many genetic variations affect the concentrations of active transcription factors in a cell and their affinities for target promoters. Understanding the effects of these perturbations can help us to paint a more complete picture of the complex landscape of transcription regulation. The software package implementing the algorithms discussed in this work is available as a MATLAB package upon request.

  12. Human ribosomal protein L9 is a Bax suppressor that promotes cell survival in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eid, Rawan; Sheibani, Sara; Gharib, Nada; Lapointe, Jason F; Horowitz, Avital; Vali, Hojatollah; Mandato, Craig A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2014-05-01

    The identification of a human ribosomal protein L9 (hRPL9) cDNA as a sequence capable of suppressing the lethal effects of heterologously expressed murine Bax in yeast led us to investigate its antiapoptotic potential. Using growth and viability assays, we show that yeast cells heterologously expressing hRPL9 are resistant to the growth inhibitory and lethal effects of exogenously supplied copper, indicating that it has pro-survival properties. To explore potential mechanisms, we used yeast mutants defective in all three types of programmed cell death (apoptosis, necrosis, and autophagy). The ability to retain pro-survival function in all the mutants suggests that hRPL9 may regulate a common pro-death process. In contrast, the yeast RPL9 orthologues, RPL9A and RPL9B, have opposite effects when overexpressed in yeast. In effect, instead of showing resistance to stress, RPL9A and RPL9B overexpressing cells show reduced cell growth. Further analysis indicates that the effects of overexpressed RPL9A and RPL9B are not in themselves lethal, instead, they serve to increase cell doubling time. Thus, yeast RPL9s are more representative of RPs whose extra-ribosomal function is similar to that of tumor suppressors. Taken together, our results demonstrate that RPL9 represents a species- and sequence-specific regulator of cell growth and survival. PMID:24305165

  13. New insight into translation during yeast programmed cell death

    OpenAIRE

    Silva, Maria Alexandra Oliveira da

    2012-01-01

    Tese de doutoramento em Ciências da Saúde Global mRNA translation impairment has been described during the course of apoptosis in both mammalian and yeast. Nevertheless, the molecular pathways modulating translation during different scenarios of yeast apoptosis are still largely unexplored. Here we show by polysome profile analysis an impairment in capdependent translation initiation, correlated with alterations in translation machinery, such as the decrease in eIF4A levels ...

  14. Asymmetric bioreduction of acetophenones by Baker's yeast and its cell-free extract encapsulated in sol–gel silica materials

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Baker's yeast (BY) encapsulated in silica materials was synthesized using a yeast cell suspension and its cell-free extract during a sol–gel reaction of tetramethoxysilane with nitric acid as a catalyst. The synthesized samples were fully characterized using various methods, such as scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential thermal analysis. The BY cells were easily encapsulated inside silica-gel networks, and the ratio of the cells in the silica gel was approximately 75 wt%, which indicated that a large volume of BY was trapped with a small amount of silica. The enzyme activity (asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones) of BY and its cell-free extract encapsulated in silica gel was investigated in detail. The activities and enantioselectivities of free and encapsulated BY were similar to those of acetophenone and its fluorine derivatives, which indicated that the conformation structure of BY enzymes inside silica-gel networks did not change. In addition, the encapsulated BY exhibited considerably better solvent (methanol) stability and recyclability compared to free BY solution. We expect that the development of BY encapsulated in sol–gel silica materials will significantly impact the industrial-scale advancement of high-efficiency and low-cost biocatalysts for the synthesis of valuable chiral alcohols.

  15. Asymmetric bioreduction of acetophenones by Baker's yeast and its cell-free extract encapsulated in sol-gel silica materials

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kato, Katsuya; Nakamura, Hitomi; Nakanishi, Kazuma

    2014-02-01

    Baker's yeast (BY) encapsulated in silica materials was synthesized using a yeast cell suspension and its cell-free extract during a sol-gel reaction of tetramethoxysilane with nitric acid as a catalyst. The synthesized samples were fully characterized using various methods, such as scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption-desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential thermal analysis. The BY cells were easily encapsulated inside silica-gel networks, and the ratio of the cells in the silica gel was approximately 75 wt%, which indicated that a large volume of BY was trapped with a small amount of silica. The enzyme activity (asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones) of BY and its cell-free extract encapsulated in silica gel was investigated in detail. The activities and enantioselectivities of free and encapsulated BY were similar to those of acetophenone and its fluorine derivatives, which indicated that the conformation structure of BY enzymes inside silica-gel networks did not change. In addition, the encapsulated BY exhibited considerably better solvent (methanol) stability and recyclability compared to free BY solution. We expect that the development of BY encapsulated in sol-gel silica materials will significantly impact the industrial-scale advancement of high-efficiency and low-cost biocatalysts for the synthesis of valuable chiral alcohols.

  16. Detection and quantitative determination by PIXE of the mutagen Sn2+ in yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The main goal of this work was to determine the concentration of Sn2+ ions in cells of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and to correlate their quantity with the genotoxicity of intracellularly accumulated metal ions. The intracellular metal content of yeast cells was determined by PIXE (particle-induced X-ray emission) after cell exposure to SnCl2. To that end, a thick target protocol was developed for PIXE analysis. The samples were irradiated with a 2 MeV proton beam, while the induced X-rays were detected with a high-purity germanium detector. The results of the toxicity of SnCl2 and the PIXE analysis performed with two different yeast strains (haploid and diploid) suggest that the exposure of haploid and diploid yeast to Sn2+ induces DNA lesions and that the absorption depends on the genetic background of each strain

  17. Adsorption of phenolic compounds and browning products in white wines by yeasts and their cell walls.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Razmkhab, Sahar; Lopez-Toledano, Azahara; Ortega, José M; Mayen, Manuel; Merida, Julieta; Medina, Manuel

    2002-12-01

    Dehydrated yeast cells at variable concentrations were used as fining agents to decrease the color of white wines with two different degrees of browning (0.153 and 0.177 au, measured at 420 nm). Both wines showed a linear decrease of browning with increasing yeast concentration. However, in terms of efficiency, the yeasts exhibited a higher color lightening at greater concentrations acting on the darker wine. This suggests a preferential retention of some types of yellow-brown compounds that could increase their concentrations at the higher degree of browning. To confirm the role of yeast cell walls in the retention of browning compounds and to evaluate their potential use as fining agents, they were applied at variable concentrations to a browned wine (0.175 au). The cell walls were found to be the active support for the adsorption of browning compounds, but their efficiency was much lower than that of an equivalent amount of the yeast cells from which they were obtained. Finally, HPLC determinations of low-molecular-weight phenolic compounds showed flavan-3-ol derivatives to be significantly retained by both yeasts and their cell walls. PMID:12452671

  18. Positive Selection and Centrality in the Yeast and Fly Protein-Protein Interaction Networks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sandip Chakraborty

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Proteins within a molecular network are expected to be subject to different selective pressures depending on their relative hierarchical positions. However, it is not obvious what genes within a network should be more likely to evolve under positive selection. On one hand, only mutations at genes with a relatively high degree of control over adaptive phenotypes (such as those encoding highly connected proteins are expected to be “seen” by natural selection. On the other hand, a high degree of pleiotropy at these genes is expected to hinder adaptation. Previous analyses of the human protein-protein interaction network have shown that genes under long-term, recurrent positive selection (as inferred from interspecific comparisons tend to act at the periphery of the network. It is unknown, however, whether these trends apply to other organisms. Here, we show that long-term positive selection has preferentially targeted the periphery of the yeast interactome. Conversely, in flies, genes under positive selection encode significantly more connected and central proteins. These observations are not due to covariation of genes’ adaptability and centrality with confounding factors. Therefore, the distribution of proteins encoded by genes under recurrent positive selection across protein-protein interaction networks varies from one species to another.

  19. Self-organization of yeast cells on modified polymer surfaces after dewetting: new perspectives in cellular patterning

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carnazza, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy); Satriano, S [Department of Chemical Sciences, University of Catania, Catania (Italy); Guglielmino, S [Department of Microbiological, Genetic and Molecular Sciences, University of Messina, Messina (Italy)

    2006-08-23

    In recent years, biological micro-electro-mechanical systems (commonly referred to as BioMEMS) have found widespread use, becoming increasingly prevalent in diagnostics and therapeutics. Cell-based sensors are nowadays gaining increasing attention, due to cellular built-in natural selectivity and physiologically relevant response to biologically active chemicals. On the other hand, surrogate microbial systems, including yeast models, have become a useful alternative to animal and mammalian cell systems for high-throughput screening for the identification of new pharmacological agents. A main obstacle in biosensor device fabrication is the need for localized geometric confinement of cells, without losing cell viability and sensing capability. Here we illustrate a new approach for cellular patterning using dewetting processes to control cell adhesion and spatial confinement on modified surfaces. By the control of simple system parameters, a rich variety of morphologies, ranging through hexagonal arrays, polygonal networks, bicontinuous structures, and elongated fingers, can be obtained.

  20. Specific initiation by RNA polymerase I in a whole-cell extract from yeast.

    OpenAIRE

    Schultz, M C; Choe, S Y; Reeder, R H

    1991-01-01

    A protocol is described for making a soluble whole-cell extract from yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) that supports active and specific transcription initiation by RNA polymerases I, II, and III. Specific initiation by polymerase I decreases in high-density cultures, paralleling the decrease in abundance of the endogenous 35S rRNA precursor. This extract should be useful for studying the molecular mechanisms that regulate rRNA transcription in yeast.

  1. How do yeast cells become tolerant to high ethanol concentrations?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Snoek, Tim; Verstrepen, Kevin J.; Voordeckers, Karin

    2016-01-01

    The brewer’s yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae displays a much higher ethanol tolerance compared to most other organisms, and it is therefore commonly used for the industrial production of bioethanol and alcoholic beverages. However, the genetic determinants underlying this yeast’s exceptional ethanol...... tolerance have proven difficult to elucidate. In this perspective, we discuss how different types of experiments have contributed to our understanding of the toxic effects of ethanol and the mechanisms and complex genetics underlying ethanol tolerance. In a second part, we summarize the different routes...... and challenges involved in obtaining superior industrial yeasts with improved ethanol tolerance....

  2. Image processing and classification algorithm for yeast cell morphology in a microfluidic chip

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang Yu, Bo; Elbuken, Caglar; Ren, Carolyn L.; Huissoon, Jan P.

    2011-06-01

    The study of yeast cell morphology requires consistent identification of cell cycle phases based on cell bud size. A computer-based image processing algorithm is designed to automatically classify microscopic images of yeast cells in a microfluidic channel environment. The images were enhanced to reduce background noise, and a robust segmentation algorithm is developed to extract geometrical features including compactness, axis ratio, and bud size. The features are then used for classification, and the accuracy of various machine-learning classifiers is compared. The linear support vector machine, distance-based classification, and k-nearest-neighbor algorithm were the classifiers used in this experiment. The performance of the system under various illumination and focusing conditions were also tested. The results suggest it is possible to automatically classify yeast cells based on their morphological characteristics with noisy and low-contrast images.

  3. Yeast Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-Ribosylation Factor-binding Proteins Are but Adaptor Protein-1 Is Not Required for Cell-free Transport of Membrane Proteins from the Trans-Golgi Network to the Prevacuolar Compartment

    OpenAIRE

    Abazeed, Mohamed E.; Fuller, Robert S.

    2008-01-01

    Golgi-localized, γ-Ear–containing, ADP-ribosylation factor-binding proteins (GGAs) and adaptor protein-1 (AP-1) mediate clathrin-dependent trafficking of transmembrane proteins between the trans-Golgi network (TGN) and endosomes. In yeast, the vacuolar sorting receptor Vps10p follows a direct pathway from the TGN to the late endosome/prevacuolar compartment (PVC), whereas, the processing protease Kex2p partitions between the direct pathway and an indirect pathway through the early endosome. T...

  4. Yeast peroxisomes : function and biogenesis of a versatile cell organelle

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Klei, IJ; Veenhuis, M

    1997-01-01

    Yeast peroxisomes harbour enzymes involved in the metabolism of specific growth substrates, Sequestration of these enzymes increases the efficiency of such pathways. Currently, 16 genes involved in peroxisome biogenesis have been identified, and analysis of their products suggests novel mechanisms f

  5. Extracellular superoxide dismutase protects Histoplasma yeast cells from host-derived oxidative stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Brian H Youseff

    Full Text Available In order to establish infections within the mammalian host, pathogens must protect themselves against toxic reactive oxygen species produced by phagocytes of the immune system. The fungal pathogen Histoplasma capsulatum infects both neutrophils and macrophages but the mechanisms enabling Histoplasma yeasts to survive in these phagocytes have not been fully elucidated. We show that Histoplasma yeasts produce a superoxide dismutase (Sod3 and direct it to the extracellular environment via N-terminal and C-terminal signals which promote its secretion and association with the yeast cell surface. This localization permits Sod3 to protect yeasts specifically from exogenous superoxide whereas amelioration of endogenous reactive oxygen depends on intracellular dismutases such as Sod1. While infection of resting macrophages by Histoplasma does not stimulate the phagocyte oxidative burst, interaction with polymorphonuclear leukocytes (PMNs and cytokine-activated macrophages triggers production of reactive oxygen species (ROS. Histoplasma yeasts producing Sod3 survive co-incubation with these phagocytes but yeasts lacking Sod3 are rapidly eliminated through oxidative killing similar to the effect of phagocytes on Candida albicans yeasts. The protection provided by Sod3 against host-derived ROS extends in vivo. Without Sod3, Histoplasma yeasts are attenuated in their ability to establish respiratory infections and are rapidly cleared with the onset of adaptive immunity. The virulence of Sod3-deficient yeasts is restored in murine hosts unable to produce superoxide due to loss of the NADPH-oxidase function. These results demonstrate that phagocyte-produced ROS contributes to the immune response to Histoplasma and that Sod3 facilitates Histoplasma pathogenesis by detoxifying host-derived reactive oxygen thereby enabling Histoplasma survival.

  6. Divergent Evolution of the Transcriptional Network Controlled by Snf1-Interacting Protein Sip4 in Budding Yeasts.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Constance Mehlgarten

    Full Text Available Cellular responses to starvation are of ancient origin since nutrient limitation has always been a common challenge to the stability of living systems. Hence, signaling molecules involved in sensing or transducing information about limiting metabolites are highly conserved, whereas transcription factors and the genes they regulate have diverged. In eukaryotes the AMP-activated protein kinase (AMPK functions as a central regulator of cellular energy homeostasis. The yeast AMPK ortholog SNF1 controls the transcriptional network that counteracts carbon starvation conditions by regulating a set of transcription factors. Among those Cat8 and Sip4 have overlapping DNA-binding specificity for so-called carbon source responsive elements and induce target genes upon SNF1 activation. To analyze the evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 controlled transcriptional network we have compared the response to carbon limitation of Saccharomyces cerevisiae to that of Kluyveromyces lactis. In high glucose, S. cerevisiae displays tumor cell-like aerobic fermentation and repression of respiration (Crabtree-positive while K. lactis has a respiratory-fermentative life-style, respiration being regulated by oxygen availability (Crabtree-negative, which is typical for many yeasts and for differentiated higher cells. We demonstrate divergent evolution of the Cat8-Sip4 network and present evidence that a role of Sip4 in controlling anabolic metabolism has been lost in the Saccharomyces lineage. We find that in K. lactis, but not in S. cerevisiae, the Sip4 protein plays an essential role in C2 carbon assimilation including induction of the glyoxylate cycle and the carnitine shuttle genes. Induction of KlSIP4 gene expression by KlCat8 is essential under these growth conditions and a primary function of KlCat8. Both KlCat8 and KlSip4 are involved in the regulation of lactose metabolism in K. lactis. In chromatin-immunoprecipitation experiments we demonstrate binding of both, KlSip4 and

  7. Bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system as containment control in yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristoffersen, P.; Jensen, G. B.; Gerdes, K.;

    2000-01-01

    The potential of a bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene system for use in containment control in eukaryotes was explored. The Escherichia coli relE and relB genes were expressed in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Expression of the relE gene was highly toxic to yeast cells. However, expression...... of the relB gene counteracted the effect of relE to some extent, suggesting that toxin-antitoxin interaction also occurs in S. cerevisiae, Thus, bacterial toxin-antitoxin gene systems also have potential applications in the control of cell proliferation in eukaryotic cells, especially in those industrial...

  8. Mitochondrial-derived ROS in edelfosine-induced apoptosis in yeasts and tumor cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Hui ZHANG; Consuelo GAJATE; Li-ping YU; Yun-xiang FANG; Faustino MOLLINEDO

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate whether a similar process mediates cytotoxicity of 1-O-octadecyl-2-O-methyl-rac-glycero-3-phosphocholine (ET- 18-OCH3, edelfosine) in both yeasts and human tumor cells.Methods: A modified version of a previously described assay for the intracellular conversion of nitro blue tetrazolium to formazan by superoxide anion was used to measure the generation of reactive oxygen spe-cies (ROS). Apoptotic yeast cells were detected using terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-mediated dUTP nick end labeling (TUNEL) assay. DNA fragmenta-tion and the generation of ROS were measured by cytofluorimetric analysis in Jurkat cells.Results: Edelfosine induced apoptosis in Saccharomyces cerevisiae,as assessed by TUNEL assay. Meanwhile, edelfosine induced a time- and con-centration-dependent generation of ROS in yeasts. Rotenone, an inhibitor of the mitochondrial electron transport chain, prevented ROS generation and apoptosis in response to edelfosine in S cerevisiae, α-Tocopherol abrogated the edelfosine-induced generation of intracellular ROS and apoptosis. Edelfosine also induced an increase of ROS in human leukemic cells that preceded apoptosis. The overexpression of Bcl-2 by gene transfer abrogated both ROS generation and apoptosis induced by edelfosine in leukemic cells. Changes in the relative mito-chondrial membrane potential were detected in both yeasts and Jurkat cells.Conclusion: These results indicate that edelfosine induces apoptosis in yeasts in addition to human tumor cells, and this apoptotic process involves mitochondria,likely through mitochondrial-derived ROS. These data also suggest that yeasts can be used as a suitable cell model in elucidating the antitumor mechanism of action of edelfosine.

  9. Reconstruction of the yeast Snf1 kinase regulatory network reveals its role as a global energy regulator

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Usaite, Renata; Jewett, Michael Christopher; Soberano de Oliveira, Ana Paula;

    2009-01-01

    levels in wild type, Deltasnf1, Deltasnf4, and Deltasnf1Deltasnf4 knockout strains. Using four newly developed computational tools, including novel DOGMA sub-network analysis, we showed the benefits of three-level ome-data integration to uncover the global Snf1 kinase role in yeast. We for the first time...

  10. Genetic and proteomic evidences support the localization of yeast enolase in the cell surface

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    López-Villar, Elena; Monteoliva, Lucía; Larsen, Martin Røssel;

    2006-01-01

    Although enolase, other glycolytic enzymes, and a variety of cytoplasmic proteins lacking an N-terminal secretion signal have been widely described as located at the cell surface in yeast and in mammalian cells, their presence in this external location is still controversial. Here, we report that...

  11. Reconstruction and in silico analysis of metabolic network for an oleaginous yeast, Yarrowia lipolytica.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pengcheng Pan

    Full Text Available With the emergence of energy scarcity, the use of renewable energy sources such as biodiesel is becoming increasingly necessary. Recently, many researchers have focused their minds on Yarrowia lipolytica, a model oleaginous yeast, which can be employed to accumulate large amounts of lipids that could be further converted to biodiesel. In order to understand the metabolic characteristics of Y. lipolytica at a systems level and to examine the potential for enhanced lipid production, a genome-scale compartmentalized metabolic network was reconstructed based on a combination of genome annotation and the detailed biochemical knowledge from multiple databases such as KEGG, ENZYME and BIGG. The information about protein and reaction associations of all the organisms in KEGG and Expasy-ENZYME database was arranged into an EXCEL file that can then be regarded as a new useful database to generate other reconstructions. The generated model iYL619_PCP accounts for 619 genes, 843 metabolites and 1,142 reactions including 236 transport reactions, 125 exchange reactions and 13 spontaneous reactions. The in silico model successfully predicted the minimal media and the growing abilities on different substrates. With flux balance analysis, single gene knockouts were also simulated to predict the essential genes and partially essential genes. In addition, flux variability analysis was applied to design new mutant strains that will redirect fluxes through the network and may enhance the production of lipid. This genome-scale metabolic model of Y. lipolytica can facilitate system-level metabolic analysis as well as strain development for improving the production of biodiesels and other valuable products by Y. lipolytica and other closely related oleaginous yeasts.

  12. Sorption of volatile phenols by yeast cell walls

    OpenAIRE

    Nerea Jiménez-Moreno; Carmen Ancín-Azpilicueta

    2009-01-01

    Nerea Jiménez-Moreno, Carmen Ancín-AzpilicuetaDepartment of Applied Chemistry, Universidad Pública de Navarra, Pamplona, SpainAbstract: Yeast walls can retain different wine compounds and so its use is interesting in order to eliminate harmful substances from the must which affect alcoholic fermentation (medium chain fatty acids) or which affect wine quality in a negative way (ethyl phenols, ochratoxin A). The aim of this study was to examine the capacity of c...

  13. Fermentation of lactose by yeast cells secreting recombinant fungal lactase.

    OpenAIRE

    Ramakrishnan, S.; Hartley, B S

    1993-01-01

    Strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae transformed with a yeast multicopy expression vector carrying the cDNA for Aspergillus niger secretory beta-galactosidase under the control of ADH1 promoter and terminator were studied for their fermentation properties on lactose (V. Kumar, S. Ramakrishnan, T. T. Teeri, J. K. C. Knowles, and B. S. Hartley, Biotechnology 10:82-85, 1992). Lactose was hydrolyzed extracellularly into glucose and galactose, and both sugars were utilized simultaneously. Diauxic g...

  14. Ethanol production potential from fermented rice noodle wastewater treatment using entrapped yeast cell sequencing batch reactor

    Science.gov (United States)

    Siripattanakul-Ratpukdi, Sumana

    2012-03-01

    Fermented rice noodle production generates a large volume of starch-based wastewater. This study investigated the treatment of the fermented rice noodle wastewater using entrapped cell sequencing batch reactor (ECSBR) compared to traditional sequencing batch reactor (SBR). The yeast cells were applied because of their potential to convert reducing sugar in the wastewater to ethanol. In present study, preliminary treatment by acid hydrolysis was performed. A yeast culture, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with calcium alginate cell entrapment was used. Optimum yeast cell loading in batch experiment and fermented rice noodle treatment performances using ECSBR and SBR systems were examined. In the first part, it was found that the cell loadings (0.6-2.7 × 108 cells/mL) did not play an important role in this study. Treatment reactions followed the second-order kinetics with the treatment efficiencies of 92-95%. In the second part, the result showed that ECSBR performed better than SBR in both treatment efficiency and system stability perspectives. ECSBR maintained glucose removal of 82.5 ± 10% for 5-cycle treatment while glucose removal by SBR declined from 96 to 40% within the 5-cycle treatment. Scanning electron microscopic images supported the treatment results. A number of yeast cells entrapped and attached onto the matrix grew in the entrapment matrix.

  15. A network of interdependent molecular interactions describes a higher order Nrd1-Nab3 complex involved in yeast transcription termination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Loya, Travis J; O'Rourke, Thomas W; Degtyareva, Natalya; Reines, Daniel

    2013-11-22

    Nab3 and Nrd1 are yeast heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein (hnRNP)-like proteins that heterodimerize and bind RNA. Genetic and biochemical evidence reveals that they are integral to the termination of transcription of short non-coding RNAs by RNA polymerase II. Here we define a Nab3 mutation (nab3Δ134) that removes an essential part of the protein's C terminus but nevertheless can rescue, in trans, the phenotype resulting from a mutation in the RNA recognition motif of Nab3. This low complexity region of Nab3 appears intrinsically unstructured and can form a hydrogel in vitro. These data support a model in which multiple Nrd1-Nab3 heterodimers polymerize onto substrate RNA to effect termination, allowing complementation of one mutant Nab3 molecule by another lacking a different function. The self-association property of Nab3 adds to the previously documented interactions between these hnRNP-like proteins, RNA polymerase II, and the nascent transcript, leading to a network of nucleoprotein interactions that define a higher order Nrd1-Nab3 complex. This was underscored from the synthetic phenotypes of yeast strains with pairwise combinations of Nrd1 and Nab3 mutations known to affect their distinct biochemical activities. The mutations included a Nab3 self-association defect, a Nab3-Nrd1 heterodimerization defect, a Nrd1-polymerase II binding defect, and an Nab3-RNA recognition motif mutation. Although no single mutation was lethal, cells with any two mutations were not viable for four such pairings, and a fifth displayed a synthetic growth defect. These data strengthen the idea that a multiplicity of interactions is needed to assemble a higher order Nrd1-Nab3 complex that coats specific nascent RNAs in preparation for termination. PMID:24100036

  16. Mechanisms underlying the toxicity of lactone aroma compounds towards the producing yeast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Aguedo, Mario; Beney, L.; Waché, Y.; Belin, J.-M.

    2003-01-01

    Aims: To study the fundamental mechanisms of toxicity of the fruity aroma compound γ-decalactone, that lead to alterations in cell viability during its biotechnological production by yeast cells; Yarrowia lipolytica that is able to produce high amounts of this metabolite was used here as a model. Methods and Results: Lactone concentrations above 150 mg l-1 inhibited cell growth, depolarized the living cells and increased membrane fluidity. Infrared spectroscopic measurements revealed that the...

  17. Yeast CUP1 protects HeLa cells against copper-induced stress

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xie, X.X. [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Shanghai (China); College of Biological and Environmental Engineering, Zhejiang University of Technology, Hangzhou (China); Ma, Y.F.; Wang, Q.S.; Chen, Z.L.; Liao, R.R.; Pan, Y.C. [Department of Animal Sciences, School of Agriculture and Biology, Shanghai Jiao Tong University, Shanghai (China); Shanghai Key Laboratory of Veterinary Biotechnology, Shanghai (China)

    2015-06-12

    As an essential trace element, copper can be toxic in mammalian cells when present in excess. Metallothioneins (MTs) are small, cysteine-rich proteins that avidly bind copper and thus play an important role in detoxification. YeastCUP1 is a member of the MT gene family. The aim of this study was to determine whether yeast CUP1 could bind copper effectively and protect cells against copper stress. In this study,CUP1 expression was determined by quantitative real-time PCR, and copper content was detected by inductively coupled plasma mass spectrometry. Production of intracellular reactive oxygen species (ROS) was evaluated using the 2',7'-dichlorofluorescein-diacetate (DCFH-DA) assay. Cellular viability was detected using the 3-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl)-2,5-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay, and the cell cycle distribution of CUP1 was analyzed by fluorescence-activated cell sorting. The data indicated that overexpression of yeast CUP1 in HeLa cells played a protective role against copper-induced stress, leading to increased cellular viability (P<0.05) and decreased ROS production (P<0.05). It was also observed that overexpression of yeast CUP1 reduced the percentage of G1 cells and increased the percentage of S cells, which suggested that it contributed to cell viability. We found that overexpression of yeast CUP1 protected HeLa cells against copper stress. These results offer useful data to elucidate the mechanism of the MT gene on copper metabolism in mammalian cells.

  18. Modeling the fission yeast cell cycle: Quantized cycle times in wee1 cdc25 mutant cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sveiczer, Akos; Csikasz-Nagy, Attila; Gyorffy, Bela; Tyson, John J.; Novak, Bela

    2000-07-01

    A detailed mathematical model for the fission yeast mitotic cycle is developed based on positive and negative feedback loops by which Cdc13/Cdc2 kinase activates and inactivates itself. Positive feedbacks are created by Cdc13/Cdc2-dependent phosphorylation of specific substrates: inactivating its negative regulators (Rum1, Ste9 and Wee1/Mik1) and activating its positive regulator (Cdc25). A slow negative feedback loop is turned on during mitosis by activation of Slp1/anaphase-promoting complex (APC), which indirectly re-activates the negative regulators, leading to a drop in Cdc13/Cdc2 activity and exit from mitosis. The model explains how fission yeast cells can exit mitosis in the absence of Ste9 (Cdc13 degradation) and Rum1 (an inhibitor of Cdc13/Cdc2). We also show that, if the positive feedback loops accelerating the G2/M transition (through Wee1 and Cdc25) are weak, then cells can reset back to G2 from early stages of mitosis by premature activation of the negative feedback loop. This resetting can happen more than once, resulting in a quantized distribution of cycle times, as observed experimentally in wee1- cdc25 mutant cells. Our quantitative description of these quantized cycles demonstrates the utility of mathematical modeling, because these cycles cannot be understood by intuitive arguments alone.

  19. Yeast Extract Promotes Cell Growth and Induces Production of Polyvinyl Alcohol-Degrading Enzymes

    OpenAIRE

    Min Li; Xianyan Liao; Dongxu Zhang; Guocheng Du; Jian Chen

    2011-01-01

    Polyvinyl alcohol-degrading enzymes (PVAases) have a great potential in bio-desizing processes for its low environmental impact and low energy consumption. In this study, the effect of yeast extract on PVAases production was investigated. A strategy of four-point yeast extract addition was developed and applied to maximize cell growth and PVAases production. As a result, the maximum dry cell weight achieved was 1.48 g/L and the corresponding PVAases activity was 2.99 U/mL, which are 46.5% and...

  20. Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Zhou, Yongjin J.; Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhu, Zhiwei;

    2016-01-01

    -level production of free fatty acids (FFAs) in a yeast cell factory, and the production of alkanes and fatty alcohols from its descendants. The engineered strain produces up to 10.4 g l−1 of FFAs, which is the highest reported titre to date. Furthermore, through screening of specific pathway enzymes, endogenous...... alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde reductases, we reconstruct efficient pathways for conversion of fatty acids to alkanes (0.8 mg l−1) and fatty alcohols (1.5 g l−1), to our knowledge the highest titres reported in S. cerevisiae. This should facilitate the construction of yeast cell factories...

  1. A sphingolipid-dependent diffusion barrier confines ER stress to the yeast mother cell

    OpenAIRE

    Lori Clay; Fabrice Caudron; Annina Denoth-Lippuner; Barbara Boettcher; St\\xfdphanie Buvelot Frei; Erik Lee Snapp; Yves Barral

    2014-01-01

    eLife digest Cell division isn't always about splitting a cell into two identical parts. The diversity of many of our own cells relies on asymmetric cell divisions. The yeast used to make bread rely on a process called ‘budding’ that involves a small daughter cell emerging from the surface of the mother cell. Mother cells can only produce around 20–50 daughter cells before dying from old age. However, their daughters are always born rejuvenated, and not aged like their mothers. Budding involv...

  2. Comparative Polygenic Analysis of Maximal Ethanol Accumulation Capacity and Tolerance to High Ethanol Levels of Cell Proliferation in Yeast

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Pais, Thiago M.; Foulquié-Moreno, María R.; Hubmann, Georg; Duitama, Jorge; Swinnen, Steve; Goovaerts, Annelies; Yang, Yudi; Dumortier, Françoise; Thevelein, Johan M.

    2013-01-01

    The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is able to accumulate ≥17% ethanol (v/v) by fermentation in the absence of cell proliferation. The genetic basis of this unique capacity is unknown. Up to now, all research has focused on tolerance of yeast cell proliferation to high ethanol levels. Comparison of m

  3. Physical, functional and structural characterization of the cell wall fractions from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem; Paquot, Michel; Thonart, Philippe; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The yeast cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important source of β-d-glucan, a glucose homopolymer with many functional, nutritional and human health benefits. In the present study, the yeast cell wall fractionation process involving enzymatic treatments (savinase and lipolase enzymes) affected most of the physical and functional characteristics of extracted fractions. Thus, the fractionation process showed that β-d-glucan fraction F4 had significantly higher swelling power and fat binding capacity compared to other fractions (F1, F2 and F3). It also exhibited a viscosity of 652.12mPas and a high degree of brightness of extracted β-d-glucan fraction. Moreover, the fractionation process seemed to have an effect on structural and thermal properties of extracted fractions. Overall, results showed that yeast β-d-glucan had good potential for use as a prebiotic ingredient in food, as well as medicinal and pharmaceutical products.

  4. Physical, functional and structural characterization of the cell wall fractions from baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borchani, Chema; Fonteyn, Fabienne; Jamin, Guilhem; Paquot, Michel; Thonart, Philippe; Blecker, Christophe

    2016-03-01

    The yeast cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an important source of β-d-glucan, a glucose homopolymer with many functional, nutritional and human health benefits. In the present study, the yeast cell wall fractionation process involving enzymatic treatments (savinase and lipolase enzymes) affected most of the physical and functional characteristics of extracted fractions. Thus, the fractionation process showed that β-d-glucan fraction F4 had significantly higher swelling power and fat binding capacity compared to other fractions (F1, F2 and F3). It also exhibited a viscosity of 652.12mPas and a high degree of brightness of extracted β-d-glucan fraction. Moreover, the fractionation process seemed to have an effect on structural and thermal properties of extracted fractions. Overall, results showed that yeast β-d-glucan had good potential for use as a prebiotic ingredient in food, as well as medicinal and pharmaceutical products. PMID:26471666

  5. The sensitivity of yeast and yeast-like cells to new lysosomotropic agents.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Krasowska, Anna; Chmielewska, Lucyna; Adamski, Ryszard; Luczyński, Jacek; Witek, Stanisław; Sigler, Karel

    2004-01-01

    The lysosomotropic action of the compounds DM-11 and DMAL-12s against Saccharomyces cerevisiae, Schizosaccharomyces pombe and Candida albicans is species- and pH-dependent. At pH 6.0, DMAL-12s is less effective against S. cerevisiae and S. pombe but more effective against C. albicans than DM-11. At pH 8.0, DMAL-12s strongly inhibits the growth of S. cerevisiae but has only a marginal effect on the resistant C. albicans. S. pombe did not grow at pH 8.0. As shown by quinacrine accumulation, DM-11 causes a general intracellular acidification in all three species, while with DMAL-12s, the acidification is marginal. Morphological changes caused by DMAL-12s in S. cerevisiae affect the cell interior but not surface structures, while S. pombe cells exhibit a thickened and wrinkled cell wall, shrunken protoplast and "grainy" plasma membrane. A large number of blisters resembling lipid droplets were observed inside S. cerevisiae and S. pombe vacuoles. The high susceptibility of S. pombe cells to the action of DM-11 and DMAL-12s contrasts with the low sensitivity of S. pombe H+-ATPase to the agents. In our C. albicans isolate, DMAL 12s did not have an effect on cell morphology and appeared to be unable to penetrate the cells, especially at pH 8.0.

  6. Simple and reliable procedure for PCR amplification of genomic DNA from yeast cells using short sequencing primers

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Haaning, J; Oxvig, C; Overgaard, Michael Toft;

    1997-01-01

    by means of PCR without any prior DNA purification steps. This method involves a simple boiling step of whole yeast cells in the presence of detergent, and subsequent amplification of genomic DNA using short sequencing primers in a polymerase chain reaction assay with a decreasing annealing temperature......Yeast is widely used in molecular biology. Heterologous expression of recombinant proteins in yeast involves screening of a large number of recombinants. We present an easy and reliable procedure for amplifying genomic DNA from freshly grown cells of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris...

  7. Glycerol production by fermenting yeast cells is essential for optimal bread dough fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aslankoohi, Elham; Rezaei, Mohammad Naser; Vervoort, Yannick; Courtin, Christophe M; Verstrepen, Kevin J

    2015-01-01

    Glycerol is the main compatible solute in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. When faced with osmotic stress, for example during semi-solid state bread dough fermentation, yeast cells produce and accumulate glycerol in order to prevent dehydration by balancing the intracellular osmolarity with that of the environment. However, increased glycerol production also results in decreased CO2 production, which may reduce dough leavening. We investigated the effect of yeast glycerol production level on bread dough fermentation capacity of a commercial bakery strain and a laboratory strain. We find that Δgpd1 mutants that show decreased glycerol production show impaired dough fermentation. In contrast, overexpression of GPD1 in the laboratory strain results in increased fermentation rates in high-sugar dough and improved gas retention in the fermenting bread dough. Together, our results reveal the crucial role of glycerol production level by fermenting yeast cells in dough fermentation efficiency as well as gas retention in dough, thereby opening up new routes for the selection of improved commercial bakery yeasts.

  8. A conserved protein interaction network involving the yeast MAP kinases Fus3 and Kss1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kusari, Anasua B; Molina, Douglas M; Sabbagh, Walid; Lau, Chang S; Bardwell, Lee

    2004-01-19

    The Saccharomyces cerevisiae mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) Fus3 and Kss1 bind to multiple regulators and substrates. We show that mutations in a conserved docking site in these MAPKs (the CD/7m region) disrupt binding to an important subset of their binding partners, including the Ste7 MAPK kinase, the Ste5 adaptor/scaffold protein, and the Dig1 and Dig2 transcriptional repressors. Supporting the possibility that Ste5 and Ste7 bind to the same region of the MAPKs, they partially competed for Fus3 binding. In vivo, some of the MAPK mutants displayed reduced Ste7-dependent phosphorylation, and all of them exhibited multiple defects in mating and pheromone response. The Kss1 mutants were also defective in Kss1-imposed repression of Ste12. We conclude that MAPKs contain a structurally and functionally conserved docking site that mediates an overall positively acting network of interactions with cognate docking sites on their regulators and substrates. Key features of this interaction network appear to have been conserved from yeast to humans. PMID:14734536

  9. Phenotypic and transcriptional plasticity directed by a yeast mitogen-activated protein kinase network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Breitkreutz, Ashton; Boucher, Lorrie; Breitkreutz, Bobby-Joe; Sultan, Mujahid; Jurisica, Igor; Tyers, Mike

    2003-11-01

    The yeast pheromone/filamentous growth MAPK pathway mediates both mating and invasive-growth responses. The interface between this MAPK module and the transcriptional machinery consists of a network of two MAPKs, Fus3 and Kss1; two regulators, Rst1 and Rst2 (a.k.a. Dig1 and Dig2); and two transcription factors, Ste12 and Tec1. Of 16 possible combinations of gene deletions in FUS3, KSS1, RST1, and RST2 in the sigma1278 background, 10 display constitutive invasive growth. Rst1 was the primary negative regulator of invasive growth, while other components either attenuated or enhanced invasive growth, depending on the genetic context. Despite activation of the invasive response by lesions at the same level in the MAPK pathway, transcriptional profiles of different invasive mutant combinations did not exhibit a unified program of gene expression. The distal MAPK regulatory network is thus capable of generating phenotypically similar invasive-growth states (an attractor) from different molecular architectures (trajectories) that can functionally compensate for one another. This systems-level robustness may also account for the observed diversity of signals that trigger invasive growth. PMID:14668360

  10. Palytoxin induces K+ efflux from yeast cells expressing the mammalian sodium pump.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scheiner-Bobis, G; Meyer zu Heringdorf, D; Christ, M; Habermann, E

    1994-06-01

    Palytoxin causes potassium efflux and sodium influx in all investigated animals cells. Much evidence points to the sodium pump (Na+/K(+)-ATPase) as the target of the toxin. A heterologous expression system for mammalian Na+/K(+)-ATPase in the brewers yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been used to test this hypothesis. Yeast cells do not contain endogenous sodium pumps but can be transformed with vectors coding for the alpha and beta subunits of the mammalian sodium pump. We now show that transformed yeast cells expressing both alpha and beta subunits of Na+/K(+)-ATPase are highly sensitive to the toxin, as measured by the loss of intracellular potassium. Palytoxin-induced potassium efflux is completely inhibited by 500 microM ouabain. In contrast, nontransformed yeast cells or cells expressing either the alpha or beta subunits are insensitive to palytoxin. Thus, the alpha/beta heterodimer of the sodium pump is required for the release of potassium induced by palytoxin. The results suggest that palytoxin converts the sodium pump into an open channel, allowing the passage of alkali ions.

  11. Monitoring of chromosome dynamics of single yeast cells in a microfluidic platform with aperture cell traps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jin, Si Hyung; Jang, Sung-Chan; Lee, Byungjin; Jeong, Heon-Ho; Jeong, Seong-Geun; Lee, Sung Sik; Kim, Keun Pil; Lee, Chang-Soo

    2016-04-12

    Chromosome movement plays important roles in DNA replication, repair, genetic recombination, and epigenetic phenomena during mitosis and meiosis. In particular, chromosome movement in the nuclear space is essential for the reorganization of the nucleus. However, conventional methods for analyzing the chromosome movements in vivo have been limited by technical constraints of cell trapping, cell cultivation, oxygenation, and in situ imaging. Here, we present a simple microfluidic platform with aperture-based cell trapping arrays to monitor the chromosome dynamics in single living cells for a desired period of time. Under the optimized conditions, our microfluidic platform shows a single-cell trapping efficiency of 57%. This microfluidic approach enables in situ imaging of intracellular dynamics in living cells responding to variable input stimuli under the well-controlled microenvironment. As a validation of this microfluidic platform, we investigate the fundamental features of the dynamic cellular response of the individual cells treated with different stimuli and drug. We prove the basis for dynamic chromosome movement in single yeast cells to be the telomere and nuclear envelope ensembles that attach to and move in concert with nuclear actin cables. Therefore, these results illustrate the monitoring of cellular functions and obtaining of dynamic information at a high spatiotemporal resolution through the integration of a simple microfluidic platform. PMID:26980179

  12. Multisite phosphorylation of the guanine nucleotide exchange factor Cdc24 during yeast cell polarization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stephanie C Wai

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Cell polarization is essential for processes such as cell migration and asymmetric cell division. A common regulator of cell polarization in most eukaryotic cells is the conserved Rho GTPase, Cdc42. In budding yeast, Cdc42 is activated by a single guanine nucleotide exchange factor, Cdc24. The mechanistic details of Cdc24 activation at the onset of yeast cell polarization are unclear. Previous studies have suggested an important role for phosphorylation of Cdc24, which may regulate activity or function of the protein, representing a key step in the symmetry breaking process. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: Here, we directly ask whether multisite phosphorylation of Cdc24 plays a role in its regulation. We identify through mass spectrometry analysis over thirty putative in vivo phosphorylation sites. We first focus on sites matching consensus sequences for cyclin-dependent and p21-activated kinases, two kinase families that have been previously shown to phosphorylate Cdc24. Through site-directed mutagenesis, yeast genetics, and light and fluorescence microscopy, we show that nonphosphorylatable mutations of these consensus sites do not lead to any detectable consequences on growth rate, morphology, kinetics of polarization, or localization of the mutant protein. We do, however, observe a change in the mobility shift of mutant Cdc24 proteins on SDS-PAGE, suggesting that we have indeed perturbed its phosphorylation. Finally, we show that mutation of all identified phosphorylation sites does not cause observable defects in growth rate or morphology. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: We conclude that lack of phosphorylation on Cdc24 has no overt functional consequences in budding yeast. Yeast cell polarization may be more tightly regulated by inactivation of Cdc42 by GTPase activating proteins or by alternative methods of Cdc24 regulation, such as conformational changes or oligomerization.

  13. Single Cell Analysis of Yeast Replicative Aging Using a New Generation of Microfluidic Device

    OpenAIRE

    Yi Zhang; Chunxiong Luo; Ke Zou; Zhengwei Xie; Onn Brandman; Qi Ouyang; Hao Li

    2012-01-01

    A major limitation to yeast aging study has been the inability to track mother cells and observe molecular markers during the aging process. The traditional lifespan assay relies on manual micro-manipulation to remove daughter cells from the mother, which is laborious, time consuming, and does not allow long term tracking with high resolution microscopy. Recently, we have developed a microfluidic system capable of retaining mother cells in the microfluidic chambers while removing daughter cel...

  14. The Endoplasmic Reticulum: A Social Network in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun Chen; Caitlin Doyle; Xingyun Qi; Huanquan Zheng

    2012-01-01

    The endoplasmic reticulum (ER) is an interconnected network comprised of ribosome-studded sheets and smooth tubules.The ER plays crucial roles in the biosynthesis and transport of proteins and lipids,and in calcium (Ca2+) regulation in compartmentalized eukaryotic cells including plant cells.To support its well-segregated functions,the shape of the ER undergoes notable changes in response to both developmental cues and outside influences.In this review,we will discuss recent findings on molecular mechanisms underlying the unique morphology and dynamics of the ER,and the importance of the interconnected ER network in cell polarity.In animal and yeast cells,two family proteins,the reticulons and DP1/Yop1,are required for shaping high-curvature ER tubules,while members of the atlastin family of dynamin-like GTPases are involved in the fusion of ER tubules to make an interconnected ER network.In plant cells,recent data also indicate that the reticulons are involved in shaping ER tubules,while RHD3,a plant member of the atlastin GTPases,is required for the generation of an interconnected ER network.We will also summarize the current knowledge on how the ER interacts with other membrane-bound organelles,with a focus on how the ER and Golgi interplay in plant cells.

  15. Chemical responses of single yeast cells studied by fluorescence microspectroscopy under solution-flow conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kogi, Osamu; Kim, Haeng-Boo; Kitamura, Noboru

    2002-07-01

    A microspectroscopy system combined with a fluid manifold was developed to manipulate and analyze "single" living cells. A sample buffer solution containing living cells was introduced into a flow cell set on a thermostated microscope stage and a few cells were allowed to attach to the bottom wall of the flow cell. With these living cells being attached to the wall, other floating cells were pumped out by flowing a buffer solution. These procedures made it possible to keep a few cells in the flow cell and to analyze single cells by fluorescence microspectroscopy. The technique was applied to study the time course of staining processes of single living yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) cells by using two types of a fluorescent probe. The present methodology was shown to be of primary importance for obtaining biochemical/physiological information on single living cells and also for studying cell-to-cell variations in several characteristics.

  16. Systematic identification of yeast cell cycle transcription factors using multiple data sources

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Wen-Hsiung

    2008-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic cell cycle is a complex process and is precisely regulated at many levels. Many genes specific to the cell cycle are regulated transcriptionally and are expressed just before they are needed. To understand the cell cycle process, it is important to identify the cell cycle transcription factors (TFs that regulate the expression of cell cycle-regulated genes. Results We developed a method to identify cell cycle TFs in yeast by integrating current ChIP-chip, mutant, transcription factor binding site (TFBS, and cell cycle gene expression data. We identified 17 cell cycle TFs, 12 of which are known cell cycle TFs, while the remaining five (Ash1, Rlm1, Ste12, Stp1, Tec1 are putative novel cell cycle TFs. For each cell cycle TF, we assigned specific cell cycle phases in which the TF functions and identified the time lag for the TF to exert regulatory effects on its target genes. We also identified 178 novel cell cycle-regulated genes, among which 59 have unknown functions, but they may now be annotated as cell cycle-regulated genes. Most of our predictions are supported by previous experimental or computational studies. Furthermore, a high confidence TF-gene regulatory matrix is derived as a byproduct of our method. Each TF-gene regulatory relationship in this matrix is supported by at least three data sources: gene expression, TFBS, and ChIP-chip or/and mutant data. We show that our method performs better than four existing methods for identifying yeast cell cycle TFs. Finally, an application of our method to different cell cycle gene expression datasets suggests that our method is robust. Conclusion Our method is effective for identifying yeast cell cycle TFs and cell cycle-regulated genes. Many of our predictions are validated by the literature. Our study shows that integrating multiple data sources is a powerful approach to studying complex biological systems.

  17. Mice immunization with radioattenuated Paracoccidioides brasiliensis yeast cells: protective immunity induction evaluation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Estefania M.N.; Andrade, Antero S.R. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear CDTN/CNEN-MG, Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)]. E-mail: estefaniabio@yahoo.com.br; antero@cdtn.br; Reis, Bernardo S.; Goes, Alfredo M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia]. E-mail: brsgarbi@mono.icb.ufmg.br; goes@mono.icb.ufmg.br

    2007-07-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a chronic systemic disease prevalent in Latin America. To date, there is no effective vaccine. The potential of gamma radiation for pathogens attenuation and vaccine development was explored in this work. In our laboratory was developed radioattenuated yeast cells of P. brasiliensis and the aim of this work was to evaluate the protection elicited by the immunization with this cells. To check the protector effect BALB/c mice were divided in two groups. The mice of group 1 were immunized once and those of group 2 twice, at two weeks intervals, using 10{sup 5} radioattenuated yeast cells. The mice were sacrificed 30 and 90 days after challenge. The removed organs were used for colony-forming units (CFUs) recover and histopathologic analysis. The gamma irradiated yeast loses its virulence since fails in producing infection in BALB/c mice. An efficient protection against highly infective forms of P. brasiliensis was developed in the group of mice immunized two times. The immunization was able to reduce the initial infection and elicited a long lasted protection. We concluded that the radioattenuated yeast cells are a valuable tool for the protective immunity study in the PCM and for vaccine research. (author)

  18. Inhibition of stress mediated cell death by human lactate dehydrogenase B in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sheibani, Sara; Jones, Natalie K; Eid, Rawan; Gharib, Nada; Arab, Nagla T T; Titorenko, Vladimir; Vali, Hojatollah; Young, Paul A; Greenwood, Michael T

    2015-08-01

    We report the identification of human L- lactate dehydrogenase B (LDHB) as a novel Bax suppressor. Yeast heterologously expressing LDHB is also resistant to the lethal effects of copper indicating that it is a general suppressor of stress mediated cell death. To identify potential LDHB targets, LDHB was expressed in yeast mutants defective in apoptosis, necrosis and autophagy. The absence of functional PCD regulators including MCA1, YBH3, cyclophilin (CPR3) and VMA3, as well as the absence of the pro-survival autophagic pathway (ATG1,7) did not interfere with the LDHB mediated protection against copper indicating that LDHB functions independently of known PCD regulators or by simply blocking or stimulating a common PCD promoting or inhibitory pathway. Measurements of lactate levels revealed that short-term copper stress (1.6 mM, 4 h), does not increase intracellular levels of lactate, instead a three-fold increase in extracellular lactate was observed. Thus, yeast cells resemble mammalian cells where different stresses are known to lead to increased lactate production leading to lactic acidosis. In agreement with this, we found that the addition of exogenous lactic acid to growth media was sufficient to induce cell death that could be inhibited by the expression of LDHB. Taken together our results suggest that lactate dehydrogenase is a general suppressor of PCD in yeast. PMID:26032856

  19. Problem-Solving Test: Analysis of DNA Damage Recognizing Proteins in Yeast and Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Szeberenyi, Jozsef

    2013-01-01

    The experiment described in this test was aimed at identifying DNA repair proteins in human and yeast cells. Terms to be familiar with before you start to solve the test: DNA repair, germline mutation, somatic mutation, inherited disease, cancer, restriction endonuclease, radioactive labeling, [alpha-[superscript 32]P]ATP, [gamma-[superscript…

  20. The use of scFv-displaying yeast in mammalian cell surface selections.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xin Xiang; Shusta, Eric V

    2005-09-01

    Yeast surface display has proven to be a powerful tool for the directed evolution of immunological proteins when soluble ligands are available (Cho, B.K., Kieke, M.C., Boder, E.T., Wittrup, K.D., Kranz, D.M., 1998. A yeast surface display system for the discovery of ligands that trigger cell activation. J. Immunol. Methods 220, 179; Boder, E.T., Midelfort, K.S., Wittrup, K.D., 2000. Directed evolution of antibody fragments with monovalent femtomolar antigen-binding affinity. Proc. Natl. Acad. Sci. U. S. A. 97, 10701; Shusta, E.V., Holler, P.D., Kieke, M.C., Kranz, D.M., Wittrup, K.D., 2000. Directed evolution of a stable scaffold for T-cell receptor engineering. Nat. Biotechnol. 18, 754; Esteban, O., Zhao, H., 2004. Directed evolution of soluble single-chain human class II MHC molecules. J. Mol. Biol. 340, 81). This investigation extends the utility of this display platform by demonstrating its capacity for use in cell panning selections. This was accomplished by employing a model single-chain antibody (scFv)-hapten system that allowed for detailed investigation of the factors governing panning success. Yeast displaying anti-fluorescein scFv (4-4-20) exhibited specific interactions with the fluoresceinated endothelial cells and could be recovered from large backgrounds of irrelevant yeast in just three rounds. Successful selections required as few as 1700 fluorescein ligands per cell, and a three-round enrichment ratio of 10(6) was possible. These results indicate that yeast surface display is a viable option for use in cell or tissue-based selections.

  1. Non-Saccharomyces yeasts protect against epithelial cell barrier disruption induced by Salmonella enterica subsp. enterica serovar Typhimurium

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Smith, Ida Mosbech; Baker, A; Arneborg, Nils;

    2015-01-01

    . In addition, probiotic strains may be able to reduce epithelial barrier disruption caused by pathogenic species. The aim of this study was to explore non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function in vitro. Benchmarking against established probiotic strains, we evaluated the ability...... of four nonpathogenic yeast species to modulate transepithelial electrical resistance (TER) across a monolayer of differentiated human colonocytes (Caco-2 cells). Further, we assessed yeast modulation of a Salmonella Typhimurium-induced epithelial cell barrier function insult. Our findings demonstrate...... distinct patterns of non-Saccharomyces yeast modulation of epithelial cell barrier function. While the established probiotic yeast Saccharomyces boulardii increased TER across a Caco-2 monolayer by 30%, Kluyveromyces marxianus exhibited significantly stronger properties of TER enhancement (50% TER increase...

  2. In cellulo serial crystallography of alcohol oxidase crystals inside yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Arjen J. Jakobi

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The possibility of using femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser to collect diffraction data from protein crystals formed in their native cellular organelle has been explored. X-ray diffraction of submicrometre-sized alcohol oxidase crystals formed in peroxisomes within cells of genetically modified variants of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha is reported and characterized. The observations are supported by synchrotron radiation-based powder diffraction data and electron microscopy. Based on these findings, the concept of in cellulo serial crystallography on protein targets imported into yeast peroxisomes without the need for protein purification as a requirement for subsequent crystallization is outlined.

  3. Study of budding yeast colony formation and its characterizations by using circular granular cell

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aprianti, D.; Haryanto, F.; Purqon, A.; Khotimah, S. N.; Viridi, S.

    2016-03-01

    Budding yeast can exhibit colony formation in solid substrate. The colony of pathogenic budding yeast can colonize various surfaces of the human body and medical devices. Furthermore, it can form biofilm that resists drug effective therapy. The formation of the colony is affected by the interaction between cells and with its growth media. The cell budding pattern holds an important role in colony expansion. To study this colony growth, the molecular dynamic method was chosen to simulate the interaction between budding yeast cells. Every cell was modelled by circular granular cells, which can grow and produce buds. Cohesion force, contact force, and Stokes force govern this model to mimic the interaction between cells and with the growth substrate. Characterization was determined by the maximum (L max) and minimum (L min) distances between two cells within the colony and whether two lines that connect the two cells in the maximum and minimum distances intersect each other. Therefore, it can be recognized the colony shape in circular, oval, and irregular shapes. Simulation resulted that colony formation are mostly in oval shape with little branch. It also shows that greater cohesion strength obtains more compact colony formation.

  4. Adsorption of ochratoxin A from grape juice by yeast cells immobilised in calcium alginate beads.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farbo, Maria Grazia; Urgeghe, Pietro Paolo; Fiori, Stefano; Marceddu, Salvatore; Jaoua, Samir; Migheli, Quirico

    2016-01-18

    Grape juice can be easily contaminated with ochratoxin A (OTA), one of the known mycotoxins with the greatest public health significance. Among the different approaches to decontaminate juice from this mycotoxin, microbiological methods proved efficient, inexpensive and safe, particularly the use of yeast or yeast products. To ascertain whether immobilisation of the yeast biomass would lead to successful decontamination, alginate beads encapsulating Candida intermedia yeast cells were used in our experiments to evaluate their OTA-biosorption efficacy. Magnetic calcium alginate beads were also prepared by adding magnetite in the formulation to allow fast removal from the aqueous solution with a magnet. Calcium alginate beads were added to commercial grape juice spiked with 20 μg/kg OTA and after 48 h of incubation a significant reduction (>80%), of the total OTA content was achieved, while in the subsequent phases (72-120 h) OTA was slowly released into the grape juice by alginate beads. Biosorption properties of alginate-yeast beads were tested in a prototype bioreactor consisting in a glass chromatography column packed with beads, where juice amended with OTA was slowly flowed downstream. The adoption of an interconnected scaled-up bioreactor as an efficient and safe tool to remove traces of OTA from liquid matrices is discussed. PMID:26485316

  5. Lactic acid-producing yeast cells having nonfunctional L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome C oxidoreductase cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Matthew; Suominen, Pirkko; Aristidou, Aristos; Hause, Benjamin Matthew; Van Hoek, Pim; Dundon, Catherine Asleson

    2012-03-20

    Yeast cells having an exogenous lactate dehydrogenase gene ae modified by reducing L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity in the cell. This leads to reduced consumption of lactate by the cell and can increase overall lactate yields in a fermentation process. Cells having the reduced L- or D-lactate:ferricytochrome c oxidoreductase activity can be screened for by resistance to organic acids such as lactic or glycolic acid.

  6. Scanning electrochemical microscopy of menadione-glutathione conjugate export from yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mauzeroll, Janine; Bard, Allen J

    2004-05-25

    The uptake of menadione (2-methyl-1,4-naphthoquinone), which is toxic to yeast cells, and its expulsion as a glutathione complex were studied by scanning electrochemical microscopy. The progression of the in vitro reaction between menadione and glutathione was monitored electrochemically by cyclic voltammetry and correlated with the spectroscopic (UV-visible) behavior. By observing the scanning electrochemical microscope tip current of yeast cells suspended in a menadione-containing solution, the export of the conjugate from the cells with time could be measured. Similar experiments were performed on immobilized yeast cell aggregates stressed by a menadione solution. From the export of the menadione-glutathione conjugate detected at a 1-microm-diameter electrode situated 10 microm from the cells, a flux of about 30,000 thiodione molecules per second per cell was extracted. Numerical simulations based on an explicit finite difference method further revealed that the observation of a constant efflux of thiodione from the cells suggested the rate was limited by the uptake of menadione and that the efflux through the glutathione-conjugate pump was at least an order of magnitude faster. PMID:15148374

  7. Recent advances in yeast cell-surface display technologies for waste biorefineries.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Zhuo; Ho, Shih-Hsin; Hasunuma, Tomohisa; Chang, Jo-Shu; Ren, Nan-Qi; Kondo, Akihiko

    2016-09-01

    Waste biorefinery aims to maximize the output of value-added products from various artificial/agricultural wastes by using integrated bioprocesses. To make waste biorefinery economically feasible, it is thus necessary to develop a low-cost, environment-friendly technique to perform simultaneous biodegradation and bioconversion of waste materials. Cell-surface display engineering is a novel, cost-effective technique that can auto-immobilize proteins on the cell exterior of microorganisms, and has been applied for use with waste biofinery. Through tethering different enzymes (e.g., cellulase, lipase, and protease) or metal-binding peptides on cell surfaces, various yeast strains can effectively produce biofuels and biochemicals from sugar/protein-rich waste materials, catalyze waste oils into biodiesels, or retrieve heavy metals from wastewater. This review critically summarizes recent applications of yeast cell-surface display on various types of waste biorefineries, highlighting its potential and future challenges with regard to commercializing this technology. PMID:27039354

  8. Cdc42p and Fus2p act together late in yeast cell fusion

    OpenAIRE

    Ydenberg, Casey A.; Stein, Richard A; Rose, Mark D.

    2012-01-01

    Cell fusion is the key event of fertilization that gives rise to the diploid zygote and is a nearly universal aspect of eukaryotic biology. In the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, several mutants have been identified that are defective for cell fusion, and yet the molecular mechanism of this process remains obscure. One obstacle has been that genetic screens have mainly focused on mating-specific factors, whereas the process likely involves housekeeping proteins as well. Here we implicate Cdc4...

  9. Microwave-synthesized magnetic chitosan microparticles for the immobilization of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Safarik, Ivo; Pospiskova, Kristyna; Maderova, Zdenka; Baldikova, Eva; Horska, Katerina; Safarikova, Mirka

    2015-01-01

    An extremely simple procedure has been developed for the immobilization of Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells on magnetic chitosan microparticles. The magnetic carrier was prepared using an inexpensive, simple, rapid, one-pot process, based on the microwave irradiation of chitosan and ferrous sulphate at high pH. Immobilized yeast cells have been used for sucrose hydrolysis, hydrogen peroxide decomposition and the adsorption of selected dyes. PMID:24753015

  10. Shuffling Yeast Gene Expression Data

    CERN Document Server

    Bilke, S

    2000-01-01

    A new method to sort gene expression patterns into functional groups is presented. The method is based on a sorting algorithm using a non-local similarity score, which takes all other patterns in the dataset into account. The method is therefore very robust with respect to noise. Using the expression data for yeast, we extract information about functional groups. Without prior knowledge of parameters the cell cycle regulated genes in yeast can be identified. Furthermore a second, independent cell clock is identified. The capability of the algorithm to extract information about signal flow in the regulatory network underlying the expression patterns is demonstrated.

  11. Origin of cells and network information

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Shihori Tanabe

    2015-01-01

    All cells are derived from one cell, and the origin ofdifferent cell types is a subject of curiosity. Cells constructlife through appropriately timed networks at each stageof development. Communication among cells andintracellular signaling are essential for cell differentiationand for life processes. Cellular molecular networksestablish cell diversity and life. The investigation ofthe regulation of each gene in the genome within thecellular network is therefore of interest. Stem cellsproduce various cells that are suitable for specificpurposes. The dynamics of the information in thecellular network changes as the status of cells isaltered. The components of each cell are subject toinvestigation.

  12. Involvement of flocculin in negative potential-applied ITO electrode adhesion of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koyama, Sumihiro; Tsubouchi, Taishi; Usui, Keiko; Uematsu, Katsuyuki; Tame, Akihiro; Nogi, Yuichi; Ohta, Yukari; Hatada, Yuji; Kato, Chiaki; Miwa, Tetsuya; Toyofuku, Takashi; Nagahama, Takehiko; Konishi, Masaaki; Nagano, Yuriko; Abe, Fumiyoshi

    2015-09-01

    The purpose of this study was to develop novel methods for attachment and cultivation of specifically positioned single yeast cells on a microelectrode surface with the application of a weak electrical potential. Saccharomyces cerevisiae diploid strains attached to an indium tin oxide/glass (ITO) electrode to which a negative potential between -0.2 and -0.4 V vs. Ag/AgCl was applied, while they did not adhere to a gallium-doped zinc oxide/glass electrode surface. The yeast cells attached to the negative potential-applied ITO electrodes showed normal cell proliferation. We found that the flocculin FLO10 gene-disrupted diploid BY4743 mutant strain (flo10Δ /flo10Δ) almost completely lost the ability to adhere to the negative potential-applied ITO electrode. Our results indicate that the mechanisms of diploid BY4743 S. cerevisiae adhesion involve interaction between the negative potential-applied ITO electrode and the Flo10 protein on the cell wall surface. A combination of micropatterning techniques of living single yeast cell on the ITO electrode and omics technologies holds potential of novel, highly parallelized, microchip-based single-cell analysis that will contribute to new screening concepts and applications. PMID:26187908

  13. Early biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation on yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The biological effectiveness of different radiation types for variety organisms requires further study. For fundamental studies of this problem it is worthwhile to use the most thoroughly investigated biological objects, for example, yeasts. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used as the test eukaryotic organism which gives the experimenter complete control over its chemical and physical environment. The aim of the study consisted in comparative analysis of early effects induced by low doses of low LET (60Co and 137Cs) and high LET ( α-particles 239Pu, neutrons) radiation on eukaryotic cells (cell survival about 100%). Biological effects of low doses of ionizing radiation were studied by two criteria: 1.delay of cell division and kinetics of yeast cells micro-colonies formation; 2.morphology of micro-colonies at different temperature. The results have shown that only small part of irradiated cell population (∼10%) divided at the same rate as unirradiated cells. Other part of cells had a delayed division. Unirradiated control cells formed typical micro-colonies at the solid nutrient media (YEPD) after 10 15 h of incubation. The fraction of cells population (20- 25%) exposed to low doses of?-particles or neutrons formed spectrum of untypical micro-colonies for the same incubation time, which consisted of small number of larger and more elongated cells. Some of these micro-colonies had 10 50 cells were of exotic forms ('spider'), differed from other micro-colonies in population. Using this method we can reveal an early response of cells at very low doses (survival about 100%) and determine the number non-lethally damaged cells. (author)

  14. Classification of yeast cells from image features to evaluate pathogen conditions

    Science.gov (United States)

    van der Putten, Peter; Bertens, Laura; Liu, Jinshuo; Hagen, Ferry; Boekhout, Teun; Verbeek, Fons J.

    2007-01-01

    Morphometrics from images, image analysis, may reveal differences between classes of objects present in the images. We have performed an image-features-based classification for the pathogenic yeast Cryptococcus neoformans. Building and analyzing image collections from the yeast under different environmental or genetic conditions may help to diagnose a new "unseen" situation. Diagnosis here means that retrieval of the relevant information from the image collection is at hand each time a new "sample" is presented. The basidiomycetous yeast Cryptococcus neoformans can cause infections such as meningitis or pneumonia. The presence of an extra-cellular capsule is known to be related to virulence. This paper reports on the approach towards developing classifiers for detecting potentially more or less virulent cells in a sample, i.e. an image, by using a range of features derived from the shape or density distribution. The classifier can henceforth be used for automating screening and annotating existing image collections. In addition we will present our methods for creating samples, collecting images, image preprocessing, identifying "yeast cells" and creating feature extraction from the images. We compare various expertise based and fully automated methods of feature selection and benchmark a range of classification algorithms and illustrate successful application to this particular domain.

  15. He-Ne laser irradiation causes changes in mitochondria ultrastructure in successive generations of yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Changes in the mitochondria ultrastructural organization in the Torulopsis sphaerica yeast cells, cultivated in 18 hours after irradiation by the He-Ne laser, are studied. Two doses - 460 and 1150 J/m2 were chosen, while irradiation in low doses optimally stimulates the given culture growth (the biomass increases up to 141.2 %). The studies were conducted on the cells of 4-5 generation after irradiation. It is shown, that laser irradiation in the yeast cells effects the ATP-ase synthesis not only through the mechanism of fast respiratory control but also through the synthesis of mitochondrial fermentation complexes (slow respiratory control), which is regulated at the genetic level

  16. Regulatory mechanism of the flavoprotein Tah18-dependent nitric oxide synthesis and cell death in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshikawa, Yuki; Nasuno, Ryo; Kawahara, Nobuhiro; Nishimura, Akira; Watanabe, Daisuke; Takagi, Hiroshi

    2016-07-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) is a ubiquitous signaling molecule involved in the regulation of a large number of cellular functions. The regulatory mechanism of NO generation in unicellular eukaryotic yeast cells is poorly understood due to the lack of mammalian and bacterial NO synthase (NOS) orthologues, even though yeast produces NO under oxidative stress conditions. Recently, we reported that the flavoprotein Tah18, which was previously shown to transfer electrons to the iron-sulfur cluster protein Dre2, is involved in NOS-like activity in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. On the other hand, Tah18 was reported to promote apoptotic cell death after exposure to hydrogen peroxide (H2O2). Here, we showed that NOS-like activity requiring Tah18 induced cell death upon treatment with H2O2. Our experimental results also indicate that Tah18-dependent NO production and cell death are suppressed by enhancement of the interaction between Tah18 and its molecular partner Dre2. Our findings indicate that the Tah18-Dre2 complex regulates cell death as a molecular switch via Tah18-dependent NOS-like activity in response to environmental changes. PMID:27178802

  17. Mitochondrion-mediated cell death: Dissecting yeast apoptosis for a better understanding of neurodegeneration

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ralf J Braun

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Mitochondrial damage and dysfunction are common hallmarks for neurodegenerative disorders, including Alzheimer, Parkinson, Huntington diseases, and the motor neuron disorder amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Damaged mitochondria pivotally contribute to neurotoxicity and neuronal cell death in these disorders, e.g., due to their inability to provide the high energy requirements for neurons, their generation of reactive oxygen species, and their induction of mitochondrion-mediated cell death pathways. Therefore, in-depth analyses of the underlying molecular pathways, including cellular mechanisms controlling the maintenance of mitochondrial function, is a prerequisite for a better understanding of neurodegenerative disorders. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an established model for deciphering mitochondrial quality control mechanisms and the distinct mitochondrial roles during apoptosis and programmed cell death. Cell death upon expression of various human neurotoxic proteins has been characterized in yeast, revealing neurotoxic protein-specific differences. This review summarizes how mitochondria are affected in these neurotoxic yeast models, and how they are involved in the execution and prevention of cell death. I will discuss to which extent this mimics the situation in other neurotoxic model systems, and how this may contribute to a better understanding of the mitochondrial roles in the human disorders.

  18. Cell organisation, sulphur metabolism and ion transport-related genes are differentially expressed in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis mycelium and yeast cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Passos Geraldo AS

    2006-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Mycelium-to-yeast transition in the human host is essential for pathogenicity by the fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis and both cell types are therefore critical to the establishment of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM, a systemic mycosis endemic to Latin America. The infected population is of about 10 million individuals, 2% of whom will eventually develop the disease. Previously, transcriptome analysis of mycelium and yeast cells resulted in the assembly of 6,022 sequence groups. Gene expression analysis, using both in silico EST subtraction and cDNA microarray, revealed genes that were differential to yeast or mycelium, and we discussed those involved in sugar metabolism. To advance our understanding of molecular mechanisms of dimorphic transition, we performed an extended analysis of gene expression profiles using the methods mentioned above. Results In this work, continuous data mining revealed 66 new differentially expressed sequences that were MIPS(Munich Information Center for Protein Sequences-categorised according to the cellular process in which they are presumably involved. Two well represented classes were chosen for further analysis: (i control of cell organisation – cell wall, membrane and cytoskeleton, whose representatives were hex (encoding for a hexagonal peroxisome protein, bgl (encoding for a 1,3-β-glucosidase in mycelium cells; and ags (an α-1,3-glucan synthase, cda (a chitin deacetylase and vrp (a verprolin in yeast cells; (ii ion metabolism and transport – two genes putatively implicated in ion transport were confirmed to be highly expressed in mycelium cells – isc and ktp, respectively an iron-sulphur cluster-like protein and a cation transporter; and a putative P-type cation pump (pct in yeast. Also, several enzymes from the cysteine de novo biosynthesis pathway were shown to be up regulated in the yeast form, including ATP sulphurylase, APS kinase and also PAPS reductase. Conclusion Taken

  19. Local Pheromone Release from Dynamic Polarity Sites Underlies Cell-Cell Pairing during Yeast Mating.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Merlini, Laura; Khalili, Bita; Bendezú, Felipe O; Hurwitz, Daniel; Vincenzetti, Vincent; Vavylonis, Dimitrios; Martin, Sophie G

    2016-04-25

    Cell pairing is central for many processes, including immune defense, neuronal connection, hyphal fusion, and sexual reproduction. How does a cell orient toward a partner, especially when faced with multiple choices? Fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe P and M cells, which respectively express P and M factor pheromones [1, 2], pair during the mating process induced by nitrogen starvation. Engagement of pheromone receptors Map3 and Mam2 [3, 4] with their cognate pheromone ligands leads to activation of the Gα protein Gpa1 to signal sexual differentiation [3, 5, 6]. Prior to cell pairing, the Cdc42 GTPase, a central regulator of cell polarization, forms dynamic zones of activity at the cell periphery at distinct locations over time [7]. Here we show that Cdc42-GTP polarization sites contain the M factor transporter Mam1, the general secretion machinery, which underlies P factor secretion, and Gpa1, suggesting that these are sub-cellular zones of pheromone secretion and signaling. Zone lifetimes scale with pheromone concentration. Computational simulations of pair formation through a fluctuating zone show that the combination of local pheromone release and sensing, short pheromone decay length, and pheromone-dependent zone stabilization leads to efficient pair formation. Consistently, pairing efficiency is reduced in the absence of the P factor protease. Similarly, zone stabilization at reduced pheromone levels, which occurs in the absence of the predicted GTPase-activating protein for Ras, leads to reduction in pairing efficiency. We propose that efficient cell pairing relies on fluctuating local signal emission and perception, which become locked into place through stimulation. PMID:27020743

  20. The proteomics of quiescent and nonquiescent cell differentiation in yeast stationary-phase cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davidson, George S; Joe, Ray M; Roy, Sushmita; Meirelles, Osorio; Allen, Chris P; Wilson, Melissa R; Tapia, Phillip H; Manzanilla, Elaine E; Dodson, Anne E; Chakraborty, Swagata; Carter, Mark; Young, Susan; Edwards, Bruce; Sklar, Larry; Werner-Washburne, Margaret

    2011-04-01

    As yeast cultures enter stationary phase in rich, glucose-based medium, differentiation of two major subpopulations of cells, termed quiescent and nonquiescent, is observed. Differences in mRNA abundance between exponentially growing and stationary-phase cultures and quiescent and nonquiescent cells are known, but little was known about protein abundance in these cells. To measure protein abundance in exponential and stationary-phase cultures, the yeast GFP-fusion library (4159 strains) was examined during exponential and stationary phases, using high-throughput flow cytometry (HyperCyt). Approximately 5% of proteins in the library showed twofold or greater changes in median fluorescence intensity (abundance) between the two conditions. We examined 38 strains exhibiting two distinct fluorescence-intensity peaks in stationary phase and determined that the two fluorescence peaks distinguished quiescent and nonquiescent cells, the two major subpopulations of cells in stationary-phase cultures. GFP-fusion proteins in this group were more abundant in quiescent cells, and half were involved in mitochondrial function, consistent with the sixfold increase in respiration observed in quiescent cells and the relative absence of Cit1p:GFP in nonquiescent cells. Finally, examination of quiescent cell-specific GFP-fusion proteins revealed symmetry in protein accumulation in dividing quiescent and nonquiescent cells after glucose exhaustion, leading to a new model for the differentiation of these cells. PMID:21289090

  1. Influence the oxidant action of selenium in radiosensitivity induction and cell death in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ionizing radiations are from both natural sources such as from anthropogenic sources. Recently, radiotherapy has emerged as one of the most common therapies against cancer. Co-60 irradiators (cobalt-60 linear accelerators) are used to treat of malignant tumors routinely in hospitals around the world. Exposure to ionizing radiation can induce changes in cellular macromolecules and affect its functions, because they cause radiolysis of the water molecule generating reactive oxygen species, which can cause damage to virtually all organelles and cell components known as oxidative damage that can culminate in oxidative stress. Oxidative stress is a situation in which the balance between oxidants and antioxidants is broken resulting in excessive production of reactive species, it is not accompanied by the increase in antioxidant capacity, making it impossible to neutralize them. Selenium is a micronutrient considered as antioxidant, antiinflammatory, which could prevent cancer. Selenium in biological system exists as seleno proteins. Nowadays, 25 human seleno proteins have been identified, including glutathione peroxidase, an antioxidant enzyme. Yeasts have the ability to incorporate various metals such as iron, cadmium, zinc and selenium, as well as all biological organisms. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, unlike mammalian cells is devoid of seleno proteins, being considered as a practical model for studies on the toxicity of selenium, without any interference from the metabolism of seleno proteins. Moreover, yeast cells proliferate through the fermentation, the microbial equivalent of aerobic glycolysis in mammals and the process is also used by tumors. Several reports show that the pro-oxidante effects and induced toxic selenium compounds occur at lower doses and in malignant cells compared with benign cells. Therefore selenium giving a great therapeutic potential in cancer treatment .Our objective was to determine whether selenium is capable to sensitize yeasts

  2. Studies on regulation of the cell cycle in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Miroslava Požgajová

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available All living organisms including plants and animals are composed of millions of cells. These cells perform different functions for the organism although they possess the same chromosomes and carry the same genetic information. Thus, to be able to understand multicellular organism we need to understand the life cycle of individual cells from which the organism comprises. The cell cycle is the life cycle of a single cell in the plant or animal body. It involves series of events in which components of the cell doubles and afterwards equally segregate into daughter cells. Such process ensures growth of the organism, and specialized reductional cell division which leads to production of gamets, assures sexual reproduction. Cell cycle is divided in the G1, S, G2 and M phase. Two gap-phases (G1 and G2 separate S phase (or synthesis and M phase which stays either for mitosis or meiosis. Essential for normal life progression and reproduction is correct chromosome segregation during mitosis and meiosis. Defects in the division program lead to aneuploidy, which in turn leads to birth defects, miscarriages or cancer. Even thou, researchers invented much about the regulation of the cell cycle, there is still long way to understand the complexity of the regulatory machineries that ensure proper segregation of chromosomes. In this paper we would like to describe techniques and materials we use for our studies on chromosome segregation in the model organism Schizosaccharomyces pombe.

  3. Stratification of yeast cells during chronological aging by size points to the role of trehalose in cell vitality.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svenkrtova, Andrea; Belicova, Lenka; Volejnikova, Andrea; Sigler, Karel; Jazwinski, S Michal; Pichova, Alena

    2016-04-01

    Cells of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae undergo a process akin to differentiation during prolonged culture without medium replenishment. Various methods have been used to separate and determine the potential role and fate of the different cell species. We have stratified chronologically-aged yeast cultures into cells of different sizes, using centrifugal elutriation, and characterized these subpopulations physiologically. We distinguish two extreme cell types, very small (XS) and very large (L) cells. L cells display higher viability based on two separate criteria. They respire much more actively, but produce lower levels of reactive oxygen species (ROS). L cells are capable of dividing, albeit slowly, giving rise to XS cells which do not divide. L cells are more resistant to osmotic stress and they have higher trehalose content, a storage carbohydrate often connected to stress resistance. Depletion of trehalose by deletion of TPS2 does not affect the vital characteristics of L cells, but it improves some of these characteristics in XS cells. Therefore, we propose that the response of L and XS cells to the trehalose produced in the former differs in a way that lowers the vitality of the latter. We compare our XS- and L-fraction cell characteristics with those of cells isolated from stationary cultures by others based on density. This comparison suggests that the cells have some similarities but also differences that may prove useful in addressing whether it is the segregation or the response to trehalose that may play the predominant role in cell division from stationary culture.

  4. The Natural Product Resveratrol Inhibits Yeast Cell Separation by Extensively Modulating the Transcriptional Landscape and Reprogramming the Intracellular Metabolome.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhe Wang

    Full Text Available An increasing number of studies have shown that the promising compound resveratrol treats multiple diseases, such as cancer and aging; however, the resveratrol mode-of-action (MoA remains largely unknown. Here, by virtue of multiple omics approaches, we adopted fission yeast as a model system with the goal of dissecting the common MoA of the anti-proliferative activity of resveratrol. We found that the anti-proliferative activity of resveratrol is mainly due to its unique role of inhibiting the separation of sister cells, similar phenotype with the C2H2 zinc finger transcription factor Ace2 knock-out strain. Microarray analysis shown that resveratrol has extensive impact on the fission yeast transcription levels. Among the changed gene's list, 40% of up-regulated genes are Core Environmental Stress Responses genes, and 57% of the down-regulated genes are periodically expressed. Moreover, resveratrol leverages the metabolome, which unbalances the intracellular pool sizes of several classes of amino acids, nucleosides, sugars and lipids, thus reflecting the remodulated metabolic networks. The complexity of the resveratrol MoA displayed in previous reports and our work demonstrates that multiple omics approaches must be applied together to obtain a complete picture of resveratrol's anti-proliferative function.

  5. Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongjin J; Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhu, Zhiwei; Qin, Jiufu; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production of oleochemicals requires establishment of cell factory platform strains. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory as new strains can be rapidly implemented into existing infrastructures such as bioethanol production plants. Here we show high-level production of free fatty acids (FFAs) in a yeast cell factory, and the production of alkanes and fatty alcohols from its descendants. The engineered strain produces up to 10.4 g l(-1) of FFAs, which is the highest reported titre to date. Furthermore, through screening of specific pathway enzymes, endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde reductases, we reconstruct efficient pathways for conversion of fatty acids to alkanes (0.8 mg l(-1)) and fatty alcohols (1.5 g l(-1)), to our knowledge the highest titres reported in S. cerevisiae. This should facilitate the construction of yeast cell factories for production of fatty acids derived products and even aldehyde-derived chemicals of high value. PMID:27222209

  6. Production of fatty acid-derived oleochemicals and biofuels by synthetic yeast cell factories.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Yongjin J; Buijs, Nicolaas A; Zhu, Zhiwei; Qin, Jiufu; Siewers, Verena; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Sustainable production of oleochemicals requires establishment of cell factory platform strains. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is an attractive cell factory as new strains can be rapidly implemented into existing infrastructures such as bioethanol production plants. Here we show high-level production of free fatty acids (FFAs) in a yeast cell factory, and the production of alkanes and fatty alcohols from its descendants. The engineered strain produces up to 10.4 g l(-1) of FFAs, which is the highest reported titre to date. Furthermore, through screening of specific pathway enzymes, endogenous alcohol dehydrogenases and aldehyde reductases, we reconstruct efficient pathways for conversion of fatty acids to alkanes (0.8 mg l(-1)) and fatty alcohols (1.5 g l(-1)), to our knowledge the highest titres reported in S. cerevisiae. This should facilitate the construction of yeast cell factories for production of fatty acids derived products and even aldehyde-derived chemicals of high value.

  7. Relationship between sensitivity to ultraviolet light and budding in yeast cells of different culture ages

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Subpopulations of yeast cells, consisting of cells of different sizes and different percentages of budding cells, were prepared by centrifugation through sucrose solutions with linear density gradients of cultures at different phases of the growth cycle. Ultraviolet survival of these cells was determined by colony counting, and the survival rate was compared with the cells' respiratory rates. Individual budding cells and interdivisional cells, and also mother cells and daughter cells derived from irradiated budding cells, were isolated by the micromanipulation technique. The number of divisions in each cell was measured during a 21-hr incubation period immediately after irradiation. In the population in the logarithmic phase consisting of homogeneous cells of middle size, no difference in uv sensitivity was observed between mother cells and daughter cells, irrespective of mutual adhesion. Budding cell resistance was observed in the population in the transitional phase; this was due to the lesser uv sensitivity of daughter cells in the fresh medium. In the stationary phase, daughter cells were rather more sensitive than mother cells or interdivisional cells, so there was little difference in uv sensitivity between budding cells and interdivisional cells

  8. Small Cell Network Topology Comparison

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jan Oppolzer

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available One of the essential problems in a mobile network with small cells is that there is only a limited number of (PCIs available. Due to this fact, operators face the inevitable need for reusing (PCIs. In our contribution, we are dealing with a (PCI assignment to FAPs in three different topologies. The first model places FAPs randomly within the network while respecting overlapping defined. The second model places FAPs in a grid without other restrictions. The third model forms a grid as well, although buildings and roads are taken into account and (FAPs are always inside buildings. The proposed models are compared and a conclusion is made based on simulation results.

  9. The role of the Parkinson's disease gene PARK9 in essential cellular pathways and the manganese homeostasis network in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessandra Chesi

    Full Text Available YPK9 (Yeast PARK9; also known as YOR291W is a non-essential yeast gene predicted by sequence to encode a transmembrane P-type transport ATPase. However, its substrate specificity is unknown. Mutations in the human homolog of YPK9, ATP13A2/PARK9, have been linked to genetic forms of early onset parkinsonism. We previously described a strong genetic interaction between Ypk9 and another Parkinson's disease (PD protein α-synuclein in multiple model systems, and a role for Ypk9 in manganese detoxification in yeast. In humans, environmental exposure to toxic levels of manganese causes a syndrome similar to PD and is thus an environmental risk factor for the disease. How manganese contributes to neurodegeneration is poorly understood. Here we describe multiple genome-wide screens in yeast aimed at defining the cellular function of Ypk9 and the mechanisms by which it protects cells from manganese toxicity. In physiological conditions, we found that Ypk9 genetically interacts with essential genes involved in cellular trafficking and the cell cycle. Deletion of Ypk9 sensitizes yeast cells to exposure to excess manganese. Using a library of non-essential gene deletions, we screened for additional genes involved in tolerance to excess manganese exposure, discovering several novel pathways involved in manganese homeostasis. We defined the dependence of the deletion strain phenotypes in the presence of manganese on Ypk9, and found that Ypk9 deletion modifies the manganese tolerance of only a subset of strains. These results confirm a role for Ypk9 in manganese homeostasis and illuminates cellular pathways and biological processes in which Ypk9 likely functions.

  10. Spurious automated platelet count. Enumeration of yeast forms as platelets by the cell-DYN 4000.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Latif, Shahnila; Veillon, Diana M; Brown, Donald; Kaltenbach, Jenny; Curry, Sherry; Linscott, Andrea J; Oberle, Arnold; Cotelingam, James D

    2003-12-01

    We recently encountered a patient with thrombocytopenia secondary to multiple drug therapy, disseminated prostatic adenocarcinoma, and sepsis who had a sudden decrease in his platelet count as enumerated by the Cell-DYN 4000 hematology analyzer (Abbott Diagnostics, Santa Clara, CA). A manual platelet count performed thereafter was even lower. The etiology of the spurious platelet count was clarified when numerous yeast forms were observed on routine microscopy of the peripheral blood smear. Subsequently, these organisms were identified as Candida glabrata from a positive blood culture (BACTEC 9240, Becton Dickinson, Cockeysville, MD). To our knowledge, this is the first report of spurious enumeration of yeast forms as platelets in an automated hematology system. The principle underlying platelet enumeration by the Cell-DYN 4000 system and other hematology analyzers and the value of microscopy on peripheral smears with unexpected CBC count results are discussed. PMID:14671977

  11. Robust Cell Size Checkpoint from Spatiotemporal Positive Feedback Loop in Fission Yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jie Yan

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Cells must maintain appropriate cell size during proliferation. Size control may be regulated by a size checkpoint that couples cell size to cell division. Biological experimental data suggests that the cell size is coupled to the cell cycle in two ways: the rates of protein synthesis and the cell polarity protein kinase Pom1 provide spatial information that is used to regulate mitosis inhibitor Wee1. Here a mathematical model involving these spatiotemporal regulations was developed and used to explore the mechanisms underlying the size checkpoint in fission yeast. Bifurcation analysis shows that when the spatiotemporal regulation is coupled to the positive feedback loops (active Cdc2 promotes its activator, Cdc25, and suppress its inhibitor, Wee1, the mitosis-promoting factor (MPF exhibits a bistable steady-state relationship with the cell size. The switch-like response from the positive feedback loops naturally generates the cell size checkpoint. Further analysis indicated that the spatial regulation provided by Pom1 enhances the robustness of the size checkpoint in fission yeast. This was consistent with experimental data.

  12. Effect of inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate and immune parameters in Pacific White Shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rutchanee Chotikachinda

    2008-10-01

    Full Text Available Effects of dietary inactive yeast cell wall on growth performance, survival rate, and immune parameters in pacific white shrimp (Litopenaeus vannamei was investigated. Three dosages of inactive yeast cell wall (0, 1, and 2 g kg-1 were tested in three replicate groups of juvenile shrimps with an average initial weight of 7.15±0.05 g for four weeks. There was no significant difference in final weight, survival rate, specific growth rate, feed conversion ratio, feed intake, protein efficiency ratio, and apparent net protein utilization of each treatments. However, different levels of inactive yeast cell wall showed an effect on certain immune parameters (p<0.05. Total hemocyte counts, granular hemocyte count, and bacterial clearance were better in shrimp fed diets supplemented with 1 and 2 g kg-1 inactive yeast cell wall as compared with thecontrol group.

  13. Growth promoting effects of prebiotic yeast cell wall products in starter broilers under an immune stress and Clostridium perfringens challenge

    Science.gov (United States)

    This study was designed to investigate the growth promoting effects of supplementing different sources and concentrations of prebiotic yeast cell wall (YCW) products containing mannanoligosaccharides in starter broilers under an immune stress and Clostridium perfringens challenge. Through a series ...

  14. Quantitative phase imaging of cell division in yeast cells and E.coli using digital holographic microscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pandiyan, Vimal Prabhu; John, Renu

    2015-12-01

    Digital holographic microscope (DHM) is an emerging quantitative phase imaging technique with unique imaging scales and resolutions leading to multitude of applications. DHM is promising as a novel investigational and applied tool for cell imaging, studying the morphology and real time dynamics of cells and a number of related applications. The use of numerical propagation and computational digital optics offer unique flexibility to tune the depth of focus, and compensate for image aberrations. In this work, we report imaging the dynamics of cell division in E.coli and yeast cells using a DHM platform. We demonstrate 3-D and depth imaging as well as reconstruction of phase profiles of E.coli and yeast cells using the system. We record a digital hologram of E.coli and yeast cells and reconstruct the image using Fresnel propagation algorithm. We also use aberration compensation algorithms for correcting the aberrations that are introduced by the microscope objective in the object path using linear least square fitting techniques. This work demonstrates the strong potential of a DHM platform in 3-D live cell imaging, fast clinical quantifications and pathological applications.

  15. In cellulo serial crystallography of alcohol oxidase crystals inside yeast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Jakobi, Arjen J.; Daniel M. Passon; Kèvin Knoops; Francesco Stellato; Mengning Liang; White, Thomas A.; Thomas Seine; Marc Messerschmidt; Chapman, Henry N.; Matthias Wilmanns

    2016-01-01

    The possibility of using femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser to collect diffraction data from protein crystals formed in their native cellular organelle has been explored. X-ray diffraction of submicrometre-sized alcohol oxidase crystals formed in peroxisomes within cells of genetically modified variants of the methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha is reported and characterized. The observations are supported by synchrotron radiation-based powder diffraction data and elec...

  16. A high-throughput method for quantifying metabolically active yeast cells

    OpenAIRE

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Rosenkjær, Alexander; Eliasson Lantz, Anna; Thykær, Jette; Workman, Mhairi

    2015-01-01

    By redesigning the established methylene blue reduction test for bacteria and yeast, we present a cheap and efficient methodology for quantitative physiology of eukaryotic cells applicable for high-throughput systems. Validation of themethod in fermenters and highthroughput systems proved equivalent, displaying reduction curves that interrelated directly with CFU counts. For growth rate estimation, the methylene blue reduction test (MBRT) proved superior, since the discriminatory nature of th...

  17. Cell-cycle regulation of cohesin stability along fission yeast chromosomes

    OpenAIRE

    Bernard, Pascal; Schmidt, Christine Katrin; Vaur, Sabine; Dheur, Sonia; Drogat, Julie; Genier, Sylvie; Ekwall, Karl; Uhlmann, Frank; Javerzat, Jean-Paul

    2007-01-01

    Sister chromatid cohesion is mediated by cohesin, but the process of cohesion establishment during S-phase is still enigmatic. In mammalian cells, cohesin binding to chromatin is dynamic in G1, but becomes stabilized during S-phase. Whether the regulation of cohesin stability is integral to the process of cohesion establishment is unknown. Here, we provide evidence that fission yeast cohesin also displays dynamic behavior. Cohesin association with G1 chromosomes requires continued activity of...

  18. Awa1p on the cell surface of sake yeast inhibits biofilm formation and the co-aggregation between sake yeasts and Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hirayama, Satoru; Shimizu, Masashi; Tsuchiya, Noriko; Furukawa, Soichi; Watanabe, Daisuke; Shimoi, Hitoshi; Takagi, Hiroshi; Ogihara, Hirokazu; Morinaga, Yasushi

    2015-05-01

    We examined mixed-species biofilm formation between Lactobacillus plantarum ML11-11 and both foaming and non-foaming mutant strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sake yeasts. Wild-type strains showed significantly lower levels of biofilm formation compared with the non-foaming mutants. Awa1p, a protein involved in foam formation during sake brewing, is a glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI)-anchored protein and is associated with the cell wall of sake yeasts. The AWA1 gene of the non-foaming mutant strain Kyokai no. 701 (K701) has lost the C-terminal sequence that includes the GPI anchor signal. Mixed-species biofilm formation and co-aggregation of wild-type strain Kyokai no. 7 (K7) were significantly lower than K701 UT-1 (K701 ura3/ura3 trp1/trp1), while the levels of strain K701 UT-1 carrying the AWA1 on a plasmid were comparable to those of K7. The levels of biofilm formation and co-aggregation of the strain K701 UT-1 harboring AWA1 with a deleted GPI anchor signal were similar to those of K701 UT-1. These results clearly demonstrate that Awa1p present on the surface of sake yeast strain K7 inhibits adhesion between yeast cells and L. plantarum ML11-11, consequently impeding mixed-species biofilm formation.

  19. A high-throughput method for quantifying metabolically active yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Knudsen, Peter Boldsen; Rosenkjær, Alexander;

    2015-01-01

    equivalent, displaying reduction curves that interrelated directly with CFU counts. For growth rate estimation, the methylene blue reduction test (MBRT) proved superior, since the discriminatory nature of the method allowed for the quantification of metabolically active cells only, excluding dead cells....... The drop in metabolic activity associated with the diauxic shift in yeast proved more pronounced for the MBRT-derived curve compared with OD curves, consistent with a dramatic shift in the ratio between live and dead cells at this metabolic event. This method provides a tool with numerous applications, e...

  20. Oral vaccination of mice with Tremella fuciformis yeast-like conidium cells expressing HBsAg.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shin, Dong-Il; Song, Kyu-Seon; Park, Hee-Sung

    2015-03-01

    Tremella fuciformis yeast-like conidium (YLC) cells were transformed by co-cultivation with Agrobacterium cells harboring the hepatitis B surface antigen (HBsAg) gene construct under the control of the CaMV35S promoter. Integration of HBsAg DNA into the YLC genome was confirmed by PCR and dot-blot hybridization. Immunoblotting verified expression of the recombinant protein. Oral administration of YLC cells expressing HBsAg in mice significantly increased anti-HBsAg antibody titer levels using a double prime-boost strategy that combined parenteral and oral HBsAg boosters. PMID:25374008

  1. Together we are strong--cell wall integrity sensors in yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodicio, Rosaura; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2010-08-01

    The integrity of the fungal cell wall is ensured by a signal transduction pathway, the so-called CWI pathway, which has best been studied in the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. In this context, environmental stress and other perturbations at the cell surface are detected by a small set of plasma membrane-spanning sensors, viz. Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2 and Mtl1. This review covers the recent advances in sensor structure, sensor mechanics, their cellular distribution and their in vivo functions, obtained from genetic, biochemical, cell biological and biophysical investigations.

  2. Industrial systems biology and its impact on synthetic biology of yeast cell factories

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fletcher, Eugene; Krivoruchko, Anastasia; Nielsen, Jens

    2016-01-01

    Engineering industrial cell factories to effectively yield a desired product while dealing with industrially relevant stresses is usually the most challenging step in the development of industrial production of chemicals using microbial fermentation processes. Using synthetic biology tools......, microbial cell factories such as Saccharomyces cerevisiae can be engineered to express synthetic pathways for the production of fuels, biopharmaceuticals, fragrances, and food flavors. However, directing fluxes through these synthetic pathways towards the desired product can be demanding due to complex...... of developing improved yeast cell factories....

  3. Single Cell Oil Producing Yeasts Lipomyces starkeyi and Rhodosporidium toruloides: Selection of Extraction Strategies and Biodiesel Property Prediction

    OpenAIRE

    Nemailla Bonturi; Leonidas Matsakas; Robert Nilsson; Paul Christakopoulos; Everson Alves Miranda; Kris Arvid Berglund; Ulrika Rova

    2015-01-01

    Single cell oils (SCOs) are considered potential raw material for the production of biodiesel. Rhodosporidium sp. and Lipomyces sp. are good candidates for SCO production. Lipid extractability differs according to yeast species and literature on the most suitable method for each oleaginous yeast species is scarce. This work aimed to investigate the efficiency of the most cited strategies for extracting lipids from intact and pretreated cells of Rhodosporidium toruloides and Lipomyces starkeyi...

  4. Isolation of anti-T cell receptor scFv mutants by yeast surface display.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieke, M C; Cho, B K; Boder, E T; Kranz, D M; Wittrup, K D

    1997-11-01

    Yeast surface display and sorting by flow cytometry have been used to isolate mutants of an scFv that is specific for the Vbeta8 region of the T cell receptor. Selection was based on equilibrium binding by two fluorescently labeled probes, a soluble Vbeta8 domain and an antibody to the c-myc epitope tag present at the carboxy-terminus of the scFv. The mutants that were selected in this screen included a scFv with threefold increased affinity for the Vbeta8 and scFv clones that were bound with reduced affinities by the anti-c-myc antibody. The latter finding indicates that the yeast display system may be used to map conformational epitopes, which cannot be revealed by standard peptide screens. Equilibrium antigen binding constants were estimated within the surface display format, allowing screening of isolated mutants without necessitating subcloning and soluble expression. Only a relatively small library of yeast cells (3 x 10[5]) displaying randomly mutagenized scFv was screened to identify these mutants, indicating that this system will provide a powerful tool for engineering the binding properties of eucaryotic secreted and cell surface proteins.

  5. Mechanisms of electron transfer between a styrylquinolinium dye and yeast in biofuel cell.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hubenova, Yolina; Bakalska, Rumyana; Hubenova, Eleonora; Mitov, Mario

    2016-12-01

    In the present study, the influence of the recently synthesized styrylquinolinium dye 4-{(E)-2-[4-(dimethylamino)naphthalen-1-yl]ethenyl}-1-methylquinolinium iodide (DANSQI) on the intracellular processes as well as the electrical outputs of Candida melibiosica 2491 yeast-based biofuel cell was investigated. The addition of nanomolar quantities of DANSQI to the yeast suspension results in an increase of the current outputs right after the startup of the biofuel cells, associated with an electrooxidation of the dye on the anode. After that, the formed cation radical of the dye penetrates the yeast cells, provoking a set of intracellular changes. Studies of the subcellular anolyte fractions show that 1μM dye increased the peroxisomal catalase activity 30-times (1.15±0.06Unit/mg protein) and over twice the mitochondrial cytochrome c oxidase activity (92±5Unit/mg protein). The results obtained by electrochemical and spectrophotometric analyses let to the supposition that the dye acts as subcellular shuttle, on account of its specific intramolecular charge transfer properties. The transition between its benzoid, quinolyl radical and ion forms and their putative role for the extracellular and intracellular charge transfer mechanisms are discussed. PMID:26924617

  6. Yeast mother cell-specific ageing, genetic (in)stability, and the somatic mutation theory of ageing

    OpenAIRE

    Laun, Peter; Bruschi, Carlo V.; Dickinson, J. Richard; Rinnerthaler, Mark; Heeren, Gino; Schwimbersky, Richard; Rid, Raphaela; Breitenbach, Michael

    2007-01-01

    Yeast mother cell-specific ageing is characterized by a limited capacity to produce daughter cells. The replicative lifespan is determined by the number of cell cycles a mother cell has undergone, not by calendar time, and in a population of cells its distribution follows the Gompertz law. Daughter cells reset their clock to zero and enjoy the full lifespan characteristic for the strain. This kind of replicative ageing of a cell population based on asymmetric cell divisions is investigated as...

  7. Dynamical Adaptation in Terrorist Cells/Networks

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hussain, Dil Muhammad Akbar; Ahmed, Zaki

    2010-01-01

    Typical terrorist cells/networks have dynamical structure as they evolve or adapt to changes which may occur due to capturing or killing of a member of the cell/network. Analytical measures in graph theory like degree centrality, betweenness and closeness centralities are very common and have long...... history of their successful use in revealing the importance of various members of the network. However, modeling of covert, terrorist or criminal networks through social graph dose not really provide the hierarchical structure which exist in these networks as these networks are composed of leaders...

  8. Mechanism of yeast cell photoinactivation by visible light

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The nature of inactivation of visible light without sensitizers added to the cells has been investigated. In particular, the problem on the nature of intracellular sensitizers has been studied. Visible light is shown to inactivate the cells only in the presence of oxygen, that gives evidence that the process of photoinactivation is carried out according a photodynamic mechanism with participation of the endogenic sensitizer. The pigment - sensitizer is identified as the protoporphyrin on the basis of comparison of data obtained for the absorption spectrum structure and pigment fluorescence with the literature data on the spectral properties of porphyrin compounds

  9. Intracellular trehalose and sorbitol synergistically promoting cell viability of a biocontrol yeast, Pichia anomala, for aflatoxin reduction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hua, Sui Sheng T; Hernlem, Bradley J; Yokoyama, Wallace; Sarreal, Siov Bouy L

    2015-05-01

    Pichia anomala (Wickerhamomyces anomalus) WRL-076 was discovered by a visual screening bioassay for its antagonism against Aspergillus flavus. The yeast was shown to significantly inhibit aflatoxin production and the growth of A. flavus. P. anomala is a potential biocontrol agent for reduction of aflatoxin in the food chain. Maintaining the viability of biocontrol agents in formulated products is a great challenge for commercial applications. Four media, NYG, NYGS, NYGT and NYGST are described which support good growth of yeast cells and were tested as storage formulations. Post growth supplement of 5 % trehalose to NYGST resulted in 83 % viable yeast cells after 12 months in cold storage. Intracellular sorbitol and trehalose concentrations were determined by HPLC analysis at the beginning of the storage and at the end of 12 month. Correlation of cell viability to both trehalose and sorbitol suggested a synergistic effect. Bonferroni (Dunn) t Test, Tukey's Studentized Range (HSD) Test and Duncan's Multiple Range Test, all showed that yeast cell viability in samples with both intracellular trehalose and sorbitol were significantly higher than those with either or none, at a 95 % confidence level. DiBAC4(5) and CFDA-AM were used as the membrane integrity fluorescent stains to create a two-color vital staining scheme with red and green fluorescence, respectively. Yeast cells stored in formulations NYG and NYGS with no detectable trehalose, displayed mostly red fluorescence. Yeast cells in NYGST+5T showed mostly green fluorescence.

  10. Bioethanol Production from Uncooked Raw Starch by Immobilized Surface-engineered Yeast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Jyh-Ping; Wu, Kuo-Wei; Fukuda, Hideki

    Surface-engineered yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae codisplaying Rhizopus oryzae glucoamylase and Streptococcus bovis α-amylase on the cell surface was used for direct production of ethanol from uncooked raw starch. By using 50 g/L cells during batch fermentation, ethanol concentration could reach 53 g/L in 7 days. During repeated batch fermentation, the production of ethanol could be maintained for seven consecutive cycles. For cells immobilized in loofa sponge, the concentration of ethanol could reach 42 g/L in 3 days in a circulating packed-bed bioreactor. However, the production of ethanol stopped thereafter because of limited contact between cells and starch. The bioreactor could be operated for repeated batch production of ethanol, but ethanol concentration dropped to 55% of its initial value after five cycles because of a decrease in cell mass and cell viability in the bioreactor. Adding cells to the bioreactor could partially restore ethanol production to 75% of its initial value.

  11. Asymmetric bioreduction of acetophenones by Baker's yeast and its cell-free extract encapsulated in sol–gel silica materials

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kato, Katsuya, E-mail: katsuya-kato@aist.go.jp [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya, 463-8560 (Japan); Nakamura, Hitomi [National Institute of Advanced Industrial Science and Technology (AIST), 2266-98 Anagahora, Shimoshidami, Moriyama-ku, Nagoya, 463-8560 (Japan); Nakanishi, Kazuma [Department of Chemistry for Materials, Graduate School of Engineering, Mie University, 1577 Kurimamachiya-cho, Tsu, Mie, 514-8570 (Japan)

    2014-02-28

    Baker's yeast (BY) encapsulated in silica materials was synthesized using a yeast cell suspension and its cell-free extract during a sol–gel reaction of tetramethoxysilane with nitric acid as a catalyst. The synthesized samples were fully characterized using various methods, such as scanning electron microscopy, nitrogen adsorption–desorption, Fourier transform infrared spectroscopy, thermogravimetry, and differential thermal analysis. The BY cells were easily encapsulated inside silica-gel networks, and the ratio of the cells in the silica gel was approximately 75 wt%, which indicated that a large volume of BY was trapped with a small amount of silica. The enzyme activity (asymmetric reduction of prochiral ketones) of BY and its cell-free extract encapsulated in silica gel was investigated in detail. The activities and enantioselectivities of free and encapsulated BY were similar to those of acetophenone and its fluorine derivatives, which indicated that the conformation structure of BY enzymes inside silica-gel networks did not change. In addition, the encapsulated BY exhibited considerably better solvent (methanol) stability and recyclability compared to free BY solution. We expect that the development of BY encapsulated in sol–gel silica materials will significantly impact the industrial-scale advancement of high-efficiency and low-cost biocatalysts for the synthesis of valuable chiral alcohols.

  12. T Cell Receptor Engineering and Analysis Using the Yeast Display Platform.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smith, Sheena N; Harris, Daniel T; Kranz, David M

    2015-01-01

    The αβ heterodimeric T cell receptor (TCR) recognizes peptide antigens that are transported to the cell surface as a complex with a protein encoded by the major histocompatibility complex (MHC). T cells thus evolved a strategy to sense these intracellular antigens, and to respond either by eliminating the antigen-presenting cell (e.g., a virus-infected cell) or by secreting factors that recruit the immune system to the site of the antigen. The central role of the TCR in the binding of antigens as peptide-MHC (pepMHC) ligands has now been studied thoroughly. Interestingly, despite their exquisite sensitivity (e.g., T cell activation by as few as 1-3 pepMHC complexes on a single target cell), TCRs are known to have relatively low affinities for pepMHC, with K D values in the micromolar range. There has been interest in engineering the affinity of TCRs in order to use this class of molecules in ways similar to now done with antibodies. By doing so, it would be possible to harness the potential of TCRs as therapeutics against a much wider array of antigens that include essentially all intracellular targets. To engineer TCRs, and to analyze their binding features more rapidly, we have used a yeast display system as a platform. Expression and engineering of a single-chain form of the TCR, analogous to scFv fragments from antibodies, allow the TCR to be affinity matured with a variety of possible pepMHC ligands. In addition, the yeast display platform allows one to rapidly generate TCR variants with diverse binding affinities and to analyze specificity and affinity without the need for purification of soluble forms of the TCRs. The present chapter describes the methods for engineering and analyzing single-chain TCRs using yeast display. PMID:26060072

  13. Identifying Gene Regulatory Networks in Arabidopsis by In Silico Prediction, Yeast-1-Hybrid, and Inducible Gene Profiling Assays.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sparks, Erin E; Benfey, Philip N

    2016-01-01

    A system-wide understanding of gene regulation will provide deep insights into plant development and physiology. In this chapter we describe a threefold approach to identify the gene regulatory networks in Arabidopsis thaliana that function in a specific tissue or biological process. Since no single method is sufficient to establish comprehensive and high-confidence gene regulatory networks, we focus on the integration of three approaches. First, we describe an in silico prediction method of transcription factor-DNA binding, then an in vivo assay of transcription factor-DNA binding by yeast-1-hybrid and lastly the identification of co-expression clusters by transcription factor induction in planta. Each of these methods provides a unique tool to advance our understanding of gene regulation, and together provide a robust model for the generation of gene regulatory networks.

  14. A Model for Cell Wall Dissolution in Mating Yeast Cells: Polarized Secretion and Restricted Diffusion of Cell Wall Remodeling Enzymes Induces Local Dissolution

    OpenAIRE

    Huberman, Lori B.; Murray, Andrew W.

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell...

  15. Optimized extract preparation methods and reaction conditions for improved yeast cell-free protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodgman, C Eric; Jewett, Michael C

    2013-10-01

    Cell-free protein synthesis (CFPS) has emerged as a powerful platform technology to help satisfy the growing demand for simple, affordable, and efficient protein production. In this article, we describe a novel CFPS platform derived from the popular bio-manufacturing organism Saccharomyces cerevisiae. By developing a streamlined crude extract preparation protocol and optimizing the CFPS reaction conditions we were able to achieve active firefly luciferase synthesis yields of 7.7 ± 0.5 µg mL(-1) with batch reactions lasting up to 2 h. This duration of synthesis is the longest ever reported for a yeast CFPS batch reaction. Furthermore, by removing extraneous processing steps and eliminating expensive reagents from the cell-free reaction, we have increased relative product yield (µg protein synthesized per $ reagent cost) over an alternative commonly used method up to 2000-fold from ∼2 × 10(-4) to ∼4 × 10(-1)  µg $(-1) , which now puts the yeast CPFS platform on par with other eukaryotic CFPS platforms commercially available. Our results set the stage for developing a yeast CFPS platform that provides for high-yielding and cost-effective expression of a variety of protein therapeutics and protein libraries.

  16. Biostimulation effects of low-energy laser radiation on yeast cell suspensions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Anghel, Sorin; Stanescu, Constantin S.; Giosanu, Dana; Neagu, Ionica; Savulescu, Geta; Iorga-Siman, Ion

    2000-02-01

    This paper presents work to determine the effects produced by low energy laser radiation on the metabolism and growth of a yeast cell suspension. As experimental material, we used young yeast culture in liquid medium, then distributed on a solid medium, to obtain isolated colonies. As laser source, we used a He-Ne laser, and the irradiation was made with different exposure times. Form each irradiated material, a sample of white grape sterile must was sowed, that has fermented at 18 divided by 20 degrees C for 10 divided by 15 days, after that some properties was tested. Some microscopic studies were also made. The results prove some influence of low energy laser irradiation, which can induce mutations, with new properties of the irradiated material. These mutations can be obtained in a positive sense, with new and important perspectives in wine industry. Also, we observed an inhibitory effect of the laser radiation on the yeast cell growth, due, probably to the too high values of the exposure.

  17. In cellulo serial crystallography of alcohol oxidase crystals inside yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Jakobi, Arjen J.; Passon, Daniel M.; Knoops, Kèvin; Stellato, Francesco; Liang, Mengning; White, Thomas A.; Seine, Thomas; Messerschmidt, Marc; Chapman, Henry N.; Wilmanns, Matthias

    2016-01-12

    The possibility of using femtosecond pulses from an X-ray free-electron laser to collect diffraction data from protein crystals formed in their native cellular organelle has been explored. X-ray diffraction of submicrometre-sized alcohol oxidase crystals formed in peroxisomes within cells of genetically modified variants of the methylotrophic yeastHansenula polymorphais reported and characterized. The observations are supported by synchrotron radiation-based powder diffraction data and electron microscopy. Based on these findings, the concept ofin celluloserial crystallography on protein targets imported into yeast peroxisomes without the need for protein purification as a requirement for subsequent crystallization is outlined.

  18. A microfluidic system for studying ageing and dynamic single-cell responses in budding yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matthew M Crane

    Full Text Available Recognition of the importance of cell-to-cell variability in cellular decision-making and a growing interest in stochastic modeling of cellular processes has led to an increased demand for high density, reproducible, single-cell measurements in time-varying surroundings. We present ALCATRAS (A Long-term Culturing And TRApping System, a microfluidic device that can quantitatively monitor up to 1000 cells of budding yeast in a well-defined and controlled environment. Daughter cells are removed by fluid flow to avoid crowding allowing experiments to run for over 60 hours, and the extracellular media may be changed repeatedly and in seconds. We illustrate use of the device by measuring ageing through replicative life span curves, following the dynamics of the cell cycle, and examining history-dependent behaviour in the general stress response.

  19. On the Doublet Formation in the Flocculation Process of the Yeast Cells

    CERN Document Server

    Stan, S; Stan, Silvia; Despa, Florin

    2000-01-01

    The combination of single cells to form doublets is regarded as the rate-limiting step of flocculation and requires the presence of surface proteins in active form. The process of activation of the flocculation proteins of yeast cells is described in the frame of the autocrine interaction regime (Cantrell, D. A. and Smith, K. A., 1984, Science 224, 1312-1316). The influence of several effectors (the cell efficiency to use sugars, the calcium content in the external medium and the probability that free cells collide each other under thermal motion conditions) on the initial rate of flocculation and on the fraction of remaining free cells in the steady state is briefly discussed in the paper. The present model offers an useful tool for further quantitative investigations in this topic. Also, it indicates qualitatively a way in which the regulation of flocculation might be controlled at the level of the expression of cell-surface activation abilities. Keywords: flocculation; yeast; autocrine binding; lectin hypo...

  20. Fission yeast cells undergo nuclear division in the absence of spindle microtubules.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefania Castagnetti

    Full Text Available Mitosis in eukaryotic cells employs spindle microtubules to drive accurate chromosome segregation at cell division. Cells lacking spindle microtubules arrest in mitosis due to a spindle checkpoint that delays mitotic progression until all chromosomes have achieved stable bipolar attachment to spindle microtubules. In fission yeast, mitosis occurs within an intact nuclear membrane with the mitotic spindle elongating between the spindle pole bodies. We show here that in fission yeast interference with mitotic spindle formation delays mitosis only briefly and cells proceed to an unusual nuclear division process we term nuclear fission, during which cells perform some chromosome segregation and efficiently enter S-phase of the next cell cycle. Nuclear fission is blocked if spindle pole body maturation or sister chromatid separation cannot take place or if actin polymerization is inhibited. We suggest that this process exhibits vestiges of a primitive nuclear division process independent of spindle microtubules, possibly reflecting an evolutionary intermediate state between bacterial and Archeal chromosome segregation where the nucleoid divides without a spindle and a microtubule spindle-based eukaryotic mitosis.

  1. Single-molecule analysis of the major glycopolymers of pathogenic and non-pathogenic yeast cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Alsteens, David; Sarazin, Aurore; Jouault, Thierry; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2013-05-01

    Most microbes are coated with carbohydrates that show remarkable structural variability and play a crucial role in mediating microbial-host interactions. Understanding the functions of cell wall glycoconjugates requires detailed knowledge of their molecular organization, diversity and heterogeneity. Here we use atomic force microscopy (AFM) with tips bearing specific probes (lectins, antibodies) to analyze the major glycopolymers of pathogenic and non-pathogenic yeast cells at molecular resolution. We show that non-ubiquitous β-1,2-mannans are largely exposed on the surface of native cells from pathogenic Candida albicans and C. glabrata, the former species displaying the highest glycopolymer density and extensions. We also find that chitin, a major component of the inner layer of the yeast cell wall, is much more abundant in C. albicans. These differences in molecular properties, further supported by flow cytometry measurements, may play an important role in strengthening cell wall mechanics and immune interactions. This study demonstrates that single-molecule AFM, combined with immunological and fluorescence methods, is a powerful platform in fungal glycobiology for probing the density, distribution and extension of specific cell wall glycoconjugates. In nanomedicine, we anticipate that this new form of AFM-based nanoglycobiology will contribute to the development of sugar-based drugs, immunotherapeutics, vaccines and diagnostics.

  2. Role of the fission yeast cell integrity MAPK pathway in response to glucose limitation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madrid Marisa

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Glucose is a signaling molecule which regulates multiple events in eukaryotic organisms and the most preferred carbon source in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. The ability of this yeast to grow in the absence of glucose becomes strongly limited due to lack of enzymes of the glyoxylate cycle that support diauxic growth. The stress-activated protein kinase (SAPK pathway and its effectors, Sty1 MAPK and transcription factor Atf1, play a critical role in the adaptation of fission yeast to grow on alternative non-fermentable carbon sources by inducing the expression of fbp1+ gene, coding for the gluconeogenic enzyme fructose-1,6-bisphosphatase. The cell integrity Pmk1 pathway is another MAPK cascade that regulates various processes in fission yeast, including cell wall construction, cytokinesis, and ionic homeostasis. Pmk1 pathway also becomes strongly activated in response to glucose deprivation but its role during glucose exhaustion and ensuing adaptation to respiratory metabolism is currently unknown. Results We found that Pmk1 activation in the absence of glucose takes place only after complete depletion of this carbon source and that such activation is not related to an endogenous oxidative stress. Notably, Pmk1 MAPK activation relies on de novo protein synthesis, is independent on known upstream activators of the pathway like Rho2 GTPase, and involves PKC ortholog Pck2. Also, the Glucose/cAMP pathway is required operative for full activation of the Pmk1 signaling cascade. Mutants lacking Pmk1 displayed a partial growth defect in respiratory media which was not observed in the presence of glucose. This phenotype was accompanied by a decreased and delayed expression of transcription factor Atf1 and target genes fbp1+ and pyp2+. Intriguingly, the kinetics of Sty1 activation in Pmk1-less cells was clearly altered during growth adaptation to non-fermentable carbon sources. Conclusions Unknown upstream elements

  3. Reassembly and protection of small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles by heat shock proteins in yeast cells.

    OpenAIRE

    Bracken, A P; Bond, U

    1999-01-01

    The process of mRNA splicing is sensitive to in vivo thermal inactivation, but can be protected by pretreatment of cells under conditions that induce heat-shock proteins (Hsps). This latter phenomenon is known as "splicing thermotolerance". In this article we demonstrate that the small nuclear ribonucleoprotein particles (snRNPs) are in vivo targets of thermal damage within the splicing apparatus in heat-shocked yeast cells. Following a heat shock, levels of the tri-snRNP (U4/U6.U5), free U6 ...

  4. Bimolecular Fluorescence Complementation to Assay the Interactions of Ubiquitylation Enzymes in Living Yeast Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaszczak, Ewa; Prigent, Claude; Rabut, Gwenaël

    2016-01-01

    Ubiquitylation is a versatile posttranslational protein modification catalyzed through the concerted action of ubiquitin-conjugating enzymes (E2s) and ubiquitin ligases (E3s). These enzymes form transient complexes with each other and their modification substrates and determine the nature of the ubiquitin signals attached to their substrates. One challenge in the field of protein ubiquitylation is thus to identify the E2-E3 pairs that function in the cell. In this chapter, we describe the use of bimolecular fluorescence complementation to assay E2-E3 interactions in living cells, using budding yeast as a model organism. PMID:27613039

  5. Highly efficient transformation of intact yeast-like conidium cells of Tremella fuciformin by electroporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    GUO LiQiong; LIU Yong; ZHAO ShuXian; LIU ErXian; LIU JunFang

    2008-01-01

    Tremella fuciformis is one of higher basidiomycetes. Its basidiospore can reproduce yeast-like conidia, also called the blastospore by budding. The yeast-like conidia of T. Fuciformis is monokaryotic and easy to culture by submerged fermentation similar to yeast. So it is a good recipient cell for exogenous gone expression. In this study, two expression vectors pGIg-gfp containing gpd-GI promoter and gfp gone and pGIg-hph containing gpd-GI promoter and hph gone were constructed. The lowest sensitive concentration of hygromycin for the blastospore was determined on three types of media. Our ex-perimenta showed that the lowest sensitive concentration of hygromycin for the blastospore was 5 μg/mL on MA medium. The intact blastospores were transformed with the expression vector pGIg-hph by electroporation. The putative transformants were obtained by the MA selective medium. Experi-mental results showed that the most effective parameters for the electroporation of intact blastospores were obtained by using STM buffer, 1.0×108 cells/mL of blastospores, 200 μL in transformation volume, 6 μg plasmid, 2.0 kV/cm of electric pulse voltage, stillness culturing on MB liquid medium for 48 h after electroporation. In these transformation conditions, the efficiency reached 277 colonies/μg DNA. With the optimal parameters. The putative co-transformants were obtained by the MA selective medium. Eight randomly selected colonies from the vast putative co-transformants were analyzed by PCR de-tection and Southern blotting. The experiments showed that the gfp was integrated into the genomes of three transformants. The co-transformation efficiency was 37.5%. Green fluorescence was observed under laser scanning confocal microscope in these gfp positive transformants. This indicates that the exogenous gfp can be expressed effectively in the yeast-like conidia of T. Fuciformis.

  6. Yeast Genetics and Biotechnological Applications

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mishra, Saroj; Baranwal, Richa

    Yeast can be recognized as one of the very important groups of microorganisms on account of its extensive use in the fermentation industry and as a basic eukaryotic model cellular system. The yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae has been extensively used to elucidate the genetics and regulation of several key functions in the cell such as cell mating, electron transport chain, protein trafficking, cell cycle events and others. Even before the genome sequence of the yeast was out, the structural organization and function of several of its genes was known. With the availability of the origin of replication from the 2 μm plasmid and the development of transformation system, it became the host of choice for expression of a number of important proteins. A large number of episomal and integrative shuttle vectors are available for expression of mammalian proteins. The latest developments in genomics and micro-array technology have allowed investigations of individual gene function by site-specific deletion method. The application of metabolic profiling has also assisted in understanding the cellular network operating in this yeast. This chapter is aimed at reviewing the use of this system as an experimental tool for conducting classical genetics. Various vector systems available, foreign genes expressed and the limitations as a host will be discussed. Finally, the use of various yeast enzymes in biotechnology sector will be reviewed.

  7. Continuous crossbreeding of sake yeasts using growth selection systems for a-type and α-type cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fukuda, Nobuo; Kaishima, Misato; Ishii, Jun; Kondo, Akihiko; Honda, Shinya

    2016-12-01

    Sake yeasts belong to the budding yeast species Saccharomyces cerevisiae and have high fermentation activity and ethanol production. Although the traditional crossbreeding of sake yeasts is a time-consuming and inefficient process due to the low sporulation rates and spore viability of these strains, considerable effort has been devoted to the development of hybrid strains with superior brewing characteristics. In the present work, we describe a growth selection system for a- and α-type cells aimed at the crossbreeding of industrial yeasts, and performed hybridizations with sake yeast strains Kyokai No. 6, No. 7 and No. 9 to examine the feasibility of this approach. We successfully generated both a- and α-type strains from all parental strains, and acquired six types of hybrids by outcrossing. One of these hybrid strains was subjected to continuous crossbreeding, yielding the multi-hybrid strain, which inherited the genetic characteristics of Kyokai No. 6, No. 7 and No. 9. Notably, because all of the genetic modifications of the yeast cells were introduced using plasmids, these traits can be easily removed. The approach described here has the potential to markedly accelerate the crossbreeding of industrial yeast strains with desirable properties. PMID:27392493

  8. Microfluidic platforms for generating dynamic environmental perturbations to study the responses of single yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bisaria, Anjali; Hersen, Pascal; McClean, Megan N

    2014-01-01

    Microfluidic platforms are ideal for generating dynamic temporal and spatial perturbations in extracellular environments. Single cells and organisms can be trapped and maintained in microfluidic platforms for long periods of time while their responses to stimuli are measured using appropriate fluorescence reporters and time-lapse microscopy. Such platforms have been used to study problems as diverse as C. elegans olfaction (Chronis et al. Nature Methods 4:727-731, 2007), cancer cell migration (Huang et al. Biomicrofluidics 5:13412, 2011), and E. coli chemotaxis (Ahmed et al. Integr Biol 2:604-629, 2010). In this paper we describe how to construct and use a microfluidic chip to study the response of single yeast cells to dynamic perturbations of their fluid environment. The method involves creation of a photoresist master mold followed by subsequent creation of a polydimethylsiloxane (PDMS) microfluidic chip for maintaining live yeast cells in a channel with two inputs for stimulating the cells. We emphasize simplicity and the methods discussed here are accessible to the average biological laboratory. We cover the basic toolbox for making microfluidic lab-on-a-chip devices, and the techniques discussed serve as a starting point for creating sophisticated microfluidic devices capable of implementing more complicated experimental protocols.

  9. Utilization of Candida utilis Cells for the Production of Yeast Extract:Effects of Enzyme Types, Dosages and Treatment Time

    OpenAIRE

    Yuping Guan; Yan Zeng; Wei Bai; Yuanxia Sun

    2013-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to establish an enzymatic hydrolysis process to prepare yeast extract with the advantages of low-cost and high-content of flavor nucleotides. Yeast extract was produced from the broken cell suspension of Candida utilis, using papain, 5′-Phosphodiesterase (RP-1) and Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP) -deaminase. The effects of types, dosages and treatment time of enzymes on the recovery of solid, protein and flavor nucleotides, as well as the extract composition were i...

  10. Detecting estrogenic activity in water samples withestrogen-sensitive yeast cells using spectrophotometry and fluorescencemicroscopy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wozei, E.; Holman, H-Y.N.; Hermanowicz, S.W.; Borglin S.

    2006-03-15

    Environmental estrogens are environmental contaminants that can mimic the biological activities of the female hormone estrogen in the endocrine system, i.e. they act as endocrine disrupters. Several substances are reported to have estrogen-like activity or estrogenic activity. These include steroid hormones, synthetic estrogens (xenoestrogens), environmental pollutants and phytoestrogens (plant estrogens). Using the chromogenic substrate ortho-nitrophenyl-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (ONPG) we show that an estrogen-sensitive yeast strain RMY/ER-ERE, with human estrogen receptor (hER{alpha}) gene and the lacZ gene which encodes the enzyme {beta}-galactosidase, is able to detect estrogenic activity in water samples over a wide range of spiked concentrations of the hormonal estrogen 17{beta}-estradiol (E2). Ortho-nitrophenol (ONP), the yellow product of this assay can be detected using spectrophotometry but requires cell lysis to release the enzyme and allow product formation. We improved this aspect in a fluorogenic assay by using fluorescein di-{beta}-D-galactopyranoside (FDG) as a substrate. The product was visualized using fluorescence microscopy without the need to kill, fix or lyse the cells. We show that in live yeast cells, the uptake of E2 and the subsequent production of {beta}-galactosidase enzyme occur quite rapidly, with maximum enzyme-catalyzed fluorescent product formation evident after about 30 minutes of exposure to E2. The fluorogenic assay was applied to a selection of estrogenic compounds and the Synchrotron-based Fourier transform infrared (SR-FTIR) spectra of the cells obtained to better understand the yeast whole cell response to the compounds. The fluorogenic assay is most sensitive to E2, but the SR-FTIR spectra suggest that the cells respond to all the estrogenic compounds tested even when no fluorescent response was detected. These findings are promising and may shorten the duration of environmental water screening and monitoring regimes using

  11. Creutzfeldt-Jakob disease and mad cows: lessons learnt from yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofmann, J; Wolf, H; Grassmann, A; Arndt, V; Graham, J; Vorberg, I

    2012-01-01

    Transmissible spongiform encephalopathies are fatal neurodegenerative diseases that affect mammals including humans. The proteinaceous nature of the infectious agent, the prion, and its propagation, challenge established dogmas in biology. It is now widely accepted that prion diseases are caused by unconventional agents principally composed of a misfolded host-encoded protein, PrP. Surprisingly, major break-throughs in prion research came from studies on functionally unrelated proteins in yeast and filamentous fungi. Aggregates composed of these proteins act as epigenetic elements of inheritance that can propagate their alternative states by a conformational switch into an ordered ß-sheet rich polymer just like mammalian prions. Since their discovery prions of lower eukaryotes have provided invaluable insights into all aspects of prion biogenesis. Importantly, yeast prions provide proof-of-principle that distinct protein conformers can be infectious and can serve as genetic elements that have the capacity to encipher strain specific information. As a powerful and tractable model system, yeast prions will continue to increase our understanding of prion-host cell interaction and potential mechanisms of protein-based epigenetic inheritance. PMID:22270552

  12. How can yeast cells decide between three activated MAP kinase pathways? A model approach.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rensing, Ludger; Ruoff, Peter

    2009-04-21

    In yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), the regulation of three MAP kinase pathways responding to pheromones (Fus3 pathway), carbon/nitrogen starvation (Kss1 pathway), and high osmolarity/osmotic stress (Hog1 pathway) is the subject of intensive research. We were interested in the question how yeast cells would respond when more than one of the MAP kinase pathways are activated simultaneously. Here, we give a brief overview over the regulatory mechanisms of the yeast MAP kinase pathways and investigate a kinetic model based on presently known molecular interactions and feedbacks within and between the three mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK) pathways. When two pathways are activated simultaneously with the osmotic stress response as one of them, the model predicts that the osmotic stress response (Hog1 pathway) is turned on first. The same is true when all three pathways are activated at the same time. When testing simultaneous stimulations by low nitrogen and pheromones through the Kss1 and Fus3 pathways, respectively, the low nitrogen response dominates over the pheromone response. Due to its autocatalytic activation mechanism, the pheromone response (Fus3 pathway) shows typical sigmoid response kinetics and excitability. In the presence of a small but sufficient amount of activated Fus3, a stimulation by pheromones will lead to a rapid self-amplification of the pheromone response. This 'excitability' appears to be a feature of the pheromone pathway that has specific biological significance. PMID:19322936

  13. Comparison of methods used for assessing the viability and vitality of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwolek-Mirek, Magdalena; Zadrag-Tecza, Renata

    2014-11-01

    Determination of cell viability is the most commonly used method for assessing the impact of various types of stressors in toxicity research and in industrial microbiology studies. Viability is defined as a percentage of live cells in a whole population. Although cell death is one of the consequences of toxicity, chemical or physical factors may exert their toxic effects through a number of cellular alterations that may compromise cell ability to divide without necessarily leading to cell death. This aspect represents the term 'cell vitality' defined as physiological capabilities of cells. It is important to note that cell viability and cell vitality represent two different aspects of cell functions, and both are required for the estimation of the physiological state of a cell after exposure to various types of stressors and chemical or physical factors. In this paper, we introduced a classification of available methods for estimating both viability and vitality in Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cells (wild-type and Δsod1 mutant) in which the effects of selected oxidants causing oxidative stress is evaluated. We present the advantages as well as disadvantages of the selected methods and assess their usefulness in different types of research.

  14. Interaction of benzo[c]phenanthridine and protoberberine alkaloids with animal and yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Slaninová, I; Táborská, E; Bochoráková, H; Slanina, J

    2001-01-01

    We compared the effects of four quaternary benzo[c]phenanthridine alkaloids--chelerythrine, chelilutine, sanguinarine, and sanguilutine--and two quaternary protoberberine alkaloids-berberine and coptisine--on the human cell line HeLa (cervix carcinoma cells) and the yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Schizosaccharomyces japonicus var. versatilis. The ability of alkaloids to display primary fluorescence, allowed us to record their dynamics and localization in cells. Cytotoxic, anti-microtubular, and anti-actin effects in living cells were studied. In the yeasts, neither microtubules nor cell growth was seriously affected even at the alkaloid concentration of 100 microg/ml. The HeLa cells, however, responded to the toxic effect of alkaloids at concentrations ranging from 1 to 50 microg/ml. IC50 values for individual alkaloids were: sanguinarine IC50 = 0.8 microg/ml, sanguilutine IC50 = 8.3 microg/ml, chelerythrine IC50 = 6.2 microg/ml, chelilutine IC50 = 5.2 microg/ml, coptisine IC50 = 2.6 microg/ml and berberine IC50 > 10.0 microg/ml. In living cells, sanguinarine produced a decrease in microtubule numbers, particularly at the cell periphery, at a concentration of 0.1 microg/ml. The other alkaloids showed a similar effect but at higher concentrations (5-50 microg/ml). The strongest effects of sanguinarine were explained as a consequence of its easy penetration through the cell membrane owing to nonpolar pseudobase formation and to a high degree of molecular planarity.

  15. Selection of functional T cell receptor mutants from a yeast surface-display library.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kieke, M C; Shusta, E V; Boder, E T; Teyton, L; Wittrup, K D; Kranz, D M

    1999-05-11

    The heterodimeric alphabeta T cell receptor (TCR) for antigen is the key determinant of T cell specificity. The structure of the TCR is very similar to that of antibodies, but the engineering of TCRs by directed evolution with combinatorial display libraries has not been accomplished to date. Here, we report that yeast surface display of a TCR was achieved only after the mutation of specific variable region residues. These residues are located in two regions of the TCR, at the interface of the alpha- and beta-chains and in the beta-chain framework region that is thought to be in proximity to the CD3 signal-transduction complex. The mutations are encoded naturally in many antibody variable regions, indicating specific functional differences that have not been appreciated between TCRs and antibodies. The identification of these residues provides an explanation for the inherent difficulties in the display of wild-type TCRs compared with antibodies. Yeast-displayed mutant TCRs bind specifically to the peptide/MHC antigen, enabling engineering of soluble T cell receptors as specific T cell antagonists. This strategy of random mutagenesis followed by selection for surface expression may be of general use in the directed evolution of other eukaryotic proteins that are refractory to display.

  16. Up against the wall: is yeast cell wall integrity ensured by mechanosensing in plasma membrane microdomains?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Dufrêne, Yves F; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2015-02-01

    Yeast cell wall integrity (CWI) signaling serves as a model of the regulation of fungal cell wall synthesis and provides the basis for the development of antifungal drugs. A set of five membrane-spanning sensors (Wsc1 to Wsc3, Mid2, and Mtl1) detect cell surface stress and commence the signaling pathway upon perturbations of either the cell wall structure or the plasma membrane. We here summarize the latest advances in the structure/function relationship primarily of the Wsc1 sensor and critically review the evidence that it acts as a mechanosensor. The relevance and physiological significance of the information obtained for the function of the other CWI sensors, as well as expected future developments, are discussed.

  17. Yeast That Smell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eugenia Y Xu

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available The fundamental mechanism of olfactory receptor activation has been conserved from yeast to humans. Engineered yeast cells can smell some of the same odorants as humans can, which makes yeast an ideal model system for studying human olfaction. Furthermore, if engineered yeast cells are incorporated into sensory arrays, they can be used as biosensors or artificial noses.Keywords: Yeast, olfactory receptor, G protein-coupled receptor, biosensor, smellReceived: 31 July 2008 / Received in revised form: 6 August 2008, Accepted: 13 August 2008, Published online: 17 August 2008

  18. Rewiring yeast osmostress signalling through the MAPK network reveals essential and non-essential roles of Hog1 in osmoadaptation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Babazadeh, Roja; Furukawa, Takako; Hohmann, Stefan; Furukawa, Kentaro

    2014-01-01

    Mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPKs) have a number of targets which they regulate at transcriptional and post-translational levels to mediate specific responses. The yeast Hog1 MAPK is essential for cell survival under hyperosmotic conditions and it plays multiple roles in gene expression, metabolic regulation, signal fidelity and cell cycle regulation. Here we describe essential and non-essential roles of Hog1 using engineered yeast cells in which osmoadaptation was reconstituted in a Hog1-independent manner. We rewired Hog1-dependent osmotic stress-induced gene expression under the control of Fus3/Kss1 MAPKs, which are activated upon osmostress via crosstalk in hog1Δ cells. This approach revealed that osmotic up-regulation of only two Hog1-dependent glycerol biosynthesis genes, GPD1 and GPP2, is sufficient for successful osmoadaptation. Moreover, some of the previously described Hog1-dependent mechanisms appeared to be dispensable for osmoadaptation in the engineered cells. These results suggest that the number of essential MAPK functions may be significantly smaller than anticipated and that knockout approaches may lead to over-interpretation of phenotypic data. PMID:24732094

  19. Cell cycle- and chaperone-mediated regulation of H3K56ac incorporation in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tommy Kaplan

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Acetylation of histone H3 lysine 56 is a covalent modification best known as a mark of newly replicated chromatin, but it has also been linked to replication-independent histone replacement. Here, we measured H3K56ac levels at single-nucleosome resolution in asynchronously growing yeast cultures, as well as in yeast proceeding synchronously through the cell cycle. We developed a quantitative model of H3K56ac kinetics, which shows that H3K56ac is largely explained by the genomic replication timing and the turnover rate of each nucleosome, suggesting that cell cycle profiles of H3K56ac should reveal most first-time nucleosome incorporation events. However, since the deacetylases Hst3/4 prevent use of H3K56ac as a marker for histone deposition during M phase, we also directly measured M phase histone replacement rates. We report a global decrease in turnover rates during M phase and a further specific decrease in turnover at several early origins of replication, which switch from rapidly replaced in G1 phase to stably bound during M phase. Finally, by measuring H3 replacement in yeast deleted for the H3K56 acetyltransferase Rtt109 and its two co-chaperones Asf1 and Vps75, we find evidence that Rtt109 and Asf1 preferentially enhance histone replacement at rapidly replaced nucleosomes, whereas Vps75 appears to inhibit histone turnover at those loci. These results provide a broad perspective on histone replacement/incorporation throughout the cell cycle and suggest that H3K56 acetylation provides a positive-feedback loop by which replacement of a nucleosome enhances subsequent replacement at the same location.

  20. Studying p53 family proteins in yeast: Induction of autophagic cell death and modulation by interactors and small molecules

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In this work, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to individually study human p53, p63 (full length and truncated forms) and p73. Using this cell system, the effect of these proteins on cell proliferation and death, and the influence of MDM2 and MDMX on their activities were analyzed. When expressed in yeast, wild-type p53, TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 induced growth inhibition associated with S-phase cell cycle arrest. This growth inhibition was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and autophagic cell death. Furthermore, they stimulated rapamycin-induced autophagy. On the contrary, none of the tested p53 family members induced apoptosis either per se or after apoptotic stimuli. As previously reported for p53, also TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 increased actin expression levels and its depolarization, suggesting that ACT1 is also a p63 and p73 putative yeast target gene. Additionally, MDM2 and MDMX inhibited the activity of all tested p53 family members in yeast, although the effect was weaker on TAp63. Moreover, Nutlin-3a and SJ-172550 were identified as potential inhibitors of the p73 interaction with MDM2 and MDMX, respectively. Altogether, the yeast-based assays herein developed can be envisaged as a simplified cell system to study the involvement of p53 family members in autophagy, the modulation of their activities by specific interactors (MDM2 and MDMX), and the potential of new small molecules to modulate these interactions. - Highlights: • p53, p63 and p73 are individually studied in the yeast S. cerevisiae. • p53 family members induce ROS production, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in yeast. • p53 family members increase actin depolarization and expression levels in yeast. • MDM2 and MDMX inhibit the activity of p53 family members in yeast. • Yeast can be a useful tool to study the biology and drugability of p53, p63 and p73

  1. Studying p53 family proteins in yeast: Induction of autophagic cell death and modulation by interactors and small molecules

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Leão, Mariana; Gomes, Sara; Bessa, Cláudia; Soares, Joana; Raimundo, Liliana [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Monti, Paola; Fronza, Gilberto [Mutagenesis Unit, Istituto di Ricerca e Cura a Carattere Scientifico Azienda Ospedaliera Universitaria San Martino-IST-Istituto Nazionale per la Ricerca sul Cancro, 16132 Genoa (Italy); Pereira, Clara [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal); Saraiva, Lucília, E-mail: lucilia.saraiva@ff.up.pt [REQUIMTE, Laboratório de Microbiologia, Departamento de Ciências Biológicas, Faculdade de Farmácia, Universidade do Porto, Rua de Jorge Viterbo Ferreira n. 164, 4050-313 Porto (Portugal)

    2015-01-01

    In this work, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae was used to individually study human p53, p63 (full length and truncated forms) and p73. Using this cell system, the effect of these proteins on cell proliferation and death, and the influence of MDM2 and MDMX on their activities were analyzed. When expressed in yeast, wild-type p53, TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 induced growth inhibition associated with S-phase cell cycle arrest. This growth inhibition was accompanied by reactive oxygen species production and autophagic cell death. Furthermore, they stimulated rapamycin-induced autophagy. On the contrary, none of the tested p53 family members induced apoptosis either per se or after apoptotic stimuli. As previously reported for p53, also TAp63, ΔNp63 and TAp73 increased actin expression levels and its depolarization, suggesting that ACT1 is also a p63 and p73 putative yeast target gene. Additionally, MDM2 and MDMX inhibited the activity of all tested p53 family members in yeast, although the effect was weaker on TAp63. Moreover, Nutlin-3a and SJ-172550 were identified as potential inhibitors of the p73 interaction with MDM2 and MDMX, respectively. Altogether, the yeast-based assays herein developed can be envisaged as a simplified cell system to study the involvement of p53 family members in autophagy, the modulation of their activities by specific interactors (MDM2 and MDMX), and the potential of new small molecules to modulate these interactions. - Highlights: • p53, p63 and p73 are individually studied in the yeast S. cerevisiae. • p53 family members induce ROS production, cell cycle arrest and autophagy in yeast. • p53 family members increase actin depolarization and expression levels in yeast. • MDM2 and MDMX inhibit the activity of p53 family members in yeast. • Yeast can be a useful tool to study the biology and drugability of p53, p63 and p73.

  2. The yeast ROAM mutation--identification of the sequences mediating host gene activation and cell-type control in the yeast retrotransposon, Ty.

    OpenAIRE

    Rathjen, P D; Kingsman, A J; Kingsman, S M

    1987-01-01

    When the yeast retrotransposon, Ty, integrates into the 5' flanking region of a gene it can activate the expression of that gene. At the same time the activated gene is brought under cell-type specific control such that expression is high in haploid a or alpha cells but low in a/alpha diploids. These Ty mediated mutations are known as ROAM mutations. In this study we have used a ROAM mutation created in vitro to identify the sequences within Ty that mediate this phenomenon. We show that a sin...

  3. Calorie Restriction-Mediated Replicative Lifespan Extension in Yeast Is Non-Cell Autonomous

    OpenAIRE

    Szu-Chieh Mei; Charles Brenner

    2015-01-01

    In laboratory yeast strains with Sir2 and Fob1 function, wild-type NAD+ salvage is required for calorie restriction (CR) to extend replicative lifespan. CR does not significantly alter steady state levels of intracellular NAD+ metabolites. However, levels of Sir2 and Pnc1, two enzymes that sequentially convert NAD+ to nicotinic acid (NA), are up-regulated during CR. To test whether factors such as NA might be exported by glucose-restricted mother cells to survive later generations, we develop...

  4. Trophic effect of a methanol yeast extract on 3T3 fibroblast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gallo, Dominique; Dillemans, Monique; Allardin, David; Priem, Fabian; Van Nedervelde, Laurence

    2014-01-01

    With regard to the increase of human life expectancy, interest for topical treatments aimed to counteract skin aging is still growing. Hence, research for bioactive compounds able to stimulate skin fibroblast activity is an attractive topic. Having previously described the effects of a new methanol yeast extract on growth and metabolic activity of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we studied its effects on 3T3 fibroblasts to evaluate its potential antiaging property. This investigation demonstrates that this extract increases proliferation as well as migration of 3T3 cells and decreases their entrance in senescence and apoptosis phases. Altogether, these results open new perspectives for the formulation of innovative antiaging topical treatments.

  5. Drying of immobilized yeast cells in a spouted bed dryer with a moving draft tube

    OpenAIRE

    Dragan Povrenović; Viktor Nedović

    2010-01-01

    Brewery yeast cells immobilized in Ca-alginate were dried in a laboratory scale spouted bed with a draft tube.The experiment was conducted under variable temperatures and air flow rates. The temperature and air velocity at the bottom of the column have been varied in the range from 30 to 60 °C and from 6 to 10 m/s in a duration of 60 min. The moisture of dryied particles was in the interval of 10.00 to 21.00 g/g, while the water activity was in the range of 0.40 to 0.45 what ensures the prese...

  6. Genomic, genetic and physiological effects of bio-electrospraying on live cells of the model yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greig, Duncan [Department of Biology, University College London, Gower Street, London, WC1E 6BT (United Kingdom); Jayasinghe, Suwan N [Department of Mechanical Engineering, University College London, Torrington Place, London, WC1E 7JE (United Kingdom)], E-mail: s.jayasinghe@ucl.ac.uk

    2008-09-01

    The ability to directly engineer living cells is rapidly becoming a hot field of research for a wide range of applications within the life sciences. 'Bio-electrospraying' cells, a recently developed technique, has great potential in this area. In this paper, we quantify genetic, genomic and physiological effects of bio-electrospraying cells of a model eukaryote, the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Our results demonstrate that yeast cells bio-electrosprayed at 30 kV have not incurred any detectable damage at a genomic or genetic level, and that the detectable physiological stress of the procedure is negligible. These results support our proposal to use yeast as a model system to develop bio-electrospray devices and protocols.

  7. Direct conversion of inulin into cell lipid by an inulinase-producing yeast Rhodosporidium toruloides 2F5.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Zhi-Peng; Fu, Wen-Juan; Xu, Hong-Mei; Chi, Zhen-Ming

    2014-06-01

    In this study, an inulinase-producing yeast strain 2F5 of Rhodosporidium toruloides was obtained. It was found that the yeast strain 2F5 could produce higher amount of oil from inulin and larger lipid bodies in its cells than any other yeast strains tested in this study. Under the optimal conditions, 62.14% (w/w) of lipid based on cell dry weight and 15.82g/l of the dry cell mass were produced from 6.0% (w/v) inulin at flask level, leaving 0.92% (w/v) of total sugar in the fermented medium. During 2-l fermentation, 70.36% (w/w) of lipid based on cell dry weight and 15.64g/l of the dry cell mass were produced from 6.0% (w/v) inulin. Over 99.09% of the fatty acids from the yeast strain 2F5 grown on inulin was C16:0, C18:0, C18:1 and C18:2, especially C18:1 (52.2%). The biodiesel prepared using the lipids produced by the yeast strain 2F5 could be burnt well.

  8. Synthesis of polypyrrole within the cell wall of yeast by redox-cycling of [Fe(CN)6](3-)/[Fe(CN)6](4-).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramanavicius, Arunas; Andriukonis, Eivydas; Stirke, Arunas; Mikoliunaite, Lina; Balevicius, Zigmas; Ramanaviciene, Almira

    2016-02-01

    Yeast cells are often used as a model system in various experiments. Moreover, due to their high metabolic activity, yeast cells have a potential to be applied as elements in the design of biofuel cells and biosensors. However a wider application of yeast cells in electrochemical systems is limited due to high electric resistance of their cell wall. In order to reduce this problem we have polymerized conducting polymer polypyrrole (Ppy) directly in the cell wall and/or within periplasmic membrane. In this research the formation of Ppy was induced by [Fe(CN)6](3-)ions, which were generated from K4[Fe(CN)6], which was initially added to polymerization solution. The redox process was catalyzed by oxido-reductases, which are present in the plasma membrane of yeast cells. The formation of Ppy was confirmed by spectrophotometry and atomic force microscopy. It was confirmed that the conducting polymer polypyrrole was formed within periplasmic space and/or within the cell wall of yeast cells, which were incubated in solution containing pyrrole, glucose and [Fe(CN)6](4-). After 24h drying at room temperature we have observed that Ppy-modified yeast cell walls retained their initial spherical form. In contrast to Ppy-modified cells, the walls of unmodified yeast have wrinkled after 24h drying. The viability of yeast cells in the presence of different pyrrole concentrations has been evaluated.

  9. The indentation of pressurized elastic shells: from polymeric capsules to yeast cells

    KAUST Repository

    Vella, D.

    2011-08-10

    Pressurized elastic capsules arise at scales ranging from the 10 m diameter pressure vessels used to store propane at oil refineries to the microscopic polymeric capsules that may be used in drug delivery. Nature also makes extensive use of pressurized elastic capsules: plant cells, bacteria and fungi have stiff walls, which are subject to an internal turgor pressure. Here, we present theoretical, numerical and experimental investigations of the indentation of a linearly elastic shell subject to a constant internal pressure. We show that, unlike unpressurized shells, the relationship between force and displacement demonstrates two linear regimes. We determine analytical expressions for the effective stiffness in each of these regimes in terms of the material properties of the shell and the pressure difference. As a consequence, a single indentation experiment over a range of displacements may be used as a simple assay to determine both the internal pressure and elastic properties of capsules. Our results are relevant for determining the internal pressure in bacterial, fungal or plant cells. As an illustration of this, we apply our results to recent measurements of the stiffness of baker\\'s yeast and infer from these experiments that the internal osmotic pressure of yeast cells may be regulated in response to changes in the osmotic pressure of the external medium.

  10. Yeast dual-affinity biobricks: Progress towards renewable whole-cell biosensors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venkatesh, A G; Sun, Alexander; Brickner, Howard; Looney, David; Hall, Drew A; Aronoff-Spencer, Eliah

    2015-08-15

    Point-of-care (POC) diagnostic biosensors offer a promising solution to improve healthcare, not only in developed parts of the world, but also in resource limited areas that lack adequate medical infrastructure and trained technicians. However, in remote and resource limited settings, cost and storage of traditional POC immunoassays often limit actual deployment. Synthetically engineered biological components ("BioBricks") provide an avenue to reduce costs and simplify assay procedures. In this article, the design and development of an ultra-low cost, whole-cell "renewable" capture reagent for use in POC diagnostic applications is described. Yeast cells were genetically modified to display both single chain variable fragment (scFv) antibodies and gold-binding peptide (GBP) on their surfaces for simple one step enrichment and surface functionalization. Electrochemical impedance spectroscopy (EIS) and fluorescent imaging were used to verify and characterize the binding of cells to gold electrodes. A complete electrochemical detection assay was then performed on screen-printed electrodes fixed with yeast displaying scFv directed to Salmonella outer membrane protein D (OmpD). Electrochemical assays were optimized and cross-validated with established fluorescence techniques. Nanomolar detection limits were observed for both formats. PMID:25863344

  11. Raspberry wine fermentation with suspended and immobilized yeast cells of two strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Djordjević, Radovan; Gibson, Brian; Sandell, Mari; de Billerbeck, Gustavo M; Bugarski, Branko; Leskošek-Čukalović, Ida; Vunduk, Jovana; Nikićević, Ninoslav; Nedović, Viktor

    2015-01-01

    The objectives of this study were to assess the differences in fermentative behaviour of two different strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae (EC1118 and RC212) and to determine the differences in composition and sensory properties of raspberry wines fermented with immobilized and suspended yeast cells of both strains at 15 °C. Analyses of aroma compounds, glycerol, acetic acid and ethanol, as well as the kinetics of fermentation and a sensory evaluation of the wines, were performed. All fermentations with immobilized yeast cells had a shorter lag phase and faster utilization of sugars and ethanol production than those fermented with suspended cells. Slower fermentation kinetics were observed in all the samples that were fermented with strain RC212 (suspended and immobilized) than in samples fermented with strain EC1118. Significantly higher amounts of acetic acid were detected in all samples fermented with strain RC212 than in those fermented with strain EC1118 (0.282 and 0.602 g/l, respectively). Slightly higher amounts of glycerol were observed in samples fermented with strain EC1118 than in those fermented with strain RC212.

  12. Rapid and serial quantification of adhesion forces of yeast and Mammalian cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva Potthoff

    Full Text Available Cell adhesion to surfaces represents the basis for niche colonization and survival. Here we establish serial quantification of adhesion forces of different cell types using a single probe. The pace of single-cell force-spectroscopy was accelerated to up to 200 yeast and 20 mammalian cells per probe when replacing the conventional cell trapping cantilever chemistry of atomic force microscopy by underpressure immobilization with fluidic force microscopy (FluidFM. In consequence, statistically relevant data could be recorded in a rapid manner, the spectrum of examinable cells was enlarged, and the cell physiology preserved until approached for force spectroscopy. Adhesion forces of Candida albicans increased from below 4 up to 16 nN at 37°C on hydrophobic surfaces, whereas a Δhgc1-mutant showed forces consistently below 4 nN. Monitoring adhesion of mammalian cells revealed mean adhesion forces of 600 nN of HeLa cells on fibronectin and were one order of magnitude higher than those observed for HEK cells.

  13. Absence of Btn1p in the yeast model for juvenile Batten disease may cause arginine to become toxic to yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vitiello, Seasson Phillips; Wolfe, Devin M; Pearce, David A

    2007-05-01

    Lymphoblast cell lines established from individuals with juvenile Batten disease (JNCL) bearing mutations in CLN3 and yeast strains lacking Btn1p (btn1-Delta), the homolog to CLN3, have decreased intracellular levels of arginine and defective lysosomal/vacuolar transport of arginine. It is important to establish the basis for this decrease in arginine levels and whether restoration of arginine levels would be of therapeutic value for Batten disease. Previous studies have suggested that synthesis and degradation of arginine are unaltered in btn1-Delta. Using the yeast model for the Batten disease, we have determined that although btn1-Delta results in decreased intracellular arginine levels, it does not result from altered arginine uptake, arginine efflux or differences in arginine incorporation into peptides. However, expression of BTN1 is dependent on arginine and Gcn4p, the master regulator of amino acid biosynthesis. Moreover, deletion of GCN4 (gcn4-Delta), in combination with btn1-Delta, results in a very specific growth requirement for arginine. In addition, increasing the intracellular levels of arginine through overexpression of Can1p, the plasma membrane basic amino acid permease, results in increased cell volume and a severe growth defect specific to basic amino acid availability for btn1-Delta, but not wild-type cells. Therefore, elevation of intracellular levels of arginine in btn1-Delta cells is detrimental and is suggestive that btn1-Delta and perhaps mutation of CLN3 predispose cells to keep arginine levels lower than normal.

  14. 酵母细胞壁对葡萄酒中酵母发酵代谢的影响%Effects of Yeast Cell Wall on Yeast Fermentation & Metabolism of Grape Wine

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    卢新军; 张方方; 许引虎

    2015-01-01

    Yeast cell wall, also called yeast hulls, has become one of the most important auxiliary materials in grape wine-making due to its unique physiological activities. In this study, yeast hulls was added during the fermentation of grape wine to investigate its effects on yeast growth& metabolism. The results suggested that yeast hulls could significantly promote the growth and the reproduction of yeast, and the addi-tion of yeast hulls in grape juice containing alcohol could reduce the inhibition and the toxication of ethanol on yeast and promote the physio-logical activities and the growth and the metabolism of yeast. (Trans. by YUANG Yang).%酵母细胞壁也称为酵母皮,因其独特的生理活性功能已成为葡萄酒酿造的重要辅料之一。本实验在发酵过程中添加酵母细胞壁,研究其对酵母生长代谢的影响。研究发现,酵母细胞壁能显著促进酵母的生长繁殖,在含乙醇的葡萄汁中,添加酵母细胞壁能减轻乙醇对酵母的抑制甚至毒害作用,促进酵母的生理活性及生长代谢。

  15. [The construction and the expression of V5 epitope fused human androgen receptor vector in the yeast cell].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yang, Chen; Luo, Fangni; Dai, Weixing; Li, Shanshan; Huang, Renhua; Xie, Yangmei; Xue, Feiyue; Li, Xiangming

    2013-08-01

    When we try to establish the gene recombinant yeast cell to screen the androgenic endocrine disruptors, the key procedure is the androgen receptor (AR) expression in the yeast cell. For this purpose, we obtained the GPD (glyceraldehyde-3-phosphote dehydrogenase) promoter from the yeast genosome of W303-1A using PCR system and inserting it into Swa I and BamH I sites of pYestrp2. The new constructed vector was named pGPD. The V5 epitope tag DNA with a 5'-BamH I and a 3'-EcoR I sticky end was cloned into the corresponding site of the pGPD vector to yield the vector of pGPDV5. The 2 723 bp full length AR ORF amplified by PCR from pcDNA3.1/AR was fused to V5 epitope tag DNA in pGPDV5 to give the AR yeast expression vector of pGPDV5/AR. This fused vector was transformed into the yeast cell (W303-1A). Western blot was used to detect the V5 fused protein of AR, in the protocol of which the primary monoclonal antibody (IgG(2a)) of mouse anti-V5 and the polyclonal secondary antibody of goat anti-mouse (IgG) linked to horseradish peroxidase (HRP) were used to detect the specific protein in the given sample of the transformed yeast extract. The result showed that the fused protein of AR was expressed successfully in the yeast cell. PMID:24059072

  16. Development of Crystalline Peroxisomes in Methanol-Grown Cells of the Yeast Hansenula polymorpha and Its Relation to Environmental Conditions

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Veenhuis, M.; Dijken, J.P. van; Pilon, S.A.F.; Harder, W.

    1978-01-01

    The development of peroxisomes has been studied in cells of the yeast Hansenula polymorpha during growth on methanol in batch and chemostat cultures. During bud formation, new peroxisomes were generated by the separation of small peroxisomes from mature organelles in the mother cells. The number of

  17. Ethanol production from concentrated food waste hydrolysates with yeast cells immobilized on corn stalk

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yan, Shoubao [Huainan Normal Univ., Anhui (China). School of Life Science; Chen, Xiangsong; Wu, Jingyong; Wang, Pingchao [Chinese Academy of Sciences, Hefei (China). Key Lab. of Ion Beam Bio-engineering of Inst. of Plasma Physics

    2012-05-15

    The aim of the present study was to examine ethanol production from concentrated food waste hydrolysates using whole cells of S. cerevisiae immobilized on corn stalks. In order to improve cell immobilization efficiency, biological modification of the carrier was carried out by cellulase hydrolysis. The results show that proper modification of the carrier with cellulase hydrolysis was suitable for cell immobilization. The mechanism proposed, cellulase hydrolysis, not only increased the immobilized cell concentration, but also disrupted the sleek surface to become rough and porous, which enhanced ethanol production. In batch fermentation with an initial reducing sugar concentration of 202.64 {+-} 1.86 g/l, an optimal ethanol concentration of 87.91 {+-} 1.98 g/l was obtained using a modified corn stalk-immobilized cell system. The ethanol concentration produced by the immobilized cells was 6.9% higher than that produced by the free cells. Ethanol production in the 14th cycle repeated batch fermentation demonstrated the enhanced stability of the immobilized yeast cells. Under continuous fermentation in an immobilized cell reactor, the maximum ethanol concentration of 84.85 g/l, and the highest ethanol yield of 0.43 g/g (of reducing sugar) were achieved at hydraulic retention time (HRT) of 3.10 h, whereas the maximum volumetric ethanol productivity of 43.54 g/l/h was observed at a HRT of 1.55 h. (orig.)

  18. Profiling DNA damage-induced phosphorylation in budding yeast reveals diverse signaling networks.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhou, Chunshui; Elia, Andrew E H; Naylor, Maria L; Dephoure, Noah; Ballif, Bryan A; Goel, Gautam; Xu, Qikai; Ng, Aylwin; Chou, Danny M; Xavier, Ramnik J; Gygi, Steven P; Elledge, Stephen J

    2016-06-28

    The DNA damage response (DDR) is regulated by a protein kinase signaling cascade that orchestrates DNA repair and other processes. Identifying the substrate effectors of these kinases is critical for understanding the underlying physiology and mechanism of the response. We have used quantitative mass spectrometry to profile DDR-dependent phosphorylation in budding yeast and genetically explored the dependency of these phosphorylation events on the DDR kinases MEC1, RAD53, CHK1, and DUN1. Based on these screens, a database containing many novel DDR-regulated phosphorylation events has been established. Phosphorylation of many of these proteins has been validated by quantitative peptide phospho-immunoprecipitation and examined for functional relevance to the DDR through large-scale analysis of sensitivity to DNA damage in yeast deletion strains. We reveal a link between DDR signaling and the metabolic pathways of inositol phosphate and phosphatidyl inositol synthesis, which are required for resistance to DNA damage. We also uncover links between the DDR and TOR signaling as well as translation regulation. Taken together, these data shed new light on the organization of DDR signaling in budding yeast. PMID:27298372

  19. A vibrating membrane bioreactor operated at supra- and sub-critical flux: Influence of extracellular polymeric substances from yeast cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Beier, Søren Prip; Jonsson, Gunnar Eigil

    2007-01-01

    A vibrating membrane bioreactor, in which the fouling problems are reduced by vibrating a hollow fiber membrane module, has been tested in constant flux microfiltration above (supra-critical) and below (sub-critical) an experimentally determined critical flux. Suspensions of bakers yeast cells were...... chosen as filtration medium (dry weight 4 g/l). The influence of extracellular polymeric substances (EPS) from the yeast cells is evaluated by UV absorbance measurements of the bulk supernatant during filtration. The critical flux seems to be an interval or a relative value rather than an absolute value....... Filtration just below the critical flux (sub-critical) seems to be a good compromise between acceptable flux level and acceptable increase of fouling resistance and trans-membrane pressure (TMP) in a given time period. EPS from the yeast cells causes the membrane module to foul and part of the fouling...

  20. Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA: a new systems approach to identify therapeutic targets for human genetic diseases [v1; ref status: indexed, http://f1000r.es/3gk

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David J. Wiley

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Genetic interaction networks that underlie most human diseases are highly complex and poorly defined. Better-defined networks will allow identification of a greater number of therapeutic targets. Here we introduce our Yeast Augmented Network Analysis (YANA approach and test it with the X-linked spinal muscular atrophy (SMA disease gene UBA1. First, we express UBA1 and a mutant variant in fission yeast and use high-throughput methods to identify fission yeast genetic modifiers of UBA1. Second, we analyze available protein-protein interaction network databases in both fission yeast and human to construct UBA1 genetic networks. Third, from these networks we identified potential therapeutic targets for SMA. Finally, we validate one of these targets in a vertebrate (zebrafish SMA model. This study demonstrates the power of combining synthetic and chemical genetics with a simple model system to identify human disease gene networks that can be exploited for treating human diseases.

  1. A comparative study on glycerol metabolism to erythritol and citric acid in Yarrowia lipolytica yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomaszewska, Ludwika; Rakicka, Magdalena; Rymowicz, Waldemar; Rywińska, Anita

    2014-09-01

    Citric acid and erythritol biosynthesis from pure and crude glycerol by three acetate-negative mutants of Yarrowia lipolytica yeast was investigated in batch cultures in a wide pH range (3.0-6.5). Citric acid biosynthesis was the most effective at pH 5.0-5.5 in the case of Wratislavia 1.31 and Wratislavia AWG7. With a decreasing pH value, the direction of biosynthesis changed into erythritol synthesis accompanied by low production of citric acid. Pathways of glycerol conversion into erythritol and citric acid were investigated in Wratislavia K1 cells. Enzymatic activity was compared in cultures run at pH 3.0 and 4.5, that is, under conditions promoting the production of erythritol and citric acid, respectively. The effect of pH value (3.0 and 4.5) and NaCl presence on the extracellular production and intracellular accumulation of citric acid and erythritol was compared as well. Low pH and NaCl resulted in diminished activity of glycerol kinase, whereas such conditions stimulated the activity of glycerol-3-phosphate dehydrogenase. The presence of NaCl strongly influenced enzymes activity - the effective erythritol production was correlated with a high activity of transketolase and erythrose reductase. Therefore, presented results confirmed that transketolase and erythrose reductase are involved in the overproduction of erythritol in the cells of Y. lipolytica yeast.

  2. Enzymatic hydrolysis of inulin to fructose by glutaraldehyde fixed yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Workman, W E; Day, D F

    1984-08-01

    Inulin, a polyfruction, is found as the reserve carbohydrate in the roots and tubers of various plants (i.e. Jerusalem artichoke, chicory, and dahlia tubers). The beta-fructofuranosidase (inulase) from the yeast Kluyveromyces fragilis is of interest because of its industrial potential in fructose syrup and alcohol production from inulin containing plants. We have found that the inulase of K. fragilis can be immobilized in the yeast cells by glutaraldehyde treatment. These cells are resistant to physical and enzymatic destruction. Although the exact nature of the immobilization is not fully understood, the kinetic parameters of the immobilized enzyme are similar to those of the soluble enzyme. No reduction of enzyme activity was observed after glutaraldehyde treatment and glutaraldehyde concentration did not affect enzyme activity. A 96% hydrolysis of dahlia inulin was achieved in 10.5 h with a 9.5% (w/v) fixed enzyme suspension. A Jerusalem artichoke extract containing 16.8%polyfructan was completely hydrolyzed in 3.5 h with a 0.24% (w/v)fixed enzyme suspension. This is a time frame feasible for industrial consideration. PMID:18553476

  3. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kamei, Yuka; Tai, Akiko; Dakeyama, Shota; Yamamoto, Kaori; Inoue, Yamato; Kishimoto, Yoshifumi; Ohara, Hiroya; Mukai, Yukio, E-mail: y_mukai@nagahama-i-bio.ac.jp

    2015-07-31

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. {sup 1}H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan.

  4. Drying of immobilized yeast cells in a spouted bed dryer with a moving draft tube

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dragan Povrenović

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Brewery yeast cells immobilized in Ca-alginate were dried in a laboratory scale spouted bed with a draft tube.The experiment was conducted under variable temperatures and air flow rates. The temperature and air velocity at the bottom of the column have been varied in the range from 30 to 60 °C and from 6 to 10 m/s in a duration of 60 min. The moisture of dryied particles was in the interval of 10.00 to 21.00 g/g, while the water activity was in the range of 0.40 to 0.45 what ensures the preservation of immobilized yeast as a starter and provides the biological activity of dried particles. A rehidration process of dryied particles proved that dried particles could completely restore their original shape and starting volume, while the mechanical resistance is somewhat reduced. The cells preserved in this way completely restore their catalytical activity after the rehidration.

  5. Transcription factor genes essential for cell proliferation and replicative lifespan in budding yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Many of the lifespan-related genes have been identified in eukaryotes ranging from the yeast to human. However, there is limited information available on the longevity genes that are essential for cell proliferation. Here, we investigated whether the essential genes encoding DNA-binding transcription factors modulated the replicative lifespan of Saccharomyces cerevisiae. Heterozygous diploid knockout strains for FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1 genes showed significantly short lifespan. 1H-nuclear magnetic resonance analysis indicated a characteristic metabolic profile in the Δfhl1/FHL1 mutant. These results strongly suggest that FHL1 regulates the transcription of lifespan related metabolic genes. Thus, heterozygous knockout strains could be the potential materials for discovering further novel lifespan genes. - Highlights: • Involvement of yeast TF genes essential for cell growth in lifespan was evaluated. • The essential TF genes, FHL1, RAP1, REB1, and MCM1, regulate replicative lifespan. • Heterozygous deletion of FHL1 changes cellular metabolism related to lifespan

  6. Highly efficient transformation of intact yeast-like conidium cells of Tremella fuciformis by electroporation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    Tremella fuciformis is one of higher basidiomycetes. Its basidiospore can reproduce yeast-like conidia, also called the blastospore by budding. The yeast-like conidia of T. fuciformis is monokaryotic and easy to culture by submerged fermentation similar to yeast. So it is a good recipient cell for exogenous gene expression. In this study, two expression vectors pGlg-gfp containing gpd-Gl promoter and gfp gene and pGlg-hph containing gpd-Gl promoter and hph gene were constructed. The lowest sensitive concentration of hygromycin for the blastospore was determined on three types of media. Our ex- periments showed that the lowest sensitive concentration of hygromycin for the blastospore was 5 μg/mL on MA medium. The intact blastospores were transformed with the expression vector pGlg-hph by electroporation. The putative transformants were obtained by the MA selective medium. Experi- mental results showed that the most effective parameters for the electroporation of intact blastospores were obtained by using STM buffer, 1.0×108 cells/mL of blastospores, 200 μL in transformation volume, 6 μg plasmid, 2.0 kV/cm of electric pulse voltage, stillness culturing on MB liquid medium for 48 h after electroporation. In these transformation conditions, the efficiency reached 277 colonies/μg DNA. Co-transformation of plasmid pGlg-gfp and pGlg-hph with ratio of 1:1 was performed by electroporation with the optimal parameters. The putative co-transformants were obtained by the MA selective medium. Eight randomly selected colonies from the vast putative co-transformants were analyzed by PCR de- tection and Southern blotting. The experiments showed that the gfp was integrated into the genomes of three transformants. The co-transformation efficiency was 37.5%. Green fluorescence was observed under laser scanning confocal microscope in these gfp positive transformants. This indicates that the exogenous gfp can be expressed effectively in the yeast-like conidia of T. fuciformis.

  7. Construction and Identification of a Yeast Two-Hybrid Bait Vector and Its Effect on the Growth of Yeast Cells and the Self-Activating Function of Reporter Genes for Screening of HPV18 E6-Interacting Protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    梅泉; 李双; 刘萍; 奚玲; 王世宣; 孟玉菡; 刘杰; 杨欣慰; 卢运萍; 汪辉

    2010-01-01

    By using a yeast two-hybrid system,a yeast two-hybrid bait vector was constructed and identified for screening of the HPV18 E6-interacting proteins,and its effects on the growth of yeast cells and the activation of reporter genes were investigated.Total mRNA extracted from Hela cells was reversely transcribed into cDNA.Fragment of HPV18 E6 cDNA was amplified using RT-PCR and directly ligated to the pGBKT7 vector.The recombinant plasmid was confirmed by restriction endonuclease analysis and DNA sequencing.Th...

  8. Simultaneous cell growth and ethanol production from cellulose by an engineered yeast consortium displaying a functional mini-cellulosome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Madan Bhawna

    2011-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recalcitrant nature of cellulosic materials and the high cost of enzymes required for efficient hydrolysis are the major impeding steps to their practical usage for ethanol production. Ideally, a recombinant microorganism, possessing the capability to utilize cellulose for simultaneous growth and ethanol production, is of great interest. We have reported recently the use of a yeast consortium for the functional presentation of a mini-cellulosome structure onto the yeast surface by exploiting the specific interaction of different cohesin-dockerin pairs. In this study, we engineered a yeast consortium capable of displaying a functional mini-cellulosome for the simultaneous growth and ethanol production on phosphoric acid swollen cellulose (PASC. Results A yeast consortium composed of four different populations was engineered to display a functional mini-cellulosome containing an endoglucanase, an exoglucanase and a β-glucosidase. The resulting consortium was demonstrated to utilize PASC for growth and ethanol production. The final ethanol production of 1.25 g/L corresponded to 87% of the theoretical value and was 3-fold higher than a similar yeast consortium secreting only the three cellulases. Quantitative PCR was used to enumerate the dynamics of each individual yeast population for the two consortia. Results indicated that the slight difference in cell growth cannot explain the 3-fold increase in PASC hydrolysis and ethanol production. Instead, the substantial increase in ethanol production is consistent with the reported synergistic effect on cellulose hydrolysis using the displayed mini-cellulosome. Conclusions This report represents a significant step towards the goal of cellulosic ethanol production. This engineered yeast consortium displaying a functional mini-cellulosome demonstrated not only the ability to grow on the released sugars from PASC but also a 3-fold higher ethanol production than a similar yeast

  9. [Cloning and expression of bacteriophage FMV lysocyme gene in cells of yeasts Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kozlov, D G; Cheperigin, S E; Chestkov, A V; Krylov, V N; Tsygankov, Iu D

    2010-03-01

    Cloning, sequencing, and expression of the gene for soluble lysozyme of bacteriophage FMV from Gram-negative Pseudomonas aeruginosa bacteria were conducted in yeast cells. Comparable efficiency of two lysozyme expression variants (as intracellular or secreted proteins) was estimated in cells of Saccharomyces cerevisiae and Pichia pastoris. Under laboratory conditions, yeast S. cerevisiae proved to be more effective producer of phage lysozyme than P. pastoris, the yield of the enzyme in the secreted form being significantly higher than that produced in the intracellular form. PMID:20391778

  10. Discovering aptamers by cell-SELEX against human soluble growth factors ectopically expressed on yeast cell surface.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hsien-Wei Meng

    Full Text Available SELEX, the process of selecting aptamers, is often hampered by the difficulty of preparing target molecules in their native forms and by a lack of a simple yet quantitative assay for monitoring enrichment and affinity of reactive aptamers. In this study, we sought to discover DNA aptamers against human serum markers for potential therapeutic and diagnostic applications. To circumvent soluble expression and immobilization for performing SELEX, we ectopically expressed soluble growth factors on the surface of yeast cells to enable cell-SELEX and devised a flow cytometry-based method to quantitatively monitor progressive enrichment of specific aptamers. High-throughput sequencing of selected pools revealed that the emergence of highly enriched sequences concurred with the increase in the percentage of reactive aptamers shown by flow cytometry. Particularly, selected DNA aptamers against VEGF were specific and of high affinity (K(D  = ∼ 1 nM and demonstrated a potent inhibition of capillary tube formation of endothelial cells, comparable to the effect of a clinically approved anti-VEGF antibody drug, bevacizumab. Considering the fact that many mammalian secretory proteins have been functionally expressed in yeast, the strategy of implementing cell-SELEX and quantitative binding assay can be extended to discover aptamers against a broad array of soluble antigens.

  11. [Hybridization of cells of the same mating type in Saccharomyces yeasts].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Inge-Vechtomov, S G; Repnevskaia, M V; Karpova, T S

    1986-11-01

    The problem of mating-type switches in heterothallic yeast cells was investigated. 93% of non-mating hybrids were obtained in a X a crosses. The hybrids obtained in alpha X alpha crosses expressed alpha-mating type predominantly. Hybrids with no major rearrangements or loss of chromosome III were detected among these hybrids. In the selective system for cytoduction in a X a crosses the significant part of all cytoductants were alpha-maters, i.e. those originated through a----alpha switches. In alpha X alpha crosses alpha cytoductants were predominantly obtained either spontaneously or after UV-irradiation, though the frequency of cytoductants after UV-irradiation exceeded the control value several times. So, we developed the method for selection of mating-type "switchers" (a in equilibrium alpha), avoiding the diploid stage, and demonstrated the possibility of hybridization among the alpha-cells without hereditary changes at the MAT locus.

  12. Expanding xylose metabolism in yeast for plant cell wall conversion to biofuels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xin; Yu, Vivian Yaci; Lin, Yuping; Chomvong, Kulika; Estrela, Raíssa; Park, Annsea; Liang, Julie M; Znameroski, Elizabeth A; Feehan, Joanna; Kim, Soo Rin; Jin, Yong-Su; Glass, N Louise; Cate, Jamie H D

    2015-01-01

    Sustainable biofuel production from renewable biomass will require the efficient and complete use of all abundant sugars in the plant cell wall. Using the cellulolytic fungus Neurospora crassa as a model, we identified a xylodextrin transport and consumption pathway required for its growth on hemicellulose. Reconstitution of this xylodextrin utilization pathway in Saccharomyces cerevisiae revealed that fungal xylose reductases act as xylodextrin reductases, producing xylosyl-xylitol oligomers as metabolic intermediates. These xylosyl-xylitol intermediates are generated by diverse fungi and bacteria, indicating that xylodextrin reduction is widespread in nature. Xylodextrins and xylosyl-xylitol oligomers are then hydrolyzed by two hydrolases to generate intracellular xylose and xylitol. Xylodextrin consumption using a xylodextrin transporter, xylodextrin reductases and tandem intracellular hydrolases in cofermentations with sucrose and glucose greatly expands the capacity of yeast to use plant cell wall-derived sugars and has the potential to increase the efficiency of both first-generation and next-generation biofuel production. PMID:25647728

  13. Starvation induced cell death in autophagy-defective yeast mutants is caused by mitochondria dysfunction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sho W Suzuki

    Full Text Available Autophagy is a highly-conserved cellular degradation and recycling system that is essential for cell survival during nutrient starvation. The loss of viability had been used as an initial screen to identify autophagy-defective (atg mutants of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, but the mechanism of cell death in these mutants has remained unclear. When cells grown in a rich medium were transferred to a synthetic nitrogen starvation media, secreted metabolites lowered the extracellular pH below 3.0 and autophagy-defective mutants mostly died. We found that buffering of the starvation medium dramatically restored the viability of atg mutants. In response to starvation, wild-type (WT cells were able to upregulate components of the respiratory pathway and ROS (reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes, but atg mutants lacked this synthetic capacity. Consequently, autophagy-defective mutants accumulated the high level of ROS, leading to deficient respiratory function, resulting in the loss of mitochondria DNA (mtDNA. We also showed that mtDNA deficient cells are subject to cell death under low pH starvation conditions. Taken together, under starvation conditions non-selective autophagy, rather than mitophagy, plays an essential role in preventing ROS accumulation, and thus in maintaining mitochondria function. The failure of response to starvation is the major cause of cell death in atg mutants.

  14. Cell Surface Interference with Plasma Membrane and Transport Processes in Yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francois, Jean Marie

    2016-01-01

    The wall of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae is a shell of about 120 nm thick, made of two distinct layers, which surrounds the cell. The outer layer is constituted of highly glycosylated proteins and the inner layer is composed of β-glucan and chitin. These two layers are interconnected through covalent linkages leading to a supramolecular architecture that is characterized by physical and chemical properties including rigidity, porosity and biosorption. The later property results from the presence of highly negative charged phosphate and carboxylic groups of the cell wall proteins, allowing the cell wall to act as an efficient barrier to metals ions, toxins and organic compounds. An intimate connection between cell wall and plasma membrane is indicated by the fact that changes in membrane fluidity results in change in cell wall nanomechanical properties. Finally, cell wall contributes to transport processes through the use of dedicated cell wall mannoproteins, as it is the case for Fit proteins implicated in the siderophore-iron bound transport and the Tir/Dan proteins family in the uptake of sterols. PMID:26721269

  15. Components of yeast (Sacchromyces cervisiae) extract as defined media additives that support the growth and productivity of CHO cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spearman, Maureen; Chan, Sarah; Jung, Vince; Kowbel, Vanessa; Mendoza, Meg; Miranda, Vivian; Butler, Michael

    2016-09-10

    Yeast and plant hydrolysates are used as media supplements to support the growth and productivity of CHO cultures for biopharmaceutical production. Through fractionation of a yeast lysate and metabolic analysis of a fraction that had bioactivity equivalent to commercial yeast extract (YE), bioactive components were identified that promoted growth and productivity of two recombinant CHO cell lines (CHO-Luc and CHO-hFcEG2) equivalent to or greater than YE-supplemented media. Autolysis of the yeast lysate was not necessary for full activity, suggesting that the active components are present in untreated yeast cells. A bioactive fraction (3KF) of the yeast lysate was isolated from the permeate using a 3kDa molecular weight cut-off (MWCO) filter. Supplementation of this 3KF fraction into the base media supported growth of CHO-Luc cells over eight passages equivalent to YE-supplemented media. The 3KF fraction was fractionated further by a cation exchange spin column using a stepwise pH elution. Metabolomic analysis of a bioactive fraction isolated at high pH identified several arginine and lysine-containing peptides as well as two polyamines, spermine and spermidine, with 3.5× and 4.5× higher levels compared to a fraction showing no bioactivity. The addition of a mixture of polyamines and their precursors (putrescine, spermine, spermidine, ornithine and citrulline) as well as increasing the concentration of some of the components of the original base medium resulted in a chemically-defined (CD) formulation that produced an equivalent viable cell density (VCD) and productivity of the CHO-Luc cells as the YE-supplemented medium. The VCD of the CHO-hFcEG2 culture in the CD medium was 1.9× greater and with equivalent productivity to the YE-supplemented media.

  16. Physiological analysis of yeast cells by flow cytometry during serial-repitching of low-malt beer fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shioya, Suteaki

    2007-05-01

    At the end of beer brewing fermentation, yeast cells are collected and repitched for economical reasons. Although it is generally accepted that the physiological state of inoculated yeast cells affects their subsequent fermentation performance, the effect of serial-repitching on the physiological state of such yeast cells has not been well clarified. In this study, the fermentation performance of yeast cells during serial-repitching was investigated. After multiple repitchings, the specific growth rate and maximum optical density (OD(660)) decreased, and increases in isoamyl alcohol, which causes an undesirable flavor, and residual free amino acid nitrogen (FAN) concentrations were observed. The physiological state of individual cells before inoculation was characterized by flow cytometry using the fluorescent dyes dehydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) and bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol (OXN). The fluorescence intensities of DHR, an indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROSs), and OXN, which indicates membrane potential, gradually increased as the number of serial-repitching cycles increased. Fluorescence intensity correlated strongly with cell growth. The subsequent fermentation performance can be predicted from this correlation.

  17. Physiological analysis of yeast cells by flow cytometry during serial-repitching of low-malt beer fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kobayashi, Michiko; Shimizu, Hiroshi; Shioya, Suteaki

    2007-05-01

    At the end of beer brewing fermentation, yeast cells are collected and repitched for economical reasons. Although it is generally accepted that the physiological state of inoculated yeast cells affects their subsequent fermentation performance, the effect of serial-repitching on the physiological state of such yeast cells has not been well clarified. In this study, the fermentation performance of yeast cells during serial-repitching was investigated. After multiple repitchings, the specific growth rate and maximum optical density (OD(660)) decreased, and increases in isoamyl alcohol, which causes an undesirable flavor, and residual free amino acid nitrogen (FAN) concentrations were observed. The physiological state of individual cells before inoculation was characterized by flow cytometry using the fluorescent dyes dehydrorhodamine 123 (DHR) and bis-(1,3-dibutylbarbituric acid) trimethine oxonol (OXN). The fluorescence intensities of DHR, an indicator of reactive oxygen species (ROSs), and OXN, which indicates membrane potential, gradually increased as the number of serial-repitching cycles increased. Fluorescence intensity correlated strongly with cell growth. The subsequent fermentation performance can be predicted from this correlation. PMID:17609161

  18. Non-Invasive Green Small Cell Network

    OpenAIRE

    Mawlawi, Baher; Bastug, Ejder; Nerguizian, Chahé; Azarian, Sylvain; Debbah, Mérouane

    2011-01-01

    Future low cost wireless networks are expected to provide high data rates with low power consumption. A dense deployment of distributed small-cells, within the existing network infrastructure, is one of the candidate solutions to achieve this goal. Unfortunately, the aggregate signal resulting from the transmission of these multiples small cells can be considered as an electromagnetic (EM) pollution for passive users who do not carry wireless devices. These users are victim of primary electro...

  19. Characterization of winemaking yeast by cell number-size distribution analysis through flow field-flow fractionation with multi-wavelength turbidimetric detection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zattoni, Andrea; Melucci, Dora; Reschiglian, Pierluigi; Sanz, Ramsés; Puignou, Lluís; Galceran, Maria Teresa

    2004-10-29

    Yeasts are widely used in several areas of food industry, e.g. baking, beer brewing, and wine production. Interest in new analytical methods for quality control and characterization of yeast cells is thus increasing. The biophysical properties of yeast cells, among which cell size, are related to yeast cell capabilities to produce primary and secondary metabolites during the fermentation process. Biophysical properties of winemaking yeast strains can be screened by field-flow fractionation (FFF). In this work we present the use of flow FFF (FlFFF) with turbidimetric multi-wavelength detection for the number-size distribution analysis of different commercial winemaking yeast varieties. The use of a diode-array detector allows to apply to dispersed samples like yeast cells the recently developed method for number-size (or mass-size) analysis in flow-assisted separation techniques. Results for six commercial winemaking yeast strains are compared with data obtained by a standard method for cell sizing (Coulter counter). The method here proposed gives, at short analysis time, accurate information on the number of cells of a given size, and information on the total number of cells.

  20. A newly identified essential complex, Dre2-Tah18, controls mitochondria integrity and cell death after oxidative stress in yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurence Vernis

    Full Text Available A mutated allele of the essential gene TAH18 was previously identified in our laboratory in a genetic screen for new proteins interacting with the DNA polymerase delta in yeast [1]. The present work shows that Tah18 plays a role in response to oxidative stress. After exposure to lethal doses of H(2O(2, GFP-Tah18 relocalizes to the mitochondria and controls mitochondria integrity and cell death. Dre2, an essential Fe/S cluster protein and homologue of human anti-apoptotic Ciapin1, was identified as a molecular partner of Tah18 in the absence of stress. Moreover, Ciapin1 is able to replace yeast Dre2 in vivo and physically interacts with Tah18. Our results are in favour of an oxidative stress-induced cell death in yeast that involves mitochondria and is controlled by the newly identified Dre2-Tah18 complex.

  1. Role of intracellular freezing in the death of cells cooled at supraoptimal rates. [Preservation of erythrocytes, bone marrow cells, and yeasts by freezing

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mazur, P.

    1976-01-01

    Cooling velocity is one of the major factors that determines whether viable cells can be frozen to temperatures that permit indefinite storage. Cooling either too slowly or too rapidly tends to be damaging. Optimum cooling rates are reported for mouse marrow stem cells, yeast, and human red cells.

  2. Gis1 and Rph1 regulate glycerol and acetate metabolism in glucose depleted yeast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakub Orzechowski Westholm

    Full Text Available Aging in organisms as diverse as yeast, nematodes, and mammals is delayed by caloric restriction, an effect mediated by the nutrient sensing TOR, RAS/cAMP, and AKT/Sch9 pathways. The transcription factor Gis1 functions downstream of these pathways in extending the lifespan of nutrient restricted yeast cells, but the mechanisms involved are still poorly understood. We have used gene expression microarrays to study the targets of Gis1 and the related protein Rph1 in different growth phases. Our results show that Gis1 and Rph1 act both as repressors and activators, on overlapping sets of genes as well as on distinct targets. Interestingly, both the activities and the target specificities of Gis1 and Rph1 depend on the growth phase. Thus, both proteins are associated with repression during exponential growth, targeting genes with STRE or PDS motifs in their promoters. After the diauxic shift, both become involved in activation, with Gis1 acting primarily on genes with PDS motifs, and Rph1 on genes with STRE motifs. Significantly, Gis1 and Rph1 control a number of genes involved in acetate and glycerol formation, metabolites that have been implicated in aging. Furthermore, several genes involved in acetyl-CoA metabolism are downregulated by Gis1.

  3. Construction and Immunogenicity Testing of Whole Recombinant Yeast-Based T-Cell Vaccines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    King, Thomas H; Guo, Zhimin; Hermreck, Melanie; Bellgrau, Donald; Rodell, Timothy C

    2016-01-01

    GlobeImmune's Tarmogen(®) immunotherapy platform utilizes recombinant Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast as a vaccine vector to deliver heterologous antigens for activation of disease-specific, targeted cellular immunity. The vaccines elicit immune-mediated killing of target cells expressing viral and cancer antigens in vivo via a CD8(+) CTL-mediated mechanism. Tarmogens are not neutralized by host immune responses and can be administered repeatedly to boost antigen-specific immunity. Production of the vaccines yields stable off-the-shelf products that avoid the need for patient-specific manufacturing found with other immunotherapeutic approaches. Tarmogens for the treatment of chronic hepatitis B and C and various cancers were well tolerated and immunogenic in phase 1 and 2 clinical trials encompassing >600 subjects. The platform is being widely utilized in basic vaccine research and the most rapid path to success in these endeavors follows from optimal immunoassay selection and execution. This chapter provides detailed methods for the construction and preclinical immunogenicity testing of yeast-based immunotherapeutic products to support the rapid and efficient use of this versatile technology. PMID:27076321

  4. The role of the RACK1 ortholog Cpc2p in modulating pheromone-induced cell cycle arrest in fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Magdalena Mos

    Full Text Available The detection and amplification of extracellular signals requires the involvement of multiple protein components. In mammalian cells the receptor of activated C kinase (RACK1 is an important scaffolding protein for signal transduction networks. Further, it also performs a critical function in regulating the cell cycle by modulating the G1/S transition. Many eukaryotic cells express RACK1 orthologs, with one example being Cpc2p in the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe. In contrast to RACK1, Cpc2p has been described to positively regulate, at the ribosomal level, cells entry into M phase. In addition, Cpc2p controls the stress response pathways through an interaction with Msa2p, and sexual development by modulating Ran1p/Pat1p. Here we describe investigations into the role, which Cpc2p performs in controlling the G protein-mediated mating response pathway. Despite structural similarity to Gβ-like subunits, Cpc2p appears not to function at the G protein level. However, upon pheromone stimulation, cells overexpressing Cpc2p display substantial cell morphology defects, disorientation of septum formation and a significantly protracted G1 arrest. Cpc2p has the potential to function at multiple positions within the pheromone response pathway. We provide a mechanistic interpretation of this novel data by linking Cpc2p function, during the mating response, with its previous described interactions with Ran1p/Pat1p. We suggest that overexpressing Cpc2p prolongs the stimulated state of pheromone-induced cells by increasing ste11 gene expression. These data indicate that Cpc2p regulates the pheromone-induced cell cycle arrest in fission yeast by delaying cells entry into S phase.

  5. Enhanced arsenic accumulation by engineered yeast cells expressing Arabidopsis thaliana phytochelatin synthase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Shailendra; Lee, Wonkyu; Dasilva, Nancy A; Mulchandani, Ashok; Chen, Wilfred

    2008-02-01

    Phytochelatins (PCs) are naturally occurring peptides with high-binding capabilities for a wide range of heavy metals including arsenic (As). PCs are enzymatically synthesized by phytochelatin synthases and contain a (gamma-Glu-Cys)(n) moiety terminated by a Gly residue that makes them relatively proteolysis resistant. In this study, PCs were introduced by expressing Arabidopsis thaliana Phytochelatin Synthase (AtPCS) in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae for enhanced As accumulation and removal. PCs production in yeast resulted in six times higher As accumulation as compared to the control strain under a wide range of As concentrations. For the high-arsenic concentration, PCs production led to a substantial decrease in levels of PC precursors such as glutathione (GSH) and gamma-glutamyl cysteine (gamma-EC). The levels of As(III) accumulation were found to be similar between AtPCS-expressing wild type strain and AtPCS-expressing acr3Delta strain lacking the arsenic efflux system, suggesting that the arsenic uptake may become limiting. This is further supported by the roughly 1:3 stoichiometric ratio between arsenic and PC2 (n = 2) level (comparing with a theoretical value of 1:2), indicating an excess availability of PCs inside the cells. However, at lower As(III) concentration, PC production became limiting and an additive effect on arsenic accumulation was observed for strain lacking the efflux system. More importantly, even resting cells expressing AtPCS pre-cultured in Zn(2+) enriched media showed PCs production and two times higher arsenic removal than the control strain. These results open up the possibility of using cells expressing AtPCS as an inexpensive sorbent for the removal of toxic arsenic.

  6. Accumulation of an antidepressant in vesiculogenic membranes of yeast cells triggers autophagy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jingqiu Chen

    Full Text Available Many antidepressants are cationic amphipaths, which spontaneously accumulate in natural or reconstituted membranes in the absence of their specific protein targets. However, the clinical relevance of cellular membrane accumulation by antidepressants in the human brain is unknown and hotly debated. Here we take a novel, evolutionarily informed approach to studying the effects of the selective-serotonin reuptake inhibitor sertraline/Zoloft® on cell physiology in the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae (budding yeast, which lacks a serotonin transporter entirely. We biochemically and pharmacologically characterized cellular uptake and subcellular distribution of radiolabeled sertraline, and in parallel performed a quantitative ultrastructural analysis of organellar membrane homeostasis in untreated vs. sertraline-treated cells. These experiments have revealed that sertraline enters yeast cells and then reshapes vesiculogenic membranes by a complex process. Internalization of the neutral species proceeds by simple diffusion, is accelerated by proton motive forces generated by the vacuolar H(+-ATPase, but is counteracted by energy-dependent xenobiotic efflux pumps. At equilibrium, a small fraction (10-15% of reprotonated sertraline is soluble while the bulk (90-85% partitions into organellar membranes by adsorption to interfacial anionic sites or by intercalation into the hydrophobic phase of the bilayer. Asymmetric accumulation of sertraline in vesiculogenic membranes leads to local membrane curvature stresses that trigger an adaptive autophagic response. In mutants with altered clathrin function, this adaptive response is associated with increased lipid droplet formation. Our data not only support the notion of a serotonin transporter-independent component of antidepressant function, but also enable a conceptual framework for characterizing the physiological states associated with chronic but not acute antidepressant administration in a model

  7. Single cell analysis of yeast replicative aging using a new generation of microfluidic device.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi Zhang

    Full Text Available A major limitation to yeast aging study has been the inability to track mother cells and observe molecular markers during the aging process. The traditional lifespan assay relies on manual micro-manipulation to remove daughter cells from the mother, which is laborious, time consuming, and does not allow long term tracking with high resolution microscopy. Recently, we have developed a microfluidic system capable of retaining mother cells in the microfluidic chambers while removing daughter cells automatically, making it possible to observe fluorescent reporters in single cells throughout their lifespan. Here we report the development of a new generation of microfluidic device that overcomes several limitations of the previous system, making it easier to fabricate and operate, and allowing functions not possible with the previous design. The basic unit of the device consists of microfluidic channels with pensile columns that can physically trap the mother cells while allowing the removal of daughter cells automatically by the flow of the fresh media. The whole microfluidic device contains multiple independent units operating in parallel, allowing simultaneous analysis of multiple strains. Using this system, we have reproduced the lifespan curves for the known long and short-lived mutants, demonstrating the power of the device for automated lifespan measurement. Following fluorescent reporters in single mother cells throughout their lifespan, we discovered a surprising change of expression of the translation elongation factor TEF2 during aging, suggesting altered translational control in aged mother cells. Utilizing the capability of the new device to trap mother-daughter pairs, we analyzed mother-daughter inheritance and found age dependent asymmetric partitioning of a general stress response reporter between mother and daughter cells.

  8. Two isoforms of trimming glucosidase II exist in mammalian tissues and cell lines but not in yeast and insect cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ziak, M; Meier, M; Etter, K S; Roth, J

    2001-01-12

    We previously cloned glucosidase II and provided in vivo evidence for its involvement in protein folding quality control. DNA-sequencing of different clones demonstrated the existence of two isoforms of glucosidase II which differed by 66 nucleotides due to alternative splicing. The existence of two enzyme isoforms in various organs of pig and rat as well as human, bovine, rat, and mouse cell lines could be demonstrated by RT-PCR and Western blotting. Furthermore, the two isoforms of glucosidase II could be detected in embryonic and postnatal rat kidney and liver. In yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, and in insects, Drosophila S2 cells, only one isoforms of the enzyme was detectable. The ubiquitous occurrence of the two glucosidase II isoforms in mammalian tissues and cell lines might be indicative of a special function of each isoform.

  9. A consensus yeast metabolic network reconstruction obtained from a community approach to systems biology

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Herrgård, Markus J.; Swainston, Neil; Dobson, Paul; Dunn, Warwick B.; Arga, K. Yalçin; Arvas, Mikko; Blüthgen, Nils; Borger, Simon; Costenoble, Roeland; Heinemann, Matthias; Hucka, Michael; Novère, Nicolas Le; Li, Peter; Liebermeister, Wolfram; Mo, Monica L.; Oliveira, Ana Paula; Petranovic, Dina; Pettifer, Stephen; Simeonidis, Evangelos; Smallbone, Kieran; Spasić, Irena; Weichart, Dieter; Brent, Roger; Broomhead, David S.; Westerhoff, Hans V.; Kırdar, Betül; Penttilä, Merja; Klipp, Edda; Palsson, Bernhard Ø.; Sauer, Uwe; Oliver, Stephen G.; Mendes, Pedro; Nielsen, Jens; Kell, Douglas B.

    2008-01-01

    Genomic data allow the large-scale manual or semi-automated assembly of metabolic network reconstructions, which provide highly curated organism-specific knowledge bases. Although several genome-scale network reconstructions describe Saccharomyces cerevisiae metabolism, they differ in scope and cont

  10. Effects of Ionizing Radiation and Glutathione Precursor on Antioxidant Enzyme and Cell Survival in Yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jinkyu; Roh, Changhyun; Ryu, Taeho; Park, Jiyoung [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Michael A. [Oxiage Cosmeceutical Research Institute, Virginia (United States)

    2013-05-15

    Cells react to such an induced oxidative stress through scavenging the generated reactive oxygen species to reduce oxidative damage. Antioxidant enzymes such as glutathione peroxidase, catalase, and superoxide dismutase are immediately triggered for reactive oxygen species. N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC), a precursor of glutathione, is one of the antioxidants. The effect of NAC as an antioxidant and/or a cell rescue agent was investigated in the present study. Glutathione (GSH) is the most abundant intracellular thiol, which involves in antioxidant defense via direct interaction with ROS or via activities of detoxication enzymes like glutathione peroxidases (GPx). NAC flowed in the cell is converted to cysteine by deacetylation, that is supplied to the depleted GSH by oxidative stress. NAC prevents the depletion of GSH by radiation, increases the production of GSH, and improves enzymes activity such as GPx and alkaline phosphatase. Cell growth and survivorship and transcriptional level of glutathione gene are analyzed in two yeast strains exposed to combined treatment of NAC with gamma-rays. The effect of NAC on cell growth was measured during 72 hours. The cell growth was hampered by higher concentrations of NAC at stationary phase. NAC, however, didn't affect the cell division at the exponential phase. The survival of the cells decreased with radiation dose. The cell viability of the strain W303-1A was reduced significantly at the low dose (10 and 30 Gy). By comparison, the strain W303-1A was more sensitive to radiation with having a half lethal dose (LD{sub 50}) of about 20 Gy. The quantitative RT-PCR analysis showed that the transcriptional expression of antioxidant enzyme gene GPX1 increased after irradiation while the expression of the gene decreased by the combined treatment of NAC with 100 Gy radiation. The present study shows that NAC can directly scavenge ROS against oxidative stress in vivo. In conclusion, NAC can prevent radiation-induced oxidative

  11. A direct droplet digital PCR method for quantification of residual DNA in protein drugs produced in yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hussain, Musaddeq; Fantuzzo, Rebecca; Mercorelli, Suzanne; Cullen, Constance

    2016-05-10

    Yeast cells, in particular Pichia pastoris, are the host cell of choice for manufacturing several protein therapeutic agents in the biopharmaceutical industry. Host cell DNA is an impurity of such manufacturing process and the residual DNA after the purification process of the drug must be monitored to ensure drug purity and safety. Currently, real-time PCR (qPCR) based methods are widely employed for quantification of host residual DNA. At the same time the digital PCR technology is coming into prominence with promise of higher sensitivity. Here we report a method where the protein drug is directly added to the droplet digital PCR (ddPCR) reaction including yeast-specific primers and fluorescent-tagged probe and nanoliter-sized droplets are generated. The droplets are then subjected to PCR followed by analysis for fluorescence. This Pichia residual DNA direct ddPCR method for yeast can be used to test higher amount of drug compared to the corresponding qPCR method thereby increasing sensitivity, retaining high precision and accuracy and has a wide linear range of determination. The method has been successfully tested with three batches of a recombinant human IgG1-Fc-based drug (RP-1) and with commercially available human insulin, both manufactured in yeast cells. This method simplifies the residual DNA quantification protocol by eliminating DNA extraction or protease digestion and eliminates use of DNA standards in day-to-day running of the method. PMID:26896631

  12. Use of yeast cell wall extract as a tool to reduce the impact of necrotic enteritis in broilers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    M'Sadeq, Shawkat A; Wu, Shu-Biao; Choct, Mingan; Forder, Rebecca; Swick, Robert A

    2015-05-01

    The use of a yeast cell wall extract derived from Saccharomyces cerevisiae (Actigen(®)) has been proposed as an alternative to in-feed antibiotics. This experiment was conducted to investigate the efficacy of yeast cell extract as an alternative to zinc bacitracin or salinomycin using a necrotic enteritis challenge model. A feeding study was conducted using 480-day-old male Ross 308 chicks assigned to 48 floor pens. A 2 × 4 factorial arrangement of treatments was employed. The factors were: challenge (- or +) and feed additive (control, zinc bacitracin at 100/50 mg/kg, yeast cell wall extract at 400/800/200 mg/kg, or salinomycin at 60 mg/kg in starter, grower, and finisher, respectively). Diets based on wheat, sorghum, soybean meal, meat and bone meal, and canola meal were formulated according to the Ross 308 nutrient specifications. Birds were challenged using a previously established protocol (attenuated Eimeria spp oocysts) on d 9 and 10(8) to 10(9) Clostridium perfringens (type A strain EHE-NE18) on d 14 and 15). Challenged and unchallenged birds were partitioned to avoid cross contamination. Challenged birds had lower weight gain, feed intake and livability compared to unchallenged birds on d 24 and d 35 (P enteritis lesion scores in the small intestine sections when compared to unchallenged birds (P enteritis in the current study. This study indicates that yeast cell wall extract has promise as a tool for controlling necrotic enteritis.

  13. Dynamic behaviour of the 'Raman spectroscopic signature of life' in a starving budding yeast cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Complete text of publication follows. In vivo molecular-level information is essentially important for understanding the structure, dynamics and functions of living cells. We use Raman microspectroscopy to single living budding yeast cells under a starving condition and study the dynamic behaviour of the 'Raman spectroscopic signature of life' (Y. Naito et al., J. Raman. Spectrosc., 36 (2005) 837-839. and Y-S. Huang et al., Biochemistry, 44 (2005) 10009-10019.) in relation to the formation and disappearance of a 'dancing body' in a vacuole. A focus is placed on the cell death process and the recovery from it. Our previous studies have shown that, under a starving condition, a dancing body appears suddenly in a vacuole and that the 'Raman spectroscopic signature of life' disappears concomitantly indicating the loss of the mitochondrial metabolic activity. This event is followed by gradual deterioration of the cell structure leading to death. This cell death process was visualized at the molecular level by time-resolved Raman imaging. In the present study, we show strong correlations not only between the appearance of a dancing body and the loss of the mitochondrial activity but also between the disappearance of the dancing body and the recovery of the activity. Time- and space-resolved Raman spectra of a single living budding yeast cell were recorded on a confocal Raman microspectrometer with 632.8 nm line of a He-Ne laser for excitation. The laser power at the sample was about 5 mW. The lateral and depth resolutions were about 300 nm with a 100 x oil immersion objective lens (N.A.=1.3) and about 2 μm with a 100 μm pinhole for a confocal detection. Raman spectra were recorded in the wavenumber range 300 - 1800 cm-1 with a spectral resolution of 3 cm-1. The exposure time was 150 sec. Saccharomyces cerevisiae/ Saccharomyces Bayanus hybrid, strain AJL3062 from, was grown at 30 deg C under a stationary cultivation condition in wort medium. The cells dispersed in 1 ml

  14. Single molecule narrowfield microscopy of protein-DNA binding dynamics in glucose signal transduction of live yeast cells

    CERN Document Server

    Wollman, Adam J M

    2016-01-01

    Single-molecule narrowfield microscopy is a versatile tool to investigate a diverse range of protein dynamics in live cells and has been extensively used in bacteria. Here, we describe how these methods can be extended to larger eukaryotic, yeast cells, which contain sub-cellular compartments. We describe how to obtain single-molecule microscopy data but also how to analyse these data to track and obtain the stoichiometry of molecular complexes diffusing in the cell. We chose glucose mediated signal transduction of live yeast cells as the system to demonstrate these single-molecule techniques as transcriptional regulation is fundamentally a single molecule problem - a single repressor protein binding a single binding site in the genome can dramatically alter behaviour at the whole cell and population level.

  15. The BETA-1, 3-Glucanase of Basidiomycete QM 806: Studies on it's production and application in yeast cell wall hydrolysis

    OpenAIRE

    Ryan, Eleanor

    1986-01-01

    In this project the growth and production of JB-1,3-glucanase by Basidiomycete sp QM 806 was investigated, with a view to studying its application in B-1,3-glucan degradation and in yeast extract production. The effect of various parameters on 3-1 »3-glucanase production was examined. The optimal conditions for enzyme production in submerged shake-flask culture were chosen. Two B-1,3-glucans (laminarin and yeast cell walls) were degraded using the B-1,3-glucanase produced. The degra...

  16. Mapping the Protein-Protein Interactome Networks Using Yeast Two-Hybrid Screens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rajagopala, Seesandra Venkatappa

    2015-01-01

    The yeast two-hybrid system (Y2H) is a powerful method to identify binary protein-protein interactions in vivo. Here we describe Y2H screening strategies that use defined libraries of open reading frames (ORFs) and cDNA libraries. The array-based Y2H system is well suited for interactome studies of small genomes with an existing ORFeome clones preferentially in a recombination based cloning system. For large genomes, pooled library screening followed by Y2H pairwise retests may be more efficient in terms of time and resources, but multiple sampling is necessary to ensure comprehensive screening. While the Y2H false positives can be efficiently reduced by using built-in controls, retesting, and evaluation of background activation; implementing the multiple variants of the Y2H vector systems is essential to reduce the false negatives and ensure comprehensive coverage of an interactome. PMID:26621469

  17. The determination of mother cell-specific mating type of switching in yeast by a specific regulator of HO transcription

    OpenAIRE

    Nasmyth, Kim

    1987-01-01

    In haploid homothallic budding yeast, cell division gives rise to a mother cell which proceeds to switch its mating type and a daughter cell (the bud) which does not. Switching is initiated by a specific double strand cleavage of mating type DNA by an endonuclease encoded by the HO gene. Previous data suggest that the pattern of HO transcription is responsible for the mother cell specificity of switching. HO is transcribed transiently, at START, during the cell cycle of mother cells but not a...

  18. Stress-induced nuclear RNA degradation pathways regulate yeast bromodomain factor 2 to promote cell survival.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kevin Roy

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Bromodomain proteins are key regulators of gene expression. How the levels of these factors are regulated in specific environmental conditions is unknown. Previous work has established that expression of yeast Bromodomain factor 2 (BDF2 is limited by spliceosome-mediated decay (SMD. Here we show that BDF2 is subject to an additional layer of post-transcriptional control through RNase III-mediated decay (RMD. We found that the yeast RNase III Rnt1p cleaves a stem-loop structure within the BDF2 mRNA to down-regulate its expression. However, these two nuclear RNA degradation pathways play distinct roles in the regulation of BDF2 expression, as we show that the RMD and SMD pathways of the BDF2 mRNA are differentially activated or repressed in specific environmental conditions. RMD is hyper-activated by salt stress and repressed by hydroxyurea-induced DNA damage while SMD is inactivated by salt stress and predominates during DNA damage. Mutations of cis-acting signals that control SMD and RMD rescue numerous growth defects of cells lacking Bdf1p, and show that SMD plays an important role in the DNA damage response. These results demonstrate that specific environmental conditions modulate nuclear RNA degradation pathways to control BDF2 expression and Bdf2p-mediated gene regulation. Moreover, these results show that precise dosage of Bromodomain factors is essential for cell survival in specific environmental conditions, emphasizing their importance for controlling chromatin structure and gene expression in response to environmental stress.

  19. Overexpression of stress-related genes enhances cell viability and velum formation in Sherry wine yeasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fierro-Risco, Jesús; Rincón, Ana María; Benítez, Tahía; Codón, Antonio C

    2013-08-01

    Flor formation and flor endurance have been related to ability by Saccharomyces cerevisiae flor yeasts to resist hostile conditions such as oxidative stress and the presence of acetaldehyde and ethanol. Ethanol and acetaldehyde toxicity give rise to formation of reactive oxygen species (ROS) and loss of cell viability. Superoxide dismutases Sod1p and Sod2p and other proteins such as Hsp12p are involved in oxidative stress tolerance. In this study, genes SOD1, SOD2, and HSP12 were overexpressed in flor yeast strains FJF206, FJF414 and B16. In the SOD1 and SOD2 transformant strains superoxide dismutases encoded by genes SOD1 and SOD2 increased their specific activity considerably as a direct result of overexpression of genes SOD1 and SOD2, indirectly, catalase, glutathione reductase, and glutathione peroxidase activities increased too. The HSP12 transformant strains showed higher levels of glutathione peroxidase and reductase activities. These transformant strains showed an increase in intracellular glutathione content, a reduction in peroxidized lipid concentration, and higher resistance to oxidative stress conditions. As a result, flor formation by these strains took place more rapidly than by their parental strains, velum being thicker and with higher percentages of viable cells. In addition, a slight decrease in ethanol and glycerol concentrations, and an increase in acetaldehyde were detected in wines matured under velum formed by transformant strains, as compared to their parental strains. In the industry, velum formed by transformant strains with increased viability may result in acceleration of both metabolism and wine aging, thus reducing time needed for wine maturation. PMID:23553032

  20. Yeast cell wall integrity sensors form specific plasma membrane microdomains important for signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Arlt, Henning; Ungermann, Christian; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae relies on the detection of cell surface stress by five sensors (Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2, Mtl1). Each sensor contains a single transmembrane domain and a highly mannosylated extracellular region, and probably detects mechanical stress in the cell wall or the plasma membrane. We here studied the distribution of the five sensors at the cell surface by using fluorescently tagged variants in conjunction with marker proteins for established membrane compartments. We find that each of the sensors occupies a specific microdomain at the plasma membrane. The novel punctate 'membrane compartment occupied by Wsc1' (MCW) shows moderate overlap with other Wsc-type sensors, but not with those of the Mid-type sensors or other established plasma membrane domains. We further observed that sensor density and formation of the MCW compartment depends on the cysteine-rich head group near the N-terminus of Wsc1. Yet, signalling capacity depends more on the sensor density in the plasma membrane than on clustering within its microcompartment. We propose that the MCW microcompartment provides a quality control mechanism for retaining functional sensors at the plasma membrane to prevent them from endocytosis. PMID:27337501

  1. Yeast cell wall integrity sensors form specific plasma membrane microdomains important for signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kock, Christian; Arlt, Henning; Ungermann, Christian; Heinisch, Jürgen J

    2016-09-01

    The cell wall integrity (CWI) pathway of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae relies on the detection of cell surface stress by five sensors (Wsc1, Wsc2, Wsc3, Mid2, Mtl1). Each sensor contains a single transmembrane domain and a highly mannosylated extracellular region, and probably detects mechanical stress in the cell wall or the plasma membrane. We here studied the distribution of the five sensors at the cell surface by using fluorescently tagged variants in conjunction with marker proteins for established membrane compartments. We find that each of the sensors occupies a specific microdomain at the plasma membrane. The novel punctate 'membrane compartment occupied by Wsc1' (MCW) shows moderate overlap with other Wsc-type sensors, but not with those of the Mid-type sensors or other established plasma membrane domains. We further observed that sensor density and formation of the MCW compartment depends on the cysteine-rich head group near the N-terminus of Wsc1. Yet, signalling capacity depends more on the sensor density in the plasma membrane than on clustering within its microcompartment. We propose that the MCW microcompartment provides a quality control mechanism for retaining functional sensors at the plasma membrane to prevent them from endocytosis.

  2. Selective inhibition of purified human phosphodiesterase 4A expressed in yeast cell GL62 by ciclamilast, piclamilast, and rolipram

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jun-chun CHEN; Ji-qiang CHEN; Qiang-min Xie; Yi-liang ZHU

    2004-01-01

    AIM: To improve the specific activity of human phosphodiesterase 4A (PDE4A) expressed in yeast cell GL62 and investigate the effects of selective phosphodiesterase 4 (PDE4) inhibitors (ciclamilast, piclamilast, and rolipram),selective phosphodiesterase 5 (PDES) inhibitor zaprinast, and cyclooxygenase (COX) inhibitors (aspirin, indomethacin)on human PDE4A activity expressed in yeast cell GL62. METHODS: Human PDE4A was expressed in yeast cell GL62 after CuSO4 induction and the specific activity of human PDE4A was improved by ammonium sulfate fractionation, DEAE Sephadex A-50 chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 chromatography. The activity of PDE4A was measured by high performance liquid chromatography (HPLC). RESULTS: Induced PDE4A activity expressed in crude yeast cell GL62 supernatant and pellet was (340±21) nmol.g-1.min-1 and (250±25) nmol.g-1.min-lrespectively. The specific activity of recombinant PDE4A in supernatant was improved 6.4 fold. Ciclamilast,piclamilast, and rolipram could inhibit PDE4A activity. The ICs0 values (95 % confidence limits) of ciclamilast,piclamilast, and rolipram were 1.27 (0.84-1.91), 66.4 (33.3-132.2), and 3.73 (2.51-5.53) μmol/L respectively.Zaprinast, aspirin, and indomethacin had no obvious inhibitory effect on PDE4A activity. CONCLUSION: The specific activity of PDE4A expressed in yeast cell GL62 can be improved by ammonium sulfate fractionation,DEAE Sephadex A-50 chromatography, and Sephadex G-100 chromatography. Ciclamilast, piclamilast, and rolipram can inhibit PDE4A activity while zaprinast, aspirin, and indomethacin have no obvious inhibitory effect on PDE4A activity. Human PDE4A expressed in GL62 might be useful in the research and screening of new selective PDE4 inhibitors.

  3. A Nonlinear Mixed Effects Approach for Modeling the Cell-To-Cell Variability of Mig1 Dynamics in Yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Joachim Almquist

    Full Text Available The last decade has seen a rapid development of experimental techniques that allow data collection from individual cells. These techniques have enabled the discovery and characterization of variability within a population of genetically identical cells. Nonlinear mixed effects (NLME modeling is an established framework for studying variability between individuals in a population, frequently used in pharmacokinetics and pharmacodynamics, but its potential for studies of cell-to-cell variability in molecular cell biology is yet to be exploited. Here we take advantage of this novel application of NLME modeling to study cell-to-cell variability in the dynamic behavior of the yeast transcription repressor Mig1. In particular, we investigate a recently discovered phenomenon where Mig1 during a short and transient period exits the nucleus when cells experience a shift from high to intermediate levels of extracellular glucose. A phenomenological model based on ordinary differential equations describing the transient dynamics of nuclear Mig1 is introduced, and according to the NLME methodology the parameters of this model are in turn modeled by a multivariate probability distribution. Using time-lapse microscopy data from nearly 200 cells, we estimate this parameter distribution according to the approach of maximizing the population likelihood. Based on the estimated distribution, parameter values for individual cells are furthermore characterized and the resulting Mig1 dynamics are compared to the single cell times-series data. The proposed NLME framework is also compared to the intuitive but limited standard two-stage (STS approach. We demonstrate that the latter may overestimate variabilities by up to almost five fold. Finally, Monte Carlo simulations of the inferred population model are used to predict the distribution of key characteristics of the Mig1 transient response. We find that with decreasing levels of post-shift glucose, the transient

  4. Single Cell Oil Producing Yeasts Lipomyces starkeyi and Rhodosporidium toruloides: Selection of Extraction Strategies and Biodiesel Property Prediction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nemailla Bonturi

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Single cell oils (SCOs are considered potential raw material for the production of biodiesel. Rhodosporidium sp. and Lipomyces sp. are good candidates for SCO production. Lipid extractability differs according to yeast species and literature on the most suitable method for each oleaginous yeast species is scarce. This work aimed to investigate the efficiency of the most cited strategies for extracting lipids from intact and pretreated cells of Rhodosporidium toruloides and Lipomyces starkeyi. Lipid extractions were conducted using hexane or combinations of chloroform and methanol. The Folch method resulted in the highest lipid yields for both yeasts (42% for R. toruloides and 48% for L. starkeyi. Also, this method eliminates the cell pretreatment step. The Bligh and Dyer method underestimated the lipid content in the tested strains (25% for R. toruloides and 34% for L. starkeyi. Lipid extractability increased after acid pretreatment for the Pedersen, hexane, and Bligh and Dyer methods. For R. toruloides unexpected fatty acid methyl esters (FAME composition were found for some lipid extraction strategies tested. Therefore, this work provides useful information for analytical and process development aiming at biodiesel production from the SCO of these two yeast species.

  5. Zinc up-regulated the expression of the rice metallonthionein gene family and enhanced the zinc tolerance of yeast cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2007-01-01

    Northern blot and functional complementation assay were employed to analyze the effects of zinc on expression of ten rice metallothionein genes (OsMT-Is) in rice seedlings and the growth of yeast cells transformed with OsMT-Is. Northern blot revealed that in shoots of the rice seedlings treated with different Zn2+ concentrations, expression of most members of OsMT-I family was increased, except the type 4 OsMT-Is (OsMT-I-4a, 4b and 4c). In roots, Zn2+ significantly increased the transcription of OsMT-I-1b and OsMT-I-2c, but reduced the trascription of OsMT-I-1a and OsMT-I-3a. When these ten cDNAs were heterologously expressed in zinc sensitive yeast mutant, all transgenic yeasts showed increased tolerance to Zn2+, and zinc accumulation in these yeast cells also increased.These indicated that OsMT-I family members might respond to extra Zn2+, and they could enhance Zn2+ tolerance of cells by direct binding Zn2+.

  6. H/KDEL receptors mediate host cell intoxication by a viral A/B toxin in yeast

    Science.gov (United States)

    Becker, Björn; Blum, Andrea; Gießelmann, Esther; Dausend, Julia; Rammo, Domenik; Müller, Nina C.; Tschacksch, Emilia; Steimer, Miriam; Spindler, Jenny; Becherer, Ute; Rettig, Jens; Breinig, Frank; Schmitt, Manfred J.

    2016-01-01

    A/B toxins such as cholera toxin, Pseudomonas exotoxin and killer toxin K28 contain a KDEL-like amino acid motif at one of their subunits which ensures retrograde toxin transport through the secretory pathway of a target cell. As key step in host cell invasion, each toxin binds to distinct plasma membrane receptors that are utilized for cell entry. Despite intensive efforts, some of these receptors are still unknown. Here we identify the yeast H/KDEL receptor Erd2p as membrane receptor of K28, a viral A/B toxin carrying an HDEL motif at its cell binding β-subunit. While initial toxin binding to the yeast cell wall is unaffected in cells lacking Erd2p, binding to spheroplasts and in vivo toxicity strongly depend on the presence of Erd2p. Consistently, Erd2p is not restricted to membranes of the early secretory pathway but extends to the plasma membrane where it binds and internalizes HDEL-cargo such as K28 toxin, GFPHDEL and Kar2p. Since human KDEL receptors are fully functional in yeast and restore toxin sensitivity in the absence of endogenous Erd2p, toxin uptake by H/KDEL receptors at the cell surface might likewise contribute to the intoxication efficiency of A/B toxins carrying a KDEL-motif at their cytotoxic A-subunit(s). PMID:27493088

  7. Endocytic Ark/Prk kinases play a critical role in adriamycin resistance in both yeast and mammalian cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Tsutomu; Furuchi, Takemitsu; Naganuma, Akira

    2006-12-15

    To elucidate the mechanism of acquired resistance to Adriamycin, we searched for genes that, when overexpressed, render Saccharomyces cerevisiae resistant to Adriamycin. We identified AKL1, a gene of which the function is unknown but is considered, nonetheless, to be a member of the Ark/Prk kinase family, which is involved in the regulation of endocytosis, on the basis of its deduced amino acid sequence. Among tested members of the Ark/Prk kinase family (Ark1, Prk1, and Akl1), overexpressed Prk1 also conferred Adriamycin resistance on yeast cells. Prk1 is known to dissociate the Sla1/Pan1/End3 complex, which is involved in endocytosis, by phosphorylating Sla1 and Pan1 in the complex. We showed that Akl1 promotes phosphorylation of Pan1 in this complex and reduces the endocytic ability of the cell, as does Prk1. Sla1- and End3-defective yeast cells were also resistant to Adriamycin and overexpression of Akl1 in these defective cells did not increase the degree of Adriamycin resistance, suggesting that Akl1 might reduce Adriamycin toxicity by reducing the endocytic ability of cells via a mechanism that involves the Sla1/Pan1/End3 complex and the phosphorylation of Pan1. We also found that HEK293 cells that overexpressed AAK1, a member of the human Ark/Prk family, were Adriamycin resistant. Our findings suggest that endocytosis might be involved in the mechanism of Adriamycin toxicity in yeast and human cells.

  8. Evaluation of the sensitivity of bacterial and yeast cells to cold atmospheric plasma jet treatments.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharkey, Michael A; Chebbi, Ahmed; McDonnell, Kevin A; Staunton, Claire; Dowling, Denis P

    2015-01-01

    The focus of this research was first to determine the influence of the atmospheric plasma drive frequency on the generation of atomic oxygen species and its correlation with the reduction of bacterial load after treatment in vitro. The treatments were carried out using a helium-plasma jet source called PlasmaStream™. The susceptibility of multiple microbial cell lines was investigated in order to compare the response of gram-positive and gram-negative bacteria, as well as a yeast cell line to the atmospheric plasma treatment. It was observed for the source evaluated that at a frequency of 160 kHz, increased levels of oxygen-laden active species (i.e., OH, NO) were generated. At this frequency, the maximum level of bacterial inactivation in vitro was also achieved. Ex vivo studies (using freshly excised porcine skin as a human analog) were also carried out to verify the antibacterial effect of the plasma jet treatment at this optimal operational frequency and to investigate the effect of treatment duration on the reduction of bacterial load. The plasma jet treatment was found to yield a 4 log reduction in bacterial load after 6 min of treatment, with no observable adverse effects on the treatment surface. The gram-negative bacterial cell lines were found to be far more susceptible to the atmospheric plasma treatments than the gram-positive bacteria. Flow cytometric analysis of plasma treated bacterial cells (Escherichia coli) was conducted in order to attain a fundamental understanding of the mode of action of the treatment on bacteria at a cellular level. This study showed that after treatment with the plasma jet, E. coli cells progressed through the following steps of cell death; the inactivation of transport systems, followed by depolarization of the cytoplasmic membrane, and finally permeabilization of the cell wall.

  9. 31P NMR measurements of the ADP concentration in yeast cells genetically modified to express creatine kinase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rabbit muscle creatine kinase has been introduced into the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by transforming cells with a multicopy plasmid containing the coding sequence for the enzyme under the control of the yeast phosphoglycerate kinase promoter. The transformed cells showed creating kinase activities similar to those found in mammalian heart muscle. 31P NMR measurements of the near-equilibrium concentrations of phosphocreatine and cellular pH together with measurements of the total extractable concentrations of phosphocreatine and creatine allowed calculation of the free ADP/ATP ratio in the cell. The calculated ratio of approximately 2 was considerably higher than the ratio of between 0.06 and 0.1 measured directly in cell extracts

  10. Modification of aflatoxin B1 and ochratoxin A toxicokinetics in rats administered a yeast cell wall preparation

    OpenAIRE

    Firmin, Stéphane; Gandia, Peggy; Morgavi, Diego Pablo; Houin, Georges; Jouany, JP; Bertin, Gérard; Boudra, Hamid

    2010-01-01

    Abstract The cell wall of Saccharomyces cerevisiae can bind mycotoxins in vitro but there is scarce information on whether this property decreases the absorption of mycotoxins in vivo. The effect of a yeast cell wall preparation (YCW) on toxicokinetics and balance excretion (urine and faeces) of aflatoxin B1 (AFB1) and ochratoxin A (OTA) was tested in rats after oral administration of each toxin. The 3H-labelled mycotoxins were used at low doses. Co-administration of YCW with AF...

  11. Psychrotrophic yeast Yarrowia lipolytica NCYC 789 mediates the synthesis of antimicrobial silver nanoparticles via cell-associated melanin

    OpenAIRE

    Apte, Mugdha; Sambre, Devashree; Gaikawad, Shital; Joshi, Swanand; Bankar, Ashok; Kumar, Ameeta Ravi; Zinjarde, Smita

    2013-01-01

    A psychrotrophic marine strain of the ascomycetous yeast Yarrowia lipolytica (NCYC 789) synthesized silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) in a cell-associated manner. These nanostructures were characterized by UV-Visible spectroscopy and scanning electron microscope-energy dispersive spectrometer (SEM-EDS) analysis. The brown pigment (melanin) involved in metal-interactions was obtained from the cells. This extracted pigment also mediated the synthesis of silver nanoparticles that were characterized b...

  12. The Bioeffects Resulting from Prokaryotic Cells and Yeast Being Exposed to an 18 GHz Electromagnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, The Hong Phong; Pham, Vy T H; Nguyen, Song Ha; Baulin, Vladimir; Croft, Rodney J; Phillips, Brian; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which various biological effects are triggered by exposure to an electromagnetic field are not fully understood and have been the subject of debate. Here, the effects of exposing typical representatives of the major microbial taxa to an 18 GHz microwave electromagnetic field (EMF)were studied. It appeared that the EMF exposure induced cell permeabilisation in all of the bacteria and yeast studied, while the cells remained viable (94% throughout the exposure), independent of the differences in cell membrane fatty acid and phospholipid composition. The resulting cell permeabilisation was confirmed by detection of the uptake of propidium iodine and 23 nm fluorescent silica nanospheres using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Upon EMF exposure, the bacterial cell membranes are believed to become permeable through quasi-endocytosis processes. The dosimetry analysis revealed that the EMF threshold level required to induce the uptake of the large (46 nm) nanopsheres was between three and six EMF doses, with a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 3 kW/kg and 5 kW/kg per exposure, respectively, depending on the bacterial taxa being studied. It is suggested that the taxonomic affiliation and lipid composition (e.g. the presence of phosphatidyl-glycerol and/or pentadecanoic fatty acid) may affect the extent of uptake of the large nanospheres (46 nm). Multiple 18 GHz EMF exposures over a one-hour period induced periodic anomalous increases in the cell growth behavior of two Staphylococcus aureus strains, namely ATCC 25923 and CIP 65.8T. PMID:27391488

  13. The Bioeffects Resulting from Prokaryotic Cells and Yeast Being Exposed to an 18 GHz Electromagnetic Field

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pham, Vy T. H.; Nguyen, Song Ha; Baulin, Vladimir; Croft, Rodney J.; Phillips, Brian; Crawford, Russell J.

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which various biological effects are triggered by exposure to an electromagnetic field are not fully understood and have been the subject of debate. Here, the effects of exposing typical representatives of the major microbial taxa to an 18 GHz microwave electromagnetic field (EMF)were studied. It appeared that the EMF exposure induced cell permeabilisation in all of the bacteria and yeast studied, while the cells remained viable (94% throughout the exposure), independent of the differences in cell membrane fatty acid and phospholipid composition. The resulting cell permeabilisation was confirmed by detection of the uptake of propidium iodine and 23 nm fluorescent silica nanospheres using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Upon EMF exposure, the bacterial cell membranes are believed to become permeable through quasi-endocytosis processes. The dosimetry analysis revealed that the EMF threshold level required to induce the uptake of the large (46 nm) nanopsheres was between three and six EMF doses, with a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 3 kW/kg and 5 kW/kg per exposure, respectively, depending on the bacterial taxa being studied. It is suggested that the taxonomic affiliation and lipid composition (e.g. the presence of phosphatidyl-glycerol and/or pentadecanoic fatty acid) may affect the extent of uptake of the large nanospheres (46 nm). Multiple 18 GHz EMF exposures over a one-hour period induced periodic anomalous increases in the cell growth behavior of two Staphylococcus aureus strains, namely ATCC 25923 and CIP 65.8T. PMID:27391488

  14. The Bioeffects Resulting from Prokaryotic Cells and Yeast Being Exposed to an 18 GHz Electromagnetic Field.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nguyen, The Hong Phong; Pham, Vy T H; Nguyen, Song Ha; Baulin, Vladimir; Croft, Rodney J; Phillips, Brian; Crawford, Russell J; Ivanova, Elena P

    2016-01-01

    The mechanisms by which various biological effects are triggered by exposure to an electromagnetic field are not fully understood and have been the subject of debate. Here, the effects of exposing typical representatives of the major microbial taxa to an 18 GHz microwave electromagnetic field (EMF)were studied. It appeared that the EMF exposure induced cell permeabilisation in all of the bacteria and yeast studied, while the cells remained viable (94% throughout the exposure), independent of the differences in cell membrane fatty acid and phospholipid composition. The resulting cell permeabilisation was confirmed by detection of the uptake of propidium iodine and 23 nm fluorescent silica nanospheres using transmission electron microscopy (TEM) and confocal laser scanning microscopy (CLSM). Upon EMF exposure, the bacterial cell membranes are believed to become permeable through quasi-endocytosis processes. The dosimetry analysis revealed that the EMF threshold level required to induce the uptake of the large (46 nm) nanopsheres was between three and six EMF doses, with a specific absorption rate (SAR) of 3 kW/kg and 5 kW/kg per exposure, respectively, depending on the bacterial taxa being studied. It is suggested that the taxonomic affiliation and lipid composition (e.g. the presence of phosphatidyl-glycerol and/or pentadecanoic fatty acid) may affect the extent of uptake of the large nanospheres (46 nm). Multiple 18 GHz EMF exposures over a one-hour period induced periodic anomalous increases in the cell growth behavior of two Staphylococcus aureus strains, namely ATCC 25923 and CIP 65.8T.

  15. REAL-Select: full-length antibody display and library screening by surface capture on yeast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura Rhiel

    Full Text Available We describe a novel approach named REAL-Select for the non-covalent display of IgG-molecules on the surface of yeast cells for the purpose of antibody engineering and selection. It relies on the capture of secreted native full-length antibodies on the cell surface via binding to an externally immobilized ZZ domain, which tightly binds antibody Fc. It is beneficial for high-throughput screening of yeast-displayed IgG-libraries during antibody discovery and development. In a model experiment, antibody-displaying yeast cells were isolated from a 1:1,000,000 mixture with control cells confirming the maintenance of genotype-phenotype linkage. Antibodies with improved binding characteristics were obtained by affinity maturation using REAL-Select, demonstrating the ability of this system to display antibodies in their native form and to detect subtle changes in affinity by flow cytometry. The biotinylation of the cell surface followed by functionalization with a streptavidin-ZZ fusion protein is an approach that is independent of the genetic background of the antibody-producing host and therefore can be expected to be compatible with other eukaryotic expression hosts such as P. pastoris or mammalian cells.

  16. Encoding network states by striatal cell assemblies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrillo-Reid, Luis; Tecuapetla, Fatuel; Tapia, Dagoberto; Hernández-Cruz, Arturo; Galarraga, Elvira; Drucker-Colin, René; Bargas, José

    2008-03-01

    Correlated activity in cortico-basal ganglia circuits plays a key role in the encoding of movement, associative learning and procedural memory. How correlated activity is assembled by striatal microcircuits is not understood. Calcium imaging of striatal neuronal populations, with single-cell resolution, reveals sporadic and asynchronous activity under control conditions. However, N-methyl-d-aspartate (NMDA) application induces bistability and correlated activity in striatal neurons. Widespread neurons within the field of observation present burst firing. Sets of neurons exhibit episodes of recurrent and synchronized bursting. Dimensionality reduction of network dynamics reveals functional states defined by cell assemblies that alternate their activity and display spatiotemporal pattern generation. Recurrent synchronous activity travels from one cell assembly to the other often returning to the original assembly; suggesting a robust structure. An initial search into the factors that sustain correlated activity of neuronal assemblies showed a critical dependence on both intrinsic and synaptic mechanisms: blockage of fast glutamatergic transmission annihilates all correlated firing, whereas blockage of GABAergic transmission locked the network into a single dominant state that eliminates assembly diversity. Reduction of L-type Ca(2+)-current restrains synchronization. Each cell assembly comprised different cells, but a small set of neurons was shared by different assemblies. A great proportion of the shared neurons was local interneurons with pacemaking properties. The network dynamics set into action by NMDA in the striatal network may reveal important properties of striatal microcircuits under normal and pathological conditions. PMID:18184883

  17. Monitoring Intracellular pH Change with a Genetically Encoded and Ratiometric Luminescence Sensor in Yeast and Mammalian Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yunfei; Robertson, J Brian; Xie, Qiguang; Johnson, Carl Hirschie

    2016-01-01

    "pHlash" is a novel bioluminescence-based pH sensor for measuring intracellular pH, which is developed based on Bioluminescence Resonance Energy Transfer (BRET). pHlash is a fusion protein between a mutant of Renilla luciferase (RLuc) and a Venus fluorophore. The spectral emission of purified pHlash protein exhibits pH dependence in vitro. When expressed in either yeast or mammalian cells, pHlash reports basal pH and cytosolic acidification. In this chapter, we describe an in vitro characterization of pHlash, and also in vivo assays including in yeast cells and in HeLa cells using pHlash as a cytoplasmic pH indicator. PMID:27424899

  18. Monitoring the osmotic response of single yeast cells through force measurement in the environmental scanning electron microscope

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    We present a measurement system that combines an environmental scanning electron microscope (ESEM) and an atomic force microscope (AFM). This combination enables studies of static and dynamic mechanical properties of hydrated specimens, such as individual living cells. The integrated AFM sensor provides direct and continuous force measurement based on piezoresistive force transduction, allowing the recording of events in the millisecond range. The in situ ESEM-AFM setup was used to study Pichia pastoris wild-type yeast cells. For the first time, a quantified measure of the osmotic response of an individual yeast cell inside an ESEM is presented. With this technique, cell size changes due to humidity variations can be monitored with nanometre accuracy. In addition, mechanical properties were extracted from load–displacement curves. A Young's modulus of 13–15 MPa was obtained for the P. pastoris yeast cells. The developed method is highly interesting as a complementary tool for the screening of drugs directed towards cellular water transport activity and provides new possibilities of studying mechanosensitive regulation of aquaporins. (paper)

  19. L-Lactate-selective microbial sensor based on flavocytochrome b2-enriched yeast cells using recombinant and nanotechnology approaches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karkovska, Maria; Smutok, Oleh; Stasyuk, Nataliya; Gonchar, Mykhailo

    2015-11-01

    In the recent years, nanotechnology is the most developing branch due to a wide variety of potential applications in biomedical, biotechnological and agriculture fields. The binding nanoparticles with various biological molecules makes them attractive candidates for using in sensor technologies. The particularly actual is obtaining the bionanomembranes based on biocatalytic elements with improved sensing characteristics. The aim of this investigation is to study the properties of microbial L-lactate-selective sensor based on using the recombinant Hansenula polymorpha yeast cells overproducing flavocytochrome b2 (FC b2), as well as additionally enriched by the enzyme bound with gold nanoparticles (FC b2-nAu). Although, the high permeability of the living cells to nanoparticles is being intensively studied (mostly for delivery of drugs), the idea of using both recombinant technology and nanotechnology to increase the amount of the target enzyme in the biosensing layer is really novel. The FC b2-nAu-enriched living and permeabilized yeast cells were used for construction of a bioselective membrane of microbial L-lactate-selective amperometric biosensor. Phenazine methosulphate was served as a free defusing electron transfer mediator which provides effective electron transfer from the reduced enzyme to the electrode surface. It was shown that the output to L-lactate of FC b2-nAu-enriched permeabilized yeast cells is 2.5-fold higher when compared to the control cells. The obtained results confirm that additional enrichment of the recombinant yeast cell by the enzyme bound with nanoparticles improves the analytical parameters of microbial sensor.

  20. Biphenyl Phytoalexin in Sorbus pohuashanensis Suspension Cell Induced by Yeast Extract

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liangyun Zhou

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Biphenyls are unique phytoalexins de novo synthesized in plants in response to pathogen attack. These compounds are found in Maloideae, a subfamily of the Rosaceae. The anti-microbial activities of biphenyls have been reported in a number of studies and they appear to represent an important defense strategy against pathogens common in the Maloideae, such as species in Malus, Pyrus, Sorbus, and Chaenomeles. Here, cell suspension cultures of Sorbus pohuashanensis were established to study biphenyl phytoalexins formation after yeast extract (YE treatment. An ultra-performance liquid chromatography (UPLC method coupled with quadrupole time of flight mass spectrometry (Q-TOF-MS LC−MS/MS was applied to determine the time course of these biphenyl biomarkers accumulation in YE-treated S. pohuashanensis suspension cells. The results of quantitative analyses show the content of Noraucuparin, 2′-Hydroxyaucuparin, and their glycosides initially increased, then decreased over time. The Noraucuparin content reached its highest (225.76 μg·g−1 at 18 h after treatment, 6 hours earlier than that of Noraucuparin 5-O-β-d-glucopyranoside. The content of 2′-Hydroxyaucuparin reached its highest (422.75 μg·g−1 at 30 h after treatment, also earlier than that of its glycoside. The understanding of phytoalexin metabolism in this study may provide a basis for improving Maloideae resistance to pathogens.

  1. "Omics" of Selenium Biology: A Prospective Study of Plasma Proteome Network Before and After Selenized-Yeast Supplementation in Healthy Men.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sinha, Indu; Karagoz, Kubra; Fogle, Rachel L; Hollenbeak, Christopher S; Zea, Arnold H; Arga, Kazim Y; Stanley, Anne E; Hawkes, Wayne C; Sinha, Raghu

    2016-04-01

    Low selenium levels have been linked to a higher incidence of cancer and other diseases, including Keshan, Chagas, and Kashin-Beck, and insulin resistance. Additionally, muscle and cardiovascular disorders, immune dysfunction, cancer, neurological disorders, and endocrine function have been associated with mutations in genes encoding for selenoproteins. Selenium biology is complex, and a systems biology approach to study global metabolomics, genomics, and/or proteomics may provide important clues to examining selenium-responsive markers in circulation. In the current investigation, we applied a global proteomics approach on plasma samples collected from a previously conducted, double-blinded placebo controlled clinical study, where men were supplemented with selenized-yeast (Se-Yeast; 300 μg/day, 3.8 μmol/day) or placebo-yeast for 48 weeks. Proteomic analysis was performed by iTRAQ on 8 plasma samples from each arm at baseline and 48 weeks. A total of 161 plasma proteins were identified in both arms. Twenty-two proteins were significantly altered following Se-Yeast supplementation and thirteen proteins were significantly changed after placebo-yeast supplementation in healthy men. The differentially expressed proteins were involved in complement and coagulation pathways, immune functions, lipid metabolism, and insulin resistance. Reconstruction and analysis of protein-protein interaction network around selected proteins revealed several hub proteins. One of the interactions suggested by our analysis, PHLD-APOA4, which is involved in insulin resistance, was subsequently validated by Western blot analysis. Our systems approach illustrates a viable platform for investigating responsive proteomic profile in 'before and after' condition following Se-Yeast supplementation. The nature of proteins identified suggests that selenium may play an important role in complement and coagulation pathways, and insulin resistance. PMID:27027327

  2. Flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins interaction network: a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screen

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Canard Bruno

    2011-10-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The genus Flavivirus encompasses more than 50 distinct species of arthropod-borne viruses, including several major human pathogens, such as West Nile virus, yellow fever virus, Japanese encephalitis virus and the four serotypes of dengue viruses (DENV type 1-4. Each year, flaviviruses cause more than 100 million infections worldwide, some of which lead to life-threatening conditions such as encephalitis or haemorrhagic fever. Among the viral proteins, NS3 and NS5 proteins constitute the major enzymatic components of the viral replication complex and are essential to the flavivirus life cycle. Results We report here the results of a high-throughput yeast two-hybrid screen to identify the interactions between human host proteins and the flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins. Using our screen results and literature curation, we performed a global analysis of the NS3 and NS5 cellular targets based on functional annotation with the Gene Ontology features. We finally created the first flavivirus NS3 and NS5 proteins interaction network and analysed the topological features of this network. Our proteome mapping screen identified 108 human proteins interacting with NS3 or NS5 proteins or both. The global analysis of the cellular targets revealed the enrichment of host proteins involved in RNA binding, transcription regulation, vesicular transport or innate immune response regulation. Conclusions We proposed that the selective disruption of these newly identified host/virus interactions could represent a novel and attractive therapeutic strategy in treating flavivirus infections. Our virus-host interaction map provides a basis to unravel fundamental processes about flavivirus subversion of the host replication machinery and/or immune defence strategy.

  3. A Systematic Analysis of Cell Cycle Regulators in Yeast Reveals That Most Factors Act Independently of Cell Size to Control Initiation of Division

    OpenAIRE

    Scott A Hoose; Jeremy A Rawlings; Kelly, Michelle M.; M Camille Leitch; Ababneh, Qotaiba O; Robles, Juan P.; David Taylor; Hoover, Evelyn M.; Bethel Hailu; McEnery, Kayla A.; S Sabina Downing; Deepika Kaushal; Yi Chen; Alex Rife; Kirtan A Brahmbhatt

    2012-01-01

    Upstream events that trigger initiation of cell division, at a point called START in yeast, determine the overall rates of cell proliferation. The identity and complete sequence of those events remain unknown. Previous studies relied mainly on cell size changes to identify systematically genes required for the timely completion of START. Here, we evaluated panels of non-essential single gene deletion strains for altered DNA content by flow cytometry. This analysis revealed that most gene dele...

  4. Beta-glucan-depleted, glycopeptide-rich extracts from Brewer's and Baker's yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) lower interferon-gamma production by stimulated human blood cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, Roderick; Dias, Daniel A; Jayasinghe, Nirupama; Roessner, Ute; Bennett, Louise E

    2016-04-15

    Regulation of the human immune system requires controlled pro- and anti-inflammatory responses for host defence against infection and disease states. Yeasts (Saccharomyces cerevisiae), as used in brewing and baking, are mostly known for ability to stimulate the human immune-system predominantly reflecting the pro-inflammatory cell wall β-glucans. However, in this study, using food-compatible processing methods, glycopeptide-enriched and β-glucan-depleted products were each prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeasts, which suppressed production of interferon-γ (IFN-γ) in human whole blood cell assay, signifying that anti-inflammatory factors are also present in yeast. Anti-inflammatory bioactivities of products prepared from Brewer's and Baker's yeast were compared with the commercial yeast product, Epicor®. While unfractionated Epicor was inactive, the C18 resin-binding fractions of Brewer's and Baker's yeast products and Epicor dose-dependently lowered IFN-γ, demonstrating that Epicor also contained both pro-inflammatory (β-glucans) and anti-inflammatory components. Anti-inflammatory activity was attributed to C18 resin-binding species glyco-peptides in Epicor and experimental yeast products. This study demonstrated that pro- and anti-inflammatory factors could be resolved and enriched in yeasts by suitable processing, with potential to improve specific activities.

  5. Engineered yeast whole-cell biocatalyst for direct degradation of alginate from macroalgae and production of non-commercialized useful monosaccharide from alginate.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takagi, Toshiyuki; Yokoi, Takahiro; Shibata, Toshiyuki; Morisaka, Hironobu; Kuroda, Kouichi; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi

    2016-02-01

    Alginate is a major component of brown macroalgae. In macroalgae, an endolytic alginate lyase first degrades alginate into oligosaccharides. These oligosaccharides are further broken down into monosaccharides by an exolytic alginate lyase. In this study, genes encoding various alginate lyases derived from alginate-assimilating marine bacterium Saccharophagus degradans were isolated, and their enzymes were displayed using the yeast cell surface display system. Alg7A-, Alg7D-, and Alg18J-displaying yeasts showed endolytic alginate lyase activity. On the other hand, Alg7K-displaying yeast showed exolytic alginate lyase activity. Alg7A, Alg7D, Alg7K, and Alg18J, when displayed on yeast cell surface, demonstrated both polyguluronate lyase and polymannuronate lyase activities. Additionally, polyguluronic acid could be much easily degraded by Alg7A, Alg7K, and Alg7D than polymannuronic acid. In contrast, polymannuronic acid could be much easily degraded by Alg18J than polyguluronic acid. We further constructed yeasts co-displaying endolytic and exolytic alginate lyases. Degradation efficiency by the co-displaying yeasts were significantly higher than single alginate lyase-displaying yeasts. Alg7A/Alg7K co-displaying yeast had maximum alginate degrading activity, with production of 1.98 g/L of reducing sugars in a 60-min reaction. This system developed, along with our findings, will contribute to the efficient utilization and production of useful and non-commercialized monosaccharides from alginate by Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:26490549

  6. RNA interference regulates the cell cycle checkpoint through the RNA export factor, Ptr1, in fission yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Highlights: ► RNAi is linked to the cell cycle checkpoint in fission yeast. ► Ptr1 co-purifies with Ago1. ► The ptr1-1 mutation impairs the checkpoint but does not affect gene silencing. ► ago1+ and ptr1+ regulate the cell cycle checkpoint via the same pathway. ► Mutations in ago1+ and ptr1+ lead to the nuclear accumulation of poly(A)+ RNAs. -- Abstract: Ago1, an effector protein of RNA interference (RNAi), regulates heterochromatin silencing and cell cycle arrest in fission yeast. However, the mechanism by which Ago1 controls cell cycle checkpoint following hydroxyurea (HU) treatment has not been elucidated. In this study, we show that Ago1 and other RNAi factors control cell cycle checkpoint following HU treatment via a mechanism independent of silencing. While silencing requires dcr1+, the overexpression of ago1+ alleviated the cell cycle defect in dcr1Δ. Ago1 interacted with the mRNA export factor, Ptr1. The ptr1-1 mutation impaired cell cycle checkpoint but gene silencing was unaffected. Genetic analysis revealed that the regulation of cell cycle checkpoint by ago1+ is dependent on ptr1+. Nuclear accumulation of poly(A)+ RNAs was detected in mutants of ago1+ and ptr1+, suggesting there is a functional link between the cell cycle checkpoint and RNAi-mediated RNA quality control.

  7. Characterization of the minimum domain required for targeting budding yeast myosin II to the site of cell division

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tolliday Nicola J

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background All eukaryotes with the exception of plants use an actomyosin ring to generate a constriction force at the site of cell division (cleavage furrow during mitosis and meiosis. The structure and filament forming abilities located in the C-terminal or tail region of one of the main components, myosin II, are important for localising the molecule to the contractile ring (CR during cytokinesis. However, it remains poorly understood how myosin II is recruited to the site of cell division and how this recruitment relates to myosin filament assembly. Significant conservation between species of the components involved in cytokinesis, including those of the CR, allows the use of easily genetically manipulated organisms, such as budding yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, in the study of cytokinesis. Budding yeast has a single myosin II protein, named Myo1. Unlike most other class II myosins, the tail of Myo1 has an irregular coiled coil. In this report we use molecular genetics, biochemistry and live cell imaging to characterize the minimum localisation domain (MLD of budding yeast Myo1. Results We show that the MLD is a small region in the centre of the tail of Myo1 and that it is both necessary and sufficient for localisation of Myo1 to the yeast bud neck, the pre-determined site of cell division. Hydrodynamic measurements of the MLD, purified from bacteria or yeast, show that it is likely to exist as a trimer. We also examine the importance of a small region of low coiled coil forming probability within the MLD, which we call the hinge region. Removal of the hinge region prevents contraction of the CR. Using fluorescence recovery after photobleaching (FRAP, we show that GFP-tagged MLD is slightly more dynamic than the GFP-tagged full length molecule but less dynamic than the GFP-tagged Myo1 construct lacking the hinge region. Conclusion Our results define the intrinsic determinant for the localization of budding yeast myosin II and show

  8. The small GTPase Rab5 homologue Ypt5 regulates cell morphology, sexual development, ion-stress response and vacuolar formation in fission yeast

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tsukamoto, Yuta; Katayama, Chisako [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Shinohara, Miki; Shinohara, Akira [Institute for Protein Research, Osaka University, 3-2 Yamadaoka, Suita, Osaka 565-0871 (Japan); Maekawa, Shohei [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Miyamoto, Masaaki, E-mail: miya@kobe-u.ac.jp [Graduate School of Science, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan); Center for Supports to Research and Education Activities, Kobe University, 1-1 Rokkodai-cho Nada, Kobe 657-8501 (Japan)

    2013-11-29

    Highlights: •Multiple functions of Rab5 GTPase in fission yeast were found. •Roles of Rab5 in fission yeast were discussed. •Relation between Rab5 and actin cytoskeleton were discussed. -- Abstract: Inner-membrane transport is critical to cell function. Rab family GTPases play an important role in vesicle transport. In mammalian cells, Rab5 is reported to be involved in the regulation of endosome formation, phagocytosis and chromosome alignment. Here, we examined the role of the fission yeast Rab5 homologue Ypt5 using a point mutant allele. Mutant cells displayed abnormal cell morphology, mating, sporulation, endocytosis, vacuole fusion and responses to ion stress. Our data strongly suggest that fission yeast Rab5 is involved in the regulation of various types of cellular functions.

  9. Immunogenic evaluation of Paracoccidioides brasiliensis radioattenuated yeast cells in murine model

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis (PCM), a chronic systemic disease prevalent in Latin American, which is characterized by the formation of granulomatous lesions. To date, there is no effective vaccine to PCM or to any systemic mycosis. In an attempt to induce an efficient response to such agent in an animal model, gamma radiation attenuated P. brasiliensis yeast cells (LevRad) were developed at the Radiobiology Laboratory from CDTN/CNEN. A gamma radiation dose was defined in which the pathogen loses its ability to multiply, while retaining its viability, metabolic activity and antigenic profile. The prophylactic potential of LevRad was assessed after its intravenous administration in male Balb/C mice, challenged 45 days after immunization with intratracheal administration of 3x105 cells of a highly virulent non-radiated P.brasiliensis isolate. At 30 and 90 days post challenge (dpc), lungs, spleen and liver were collected to analyse CFU (colony forming units) recovery, histology, cell proliferation, cytokine (IFN-gamma, IL-4, IL-10, TNF-alpha and TGF-beta) and iNOS production. The sera were used to evaluate the immunization efficacy, and to assess IgG isotypes (IgG1, IgG2a, IgG2b, IgG3) and total IgG levels. The present data show that there was no significant decrease in the CFU counts of the lungs of immunized animals 30 dpc. Nevertheless, no CFU or histopathological alterations were visualized at the organs of immunized animals at 90 dpc. During the same period, IgG2a, IgG2b, IFN-alpha and iNOS levels raised while IL-10, TNF-alpha, TGF-beta and IL-4 maintained low levels, suggesting the prevalence of Th1 response profile. Our results confirmed the protective (author)

  10. Forces in yeast flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    El-Kirat-Chatel, Sofiane; Beaussart, Audrey; Vincent, Stéphane P.; Abellán Flos, Marta; Hols, Pascal; Lipke, Peter N.; Dufrêne, Yves F.

    2015-01-01

    In the baker's yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, cell-cell adhesion (``flocculation'') is conferred by a family of lectin-like proteins known as the flocculin (Flo) proteins. Knowledge of the adhesive and mechanical properties of flocculins is important for understanding the mechanisms of yeast adhesion, and may help controlling yeast behaviour in biotechnology. We use single-molecule and single-cell atomic force microscopy (AFM) to explore the nanoscale forces engaged in yeast flocculation, focusing on the role of Flo1 as a prototype of flocculins. Using AFM tips labelled with mannose, we detect single flocculins on Flo1-expressing cells, showing they are widely exposed on the cell surface. When subjected to force, individual Flo1 proteins display two distinct force responses, i.e. weak lectin binding forces and strong unfolding forces reflecting the force-induced extension of hydrophobic tandem repeats. We demonstrate that cell-cell adhesion bonds also involve multiple weak lectin interactions together with strong unfolding forces, both associated with Flo1 molecules. Single-molecule and single-cell data correlate with microscale cell adhesion behaviour, suggesting strongly that Flo1 mechanics is critical for yeast flocculation. These results favour a model in which not only weak lectin-sugar interactions are involved in yeast flocculation but also strong hydrophobic interactions resulting from protein unfolding.

  11. Clausmarin A, Potential Immunosuppressant Revealed by Yeast-Based Assay and Interleukin-2 Production Assay in Jurkat T Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pitipreya Suauam

    Full Text Available Small-molecule inhibitors of Ca2+-signaling pathways are of medicinal importance, as exemplified by the immunosuppressants FK506 and cyclosporin A. Using a yeast-based assay devised for the specific detection of Ca2+-signaling inhibitors, clausmarin A, a previously reported terpenoid coumarin, was identified as an active substance. Here, we investigated the likely mechanism of clausmarin A action in yeast and Jurkat T-cells. In the presence of 100 mM CaCl2 in the growth medium of Ca2+-sensitive Δzds1 strain yeast, clausmarin A exhibited a dose-dependent alleviation of various defects due to hyperactivation of Ca2+ signaling, such as growth inhibition, polarized bud growth and G2 phase cell-cycle arrest. Furthermore, clausmarin A inhibited the growth of Δmpk1 (lacking the Mpk1 MAP kinase pathway but not Δcnb1 (lacking the calcineurin pathway strain, suggesting that clausmarin A inhibited the calcineurin pathway as presumed from the synthetic lethality of these pathways. Furthermore, clausmarin A alleviated the serious defects of a strain expressing a constitutively active form of calcineurin. In the human Jurkat T-cell line, clausmarin A exhibited a dose-dependent inhibition of IL-2 production and IL-2 gene transcription, as well as an inhibition of NFAT dephosphorylation. The effects of clausmarin A observed in both yeast and Jurkat cells are basically similar to those of FK506. Our study revealed that clausmarin A is an inhibitor of the calcineurin pathway, and that this is probably mediated via inhibition of calcineurin phosphatase activity. As such, clausmarin A is a potential immunosuppressant.

  12. Application of microbial electrolysis cells to treat spent yeast from an alcoholic fermentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sosa-Hernández, Ornella; Popat, Sudeep C; Parameswaran, Prathap; Alemán-Nava, Gibrán Sidney; Torres, César I; Buitrón, Germán; Parra-Saldívar, Roberto

    2016-01-01

    Spent yeast (SY), a major challenge for the brewing industry, was treated using a microbial electrolysis cell to recover energy. Concentrations of SY from bench alcoholic fermentation and ethanol were tested, ranging from 750 to 1500mgCOD/L and 0 to 2400mgCOD/L respectively. COD removal efficiency (RE), coulombic efficiency (CE), coulombic recovery (CR), hydrogen production and current density were evaluated. The best treatment condition was 750mgCOD/LSY+1200mgCOD/L ethanol giving higher COD RE, CE, CR (90±1%, 90±2% and 81±1% respectively), as compared with 1500mgCOD/LSY (76±2%, 63±7% and 48±4% respectively); ethanol addition was significantly favorable (p value=0.011), possibly due to electron availability and SY autolysis. 1500mgCOD/LSY+1200mgCOD/L ethanol achieved higher current density (222.0±31.3A/m(3)) and hydrogen production (2.18±0.66 [Formula: see text] ) but with lower efficiencies (87±2% COD RE, 71.0±.4% CE). Future work should focus on electron sinks, acclimation and optimizing SY breakdown. PMID:26512857

  13. Use of yeast cell walls and Yucca schidigera extract in layer hens’ diets

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasemin Oznurlu

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available This research was conducted to determine the impact of diet supplementation with yeast cell walls (YCW and Yucca schidigera extract (YE on performance, egg weight, specific gravity, body weight, and intestinal tissue hist­ology in layer hens. White, 48-week-old, Hy-line hybrid hens (n=320 were divided into four main groups, each comprising eight groups of 10 hens: (1 control, (2 500 mg/kg YCW added, (3 500 mg/kg YE added and (4 250 mg/kg YE plus 2500 mg/kg YCW added. While the egg production and feed intake of the hens was significantly affected, overall feed efficiency, damaged-egg ratio, dirty-egg ratio, egg weight and specific gravity did not differ between the control group and the YCW, YE or YCW+YE groups. Final body weight was higher in the YCW, YE and YCW+YE groups than in the control group. There were differences in the width, muscle layer thickness and height/crypt depth ratio of the duodenal villus and the width of the ileal villus among the four groups. It can be concluded that YCW and YCW+YE supplementation for layer hens are beneficial for egg production.

  14. Pseudouridine profiling reveals regulated mRNA pseudouridylation in yeast and human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlile, Thomas M; Rojas-Duran, Maria F; Zinshteyn, Boris; Shin, Hakyung; Bartoli, Kristen M; Gilbert, Wendy V

    2014-11-01

    Post-transcriptional modification of RNA nucleosides occurs in all living organisms. Pseudouridine, the most abundant modified nucleoside in non-coding RNAs, enhances the function of transfer RNA and ribosomal RNA by stabilizing the RNA structure. Messenger RNAs were not known to contain pseudouridine, but artificial pseudouridylation dramatically affects mRNA function--it changes the genetic code by facilitating non-canonical base pairing in the ribosome decoding centre. However, without evidence of naturally occurring mRNA pseudouridylation, its physiological relevance was unclear. Here we present a comprehensive analysis of pseudouridylation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae and human RNAs using Pseudo-seq, a genome-wide, single-nucleotide-resolution method for pseudouridine identification. Pseudo-seq accurately identifies known modification sites as well as many novel sites in non-coding RNAs, and reveals hundreds of pseudouridylated sites in mRNAs. Genetic analysis allowed us to assign most of the new modification sites to one of seven conserved pseudouridine synthases, Pus1-4, 6, 7 and 9. Notably, the majority of pseudouridines in mRNA are regulated in response to environmental signals, such as nutrient deprivation in yeast and serum starvation in human cells. These results suggest a mechanism for the rapid and regulated rewiring of the genetic code through inducible mRNA modifications. Our findings reveal unanticipated roles for pseudouridylation and provide a resource for identifying the targets of pseudouridine synthases implicated in human disease.

  15. Endometritis therapy in sows by intra uterine instillation of yeast cell wall solution

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lazarević M.

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available On the basis of our investigations it was possible to conclude that intrauterine treatment of sows with puerperal uterine infections with sterile YCW (Yeast Cell Wall resulted in significant clinical improvement. The percent of recidivism was the lowest (10% in groups of sows treated with 10 and 20 g of YCW. The degree of bacterial CFU (Colony Forming Units reduction in samples of sows uterine flushings following instillation of YCW (5, 10 and 20 g was wery high and ranged from 1361 to 1444 times, while in sows treated with Lotagen 2% solution (100 mL this parametar was only 32. At the moment of weaning, piglets from sows treated with 10 and 20 g of YCW were heavier when compared to the control and Lotagen group and their DBWG (Daily Body Weight Gain was higher when compared to the Lotagen and control group. Treatment of sows by IU instillation of YCW did not influence the number of piglets in the next breeding cycle.

  16. Dissecting Germ Cell Metabolism through Network Modeling.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Leanne S Whitmore

    Full Text Available Metabolic pathways are increasingly postulated to be vital in programming cell fate, including stemness, differentiation, proliferation, and apoptosis. The commitment to meiosis is a critical fate decision for mammalian germ cells, and requires a metabolic derivative of vitamin A, retinoic acid (RA. Recent evidence showed that a pulse of RA is generated in the testis of male mice thereby triggering meiotic commitment. However, enzymes and reactions that regulate this RA pulse have yet to be identified. We developed a mouse germ cell-specific metabolic network with a curated vitamin A pathway. Using this network, we implemented flux balance analysis throughout the initial wave of spermatogenesis to elucidate important reactions and enzymes for the generation and degradation of RA. Our results indicate that primary RA sources in the germ cell include RA import from the extracellular region, release of RA from binding proteins, and metabolism of retinal to RA. Further, in silico knockouts of genes and reactions in the vitamin A pathway predict that deletion of Lipe, hormone-sensitive lipase, disrupts the RA pulse thereby causing spermatogenic defects. Examination of other metabolic pathways reveals that the citric acid cycle is the most active pathway. In addition, we discover that fatty acid synthesis/oxidation are the primary energy sources in the germ cell. In summary, this study predicts enzymes, reactions, and pathways important for germ cell commitment to meiosis. These findings enhance our understanding of the metabolic control of germ cell differentiation and will help guide future experiments to improve reproductive health.

  17. Evaluation of single cell oil (SCO) from a tropical marine yeast Yarrowia lipolytica NCIM 3589 as a potential feedstock for biodiesel

    OpenAIRE

    Katre, Gouri; Joshi, Chirantan; Khot, Mahesh; Zinjarde, Smita; RaviKumar, Ameeta

    2012-01-01

    Single cell oils (SCOs) accumulated by oleaginous yeasts have emerged as potential alternative feedstocks for biodiesel production. As lipid accumulation is species and substrate specific, selection of an appropriate strain is critical. Five strains of Y. lipolytica, a known model oleaginous yeast, were investigated to explore their potential for biodiesel production when grown on glucose and inexpensive wastes. All the strains were found to accumulate > 20% (w/w) of their dry cell mass as li...

  18. Yeast Extract and Silver Nitrate Induce the Expression of Phenylpropanoid Biosynthetic Genes and Induce the Accumulation of Rosmarinic Acid in Agastache rugosa Cell Culture

    OpenAIRE

    Woo Tae Park; Mariadhas Valan Arasu; Naif Abdullah Al-Dhabi; Sun Kyung Yeo; Jin Jeon; Jong Seok Park; Sook Young Lee; Sang Un Park

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of yeast extract and silver nitrate on the enhancement of phenylpropanoid pathway genes and accumulation of rosmarinic acid in Agastache rugosa cell cultures. The treatment of cell cultures with yeast extract (500 mg/L) and silver nitrate (30 mg/L) for varying times enhanced the expression of genes in the phenylpropanoid pathway and the production of rosmarinic acid. The results indicated that the expression of RAS and HPPR was proportional to t...

  19. Reconstruction of the yeast protein-protein interaction network involved in nutrient sensing and global metabolic regulation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nandy, Subir Kumar; Jouhten, Paula; Nielsen, Jens

    2010-01-01

    proteins. Despite the value of BioGRID for studying protein-protein interactions, there is a need for manual curation of these interactions in order to remove false positives. RESULTS: Here we describe an annotated reconstruction of the protein-protein interactions around four key nutrient......) and 779 protein-protein interactions. A number of proteins were identified having interactions with more than one of the protein kinases. The fully reconstructed interaction network includes all the information available in separate databases for all the proteins included in the network (nodes......) and for all the interactions between them (edges). The annotated information is readily available utilizing the functionalities of network modelling tools such as Cytoscape and CellDesigner. CONCLUSIONS: The reported fully annotated interaction model serves as a platform for integrated systems biology studies...

  20. Analysis of the structural integrity of YACs comprising human immunoglobulin genes in yeast and in embryonic stem cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mendez, M.J.; Abderrahim, H.; Noguchi, M. [Cell Genesys, Inc., Foster City, CA (United States)] [and others

    1995-03-20

    With the goal of creating a strain of mice capable of producing human antibodies, we are cloning and reconstructing the human immunoglobulin germline repertoire in yeast artificial chromosomes (YACs). We describe the identification of YACs containing variable and constant region sequences from the human heavy chain (IgH) and kappa light chain (IgK) loci and the characterization of their integrity in yeast and in mouse embryonic stem (ES) cells. The IgH locus-derived YAC contains five variable (V{sub H}) genes, the major diversity (D) gene cluster, the joining (J{sub H}) genes, the intronic enhancer (E{sub H}), and the constant region genes, mu (C{mu}) and delta (C{delta}). Two IgK locus-derived YACs each contain three variable (V{kappa}) genes, the joining (J{kappa}) region, the intronic enhancer (E{kappa}), the constant gene (C{kappa}), and the kappa deleting element (kde). The IgH YAC was unstable in yeast, generating a variety of deletion derivatives, whereas both IgK YACs were stable. YACs encoding heavy chain and kappa light chain, retrofitted with the mammalian selectable marker, hypoxanthine phosphoribosyltransferase (HPRT), were each introduced into HPRT-deficient mouse ES cells. Analysis of YAC integrity in ES cell lines revealed that the majority of DNA inserts were integrated in substantially intact form. 78 refs., 7 figs.

  1. Modeling brewers' yeast flocculation

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Hamersveld EH; van der Lans RG; Caulet; Luyben

    1998-02-01

    Flocculation of yeast cells occurs during the fermentation of beer. Partway through the fermentation the cells become flocculent and start to form flocs. If the environmental conditions, such as medium composition and fluid velocities in the tank, are optimal, the flocs will grow in size large enough to settle. After settling of the main part of the yeast the green beer is left, containing only a small amount of yeast necessary for rest conversions during the next process step, the lagering. The physical process of flocculation is a dynamic equilibrium of floc formation and floc breakup resulting in a bimodal size distribution containing single cells and flocs. The floc size distribution and the single cell amount were measured under the different conditions that occur during full scale fermentation. Influences on flocculation such as floc strength, specific power input, and total number of yeast cells in suspension were studied. A flocculation model was developed, and the measured data used for validation. Yeast floc formation can be described with the collision theory assuming a constant collision efficiency. The breakup of flocs appears to occur mainly via two mechanisms, the splitting of flocs and the erosion of yeast cells from the floc surface. The splitting rate determines the average floc size and the erosion rate determines the number of single cells. Regarding the size of the flocs with respect to the scale of turbulence, only the viscous subrange needs to be considered. With the model, the floc size distribution and the number of single cells can be predicted at a certain point during the fermentation. For this, the bond strength between the cells, the fractal dimension of the yeast, the specific power input in the tank and the number of yeast cells that are in suspension in the tank have to be known. Copyright 1998 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  2. Dynamic Metabolic Footprinting Reveals the Key Components of Metabolic Network in Yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Chumnanpuen, Pramote; Hansen, Michael Adsetts Edberg; Smedsgaard, Jørn;

    2014-01-01

    Metabolic footprinting offers a relatively easy approach to exploit the potentials of metabolomics for phenotypic characterization of microbial cells. To capture the highly dynamic nature of metabolites, we propose the use of dynamic metabolic footprinting instead of the traditional method which...

  3. Microtubule networks for plant cell division.

    Science.gov (United States)

    de Keijzer, Jeroen; Mulder, Bela M; Janson, Marcel E

    2014-09-01

    During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of a cell is divided to form two daughter cells. In animal cells, the existing plasma membrane is first constricted and then abscised to generate two individual plasma membranes. Plant cells on the other hand divide by forming an interior dividing wall, the so-called cell plate, which is constructed by localized deposition of membrane and cell wall material. Construction starts in the centre of the cell at the locus of the mitotic spindle and continues radially towards the existing plasma membrane. Finally the membrane of the cell plate and plasma membrane fuse to form two individual plasma membranes. Two microtubule-based cytoskeletal networks, the phragmoplast and the pre-prophase band (PPB), jointly control cytokinesis in plants. The bipolar microtubule array of the phragmoplast regulates cell plate deposition towards a cortical position that is templated by the ring-shaped microtubule array of the PPB. In contrast to most animal cells, plants do not use centrosomes as foci of microtubule growth initiation. Instead, plant microtubule networks are striking examples of self-organizing systems that emerge from physically constrained interactions of dispersed microtubules. Here we will discuss how microtubule-based activities including growth, shrinkage, severing, sliding, nucleation and bundling interrelate to jointly generate the required ordered structures. Evidence mounts that adapter proteins sense the local geometry of microtubules to locally modulate the activity of proteins involved in microtubule growth regulation and severing. Many of the proteins and mechanisms involved have roles in other microtubule assemblies as well, bestowing broader relevance to insights gained from plants. PMID:25136380

  4. 2-DG induced modulation of chromosomal DNA profile, cell survival, mutagenesis and gene conversion in x-irradiated yeast

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Effect of post-irradiation modulation in presence of 2-deoxy-D-glucose and yeast extract, on chromosomal DNA profile, cell survival, reverse mutation (ILV+) and gene conversion (TRP+), were studied in x-irradiated stationary phase yeast cells (diploid strain D7 of Saccharomyces cerevisiae). The damage and repair in chromosomal DNA bands, resolved by using contour clamped homogeneous electric pulsed-field gel electrophoresis (PFGE) technique, was estimated by calculating intensity ratio, Ρn (Ρn=In/It; where In is the intensity of nth band in a lane and It is the sum of intensities of all bands and the well in the lane). The data indicate linear correlation between relative compactness (τ) of a chromosome [chromosome size (Kb)/length of synaptonemal complex (μm)[ and DNA damage and repair. The chromosome repair kinetics were biphasic, showing initial decrease followed by an increase in Ρn. Variations were observed among different chromosomes with respect to DNA damage, repair and post-irradiation repair modulation. 2-DG inhibited both components of chromosomal DNA repair and also repair of potentially lethal damage but enhanced frequencies of mutants. Relatively the effects on revertants were greater in cells irradiated with lower doses (50 Gy) of x-rays and post-irradiation incubation in presence of phosphate buffer having 2-DG (50 mM) and glucose (10 mM). Yeast extract increased frequencies of revertants and convertants thus promoting error-prone DNA repair. Yeast extract in combination with 2-DG showed complex effects on chromosomal DNA repair and enhanced mutagenesis further. (author). 35 refs., 8 figs., 1 tab

  5. Extraction of cell surface-associated proteins from living yeast cells.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    F.M. Klis; M. de Jong; S. Brul; P.W.J. de Groot

    2007-01-01

    To extract cell surface-associated proteins from living fungal cells, reducing agents such as beta-mercaptoethanol and dithiothreitol are often used. We show here that both compounds are moderately lipophilic and may perturb the plasma membrane, thus causing the release of cytosolic proteins, especi

  6. Distinct centromere domain structures with separate functions demonstrated in live fission yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Appelgren, Henrik; Kniola, Barbara; Ekwall, Karl

    2003-10-01

    Fission yeast (Saccharomyces pombe) centromere DNA is organized in a central core region flanked on either side by a region of outer repeat (otr) sequences. The otr region is known to be heterochromatic and bound by the Swi6 protein whereas the central core region contains an unusual chromatin structure involving the histone H3 variant Cnp1 (S. pombe CENP-A). The central core is the base for formation of the kinetochore structure whereas the flanking region is important for sister centromere cohesion. We have previously shown that the ultrastructural domain structure of S. pombe centromeres in interphase is similar to that of human centromeres. Here we demonstrate that S. pombe centromeres are organized in cytologically distinct domains even in mitosis. Fluorescence in situ hybridization of fixed metaphase cells revealed that the otr regions of the centromere were still held together by cohesion even after the sister kinetochores had separated. In live cells, the central cores and kinetochores of sister chromosomes could be distinguished from one another when they were subjected to mitotic tension. The function of the different centromeric domains was addressed. Transacting mutations affecting the kinetochore (nuf2) central core domain (mis6) and the heterochromatin domain (rik1) were analyzed in live cells. In interphase, both nuf2 and mis6 caused declustering of centromeres from the spindle pole body whereas centromere clustering was normal in rik1 despite an apparent decondensation defect. The declustering of centromeres in mis6 cells correlated with loss the Ndc80 kinetochore marker protein from the centromeres. Interestingly the declustered centromeres were still restricted to the nuclear periphery thus revealing a kinetochore-independent peripheral localization mechanism for heterochromatin. Time-lapse microscopy of live mis6 and nuf2-1 mutant cells in mitosis showed similar severe misaggregation phenotypes whereas the rik1 mutants showed a mild cohesion

  7. Stoichiometric network reconstruction and analysis of yeast sphingolipid metabolism incorporating different states of hydroxylation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kavun Ozbayraktar, Fatma Betul; Ulgen, Kutlu O

    2011-04-01

    The first elaborate metabolic model of Saccharomyces cerevisiae sphingolipid metabolism was reconstructed in silico. The model considers five different states of sphingolipid hydroxylation, rendering it unique among other models. It is aimed to clarify the significance of hydroxylation on sphingolipids and hence to interpret the preferences of the cell between different metabolic pathway branches under different stress conditions. The newly constructed model was validated by single, double and triple gene deletions with experimentally verified phenotypes. Calcium sensitivity and deletion mutations that may suppress calcium sensitivity were examined by CSG1 and CSG2 related deletions. The model enabled the analysis of complex sphingolipid content of the plasma membrane coupled with diacylglycerol and phosphatidic acid biosynthesis and ATP consumption in in silico cell. The flux data belonging to these critically important key metabolites are integrated with the fact of phytoceramide induced cell death to propose novel potential drug targets for cancer therapeutics. In conclusion, we propose that IPT1, GDA1, CSG and AUR1 gene deletions may be novel candidates of drug targets for cancer therapy according to the results of flux balance and variability analyses coupled with robustness analysis.

  8. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori B Huberman

    Full Text Available Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells.

  9. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberman, Lori B; Murray, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells.

  10. In vitro formation of the anthranoid scaffold by cell-free extracts from yeast-extract-treated Cassia bicapsularis cell cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdel-Rahman, Iman A M; Beuerle, Till; Ernst, Ludger; Abdel-Baky, Afaf M; Desoky, Ezz El-Din K; Ahmed, Amany S; Beerhues, Ludger

    2013-04-01

    The anthranoid skeleton is believed to be formed by octaketide synthase (OKS), a member of the type III polyketide synthase (PKS) superfamily. Recombinant OKSs catalyze stepwise condensation of eight acetyl units to form a linear octaketide intermediate which, however, is incorrectly folded and cyclized to give the shunt products SEK4 and SEK4b. Here we report in vitro formation of the anthranoid scaffold by cell-free extracts from yeast-extract-treated Cassia bicapsularis cell cultures. Unlike field- and in vitro-grown shoots which accumulate anthraquinones, cell cultures mainly contained tetrahydroanthracenes, formation of which was increased 2.5-fold by the addition of yeast extract. The elicitor-stimulated accumulation of tetrahydroanthracenes was preceded by an approx. 35-fold increase in OKS activity. Incubation of cell-free extracts from yeast-extract-treated cell cultures with acetyl-CoA and [2-(14)C]malonyl-CoA led to formation of torosachrysone (tetrahydroanthracene) and emodin anthrone, beside two yet unidentified products. No product formation occurred in the absence of acetyl-CoA as starter substrate. To confirm the identities of the enzymatic products, cell-free extracts were incubated with acetyl-CoA and [U-(13)C(3)]malonyl-CoA and (13)C incorporation was analyzed by ESI-MS/MS. Detection of anthranoid biosynthesis in cell-free extracts indicates in vitro cooperation of OKS with a yet unidentified factor or enzyme for octaketide cyclization.

  11. Suprachiasmatic Nucleus: Cell Autonomy and Network Properties

    Science.gov (United States)

    Welsh, David K.; Takahashi, Joseph S.; Kay, Steve A.

    2013-01-01

    The suprachiasmatic nucleus (SCN) is the primary circadian pacemaker in mammals. Individual SCN neurons in dispersed culture can generate independent circadian oscillations of clock gene expression and neuronal firing. However, SCN rhythmicity depends on sufficient membrane depolarization and levels of intracellular calcium and cAMP. In the intact SCN, cellular oscillations are synchronized and reinforced by rhythmic synaptic input from other cells, resulting in a reproducible topographic pattern of distinct phases and amplitudes specified by SCN circuit organization. The SCN network synchronizes its component cellular oscillators, reinforces their oscillations, responds to light input by altering their phase distribution, increases their robustness to genetic perturbations, and enhances their precision. Thus, even though individual SCN neurons can be cell-autonomous circadian oscillators, neuronal network properties are integral to normal function of the SCN. PMID:20148688

  12. Cell Multiprocessor Communication Network: Built for Speed

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    The existence of major obstacles to the traditional path to processor performance improvement has led chip manufacturers to consider multi-core designs. These architectural solutions promise a variety of power/performance and area/performance benefits. But additional care must be taken to ensure that these benefits are not lost due to inadequate design of the on-chip communication network. This paper presents the design challenges of the on-chip network of the Cell Broadband Engine (Cell BE) processor, and describes in detail its architectural design and the network, communication and synchronization protocols. In the experimental evaluation, performed on an early prototype, we analyze the communication characteristics of the Cell BE processor, using a series of microbenchmarks involving various DMA traffic patterns and synchronization protocols. We find that the on-chip communication subsystem is well matched to the to computational capacity of the processor. A Synergistic Processing Element (SPE) can issue an internal direct memory access (DMA) operation in less than 4 nanoseconds, and a DMA of a single cache line can be executed in less the than 100 nanoseconds. SPEs can achieve the optimal bandwidth of 25.6 GB/second in point to point communication with surprisingly small messages ?only a few KB, using batches of non-blocking DMAs. The aggregate network behavior under heavy load is also remarkably efficient, reaching almost 200 GB/second with collective patterns and optimal contention resolution under hot-spot traffic. Additionally, we demonstrate the consistency of these hardware results with identical experiments carried out using the Mambo simulator software for Cell BE

  13. Utilization of Candida utilis Cells for the Production of Yeast Extract:Effects of Enzyme Types, Dosages and Treatment Time

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuping Guan

    2013-05-01

    Full Text Available The purpose of this study was to establish an enzymatic hydrolysis process to prepare yeast extract with the advantages of low-cost and high-content of flavor nucleotides. Yeast extract was produced from the broken cell suspension of Candida utilis, using papain, 5′-Phosphodiesterase (RP-1 and Adenosine Monophosphate (AMP -deaminase. The effects of types, dosages and treatment time of enzymes on the recovery of solid, protein and flavor nucleotides, as well as the extract composition were investigated. Enzyme types remarkably affected the recovery of protein and solid and papain was found to be the most effective hydrolysis enzyme. The optimal dosage of papain and its treatment time were determined as 0.2% and 6 h, respectively. On this condition, the recovery of solid and protein of yeast cells was 69.26 and 60.87%, respectively. Further treatments with RP-1 (0.045%, 3 h and AMP-deaminase (0.045%, 2 h were employed to obtain a higher content of flavor 5′-nucleotides (GMP + IMP, 4.39%. This process had the advantages of a small amount of enzymes dosage, short enzymatic reaction time and high extraction yield.

  14. Meiosis in haploid yeast

    OpenAIRE

    Wagstaff, Joseph E.; Klapholz, Sue; Esposito, Rochelle Easton

    1982-01-01

    Haploid yeast cells normally contain either the MATa or MATα mating-type allele and cannot undergo meiosis and spore formation. If both mating-type alleles are present as a consequence of chromosome III disomy (MATa/MATα), haploids initiate meiosis but do not successfully form spores, probably because the haploid chromosome complement is irregularly partitioned during meiotic nuclear division. We have demonstrated that the ochre-suppressible mutation spo13-1 enables haploid yeast cells disomi...

  15. The time-profile of cell growth in fission yeast: model selection criteria favoring bilinear models over exponential ones

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sveiczer Akos

    2006-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background There is considerable controversy concerning the exact growth profile of size parameters during the cell cycle. Linear, exponential and bilinear models are commonly considered, and the same model may not apply for all species. Selection of the most adequate model to describe a given data-set requires the use of quantitative model selection criteria, such as the partial (sequential F-test, the Akaike information criterion and the Schwarz Bayesian information criterion, which are suitable for comparing differently parameterized models in terms of the quality and robustness of the fit but have not yet been used in cell growth-profile studies. Results Length increase data from representative individual fission yeast (Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells measured on time-lapse films have been reanalyzed using these model selection criteria. To fit the data, an extended version of a recently introduced linearized biexponential (LinBiExp model was developed, which makes possible a smooth, continuously differentiable transition between two linear segments and, hence, allows fully parametrized bilinear fittings. Despite relatively small differences, essentially all the quantitative selection criteria considered here indicated that the bilinear model was somewhat more adequate than the exponential model for fitting these fission yeast data. Conclusion A general quantitative framework was introduced to judge the adequacy of bilinear versus exponential models in the description of growth time-profiles. For single cell growth, because of the relatively limited data-range, the statistical evidence is not strong enough to favor one model clearly over the other and to settle the bilinear versus exponential dispute. Nevertheless, for the present individual cell growth data for fission yeast, the bilinear model seems more adequate according to all metrics, especially in the case of wee1Δ cells.

  16. Production of N2O in soil during decomposition of dead yeast cells with different spatial distributions

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ambus, P.

    1996-01-01

    Production and sources of N2O were determined in soil columns amended with autoclaved yeast cells either mixed into or added as 0.5 cm(3) lumps to the soil in combination with no or 200 mu g NO3--Ng(-1). At four occasions over a two-week study period, subsets of cores were measured for N2O...... and no yeast treatments. Incubation in the presence of 10 Pa C2H2 indicated that denitrification was the sole source of N2O, in accordance with an increase in DEA. Nitrous oxide production and DEA peaked after 4-7 days of incubation, and both were unaffected by additional NO3. Two to four-fold responses...

  17. [Analysis of the mechanism of intensification of fermentation process using yeast cells in a suspension of high-dispersed oxides].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bagatskaya, A N; Mazurenko, R V; Makhno, S N; Gorbik, P P

    2014-01-01

    The differential microcalorimetry was used to explore an influence of particles of silicon dioxide, and also other high-dispersed oxides (0.05% of masses.) in water suspension of yeast cells on intensification of the process of their fermentation in endogenous metabolic conditions. It was shown that intensification of the processes of the vital activity of yeast microorganisms was observed in the specified interval of the concentration of silicon dioxide hydrosol particles. Mechanisms of interaction between SiO2 particles and a surface of a cellular organism, as well as interaction between SiO2 particles and one of metabolism products--carbon dioxide were studied. It was found out, that Al2O3, TiO2 hydrosols also had a stimulating effect, but it is lower compared to that of SiO2.

  18. Towards systematic discovery of signaling networks in budding yeast filamentous growth stress response using interventional phosphorylation data.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yan Zhang

    Full Text Available Reversible phosphorylation is one of the major mechanisms of signal transduction, and signaling networks are critical regulators of cell growth and development. However, few of these networks have been delineated completely. Towards this end, quantitative phosphoproteomics is emerging as a useful tool enabling large-scale determination of relative phosphorylation levels. However, phosphoproteomics differs from classical proteomics by a more extensive sampling limitation due to the limited number of detectable sites per protein. Here, we propose a comprehensive quantitative analysis pipeline customized for phosphoproteome data from interventional experiments for identifying key proteins in specific pathways, discovering the protein-protein interactions and inferring the signaling network. We also made an effort to partially compensate for the missing value problem, a chronic issue for proteomics studies. The dataset used for this study was generated using SILAC (Stable Isotope Labeling with Amino acids in Cell culture technique with interventional experiments (kinase-dead mutations. The major components of the pipeline include phosphopeptide meta-analysis, correlation network analysis and causal relationship discovery. We have successfully applied our pipeline to interventional experiments identifying phosphorylation events underlying the transition to a filamentous growth form in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. We identified 5 high-confidence proteins from meta-analysis, and 19 hub proteins from correlation analysis (Pbi2p and Hsp42p were identified by both analyses. All these proteins are involved in stress responses. Nine of them have direct or indirect evidence of involvement in filamentous growth. In addition, we tested four of our predicted proteins, Nth1p, Pbi2p, Pdr12p and Rcn2p, by interventional phenotypic experiments and all of them present differential invasive growth, providing prospective validation of our approach. This comprehensive

  19. A ~35 kDa polypeptide from insect cells binds to yeast ACS like elements in the presence of ATP

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soni Rajesh K

    2002-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The S. cerevisiae origin recognition complex binds to the ARS consensus sequence in an ATP dependent fashion. Recently, the yeast Cdc6 has been reported to have DNA binding activity. Conservation of replication proteins among different species strongly supports their functional similarity. Here we report the results of an investigation into the DNA binding activity of human Cdc6 protein. Cdc6 was expressed and purified from baculovirus infected Sf9 (Spodoptera frugiperda insect cells as GST fusion protein (GST-Cdc6 and its DNA binding activity was tested. Results Partially purified fractions containing GSTCdc6 or GST showed an ACS binding activity in an ATP dependent manner. However, further purification revealed the presence of a putative 35 kDa insect cell protein (p35 which was found responsible for the DNA binding activity. A close match to the 9/11 bases of the ARS consensus sequence was sufficient for p35 binding activity. A DNA fragment from the human c-myc origin region containing yeast ACS like elements also showed p35 binding activity. Conclusions We have identified a Spodoptera frugiperda protein with ATP dependent DNA binding activity to ACS like elements. ACS like elements have been reported to be essential for ORC binding and replication initiation in yeast but their role in higher eukaryotes still remains elusive. Like the ARS consensus sequence elements of yeast, ACS like elements found in c-myc and lamin beta 2 origin regions may play similar roles in replication and indicate a conserved role for this DNA motif among eukaryotes.

  20. Sporothrix schenckii yeasts induce ERK pathway activation and secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α in rat mast cells, but no degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca; Salinas, Eva

    2014-11-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is a dimorphic fungus that causes sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis found throughout the world in humans and other mammals. After contact with conidia, transition to the yeast stage is required for establishment of infection. Mast cells are one of the first components of the immune system to make contact with invading pathogens. They release potent mediators that are decisive in initiating and directing the course of immune and inflammatory responses in the host. It remains unknown whether or not yeast cells of S. schenckii activate mast cells. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the in vitro response of mast cells to S. schenckii yeasts cells. Mast cells became activated after interaction with the yeasts, although exocytosis of preformed mediators was not stimulated. Sporothrix schenckii yeasts induced the release of early response cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6 and activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway in mast cells. As TNF-α and IL-6 are considered crucial mediators in the defense of the host against fungal disease, the release of both mediators from mast cells may contribute to the overall response of the host immune system during S. schenckii infection.

  1. Sporothrix schenckii yeasts induce ERK pathway activation and secretion of IL-6 and TNF-α in rat mast cells, but no degranulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Romo-Lozano, Yolanda; Hernández-Hernández, Francisca; Salinas, Eva

    2014-11-01

    Sporothrix schenckii is a dimorphic fungus that causes sporotrichosis, a subcutaneous mycosis found throughout the world in humans and other mammals. After contact with conidia, transition to the yeast stage is required for establishment of infection. Mast cells are one of the first components of the immune system to make contact with invading pathogens. They release potent mediators that are decisive in initiating and directing the course of immune and inflammatory responses in the host. It remains unknown whether or not yeast cells of S. schenckii activate mast cells. Our aim in this study was to evaluate the in vitro response of mast cells to S. schenckii yeasts cells. Mast cells became activated after interaction with the yeasts, although exocytosis of preformed mediators was not stimulated. Sporothrix schenckii yeasts induced the release of early response cytokines such as tumor necrosis factor alpha (TNF-α) and interleukin (IL)-6 and activation of the extracellular signal-regulated kinase (ERK) signaling pathway in mast cells. As TNF-α and IL-6 are considered crucial mediators in the defense of the host against fungal disease, the release of both mediators from mast cells may contribute to the overall response of the host immune system during S. schenckii infection. PMID:25262023

  2. Immunologic proof of DNS irradiation damages and their repair in stationary yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    In rabbits an antiserum was produced by injecting UV-irradiated denaturated calf-thymus DNS; after inhibiting unspecific bindings, a specific serological reaction with UV-induced irradiation damages could be taken as present in this antiserum. By the ammonium sulphate precipitation as immunologic method of detection, after UV-irradiation the genesis of damages at certain sites in the DNS of different yeast lineages and their repair was observed. The elemination of UV-induced DNS damages was observed after an incubation in a nutrien medium, after photo-reactivation and after combining both therapeutic treatments. The following results were obtained: the detected DNS damage (number of induced dimeres/yeast genomes) had the same degree in the four yeast lineages. Apart from the excision-negative mutante 2094 for all yeast lineages a repair efficiency of 60% could be detected. All yeast lineages presented themselves as photographically to be reactivated; however, in all cases a DNS damage of 40 to 50% remained. The examinations for the specificity of antiserum against roentgenologically irradiated DNS led to the conclusion that the antibody population of the serum consisted mainly of immunoglobulines against unchanged DNS areas. A specific immunological reaction of only about 10% could be achieved. (orig./MG)

  3. Inferring yeast cell cycle regulators and interactions using transcription factor activities

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Galbraith Simon J

    2005-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Since transcription factors are often regulated at the post-transcriptional level, their activities, rather than expression levels may provide valuable information for investigating functions and their interactions. The recently developed Network Component Analysis (NCA and its generalized form (gNCA provide a robust framework for deducing the transcription factor activities (TFAs from various types of DNA microarray data and transcription factor-gene connectivity. The goal of this work is to demonstrate the utility of TFAs in inferring transcription factor functions and interactions in Saccharomyces cerevisiae cell cycle regulation. Results Using gNCA, we determined 74 TFAs from both wild type and fkh1 fkh2 deletion mutant microarray data encompassing 1529 ORFs. We hypothesized that transcription factors participating in the cell cycle regulation exhibit cyclic activity profiles. This hypothesis was supported by the TFA profiles of known cell cycle factors and was used as a basis to uncover other potential cell cycle factors. By combining the results from both cluster analysis and periodicity analysis, we recovered nearly 90% of the known cell cycle regulators, and identified 5 putative cell cycle-related transcription factors (Dal81, Hap2, Hir2, Mss11, and Rlm1. In addition, by analyzing expression data from transcription factor knockout strains, we determined 3 verified (Ace2, Ndd1, and Swi5 and 4 putative interaction partners (Cha4, Hap2, Fhl1, and Rts2 of the forkhead transcription factors. Sensitivity of TFAs to connectivity errors was determined to provide confidence level of these predictions. Conclusion By subjecting TFA profiles to analyses based upon physiological signatures we were able to identify cell cycle related transcription factors consistent with current literature, transcription factors with potential cell cycle dependent roles, and interactions between transcription factors.

  4. A high-throughput method to measure the sensitivity of yeast cells to genotoxic agents in liquid cultures.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toussaint, Martin; Levasseur, Geneviève; Gervais-Bird, Julien; Wellinger, Raymund J; Elela, Sherif Abou; Conconi, Antonio

    2006-07-14

    The sensitivity of yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to DNA damaging agents is better represented when cells are grown in liquid media than on solid plates. However, systematic assessment of several strains that are grown in different conditions is a cumbersome undertaking. We report an assay to determine cell growth based on automatic measurements of optical densities of very small (100 microl) liquid cell cultures. Furthermore, an algorithm was elaborated to analyze large data files obtained from the cell growth curves, which are described by the growth rate--that starts at zero and accelerates to the maximal rate (mu(m))--and by the lag time (lambda). Cell dilution spot test for colony formation on solid media and the growth curve assay were used in parallel to analyze the phenotypes of cells after treatments with three different classes of DNA damaging agents (methyl methanesulfonate, bleomycin, and ultraviolet light). In these experiments the survival of the WT (wild type) and a number of DNA repair-deficient strains were compared. The results show that only the cell growth curve assay could uncover subtle phenotypes when WT cells, or mutant strains that are only weakly affected in DNA repair proficiency, were treated with low doses of cytotoxic compounds. The growth curve assay was also applied to establish whether histone acetyltransferases and deacetylases affect the resistance of yeast cells to UV irradiation. Out of 20 strains tested the sir2delta and rpd3delta cells were found to be more resistant than the WT, while gcn5delta and spt10delta cells were found to be more sensitive. This new protocol is sensitive, provides quantifiable data, offers increased screening capability and speed compared to the colony formation test. PMID:16713735

  5. Fission yeast Sec3 and Exo70 are transported on actin cables and localize the exocyst complex to cell poles.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Felipe O Bendezú

    Full Text Available The exocyst complex is essential for many exocytic events, by tethering vesicles at the plasma membrane for fusion. In fission yeast, polarized exocytosis for growth relies on the combined action of the exocyst at cell poles and myosin-driven transport along actin cables. We report here the identification of fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe Sec3 protein, which we identified through sequence homology of its PH-like domain. Like other exocyst subunits, sec3 is required for secretion and cell division. Cells deleted for sec3 are only conditionally lethal and can proliferate when osmotically stabilized. Sec3 is redundant with Exo70 for viability and for the localization of other exocyst subunits, suggesting these components act as exocyst tethers at the plasma membrane. Consistently, Sec3 localizes to zones of growth independently of other exocyst subunits but depends on PIP(2 and functional Cdc42. FRAP analysis shows that Sec3, like all other exocyst subunits, localizes to cell poles largely independently of the actin cytoskeleton. However, we show that Sec3, Exo70 and Sec5 are transported by the myosin V Myo52 along actin cables. These data suggest that the exocyst holocomplex, including Sec3 and Exo70, is present on exocytic vesicles, which can reach cell poles by either myosin-driven transport or random walk.

  6. The steady-state level and stability of TLS polymerase eta are cell cycle dependent in the yeast S. cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plachta, Michal; Halas, Agnieszka; McIntyre, Justyna; Sledziewska-Gojska, Ewa

    2015-05-01

    Polymerase eta (Pol eta) is a ubiquitous translesion DNA polymerase that is capable of bypassing UV-induced pyrimidine dimers in an error-free manner. However, this specialized polymerase is error prone when synthesizing through an undamaged DNA template. In Saccharomyces cerevisiae, both depletion and overproduction of Pol eta result in mutator phenotypes. Therefore, regulation of the cellular abundance of this enzyme is of particular interest. However, based on the investigation of variously tagged forms of Pol eta, mutually contradictory conclusions have been reached regarding the stability of this polymerase in yeast. Here, we optimized a protocol for the detection of untagged yeast Pol eta and established that the half-life of the native enzyme is 80 ± 14 min in asynchronously growing cultures. Experiments with synchronized cells indicated that the cellular abundance of this translesion polymerase changes throughout the cell cycle. Accordingly, we show that the stability of Pol eta, but not its mRNA level, is cell cycle stage dependent. The half-life of the polymerase is more than fourfold shorter in G1-arrested cells than in those at G2/M. Our results, in concert with previous data for Rev1, indicate that cell cycle regulation is a general property of Y family TLS polymerases in S. cerevisiae. PMID:25766643

  7. A systematic analysis of cell cycle regulators in yeast reveals that most factors act independently of cell size to control initiation of division.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Scott A Hoose

    Full Text Available Upstream events that trigger initiation of cell division, at a point called START in yeast, determine the overall rates of cell proliferation. The identity and complete sequence of those events remain unknown. Previous studies relied mainly on cell size changes to identify systematically genes required for the timely completion of START. Here, we evaluated panels of non-essential single gene deletion strains for altered DNA content by flow cytometry. This analysis revealed that most gene deletions that altered cell cycle progression did not change cell size. Our results highlight a strong requirement for ribosomal biogenesis and protein synthesis for initiation of cell division. We also identified numerous factors that have not been previously implicated in cell cycle control mechanisms. We found that CBS, which catalyzes the synthesis of cystathionine from serine and homocysteine, advances START in two ways: by promoting cell growth, which requires CBS's catalytic activity, and by a separate function, which does not require CBS's catalytic activity. CBS defects cause disease in humans, and in animals CBS has vital, non-catalytic, unknown roles. Hence, our results may be relevant for human biology. Taken together, these findings significantly expand the range of factors required for the timely initiation of cell division. The systematic identification of non-essential regulators of cell division we describe will be a valuable resource for analysis of cell cycle progression in yeast and other organisms.

  8. A novel fluorescence-activated cell sorter-based screen for yeast endocytosis mutants identifies a yeast homologue of mammalian eps15

    OpenAIRE

    1996-01-01

    A complete understanding of the molecular mechanisms of endocytosis requires the discovery and characterization of the protein machinery that mediates this aspect of membrane trafficking. A novel genetic screen was used to identify yeast mutants defective in internalization of bulk lipid. The fluorescent lipophilic styryl dye FM4-64 was used in conjunction with FACS to enrich for yeast mutants that exhibit internalization defects. Detailed characterization of two of these mutants, dim1-1 and ...

  9. Establishing and maintaining the Langerhans cell network.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chopin, Michaël; Nutt, Stephen L

    2015-05-01

    Langerhans cells (LCs) are the unique antigen-presenting cell of the epidermis. LCs have long been depicted in textbooks as the archetypical dendritic cell that alerts the immune system upon pathogen induced skin barrier breakage, however recent findings argue instead for a more tolerogenic function. While the LCs that populate the epidermis in steady-state arise from progenitors that seed the skin during embryogenesis, it is now apparent that a second pathway generating LCs from a bone marrow derived progenitor is active in inflammatory settings. This review emphasizes the determinants underpinning the establishment of the LC network in steady-state and under inflammatory conditions, as well as the transcriptional machinery governing their differentiation. The dual origin of LCs raises important questions about the functional differences between these subsets in balancing the epidermal immune response between immunity and tolerance.

  10. Influence of Selenium Content in the Culture Medium on Protein Profile of Yeast Cells Candida utilis ATCC 9950

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Kieliszek

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Selenium is an essential trace element for human health and it has been recognized as a component of several selenoproteins with crucial biological functions. It has been identified as a component of active centers of many enzymes, as well as integral part of biologically active complexes. The aim of the study was to evaluate the protein content and amino acid profile of the protein of fodder yeast Candida utilis ATCC 9950 cultured in media control and experimental enriched selenium. Protein analysis was performed using SDS-PAGE method consisting of polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in the presence of SDS. The highest contents of soluble protein (49,5 mg/g were found in yeast cells after 24-hour culture conducted in control (YPD medium. In the presence of selenium there were determined small amounts of protein content. With increasing time of yeast culture (to 72 hours the control and experimental media were reported to reduce soluble protein content. In electropherogram proteins from control cultures was observed the presence of 10 protein fractions, but in all the experimental cultures (containing 20, 30, and 40 mg/L selenium of 14 protein fractions. On the basis of the molecular weights of proteins, it can be concluded that they were among others: selenoprotein 15 kDa and selenoprotein 18 kDa.

  11. Yeast Extract and Silver Nitrate Induce the Expression of Phenylpropanoid Biosynthetic Genes and Induce the Accumulation of Rosmarinic Acid in Agastache rugosa Cell Culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, Woo Tae; Arasu, Mariadhas Valan; Al-Dhabi, Naif Abdullah; Yeo, Sun Kyung; Jeon, Jin; Park, Jong Seok; Lee, Sook Young; Park, Sang Un

    2016-01-01

    The present study aimed to investigate the role of yeast extract and silver nitrate on the enhancement of phenylpropanoid pathway genes and accumulation of rosmarinic acid in Agastache rugosa cell cultures. The treatment of cell cultures with yeast extract (500 mg/L) and silver nitrate (30 mg/L) for varying times enhanced the expression of genes in the phenylpropanoid pathway and the production of rosmarinic acid. The results indicated that the expression of RAS and HPPR was proportional to the amount of yeast extract and silver nitrate. The transcript levels of HPPR under yeast extract treatment were 1.84-, 1.97-, and 2.86-fold higher than the control treatments after 3, 6, and 12 h, respectively, whereas PAL expression under silver nitrate treatment was 52.31-fold higher than in the non-treated controls after 24 h of elicitation. The concentration of rosmarinic acid was directly proportional to the concentration of the applied elicitors. Yeast extract supplementation documented the highest amount of rosmarinic acid at 4.98 mg/g, whereas silver nitrate addition resulted in a comparatively lower amount of rosmarinic acid at 0.65 mg/g. In conclusion, addition of yeast extract to the cell cultures enhanced the accumulation of rosmarinic acid, which was evidenced by the expression levels of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway genes in A. rugosa.

  12. Yeast Extract and Silver Nitrate Induce the Expression of Phenylpropanoid Biosynthetic Genes and Induce the Accumulation of Rosmarinic Acid in Agastache rugosa Cell Culture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Woo Tae Park

    2016-03-01

    Full Text Available The present study aimed to investigate the role of yeast extract and silver nitrate on the enhancement of phenylpropanoid pathway genes and accumulation of rosmarinic acid in Agastache rugosa cell cultures. The treatment of cell cultures with yeast extract (500 mg/L and silver nitrate (30 mg/L for varying times enhanced the expression of genes in the phenylpropanoid pathway and the production of rosmarinic acid. The results indicated that the expression of RAS and HPPR was proportional to the amount of yeast extract and silver nitrate. The transcript levels of HPPR under yeast extract treatment were 1.84-, 1.97-, and 2.86-fold higher than the control treatments after 3, 6, and 12 h, respectively, whereas PAL expression under silver nitrate treatment was 52.31-fold higher than in the non-treated controls after 24 h of elicitation. The concentration of rosmarinic acid was directly proportional to the concentration of the applied elicitors. Yeast extract supplementation documented the highest amount of rosmarinic acid at 4.98 mg/g, whereas silver nitrate addition resulted in a comparatively lower amount of rosmarinic acid at 0.65 mg/g. In conclusion, addition of yeast extract to the cell cultures enhanced the accumulation of rosmarinic acid, which was evidenced by the expression levels of the phenylpropanoid biosynthetic pathway genes in A. rugosa.

  13. Overexpression of O‐methyltransferase leads to improved vanillin production in baker's yeast only when complemented with model‐guided network engineering

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochado, Ana Rita; Patil, Kiran R.

    2013-01-01

    limited in eukaryotic systems. In this study, we compared the effects of overexpressing a key gene in de novo vanillin biosynthesis (coding for O‐methyltransferase, hsOMT) in two yeast strains, with and without model‐guided global network modifications. Overexpression of hsOMT resulted in increased...... vanillin production only in the strain with model‐guided modifications, exemplifying advantage of using a global strategy prior to local pathway manipulation. Biotechnol. Bioeng. 2013; 110: 656–659. © 2012 Wiley Periodicals, Inc....

  14. Tris-sucrose buffer system: a new specially designed medium for extracellular invertase production by immobilized cells of isolated yeast Cryptococcus laurentii MT-61.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydogan, Mehmet Nuri; Taskin, Mesut; Canli, Ozden; Arslan, Nazli Pinar; Ortucu, Serkan

    2014-01-01

    The aims of the present study were to isolate new yeasts with high extracellular (exo) invertase activity and to investigate the usability of buffer systems as invertase production media by immobilized yeast cells. Among 70 yeast isolates, Cryptococcus laurentii MT-61 had the highest exo-invertase activity. Immobilization of yeast cells was performed using sodium alginate. Higher exo-invertase activity for immobilized cells was achieved in tris-sucrose buffer system (TSBS) compared to sodium acetate buffer system and potassium phosphate buffer system. TSBS was prepared by dissolving 30 g of sucrose in 1 L of tris buffer solution. The optimum pH, temperature, and incubation time for invertase production with immobilized cells were determined as 8.0, 35 °C and 36 h in TSBS, respectively. Under optimized conditions, maximum exo-invertase activity was found to be 28.4 U/mL in sterile and nonsterile TSBS. Immobilized cells could be reused in 14 and 12 successive cycles in sterile and nonsterile TSBS without any loss in the maximum invertase activity, respectively. This is the first report which showed that immobilized microbial cells could be used as a biocatalyst for exo-invertase production in buffer system. As an additional contribution, a new yeast strain with high invertase activity was isolated.

  15. 酵母细胞表面展示技术%Recent Advances in Yeast Cell-Surface Display Technology

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    王佳堃; 孙中远; 刘建新

    2011-01-01

    酵母细胞表达体系具备较为完善的蛋白质翻译后修饰和分泌的机制.以酵母为基础的细胞表面展示技术是一项新兴的真核蛋白展示技术,已成功应用于蛋白质识别、蛋白质的固定化和定向进化研究,成为了蛋白质工程研究的重要工具.根据与酵母细胞壁的外源目的蛋白融合部位的不同,酿酒酵母表面展示系统主要分为凝集素系统和絮凝素系统2大系统.将该技术引入动物营养研究领域,有望通过诱导宿主产生原虫或甲烷菌的抗体,对瘤胃微生态进行调控,从而以减少甲烷排放;生产高活性的全细胞催化剂,以提高反刍动物和单胃动物对纤维物质的利用效率.为此,本文就该技术的原理、特点和应用领域进行了综述.%Yeast cell has a perfect system for protein post-translational modification and secretion. The cell surface display technology based on yeast is a novel eukaryotic protein display technology. It has been successfully used for protein recognition, immobilization and remediation, and becomes an important tool for the study of protein engineering. Yeast cell surface display technology is divided into two systems, which are agglutinin and flocculin, according to the different insertion sites of the yeast cell wall for target heterologous proteins. If introduced to animal nutrition research, this technology will be a promising strategy to reduce the methane production by the regulation on ruminal microbial ecology, which is inducing of production of antibodies for protozoa and methanogen in host; highly active whole cell biocatalysts will be produced by increasing fiber utilization in ruminant and monogastric animal. Therefore, mechanism, characteristic and application of the technology are reviewed in this paper.

  16. Unscheduled DNA synthesis in xeroderma pigmentosum cells after microinjection of yeast photoreactivating enzyme.

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    J.C.M. Zwetsloot; J.H.J. Hoeijmakers (Jan); W. Vermeulen (Wim); A.P.M. Eker (André); D. Bootsma (Dirk)

    1986-01-01

    textabstractPhotoreactivating enzyme (PRE) from yeast causes a light-dependent reduction of UV-induced unscheduled DNA synthesis (UDS) when injected into the cytoplasm of repair-proficieint human fibroblasts (Zwetsloot et al., 1985). This result indicates that the exogenous PRE monomerizers UV-induc

  17. The power of yeast to model diseases of the powerhouse of the cell

    OpenAIRE

    Baile, Matthew G.; Claypool, Steven M.

    2013-01-01

    Mitochondria participate in a variety of cellular functions. As such, mitochondrial diseases exhibit numerous clinical phenotypes. Because mitochondrial functions are highly conserved between humans and Saccharomyces cerevisiae, yeast are an excellent model to study mitochondrial disease, providing insight into both physiological and pathophysiological processes.

  18. Critical assessment of the formation of hydrogen peroxide in dough by fermenting yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rezaei, Mohammad N; Dornez, Emmie; Verstrepen, Kevin J; Courtin, Christophe M

    2015-02-01

    Fermentation of bread dough leads to strengthening of the dough matrix. This effect has previously been ascribed to the action of hydrogen peroxide (H2O2) produced by yeast in dough. In this study, we re-evaluate the production of H2O2 by yeast in dough and aqueous fermentation broth. Results show that the previously reported high levels of H2O2 in fermenting dough were most probably due to the lack of specificity of the potassium dichromate/acetic acid-based method used. Using the chemiluminescent HyPerBlu assay, no yeast H2O2 production could be detected in fermented dough or broth. Even though the formation of low levels of H2O2 cannot be ruled out due to the presence of catalase in flour and the fast reaction of H2O2 with gluten proteins, our results suggest that the changes in dough matrix rheological properties upon fermentation are not due to production of H2O2 by yeast. PMID:25172698

  19. Absence of fks1p in lager brewing yeast results in aberrant cell wall composition and improved beer flavor stability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jin-jing; Xu, Wei-na; Li, Xin'er; Li, Jia; Li, Qi

    2014-06-01

    The flavor stability during storage is very important to the freshness and shelf life of beer. However, beer fermented with a yeast strain which is prone to autolyze will significantly affect the flavor of product. In this study, the gene encoding β-1,3-glucan synthetase catalytic subunit (fks1) of the lager yeast was destroyed via self-clone strategy. β-1,3-glucan is the principle cell wall component, so fks1 disruption caused a decrease in β-1,3-glucan level and increase in chitin level in cell wall, resulting in the increased cell wall thickness. Comparing with wild-type strain, the mutant strain had 39.9 and 63.41 % less leakage of octanoic acid and decanoic acid which would significantly affect the flavor of beer during storage. Moreover, the results of European Brewery Convention tube fermentation test showed that the genetic manipulation to the industrial brewing yeast helped with the anti-staling ability, rather than affecting the fermentation ability. The thiobarbituric acid value reduced by 65.59 %, and the resistant staling value increased by 26.56 %. Moreover, the anti-staling index of the beer fermented with mutant strain increased by 2.64-fold than that from wild-type strain respectively. China has the most production and consumption of beer around the world, so the quality of beer has a significant impact on Chinese beer industry. The result of this study could help with the improvement of the quality of beer in China as well as around the world.

  20. Two distinct pathways responsible for the loading of CENP-A to centromeres in the fission yeast cell cycle

    OpenAIRE

    Takahashi, Kohta; Takayama, Yuko; Masuda, Fumie; Kobayashi, Yasuyo; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2005-01-01

    CENP-A is a centromere-specific histone H3 variant that is- essential for faithful chromosome segregation in all eukaryotes thus far investigated. We genetically identified two factors, Ams2 and Mis6, each of which is required for the correct centromere localization of SpCENP-A (Cnp1), the fission yeast homologue of CENP-A. Ams2 is a cell-cycle-regulated GATA factor that localizes on the nuclear chromatin, including on centromeres, during the S phase. Ams2 may be responsible for the replicati...

  1. Control and Communication Network in Hybrid Fuel Cell Vehicles

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    朱元; 吴昊; 田光宇; 阳宪惠; 赵立安; 周伟波

    2004-01-01

    This paper describes the control and communication network in fuel cell vehicles, including both the protocol and the hardware.Based on the current protocol (ISO-11898 and SAE J1939), a new practical protocol is proposed and implemented for the control and communication network in fuel cell vehicles.To improve the reliability of data communication and to unify the network management, a new network system based on dual-port RAM is also implemented.

  2. Cell outage compensation in LTE networks: Algorithms and performance assessment

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amirijoo, M.; Jorguseski, L.; Litjens, R.; Schmelz, L.C.

    2011-01-01

    Cell outage compensation is a self-healing function and as such part of the Self-Organising Networks concept for mobile wireless networks. It aims at mitigating the degradation of coverage, capacity and service quality caused by a cell or site level outage. Upon detection of such an outage, cell out

  3. Effects of yeast extract and methyl jasmonate on the enhancement of solasodine biosynthesis in cell cultures of Solanum hainanense Hance

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    NGUYEN HOANG LOC

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this work, the effects of the elicitors methyl jasmonate (MeJA and yeast extract (YE on the growth and solasodine production of Solanum hainanense cells were investigated. The results showed that various concentrations of MeJA (50-250 µM and YE (1-4 g/L have different eliciting influences. The increase of solasodine content induced by the elicitation of 3 g/L of YE and 50 µM of MeJA at the beginning of cell culture was about 1.9- and 1.3-fold, respectively, as compared with that of the non-elicitated cells. In general, YE (biotic elicitor was more effective in enhancing solasodine production than MeJA (abiotic elicitor.

  4. Self-Organization in Disaster Resilient Heterogeneous Small Cell Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Zhang, Haijun; Jiang, Chunxiao; Hu, Rose Qingyang; Qian, Yi

    2015-01-01

    Heterogeneous small cell networks with overlay femtocells and macrocell is a promising solution for future heterogeneous wireless cellular communications. However, great resilience is needed in heterogeneous small cells in case of accidents, attacks and natural disasters. In this article, we first describe the network architecture of disaster resilient heterogeneous small cell networks (DRHSCNs), where several self-organization inspired approaches are applied. Based on the proposed resilient ...

  5. UV-dependent production of 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 2} in the recombinant yeast cells expressing human CYP2R1

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yasuda, Kaori; Endo, Mariko; Ikushiro, Shinichi; Kamakura, Masaki [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Engineering, Toyama Prefectural University, 5180 Kurokawa, Imizu, Toyama 939-0398 (Japan); Ohta, Miho [Department of Food and Nutrition Management Studies, Faculty of Human Development, Soai University, 4-4-1 Nanko-naka, Suminoe-ku, Osaka 559-0033 (Japan); Sakaki, Toshiyuki, E-mail: tsakaki@pu-toyama.ac.jp [Department of Biotechnology, Faculty of Engineering, Toyama Prefectural University, 5180 Kurokawa, Imizu, Toyama 939-0398 (Japan)

    2013-05-03

    Highlights: •We produce 25-hydroxyvitamin D in the recombinant yeast expressing human CYP2R1. •Vitamin D2 is produced in yeast from endogenous ergosterol with UV irradiation. •We produce 25-hydroxyvitamin D2 in the recombinant yeast without added substrate. -- Abstract: CYP2R1 is known to be a physiologically important vitamin D 25-hydroxylase. We have successfully expressed human CYP2R1 in Saccharomyces cerevisiae to reveal its enzymatic properties. In this study, we examined production of 25-hydroxylated vitamin D using whole recombinant yeast cells that expressed CYP2R1. When vitamin D{sub 3} or vitamin D{sub 2} was added to the cell suspension of CYP2R1-expressing yeast cells in a buffer containing glucose and β-cyclodextrin, the vitamins were converted into their 25-hydroxylated products. Next, we irradiated the cell suspension with UVB and incubated at 37 °C. Surprisingly, the 25-hydroxy vitamin D{sub 2} was produced without additional vitamin D{sub 2}. Endogenous ergosterol was likely converted into vitamin D{sub 2} by UV irradiation and thermal isomerization, and then the resulting vitamin D{sub 2} was converted to 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 2} by CYP2R1. This novel method for producing 25-hydroxyvitamin D{sub 2} without a substrate could be useful for practical purposes.

  6. Bright fluorescence monitoring system utilizing Zoanthus sp. green fluorescent protein (ZsGreen for human G-protein-coupled receptor signaling in microbial yeast cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yasuyuki Nakamura

    Full Text Available G-protein-coupled receptors (GPCRs are currently the most important pharmaceutical targets for drug discovery because they regulate a wide variety of physiological processes. Consequently, simple and convenient detection systems for ligands that regulate the function of GPCR have attracted attention as powerful tools for new drug development. We previously developed a yeast-based fluorescence reporter ligand detection system using flow cytometry. However, using this conventional detection system, fluorescence from a cell expressing GFP and responding to a ligand is weak, making detection of these cells by fluorescence microscopy difficult. We here report improvements to the conventional yeast fluorescence reporter assay system resulting in the development of a new highly-sensitive fluorescence reporter assay system with extremely bright fluorescence and high signal-to-noise (S/N ratio. This new system allowed the easy detection of GPCR signaling in yeast using fluorescence microscopy. Somatostatin receptor and neurotensin receptor (implicated in Alzheimer's disease and Parkinson's disease, respectively were chosen as human GPCR(s. The facile detection of binding to these receptors by cognate peptide ligands was demonstrated. In addition, we established a highly sensitive ligand detection system using yeast cell surface display technology that is applicable to peptide screening, and demonstrate that the display of various peptide analogs of neurotensin can activate signaling through the neurotensin receptor in yeast cells. Our system could be useful for identifying lead peptides with agonistic activity towards targeted human GPCR(s.

  7. A Western Blot-based Investigation of the Yeast Secretory Pathway Designed for an Intermediate-Level Undergraduate Cell Biology Laboratory

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hood-DeGrenier, Jennifer K.

    2008-01-01

    The movement of newly synthesized proteins through the endomembrane system of eukaryotic cells, often referred to generally as the secretory pathway, is a topic covered in most intermediate-level undergraduate cell biology courses. An article previously published in this journal described a laboratory exercise in which yeast mutants defective in…

  8. Nitrile Metabolizing Yeasts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bhalla, Tek Chand; Sharma, Monica; Sharma, Nitya Nand

    Nitriles and amides are widely distributed in the biotic and abiotic components of our ecosystem. Nitrile form an important group of organic compounds which find their applications in the synthesis of a large number of compounds used as/in pharmaceutical, cosmetics, plastics, dyes, etc>. Nitriles are mainly hydro-lyzed to corresponding amide/acid in organic chemistry. Industrial and agricultural activities have also lead to release of nitriles and amides into the environment and some of them pose threat to human health. Biocatalysis and biotransformations are increasingly replacing chemical routes of synthesis in organic chemistry as a part of ‘green chemistry’. Nitrile metabolizing organisms or enzymes thus has assumed greater significance in all these years to convert nitriles to amides/ acids. The nitrile metabolizing enzymes are widely present in bacteria, fungi and yeasts. Yeasts metabolize nitriles through nitrilase and/or nitrile hydratase and amidase enzymes. Only few yeasts have been reported to possess aldoxime dehydratase. More than sixty nitrile metabolizing yeast strains have been hither to isolated from cyanide treatment bioreactor, fermented foods and soil. Most of the yeasts contain nitrile hydratase-amidase system for metabolizing nitriles. Transformations of nitriles to amides/acids have been carried out with free and immobilized yeast cells. The nitrilases of Torulopsis candida>and Exophiala oligosperma>R1 are enantioselec-tive and regiospecific respectively. Geotrichum>sp. JR1 grows in the presence of 2M acetonitrile and may have potential for application in bioremediation of nitrile contaminated soil/water. The nitrilase of E. oligosperma>R1 being active at low pH (3-6) has shown promise for the hydroxy acids. Immobilized yeast cells hydrolyze some additional nitriles in comparison to free cells. It is expected that more focus in future will be on purification, characterization, cloning, expression and immobilization of nitrile metabolizing

  9. Random matrix analysis for gene interaction networks in cancer cells

    CERN Document Server

    Kikkawa, Ayumi

    2016-01-01

    Motivation: The investigation of topological modifications of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells is essential for understanding the desease. We study gene interaction networks in various human cancer cells with the random matrix theory. This study is based on the Cancer Network Galaxy (TCNG) database which is the repository of huge gene interactions inferred by Bayesian network algorithms from 256 microarray experimental data downloaded from NCBI GEO. The original GEO data are provided by the high-throughput microarray expression experiments on various human cancer cells. We apply the random matrix theory to the computationally inferred gene interaction networks in TCNG in order to detect the universality in the topology of the gene interaction networks in cancer cells. Results: We found the universal behavior in almost one half of the 256 gene interaction networks in TCNG. The distribution of nearest neighbor level spacing of the gene interaction matrix becomes the Wigner distribution when the net...

  10. Cell size at S phase initiation: an emergent property of the G1/S network.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matteo Barberis

    2007-04-01

    Full Text Available The eukaryotic cell cycle is the repeated sequence of events that enable the division of a cell into two daughter cells. It is divided into four phases: G1, S, G2, and M. Passage through the cell cycle is strictly regulated by a molecular interaction network, which involves the periodic synthesis and destruction of cyclins that bind and activate cyclin-dependent kinases that are present in nonlimiting amounts. Cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors contribute to cell cycle control. Budding yeast is an established model organism for cell cycle studies, and several mathematical models have been proposed for its cell cycle. An area of major relevance in cell cycle control is the G1 to S transition. In any given growth condition, it is characterized by the requirement of a specific, critical cell size, PS, to enter S phase. The molecular basis of this control is still under discussion. The authors report a mathematical model of the G1 to S network that newly takes into account nucleo/cytoplasmic localization, the role of the cyclin-dependent kinase Sic1 in facilitating nuclear import of its cognate Cdk1-Clb5, Whi5 control, and carbon source regulation of Sic1 and Sic1-containing complexes. The model was implemented by a set of ordinary differential equations that describe the temporal change of the concentration of the involved proteins and protein complexes. The model was tested by simulation in several genetic and nutritional setups and was found to be neatly consistent with experimental data. To estimate PS, the authors developed a hybrid model including a probabilistic component for firing of DNA replication origins. Sensitivity analysis of PS provides a novel relevant conclusion: PS is an emergent property of the G1 to S network that strongly depends on growth rate.

  11. Yeast genome sequencing:

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Piskur, Jure; Langkjær, Rikke Breinhold

    2004-01-01

    For decades, unicellular yeasts have been general models to help understand the eukaryotic cell and also our own biology. Recently, over a dozen yeast genomes have been sequenced, providing the basis to resolve several complex biological questions. Analysis of the novel sequence data has shown...... of closely related species helps in gene annotation and to answer how many genes there really are within the genomes. Analysis of non-coding regions among closely related species has provided an example of how to determine novel gene regulatory sequences, which were previously difficult to analyse because...... they are short and degenerate and occupy different positions. Comparative genomics helps to understand the origin of yeasts and points out crucial molecular events in yeast evolutionary history, such as whole-genome duplication and horizontal gene transfer(s). In addition, the accumulating sequence data provide...

  12. Network benchmarking: a happy marriage between systems and synthetic biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minty, Jeremy J; Varedi K, S Marjan; Nina Lin, Xiaoxia

    2009-03-27

    In their new Cell paper, Cantone et al. (2009) present exciting results on constructing and utilizing a small synthetic gene regulatory network in yeast that draws from two rapidly developing fields of systems and synthetic biology.

  13. Live Yeast and Yeast Cell Wall Supplements Enhance Immune Function and Performance in Food-Producing Livestock: A Review †,‡

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul R. Broadway

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available More livestock producers are seeking natural alternatives to antibiotics and antimicrobials, and searching for supplements to enhance growth performance, and general animal health and well-being. Some of the compounds currently being utilized and studied are live yeast and yeast-based products derived from the strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae. These products have been reported to have positive effects both directly and indirectly on the immune system and its subsequent biomarkers, thereby mitigating negative effects associated with stress and disease. These yeast-based products have also been reported to simultaneously enhance growth and performance by enhancing dry matter intake (DMI and average daily gain (ADG perhaps through the establishment of a healthy gastrointestinal tract. These products may be especially useful in times of potential stress such as during birth, weaning, early lactation, and during the receiving period at the feedlot. Overall, yeast supplements appear to possess the ability to improve animal health and metabolism while decreasing morbidity, thereby enhancing profitability of these animals.

  14. Influence of N-glycans on Expression of Cell Wall Remodeling Related Genes in Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Yeast Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Almeida, Fausto; Antoniêto, Amanda Cristina Campos; Pessoni, André Moreira; Monteiro, Valdirene Neves; Alegre-Maller, Ana Claudia Paiva; Pigosso, Laurine Lacerda; Pereira, Maristela; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2016-01-01

    Paracoccidioidomycosis is the most prevalent systemic mycosis in Latin America. It is caused by the temperature-dependent dimorphic fungus Paracoccidioides brasiliensis. The P. brasiliensis cell wall is a dynamic outer structure, composed of a network of glycoproteins and polysaccharides, such as chitin, glucan and N-glycosylated proteins. These glycoproteins can interact with the host to affect infection rates, and are known to perform other functions. We inhibited N-linked glycosylation using tunicamycin (TM), and then evaluated the expression of P. brasiliensis genes related to cell wall remodeling. Our results suggest that cell wall synthesis related genes, such as β-1,3-glucanosyltransferase (PbGEL3), 1,3-β-D-glucan synthase (PbFKS1), and α-1,4-amylase (PbAMY), as well as cell wall degrading related genes, such as N-acetyl-β-D-glucosaminidase (PbNAG1), α-1,3-glucanase (PbAGN), and β-1,3-glucanase (PbBGN1 and PbBGN2), have their expression increased by the N-glycosylation inhibition, as detected by qRT-PCR. The observed increases in gene expression levels reveal possible compensatory mechanisms for diminished enzyme activity due to the lack of glycosylation caused by TM. PMID:27226767

  15. The contribution of glutathione to the destabilizing effect of yeast on wheat dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Verheyen, C; Albrecht, A; Herrmann, J; Strobl, M; Jekle, M; Becker, T

    2015-04-15

    Any factor which impairs the development of the gluten network affects the gas retention capacity and the overall baking performance. This study aimed to examine why rising yeast concentrations (Saccharomyces cerevisiae) decrease the dough elasticity in an asymptotic manner. Since in 27 commercial fresh and dry yeasts up to 81 mg glutathione (GSH) per 1g dry sample were found. Through the addition of reduced GSH in dough without yeast, the extent of dough weakening was analysed. Indeed rheological measurements confirmed that yeast-equivalent levels of GSH had a softening effect and during 3h fermentation the weakening coefficient increased from 0.3% to 20.4% in a Rheofermentometer. The present results indicate that free -SH compounds, as represented by GSH, considerably contribute to the softening of dough through dead yeast cells. PMID:25466019

  16. Highly fluorescent semiconductor core-shell CdTe-CdS nanocrystals for monitoring living yeast cells activity

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Farias, P.M.A. de; Motta, M.A.; Castro-Neto, A.G.; Vieira, A.A.S.; Silva, D.C.N.; Fontes, A. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Biofisica e Radiobiologia, Recife, PE (Brazil); Santos, B.S.; Brasil, A.G. Jr. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Ciencias Farmaceuticas, Recife, PE (Brazil); Menezes, F.D.; Ferreira, R. [Universidade Federal de Pernambuco, Departamento de Quimica Fundamental, Recife, PE (Brazil); Cesar, C.L. [Universidade Estadual de Campinas, Departamento de Eletronica Quantica, Campinas, SP (Brazil)

    2007-12-15

    Fluorescent semiconductor nanocrystals in quantum confinement regime (quantum dots) present several well-known features which make them very useful tools for biological labeling purposes. Low photobleaching rates, high chemical stability and active surface allowing conjugation to living cells explain the success of this labeling procedure over the commonly used fluorescent dyes. In this paper we report the results obtained with highly fluorescent core-shell CdTe-CdS (diameter=3-7 nm) colloidal nanocrystals synthesized in aqueous medium and conjugated to glucose molecules. The conjugated nanocrystals were incubated with living yeast cells, in order to investigate their glucose up-take activity in real time, by confocal microscopy analysis. (orig.)

  17. A multivariate approach using attenuated total reflectance mid-infrared spectroscopy to measure the surface mannoproteins and β-glucans of yeast cell walls during wine fermentations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, John P; Zhang, Song-Lei; Nieuwoudt, Hélène; Divol, Benoit; Trygg, Johan; Bauer, Florian F

    2015-11-18

    Yeast cells possess a cell wall comprising primarily glycoproteins, mannans, and glucan polymers. Several yeast phenotypes relevant for fermentation, wine processing, and wine quality are correlated with cell wall properties. To investigate the effect of wine fermentation on cell wall composition, a study was performed using mid-infrared (MIR) spectroscopy coupled with multivariate methods (i.e., PCA and OPLS-DA). A total of 40 yeast strains were evaluated, including Saccharomyces strains (laboratory and industrial) and non-Saccharomyces species. Cells were fermented in both synthetic MS300 and Chardonnay grape must to stationery phase, processed, and scanned in the MIR spectrum. PCA of the fingerprint spectral region showed distinct separation of Saccharomyces strains from non-Saccharomyces species; furthermore, industrial wine yeast strains separated from laboratory strains. PCA loading plots and the use of OPLS-DA to the data sets suggested that industrial strains were enriched with cell wall proteins (e.g., mannoproteins), whereas laboratory strains were composed mainly of mannan and glucan polymers.

  18. Two distinct pathways responsible for the loading of CENP-A to centromeres in the fission yeast cell cycle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Takahashi, Kohta; Takayama, Yuko; Masuda, Fumie; Kobayashi, Yasuyo; Saitoh, Shigeaki

    2005-03-29

    CENP-A is a centromere-specific histone H3 variant that is- essential for faithful chromosome segregation in all eukaryotes thus far investigated. We genetically identified two factors, Ams2 and Mis6, each of which is required for the correct centromere localization of SpCENP-A (Cnp1), the fission yeast homologue of CENP-A. Ams2 is a cell-cycle-regulated GATA factor that localizes on the nuclear chromatin, including on centromeres, during the S phase. Ams2 may be responsible for the replication-coupled loading of SpCENP-A by facilitating nucleosomal formation during the S phase. Consistently, overproduction of histone H4, but not that of H3, suppressed the defect of SpCENP-A localization in Ams2-deficient cells. We demonstrated the existence of at least two distinct phases for SpCENP-A loading during the cell cycle: the S phase and the late-G2 phase. Ectopically induced SpCENP-A was efficiently loaded onto the centromeres in G2-arrested cells, indicating that SpCENP-A probably undergoes replication-uncoupled loading after the completion of S phase. This G2 loading pathway of SpCENP-A may require Mis6, a constitutive centromere-binding protein that is also implicated in the Mad2-dependent spindle attachment checkpoint response. Here, we discuss the functional relationship between the flexible loading mechanism of CENP-A and the plasticity of centromere chromatin formation in fission yeast. PMID:15897182

  19. Reconstruction of the yeast protein-protein interaction network involved in nutrient sensing and global metabolic regulation

    OpenAIRE

    Nielsen Jens; Jouhten Paula; Nandy Subir K

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background Several protein-protein interaction studies have been performed for the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae using different high-throughput experimental techniques. All these results are collected in the BioGRID database and the SGD database provide detailed annotation of the different proteins. Despite the value of BioGRID for studying protein-protein interactions, there is a need for manual curation of these interactions in order to remove false positives. Results Here we des...

  20. Cell cycle-dependent gene networks relevant to cancer

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    2008-01-01

    The analysis of sophisticated interplays between cell cycle-dependent genes in a disease condition is one of the largely unexplored areas in modern tumor biology research. Many cell cycle-dependent genes are either oncogenes or suppressor genes, or are closely asso- ciated with the transition of a cell cycle. However, it is unclear how the complicated relationships between these cell cycle-dependent genes are, especially in cancers. Here, we sought to identify significant expression relationships between cell cycle-dependent genes by analyzing a HeLa microarray dataset using a local alignment algorithm and constructed a gene transcriptional network specific to the cancer by assembling these newly identified gene-gene relationships. We further characterized this global network by partitioning the whole network into several cell cycle phase-specific sub-networks. All generated networks exhibited the power-law node-degree dis- tribution, and the average clustering coefficients of these networks were remarkably higher than those of pure scale-free networks, indi- cating a property of hierarchical modularity. Based on the known protein-protein interactions and Gene Ontology annotation data, the proteins encoded by cell cycle-dependent interacting genes tended to share the same biological functions or to be involved in the same biological processes, rather than interacting by physical means. Finally, we identified the hub genes related to cancer based on the topo- logical importance that maintain the basic structure of cell cycle-dependent gene networks.

  1. Identification of genes responsible for improved cryoresistance in fermenting yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tanghe, A; Teunissen, A; Van Dijck, P; Thevelein, J M

    2000-04-10

    Using repetitive freezing and thawing, different mutant industrial Saccharomyces cerevisiae strains with increased freeze resistance have been isolated. To get a better insight in the mechanisms responsible for this elevated resistance and to give us the opportunity to modify other strains so that they become more suitable for use in frozen dough preparations, we applied the microarray technology in order to identify genes that are differentially expressed in a freeze-resistant mutant when compared to a freeze-sensitive industrial yeast strain. PMID:10791754

  2. Observation and inverse problems in coupled cell networks

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A coupled cell network is a model for many situations such as food webs in ecosystems, cellular metabolism and economic networks. It consists in a directed graph G, each node (or cell) representing an agent of the network and each directed arrow representing which agent acts on which. It yields a system of differential equations .x(t)=f(x(t)), where the component i of f depends only on the cells xj(t) for which the arrow j → i exists in G. In this paper, we investigate the observation problems in coupled cell networks: can one deduce the behaviour of the whole network (oscillations, stabilization, etc) by observing only one of the cells? We show that the natural observation properties hold for almost all the interactions f

  3. Whole-cell imaging of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by high-voltage scanning transmission electron tomography

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Murata, Kazuyoshi, E-mail: kazum@nips.ac.jp [National Institute for Physiological Sciences, Okazaki, Aichi 444-8585 (Japan); Esaki, Masatoshi; Ogura, Teru [Institute of Molecular Embryology and Genetics, Kumamoto University, Kumamoto 860-0811 (Japan); Arai, Shigeo; Yamamoto, Yuta; Tanaka, Nobuo [Ecotopia Science Institute, Nagoya University, Nagoya, Aichi 464-8603 (Japan)

    2014-11-15

    Electron tomography using a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) provides three-dimensional information about cellular components in sections thicker than 1 μm, although in bright-field mode image degradation caused by multiple inelastic scattering of transmitted electrons limit the attainable resolution. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is believed to give enhanced contrast and resolution compared to conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). Samples up to 1 μm in thickness have been analyzed with an intermediate-voltage electron microscope because inelastic scattering is not a critical limitation, and probe broadening can be minimized. Here, we employed STEM at 1 MeV high-voltage to extend the useful specimen thickness for electron tomography, which we demonstrate by a seamless tomographic reconstruction of a whole, budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cell, which is ∼3 μm in thickness. High-voltage STEM tomography, especially in the bright-field mode, demonstrated sufficiently enhanced contrast and intensity, compared to CTEM tomography, to permit segmentation of major organelles in the whole cell. STEM imaging also reduced specimen shrinkage during tilt-series acquisition. The fidelity of structural preservation was limited by cytoplasmic extraction, and the spatial resolution was limited by the relatively large convergence angle of the scanning probe. However, the new technique has potential to solve longstanding problems of image blurring in biological specimens beyond 1 μm in thickness, and may facilitate new research in cellular structural biology. - Highlights: • High voltage TEM and STEM tomography were compared to visualize whole yeast cells. • 1-MeV STEM-BF tomography had significant improvements in image contrast and SNR. • 1-MeV STEM tomography showed less specimen shrinkage than the TEM tomography. • KMnO{sub 4} post-treatment permitted segmenting the major cellular components.

  4. Whole-cell imaging of the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae by high-voltage scanning transmission electron tomography

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Electron tomography using a high-voltage electron microscope (HVEM) provides three-dimensional information about cellular components in sections thicker than 1 μm, although in bright-field mode image degradation caused by multiple inelastic scattering of transmitted electrons limit the attainable resolution. Scanning transmission electron microscopy (STEM) is believed to give enhanced contrast and resolution compared to conventional transmission electron microscopy (CTEM). Samples up to 1 μm in thickness have been analyzed with an intermediate-voltage electron microscope because inelastic scattering is not a critical limitation, and probe broadening can be minimized. Here, we employed STEM at 1 MeV high-voltage to extend the useful specimen thickness for electron tomography, which we demonstrate by a seamless tomographic reconstruction of a whole, budding Saccharomyces cerevisiae yeast cell, which is ∼3 μm in thickness. High-voltage STEM tomography, especially in the bright-field mode, demonstrated sufficiently enhanced contrast and intensity, compared to CTEM tomography, to permit segmentation of major organelles in the whole cell. STEM imaging also reduced specimen shrinkage during tilt-series acquisition. The fidelity of structural preservation was limited by cytoplasmic extraction, and the spatial resolution was limited by the relatively large convergence angle of the scanning probe. However, the new technique has potential to solve longstanding problems of image blurring in biological specimens beyond 1 μm in thickness, and may facilitate new research in cellular structural biology. - Highlights: • High voltage TEM and STEM tomography were compared to visualize whole yeast cells. • 1-MeV STEM-BF tomography had significant improvements in image contrast and SNR. • 1-MeV STEM tomography showed less specimen shrinkage than the TEM tomography. • KMnO4 post-treatment permitted segmenting the major cellular components

  5. Using Gene Essentiality and Synthetic Lethality Information to Correct Yeast and CHO Cell Genome-Scale Models

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chowdhury, Ratul; Chowdhury, Anupam; Maranas, Costas D.

    2015-01-01

    Essentiality (ES) and Synthetic Lethality (SL) information identify combination of genes whose deletion inhibits cell growth. This information is important for both identifying drug targets for tumor and pathogenic bacteria suppression and for flagging and avoiding gene deletions that are non-viable in biotechnology. In this study, we performed a comprehensive ES and SL analysis of two important eukaryotic models (S. cerevisiae and CHO cells) using a bilevel optimization approach introduced earlier. Information gleaned from this study is used to propose specific model changes to remedy inconsistent with data model predictions. Even for the highly curated Yeast 7.11 model we identified 50 changes (metabolic and GPR) leading to the correct prediction of an additional 28% of essential genes and 36% of synthetic lethals along with a 53% reduction in the erroneous identification of essential genes. Due to the paucity of mutant growth phenotype data only 12 changes were made for the CHO 1.2 model leading to an additional correctly predicted 11 essential and eight non-essential genes. Overall, we find that CHO 1.2 was 76% less accurate than the Yeast 7.11 metabolic model in predicting essential genes. Based on this analysis, 14 (single and double deletion) maximally informative experiments are suggested to improve the CHO cell model by using information from a mouse metabolic model. This analysis demonstrates the importance of single and multiple knockout phenotypes in assessing and improving model reconstructions. The advent of techniques such as CRISPR opens the door for the global assessment of eukaryotic models. PMID:26426067

  6. Effects of N-acetyl-L-cysteine on gene expression of antioxidant enzymes in yeast cells after irradiation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Jin Kyu; Park, Ji Young; Ryu, Tae Ho; Roh, Chang Hyun [Korea Atomic Energy Research Institute, Daejeon (Korea, Republic of); Nili, Mohammad [Dawnesh Radiation Research Institute, Barcelona (Spain)

    2012-04-15

    Ionizing radiation induces water radiolysis, which generates highly reactive hydroxyl radicals. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) cause apoptosis and cell damage. When exposed to ionizing radiation, cells activates ROS scavenging detoxifying enzymes such as superoxide dismutase (SOD), glutathione peroxidase (GPx), and catalase. SOD scavenges superoxide radicals by catalyzing the conversion of two of these radicals into hydrogen peroxide and molecular oxygen. The hydrogen peroxide formed by superoxide dismutase and by other processes is scavenged by catalase, a ubiquitous heme protein that catalyzes the dismutation of hydrogen peroxide into water and molecular oxygen. Yeast has two catalase and three GPx proteins. The biochemical function of GPx is to reduce lipid-hydroperoxides to their corresponding alcohols and to reduce free hydrogen peroxide to water. N-acetylL-cysteine (NAC) having a thiol, a precursor for glutathione (GSH), is known as one of the antioxidants. NAC prevents the depletion of GSH by radiation, increases the production of GSH, and improves enzymes activity and alkaline phosphatase. In this study, the role of NAC as an antioxidant and a radioprotector was examined on cell survival, transcriptional level, and protein level. through observing viability of cells, analyzing the gene expression of antioxidant enzyme, measuring the SOD activity and intracellular GSH levels in yeast W303-1A strain The cell viability of haploid S. cerevisiae W303-1A strain was reduced significantly at the low dose (10∼30 Gy). The half-lethal dose of the strain was about 20 Gy. The CFU assay result confirmed that NAC could not rescue the cells from radiation-induced death. When irradiated with 100 Gy, an increase in the transcriptional expression was observed in the antioxicant genes. The expression of these genes decreased by treatment of NAC in irradiated cells. NAC decline SOD activity and intracellular GSH levels. The present study shows that NAC can directly scavenge

  7. Yeasts preservation: alternatives for lyophilisation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nyanga, L.K.; Nout, M.J.R.; Smid, E.J.; Boekhout, T.; Zwietering, M.H.

    2012-01-01

    The aim of the study was to compare the effect of two low-cost, low technology traditional methods for drying starter cultures with standard lyophilisation. Lyophilised yeast cultures and yeast cultures preserved in dry rice cakes and dry plant fibre strands were examined for viable cell counts duri

  8. Direct cloning of isogenic murine DNA in yeast and relevance of isogenicity for targeting in embryonic stem cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Claes Andréasson

    Full Text Available Efficient gene targeting in embryonic stem cells requires that modifying DNA sequences are identical to those in the targeted chromosomal locus. Yet, there is a paucity of isogenic genomic clones for human cell lines and PCR amplification cannot be used in many mutation-sensitive applications. Here, we describe a novel method for the direct cloning of genomic DNA into a targeting vector, pRTVIR, using oligonucleotide-directed homologous recombination in yeast. We demonstrate the applicability of the method by constructing functional targeting vectors for mammalian genes Uhrf1 and Gfap. Whereas the isogenic targeting of the gene Uhrf1 showed a substantial increase in targeting efficiency compared to non-isogenic DNA in mouse E14 cells, E14-derived DNA performed better than the isogenic DNA in JM8 cells for both Uhrf1 and Gfap. Analysis of 70 C57BL/6-derived targeting vectors electroporated in JM8 and E14 cell lines in parallel showed a clear dependence on isogenicity for targeting, but for three genes isogenic DNA was found to be inhibitory. In summary, this study provides a straightforward methodological approach for the direct generation of isogenic gene targeting vectors.

  9. Fractionation of yeast extract by nanofiltration process to assess key compounds involved in CHO cell culture improvement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mosser, Mathilde; Kapel, Romain; Chevalot, Isabelle; Olmos, Eric; Marc, Ivan; Marc, Annie; Oriol, Eric

    2015-01-01

    Yeast extract (YE) is known to greatly enhance mammalian cell culture performances, but its undefined composition decreases process reliability. Accordingly, in the present study, the nature of YE compounds involved in the improvement of recombinant CHO cell growth and IgG production was investigated. First, the benefits of YE were verified, revealing that it increased maximal concentrations of viable cells and IgG up to 73 and 60%, respectively compared to a reference culture. Then, the analyses of YE composition highlighted the presence of molecules such as amino acids, vitamins, salts, nucleobase, and glucose that were contained in reference medium, while others including peptides, trehalose, polysaccharides, and nucleic acids were not. Consequently, YE was fractionated by a nanofiltration process to deeper evaluate its effects on CHO cell cultures. The YE molecules already contained in reference medium were mainly isolated in the permeate fraction together with trehalose and short peptides, while other molecules were concentrated in the retentate. Permeate, which was free of macromolecules, exhibited a similar positive effect than raw YE on maximal concentrations. Additional studies on cell energetic metabolism underlined that dipeptides and tripeptides in permeate were used as an efficient source of nitrogenous substrates.

  10. Gata3 Hypomorphic Mutant Mice Rescued with a Yeast Artificial Chromosome Transgene Suffer a Glomerular Mesangial Cell Defect.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moriguchi, Takashi; Yu, Lei; Otsuki, Akihito; Ainoya, Keiko; Lim, Kim-Chew; Yamamoto, Masayuki; Engel, James Douglas

    2016-09-01

    GATA3 is a zinc finger transcription factor that plays a crucial role in embryonic kidney development, while its precise functions in the adult kidney remain largely unexplored. Here, we demonstrate that GATA3 is specifically expressed in glomerular mesangial cells and plays a critical role in the maintenance of renal glomerular function. Newly generated Gata3 hypomorphic mutant mice exhibited neonatal lethality associated with severe renal hypoplasia. Normal kidney size was restored by breeding the hypomorphic mutant with a rescuing transgenic mouse line bearing a 662-kb Gata3 yeast artificial chromosome (YAC), and these animals (termed G3YR mice) survived to adulthood. However, most of the G3YR mice showed degenerative changes in glomerular mesangial cells, which deteriorated progressively during postnatal development. Consequently, the G3YR adult mice suffered severe renal failure. We found that the 662-kb Gata3 YAC transgene recapitulated Gata3 expression in the renal tubules but failed to direct sufficient GATA3 activity to mesangial cells. Renal glomeruli of the G3YR mice had significantly reduced amounts of platelet-derived growth factor receptor (PDGFR), which is known to participate in the development and maintenance of glomerular mesangial cells. These results demonstrate a critical role for GATA3 in the maintenance of mesangial cells and its absolute requirement for prevention of glomerular disease. PMID:27296697

  11. Yeast extract action on proliferation of irradiated rice (Oryza sativa L. var. Cigalon) radicular meristems cells by γ rays of Co60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    After γ rays of Co60 irradiation, the mitotic index is disturbed and mitosis is very low in radicular meristem cells. When yeast extract is supplied in the medium before irradiation, a normal mitotic index appear and mitosis inhibition is reversed

  12. Combining Phage and Yeast Cell Surface Antibody Display to Identify Novel Cell Type-Selective Internalizing Human Monoclonal Antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bidlingmaier, Scott; Su, Yang; Liu, Bin

    2015-01-01

    Using phage antibody display, large libraries can be generated and screened to identify monoclonal antibodies with affinity for target antigens. However, while library size and diversity is an advantage of the phage display method, there is limited ability to quantitatively enrich for specific binding properties such as affinity. One way of overcoming this limitation is to combine the scale of phage display selections with the flexibility and quantitativeness of FACS-based yeast surface display selections. In this chapter we describe protocols for generating yeast surface antibody display libraries using phage antibody display selection outputs as starting material and FACS-based enrichment of target antigen-binding clones from these libraries. These methods should be widely applicable for the identification of monoclonal antibodies with specific binding properties. PMID:26060069

  13. The Proapoptotic Effect of Traditional and Novel Nonsteroidal Anti-Inflammatory Drugs in Mammalian and Yeast Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gianluca Farrugia

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Nonsteroidal anti-inflammatory drugs (NSAIDs have long been used to treat pain, fever, and inflammation. However, mounting evidence shows that NSAIDs, such as aspirin, have very promising antineoplastic properties. The chemopreventive, antiproliferative behaviour of NSAIDs has been associated with both their inactivation of cyclooxygenases (COX and their ability to induce apoptosis via pathways that are largely COX-independent. In this review, the various proapoptotic pathways induced by traditional and novel NSAIDs such as phospho-NSAIDs, hydrogen sulfide-releasing NSAIDs and nitric oxide-releasing NSAIDs in mammalian cell lines are discussed, as well as the proapoptotic effects of NSAIDs on budding yeast which retains the hallmarks of mammalian apoptosis. The significance of these mechanisms in terms of the role of NSAIDs in effective cancer prevention is considered.

  14. Yeast cells lacking all known ceramide synthases continue to make complex sphingolipids and to incorporate ceramides into glycosylphosphatidylinositol (GPI) anchors

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vionnet, Christine; Roubaty, Carole; Ejsing, Christer S.;

    2010-01-01

    In yeast, the inositolphosphorylceramides mostly contain C26:0 fatty acids. Inositolphosphorylceramides were considered to be important for viability, since the inositolphosphorylceramide synthase AUR1 is essential. Yet, lcb1 cells, unable to make sphingoid bases and inositolphosphorylceramides, ......, are viable if they harbor SLC1-1, a gain of function mutation in the 1-acyl-glycerol-3-phosphate acyltransferase SLC1. SLC1-1 allows to incorporate C26:0 fatty acids into phosphatidylinositol (PI), thus generating PIii, an abnormal, C26-containing PI, presumably acting as surrogate...... genetic backgrounds but to still make some abnormal uncharacterized inositol-containing sphingolipids. Indeed, we find that 4 quadruple mutants make substantial amounts of unphysiological inositolphosphorylphytosphingosines but that they also still make small amounts of normal inositolphosphorylceramides...

  15. Statistical design and optimization of single cell oil production from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by an oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula sp. IIP-33 using response surface methodology

    OpenAIRE

    Bandhu, Sheetal; Dasgupta, Diptarka; Akhter, Jawed; Kanaujia, Pankaj; Suman, Sunil K; Agrawal, Deepti; Kaul, Savita; Adhikari, Dilip K; Ghosh, Debashish

    2014-01-01

    Single cell oil production from sugarcane bagasse hydrolysate by oleaginous yeast Rhodotorula sp. IIP-33 was analyzed using a two stage statistical design approach based on Response Surface Methodology. Variables like pentose sugar, (NH4)2SO4, KH2PO4, yeast extract, pH and temperature were found to influence lipid production significantly. Under optimized condition in a shake flask, yield of lipid was 2.1199 g with fat coefficient of 7.09 which also resembled ~99% similarity to model predicte...

  16. Breakdown of cell-collagen networks through collagen remodeling

    OpenAIRE

    Iordan, Andreea; Duperray, Alain; Gérard, Anaïs; Grichine, Alexei; Verdier, Claude

    2010-01-01

    International audience Collagen model tissues are analyzed, which consist of cells embedded in a collagen matrix at different concentrations (of cells and collagen). Rheological properties are measured and complementary confocal microscopy analyses are carried out. An important feature is observed, corresponding to the breakdown of the collagen network (i.e. decrease in network elasticity) for high collagen concentrations, due to the presence of cells. Thanks to confocal microscopy, we sho...

  17. A New Cell Association Scheme In Heterogeneous Networks

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Bin; Mao, Guoqiang; Ge, Xiaohu; Han, Tao

    2015-01-01

    Cell association scheme determines which base station (BS) and mobile user (MU) should be associated with and also plays a significant role in determining the average data rate a MU can achieve in heterogeneous networks. However, the explosion of digital devices and the scarcity of spectra collectively force us to carefully re-design cell association scheme which was kind of taken for granted before. To address this, we develop a new cell association scheme in heterogeneous networks based on ...

  18. Discrimination of intra- and extracellular 23Na + signals in yeast cell suspensions using longitudinal magnetic resonance relaxography

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Yajie; Poirer-Quinot, Marie; Springer, Charles S.; Balschi, James A.

    2010-07-01

    This study tested the ability of MR relaxography (MRR) to discriminate intra- (Nai+) and extracellular (Nae+)23Na + signals using their longitudinal relaxation time constant ( T1) values. Na +-loaded yeast cell ( Saccharomyces cerevisiae) suspensions were investigated. Two types of compartmental 23Na +T1 differences were examined: a selective Nae+T1 decrease induced by an extracellular relaxation reagent (RR e), GdDOTP 5-; and, an intrinsic T1 difference. Parallel studies using the established method of 23Na MRS with an extracellular shift reagent (SR e), TmDOTP 5-, were used to validate the MRR measurements. With 12.8 mM RR e, the 23Nae+T1 was 2.4 ms and the 23Nai+T1 was 9.5 ms (9.4T, 24 °C). The Na + amounts and spontaneous efflux rate constants were found to be identical within experimental error whether measured by MRR/RR e or by MRS/SR e. Without RR e, the Na +-loaded yeast cell suspension 23Na MR signal exhibited two T1 values, 9.1 (±0.3) ms and 32.7 (±2.3) ms, assigned to 23Nai+ and 23Nae+, respectively. The Nai+ content measured was lower, 0.88 (±0.06); while Nae+ was higher, 1.43 (±0.12) compared with MRS/SR e measures on the same samples. However, the measured efflux rate constant was identical. T1 MRR potentially may be used for Nai+ determination in vivo and Na + flux measurements; with RR e for animal studies and without RR e for humans.

  19. 21 CFR 73.355 - Phaffia yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-04-01

    ... 21 Food and Drugs 1 2010-04-01 2010-04-01 false Phaffia yeast. 73.355 Section 73.355 Food and... ADDITIVES EXEMPT FROM CERTIFICATION Foods § 73.355 Phaffia yeast. (a) Identity. (1) The color additive phaffia yeast consists of the killed, dried cells of a nonpathogenic and nontoxicogenic strain of...

  20. Non-homologous end joining dependency of {gamma}-irradiation-induced adaptive frameshift mutation formation in cell cycle-arrested yeast cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Heidenreich, Erich [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Molecular Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)]. E-mail: erich.heidenreich@meduniwien.ac.at; Eisler, Herfried [Institute of Cancer Research, Division of Molecular Genetics, Medical University of Vienna, Borschkegasse 8a, A-1090 Vienna (Austria)

    2004-11-22

    There is a strong selective pressure favoring adaptive mutations which relieve proliferation-limiting adverse living conditions. Due to their importance for evolution and pathogenesis, we are interested in the mechanisms responsible for the formation of such adaptive, gain-of-fitness mutations in stationary-phase cells. During previous studies on the occurrence of spontaneous reversions of an auxotrophy-causing frameshift allele in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae, we noticed that about 50% of the adaptive reversions depended on a functional non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) pathway of DNA double-strand break (DSB) repair. Here, we show that the occasional NHEJ component Pol4, which is the yeast ortholog of mammalian DNA polymerase lambda, is not required for adaptive mutagenesis. An artificially imposed excess of DSBs by {gamma}-irradiation resulted in a dramatic increase in the incidence of adaptive, cell cycle arrest-releasing frameshift reversions. By the use of DNA ligase IV-deficient strains we detected that the majority of the {gamma}-induced adaptive mutations were also dependent on a functional NHEJ pathway. This suggests that the same mutagenic NHEJ mechanism acts on spontaneously arising as well as on ionizing radiation-induced DSBs. Inaccuracy of the NHEJ repair pathway may extensively contribute to the incidence of frameshift mutations in resting (non-dividing) eukaryotic cells, and thus act as a driving force in tumor development.

  1. Increasing binding density of yeast cells by control of surface charge with allylamine grafting to ion modified polymer surfaces.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Clara T H; Kondyurin, Alexey; Chrzanowski, Wojciech; Bilek, Marcela M M; McKenzie, David R

    2014-10-01

    Plasma immersion ion implantation (PIII) treatment of polymers creates a biointerface capable of direct covalent immobilization of biomolecules. The immobilization of protein molecules is achieved by covalent bonds formed between embedded radicals on the treated surface and amino acid side chains and cells can be immobilized through cell-wall proteins. The attachment density of negatively charged entities on a PIII treated surface is inhibited by its negative surface charge at neutral pH. To reduce the negative charge of PIII treated surfaces in phosphate buffer (pH 7.4, 11mM), we develop an effective approach of grafting allylamine monomers onto the treated surface. The results reveal reactions between allylamine and radicals on the PIII treated surface. One of these triggers polymerization, increasing the number of amine groups grafted. As a consequence, the PIII treated polystyrene surface after allylamine exposure becomes more hydrophobic and less negatively charged in phosphate buffer. Using yeast cells as an example, we have shown a significant improvement (6-15 times) of cell density immobilized on the PIII treated surface after exposure to allylamine. PMID:25092587

  2. Displaying Lipase B from Candida antarctica in Pichia pastoris Using the Yeast Surface Display Approach: Prospection of a New Anchor and Characterization of the Whole Cell Biocatalyst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marcelo Victor Holanda Moura

    Full Text Available Yeast Surface Display (YSD is a strategy to anchor proteins on the yeast cell wall which has been employed to increase enzyme stability thus decreasing production costs. Lipase B from Candida antarctica (LipB is one of the most studied enzymes in the context of industrial biotechnology. This study aimed to assess the biochemical features of this important biocatalyst when immobilized on the cell surface of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris using the YSD approach. For that purpose, two anchors were tested. The first (Flo9 was identified after a prospection of the P. pastoris genome being related to the family of flocculins similar to Flo1 but significantly smaller. The second is the Protein with Internal Repeats (Pir1 from P. pastoris. An immunolocalization assay showed that both anchor proteins were able to display the reporter protein EGFP in the yeast outer cell wall. LipB was expressed in P. pastoris fused either to Flo9 (FLOLIPB or Pir1 (PIRLIPB. Both constructions showed hydrolytic activity towards tributyrin (>100 U/mgdcw and >80 U/mgdcw, respectively, optimal hydrolytic activity around 45°C and pH 7.0, higher thermostability at 45°C and stability in organic solvents when compared to a free lipase.

  3. Displaying Lipase B from Candida antarctica in Pichia pastoris Using the Yeast Surface Display Approach: Prospection of a New Anchor and Characterization of the Whole Cell Biocatalyst

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Marcelo Victor Holanda; da Silva, Giulia Pontes; Machado, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves; Freire, Denise Maria Guimarães; Almeida, Rodrigo Volcan

    2015-01-01

    Yeast Surface Display (YSD) is a strategy to anchor proteins on the yeast cell wall which has been employed to increase enzyme stability thus decreasing production costs. Lipase B from Candida antarctica (LipB) is one of the most studied enzymes in the context of industrial biotechnology. This study aimed to assess the biochemical features of this important biocatalyst when immobilized on the cell surface of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris using the YSD approach. For that purpose, two anchors were tested. The first (Flo9) was identified after a prospection of the P. pastoris genome being related to the family of flocculins similar to Flo1 but significantly smaller. The second is the Protein with Internal Repeats (Pir1) from P. pastoris. An immunolocalization assay showed that both anchor proteins were able to display the reporter protein EGFP in the yeast outer cell wall. LipB was expressed in P. pastoris fused either to Flo9 (FLOLIPB) or Pir1 (PIRLIPB). Both constructions showed hydrolytic activity towards tributyrin (>100 U/mgdcw and >80 U/mgdcw, respectively), optimal hydrolytic activity around 45°C and pH 7.0, higher thermostability at 45°C and stability in organic solvents when compared to a free lipase. PMID:26510006

  4. Displaying Lipase B from Candida antarctica in Pichia pastoris Using the Yeast Surface Display Approach: Prospection of a New Anchor and Characterization of the Whole Cell Biocatalyst.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moura, Marcelo Victor Holanda; da Silva, Giulia Pontes; Machado, Antônio Carlos de Oliveira; Torres, Fernando Araripe Gonçalves; Freire, Denise Maria Guimarães; Almeida, Rodrigo Volcan

    2015-01-01

    Yeast Surface Display (YSD) is a strategy to anchor proteins on the yeast cell wall which has been employed to increase enzyme stability thus decreasing production costs. Lipase B from Candida antarctica (LipB) is one of the most studied enzymes in the context of industrial biotechnology. This study aimed to assess the biochemical features of this important biocatalyst when immobilized on the cell surface of the methylotrophic yeast Pichia pastoris using the YSD approach. For that purpose, two anchors were tested. The first (Flo9) was identified after a prospection of the P. pastoris genome being related to the family of flocculins similar to Flo1 but significantly smaller. The second is the Protein with Internal Repeats (Pir1) from P. pastoris. An immunolocalization assay showed that both anchor proteins were able to display the reporter protein EGFP in the yeast outer cell wall. LipB was expressed in P. pastoris fused either to Flo9 (FLOLIPB) or Pir1 (PIRLIPB). Both constructions showed hydrolytic activity towards tributyrin (>100 U/mgdcw and >80 U/mgdcw, respectively), optimal hydrolytic activity around 45°C and pH 7.0, higher thermostability at 45°C and stability in organic solvents when compared to a free lipase. PMID:26510006

  5. A kinetic study of the oxidation by molecular oxygen of the cytochrome chain of intact yeast cells, Acetobacter suboxydans cells, and of particulate suspensions of heart muscle.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ludwig, G D; Kuby, S A; Edelman, G M; Chance, B

    1983-01-01

    The pre-steady state kinetics of the cytochrome c oxidase reaction with oxygen were studied by a variation in the reaction time between approximately 6 and 25 ms at oxygen concentrations less than 6 mumol/l. For baker's yeast, a pseudo-first-order velocity constant of approximately 150 s-1 at 1.3 mumol/l O2 was obtained corresponding to a second-order reaction between O2 and a3 at a forward velocity constant (k+1) of approximately 3 X 10(7) liter equiv.-1s-1. Thus, the membrane-bound oxidase in the intact cell exhibits one of the most rapid enzyme-substrate reactions to be reported. The value is identical with that of Greenwood and Gibson on an isolated, solubilized cytochrome c oxidase. Similar values of k+1 are calculated from the turnover numbers [k+2 (a+2)] divided by the Km values (formula; see text) measured for these yeast preparations, which points to an almost negligible reverse reaction (k-1) compared to k+2(a+2). Similar calculations for the membrane-bound cytochrome c oxidase of heart muscle give a value of k+1 approximately equal to 10(7) liter equiv.-1s-1. The concordance of the different values of k+1 supports the view that the yeast cell wall does not impart a significant diffusion barrier to the transport of molecular oxygen. In contrast, Acetobacter suboxydans exhibits a much larger value for Km, and has a terminal oxidase of different kinetic parameters.

  6. Enhanced Inter-Cell Interference Coordination Challenges in Heterogeneous Networks

    CERN Document Server

    Lopez-Perez, David; de la Roche, Guillaume; Kountouris, Marios; Quek, Tony Q S; Zhang, Jie; 10.1109/MWC.2011.5876497

    2011-01-01

    3GPP LTE-Advanced has started a new study item to investigate Heterogeneous Network (HetNet) deployments as a cost effective way to deal with the unrelenting traffic demand. HetNets consist of a mix of macrocells, remote radio heads, and low-power nodes such as picocells, femtocells, and relays. Leveraging network topology, increasing the proximity between the access network and the end-users, has the potential to provide the next significant performance leap in wireless networks, improving spatial spectrum reuse and enhancing indoor coverage. Nevertheless, deployment of a large number of small cells overlaying the macrocells is not without new technical challenges. In this article, we present the concept of heterogeneous networks and also describe the major technical challenges associated with such network architecture. We focus in particular on the standardization activities within the 3GPP related to enhanced inter-cell interference coordination.

  7. Telomere Cap Components Influence the Rate of Senescence in Telomerase-Deficient Yeast Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Enomoto, Shinichiro; Glowczewski, Lynn; Lew-Smith, Jodi; Berman, Judith G.

    2004-01-01

    Cells lacking telomerase undergo senescence, a progressive reduction in cell division that involves a cell cycle delay and culminates in “crisis,” a period when most cells become inviable. In telomerase-deficient Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells lacking components of the nonsense-mediated mRNA decay (NMD) pathway (Upf1,Upf2, or Upf3 proteins), senescence is delayed, with crisis occurring ∼10 to 25 population doublings later than in Upf+ cells. Delayed senescence is seen in upfΔ cells lacking th...

  8. The AII Amacrine Cell Connectome: A Dense Network Hub

    OpenAIRE

    Marc, Robert E.; James Russell Anderson; Bryan William Jones; Crystal Lynn Sigulinsky; James Scott Lauritzen

    2014-01-01

    The mammalian AII retinal amacrine cell is a narrow-field, multistratified glycinergic neuron best known for its role in collecting scotopic signals from rod bipolar cells and distributing them to ON and OFF cone pathways in a crossover network via a combination of inhibitory synapses and heterocellular AII::ON cone bipolar cell gap junctions. Long considered a simple cell, a full connectomics analysis shows that AII cells possess the most complex interaction repertoire of any known vertebrat...

  9. Systematic analysis of asymmetric partitioning of yeast proteome between mother and daughter cells reveals “aging factors” and mechanism of lifespan asymmetry

    OpenAIRE

    Yang, Jing; McCormick, Mark A.; Zheng, Jiashun; Xie, Zhengwei; Tsuchiya, Mitsuhiro; Tsuchiyama, Scott; El-Samad, Hana; Ouyang, Qi; Kaeberlein, Matt; Kennedy, Brian K.; Li, Hao

    2015-01-01

    In this work, we took a proteome-centric view to analyze the cell division and lifespan asymmetry between mother and daughter cells in budding yeast. Using a flow cytometry-based, high-throughput approach, we quantified the partitioning of the proteome and identified 74 mother-enriched and 60 daughter-enriched proteins. Functional analysis of these proteins suggests mechanisms of asymmetric partitioning at an organelle/suborganelle level. We found that mother-enriched proteins are much more l...

  10. Regulation of the antioxidant system in cells of the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe after combined treatment with patulin and citrinin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Papp, Gábor; Máté, Gábor; Mike, Nóra; Gazdag, Zoltán; Pesti, Miklós

    2016-03-01

    The effects of combined treatment with patulin (PAT) and citrinin (CTN) on Schizosaccharomyces pombe cells were investigated in acute toxicity tests. In comparison with the controls the exposure of fission yeast cells (10(7) cells ml(-1)) to PAT + CTN (250 μM each) for 1 h at a survival rate of 66.6% significantly elevated the concentration of total reactive oxygen species (ROS) via increased levels of peroxides without affecting the concentrations of superoxides or the hydroxyl radical. This treatment induced a 3.08-fold increase in the specific concentration of glutathione and elevated specific activities of catalase and glutathione S-transferase, while at the same time the activity of glutathione reductase decreased. The pattern of the ROS was the same as that induced by CTN (Máté et al., 2014), while the presence of PAT in the PAT + CTN combination treatment modified the activities of the antioxidant system (Papp et al., 2012) in comparison with the individual PAT or CTN treatment, suggesting toxin-specific regulation of glutathione and the enzymes of the antioxidant system and the possibility that the transcription factor (pap1 and atf1) -regulated processes might be influenced directly by ROS. PMID:26752674

  11. Malassezia yeasts activate the NLRP3 inflammasome in antigen-presenting cells via Syk-kinase signalling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kistowska, Magdalena; Fenini, Gabriele; Jankovic, Dragana; Feldmeyer, Laurence; Kerl, Katrin; Bosshard, Philipp; Contassot, Emmanuel; French, Lars E

    2014-12-01

    Although being a normal part of the skin flora, yeasts of the genus Malassezia are associated with several common dermatologic conditions including pityriasis versicolour, seborrhoeic dermatitis (SD), folliculitis, atopic eczema/dermatitis (AE/AD) and dandruff. While Malassezia spp. are aetiological agents of pityriasis versicolour, a causal role of Malassezia spp. in AE/AD and SD remains to be established. Previous reports have shown that fungi such as Candida albicans and Aspergillus fumigatus are able to efficiently activate the NLRP3 inflammasome leading to robust secretion of the pro-inflammatory cytokine IL-1β. To date, innate immune responses to Malassezia spp. are not well characterized. Here, we show that different Malassezia species could induce NLRP3 inflammasome activation and subsequent IL-1β secretion in human antigen-presenting cells. In contrast, keratinocytes were not able to secrete IL-1β when exposed to Malassezia spp. Moreover, we demonstrate that IL-1β secretion in antigen-presenting cells was dependent on Syk-kinase signalling. Our results identify Malassezia spp. as potential strong inducers of pro-inflammatory responses when taken up by antigen-presenting cells and identify C-type lectin receptors and the NLRP3 inflammasome as crucial actors in this process. PMID:25267545

  12. Depletion of eIF4G from yeast cells narrows the range of translational efficiencies genome-wide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hinnebusch Alan G

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Eukaryotic translation initiation factor 4G (eIF4G is thought to influence the translational efficiencies of cellular mRNAs by its roles in forming an eIF4F-mRNA-PABP mRNP that is competent for attachment of the 43S preinitiation complex, and in scanning through structured 5' UTR sequences. We have tested this hypothesis by determining the effects of genetically depleting eIF4G from yeast cells on global translational efficiencies (TEs, using gene expression microarrays to measure the abundance of mRNA in polysomes relative to total mRNA for ~5900 genes. Results Although depletion of eIF4G is lethal and reduces protein synthesis by ~75%, it had small effects (less than a factor of 1.5 on the relative TE of most genes. Within these limits, however, depleting eIF4G narrowed the range of translational efficiencies genome-wide, with mRNAs of better than average TE being translated relatively worse, and mRNAs with lower than average TE being translated relatively better. Surprisingly, the fraction of mRNAs most dependent on eIF4G display an average 5' UTR length at or below the mean for all yeast genes. Conclusions This finding suggests that eIF4G is more critical for ribosome attachment to mRNAs than for scanning long, structured 5' UTRs. Our results also indicate that eIF4G, and the closed-loop mRNP it assembles with the m7 G cap- and poly(A-binding factors (eIF4E and PABP, is not essential for translation of most (if not all mRNAs but enhances the differentiation of translational efficiencies genome-wide.

  13. ASYNCHRONOUS MEASUREMENT OF CDV IN ATM NETWORKS USING OAM CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    J. GARCÍA-HERNÁNDEZ

    2003-09-01

    Full Text Available The synchronisation between source and destination clocks at network nodes to a common reference time of day is important in order to achieve accurate measurements of cells delays in ATM networks. Otherwise, direct measurement of the cell transfer delay and cell delay variation using time-stamped OAM cells would be inaccurate. In this work, a method for the accurate measurement of cell delay variation using OAM cells, which does not rely on synchronised clocks at the measurement points is presented. This is achieved by assuming that each ATM switch has the capability to process and to modify the information contained in the OAM cells. The system presented here was modelled by means of a block-oriented network simulator (BONeS, which is a graphically-oriented, general-purpose simulation language for modelling and simulating communications networks, including ATM networks. The measurements of the cell delay variation were carried out on a VBR video source generated by a real MPEG-2 encoder with a fixed quantizer step size. The simulation results obtained show that measurements of the cumulative cell delay variation carried out without synchronised clocks at the measurement points were very closed to those obtained using synchronised clocks at the measurement points.

  14. Yeast Gga Coat Proteins Function with Clathrin in Golgi to Endosome Transport

    OpenAIRE

    Costaguta, G; Stefan, C. J.; Bensen, E. S.; Emr, S D; Payne, G S

    2001-01-01

    Gga proteins represent a newly recognized, evolutionarily conserved protein family with homology to the “ear” domain of the clathrin adaptor AP-1 γ subunit. Yeast cells contain two Gga proteins, Gga1p and Gga2p, that have been proposed to act in transport between the trans-Golgi network and endosomes. Here we provide genetic and physical evidence that yeast Gga proteins function in trans-Golgi network clathrin coats. Deletion of Gga2p (gga2Δ), the major Gga protein...

  15. Interaction Between Yeasts and Zinc

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nicola, Raffaele De; Walker, Graeme

    Zinc is an essential trace element in biological systems. For example, it acts as a cellular membrane stabiliser, plays a critical role in gene expression and genome modification and activates nearly 300 enzymes, including alcohol dehydrogenase. The present chapter will be focused on the influence of zinc on cell physiology of industrial yeast strains of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, with special regard to the uptake and subsequent utilisation of this metal. Zinc uptake by yeast is metabolism-dependent, with most of the available zinc translocated very quickly into the vacuole. At cell division, zinc is distributed from mother to daughter cells and this effectively lowers the individual cellular zinc concentration, which may become zinc depleted at the onset of the fermentation. Zinc influences yeast fermentative performance and examples will be provided relating to brewing and wine fermentations. Industrial yeasts are subjected to several stresses that may impair fermentation performance. Such stresses may also impact on yeast cell zinc homeostasis. This chapter will discuss the practical implications for the correct management of zinc bioavailability for yeast-based biotechnologies aimed at improving yeast growth, viability, fermentation performance and resistance to environmental stresses

  16. Evaluation of Relative Yeast Cell Surface Hydrophobicity Measured by Flow Cytometry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lisa Colling

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective: To develop an efficient method for evaluating cell surface hydrophobicity and to apply the method to demonstrate the effects of fungal growth conditions on cell surface properties.

  17. Metamorphosis of the Basidiomycota Ustilago maydis: transformation of yeast-like cells into basidiocarps.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cabrera-Ponce, José L; León-Ramírez, Claudia G; Verver-Vargas, Aurora; Palma-Tirado, Lourdes; Ruiz-Herrera, José

    2012-10-01

    Ustilago maydis (DC) Cda., a phytopathogenic Basidiomycota, is the causal agent of corn smut. During its life cycle U. maydis alternates between a yeast-like, haploid nonpathogenic stage, and a filamentous, dikaryotic pathogenic form that invades the plant and induces tumor formation. As all the members of the Subphylum Ustilaginomycotina, U. maydis is unable to form basidiocarps, instead it produces teliospores within the tumors that germinate forming a septate basidium (phragmobasidium). We have now established conditions allowing a completely different developmental program of U. maydis when grown on solid medium containing auxins in dual cultures with maize embryogenic calli. Under these conditions U. maydis forms large hemi-spheroidal structures with all the morphological and structural characteristics of gastroid-type basidiocarps. These basidiocarps are made of three distinct hyphal layers, the most internal of which (hymenium) contains non-septate basidia (holobasidia) from which four basidiospores develop. In basidiocarps meiosis and genetic recombination occur, and meiotic products (basidiospores) segregate in a Mendelian fashion. These results are evidence of sexual cycle completion of an Ustilaginomycotina in vitro, and the demonstration that, besides its quasi-obligate biotrophic pathogenic mode of life, U. maydis possesses the genetic program to form basidiocarps as occurs in saprophytic Basidiomycota species.

  18. Nutrient control of eukaryote cell growth: a systems biology study in yeast

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lilley Kathryn S

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background To elucidate the biological processes affected by changes in growth rate and nutrient availability, we have performed a comprehensive analysis of the transcriptome, proteome and metabolome responses of chemostat cultures of the yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, growing at a range of growth rates and in four different nutrient-limiting conditions. Results We find significant changes in expression for many genes in each of the four nutrient-limited conditions tested. We also observe several processes that respond differently to changes in growth rate and are specific to each nutrient-limiting condition. These include carbohydrate storage, mitochondrial function, ribosome synthesis, and phosphate transport. Integrating transcriptome data with proteome measurements allows us to identify previously unrecognized examples of post-transcriptional regulation in response to both nutrient and growth-rate signals. Conclusions Our results emphasize the unique properties of carbon metabolism and the carbon substrate, the limitation of which induces significant changes in gene regulation at the transcriptional and post-transcriptional level, as well as altering how many genes respond to growth rate. By comparison, the responses to growth limitation by other nutrients involve a smaller set of genes that participate in specific pathways. See associated commentary http://www.biomedcentral.com/1741-7007/8/62

  19. The yeast three-hybrid system as an experimental platform to identify proteins interacting with small signaling molecules in plant cells: Potential and limitations

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stéphanie eCottier

    2011-12-01

    Full Text Available Chemical genetics is a powerful scientific strategy that utilizes small bioactive molecules as experimental tools to unravel biological processes. Bioactive compounds occurring in nature represent an enormous diversity of structures that can be used to dissect functions of biological systems. Once the bioactivity of a natural or synthetic compound has been critically evaluated the challenge remains to identify its molecular target and mode of action, which usually is a time consuming and labor-intensive process. To facilitate this task, we decided to implement the yeast three-hybrid (Y3H technology as a general experimental platform to scan the whole Arabidopsis proteome for targets of small signaling molecules. The Y3H technology is based on the yeast two-hybrid system and allows direct cloning of proteins that interact in vivo with a synthetic hybrid ligand, which comprises the biologically active molecule of interest covalently linked to methotrexate (Mtx. In yeast nucleus the hybrid ligand connects two fusion proteins: the Mtx part binding to dihydrofolate reductase fused to a DNA binding domain (encoded in the yeast strain, and the bioactive molecule part binding to its potential protein target fused to a DNA activating domain (encoded on a cDNA expression vector. During cDNA library screening, the formation of this ternary, transcriptional activator complex leads to reporter gene activation in yeast cells, and thereby allows selection of the putative targets of small bioactive molecules of interest. Here we present the strategy and experimental details for construction and application of a Y3H platform, including chemical synthesis of different hybrid ligands, construction of suitable cDNA libraries, the choice of yeast strains, and appropriate screening conditions. Based on the results obtained and the current literature we discussed the perspectives and limitations of the Y3H approach for identifying targets of small bioactive molecules.

  20. Time-dependent regulation of yeast glycolysis upon nitrogen starvation depends on cell history

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Eunen, K.; Dool, P.; Canelas, A. B.; Kiewiet, J.; Bouwman, J.; van Gulik, W. M.; Westerhoff, H. V.; Bakker, B. M.

    2010-01-01

    In this study, the authors investigated how the glycolytic flux was regulated in time upon nitrogen starvation of cells with different growth histories. We have compared cells grown in glucose-limited chemostat cultures under respiratory conditions (low dilution rate of 0.1/h) to cells grown under r

  1. Mass Spectrometric Method for Analyzing Metabolites in Yeast with Single Cell Sensitivity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Amantonico, Andrea; Oh, Joo Yeon; Sobek, Jens; Heinemann, Matthias; Zenobi, Renato

    2008-01-01

    Getting a look-in: An optimized MALDI-MS procedure has been developed to detect endogenous primary metabolites directly in the cell extract. A detection limit corresponding to metabolites from less than a single cell has been attained, opening the door to single-cell metabolomics by mass spectrometr

  2. Immunization with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis radioattenuated yeast cells induces Th1 immune response in Balb/C mice

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Martins, Estefania M.N.; Andrade, Antero S.R. [Centro de Desenvolvimento da Tecnologia Nuclear (CDTN-CNEN/MG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil)], e-mail: estefaniabio@yahoo.com.br, e-mail: antero@cdtn.br; Resende, Maria Aparecida de [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Microbiologia], e-mail: maresend@mono.icb.ufmg.br; Reis, Bernardo S.; Goes, Alfredo M. [Universidade Federal de Minas Gerais (UFMG), Belo Horizonte, MG (Brazil). Dept. de Bioquimica e Imunologia], e-mail: goes@mono.icb.ufmg.br, e-mail: brsgarbi@mono.icb.ufmg.br

    2009-07-01

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent mycosis in Latin America. To date, there is no effective vaccine. In our laboratory yeast cells of P. brasiliensis were attenuated by gamma irradiation. We defined an absorbed dose in which the pathogen loses the reproductive ability, while retaining the morphology, the synthesis and secretion of proteins and the oxidative metabolism. The immunization with these cells was able to confer protection in BALB/c mice. The aim of the present work was evaluate the immune response pathway activated in mice immunized with P. brasiliensis radioattenuated yeast cells. The protector effect was evaluated in BALB/c mice groups immunized once or twice, respectively. Each group was divided in three sub groups that were challenge 30, 45 or 60 days after the immunization. These groups were called G1A, G1B and G1C in the group immunized once and G2A, G2B and G2C in the group immunized twice. Recovery of CFUs and cytokines determination (IFN - {gamma}, IL - 10 and IL IV 4) were performed three months post challenge. Quantitative RT-PCR was the method of choice used to quantify the expression of cytokines. The sera were collected weekly to evaluate the IgG antibody titers and the IgG1 and IgG2a pattern in the course of infection. A significant reduction in CFUs recovery was verified 90 days post challenge in mice submitted to one immunization: 73.0%, 96.0% and 76.3% for sub-groups G1A, G1B and G1C, respectively. In the group submitted to two immunizations, a remarkable increase in the protection was obtained. No CFUs was recovered from sub-groups G2B and G2C and very few CFUs (reduction of 98.6%) were recovered from the lungs of sub group G2A. In mice submitted to one immunization, Th1 and Th2 cytokines were simultaneously produced. In the group submitted to two immunizations, levels of IL-10 and IL-4 were very low, while IFN-{gamma} production was maintained indicating that a Th1 pattern was

  3. Immunization with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis radioattenuated yeast cells induces Th1 immune response in Balb/C mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paracoccidioides brasiliensis is the agent of paracoccidioidomycosis, the most prevalent mycosis in Latin America. To date, there is no effective vaccine. In our laboratory yeast cells of P. brasiliensis were attenuated by gamma irradiation. We defined an absorbed dose in which the pathogen loses the reproductive ability, while retaining the morphology, the synthesis and secretion of proteins and the oxidative metabolism. The immunization with these cells was able to confer protection in BALB/c mice. The aim of the present work was evaluate the immune response pathway activated in mice immunized with P. brasiliensis radioattenuated yeast cells. The protector effect was evaluated in BALB/c mice groups immunized once or twice, respectively. Each group was divided in three sub groups that were challenge 30, 45 or 60 days after the immunization. These groups were called G1A, G1B and G1C in the group immunized once and G2A, G2B and G2C in the group immunized twice. Recovery of CFUs and cytokines determination (IFN - γ, IL - 10 and IL IV 4) were performed three months post challenge. Quantitative RT-PCR was the method of choice used to quantify the expression of cytokines. The sera were collected weekly to evaluate the IgG antibody titers and the IgG1 and IgG2a pattern in the course of infection. A significant reduction in CFUs recovery was verified 90 days post challenge in mice submitted to one immunization: 73.0%, 96.0% and 76.3% for sub-groups G1A, G1B and G1C, respectively. In the group submitted to two immunizations, a remarkable increase in the protection was obtained. No CFUs was recovered from sub-groups G2B and G2C and very few CFUs (reduction of 98.6%) were recovered from the lungs of sub group G2A. In mice submitted to one immunization, Th1 and Th2 cytokines were simultaneously produced. In the group submitted to two immunizations, levels of IL-10 and IL-4 were very low, while IFN-γ production was maintained indicating that a Th1 pattern was dominant. For

  4. Application in the Ethanol Fermentation of Immobilized Yeast Cells in Matrix of Alginate/Magnetic Nanoparticles, on Chitosan-Magnetite Microparticles and Cellulose-coated Magnetic Nanoparticles

    CERN Document Server

    Ivanova, Viara; Hristov, Jordan

    2011-01-01

    Saccharomyces cerevisiae cells were entrapped in matrix of alginate and magnetic nanoparticles and covalently immobilized on magnetite-containing chitosan and cellulose-coated magnetic nanoparticles. Cellulose-coated magnetic nanoparticles with covalently immobilized thermostable {\\alpha}-amylase and chitosan particles with immobilized glucoamylase were also prepared. The immobilized cells and enzymes were applied in column reactors - 1/for simultaneous corn starch saccharification with the immobilized glucoamylase and production of ethanol with the entrapped or covalently immobilized yeast cells, 2/ for separate ethanol fermentation of the starch hydrolysates with the fixed yeasts. Hydrolysis of corn starch with the immobilized {\\alpha}-amylase and glucoamylase, and separate hydrolysis with the immobilized {\\alpha}-amylase were also examined. In the first reactor the ethanol yield reached approx. 91% of the theoretical; the yield was approx. 86% in the second. The ethanol fermentation was affected by the typ...

  5. Fission yeast Nod1 is a component of cortical nodes involved in cell size control and division site placement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Isabelle Jourdain

    Full Text Available Most cells enter mitosis once they have reached a defined size. In the fission yeast Schizosaccharomyces pombe, mitotic entry is orchestrated by a geometry-sensing mechanism that involves the Cdk1/Cdc2-inhibiting Wee1 kinase. The factors upstream of Wee1 gather together in interphase to form a characteristic medial and cortical belt of nodes. Nodes are also considered to be precursors of the cytokinesis contractile actomyosin ring (CAR. Here we describe a new component of the interphase nodes and cytokinesis rings, which we named Nod1. Consistent with its role in cell size control at division, nod1Δ cells were elongated and epistatic with regulators of Wee1. Through biochemical and localisation studies, we placed Nod1 in a complex with the Rho-guanine nucleotide exchange factor Gef2. Nod1 and Gef2 mutually recruited each other in nodes and Nod1 also assembles Gef2 in rings. Like gef2Δ, nod1Δ cells showed a mild displacement of their division plane and this phenotype was severely exacerbated when the parallel Polo kinase pathway was also compromised. We conclude that Nod1 specifies the division site by localising Gef2 to the mitotic cell middle. Previous work showed that Gef2 in turn anchors factors that control the spatio-temporal recruitment of the actin nucleation machinery. It is believed that the actin filaments originated from the nodes pull nodes together into a single contractile ring. Surprisingly however, we found that node proteins could form pre-ring helical filaments in a cdc12-112 mutant in which nucleation of the actin ring is impaired. Furthermore, the deletion of either nod1 or gef2 created an un-expected situation where different ring components were recruited sequentially rather than simultaneously. At later stages of cytokinesis, these various rings appeared inter-fitted rather than merged. This study brings a new slant to the understanding of CAR assembly and function.

  6. CHANGES IN LIPID CONTENT OF WINE YEASTS DURING FERMENTATION BY IMMOBILIZED CELLS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fedor Malik

    2010-05-01

    Full Text Available Comparison of the lipid composition of immobilised and non-immobilised cells of the wine cell strain Saccharomyces cerevisiae 6C subjected to ethanol stress indicates that the whole impact of the ethanol stress on the fatty acids composition is less influenced with immobilised cells as with non- immobilised ones. The ethanol stress raised in immobilised and free cells occurrence of palmitoleic acid to the detriment of palmitic acid. The character of changes in lipid composition during immobilisation probably has an impact upon slightly increased stress resistance. The immobilised cells are as well resistive against passive membrane fluidisation by ethanol. doi:10.5219/56

  7. Influence of the fibroblastic reticular network on cell-cell interactions in lymphoid organs.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Frederik Graw

    Full Text Available Secondary lymphoid organs (SLO, such as lymph nodes and the spleen, display a complex micro-architecture. In the T cell zone the micro-architecture is provided by a network of fibroblastic reticular cells (FRC and their filaments. The FRC network is thought to enhance the interaction between immune cells and their cognate antigen. However, the effect of the FRC network on cell interaction cannot be quantified to date because of limitations in immunological methodology. We use computational models to study the influence of different densities of FRC networks on the probability that two cells meet. We developed a 3D cellular automaton model to simulate cell movements and interactions along the FRC network inside lymphatic tissue. We show that the FRC network density has only a small effect on the probability of a cell to come into contact with a static or motile target. However, damage caused by a disruption of the FRC network is greatest at FRC densities corresponding to densities observed in the spleen of naïve mice. Our analysis suggests that the FRC network as a guiding structure for moving T cells has only a minor effect on the probability to find a corresponding dendritic cell. We propose alternative hypotheses by which the FRC network might influence the functionality of immune responses in a more significant way.

  8. The glucose metabolite methylglyoxal inhibits expression of the glucose transporter genes by inactivating the cell surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 in yeast.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roy, Adhiraj; Hashmi, Salman; Li, Zerui; Dement, Angela D; Cho, Kyu Hong; Kim, Jeong-Ho

    2016-03-01

    Methylglyoxal (MG) is a cytotoxic by-product of glycolysis. MG has inhibitory effect on the growth of cells ranging from microorganisms to higher eukaryotes, but its molecular targets are largely unknown. The yeast cell-surface glucose sensors Rgt2 and Snf3 function as glucose receptors that sense extracellular glucose and generate a signal for induction of expression of genes encoding glucose transporters (HXTs). Here we provide evidence that these glucose sensors are primary targets of MG in yeast. MG inhibits the growth of glucose-fermenting yeast cells by inducing endocytosis and degradation of the glucose sensors. However, the glucose sensors with mutations at their putative ubiquitin-acceptor lysine residues are resistant to MG-induced degradation. These results suggest that the glucose sensors are inactivated through ubiquitin-mediated endocytosis and degraded in the presence of MG. In addition, the inhibitory effect of MG on the glucose sensors is greatly enhanced in cells lacking Glo1, a key component of the MG detoxification system. Thus the stability of these glucose sensors seems to be critically regulated by intracellular MG levels. Taken together, these findings suggest that MG attenuates glycolysis by promoting degradation of the cell-surface glucose sensors and thus identify MG as a potential glycolytic inhibitor.

  9. Anti-Cancer Effects of Chinese Red Yeast Rice beyond Monacolin K alone in Colon Cancer Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Hong, Mee Young; Seeram, Navindra P.; Zhang, Yanjun; HEBER, DAVID

    2007-01-01

    Chinese Red Yeast Rice (RYR) is a food herb made by fermenting Monascus purpureus Went yeast on white rice. RYR contains a mixture of monacolins, one of which, Monacolin K (MK), is identical to lovastatin. Epidemiological studies show that individuals taking statins have a reduced risk of colon cancer. In the present study, lovastatin decreased cellular proliferation (P

  10. [Demonstration of β-1,2 mannan structures expressed on the cell wall of Candida albicans yeast form but not on the hyphal form by using monoclonal antibodies].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aydın, Cevahir; Ataoğlu, Haluk

    2015-01-01

    Candida albicans is a polymorphic fungus that may be observed as both commensal and opportunistic pathogen in humans. As one of the major components of Candida cell wall structure, mannan plays an important role in the fungus-host cell interaction and in virulence. The ability to switch from yeast to hypha form of microorganism is crutial in the development of C.albicans infections. Hyphal form has different antigenic properties compared to yeast form and structural changes occur in the yeast cell wall during transition from yeast to hypha form. Although there are several factors associated with this transition process, sufficient information is not available. The aim of this study was to investigate the change of configuration in mannan structure found in C.albicans cell wall by using monoclonal antibodies. C.albicans (NIHA 207) serotype A strains were used as test strains throughout the study, together with Salmonella choleraesuis 211 and Salmonella infantis as controls with similar cell wall structures to that of C.albicans. Cultures were maintained on YPD-agar medium by incubating at 28°C for yeast forms, and on YPD-broth medium in a shaking incubator at 37°C for 3-4 hours for the growth of hyphal forms. Cells were harvested in the exponential phase, and after being washed, the mannan content from C.albicans were extracted from pellet by heating in 20 mM sodium citrate buffer for 90 minutes at 125°C. Hybridoma technique was used for the production of monoclonal antibodies. After immunizing the Balb/C mice with antigen, the splenocytes were harvested and fusion was performed between spleen cells and F0 myeloma cells. The clones grown in HAT medium were screened for the presence of antibody producing hybrid cells by ELISA method. The antibody isotypes were determined by using a commercial kit (Pierce Biotechnology, ABD). The culture supernatants which contained monoclonal antibodies were collected and purified according to the ammonium sulphate method

  11. Eighteen new oleaginous yeast species.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garay, Luis A; Sitepu, Irnayuli R; Cajka, Tomas; Chandra, Idelia; Shi, Sandy; Lin, Ting; German, J Bruce; Fiehn, Oliver; Boundy-Mills, Kyria L

    2016-07-01

    Of 1600 known species of yeasts, about 70 are known to be oleaginous, defined as being able to accumulate over 20 % intracellular lipids. These yeasts have value for fundamental and applied research. A survey of yeasts from the Phaff Yeast Culture Collection, University of California Davis was performed to identify additional oleaginous species within the Basidiomycota phylum. Fifty-nine strains belonging to 34 species were grown in lipid inducing media, and total cell mass, lipid yield and triacylglycerol profiles were determined. Thirty-two species accumulated at least 20 % lipid and 25 species accumulated over 40 % lipid by dry weight. Eighteen of these species were not previously reported to be oleaginous. Triacylglycerol profiles were suitable for biodiesel production. These results greatly expand the number of known oleaginous yeast species, and reveal the wealth of natural diversity of triacylglycerol profiles within wild-type oleaginous Basidiomycetes. PMID:27072563

  12. rRNA maturation in yeast cells depleted of large ribosomal subunit proteins.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gisela Pöll

    Full Text Available The structural constituents of the large eukaryotic ribosomal subunit are 3 ribosomal RNAs, namely the 25S, 5.8S and 5S rRNA and about 46 ribosomal proteins (r-proteins. They assemble and mature in a highly dynamic process that involves more than 150 proteins and 70 small RNAs. Ribosome biogenesis starts in the nucleolus, continues in the nucleoplasm and is completed after nucleo-cytoplasmic translocation of the subunits in the cytoplasm. In this work we created 26 yeast strains, each of which conditionally expresses one of the large ribosomal subunit (LSU proteins. In vivo depletion of the analysed LSU r-proteins was lethal and led to destabilisation and degradation of the LSU and/or its precursors. Detailed steady state and metabolic pulse labelling analyses of rRNA precursors in these mutant strains showed that LSU r-proteins can be grouped according to their requirement for efficient progression of different steps of large ribosomal subunit maturation. Comparative analyses of the observed phenotypes and the nature of r-protein-rRNA interactions as predicted by current atomic LSU structure models led us to discuss working hypotheses on i how individual r-proteins control the productive processing of the major 5' end of 5.8S rRNA precursors by exonucleases Rat1p and Xrn1p, and ii the nature of structural characteristics of nascent LSUs that are required for cytoplasmic accumulation of nascent subunits but are nonessential for most of the nuclear LSU pre-rRNA processing events.

  13. Microtubule networks for plant cell division

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Keijzer, de Jeroen; Mulder, B.M.; Janson, M.E.

    2014-01-01

    During cytokinesis the cytoplasm of a cell is divided to form two daughter cells. In animal cells, the existing plasma membrane is first constricted and then abscised to generate two individual plasma membranes. Plant cells on the other hand divide by forming an interior dividing wall, the so-called

  14. NetPhosYeast: prediction of protein phosphorylation sites in yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ingrell, C.R.; Miller, Martin Lee; Jensen, O.N.;

    2007-01-01

    We here present a neural network-based method for the prediction of protein phosphorylation sites in yeast-an important model organism for basic research. Existing protein phosphorylation site predictors are primarily based on mammalian data and show reduced sensitivity on yeast phosphorylation...... sites compared to those in humans, suggesting the need for an yeast-specific phosphorylation site predictor. NetPhosYeast achieves a correlation coefficient close to 0.75 with a sensitivity of 0.84 and specificity of 0.90 and outperforms existing predictors in the identification of phosphorylation sites...... in yeast....

  15. d-lactate-selective amperometric biosensor based on the cell debris of the recombinant yeast Hansenula polymorpha.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smutok, Oleh V; Dmytruk, Kostyantyn V; Karkovska, Maria I; Schuhmann, Wolfgang; Gonchar, Mykhailo V; Sibirny, Andriy A

    2014-07-01

    A d-lactate-selective biosensor has been developed using cells' debris of recombinant thermotolerant methylotrophic yeast Hansenula polymorpha, overproducing d-lactate: cytochrome c-oxidoreductase (EC 1.1.2.4, d-lactate dehydrogenase (cytochrome), DlDH). The H. polymorpha DlDH-producer was constructed in two steps. First, the gene CYB2 was deleted on the background of the С-105 (gcr1 catX) strain of H. polymorpha impaired in glucose repression and devoid of catalase activity to avoid specific l-lactate-cytochrome c oxidoreductase activity. Second, the homologous gene DLD1 coding for DlDH was overexpressed under the control of the strong H. polymorpha alcohol oxidase promoter in the frame of a plasmid for multicopy integration in the Δcyb2 strain. The selected recombinant strain possesses 6-fold increased DlDH activity as compared to the initial strain. The cells debris was used as a biorecognition element of a biosensor, since DlDH is strongly bound to mitochondrial membranes. The cells' debris, prepared by mechanic disintegration of recombinant cells, was immobilized on a graphite working electrode in an electrochemically generated layer using an Os-complex modified cathodic electrodeposition polymer. Cytochrome c was used as additional native electron mediator to improve electron transfer from reduced DlDH to the working electrode. The constructed d-lactate-selective biosensors are characterized by a high sensitivity (46.3-61.6 A M(-1)m(-2)), high selectivity and sufficient storage stability. PMID:24840438

  16. Lager yeast comes of age.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wendland, Jürgen

    2014-10-01

    Alcoholic fermentations have accompanied human civilizations throughout our history. Lager yeasts have a several-century-long tradition of providing fresh beer with clean taste. The yeast strains used for lager beer fermentation have long been recognized as hybrids between two Saccharomyces species. We summarize the initial findings on this hybrid nature, the genomics/transcriptomics of lager yeasts, and established targets of strain improvements. Next-generation sequencing has provided fast access to yeast genomes. Its use in population genomics has uncovered many more hybridization events within Saccharomyces species, so that lager yeast hybrids are no longer the exception from the rule. These findings have led us to propose network evolution within Saccharomyces species. This "web of life" recognizes the ability of closely related species to exchange DNA and thus drain from a combined gene pool rather than be limited to a gene pool restricted by speciation. Within the domesticated lager yeasts, two groups, the Saaz and Frohberg groups, can be distinguished based on fermentation characteristics. Recent evidence suggests that these groups share an evolutionary history. We thus propose to refer to the Saaz group as Saccharomyces carlsbergensis and to the Frohberg group as Saccharomyces pastorianus based on their distinct genomes. New insight into the hybrid nature of lager yeast will provide novel directions for future strain improvement. PMID:25084862

  17. Isolation of a cdc28 mutation that abrogates the dependence of S phase on completion of M phase of the budding yeast cell cycle

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Santanu Kumar Ghosh; Pratima Sinha

    2000-01-01

    We have isolated a mutation in the budding yeast Saccharomyces cerevisisae CDC28 gene that allows cdc13 cells, carrying damaged DNA, to continue with the cell division cycle. While cdc13 mutant cells are arrested as large-budded cells at the nonpermissive temperature 37°C, the cdc13 cdc28 double mutant culture showed cells with one or more buds, most of which showed apical growth. The additional buds emerged without the intervening steps of nuclear division and cell separation. We suggest that the cdc28 mutation abrogates a checkpoint function and allows cells with damaged or incompletely replicated DNA an entry to another round of cell cycle and bypasses the mitotic phase of the cell cycle.

  18. To nick or not to nick: comparison of I-SceI single- and double-strand break-induced recombination in yeast and human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Samantha S Katz

    Full Text Available Genetic modification of a chromosomal locus to replace an existing dysfunctional allele with a corrected sequence can be accomplished through targeted gene correction using the cell's homologous recombination (HR machinery. Gene targeting is stimulated by generation of a DNA double-strand break (DSB at or near the site of correction, but repair of the break via non-homologous end-joining without using the homologous template can lead to deleterious genomic changes such as in/del mutations, or chromosomal rearrangements. By contrast, generation of a DNA single-strand break (SSB, or nick, can stimulate gene correction without the problems of DSB repair because the uncut DNA strand acts as a template to permit healing without alteration of genetic material. Here, we examine the ability of a nicking variant of the I-SceI endonuclease (K223I I-SceI to stimulate gene targeting in yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae and in human embryonic kidney (HEK-293 cells. K223I I-SceI is proficient in both yeast and human cells and promotes gene correction up to 12-fold. We show that K223I I-SceI-driven recombination follows a different mechanism than wild-type I-SceI-driven recombination, thus indicating that the initial DNA break that stimulates recombination is not a low-level DSB but a nick. We also demonstrate that K223I I-SceI efficiently elevates gene targeting at loci distant from the break site in yeast cells. These findings establish the capability of the I-SceI nickase to enhance recombination in yeast and human cells, strengthening the notion that nicking enzymes could be effective tools in gene correction strategies for applications in molecular biology, biotechnology, and gene therapy.

  19. Aureobasidin A arrests growth of yeast cells through both ceramide intoxication and deprivation of essential inositolphosphorylceramides

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cerantola, Vanessa; Guillas, Isabelle; Roubaty, Carole;

    2009-01-01

    require the reverse ceramidase activity of overexpressed Ydc1p for sphingolipid biosynthesis and viability. These cells, termed 2Delta.YDC1, make sphingolipids containing exclusively dihydrosphingosine and an abnormally wide spectrum of fatty acids with between 18 and 26 carbon atoms. Like wild-type cells...

  20. Polypeptone induces dramatic cell lysis in ura4 deletion mutants of fission yeast.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yuzy Matsuo

    Full Text Available Polypeptone is widely excluded from Schizosaccharomyces pombe growth medium. However, the reasons why polypeptone should be avoided have not been documented. Polypeptone dramatically induced cell lysis in the ura4 deletion mutant when cells approached the stationary growth phase, and this phenotype was suppressed by supplementation of uracil. To determine the specificity of this cell lysis phenotype, we created deletion mutants of other genes involved in de novo biosynthesis of uridine monophosphate (ura1, ura2, ura3, and ura5. Cell lysis was not observed in these gene deletion mutants. In addition, concomitant disruption of ura1, ura2, ura3, or ura5 in the ura4 deletion mutant suppressed cell lysis, indicating that cell lysis induced by polypeptone is specific to the ura4 deletion mutant. Furthermore, cell lysis was also suppressed when the gene involved in coenzyme Q biosynthesis was deleted. This is likely because Ura3 requires coenzyme Q for its activity. The ura4 deletion mutant was sensitive to zymolyase, which mainly degrades (1,3-beta-D glucan, when grown in the presence of polypeptone, and cell lysis was suppressed by the osmotic stabiliser, sorbitol. Finally, the induction of cell lysis in the ura4 deletion mutant was due to the accumulation of orotidine-5-monophosphate. Cell wall integrity was dramatically impaired in the ura4 deletion mutant when grown in the presence of polypeptone. Because ura4 is widely used as a selection marker in S. pombe, caution needs to be taken when evaluating phenotypes of ura4 mutants.

  1. Why do hubs in the yeast protein interaction network tend to be essential: reexamining the connection between the network topology and essentiality.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elena Zotenko

    Full Text Available The centrality-lethality rule, which notes that high-degree nodes in a protein interaction network tend to correspond to proteins that are essential, suggests that the topological prominence of a protein in a protein interaction network may be a good predictor of its biological importance. Even though the correlation between degree and essentiality was confirmed by many independent studies, the reason for this correlation remains illusive. Several hypotheses about putative connections between essentiality of hubs and the topology of protein-protein interaction networks have been proposed, but as we demonstrate, these explanations are not supported by the properties of protein interaction networks. To identify the main topological determinant of essentiality and to provide a biological explanation for the connection between the network topology and essentiality, we performed a rigorous analysis of six variants of the genomewide protein interaction network for Saccharomyces cerevisiae obtained using different techniques. We demonstrated that the majority of hubs are essential due to their involvement in Essential Complex Biological Modules, a group of densely connected proteins with shared biological function that are enriched in essential proteins. Moreover, we rejected two previously proposed explanations for the centrality-lethality rule, one relating the essentiality of hubs to their role in the overall network connectivity and another relying on the recently published essential protein interactions model.

  2. Continuous ethanol production using immobilized yeast cells entrapped in loofa-reinforced alginate carriers

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Phoowit Bangrak

    2011-06-01

    Full Text Available A culture of Saccharomyces cerevisiae M30 entrapped in loofa-reinforced alginate was used for continuous ethanol fermentation in a packed-bed reactor with initial sugar concentrations of 200-248 g/L. Maximum ethanol productivity of 11.5 g/(L·h was obtained at an ethanol concentration of 57.4 g/L, an initial sugar concentration of 220 g/L and a dilution rate (D of 0.2 h-1. However, a maximum ethanol concentration of 82.1 g/L (productivity of 9.0 g/(L·h was obtained at a D of 0.11 h-1. Ethanol productivity in the continuous culture was 6-8-fold higher than that in the batch culture. Due to the developed carrier's high biocompatibility, high porosity, and good mechanical strength, advantages such as cell regeneration, reusability, altered mechanical strength, and high capacity to trap active cells in the reactor were achieved in this study. The immobilized cell reactor was successfully operated for 30 days without any loss in ethanol productivity. The average conversion yield was 0.43-0.45 throughout the entire operation, with an immobilization yield of 47.5%. The final total cell concentration in the reactor was 37.3 g/L (17.7 g/L immobilized cells and 19.6 g/L suspended cells. The concentration of suspended cells in the effluent was 0.8 g/L.

  3. Cell proliferation along vascular islands during microvascular network growth

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kelly-Goss Molly R

    2012-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Observations in our laboratory provide evidence of vascular islands, defined as disconnected endothelial cell segments, in the adult microcirculation. The objective of this study was to determine if vascular islands are involved in angiogenesis during microvascular network growth. Results Mesenteric tissues, which allow visualization of entire microvascular networks at a single cell level, were harvested from unstimulated adult male Wistar rats and Wistar rats 3 and 10 days post angiogenesis stimulation by mast cell degranulation with compound 48/80. Tissues were immunolabeled for PECAM and BRDU. Identification of vessel lumens via injection of FITC-dextran confirmed that endothelial cell segments were disconnected from nearby patent networks. Stimulated networks displayed increases in vascular area, length density, and capillary sprouting. On day 3, the percentage of islands with at least one BRDU-positive cell increased compared to the unstimulated level and was equal to the percentage of capillary sprouts with at least one BRDU-positive cell. At day 10, the number of vascular islands per vascular area dramatically decreased compared to unstimulated and day 3 levels. Conclusions These results show that vascular islands have the ability to proliferate and suggest that they are able to incorporate into the microcirculation during the initial stages of microvascular network growth.

  4. Metabolic network analysis on Phaffia rhodozyma yeast using C-13-labeled glucose and gas chromatography-mass spectrometry

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Cannizzaro, C.; Christensen, B.; Nielsen, Jens;

    2004-01-01

    labeling patterns, as determined by GC-MS, were in accordance with a metabolic network consisting of the Embden-Meyerhof-Parnas pathway, the pentose phosphate pathway, and the TCA cycle. Glucose was mainly consumed along the pentose phosphate pathway (similar to65% for wildtype strain), which reflected...

  5. Therapeutic action of taurine on the postirradiation recovery of the yeast cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    It has been shown on X-irradiated Saccharomyces ellipsoides cells that taurine-potassium phosphate applied after the exposure has a therapeutic action, that is, it intensifies the natural process of intracellular dark repair

  6. The shuttling scaffold model for prevention of yeast pheromone pathway misactivation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Aditya P; Andries, Erik; Edwards, Jeremy S; Steinberg, Stanly

    2012-12-01

    The molecular scaffold in the yeast pheromone pathway, Ste5, shuttles continuously between the nucleus and the cytoplasm. Ste5 undergoes oligomerization reaction in the nucleus. Upon pheromone stimulation, the Ste5 dimer is rapidly exported out of the nucleus and recruited to the plasma membrane for pathway activation. This clever device on part of the yeast cell is thought to prevent pathway misactivation at high enough levels of Ste5 in the absence of pheromone. We have built a spatiotemporal model of signaling in this pathway to describe its regulation. Our present work underscores the importance of spatial modeling of cell signaling networks to understand their control and functioning.

  7. Pinostrobin from Boesenbergia pandurata is an inhibitor of Ca2+-signal-mediated cell-cycle regulation in the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wangkangwan, Wachirasak; Boonkerd, Saipin; Chavasiri, Warinthorn; Sukapirom, Kasama; Pattanapanyasat, Kovit; Kongkathip, Ngampong; Miyakawa, Tokichi; Yompakdee, Chulee

    2009-07-01

    Upon searching plant extracts for inhibitors of the Ca(2+) signaling pathway using the zds1Delta-yeast proliferation based assay, a crude rhizome extract of Boesenbergia pandurata was found to be strongly positive, and from this extract pinostrobin, alpinetin, and pinocembrin chalcone were isolated as active components. Further biochemical experiments confirmed that pinostrobin possesses inhibitory activity on the Ca(2+) signals involved in the control of G2/M phase cell cycle progression in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. PMID:19584530

  8. The resistance of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae to the biocide polyhexamethylene biguanide: involvement of cell wall integrity pathway and emerging role for YAP1

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    de Morais Marcos A

    2011-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Polyhexamethylene biguanide (PHMB is an antiseptic polymer that is mainly used for cleaning hospitals and pools and combating Acantamoeba infection. Its fungicide activity was recently shown by its lethal effect on yeasts that contaminate the industrial ethanol process, and on the PE-2 strain of Saccharomyces cerevisiae, one of the main fermenting yeasts in Brazil. This pointed to the need to know the molecular mechanism that lay behind the cell resistance to this compound. In this study, we examined the factors involved in PHMB-cell interaction and the mechanisms that respond to the damage caused by this interaction. To achieve this, two research strategies were employed: the expression of some genes by RT-qPCR and the analysis of mutant strains. Results Cell Wall integrity (CWI genes were induced in the PHMB-resistant Saccharomyces cerevisiae strain JP-1, although they are poorly expressed in the PHMB-sensitive Saccharomyces cerevisiae PE2 strain. This suggested that PHMB damages the glucan structure on the yeast cell wall. It was also confirmed by the observed sensitivity of the yeast deletion strains, Δslg1, Δrom2, Δmkk2, Δslt2, Δknr4, Δswi4 and Δswi4, which showed that the protein kinase C (PKC regulatory mechanism is involved in the response and resistance to PHMB. The sensitivity of the Δhog1 mutant was also observed. Furthermore, the cytotoxicity assay and gene expression analysis showed that the part played by YAP1 and CTT1 genes in cell resistance to PHMB is unrelated to oxidative stress response. Thus, we suggested that Yap1p can play a role in cell wall maintenance by controlling the expression of the CWI genes. Conclusion The PHMB treatment of the yeast cells activates the PKC1/Slt2 (CWI pathway. In addition, it is suggested that HOG1 and YAP1 can play a role in the regulation of CWI genes.

  9. Detailed search for protein kinase(s) involved in plasma membrane H+-ATPase activity regulation of yeast cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Renata R; Castanheira, Diogo; Teixeira, Janaina A; Bouillet, Leoneide E M; Ribeiro, Erica M C; Trópia, Maria M J; Alvarez, Florencia; Correa, Lygia F M; Mota, Bruno E F; Conceição, Luis Eduardo F R; Castro, Ieso M; Brandão, Rogelio L

    2015-03-01

    This study displays a screening using yeast strains deficient in protein kinases known to exist in Saccharomyces cerevisiae. From 95 viable single mutants, 20 mutants appear to be affected in the glucose-induced extracellular acidification. The mutants that are unaffected in calcium signaling were tested for their sensitivity to hygromycin B. Furthermore, we verified whether the remaining mutants produced enzymes that are appropriately incorporated at plasma membrane. Finally, we measure the kinetic properties of the enzyme in purified plasma membranes from glucose-starved as well as glucose-fermenting cells. We confirmed the kinase Ptk2 involvement in H(+)-ATPase regulation (increase of affinity for ATP). However, the identification of the kinase(s) responsible for phosphorylation that leads to an increase in Vmax appears to be more complex. Complementary experiments were performed to check how those protein kinases could be related to the control of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase and/or the potential membrane. In summary, our results did not permit us to identify the protein kinase(s) involved in regulating the catalytic efficiency of the plasma membrane H(+)-ATPase. Therefore, our results indicate that the current regulatory model based on the phosphorylation of two different sites located in the C-terminus tail of the enzyme could be inappropriate.

  10. Macrophage Interaction with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Yeast Cells Modulates Fungal Metabolism and Generates a Response to Oxidative Stress

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parente-Rocha, Juliana Alves; Parente, Ana Flávia Alves; Baeza, Lilian Cristiane; Bonfim, Sheyla Maria Rondon Caixeta; Hernandez, Orville; McEwen, Juan G.; Bailão, Alexandre Melo; Taborda, Carlos Pelleschi; Borges, Clayton Luiz; Soares, Célia Maria de Almeida

    2015-01-01

    Macrophages are key players during Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. However, the relative contribution of the fungal response to counteracting macrophage activity remains poorly understood. In this work, we evaluated the P. brasiliensis proteomic response to macrophage internalization. A total of 308 differentially expressed proteins were detected in P. brasiliensis during infection. The positively regulated proteins included those involved in alternative carbon metabolism, such as enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis, beta-oxidation of fatty acids and amino acids catabolism. The down-regulated proteins during P. brasiliensis internalization in macrophages included those related to glycolysis and protein synthesis. Proteins involved in the oxidative stress response in P. brasiliensis yeast cells were also up-regulated during macrophage infection, including superoxide dismutases (SOD), thioredoxins (THX) and cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP). Antisense knockdown mutants evaluated the importance of CCP during macrophage infection. The results suggested that CCP is involved in a complex system of protection against oxidative stress and that gene silencing of this component of the antioxidant system diminished the survival of P. brasiliensis in macrophages and in a murine model of infection. PMID:26360774

  11. Macrophage Interaction with Paracoccidioides brasiliensis Yeast Cells Modulates Fungal Metabolism and Generates a Response to Oxidative Stress.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Juliana Alves Parente-Rocha

    Full Text Available Macrophages are key players during Paracoccidioides brasiliensis infection. However, the relative contribution of the fungal response to counteracting macrophage activity remains poorly understood. In this work, we evaluated the P. brasiliensis proteomic response to macrophage internalization. A total of 308 differentially expressed proteins were detected in P. brasiliensis during infection. The positively regulated proteins included those involved in alternative carbon metabolism, such as enzymes involved in gluconeogenesis, beta-oxidation of fatty acids and amino acids catabolism. The down-regulated proteins during P. brasiliensis internalization in macrophages included those related to glycolysis and protein synthesis. Proteins involved in the oxidative stress response in P. brasiliensis yeast cells were also up-regulated during macrophage infection, including superoxide dismutases (SOD, thioredoxins (THX and cytochrome c peroxidase (CCP. Antisense knockdown mutants evaluated the importance of CCP during macrophage infection. The results suggested that CCP is involved in a complex system of protection against oxidative stress and that gene silencing of this component of the antioxidant system diminished the survival of P. brasiliensis in macrophages and in a murine model of infection.

  12. Multiple abiotic stress tolerance of the transformants yeast cells and the transgenic Arabidopsis plants expressing a novel durum wheat catalase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feki, Kaouthar; Kamoun, Yosra; Ben Mahmoud, Rihem; Farhat-Khemakhem, Ameny; Gargouri, Ali; Brini, Faiçal

    2015-12-01

    Catalases are reactive oxygen species scavenging enzymes involved in response to abiotic and biotic stresses. In this study, we described the isolation and functional characterization of a novel catalase from durum wheat, designed TdCAT1. Molecular Phylogeny analyses showed that wheat TdCAT1 exhibited high amino acids sequence identity to other plant catalases. Sequence homology analysis showed that TdCAT1 protein contained the putative calmodulin binding domain and a putative conserved internal peroxisomal targeting signal PTS1 motif around its C-terminus. Predicted three-dimensional structural model revealed the presence of four putative distinct structural regions which are the N-terminal arm, the β-barrel, the wrapping and the α-helical domains. TdCAT1 protein had the heme pocket that was composed by five essential residues. TdCAT1 gene expression analysis showed that this gene was induced by various abiotic stresses in durum wheat. The expression of TdCAT1 in yeast cells and Arabidopsis plants conferred tolerance to several abiotic stresses. Compared with the non-transformed plants, the transgenic lines maintained their growth and accumulated more proline under stress treatments. Furthermore, the amount of H2O2 was lower in transgenic lines, which was due to the high CAT and POD activities. Taken together, these data provide the evidence for the involvement of durum wheat catalase TdCAT1 in tolerance to multiple abiotic stresses in crop plants. PMID:26555900

  13. Yeast cell wall extract induces disease resistance against bacterial and fungal pathogens in Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica crop.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mari Narusaka

    Full Text Available Housaku Monogatari (HM is a plant activator prepared from a yeast cell wall extract. We examined the efficacy of HM application and observed that HM treatment increased the resistance of Arabidopsis thaliana and Brassica rapa leaves to bacterial and fungal infections. HM reduced the severity of bacterial leaf spot and anthracnose on A. thaliana and Brassica crop leaves with protective effects. In addition, gene expression analysis of A. thaliana plants after treatment with HM indicated increased expression of several plant defense-related genes. HM treatment appears to induce early activation of jasmonate/ethylene and late activation of salicylic acid (SA pathways. Analysis using signaling mutants revealed that HM required SA accumulation and SA signaling to facilitate resistance to the bacterial pathogen Pseudomonas syringae pv. maculicola and the fungal pathogen Colletotrichum higginsianum. In addition, HM-induced resistance conferred chitin-independent disease resistance to bacterial pathogens in A. thaliana. These results suggest that HM contains multiple microbe-associated molecular patterns that activate defense responses in plants. These findings suggest that the application of HM is a useful tool that may facilitate new disease control methods.

  14. Nano-guided cell networks as conveyors of molecular communication.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terrell, Jessica L; Wu, Hsuan-Chen; Tsao, Chen-Yu; Barber, Nathan B; Servinsky, Matthew D; Payne, Gregory F; Bentley, William E

    2015-01-01

    Advances in nanotechnology have provided unprecedented physical means to sample molecular space. Living cells provide additional capability in that they identify molecules within complex environments and actuate function. We have merged cells with nanotechnology for an integrated molecular processing network. Here we show that an engineered cell consortium autonomously generates feedback to chemical cues. Moreover, abiotic components are readily assembled onto cells, enabling amplified and 'binned' responses. Specifically, engineered cell populations are triggered by a quorum sensing (QS) signal molecule, autoinducer-2, to express surface-displayed fusions consisting of a fluorescent marker and an affinity peptide. The latter provides means for attaching magnetic nanoparticles to fluorescently activated subpopulations for coalescence into colour-indexed output. The resultant nano-guided cell network assesses QS activity and conveys molecular information as a 'bio-litmus' in a manner read by simple optical means.

  15. Visualization and quantification of three-dimensional distribution of yeast in bread dough.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maeda, Tatsuro; DO, Gab-Soo; Sugiyama, Junichi; Araki, Tetsuya; Tsuta, Mizuki; Shiraga, Seizaburo; Ueda, Mitsuyoshi; Yamada, Masaharu; Takeya, Koji; Sagara, Yasuyuki

    2009-07-01

    A three-dimensional (3-D) bio-imaging technique was developed for visualizing and quantifying the 3-D distribution of yeast in frozen bread dough samples in accordance with the progress of the mixing process of the samples, applying cell-surface engineering to the surfaces of the yeast cells. The fluorescent yeast was recognized as bright spots at the wavelength of 520 nm. Frozen dough samples were sliced at intervals of 1 microm by an micro-slicer image processing system (MSIPS) equipped with a fluorescence microscope for acquiring cross-sectional images of the samples. A set of successive two-dimensional images was reconstructed to analyze the 3-D distribution of the yeast. The average shortest distance between centroids of enhanced green fluorescent protein (EGFP) yeasts was 10.7 microm at the pick-up stage, 9.7 microm at the clean-up stage, 9.0 microm at the final stage, and 10.2 microm at the over-mixing stage. The results indicated that the distribution of the yeast cells was the most uniform in the dough of white bread at the final stage, while the heterogeneous distribution at the over-mixing stage was possibly due to the destruction of the gluten network structure within the samples. PMID:19584545

  16. Nucleotide-excision repair of DNA in cell-free extracts of the yeast Saccharomyces cerevisiae

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    A wide spectrum of DNA lesions are repaired by the nucleotide-excision repair (NER) pathway in both eukaryotic and prokaryotic cells. We have developed a cell-free system in Saccharomyces cerevisiae that supports NER. NER was monitored by measuring repair synthesis in DNA treated with cisplatin or with UV radiation. Repair synthesis in vitro was defective in extracts of rad1, rad2, and rad10 mutant cells, all of which have mutations in genes whose products are known to be required for NER in vivo. Additionally, repair synthesis was complemented by mixing different mutant extracts, or by adding purified Rad1 or Rad10 protein to rad1 or rad10 mutant extracts, respectively. The latter observation demonstrates that the Rad1 and Rad10 proteins directly participate in the biochemical pathway of NER. NER supported by nuclear extracts requires ATP and Mg2+ and is stimulated by polyethylene glycol and by small amounts of whole cell extract containing overexpressed Rad2 protein. The nuclear extracts also contain base-excision repair activity that is present at wild-type levels in rad mutant extracts. This cell-free system is expected to facilitate studies on the biochemical pathway of NER in S. cerevisiae

  17. Requirement of peroxiredoxin on the stationary phase of yeast cell growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Watanabe, Toshihiko; Irokawa, Hayato; Ogasawara, Ayako; Iwai, Kenta; Kuge, Shusuke

    2014-02-01

    Toxic chemicals often induce reactive oxygen species (ROS). Although one of the most abundant ROS-sensitive proteins is in the peroxiredoxin (Prx) family, the function of Prx proteins is poorly understood because they are inactivated under high concentrations of hydrogen peroxide. Like mammalian cells, the model eukaryote Saccharomyces cerevisiae possesses multiple Prx proteins. Among the five Prx family proteins, Tsa1 and Ahp1 have the highest and second-highest expression levels, respectively. Here, we focused on a previously uncharacterized phenotype resulting from Tsa1 loss: impaired growth during the late exponential phase. We overexpressed catalase (CTT1) and Ahp1 in cells with disruptions in TSA1 and its homologue, TSA2 (tsa1/2Δ cells), and we found that neither Ctt1 nor Ahp1 overexpression suppressed the impaired cell growth at the stationary phase, although the ROS levels were successfully suppressed. Furthermore, the cell cycle profile was not altered by Tsa1/2 loss, at least in the late exponential phase; however, the glucose consumption rate slowed in the late exponential phase. Our results suggest that ROS levels are not responsible for the growth phenotype. Tsa1 might have a specific function that could not be replaced by Ahp1. PMID:24418709

  18. High-resolution transcription atlas of the mitotic cell cycle in budding yeast

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Granovskaia, Marina V; Jensen, Lars J; Ritchie, Matthew E;

    2010-01-01

    Extensive transcription of non-coding RNAs has been detected in eukaryotic genomes and is thought to constitute an additional layer in the regulation of gene expression. Despite this role, their transcription through the cell cycle has not been studied; genome-wide approaches have only focused on...

  19. Microbuckling in fibrin networks enables long-range cell mechanosensing

    CERN Document Server

    Notbohm, Jacob; Rosakis, Phoebus; Tirrell, David A; Ravichandran, Guruswami

    2014-01-01

    We show that cells in a fibrous matrix induce deformation fields that propagate over a longer range than predicted by linear elasticity. Synthetic, linear elastic hydrogels used in many mechanotrans- duction studies fail to capture this effect. We develop a nonlinear microstructural finite element model for a fiber network to simulate localized deformations induced by cells. The model captures measured cell-induced matrix displacements from experiments and identifies an important mech- anism for long range cell mechanosensing: loss of compression stiffness due to microbuckling of individual fibers. We show evidence that cells sense each other through the formation of localized intercellular bands of tensile deformations caused by this mechanism.

  20. CO-GENERATION AND OPERATING NETWORK CELLS

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, John Eli

    2008-01-01

    In Denmark several thousands of generators are connected to the distribution system (10 kV and 0.4 kV). The production from these generators many times exceeds the load. The generators can be divided into two types, Wind turbines and CHP generators. These generators have one thing in common, the ...... concept in along these lines is the “Network Cell”....