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Sample records for cell neoplasms treatment

  1. Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Plasma cell neoplasms occur when abnormal plasma cells or myeloma cells form tumors in the bones or soft tissues of the body. Multiple myeloma, plasmacytoma, lymphoplasmacytic lymphoma, and monoclonal gammopathy of undetermined significance (MGUS) are different types of plasma cell neoplasms. Find out about risk factors, symptoms, diagnostic tests, prognosis, and treatment for these diseases.

  2. Stages of Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Treatment Health Professional Plasma Cell Neoplasms Treatment Research Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma) Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Plasma Cell Neoplasms Go to Health Professional Version Key ...

  3. Treatment Option Overview (Plasma Cell Neoplasms Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood cells) are removed from the blood or bone marrow of the patient ( autologous transplant) or a donor ( allogeneic transplant) and are ... the patient's stem cells from the blood or bone marrow are used; or two autologous stem cell transplants followed by an autologous or ...

  4. Treatment Options for Plasma Cell Neoplasms (Including Multiple Myeloma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... blood cells) are removed from the blood or bone marrow of the patient ( autologous transplant) or a donor ( allogeneic transplant) and are ... the patient's stem cells from the blood or bone marrow are used; or two autologous stem cell transplants followed by an autologous or ...

  5. Myeloproliferative neoplasm stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mead, Adam J; Mullally, Ann

    2017-03-23

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) arise in the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) compartment as a result of the acquisition of somatic mutations in a single HSC that provides a selective advantage to mutant HSC over normal HSC and promotes myeloid differentiation to engender a myeloproliferative phenotype. This population of somatically mutated HSC, which initiates and sustains MPNs, is termed MPN stem cells. In >95% of cases, mutations that drive the development of an MPN phenotype occur in a mutually exclusive manner in 1 of 3 genes: JAK2 , CALR , or MPL The thrombopoietin receptor, MPL, is the key cytokine receptor in MPN development, and these mutations all activate MPL-JAK-STAT signaling in MPN stem cells. Despite common biological features, MPNs display diverse disease phenotypes as a result of both constitutional and acquired factors that influence MPN stem cells, and likely also as a result of heterogeneity in the HSC in which MPN-initiating mutations arise. As the MPN clone expands, it exerts cell-extrinsic effects on components of the bone marrow niche that can favor the survival and expansion of MPN stem cells over normal HSC, further sustaining and driving malignant hematopoiesis. Although developed as targeted therapies for MPNs, current JAK2 inhibitors do not preferentially target MPN stem cells, and as a result, rarely induce molecular remissions in MPN patients. As the understanding of the molecular mechanisms underlying the clonal dominance of MPN stem cells advances, this will help facilitate the development of therapies that preferentially target MPN stem cells over normal HSC. © 2017 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Dendritic cell neoplasms: an overview.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kairouz, Sebastien; Hashash, Jana; Kabbara, Wadih; McHayleh, Wassim; Tabbara, Imad A

    2007-10-01

    Dendritic cell neoplasms are rare tumors that are being recognized with increasing frequency. They were previously classified as lymphomas, sarcomas, or histiocytic neoplasms. The World Health Organization (WHO) classifies dendritic cell neoplasms into five groups: Langerhans' cell histiocytosis, Langerhans' cell sarcoma, Interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, Follicular dendritic cell sarcoma/tumor, and Dendritic cell sarcoma, not specified otherwise (Jaffe, World Health Organization classification of tumors 2001; 273-289). Recently, Pileri et al. provided a comprehensive immunohistochemical classification of histiocytic and dendritic cell tumors (Pileri et al., Histopathology 2002;59:161-167). In this article, a concise overview regarding the pathological, clinical, and therapeutic aspects of follicular dendritic, interdigitating dendritic, and Langerhans' cell tumors is presented.

  7. Myelodysplastic/ Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia include fever, weight loss, and feeling very tired. Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia ...

  8. Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Types Bladder Cancer Breast Cancer Colorectal Cancer Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer Leukemia Liver Cancer Lung Cancer Lymphoma Pancreatic Cancer Prostate Cancer Skin Cancer Thyroid Cancer Uterine Cancer All Cancer Types A to ...

  9. Radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smirnov, R.V.

    1982-01-01

    Results of radiation treatment of spinal cord neoplasms are presented. The results of combined (surgical and radiation) treatment of tumors are studied. On the whole it is noted that radiation treatment of initial spinal cord tumours is not practised on a large scale because of low radiostability of spinal cord

  10. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: challenges and future prospects

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Trottier AM

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Amy M Trottier, Sonia Cerquozzi, Carolyn J Owen Division of Hematology and Hematological Malignancies, University of Calgary, Foothills Medical Centre, Calgary, AB, Canada Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN is a rare CD4+ CD56+ myeloid malignancy that is challenging to diagnose and treat. BPDCN typically presents with nonspecific cutaneous lesions with or without extra-cutaneous manifestations before progressing to leukemia. Currently, there is no standard of care for the treatment of BPDCN and various approaches have been used including acute myeloid leukemia, acute lymphoblastic leukemia, and lymphoma-based regimens with or without stem cell transplantation. Despite these treatment approaches, the prognosis of BPDCN remains poor and there is a lack of prospective data upon which to base treatment decisions. Recent work examining the mutational landscape and gene expression profiles of BPDCN has identified a number of potential therapeutic targets. One such target is CD123, the α subunit of the human interleukin-3 receptor, which is the subject of intervention studies using the novel agent SL-401. Other investigational therapies include UCART123, T-cell immunotherapy, and venetoclax. Prospective trials are needed to determine the best treatment for this uncommon and aggressive neoplasm. Keywords: BPDCN, myeloid, neoplasm, cutaneous, dendritic cell

  11. Reconstruction techniques in the treatment of vertebral neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biagini, R; Boriani, S; Casadei, R; Bandiera, S; De Iure, F; Campanacci, L; Demitri, S; Orsini, U; Di Fiore, M

    1997-01-01

    The authors present a new system for the topographical description of vertebral neoplasms. The general criteria of reconstruction after curettage or vertebral resection are evaluated. The literature is reviewed in terms of the use of prostheses, bone grafts, cement and stabilization systems in the treatment of tumors of the spine. Indications for the different methods are discussed.

  12. Treatment Options for Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia include fever, weight loss, and feeling very tired. Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia ...

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia include fever, weight loss, and feeling very tired. Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia ...

  14. RENAL MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS: RENAL CELL CARCINOMA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisangela Giachini

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this study is to evaluate the incidence and prevalence of malignant kidney tumors, to contribute to identifying factors which the diagnosis of renal cell carcinomas. Through this study, we understand that kidney disease over the years had higher incidence rates, especially in adults in the sixth decade of life. The renal cell carcinoma (RCC is the third most common malignancy of the genitourinary tract, affecting 2% to 3% of the population. There are numerous ways of diagnosis; however, the most important are ultrasonography, magnetic resonance imaging and computed tomography. In general most of the patients affected by the CCR, have a good prognosis when diagnosed early and subjected to an effective treatment. This study conducted a literature review about the CCR, through this it was possible to understand the development needs of the imaging methods used for precise diagnosis and classification of RCC through the TNM system.

  15. Immunomodifying effect of VCG vaccine in treatment of urinary bladder neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Neprina, G.S.; Panteleeva, E.S.; Vatin, O.E.; Karyakin, O.B.; Kurasova, V.G.; Filatov, P.P.; Dunchik, V.N.

    1989-01-01

    It is shown that immunotherapy realization using VCG vaccine after completion of PCT (polychemotherapy) course in patients suffering from later stages of urinary bladder neoplasm, allowed one to maximally connect stages of chemo- and radiation therapy at the expense of sufficient increase of the quantity of main groups of immunocompetent cells. Introduction of incometacin to immunocorrection scheme allowed one to remove disbalance in immunoregulating lymphocyte system which testifies to advisability of combined applicaion of VCG vaccine and indometacin in complex treatment of cerinary bladder neoplasms. 5 refs

  16. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm with absolute monocytosis at presentation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaworski JM

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Joseph M Jaworski,1,2 Vanlila K Swami,1 Rebecca C Heintzelman,1 Carrie A Cusack,3 Christina L Chung,3 Jeremy Peck,3 Matthew Fanelli,3 Micheal Styler,4 Sanaa Rizk,4 J Steve Hou1 1Department of Pathology and Laboratory Medicine, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 2Department of Pathology, Mercy Fitzgerald Hospital, Darby, PA, USA; 3Department of Dermatology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA; 4Department of Hematology/Oncology, Hahnemann University Hospital/Drexel University College of Medicine, Philadelphia, PA, USA Abstract: Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm is an uncommon malignancy derived from precursors of plasmacytoid dendritic cells. Nearly all patients present initially with cutaneous manifestations, with many having extracutaneous disease additionally. While response to chemotherapy initially is effective, relapse occurs in most, with a leukemic phase ultimately developing. The prognosis is dismal. While most of the clinical and pathologic features are well described, the association and possible prognostic significance between peripheral blood absolute monocytosis (>1.0 K/µL and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm have not been reported. We report a case of a 68-year-old man who presented with a rash for 4–5 months. On physical examination, there were multiple, dull-pink, indurated plaques on the trunk and extremities. Complete blood count revealed thrombocytopenia, absolute monocytosis of 1.7 K/µL, and a negative flow cytometry study. Biopsy of an abdominal lesion revealed typical features of blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm. Patients having both hematologic and nonhematologic malignancies have an increased incidence of absolute monocytosis. Recent studies examining Hodgkin and non-Hodgkin lymphoma patients have suggested that this is a negative prognostic factor. The association between

  17. Second Malignant Neoplasms After Treatment of Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Schmiegelow, K.; Levinsen, Mette Frandsen; Attarbaschi, Andishe

    2013-01-01

    PURPOSE: Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) after diagnosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) are rare events. PATIENTS AND METHODS: We analyzed data on risk factors and outcomes of 642 children with SMNs occurring after treatment for ALL from 18 collaborative study groups between 1980...... and 2007. RESULTS: Acute myeloid leukemia (AML; n = 186), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS; n = 69), and nonmeningioma brain tumor (n = 116) were the most common types of SMNs and had the poorest outcome (5-year survival rate, 18.1% ± 2.9%, 31.1% ± 6.2%, and 18.3% ± 3.8%, respectively). Five-year survival...

  18. Diagnostic markers for germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, Ewa; Nielsen, John E; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2015-01-01

    to gain-of function mutations in survival-promoting genes (e.g. FGFR3, HRAS), thus this tumour has a different expression profile than GCNIS-derived TGCT. Clinically most informative markers for GCT, except teratoma, are genes expressed in primordial germ cell/gonocyte and embryonic pluripotency......-genomic gene expression regulation involves small non-coding RNAs, predominantly micro-RNAs (miRs). Testicular GCTs display micro-RNA profiles similar to embryonic stem cells. Targeted miRNA-based blood tests for miR-371-3 and miR-367 clusters are currently under development and hold a great promise......This concise review summarises tissue and serum markers useful for differential diagnosis of germ cell tumours (GCTs), with focus on the most common testicular GCTs (TGCTs). GCTs are characterised by phenotypic heterogeneity due to largely retained embryonic pluripotency and aberrant somatic...

  19. Cytokine Regulation of Microenvironmental Cells in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gregor Hoermann

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The term myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN refers to a heterogeneous group of diseases including not only polycythemia vera (PV, essential thrombocythemia (ET, and primary myelofibrosis (PMF, but also chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, and systemic mastocytosis (SM. Despite the clinical and biological differences between these diseases, common pathophysiological mechanisms have been identified in MPN. First, aberrant tyrosine kinase signaling due to somatic mutations in certain driver genes is common to these MPN. Second, alterations of the bone marrow microenvironment are found in all MPN types and have been implicated in the pathogenesis of the diseases. Finally, elevated levels of proinflammatory and microenvironment-regulating cytokines are commonly found in all MPN-variants. In this paper, we review the effects of MPN-related oncogenes on cytokine expression and release and describe common as well as distinct pathogenetic mechanisms underlying microenvironmental changes in various MPN. Furthermore, targeting of the microenvironment in MPN is discussed. Such novel therapies may enhance the efficacy and may overcome resistance to established tyrosine kinase inhibitor treatment in these patients. Nevertheless, additional basic studies on the complex interplay of neoplastic and stromal cells are required in order to optimize targeting strategies and to translate these concepts into clinical application.

  20. KIT mutation analysis in mast cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Arock, M; Sotlar, K; Akin, C

    2015-01-01

    Although acquired mutations in KIT are commonly detected in various categories of mastocytosis, the methodologies applied to detect and quantify the mutant type and allele burden in various cells and tissues are poorly defined. We here propose a consensus on methodologies used to detect KIT mutat...

  1. Oral spindle cell neoplasms: a review of 307 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jordan, Richard C K; Regezi, Joseph A

    2003-06-01

    The infrequent exposure of pathologists to soft tissue spindle cell neoplasms coupled with overlapping histologic patterns can often make diagnosis challenging. We reviewed all nonodontogenic spindle cell neoplasms seen between 1982 and 2002 (86,162 total accessions). Diagnoses were reclassified according to current standards supplemented with immunohistochemistry. Of the 307 neoplasms reviewed (0.36% of total accessions), neural tumors were the most common benign entities, accounting for 21% of total cases. Kaposi's sarcoma was the most common malignancy, accounting for 67% of all cases. Diagnoses were revised for 57 cases. Schwannoma and neurofibroma were most commonly revised to palisaded encapsulated neuroma. There were 8 myofibromas and 1 inflammatory myofibroblastic tumor. There were no oral leiomyomas; that is, all 4 originally reported cases were reclassified as myofibroma, palisaded encapsulated neuroma, and solitary fibrous tumor. With the exception of Kaposi's sarcoma, oral soft tissue sarcomas were rare; most benign lesions were neural in origin. The relatively high prevalence of some tumors, such as myofibroma, likely reflects the use of immunohistochemistry in the diagnosis of spindle cell tumors.

  2. Vascular neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Williams, H B

    1980-07-01

    Vascular neoplasms in the broad sense represent a very common group of tumors or hamartomas that show great variability in gross appearance, microscopic appearance, and clinical course. Generally, neoplasms are composed of one cell type, but vascular neoplasms are collections of endothelial-lined tubes or tubules with connective tissue walls that may contain smooth muscle cells, pericytes, and nerve elements according to the specific tissues of origin. The classification of vascular neoplasms as outlined in this article attempts to delineate each tumor or hamartoma according to its histologic appearance and clinical behavior. The clinical course ranges from completely benign, self-involuting malformations such as the strawberry hemangioma to highly malignant angiosarcomas with their rapid growth and frequent metastases. Defects in the lymphatic system show gradations from simple lymphangiomas through lymphedema and lymphangiectasia, which can probably be explained by faulty embryologic development. Management of these lesions has been discussed, including brief descriptions of most of the currently accepted treatment methods for these frequently encountered clinical problems.

  3. Radiological findings of two neoplasms with perivascular epithelioid cell differentiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Timothy Diestelkamp, BS

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Perivascular epithelioid cell tumors (PEComas constitute a rare subset of mesenchymal neoplasms classified by the World Health Organization in 2002. We present two cases of PEComas; the first is a cervical PEComa in a 35-year-old woman with no known past medical history who presented with a palpable pelvic mass; the second is an adnexal PEComa in a 39-year-old woman with a history of colitis who presented with abdominal pain and diarrhea. The rarity of these tumors has led to little information about imaging characteristics which we hope these two cases will help expand.

  4. Increase in circulating CD4CD25Foxp3 T cells in patients with Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms during treatment with IFN-α

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riley, C.H.; Morten Krogh, Jensen; Brimnes, M.K.

    2011-01-01

    in these patients. Foxp3 regulatory T cells play a pivotal role in maintaining immune homeostasis and, importantly, preventing immune reactivity to self-antigens; however, their suppressive activity can compromise an effective antitumor immune response, and high frequencies of regulatory T cells in peripheral blood......Recent reports have described complete or major molecular remission in patients with polycythemia vera after long-term treatment with the immunomodulatory agent IFN-α2. Accordingly, there are reasons to believe that the immune system is a key player in eradicating the JAK2 mutated clone...

  5. Meningioma as second malignant neoplasm after oncological treatment during childhood

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Mueller, H.L.; Gebhardt, U. [Klinikum Oldenburg (Germany). Dept. of Pediatric Hematology and Oncology; Warmuth-Metz, M. [University Hospital Wuerzburg (Germany). Dept. of Neuroradiology; Pietsch, T. [Bonn Univ. (Germany). Dept. of Neuropathology; Soerensen, N. [Evangelisches Krankenhaus, Oldenburg (Germany). Dept. of Neurosurgery; Kortmann, R.D. [University Hospital Leipzig (Germany). Dept. of Radiooncology

    2012-05-15

    A total of 38 patients (18 female/20 male) with childhood meningioma were recruited from the German registry HIT-Endo (1989-2009). In 5 cases meningioma occurred as second malignant neoplasm (SMN). Histologies were confirmed by reference assessment in all cases (SMN: 2 WHO I, 1 WHO II, 2 WHO III). The SMNs were diagnosed at a median age of 12.4 years with a median latency of 10.2 years after primary malignancy (PMN; 4 brain tumors, 1 lymphoblastic leukemia; median age at diagnosis 2.7 years). Meningioma occurred as SMN in the irradiated field of PMN (range 12-54 Gy). The outcome after treatment of SMN meningioma (surgery/irradiation) was favorable in terms of psychosocial status and functional capacity in 4 of 5 patients (1 death). We conclude that survivors of childhood cancer who were exposed to radiation therapy at young age harbor the risk of developing meningioma as a SMN at a particularly short latency period in case of high dose exposure. (orig.)

  6. Hürthle Cell Neoplasms of Thyroid in South-Western Region of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    BACKGROUND: Thyroid Hürthle cell neoplasm (THCN) is relatively rare. OBJECTIVE: To describe the presentation, diagnostic approach and management of THCN in our institution. METHODS: This was a retrospective chart review of all thyroid Hürthle cell neoplasms diagnosed at Aseer Central Hospital (ACH), Saudi ...

  7. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm: update on molecular biology, diagnosis, and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riaz, Wasif; Zhang, Ling; Horna, Pedro; Sokol, Lubomir

    2014-10-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN) is a rare hematological malignancy with an aggressive clinical course. Most patients with BPDCN have skin lesions and simultaneous involvement of the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and lymph nodes. A search of PubMed and Medline was conducted for English-written articles relating to BPDCN, CD4(+)CD56(+) hematodermic neoplasm, and blastic natural killer cell lymphoma. Data regarding diagnosis, prognosis, and treatment were analyzed. BPDCN is derived from precursor plasmacytoid dendritic cells. The diagnosis of BPDCN is based on the characteristic cytology and immunophenotype of malignant cells coexpressing CD4, CD56, CD123, blood dendritic cell antigens 2 and 4, and CD2AP markers. Multiple chromosomal abnormalities and gene mutations previously reported in patients with myeloid and selected lymphoid neoplasms were identified in approximately 60% of patients with BPDCN. Prospectively controlled studies to guide treatment decisions are lacking. The overall response rate with aggressive acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type induction regimens was as high as 90%, but the durability of response was short. Median survival rates ranged between 12 and 16 months. Patients with relapsed disease may respond to L-asparaginase-containing regimens. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, particularly when performed during the first remission, may produce durable remissions in selected adults. BPDCN is a rare aggressive disease that typically affects elderly patients. The most commonly affected nonhematopoietic organ is the skin. Although BPDCN is initially sensitive to conventional chemotherapy regimens, this response is relatively short and long-term prognosis is poor. In the near future, novel targeted therapies may improve outcomes for patients with BPDCN.

  8. Rectum neoplasms treatment advanced with radio and chemotherapy before - surgery

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Luongo Cespedes, A.; Aguiar Vitacca, S.

    1993-01-01

    In Uruguay the colorectal neoplasms has a can rate of mobility. The surgery has 13-26% local recurrence. The irradiation before surgery has demonstrated to improve the resect and the local control.The objective of this protocol it is to decrease the percentage of local relapse , using radiotherapy(RT) before surgery and concomitant chemotherapy that potencies the effect of the RT, improvement this way the therapeutic quotient (AU) [es

  9. [Intracranial tumor behavior of plasma cell neoplasms. Report of 2 cases and literature review].

    Science.gov (United States)

    López-Elizalde, Ramiro; Lemus-Rodríguez, Yazmín; Godínez-Rubí, Marisol; Madrigal-Saray, Arturo; Muñoz-Serrano, José Antonio; Velásquez-Santana, Héctor

    2013-01-01

    Multiple myeloma is a plasmatic cell neoplasm that is characterized by skeletal destruction, renal failure, anemia and hypercalcemia. The skull plasmacytomas represent less than 1% of the head and neck tumors, they can be the primary lesion or occur as a secondary manifestation of multiple myeloma in 20-30% of the patients, or they can even manifest several years later after the diagnosis of plasmacytoma. Although some of the lesions may be surgically accessible, the aggressive natural behavior will complicate the evolution of the patients. We present two cases of Mexican women with intracranial plasmacytomas, one of them associated with multiple myeloma. The first case was a 24 year-old woman diagnosed with a multiple myeloma with plasmacytic-plasmablastic bone infiltration that was removed in 90%. She presented a local recurrence that required a second intervention for removal. The second case was a 62 year-old female with a malignant intracranial tumor of plasma cells that was totally resected. Both patients received adjuvant treatment based on chemotherapy and radiation therapy with favorable results. The patients died at 5 and 1.5 years respectively due to renal failure secondary to systemic disease. We propose chemotherapy and radiation therapy as an essential part of treatment for this condition, as the aggressive behavior of the neoplasms can complicate the evolution, despite being surgically accessible.

  10. Myeloid Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Subtil, Antonio

    2017-09-01

    The classification of myeloid neoplasms has undergone major changes and currently relies heavily on genetic abnormalities. Cutaneous manifestations of myeloid neoplasms may be the presenting sign of underlying bone marrow disease. Dermal infiltration by neoplastic cells may occur in otherwise normal skin or in sites of cutaneous inflammation. Leukemia cutis occasionally precedes evidence of blood and/or bone marrow involvement (aleukemic leukemia cutis). Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Hemosiderin laden macrophages and hemosiderin within follicular cells distinguish benign follicular lesions from follicular neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jaffar Reema

    2009-01-01

    Full Text Available Background: Published criteria to distinguish benign colloid nodules from follicular neoplasms emphasize only three interdependent features: size of follicles, amount of colloid, and cellularity. There is a need for the validation of other independent criteria. Methods: This study quantified the significance of cystic change, defined as presence of macrophages, and the presence of hemosiderin in either the macrophages or follicular cells. The cohort consisted of 165 patients with fine needle aspiration (FNA and histologic follow-up of either goiter (101, follicular adenoma (47, or follicular carcinoma (17. Papillary thyroid carcinomas and Hürthle cell neoplasms were excluded from the cohort, because these categories are known to show cystic change and hemosiderin. FNAs were reviewed blindly with the most cellular slide scored for the presence of macrophages and/or hemosiderin. Results: Hemosiderin within macrophages were seen in 67% (68 of 101 of the goiters and only 6% (four of 64 of follicular neoplasms ( P < .0001. All four follicular neoplasms with hemosiderin in macrophages were adenomas. Three of these four had equivocal features of a benign colloid nodule histologically. None of the 17 follicular carcinomas had hemosiderin in macrophages ( P < .12. Macrophages without hemosiderin also strongly distinguished goiters from neoplasms (83% vs 17% but appears less useful as a criterion since macrophages were present within 3 of 17 follicular carcinomas. Hemosiderin within follicular epithelial cells was present in 18% (18 of 101 of goiters, whereas none of the 64 follicular neoplasms had intraepithelial hemosiderin ( P < .0003. Conclusions: If papillary thyroid carcinoma and Hürthle cell neoplasm are ruled out, our findings indicate that the presence of hemosiderin virtually excludes a clinically significant follicular neoplasm.

  12. Hemosiderin laden macrophages and hemosiderin within follicular cells distinguish benign follicular lesions from follicular neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaffar, Reema; Mohanty, Sambit K; Khan, Ashraf; Fischer, Andrew H

    2009-01-19

    Published criteria to distinguish benign colloid nodules from follicular neoplasms emphasize only three interdependent features: size of follicles, amount of colloid, and cellularity. There is a need for the validation of other independent criteria. This study quantified the significance of cystic change, defined as presence of macrophages, and the presence of hemosiderin in either the macrophages or follicular cells. The cohort consisted of 165 patients with fine needle aspiration (FNA) and histologic follow-up of either goiter (101), follicular adenoma (47), or follicular carcinoma (17). Papillary thyroid carcinomas and Hürthle cell neoplasms were excluded from the cohort, because these categories are known to show cystic change and hemosiderin. FNAs were reviewed blindly with the most cellular slide scored for the presence of macrophages and/or hemosiderin. Hemosiderin within macrophages were seen in 67% (68 of 101) of the goiters and only 6% (four of 64) of follicular neoplasms (Phemosiderin in macrophages were adenomas. Three of these four had equivocal features of a benign colloid nodule histologically. None of the 17 follicular carcinomas had hemosiderin in macrophages (Phemosiderin also strongly distinguished goiters from neoplasms (83% vs 17%) but appears less useful as a criterion since macrophages were present within 3 of 17 follicular carcinomas. Hemosiderin within follicular epithelial cells was present in 18% (18 of 101) of goiters, whereas none of the 64 follicular neoplasms had intraepithelial hemosiderin (Phemosiderin virtually excludes a clinically significant follicular neoplasm.

  13. Thermal and epithermal neutrons in the treatment of neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sweet, W.H.; Wellum, G.; Tolpin, E.; Messer, J.R.

    1975-01-01

    Progress is reported in the preparation and testing of boron compounds for use as targets in the neutron capture therapy of neoplasms. The synthesis and structural confirmation of the disulfide, B 1 H 11 SSB 12 H 11 -4 is reported as well as a new structural model for its mono-oxidized derivative, B 12 H 11 SOSB 12 H 11 -4 , which showed useful tumor:blood concentration ratios in rats after three I. V. injections. The material, B 12 H 11 (SH) 2 -2 , was isolated and identified from impure Cs 2 B 12 H 11 SH. The former anion was shown to be responsible, in its oxidized form, for the excellent tumor uptake results shown by impure B 12 H 11 SH -2 in the past. As a consequence of this work, a borane polymer was synthesized which has shown extremely encouraging tumor uptake properties. The synthesis of this polymer depended on our production and characterization of the first stable thiyl radical at room temperature, B 12 H 11 -S: -2 . The retesting of certain phosphate boranes is reported. And a reagent, namely acetyl sulfenyl chloride, lSCOCH 3 , has been found which will produce B 12 H 11 SH -2 in a laboratory synthesis. The ability of sulfur derivatives of B 12 H 11 SH -2 to bind to proteins was examined, as was the blood distribution of two of these interesting boranes. The amount of non-protein bound borane was related to the rate of blood clearance of the borane in rats. Progress is also reported on dog irradiation experiments. (U.S.)

  14. Nordic guidelines 2014 for diagnosis and treatment of gastroenteropancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Janson, Eva Tiensuu; Sorbye, Halfdan; Welin, Staffan

    2014-01-01

    BACKGROUND: The diagnostic work-up and treatment of patients with neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) has undergone major recent advances and new methods are currently introduced into the clinic. An update of the WHO classification has resulted in a new nomenclature dividing NENs into neuroendocrine...

  15. Low grade Schwann cell neoplasms with leptomeningeal dissemination: clinicopathologic and autopsy findings

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rodriguez, Erika F.; Blakeley, Jaishri; Langmead, Shannon; Olivi, Alessandro; Tufaro, Anthony; Tabbarah, Abeer; Berkenblit, Gail; Sacks, Justin M.; Newsome, Scott D.; Montgomery, Elizabeth; Rodriguez, Fausto J.

    2016-01-01

    Leptomeningeal dissemination of low grade Schwann cell neoplasms is an exceptionally rare occurrence, and has not been well documented in the literature. We encountered two cases of leptomeningeal dissemination of low grade Schwann cell neoplasms. Patient 1 was a 63-year-old woman with NF1 and a progressive low grade MPNST developing from a diffuse/plexiform orbital neurofibroma that arose in childhood. The neoplasm demonstrated local and leptomeningeal dissemination intracranially leading to the patient’s death. There was partial loss of H3K27 tri-methylation, p16 and collagen IV. Patient 2 was a 60-year-old man without NF1 who presented with cranial nerve symptoms and a disseminated neoplasm with a Schwann cell phenotype. The neoplasm stabilized after irradiation and chemotherapy but the patient died of medical complications. Autopsy findings documented disseminated leptomeningeal disease in the intracranial and spinal compartment. H3K27M tri-methylation was preserved. The clinicopathologic and autopsy findings are studied and presented, and the literature is reviewed. PMID:27666764

  16. Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines 2013 for the treatment of uterine body neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebina, Yasuhiko; Katabuchi, Hidetaka; Mikami, Mikio; Nagase, Satoru; Yaegashi, Nobuo; Udagawa, Yasuhiro; Kato, Hidenori; Kubushiro, Kaneyuki; Takamatsu, Kiyoshi; Ino, Kazuhiko; Yoshikawa, Hiroyuki

    2016-06-01

    The third version of the Japan Society of Gynecologic Oncology guidelines for the treatment of uterine body neoplasms was published in 2013. The guidelines comprise nine chapters and nine algorithms. Each chapter includes a clinical question, recommendations, background, objectives, explanations, and references. This revision was intended to collect up-to-date international evidence. The highlights of this revision are to (1) newly specify costs and conflicts of interest; (2) describe the clinical significance of pelvic lymph node dissection and para-aortic lymphadenectomy, including variant histologic types; (3) describe more clearly the indications for laparoscopic surgery as the standard treatment; (4) provide guidelines for post-treatment hormone replacement therapy; (5) clearly differentiate treatment of advanced or recurrent cancer between the initial treatment and the treatment carried out after the primary operation; (6) collectively describe fertility-sparing therapy for both atypical endometrial hyperplasia and endometrioid adenocarcinoma (corresponding to G1) and newly describe relapse therapy after fertility-preserving treatment; and (7) newly describe the treatment of trophoblastic disease. Overall, the objective of these guidelines is to clearly delineate the standard of care for uterine body neoplasms in Japan with the goal of ensuring a high standard of care for all Japanese women diagnosed with uterine body neoplasms.

  17. Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Neoplasms: Basic Biology, Current Treatment Strategies and Prospects for the Future

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akihiro Ohmoto

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (pNENs are rare tumors accounting for only 1%–2% of all pancreatic tumors. pNENs are pathologically heterogeneous and are categorized into three groups (neuroendocrine tumor: NET G1, NET G2; and neuroendocrine carcinoma: NEC on the basis of the Ki-67 proliferation index and the mitotic count according to the 2010 World Health Organization (WHO classification of gastroenteropancreatic NENs. NEC in this classification includes both histologically well-differentiated and poorly differentiated subtypes, and modification of the WHO 2010 classification is under discussion based on genetic and clinical data. Genomic analysis has revealed NETs G1/G2 have genetic alterations in chromatin remodeling genes such as MEN1, DAXX and ATRX, whereas NECs have an inactivation of TP53 and RB1, and these data suggest that different treatment approaches would be required for NET G1/G2 and NEC. While there are promising molecular targeted drugs, such as everolimus or sunitinib, for advanced NET G1/G2, treatment stratification based on appropriate predictive and prognostic biomarkers is becoming an important issue. The clinical outcome of NEC is still dismal, and a more detailed understanding of the genetic background together with preclinical studies to develop new agents, including those already under investigation for small cell lung cancer (SCLC, will be needed to improve the prognosis.

  18. Diffuse large B-cell lymphoma of the kidney: A rare neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ram Narayan Das

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary renal lymphoma is a rare neoplasm, but it should be kept in mind in the differential diagnosis of renal neoplasms. A middle aged man presented with symptoms of weight loss, anorexia and fullness of the abdomen after meals. On clinical and radiological examination, a renal mass was revealed and operated upon. A diagnosis of primary high grade renal lymphoma was made on histopathological examination and immunohistochemically it was further classified as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma. Unfortunately, the patient died after 5 months of diagnosis in spite of three cycles of chemotherapy following surgery. The pathological details of rare tumor are presented here.

  19. A Case of Mature Natural Killer-Cell Neoplasm Manifesting Multiple Choroidal Lesions: Primary Intraocular Natural Killer-Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshiaki Tagawa

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Natural killer (NK cell neoplasm is a rare disease that follows an acute course and has a poor prognosis. It usually emerges from the nose and appears in the ocular tissue as a metastasis. Herein, we describe a case of NK-cell neoplasm in which the eye was considered to be the primary organ. Case: A 50-year-old female displayed bilateral anterior chamber cells, vitreous opacity, bullous retinal detachment, and multiple white choroidal mass lesions. Although malignant lymphoma or metastatic tumor was suspected, various systemic examinations failed to detect any positive results. A vitrectomy was performed OS; however, histocytological analyses from the vitreous sample showed no definite evidence of malignancy, and IL-10 concentration was low. Enlarged choroidal masses were fused together. Three weeks after the first visit, the patient suddenly developed an attack of fever, night sweat, and hepatic dysfunction, and 5 days later, she passed away due to multiple organ failure. Immunohistochemisty and in situ hybridization revealed the presence of atypical cells positive for CD3, CD56, and Epstein-Barr virus-encoded RNAs, resulting in the diagnosis of NK-cell neoplasm. With the characteristic clinical course, we concluded that this neoplasm was a primary intraocular NK-cell lymphoma. Conclusions: This is the first report to describe primary intraocular NK-cell neoplasm. When we encounter atypical choroidal lesions, we should consider the possibility of NK-cell lymphoma, even though it is a rare disease.

  20. Mammary neoplasm inflammatory: clinic presentation: combined treatment value

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Viola Alles, A.; Sabini Gaye, G.; Barrios Herrera, E.; Muse Sevrini, I.

    1995-01-01

    On a total of 1152 patients bearing of cancer of she suckles tried in the period 1978-1988, 41 of she(3.5% )corresponding to the variety inflamatory. Her ages was understood between 26 and 73 years , was been 15(63,5% )postmenopause. Clinically they presented commitment mammary exclusive 34,1%, invasion ganglionar lorregional 48,7% and 17% was disseminated remaining. The initial treatment bases on 3-4 cycles of chemotherapy type FCA, safe in patient with more years that they received the association CMF. All then were irradiated with dose of 5000-6000 cGy on she suckles and territories ganglionares. Finish the treatment with 6 to 8 additional cycles of the patients' chemotherapy. Nobody it was subjected to surgical. The middle survive of the population's total it was of 22 meses, has been of 26 for the premenopause and 15 for the posmenopause. The percentage of relapses arrive to 30% and 45% in the located ways they were disseminated during its evolution. It highlights that the therapeutic strategy you bases on the association open chemotherapy, radiotherapy remaining the possibility of the handling of high citostatics dose with or without transplants of osseous medulla osea (Author) [es

  1. Goblet cell carcinoid neoplasm of the appendix: Clinical and CT features

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, K.S., E-mail: kyungmouklee@alum.mit.edu [Department of Radiology Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Tang, L.H., E-mail: tangl@mskc.org [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Shia, J., E-mail: shiaj@mskcc.org [Department of Pathology, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Paty, P.B., E-mail: patyp@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Weiser, M.R., E-mail: weiser1@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Guillem, J.G., E-mail: guillemj@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Temple, L.K., E-mail: temple@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Nash, G.M., E-mail: nashg@mskcc.org [Department of Surgery, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Reidy, D., E-mail: reidyd@mskcc.org [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Saltz, L., E-mail: saltzl@mskcc.org [Department of Medicine, Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States); Gollub, M.J., E-mail: gollubm@mskcc.org [Department of Radiology Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center, 1275 York Avenue, New York, NY 10065 (United States)

    2013-01-15

    Purpose: To describe the clinical and CT imaging features of goblet cell carcinoid (GCC) neoplasm of the appendix. Methods and materials: A computer search of pathology and radiology records over a 19-year period at our two institutions was performed using the search string “goblet”. In the patients with appendiceal GCC neoplasms who had abdominopelvic CT, imaging findings were categorized, blinded to gross and surgical description, as: “Appendicitis”, “Prominent appendix without peri-appendiceal infiltration”, “Mass” or “Normal appendix”. The CT appearance was correlated with an accepted pathological classification of: low grade GCC, signet ring cell adenocarcinoma ex, and poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma ex GCC group. Results: Twenty-seven patients (age range, 28–80 years; mean age, 52 years; 15 female, 12 male) with pathology-proven appendiceal GCC neoplasm had CT scans that were reviewed. Patients presented with acute appendicitis (n = 12), abdominal pain not typical for appendicitis (n = 14) and incidental finding (n = 1). CT imaging showed 9 Appendicitis, 9 Prominent appendices without peri-appendiceal infiltration, 7 Masses and 2 Normal appendices. Appendicitis (8/9) usually correlated with typical low grade GCC on pathology. In contrast, the majority of Masses and Prominent Appendices without peri-appendiceal infiltration were pathologically confirmed to be signet ring cell adenocarcinoma ex GCC. Poorly differentiated adenocarcinoma ex GCC was seen in only a small minority of patients. Hyperattenuation of the appendiceal neoplasm was seen in a majority of cases. Conclusions: GCC neoplasm of the appendix should be considered in the differential diagnosis in patients with primary appendiceal malignancy. Our cases demonstrated close correlation between our predefined CT pattern and the pathological classification.

  2. BLASTIC PLASMACYTOID DENDRITIC CELL NEOPLASM --A RAPIDLY EVOLVING ENTITY. CASE REPORT.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andrese, Elena; Solovăstru, Laura Gheucă; Dimofte, G; Ferariu, D; Porumb, V; Vâţă, D; Iancul, Luminita Smaranda

    2015-01-01

    Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN), CD4+/CD56+hematodermic neoplasm was formally known as blastic NK-cell lymphoma. It is in fact a form of acute myeloid leukemia notable for highly aggressive behavior with cutaneous, lymph node and bone marrow involvement. This entity is derived from plasmocytoid dendritic cells and has a predilection for extranodal sites, especially the skin. Elderly male patients are the most affected and the prognostic is poor. The first case was reported in 1994 and sice then, single cases and a few small series have been published. This article presents the case of a previously healthy 56-years-old man, who presented himself to a skin eruption consisting in multiple, large dermal ulcerated tumors, located on the trunk and scalp. The lesions were painless and grew in size rapidly. Physical examination was normal except for the skin lesions. Histological examination of a biopsy specimen and immunohistochemical studies (positive for next markers: CD4, CD 45, CD56, CD68, Ki 67) revealed the rare diagnostic-blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.

  3. Hemosiderin laden macrophages and hemosiderin within follicular cells distinguish benign follicular lesions from follicular neoplasms

    OpenAIRE

    Jaffar, Reema; Mohanty, Sambit K.; Khan, Ashraf; Fischer, Andrew H.

    2009-01-01

    Background: Published criteria to distinguish benign colloid nodules from follicular neoplasms emphasize only three interdependent features: size of follicles, amount of colloid, and cellularity. There is a need for the validation of other independent criteria. Methods: This study quantified the significance of cystic change, defined as presence of macrophages, and the presence of hemosiderin in either the macrophages or follicular cells. The cohort consisted of 165 patients with fine need...

  4. Desmoplastic round small cell tumor: a case report of a neoplasm of difficult diagnosis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ogata, Daniel Cury; Totsugui, Joel Takashi; Ditzel Filho, Leo Fernando da Silva; Ioshii, Sergio Ossamu; Machuca, Tiago Noguchi; Ogata, Alessandro Cury

    2005-01-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT) is a rare neoplasm of difficult diagnosis, recently described by Gerald et al. There are reports of nearly 101 cases in the literature, being the intra-abdominal region its most common location and children and young adults its preferred age group. This paper reports a case of DSRCT in a young adult of 24 years of age. This patient presented unspecific symptoms of nausea, vomiting and a single episode of haematemesis. Upon physical examination a solid mass on the epigastrium and left hypochondrium was found. Image diagnostic procedures confirmed the existence of the expansive process and also revealed enlarged retroperitoneal lymphonodes. Diagnosis was achieved through videolaparoscopic biopsy. Histologic sections stained with hematoxylin/eosin were inconclusive and immunohistochemical analysis was required to establish the diagnosis. This analysis revealed positivity to epithelial and mesenchymal markers and weak positivity to chromogranin A, characteristic results of DSRCT. Due to the fact that the disease was locally advanced, the patient was treated with chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide and paclytaxel). However, since there was only partial response to the treatment, the patient refused to undergo any second line option of therapy. Presently, the patient is being submitted only to supportive care, within an 18-month follow-up program. (author)

  5. APRIL promotes B-1 cell-associated neoplasm

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Planelles, Lourdes; Carvalho-Pinto, Carla E.; Hardenberg, Gijs; Smaniotto, Salette; Savino, Wilson; Gómez-Caro, Ruth; Alvarez-Mon, Melchor; de Jong, Joan; Eldering, Eric; Martínez-A, Carlos; Medema, Jan Paul; Hahne, Michael

    2004-01-01

    A tumor-supporting role for the TNF-like ligand APRIL has been suggested. Here we describe that 9- to 12-month-old APRIL transgenic mice develop lymphoid tumors that originate from expansion of the peritoneal B-1 B cell population. Aging APRIL transgenic mice develop progressive hyperplasia in

  6. Expanding primary cells from mucoepidermoid and other salivary gland neoplasms for genetic and chemosensitivity testing

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad M. Alamri

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Restricted availability of cell and animal models is a rate-limiting step for investigation of salivary gland neoplasm pathophysiology and therapeutic response. Conditionally reprogrammed cell (CRC technology enables establishment of primary epithelial cell cultures from patient material. This study tested a translational workflow for acquisition, expansion and testing of CRC-derived primary cultures of salivary gland neoplasms from patients presenting to an academic surgical practice. Results showed that cultured cells were sufficient for epithelial cell-specific transcriptome characterization to detect candidate therapeutic pathways and fusion genes, and for screening for cancer risk-associated single nucleotide polymorphisms (SNPs and driver gene mutations through exome sequencing. Focused study of primary cultures of a low-grade mucoepidermoid carcinoma demonstrated amphiregulin-mechanistic target of rapamycin-protein kinase B (AKT; AKT1 pathway activation, identified through bioinformatics and subsequently confirmed as present in primary tissue and preserved through different secondary 2D and 3D culture media and xenografts. Candidate therapeutic testing showed that the allosteric AKT inhibitor MK2206 reproducibly inhibited cell survival across different culture formats. By contrast, the cells appeared resistant to the adenosine triphosphate competitive AKT inhibitor GSK690693. Procedures employed here illustrate an approach for reproducibly obtaining material for pathophysiological studies of salivary gland neoplasms, and other less common epithelial cancer types, that can be executed without compromising pathological examination of patient specimens. The approach permits combined genetic and cell-based physiological and therapeutic investigations in addition to more traditional pathologic studies, and can be used to build sustainable bio-banks for future inquiries. This article has an associated First Person interview with the first

  7. Clinicopathologic Characteristics and Outcomes of Histiocytic and Dendritic Cell Neoplasms: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience Over the Last Twenty Five Years

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Dalia, Samir, E-mail: samir.dalia@mercy.net [Mercy Clinic Oncology and Hematology-Joplin, 3001 MC Clelland Park Blvd, Joplin, MO 64804 (United States); Jaglal, Michael; Chervenick, Paul [Department of Malignant Hematology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33602 (United States); Cualing, Hernani [IHCFLOW Histopathology Laboratory, University of South Florida, 18804 Chaville Rd., Lutz, FL 33558 (United States); Sokol, Lubomir [Department of Malignant Hematology, H. Lee Moffitt Cancer Center, 12902 Magnolia Drive, Tampa, FL 33602 (United States)

    2014-11-14

    Neoplasms of histiocytic and dendritic cells are rare disorders of the lymph node and soft tissues. Because of this rarity, the corresponding biology, prognosis and terminologies are still being better defined and hence historically, these disorders pose clinical and diagnostic challenges. These disorders include Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), histiocytic sarcoma (HS), follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS), interdigtating cell sarcoma (IDCS), indeterminate cell sarcoma (INDCS), and fibroblastic reticular cell tumors (FRCT). In order to gain a better understanding of the biology, diagnosis, and treatment in these rare disorders we reviewed our cases of these neoplasms over the last twenty five years and the pertinent literature in each of these rare neoplasms. Cases of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms diagnosed between 1989–2014 were identified using our institutional database. Thirty two cases were included in this analysis and were comprised of the following: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (20/32), histiocytic sarcoma (6/32), follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (2/32), interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma (2/32), indeterminate dendritic cell sarcoma (1/32), and fibroblastic reticular cell tumor (1/32). Median overall survival was not reached in cases with LCH and showed 52 months in cases with HS, 12 months in cases with FDCS, 58 months in cases with IDCS, 13 months in the case of INDCS, and 51 months in the case of FRCT. The majority of patients had surgical resection as initial treatment (n = 18). Five patients had recurrent disease. We conclude that histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms are very rare and perplexing disorders that should be diagnosed with a combination of judicious morphology review and a battery of immunohistochemistry to rule out mimics such as carcinoma, lymphoma, neuroendocrine tumors and to better sub-classify these difficult to diagnose lesions. The mainstay of treatment for localized disease remains surgical resection

  8. Clinicopathologic Characteristics and Outcomes of Histiocytic and Dendritic Cell Neoplasms: The Moffitt Cancer Center Experience Over the Last Twenty Five Years

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dalia, Samir; Jaglal, Michael; Chervenick, Paul; Cualing, Hernani; Sokol, Lubomir

    2014-01-01

    Neoplasms of histiocytic and dendritic cells are rare disorders of the lymph node and soft tissues. Because of this rarity, the corresponding biology, prognosis and terminologies are still being better defined and hence historically, these disorders pose clinical and diagnostic challenges. These disorders include Langerhans cell histiocytosis (LCH), histiocytic sarcoma (HS), follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS), interdigtating cell sarcoma (IDCS), indeterminate cell sarcoma (INDCS), and fibroblastic reticular cell tumors (FRCT). In order to gain a better understanding of the biology, diagnosis, and treatment in these rare disorders we reviewed our cases of these neoplasms over the last twenty five years and the pertinent literature in each of these rare neoplasms. Cases of histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms diagnosed between 1989–2014 were identified using our institutional database. Thirty two cases were included in this analysis and were comprised of the following: Langerhans cell histiocytosis (20/32), histiocytic sarcoma (6/32), follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (2/32), interdigitating dendritic cell sarcoma (2/32), indeterminate dendritic cell sarcoma (1/32), and fibroblastic reticular cell tumor (1/32). Median overall survival was not reached in cases with LCH and showed 52 months in cases with HS, 12 months in cases with FDCS, 58 months in cases with IDCS, 13 months in the case of INDCS, and 51 months in the case of FRCT. The majority of patients had surgical resection as initial treatment (n = 18). Five patients had recurrent disease. We conclude that histiocytic and dendritic cell neoplasms are very rare and perplexing disorders that should be diagnosed with a combination of judicious morphology review and a battery of immunohistochemistry to rule out mimics such as carcinoma, lymphoma, neuroendocrine tumors and to better sub-classify these difficult to diagnose lesions. The mainstay of treatment for localized disease remains surgical resection

  9. Applied Protein and Molecular Techniques for Characterization of B Cell Neoplasms in Horses

    Science.gov (United States)

    Badial, Peres R.; Tallmadge, Rebecca L.; Miller, Steven; Stokol, Tracy; Richards, Kristy; Borges, Alexandre S.

    2015-01-01

    Mature B cell neoplasms cover a spectrum of diseases involving lymphoid tissues (lymphoma) or blood (leukemia), with an overlap between these two presentations. Previous studies describing equine lymphoid neoplasias have not included analyses of clonality using molecular techniques. The objective of this study was to use molecular techniques to advance the classification of B cell lymphoproliferative diseases in five adult equine patients with a rare condition of monoclonal gammopathy, B cell leukemia, and concurrent lymphadenopathy (lymphoma/leukemia). The B cell neoplasms were phenotypically characterized by gene and cell surface molecule expression, secreted immunoglobulin (Ig) isotype concentrations, Ig heavy-chain variable (IGHV) region domain sequencing, and spectratyping. All five patients had hyperglobulinemia due to IgG1 or IgG4/7 monoclonal gammopathy. Peripheral blood leukocyte immunophenotyping revealed high proportions of IgG1- or IgG4/7-positive cells and relative T cell lymphopenia. Most leukemic cells lacked the surface B cell markers CD19 and CD21. IGHG1 or IGHG4/7 gene expression was consistent with surface protein expression, and secreted isotype and Ig spectratyping revealed one dominant monoclonal peak. The mRNA expression of the B cell-associated developmental genes EBF1, PAX5, and CD19 was high compared to that of the plasma cell-associated marker CD38. Sequence analysis of the IGHV domain of leukemic cells revealed mutated Igs. In conclusion, the protein and molecular techniques used in this study identified neoplastic cells compatible with a developmental transition between B cell and plasma cell stages, and they can be used for the classification of equine B cell lymphoproliferative disease. PMID:26311245

  10. Increase in circulating CD4⁺CD25⁺Foxp3⁺ T cells in patients with Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms during treatment with IFN-α

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Jensen, Morten Krogh; Brimnes, Marie Klinge

    2011-01-01

    in these patients. Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells play a pivotal role in maintaining immune homeostasis and, importantly, preventing immune reactivity to self-antigens; however, their suppressive activity can compromise an effective antitumor immune response, and high frequencies of regulatory T cells in peripheral......Recent reports have described complete or major molecular remission in patients with polycythemia vera after long-term treatment with the immunomodulatory agent IFN-a2. Accordingly, there are reasons to believe that the immune system is a key player in eradicating the JAK2 mutated clone...

  11. Stromal cells expressing hedgehog-interacting protein regulate the proliferation of myeloid neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kobune, M; Iyama, S; Kikuchi, S; Horiguchi, H; Sato, T; Murase, K; Kawano, Y; Takada, K; Ono, K; Kamihara, Y; Hayashi, T; Miyanishi, K; Sato, Y; Takimoto, R; Kato, J

    2012-01-01

    Aberrant reactivation of hedgehog (Hh) signaling has been described in a wide variety of human cancers including cancer stem cells. However, involvement of the Hh-signaling system in the bone marrow (BM) microenvironment during the development of myeloid neoplasms is unknown. In this study, we assessed the expression of Hh-related genes in primary human CD34 + cells, CD34 + blastic cells and BM stromal cells. Both Indian Hh (Ihh) and its signal transducer, smoothened (SMO), were expressed in CD34 + acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS)-derived cells. However, Ihh expression was relatively low in BM stromal cells. Remarkably, expression of the intrinsic Hh-signaling inhibitor, human Hh-interacting protein (HHIP) in AML/MDS-derived stromal cells was markedly lower than in healthy donor-derived stromal cells. Moreover, HHIP expression levels in BM stromal cells highly correlated with their supporting activity for SMO + leukemic cells. Knockdown of HHIP gene in stromal cells increased their supporting activity although control cells marginally supported SMO + leukemic cell proliferation. The demethylating agent, 5-aza-2′-deoxycytidine rescued HHIP expression via demethylation of HHIP gene and reduced the leukemic cell-supporting activity of AML/MDS-derived stromal cells. This indicates that suppression of stromal HHIP could be associated with the proliferation of AML/MDS cells

  12. Circulating tumor cells and miRNAs as prognostic markers in neuroendocrine neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zatelli, Maria Chiara; Grossrubatscher, Erika Maria; Guadagno, Elia; Sciammarella, Concetta; Faggiano, Antongiulio; Colao, Annamaria

    2017-06-01

    The prognosis of neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) is widely variable and has been shown to associate with several tissue- and blood-based biomarkers in different settings. The identification of prognostic factors predicting NEN outcome is of paramount importance to select the best clinical management for these patients. Prognostic markers have been intensively investigated, also taking advantage of the most modern techniques, in the perspective of personalized medicine and appropriate resource utilization. This review summarizes the available data on the possible role of circulating tumor cells and microRNAs as prognostic markers in NENs. © 2017 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. The Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF)/Met Axis: A Neglected Target in the Treatment of Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Boissinot, Marjorie [Translational Neuro-Oncology Group, Leeds Institute of Cancer and Pathology, University of Leeds, Level 5 Wellcome Trust Brenner Building, St James’s Hospital, Leeds LS9 7TF (United Kingdom); Vilaine, Mathias [Institute of Research on Cancer and Aging (IRCAN), CNRS-Inserm-UNS UMR 7284, U 1081, Centre A. Lacassagne, 33 Avenue Valombrose, Nice 06189 (France); Hermouet, Sylvie, E-mail: sylvie.hermouet@univ-nantes.fr [Centre Hospitalier Universitaire (CHU), Place Alexis Ricordeau, Nantes 44093 (France); Inserm UMR892, Centre de Recherche en Cancérologie Nantes-Angers, Institut de Recherche en Santé, Université de Nantes, 8 quai Moncousu, Nantes cedex 44007 (France)

    2014-08-12

    Met is the receptor of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF), a cytoprotective cytokine. Disturbing the equilibrium between Met and its ligand may lead to inappropriate cell survival, accumulation of genetic abnormalities and eventually, malignancy. Abnormal activation of the HGF/Met axis is established in solid tumours and in chronic haematological malignancies, including myeloma, acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML), and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). The molecular mechanisms potentially responsible for the abnormal activation of HGF/Met pathways are described and discussed. Importantly, inCML and in MPNs, the production of HGF is independent of Bcr-Abl and JAK2V617F, the main molecular markers of these diseases. In vitro studies showed that blocking HGF/Met function with neutralizing antibodies or Met inhibitors significantly impairs the growth of JAK2V617F-mutated cells. With personalised medicine and curative treatment in view, blocking activation of HGF/Met could be a useful addition in the treatment of CML and MPNs for those patients with high HGF/MET expression not controlled by current treatments (Bcr-Abl inhibitors in CML; phlebotomy, hydroxurea, JAK inhibitors in MPNs)

  14. The Hepatocyte Growth Factor (HGF/Met Axis: A Neglected Target in the Treatment of Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marjorie Boissinot

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available Met is the receptor of hepatocyte growth factor (HGF, a cytoprotective cytokine. Disturbing the equilibrium between Met and its ligand may lead to inappropriate cell survival, accumulation of genetic abnormalities and eventually, malignancy. Abnormal activation of the HGF/Met axis is established in solid tumours and in chronic haematological malignancies, including myeloma, acute myeloid leukaemia, chronic myelogenous leukaemia (CML, and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. The molecular mechanisms potentially responsible for the abnormal activation of HGF/Met pathways are described and discussed. Importantly, inCML and in MPNs, the production of HGF is independent of Bcr-Abl and JAK2V617F, the main molecular markers of these diseases. In vitro studies showed that blocking HGF/Met function with neutralizing antibodies or Met inhibitors significantly impairs the growth of JAK2V617F-mutated cells. With personalised medicine and curative treatment in view, blocking activation of HGF/Met could be a useful addition in the treatment of CML and MPNs for those patients with high HGF/MET expression not controlled by current treatments (Bcr-Abl inhibitors in CML; phlebotomy, hydroxurea, JAK inhibitors in MPNs.

  15. NY-ESO-1 is a sensitive and specific immunohistochemical marker for myxoid and round cell liposarcomas among related mesenchymal myxoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hemminger, Jessica A; Iwenofu, O Hans

    2013-09-01

    Myxoid and round cell liposarcomas constitute approximately one-third of all liposarcomas, a relatively common group of fat-derived soft tissue sarcomas. The histomorphology is a continuum between highly differentiated myxoid and poorly differentiated round cell components. The gold standard of diagnosis is dependent on histomorphology and/or identification of t(12;16)(q13;p11) translocation by cytogenetics or demonstration of DDIT3 rearrangements by fluorescence in situ hybridization. There are currently no diagnostic immunohistochemical stains available. The broad range of myxoid neoplasms in the differential diagnosis includes a variety of sarcomas. Given the notable differences in disease biology among myxoid neoplasms, which range from benign to aggressive, an accurate diagnosis is imperative for proper treatment and prognostication. Prompted by our recent study showing frequent expression of the cancer testis antigen NY-ESO-1 in myxoid and round cell liposarcomas, we sought to evaluate the utility of NY-ESO-1 as an immunohistochemical marker for myxoid and round cell liposarcoma among mesenchymal myxoid neoplasms within the differential diagnosis. Formalin-fixed, paraffin-embedded blocks were obtained for the following mesenchymal myxoid neoplasms (n=138): myxoid and round cell liposarcoma (n=38); well-differentiated liposarcoma (n=12); lipoma (n=20; 4 with myxoid change); extra-cardiac soft tissue myxoma (n=39); extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma (n=12); myxofibrosarcoma (n=10: 5 low grade, 2 intermediate grade, 3 high grade); and low-grade fibromyxoid sarcoma (n=7). Utilizing standard immunohistochemistry protocols, full sections were stained with NY-ESO-1 (clone E978), and staining was assessed for intensity (1-2+), percentage of tumor positivity, and location. In all, 36/38 (95%) of the myxoid and round cell liposarcomas demonstrated NY-ESO-1 immunoreactivity. The majority of the positive cases (34/36; 94%) showed strong, homogenous staining (>50% tumor

  16. Interferon-alpha in the treatment of Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Larsen, Thomas Stauffer; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch

    2011-01-01

    The Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms encompass essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). A major break-through in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these neoplasms occurred in 2005 by the discovery of the JAK2 V617F...

  17. Combined melanocytic and sweat gland neoplasm: cell subsets harbor an identical HRAS mutation in phacomatosis pigmentokeratotica.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Janet Y; Berger, Michael F; Marghoob, Ashfaq; Bhanot, Umesh K; Toyohara, Jennifer P; Pulitzer, Melissa P

    2014-08-01

    Phacomatosis pigmentokeratotica (PPK) is characterized by the co-existence of epidermal nevi and large segmental speckled lentiginous nevi of the papulosa type. PPK, previously explained as 'twin spot' mosaicism due to the postzygotic crossing-over of two homozygous recessive mutations, has recently been shown to derive from one postzygotic activating RAS mutation. Epidermal nevi, including those in PPK, are known to give rise to neoplasms such as trichoblastoma and basal cell carcinoma. Within speckled lentiginous nevi, Spitz nevi and melanoma have been well documented. We report a case of PPK with a combined melanocytic and adnexal neoplasm presenting where the nevi conjoined. Using next-generation sequencing techniques, we were able to identify the same HRAS G13R mutation within both components of the tumor, and to show the absence of additional mutated modifier genes in a panel of 300 cancer-related genes. Given the genetic findings in this rare tumor-type, we suggest that this case may be used as a model for understanding the development of biphenotypic neoplasia or intratumoral heterogeneity in some cases. © 2014 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. 8q24/MYC rearrangement is a recurrent cytogenetic abnormality in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boddu, Prajwal C; Wang, Sa A; Pemmaraju, Naveen; Tang, Zhenya; Hu, Shimin; Li, Shaoying; Xu, Jie; Medeiros, L Jeffrey; Tang, Guilin

    2018-03-01

    8q24/MYC rearrangements resulting in MYC overexpression occur most frequently in lymphoid neoplasms. MYC rearrangements rarely have been described in blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN). Over an 8-year period in our hospital, 5 of 41 (12%) patients with BPDCN were shown 8q24/MYC rearrangements, including 2 with t(6;8)(p21;q24), 1 with t(8;14)(q24;q32), 1 with t(X;8)(q24;q24), and 1 with t(3;8)(p25;q24). 8q24/MYC rearrangement was present in the stemline in 4 patients and in the sideline in one; the latter was a patient with primary myelofibrosis who then developed BPDCN. MYC overexpression by immunohistochemistry was variable, but largely correlated with the percentage of blasts. Four patients were treated with acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type chemotherapy regimens and 3 had a good response; 1 patient was treated with acute myeloid leukemia-type regimens and was refractory to therapy. By the end of the follow-up, 3 patients died and 2 were alive in complete remission. We conclude that 8q24/MYC rearrangements occur in 10-15% of BPDCN, often partnered with non-immunoglobulin chromosomal loci, and may play a role in BPDCN pathogenesis. In this small patient sample, patients with BPDCN and MYC rearrangement often responded to therapy with acute lymphoblastic leukemia-type chemotherapy regimens. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  19. Neuroimaging findings of the post-treatment effects of radiation and chemotherapy of malignant primary glial neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mamlouk, M D; Handwerker, J; Ospina, J; Hasso, A N

    2013-08-01

    Post-treatment radiation and chemotherapy of malignant primary glial neoplasms present a wide spectrum of tumor appearances and treatment-related entities. Radiologic findings of these post-treatment effects overlap, making it difficult to distinguish treatment response and failure. The purposes of this article are to illustrate and contrast the imaging appearances of recurrent tumor from necrosis and to discuss other radiologic effects of cancer treatments. It is critical for radiologists to recognize these treatment-related effects to help direct clinical management.

  20. Interferon-alpha in the treatment of Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Status and perspectives

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, H.C.; Larsen, T.S.; Riley, C.H.

    2011-01-01

    The Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms encompass essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV) and primary myelofibrosis (PMF). A major break-through in the understanding of the pathogenesis of these neoplasms occurred in 2005 by the discovery of the JAK2 V617F mu...... and potentially cure after long-term immune therapy with IFN-alpha2 is discussed and foreseen as an achievable goal in the future....

  1. Cell cycle kinetic analysis of colorectal neoplasms using a new automated immunohistochemistry-based cell cycle detection method.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomono, Ayako; Itoh, Tomoo; Yanagita, Emmy; Imagawa, Naoko; Kakeji, Yoshihiro

    2015-01-01

    We have recently developed a new method called the immunohistochemistry-based cell cycle detection (iCCD), which allows the determination of cell cycle phases on a cell-by-cell basis. This automated procedure can be performed on tissue sections and involves triple immunostaining for geminin, cdt1, and γ H2A.X, which are nuclear proteins expressed sequentially, with a few overlaps, during the cell cycle. In the current study, we applied this technique to resected specimens of colorectal neoplasm to determine the usefulness of iCCD for the pathological examination of colorectal cancers. We examined 141 cases of colorectal cancers. Normal mucosa and adenomas were analyzed as controls. In nonneoplastic mucosa, we observed a pattern of distribution of the cells positive for these cell cycle markers. Adenomas showed a slight distortion in this pattern, the geminin-positive cells, indicative of S/G2/M phase, were localized in the upper one-third region of the crypts. In neoplastic mucosa, the marker expression pattern was disorganized. Compared with normal mucosa, colorectal neoplasms showed an increased proportion of geminin-positive cells and decreased percentages of cdt1-positive cells (G1 phase). However, we did not find significant difference in the expression pattern between adenomas and carcinomas. Cellular proportions were correlated with clinicopathological parameters such as microscopic vascular invasion and pT stages. In cases of preoperative adjuvant therapy, the proportion of geminin-positive cells decreased, whereas that of γ H2A.X-positive cells (indicative of apoptosis/degeneration) increased significantly. We believe that this novel method can be applied to clinical samples to evaluate cell cycle kinetics and the effects of preoperative adjuvant therapy in colorectal cancers.

  2. Improved Detection of Circulating Epithelial Cells in Patients with Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Franses, Joseph W; Basar, Omer; Kadayifci, Abdurrahman; Yuksel, Osman; Choz, Melissa; Kulkarni, Anupriya S; Tai, Eric; Vo, Kevin D; Arora, Kshitij S; Desai, Niyati; Licausi, Joseph A; Toner, Mehmet; Maheswaran, Shyamala; Haber, Daniel A; Ryan, David P; Brugge, William R; Ting, David T

    2018-01-01

    Recent work has demonstrated early shedding of circulating epithelial cells (CECs) from premalignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs). However, the potential use of CECs as a "liquid biopsy" for patients with IPMNs has been limited by antigen dependence of CEC isolation devices and the lack of robust detection biomarkers across CEC phenotypes. We utilized a negative depletion microfluidic platform to purify CECs from contaminating leukocytes and coupled this platform with immunofluorescence, RNA in situ hybridization, and RNA sequencing (RNA-seq) detection and enumeration. Using established protein (EpCAM, cytokeratins) and novel noncoding RNA (HSATII, cytokeratins) biomarkers, we detected CECs in 88% of patients bearing IPMN lesions. RNA-seq analysis for MUC genes confirm the likely origin of these CECs from pancreatic lesions. Our findings increase the sensitivity of detection of these cells and therefore could have clinical implications for cancer risk stratification. This work describes a high-sensitivity platform for detection of epithelial cells shed from preneoplastic lesions at high risk of malignant transformation. Further research efforts are underway to define the transcriptional programs that might allow discrimination between circulating cells released from tumors that will become malignant and cells released from tumors that will not. After further refinement, this combination of technologies could be deployed for monitoring and early detection of patients at high risk for developing new or recurrent pancreatic malignancies. © AlphaMed Press 2017.

  3. Progesterone arrested cell cycle progression through progesterone receptor isoform A in pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yazdani, Samaneh; Kasajima, Atsuko; Onodera, Yoshiaki; McNamara, Keely May; Ise, Kazue; Nakamura, Yasuhiro; Tachibana, Tomoyoshi; Motoi, Fuyuhiko; Unno, Michiaki; Sasano, Hironobu

    2018-04-01

    In pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (Pan-NEN) progesterone signaling has been shown to have both inhibitory and stimulatory effects on cell proliferation. The ability of progesterone to inhibit tumor proliferation is of particular interest and is suggested to be mediated through the less abundantly expressed progesterone receptor (PR) isoform A (PRA). To date the mechanistic processes underlying this inhibition of proliferation remain unclear. To examine the mechanism of PRA actions, the human Pan-NEN cell line QGP-1, that endogenously expresses PR isoform B (PRB) without PRA, was transfected with PRA. PRA transfection suppressed the majority of cell cycle related genes increased by progesterone including cyclin A2 (CCNA2), cyclin B1 (CCNB1), cyclin-dependent kinase 1 (CDK1) and cyclin-dependent kinase 2 (CDK2). Importantly, following progesterone administration cell cycle distribution was shifted to S and G2/M phases in the naïve cell line but in PRA-transfected cells, this effect was suppressed. To see if these mechanistic insights were confirmed in patient samples PRA, PRB, CCNA2, CCNB, CDK1 and CDK2 immunoreactivities were assessed in Pan-NEN cases. Higher levels of cell cycle markers were associated with higher WHO grade tumors and correlations between the markers suggested formation of cyclin/CDK activated complexes in S and G2/M phases. PRA expression was associated with inverse correlation of all cell cycle markers. Collectively, these results indicate that progesterone signals through PRA negatively regulates cell cycle progression through suppressing S and G2/M phases and downregulation of cell cycle phases specific cyclins/CDKs. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Papillary ureteral neoplasm of low malignant potential in the upper urinary tract: endoscopic treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ercil, Hakan; Sener, Nevzat Can; Altunkol, Adem; Adamhasan, Fulya; Yesil, Suleyman; Ortoglu, Ferhat; Alma, Ergun; Gurbuz, Zafer Gokhan

    2014-12-01

    Papillary ureteral neoplasm of low malignant potential (PUNLMP) is a rare diagnosis, and to our knowledge, has not yet been reported in the upper urinary tract. In this study, we aimed to present our experience in managing a very rare diagnosis, PUNLMP, in the upper urinary tract, with endoscopic treatment. Files of patients who received surgery between January 2007 and January 2013 for upper urinary tract tumors were reviewed and patients treated for PUNLMP in the upper urinary tract in 4 urology clinics were reviewed. Patients included in the study had at most 2 tumors in the ureter and had a pathology of PUNLMP. The study included 11 patients with a mean age of 58.5 years. There were 9 men, and 2 women with a smoking rate of 81.8%. Nine patients (8 in the distal and 1 in the mid ureter) were managed using a semirigid ureteroscope. Two patients (1 with mid ureteral and 1 proximal) were treated using flexible ureteroscopy. The mean hospital stay was 1.56 days. Mean surgical time was 37.18 ± 7.14 minutes. The mean follow-up was 31.5 (range, 7-72) months. In the follow-ups, 3 patients had recurrences of 3, 2, and 4 mm in 9, 15, and 17 months, respectively. For tumors with a low risk of progression and relatively low risk of recurrence, organ-sparing treatments should be the choice of preference. To support our initial findings, randomized controlled studies on larger cohorts should be designed. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Steroid Cell Ovarian Neoplasm, Not Otherwise Specified: A Case Report and Review of the Literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Singh

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Steroid cell ovarian tumors, not otherwise specified, represent a unique cause of female virilization. Most commonly encountered in premenopausal women, these tumors can exist throughout a women’s lifetime, from before puberty until after menopause. Case. Steroid cell, not otherwise specified, was diagnosed in a 70-year-old female significant for hirsutism. The patient demonstrated elevated total testosterone levels with normal gonadotropins, DHEA, and DHEA-S levels. CT imaging revealed a right ovarian mass and subsequent laparoscopic right oophorectomy yielded clinical improvement promptly. Conclusion. Virilization in females can occur based on ovarian or adrenal pathology. In terms of ovarian-based female virilization, many tumors exist that may induce women to demonstrate masculine features, such as pure Sertoli, pure Leydig, Sertoli-Leydig combinations, and gynandroblastomas. Each of these tumor types possesses a unique histologic pattern that allows for pathologic identification after removal. A rare source of ovarian-based female virilization is steroid cell neoplasms, not otherwise specified, that do not demonstrate these specific histologic characteristics and thus represent a diagnosis of exclusion after other causes of ovarian-based female virilization have been ruled out.

  6. Renal cell carcinoma as a second malignant neoplasm in a patient with non-syndromic hemihypertrophy and previous Wilms tumor

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kraushaar, Greg; Wiebe, Sheldon [Royal University Hospital, Department of Medical Imaging, Saskatoon (Canada)

    2005-12-01

    Survivors of childhood Wilms tumors are at an increased risk of second malignant neoplasms. Recently, it has been postulated that renal cell carcinoma is among the malignancies for which this population is at risk. We present the unique case of an adult Wilms tumor survivor with non-syndromic hemihypertrophy (NSHH) who developed renal cell carcinoma. This case highlights the need for close follow-up in two populations: adults who have survived Wilms tumor and those with NSHH. (orig.)

  7. Renal cell carcinoma as a second malignant neoplasm in a patient with non-syndromic hemihypertrophy and previous Wilms tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kraushaar, Greg; Wiebe, Sheldon

    2005-12-01

    Survivors of childhood Wilms tumors are at an increased risk of second malignant neoplasms. Recently, it has been postulated that renal cell carcinoma is among the malignancies for which this population is at risk. We present the unique case of an adult Wilms tumor survivor with non-syndromic hemihypertrophy (NSHH) who developed renal cell carcinoma. This case highlights the need for close follow-up in two populations: adults who have survived Wilms tumor and those with NSHH.

  8. The impact of ruxolitinib treatment on inflammation-mediated comorbidities in myelofibrosis and related neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bjørn, Mads Emil; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl

    2015-01-01

    The inflammation-mediated comorbidities in myelofibrosis (MF) and related neoplasms (MPNs) likely reflect the concurrent immune deregulation and systemic inflammatory nature of the MPNs, emphasizing the link between chronic systemic inflammation, immune deregulation, and the malignant clone. JAK1......-2 inhibitors in MF-patients reduce constitutional symptoms and splenomegaly, but also taget autoimmune and inflammation-mediated comorbidities....

  9. Colon neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kimura F, K.

    1991-01-01

    The main aspects of colon neoplasms are described, including several factors that predispose the disease, the occurrence, the main biomedical radiography and the evaluation after the surgery. (C.G.C.)

  10. Diagnosis and treatment in cystic neoplasms of the pancreas: Analysis of 12 cases and review of the literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faruk Karateke

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Objectives: Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas (CNPaccounts for only 1-5% of all pancreatic neoplasms but inrecent years approximately 30% of all pancreatic resectionsare performed for CNP. In this study we aimed toargue diagnosis, treatment and outcomes of the patientswhom operated in our clinic for CNP.Materials and methods: The demographic characteristics,preoperative findings, surgical procedures, histopathologicaldiagnosis, postoperative complications andlong term follow-up outcomes of the CNP patients operatedin our clinic between 2009 -Jan and 2012-Feb wereevaluated.Results: One patient was male,11 patients were femaleand mean age was 51,5 years (19-73 years.Localizationsof the lesions were in the head of pancreas for 4 patients,in the body for 2 patients and in tail for 6 patients.Mean size of the cysts was 5.1 cm (3-10 cm.Pylorus-reservedpancreaticoduodenectomy for 4 patients, subtotal/distal pancreatectomy + splenectomy for 7 patients andspleen reserved distal pancreatectomy was performedfor 1 patient. Histopathological diagnosis was reportedas serous cystadenoma in 6, mucinous cystadenoma in3, mucinous cystadenocarcinoma in 2 and pseudocystin 1 patient respectively. Postoperative complication ratewas 33%. Mean follow-up time was 18.4 months (2-38months.Conclusions: Management should be based upon oncarefully weighting the malignant potential of a pancreaticcystic lesions and the risk of surgery.Key words: Pancreas, cystic neoplasm, resection

  11. Impact of radiotherapy on pain relief and recalcification in plasma cell neoplasms. Long-term experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balducci, Mario; Chiesa, Silvia; Manfrida, Stefania

    2011-01-01

    Purpose: To evaluate the impact of radiotherapy on pain relief and on recalcification in patients with osteolytic lesions due to plasma cell neoplasm. Patients and Methods: Pain relief was evaluated according to a 0-10 verbal numerical rating scale (NRS) and recalcification was measured using radiological imaging. Results: From 1996-2007, 52 patients were treated. Median total dose was 38 Gy (range, 16-50 Gy). Pain before radiotherapy was reported by 45 of 52 (86.5%) patients as being severe (8 ≤ NRS ≤ 10) in 5 (11%), moderate (5 ≤ NRS ≤ 7) in 27 (60%), and mild in 13 (29%). Pain relief was achieved in 41 of 45 patients (91%): complete relief was obtained in 21 (51.2%) and partial relief in 20 patients (48.8%); patients with severe pain experienced resolution and none presented an increase of pain. Drugs reduction/suspension was achieved in 7 of the 21 patients with complete response. Of 42 patients evaluable for recalcification, 21 (50%) presented a radiological response, which was identified as complete in 16 (38%). Conclusion: Our data confirm the effectiveness of radiotherapy for pain relief, including a reduction in drug intake, and on recalcification, thus, supporting its use in a multidisciplinary approach. (orig.)

  12. National Institutes of Health Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation Late Effects Initiative: Consensus Recommendations for Subsequent Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morton, Lindsay M.; Saber, Wael; Baker, K. Scott; Barrett, A. John; Bhatia, Smita; Engels, Eric A.; Gadalla, Shahinaz M.; Kleiner, David E.; Pavletic, Steven; Burns, Linda J.

    2016-01-01

    Subsequent neoplasms (SN) following hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) cause significant patient morbidity and mortality. Risks for specific SN types vary substantially, with particularly elevated risks for post-transplant lymphoproliferative disorders, myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia, and squamous cell malignancies. This consensus document provides an overview of the current state of knowledge regarding SN after HCT and recommends priorities and approaches to overcome challenges and gaps in understanding. Numerous factors have been suggested to impact risk, including patient-related (e.g., age), primary disease-related (e.g., disease type, pre-HCT therapies), and HCT-related characteristics (e.g., type and intensity of conditioning regimen, stem cell source, development of graft-versus-host disease). However, gaps in understanding remain for each of these risk factors, particularly for patients receiving HCT in the current era due to substantial advances in clinical transplantation practices. Additionally, the influence of non-transplant-related risk factors (e.g., germline genetic susceptibility, oncogenic viruses, lifestyle factors) is poorly understood. Clarification of the magnitude of SN risks and identification of etiologic factors will require large-scale, long-term, systematic follow-up of HCT survivors with detailed clinical data. Most investigations of the mechanisms of SN pathogenesis after HCT have focused on immune drivers. Expansion of our understanding in this area will require interdisciplinary laboratory collaborations utilizing measures of immune function and availability of archival tissue from SN diagnoses. Consensus-based recommendations for optimal preventative, screening, and therapeutic approaches have been developed for certain SN after HCT, whereas for other SN, general population guidelines are recommended. Further evidence is needed to specifically tailor preventative, screening, and therapeutic guidelines for SN

  13. Determining the role of inflammation in the selection of JAK2 mutant cells in myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Jie; Fleischman, Angela G; Wodarz, Dominik; Komarova, Natalia L

    2017-07-21

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) is a hematologic malignancy characterized by the clonal outgrowth of hematopoietic cells with a somatically acquired mutation most commonly in JAK2 (JAK2 V617F ). This mutation endows upon myeloid progenitors cytokine independent growth and consequently leads to excessive production of myeloid lineage cells. It has been previously suggested that inflammation may play a role in the clonal evolution of JAK2 V617F mutants. In particular, it is possible that one or more cellular kinetic parameters of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) are affected by inflammation, such as division or death rates of cells, and the probability of HSC differentiation. This suggests a mechanism that can steer the outcome of the cellular competition in favor of the mutants, initiating the disease. In this paper we create a number of mathematical evolutionary models, from very abstract to more concrete, that describe cellular competition in the context of inflammation. It is possible to build a model axiomatically, where only very general assumptions are imposed on the modeling components and no arbitrary (and generally unknown) functional forms are used, and still generate a set of testable predictions. In particular, we show that, if HSC death is negligible, the evolutionary advantage of mutant cells can only be conferred by an increase in differentiation probability of HSCs in the presence of inflammation, and if death plays a significant role in the dynamics, an additional mechanism may be an increase of HSC's division-to-death ratio in the presence of inflammation. Further, we show that in the presence of inflammation, the wild type cell population is predicted to shrink under inflammation (even in the absence of mutants). Finally, it turns out that if only the differentiation probability is affected by the inflammation, then the resulting steady state population of wild type cells will contain a relatively smaller percentage of HSCs under inflammation. If

  14. The effects of hematopoietic stem cell transplant on splenic extramedullary hematopoiesis in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasm-associated myelofibrosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pizzi, Marco; Gergis, Usama; Chaviano, Felicia; Orazi, Attilio

    2016-09-01

    Hematopoietic stem cell transplant (HSCT) is the only curative treatment for myeloproliferative neoplasm-associated myelofibrosis (MPN-MF). The main clinical manifestation of MPN-MF is splenomegaly secondary to extramedullary hematopoiesis (EMH). The effects of HSCT on splenic EMH and associated vascular and stromal changes are unknown. This study compares the findings seen in spleens following HSCT with those of nontransplanted patients, normal controls, and matched bone marrow (BM) samples. This study included three transplanted MPN-MF spleens, three nontransplanted MPN-MF spleens, and three normal controls. Spleens were assessed for: (a) presence/extent of EMH; (b) presence of Gamna-Gandy bodies; (c) splenic fibrosis; (d) CD34-positive microvessel density; (e) CD8-positive sinusoids; (f) frequency of smooth muscle actin-positive myoid cells; and (g) nerve growth factor receptor-positive adventitial reticulum cells. In two cases, matched BM samples were assessed for cellularity, presence of atypical megakaryocytes, and fibrosis. Compared with normal controls, all MPN-MF spleens were larger in size, had EMH, red pulp fibrosis, higher CD34-positive microvessel density, and decreased CD8-positive sinusoids. Compared with nontransplanted cases, post-HSCT spleens showed disappearance or reduction of EMH. Gamna-Gandy bodies were increased; no differences in the remaining parameters were found. A reduction of splenic EMH was associated with normalization of BM cellularity and megakaryopoiesis. HSCT reduces/abrogates splenic EMH and is associated with an increased number of Gamna-Gandy bodies, which may suggest vascular damage. The lack of stromal changes in spleens removed shortly after transplant is in line with similar observations in the BM, where a longer interval is often necessary for resolution of fibrosis. Copyright © 2016 King Faisal Specialist Hospital & Research Centre. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  15. CD34-positive stromal cells and alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive stromal cells in the tumor capsule of skin sweat gland neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakayama, Hirofumi; Enzan, Hideaki; Miyazaki, Eriko; Moriki, Toshiaki; Toi, Makoto; Zhang, Yanhu

    2002-01-01

    To elucidate the roles of CD34-positive stromal cells and alpha-smooth muscle actin-positive stromal cells at the tumor border of skin sweat gland neoplasms, we examined expression of stromal cell markers in the tumor capsule of 19 skin sweat gland neoplasms (16 mixed tumors of the skin and three nodular hidradenomas) using monoclonal antibodies to CD34, CD31, cytokeratin 14 (CK14), alpha-smooth muscle actin (ASMA) and high molecular weight caldesmon (HCD). We regarded CD34-positive, CD31-, CK14-, ASMA- and HCD-negative stromal cells to be CD34-positive stromal cells, and ASMA-positive, HCD-, CK14-, CD34- and CD31-negative stromal cells to be ASMA-positive stromal cells. CD34-positive stromal cells were detected in the tumor capsule of all 19 of the tumors examined. In nine of the 16 mixed tumors (56%) and all of the three nodular hidradenomas, ASMA-positive stromal cells were detected at the immediate inner side of the CD34-positive stromal cell layers. These results indicate that cellular components in the tumor capsules of mixed tumors of the skin and nodular hidradenomas are CD34-positive stromal cells and ASMA-positive stromal cells, and suggest that stromal cells of these two cell types are associated with tumor capsule formation of skin sweat gland neoplasms.

  16. General Information about Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... and diagnose chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Myeloproliferative neoplasms are a group of diseases in which the bone marrow makes ... the patient’s bloodstream. Transfusion therapy Transfusion therapy ( blood transfusion ) is a method of giving red blood cells, white blood ...

  17. Myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Roaldsnes, Christina; Holst, René; Frederiksen, Henrik

    2017-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET) and myelofibrosis (MF) are clonal disorders collectively named as myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN). Published data on epidemiology of MPN after the discovery of the JAK2 mutation and the 2008 WHO classifications are scarce. We...

  18. Squamous neoplasms arising within tattoos: clinical presentation, histopathology and management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Junqueira, A L; Wanat, K A; Farah, R S

    2017-08-01

    Tattooing, which involves the placement of ink into the skin, is an ancient decorative technique that has remained popular in modern society. Tattoos have long been known to cause cutaneous reactions, which include the emergence of neoplasms such as keratoacanthoma (KA) and squamous cell carcinoma (SCC) in tattooed areas of the skin. We review the clinical presentations, histology and treatment options for squamous neoplasms, primarily KA and SCC, arising in tattoos. © 2017 British Association of Dermatologists.

  19. Genetically Modified T-cell Immunotherapy in Treating Patients With Relapsed/Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Persistent/Recurrent Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-02

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia in Remission; Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Early Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Late Relapse of Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Neoplasm; Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Interleukin-3 Receptor Subunit Alpha Positive; Minimal Residual Disease; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Untreated Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia

  20. International Working Group-Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Research and Treatment (IWG-MRT) & European Competence Network on Mastocytosis (ECNM) consensus response criteria in advanced systemic mastocytosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Gotlib, Jason; Pardanani, Animesh; Akin, Cem; Reiter, Andreas; George, Tracy; Hermine, Olivier; Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke; Hartmann, Karin; Sperr, Wolfgang R.; Brockow, Knut; Schwartz, Lawrence B.; Orfao, Alberto; DeAngelo, Daniel J.; Arock, Michel; Sotlar, Karl; Horny, Hans-Peter; Metcalfe, Dean D.; Escribano, Luis; Verstovsek, Srdan; Tefferi, Ayalew; Valent, Peter

    2013-01-01

    Systemic mastocytosis (SM) is characterized by accumulation of neoplastic mast cells and is classified into indolent and aggressive forms. The latter include aggressive SM (ASM), mast cell leukemia (MCL), and SM associated with a myeloid neoplasm wherein 1 or both disease compartments exhibit

  1. Thiopurine methyltransferase genetics is not a major risk factor for secondary malignant neoplasms after treatment of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia on Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster protocols.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stanulla, Martin; Schaeffeler, Elke; Möricke, Anja; Coulthard, Sally A; Cario, Gunnar; Schrauder, André; Kaatsch, Peter; Dördelmann, Michael; Welte, Karl; Zimmermann, Martin; Reiter, Alfred; Eichelbaum, Michel; Riehm, Hansjörg; Schrappe, Martin; Schwab, Matthias

    2009-08-13

    Thiopurine methyltransferase (TPMT)is involved in the metabolism of thiopurines such as 6-mercaptopurine and 6-thioguanine. TPMT activity is significantly altered by genetics, and heterozygous and even more homozygous variant people reveal substiantially decreased TPMT activity. Treatment for childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) regularly includes the use of thiopurine drugs. Importantly, childhood ALL patients with low TPMT activity have been considered to be at increased risk of developing therapy-associated acute myeloid leukemia and brain tumors. In the present study, we genotyped 105 of 129 patients who developed a secondary malignant neoplasm after ALL treatment on 7 consecutive German Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster trials for all functionally relevant TPMT variants. Frequencies of TPMT variants were similarly distributed in secondary malignant neoplasm patients and the overall ALL patient population of 814 patients. Thus, TPMT does not play a major role in the etiology of secondary malignant neoplasm after treatment for childhood ALL, according to Berlin-Frankfurt-Münster strategies.

  2. Differential Dynamics of CALR Mutant Allele Burden in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms during Interferon Alfa Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kjær, Lasse; Cordua, Sabrina; Holmström, Morten O

    2016-01-01

    Discovery of somatic mutations in the calreticulin gene (CALR) has identified a subgroup of Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) with separate haematological characteristics and prognosis. CALR mutations serve as novel markers both of diagnostic value and as targets...... for monitoring molecular responses during therapy. Interferon-α (IFN) selectively targets the malignant clone in a subset of MPN patients and can induce both haematological and molecular remissions in CALR mutated essential thrombocythemia (ET) patients. We investigated the response to IFN in a cohort of 21 CALR...... mutated MPN patients including ET, prefibrotic primary myelofibrosis (pre-PMF), and primary myelofibrosis (PMF) with a median follow-up of 31 months. For evaluation of a molecular response, we developed highly sensitive quantitative PCR (qPCR) assays for monitoring the mutant allele burden of the two most...

  3. Radiofrequency ablation of lung tumours. New perspective in treatment of lung neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kocijancic, K.; Kocijancic, I.

    2007-01-01

    Percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) is a minimally invasive technique used to treat solid tumours. Because of its ability to produce large volume of coagulation necrosis in controlled fashion this technique has been progressively tested as a possible treatment of lung malignancies. Recent clinical studies have shown that RFA enables successful treatment of relatively small lung malignancies with high rate of complete response and acceptable morbidity and have suggested that the technique could represent a viable alternate or complementary method for patients with non-small cell lung cancer or lung metastases of favourable histotypes who are not candidates for surgical resection. Initial international studies as well as the clinical experience of Institute of Radiology in Clinical Center Ljubljana, although limited, indicated that RFA is mostly well tolerated by patients and also, that it can result in complete necrosis of targeted lesion. Pneumothorax is most common procedure related complication, occurring in up to 40% of cases, with approx. half of them requiring drainage. (author)

  4. Primary splenic angiosarcoma with liver metastasis: A rare neoplasm diagnosed on fine-needle aspiration cytology and cell block immunocytochemistry

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saniya Sharma

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Primary splenic angiosarcoma is a rare malignant vascular neoplasm of mesenchymal origin. The tumor is highly aggressive and has a high metastatic potential. It is usually diagnosed on histopathological examination of splenectomy specimen. Only few cases of angiosarcoma diagnosed by fine-needle aspiration (FNA cytology alone have been reported in the literature. The cytologic features of angiosarcoma are heterogeneous, however, diagnosis can be suggested by FNA when vasoformative features are present. A 55-year-old female presented with abdominal pain and hepatosplenomegaly. Computed tomography scan revealed a heterogeneous splenic lesion with liver metastases. FNA from the splenic and liver lesions showed moderately pleomorphic tumor cells closely associated with anastomosing vascular channels. Cell block immunocytochemistry (ICC showed tumor cells positive for CD31, CD34, CD68 as well as for CD99. FNA supplemented by cell block ICC can render a definite diagnosis of primary splenic angiosarcoma with liver metastasis.

  5. The prevention and treatment of biliary complications occurred after CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for hepatic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Li Jianjun; Zheng Jiasheng; Cui Xiongwei; Cui Shichang; Sun Bin

    2011-01-01

    Objective: To discuss the prevention and treatment of biliary complications occurred after CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for hepatic neoplasms. Methods: A total of 1136 patients, including 920 males and 216 females, with hepatic neoplasms were enrolled in this study. The hepatic tumors consisted of primary hepatocellular carcinoma (n=1037), hepatic metastasis (n=83) and hepatic cavernous hemangioma (n=16). The diameters of the tumors ranged from 0.5 to 16 cm. A total of 1944 RFA procedures were carried out in all patients. Results: Thirty-five patients developed biliary complication (35/1944, 1.80%). Twelve patients developed asymptomatic bile duct dilatation and no special treatment was given. Obstructive jaundice occurred in two patients and percutaneous transhepatic cholangiocholecystic drainage (PTCD) together with subsequent inner stent implantation had to be carried out. Eighteen patients developed biloma, and liver abscess formation secondary to biloma infection occurred in seven of them. Percutaneous transhepatic biloma drainage (PTBD) was adopted in all these patients. One patient suffered from obstructive jaundice complicated by biloma, and both PTCD and PTBD combined with inner stent implantation were simultaneously performed. One patient had the biloma secondary to obstructive jaundice, and PTCD followed by PTBD was conducted in turn. One patient developed obstructive jaundice secondary to biloma, and PTBD followed by PTCD was employed in turn. Conclusion: Obstructive jaundice and biloma are severe biliary complications occurred after CT-guided percutaneous radiofrequency ablation for hepatic tumors, and PTCD and/or PTBD should be carried out without delay to treat these complications. The clinical symptoms can be relieved, or even completely disappear, after treatment. (authors)

  6. A method to combine three dimensional dose distributions for external beam and brachytherapy radiation treatments for gynecological neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Narayana, V.; Sahijdak, W.M.; Orton, C.G.

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: Radiation treatment of gynecological neoplasms, such as cervical carcinoma, usually combines external radiation therapy with one or more intracavitary brachytherapy applications. Although the dose from external beam radiation therapy and brachytherapy can be calculated and displayed in 3D individually, the dose distributions are not combined. At most, combined point doses are calculated for select points using various time-dose models. In this study, we present a methodology to combine external beam and brachytherapy treatments for gynecological neoplasms. Material and Methods: Three dimensional bio-effect treatment planning to obtain complication probability has been outlined. CT scans of the patient's pelvis with the gynecological applicator in place are used to outline normal tissue and tumor volumes. 3D external beam and brachytherapy treatment plans are developed separately and an external beam dose matrix and a brachytherapy dose matrix was calculated. The dose in each voxel was assumed to be homogeneous. The physical dose in each voxel of the dose matrix was then converted into extrapolated response dose (ERD) based on the linear quadratic model that accounts for the dose per fraction, number of fractions, dose rate, and complete or incomplete repair of sublethal damage (time between fractions). The net biological dose delivered was obtained by summing the ERD grids from external beam and brachytherapy since there was complete repair of sublethal damage between external beam and brachytherapy treatments. The normal tissue complication probability and tumor control probability were obtained using the biological dose matrix based on the critical element model. Results: The outlined method of combining external beam and brachytherapy treatments was implemented on gynecological treatments using an applicator for brachytherapy treatments. Conclusion: Implementation of the biological dose calculation that combine different modalities is extremely useful

  7. Histogenesis of salivary gland neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Regezi, J A; Batsakis, J G

    1977-06-01

    In an attempt to explain the histogenesis of salivary gland tumors, a bicellular theory of origin has been presented. This theory is supported by indirect evidence from light and electron microscopy. Two cells, the excretory duct reserve cell and the intercalated duct reserve cell, are presented as the hypothetical cells of origin for salivary gland neoplasms. It is argued that the excretory duct reserve cell gives rise to squamous cell carcinomas and mucoepidermoid carcinomas, and that the intercalated duct reserve cell gives rise to all others. It It is also shown that myoepithelial cells are responsible in part for the wide histologic variation of these neoplasms.

  8. Red blood cell alloimmunization in 184 patients with myeloid neoplasms treated with azacitidine - A retrospective single center experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisch, M; Weiss, L; Lindlbauer, N; Jungbauer, C; Egle, A; Rohde, E; Greil, R; Grabmer, C; Pleyer, L

    2017-08-01

    Alloimmunization to Red Blood Cell (RBC) antigens frequently occurs in patients with myeloid neoplasms (AML, MDS and CMML) and potentially poses the patient at risk for delayed hemolytic transfusion reactions and limited supply of compatible RBC-units. However, there is comparatively little data on transfusion associated characteristics in this patient cohort. We therefore retrospectively analyzed transfusion requirements and clinical outcomes of 184 patients with myloid neoplasms treated with azacitidine at the Paracelsus Medical University Salzburg, which were included in the Austrian Registry of Hypomethylating Agents. The mean blood component requirements for AML, MDS and CMML were 39.8, 67.4 and 31.4 RBC units and 31.7, 27.6 and 19.1 platelet (PLT) units respectively. In spite of an extended and stringent RBC unit matching policy (ABO, RhD, RhCcEe and K antigens), 20 (11%) patients formed at least one alloantibody ("allo-group"), whereas 164 patients (89%) did not ("non-allo-group"). The most frequent antibody specificity was anti-E, followed by anti-Wra -Lua, -D, -C and -Jka. Alloimmunization was associated with higher numbers of transfused RBC units (68 vs. 38; p=0.001), as well as with longer time under transfusion (16.7 vs. 9.4 months; p=0.014). Median overall survival (OS) did not differ significantly between the "allo"- and "non-allo-group". Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Ltd.. All rights reserved.

  9. JAK inhibitors for the treatment of myeloproliferative neoplasms and other disorders [version 1; referees: 2 approved

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    William Vainchenker

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available JAK inhibitors have been developed following the discovery of the JAK2V617F in 2005 as the driver mutation of the majority of non-BCR-ABL1 myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs. Subsequently, the search for JAK2 inhibitors continued with the discovery that the other driver mutations (CALR and MPL also exhibited persistent JAK2 activation. Several type I ATP-competitive JAK inhibitors with different specificities were assessed in clinical trials and exhibited minimal hematologic toxicity. Interestingly, these JAK inhibitors display potent anti-inflammatory activity. Thus, JAK inhibitors targeting preferentially JAK1 and JAK3 have been developed to treat inflammation, autoimmune diseases, and graft-versus-host disease. Ten years after the beginning of clinical trials, only two drugs have been approved by the US Food and Drug Administration: one JAK2/JAK1 inhibitor (ruxolitinib in intermediate-2 and high-risk myelofibrosis and hydroxyurea-resistant or -intolerant polycythemia vera and one JAK1/JAK3 inhibitor (tofacitinib in methotrexate-resistant rheumatoid arthritis. The non-approved compounds exhibited many off-target effects leading to neurological and gastrointestinal toxicities, as seen in clinical trials for MPNs. Ruxolitinib is a well-tolerated drug with mostly anti-inflammatory properties. Despite a weak effect on the cause of the disease itself in MPNs, it improves the clinical state of patients and increases survival in myelofibrosis. This limited effect is related to the fact that ruxolitinib, like the other type I JAK2 inhibitors, inhibits equally mutated and wild-type JAK2 (JAK2WT and also the JAK2 oncogenic activation. Thus, other approaches need to be developed and could be based on either (1 the development of new inhibitors specifically targeting JAK2V617F or (2 the combination of the actual JAK2 inhibitors with other therapies, in particular with molecules targeting pathways downstream of JAK2 activation or the stability of JAK2

  10. The utility of ultrasonography in the the diagnostics and monitoring of treatment of acute abdominal pain in children with neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zaleska-Dorobisz, U.; Jankowski, B.; Maciaszek, A.; Moron, K.

    2005-01-01

    The aim of this study was to estimate the results of the diagnostic imaging modalities, especially ultrasonography (US) in children during the oncological therapy with the acute abdominal symptoms. Acute abdominal symptoms in children with neoplasms causing a very difficult clinical and diagnostic problems and can occur in any stage of disease. The high-resolution ultrasound has a very important role in diagnosis in all patients with acute abdominal pain and with neoplasms. The authors consider that the US should be the first imaging method in the differential diagnosis of the abdominal changes in children with neutropenia and oncological disease. Proper diagnosis should be established only with clinical information. We analyzed 249 ultrasounds examinations of the abdominal cavity in 144 girls and 105 boys aged from 1 to 18 years (mean age 10, 3 years). The more important indication for the US exam in 133 cases was acute abdominal symptoms. We took exams during pre- and postoperative chemotherapy, radiotherapy and after the hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. All the patients were under routine hematological control. Based on the clinical symptoms and the laboratory tests we analysed two groups of children with oncological disease and acute abdomen: I group - 111 children with neutropenia, II group - 22 children without neutropenia. In the patients who underwent operation procedure the final diagnosis was established on histopathology. In the other cases diagnosis was based on clinical, laboratory and radiological exams, especially ultrasonography. We analyzed clinical picture of disease, the results of therapy and the US changes in examined patients using statistic parameters as: sensitivity, specificity and efficiency. In the group of 133 children with acute abdominal symptoms the most (92- 69,1%) patients suffer from ALL (acute lymphoblastic leukaemia) and 16(12%) - from AML (acute lymphoblastic leukaemia), Ewing sarcoma-3(2,2%), osteosarcoma - 3(2,2%), NHL

  11. Intratubular germ cell neoplasms of the testis and bilateral testicular tumors: Clinical significance and management options

    Science.gov (United States)

    Risk, Michael C.; Masterson, Timothy A.

    2010-01-01

    Objectives: Intratubular germ cell neoplasia (ITGCN) is the precursor lesion for invasive testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs) of adolescents and young adults. The rising incidence of these tumors has prompted a rigorous investigation of the etiology, diagnosis and management of ITGCN. Bilateral testicular cancer is closely linked with ITGCN, as patients with unilateral testicular cancer are at the highest risk for a future malignancy in the contralateral testicle. Methods: A literature review directed at ITGCN and bilateral testis cancer was performed using the Medline/PubMed database. Our review focused on the pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis and treatment regimens utilized. Results: Major advances have been made in the understanding of ITGCN over the past 30 years. There is evidence that TGCTs arise from ITGCN, ITGCN is closely related to fetal gonocytes, and that events in pre- and perinatal period may result in abnormal persistence of fetal gonocytes leading to ITGCN and subsequent TGCT. Controversy exists regarding the need to biopsy men at increased risk of TGCT, as well as the best approach to managing patients with known ITGCN. Bilateral testicular cancer has excellent outcomes in the current era of platinum-based chemotherapy. Conclusion: The optimal management of patients at risk for ITGCN and future TGCT is still a matter of debate. Individualization of management, including biopsy and treatment, should be based on risk factors for TGCT, compliance with potential surveillance, and patient preferences particularly with regard to fertility. PMID:20535289

  12. Intratubular germ cell neoplasms of the testis and bilateral testicular tumors: Clinical significance and management options

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Michael C Risk

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available Objectives : Intratubular germ cell neoplasia (ITGCN is the precursor lesion for invasive testicular germ cell tumors (TGCTs of adolescents and young adults. The rising incidence of these tumors has prompted a rigorous investigation of the etiology, diagnosis and management of ITGCN. Bilateral testicular cancer is closely linked with ITGCN, as patients with unilateral testicular cancer are at the highest risk for a future malignancy in the contralateral testicle. Methods : A literature review directed at ITGCN and bilateral testis cancer was performed using the Medline/PubMed database. Our review focused on the pathogenesis, risk factors, diagnosis and treatment regimens utilized. Results : Major advances have been made in the understanding of ITGCN over the past 30 years. There is evidence that TGCTs arise from ITGCN, ITGCN is closely related to fetal gonocytes, and that events in pre- and perinatal period may result in abnormal persistence of fetal gonocytes leading to ITGCN and subsequent TGCT. Controversy exists regarding the need to biopsy men at increased risk of TGCT, as well as the best approach to managing patients with known ITGCN. Bilateral testicular cancer has excellent outcomes in the current era of platinum-based chemotherapy. Conclusion : The optimal management of patients at risk for ITGCN and future TGCT is still a matter of debate. Individualization of management, including biopsy and treatment, should be based on risk factors for TGCT, compliance with potential surveillance, and patient preferences particularly with regard to fertility.

  13. Clinical end points for drug treatment trials in BCR-ABL1-negative classic myeloproliferative neoplasms: consensus statements from European LeukemiaNET (ELN) and Internation Working Group-Myeloproliferative Neoplasms Research and Treatment (IWG-MRT).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barosi, G; Tefferi, A; Besses, C; Birgegard, G; Cervantes, F; Finazzi, G; Gisslinger, H; Griesshammer, M; Harrison, C; Hehlmann, R; Hermouet, S; Kiladjian, J-J; Kröger, N; Mesa, R; Mc Mullin, M F; Pardanani, A; Passamonti, F; Samuelsson, J; Vannucchi, A M; Reiter, A; Silver, R T; Verstovsek, S; Tognoni, G; Barbui, T

    2015-01-01

    The discovery of somatic mutations, primarily JAK2V617F and CALR, in classic BCR-ABL1-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) has generated interest in the development of molecularly targeted therapies, whose accurate assessment requires a standardized framework. A working group, comprised of members from European LeukemiaNet (ELN) and International Working Group for MPN Research and Treatment (IWG-MRT), prepared consensus-based recommendations regarding trial design, patient selection and definition of relevant end points. Accordingly, a response able to capture the long-term effect of the drug should be selected as the end point of phase II trials aimed at developing new drugs for MPNs. A time-to-event, such as overall survival, or progression-free survival or both, as co-primary end points, should measure efficacy in phase III studies. New drugs should be tested for preventing disease progression in myelofibrosis patients with early disease in randomized studies, and a time to event, such as progression-free or event-free survival should be the primary end point. Phase III trials aimed at preventing vascular events in polycythemia vera and essential thrombocythemia should be based on a selection of the target population based on new prognostic factors, including JAK2 mutation. In conclusion, we recommended a format for clinical trials in MPNs that facilitates communication between academic investigators, regulatory agencies and drug companies.

  14. Cytogenetic Evolution in Myeloid Neoplasms at Relapse after Allogeneic Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation: Association with Previous Chemotherapy and Effect on Survival.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ertz-Archambault, Natalie; Kosiorek, Heidi; Slack, James L; Lonzo, Melissa L; Greipp, Patricia T; Khera, Nandita; Kelemen, Katalin

    2017-05-01

    Cytogenetic evolution (CGE) in patients with myeloid neoplasms who relapsed after an allogeneic (allo) hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT) has been evaluated by only few studies. The effect of the CGE on survival of relapsed allo-HCT recipients is not clear. The effect of previously received chemotherapy to induce CGE in this patient population has not been studied. The aims of our study are to (1) characterize the patterns of cytogenetic change in patients with myeloid neoplasms who relapsed after an allo-HCT, (2) evaluate the effect of CGE on survival, and (3) explore the association of CGE with previous chemotherapy (including the lines of salvage therapy, type of induction, and conditioning therapy). Of 49 patients with a myeloid malignancy (27 acute myeloid leukemia [AML], 19 myelodysplastic syndrome [MDS]/myeloproliferative neoplasm [MPN], and 3 chronic myelogenous leukemia) who relapsed after an allo-HCT, CGE was observed in 25 (51%), whereas 24 patients had unchanged cytogenetic findings at relapse. The CGE group carried more cytogenetic abnormalities at original diagnosis. The most frequent cytogenetic change was the acquisition of 3 or more new chromosomal abnormalities followed by acquisition of unbalanced abnormalities, aneuploidy, and emergence of apparently new clones unrelated to the original clone. The CGE cohort had higher proportion of MDS and MPN and fewer patients with de novo AML. Disease risk assessment category showed a trend to higher frequency of high-risk patients in the CGE group, though the difference was not statistically significant. Time from diagnosis to transplantation and time from transplantation to relapse were not different between the CGE and non-CGE groups. CGE and non-CGE cohorts had similar exposures to salvage therapy and to induction chemotherapy, as well as similar conditioning regimens; thus, no particular type of chemotherapy emerged as a predisposing factor to CGE. CGE was associated with significantly shortened

  15. Renal pelvic calculi and neoplasm. New indication for treatment of asymptomatic renal pelvic calculi?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Vibitis, H; Jørgensen, J B

    1990-01-01

    Metaplasia of the renal pelvis caused by chronic irritation, calculi, infection is a reversible pre-malignant condition. The application of ESWL on renal calculi as a safe treatment in relation to metaplasia is discussed and a case history is presented....

  16. Efficacy of NS-018, a potent and selective JAK2/Src inhibitor, in primary cells and mouse models of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakaya, Y; Shide, K; Niwa, T; Homan, J; Sugahara, S; Horio, T; Kuramoto, K; Kotera, T; Shibayama, H; Hori, K; Naito, H; Shimoda, K

    2011-01-01

    Aberrant activation of Janus kinase 2 (JAK2) caused by somatic mutation of JAK2 (JAK2V617F) or the thrombopoietin receptor (MPLW515L) plays an essential role in the pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), suggesting that inhibition of aberrant JAK2 activation would have a therapeutic benefit. Our novel JAK2 inhibitor, NS-018, was highly active against JAK2 with a 50% inhibition (IC 50 ) of <1 n, and had 30–50-fold greater selectivity for JAK2 over other JAK-family kinases, such as JAK1, JAK3 and tyrosine kinase 2. In addition to JAK2, NS-018 inhibited Src-family kinases. NS-018 showed potent antiproliferative activity against cell lines expressing a constitutively activated JAK2 (the JAK2V617F or MPLW515L mutations or the TEL–JAK2 fusion gene; IC 50 =11–120 n), but showed only minimal cytotoxicity against most other hematopoietic cell lines without a constitutively activated JAK2. Furthermore, NS-018 preferentially suppressed in vitro erythropoietin-independent endogenous colony formation from polycythemia vera patients. NS-018 also markedly reduced splenomegaly and prolonged the survival of mice inoculated with Ba/F3 cells harboring JAK2V617F. In addition, NS-018 significantly reduced leukocytosis, hepatosplenomegaly and extramedullary hematopoiesis, improved nutritional status, and prolonged survival in JAK2V617F transgenic mice. These results suggest that NS-018 will be a promising candidate for the treatment of MPNs

  17. Therapeutic effect of 60Co teletherapy and radium treatment to various malignant neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Jin Yong; Park, Sang Sook; Chung, Jin Woo

    1970-01-01

    In radiation therapy, a complete study of patients on the indication of radiotherapy, delicate consideration during the radiotherapy, adequate after-care, the follow-up study and reconsideration are necessary. The radiotherapy patients are quite different in treatment and care. It takes, time to evaluate. Sometimes the misjudgement of patients last several years. However, the great endurance and efforts are vital necessity for the radiotherapy evaluation and improvement of radiotherapy techniques. At the Radiological Research Institute, all the radiotherapy patients from November 23, 1963 to December 31, 1968 were observed, and among them, those who survived three years after radiotherapy were analyzed in order to report the difficulty in follow-up study and to help formulate a better method of radiotherapy. All the follow-up study was done by questionnaire form. We have sent 8,470 letters, and received 2,084 Positive answers (24.6%) and the returned and no-reply were 6,386 (75.4%). As a sample case, 121 patients, who reside in Chongro-ku Seoul, were selected for home-visiting by our staffs. 67 patients (48.6%) could be located easily where as 71 patients (51.4%) could not be located. The results of follow-up correspondences were analyzed and categorized by the international classification of disease. Three-years survivors and the surviving rate are listed

  18. Study of Proliferating cell nuclear antigen expression and Angiogenesis in Urothelial neoplasms: Correlation with tumor grade and stage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Poojan Agarwal

    2018-01-01

    Conclusion: PCNA and CD31 when used together are valuable markers to help classify urothelial neoplasms in limited tumor material. However, larger prospective studies are required for better prognostication.

  19. Gastrointestinal Surgery of Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Carsten Palnæs; Olsen, Ingrid Marie Holst; Knigge, Ulrich

    2015-01-01

    Surgery is the only treatment that may cure the patient with gastroenteropancreatic (GEP) neuroendocrine neoplasms (NENs) and should always be considered as the first-line treatment if radical resection can be achieved. Even in cases where radical surgery is not possible, palliative resection may...

  20. A new era for IFN-α in the treatment of Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hasselbalch, H.C.

    2011-01-01

    in treating patients with these neoplasms favors the upfront use of pegylated interferons, the goal being to influence the development of the disease at the molecular level and revert patients to a stage of 'minimal residual disease/operational cure' instead of progressive clonal evolution, genomic...

  1. Synchronous Occurrence of Primary Neoplasms in the Uterus with Squamous Cell Carcinoma of the Cervix and Adenocarcinoma of the Endometrium

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cheng-Kuo Lin

    2006-12-01

    Conclusion: Synchronous genital tract neoplasms are rare but cause more clinical problems than a single neoplasm. It is practical to pay more attention to the differential diagnosis of primary and metastatic tumors. The second primary cancer that occurs in an individual with endometrial cancer may offer an opportunity for early detection. The prognosis for a patient with synchronous gynecologic malignancies does not seem to be worse.

  2. Pitfalls in the staging of cancer of the major salivary gland neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Friedman, Elliott R; Saindane, Amit M

    2013-02-01

    The major salivary glands consist of the parotid, submandibular, and sublingual glands. Most neoplasms in other subsites in the head and neck are squamous cell carcinoma, but tumors of the salivary glands may be benign or malignant. Surgical treatment differs if the lesion is benign, and therefore preoperative fine needle aspiration is important in salivary neoplasms. The role of imaging is to attempt to determine histology, predict likelihood of a lesion being malignant, and report an imaging stage. This article reviews the various histologies, imaging features, and staging of major salivary gland neoplasms. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  3. Prenatal ultrasound findings of fetal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Soo Hyun; Cho, Jeong Yeon; Song, Mi Jin; Min, Jee Yeon; Han, Byoung Hee; Lee, Young Ho; Cho, Byung Jae; Kim, Seung Hyup

    2002-01-01

    A variety of neoplasms can develop in each tetal organ. Most fetal neoplasms can be detected by careful prenatal ultrasonographic examination. Some neoplosms show specific ultrasonographic findings suggesting the differential diagnosis, but others do not. Knowledge of the presence of a neoplasm in the fetus may alter the prenatal management of a pregnancy and the mode of delivery, and facilitates immediate postnatal treatment. During the last five years, we experienced 32 cases of fetal neoplasms in a variety of organs. We describe their typical and ultrasonographic findings with correlating postnatal CT, MRI, and pathologic findings

  4. Surgeon-performed ultrasound predictors of malignancy in patients with Hürthle cell neoplasms of the thyroid.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Parikh, Punam P; Allan, Bassan J; Lew, John I

    2013-09-01

    Fine-needle aspiration cannot reliably determine malignancy in patients with Hürthle cell neoplasms (HCNs) of the thyroid. Thyroid nodule size and characteristics determined by surgeon-performed ultrasound (SUS) may be useful for predicting malignancy in HCN preoperatively. This study examined whether tumor size and features by SUS can reliably predict malignancy in patients with HCN. We performed a retrospective review of 84 patients with HCN by fine-needle aspiration, who underwent SUS and thyroidectomy from 2002 to 2010. All patients underwent thyroid lobectomy with isthmusectomy unless there was a history of radiation exposure, familial thyroid cancer, obstructive symptoms, bilateral nodules, and/or patient preference, in which case total thyroidectomy was performed. Tumor size and malignant features by SUS were correlated with final histopathology using multivariate regression analysis. On final histopathology, 29 patients had malignant thyroid nodules and 55 patients had benign ones. There were no statistically significant differences in terms of age, race, ethnicity, or gender between HCN patients who revealed malignant or benign nodules on final pathology. Tumor size ≥ 4 cm measured by SUS did not predict malignancy in HCN. Hypoechogenicity and hyperechogenicity were significantly associated with malignancy, whereas isoechogenicity was predictive of benignity (P = 0.044). No other ultrasonographic features were predictive for thyroid carcinoma by multivariate analysis. Tumor size and features determined by SUS do not reliably predict malignancy in patients with HCN. Such patients at risk for malignancy should initially undergo thyroid lobectomy for definitive diagnosis. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant in adult patients with myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm (MDS/MPN) overlap syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prashant; Shinde, Shivani S; Damlaj, Moussab; Hefazi Rorghabeh, Mehrdad; Hashmi, Shahrukh K; Litzow, Mark R; Hogan, William J; Gangat, Naseema; Elliott, Michelle A; Al-Kali, Aref; Tefferi, Ayalew; Patnaik, Mrinal M

    2017-04-01

    MDS/MPN (myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm) overlap syndromes are myeloid malignancies for which allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant (allo-HSCT) is potentially curative. We describe transplant outcomes of 43 patients - 35 with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, CMML (of which 17 had blast transformation, BT) and eight with MDS/MPN-unclassifiable (MDS/MPN,U). At median follow-up of 21 months, overall survival (OS), cumulative incidence of relapse (CIR) and non-relapse mortality (NRM) were 55%, 29%, and 25% respectively in CMML without BT and 47%, 40%, and 34% respectively in CMML with BT. Higher HSCT-comorbidity index (HSCT-CI >3 versus ≤3; p = 0.015) and splenomegaly (p = 0.006) predicted worse OS in CMML without BT. In CMML with BT, engraftment failure (p = 0.006) and higher HSCT-CI (p = 0.03) were associated with inferior OS, while HSCT within 1-year of diagnosis was associated with improved OS (p = 0.045). In MDS/MPN,U, at median follow-up of 15 months, OS, CIR, and NRM were 62%, 30%, and 14%, respectively.

  6. Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm presenting as leukemia without cutaneous involvement in a 25 years male patient: Unusual presentation of a rare entity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sumaira Qayoom

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm (BPDCN is a rare, aggressive neoplasm classified under "acute myeloid leukemia (AML and related precursor neoplasm" by current WHO classification. Elderly male are commonly affected with cutaneous lesion being the hallmark of disease presentation. The disease progresses rapidly and sooner or later involves bone marrow and peripheral blood. Cases presenting primarily as leukemia without cutaneous involvement is a rarity with about 29 cases reported in literature till date. Characteristic immunophenotype of CD4 + /CD56 +/− cells expressing antigens associated with plasmacytoid dendritic cells like CD123, TCL1, BDCA2/CD303, cutaneous lymphocyte-associated and interferon dependent molecule MxA, in absence of any other lineage specific marker confirms the diagnosis. The disease has a poor survival and no standardized therapeutic strategy in the current scenario. A case of 25-year-male presenting with leukemic BPDCN without cutaneous involvement is presented here, who was treated with AML like protocol followed by hematopoietic stem cell transplantation, but succumbed to the disease within 8 months of diagnosis. The present case is being first to be reported from India.

  7. Validation of endogenous normalizing genes for expression analyses in adult human testis and germ cell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svingen, T; Jørgensen, A; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2014-08-01

    The measurement of gene expression levels in cells and tissues typically depends on a suitable point of reference for inferring biological relevance. For quantitative (or real-time) RT-PCR assays, the method of choice is often to normalize gene expression data to an endogenous gene that is stably expressed across the samples analysed: a so-called normalizing or housekeeping gene. Although this is a valid strategy, the identification of stable normalizing genes has proved challenging and a gene showing stable expression across all cells or tissues is unlikely to exist. Therefore, it is necessary to define suitable normalizing genes for specific cells and tissues. Here, we report on the performance of a panel of nine commonly employed normalizing genes in adult human testis and testicular pathologies. Our analyses revealed significant variability in transcript abundance for commonly used normalizers, highlighting the importance of selecting appropriate normalizing genes as comparative measurements can yield variable results when different normalizing genes are employed. Based on our results, we recommend using RPS20, RPS29 or SRSF4 when analysing relative gene expression levels in human testis and associated testicular pathologies. OCT4 and SALL4 can be used with caution as second-tier normalizers when determining changes in gene expression in germ cells and germ cell tumour components, but the relative transcript abundance appears variable between different germ cell tumour types. We further recommend that such studies should be accompanied by additional assessment of histology and cellularity of each sample. © The Author 2014. Published by Oxford University Press on behalf of the European Society of Human Reproduction and Embryology. All rights reserved. For Permissions, please email: journals.permissions@oup.com.

  8. Validation of endogenous normalizing genes for expression analyses in adult human testis and germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Svingen, T; Jørgensen, Anne; Rajpert-De Meyts, E

    2014-01-01

    The measurement of gene expression levels in cells and tissues typically depends on a suitable point of reference for inferring biological relevance. For quantitative (or real-time) RT-PCR assays, the method of choice is often to normalize gene expression data to an endogenous gene that is stably...... to define suitable normalizing genes for specific cells and tissues. Here, we report on the performance of a panel of nine commonly employed normalizing genes in adult human testis and testicular pathologies. Our analyses revealed significant variability in transcript abundance for commonly used normalizers...

  9. Effects of omega-3 fatty acids on regulatory T cells in hematologic neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dayanne da Silva Borges Betiati

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The development of leukemia and lymphomas is related to the increase in inflammatory process modulators. These, in turn, have divergent actions on the neoplastic process. Populations of T cells have different roles in the neoplastic environment; while interferon-gamma positive T cells have antitumor activity, the FoxP3+interleukin-10 positive population present a pro-tumor activity. Simultaneously, the inflammatory process promotes the mobilization of fatty acids from the cell membrane to produce lipid mediators, which also participate of the inflammatory response. Eicosapentaenoic (EPA and docosahexaenoic (DHA omega-3 fatty acids, when incorporated in the plasmatic membrane, decrease the arachidonic acid (AA metabolism and the production of eicosanoids derived from it. Thus, an alternative family of lipid mediators are produced that are often less inflammatory than those produced from arachidonic acid. Fatty acids can also influence the production of peptide mediators such as cytokines, and the expression of transcription factors, which can determine the production patterns of eicosanoids and cytokines as well as cell differentiation. Due to these properties, the objective of this literature review was to investigate studies published over the last 15 years on the effects of using omega-3 fatty acids on inflammatory markers in leukemia and lymphomas.

  10. Lipoprotein lipase and endothelial lipase in human testis and in germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, J E; Lindegaard, M L; Friis-Hansen, L

    2009-01-01

    The aim of this study was to investigate endothelial lipase (EL, LIPG) and lipoprotein lipase (LPL) mRNA and protein expression in normal human testis and testicular germ cell tumours (GCT). Both EL and LPL were expressed in normal seminiferous tubules and in the interstitial compartment. EL mRNA...

  11. The Short-Term and Intermediate-Term Risk of Second Neoplasms After Diagnosis and Treatment of Unilateral Vestibular Schwannoma: Analysis of 9460 Cases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Carlson, Matthew L., E-mail: carlson.matthew@mayo.edu [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Glasgow, Amy E. [Division of Health Care Policy and Research and the Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Jacob, Jeffrey T. [Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Habermann, Elizabeth B. [Division of Health Care Policy and Research and the Robert D. and Patricia E. Kern Center for the Science of Health Care Delivery, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Link, Michael J. [Department of Otorhinolaryngology, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States); Department of Neurologic Surgery, Mayo Clinic School of Medicine, Rochester, Minnesota (United States)

    2016-07-15

    Purpose: To determine the incidence of second intracranial neoplasms after the diagnosis and treatment of sporadic vestibular schwannoma (VS). Methods and Materials: Analysis of the Surveillance, Epidemiology, and End Results (SEER) database including all patients identified with a diagnosis of VS and a second intracranial tumor. The Kaplan-Meier method was used to determine the incidence of second tumors while allowing for censoring at loss to follow-up or death. Multivariable associations between treatment modality and second tumor formation were explored using Cox proportional hazards regression analysis. Two illustrative cases are also presented. Results: In all, 9460 patients with unilateral VS were identified between 2004 and 2012. Overall, 66 (0.7%) patients experienced a separate intracranial tumor, benign or malignant, after treatment of VS. Kaplan-Meier estimates for time to second neoplasm at 1, 3, and 5 years were 0.3%, 0.7%, and 0.8%, respectively. Multivariable comparison between VS treatment modalities revealed that the risk of second tumor formation was similar between radiation and surgery (hazard ratio [HR] 0.74; 95% confidence interval [CI] 0.36-1.51; P=.93) but greater for tumors managed with observation alone compared with radiation (HR 2.48; 95% CI 1.31-4.71; P<.01). A total of 6 (0.06%) intracranial malignancies were diagnosed after VS treatment. Kaplan-Meier estimates for time to malignancy at 1, 3, and 5 years were 0%, 0.1%, and 0.1%, respectively. After adjustment for age at diagnosis, sex, and treatment modality, the probability of malignancy after radiation was not greater than after observation alone or microsurgery (HR 4.88; 95% CI 0.85-28.14; P=.08) during the study period. Conclusions: The risk for the development of a second intracranial neoplasm, benign or malignant, at 5 years after treatment of unilateral VS is approximately 0.8%, whereas the risk of acquiring a separate malignancy is 0.1%, or approximately 1 per 1000 cases

  12. MR appearance of skeletal neoplasms following cryotherapy

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Richardson, M.L. [Dept. of Radiology SB-05, Washington Univ., Seattle, WA (United States); Lough, L.R. [Pitts Radiological Associates, Columbia, SC (United States); Shuman, W.P. [Dept. of Radiology, Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Lazerte, G.D. [Dept. of Pathology RC-72, Washington Univ., Medical Center Hospital of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States); Conrad, E.U. [Dept. of Orthopedic Surgery RK-10, Washington Univ., Medical Center of Vermont, Burlington, VT (United States)

    1994-02-01

    Cryotherapy is an increasingly popular mode of therapy adjunctive to surgical curettage in the treatment of certain skeletal neoplasms, such as giant cell tumors or chondrosarcomas. The magnetic resonance (MR) findings following cryotherapy have not been previously reported. We reviewed the MR findings in seven patients with skeletal neoplasms following curettage and cryotherapy. In six cases we found a zone of varying thickness extending beyond the surgical margins, corresponding to an area of cryoinjury to medullary bone. This zone displayed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, consistent with the presence of marrow edema. This zone of edema almost certainly reflects underlying thermal osteonecrosis. This zone may vary in size and intensity over time as the area of cryoinjury evolves or resolves. MR is currently the imaging procedure of choice for follow-up of most musculoskeletal neoplasms. Knowledge of the MR findings following cryotherapy should help prevent confusion during the interpretation of follow-up MR examinations. (orig.)

  13. MR appearance of skeletal neoplasms following cryotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.L.; Lough, L.R.; Shuman, W.P.; Lazerte, G.D.; Conrad, E.U.

    1994-01-01

    Cryotherapy is an increasingly popular mode of therapy adjunctive to surgical curettage in the treatment of certain skeletal neoplasms, such as giant cell tumors or chondrosarcomas. The magnetic resonance (MR) findings following cryotherapy have not been previously reported. We reviewed the MR findings in seven patients with skeletal neoplasms following curettage and cryotherapy. In six cases we found a zone of varying thickness extending beyond the surgical margins, corresponding to an area of cryoinjury to medullary bone. This zone displayed low signal intensity on T1-weighted images and high signal intensity on T2-weighted images, consistent with the presence of marrow edema. This zone of edema almost certainly reflects underlying thermal osteonecrosis. This zone may vary in size and intensity over time as the area of cryoinjury evolves or resolves. MR is currently the imaging procedure of choice for follow-up of most musculoskeletal neoplasms. Knowledge of the MR findings following cryotherapy should help prevent confusion during the interpretation of follow-up MR examinations. (orig.)

  14. Tumour-inhibitory effects of dendritic cells administered at the site of HPV 16-induced neoplasms

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Mendoza, Luis; Bubeník, Jan; Šímová, Jana; Korb, Jan; Bieblová, Jana; Vonka, V.; Indrová, Marie; Mikyšková, Romana; Jandlová, Táňa

    2002-01-01

    Roč. 48, č. 3 (2002), s. 114-119 ISSN 0015-5500 R&D Projects: GA MZd NC7148; GA ČR GA301/00/0114; GA AV ČR IAA7052002; GA AV ČR IAA5052203 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z5052915 Keywords : HPV 16 * dendritic cells * adjuvant therapy Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 0.615, year: 2002

  15. High frequency of endothelial colony forming cells marks a non-active myeloproliferative neoplasm with high risk of splanchnic vein thrombosis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vittorio Rosti

    Full Text Available Increased mobilization of circulating endothelial progenitor cells may represent a new biological hallmark of myeloproliferative neoplasms. We measured circulating endothelial colony forming cells (ECFCs in 106 patients with primary myelofibrosis, fibrotic stage, 49 with prefibrotic myelofibrosis, 59 with essential thrombocythemia or polycythemia vera, and 43 normal controls. Levels of ECFC frequency for patient's characteristics were estimated by using logistic regression in univariate and multivariate setting. The sensitivity, specificity, likelihood ratios, and positive predictive value of increased ECFC frequency were calculated for the significantly associated characteristics. Increased frequency of ECFCs resulted independently associated with history of splanchnic vein thrombosis (adjusted odds ratio = 6.61, 95% CI = 2.54-17.16, and a summary measure of non-active disease, i.e. hemoglobin of 13.8 g/dL or lower, white blood cells count of 7.8×10(9/L or lower, and platelet count of 400×10(9/L or lower (adjusted odds ratio = 4.43, 95% CI = 1.45-13.49 Thirteen patients with splanchnic vein thrombosis non associated with myeloproliferative neoplasms were recruited as controls. We excluded a causal role of splanchnic vein thrombosis in ECFCs increase, since no control had elevated ECFCs. We concluded that increased frequency of ECFCs represents the biological hallmark of a non-active myeloproliferative neoplasm with high risk of splanchnic vein thrombosis. The recognition of this disease category copes with the phenotypic mimicry of myeloproliferative neoplasms. Due to inherent performance limitations of ECFCs assay, there is an urgent need to arrive to an acceptable standardization of ECFC assessment.

  16. Fine-Needle Aspiration Cytology of Parathyroid Carcinoma Mimic Hürthle Cell Thyroid Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chutintorn Sriphrapradang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Fine-needle aspiration (FNA can cause misdiagnosis of cytomorphological findings between parathyroid and thyroid lesions. Case Presentation. A 31-year-old man presented with a palpable neck mass on the right thyroid lobe. FNA cytology was reported as intrathyroidal lymphoid hyperplasia. After 5 years, repeated FNA was done on the enlarged nodule with result of Hürthle cell lesion. Prior to right lobectomy, laboratories revealed elevated serum calcium and parathyroid hormone (PTH. Careful history taking revealed chronic knee pain and ossifying fibroma at the maxilla. Ultrasonography showed a 2.8 cm mass inferior to right thyroid lobe. Pathology from en bloc resection was parathyroid carcinoma and immunohistochemical study revealed positivity for PTH. Genetic analysis found somatic mutation of CDC73 gene in exon1 (c.70delG which caused premature stop codon in amino acid 26 (p.Glu24Lysfs2*. The final diagnosis was hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor syndrome. Conclusions. FNA cytology of parathyroid can mimic thyroid lesion. It is important to consider and correlate the entire information from clinical history, laboratory, imaging, and FNA.

  17. INTRACRANIAL NEOPLASMS IN IBADAN, NIGERIA B.J. OLASODE ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    hi-tech

    2000-01-01

    Jan 1, 2000 ... embryogenetic classifications of intracranial neoplasms in which terms like neuroblastoma, spongioblastoma, astroblastoma and ependymoblastoma were coined to indicate neoplasms arising from these primitive cells(1). Advances in our understanding of the morphobiology of intracranial neoplasms have ...

  18. Raman spectroscopy of skin neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moryatov, A. A.; Kozlov, S. V.; Kaganov, O. I.; Orlov, A. E.; Zaharov, V. P.; Batrachenko, I. A.; Artemiev, D. N.; Blinov, N. V.

    2017-09-01

    Skin melanoma is spread inhomogeneously worldwide, particularly in Samara region there are high figures of skin neoplasms sick rate as well—18.6%. Research goal: to develop a new method of early non-invasive differential diagnostics of skin neoplasms. Registration of Raman spectrum was implemented in the distance of 3-4 mm, the spectrum registration from pathologically changed zone was subsequently conducted, then from healthy skin zone. The test time for 1 patient was no longer than 3-5 min. In a range of experiments ex vivo there were the following results: melanoma—24, basal cell cancer—25, squamosus cell sarcinoma—7, nevus pigmentosis—9, other malignant neoplasms—6; in vivo: melanoma—9, basal cell cancer—8, nevus pigmentosis—2, other benign neoplasms—2. The first results of the research dedicated to studying permissive opportunities of Raman spectroscopy, with successive two-phase analysis of received parameters display high efficiency of method of differential diagnostic for skin melanoma and other malignant neoplasms, pigment and benign skin neoplasms. Safety and rapidity of the research reveal a high potential of the technique.

  19. Second Malignant Neoplasms and Cause of Death in Patients With Germ Cell Cancer

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kier, Maria Gry Gundgaard; Hansen, Merete K; Lauritsen, Jakob

    2016-01-01

    radiotherapy (RT); bleomycin, etoposide, and cisplatin (BEP); or more than 1 line of treatment (MTOL). Main Outcomes and Measures: Cumulative incidence and hazard ratios (HRs) for SMN and death calculated by the Cox proportional hazards model were compared with those of age-matched controls. Results: The study...... population comprised 2804 patients with seminoma and 2386 with nonseminoma. The median follow-up was 14.4 years (interquartile range, 8.6-20.5 years). The 20-year cumulative incidence of SMN with death as a competing risk was 7.8% (surveillance), 7.6% (BEP), 13.5% (RT), 9.2% (MTOL), and 7.0% (controls). We...... found no increased risk for SMN after surveillance, while the HRs were 1.7 (95% CI, 1.4-2.0), 1.8 (95% CI, 1.5-2.3), and 3.7 (95% CI, 2.5-5.5), respectively, after BEP, RT, and MTOL. Mortality owing to non-GCC causes was decreased after surveillance, but increased by 1.3 times after BEP and RT and by 2...

  20. Gestational trophoblastic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Demas, B.E.; Hricak, H.; Braga, C.

    1988-01-01

    Twenty-four women with suspected gestational trophoblastic neoplasms were evaluated prospectively to identify imaging algorithms optimal for treatment planning. All underwent chest radiography, chest CT, hepatic and cranial CT or MR imaging, and pelvic MR imaging. Ten also underwent pelvic CT, 13 pelvic US. The most sensitive imaging combination was chest CT, hepatic and cranial CT or MR imaging, and pelvic MR imaging. However, correct assignment to ACOG therapeutic categories was achieved by means of history, physical examination, beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotropin measurements, and chest radiography in 81% of patients. Hepatic and cranial imaging defined the need for radiation therapy. Chest CT was needed only when chest radiographs were negative. Pelvic imaging aided diagnosis but did not assist in treatment planning

  1. Identification of Prognostic Biomarkers for Progression of Invasive Squamous Cell Carcinoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-09

    Carcinoma, Squamous Cell; Carcinoma, Squamous; Squamous Cell Carcinoma; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Lung Cancer; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms

  2. Clinical features of pancreatic cystic neoplasms and its therapeutic strategy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    ZHANG Jiali

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available The detection rate of pancreatic cystic neoplasms obviously increases with the development of imaging technology. However, it is still difficult to make the differential diagnosis between different types of pancreatic cystic neoplasms. For pancreatic cystic neoplasms, the physical condition of the patient, tumor size, location, patient preference, and other potential factors should be considered to develop an individualized treatment. The incidence rate of complications is high, although the operative mortality of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is very low. Therefore, it is necessary to strictly make the treatment decision for pancreatic cystic neoplasms.

  3. Immunological aspects of adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL), a possible neoplasm of regulatory T-cells

    OpenAIRE

    Yamada, Yasuaki; Kamihira, Shimeru

    2008-01-01

    Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL) is a distinct disease caused by the first discovered human oncogenic retrovirus, human T-cell leukemia virus type-1 (HTLV-1). The peculiarity of this disease is not only in its causative agent HTLV-1 but also in the character of leukemia cells. ATLL cells express the mature helper/inducer T-cell antigens, CD2, CD3, CD4 and CD5 but usually lacking CD8. Despite CD4 expression, it has long been known that ATLL cells exhibit strong immunosuppressive activity ...

  4. Recurrent Benign Salivary Gland Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Witt, Robert Lee; Nicolai, Piero

    2016-01-01

    The most important causes of recurrence of benign pleomorphic adenoma are enucleation with intraoperative spillage and incomplete tumor excision in association with characteristic histologic findings for the lesion (incomplete pseudocapsule and the presence of pseudopodia). Most recurrent pleomorphic adenomas (RPAs) are multinodular. MRI is the imaging method of choice for their assessment. Nerve integrity monitoring may reduce morbidity of RPA surgery. Although treatment of RPA must be individualized, total parotidectomy is generally recommended given the multicentricity of the lesions. However, surgery alone may be inadequate for controlling RPA over the long term. There is growing evidence from retrospective series that postoperative radiotherapy results in significantly better local control. A high percentage of RPAs are incurable. All patients should therefore be informed about the possibility of needing multiple treatment procedures, with possible impairment of facial nerve function, and radiation therapy for RPA. Reappearance of Warthin tumor is a metachronous occurrence of a new focus or residual incomplete excision of all primary multicentric foci of Warthin tumor. Selected cases can be observed. Conservative surgical management can include partial superficial parotidectomy or extracapsular dissection. Not uncommonly, other major and minor salivary gland neoplasms, including myoepithelioma, basal cell adenoma, oncocytoma, canalicular adenoma, cystadenoma, and ductal papilloma, follow an indolent course after surgical resection, with rare cases of recurrence. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  5. Somatostatin-Immunoreactive Pancreaticoduodenal Neuroendocrine Neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Engelund Luna, Iben; Monrad, Nina; Binderup, Tina

    2016-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: Neuroendocrine neoplasms in the pancreas and duodenum with predominant or exclusive immunoreactivity for somatostatin (p-dSOMs) are rare, and knowledge on tumour biology, treatment, survival and prognostic factors is limited. This study aimes to describe clinical, pathological, and bio......OBJECTIVE: Neuroendocrine neoplasms in the pancreas and duodenum with predominant or exclusive immunoreactivity for somatostatin (p-dSOMs) are rare, and knowledge on tumour biology, treatment, survival and prognostic factors is limited. This study aimes to describe clinical, pathological...

  6. Central nervous system changes complicating the use of radiotherapy for the treatment of a nasopharyngeal neoplasm in a diabetic patient

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Smith, B.M.; McGinnis, W.; Cook, J.; Latourette, H.

    1979-01-01

    A case is reported of a diabetic patient with a nasopharyngeal neoplasm who developed radiation induced brainstem damage even though irradiated at a conventional time-dose-volume relationship. The clinical course was correlated with autopsy findings which revealed radiation changes in the brainstem consisting primarily of vascular hyalinization with foci of infarction, edema, and demyelination. Atherosclerotic changes were conspicuously absent and therefore not the cause of the alterations. The changes occurred three months after completion of therapy, which was more rapid than expected for radiation injury. It is hypothesized that diabetes may have predisposed the patient to this severe complication of standard therapy. More needs to be learned concerning the relationship between diabetes mellitus and radiation complications. Perhaps a modified time-dose relationship should be considered

  7. Marinobufagin, a molecule from poisonous frogs, causes biochemical, morphological and cell cycle changes in human neoplasms and vegetal cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Machado, Kátia da Conceição; Sousa, Lívia Queiroz de; Lima, Daisy Jereissati Barbosa; Soares, Bruno Marques; Cavalcanti, Bruno Coêlho; Maranhão, Sarah Sant'Anna; Noronha, Janaina da Costa de; Rodrigues, Domingos de Jesus; Militão, Gardenia Carmen Gadelha; Chaves, Mariana Helena; Vieira-Júnior, Gerardo Magela; Pessoa, Cláudia; Moraes, Manoel Odorico de; Sousa, João Marcelo de Castro E; Melo-Cavalcante, Ana Amélia de Carvalho; Ferreira, Paulo Michel Pinheiro

    2018-03-15

    Skin toad secretion present physiologically active molecules to protect them against microorganisms, predators and infections. This work detailed the antiproliferative action of marinobufagin on tumor and normal lines, investigate its mechanism on HL-60 leukemia cells and its toxic effects on Allium cepa meristematic cells. Initially, cytotoxic action was assessed by colorimetric assays. Next, HL-60 cells were analyzed by morphological and flow cytometry techniques and growing A. cepa roots were examined after 72 h exposure. Marinobufagin presented high antiproliferative action against all human tumor lines [IC 50 values ranging from 0.15 (leukemia) to 7.35 (larynx) μM] and it failed against human erythrocytes and murine lines. Human normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) were up to 72.5-fold less sensitive [IC 50: 10.88 μM] to marinobufagin than HL-60 line, but DNA strand breaks were no detected. Leukemia treaded cells exhibited cell viability reduction, DNA fragmentation, phosphatidylserine externalization, binucleation, nuclear condensation and cytoplasmic vacuoles. Marinobufagin also reduced the growth of A. cepa roots (EC 50 : 7.5 μM) and mitotic index, caused cell cycle arrest and chromosomal alterations (micronuclei, delays and C-metaphases) in meristematic cells. So, to find out partially targeted natural molecules on human leukemia cells, like marinobufagin, is an amazing and stimulating way to continue the battle against cancer. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Bone morbidity in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Farmer, Sarah; Ocias, Lukas Frans; Vestergaard, Hanne

    2015-01-01

    Patients with the classical Philadelphia chromosome-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms including essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera and primary myelofibrosis often suffer from comorbidities, in particular, cardiovascular diseases and thrombotic events. Apparently, there is al...... mastocytosis (SM) where pathogenic mechanisms for bone manifestations probably involve effects of mast cell mediators on bone metabolism, the mechanisms responsible for increased fracture risk in other chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are not known........ Chronic inflammation has been suggested to explain the initiation of clonal development and progression in chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. Decreased bone mineral density and enhanced fracture risk are well-known manifestations of many chronic systemic inflammatory diseases. As opposed to systemic...

  9. Comparative analysis of cytokeratin 15, TDAG51, cytokeratin 20 and androgen receptor in sclerosing adnexal neoplasms and variants of basal cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Evangelista, Mara Therese P; North, Jeffrey P

    2015-11-01

    Desmoplastic trichoepithelioma (DTE), morpheaform basal cell carcinoma (BCC) and microcystic adnexal carcinoma (MAC) are sclerosing adnexal neoplasms with overlapping histopathologic features. We compared cytokeratin 15, (CK15), T-cell death-associated gene 51 (TDAG51), cytokeratin 20 (CK20) and androgen receptor (AR) in differentiating these tumors and assessed their expression in BCC subtypes. Fifteen DTE, 15 infundibulocystic BCC, 18 micronodular BCC, 18 morpheaform BCC and 6 MAC were assessed for CK15, TDAG51, CK20 and AR expression. Quantitative CK15 staining was higher in DTE compared with BCC (p < 0.0001) and MAC (p = 0.02). Quantitative TDAG51 staining was higher in DTE than BCC (p < 0.0001). The CK20+AR- immunophenotype was 100% sensitive and specific in diagnosing DTE. The CK20-AR+ immunophenotype was 95.24% specific and 83.33% sensitive for BCC. The CK20-AR- immunophenotype was 83.33% sensitive and 90.91% specific for MAC. CK15, CK20 and AR were positive in 87, 53 and 67% of infundibulocystic BCC cases, respectively. Combination of CK20 and AR best differentiated these sclerosing adnexal neoplasms. Greater positivity for CK15 and TDAG51 generally favors benign lesions. Infundibulocystic BCC has higher CK20 and lower AR immunopositivity than other BCC variants and a high degree of CK15 and TDAG51 positivity. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. High-Grade B-Cell Neoplasm with Surface Light Chain Restriction and Tdt Coexpression Evolved in a MYC-Rearranged Diffuse Large B-Cell Lymphoma: A Dilemma in Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dina Sameh Soliman

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available According to World Health Organization (WHO classification (2008, B-cell neoplasms are classified into precursor B-cell or a mature B-cell phenotype and this classification was also kept in the latest WHO revision (2016. We are reporting a male patient in his fifties, with tonsillar swelling diagnosed as diffuse large B-cell lymphoma (DLBCL, germinal center. He received 6 cycles of RCHOP and showed complete metabolic response. Two months later, he presented with severe CNS symptoms. Flow cytometry on bone marrow (BM showed infiltration by CD10-positive Kappa-restricted B-cells with loss of CD20 and CD19, and downregulation of CD79b. Moreover, the malignant population showed Tdt expression. BM Cytogenetics revealed t(8;14(q24;q32 within a complex karyotype. Retrospectively, MYC and Tdt immunostains performed on original diagnostic tissue and came negative for Tdt and positive for MYC. It has been rarely reported that mature B-cell neoplasms present with features of immaturity; however the significance of Tdt acquisition during disease course was not addressed before. What is unique in this case is that the emerging disease has acquired an immaturity marker while retaining some features of the original mature clone. No definitive WHO category would adopt high-grade neoplasms that exhibit significant overlapping features between mature and immature phenotypes.

  11. Perspectives on testicular sex cord-stromal tumors and those composed of both germ cells and sex cord-stromal derivatives with a comparison to corresponding ovarian neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roth, Lawrence M; Lyu, Bingjian; Cheng, Liang

    2017-07-01

    Sex cord-stromal tumors (SCSTs) are the second most frequent category of testicular neoplasms, accounting for approximately 2% to 5% of cases. Both genetic and epigenetic factors account for the differences in frequency and histologic composition between testicular and ovarian SCSTs. For example, large cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumor and intratubular large cell hyalinizing Sertoli cell neoplasia occur in the testis but have not been described in the ovary. In this article, we discuss recently described diagnostic entities as well as inconsistencies in nomenclature used in the recent World Health Organization classifications of SCSTs in the testis and ovary. We also thoroughly review the topic of neoplasms composed of both germ cells and sex cord derivatives with an emphasis on controversial aspects. These include "dissecting gonadoblastoma" and testicular mixed germ cell-sex cord stromal tumor (MGC-SCST). The former is a recently described variant of gonadoblastoma that sometimes is an immediate precursor of germinoma in the dysgenetic gonads of patients with a disorder of sex development. Although the relationship of dissecting gonadoblastoma to the previously described undifferentiated gonadal tissue is complex and not entirely resolved, we believe that it is preferable to continue to use the term undifferentiated gonadal tissue for those cases that are not neoplastic and are considered to be the precursor of classical gonadoblastoma. Although the existence of testicular MGC-SCST has been challenged, the most recent evidence supports its existence; however, testicular MGC-SCST differs significantly from ovarian examples due to both genetic and epigenetic factors. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  12. Metastases of Renal Cell Carcinoma to the Thyroid Gland with Synchronous Benign and Malignant Follicular Cell-Derived Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Carlos Zamarrón

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (CCRCC is the most common origin for metastasis in the thyroid. A 51-year-old woman was referred to our hospital for a subcarinal lesion. Ten years before, the patient had undergone a nephrectomy for CCRCC. Whole-body fluorodeoxyglucose positron emission tomography revealed elevated values in the thyroid gland, while the mediastinum was normal. An endoscopic ultrasonography-guided fine-needle aspiration biopsy of the mediastinal mass was consistent with CCRCC, and this was confirmed after resection. The thyroidectomy specimen also revealed lymphocytic thyroiditis, nodular hyperplasia, one follicular adenoma, two papillary microcarcinomas, and six foci of metastatic CCRCC involving both thyroid lobes. Curiously two of the six metastatic foci were located inside two adenomatoid nodules (tumor-in-tumor. The metastatic cells were positive for cytokeratins, CD10, epidermal growth factor receptor, and vascular endothelial growth factor receptor 2. No BRAF gene mutations were found in any of the primary and metastatic lesions. The patient was treated with sunitinib and finally died due to CCRCC distant metastases 6 years after the thyroidectomy. In CCRCC patients, a particularly prolonged survival rate may be achieved with the appropriate therapy, in contrast to the ominous prognosis typically found in patients with thyroid metastases from other origins.

  13. Vascularity in thyroid neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Karen Kjaer; Andersen, Niels Frost; Melsen, Flemming

    2006-01-01

    The aim of the present study was to evaluate the reliability of four different methods (vascular grading, Chalkley count, microvessel density (MVD) and stereological estimation) for quantifying intratumoral microvascularity in thyroid neoplasms, by comparing the variability within and between...... count should be the preferred method for assessing microvascularity in thyroid neoplasms. The diagnostic evaluation revealed a tendency towards higher degree of vascularity in FA compared to both FC and PC for all methods. No statistically significant association was seen between vascular density...

  14. Treatment results and prognostic factors of clear cell ovarian carcinomas and ovarian carcinomas with clear cell component

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. D. Ahmedova

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available The most important prognostic factors for clear cell carcinoma (CCC are clinical and morphological signs and clinical stage of the disease. Analyses of 5-year survival in patients with I stage of CCC is 69 %, in II stage – 55 %, in III stage – 14 % and in IV stage – 4 % patients. We analyzed distant results of treatment of 71 patients with CCC and of 25 patients with mixed malignant ovaries neoplasm with obligatory clear cell component taking into consideration main clinical and morphological sings of disease. On the base of performed reseal we revealed that morphological structure of the tumors and stage of the disease exerted heist influence on the exponent of survival of the patients with clear CCC ovaries neoplasm. Besides, there is a correlation between exponent of patients’ survival and radicalized of surgery, character of tumor growth, differentiation degree, cell anaplasia and mitotic activity of tumor cells.

  15. Pigmented poroid neoplasm mimicking nodular melanoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsuishi, Tsuyoshi; Ansai, Shin-ichi; Ueno, Takashi; Kawana, Seiji

    2010-06-01

    We reported the case of a 92-year-old woman with a pigmented and non-pigmented surface of the pedunculated nodule on her lower leg. Microscopic examination revealed that this nodule consisted of a component of small, dark, homogenous, poroid cells and cuticular cells in the dermis. The histopathological features of the lesion were consistent with poroid neoplasm. Immunohistochemistry showed that HMB-45 and Melan-A were positive in malanocytes and melanophages of the pigmented areas. Unlike most poroid neoplasms, this case showed pigmented lesion mimicked nodular melanoma.

  16. Mutations with epigenetic effects in myeloproliferative neoplasms and recent progress in treatment: Proceedings from the 5th International Post-ASH Symposium

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tefferi, A; Abdel-Wahab, O; Cervantes, F; Crispino, J D; Finazzi, G; Girodon, F; Gisslinger, H; Gotlib, J; Kiladjian, J-J; Levine, R L; Licht, J D; Mullally, A; Odenike, O; Pardanani, A; Silver, R T; Solary, E; Mughal, T

    2011-01-01

    Immediately following the 2010 annual American Society of Hematology (ASH) meeting, the 5th International Post-ASH Symposium on Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and BCR-ABL1-Negative Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPNs) took place on 7–8 December 2010 in Orlando, Florida, USA. During this meeting, the most recent advances in laboratory research and clinical practice, including those that were presented at the 2010 ASH meeting, were discussed among recognized authorities in the field. The current paper summarizes the proceedings of this meeting in BCR-ABL1-negative MPN. We provide a detailed overview of new mutations with putative epigenetic effects (TET oncogene family member 2 (TET2), additional sex comb-like 1 (ASXL1), isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) and enhancer of zeste homolog 2 (EZH2)) and an update on treatment with Janus kinase (JAK) inhibitors, pomalidomide, everolimus, interferon-α, midostaurin and cladribine. In addition, the new ‘Dynamic International Prognostic Scoring System (DIPSS)-plus' prognostic model for primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and the clinical relevance of distinguishing essential thrombocythemia from prefibrotic PMF are discussed

  17. [The ND-Yag laser in the treatment of non-resectable esophageal neoplasms: evaluation and results].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tenchini, P; Breda, B; Montresor, E; Abrescia, F; Iacono, C; Angelini, G P; Puchetti, V

    1985-08-01

    The Authors show a set of 9 cases of patients suffering from oesophagus flaky carcinoma, judged radically non-operable, and treated with endoscopic laser-therapy by N.D. Yag Laser. They illustrate the patients' main clinical data, method followed, complications observed and results obtained. What seems to emerge from the analysis of the data is: the effectiveness of laser-therapy in the control of disphagia, simplicity of the technique and its acceptability by the patient, as well as the rareness of complications. Three are the clinical parameters used for the checking of patients before and after the laser treatment: disphagia, odynophagia and thoracic ache. The intenseness of symptoms was classed from 0 up to 3. Before the treatment, six patients out of nine showed class 3 disphagia; after the treatment, two could assume fluids (class 2), two fed also on minced foods (class 1), and two fed normally; in the two cases with initial class 2 disphagia a normal feed could be adopted; in one case no initial disphagia was present. Odynophagia was initially present in one case only at class 3, in three cases at class 1, and in all the other cases it was absent (0). After the treatment, odynophagia disappeared totally, except in one class 1 case, which remained unchanged. The presence of thoracic ache before the treatment was class 1 in four cases, class 3 in one case, and absent in four cases. After the treatment, the class 3 ache turned into class 1: in one class 1 case it was not modified; in the remaining cases the ache, if present, disappeared. Some questions remain opened, concerning the effect on survival, even in relation to other palliative methods, to the duration of the palliation obtained and to the eventual associability of lasertherapy to radiotherapy.

  18. Intrathoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Weller, R.E.

    1991-06-01

    Neoplasms of the thoracic cavity are as diverse as the structures and tissues that comprise the thorax. This paper summarizes the clinical signs, diagnosis and treatment of thoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat. Specific diagnostic techniques are evaluated, as is the utility of imaging techniques for clinical staging. Surgery is recommended as the treatment of choice for intrathoracic neoplasms, with exception for multiple tumor masses, metastasis, or poor patient health. Radiation therapy, chemotherapy, and hyperthermia are discussed individually or in combination with surgery or each other. Prognosis for specific tumors is discussed, as is lymph node involvement as a prognostic indicator. As the use of newer diagnostic procedures become more available in veterinary medicine, it should be possible to offer patients a variety of positive choices that will enhance their survival and quality of life

  19. Anal channel neoplasm: a neoplasm radio chemo curable

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Lopez, M.; Avondet, I.; Vazquez, J.; Santini Blasco, A.

    1997-01-01

    Presently work is made an exhaustive revision of the anatomy of the region, the history of the treatments and of the current treatments of channel cancer anal. It makes emphasis in the importance of the conservative treatment with radiochemotherapy (RQT). The present is a prospective study,longitudinal and descriptive. Material and method: between January of 1989 and December of 1994 20 patients attended with cancer of anal channel with an illness metastasis. An average age it was of 62.4 years.The sex, 16 men and 4 women. The performance status 0,1 or 2 of the scale of the ECOQ. In the pathological anatomy: 15 patient epidermic neoplasm, 5 patient basal neoplasm. State I: 2 patients, II: 12 patients, III: 6 patients, IV: 0 patients.Treatment: the radiotherapy one carries out with cobalt 60 and it irradiates the primary tumour and the ganglion structures region, pelvic and inguinal. It surrendered to Gy/dia from Monday to Friday up to 50 Gy. The chemotherapy one carries out with mitomicine C 10 mg/ previous day to the radiotherapy and 5-UGH 1 intravenous g/my in infusion the days from 1 to 4 and from 29 to 32 after the radiotherapy.Results: to) control locorregional patient RC-16 (80%) ,RP 2 patients (10%) , without answer or with progression lesional a patient (5%) .b) State vital: living 15 patients, died 5 patients(continuation 12 to 60 months) .e)Tolerance: there were not deaths for the gastrointestinal treatment and haematological with toxicity moderate.To conclude:1) The radiochemotherapy is the treatment of elect.2)A feasible treatment of being carried out in our environment.3)Required of a good relationship predictable interdisciplinary.4)Toxicity and tolerable.5)Results of conservation of the sphincter in 80%(AU) [es

  20. Tratamiento de las neoplasias hematológicas en el embarazo Treatment of hematologic neoplasms during pregnancy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Norma E Tartas

    2007-12-01

    Full Text Available La neoplasia hematológica más frecuente en la mujer gestante es el linfoma de Hodgkin. Con menor frecuencia se han comunicado leucemias agudas o linfomas no Hodgkin (LNH. En los últimos años se han introducido nuevos fármacos que han cambiado el pronóstico de neoplasias como la leucemia promielocítica aguda, los linfomas no Hodgkin y la leucemia mieloide crónica. Se presenta aquí información actualizada sobre drogas y tratamientos, desarrollo de nuevos fármacos, mecanismo de acción, aplicación clínica, experiencias y resultados del tratamiento, efectos secundarios y teratogénicos, a fin de orientar a hematólogos, oncólogos y pediatras. El equipo médico debe ofrecer el tratamiento más eficaz disponible para alcanzar la curación o remisión de la enfermedad, e informar acerca de sus posibles riesgos para la madre y el feto, así como los derivados por la demora de su aplicación.The most common hematological malignancy in pregnant patients is Hodgkin's lymphoma, but other diseases such as chronic and acute leukemia or non Hodgkin's lymphoma have also been reported. In the last decade, new drugs have changed the prognostic of acute promyelocytic leukemia, chronic myeloid leukemia and non Hodgkin's lymphoma. Herein we present updated information on drugs and treatments, new developments, mechanism of action, clinical application, experience on treatment outcomes, adverse effects and teratogenesis, with the objective of orienting hematologists, oncologists and pediatricians. The medical team should offer the most efficient treatment available in order to achieve cure or remission of the disease, and also inform on possible risks for the mother and the fetus, as well as those derived from the delay in treatment application.

  1. Arthroscopic guided biopsy and radiofrequency thermoablation of a benign neoplasm of the tibial spines area: a treatment option

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zoccali Carmine

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Lesions located in the area of the tibial spines are rare. In most cases, treatment follows histological diagnosis, but when imaging and clinical data are considered to be "very" characteristic for benign lesions, such as chondroblastoma or osteoid osteoma, treatment may be performed without biopsy. Traditional curettage requires opening the joint, which presents a high risk of contamination of the joint itself and surrounding structures, such as the popliteal area, with possible contamination of the neurovascular bundle when performing curettage with the posterior approach. In this case, the re-excision of a local recurrence would be extremely difficult. Results We describe a technique using arthroscopic guidance for radiofrequency thermoablation of a benign lesion in the tibial spines area. We report on an illustrative case. The patient so treated, reported immediate relief from the pain, and after two weeks, was free of pain. The biopsy performed before the treatment confirmed the radiological diagnosis of chondroblastoma. At one year of follow-up, the patient is without pain, with a 0-130°range of motion, has no activity limitations and is apparently free of disease. Conclusion This technique allows a radiofrequency thermoablation of a lesion in the tibial spines area and in the posterior tibial surface to be performed without opening the joint, monitoring the tibial plateau surface, probably decreasing the risk of cartilage damage. Unfortunately, in the case presented, the high pressure from the arthroscopy's pump broke the tibial plateau surface creating a communication to the tibial tunnel used for thermoablation.

  2. Presumed pluripotency markers UTF-1 and REX-1 are expressed in human adult testes and germ cell neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kristensen, David M; Nielsen, John E; Skakkebaek, Niels E

    2008-01-01

    UTF-1 and REX-1/ZFP42 are transcription factors involved in pluripotency. Because of phenotypic similarities between pluripotent embryonic stem cells and testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT) and the derivation of pluripotent cells from testes, we investigated the expression of UTF-1 and REX-1 duri...

  3. Circulating Tumor Cell Count Correlates with Colorectal Neoplasm Progression and Is a Prognostic Marker for Distant Metastasis in Non-Metastatic Patients

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Wen-Sy; Chen, Jinn-Shiun; Shao, Hung-Jen; Wu, Jen-Chia; Lai-Ming, Jr.; Lu, Si-Hong; Hung, Tsung-Fu; Chiu, Yen-Chi; You, Jeng-Fu; Hsieh, Pao-Shiu; Yeh, Chien-Yuh; Hung, Hsin-Yuan; Chiang, Sum-Fu; Lin, Geng-Ping; Tang, Reiping; Chang, Ying-Chih

    2016-04-01

    Enumeration of circulating tumor cells (CTCs) has been proven as a prognostic marker for metastatic colorectal cancer (m-CRC) patients. However, the currently available techniques for capturing and enumerating CTCs lack of required sensitivity to be applicable as a prognostic marker for non-metastatic patients as CTCs are even more rare. We have developed a microfluidic device utilizing antibody-conjugated non-fouling coating to eliminate nonspecific binding and to promote the multivalent binding of target cells. We then established the correlation of CTC counts and neoplasm progression through applying this platform to capture and enumerate CTCs in 2 mL of peripheral blood from healthy (n = 27), benign (n = 21), non-metastatic (n = 95), and m-CRC (n = 15) patients. The results showed that the CTC counts progressed from 0, 1, 5, to 36. Importantly, after 2-year follow-up on the non-metastatic CRC patients, we found that those who had ≥5 CTCs were 8 times more likely to develop distant metastasis within one year after curable surgery than those who had marker for the non-metastatic CRC patients who are at high risk of early recurrence.

  4. Proteotypic classification of spontaneous and transgenic mammary neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mikaelian, Igor; Blades, Natalie; Churchill, Gary A; Fancher, Karen; Knowles, Barbara B; Eppig, Janan T; Sundberg, John P

    2004-01-01

    Mammary tumors in mice are categorized by using morphologic and architectural criteria. Immunolabeling for terminal differentiation markers was compared among a variety of mouse mammary neoplasms because expression of terminal differentiation markers, and especially of keratins, provides important information on the origin of neoplastic cells and their degree of differentiation. Expression patterns for terminal differentiation markers were used to characterize tumor types and to study tumor progression in transgenic mouse models of mammary neoplasia (mice overexpressing Neu (Erbb2), Hras, Myc, Notch4, SV40-TAg, Tgfa, and Wnt1), in spontaneous mammary carcinomas, and in mammary neoplasms associated with infection by the mouse mammary tumor virus (MMTV). On the basis of the expression of terminal differentiation markers, three types of neoplasm were identified: first, simple carcinomas composed exclusively of cells with a luminal phenotype are characteristic of neoplasms arising in mice transgenic for Neu, Hras, Myc, Notch4, and SV40-TAg; second, 'complex carcinomas' displaying luminal and myoepithelial differentiation are characteristic of type P tumors arising in mice transgenic for Wnt1, neoplasms arising in mice infected by the MMTV, and spontaneous adenosquamous carcinomas; and third, 'carcinomas with epithelial to mesenchymal transition (EMT)' are a characteristic feature of tumor progression in Hras-, Myc-, and SV40-TAg-induced mammary neoplasms and PL/J and SJL/J mouse strains, and display de novo expression of myoepithelial and mesenchymal cell markers. In sharp contrast, EMT was not detected in papillary adenocarcinomas arising in BALB/cJ mice, spontaneous adenoacanthomas, neoplasms associated with MMTV-infection, or in neoplasms arising in mice transgenic for Neu and Wnt1. Immunohistochemical profiles of complex neoplasms are consistent with a stem cell origin, whereas simple carcinomas might originate from a cell committed to the

  5. Risk factors for neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Brachner, A.; Grosche, B.

    1991-06-01

    A broad survey is given of risk factors for neoplasms. The main carcinogenic substances (including also ionizing radiation and air pollution) are listed, and are correlated with the risk factors for various cancers most frequently explained and discussed in the literature. The study is intended to serve as a basis for a general assessment of the incidence of neoplasms in children, and of cancer mortality in the entire population of Bavaria in the years 1983-1989, or 1979-1988, respectively, with the principal idea of drawing up an environment-related health survey. The study therefore takes into account not only ionizing radiation as a main risk factor, but also other risk factors detectable within the ecologic context, as e.g. industrial installations and their effects, refuse incineration plants or waste dumps, or the social status. (orig./MG) [de

  6. Myeloproliferative neoplasms in five multiple sclerosis patients

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thorsteinsdottir, Sigrun; Bjerrum, Ole Weis

    2013-01-01

    The concurrence of myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and multiple sclerosis (MS) is unusual. We report five patients from a localized geographic area in Denmark with both MS and MPN; all the patients were diagnosed with MPNs in the years 2007-2012. We describe the patients' history and treatment...

  7. The new WHO nomenclature: lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leclair, Susan J; Rodak, Bernadette F

    2002-01-01

    The development of the WHO classification of lymphoid neoplasms is a remarkable example of cooperation and communication between pathologists and oncologists from around the world. Joint classification committees of the major hematopathology societies will periodically review and update this classification, facilitating further progress in the understanding and treatment of hematologic malignancies.

  8. Neurological Findings in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Semra Paydas

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN arise from genetic deficiencies at the level of pluripotent stem cells. Each of these neoplasms is a clonal stem cell disorder with specific phenotypic, genetic and clinical properties. Age is one of the most important factors in the development of symptoms and complications associated with MPNs.High white blood cell counts in chronic myelocytic leukemia also known as leukocytosis may lead to central nervous system findings. Tumors developing outside the bone marrow named as extramedullary myeloid tumors (EMMT could be detected at the initial diagnosis or during the prognosis of the disease, which may cause neurological symptoms due to pressure of leukemic cell mass on various tissues along with spinal cord. Central nervous system involvement and thrombocytopenic hemorrhage may lead to diverse neurological symptoms and findings.Transient ischemic attack and thrombotic stroke are the most common symptoms in polycythemia vera. Besides thrombosis and hemorrage, transformation to acute leukemia can cause neurological symptoms and findings. Transient ischemic attack, thrombotic stroke and specifically hemorrage can give rise to neurological symptoms similar to MPN in essential thrombocytosis.Extramedullary hematopoiesis refers to hematopoietic centers arise in organ/tissues other than bone marrow in myelofibrosis. Extramedullar hematopoietic centers may cause intracranial involvement, spinal cord compression, seizures and hydrocephalia. Though rare, extramedullary hematopoiesis can be detected in cranial/spinal meninges, paraspinal tissue and intracerebral regions. Extramedullary hematopoiesis has been reported in peripheral neurons, choroid plexus, pituitary, orbits, orbital and lacrimal fossa and in sphenoidal sinuses. [Cukurova Med J 2013; 38(2.000: 157-169

  9. Surgery for unusual histopathologic variants of esophageal neoplasms: A report of 23 cases with emphasis on histopathologic characteristics

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Klaase, J. M.; Hulscher, J. B. F.; Offerhaus, G. J. A.; ten Kate, F. J. W.; Obertop, H.; van Lanschot, J. J. B.

    2003-01-01

    Background: Adenocarcinoma and squamous cell carcinoma are the most frequent pathologic diagnoses with esophageal malignancy. Unusual pathologic variants are encountered in only 1% to 7% of patients, and therefore data evaluating the treatment and survival in this group of esophageal neoplasms are

  10. The role of p53 protein and MMP-2 tumor/stromal cells expression on progressive growth of ovarian neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grelewski, Piotr Grzegorz; Bar, Julia Krystyna

    2013-08-01

    The aim of our study was to evaluate p53 gene/protein status and MMP-2 expression in respect to ovarian tumors progress to define the role of these markers in the metastasis of ovarian carcinomas. MMP-2 and p53 alterations were evaluated on 80 malignant, 30 benign ovarian tumors, and 62 metastatic lesions by using HRM method for mutations in p53 gene and by using RT-PCR for mRNA MMP-2 level. Our data indicate that parallel expression of MMP-2 epithelial/stromal cells and p53 may enhance cells invasion and metastasis in ovarian carcinoma.

  11. Desmoplastic round small cell tumor: a case report of a neoplasm of difficult diagnosis; Tumor desmoplasico de pequenas celulas redondas: relato de um caso de uma neoplasia de dificil diagnostico

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogata, Daniel Cury; Totsugui, Joel Takashi; Ditzel Filho, Leo Fernando da Silva; Ioshii, Sergio Ossamu [Pontificia Universidade Catolica do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Machuca, Tiago Noguchi [Universidade Federal do Parana, Curitiba, PR (Brazil); Ogata, Alessandro Cury [Hospital Nossa Senhora das Gracas, Curitiba, PR (Brazil)]. E-mail: daniel_ogata@medcenter.com

    2005-07-01

    Desmoplastic Small Round Cell Tumor (DSRCT) is a rare neoplasm of difficult diagnosis, recently described by Gerald et al. There are reports of nearly 101 cases in the literature, being the intra-abdominal region its most common location and children and young adults its preferred age group. This paper reports a case of DSRCT in a young adult of 24 years of age. This patient presented unspecific symptoms of nausea, vomiting and a single episode of haematemesis. Upon physical examination a solid mass on the epigastrium and left hypochondrium was found. Image diagnostic procedures confirmed the existence of the expansive process and also revealed enlarged retroperitoneal lymphonodes. Diagnosis was achieved through videolaparoscopic biopsy. Histologic sections stained with hematoxylin/eosin were inconclusive and immunohistochemical analysis was required to establish the diagnosis. This analysis revealed positivity to epithelial and mesenchymal markers and weak positivity to chromogranin A, characteristic results of DSRCT. Due to the fact that the disease was locally advanced, the patient was treated with chemotherapy (cyclophosphamide and paclytaxel). However, since there was only partial response to the treatment, the patient refused to undergo any second line option of therapy. Presently, the patient is being submitted only to supportive care, within an 18-month follow-up program. (author)

  12. Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rosane Isabel Bittencourt

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Chronic myeloproliferative diseases without the Philadelphia chromosome marker (Ph-, although first described 60 years ago, only became the subject of interest after the turn of the millennium. In 2001, the World Health Organization (WHO defined the classification of this group of diseases and in 2008 they were renamed myeloproliferative neoplasms based on morphological, cytogenetic and molecular features. In 2005, the identification of a recurrent molecular abnormality characterized by a gain of function with a mutation in the gene encoding Janus kinase 2 (JAK2 paved the way for greater knowledge of the pathophysiology of myeloproliferative neoplasms. The JAK2 mutation is found in 90-98% of polycythemia vera and in about 50% essential thrombocytosis and primary myelofibrosis. In addition to the JAK2 mutation, other mutations involving TET2 (ten-eleven translocation, LNK (a membrane-bound adaptor protein; IDH1/2 (isocitrate dehydrogenase 1/2 enzyme; ASXL1 (additional sex combs-like 1 genes were found in myeloproliferative neoplasms thus showing the importance of identifying molecular genetic alterations to confirm diagnosis, guide treatment and improve our understanding of the biology of these diseases. Currently, polycythemia vera, essential thrombocytosis, myelofibrosis, chronic neutrophilic leukemia, chronic eosinophilic leukemia and mastocytosis are included in this group of myeloproliferative neoplasms, but are considered different situations with individualized diagnostic methods and treatment. This review updates pathogenic aspects, molecular genetic alterations, the fundamental criteria for diagnosis and the best approach for each of these entities.

  13. Gene expression profiling of loss of TET2 and/or JAK2V617F mutant hematopoietic stem cells from mouse models of myeloproliferative neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takuro Kameda

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs are clinically characterized by the chronic overproduction of differentiated peripheral blood cells and the gradual expansion of malignant intramedullary/extramedullary hematopoiesis. In MPNs mutations in JAK2 MPL or CALR are detected mutually exclusive in more than 90% of cases [1,2]. Mutations in them lead to the abnormal activation of JAK/STAT signaling and the autonomous growth of differentiated cells therefore they are considered as “driver” gene mutations. In addition to the above driver gene mutations mutations in epigenetic regulators such as TET2 DNMT3A ASXL1 EZH2 or IDH1/2 are detected in about 5%–30% of cases respectively [3]. Mutations in TET2 DNMT3A EZH2 or IDH1/2 commonly confer the increased self-renewal capacity on normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs but they do not lead to the autonomous growth of differentiated cells and only exhibit subtle clinical phenotypes [4,6–8,5]. It was unclear how mutations in such epigenetic regulators influenced abnormal HSCs with driver gene mutations how they influenced the disease phenotype or whether a single driver gene mutation was sufficient for the initiation of human MPNs. Therefore we focused on JAK2V617F and loss of TET2—the former as a representative of driver gene mutations and the latter as a representative of mutations in epigenetic regulators—and examined the influence of single or double mutations on HSCs (Lineage−Sca-1+c-Kit+ cells (LSKs by functional analyses and microarray whole-genome expression analyses [9]. Gene expression profiling showed that the HSC fingerprint genes [10] was statistically equally enriched in TET2-knockdown-LSKs but negatively enriched in JAK2V617F–LSKs compared to that in wild-type-LSKs. Double-mutant-LSKs showed the same tendency as JAK2V617F–LSKs in terms of their HSC fingerprint genes but the expression of individual genes differed between the two groups. Among 245 HSC fingerprint genes 100 were more

  14. Surgery for Malignant Submandibular Gland Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Silver, Natalie L; Chinn, Steven B; Bradley, Patrick J; Weber, Randal S

    2016-01-01

    For many decades, surgery has been the primary treatment for malignant submandibular gland neoplasms. Nonetheless, due to the heterogeneity and rarity of submandibular gland malignant tumors and the high frequency of chronic benign processes in this region, management can be complex. Preoperative investigations, such as fine-needle aspiration and imaging, are critical to achieve the correct diagnosis so that appropriate surgery can be planned. In general, for malignant submandibular gland neoplasms, the minimal treatment necessary is excision of the submandibular gland with level I lymph node dissection. Salivary gland cancer in the submandibular gland is generally more aggressive than the same histologic type in the parotid gland. Neck dissection may be required and primarily depends on the stage and histological grade. Adjuvant therapy most frequently consists of radiation and can improve overall survival. Some factors that influence prognosis after surgical treatment include the histologic grade, stage at presentation, and positive surgical margins. © 2016 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  15. A STUDY ON EYELID AND CONJUNCTIVAL NEOPLASM IN A TERTIARY CARE CENTRE IN EASTERN INDIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Soumya Swarup Chattopadhyay

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND Eyelid and conjunctival tumours (benign and malignant are very common in a tropical country like India causing not only cosmetic deformity, but also endangering patients’ life. The aim of our study is to determine the sociodemographic factors and clinicopathological assessment in order to early diagnosis and treatment. MATERIALS AND METHODS The present study is an observational study involving the cases with primary eyelid and/or conjunctival tumours. After thorough clinical history including detailed demographic details and clinical examination, the cases are admitted in the hospital. After undergoing thorough preoperative evaluation, FNAB or partial excision biopsy or total excision biopsy of the tumour mass is done by single competent ophthalmic surgeon and sent for histopathological analysis. The cases were classified into two major groups, eyelid neoplasm group and conjunctival neoplasm group. Each major group was subdivided into benign neoplasm and malignant neoplasm groups. The demographic details, clinical history, examination findings and results of the histopathological analysis is documented, appropriately tabulated and reported and statistical calculations done. RESULTS In this prospective observational study, 133 eyes of 133 patients (M:F=70:63 with primary eyelid and conjunctival tumour attending OPD and oculoplasty clinic at Regional Institute of Ophthalmology, Kolkata, were recruited into the study. There were a total of 103 (77.44% eyelid neoplasms and 30 (22.55% patients were having conjunctival neoplasms. Out of the 103 eyelids, neoplasms diagnosed 42.72% (n=44 of them were histopathologically diagnosed as benign and 57.28% (n=59 as malignant. Of the 59 cases diagnosed as malignant, four most common eyelid malignant neoplasms were sebaceous cell carcinoma (n=22, 37%, basal cell carcinoma (n=15, 25%, squamous cell carcinoma (n=10, 17% and malignant melanoma (n=7, 12%. Among the 30 conjunctival neoplasms

  16. A Study to Isolate and Test Circulating Tumor Cells Using the ClearCell® FX EP+ System

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-03-20

    Lung Cancer; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Non-small-cell Lung; Adenocarcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  17. RENAL DAMAGE WITH MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    I. B. Kolina

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between renal damage and malignant neoplasms is one of the most actual problems of the medicine of internal diseases. Very often, exactly availability of renal damage determines the forecast of cancer patients. The range of renal pathologies associated with tumors is unusually wide: from the mechanical effect of the tumor or metastases on the kidneys and/or the urinary tract and paraneoplastic manifestations in the form of nephritis or amyloidosis to nephropathies induced with drugs or tumor lysis, etc. Thrombotic complications that develop as a result of exposure to tumor effects, side effects of certain drugs or irradiation also play an important role in the development of the kidney damage. The most frequent variants of renal damage observed in the practice of medical internists (therapists, urologists, surgeons, etc., as well as methods of diagnosis and treatment approaches are described in the article. Timely and successful prevention and treatment of tumor-associated nephropathies give hope for retaining renal functions, therefore, a higher life standard after completion of anti-tumor therapy. Even a shortterm episode of acute renal damage suffered by a cancer patient must be accompanied with relevant examination and treatment. In the caseof transformation of acute renal damage into the chronic kidney disease, such patients need systematic and weighted renoprotective therapy and correct dosing of nephrotoxic drugs.

  18. Outcomes following splenectomy in patients with myeloid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rialon, Kristy L; Speicher, Paul J; Ceppa, Eugene P; Rendell, Victoria R; Vaslef, Steven N; Beaven, Anne; Tyler, Douglas S; Blazer, Dan G

    2015-03-15

    Myeloid neoplasms are classified into five major categories. These patients may develop splenomegaly and require splenectomy to alleviate mechanical symptoms, to ameliorate transfusion-dependent cytopenias, or to enhance stem cell transplantation. The objective of this study was to determine which clinical variables significantly impacted morbidity, mortality, and survival in patients with myeloid neoplasms undergoing splenectomy, and to determine if operative outcomes have improved over time. The records of all patients with myeloid neoplasms undergoing splenectomy from 1993 to 2010 were retrospectively reviewed. Eighty-nine patients (n = 89) underwent splenectomy for myeloid neoplasms. Over half of patients who had symptoms preoperatively had resolution of their symptoms post-splenectomy. The morbidity rate was 38%, with the most common complications being bleeding (14%) or infection (20%). Thirty-day mortality rate was 18% and median survival after splenectomy was 278 days. Decreased survival was associated with a diagnosis of myelodysplastic syndrome/myeloproliferative neoplasm, anemia, abnormal white blood cell count, and hypoalbuminemia. Patients who underwent stem cell transplantation did not show an increased risk for morbidity or mortality. Patients with myeloid neoplasms have a poor prognosis after splenectomy and the decision to operate is a difficult one, associated with high morbidity and mortality. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  19. Recent Advances in Analysis of Phenotype of Acute Leukemia Cells(20th Meeting of the Niigata Society of Hematologic Neoplasm The Ten-year Anniversary Symposium : Progress in Hematologic Neoplasm over the Ten Years)

    OpenAIRE

    青木, 定夫; Aoki, Sadao

    1990-01-01

    The surface markers of pathological cells in patients with acute leukemia were analyzed using flow cytometry. In this study, firstly, the phenotype of acute non-lymphatic leukemia (ANLL) cells was determind with reference to the FAB classification. Secondly the two color analysis of acute leukemia cells was performed to detect hybrid acute leukemia (HAL). In 39 cases of ANLL, leukemic blasts of M1 and M2 were positive for CD13, CD33 and anti-HLADR. Those of M3 were positive for CD13 and CD33 ...

  20. Treatment Of Sickle Cell Disease

    KAUST Repository

    Essack, Magbubah

    2014-12-04

    The present invention includes embodiments for treatment and/or prevention of sickle cell disease that employ Hydroxyfasudil or Isocoronarin D alone or either in conjunction with each other or an inducer of HbF production. The compounds may act synergistically, and the compounds employed circumvent the side effects seen with Hydroxyurea.

  1. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Childhood ALL Treatment Childhood AML Treatment Research Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)–Patient Version General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia Go to Health Professional Version Key Points ...

  2. Isolating and Testing Circulating Tumor DNA and Soluble Immune Markers During the Course of Treatment for Lung Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-01-08

    Lung Cancer; Lung Neoplasms; Cancer of Lung; Cancer of the Lung; Neoplasms, Lung; Neoplasms, Pulmonary; Pulmonary Cancer; Pulmonary Neoplasms; Carcinoma, Non-small-cell Lung; Adenocarcinoma; Squamous Cell Carcinoma

  3. Metastatic Renal Cell Carcinoma versus Pancreatic Neuroendocrine Tumor in von Hippel-Lindau Disease: Treatment with Interleukin-2

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher Williams

    2005-01-01

    Full Text Available Differentiating between clear cell neuroendocrine tumor (NET of the pancreas and renal cell carcinoma (RCC metastatic to the pancreas can be challenging in patients with von Hippel-Lindau disease (VHL. The clear cell features of both NET and RCC in VHL patients may lead to misdiagnosis, inaccurate staging, and alternative treatment. We present a patient in which this occurred. As clear cell NETs closely resembling metastatic RCC are distinctive neoplasms of VHL and metastatic RCC to the pancreas in the VHL population is rare, careful pathologic examination should be performed prior to subjecting patients to definitive surgical or medical therapies.

  4. Post-Irradiation Bladder Syndrome After Radiotherapy of Malignant Neoplasm of Small Pelvis Organs: An Observational, Non-Interventional Clinical Study Assessing VESIcare®/Solifenacin Treatment Results.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jaszczyński, Janusz; Kojs, Zbigniew; Stelmach, Andrzej; Wohadło, Łukasz; Łuczyńska, Elzbieta; Heinze, Sylwia; Rys, Janusz; Jakubowicz, Jerzy; Chłosta, Piotr

    2016-07-30

    BACKGROUND Radiotherapy is explicitly indicated as one of the excluding factors in diagnosing overactive bladder syndrome (OAB). Nevertheless, symptoms of OAB such as urgent episodes, incontinence, pollakiuria, and nocturia, which are consequences of irradiation, led us to test the effectiveness of VESIcare®/Solifenacin in patients demonstrating these symptoms after radiation therapy of small pelvis organs due to malignant neoplasm. MATERIAL AND METHODS We conducted an observatory clinical study including 300 consecutive patients with symptoms of post-irradiation bladder; 271 of those patients completed the study. The observation time was 6 months and consisted of 3 consecutive visits taking place at 12-week intervals. We used VESIcare® at a dose of 5 mg a day. Every sixth patient was examined urodynamically at the beginning and at the end of the observation period, with an inflow speed of 50 ml/s. RESULTS We noticed improvement and decline in the average number of episodes a day in the following parameters: number of micturitions a day (-36%, P<0.01), nocturia (-50%, P<0.01), urgent episodes (-41%, P<0.03), and episodes of incontinence (-43%, P<0.01). The patients' quality of life improved. The average maximal cystometric volume increased by 34 ml (21%, p<0.01), average bladder volume of "first desire" increased by 42 ml (49%, P<0.01), and average detrusor muscle pressure at maximal cystometric volume diminished by 9 cmH2O (-36%, P<0.03). CONCLUSIONS The substance is well-tolerated. Solifenacin administered long-term to patients with symptoms of OAB after radiotherapy of a malignant neoplasm of the small pelvis organs has a daily impact in decreasing number of urgent episodes, incontinence, pollakiuria, and nocturia.

  5. Incidental Gynecologic Tract Neoplasms in Women Undergoing Anterior Pelvic Exenteration for Urothelial Carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tran, Lily; Antic, Tatjana; Lastra, Ricardo R

    2017-12-18

    Urothelial carcinoma (UC) invasive into the muscularis propria or tumors unresponsive to treatment are indications for cystectomy. In females, with the goal of achieving complete cancer eradication and for concerns of UC extension into the adjacent pelvic organs, this may also warrant resection of the gynecologic organs. This study is aimed to assess the prevalence of unanticipated gynecologic neoplasms in anterior pelvic exenteration specimens. A retrospective review of pathology reports to identify women undergoing anterior pelvic exenteration for UC was performed (N=221), and incidentally discovered gynecologic tract neoplasms were recorded. Concomitant malignant or premalignant lesions of the gynecologic tract were identified in 8 patients (3.6%). These included endometrial adenocarcinoma [endometrioid type, International Federation of Gynecology and Obstetrics grade 1 (n=2, 0.9%)], cervical high-grade squamous intraepithelial lesion (n=2, 0.9%), Sertoli-Leydig cell tumor of intermediate differentiation (n=1, 0.5%), endometrioid adenocarcinoma of the ovary (n=1, 0.5%), and high-grade serous carcinoma of the ovary (n=1, 0.5%) and fallopian tube (n=1, 0.5%). Benign uterine neoplasms included leiomyomas (n=81, 37%), adenomyoma (n=3, 1.4%), and adenomatoid tumors (n=2, 0.9%). Benign ovarian neoplasms included serous cystadenoma (n=7, 3%), serous cystadenofibroma (n=4, 2%), benign Brenner tumor (n=5, 2.3%), mature teratoma (n=4, 2%), stromal luteoma (n=2, 0.9%), mucinous cystadenoma (n=1, 0.5%), thecoma (n=1, 0.5%), and endometrioid cystadenoma (n=1, 0.5%). Involvement of the gynecologic tract by UC was identified in 11 patients (5%). Spread of UC to the reproductive organs is rare in anterior pelvic exenteration specimens. Coexisting neoplasms of the gynecologic tract are occasionally identified, therefore careful evaluation of these organs is necessary.

  6. Neoplasms HIV associated Kaposi sarcoma not

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lombardo, K.; Sosa, A.; Krygier, G.; Muse, I.

    2004-01-01

    Abstract - The incidence of malignancies in virus carriers acquired immunodeficiency (HIV) has increased in conjunction with the disease during the past decade. 40% of all AIDS patients develop cancer during the course of HIV infection. Kaposi's sarcoma (KS), Non-Hodgkin lymphoma (NHL) and cervical cancer have an impact extremely high in HIV infected patients, and they are considered as disease AIDS-defining stage. Many reports suggest that other neoplasms they can have a high impact on the population of HIV carrier, including head and neck carcinoma, rectal cancer - anal, plasma cytomas, and melanoma lung cancer. Methods - We examined the spectrum of cancer in HIV-infected patients, specifically neoplasms except Kaposi sarcoma diagnosed between 1/1998 - 6/2004. Information on age, sex, factors was gathered risk for AIDS, neoplasms and mortality rate. Results: The total number of patients in our study was 21 patients, what 15 were male (71%) and 6 females (29%); the median age was 36 (29-70). Tumors were reported: 11 Non-Hodgkin lymphomas (52%), 2 Hodgkin's lymphoma (6.6%), 1 medullary thyroid cancer (6.6%), 1 melanoma (6.6%), 1 rectal cancer (5%) and three head and neck cancers (14%), 1 cancer 1 lung and breast cancer. Five of the patients were intravenous drug abusers (24%); 4 patients were homosexual, bisexual March 8 straight, on 6 patients know the data. Conclusions - The spectrum of malignancies associated with infection HIV in our study was similar to that described in other populations. ratio between the immune system and the epidemiology of the virus-induced tumors is to importance to identify new therapeutic approaches in the treatment and / or prevention of these neoplasms

  7. CT characteristics of primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu Yufeng; Wang Jichen [Department of Radiology, Peking University First Hospital, No. 8, Xishike Street, Xicheng District, Beijing 100034 (China); Peng Yun [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China); Zeng Jinjin, E-mail: jzeng5567@yahoo.co [Imaging Center, Beijing Children' s Hospital Affiliated to Capital Medical University, 56, Nanlishi Road, Xicheng District, Beijing 100045 (China)

    2010-09-15

    Primary retroperitoneal neoplasms are uncommon in children. Retroperitoneal neoplasms are either mesodermal, neurogenic, germ cell ectodermal or lymphatic in origin. In general, primary retroperitoneal neoplasms in children have different spectrum and prevalence compared to those in adults. Neuroblastoma, rhabdomyosarcoma, benign teratoma and lymphoma are the common retroperitoneal neoplasms. In this review, the clinical and CT futures of common retroperitoneal neoplasms in children are described. Coarse, amorphous, and mottled calcification are very common in neuroblastoma. Paraganglioma tends to show marked and early enhancement and may present with clinical symptoms associated with the excess catecholamine. Sarcomas are often very large and have heterogeneous appearance. Imaging cannot be reliably used to identify the type of retroperitoneal sarcomas due to overlapped radiographic features. In children, lipoblastoma is the most common lipomatous tumor in the retroperitoneum. The percentage of visible fat in tumor varies depending on the cellular composition of the lesion. The CT characteristics of teratoma are quite variable, which may be cystic, solid, on a combination of both. Typically teratoma appears as a large complex mass containing fluid, fat, fat-fluid level, and calcifications. Lymphoma is often homogeneous on both enhanced and unenhanced CT scans. Necrosis and calcification are rare on CT. In conclusion, making a final histological diagnosis of retroperitoneal tumor base on CT features is not often possible; however, CT can help to develop a differential diagnosis and determine the size and extent of the retroperitoneal neoplasms.

  8. Spontaneous T-cell responses against the immune check point programmed-death-ligand 1 (PD-L1) in patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms correlate with disease stage and clinical response

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holmström, Morten Orebo; Riley, Caroline Hasselbalch; Skov, Vibe

    2018-01-01

    The Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms (MPN) are cancers characterized by hyperinflammation and immune deregulation. Concurrently, the expression of the immune check point programmed death ligand 1 (PD-L1) is induced by inflammation. In this study we report on the occurrence of spontaneous T cell...... responses against a PD-L1 derived epitope in patients with MPN. We show that 71% of patients display a significant immune response against PD-L1, and patients with advanced MPN have significantly fewer and weaker PD-L1 specific immune responses compared to patients with non-advanced MPN. The PD-L1 specific...... T cell responses are CD4+ T cell responses, and by gene expression analysis we show that expression of PD-L1 is enhanced in patients with MPN. This could imply that the tumor specific immune response in MPN could be enhanced by vaccination with PD-L1 derived epitopes by boosting the anti...

  9. Upper lip malignant neoplasms. A study of 59 cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Luna-Ortiz, Kuauhyama; Güemes-Meza, Agustín; Villavicencio-Valencia, Verónica; Mosqueda-Taylor, Adalberto

    2012-05-01

    To present the demographic data, clinico-pathologic features and therapeutic outcome of a series of upper lip malignancies. Retrospective study at a single Cancer Institution in Mexico City during a 14-year period. There were 59 cases, (30 males and 29 females); age range: 14 to 106 years (mean: 73 yr.). Antecedents of ultraviolet light and tobacco exposure were found in 20 (33.9%) and 16 cases (27%) respectively. There were 35 squamous cell carcinomas (59.3%), 19 basal cell carcinomas (32.2%) and one case each (1.7%) of adenocarcinoma NOS, adenoid cystic carcinoma, angiosarcoma, Merkel cell carcinoma and melanoma. There were 14 cases in stage I (23.7%), 14 in stage II (23.7%), 3 in stage III (5.1%) 14 in stage IV (23.7%) and 14 were not classified (23.7%). There were no significant differences with respect to the overall survival curve and the disease-free survival curve among surgical treatment and radiotherapy. In addition, there was not statistically significant difference in the overall survival and disease-free survival among squamous cell carcinoma and basal cell carcinoma cases with respect to the type of treatment. Upper lip malignant neoplasms are infrequent lesions. The present series describes the main clinico-pathological features in a hospital-based population in Mexico city and demonstrates some differences with respect to those found in the lower lip.

  10. Multiple neoplasms among cervical cancer patients in the material of the lower Silesian cancer registry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Izmajłowicz, Barbara; Kornafel, Jan; Błaszczyk, Jerzy

    2014-01-01

    According to the definition by the International Agency for Research on Cancer (IARC), primary multiple neoplasms are two or more neoplasms of different histopathological build in one organ, or two or more tumors occurring in one patient, regardless of the time of their occurrence (synchronic - up to 6 months, metachronous - after 6 months), coming from an organ or a tissue and not being an infiltration from another neoplasm, a relapse or a metastasis. It was the aim of the study to analyze the frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasms among patients suffering from uterine cervix cancer, with a special interest in coexistent neoplasms, the time of their occurrence and total 5-year survivals. The data from the Lower Silesian Cancer Registry concerning the years 1984-2009 formed the material of the present study. 5.3% of all cervix neoplasms occurred as multiple cancers. Cervix neoplasms were 13.4% of multiple neoplasms. On average, cervical cancer occurred as a subsequent cancer in 6 patients yearly (60.7% of the occurrences of cervical cancer were in the period of 5 years following treatment for the first neoplasm). 5-year survival in patients suffering from primarily multiple cervix neoplasms constituted 57% and was convergent with the results for all patients suffering from cervical cancer. Cervical cancer as the first neoplasm occurred in 287 patients, on average in 11 patients annually. In the period of the first 5 years after the treatment of cervical cancer, there were 42.8% occurrences of other cancers. Cervical neoplasms most frequently coexisted with cancers of the breast, lung and large intestine. The frequency of the occurrence of multiple neoplasm among cervical cancer patients is increasing. Most frequently they coexist with other tobacco-related neoplasms, those related to HPV infections and with secondary post-radiation neoplasms. These facts should be taken into consideration during post-treatment observation and when directing diagnostic

  11. An international consortium proposal of uniform response criteria for myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) in adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Savona, Michael R; Malcovati, Luca; Komrokji, Rami; Tiu, Ramon V; Mughal, Tariq I; Orazi, Attilio; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Padron, Eric; Solary, Eric; Tibes, Raoul; Itzykson, Raphael; Cazzola, Mario; Mesa, Ruben; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw; Fenaux, Pierre; Garcia-Manero, Guillermo; Gerds, Aaron; Sanz, Guillermo; Niemeyer, Charlotte M; Cervantes, Francisco; Germing, Ulrich; Cross, Nicholas C P; List, Alan F

    2015-03-19

    Myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) are hematologically diverse stem cell malignancies sharing phenotypic features of both myelodysplastic syndromes and myeloproliferative neoplasms. There are currently no standard treatment recommendations for most adult patients with MDS/MPN. To optimize efforts to improve the management and disease outcomes, it is essential to identify meaningful clinical and biologic end points and standardized response criteria for clinical trials. The dual dysplastic and proliferative features in these stem cell malignancies define their uniqueness and challenges. We propose response assessment guidelines to harmonize future clinical trials with the principal objective of establishing suitable treatment algorithms. An international panel comprising laboratory and clinical experts in MDS/MPN was established involving 3 independent academic MDS/MPN workshops (March 2013, December 2013, and June 2014). These recommendations are the result of this collaborative project sponsored by the MDS Foundation. © 2015 by The American Society of Hematology.

  12. Response to Anastrozole Treatment in a Case with Peutz-Jeghers Syndrome and a Large Cell Calcifying Sertoli Cell Tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koç Yekedüz, Merve; Şıklar, Zeynep; Burgu, Berk; Kuloğlu, Zarife; Kocaay, Pınar; Çamtosun, Emine; İsakoca, Mehmet; Kansu, Aydan; Soygür, Tarkan; Berberoğlu, Merih

    2017-06-01

    Peutz-Jeghers syndrome (PJS) is inherited as an autosomal dominant trait characterized by multiple gastrointestinal hamartomatous polyps, mucocutaneous pigmentation, and an increased risk of neoplasm. Large-cell calcifying Sertoli cell tumor (LCCSCT) is a kind of sex cord-stromal tumor which may co-exist with PJS and which is characterized radiologically by calcification foci within the testes. Surgical treatment options for this tumor range from testis-preserving surgery to radical orchiectomy. Not with standing this invasive approach, recently, there are some case reports demonstrating the efficacy of aromatase inhibitors in avoiding orchiectomy and its associated complications. In this paper, we have presented a LCCSCT case diagnosed in a boy with PJS and his response to anastrozole treatment.

  13. Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Barbui, T.; Barosi, G.; Birgegard, G.

    2011-01-01

    We present a review of critical concepts and produce recommendations on the management of Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms, including monitoring, response definition, first- and second-line therapy, and therapy for special issues. Key questions were selected according...... for splenectomy include symptomatic portal hypertension, drug-refractory painful splenomegaly, and frequent RBC transfusions. The risk of allogeneic stem-cell transplantation-related complications is justified in transplantation-eligible patients whose median survival time is expected to be less than 5 years....

  14. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nangalia, J; Massie, C E; Baxter, E J; Nice, F L; Gundem, G; Wedge, D C; Avezov, E; Li, J; Kollmann, K; Kent, D G; Aziz, A; Godfrey, A L; Hinton, J; Martincorena, I; Van Loo, P; Jones, A V; Guglielmelli, P; Tarpey, P; Harding, H P; Fitzpatrick, J D; Goudie, C T; Ortmann, C A; Loughran, S J; Raine, K; Jones, D R; Butler, A P; Teague, J W; O'Meara, S; McLaren, S; Bianchi, M; Silber, Y; Dimitropoulou, D; Bloxham, D; Mudie, L; Maddison, M; Robinson, B; Keohane, C; Maclean, C; Hill, K; Orchard, K; Tauro, S; Du, M-Q; Greaves, M; Bowen, D; Huntly, B J P; Harrison, C N; Cross, N C P; Ron, D; Vannucchi, A M; Papaemmanuil, E; Campbell, P J; Green, A R

    2013-12-19

    Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. We performed exome sequencing of samples obtained from 151 patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms. The mutation status of the gene encoding calreticulin (CALR) was assessed in an additional 1345 hematologic cancers, 1517 other cancers, and 550 controls. We established phylogenetic trees using hematopoietic colonies. We assessed calreticulin subcellular localization using immunofluorescence and flow cytometry. Exome sequencing identified 1498 mutations in 151 patients, with medians of 6.5, 6.5, and 13.0 mutations per patient in samples of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia, and myelofibrosis, respectively. Somatic CALR mutations were found in 70 to 84% of samples of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2, in 8% of myelodysplasia samples, in occasional samples of other myeloid cancers, and in none of the other cancers. A total of 148 CALR mutations were identified with 19 distinct variants. Mutations were located in exon 9 and generated a +1 base-pair frameshift, which would result in a mutant protein with a novel C-terminal. Mutant calreticulin was observed in the endoplasmic reticulum without increased cell-surface or Golgi accumulation. Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms carrying CALR mutations presented with higher platelet counts and lower hemoglobin levels than patients with mutated JAK2. Mutation of CALR was detected in hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells. Clonal analyses showed CALR mutations in the earliest phylogenetic node, a finding consistent with its role as an initiating mutation in some patients. Somatic mutations in the endoplasmic reticulum chaperone CALR were found in a majority of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2. (Funded by the Kay

  15. Secondary neoplasms of the larynx from a colonic adenocarcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dadkhah, Naser; Hahn, Christoffer

    2015-01-01

    Secondary neoplasms of the larynx are rare and account for 0.09-0,4% of all laryngeal tumours. Cutaneous melanomas are the preponderant primaries metastasizing to the larynx, fol-lowed by renal cell carcinomas, breast and lung carcinomas. Colonic adenocarcinoma metastases to the larynx are extrem......Secondary neoplasms of the larynx are rare and account for 0.09-0,4% of all laryngeal tumours. Cutaneous melanomas are the preponderant primaries metastasizing to the larynx, fol-lowed by renal cell carcinomas, breast and lung carcinomas. Colonic adenocarcinoma metastases to the larynx...

  16. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xie J

    2018-01-01

    application in the treatment of digestive system neoplasms. This review highlighted the potential of SLC family proteins as drug target for the treatment of digestive system neoplasms. Keywords: solute carrier, digestive system neoplasms, carcinogenesis, tumor progression, chemoresistance, small molecule modulators

  17. Metastases in cranean of differential neoplasm tyroids

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lopez Chapuis, D.; Garrido Vazquez, P.; Vallverdu Carbajal, M.

    1994-01-01

    Two cases of matastases are presented in cranial calota of differentiated neoplasm of tyroids, one of them without other distance lesions ,in which the cranial tumours was the element that it take was to the diagnose. For the local control the surgical resection of the metastasis is recommended in calota, associated to external radiotherapy , while that the total thyroidectomy allows the detection and treatment of other metastasis with Iodine. In this situation the prediction it is unfavourable, with a half survive of 4,5 year(AU) [es

  18. Incidental renal neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rabjerg, Maj; Mikkelsen, Minne Nedergaard; Walter, Steen

    2014-01-01

    On the basis of associations between tumor size, pathological stage, histological subtype and tumor grade in incidentally detected renal cell carcinoma vs symptomatic renal cell carcinoma, we discussed the need for a screening program of renal cell carcinoma in Denmark. We analyzed a consecutive...... series of 204 patients with renal tumors in 2011 and 2012. The tumors were classified according to detection mode: symptomatic and incidental and compared to pathological parameters. Eighty-nine patients (44%) were symptomatic, 113 (55%) were incidental. Information was not available in two patients...

  19. Myeloid neoplasms in the World Health Organization 2016 classification.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asou, Norio

    In the 2016 revision of the World Health Organization (WHO) classification, the categories of myeloid neoplasms have not been revised significantly from the 2008 fourth edition. However, recent discovery of molecular abnormalities provides a new perspective regarding the diagnostic and prognostic markers. In myeloproliferative neoplasms, the identification of CALR gene mutation, in addition to the JAK2 and MPL mutations, has impacted the diagnostic criteria. In myelodysplastic syndromes and acute myeloid leukemia, in addition to alterations in the transcription factors and signal transduction pathways, discovery of gene mutations in the epigenetic regulators that are involved in DNA methylation, histone modification, cohesin complex, and RNA splicing, by comprehensive genetic analyses, has improved our understanding of the pathobiology of these diseases. Moreover, recent large-scale sequencing studies have revealed the acquisition of clonal somatic mutations, in the myeloid neoplasm-associated genes of the hematopoietic cells. Such mutations were detected in people with normal blood cell counts, without any apparent disease. Presence of these mutations confers an increased risk for subsequent hematological neoplasms, indicating the concept of clonal hematopoiesis of indeterminate potential. This updated WHO classification incorporates the criteria of new clinical, prognostic, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and genetic findings in myeloid neoplasms.

  20. Drugs Approved for Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    This page lists cancer drugs approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA) for myeloproliferative neoplasms. The list includes generic names, brand names, and common drug combinations, which are shown in capital letters. The drug names link to NCI's Cancer Drug Information summaries.

  1. [Indications for liver transplantation in neoplasms of the liver].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stauber, R E; Mischinger, H J; Trauner, M; Pristautz, H

    1993-01-01

    Orthotopic liver transplantation for hepatic neoplasms is controversial. In the past, liver transplantation was utilized to treat various advanced hepatic neoplasms such as hepatocellular carcinoma including the fibrolamellar variant, cholangiocellular carcinoma, epithelioid hemangio-endothelioma, and liver metastases. In many cases, total hepatectomy with orthotopic liver replacement is the only treatment option with intent to cure because of reduced liver function in cirrhotic patients limiting resectability. On the other hand, results of transplantation are poor; for hepatocellular carcinoma, the 5-year-survival probability averages only 20%. Thus, hepatic neoplasms have to compete with benign liver diseases for a limited supply of donor organs. However, success rates of liver transplantation were higher for fibrolamellar carcinoma and for epithelioid hemangioendothelioma. New treatment strategies for hepatocellular carcinoma including neoadjuvant chemotherapy and chemoembolization are currently being investigated. Results of liver transplantation for cholangiocellular carcinoma or hepatic metastases have been disappointing. Single cases have been successfully treated with the "cluster operation" designed by Starzl in 1988.

  2. NUP98-HOXA9 bearing therapy-related myeloid neoplasm involves myeloid-committed cell and induces HOXA5, EVI1, FLT3, and MEIS1 expression.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burillo-Sanz, S; Morales-Camacho, R M; Caballero-Velázquez, T; Vargas, M T; García-Lozano, J R; Falantes, J F; Prats-Martín, C; Bernal, R; Pérez-Simón, J A

    2016-02-01

    Chromosomal rearrangements involving NUP98 gene have been associated with human leukemias such as de novo AML, therapy-related AML (t-AML), myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS), and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Genetic fusion NUP98-HOXA9, caused by t(7;11)(p15;p15), is a recurrent cytogenetic alteration in de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML) usually found in young Asian patients and its description in therapy-related myeloid neoplasms (t-MN) is rare. Only one Asian case with molecular demonstration of the NUP98-HOXA9 fusion has been reported in therapy-related leukemia. NUP98-HOXA9 leukemogenic mechanism is derived from the transcription factor activity of the chimeric protein, which enhances the expression of genes related to cellular differentiation arrest and proliferation. We studied a Caucasian woman with a therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia after Ewing's sarcoma. Molecular demonstration of the genetic fusion NUP98-HOXA9 was performed by RT-PCR, and gene expression was analyzed by real-time PCR, including four AML patients with MLL rearrangements for comparative analysis. Cytologic and flow cytometric analysis was also carried out. After cytologic and flow cytometric analysis diagnostics was therapy-related myeloid neoplasm (t-MN). The major component of blasts in the acute leukemia was with neutrophilic differentiation, but 13% erythroid lineage blasts were also found. Cytogenetic and FISH analysis revealed t(7;11)(p15;p15) and NUP98-HOXA9 fusion gene was demonstrated. Gene expression analysis showed upregulation of EVI1 and MEIS1 in the index patient, both of them previously related to a worst outcome. In this work, we include a detailed molecular, clinical, cytological, and cytometric study of the second t-AML bearing NUP98-HOXA9 genetic fusion. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  3. Topics in histopathology of sweat gland and sebaceous neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ansai, Shin-Ichi

    2017-03-01

    This article reviews several topics regarding sweat gland and sebaceous neoplasms. First, the clinicopathological characteristics of poroid neoplasms are summarized. It was recently reported that one-fourth of poroid neoplasms are composite tumors and one-fourth are apocrine type lesions. Recent progress in the immunohistochemical diagnosis of sweat gland neoplasms is also reviewed. CD117 can help to distinguish sweat gland or sebaceous tumors from other non-Merkel cell epithelial tumors of the skin. For immunohistochemical differential diagnosis between sweat gland carcinoma (SGC) other than primary cutanesous apocrine carcinoma and skin metastasis of breast carcinoma (SMBC), a panel of antibodies may be useful, including p63 (SGC + , SMBC - ), CK5/6 (SGC + , SMBC - ), podoplanin (SGC + , SMBC - ) and mammaglobin (SGC - , SMBC + ). Comparison of antibodies used for immunohistochemical diagnosis of sebaceous carcinoma (SC) suggests that adipophilin has the highest sensitivity and specificity. Some authors have found that immunostaining for survivin, androgen receptor and ZEB2/SIP1 has prognostic value for ocular SC, but not extraocular SC. In situ SC is rare, especially extraocular SC, but there have been several recent reports that actinic keratosis and Bowen's disease are the source of invasive SC. Finally, based on recent reports, classification of sebaceous neoplasms into three categories is proposed, which are sebaceoma (a benign neoplasm with well-defined architecture and no atypia), borderline sebaceous neoplasm (low-grade SC; an intermediate tumor with well-defined architecture and nuclear atypia) and SC (a malignant tumor with invasive growth and evident nuclear atypia). © 2017 Japanese Dermatological Association.

  4. Anus neoplasm: study of a case series

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Igor Lima Fernandes

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Anus neoplasm accounts for 2 to 4% of colorectal tumors, being more prevalent around the seventh and the eighth decades. Females are mostly affected, and the ratio is 3:1. Its increased prevalence amongst the population in the past years is probably related to the higher number of people that are affected by sexually transmitted diseases, mainly human papillomavirus (types 16 and 18, mostly and/or the human immunodeficiency virus. Diagnosis is based on clinical findings and anatomopathological tests. The treatment of choice is radiochemotherapy, and the rescue surgery with abdominoperineal resection is used for recurrence and persistence cases. A retrospective and prospective longitudinal observational study was performed with 11 patients diagnosed with anal neoplasm from 2004 to 2010. Six (54.5% were females and five (45.5% were males. The incidence was higher in the sixth decade, at the mean age of 54.45 years. The most frequent histological type observed was the epidermoid carcinoma, and the most frequent cell differentiation type was the moderately differentiated. Chemotharapy associated with radiotherapy was used in 81.9% of the patients, and abdominoperineal resection was necessary as a rescue surgery in 18.2% of the patients.Neoplasias do ânus correspondem de 2 a 4% dos tumores de intestino grosso, sendo predominante nas sétima e oitava décadas. A maior prevalência é em gênero feminino, com proporção de 3:1. O aumento da prevalência na população nos últimos anos provavelmente está relacionado ao número maior de pessoas com doenças sexualmente transmissíveis, principalmente o papilomavírus humano (tipos 16 e 18, mais comumente e/ou o vírus da imunodeficiência humana. O diagnóstico é feito a partir de achados clínicos somados ao exame anatomopatológico. O tratamento de escolha baseia-se na radioquimioterapia, sendo a cirurgia de resgate com amputação abdominoperineal utilizada para casos de recidiva ou persist

  5. Giant solitary fibrous tumour of the pleura: a rare but usually benign intrathoracic neoplasm

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Bodtger, Uffe; Pedersen, Jesper Holst; Skov, Birgit Guldhammer

    2009-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Low forced expiratory volume (FEV(1)) and low performance status usually preclude surgical treatment of lung neoplasms. Earlier case reports have suggested that curative, safe surgery is possible in extrapulmonal intrathoracic neoplasms. METHODS: A case report of an 83-year-old women ...

  6. Fibroadenoma and phyllodes tumors of anogenital mammary-like glands: a series of 13 neoplasms in 12 cases, including mammary-type juvenile fibroadenoma, fibroadenoma with lactation changes, and neurofibromatosis-associated pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated giant cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kazakov, Dmitry V; Spagnolo, Dominic V; Stewart, Colin J; Thompson, Jane; Agaimy, Abbas; Magro, Gaetano; Bisceglia, Michele; Vazmitel, Marina; Kacerovska, Denisa; Kutzner, Heinz; Mukensnabl, Petr; Michal, Michal

    2010-01-01

    The authors present a series of 13 fibroepithelial neoplasms involving anogenital mammary-like glands, all occurring in 12 female patients, whose age at diagnosis ranged from 30 to 51 years (mean, 38 y; median, 42 y). All women presented with a solitary asymptomatic nodule in the vulva (n=8), perineum (n=2), or near the anus (n=2) ranging in size from 1.5 to 4.5 cm. Microscopically, 8 lesions were classified as fibroadenoma, and 5, including 1 recurrent tumor, as phyllodes tumor, of which 1 was benign and 4 low-grade malignant. In addition to conventional findings, we describe several hitherto unreported features including juvenile fibroadenoma-like proliferation, fibroadenoma with lactation change, and pseudoangiomatous stromal hyperplasia with multinucleated stromal giant cells in a patient with neurofibromatosis, type 1 all constituting potential diagnostic pitfalls, which are best averted by using the same approach to diagnosis as for their analogous mammary counterparts.

  7. Pathogenesis and FDG-PET/CT findings of Epstein-Barr virus-related lymphoid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Toriihara, Akira; Nakajima, Reiko; Arai, Ayako; Nakadate, Masashi; Abe, Koichiro; Kubota, Kazunori; Tateishi, Ukihide

    2017-07-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) is one of the most common viruses, infecting more than 90% of the adult population worldwide. EBV genome is detected in some lymphoid neoplasms. Not only their histopathological subtypes, but also their backgrounds and their clinical courses are variable. A number of B-cell lymphoproliferative disorders associated with the immunocompromised state are related to EBV infection. The incidences of these disorders have been increasing along with generalization of organ transplantations and use of immunosuppressive treatments. Furthermore, some EBV-positive lymphoma can also occur in immunocompetent patients. While evaluating patients with generalized lymphadenopathy of unknown cause by positron emission tomography/computed tomography with 2-deoxy-2-[ 18 F]fluoro-D-glucose (FDG-PET/CT), the possibility of lymphoid neoplasms should be considered in some patients, and a careful review of the background and previous history of the patients is necessary. In this review article, we describe the pathogenesis of EBV-related lymphoid neoplasms and then present FDG-PET/CT images of representative diseases. In addition, we also present a review of other EBV-related diseases, such as infectious mononucleosis and nasopharyngeal carcinoma.

  8. Cryotherapy of skeletal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Richardson, M.L.; Lough, L.R.; Shuman, W.P.; Conrad, E.U.

    1989-01-01

    The authors reviewed MR examinations in six patients with giant cell tumor or chondrosarcoma who had undergone surgical curettage and subsequent cryotherapy. In five cases, the authors found a zone of varying thickness extending beyond the surgical margins consistent with cryotherapy injury to medullary bone. This zone appeared dark or intermediate in intensity on T1-weighted images and bright on T2-weighted and short inversion recovery (STIR) images, suggesting tissue edema. In one case, this marginal zone grew for 3 months as the cryotherapy injury evolved. These findings should be expected after cryotherapy and should not be confused with recurrent tumor

  9. Myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative neoplasms: updates on the overlap syndromes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thota, Swapna; Gerds, Aaron T

    2018-04-01

    Myelodysplastic and myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN) is a rare and distinct group of myeloid neoplasms with overlapping MDS and MPN features. Next generation sequencing studies have led to an improved understanding of MDS/MPN disease biology by identifying recurrent somatic mutations. Combining the molecular findings to patho-morphologic features has improved the precision of diagnosis and prognostic models in MDS/MPN. We discuss and highlight these updates in MDS/MPN nomenclature and diagnostic criteria per revised 2016 WHO classification of myeloid neoplasms in this article. There is an ongoing effort for data integration allowing for comprehensive genomic characterization, development of improved prognostic tools, and investigation for novel therapies using an international front specific for MDS/MPN. In this article, we discuss updates in prognostic models and current state of treatment for MDS/MPN.

  10. Targeting angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms using combined polymer therapeutics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ehud Segal

    Full Text Available There is an immense clinical need for novel therapeutics for the treatment of angiogenesis-dependent calcified neoplasms such as osteosarcomas and bone metastases. We developed a new therapeutic strategy to target bone metastases and calcified neoplasms using combined polymer-bound angiogenesis inhibitors. Using an advanced "living polymerization" technique, the reversible addition-fragmentation chain transfer (RAFT, we conjugated the aminobisphosphonate alendronate (ALN, and the potent anti-angiogenic agent TNP-470 with N-(2-hydroxypropylmethacrylamide (HPMA copolymer through a Glycine-Glycine-Proline-Norleucine linker, cleaved by cathepsin K, a cysteine protease overexpressed at resorption sites in bone tissues. In this approach, dual targeting is achieved. Passive accumulation is possible due to the increase in molecular weight following polymer conjugation of the drugs, thus extravasating from the tumor leaky vessels and not from normal healthy vessels. Active targeting to the calcified tissues is achieved by ALN's affinity to bone mineral.The anti-angiogenic and antitumor potency of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was evaluated both in vitro and in vivo. We show that free and conjugated ALN-TNP-470 have synergistic anti-angiogenic and antitumor activity by inhibiting proliferation, migration and capillary-like tube formation of endothelial and human osteosarcoma cells in vitro. Evaluation of anti-angiogenic, antitumor activity and body distribution of HPMA copolymer-ALN-TNP-470 conjugate was performed on severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID male mice inoculated with mCherry-labeled MG-63-Ras human osteosarcoma and by modified Miles permeability assay. Our targeted bi-specific conjugate reduced VEGF-induced vascular hyperpermeability by 92% and remarkably inhibited osteosarcoma growth in mice by 96%.This is the first report to describe a new concept of a narrowly-dispersed combined polymer therapeutic designed to target both tumor and

  11. Paediatric atypical spitzoid melanocytic neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aileen F. Egan

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous malignant melanoma is a rare occurrence in children, with an incidence of less than one case per million per year in children under ten years of age. However this statistic is reportedly increasing. Mortality rates in paediatric melanoma are not well described, however reports suggest that 5-year survival rates are improving beyond those of adults. This may be partly attributable to more intensive classification and staging of melanocytic lesions. Atypical spitzoid neoplasms (ASN are a subcategorisation of the diagnostic spectrum which extends from Spitz naevi to spitzoid melanoma, and are relatively more common than the latter. The clinical and histopathological features of such lesions are imprecise, leading to difficulties in making diagnoses and subsequent management. This report documents one such case arising within an atypical spitzoid melanocytic neoplasm and the clinical process undertaken. In particular we wished to highlight the molecular diagnostics utilised and their impact on the decision-making pathway.

  12. Pediatric intraspinal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mueller, U.; Ahlhelm, F.; Ulmer, S.; Schlaeger, R.

    2014-01-01

    With an overall incidence of 10 % of all central nervous system tumors, spinal tumors are relatively rare in children. The majority of these tumors are astrocytomas and ependymomas (70 %) followed by rare non-glial tumor entities, such as gangliogliomas. They can be differentiated into intramedullary, extramedullary intradural and extramedullary extradural tumors according to their occurrence within the anatomical intraspinal compartments. The clinical presentation is generally unspecific. Longer lasting back pain or a gradually worsening scoliosis are often the first signs of the disease. Neurological deficits, such as gait disturbances and paresis often occur after a time delay. In rare cases increased intracranial pressure has been reported. Knowledge concerning potential organ manifestations, resulting complications and typical radiological presentation, especially in magnetic resonance imaging are mandatory for adequate diagnosis and treatment of affected patients. (orig.) [de

  13. The radiological and histopathological differential diagnosis of chordoid neoplasms in skull base

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    PAN Bin-cai

    2013-07-01

    Full Text Available Background Chordoid neoplasms refer to tumors appearing to have histological features of embryonic notochord, which is characterized by cords and lobules of neoplastic cells arranged within myxoid matrix. Because of radiological and histological similarities with myxoid matrix and overlapping immunohistochemical profile, chordoma, chordoid meningioma, chordoid glioma, and rare extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcoma enter in the radiological and histological differential diagnosis at the site of skull base. However, there is always a great challenge for histopathologists to make an accurate diagnosis when encountering a chordoid neoplasm within or near the central nervous system. The aim of this study is to investigate and summarize the radiological, histological features and immunohistochemical profiles of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, and to find a judicious panel of immunostains to unquestionably help in diagnostically challenging cases. Methods A total of 23 cases of chordoid neoplasms in skull base, including 10 chordomas, 5 chordoid meningiomas, 3 chordoid gliomas and 5 extraskeletal myxoid chondrosarcomas, were collected from the First Affiliated Hospital, Sun Yat-sen University and Guangdong Tongjiang Hospital. MRI examination was performed on the patients before surgical treatment. Microscopical examination and immunohistochemical staining study using vimentin (Vim, pan-cytokeratin (PCK, epithelial membrane antigen (EMA, S?100 protein (S-100, glial fibrillary acidic protein (GFAP, D2-40, Galectin-3, CD3, CD20, Ki-67 were performed on the samples of cases. The clinicopathological data of the patients was also analyzed retrospectively. Results Most of chordomas were localized in the clivus with heterogeneous hyperintensity on T2WI scanning. The breakage of clivus was observed in most cases. Histologically, the tumor cells of chordoma exhibited bland nuclear features and some contained abundant vacuolated cytoplasm (the so

  14. Solute carrier transporters: potential targets for digestive system neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xie, Jing; Zhu, Xiao Yan; Liu, Lu Ming; Meng, Zhi Qiang

    2018-01-01

    Digestive system neoplasms are the leading causes of cancer-related death all over the world. Solute carrier (SLC) superfamily is composed of a series of transporters that are ubiquitously expressed in organs and tissues of digestive systems and mediate specific uptake of small molecule substrates in facilitative manner. Given the important role of SLC proteins in maintaining normal functions of digestive system, dysregulation of these protein in digestive system neoplasms may deliver biological and clinical significance that deserves systemic studies. In this review, we critically summarized the recent advances in understanding the role of SLC proteins in digestive system neoplasms. We highlighted that several SLC subfamilies, including metal ion transporters, transporters of glucose and other sugars, transporters of urea, neurotransmitters and biogenic amines, ammonium and choline, inorganic cation/anion transporters, transporters of nucleotide, amino acid and oligopeptide organic anion transporters, transporters of vitamins and cofactors and mitochondrial carrier, may play important roles in mediating the initiation, progression, metastasis, and chemoresistance of digestive system neoplasms. Proteins in these SLC subfamilies may also have diagnostic and prognostic values to particular cancer types. Differential expression of SLC proteins in tumors of digestive system was analyzed by extracting data from human cancer database, which revealed that the roles of SLC proteins may either be dependent on the substrates they transport or be tissue specific. In addition, small molecule modulators that pharmacologically regulate the functions of SLC proteins were discussed for their possible application in the treatment of digestive system neoplasms. This review highlighted the potential of SLC family proteins as drug target for the treatment of digestive system neoplasms.

  15. Retinal stem cells and potential cell transplantation treatments

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Tai-Chi Lin

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The retina, histologically composed of ten delicate layers, is responsible for light perception and relaying electrochemical signals to the secondary neurons and visual cortex. Retinal disease is one of the leading clinical causes of severe vision loss, including age-related macular degeneration, Stargardt's disease, and retinitis pigmentosa. As a result of the discovery of various somatic stem cells, advances in exploring the identities of embryonic stem cells, and the development of induced pluripotent stem cells, cell transplantation treatment for retinal diseases is currently attracting much attention. The sources of stem cells for retinal regeneration include endogenous retinal stem cells (e.g., neuronal stem cells, Müller cells, and retinal stem cells from the ciliary marginal zone and exogenous stem cells (e.g., bone mesenchymal stem cells, adipose-derived stem cells, embryonic stem cells, and induced pluripotent stem cells. The success of cell transplantation treatment depends mainly on the cell source, the timing of cell harvesting, the protocol of cell induction/transplantation, and the microenvironment of the recipient's retina. This review summarizes the different sources of stem cells for regeneration treatment in retinal diseases and surveys the more recent achievements in animal studies and clinical trials. Future directions and challenges in stem cell transplantation are also discussed.

  16. Survival after Radiofrequency Ablation for 100 Cases of Lung Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Baodong LIU

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective Surgical resection is the preferred treatment in selected patients with pulmonary neoplasms. In older than 70 years or have compromised cardiopulmonary status or coexistent medical problems patients, radiofrequency ablation (RFA may offer an alternative option. The aim of this study is to evaluate the therapeutic effects after RFA in 100 patients with pulmonary neoplasms. Methods One handred cases of unresectable lung tumors with 106 lesions were underwent RFA therapy. To evaluate the therapeutic effect and complications of lung tumors using spiral CT scanning and SPECT in 1-3 months after RFA. Results One hundred patients underwent RFA for lung neoplasms (62 men, 38 women; median age, 66.6 years; range, 36 to 91 years. Eighty-six patients with primary lung neoplasms and 14 patients with pulmonary metastases underwent RFA. Treatment was complete in all cases, no treatment-related deaths occurred in all of the 100 patients and serious morbidity associated with the procedures. The median overall survival for the entire group of patients was 13.0 months, the one and two years overall survival for total of were 51% and 32.5% respectively. No differences in overall survival noted between patients with primary and metastases lung neoplasms (P=0.922. The median overall survival for the early stage of patients was 28.0 months, 2-year overall survival for early stage primary lung cancer patients were 57.7%. Conclusion RFA is a safe and effective procedure in selective lung tumors. CT-guided radiofrequency ablation is a minimally invasive treatment option. RFA could act as an alternative treatment to inoperable lung cancer.

  17. Canine Central Nervous System Neoplasm Phenotyping Using Tissue Microarray Technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spitzbarth, I; Heinrich, F; Herder, V; Recker, T; Wohlsein, P; Baumgärtner, W

    2017-05-01

    Tissue microarrays (TMAs) represent a useful technique for the simultaneous phenotyping of large sample numbers and are particularly suitable for histopathologic tumor research. In this study, TMAs were used to evaluate semiquantitatively the expression of multiple antigens in various canine central nervous system (CNS) neoplasms and to identify markers with potential discriminative diagnostic relevance. Ninety-seven canine CNS neoplasms, previously diagnosed on hematoxylin and eosin sections according to the World Health Organization classification, were investigated on TMAs, with each tumor consisting of 2 cylindrical samples from the center and the periphery of the neoplasm. Tumor cells were phenotyped using a panel of 28 monoclonal and polyclonal antibodies, and hierarchical clustering analysis was applied to group neoplasms according to similarities in their expression profiles. Hierarchical clustering generally grouped cases with similar histologic diagnoses; however, gliomas especially exhibited a considerable heterogeneity in their positivity scores. Multiple tumor groups, such as astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, significantly differed in the proportion of positive immunoreaction for certain markers such as p75 NTR , AQP4, GFAP, and S100 protein. The study highlights AQP4 and p75 NTR as novel markers, helping to discriminate between canine astrocytoma and oligodendroglioma. Furthermore, the results suggest that p75 NTR and proteolipid protein may represent useful markers, whose expression inversely correlates with malignant transformation in canine astrocytomas and oligodendrogliomas, respectively. Tissue microarray was demonstrated to be a useful and time-saving tool for the simultaneous immunohistochemical characterization of multiple canine CNS neoplasms. The present study provides a detailed overview of the expression patterns of different types of canine CNS neoplasms.

  18. Tyrosine-rich crystals associated with oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gilcrease, M Z; Nelson, F S; Guzman-Paz, M

    1998-07-01

    Crystalloids have been identified ultrastructurally within the epithelial cells of Warthin's tumors, but there have been no studies characterizing crystals or crystalloids in Warthin's tumors by light microscopy. The finding of abundant needle-shaped crystals in a fine-needle aspirate of a cystadenoma of the parotid prompted us to examine the prevalence of crystals and crystalloids in oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms. Ninety-seven oncocytic neoplasms (93 Warthin's tumors, 3 cystadenomas, and 1 oncocytoma) excised at our institution between 1950 and 1996 were examined, to identify crystals. Neoplasms with crystals were further characterized by means of a variety of histochemical stains and electron microscopy. Ninety-nine pleomorphic adenomas were similarly reviewed. Seven cases with crystals were identified. Five of these were Warthin's tumors, 1 was a cystadenoma, and 1 was an oncocytoma. The crystals were noted within tumor cysts but were not limited to the neoplasms. The crystals were predominantly either needle-shaped or tabular, but some cases contained mixtures of both as well as intermediate forms. They stained pink with hematoxylin-eosin, although the tabular forms also exhibited a focal yellow hue. The crystals were not discernible under polarized light. They stained a red-brown color with Millon's reagent, which indicated the presence of tyrosine. Trichrome, periodic acid-Schiff stain with diastase, alcian blue (pH 2.5), and Congo red stains were negative. Electron microscopy revealed sharply defined, elongate, electron-dense structures with periodicity, both extracellular and within epithelial cells. No crystals or crystalloids were identified in any of 99 pleomorphic adenomas reviewed. The findings indicate that tyrosine-rich crystals associated with several oncocytic salivary gland neoplasms are morphologically, histochemically, and ultrastructurally distinct from previously described tyrosine-rich crystalloids and collagenous crystalloids of

  19. Treatment of initially metastatic small-cell lung cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kohutek, F.; Bystricky, B.; Tamasova, M.

    2013-01-01

    Lung cancer (LC) is the most common cause of death associated with neoplasms. The incidence of LC in 2007 was 71.3/100,000 men and 18.6/100,000 women in Slovakia. Small-cell lung cancer (SCLC) includes 15 - 18% of all cases. The diagnosis of LC is based on patient's history, physical examination, basic laboratory tests, x-ray imaging and computed tomography (CT) imaging and histology. The material required for histology can be obtained by means of endoscopy or surgery. Ultrasonography (USG) and/or CT of abdomen is commonly performed as a part of staging process, along with CT or MRI of brain. Bone scan is performed in case of suspicion of bone involvement. According to TNM classification, seventh edition, the same classification can be used for SCLC and non-small cell lung cancer (NSCLC). Chemotherapy and radiotherapy are available for treatment of initially metastatic SCLC. First-line chemotherapy regimen should be based on combination of cisplatin or carboplatin with etoposide (PE). Alternatively, CAV regimen (cyclophosphamide, doxorubicin, vincristine) can be used. Newer regimens did not provide benefit when compared to standard regimens. If progression occurs later than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, the same regimen may be used in second-line chemotherapy. If progression occurs earlier than 3 months after finishing first-line chemotherapy, topotecan-based regimen is an option for second-line line chemotherapy. Despite promising outcomes of amrubicin-based second-line chemotherapy in Japan, amrubicin is not available in countries of E U. Standard therapy schedules do not include radiotherapy targeted on primary tumor and affected lymph-nodes. According to American and European guidelines, prophylactic cranial irradiation is recommended for patients with extensive disease-SCLC with good performance status after achieving complete or partial response to first-line chemotherapy. (author)

  20. Basal cell carcinoma-treatment with cryosurgery

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kaur S

    2003-03-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is a common cutaneous malignancy, frequently occurring over the face in elderly individuals. Various therapeutic modalities are available to treat these tumors. We describe three patients with basal cell carcinoma successfully treated with cryosurgery and discuss the indications and the use of this treatment modality for basal cell carcinomas.

  1. Stem Cell Treatments: What to Ask

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Medicine About Clinical Trials Things to Consider About Clinical Trials Stem Cells & Medicine Nine Things to Know About Stem Cell ... should look into if you are considering a stem cell treatment, including a ... in a clinical trial, you should be provided with a patient information ...

  2. Treatment of Aggressive NK-Cell Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders Kindberg; Jensen, Paw; Johansen, Preben

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive NK-cell leukemia is a rare malignancy with neoplastic proliferation of natural killer cells. It often presents with constitutional symptoms, a rapid declining clinical course, and a poor prognosis with a median survival of a few months. The disease is usually resistant to cytotoxic...... literature concerning treatment of aggressive NK-cell leukemia....

  3. [Bladder neoplasm in a patient with panarteritis nodosa treated with cyclophosphamide].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albanell, J; Gallego, O S; Bellmunt, J; Vicente, P; Morales, S; Solé, L A

    1992-05-01

    Cyclophosphamide is used both in the treatment of malignant and non-malignant diseases. Urinary neoplasms secondary to its use have been described. We discuss the case of a patient with panarteritis nodosa treated with cyclophosphamide during 63 months, with a total dose of 210 grams, and that showed a bladder neoplasm 8 years after beginning of the treatment. In patients receiving a total dose of cyclophosphamide over 85 grams, a follow-up of ten years minimum should be performed aimed to the early detection of secondary neoplasms.

  4. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tacke, J.; Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W.

    2005-01-01

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  5. Experience in diagnosis and treatment of patients with breast neoplasm in the 'Hospital Ramon Gonzalez Coro' in the period 2006-2008

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ruiz Lorente, Raiza; Hernandez Duran, Daisy; Rubio, Maria Caridad

    2009-01-01

    Breast cancer remains one of the most malignant common in Cuba and the world. The existence of screening programs through active investigation in healthy women has allowed the diagnostic stage more precocious, this coupled with the new modalities of treatment and testing has current clinical knowledge of the clinical stages diagnosis in very early stages and achieve a free range of events and better survival in cases diagnosed, but despite be shown that it is preventable and curable cancer has not been achieved in our country reduce mortality is now among the first 4 causes of cancer death in women and the incidence has continued increasing during the last decades. In this paper a study retrospective longitudinal descriptive in patients with breast cancer at the Hospital Ramon Gonzalez Coro in the period for January 2006 to December 2008.Se treated at this stage a total of 132 cases with histologically confirmed breast cancer. It stage as diagnostic and therapeutic guidelines in force and sets out results of treatments with an interval of an event-free 92.7%. (Author)

  6. Differences in treatment goals and perception of symptom burden between patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and hematologists/oncologists in the United States: Findings from the MPN Landmark survey.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mesa, Ruben A; Miller, Carole B; Thyne, Maureen; Mangan, James; Goldberger, Sara; Fazal, Salman; Ma, Xiaomei; Wilson, Wendy; Paranagama, Dilan C; Dubinski, David G; Naim, Ahmad; Parasuraman, Shreekant; Boyle, John; Mascarenhas, John O

    2017-02-01

    This analysis of the myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) Landmark survey evaluated gaps between patient perceptions of their disease management and physician self-reported practices. The survey included 813 patient respondents who had MPNs (myelofibrosis [MF], polycythemia vera [PV], or essential thrombocythemia [ET]) and 457 hematologist/oncologist respondents who treated patients with these conditions. Greater proportions of physician respondents reported using prognostic risk classifications (MF, 83%; PV, 59%; ET, 77%) compared with patient recollections (MF, 54%; PV, 17%; ET, 31%). Most physician respondents reported that their typical symptom assessments included asking patients about the most important symptoms or a full list of symptoms, whereas many patient respondents reported less specific assessments (eg, they were asked how they were feeling). Many patient respondents did not recognize common symptoms as MPN-related. For example, approximately one-half or more did not believe difficulty sleeping resulted from their MPN (MF, 49%; PV, 64%; ET, 76%). Physician respondents underestimated the proportion of patients who had symptomatic PV or ET at diagnosis compared with patient respondents. There was discordance regarding treatment goals: among patient respondents with MF or PV, "slow/delay progression of condition" was the most important treatment goal, whereas physician respondents reported "symptom improvement" and "prevention of vascular/thrombotic events," respectively. Finally, more than one-third of patient respondents were not "very satisfied" with their physician's overall management/communication. The care and satisfaction of patients with MPN may be improved with increased patient education and improved patient-physician communication. Cancer 2017;123:449-458. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American Cancer Society. © 2016 The Authors. Cancer published by Wiley Periodicals, Inc. on behalf of American

  7. Stem cell treatment of degenerative eye disease

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Mead

    2015-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cell therapies are being explored extensively as treatments for degenerative eye disease, either for replacing lost neurons, restoring neural circuits or, based on more recent evidence, as paracrine-mediated therapies in which stem cell-derived trophic factors protect compromised endogenous retinal neurons from death and induce the growth of new connections. Retinal progenitor phenotypes induced from embryonic stem cells/induced pluripotent stem cells (ESCs/iPSCs and endogenous retinal stem cells may replace lost photoreceptors and retinal pigment epithelial (RPE cells and restore vision in the diseased eye, whereas treatment of injured retinal ganglion cells (RGCs has so far been reliant on mesenchymal stem cells (MSC. Here, we review the properties of non-retinal-derived adult stem cells, in particular neural stem cells (NSCs, MSC derived from bone marrow (BMSC, adipose tissues (ADSC and dental pulp (DPSC, together with ESC/iPSC and discuss and compare their potential advantages as therapies designed to provide trophic support, repair and replacement of retinal neurons, RPE and glia in degenerative retinal diseases. We conclude that ESCs/iPSCs have the potential to replace lost retinal cells, whereas MSC may be a useful source of paracrine factors that protect RGC and stimulate regeneration of their axons in the optic nerve in degenerate eye disease. NSC may have potential as both a source of replacement cells and also as mediators of paracrine treatment.

  8. [Epidermoid neoplasm of the fourth ventricle. Report of two cases].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Santos-Franco, Jorge Arturo; Vallejo-Moncada, Cristóbal; Collado-Arce, Griselda; Villalpando-Navarrete, Edgar; Sandoval-Balanzario, M

    2013-01-01

    epidermoid neoplasm (EN) accounts for 1 % of whole intracranial neoplasms. Usually, it is found at the cerebello-pontine angle and the location in the fourth ventricle (FV) is rare. The aim was to report two cases of EN of the FV. case 1: a female 22 year old presented with an intense headache with a history of 3 months. At the hospital entry, symptoms and signs of high intracranial pressure were found. Tomography images showed hydrocephalus with high pressure in the FV. She was treated with a shunt from ventricular to peritoneal cavity. After that an encapsulated neoplasm was drawn. It had a pearled aspect. The histology report showed an EN originating in the FV. Case 2: a female 44 year old with a history of five years of dizziness; three years before admission she presented intermittent diplopia and disophagia. At the hospital admission the patient presented paresis of the 6th and 7th cranial nerve. The tomography and the magnetic resonance studies showed a mass in the FV. The neoplasm was extirpated. the EN of the FV is an infrequent benign lesion. Magnetic resonance is the standard diagnostic study, but it could lead to confusion with neurocisticercosis. The extirpation and the treatment of the hydrocephalus are indicated.

  9. Expression of vitamin D receptor and vitamin D status in patients with oral neoplasms and effect of vitamin D supplementation on quality of life in advanced cancer treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Akshay Anand

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Aim of the study: Vitamin D receptor (VDR expression and serum vitamin D scores in oral premalignant lesions and oral cancer have not been widely analyzed. The role of vitamin D supplementation in advanced oral cancer for improving quality of life (QOL is also a matter of research. Material and methods: Vitamin D receptor expression and vitamin D scores were analyzed in normal oral mucosa (n = 95, leukoplakia (n = 23 and oral cancer (n = 87. 45 patients with advanced oral cancer subjected to chemoradiation were evaluated for the effect of vitamin D supplementation on most observable QOL parameters such as oral mucositis, swallowing performance and overall QOL. Results: Vitamin D receptor expression was increased in oral neoplastic lesions. Vitamin D scores were significantly lower in cases compared to healthy controls (p = 0.002. Vitamin D supplementation significantly reduced the therapy-related toxicities in advanced cancer, thus reducing morbidity and improving QOL. Conclusions : Vitamin D receptor expression is increased in premalignant lesions and oral cancer. Vitamin D insufficiency and deficiency are prevalent in patients with oral neoplastic lesions. Vitamin D supplementation has a role in reducing treatment-related toxicities, especially in advanced cancer.

  10. Delta-aminolevulinic acid as a photosensitizer precursor for the treatment of hepatoma cells in vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laukka, Mark A.; Wang, Kenneth K.

    1994-07-01

    Delta-aminolevulinic acid ((delta) -ALA) has been recently proposed as a tumor photosensitizer precursor with increased selectivity and decreased toxicity for the treatment of neoplasms. We investigated the conversion and cytotoxicity of (delta) -ALA in a human hepatoma cell line to determine its clinical potential. SK-HEP-1 (ATCC) cells were plated on 35 mm coverslips in media for use in a digital fluorescence microscopic imaging system. (delta) -ALA was added to achieve final concentrations between 0-5 mM. Cells were excited with 450-490 nm light while a 610 nm long pass filter was used to assess fluorescence from conversion to protoporphyrin IX, the putative photosensitizer. After maximal fluorescence was obtained at each initial concentration of (delta) -ALA, cells were radiated with 10 J/cm2 of light from a xenon lamp fitted with a 515 nm band pass filter. After photoradiation, cell death was assessed by flow cytometry using propidium iodide labeling. Protoporphyrin IX accumulation was constant at Ksequals0.001 until a plateau was achieved 2 hours after the addition of (delta -ALA. Photoradiation with 10 J/cm2 at a concentration of 1 mM (delta ALA resulted in a linear increase in cell death over time with 5% cell death at 2 hours and 12% at 5 hours compared to controls. Interestingly, controls with (delta) -ALA alone demonstrated a cytoprotective effect with a logarithmic relationship between increasing cell survival and increasing dose of drug.

  11. Meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms in Johannesburg ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background: Worldwide there are varying reports on the prevalence of meningiomas among intracranial neoplasms. Different reports state intracranial meningiomas, gliomas or metastatic tumours as the most common tumour among intracranial neoplasms. We present our institutions' experience of patients with intracranial ...

  12. Histopathological evaluation of parotid gland neoplasms in Queensland, Australia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Coombe, R F; Lam, A K; O'Neill, J

    2016-01-01

    Parotid gland tumours are complex neoplasms with a broad histological range. The parotid gland is also a common site of face and scalp skin cancer metastases. Parotidectomies performed by ENT department in the Gold Coast health district from 2006 to 2013. A total of 158 specimens were examined. Of these, 53.80 per cent were benign and 46.20 per cent were malignant. Pleomorphic adenoma was the most common tumour (29.11 per cent), followed by cutaneous squamous cell carcinoma (23.42 per cent) and Warthin's tumour (12.03 per cent). Metastatic squamous cell carcinoma accounted for a large proportion of parotid masses in our case series, reflecting the high prevalence of non-melanoma skin cancer in Australia. Primary parotid neoplasms had similar incidence rates to other studies.

  13. Basaloid Carcinoma of the Breast Mimicking Cutaneous Basaloid Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Solus, Jason F; Goyal, Amrita; Duncan, Lyn M; Nazarian, Rosalynn M

    2015-09-01

    Basaloid carcinoma of the breast (BCB) is a rare, triple-negative aggressive primary breast tumor that can closely mimic cutaneous basal cell carcinoma (BCC), neuroendocrine tumors, adnexal neoplasms, and other primary breast tumors. Accurate diagnosis of this tumor is critical for appropriate clinical management. We add to the literature 2 female patients with BCB presenting with a nipple mass. Histopathologic findings from both patients showed dermal nests and cords of atypical basaloid cells with epidermal involvement, closely resembling cutaneous BCC. A panel of immunohistochemical stains, including the novel use of CK17, is essential for differentiating BCB from mimickers. BCB is a rare primary breast tumor that follows an aggressive clinical course and closely mimics many basaloid neoplasms, including cutaneous BCC clinicopathologically. Increased awareness of BCB among dermatologists and dermatopathologists is critical for accurate diagnosis and patient care.

  14. Diagnostic and therapeutic implications of genetic heterogeneity in myeloid neoplasms uncovered by comprehensive mutational analysis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sarah M. Choi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available While growing use of comprehensive mutational analysis has led to the discovery of innumerable genetic alterations associated with various myeloid neoplasms, the under-recognized phenomenon of genetic heterogeneity within such neoplasms creates a potential for diagnostic confusion. Here, we describe two cases where expanded mutational testing led to amendment of an initial diagnosis of chronic myelogenous leukemia with subsequent altered treatment of each patient. We demonstrate the power of comprehensive testing in ensuring appropriate classification of genetically heterogeneous neoplasms, and emphasize thoughtful analysis of molecular and genetic data as an essential component of diagnosis and management.

  15. Branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm presenting as paraneoplastic small plaque para-psoriasis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cyriac A Philips

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available To present and discuss a novel association between branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and paraneoplastic parapsoriasis. We present the case of a middle-aged male presenting with skin lesions that were suggestive of parapsoriasis, resistant to treatment, and in whom a diagnosis of branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas was eventually made. A curative Whipple's surgery led to complete resolution of the skin lesions within 3 weeks. Paraneoplastic parapsoriasis in association with intraductal papillary mucinous pancreatic neoplasm has never been reported before.

  16. Branch Duct-type Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Presenting as Paraneoplastic Small Plaque Para-psoriasis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Cyriac A.; Augustine, Philip; Kumar, Lijesh; Joseph, George; Mahadevan, Pushpa

    2018-01-01

    To present and discuss a novel association between branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and paraneoplastic parapsoriasis. We present the case of a middle-aged male presenting with skin lesions that were suggestive of parapsoriasis, resistant to treatment, and in whom a diagnosis of branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas was eventually made. A curative Whipple's surgery led to complete resolution of the skin lesions within 3 weeks. Paraneoplastic parapsoriasis in association with intraductal papillary mucinous pancreatic neoplasm has never been reported before. PMID:29441297

  17. Branch Duct-type Intraductal Papillary Mucinous Neoplasm Presenting as Paraneoplastic Small Plaque Para-psoriasis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Philips, Cyriac A; Augustine, Philip; Kumar, Lijesh; Joseph, George; Mahadevan, Pushpa

    2018-01-01

    To present and discuss a novel association between branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and paraneoplastic parapsoriasis. We present the case of a middle-aged male presenting with skin lesions that were suggestive of parapsoriasis, resistant to treatment, and in whom a diagnosis of branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas was eventually made. A curative Whipple's surgery led to complete resolution of the skin lesions within 3 weeks. Paraneoplastic parapsoriasis in association with intraductal papillary mucinous pancreatic neoplasm has never been reported before.

  18. HCV Virus and Lymphoid Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yutaka Tsutsumi

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is one of the viruses known to cause hepatic cancer. HCV is also believed to be involved in malignant lymphoma. In this paper, we investigated characteristics of malignant lymphoma cases that were anti-HCV antibody (HCV-Ab positive. We were able to perform pathological examinations on 13 out of 14 HCV-positive cases. Of these, lymphoid tissues of 10 stained positive for HCV-Ab. There was no significant correlation between the degree of HCV staining and the rate of recurrence or resistance to treatment. However, there did appear to be a consistent decrease in the amount of HCV-RNA between pre- and posttreatment among HCV-Ab-positive cases; that is, treatment-resistant cases that exhibited resistance from the first treatment and recurrent cases more frequently had a higher HCV level at treatment termination compared to the pretreatment level. This suggests that the HCV virus either accelerates oncogenesis by direct interaction with B cells or indirectly affects lymphoma prognosis.

  19. Treatment Options for Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... response ) and help fight infections caused by certain parasites . In chronic eosinophilic leukemia , there are too many eosinophils in the blood , bone marrow , and other tissues . Chronic eosinophilic leukemia ...

  20. Treatment Option Overview (Chronic Myeloproliferative Neoplasms)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... response ) and help fight infections caused by certain parasites . In chronic eosinophilic leukemia , there are too many eosinophils in the blood , bone marrow , and other tissues . Chronic eosinophilic leukemia ...

  1. Endoscopic Diagnosis of Leiomyosarcoma of the Esophagus, a Rare Neoplasm

    OpenAIRE

    Ravini, Mario; Torre, Massimo; Zanasi, Giulio; Vanini, Marco; Camozzi, Mario

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of leiomyosarcoma of the distal third of the esophagus in a 51-year-old woman presenting with a six-month history of severe epigastric pain, disphagia and weight loss. The diagnosis, suspected on endoscopic examination, was preoperatively acheived by biopsy and immunohistological stain. Surgical treatment was undertaken with good results. Differentiation between leiomyosarcoma and more common esophageal neoplasm may be difficult if based on radiographic and endoscopic appeara...

  2. Radiofrequency treatment alters cancer cell phenotype

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ware, Matthew J.; Tinger, Sophia; Colbert, Kevin L.; Corr, Stuart J.; Rees, Paul; Koshkina, Nadezhda; Curley, Steven; Summers, H. D.; Godin, Biana

    2015-07-01

    The importance of evaluating physical cues in cancer research is gradually being realized. Assessment of cancer cell physical appearance, or phenotype, may provide information on changes in cellular behavior, including migratory or communicative changes. These characteristics are intrinsically different between malignant and non-malignant cells and change in response to therapy or in the progression of the disease. Here, we report that pancreatic cancer cell phenotype was altered in response to a physical method for cancer therapy, a non-invasive radiofrequency (RF) treatment, which is currently being developed for human trials. We provide a battery of tests to explore these phenotype characteristics. Our data show that cell topography, morphology, motility, adhesion and division change as a result of the treatment. These may have consequences for tissue architecture, for diffusion of anti-cancer therapeutics and cancer cell susceptibility within the tumor. Clear phenotypical differences were observed between cancerous and normal cells in both their untreated states and in their response to RF therapy. We also report, for the first time, a transfer of microsized particles through tunneling nanotubes, which were produced by cancer cells in response to RF therapy. Additionally, we provide evidence that various sub-populations of cancer cells heterogeneously respond to RF treatment.

  3. Renal Function Outcomes for Multifocal Renal Neoplasms Managed by Radiofrequency Ablation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gupta, Pushpender, E-mail: pugupta@wakehealth.edu; Allen, Brian C., E-mail: bcallen2@wakehealth.edu; Chen, Michael Y., E-mail: mchen@wakehealth.edu; Childs, David D., E-mail: dchilds@wakehealth.edu; Kota, Gopi, E-mail: gkota@wakehealth.edu; Zagoria, Ronald J., E-mail: rzagoria@wakehealth.edu [Wake Forest University School of Medicine, Department of Radiology (United States)

    2013-10-15

    Purpose: To evaluate renal function changes related to radiofrequency ablation (RFA) for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms. Methods: This is an institutional review board-approved, Health Insurance Portability and Accountability Act compliant retrospective study of all patients treated with computed tomography guided RFA for multifocal renal neoplasms at one institution. Fifty-seven subjects, mean age 70 (range 37-88) years, underwent RFA of 169 renal neoplasms (average size 2.0 cm). Subjects had between 2 and 8 (mean 2.96) neoplasms ablated. Estimated glomerular filtration rate (eGFR) was measured before and after RFA. Complications related to RFA were recorded. Results: eGFR decreased on average of 4.4 % per tumor treated and 6.7 % per ablation session (average 1.76 tumors treated per session). For subjects with the largest neoplasm measuring >3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 14.5 % during the course of their treatment. If the largest neoplasm measured 2-3 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 7.7 %, and if the largest neoplasm measured <2 cm, eGFR decreased an average of 3.8 %. Subjects with reduced baseline renal function were more likely to have a greater decline in eGFR after RFA. There was a minor complication rate of 6.3 % (6 of 96 sessions), none of which required treatment, and a major complication rate of 4.2 % (4 of 96 sessions). Conclusion: RFA for the treatment of multifocal renal neoplasms results in mild decline of renal function.

  4. Branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm presenting as paraneoplastic small plaque para-psoriasis

    OpenAIRE

    Cyriac A Philips; Philip Augustine; Lijesh Kumar; George Joseph; Pushpa Mahadevan

    2018-01-01

    To present and discuss a novel association between branch duct-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm and paraneoplastic parapsoriasis. We present the case of a middle-aged male presenting with skin lesions that were suggestive of parapsoriasis, resistant to treatment, and in whom a diagnosis of branch-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas was eventually made. A curative Whipple's surgery led to complete resolution of the skin lesions within 3 weeks. Paraneoplasti...

  5. Chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms and subsequent cancer risk

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Frederiksen, H.; Farkas, Dora Kormendine; Christiansen, C.F.

    2011-01-01

    Patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms, including essential thrombocythemia (ET), polycythemia vera (PV), and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), are at increased risk of new hematologic malignancies, but their risk of nonhematologic malignancies remains unknown. In the present study, we...... diagnosed with a chronic myeloproliferative neoplasm during 1977-2008. We compared the incidence of subsequent cancer in this cohort with that expected on the basis of cancer incidence in the general population (standardized incidence ratio). Overall, ET, PV, and CML patients were at increased risk...... conclude that patients with chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms are at increased risk of developing a new malignant disease....

  6. Spectrum of myeloid neoplasms and immune deficiency associated with germline GATA2 mutations

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mir, Muhammad A; Kochuparambil, Samith T; Abraham, Roshini S; Rodriguez, Vilmarie; Howard, Matthew; Hsu, Amy P; Jackson, Amie E; Holland, Steven M; Patnaik, Mrinal M

    2015-01-01

    Guanine-adenine-thymine-adenine 2 (GATA2) mutated disorders include the recently described MonoMAC syndrome (Monocytopenia and Mycobacterium avium complex infections), DCML (dendritic cell, monocyte, and lymphocyte deficiency), familial MDS/AML (myelodysplastic syndrome/acute myeloid leukemia) (myeloid neoplasms), congenital neutropenia, congenital lymphedema (Emberger's syndrome), sensorineural deafness, viral warts, and a spectrum of aggressive infections seen across all age groups. While considerable efforts have been made to identify the mutations that characterize this disorder, pathogenesis remains a work in progress with less than 100 patients described in current literature. Varying clinical presentations offer diagnostic challenges. Allogeneic stem cell transplant remains the treatment of choice. Morbidity, mortality, and social costs due to the familial nature of the disease are considerable. We describe our experience with the disorder in three affected families and a comprehensive review of current literature

  7. The Role of mTOR Inhibitors for the Treatment of B-Cell Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pinelopi Argyriou

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Despite the fact that the majority of lymphomas initially respond to treatment, many patients relapse and die from disease that is refractory to current regimens. The need for new treatment strategies in lymphomas has led to the investigation and evaluation of novel agents that target cellular pathways. The mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR is a representative pathway that may be implicated in lymphomagenesis. Rapamycin and especially its derivatives (temsirolimus, everolimus, and deforolimus represent the first described mTOR inhibitors. These agents have shown promising results in the treatment of lymphoid malignancies. On the other hand, new ATP-competitive mTOR inhibitors that provoke a broader inhibition of mTOR activity are in early stages of clinical development. The purpose of this paper is to summarize the existing knowledge about mTOR inhibitors and their use in the treatment of B-cell lymphomas. Relevant issues regarding mTOR biology in general as well as in B-cell lymphoid neoplasms are also discussed in short.

  8. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency and Treatment with Stem Cell Transplantation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barut Selver, Özlem; Yağcı, Ayşe; Eğrilmez, Sait; Gürdal, Mehmet; Palamar, Melis; Çavuşoğlu, Türker; Ateş, Utku; Veral, Ali; Güven, Çağrı; Wolosin, Jose Mario

    2017-10-01

    The cornea is the outermost tissue of the eye and it must be transparent for the maintenance of good visual function. The superficial epithelium of the cornea, which is renewed continuously by corneal stem cells, plays a critical role in the permanence of this transparency. These stem cells are localized at the cornea-conjunctival transition zone, referred to as the limbus. When this zone is affected/destroyed, limbal stem cell deficiency ensues. Loss of limbal stem cell function allows colonization of the corneal surface by conjunctival epithelium. Over 6 million people worldwide are affected by corneal blindness, and limbal stem cell deficiency is one of the main causes. Fortunately, it is becoming possible to recover vision by autologous transplantation of limbal cells obtained from the contralateral eye in unilateral cases. Due to the potential risks to the donor eye, only a small amount of tissue can be obtained, in which only 1-2% of the limbal epithelial cells are actually limbal stem cells. Vigorous attempts are being made to expand limbal stem cells in culture to preserve or even enrich the stem cell population. Ex vivo expanded limbal stem cell treatment in limbal stem cell deficiency was first reported in 1997. In the 20 years since, various protocols have been developed for the cultivation of limbal epithelial cells. It is still not clear which method promotes effective stem cell viability and this remains a subject of ongoing research. The most preferred technique for limbal cell culture is the explant culture model. In this approach, a small donor eye limbal biopsy is placed as an explant onto a biocompatible substrate (preferably human amniotic membrane) for expansion. The outgrowth (cultivated limbal epithelial cells) is then surgically transferred to the recipient eye. Due to changing regulations concerning cell-based therapy, the implementation of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation in accordance with Good Laboratory Practice using

  9. Limbal Stem Cell Deficiency and Treatment with Stem Cell Transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Özlem Barut Selver

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available The cornea is the outermost tissue of the eye and it must be transparent for the maintenance of good visual function. The superficial epithelium of the cornea, which is renewed continuously by corneal stem cells, plays a critical role in the permanence of this transparency. These stem cells are localized at the cornea-conjunctival transition zone, referred to as the limbus. When this zone is affected/destroyed, limbal stem cell deficiency ensues. Loss of limbal stem cell function allows colonization of the corneal surface by conjunctival epithelium. Over 6 million people worldwide are affected by corneal blindness, and limbal stem cell deficiency is one of the main causes. Fortunately, it is becoming possible to recover vision by autologous transplantation of limbal cells obtained from the contralateral eye in unilateral cases. Due to the potential risks to the donor eye, only a small amount of tissue can be obtained, in which only 1-2% of the limbal epithelial cells are actually limbal stem cells. Vigorous attempts are being made to expand limbal stem cells in culture to preserve or even enrich the stem cell population. Ex vivo expanded limbal stem cell treatment in limbal stem cell deficiency was first reported in 1997. In the 20 years since, various protocols have been developed for the cultivation of limbal epithelial cells. It is still not clear which method promotes effective stem cell viability and this remains a subject of ongoing research. The most preferred technique for limbal cell culture is the explant culture model. In this approach, a small donor eye limbal biopsy is placed as an explant onto a biocompatible substrate (preferably human amniotic membrane for expansion. The outgrowth (cultivated limbal epithelial cells is then surgically transferred to the recipient eye. Due to changing regulations concerning cell-based therapy, the implementation of cultivated limbal epithelial transplantation in accordance with Good Laboratory

  10. Diagnosis of pancreatic neoplasms using a novel method of DNA methylation analysis of mucin expression in pancreatic juice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Seiya Yokoyama

    Full Text Available Mucins (MUC play crucial roles in carcinogenesis and tumor invasion in pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma (PDAC and intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms (IPMNs. Our immunohistochemistry (IHC studies have shown a consensus position on mucin expression profiles in pancreatic neoplasms as follows: MUC1-positive but MUC2-negative expression in PDACs; MUC1-negative but MUC2-positive expression in intestinal-type IPMNs (dangerous type; MUC1-negative and MUC2-negative expression in gastric-type IPMNs (safe type; High MUC4 expression in PDAC patients with a poor outcome; and MUC4-positive expression in intestinal-type IPMNs. We also showed that three mucin genes (MUC1, MUC2 and MUC4 expression in cancer cell line was regulated by DNA methylation. We have developed a novel 'methylation-specific electrophoresis (MSE' method to analyze the DNA methylation status of mucin genes by high sensitivity and resolution. By using the MSE method, we evaluated pancreatic juice samples from 45 patients with various pancreatic lesions. The results were compared with final diagnosis of the pancreatic lesions including IHC of mucin expression in the paired pancreatic tissues. The results indicated that the DNA methylation status of MUC1, MUC2 and MUC4 in pancreatic juice matched with the mucin expression in tissue. Analyses of the DNA methylation status of MUC1, MUC2 and MUC4 were useful for differential diagnosis of human pancreatic neoplasms, with specificity and sensitivity of 87% and 80% for PDAC; 100% and 88% for intestinal-type IPMN; and 88% and 77% for gastric-type IPMN, respectively. In conclusion, MSE analysis of human pancreatic juice may provide useful information for selection of treatment for pancreatic neoplasms.

  11. High grade serous ovarian carcinoma with serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma in a case presented with atypical glandular cell favor neoplasm cervical cytology and dermatomyositis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hong, Mun-Kun; Lee, Ming-Hsun; Ding, Dah-Ching; Chu, Sung-Chao; Chu, Tang-Yuan

    2015-04-01

    This report describes a case of serous ovarian carcinoma with occult serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma (STIC), which presented as atypical glandular cells favor neoplasia (AGC-FN) with Pap cytology and dermatomyositis. A 48-year-old woman presented with symptoms of dermatomyositis. An AGC-FN result from a Pap smear, with an absence of a cervical or endometrial lesion was noted. After cancer surveillance, ovarian high grade serous carcinoma associated with serous tubal intraepithelial carcinoma was diagnosed. Two weeks following surgical excision of the carcinoma, dramatic remission of the dermatomyositis symptoms was evident. The patient had serous carcinoma of the ovary with tubal STIC, which presented as dermatomyositis. The AGC-FN identified from a Pap smear hinted at a diagnosis of ovarian carcinoma. These presentations point to an occult malignancy in the genital tract and demand careful diagnostic workup. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  12. Brain and spinal cord neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Anderson, R.E.; Bragg, D.G.; Youker, J.E.

    1985-01-01

    Traditional means of detecting CNS neoplasms include plain film studies, isotope brain scans, angiography, pneumoencephalography, and myelography. Computed tomography (CT) scanning has replaced nearly all of these studies in both the initial detection and follow-up of brain tumors. Air studies (pneumoencephalography and ventriculography) have been virtually eliminated, except in certain unusual circumstances when two positions need to be checked, or hydrocephalus followed. The nuclear brain scan has a very limited role at present, being useful primarily for detecting skull or meningeal metastases. Myelography, however, remains a valuable imaging tool for the assessment of tumors of the spinal canal. CT scanning has not only improved our ability to detect smaller brain tumors, but also CT guided stereotactic biopsy techniques provide a safer means of obtaining tissue from these smaller lesions, regardless of location. Surgical techniques, guided by CT sterotactic techniques, show promise as well, but the impact of these therapeutic techniques on survival statistics remains to be defined. CT has revolutionized the approach to the detection and diagnosis of space-occupying lesions in the brain. Tumors can be detected at a smaller site

  13. Molecular diagnostics of myeloproliferative neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langabeer, Stephen E; Andrikovics, Hajnalka; Asp, Julia; Bellosillo, Beatriz; Carillo, Serge; Haslam, Karl; Kjaer, Lasse; Lippert, Eric; Mansier, Olivier; Oppliger Leibundgut, Elisabeth; Percy, Melanie J; Porret, Naomi; Palmqvist, Lars; Schwarz, Jiri; McMullin, Mary F; Schnittger, Susanne; Pallisgaard, Niels; Hermouet, Sylvie

    2015-10-01

    Since the discovery of the JAK2 V617F mutation in the majority of the myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPN) of polycythemia vera, essential thrombocythemia and primary myelofibrosis ten years ago, further MPN-specific mutational events, notably in JAK2 exon 12, MPL exon 10 and CALR exon 9 have been identified. These discoveries have been rapidly incorporated into evolving molecular diagnostic algorithms. Whilst many of these mutations appear to have prognostic implications, establishing MPN diagnosis is of immediate clinical importance with selection, implementation and the continual evaluation of the appropriate laboratory methodology to achieve this diagnosis similarly vital. The advantages and limitations of these approaches in identifying and quantitating the common MPN-associated mutations are considered herein with particular regard to their clinical utility. The evolution of molecular diagnostic applications and platforms has occurred in parallel with the discovery of MPN-associated mutations, and it therefore appears likely that emerging technologies such as next-generation sequencing and digital PCR will in the future play an increasing role in the molecular diagnosis of MPN. © 2015 John Wiley & Sons A/S. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  14. Cytokeratins in epithelia of odontogenic neoplasms

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Crivelini, MM; de Araujo, VC; de Sousa, SOM; de Araujo, NS

    Neoplasms and tumours related to the odontogenic apparatus may be composed only of epithelial tissue or epithelial tissue associated with odontogenic ectomesenchyme. The immunohistochemical detection of different cytokeratins (CKs) polypeptides and vimentin has made it easier to explain the

  15. Resection is an effective treatment for recurrent follicular dendritic cell sarcoma from retroperitoneum: unusual presentation of a rare tumor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, Jie; Chen, Ling-Li; Ding, Bo-Wen; Jin, Da-Yong; Xu, Xue-Feng

    2015-01-01

    Retroperitoneum follicular dendritic cell sarcoma (FDCS) is an extremely rare neoplasm. The treatment of this disease is not clear. A 49-year-old Chinese female who had been found a 4.4×4 cm retroperitoneum mass by routine physical examination was received radical resection. Pathology revealed an inflammatory pseudotumor-like follicular dendritic cell tumor. After five years follow-up, a new nodule was noted on the tail of pancreas by routine CT evaluation. Re-resection was performed and pathological examination found a spindle-cell tumor with a great quantity of froth histiocytes. Immunohistochemical stains were positive for CD35 and CD21 which suggested it was a recurrent FDCS. Retroperitoneum FDCS is a very rare tumor. Surgical resection may be the first choice for this disease, even for recurrent tumor, if feasible. A relatively good prognosis often is achieved when compared with other malignancy.

  16. Lactobacillus in Preventing Infection in Patients Undergoing a Donor Stem Cell Transplant for Hematologic Cancer or Myelodysplastic Syndrome

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-02-02

    Breast Cancer; Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms; Neuroblastoma; Ovarian Cancer; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor

  17. Stem cell therapy for treatment of epilepsy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Parisa Goodarzi

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Epilepsy as one of the most common neurological disorders affects more than 50 million people worldwide with a higher prevalence rate in low-income countries. Excessive electrical discharges in neurons following neural cell damage or loss cause recurrent seizures. One of the most common and difficult to treat types of epilepsy is temporal lobe epilepsy (TLE which results from hippocampal sclerosis. Nowadays, similar to other diseases, epilepsy also is a candidate for treatment with different types of stem cells. Various stem cell types were used for treatment of epilepsy in basic and experimental researches. Two major roles of stem cell therapy in epilepsy are prophylaxis against chronic epilepsy and amelioration cognitive function after the occurrence of TLE. Several animal studies have supported the use of these cells for treating drug-resistant TLE. Although stem cell therapy seems like a promising approach for treatment of epilepsy in the future however, there are some serious safety and ethical concerns that are needed to be eliminated before clinical application.

  18. Prevalence, Diagnosis and Management of Pancreatic Cystic Neoplasms: Current Status and Future Directions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Farrell, James J.

    2015-01-01

    Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are found with increasing prevalence, especially in elderly asymptomatic individuals. Although the overall risk of malignancy is very low, the presence of these pancreatic cysts is associated with a large degree of anxiety and further medical investigation due to concerns about malignancy. This review discusses the different cystic neoplasms of the pancreas and reports diagnostic strategies based on clinical features and imaging data. Surgical and nonsurgical management of the most common cystic neoplasms, based on the recently revised Sendai guidelines, is also discussed, with special reference to intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN; particularly the branch duct variant), which is the lesion most frequently identified incidentally. IPMN pathology, its risk for development into pancreatic ductal adenocarcinoma, the pros and cons of current guidelines for management, and the potential role of endoscopic ultrasound in determining cancer risk are discussed. Finally, surgical treatment, strategies for surveillance of pancreatic cysts, and possible future directions are discussed. PMID:26343068

  19. Stereotactic Body Radiaton Therapy for 15 Patients with Small Lung Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rong YU

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Background and objective It has been known that stereotactic radiotherapy has been widely used in clinical practice. The aim of this study is to evaluate the feasibility to treat small lung neoplasms with hypofraction stereotactic radiotherapy. Methods From September 2005 to November 2009, 15 patients with non-small cell lung cancer and solitary metastatic lung cancer were treated with hypofration stereotactic radiotherapy. Dose volume histogram was used to evaluated treatment plans. Lesion diameter 1.5 cm-4.0 cm. Toxicity was evaluated with the NCI-CTCAE 3.0 version. A dose 48 Gy-50 Gy was given in 4-10 fractions. Results The short-term results showed that the complete response (CR rate, the partial response (PR rate, the overall response (CR+PR rate, the one-year local control rate, the one-year survival rate was 60%, 20%, 80%, 100% and 86.67% respectively. Two patients had radiation pneumonitis of 0 grade. Acute radiation pneumonitis of grade I occurred in 9 patients, 4 patients had radiation pneumonitis of grade II and no patient developed serious (grade III radiation pneumonitis. Conclusion The hypofraction stereotactic radiotherapy is safe for small lung neoplasms.

  20. Branchial osteogenetic neoplasm in barbel Barbus barbus plebejus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manera, M; Biavati, S

    1999-09-14

    A branchial osteogenetic neoplasm affecting a barbel Barbus barbus plebejus (Valenciennes, 1829) is described. The osteoblasts' pleomorphism, the lack of a well-developed and complete separation, the presence of eccentric, terminal proliferative edges infiltrating the lining tissues and the abundant tumour matrix suggest a histopathological diagnosis of a 'productive osteoblastic osteosarcoma'. The occurrence of eosinophilic granule cells (EGCs) scattered among neoplastic tissue is discussed in relation to the neoplastic growth and the inflammatory reaction, with reference to recent discoveries in mammalian mast cell biology.

  1. Hypothetical atopic dermatitis-myeloproliferative neoplasm (AD-MPN syndrome

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshiaki eKawakami

    2015-08-01

    Full Text Available Atopic dermatitis (AD is a chronic inflammatory skin disease. Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs are hematopoietic malignancies caused by uncontrolled proliferation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells. Recent studies have described several mutant mice exhibiting both AD-like skin inflammation and MPN. Common pathways for skin inflammation encompass overexpression of thymic stromal lymphopoietin and reduced signaling of epidermal growth factor receptor in the epidermis, while overproduction of granulocyte-colony stimulating factor by keratinocytes and constitutive activation of Stat5 in hematopoietic stem cells are important for the development of MPN. The murine studies suggest the existence of a similar human disease tentatively termed the AD-MPN syndrome.

  2. Treatment of localised renal cell carcinoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Poppel, Hein; Becker, Frank; Cadeddu, Jeffrey A.; Gill, Inderbir S.; Janetschek, Gunther; Jewett, Michael A. S.; Laguna, M. Pilar; Marberger, Michael; Montorsi, Francesco; Polascik, Thomas J.; Ukimura, Osamu; Zhu, Gang

    2011-01-01

    The increasing incidence of localised renal cell carcinoma (RCC) over the last 3 decades and controversy over mortality rates have prompted reassessment of current treatment. To critically review the recent data on the management of localised RCC to arrive at a general consensus. A Medline search

  3. Giant cell arteritis: diagnosis and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calvo Romero, J M

    2015-01-01

    Giant cell arteritis is the most common primary systemic vasculitis in adults. The condition is granulomatous arteritis of large and medium vessels, which occurs almost exclusively in patients aged 50 years or more. This article reviews the diagnosis and treatment of the disease. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier España, S.L.U.

  4. Treatment Options for Renal Cell Cancer

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... being treated. See Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer for more information. Biologic therapy Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses ... called biotherapy or immunotherapy. The following types of biologic therapy are being used or ... Nivolumab : Nivolumab is a monoclonal antibody that boosts ...

  5. Treatment Option Overview (Renal Cell Cancer)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... being treated. See Drugs Approved for Kidney (Renal Cell) Cancer for more information. Biologic therapy Biologic therapy is a treatment that uses ... called biotherapy or immunotherapy. The following types of biologic therapy are being used or ... Nivolumab : Nivolumab is a monoclonal antibody that boosts ...

  6. MALIGNANT NEOPLASMS IN CHILDREN: CLINICAL MANIFESTATIONS AND DIAGNOSIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maxim Yu. Rykov

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Treatment efficacy for children with cancer depends on the diagnosis timeliness since the earlier expert care has been started, the higher likelihood there is to achieve remission. In this regard, a special role belongs to primary care physicians — district pediatricians who should timely recognize the malignant neoplasm and refer the patient to a pediatric oncologist for advice. Wherein, a limited number of primary patients and atypical course of oncological diseases are the causes of a decrease in oncological alertness. This lecture is aimed at a wide range of specialists (pediatricians, radiologists, pathologists and devoted to clinical manifestations and diagnosis of malignant neoplasms in children — hemoblastosis and solid tumours. The suggested algorithms for the examination of patients will allow to make a diagnosis faster and timely initiate expert care in specialized departments. The article is illustrated with unique pictures — images of histological specimens, MRI, and CT of patients with the most neglected cases of malignant neoplasms being the result of diagnostic errors of pediatricians. 

  7. HISTOPATHOLOGIC CHARACTERISTICS OF THYROID GLAND NEOPLASMS IN THOMSON'S GAZELLES ( EUDORCUS THOMSONII).

    Science.gov (United States)

    French, Stephanie J; Garner, Michael M; Kiupel, Matti

    2018-03-01

    Published reports of neoplasms in Thomson's gazelles ( Eudorcas thomsonii) are very rare, but thyroid tumors were the most common neoplasm of this species, accounting for 12% of reported pathologies in a 1998-2012 retrospective study of cases submitted for histologic review of grossly enlarged thyroid glands. This report describes the histological and immunohistochemical characteristics of thyroid neoplasms in 10 Thomson's gazelles from five different zoological collections. Neoplasms were submitted as biopsies from six gazelles or collected during necropsy from four gazelles. The most common clinical findings included a palpable mass on the ventral neck and progressive weight loss. Radiographic mineral density was detected in one of the neoplastic masses. Histologically, the neoplasms were classified as microfollicular thyroid adenoma ( n = 2), solid thyroid adenoma ( n = 2), papillary thyroid adenoma ( n = 1), and solid thyroid carcinoma ( n = 5). Neoplastic cells in all 10 neoplasms were positive for thyroid transcription factor 1 and thyroglobulin, but negative for calcitonin. While five cases had histologic features of malignancy, there was no evidence of metastatic disease either clinically (biopsies) or on necropsy. Numerous concurrent diseases, including cardiomyopathies and nephropathies, were present and led to choice for euthanasia in several cases.

  8. Classifying the evolutionary and ecological features of neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    Maley, Carlo C.; Aktipis, Athena; Graham, Trevor A.; Sottoriva, Andrea; Boddy, Amy M.; Janiszewska, Michalina; Silva, Ariosto S.; Gerlinger, Marco; Yuan, Yinyin; Pienta, Kenneth J.; Anderson, Karen S.; Gatenby, Robert; Swanton, Charles; Posada, David; Wu, Chung-I; Schiffman, Joshua D.; Hwang, E. Shelley; Polyak, Kornelia; Anderson, Alexander R. A.; Brown, Joel S.; Greaves, Mel; Shibata, Darryl

    2018-01-01

    Neoplasms change over time through a process of cell-level evolution, driven by genetic and epigenetic alterations. However, the ecology of the microenvironment of a neoplastic cell determines which changes provide adaptive benefits. There is widespread recognition of the importance of these evolutionary and ecological processes in cancer, but to date, no system has been proposed for drawing clinically relevant distinctions between how different tumours are evolving. On the basis of a consensus conference of experts in the fields of cancer evolution and cancer ecology, we propose a framework for classifying tumours that is based on four relevant components. These are the diversity of neoplastic cells (intratumoural heterogeneity) and changes over time in that diversity, which make up an evolutionary index (Evo-index), as well as the hazards to neoplastic cell survival and the resources available to neoplastic cells, which make up an ecological index (Eco-index). We review evidence demonstrating the importance of each of these factors and describe multiple methods that can be used to measure them. Development of this classification system holds promise for enabling clinicians to personalize optimal interventions based on the evolvability of the patient’s tumour. The Evo- and Eco-indices provide a common lexicon for communicating about how neoplasms change in response to interventions, with potential implications for clinical trials, personalized medicine and basic cancer research. PMID:28912577

  9. Neuroendocrine small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reig Castillejo, Anna; Membrive Conejo, Ismael; Foro Arnalot, Palmira; Rodríguez de Dios, Nuria; Algara López, Manuel

    2010-07-01

    Neuroendocrine small cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix (SCC) is a rare disease that mixes clinical and biological characteristics of both cervical neoplasms and neuroendocrine small cell cancer. The prognosis is poor and the optimal treatment has not yet been clarified. Multimodality treatment, with surgery and concurrent chemoradiation has recently been shown to improve local control and survival rates.

  10. Diagnosis and treatment of Basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Firnhaber, Jonathon M

    2012-07-15

    Family physicians are regularly faced with identifying, treating, and counseling patients with skin cancers. Nonmelanoma skin cancer, which encompasses basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma, is the most common cancer in the United States. Ultraviolet B exposure is a significant factor in the development of basal cell and squamous cell carcinoma. The use of tanning beds is associated with a 1.5-fold increase in the risk of basal cell carcinoma and a 2.5-fold increase in the risk of squamous cell carcinoma. Routine screening for skin cancer is controversial. The U.S. Preventive Services Task Force cites insufficient evidence to recommend for or against routine whole-body skin examination to screen for skin cancer. Basal cell carcinoma most commonly appears as a pearly white, dome-shaped papule with prominent telangiectatic surface vessels. Squamous cell carcinoma most commonly appears as a firm, smooth, or hyperkeratotic papule or plaque, often with central ulceration. Initial tissue sampling for diagnosis involves a shave technique if the lesion is raised, or a 2- to 4-mm punch biopsy of the most abnormal-appearing area of skin. Mohs micrographic surgery has the lowest recurrence rate among treatments, but is best considered for large, high-risk tumors. Smaller, lower-risk tumors may be treated with surgical excision, electrodesiccation and curettage, or cryotherapy. Topical imiquimod and fluorouracil are also potential, but less supported, treatments. Although there are no clear guidelines for follow-up after an index nonmelanoma skin cancer, monitoring for recurrence is prudent because the risk of subsequent skin cancer is 35 percent at three years and 50 percent at five years.

  11. Value of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) and dual focus narrow-band imaging (dNBI) in diagnosing early squamous cell neoplasms in esophageal Lugol's voiding lesions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueksapanich, Piyapan; Pittayanon, Rapat; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Wisedopas, Naruemon; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2015-08-01

    Lugol's chromoendoscopy provides excellent sensitivity for the detection of early esophageal squamous cell neoplasms (ESCN), but its specificity is suboptimal. An endoscopy technique for real-time histology is required to decrease the number of unnecessary biopsies. This study aimed to compare the ESCN diagnostic capability of probed-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) and dual focus narrow-band imaging (dNBI) in Lugol's voiding lesions. Patients with a history of head and neck cancer without dysphagia were recruited. Lugol's voiding lesions larger than 5 mm were sequentially characterized by dNBI and pCLE by two independent operators. Finally, all lesions larger than 5 mm were biopsied followed by histological analysis, which is considered to be the gold standard in cancer diagnosis. The primary outcomes were the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and the accuracy of the two techniques. In total, 44 patients were enrolled with a mean age of 60 years; 80 % were male. Twenty-one Lugol's voiding lesions larger than 5 mm were detected in 12 patients. Seven lesions (33 %) from four patients were histologically diagnosed as ESCNs (four with high grade dysplasia and three with low grade dysplasia). The other 14 lesions were histologically confirmed as non-neoplastic: active esophagitis, glycogenation with inflammation, acute ulcer, inlet patch, and unremarkable changes. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of pCLE vs. dNBI were 83 % vs. 85 %, 92 % vs. 62 %, 83 % vs. 54 %, 92 % vs. 89 %, and 89 % vs. 70 %, respectively (NS). Asymptomatic patients with a history of head and neck cancer underwent Lugol's chromoendoscopy based ESCN surveillance. Further characterization of the Lugol's voiding lesions by advanced imaging showed that both pCLE and dNBI provided good sensitivity in diagnosing ESCN, and pCLE tended to provide higher specificity, PPV, and accuracy than d

  12. Value of probe-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) and dual focus narrow-band imaging (dNBI) in diagnosing early squamous cell neoplasms in esophageal Lugol’s voiding lesions

    Science.gov (United States)

    Prueksapanich, Piyapan; Pittayanon, Rapat; Rerknimitr, Rungsun; Wisedopas, Naruemon; Kullavanijaya, Pinit

    2015-01-01

    Background and study aims: Lugol’s chromoendoscopy provides excellent sensitivity for the detection of early esophageal squamous cell neoplasms (ESCN), but its specificity is suboptimal. An endoscopy technique for real-time histology is required to decrease the number of unnecessary biopsies. This study aimed to compare the ESCN diagnostic capability of probed-based confocal laser endomicroscopy (pCLE) and dual focus narrow-band imaging (dNBI) in Lugol’s voiding lesions. Patients and methods: Patients with a history of head and neck cancer without dysphagia were recruited. Lugol’s voiding lesions larger than 5 mm were sequentially characterized by dNBI and pCLE by two independent operators. Finally, all lesions larger than 5 mm were biopsied followed by histological analysis, which is considered to be the gold standard in cancer diagnosis. The primary outcomes were the sensitivity, specificity, positive predictive value (PPV), negative predictive value (NPV), and the accuracy of the two techniques. Results: In total, 44 patients were enrolled with a mean age of 60 years; 80 % were male. Twenty-one Lugol’s voiding lesions larger than 5 mm were detected in 12 patients. Seven lesions (33 %) from four patients were histologically diagnosed as ESCNs (four with high grade dysplasia and three with low grade dysplasia). The other 14 lesions were histologically confirmed as non-neoplastic: active esophagitis, glycogenation with inflammation, acute ulcer, inlet patch, and unremarkable changes. The sensitivity, specificity, PPV, NPV, and accuracy of pCLE vs. dNBI were 83 % vs. 85 %, 92 % vs. 62 %, 83 % vs. 54 %, 92 % vs. 89 %, and 89 % vs. 70 %, respectively (NS). Conclusions: Asymptomatic patients with a history of head and neck cancer underwent Lugol’s chromoendoscopy based ESCN surveillance. Further characterization of the Lugol’s voiding lesions by advanced imaging showed that both pCLE and dNBI provided good sensitivity in

  13. Orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alsuhaibani, Adel H; Hitchon, Patrick W; Smoker, Wendy R K; Lee, Andrew G; Nerad, Jeffrey A

    2011-01-01

    The purpose of this case report is to report an orbital roof encephalocele mimicking a destructive orbital neoplasm. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon but can mimic neoplasm. One potential mechanism for the orbital roof destruction is a post-traumatic "growing orbital roof fracture." The growing fracture has been reported mostly in children but can occur in adults. Alternative potential etiologies for the encephalocele are discussed, including Gorham syndrome. Orbital roof encephalocele is uncommon in adults, and the findings can superficially resemble an orbital neoplasm. Radiographic and clinical features that might suggest the correct diagnosis include a prior history of trauma, overlying frontal lobe encephalomalacia without significant mass effect or edema, and an orbital roof defect. The "growing fracture" mechanism may be a potential explanation for the orbital roof destruction in some cases.

  14. The mantle cells lymphoma: a proposed treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chavez Martinez, Marlene Elizabeth

    2012-01-01

    A literature review was performed on mantle cells lymphoma in the therapeutic schemes. The literature that has been used is published in journals of medicine specializing in hematology, oncology, radiation therapy, molecular biology and internal medicine. The literature review was performed to propose a scheme of treatment according to Costa Rica. Epigenetic alterations have been revealed in patients with mantle lymphoma on current researches. The mantle lymphoma pathology has been described in various forms of clinical and histological presentation, stressing the importance of detailing the different methods and diagnostic reports. Working groups have proposed and developed various chemotherapy regimens and concluded that CHOP alone is without effect in mantle cell lymphoma unlike R-hyper-CVAD, CHOP / DHAP, high-dose Ara-C. Researchers have tried to develop new treatments based vaccines, use of modified viruses, specific monoclonal antibodies. The classic treatment has been triple intrathecal therapy. The central nervous system has been one of the most momentous sites of mantle cell lymphoma infiltration because poorer patient prognosis [es

  15. Challenges in Consolidated Reporting of Hematopoietic Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ohgami, Robert S; Arber, Daniel A

    2013-12-01

    This article focuses on the challenges of generating comprehensive diagnostic reports in hematopathology. In particular, two main challenges that diagnosticians face are (1) interpreting and understanding the rapid advances in molecular and genetic pathology, which have gained increasing importance in classifications of hematopoietic neoplasms, and (2) managing the logistics of reporting ancillary studies and incorporating them effectively into a final synthesized report. This article summarizes many important genetic findings in hematopoietic neoplasms, which are required for accurate diagnoses, and discusses practical issues to generating accurate and complete hematopathology reports. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  16. Malignant Ewing-Like Neoplasm With an EWSR1-KLF15 Fusion: At the Crossroads of a Myoepithelial Carcinoma and a Ewing-Like Sarcoma. A Case Report With Treatment Options.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stevens, Todd M; Qarmali, Morad; Morlote, Diana; Mikhail, Fady M; Swensen, Jeffrey; Gatalica, Zoran; Siegal, Gene P; Conry, Robert M

    2018-01-01

    We present a case of a malignant Ewing-like neoplasm of the parotid gland in a 20-year-old woman with an EWSR1-KLF15 gene fusion that presented with pulmonary metastasis. Despite the fact that the tumor was essentially immunohistochemically negative for keratins, p63, and p40, we interpret this neoplasm as an unusual form of a high-grade myoepithelial carcinoma based on its focal plasmacytoid cytology, chondromyxoid matrix, SOX10, S100 protein, and calponin expression, and the knowledge that the EWSR1-KLF15 gene fusion has, to date, only been identified in 2 tumors, both myoepithelial carcinomas of the kidney. We also present a cytogenetic analysis of this unusual tumor. This "Ewing-like myoepithelial carcinoma" initially did not respond to 2 cycles of ifosfamide and etoposide alternated with a cycle of cytoxan, adriamycin, and vincristine, a standard regimen for Ewing sarcoma. Subsequent oral pazopanib therapy did result in a reduction of the patient's pulmonary and nodal disease.

  17. Classification tree analysis of second neoplasms in survivors of childhood cancer

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jazbec, Janez; Todorovski, Ljupčo; Jereb, Berta

    2007-01-01

    Reports on childhood cancer survivors estimated cumulative probability of developing secondary neoplasms vary from 3,3% to 25% at 25 years from diagnosis, and the risk of developing another cancer to several times greater than in the general population. In our retrospective study, we have used the classification tree multivariate method on a group of 849 first cancer survivors, to identify childhood cancer patients with the greatest risk for development of secondary neoplasms. In observed group of patients, 34 develop secondary neoplasm after treatment of primary cancer. Analysis of parameters present at the treatment of first cancer, exposed two groups of patients at the special risk for secondary neoplasm. First are female patients treated for Hodgkin's disease at the age between 10 and 15 years, whose treatment included radiotherapy. Second group at special risk were male patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia who were treated at the age between 4,6 and 6,6 years of age. The risk groups identified in our study are similar to the results of studies that used more conventional approaches. Usefulness of our approach in study of occurrence of second neoplasms should be confirmed in larger sample study, but user friendly presentation of results makes it attractive for further studies

  18. Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasm, Unclassifiable

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia include fever, weight loss, and feeling very tired. Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia ...

  19. TREATMENT OF PRIMARY PLASMA CELL LEUKAEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Peter Černelč

    2003-04-01

    Full Text Available Background. The author describes long-term survival in 3 patients with primary plasma cell leukaemia (PL after different therapeutic regimen and maintenance treatment with interferon alpha (INF.Patients and treatment. In a 52-year-old male patient, a partial remission of PL was achieved after 6 months of treatment with melphalan and prednisone. The patient did not consent to stem cell transplantation (SCT. An 86-year-old female patient with PL achieved a complete remission after 6 months of treatment with vincristine, doxorubicin and dexamethasone. A 31-year-old male patient experienced a complete remission of PL after 6 months of treatment with cyclophosphamide, vincristine, doxorubicin, methilprednisone, followed by autologous SCT. All three patients were placed on maintenance therapy with INF-2b (Intron A 3 × 106 IU given subcutaneously on two days per week. In the 52-year-old man, the remission lasted 9 months and in the woman 23 months, whereupon they developed a relapse with signs of disseminated plasmacytoma. In both patients the former chemotherapy was applied again, resulting in a slight improvement. The man died 37 months and the woman 43 months after the diagnosis of PL, while the youngest patient has been in complete remission for 82 months.Conclusions. Long remission achieved in our patients confirmed the favourable effect of INF in terms of prolongation of the remission duration in this patients. The effect of maintenance treatment with INF is usually directly dependent on the degree of remission induced by different therapeutic regimen.

  20. SOLID PSEUDOPAPILLARY NEOPLASM OF THE PANCREAS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carlotto, Jorge Roberto Marcante; Torrez, Franz Robert Apodaca; Gonzalez, Adriano Miziara; Linhares, Marcelo Moura; Triviño, Tarcisio; Herani-Filho, Benedito; Goldenberg, Alberto; Lopes-Filho, Gaspar de Jesus; Lobo, Edson José

    2016-01-01

    The solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare tumor of the pancreas. However, it´s etiology still maintain discussions. To analyze it´s clinical data, diagnosis and treatment. A retrospective study of medical records of all patients treated from January 1997 until July 2015. Were identified 17 cases. Most patients were women (94.11%) and the average age was 32.88 years. The main complaint was abdominal mass (47.05%). The most frequent location was in the body/tail of the pancreas (72.22%) and the most frequently performed surgery was distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy (64.70%). No patient had metastases at diagnosis. Conservative surgery for pancreatic parenchyma was performed in only three cases. The rate of complications in the postoperative period was 35.29% and the main complication was pancreatic fistula (29.41%). No patient underwent adjuvant treatment. The treatment is surgical and the most common clinical presentation is abdominal mass. Distal pancreatectomy with splenectomy was the most frequently performed surgery for its treatment. A neoplasia sólida pseudopapilar é tumor raro de pâncreas de tratamento cirúrgico. No entanto, sua causa ainda gera discussões. Analisar os dados clínicos, do diagnóstico e do tratamento da dessa neoplasia. Estudo retrospectivo com dados médicos de pacientes tratados entre janeiro de 1997 a julho de 2015. Foram identificados 17 casos. A maioria era de mulheres (94,11%) e a média de idade foi de 32,88 anos. A principal queixa era massa abdominal (47,05%). A localização mais frequente era no corpo/cauda do pâncreas (72,22%) e a operação mais realizada foi a pancreatectomia corpocaudal com esplenectomia (64,70%). Nenhum caso apresentou metástase no momento do diagnóstico. Operação conservadora de parênquima pancreático foi realizada em apenas três casos. A taxa de complicações no pós-operatório foi de 35,29% e a principal complicação foi fístula pancreática (29,41%). Nenhum paciente realizou

  1. Endoscopic diagnosis of leiomyosarcoma of the esophagus, a rare neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ravini, M; Torre, M; Zanasi, G; Vanini, M; Camozzi, M

    1998-01-01

    We report a case of leiomyosarcoma of the distal third of the esophagus in a 51-year-old woman presenting with a six-month history of severe epigastric pain, disphagia and weight loss. The diagnosis, suspected on endoscopic examination, was preoperatively acheived by biopsy and immunohistological stain. Surgical treatment was undertaken with good results. Differentiation between leiomyosarcoma and more common esophageal neoplasm may be difficult if based on radiographic and endoscopic appearance. Preoperative histological confirmation is therefore mandatory to schedule a wide surgical excision.

  2. Dermal Squamomelanocytic Tumor: Neoplasm of Uncertain Biological Potential

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mirsad Dorić

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available We report a case of exceedingly rare cutaneous neoplasm with histological features of malignancy and uncertain biological potential. The nodular, darkly pigmented facial tumor with central exulceration, size 12x10x7 mm, of the skin 61-year-old man preauricular left was completely exised.Histologically tumor consists of atypical squamous cells, which express signs of moderate to significant pleomorphism, mitotically active, with foci forming of parakeratotic horn cysts (“pearls”. Characteristically tumor also consists of large number of atypical melanocytes with multifocal pattern, inserted between atypical squamous cells, and which contain large amount of dark brown pigment melanin. Immunohistochemically, squamous cells stain positively with keratin (CK116, melanocytes were stained with S -100 protein, HMB 45, and vimentin, but failed to stain with CK 116.To our knowledge this is the sixth reported case in world literature. The follow-up time of four years no evidence of recurrence or metastasis, similar all reported cases, but it is too short period in estimation to guarantee a benign course. However, it appears that this group of neoplasm may have different prognosis from pure squamous carcinoma or malignant melanoma.

  3. Simultaneous Occurrence of Different Follicular Neoplasms within the Same Thyroid Gland

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Şefika Burçak Polat

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Neoplasms of the thyroid gland are classified according to the cells they originate from and commonly develop from cells of follicular origin. The most common differentiated thyroid cancers (DTC are papillary and follicular carcinomas. Coexistence of two different histological types of primary follicular thyroid neoplasm is a rare condition. There are previous reports of concomitant medullary and papillary thyroid cancers. However, there is scarce data about the simultaneous occurrence of the two different histological types of primary follicular thyroid tumors and this is the first study on that subject. Material and Method: From January 2007 to September 2014, our institutional database was reviewed for patients who underwent thyroid surgery for various indications. Medical records and cytopathology reports of those patients were examined retrospectively. Simultaneous neoplasms of follicular origin were noted. Results: A total of 3.700 patients were operated. Histopathological examination revealed a benign pattern in 2.686 (73% patients and a malignant pattern in 1.014 (27% patients. Among the patients with the diagnosis of DTC, only 20 (1.9% had a concomitant neoplasm within the same thyroid gland. Discussion: Such simultaneous tumors may be a part of a familial tumor syndrome or an unidentified novel gene mutation playing role in the pathogenesis of more than one type of tumor. Based on the current evidence, the synchronous occurrence of those neoplasms in a given patient is likely coincidental in the literature. Further studies on larger patient population with standardized genetic characterization are needed.

  4. Solid and papillary neoplasm of the pancreas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jørgensen, L J; Hansen, A B; Burcharth, F

    1992-01-01

    In two cases of solid and papillary neoplasm of the pancreas (SPN), positive staining for argyrophil granules, chromogranin-A, neuron-specific enolase, chymotrypsin, alpha 1-antitrypsin, vimentin, cytokeratin, and estrogen receptors was present. Ultrastructurally, neurosecretory as well as zymoge...

  5. Solid Pseudopapillary Neoplasm of the Pancreas | Waithaka ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Solid pseudopapillary neoplasm is a rare pancreatic tumour predominantly affecting young women. We present two cases in young female patients. Both tumours were surgically removed as abdominal masses, one from the pancreatic tail and the other posterior to the stomach with an unclear organ of origin. On gross ...

  6. Factors associated with phyllodes tumor of the breast after core needle biopsy identifies fibroepithelial neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gould, Daniel J; Salmans, Jessica A; Lassinger, Brian K; Contreras, Alejandro; Gutierrez, Carolina; Bonefas, Elizabeth; Liscum, Kathleen R; Silberfein, Eric J

    2012-11-01

    Phyllodes tumors represent less than 1% of all breast neoplasms and can mimic fibroadenoma on core needle biopsy (CNB). The treatment of fibroepithelial (FE) neoplasms identified on CNB is controversial. We sought to identify factors that were associated with phyllodes tumors after CNB suggested FE neoplasm. A retrospective database was queried for all patients diagnosed with FE neoplasm on CNB at Ben Taub General Hospital over a 10-y period. One hundred twenty-three patients were identified and demographic, clinical, and outcome data were analyzed. Of the 123 patients, 46 (37%) were found to have fibroadenomatous features and 59 (48%) were found to have FE features. All went on to have surgical excision. Forty (38%) contained phyllodes tumors, and 65 (62%) found no phyllodes tumor on final pathology. There were significant differences in the median size of the masses (4 cm versus 2.4 cm P phyllodes tumors and the group that did not on preoperative imaging. Further evaluation did not show any significant differences on preoperative imaging between benign and borderline/malignant phyllodes tumors. Hispanic ethnicity correlated with a higher chance of phyllodes tumor after CNB (P phyllodes tumor, surgical excision remains the standard of care; however, patients with suspicious FE neoplasms represent a treatment dilemma as many will prove to be benign. Preoperative size and the density of the mass on imaging and ethnicity were associated with phyllodes tumors on final pathology. Copyright © 2012 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  7. Radiologic features of cystic, endocrine and other pancreatic neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Balci, N. Cem; Semelka, Richard C.

    2001-01-01

    This article presents imaging features of cystic, endocrine and other pancreatic neoplasms. Microcystic adenoma which is composed of small cysts ( 2 cm) are accounted for mucinous cystic neoplasms, its variant along pancreatic duct is ductectatic mucinous cystic neoplasm. Endocrine tumors of pancreas are hypervascular and can be depicted on early dynamic enhanced crosssectional imaging modalities or on angiography when they are <1 cm. Pancreatic metastases and lymphomas are rare neoplasms which should also be included in differential diagnosis for pancreatic masses

  8. Treatment of osteoarthritis with mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wen; Cao, Wei

    2014-06-01

    Osteoarthritis (OA) is one of the most prevalent joint diseases with prominent symptoms affecting the daily life of millions of middle aged and elderly people. Despite this, there are no successful medical interventions that can prevent the progressive destruction of OA joints. The onset of pathological changes in OA is associated with deviant activity of mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), the multipotent precursors of connective tissue cells that reside in joints. Current therapies for OA have resulted in poor clinical outcomes without repairing the damaged cartilage. Intra-articular delivery of culture-expanded MSCs has opened new avenues of OA treatment. Pre-clinical and clinical trials demonstrated the feasibility, safety, and efficacy of MSC therapy. The Wnt/β-catenin, bone morphogenetic protein 2, Indian hedgehog, and Mitogen-activated protein kinase signaling pathways have been demonstrated to be involved in OA and the mechanism of action of MSC therapies.

  9. Nonsurgical Treatment Options for Basal Cell Carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mary H. Lien

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma (BCC remains the most common form of nonmelanoma skin cancer (NMSC in Caucasians, with perhaps as many as 2 million new cases expected to occur in the United States in 2010. Many treatment options, including surgical interventions and nonsurgical alternatives, have been utilized to treat BCC. In this paper, two non-surgical options, imiquimod therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT, will be discussed. Both modalities have demonstrated acceptable disease control rates, cosmetically superior outcomes, and short-term cost-effectiveness. Further studies evaluating long-term cure rates and long-term cost effectiveness of imiquimod therapy and PDT are needed.

  10. Nonsurgical Treatment Options for Basal Cell Carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lien, M. H.; Sondak, V. K.; Sondak, V. K.

    2011-01-01

    Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) remains the most common form of non melanoma skin cancer (NMSC) in Caucasians, with perhaps as many as 2 million new cases expected to occur in the United States in 2010. Many treatment options, including surgical interventions and nonsurgical alternatives, have been utilized to treat BCC. In this paper, two non-surgical options, imiquimod therapy and photodynamic therapy (PDT), will be discussed. Both modalities have demonstrated acceptable disease control rates, cosmetically superior outcomes, and short-term cost-effectiveness. Further studies evaluating long-term cure rates and long-term cost effectiveness of imiquimod therapy and PDT are needed.

  11. Somatic CALR mutations in myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nangalia, J.; Massie, C.E.; Baxter, E.J.; Nice, F.L.; Gundem, G.; Wedge, D.C.; Avezov, E.; Li, J.; Kollmann, K.; Kent, D.G.; Aziz, A.; Godfrey, A.L.; Hinton, J.; Martincorena, I.; Loo, P. Van; Jones, A.V.; Guglielmelli, P.; Tarpey, P.; Harding, H.P.; Fitzpatrick, J.D.; Goudie, C.T.; Ortmann, C.A.; Loughran, S.J.; Raine, K.; Jones, D.R.; Butler, A.P.; Teague, J.W.; O'Meara, S.; McLaren, S.; Bianchi, M.; Silber, Y.; Dimitropoulou, D.; Bloxham, D.; Mudie, L.; Maddison, M.; Robinson, B.; Keohane, C.; Maclean, C.; Hill, K.; Orchard, K.; Tauro, S.; Du, M.Q.; Greaves, M.; Bowen, D.; Huntly, B.J.; Harrison, C.N.; Cross, N.C.; Ron, D.; Vannucchi, A.M.; Papaemmanuil, E.; Campbell, P.J.; Green, A.R.

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Somatic mutations in the Janus kinase 2 gene (JAK2) occur in many myeloproliferative neoplasms, but the molecular pathogenesis of myeloproliferative neoplasms with nonmutated JAK2 is obscure, and the diagnosis of these neoplasms remains a challenge. METHODS: We performed exome sequencing

  12. Active Surveillance for Renal Neoplasms with Oncocytic Features is Safe.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Richard, Patrick O; Jewett, Michael A S; Bhatt, Jaimin R; Evans, Andrew J; Timilsina, Narhari; Finelli, Antonio

    2016-03-01

    Oncocytomas are benign tumors often diagnosed incidentally on imaging. Small case series have suggested that the growth kinetics of oncocytomas are similar to those of malignant renal tumors. Biopsy material may be insufficient to exclude a diagnosis of chromophobe renal cell carcinoma. We evaluated and compared the growth rates of oncocytoma and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma to improve our understanding of their natural history. This was a single center, retrospective study of patients diagnosed with lesions suggestive of oncocytoma or chromophobe renal cell carcinoma between 2003 and 2014. The growth rates were estimated using a mixed effect linear model. Patient and lesion characteristics were tested using a similar model for association with growth rate. Of the 95 lesions (oncocytoma 81, chromophobe renal cell carcinoma 14) included in the analysis 98% were diagnosed on biopsy. The annual growth rate was 0.14 cm and 0.38 cm for oncocytoma (median followup 34 months) and chromophobe renal cell carcinoma (median followup 25 months), respectively (p=0.5). Baseline lesion size was significantly associated with growth (p renal cell carcinomas (67%) followed up to the 3-year mark had grown. Of these, 8 underwent surgery (6 in the chromophobe renal cell carcinoma group). The initial diagnosis was confirmed in all. Overall 5 patients died, all of nonrenal related causes. Although the majority of oncocytic renal neoplasms will grow with time, surveillance appears to remain safe. Patients opting for this strategy should be made aware that a diagnosis of oncocytoma following biopsy is associated with some degree of uncertainty due to the difficulty of differentiating them from other oncocytic renal neoplasms. Copyright © 2016 American Urological Association Education and Research, Inc. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  13. 78 FR 44575 - Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration Program

    Science.gov (United States)

    2013-07-24

    ... Extension: Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration Program (U1E) Awards to Three Currently Funded... the Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration Program. Three of these awards will end on August 31.... Justification: The Sickle Cell Disease Treatment Demonstration Program provides grants to evaluate the use of...

  14. Altered glutamyl-aminopeptidase activity and expression in renal neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blanco, Lorena; Larrinaga, Gorka; Sanz, Begoña; Perez, Itxaro; Sánchez, Clara E; Cándenas, M Luz; Pinto, Francisco M; Gil, Javier; Casis, Luis; López, José I

    2014-01-01

    Advances in the knowledge of renal neoplasms have demonstrated the implication of several proteases in their genesis, growth and dissemination. Glutamyl-aminopeptidase (GAP) (EC. 3.4.11.7) is a zinc metallopeptidase with angiotensinase activity highly expressed in kidney tissues and its expression and activity have been associated wtih tumour development. In this prospective study, GAP spectrofluorometric activity and immunohistochemical expression were analysed in clear-cell (CCRCC), papillary (PRCC) and chromophobe (ChRCC) renal cell carcinomas, and in renal oncocytoma (RO). Data obtained in tumour tissue were compared with those from the surrounding uninvolved kidney tissue. In CCRCC, classic pathological parameters such as grade, stage and tumour size were stratified following GAP data and analyzed for 5-year survival. GAP activity in both the membrane-bound and soluble fractions was sharply decreased and its immunohistochemical expression showed mild staining in the four histological types of renal tumours. Soluble and membrane-bound GAP activities correlated with tumour grade and size in CCRCCs. This study suggests a role for GAP in the neoplastic development of renal tumours and provides additional data for considering the activity and expression of this enzyme of interest in the diagnosis and prognosis of renal neoplasms

  15. Localization of gonadotropin binding sites in human ovarian neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, R.; Kitayama, S.; Yamoto, M.; Shima, K.; Ooshima, A.

    1989-01-01

    The binding of human luteinizing hormone and human follicle-stimulating hormone to ovarian tumor biopsy specimens from 29 patients was analyzed. The binding sites for human luteinizing hormone were demonstrated in one tumor of epithelial origin (mucinous cystadenoma) and in one of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor). The binding sites for human follicle-stimulating hormone were found in three tumors of epithelial origin (serous cystadenoma and mucinous cystadenoma) and in two of sex cord-stromal origin (theca cell tumor and theca-granulosa cell tumor). The surface-binding autoradiographic study revealed that the binding sites for gonadotropins were localized in the stromal tissue. The results suggest that gonadotropic hormones may play a role in the growth and differentiation of a certain type of human ovarian neoplasms

  16. Development of a mouse model for testing therapeutic agents: the anticancer effect of dienogest on endometrial neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saito, Fumitaka; Tashiro, Hironori; Yamaguchi, Munekage; Honda, Ritsuo; Ohba, Takashi; Suzuki, Akira; Katabuchi, Hidetaka

    2016-01-01

    As the number of younger women with endometrial carcinoma has increased, fertility-sparing treatments have received more attention. Although there have been several reports on conservative treatments with progestins for endometrial carcinoma, only medroxyprogesterone acetate (MPA) is available in Japan. Dienogest has been developed as a fourth-generation progestin for treating endometriosis. Because of its high progesterone activity, its antitumor activity has attracted attention. In this study, we investigated the anticancer effect of dienogest on endometrial neoplasms using mouse model of endometrial carcinoma. Pten(loxP/loxP) mice were injected with MPA or dienogest subcutaneously to evaluate the anticancer effect against endometrial neoplasms that developed in the mice. One week after injections, histopathological analyzes were performed. Endometrial neoplasms were found in one of the eight (12.5%) mice from each group treated with either dienogest or MPA. In contrast, they were found in seven of eight (87.5%) mice not treated with progestins. Each progestin treatment showed anticancer activity against endometrial neoplasms that developed in the mice compared to those without treatment. Dienogest and MPA showed potent anticancer activity against endometrial neoplasms in our mouse model. The present study demonstrated that dienogest might be a useful therapeutic agent for human endometrial neoplasms.

  17. JAK2/IDH-mutant–driven myeloproliferative neoplasm is sensitive to combined targeted inhibition

    Science.gov (United States)

    McKenney, Anna Sophia; Somasundara, Amritha Varshini Hanasoge; Spitzer, Barbara; Intlekofer, Andrew M.; Ahn, Jihae; Shank, Kaitlyn; Rapaport, Franck T.; Patel, Minal A.; Papalexi, Efthymia; Shih, Alan H.; Chiu, April; Freinkman, Elizaveta; Akbay, Esra A.; Steadman, Mya; Nagaraja, Raj; Yen, Katharine; Teruya-Feldstein, Julie; Wong, Kwok-Kin; Rampal, Raajit; Thompson, Craig B.

    2018-01-01

    Patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) frequently progress to bone marrow failure or acute myeloid leukemia (AML), and mutations in epigenetic regulators such as the metabolic enzyme isocitrate dehydrogenase (IDH) are associated with poor outcomes. Here, we showed that combined expression of Jak2V617F and mutant IDH1R132H or Idh2R140Q induces MPN progression, alters stem/progenitor cell function, and impairs differentiation in mice. Jak2V617F Idh2R140Q–mutant MPNs were sensitive to small-molecule inhibition of IDH. Combined inhibition of JAK2 and IDH2 normalized the stem and progenitor cell compartments in the murine model and reduced disease burden to a greater extent than was seen with JAK inhibition alone. In addition, combined JAK2 and IDH2 inhibitor treatment also reversed aberrant gene expression in MPN stem cells and reversed the metabolite perturbations induced by concurrent JAK2 and IDH2 mutations. Combined JAK2 and IDH2 inhibitor therapy also showed cooperative efficacy in cells from MPN patients with both JAK2mut and IDH2mut mutations. Taken together, these data suggest that combined JAK and IDH inhibition may offer a therapeutic advantage in this high-risk MPN subtype. PMID:29355841

  18. A case series of clinically undiagnosed hematopoietic neoplasms discovered at autopsy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podduturi, Varsha; Guileyardo, Joseph M; Soto, Luis R; Krause, John R

    2015-06-01

    In the United States, autopsy rates have diminished to less than 5% during the last half of the 20th century and the beginning of the 21st century for a multitude of reasons. Many believe this results in unrecognized malignancies that could have explained a patient's death. We describe six deaths in which hematopoietic neoplasms were identified at autopsy but were not diagnosed clinically. The six undiagnosed hematopoietic malignancy cases discovered at autopsy include four men and two women ranging from 50 to 78 years of age. One patient was African American and five patients were white, all with multiple comorbidities. The tumors included diffuse large B-cell lymphoma, activated B-cell type, intravascular large B-cell lymphoma, ALK-negative anaplastic large cell lymphoma arising in a setting of human immunodeficiency virus, and a myeloid sarcoma. These cases illustrate the importance of the traditional postmortem examination in not only confirming clinical diagnoses but also identifying previously unknown diagnoses. Hematologic malignancies may present with nonspecific clinical manifestations, and this series of cases also emphasizes the necessity for widening the differential diagnosis in patients with unexplained lactic acidosis and hepatic failure to include hematopoietic malignancies since prompt treatment may be lifesaving. Copyright© by the American Society for Clinical Pathology.

  19. Myeloid neoplasm with prominent eosinophilia and PDGFRA rearrangement treated with imatinib mesylate

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rathe, Mathias; Kielsgaard Kristensen, Thomas; Møller, Michael Boe

    2010-01-01

    The FIP1L1-PDGFRA fusion gene is the most frequent genetic aberration in myeloid neoplasms associated with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB, or FGFR1. Affected patients in adult populations are very sensitive to imatinib therapy. Pediatric cases are rare and so far only one case...... of FIP1L1-PDGFRA positive disease has been reported. We report a 2-year-old female with a myeloid neoplasm associated with eosinophilia and rearrangement of PDGFRA. Treatment with imatinib resulted in complete and durable clinical, hematological, and molecular remission within 3 months after starting...

  20. Virus como inductores de neoplasias cutáneas Viruses as agents inducing cutaneous neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Francisco Bravo Puccio

    2013-03-01

    human T-lymphotropic virus type I (HTLV-1, which is responsible for the T-cell lymphomas, in which the cutaneous manifestations are non-specific and have a wide spectrum, thus posing a challenge for differential diagnosis. The Epstein Barr virus, linked to nasal lymphomas of NK/T-cells and Hydroa-like cutaneous lymphomas, is also part of this group. In an era in which the genetic and molecular aspects of cancer research prevail, we may not leave behind the concept of neoplasms as a result an infection with a viral agent, which opens a wide array of new possibilities for cancer treatment based on antiviral drugs

  1. Migrated herniated disc mimicking a neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoch, Benjamin; Hermann, George

    2010-12-01

    Disc sequestration is defined as migration of a herniated disc fragment into the epidural space such that it is completely separated from the parent disc. We report a case of a migrated herniated disc that was initially pathologically diagnosed as a cartilage neoplasm. In addition to confounding morphological features, this interpretation may have been influenced by an initial radiological interpretation that did not include herniated disc in the differential diagnosis of a spinal lesion with prominent peripheral contrast enhancement. MR imaging is most helpful in considering other lesions in the differential diagnosis including abscess, hematoma, and primary or metastatic neoplasms. Pathologically, degenerative changes in herniated discs, including clustering of chondrocytes and neovascularization, may be severe resulting in a pseudoneoplastic appearance. Increased awareness of the radiological and pathological features of migrated herniated disc should limit confusion with other tumors.

  2. Primary bone neoplasms in dogs: 90 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maria E. Trost

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available A retrospective study of necropsy and biopsy cases of 90 primary bone tumors (89 malignant and one benign in dogs received over a period of 22 years at the Laboratório de Patologia Veterinária, Universidade Federal de Santa Maria, was performed. Osteosarcoma was the most prevalent bone tumor, accounting for 86.7% of all malignant primary bone neoplasms diagnosed. Most cases occurred in dogs of large and giant breeds with ages between 6 and 10-years-old. The neoplasms involved mainly the appendicular skeleton, and were 3.5 times more prevalent in the forelimbs than in the hindlimbs. Osteoblastic osteosarcoma was the predominant histological subtype. Epidemiological and pathological findings of osteosarcomas are reported and discussed.

  3. Intrathoracic neoplasms in the dog and cat

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Weller, R.E.

    1994-03-01

    Very little is known regarding the epidemiology, etiology, and mechanisms of spontaneous intrathoracic neoplasia in companion animals. Much of what we know or suspect about thoracic neoplasia in animals has been extrapolated from experimentally-induced neoplasms. Most studies of thoracic neoplasia have focused on the pathology of primary and metastatic neoplasms of the lung with little attention given to diagnostic and therapeutic considerations. Although the cited incidence rate for primary respiratory tract neoplasia is low, 8.5 cases per 100,000 dogs and 5.5 cases per 100,000 cats, intrathoracic masses often attract attention out of proportion to their actual importance since they are often readily visualized on routine thoracic radiographs.

  4. Intraoperative High Dose Rate 32P Brachytherapy for Diffuse Recalcitrant Conjunctival Neoplasms: A Retrospective Case Series and Report of Toxicity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marr, Brian P.; Abramson, David H.; Cohen, Gil’ad N.; Williamson, Matthew J.; McCormick, Beryl; Barker, Christopher A.

    2017-01-01

    Importance Adjunct treatments for conjunctival malignancies are needed when standard therapy provides limited benefits or fails. Objective To describe the results of patients with diffuse conjunctival neoplasms treated with a radioactive phosphorus (32P) impregnated flexible film. Design Retrospective case series between 2010 and 2013. Setting Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center – a tertiary referral center Participants The study was conducted on 7 eyes of 6 patients treated for diffuse conjunctival squamous cell carcinoma, sebaceous carcinoma, or lymphoma that had recurrent or residual disease after primary treatment. Intervention Patients underwent mapping biopsies and detailed conjunctival drawings to delineate the pathologic extent of the disease. The brachytherapy film used for treatment was the RIC Conformal Source Model 100 (RIC-100, R.I. Consultants, Hudson, NH). The RIC-100 is a flexible, thin (~0.5 mm) film made of a polymer chemically bound to 32P. The radioactive 32P film was placed intraoperatively, allowed to stay in place until the prescription dose was reached, and then removed. Median dose at the prescription point (1 mm from the surface of the film) was 15 Gy (range, 5–17 Gy). Main Outcome Measures Patients were tested for best-corrected visual acuity (BCVA), recurrence-free survival, and adverse events scored by using the adult comorbidity evaluation-27 (ACE-27) scale. Results Between 2010 and 2013, 7 eyes of 6 patients were treated. Median age was 70 years old. All patients had a recurrent or persistent neoplasm. Four patients with squamous cell carcinoma, 1 with sebaceous carcinoma, and 1 with metachronous bilateral lymphomas were treated. Median treatment time was 19 minutes (range, 10–52 minutes). Median follow-up was 24.9 months (range, 3.1–38.2 months). Recurrence-free survival 24 months after brachytherapy was 75% (95% CI 19–89.1%). Two moderate adverse events and one severe adverse event occurred. Vision was stable or

  5. Sirolimus, Tacrolimus, Thymoglobulin and Rituximab as Graft-versus-Host-Disease Prophylaxis in Patients Undergoing Haploidentical and HLA Partially Matched Donor Hematopoietic Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-05-26

    Chronic Myeloproliferative Disorders; Graft Versus Host Disease; Leukemia; Lymphoma; Lymphoproliferative Disorder; Multiple Myeloma and Plasma Cell Neoplasm; Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

  6. Second malignancies in hydroxyurea and interferon-treated Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Iben Onsberg; Sørensen, Anders Lindholm; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl

    2017-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: In an era of controversy in regard to 'hydroxyurea-leukaemogenicity' and when interferon-alfa2 (IFN) is being revived in the treatment of Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs), we aim in this single-centre observational study to describe the frequencies of second...

  7. Radioisotopic methods for the study of bone sarcoma and soft tissue neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gongora, R.

    1988-01-01

    Radioisotopic methods are widely applied to investigations of bone sarcoma and soft tissue neoplasms. We have at our disposal molecules with osseous, tumoral or vascular tropism. Their use, as single agents or combination, is helpful in positive and differential diagnosis and provides nosological informations. They are also useful in treatment monitoring and in long-term follow-up.

  8. The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of tumors of the hematopoietic and lymphoid tissues: an overview with emphasis on the myeloid neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vardiman, James W

    2010-03-19

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of myeloid and lymphoid neoplasms utilizes morphology, immunophenotype, genetics and clinical features to define disease entities of clinical significance. It is a consensus classification in which a number of experts have agreed on the classification and diagnostic criteria. In general, the classification stratifies neoplasms according to their lineage (myeloid, lymphoid, histiocytic/dendritic) and distinguishes neoplasms of precursor cells from those comprised of functionally mature cells. Lymphoid neoplasms are derived from cells that frequently have features that recapitulate stages of normal B-, T-, and NK-cell differentiation and function, so to some extent they can be classified according to the corresponding normal counterpart, although additional features, such as genotype, clinical features and even location of the tumor figure into the final classification listing as well. Five major subgroups of myeloid neoplasms are recognized based mainly on their degree of maturation and biologic properties: myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) which are comprised primarily of mature cells with effective proliferation; myeloid (and lymphoid) neoplasms with eosinophilia and abnormalities of PDGFRA, PDGFRB and FGFR1, defined largely by the finding of significant eosinophilia and specific genetic abnormalities; myelodysplastic/myeloproliferative neoplasms (MDS/MPN), comprised mainly of mature cells with both effective and ineffective proliferation of various lineages; myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS), in which immature and mature cells are found with abnormal, dysplastic and ineffective maturation, and acute myeloid leukemia (AML), comprised of precursor cells with impaired maturation. Genetic abnormalities play an important role as diagnostic criteria for further sub-classification of some myeloid neoplasms, particularly of AML. Although therapy-related MDS and AML (t-MDS/AML) often have genetic defects identical to

  9. Treatment of a primary intracranial germ cell tumor with systemic chemotherapy

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirshner, J.J.; Ginsberg, S.J.; Fitzpatrick, A.V.; Comis, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    Primary germ cell neoplasms of the central nervous system (CNS) are rare tumors which generally respond to radiotherapy. Experience is limited in managing the refractory patient. We report a patient whose suprasellar dysgerminoma responded completely to 5,000 rad. Seven years later, disease recurrence was refractory to an additional 4,000 rad. Theorizing that the ''blood-brain barrier'' was no longer intact after extensive radiotherapy and tumor involvement of the ventricular system, the patient was treated with systemic bleomycin, cisplatin, and vinblastine. Pharmacokinetic studies revealed that the bleomycin and cisplatin entered the cerebrospinal fluid. Serial CT scans and CSF levels of beta-HCG confirmed the clinical impression of a partial remission. Subsequent tumor progression was refractory to therapy with intraventricular bleomycin. It is concluded that systemic chemotherapy may be beneficial in certain cases of CNS germ cell neoplasms

  10. Treatment Resistance Mechanisms of Malignant Glioma Tumor Stem Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schmalz, Philip G.R.; Shen, Michael J.; Park, John K.

    2011-01-01

    Malignant gliomas are highly lethal because of their resistance to conventional treatments. Recent evidence suggests that a minor subpopulation of cells with stem cell properties reside within these tumors. These tumor stem cells are more resistant to radiation and chemotherapies than their counterpart differentiated tumor cells and may underlie the persistence and recurrence of tumors following treatment. The various mechanisms by which tumor stem cells avoid or repair the damaging effects of cancer therapies are discussed

  11. Transmission of a common intestinal neoplasm in zebrafish by cohabitation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Burns, A R; Watral, V; Sichel, S; Spagnoli, S; Banse, A V; Mittge, E; Sharpton, T J; Guillemin, K; Kent, M L

    2017-10-11

    Intestinal neoplasms are common in zebrafish (Danio rerio) research facilities. These tumours are most often seen in older fish and are classified as small cell carcinomas or adenocarcinomas. Affected fish populations always contain subpopulations with preneoplastic lesions, characterized by epithelial hyperplasia or inflammation. Previous observations indicated that these tumours are unlikely caused by diet, water quality or genetic background, suggesting an infectious aetiology. We performed five transmission experiments by exposure of naïve fish to affected donor fish by cohabitation or exposure to tank effluent water. Intestinal lesions were observed in recipient fish in all exposure groups, including transmissions from previous recipient fish, and moribund fish exhibited a higher prevalence of neoplasms. We found a single 16S rRNA sequence, most similar to Mycoplasma penetrans, to be highly enriched in the donors and exposed recipients compared to unexposed control fish. We further tracked the presence of the Mycoplasma sp. using a targeted PCR test on individual dissected intestines or faeces or tank faeces. Original donor and exposed fish populations were positive for Mycoplasma, while corresponding unexposed control fish were negative. This study indicates an infectious aetiology for these transmissible tumours of zebrafish and suggests a possible candidate agent of a Mycoplasma species. © 2017 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  12. Endocrine neoplasms in familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yulong; Simonds, William F

    2016-06-01

    Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism, including multiple endocrine neoplasia type 1 (MEN1), multiple endocrine neoplasia type 2A (MEN2A), and the hyperparathyroidism-jaw tumor (HPT-JT), comprise 2-5% of primary hyperparathyroidism cases. Familial syndromes of hyperparathyroidism are also associated with a range of endocrine and nonendocrine tumors, including potential malignancies. Complications of the associated neoplasms are the major causes of morbidities and mortalities in these familial syndromes, e.g., parathyroid carcinoma in HPT-JT syndrome; thymic, bronchial, and enteropancreatic neuroendocrine tumors in MEN1; and medullary thyroid cancer and pheochromocytoma in MEN2A. Because of the different underlying mechanisms of neoplasia, these familial tumors may have different characteristics compared with their sporadic counterparts. Large-scale clinical trials are frequently lacking due to the rarity of these diseases. With technological advances and the development of new medications, the natural history, diagnosis, and management of these syndromes are also evolving. In this article, we summarize the recent knowledge on endocrine neoplasms in three familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes, with an emphasis on disease characteristics, molecular pathogenesis, recent developments in biochemical and radiological evaluation, and expert opinions on surgical and medical therapies. Because these familial hyperparathyroidism syndromes are associated with a wide variety of tumors in different organs, this review is focused on those endocrine neoplasms with malignant potential. © 2016 Society for Endocrinology.

  13. Mucinous Neoplasms of the Vermiform Appendix.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xiao, Shu-Yuan

    2010-06-01

    Most epithelial neoplasms of the vermiform appendix are of mucinous type and can be stratified into 3 main diagnostic categories: (1) adenoma, (2) mucinous neoplasms of uncertain malignant potential or low-grade mucinous neoplasm, and (3) adenocarcinoma. Clinically, appendiceal mucinous adenomas and adenocarcinomas may present as right lower abdominal pain mimicking acute appendicitis, a mass, or pseudomyxoma peritonei. Nomenclature currently in use to describe and diagnose mucinous tumors of the appendix, particularly those of low morphologic grade, varies among surgical pathologists and centers, resulting in different histologic and clinical features being attributed to these entities in the literature. It may be of help, as already attempted by some investigators, to simply apply algorithmic parameters for such lesions (grade of the primary lesion, extensiveness and composite of extra-appendiceal involvement, and so forth), instead of adopting rigid classification categories. This approach allows for more objective data to be collected in hopes that it will provide a more nuanced understanding of the clinical behavior of the spectrum of mucinous appendiceal tumors. Remaining focused on histopathologic parameters of the primary and secondary sites of involvement may help in avoiding circular reasoning. Copyright © 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  14. Routine Treatment of Cervical Cytological Cell Changes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huber, J.; Pötsch, B.; Gantschacher, M.; Templ, M.

    2016-01-01

    Introduction: Diagnosis and treatment of vaginal and cervical cytological cell changes are described in European and national guidelines. The aim of this data collection was to evaluate the remission rates of PAP III and PAP III D cytological findings in patients over a period of 3–4 months. Method: The current state of affairs in managing suspicious and cytological findings (PAP III, and III D) in gynecological practice was assessed in the context of a data collection survey. An evaluation over a period of 24 months was conducted on preventative measures, the occurrence and changes to normal/suspect/pathological findings and therapy management (for suspicious or pathological findings). Results: 307 female patients were included in the analysis. At the time of the survey 186 patients (60.6 %) had PAP III and 119 (38.8 %) had PAP III D findings. The spontaneous remission rate of untreated PAP III patients was 6 % and that of untreated PAP III D patients was 11 %. The remission rates of patients treated with a vaginal gel were 77 % for PAP III and 71 % for PAP III D. Conclusion: A new treatment option was used in gynecological practice on patients with PAP III and PAP III D findings between confirmation and the next follow-up with excellent success. PMID:27761030

  15. Endoscopic approach for a laryngeal neoplasm in a dog

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Pedro Paulo Maia Teixeira

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Laryngeal and tracheal tumors are rare in pets; some piece of information on their disease behavior, therapy and evolution are limited. Neoplasms in this area are a diagnostic challenge. In many cases, they can be biopsied and excised using endoscopic instruments, but there is no report of this in canines. The goal of this study is to report a successful case of a laryngeal neoplasm removal through endoscopy. A head and neck radiogram revealed a mass in the laryngeal lumen protruding into the trachea. The patient then underwent an endoscopy to confirm the radiographic diagnosis and to surgically remove the tumor. The histopathological diagnosis was poorly differentiated carcinoma. The most appropriate treatment for laryngeal tumors is the resection of the submucosa or a partial laryngectomy however, partial and total laryngectomies are associated with many postoperative complications. In contrast, the endoscopic approach allows for highly magnified visualization of the lesion in situ, which facilitates the surgical removal of the mass through videosurgery. With little manipulation of the affected area, the chances of postoperative complications are reduced, leading to a more rapid recovery.

  16. Physical Activity as a Nonpharmacological Symptom Management Approach in Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Recommendations for Future Research.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckert, Ryan; Huberty, Jennifer; Gowin, Krisstina; Mesa, Ruben; Marks, Lisa

    2017-12-01

    Essential thrombocythemia, polycythemia vera, and myelofibrosis are rare chronic hematological malignancies known as myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) and are characterized by deregulated myeloid lineage cell production, splenomegaly, and heterogeneous symptom profiles. MPN patients suffer from a significant symptom burden (eg, fatigue, depressive symptoms, early satiety) and an impaired overall quality of life (QoL). Current treatments typically include pharmacological approaches, which may come with additional side effects and may be limited by treatment-associated toxicities (ie, cytopenias). Nonpharmacological approaches such as physical activity may be beneficial for reducing symptom burden and improving QoL. To date, no studies have examined physical activity as a nonpharmacological approach in MPN patients despite preliminary evidence supporting its benefit in other hematological cancers. The purpose of this article is to (1) review the literature related to physical activity and specific hematological cancer subtypes and to (2) make suggestions for future research involving physical activity in MPN patients as a symptom management strategy. A brief review of studies examining physical activity in leukemias, lymphomas, and myelomas (excluding stem-cell transplant patients) was conducted. There is preliminary evidence to suggest that physical activity may be an effective approach to improve patient-reported outcomes (fatigue, depression, anxiety, sleep), physical fitness (cardiovascular fitness, balance, body composition), and overall QoL in other hematological cancers. Based on encouraging findings in other hematological cancers, future research should examine the feasibility and effectiveness of physical activity in MPN patients.

  17. Concomitant chemo-radiotherapy and local dose of radiation as risk factors for second malignant neoplasms after cancer in childhood: a case control study

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Guerin, S.; Guibout, C.; Vathaire, F. de; Shamsaldin, A.; Diallo, I.; Oberlin, O.; Hartmann, O.; Le Deley, M.C.; Dondon, M.G.; Hawkins, M.

    2006-01-01

    Radiotherapy and chemotherapy are associated with an increased risk of a second malignant neoplasm. after a cancer during childhood. This study specified the dose effect relationship between the local dose of radiation received at the site of the second malignant neoplasm and the risk of a second malignant neoplasm.It also investigated the effect of chemo radiotherapy on the risk of second malignant neoplasm. An European cohort of 4581 patients, treated for a solid cancer during childhood have been included in the study. 153 cases with a second malignant neoplasm, and 442 controls were matched according to sex, age at first cancer, calendar year, type of first cancer and follow-up. The local dose of radiation was estimated at the site of the second malignant neoplasm, for each case and at the same site, for his matched control. In conclusion, radiation was the foremost treatment related risk factor for the occurrence of a second malignant neoplasm. Compared to sequential treatment, concomitant chemo radiotherapy may lead to a higher risk of a second malignant neoplasm. (N.C.)

  18. Bleomycin/interleukin-12 electrochemogenetherapy for treating naturally occurring spontaneous neoplasms in dogs.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reed, S D; Fulmer, A; Buckholz, J; Zhang, B; Cutrera, J; Shiomitsu, K; Li, S

    2010-08-01

    On the basis of superior outcomes from electrochemogenetherapy (ECGT) compared with electrochemotherapy in mice, we determined the efficacy of ECGT applied to spontaneous canine neoplasms. Intralesional bleomycin (BLM) and feline interleukin-12 DNA injection combined with translesional electroporation resulted in complete cure of two recurrent World Health Organization stage T(2b)N(0)M(0) oral squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs) and one T(2)N(0)M(0) acanthomatous ameloblastoma. Three remaining dogs, which had no other treatment options, had partial responses to ECGT; one had mandibular T(3b)N(2b)M(1) melanoma with pulmonary and lymph node metastases; one had cubital T(3)N(0)M(1) histiocytic sarcoma with spleen metastases; and one had soft palate T(3)N(0)M(0) fibrosarcoma. The melanoma dog had decrease in the size of the primary tumor before recrudescence and euthanasia. The histiocytic sarcoma dog had resolution of the primary tumor, but was euthanized because of metastases 4 months after the only treatment. The dog with T(3)N(0)M(0) fibrosarcoma had tumor regression with recrudescence. Treatment was associated with minimal side effects and was easy to perform, was associated with repair of bone lysis in cured dogs, improved quality of life for dogs with partial responses and extended overall survival time. ECGT seems to be a safe and resulted in complete responses in SCC and acanthomatous ameloblastoma.

  19. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake on PET in primary mediastinal non-thymic neoplasm: A clinicopathological study

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kaira, Kyoichi, E-mail: kkaira1970@yahoo.co.jp [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Abe, Masato [Division of Pathology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Nakagawa, Kazuo; Ohde, Yasuhisa; Okumura, Takehiro [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Takahashi, Toshiaki; Murakami, Haruyasu; Shukuya, Takehito; Kenmotsu, Hirotsugu; Naito, Tateaki [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Hayashi, Isamu [Division of Pathology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Oriuchi, Noboru [Department of Diagnostic Radiology and Nuclear medicine, Gunma University Graduate School of Medicine, Showa-machi, Maebashi 371-8511, Gunma (Japan); Endo, Masahiro [Division of Diagnostic Radiology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Kondo, Haruhiko [Division of Thoracic Surgery, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Nakajima, Takashi [Division of Pathology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan); Yamamoto, Nobuyuki [Division of Thoracic Oncology, Shizuoka Cancer Center, 1007 Shimonagakubo Nagaizumi-cho, Sunto-gun, Shizuoka 411-8777 (Japan)

    2012-09-15

    Background: The usefulness of 2-[{sup 18}F]-fluoro-2-deoxy-D-glucose ({sup 18}F-FDG) positron emission tomography (PET) has been investigated in thymic epithelial tumors. However, little is known about PET imaging of {sup 18}F-FDG in primary non-thymic mediastinal neoplasms. The aim of this study is to explore the clinicopathological significance of {sup 18}F-FDG PET in primary mediastinal (non-thymic) neoplasms. Methods: Twenty-one patients with mediastinal neoplasms who underwent {sup 18}F-FDG PET before treatment were included in this study. Tumor sections were stained by immunohistochemistry for glucose transporter 1 (Glut1); glucose transporter 3 (Glut3); hypoxia-inducible factor-1 alpha (HIF-1α); hexokinase I; vascular endothelial growth factor (VEGF); microvessels (CD34); epidermal growth factor receptor (EGFR); Akt/mTOR signaling pathway (p-Akt and p-mTOR); cell cycle control (p53). Results: Seventeen of 21 patients were imaged on PET system using {sup 18}F-FDG, but 4 patients with a histology of cyst showed nothing abnormal in PET scans. The histology of the resected tumors was as follows: 6 schwannoma, 3 teratoma, 4 cyst, 3 sarcoma, 1 undifferentiated carcinoma, 1 seminoma, 1 mediastinal goiter, 1 ganglioneuroma, and 1 Hodgkin lymphoma. {sup 18}F-FDG uptake was significantly correlated with Glut1, HIF-1α, EGFR, p-Akt and p-S6K. These biomarkers were highly expressed in schwannoma, teratoma and high grade malignancies, whereas all patients with cyst and ganglioneuroma had no positive expression of these biomarkers. High uptake of {sup 18}F-FDG was significant associated with Glut1, VEGF, EGFR, p-Akt, p-S6K and tumor maximal size. Conclusion: The amount of {sup 18}F-FDG uptake in primary mediastinal non-thymic neoplasms is determined by the presence of glucose metabolism (Glut1), hypoxia (HIF-1α) and upstream components of HIF-1α (EGFR, p-Akt and p-S6K)

  20. Myeloproliferative neoplasms and inflammation: whether to target the malignant clone or the inflammatory process or both.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koschmieder, S; Mughal, T I; Hasselbalch, H C; Barosi, G; Valent, P; Kiladjian, J-J; Jeryczynski, G; Gisslinger, H; Jutzi, J S; Pahl, H L; Hehlmann, R; Maria Vannucchi, A; Cervantes, F; Silver, R T; Barbui, T

    2016-05-01

    The Philadelphia-negative myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are clonal disorders involving hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells and are associated with myeloproliferation, splenomegaly and constitutional symptoms. Similar signs and symptoms can also be found in patients with chronic inflammatory diseases, and inflammatory processes have been found to play an important role in the pathogenesis and progression of MPNs. Signal transduction pathways involving JAK1, JAK2, STAT3 and STAT5 are causally involved in driving both the malignant cells and the inflammatory process. Moreover, anti-inflammatory and immune-modulating drugs have been used successfully in the treatment of MPNs. However, to date, many unresoved issues remain. These include the role of somatic mutations that are present in addition to JAK2V617F, CALR and MPL W515 mutations, the interdependency of malignant and nonmalignant cells and the means to eradicate MPN-initiating and -maintaining cells. It is imperative for successful therapeutic approaches to define whether the malignant clone or the inflammatory cells or both should be targeted. The present review will cover three aspects of the role of inflammation in MPNs: inflammatory states as important differential diagnoses in cases of suspected MPN (that is, in the absence of a clonal marker), the role of inflammation in MPN pathogenesis and progression and the use of anti-inflammatory drugs for MPNs. The findings emphasize the need to separate the inflammatory processes from the malignancy in order to improve our understanding of the pathogenesis, diagnosis and treatment of patients with Philadelphia-negative MPNs.

  1. Molecular approaches identify a cryptic MECOM rearrangement in a child with a rapidly progressive myeloid neoplasm.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Capela de Matos, Roberto R; Othman, Moneeb A K; Ferreira, Gerson M; Costa, Elaine S; Melo, Joana B; Carreira, Isabel M; de Souza, Mariana T; Lopes, Bruno A; Emerenciano, Mariana; Land, Marcelo G P; Liehr, Thomas; Ribeiro, Raul C; Silva, Maria Luiza M

    2018-02-01

    Myeloid neoplasms are a heterogeneous group of hematologic disorders with divergent patterns of cell differentiation and proliferation, as well as divergent clinical courses. Rare recurrent genetic abnormalities related to this group of cancers are associated with poor outcomes. One such abnormality is the MECOM gene rearrangement that typically occurs in cases with chromosome 7 abnormalities. MECOM encodes a transcription factor that plays an essential role in cell proliferation and maintenance and also in epigenetic regulation. Aberrant expression of this gene is associated with reduced survival. Hence, its detailed characterization provides biological and clinical information relevant to the management of pediatric myeloid neoplasms. In this work, we describe a rare karyotype harboring three copies of MECOM with overexpression of the gene in a child with a very aggressive myeloid neoplasm. Cytogenetic studies defined the karyotype as 46,XX,der(7)t(3;7)(q26.2;q21.2). Array comparative genomic hybridization (aCGH) revealed a gain of 26.04 Mb in the 3q26.2-3qter region and a loss of 66.6 Mb in the 7q21.2-7qter region. RT-qPCR analysis detected elevated expression of the MECOM and CDK6 genes (458.5-fold and 35.2-fold, respectively). Overall, we show the importance of performing detailed molecular cytogenetic analysis of MECOM to enable appropriate management of high-risk pediatric myeloid neoplasms. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  2. Accelerated treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barkley, H T

    1985-05-01

    In the first third of this century, the prevailing concept was that malignant cells had a brief period of sensitivity and radiation treatments were ideally given in overall times of 2 weeks or less. Following the Second World War, routine treatment times were extended to 5 to 8 weeks to avoid severe acute normal tissue reactions and achieve higher tumor doses. In reaction to these prolonged overall times, a series of large-fraction, shortened-overall-time clinical experiments were attempted, with disastrous normal tissue effects and poor tumor control. More recently, attempts to accelerate treatment have been accomplished by utilizing multiple fractions per day or semicontinuous irradiation. Unfortunately, the majority of these attempts have been forced by the occurrence of unacceptable normal tissue reactions to significantly reduce total dose or introduce lengthy splits in treatment. These results suggest that in our current state of knowledge accelerated schedules be reserved for use in the treatment of rapidly proliferating neoplasms or for palliation.

  3. [Thymic epithelial neoplasms: updates on diagnosis, staging, biology and management in France].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hadoux, Julien; Girard, Nicolas; Besse, Benjamin

    2012-11-01

    Thymic epithelial neoplasms are rare malignancies with about 250 new incident cases in France every year. The WHO histologic classification distinguishes thymoma and thymic carcinoma which are tumors with different biological and clinical behaviors and outcomes. The Masaoka-Koga staging system is considered as a reference and is also of prognosis value. Diagnosis, multimodal treatment and follow-up of thymic epithelial neoplasms require a multidisciplinary approach where surgery is the cornerstone treatment. A national expert center coordinates thymic epithelial neoplasms management with 12 other regional expert centers through the French organization named RYTHMIC (www.rythmic.org). Patient's files have to be discussed at regional or national multidisciplinary staff. A group of expert pathologists will centrally review tumors when the diagnosis or classification is a matter of controversy. Among its objectives, RYHTMIC has to promote medical education, patient's information and research. This review focuses on RYTHMIC guidelines and data regarding multimodal management and targeted therapies in epithelial thymic neoplasms.

  4. Autopsy findings of malignant neoplasms treated with radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Okazaki, Atsushi; Ito, Jun; Tatezawa, Takashi; Nishimura, Toshinobu; Niibe, Hideo.

    1984-01-01

    Autopsy findings in 26 cases of malignant neoplasms treated with radiation were analysed and following results were obtained. 1. Causes of death except for neoplastic extension were 58% (15/26) and infection was the single predominant cause of death (73% : 11/15) with 50% (4/8) in lung cancer. 2. Distant metastases were found in 73% (19/26). In 7 cases, no obvious metastasis was found before and after autopsy. On the other hand, the patients with metastases over 2 organs before autopsy revealed metastases in 82% (9/11) to the other organs at autopsy. 3. Radiation therapy was effective and the primary tumor disappeared completely in 71% (10/14) with curative irradiation. In metastatic lesions, tumor cells were almost disappeared with dosage over 40 Gy. (author)

  5. CT diagnosis of hyperdense intracranial neoplasms. Review of the literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishikura, Reiichi; Ando, Kumiko; Tominaga, Satoru; Nakao, Norio; Ikeda, Jouta; Takemura, Yuriko; Morikawa, Tsutomu

    1999-01-01

    In contrast to typical astrocytic tumors that show hypodense areas on computed tomographic images, some intracranial tumors show hyperdense areas on CT images. The major reasons for hyperdensity on CT images are hypercellular lesions, intratumoral calcification, and intratumoral hemorrhage. Malignant lymphomas, germinomas, and medulloblastomas show homogenous hyperdensity on CT images because of their hypercellularity. Tumorous lesions such as subependymal giant cell astrocytomas, oligodendrogliomas, ependymomas, central neurocytomas, craniopharyngiomas, and meningiomas often present with hyperdense calcified lesions on CT images. Intratumoral hemorrhage also causes hyperdensity on CT images, and is often associated with metastatic brain tumors, glioblastomas, pituitary adenomas, and rarely with any of the other intracranial tumors. Although magnetic resonance imaging is now the major diagnostic tool for diseases of the central nervous system, the first imaging studies for patients with neurologic symptoms are still CT scans. Hyperdense areas on CT images are a clue to making an accurate diagnosis of intracranial neoplasms. (author)

  6. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 1, benign lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, W.C. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Klein, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Pitt, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Siegal, G.P. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Departments of Pathology, Cell Biology, and Surgery, and the Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-11-15

    This two-part review presents an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. This first part presents a brief review of methods in molecular pathology along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. Malignant chondroid neoplasms will be considered in the second part of this review. (orig.)

  7. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 1, benign lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, W.C.; Klein, M.J.; Pitt, M.J.; Siegal, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This two-part review presents an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. This first part presents a brief review of methods in molecular pathology along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. Malignant chondroid neoplasms will be considered in the second part of this review. (orig.)

  8. Application of MRI for the Diagnosis of Neoplasms

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ewa Bejer-Oleńska

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Aim. The aim of the study was to determine the most commonly diagnosed neoplasms in the MRI scanned patient population and indicate correlations based on the descriptive variables. Methods. The SPSS software was used to determine the incidence of neoplasms within the specific diagnoses based on the descriptive variables of the studied population. Over a five year period, 791 patients and 839 MRI scans were identified in neoplasm category (C00-D48 according to the International Statistical Classification of Diseases and Related Health Problems ICD-10. Results. More women (56% than men (44% represented C00-D48. Three categories of neoplasms were recorded. Furthermore, benign neoplasms were the most numerous, diagnosed mainly in patients in the fifth decade of life, and included benign neoplasms of the brain and other parts of the central nervous system. Conclusions. Males ≤ 30 years of age with neoplasms had three times higher MRI scans rate than females of the same age group; even though females had much higher scans rate in every other category. The young males are more often selected for these scans if a neoplasm is suspected. Finally, the number of MRI-diagnosed neoplasms showed a linear annual increase.

  9. Multiple primary malignant neoplasms in breast cancer patients in Israel

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Schenker, J.G.; Levinsky, R.; Ohel, G.

    1984-01-01

    The data of an epidemiologic study of multiple primary malignant neoplasms in breast cancer patients in Israel are presented. During the 18-year period of the study 12,302 cases of breast carcinoma were diagnosed, and, of these, 984 patients (8%) had multiple primary malignant tumors. Forty-seven of these patients developed two multiple primary cancers. A significantly higher than expected incidence of second primary cancers occurred at the following five sites: the opposite breast, salivary glands, uterine corpus, ovary, and thyroid. Cancers of the stomach and gallbladder were fewer than expected. Treatment of the breast cancer by irradiation was associated with an increased risk of subsequent cancers of lung and hematopoietic system. The prognosis was mainly influenced by the site and malignancy of the second primary cancer. The incidence of multiple primary malignancies justifies a high level of alertness to this possibility in the follow-up of breast cancer patients

  10. Thyroid neoplasms after radiation therapy for adolescent acne vulgaris

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Paloyan, E.; Lawrence, A.M.

    1978-01-01

    There is a potential hazard of thyroid cancer after exposure to external irradiation for the treatment of adolescent acne vulgaris. We noted a 60% incidence of thyroid carcinoma among 20 patients with such a history, who were operated on for thyroid nodules during a five-year period. Eighty-three percent of the patients with carcinoma had either a follicular or a mixed papillary-follicular carcinoma; 17% had a papillary carcinoma; 33% had regional node metastases; none had evidence of distant metastases. The interval between radiation exposure and thyroidectomy ranged from nine to 41 years. This association of thyroid neoplasms and a prior history of radiation for acne vulgaris may be coincidental and therefore remains to be proved by retrospective surveys of large numbers of treated patients with appropriate controls

  11. Stem cell therapy in treatment of different diseases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Larijani, Bagher; Esfahani, Ensieh Nasli; Amini, Peyvand; Nikbin, Behrouz; Alimoghaddam, Kamran; Amiri, Somayeh; Malekzadeh, Reza; Yazdi, Nika Mojahed; Ghodsi, Maryam; Dowlati, Yahya; Sahraian, Mohammad Ali; Ghavamzadeh, Ardeshir

    2012-01-01

    Stem cells are undifferentiated cells with the ability of proliferation, regeneration, conversion to differentiated cells and producing various tissues. Stem cells are divided into two categories of embryonic and adult. In another categorization stem cells are divided to Totipotent, Multipotent and Unipotent cells.So far usage of stem cells in treatment of various blood diseases has been studied (such as lymphoblastic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, thalassemia, multiple myeloma and cycle cell anemia). In this paper the goal is evaluation of cell therapy in treatment of Parkinson's disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer, Stroke, Spinal Cord Injury, Multiple Sclerosis, Radiation Induced Intestinal Injury, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Liver Disease, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Bone Disease, Renal Disease, Chronic Wounds, Graft-Versus-Host Disease, Sepsis and Respiratory diseases. It should be mentioned that some disease that are the target of cell therapy are discussed in this article.

  12. Stem Cell Therapy in Treatment of Different Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mohammad Ali Sahraian

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells are undifferentiated cells with the ability of proliferation, regeneration, conversion to differentiated cells and producing various tissues. Stem cells are divided into two categories of embryonic and adult. In another categorization stem cells are divided to Totipotent, Multipotent and Unipotent cells.So far usage of stem cells in treatment of various blood diseases has been studied (such as lymphoblastic leukemia, myeloid leukemia, thalassemia, multiple myeloma and cycle cell anemia. In this paper the goal is evaluation of cell therapy in treatment of Parkinsons disease, Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer, Stroke, Spinal Cord Injury, Multiple Sclerosis, Radiation Induced Intestinal Injury, Inflammatory Bowel Disease, Liver Disease, Duchenne Muscular Dystrophy, Diabetes, Heart Disease, Bone Disease, Renal Disease, Chronic Wounds, Graft-Versus-Host Disease, Sepsis and Respiratory diseases. It should be mentioned that some disease that are the target of cell therapy are discussed in this article.

  13. Treatment Option Overview (Merkel Cell Carcinoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissue. Merkel cells are in the layer of basal cells at the deepest part of the epidermis and are connected to nerves. Merkel cell carcinoma tends to grow quickly and to metastasize (spread) at an early stage . It usually spreads first to nearby lymph nodes and then may spread to lymph nodes or ...

  14. Treatment Options by Stage (Merkel Cell Carcinoma)

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... tissue. Merkel cells are in the layer of basal cells at the deepest part of the epidermis and are connected to nerves. Merkel cell carcinoma tends to grow quickly and to metastasize (spread) at an early stage . It usually spreads first to nearby lymph nodes and then may spread to lymph nodes or ...

  15. Two Metachronous Neoplasms in the Radiotherapy Fields of a Young Man With Familial Adenomatous Polyposis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Patrick A. Williams BS

    2013-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: It is recognized that various radiation-induced malignancies often follow childhood radiotherapy. Radiation-induced neoplasms have been shown to occur with increased frequency in syndromes due to mutated tumor suppressor genes. There exist no recommendations for the management of cancer patients with germline APC gene mutations. Preclinical data suggest that APC gene mutations cause enhanced radiosensitivity, but no clinical observations exist that show that patients with this mutation are at higher risk for radiation-induced malignancies. Results: We report the case of a 32-year-old man with a genetic diagnosis of familial adenomatous polyposis (FAP who initially presented at age 10 with a medulloblastoma treated with radiotherapy and surgery. Radiation-induced papillary thyroid carcinoma followed 13 years later. Finally, radiation-induced soft tissue osteosarcoma occurred with widespread metastasis 20 years thereafter. Conclusions: This is the first report of 2 malignancies in the prior radiotherapy fields of a patient with a genetic diagnosis of FAP. More important, this suggests that APC-defective cells are at an enhanced sensitivity to the carcinogenic effects of radiotherapy compared with APC-proficient cells. This could argue for genetic screening in affected members of these families and for creation of treatment recommendations to more seriously consider the risks of radiation therapy.

  16. Percutaneous thermal ablation of renal neoplasms; Perkutane Thermoablation von Nierentumoren

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Tacke, J. [Inst. fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie/Neuroradiologie, Klinikum Passau (Germany); Mahnken, A.H.; Guenther, R.W. [Klinik fuer Radiologische Diagnostik, Universitaetsklinikum Aachen (Germany)

    2005-12-15

    Due to modern examination techniques such as multidetector computed tomography and high-field magnetic resonance imaging, the detection rate of renal neoplasms is continually increasing. Even though tumors exceeding 4 cm in diameter rarely metastasize, all renal lesions that are possible neoplasms should be treated. Traditional treatment techniques include radical nephrectomy or nephron-sparing resection, which are increasingly performed laparoscopically. Modern thermal ablation techniques such as hyperthermal techniques like radiofrequency ablation RFA, laser induced thermal ablation LITT, focused ultrasound FUS and microwave therapy MW, as well as hypothermal techniques (cryotherapy) may be a useful treatment option for patients who are unfit for or refuse surgical resection. Cryotherapy is the oldest and best known thermal ablation technique and can be performed laparoscopically or percutaneously. Since subzero temperatures have no antistyptic effect, additional maneuvers must be performed to control bleeding. Percutaneous cryotherapy of renal tumors is a new and interesting method, but experience with it is still limited. Radiofrequency ablation is the most frequently used method. Modern probe design allows volumes between 2 and 5 cm in diameter to be ablated. Due to hyperthermal tract ablation, the procedure is deemed to be safe and has a low complication rate. Although there are no randomized comparative studies to open resection, the preliminary results for renal RFA are promising and show RFA to be superior to other thermal ablation techniques. Clinical success rates are over 90% for both, cryo- and radiofrequency ablation. Whereas laser induced thermal therapy is established in hepatic ablation, experience is minimal with respect to renal application. For lesions of more than 2 cm in diameter, additional cooling catheters are required. MR thermometry offers temperature control during ablation. Microwave ablation is characterized by small ablation volumes

  17. Lymphoma in Taiwan: Review of 1347 neoplasms from a single institution according to the 2016 Revision of the World Health Organization Classification

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shih-Sung Chuang

    2017-08-01

    Conclusion: We analyzed the largest series of lymphomas to date from Taiwan and concluded that HL was rare and T-cell neoplasms comprised around 17% of all NHLs in Taiwan. The relative frequency of the major lymphoma types is similar in East Asian countries, with only a minor difference, but the overall pattern in the East is quite different from that in the West, with the latter showing a higher frequency of HL and a lower rate of T-cell neoplasms.

  18. Peptichemio in pretreated patients with plasmacell neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paccagnella, A; Salvagno, L; Chiarion-Sileni, V; Bolzonella, S; De Besi, P; Frizzarin, M; Pappagallo, G L; Fosser, V P; Fornasiero, A; Segati, R

    1986-09-01

    Twenty-one patients with alkylator-resistant plasmacell neoplasms were treated with Peptichemio (PTC) at a dose of 40 mg/m2 for 3 days every 3 weeks or, in the case of persistent leukopenia and/or thrombocytopenia, at the single dose of 70 mg/m2 every 2-3 weeks according to haematological recovery. Seventeen patients, 10 with multiple myeloma and seven with extramedullary plasmacytoma (EMP), were fully evaluable. Six of 17 patients (35%) responded: three of seven EMP patients had a complete remission and 3 of 10 multiple myeloma patients had an objective response greater than 50%. The median duration of response was 8.5 months. An EMP patient obtained a complete response lasting for 16 months. The most frequent toxic effect were phlebosclerosis, occurring in all the patients, and myelosuppression, which was severe in only one case. PTC appears to be an active drug in patients with plasmacell neoplasms even if resistant to alkylating agents.

  19. Patterns of second malignant neoplasms in children

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meadows, A.T.; D'Angio, G.J.; Mike, V.; Banfi, A.; Harris, C.; Jenkin, R.D.T.; Schwartz, A.

    1977-01-01

    A search of the records of 10 pediatric oncology centers revealed 102 children with more than one malignant neoplasm. In this group of 102 patients, all pediatric cancers were seen as initial lesions, but Wilms' tumor and retinoblastoma were over-represented and leukemia and brain tumors underrepresented. Survival variation as well as tumor susceptibility may be responsible for this disproportion. Osteosarcomas and chondrosarcomas were the most frequent second malignant neoplasms (SMN). Embryonal tumors were rare as SMN and adult-type tumors (carcinomas) appeared at earlier than expected ages, whether arising after irradiation or not related to that form of therapy. Radiation was associated with 69 SMN, genetic disease accounted for 27 SMN and both conditions were noted in 15 SMN. In the group of 21 patients for whom neither radiation nor a known genetic disorder could be implicated, there were three with colon carcinoma and glioma and five with leukemia or lymphoma and glioma. These combinations may reflect new tissue-specific hereditary cancer syndromes

  20. Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms; Neuroendokrine Neoplasien des Pankreas

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Beiderwellen, K.; Lauenstein, T.C. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Institut fuer Diagnostische und Interventionelle Radiologie und Neuroradiologie, Essen (Germany); Sabet, A.; Poeppel, T.D. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Nuklearmedizin, Essen (Germany); Lahner, H. [Universitaetsklinikum Essen, Klinik fuer Endokrinologie und Stoffwechselerkrankungen, Essen (Germany)

    2016-04-15

    Pancreatic neuroendocrine neoplasms (NEN) account for 1-2 % of all pancreatic neoplasms and represent a rare differential diagnosis. While some pancreatic NEN are hormonally active and exhibit endocrine activity associated with characteristic symptoms, the majority are hormonally inactive. Imaging techniques such as ultrasound, computed tomography (CT), magnetic resonance imaging (MRI) and positron emission tomography (PET) or as combined PET/CT play a crucial role in the initial diagnosis, therapy planning and control. Endoscopic ultrasound (EUS) and multiphase CT represent the reference methods for localization of the primary pancreatic tumor. Particularly in the evaluation of small liver lesions MRI is the method of choice. Somatostatin receptor scintigraphy and somatostatin receptor PET/CT are of particular value for whole body staging and special aspects of further therapy planning. (orig.) [German] Neuroendokrine Neoplasien (NEN) des Pankreas stellen mit einem Anteil von 1-2 % aller pankreatischen Tumoren eine seltene Differenzialdiagnose dar. Ein Teil der Tumoren ist hormonell aktiv und faellt klinisch durch charakteristische Symptome auf, wohingegen der ueberwiegende Anteil hormonell inaktiv ist. Bildgebende Verfahren wie Sonographie, Computertomographie (CT), Magnetresonanztomographie (MRT) und nicht zuletzt Positronenemissionstomographie (PET oder kombiniert als PET/CT) spielen eine zentrale Rolle fuer Erstdiagnose, Therapieplanung und -kontrolle. Die Endosonographie und die multiphasische CT stellen die Referenzmethoden zur Lokalisation des Primaertumors dar. Fuer die Differenzierung insbesondere kleiner Leberlaesionen bietet die MRT die hoechste Aussagekraft. Fuer das Ganzkoerperstaging und bestimmte Aspekte der Therapieplanung lassen sich die Somatostatinrezeptorszintigraphie und v. a. die Somatostatinrezeptor-PET/CT heranziehen. (orig.)

  1. Surgical Management of Penile and Preputial Neoplasms in Equine with Special Reference to Partial Phallectomy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Awad Rizk

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Penile and preputial neoplasia in horses occurs infrequently and represents diagnostic and therapeutic challenges. The present study was carried out on a total number of 21 equids (14 stallions and 7 donkeys suffered from different penile and preputial neoplasia. Diagnosis of neoplasms was based up on history of the case, clinical examination as well as histopathological evaluation. Animals with penile and preputial neoplasms were underwent local excision and partial phallectomy with a slightly modified version of the techniques described by William’s. The diagnosed neoplasms were penile and preputial squamous cell carcinomas (SCCs; ; sarcoid (; a-fibrosarcoma; and a melanoma. Local excision was curative in all cases except 5 stallions with SCCs. These stallions had extensive damage of the glans penis, free part of the penis and the inner lamina of the internal fold of the prepuce, and they underwent a partial phallectomy with successful outcome. Follow-up information was obtained by visit and telephone inquiries. In conclusion, penile and preputial neoplasms are commonly encountered in elderly male horses and SCCs are the most common type affecting male external genitalia. Partial phallectomy is effective for management of equine neoplasia if they are confined to the glans and body of the penis and there is no proximal spread or involvement to regional lymph nodes.

  2. New classification of acute myeloid leukemia and precursor-related neoplasms: changes and unsolved issues.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Falini, Brunangelo; Tiacci, Enrico; Martelli, Maria Paola; Ascani, Stefano; Pileri, Stefano A

    2010-10-01

    The World Health Organization (WHO) classification of lympho-hematopoietic neoplasms is increasingly based on genetic criteria. Here, we focus on changes that, as compared to the 2001 edition, were introduced into the 2008 WHO classification of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and related precursor neoplasms. The category of AML with recurrent genetic abnormalities was expanded to account for 60% of AML by adding three distinct entities, i.e., AML with t(6,9), inv(3), or t(1;22), and two provisional entities, i.e., AML with mutated NPM1 or CEBPA. These changes have greatly modified the approaches to diagnosis and prognostic stratification of AML patients. To emphasize the need of various parameters for diagnosis, including myelodysplasia (MD)-related cytogenetic abnormalities, history of myelodysplasia or myelodysplasia/myeloproliferative neoplasm, and multilineage dysplasia, the category of "AML with multilineage dysplasia" was re-named AML with MD-related changes. Finally, we describe the unique characteristics of myeloid proliferations associated with Down syndrome and blastic plasmacytoid dendritic cell neoplasm.

  3. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for Treatment of CNS Injury

    OpenAIRE

    Azari, Michael F; Mathias, Louisa; Ozturk, Ezgi; Cram, David S; Boyd, Richard L; Petratos, Steven

    2010-01-01

    Brain and spinal cord injuries present significant therapeutic challenges. The treatments available for these conditions are largely ineffective, partly due to limitations in directly targeting the therapeutic agents to sites of pathology within the central nervous system (CNS). The use of stem cells to treat these conditions presents a novel therapeutic strategy. A variety of stem cell treatments have been examined in animal models of CNS trauma. Many of these studies have used stem cells as...

  4. Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) accelerates the growth of colonic neoplasms in mice

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Thulesen, J; Hartmann, B; Hare, K J

    2004-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Glucagon-like peptide 2 (GLP-2) is an intestinotrophic mediator with therapeutic potential in conditions with compromised intestinal capacity. However, growth stimulation of the intestinal system may accelerate the growth of existing neoplasms in the intestine. AIMS: In the present...... study, the effects of GLP-2 treatment on the growth of chemically induced colonic neoplasms were investigated. METHODS: In 210 female C57bl mice, colonic tumours were initially induced with the methylating carcinogen 1,2-dimethylhydrazine (DMH) and mice were then treated with GLP-2. Two months after...... period of three months and were then allocated to groups subjected to long term treatment, as above. RESULTS: Colonic polyps developed in 100% of the mice, regardless of treatment. Survival data revealed no statistical significant differences among the different groups but histopathological analysis...

  5. Stem Cell Transplants in Cancer Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stem cell transplants are procedures that restore blood-forming stem cells in cancer patients who have had theirs destroyed by very high doses of chemotherapy or radiation therapy. Learn about the types of transplants and side effects that may occur.

  6. Aggressive management of peritoneal carcinomatosis from mucinous appendiceal neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Austin, Frances; Mavanur, Arun; Sathaiah, Magesh; Steel, Jennifer; Lenzner, Diana; Ramalingam, Lekshmi; Holtzman, Matthew; Ahrendt, Steven; Pingpank, James; Zeh, Herbert J; Bartlett, David L; Choudry, Haroon A

    2012-05-01

    Peritoneal carcinomatosis (PC) in the setting of mucinous appendiceal neoplasms is characterized by the intraperitoneal accumulation of mucinous ascites and mucin-secreting epithelial cells that leads to progressive compression of intra-abdominal organs, morbidity, and eventual death. We assessed postoperative and oncologic outcomes after aggressive surgical management by experienced surgeons. We analyzed clinicopathologic, perioperative, and oncologic outcome data in 282 patients with PC from appendiceal adenocarcinomas between 2001 and 2010 from a prospective database. Kaplan–Meier survival curves and multivariate Cox-regression models were used to identify prognostic factors affecting oncologic outcomes. Adequate cytoreduction was achieved in 82% of patients (completeness of cytoreduction score (CC)-0: 49%; CC-1: 33%). Median simplified peritoneal cancer index (SPCI), operative time, and estimated blood loss were 14 (range, 0–21), 483.5 min (range, 46–1,402), and 800 ml (range, 0–14,000), respectively. Pathology assessment demonstrated high-grade tumors in 36% of patients and lymph node involvement in 23% of patients. Major postoperative morbidity occurred in 70 (25%) patients. Median overall survival was 6.72 years (95% confidence interval (CI), 4.17 years not reached), with 5 year overall survival probability of 52.7% (95% CI, 42.4, 62%). In a multivariate Cox-regression model, tumor grade, age, preoperative SPCI and chemo-naïve status at surgery were joint significant predictors of overall survival. Tumor grade, postoperative CC-score, prior chemotherapy, and preoperative SPCI were joint significant predictors of time to progression. Aggressive management of PC from mucinous appendiceal neoplasms, by experienced surgeons, to achieve complete cytoreduction provides long-term survival with low major morbidity.

  7. Spectrum of Intestinal Neoplasms: A study of 400 cases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aminder Singh

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available Objective: The present study is a five-year analysis of all the tumors of small and large intestine received in the Pathology Department of Dayanand Medical College and Hospital, Ludhiana. Methods: All the cases were grossly and microscopically examined and were staged according to Astler Coller Staging and classified and subtyped according to WHO classification. The important differences between the small and large intestine tumors were also analyzed. Results: There were 400 cases out of which 356 were in large intestine while 44 were in the small intestine. There were only 56 benign neoplasms while 344 were malignant tumors. Adenomas were the most common benign tumors while majority of malignant tumors were adenocarcinomas. Lymphomas, mesenchymal tumors, and carcinoid tumors were much more common in a small intestine as compared to large intestine. Majority of adenocarcinomas were located in the large intestine with most of them being moderately differentiated having Astler Coller Stage B II. Mucinous carcinomas had the worst prognosis as compared to adenocarcinomas. Anal canal had mainly squamous cell carcinomas. Conclusions: Tumors of large intestine were much commoner than of small intestine. There was a higher incidence of tumor in males with M:F ratio of 2.2:1. Mean age of presentation of benign tumor was younger, i.e., 32.6 years when compared to 54.5 years for malignant tumors. Tubular adenoma was the most common benign tumor and adenocarcinoma the commonest malignant neoplasm. [J Interdiscipl Histopathol 2015; 3(1.000: 19-23

  8. The incidence of malignancy in neoplasms of the submandibular ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Objective. To test the validity of the reported high incidence (50%) of malignancy in neoplasms of the submandibular salivary gland, and to compare it with that of the parotid gland. Methods. This is a retrospective analysis of major salivary gland neoplasms in 127 patients who were treated between August 1988 and ...

  9. Multiple neoplasms, single primaries, and patient survival

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Amer MH

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Magid H Amer Department of Medicine, St Rita's Medical Center, Lima, OH, USA Background: Multiple primary neoplasms in surviving cancer patients are relatively common, with an increasing incidence. Their impact on survival has not been clearly defined. Methods: This was a retrospective review of clinical data for all consecutive patients with histologically confirmed cancer, with emphasis on single versus multiple primary neoplasms. Second primaries discovered at the workup of the index (first primary were termed simultaneous, if discovered within 6 months of the index primary were called synchronous, and if discovered after 6 months were termed metachronous. Results: Between 2005 and 2012, of 1,873 cancer patients, 322 developed second malignancies; these included two primaries (n=284, and three or more primaries (n=38. Forty-seven patients had synchronous primaries and 275 had metachronous primaries. Patients with multiple primaries were predominantly of Caucasian ancestry (91.0%, with a tendency to develop thrombosis (20.2%, had a strong family history of similar cancer (22.3%, and usually presented with earlier stage 0 through stage II disease (78.9%. When compared with 1,551 patients with a single primary, these figures were 8.9%, 15.6%, 18.3%, and 50.9%, respectively (P≤0.001. Five-year survival rates were higher for metachronous cancers (95% than for synchronous primaries (59% and single primaries (59%. The worst survival rate was for simultaneous concomitant multiple primaries, being a median of 1.9 years. The best survival was for patients with three or more primaries (median 10.9 years and was similar to the expected survival for the age-matched and sex-matched general population (P=0.06991. Conclusion: Patients with multiple primaries are usually of Caucasian ancestry, have less aggressive malignancies, present at earlier stages, frequently have a strong family history of similar cancer, and their cancers tend to have indolent

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  1. File list: His.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms http:...//dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  2. Low Temperature Plasma for the Treatment of Epithelial Cancer Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohades, Soheila

    Biomedical applications of low temperature plasmas (LTP) may lead to a paradigm shift in treating various diseases by conducting fundamental research on the effects of LTP on cells, tissues, organisms (plants, insects, and microorganisms). This is a rapidly growing interdisciplinary research field that involves engineering, physics, life sciences, and chemistry to find novel solutions for urgent medical needs. Effects of different LTP sources have shown the anti-tumor properties of plasma exposure; however, there are still many unknowns about the interaction of plasma with eukaryotic cells which must be elucidated in order to evaluate the practical potential of plasma in cancer treatment. Plasma, the fourth state of matter, is composed of electrons, ions, reactive molecules (radicals and non-radicals), excited species, radiation, and heat. A sufficient dose (time) of plasma exposure can induce death in cancer cells. The plasma pencil is employed to study the anti-tumor properties of this treatment on epithelial cells. The plasma pencil has been previously used for the inactivation of bacteria, destroying amyloid fibrils, and the killing of various cancer cells. Bladder cancer is the 9th leading cause of cancer. In this dissertation, human urinary bladder tissue with the squamous cell carcinoma disease (SCaBER cells) is treated with LTP utilizing two different approaches: direct plasma exposure and Plasma Activated Media (PAM) as an advancement to the treatment. PAM is produced by exposing a liquid cell culture medium to the plasma pencil. Direct LTP treatment of cancer cells indicates a dose-dependent killing effect at post-treatment times. Similarly, PAM treatment shows an anti-cancer effect by inducing substantial cell death. Reactive oxygen species (ROS) and reactive nitrogen species (RNS) have an important role in the biomedical effects of LTP treatment. This study demonstrates the capability of the plasma pencil to transport ROS/RNS into cell culture media

  3. Prognostic factors in childhood intracranial neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ampil, F.L.

    1987-01-01

    Thirty-six cases of primary intracranial neoplasm in children (over 1 year but under 13 years of age) seen at the university medical center between 1951 and 1982 were reviewed because of concern as to the results and after-effects of applied therapy. The overall 5-year actuarial survival rate was 17 %. Several factors of possible prognostic relevance, such as patient's age, intracranial location of the tumor, application or nonapplication of therapy, single or multiple modes of therapy, and extent of surgery, were analyzed. Completeness of surgical removal of the tumor proved to be the only statistically significant factor that correlated with survival. There was only one recorded case of severe learning disability and abnormal neuropsychologic development among the 12 living patients. The influence of patient's age (and technical factors) at the time of irradiation in correlation with the child's subsequent posttreatment functional performance, as reported in the literature, is reviewed. (author)

  4. Treatment selection for tonsillar squamous cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Yuan Kuo

    2013-04-01

    Conclusion: Both primary surgery and RT/CRT organ preservation are effective treatments for tonsillar SCC. Single modality treatment, either surgery or RT/CRT, can typically be provided for stage I–II diseases. Although RT/CRT organ preservation is used more frequently for stage III–IV tonsillar SCC in recent years, primary surgery combined with adjuvant therapy still achieves equivalent outcomes. Multidisciplinary pretreatment counseling and the facilities and personnel available are therefore important for decision-making. In addition, if RT/CRT organ preservation is selected as the primary treatment, tumor tonsillectomy is not indicated.

  5. Thyroid cancer: a lethal endocrine neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Robbins, J.; Merino, M.J.; Boice, J.D. Jr.; Ron, E.; Ain, K.B.; Alexander, H.R.; Norton, J.A.; Reynolds, J.

    1991-01-01

    This conference focuses on the controversies about managing thyroid cancer, emphasizing the possibility that the treatment of patients with potentially fatal thyroid cancer may be improved. Although the mortality rate from thyroid cancer is low, it is the highest among cancers affecting the endocrine glands (excluding the ovary). Exposure to radiation during childhood in the 1930s and 1940s increased the incidence of but not the mortality from thyroid cancer, because these tumors are mainly papillary cancers developing in young adults. These rates may change as the exposed cohort ages. Risk factors that increase mortality include older patient age and the growth characteristics of the tumor at diagnosis, the presence of distant metastases, and cell type (for example, the tall-cell variants of papillary cancer, follicular cancer [to be distinguished from the more benign follicular variant of papillary cancer], medullary cancer, and anaplastic cancer). Local metastases in lymph nodes do not seem to increase the risk for death from papillary cancer, but they do increase the risk for death from follicular and medullary cancer. In the latter, mortality is decreased by the early detection and treatment of patients with the familial multiple endocrine neoplasia syndrome 2a. There are excellent tumor markers for differentiated cancer of the parafollicular and of the follicular cells. Measuring the calcitonin level allows early diagnosis of familial medullary cancer, whereas measuring the thyroglobulin level, although useful only after total thyroidectomy, allows early recognition of recurrence or metastases of papillary or follicular cancer. Initial surgery, protocols for follow-up, and the use of radioiodine for the ablation of any residual thyroid and the treatment of metastatic cancer are discussed.128 references

  6. Multiple neoplasms, single primaries, and patient survival

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Amer, Magid H

    2014-01-01

    Multiple primary neoplasms in surviving cancer patients are relatively common, with an increasing incidence. Their impact on survival has not been clearly defined. This was a retrospective review of clinical data for all consecutive patients with histologically confirmed cancer, with emphasis on single versus multiple primary neoplasms. Second primaries discovered at the workup of the index (first) primary were termed simultaneous, if discovered within 6 months of the index primary were called synchronous, and if discovered after 6 months were termed metachronous. Between 2005 and 2012, of 1,873 cancer patients, 322 developed second malignancies; these included two primaries (n=284), and three or more primaries (n=38). Forty-seven patients had synchronous primaries and 275 had metachronous primaries. Patients with multiple primaries were predominantly of Caucasian ancestry (91.0%), with a tendency to develop thrombosis (20.2%), had a strong family history of similar cancer (22.3%), and usually presented with earlier stage 0 through stage II disease (78.9%). When compared with 1,551 patients with a single primary, these figures were 8.9%, 15.6%, 18.3%, and 50.9%, respectively (P≤0.001). Five-year survival rates were higher for metachronous cancers (95%) than for synchronous primaries (59%) and single primaries (59%). The worst survival rate was for simultaneous concomitant multiple primaries, being a median of 1.9 years. The best survival was for patients with three or more primaries (median 10.9 years) and was similar to the expected survival for the age-matched and sex-matched general population (P=0.06991). Patients with multiple primaries are usually of Caucasian ancestry, have less aggressive malignancies, present at earlier stages, frequently have a strong family history of similar cancer, and their cancers tend to have indolent clinical behavior with longer survival rates, possibly related to genetic predisposition

  7. Favourable results of Mohs micrographic surgery for basal cell carcinoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gniadecki, Robert; Glud, Martin; Mortensen, Kia

    2015-01-01

    INTRODUCTION: Basal cell carcinoma (BCC) is the most common malignant neoplasm with an annual incidence approaching 200/100,000 person-years. Mohs micrographic surgery (MMS) is widely used in North America and in Europe for treatment of BCC. This technique ensures radical tumour removal, sparing...

  8. Morphological clues to the appropriate recognition of hereditary renal neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moch, Holger; Ohashi, Riuko; Gandhi, Jatin S; Amin, Mahul B

    2018-02-14

    An important emerging role of the surgical pathologist besides the traditional tasks of establishment of the diagnosis and documentation of prognostic and predictive factors, is to recognize the possibility of a hereditary condition in cases where the histology is suggestive for a familial cancer syndrome. In recent years, the knowledge regarding all of the above roles, including the role of recognition of familial cancer, has particularly expanded in renal neoplasms with the close scrutiny to morphology, molecular correlates and clinical features of the different sub-types of renal cell carcinoma. Awareness of these clinically distinctive sub-types and their associated histologic clues will prompt the pathologist for further immunohistochemical or molecular work up, to look for clinical information to support the suspected diagnosis of familial cancer, to alert managing physician/s to look for stigmata of history of familial cancer, which will permit triaging patients and their families for appropriate genetic counseling. This review provides a comprehensive review of the known sub-types of renal cell carcinoma that have a predilection to occur in the setting of hereditary disease; examples include renal cancers occurring in the background of von Hippel Lindau disease, hereditary leiomyomatosis and renal cell carcinoma syndrome, tuberous sclerosis, Birt Hogg Dube syndrome and succinate dehydrogenase deficiency. Herein we focus on diagnostic clues for renal tumors occurring in a non-pediatric setting that should prompt their correct recognition and reiterate the importance of the correct diagnosis. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  9. Cancer Stem Cells – New Approach to Cancerogenensis and Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zuzana Mačingová

    2008-01-01

    Full Text Available Recently, there is an increasing evidence supporting the theory of cancer stem cells not only in leukemia but also in solid cancer. To date, the existence of cancer stem cells has been proven in acute and chronic myeloid leukemia, in breast cancer, in brain tumors, in lung cancer and gastrointestinal tumors. This review is focusing on the recent discovery of stem cells in leukemia, human brain tumors and breast cancer. A small population of cells in the tumor (less than 1 % shows the potential to give rise to the tumor and its growth. These cells have a substantial characteristic of stem cells – ability for self-renewal without loss of proliferation capacity with each cell division. Furthermore they are immortal, rather resistant to treatment and express typical markers of stem cells. The origin of these resident cancer stem cells is not clear. Whether the cancer stem cells originate from normal stem cells in consequence of genetic and epigenetic changes and/or redifferentiation from somatic tumor cells to the stem-like cells remains to be investigated. We propose the idea of the relation between normal tissue stem cells and cancer stem cells and their populations – progenitor cells. Based on this we highlight one of the major characteristic of stem cell – plasticity, which is equally important in the physiological regeneration process as well as carcinogenesis. Furthermore, we consider the microenvironment as a limiting factor for tumor genesis in AML, breast cancer and brain tumors. Thus the biological properties of cancer stem cells are just beginning to be revealed, the continuation of these studies should lead to the development of cancer stem cells target therapies for cancer treatment.

  10. [Protein p53 in gastric carcinoma: clinical use of cancer research on neoplasms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Starzyńska, T

    1999-02-01

    Mutations of the tumour-suppressor p53 gene are a very frequent event in many human cancers. In normal cells and tissue, p53 protein has a very short half-life and attains such a low level that is not detectable immunohistochemically. In contrast, the altered forms, present in 30 to 80% of different neoplasms, are more stable and accumulate to concentration that can be detected by immunohistochemistry. Changes in the p53 gene product can be immunogenic. Thus a simple procedures as immunohistochemistry or Elisa test which stratifies cancer patients into those with and without p53 accumulation or p53 auto- antibodies can be analyzed for useful correlations with clinical and histopathological data. The p53 studies have demonstrated that in gastric carcinoma the expression of p53 protein can be properly assessed prior to surgery, using immunohistochemistry on a small tissue samples obtained during endoscopy. It has been shown that p53 assessment in this carcinoma can be helpful in identifying patients at high risk for metastatic spread, including regional lymph node involvement, and in the discrimination of those patients with especially poor prognosis. Furthermore it was demonstrated that in stomach p53 accumulation is a marker of malignancy. Thus, when combined with routine procedures, a simple test as p53 immunohistochemistry might allow better planing of appropriate treatment strategies and help in the pre-operative diagnosis of gastric carcinoma. Further studies are required to determine the clinical significance of p53 serum antibodies in gastric cancer.

  11. [Results after surgical treatment of giant cell tumor].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aguilar Ezquerra, Andres; Lopez Subias, Jorge; Lillo Adán, Marina; Garcia Torrealba, Lorena; Peguero Bona, Antonio

    2016-01-01

    giant cell is a tumor that appears in young adults, requirirng surgical treatment due to its metastatic capacity, but recurrence rates makes no consensus about theraperutic management. 23 patients were operated between 1996-2012 at Miguel Servet hospital, performing a mean of 8.9 years follow-up. Functional result was satisfactory in all cases, being able to perform normal phisical activity. Six recurrences were detected, which required surgical treatment, showing complete recovery at the end of the follow-up. One patient died by pulmonary metastasis. Surgery is the most appropriate treatment in giant cell tumors, having shown good results both in treatment of primary tumor and recurrences.

  12. Multifunctional Nucleic Acids for Tumor Cell Treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Pofahl, Monika; Wengel, Jesper; Mayer, Günter

    2014-01-01

    -proliferative and antimiR function in one 37-nucleotide nucleic acid molecule. It inhibits cancer cell growth and induces gene expression that is pathologically damped by an oncomir. These findings will have a strong impact on future developments regarding aptamer- and antimiR-related applications for tumor targeting...

  13. Training stem cells for treatment of malignant brain tumors

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Shengwen Calvin; Kabeer, Mustafa H; Vu, Long T; Keschrumrus, Vic; Yin, Hong Zhen; Dethlefs, Brent A; Zhong, Jiang F; Weiss, John H; Loudon, William G

    2014-01-01

    The treatment of malignant brain tumors remains a challenge. Stem cell technology has been applied in the treatment of brain tumors largely because of the ability of some stem cells to infiltrate into regions within the brain where tumor cells migrate as shown in preclinical studies. However, not all of these efforts can translate in the effective treatment that improves the quality of life for patients. Here, we perform a literature review to identify the problems in the field. Given the lack of efficacy of most stem cell-based agents used in the treatment of malignant brain tumors, we found that stem cell distribution (i.e., only a fraction of stem cells applied capable of targeting tumors) are among the limiting factors. We provide guidelines for potential improvements in stem cell distribution. Specifically, we use an engineered tissue graft platform that replicates the in vivo microenvironment, and provide our data to validate that this culture platform is viable for producing stem cells that have better stem cell distribution than with the Petri dish culture system. PMID:25258664

  14. Clinical manifestations and diagnosis of malignant neoplasms in children: what do pediatricians need to know?

    OpenAIRE

    M. Yu. Rykov; V. G. Polyakov

    2017-01-01

    Pediatric oncology is a complex specialty, requiring the involvement of various specialists – pediatric oncologists, pathomorphologists, radiation diagnosticians, surgeons. The patient’s life depends, first of all, on the timeliness of the diagnosis, since the earlier the specialized treatment is started, the higher the probability of achieving remission. In this connection, the problem of early detection of malignant neoplasms is particularly relevant. The complexity of solving this problem ...

  15. Nine Things to Know About Stem Cell Treatments

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... of. Unproven treatments present serious health, personal and financial considerations. Consider what might be lost and discuss these risks with your family and healthcare providers. 3 Different types of stem cells serve ...

  16. Carboplatin treatment of antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Larsen, Mathilde S; Yde, Christina Westmose; Christensen, Ib J

    2012-01-01

    Antiestrogen resistance is a major clinical problem in current breast cancer treatment. Therefore, biomarkers and new treatment options for antiestrogen-resistant breast cancer are needed. In this study, we investigated whether antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer cell lines have increased...... sensitivity to carboplatin, as it was previously shown with cisplatin, and whether low Bcl-2 expression levels have a potential value as marker for increased carboplatin sensitivity. Breast cancer cells resistant to the pure antiestrogen fulvestrant, and two out of four cell lines resistant...... to the antiestrogen tamoxifen, were more sensitive to carboplatin treatment compared to the parental MCF-7 cell line. This indicates that carboplatin may be an advantageous treatment in antiestrogen‑resistant breast cancer; however, a marker for increased sensitivity would be needed. Low Bcl-2 expression...

  17. Stem cells show promising results for lymphoedema treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Toyserkani, Navid Mohamadpour; Quaade, Marlene Louise; Sheikh, Søren Paludan

    2015-01-01

    in a single stage procedure as an autologous treatment. The aim of this paper was to review all studies using mesenchymal stem cells for lymphoedema treatment with a special focus on the potential use of adipose-derived stem cells. A systematic search was performed and five preclinical and two clinical......, secrete growth factors, regulate the inflammatory process, and differentiate into multiple cell types make them a potential ideal therapy for lymphoedema. Adipose tissue is the richest and most accessible source of mesenchymal stem cells and they can be harvested, isolated, and used for therapy......Abstract Lymphoedema is a debilitating condition, manifesting in excess lymphatic fluid and swelling of subcutaneous tissues. Lymphoedema is as of yet still an incurable condition and current treatment modalities are not satisfactory. The capacity of mesenchymal stem cells to promote angiogenesis...

  18. Plectin deficiency in liver cancer cells promotes cell migration and sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, Chiung-Chi; Chao, Wei-Ting; Liao, Chen-Chun; Tseng, Yu-Hui; Lai, Yen-Chang Clark; Lai, Yih-Shyong; Hsu, Yung-Hsiang; Liu, Yi-Hsiang

    2018-01-02

    Plectin involved in activation of kinases in cell signaling pathway and plays important role in cell morphology and migration. Plectin knockdown promotes cell migration by activating focal adhesion kinase and Rac1-GTPase activity in liver cells. Sorafenib is a multi-targeting tyrosine kinase inhibitor that improves patient survival on hepatocellular carcinoma. The aim of this study is to investigate the correlation between the expression of plectin and cell migration as well as the sensitivity of hepatoma cell lines exposing to sorafenib. Hepatoma cell lines PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 were used to examine the level of plectin expression and cell migration in comparison with Chang liver cell line. In addition, sensitivity of the 3 cell lines to sorafenib treatment was also measured. Expression of plectin was lower in PLC/PRF/5 and HepG2 hepatoma cells than that of Chang liver cells whereas HepG2 and PLC/PRF/5 cells exhibit higher rate of cell migration in trans-well migration assay. Immunohistofluorecent staining on E-cadherin revealed the highest rate of collective cell migration in HepG2 cells and the lowest was found in Chang liver cells. Likewise, HepG2 cell line was most sensitive to sorafenib treatment and Chang liver cells exhibited the least sensitivity. The drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment showed inverse correlation with the expression of plectin. We suggest that plectin deficiency and increased E-cadherin in hepatoma cells were associated with higher rates of cell motility, collective cell migration as well as higher drug sensitivity to sorafenib treatment.

  19. Islet-cell dysfunction induced by glucocorticoid treatment

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    van Raalte, Daniël H; Kwa, Kelly A A; van Genugten, Renate E

    2013-01-01

    Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system.......Glucocorticoids impair glucose tolerance by inducing insulin resistance. We investigated the dose-dependent effects of glucocorticoid treatment on islet-cell function in healthy males and studied the role of the autonomic nervous system....

  20. [Treatment of relapsed Hodgkin lymphoma after autologous stem cell transplantation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Illés, Árpád; Simon, Zsófia; Udvardy, Miklós; Magyari, Ferenc; Jóna, Ádám; Miltényi, Zsófia

    2017-08-01

    Approximately 10-30% of Hodgkin lymphoma patients relapses or experience refractory disease after first line treatment. Nowadays, autologous stem cell transplantation can successfully salvage half of these patients, median overall survival is only 2-2.5 years. Several prognostic factors determine success of autologous stem cell transplantation. Result of transplantation can be improved considering these factors and using consolidation treatment, if necessary. Patients who relapse after autologous transplantation had worse prognosis, treatment of this patient population is unmet clinical need. Several new treatment options became available in the recent years (brentuximab vedotin and immuncheckpoint inhibitors). These new treatment options offer more chance for cure in relapsed/refractory Hodgkin patients. Outcome of allogenic stem cell transplantation can be improved by using haploidentical donors. New therapeutic options will be discussed in this review. Orv Hetil. 2017; 158(34): 1338-1345.

  1. Endoscopic surgery and photodynamic therapy for behign and malignant neoplasms of colon

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    А. А. Razzhivina

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available The review of literature for current methods of endoscopic treatment for colon epithelial neoplasms is represented. Such types of endoscopic interventions as loop electroresection, submucosal dissection, coagulation and destruction of tumors and combination of several options depending on efficiency of previous therapy is analyzed. Limitations of every method, its special aspects and possible complications are described. Special focus is on specifics of neoplasms for which selected methods may be the most effective. Thus, hot biopsy and destruction using high-energy laser is efficient for small flat neoplasms, endoscopic electroexcision – far small pedunculated lesions, and fragmentation is adequate for exophytic tumors more than 2.0 cm. Long-term results of endoscopic treatment, recurrence rates after different options are represented. The literature for photodynamic therapy consists mostly articles about development (on pre-clenecal stage of new photosensitizers which are effective for colon cancer, new methods of treatment including combination with hyperthermia in low-dose light irradiation etc. The literature data shows the prospectivity of subsequent developments in this field. 

  2. Myoepithelial carcinoma of the paracecal mesentery: aggressive behavior of a rare neoplasm at an unusual anatomic site

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Khin Thway

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Myoepithelial tumors of the soft tissues represent a rare group of neoplasms that vary in their clinical behavior, pathologic features and genetics. They are histopathologically typified by a myoepithelial immunohistochemical phenotype, of expression of one or more epithelial markers, S100 protein and smooth muscle actin. Because of their rarity and occurrence over a wide age range and at a variety of anatomic sites, they can be difficult to diagnose due to the lack of familiarity by physicians, which is compounded by their spectrum of histologic features and morphologic overlap with several other neoplasms. Recent genetic insights have aided classification, and it is increasingly understood that soft tissue myoepithelial neoplasms can be stratified into two distinct morphologic and genetic subgroups. We describe a case of a 44-year-old man who was diagnosed with a primary myoepithelial neoplasm of the paracecal mesentery, which showed aggressive local recurrence after four years. The tumor was composed of cords of ovoid cells within chondromyxoid stroma, and displayed a characteristic pancytokeratin, S100 protein and smooth muscle actin-positive myoepithelial immunoprofile. Primary myoepithelioma has not been previously described at this site, and this case highlights this varied family of tumors, emphasizes the need to consider myoepithelial tumor in the differential diagnoses of carcinoma variants occurring in the bowel or mesentery, and also adds to the number of reported myoepithelial neoplasms showing markedly aggressive behavior.

  3. Re-Emergence of Dendritic Cell Vaccines for Cancer Treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Saxena, Mansi; Bhardwaj, Nina

    2018-02-01

    Dendritic cells (DCs) are essential in immunity owing to their role in activating T cells, thereby promoting antitumor responses. Tumor cells, however, hijack the immune system, causing T cell exhaustion and DC dysfunction. Tumor-induced T cell exhaustion may be reversed through immune checkpoint blockade (ICB); however, this treatment fails to show clinical benefit in many patients. While ICB serves to reverse T cell exhaustion, DCs are still necessary to prime, activate, and direct the T cells to target tumor cells. In this review we provide a brief overview of DC function, describe mechanisms by which DC functions are disrupted by the tumor microenvironment, and highlight recent developments in DC cancer vaccines. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  4. Immobilization of microbial cells: A promising tool for treatment of ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Suzana

    2013-07-10

    Jul 10, 2013 ... Review. Immobilization of microbial cells: A promising tool for treatment of toxic pollutants in industrial ... immobilized microorganisms could be cost effective since they can be used several times without ..... controlling the cell immobilization on the support (Hsu et al., 2004, Górecka and Jastrzębska, 2011).

  5. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 2, malignant lesions

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Bell, W.C.; Klein, M.J.; Pitt, M.J.; Siegal, G.P.

    2006-01-01

    This is the second part of a two-part review presenting an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. The first part presented a brief review of modern methods in molecular pathology, along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. This second part reviews the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in malignant chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. (orig.)

  6. Molecular pathology of chondroid neoplasms: part 2, malignant lesions

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bell, W.C. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Klein, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Pathology, Birmingham, AL (United States); Pitt, M.J. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Department of Diagnostic Radiology, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States); Siegal, G.P. [University of Alabama at Birmingham, Departments of Pathology, Cell Biology, and Surgery, Birmingham, AL (United States); University of Alabama at Birmingham, Center for Metabolic Bone Disease, Birmingham, AL (United States)

    2006-12-15

    This is the second part of a two-part review presenting an overview of the molecular findings associated with both benign and malignant chondroid neoplasms. The first part presented a brief review of modern methods in molecular pathology, along with a review of the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in benign chondroid neoplasms. This second part reviews the cytogenetic and molecular genetic findings in malignant chondroid neoplasms. Clinical aspects of the various lesions are briefly discussed, and each tumor is illustrated with representative radiographic and pathologic images. (orig.)

  7. Small-bowel neoplasms in patients undergoing video capsule endoscopy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rondonotti, E; Pennazio, M; Toth, E

    2008-01-01

    BACKGROUND AND STUDY AIM: Small-bowel tumors account for 1% - 3% of all gastrointestinal neoplasms. Recent studies with video capsule endoscopy (VCE) suggest that the frequency of these tumors may be substantially higher than previously reported. The aim of the study was to evaluate the frequency...... of the neoplasm seen in 29 centers of 10 European Countries. RESULTS: Of 5129 patients undergoing VCE, 124 (2.4%) had small-bowel tumors (112 primary, 12 metastatic). Among these patients, indications for VCE were: obscure gastrointestinal bleeding (108 patients), abdominal pain (9), search for primary neoplasm...

  8. LITERATURE REVIEW ON STEM CELL TREATMENT & ORAL SUBMUCOUS FIBROSIS (OSMF)

    OpenAIRE

    Prathipaty James; Kameswararao

    2015-01-01

    Stem cell therapy is a part of regenerative medicine that involves the use of undifferentiated cells in order to cure the disease. Stem cell - based therapies are being investigated for the treatment of many conditions, including neurodegenerative conditions such as Parkinson's disease, cardiovascular disease, liver disease, diabetes, autoimmune diseases and for nerve regeneration. (1) In orofacial region these therapies are being used for tooth and periodonta...

  9. Treatment of Elderly Patients With Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Kluin-Nelemans, Hanneke C.; Doorduijn, Jeanette K.

    Treatment of elderly patients with a mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) is a challenge. High-dose cytarabine and autologous transplantation, both important components of the treatment in younger patients, are not feasible for most elderly patients. However, in fit elderly patients long progression-free

  10. Pancreatic carcinosarcoma mimics malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Bing-Qi; Liu, Qiao-Fei; Chang, Xiao-Yan; Hu, Ya; Chen, Jie; Guo, Jun-Chao

    2017-01-01

    Abstract Rationale: Carcinosarcoma, an extremely rare pancreatic primary tumor, is characterized by coexistence of both carcinomatous and sarcomatous components. Due to its rarity, the clinical manifestation and imaging features have not been recognized. An accurate diagnostic method has not been available and a widely accepted guidelines instructing treatment has not been established. Patient concerns: We present an uncommon case of pancreatic carcinosarcoma (PCS) which has been preoperatively diagnosed as pancreatic malignant intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm. A radical resection, including total pancreatectomy (TP) and splenectomy, was performed. Diagnosis: The diagnosis of PCS was confirmed by postoperative pathology. Interventions: A radical resection, including TP and splenectomy, was performed. The patient was followed up by abdominal contrast-enhanced computed tomography scan and blood tumor marker examination. Outcomes: The patient is still alive and self-sufficient 7 months after the surgery. No evidence of tumor recurrence is found during follow-up. Lessons: Although, until recently, there are no widely accepted guidelines instructing treatment for PCS, a radical resection is still a possible way. All the pancreatic neoplastic patients with high surgical risk should be transferred to a specialized high-volume pancreatic center to get precise preoperative evaluation, fine operation technique, and careful postoperative management. PMID:28591030

  11. Hidradenocarcinoma: A Rare Sweat Gland Neoplasm Presenting as Small Turban Tumor of the Scalp.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asati, Dinesh P; Brahmachari, Swagata; Kudligi, Chandramohan; Gupta, Chandramohan

    2015-01-01

    Hidradenocarcinomas are very rare malignant sweat gland tumors that possess an infiltrative and/or low metastatic potential. Here we describe an interesting case of hidradenoma on the fronto-parietal region of the scalp of an elderly female, part of which had developed carcinomatous changes, infiltrating up to the pericranium. She developed intense itching, pain, spontaneous ulceration and rapid increase in the size of the tumor correlating with the expression of malignant behavior of the neoplasm. An initial incision biopsy suggested features of benign poroid hidradenoma, while the histology from the excised tumor exhibited a fairly well circumscribed epithelial neoplasm in dermis consisting of interconnected nodules as well as differentiated ducts, the neoplastic cells showing mild pleomorphism of nuclei, mitotic figures and abundant pale cytoplasm. Clefts, sclerotic stroma and foci of necrosis en mass were also seen. The final diagnosis was a well differentiated and slow growing hidradenocarcinoma. The tumor recurred locally despite total excision.

  12. Hidradenocarcinoma: A rare sweat gland neoplasm presenting as small turban tumor of the scalp

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinesh P Asati

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Hidradenocarcinomas are very rare malignant sweat gland tumors that possess an infiltrative and/or low metastatic potential. Here we describe an interesting case of hidradenoma on the fronto-parietal region of the scalp of an elderly female, part of which had developed carcinomatous changes, infiltrating up to the pericranium. She developed intense itching, pain, spontaneous ulceration and rapid increase in the size of the tumor correlating with the expression of malignant behavior of the neoplasm. An initial incision biopsy suggested features of benign poroid hidradenoma, while the histology from the excised tumor exhibited a fairly well circumscribed epithelial neoplasm in dermis consisting of interconnected nodules as well as differentiated ducts, the neoplastic cells showing mild pleomorphism of nuclei, mitotic figures and abundant pale cytoplasm. Clefts, sclerotic stroma and foci of necrosis en mass were also seen. The final diagnosis was a well differentiated and slow growing hidradenocarcinoma. The tumor recurred locally despite total excision.

  13. Reticulated acanthoma with sebaceous differentiation: another sebaceous neoplasm associated with Muir-Torre syndrome?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shon, Wonwoo; Wolz, Michael M; Newman, Catherine C; Bridges, Alina G

    2014-11-01

    Reticulated acanthoma with sebaceous differentiation (RASD) represents a rare benign cutaneous epithelial neoplasm with sebaceous differentiation. There has been much speculation about the relationship between RASD and Muir-Torre syndrome (MTS). We report a 53 year-old man who presented with RASD in addition to a prior history of sebaceous adenomas. Immunohistochemically, the tumour cells in the RASD and sebaceous adenomas showed a significantly reduced MSH6 protein expression, whereas there was no loss of MLH1, MSH2 and PMS2. This benign neoplasm, which can be mistaken for various other cutaneous lesions with sebaceous differentiation, deserves wider recognition for its possible association with MTS. © 2013 The Authors. Australasian Journal of Dermatology © 2013 The Australasian College of Dermatologists.

  14. Molecular Analysis of Gene Rearrangements and Mutations in Acute Leukemias and Myeloid Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sholl, Lynette M; Longtine, Janina; Kuo, Frank C

    2017-01-11

    A subset of acute leukemias and other myeloid neoplasms contains specific genetic alterations, many of which are associated with unique clinical and pathologic features. These alterations include chromosomal rearrangements leading to oncogenic fusion proteins or alteration of gene expression by juxtaposing oncogenes to enhancer elements, as well as mutations leading to aberrant activation of a variety of proteins critical to hematopoietic progenitor cell proliferation and differentiation. Molecular analysis is central to diagnosis and clinical management of leukemias, permitting genetic confirmation of a clinical and histologic impression, providing prognostic and predictive information, and facilitating detection of minimal residual disease. This unit will outline approaches to the molecular diagnosis of the most frequent and clinically relevant genetic alterations in acute leukemias and myeloid neoplasms. © 2017 by John Wiley & Sons, Inc. Copyright © 2017 John Wiley & Sons, Inc.

  15. [Repairing bone defects of benign bone neoplasm by grafting of bioactive glass combined with autologous bone marrow].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Hongwei; Sun, Junying; Wang, Yong; Yang, Xing; Zhu, Ershan

    2008-11-01

    To investigate the clinical application of grafting with bioactive glass (BG) and autologous bone marrow for defect after resection and curettage of benign bone neoplasm. From January 2004 to May 2007, 34 patients with bone defects were repaired. There were 21 males and 13 females with a mean age of 25.6 years (8 to 56 years). There were 14 cases of simple bone cysts, 6 cases of fibrous dysplasia, 3 cases of osteoid osteoma, 4 cases of non-ossifying fibroma, 2 cases of enchondroma and 3 cases of giant cell tumor of bone. Tumor sizes varied from 2.0 cm x 1.5 cm x 1.0 cm to 9.0 cm x 3.0 cm x 2.5 cm. Benign bone neoplasm was removed thoroughly with a curet or osteotome, bone defects ranged from 3.0 cm x 2.0 cm x 1.5 cm to 11.0 cm x 3.5 cm x 3.0 cm, which was closed-up with the mixtures of BG and autogenous red bone marrow. Six cases of pathologic fracture were fixed with steel plate or intramedullary nail. The postoperative systemic and local reactions were observed, and the regular X-ray examinations were performed to observe the bone healing. All the patients had good wound healing after operation. There was no yellow effusion nor white crystal and skin rash appeared around wound, indicating no allergic reaction occurred. A follow-up of 1 to 4 years (mean 24.6 months) showed satisfactory healing without complications. At averaged 16 weeks after operation, patients with bone tumor in lower limbs resumed walking independently and those with bone tumor in upper limbs resumed holding object. There was no tumor recurrence during follow-up. Radiographically, the interface between the implanted bone and host bone became fuzzy 1 month after implantation. Two months after operation, the BG was absorbed gradually, new bone formation could be seen in the defects. Four months after operation, implanted bone and host bone merged together, bone density increased. Six to ten months after operation, the majority of the implanted BG was absorbed and substituted for new bone, bone

  16. Mesenchymal Stem Cells for the Treatment of Skin Diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Toshio Hasegawa

    2017-08-01

    Full Text Available Mesenchymal stem cell (MSC-based therapy involving both autologous and allogeneic MSCs shows great promise in treating several conditions. MSCs promote wound healing, and can differentiate into multiple cell lineages, including keratinocytes. Therefore, MSCs can be used for the treatment of congenital or acquired skin defects. Because of their immunomodulatory properties, MSCs may be useful for the treatment of inflammatory and autoimmune skin diseases. In particular, MSCs might be effective for the treatment of large vitiligo lesions as immunosuppressant or cultured grafts. MSCs can also be a novel cell source for regenerating hair in the treatment of scarring alopecia and androgenic alopecia. MSCs might also be an effective treatment for alopecia areata, which is associated with autoimmunity. Stem cell therapies with topical administration of MSCs and bone marrow transplantation were shown to alleviate recessive dystrophic epidermolysis bullosa in both animal models and human subjects. In addition to cell transplantation, the mobilization of endogenous MSCs has been attempted for skin regeneration. Overall, this review highlights the great potential of MSCs for the treatment of skin diseases in the near future.

  17. Tumor cells and neovasculature dual targeting delivery for glioblastoma treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Huile; Yang, Zhi; Cao, Shijie; Xiong, Yang; Zhang, Shuang; Pang, Zhiqing; Jiang, Xinguo

    2014-02-01

    Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM), one of the most common primary malignant brain tumors, was characterized by angiogenesis and tumor cells proliferation. Antiangiogenesis and antitumor combination treatment gained much attention because of the potency in dual inhibition of both the tumor proliferation and the tumor invasion. In this study, a neovasculature and tumor cell dual targeting delivery system was developed through modification of nanoparticles with interleukin-13 peptide and RGD (IRNPs), in which interleukin-13 peptide was targeting GBM cells and RGD was targeting neovasculature. To evaluate the potency in GBM treatment, docetaxel was loaded into IRNPs. In vitro, interleukin-13 peptide and RGD could enhance the corresponding cells (C6 and human umbilical vein endothelial cells) uptake and cytotoxicity. In combination, IRNPs showed high uptake in both cells and increased the cytotoxicity on both cells. In vivo, IRNPs could effectively deliver cargoes to GBM with higher intensity than mono-modified nanoparticles. Correspondingly, docetaxel-IRNPs displayed best anti-tumor effect with a median survival time of 35 days, which was significantly longer than that of mono-modified and unmodified nanoparticles. Importantly, treatment with docetaxel-IRNPs could avoid the accumulation of HIF1α in GBM site, which was crucial for the tumor invasion. After the treatment, there was no obvious change in normal organs of mice. Copyright © 2013 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  18. Epidemiology of hemopoietic system neoplasms in Argentina.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Micheo, E Q; Calcagno, E J; de Sijvarger, S R; Calabria, S I; Maccione, E; Besuschio, S C; Magnasco, J H; Barros, C; Muriel, F S; de Soto, Z C

    1979-08-01

    The mortality caused by blood neoplasms in Argentina shows great irregularity. This was found to be caused in certain ways by (a) differences in the sexes and ages of the populations studied; (b) differences in available health services; and (c) environmental factors. Thus high rates and clusters of lymphomas and multiple mylomas were observed in zones with arsenical water, for example.In rural districts, the rates are lower, especially among old-aged people.Lower rates of leukemias were also observed among Spaniards compared to Italians (p=0.001) residing in Argentina. Turkish, Syrian, and Lebanese showed higher rates than Argentinians, Spaniards, or Italians.The results of a case-control study are given in which the following were observed: (a) Among the ancestors of cases HSN there are fewer Spaniards (not significant) and Latin-Americans (p=0.03) and more people who were born in Central or Eastern Europe (p=0.01). (b) In case group, there was more frequent contact with animals, especially dogs; and a greater exposure to petroleum and its products, and to insecticides.

  19. Eponyms in cardiothoracic radiology: Part I. Neoplasms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mohammed, Tan-Lucien H; Saettele, Megan R; Saettele, Timothy; Patel, Vikas; Kanne, Jeffrey P

    2014-01-01

    Eponyms serve the purpose of honoring individuals who have made important observations and discoveries. As with other fields of medicine, eponyms are frequently encountered in radiology, particularly in chest radiology. However, inappropriate use of an eponym may lead to potentially dangerous miscommunication. Moreover, an eponym may honor the incorrect person or a person who falls into disrepute. Despite their limitations, eponyms are still widespread in medical literature. Furthermore, in some circumstances, more than one individual may have contributed to the description or discovery of a particular anatomical structure or disease, whereas in others, an eponym may have been incorrectly applied initially and propagated for years in medical literature. Nevertheless, radiologic eponyms are a means of honoring those who have made lasting contributions to the field of radiology, and familiarity with these eponyms is critical for proper reporting and accurate communication. In addition, the acquisition of some historical knowledge about those whose names are associated with various structures or pathologic conditions conveys a sense of humanity in the field of medicine. In this article, the first of a multipart series, the authors discuss a number of chest radiology eponyms as they relate to neoplasms, including relevant clinical and imaging features, as well biographic information of the respective eponym׳s namesake. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Changes in the profile of simple mucin-type O-glycans and polypeptide GalNAc-transferases in human testis and testicular neoplasms are associated with germ cell maturation and tumour differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rajpert-De Meyts, E; Poll, S N; Goukasian, I

    2007-01-01

    Testicular germ cell tumours (TGCT) exhibit remarkable ability to differentiate into virtually all somatic tissue types. In this study, we investigated changes in mucin-type O-glycosylation, which have been associated with somatic cell differentiation and cancer. Expression profile of simple mucin......-glycosylation pattern in haploid germ cells suggests a role in their maturation or egg recognition/fertilization warranting further studies in male infertility, whereas the findings in TGCT provide new diagnostic tools and support our hypothesis that testicular cancer is a developmental disease of germ cell...

  1. Asthma in Sickle Cell Disease: Implications for Treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Blake

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Objective. To review issues related to asthma in sickle cell disease and management strategies. Data Source. A systematic review of pertinent original research publications, reviews, and editorials was undertaken using MEDLlNE, the Cochrane Library databases, and CINAHL from 1947 to November 2010. Search terms were [asthma] and [sickle cell disease]. Additional publications considered relevant to the sickle cell disease population of patients were identified; search terms included [sickle cell disease] combined with [acetaminophen], [pain medications], [vitamin D], [beta agonists], [exhaled nitric oxide], and [corticosteroids]. Results. The reported prevalence of asthma in children with sickle cell disease varies from 2% to approximately 50%. Having asthma increases the risk for developing acute chest syndrome , death, or painful episodes compared to having sickle cell disease without asthma. Asthma and sickle cell may be linked by impaired nitric oxide regulation, excessive production of leukotrienes, insufficient levels of Vitamin D, and exposure to acetaminophen in early life. Treatment of sickle cell patients includes using commonly prescribed asthma medications; specific considerations are suggested to ensure safety in the sickle cell population. Conclusion. Prospective controlled trials of drug treatment for asthma in patients who have both sickle cell disease and asthma are urgently needed.

  2. Ectopic production of the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotrophin by malignant ovarian neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tsalacopoulos, G.; Bloch, B.

    1982-01-01

    A sensitive and specific radio-immunoassay for the beta subunit of human chorionic gonadotrophin(β-HCG) was performed on serum samples from 18 patients with large pelvic masses. No β-HCG level was detectable in 8 patients with either benign ovarian tumours or non-ovarian masses. Ten patients had a malignant ovarian neoplasm, and 6 of these (60%) had raised β-HCG levels. Cystadenocarcinoma of the ovary was the commonest malignant tumour (6/10) and the β-HCG was raised in 4 patients (66,6%) with this tumour. Serum β-HCG values therefore appear to be useful in the management of ovarian neoplasms, both for the early diagnosis of occult tumour and for monitoring response to treatment

  3. Inheritance of the chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms. A systematic review

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ranjan, Ajenthen; Penninga, E; Jelsig, Am

    2012-01-01

    This systematic review investigated the inheritance of the classical chronic myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) including polycythemia vera (PV), essential thrombocythemia (ET), primary myelofibrosis (PMF) and chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML). Sixty-one articles were included and provided 135...

  4. [Approach to diagnosis and management of myeloproliferative neoplasm variants].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitsumori, Toru; Kirito, Keita

    2015-08-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) variants are defined as relatively uncommon myeloid neoplasms which do not meet the criteria for either classical MPN or myelodysplastic syndrome. Due to the lack of specific markers, it has been challenging to accurately diagnose these malignant diseases. Recent studies have revealed new genetic abnormalities in MPN variants. These research advances are anticipated to open new approaches to not only achieving accurate diagnosis but also novel therapeutic options for these diseases.

  5. First line treatment of advanced non-small-cell lung cancer – specific focus on albumin bound paclitaxel

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Gupta N

    2013-12-01

    Full Text Available Neha Gupta, Hassan Hatoum, Grace K DyDepartment of Medicine, Roswell Park Cancer Institute, Buffalo, NY, USAAbstract: Lung cancer is the leading cause of cancer mortality worldwide in both men and women. Non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC is the most common type of lung cancer, accounting for more than 80% of cases. Paclitaxel has a broad spectrum of activity against various malignancies, including NSCLC. Paclitaxel is poorly soluble in water and thus, until recently, its commercially available preparations contained a non-ionic solvent Cremophor EL®. Cremophor EL® improves the solubility of paclitaxel and allows its intravenous administration. However, certain side-effects associated with paclitaxel, such as hypersensitivity reactions, myelosuppression, and peripheral neuropathy, are known to be worsened by Cremophor®. Nanoparticle albumin-bound paclitaxel ([nab-paclitaxel] ABRAXANE® ABI-007 is a new generation formulation of paclitaxel that obviates the need for Cremophor®, resulting in a safer and faster infusion without requiring the use of premedications to avoid hypersensitivity. Albumin-binding receptor-mediated delivery and lack of sequestering Cremophor® micelles allow higher intratumoral concentration of pharmacologically active paclitaxel. Multiple clinical trials have demonstrated a superior tolerability profile of nab-paclitaxel in comparison to solvent-bound paclitaxel (sb-paclitaxel. A recent Phase III trial compared the effects of weekly nab-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin versus sb-paclitaxel in combination with carboplatin given every 3 weeks for first line treatment of NSCLC. This trial highlights the weekly nab-paclitaxel combination as an alternate treatment option for NSCLC, with higher response rate in squamous cell NSCLC and longer survival in elderly patients. This review will focus on the properties of nab-paclitaxel and its use in the first line treatment of NSCLC.Keywords: ABI-007, Abraxane, nab

  6. Adrenal Oncocytic Neoplasm with Paradoxical Loss of Important Mitochondrial Steroidogenic Protein: The 18 kDA Translocator Protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Roberto Ruiz-Cordero

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available The adrenal glands produce a variety of hormones that play a key role in the regulation of blood pressure, electrolyte homeostasis, metabolism, immune system suppression, and the body’s physiologic response to stress. Adrenal neoplasms can be asymptomatic or can overproduce certain hormones that lead to different clinical manifestations. Oncocytic adrenal neoplasms are infrequent tumors that arise from cells in the adrenal cortex and display a characteristic increase in the number of cytoplasmic mitochondria. Since the rate-limiting step in steroidogenesis includes the transport of cholesterol across the mitochondrial membranes, in part carried out by the 18-kDa translocator protein (TSPO, we assessed the expression of TSPO in a case of adrenal oncocytic neoplasm using residual adrenal gland of the patient as internal control. We observed a significant loss of TSPO immunofluorescence expression in the adrenal oncocytic tumor cells when compared to adjacent normal adrenal tissue. We further confirmed this finding by employing Western blot analysis to semiquantify TSPO expression in tumor and normal adrenal cells. Our findings could suggest a potential role of TSPO in the tumorigenesis of this case of adrenocortical oncocytic neoplasm.

  7. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, retinal pigment epithelial cells, transplantation, treatment...

  8. Transplantation of retinal pigment epithelial cells - a possible future treatment for age-related macular degeneration

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Wiencke, Anne Katrine

    2001-01-01

    ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment......ophthalmology, age-related macular degeneration, transplantation, retinal pigment epithelial cells, treatment...

  9. Induced pluripotent stem cells and Parkinson's disease: modelling and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xiaoyun; Huang, Jinsha; Li, Jie; Liu, Ling; Han, Chao; Shen, Yan; Zhang, Guoxin; Jiang, Haiyang; Lin, Zhicheng; Xiong, Nian; Wang, Tao

    2016-02-01

    Many neurodegenerative disorders, such as Parkinson's disease (PD), are characterized by progressive neuronal loss in different regions of the central nervous system, contributing to brain dysfunction in the relevant patients. Stem cell therapy holds great promise for PD patients, including with foetal ventral mesencephalic cells, human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) and human induced pluripotent stem cells (hiPSCs). Moreover, stem cells can be used to model neurodegenerative diseases in order to screen potential medication and explore their mechanisms of disease. However, related ethical issues, immunological rejection and lack of canonical grafting protocols limit common clinical use of stem cells. iPSCs, derived from reprogrammed somatic cells, provide new hope for cell replacement therapy. In this review, recent development in stem cell treatment for PD, using hiPSCs, as well as the potential value of hiPSCs in modelling for PD, have been summarized for application of iPSCs technology to clinical translation for PD treatment. © 2016 John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  10. Glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood leukodystrophies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osorio, M Joana; Goldman, Steven A

    2016-09-01

    The childhood leukodystrophies comprise a group of hereditary disorders characterized by the absence, malformation or destruction of myelin. These disorders share common clinical, radiological and pathological features, despite their diverse molecular and genetic etiologies. Oligodendrocytes and astrocytes are the major affected cell populations, and are either structurally impaired or metabolically compromised through cell-intrinsic pathology, or are the victims of mis-accumulated toxic byproducts of metabolic derangement. In either case, glial cell replacement using implanted tissue or pluripotent stem cell-derived human neural or glial progenitor cells may comprise a promising strategy for both structural remyelination and metabolic rescue. A broad variety of pediatric white matter disorders, including the primary hypomyelinating disorders, the lysosomal storage disorders, and the broader group of non-lysosomal metabolic leukodystrophies, may all be appropriate candidates for glial progenitor cell-based treatment. Nonetheless, a variety of specific challenges remain before this therapeutic strategy can be applied to children. These include timely diagnosis, before irreparable neuronal injury has ensued; understanding the natural history of the targeted disease; defining the optimal cell phenotype for each disorder; achieving safe and scalable cellular compositions; designing age-appropriate controlled clinical trials; and for autologous therapy of genetic disorders, achieving the safe genetic editing of pluripotent stem cells. Yet these challenges notwithstanding, the promise of glial progenitor cell-based treatment of the childhood myelin disorders offers hope to the many victims of this otherwise largely untreatable class of disease. Copyright © 2016 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Salivary Gland Neoplasms: Does Morphological Diversity Reflect Tumor Heterogeneity?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rito, Miguel; Fonseca, Isabel

    2017-09-21

    Salivary gland tumor classification encompasses a vast list of benign and malignant neoplasms. Their morphological diversity is recognized not only between different entities but also within individual tumors. Tumor categories as described by the World Health Organization reflect, in part, a true genetic heterogeneity (e.g., translocations involving CRTC1 and CRTC3-MAML2 genes in mucoepidermoid carcinoma and MYB-NFIB fusion in adenoid cystic carcinoma). Carcinoma ex pleomorphic adenoma shows diversity in its histological appearance, but recurrent rearrangements on PLAG1 and HMGA2 are common to its benign precursor. More recently, new categories have been defined, like secretory carcinoma with the t(12;15) (p13;q25) ETV6-NTRK3 translocation and clear-cell carcinoma with EWSR1-ATF1 fusion. Recent studies on cribriform adenocarcinoma of minor salivary gland origin and epithelial-myoepithelial carcinoma point to a correlation with their morphological features. All of these advances show that the search of a histogenetic and genetic basis for salivary gland tumors is helping to clarify morphological categories and unraveling new ones. Nevertheless, currently morphology is still the hallmark of tumor classification and the gold standard. The therapeutic options for advanced tumors remain very limited but the discovery of translocation-generated gene fusions and increased knowledge of the genomic information of salivary gland tumors is creating opportunities for the development of specific targeted therapies. © 2017 S. Karger AG, Basel.

  12. Pathogenesis of Myeloproliferative Neoplasms: Role and Mechanisms of Chronic Inflammation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bigot-Corbel, Edith; Gardie, Betty

    2015-01-01

    Myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs) are a heterogeneous group of clonal diseases characterized by the excessive and chronic production of mature cells from one or several of the myeloid lineages. Recent advances in the biology of MPNs have greatly facilitated their molecular diagnosis since most patients present with mutation(s) in the JAK2, MPL, or CALR genes. Yet the roles played by these mutations in the pathogenesis and main complications of the different subtypes of MPNs are not fully elucidated. Importantly, chronic inflammation has long been associated with MPN disease and some of the symptoms and complications can be linked to inflammation. Moreover, the JAK inhibitor clinical trials showed that the reduction of symptoms linked to inflammation was beneficial to patients even in the absence of significant decrease in the JAK2-V617F mutant load. These observations suggested that part of the inflammation observed in patients with JAK2-mutated MPNs may not be the consequence of JAK2 mutation. The aim of this paper is to review the different aspects of inflammation in MPNs, the molecular mechanisms involved, the role of specific genetic defects, and the evidence that increased production of certain cytokines depends or not on MPN-associated mutations, and to discuss possible nongenetic causes of inflammation. PMID:26538820

  13. Propranolol treatment of infantile hemangioma endothelial cells: A molecular analysis

    Science.gov (United States)

    STILES, JESSICA; AMAYA, CLARISSA; PHAM, ROBERT; ROWNTREE, REBECCA K.; LACAZE, MARY; MULNE, ARLYNN; BISCHOFF, JOYCE; KOKTA, VICTOR; BOUCHERON, LAURA E.; MITCHELL, DIANNE C.; BRYAN, BRAD A.

    2012-01-01

    Infantile hemangiomas (IHs) are non-malignant, largely cutaneous vascular tumors affecting approximately 5–10% of children to varying degrees. During the first year of life, these tumors are strongly proliferative, reaching an average size ranging from 2 to 20 cm. These lesions subsequently stabilize, undergo a spontaneous slow involution and are fully regressed by 5 to 10 years of age. Systemic treatment of infants with the non-selective β-adrenergic receptor blocker, propranolol, has demonstrated remarkable efficacy in reducing the size and appearance of IHs. However, the mechanism by which this occurs is largely unknown. In this study, we sought to understand the molecular mechanisms underlying the effectiveness of β blocker treatment in IHs. Our data reveal that propranolol treatment of IH endothelial cells, as well as a panel of normal primary endothelial cells, blocks endothelial cell proliferation, migration, and formation of the actin cytoskeleton coincident with alterations in vascular endothelial growth factor receptor-2 (VEGFR-2), p38 and cofilin signaling. Moreover, propranolol induces major alterations in the protein levels of key cyclins and cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors, and modulates global gene expression patterns with a particular affect on genes involved in lipid/sterol metabolism, cell cycle regulation, angiogenesis and ubiquitination. Interestingly, the effects of propranolol were endothelial cell-type independent, affecting the properties of IH endothelial cells at similar levels to that observed in neonatal dermal microvascular and coronary artery endothelial cells. This data suggests that while propranolol markedly inhibits hemangioma and normal endothelial cell function, its lack of endothelial cell specificity hints that the efficacy of this drug in the treatment of IHs may be more complex than simply blockage of endothelial function as previously believed. PMID:23170111

  14. Pediatric adrenocortical neoplasms: can imaging reliably discriminate adenomas from carcinomas?

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Flynt, Kelsey A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Smith, Ethan A.; Strouse, Peter J.; Davenport, Matthew S.; Caoili, Elaine M.; Else, Tobias

    2015-01-01

    There is a paucity of literature describing and comparing the imaging features of adrenocortical adenomas and carcinomas in children and adolescents. To document the CT and MRI features of adrenocortical neoplasms in a pediatric population and to determine whether imaging findings (other than metastatic disease) can distinguish adenomas from carcinomas. We searched institutional medical records to identify pediatric patients with adrenocortical neoplasms. Pre-treatment CT and MRI examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus, and pertinent imaging findings were documented. We also recorded relevant histopathological, demographic, clinical follow-up and survival data. We used the Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test to compare parametric and nonparametric continuous data, and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses to evaluate the diagnostic performances of tumor diameter and volume for discriminating carcinoma from adenoma. A P-value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Among the adrenocortical lesions, 9 were adenomas, 15 were carcinomas, and 1 was of uncertain malignant potential. There were no differences in mean age, gender or sidedness between adenomas and carcinomas. Carcinomas were significantly larger than adenomas based on mean estimated volume (581 ml, range 16-2,101 vs. 54 ml, range 3-197 ml; P-value = 0.003; ROC area under the curve = 0.92) and mean maximum transverse plane diameter (9.9 cm, range 3.0-14.9 vs. 4.4 cm, range 1.9-8.2 cm; P-value = 0.0001; ROC area under the curve = 0.92). Carcinomas also were more heterogeneous than adenomas on post-contrast imaging (13/14 vs. 2/9; odds ratio [OR] = 45.5; P-value = 0.001). Six of 13 carcinomas and 1 of 8 adenomas contained calcification at CT (OR = 6.0; P-value = 0.17). Seven of 15 children with carcinomas exhibited metastatic disease at diagnosis, and three had inferior vena cava invasion. Median

  15. Pediatric adrenocortical neoplasms: can imaging reliably discriminate adenomas from carcinomas?

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Flynt, Kelsey A.; Dillman, Jonathan R.; Smith, Ethan A.; Strouse, Peter J. [University of Michigan Health System, Section of Pediatric Radiology, C. S. Mott Children' s Hospital, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Davenport, Matthew S.; Caoili, Elaine M. [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Abdominal Imaging, Department of Radiology, Ann Arbor, MI (United States); Else, Tobias [University of Michigan Health System, Division of Metabolism, Endocrinology and Diabetes, Department of Internal Medicine, Ann Arbor, MI (United States)

    2015-08-15

    There is a paucity of literature describing and comparing the imaging features of adrenocortical adenomas and carcinomas in children and adolescents. To document the CT and MRI features of adrenocortical neoplasms in a pediatric population and to determine whether imaging findings (other than metastatic disease) can distinguish adenomas from carcinomas. We searched institutional medical records to identify pediatric patients with adrenocortical neoplasms. Pre-treatment CT and MRI examinations were reviewed by two radiologists in consensus, and pertinent imaging findings were documented. We also recorded relevant histopathological, demographic, clinical follow-up and survival data. We used the Student's t-test and Wilcoxon rank sum test to compare parametric and nonparametric continuous data, and the Fisher exact test to compare proportions. We used receiver operating characteristic (ROC) curve analyses to evaluate the diagnostic performances of tumor diameter and volume for discriminating carcinoma from adenoma. A P-value ≤0.05 was considered statistically significant. Among the adrenocortical lesions, 9 were adenomas, 15 were carcinomas, and 1 was of uncertain malignant potential. There were no differences in mean age, gender or sidedness between adenomas and carcinomas. Carcinomas were significantly larger than adenomas based on mean estimated volume (581 ml, range 16-2,101 vs. 54 ml, range 3-197 ml; P-value = 0.003; ROC area under the curve = 0.92) and mean maximum transverse plane diameter (9.9 cm, range 3.0-14.9 vs. 4.4 cm, range 1.9-8.2 cm; P-value = 0.0001; ROC area under the curve = 0.92). Carcinomas also were more heterogeneous than adenomas on post-contrast imaging (13/14 vs. 2/9; odds ratio [OR] = 45.5; P-value = 0.001). Six of 13 carcinomas and 1 of 8 adenomas contained calcification at CT (OR = 6.0; P-value = 0.17). Seven of 15 children with carcinomas exhibited metastatic disease at diagnosis, and three had inferior vena cava invasion. Median

  16. Autologous dendritic cells combined with cytokine-induced killer cells in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jin-chao ZHANG

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Objective  To evaluate the clinical efficacy, the immune function and follow-up observation of autologous dendritic cells (DCs combined with cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells in the treatment of metastatic renal cell carcinoma. Methods  Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs were collected from 27 patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and cultured in vitro to produce DCs and CIK cells. After sterility test, phenotypic characterization by flow cytometry and cell count, the produced DCs and CIK cells were then returned to the patient. DCs were given subcutaneously on day 7, 9, 11 and 13 respectively, after PBMCs collection, and CIK cells were given intravenously on day 11 and 13 respectively. This treatment regimen was repeated at a 3 months interval until the disease progresses. Clinical outcomes and immune function were recorded during the treatment period. Results  After DCs-CIK cells treatment, clinical efficacy showed an objective response rate (ORR of 37%, a disease control rate (DCR of 85% and 2 years overall survival rate of 81.5%. There were no significant changes of T cell subsets including CD3 +CD4+CD8–, CD3+CD4–CD8+, CD3+CD19–, CD3–CD19+, CD3–CD16+CD56+, CD3+CD16+CD56+, CD3+HLA-DR–, CD3+HLA-DR+, CD3+CD28+CD8+ and Th2 cells except CD3+CD4+CD25+ T cells (Treg cells and Th1 in peripheral blood between pre-and post-treatment. No serious adverse events were observed. Conclusion  DCs-CIK cells immunotherapy provides a safe and effective treatment approach for patients with metastatic renal cell carcinoma, and may improve the immunosuppression status and enhance the anti-tumor immunity without obvious adverse reaction. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.10.07

  17. Parathyroid carcinoma: an unusual presentation of a rare neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shruti, Sharma

    2017-12-01

    Full Text Available Parathyroid carcinoma is an extremely rare malignant endocrine neoplasm that is very challenging in its diagnosis as well as its treatment. Clinically the disease is detected earlier in patients who present with hyperparathyroidism with signs of profound hypercalcemia. Differentiation between benign and malignant disease of the parathyroid is challenging both for the clinician and for the pathologist. Complete surgical resection at the time of first operation offers the best chance of cure. Even after radical excision which is the standard management, local recurrence and metastases are frequent. The disease usually has a slow indolent course and most patients suffer from complications of hypercalcemia rather than tumor invasion or metastasis.We report a case of a 31-year-old woman who presented with renal colic. Various hematological, biochemical and radiological investigations were performed and a slightly enlarged right parathyroid was found. A clinical diagnosis of parathyroid adenoma was made and a right parathyroidectomy was done. Intraoperatively the surgeon had no suspicion of malignancy but microscopically the lesion was malignant and a final diagnosis of parathyroid carcinoma was rendered based on the criteria of invasion. Since there is no gold standard, a multidisciplinary approach, including the entire clinical, biochemical, radiological and pathological profile of the disease aids in an accurate diagnosis. Here we are reporting a case of a functional parathyroid carcinoma presenting in a relatively young patient with all the biochemical and radiological investigations and findings pointing towards a benign parathyroid disease.

  18. Treatment of mycoplasma contamination in cell cultures with Plasmocin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uphoff, Cord C; Denkmann, Sabine-A; Drexler, Hans G

    2012-01-01

    A high percentage of cell lines are chronically infected with various mycoplasma species. The addition of antibiotics that are particularly effective against these contaminants to the culture medium during a limited period of time is a simple, inexpensive, and very practical approach for decontaminating cell cultures. Here, we examined the effectiveness of the new antimycoplasma compound Plasmocin that has been employed routinely to cleanse chronically infected cell lines. In a first round of treatment 45 out of 58 (78%) mycoplasma-positive cell lines could be cured. In a second attempt using back-up cryopreserved original cells, four additional cell lines were cured; thus, the overall cure rate was 84%. Even if the mycoplasma contamination was not eradicated by Plasmocin, the parallel treatment with several other antibiotics (Baytril, BM-Cyclin, Ciprobay, MRA, or MycoZap) led to the cure of all 58 cell lines. The successful decontamination was permanent as mycoplasmas were no longer detected at day +14 posttreatment and at later time points as examined by PCR which is the most sensitive and specific mycoplasma detection method. Collectively, our results highlight certain antibiotics as effective antimycoplasma reagents and support the therapeutic rationale for their use in the eradication of this notorious cell culture contaminant.

  19. Treatment of Mycoplasma Contamination in Cell Cultures with Plasmocin

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cord C. Uphoff

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available A high percentage of cell lines are chronically infected with various mycoplasma species. The addition of antibiotics that are particularly effective against these contaminants to the culture medium during a limited period of time is a simple, inexpensive, and very practical approach for decontaminating cell cultures. Here, we examined the effectiveness of the new antimycoplasma compound Plasmocin that has been employed routinely to cleanse chronically infected cell lines. In a first round of treatment 45 out of 58 (78% mycoplasma-positive cell lines could be cured. In a second attempt using back-up cryopreserved original cells, four additional cell lines were cured; thus, the overall cure rate was 84%. Even if the mycoplasma contamination was not eradicated by Plasmocin, the parallel treatment with several other antibiotics (Baytril, BM-Cyclin, Ciprobay, MRA, or MycoZap led to the cure of all 58 cell lines. The successful decontamination was permanent as mycoplasmas were no longer detected at day +14 posttreatment and at later time points as examined by PCR which is the most sensitive and specific mycoplasma detection method. Collectively, our results highlight certain antibiotics as effective antimycoplasma reagents and support the therapeutic rationale for their use in the eradication of this notorious cell culture contaminant.

  20. Neoplasms in dogs receiving low-level gamma radiation during pre- and postnatal development

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Benjamin, S.A.; Thomassen, R.W.; Hargis, A.M.; Angleton, G.M.; Lee, A.C.

    1978-01-01

    Mortality because of neoplasia was examined in Segment III dogs exposed to 0,20, or 100 R of 60 Co gamma radiation in prenatal and early postnatal life. During the inital 10 years of the experiment (through January 31, 1978) 20 dogs died or were killed because of neoplasia, 19 having been irradiated. Tumors in these 19 irradiated dogs included 5 malignant lymphomas, 8 carcinomas (2 of mammary origin, 2 of prostatic origin, and 1 each or oral mucosa, ovary, urinary bladder, and thyroid origin), 4 sarcomas (2 hemangiosarcomas, 1 fibrosarcoma and 1 mast cell sarcoma), 1 astrocytoma, and 1 hepatocellular adenoma. Neoplasms occurred in all irradiated groups except 8 dpc (20 and 100R) and 70 dpp (100R). Eleven neoplasms developed in dogs irradiated perinatally (55 dpc or 2 dpp) with 20 or 100R. Four of the tumors in the perinatally irradiated dogs were detected before 2 years of age. The earliest death was at 3 months, because of an astrocytoma. A single sham-irradiated dog died or a malignant tumor, a mammary carcinoma. Preliminary analyses point to three findings of particular interest: the preponderance of neoplasms causing death or euthanasia occurred in irradiated dogs, the unusual finding of four deaths because of neoplasia prior to 2 years of age in perinatally irradiated dogs, and the occurrence of five malignant lymphomas in this relatively small irradiated population

  1. Treatment of basal cell epithelioma with high energy electron beam

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ogawa, Y. (Hyogo-ken Cancer Center, Kobe (Japan)); Kumano, M.; Kumano, K.

    1981-11-01

    Thirty patients with basal cell epithelioma received high energy electron beam therapy. They were irradiated with a dose ranging from 4,800 rad (24 fractions, 35 days) to 12,000 rad (40 fractions, 57 days). Tumors disappeared in all cases. These were no disease-related deaths; in one patient there was recurrence after 2 years. We conclude that radiotherapy with high energy electron beam is very effective in the treatment of basal cell epithelioma.

  2. Main-duct intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas: a case report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natalia Manetti

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Three distinct entities among non-inflammatory cystic lesions of the pancreas have been defined: intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm (IPMN, serous cystic neoplasm (SCN and mucinous cystic neoplasm (MCN. IPMN is characterized by intraductal papillary growth and thick mucus secretion: its incidence has dramatically increased since its initial description. These lesions probably can progress towards invasive carcinoma. IPMNs are symptomatic in most cases: the typical presentation is a recurrent acute pancreatitis, without evident cause, of low or moderate severity. The diagnosis is usually based upon the imaging (CT/cholangio-MRI demonstrating a pancreatic cystic mass, involving a dilated main duct, eventually associated to some filling defects, or a normal Wirsung duct communicating with the cyst lesion. Surgical treatment is generally indicated for main duct IPMN and branch duct IPMN with suspected malignancy (tumour size ≥ 30 mm, mural nodules, dilated main pancreatic duct, or positive cytology or prominent symptoms. Herein we present a case of IPMN of the main duct which occurred with abdominal and back pain associated with weight loss. After the diagnosis, she successfully underwent surgery and is now in a follow-up program.

  3. Role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the management of thrombocytopenic patients with malignant neoplasms

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Oriuchi, N.; Korkmaz, M.; Kim, E.E.; Delpassand, E.S.; Wong, F.; Podoloff, D.A. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Nuclear Medicine; Wallace, S. [Texas Univ., Houston, TX (United States). Dept. of Diagnostic Radiology

    1998-03-01

    This study was done to investigate the role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the treatment of thrombocytopenia in patients with malignant neoplasms. The study involved 20 consecutive patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms or hematological disorders and without evidence of underproduction of megakaryocytes due to chemotherapy or bone marrow infiltration by the malignancy. Splenic sequestration of platelets was evaluated by measuring spenic uptake of {sup 111}In-labelled platelets, and findings were correlated with the outcome of splenectomy and medication. Of the 20 patients, 13 had splenic sequestration of platelets. Seven of the 13 patients underwent splenectomy; six of these seven patients experienced a complete response. The other six patients received medication only and showed no response. Of the seven patients without splenic sequestration of platelets, five received medication, and four of them responded to it. {sup 111}In-labelled platelet scintigraphy has a role in selecting appropriate therapy and predicting its efficacy in patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms. (orig.)

  4. Role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the management of thrombocytopenic patients with malignant neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Oriuchi, N.; Korkmaz, M.; Kim, E.E.; Delpassand, E.S.; Wong, F.; Podoloff, D.A.; Wallace, S.

    1998-01-01

    This study was done to investigate the role of indium-111 labelled platelet scintigraphy in the treatment of thrombocytopenia in patients with malignant neoplasms. The study involved 20 consecutive patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms or hematological disorders and without evidence of underproduction of megakaryocytes due to chemotherapy or bone marrow infiltration by the malignancy. Splenic sequestration of platelets was evaluated by measuring spenic uptake of 111 In-labelled platelets, and findings were correlated with the outcome of splenectomy and medication. Of the 20 patients, 13 had splenic sequestration of platelets. Seven of the 13 patients underwent splenectomy; six of these seven patients experienced a complete response. The other six patients received medication only and showed no response. Of the seven patients without splenic sequestration of platelets, five received medication, and four of them responded to it. 111 In-labelled platelet scintigraphy has a role in selecting appropriate therapy and predicting its efficacy in patients with thrombocytopenia associated with malignant neoplasms. (orig.)

  5. Stem cell challenges in the treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Feng, Zhongling; Gao, Feng

    2012-02-01

    Neurodegenerative diseases result from the gradual and progressive loss of neural cells and lead to nervous system dysfunction. The rapidly advancing stem cell field is providing attractive alternative options for fighting these diseases. Results have provided proof of principle that cell replacement can work in humans with Parkinson's disease (PD). However, three clinical studies of cell transplantation were published that found no net benefit, while patients in two of the studies developed dyskinesias that persisted despite reductions in treatment. Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSC) have major potential advantages because patient-specific neuroblasts are suitable for transplantation, avoid immune reactions, and can be produced without the use of human ES cells (hESC). Although iPSCs have not been successfully used in clinical trials for PD, patients with amyotrophic lateral sclerosis (ALS) were treated with autologous stem cells and, though they had some degree of decline one year after treatment, they were still improved compared with the preoperative period or without any drug therapy. In addition, neural stem cells (NSCs), via brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF), have been shown to ameliorate complex behavioral deficits associated with widespread Alzheimer's disease (AD) pathology in a transgenic mouse model of AD. So far, the FDA lists 18 clinical trials treating multiple sclerosis (MS), but most are in preliminary stages. This article serves as an overview of recent studies in stem cell and regenerative approaches to the above chronic neurodegenerative disorders. There are still many obstacles to the use of stem cells as a cure for neurodegenerative disease, especially because we still don't fully understand the true mechanisms of these diseases. However, there is hope in the potential of stem cells to help us learn and understand a great deal more about the mechanisms underlying these devastating neurodegenerative diseases. © 2011 Blackwell

  6. Treatment of early glassy cell carcinoma of uterine cervix

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Ok Bae; Kim, Jin Hee; Choi, Tae Jin

    2006-01-01

    The purpose of this study was to investigate the clinical findings, treatment, and outcome of patients with glassy cell carcinoma of cervix. We reviewed all cases of glassy cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix confirmed and treated at the Dongsan Medical Center, Keimyung University, between January 1993 and December 2005. There were 7 cases with histopathologically confirmed gassy cell carcinoma. A tumor was diagnosed as glassy cell carcinoma if over 50% of the tumor cell type displayed glassy cell features. Six patients with stage IB had radical hysterectomy and bilateral pelvic node dissection, and 2 of them received adjuvant external pelvic irradiation with concurrent chemotherapy. Remaining one patient with stage IIA had curative concurrent chemoradiotherapy with external pelvic irradiation and brachytherapy. There were 7 patients diagnosed as glassy cell carcinoma among the 3,745 (0.2%) patients of carcinoma of uterine cervix. The mean age of 7 patients was 44 years with range of 35 to 53 years of age. The most frequent symptom was vaginal bleeding (86%). By the punch biopsy undertaken before treatment of 7 cases, 2 only cases could diagnose as glassy cell carcinoma of uterine cervix, but remaining of them confirmed by surgical pathological examination. The mean follow up duration was 73 months with range of 13 to 150 months. All 7 patients were alive without disease after treatment. Glassy cell carcinoma of the uterine cervix is a distinct clinicopathologic entity that demonstrates an aggressive biologic behavior. However for early-stage disease, we may have more favorable clinical outcome with radical surgery followed by chemoradiotherapy

  7. Refined staging in hilar bronchial neoplasms with ECG-gated multislice-CT. Case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohlmann, S.; Daliri, A.; Froelich, J.J.; Nowak, R.; Michulla, R.

    2008-01-01

    Equivocal initial CT-based staging in 2 patients with hilar bronchial neoplasms was reassessed with retrospective ECG-gated Multislice-CT and optimized examination parameters prior to definition of treatment. An initially suspected irresectable T 4 tumor with mediastinal infiltration was downstaged to T 2 in one case, while tumor infiltration into the left atrium could be confirmed in the other case. In doubtful conditions, ECG-gated multislice CT with optimized examination parameters may be helpful for refined staging in patients with hilar bronchial neoplasma, thus possibly influencing treatment strategies. (orig.)

  8. Mesenchymal stem cells in diabetes treatment: progress and perspectives

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yu CHENG

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Diabetes is a chronic metabolic disorder caused by relative or absolute insulin deficient or reduced sensitivity of target cells to insulin. Mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are adult stem cells with multiple differentiation potential, self-renewable and immunoregulatory properties. Accumulating evidences from clinic or animal experiments recent years showed that MSCs infusion could ameliorate hyperglycemia in diabetes. The research progress of MSCs in diabetes treatment is summarized and a corresponding perspective is herewith proposed in present paper. DOI: 10.11855/j.issn.0577-7402.2016.07.16

  9. Autologous epidermal cell suspension: A promising treatment for chronic wounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Hongliang; Chen, Yan; Zhang, Cuiping; Fu, Xiaobing

    2016-02-01

    Chronic wounds have become an increasing medical and economic problem of aging societies because they are difficult to manage. Skin grafting is an important treatment method for chronic wounds, which are refractory to conservative therapy. The technique involving epidermal cell suspensions was invented to enable the possibility of treating larger wounds with only a small piece of donor skin. Both uncultured and cultured autologous epidermal cell suspensions can be prepared and survive permanently on the wound bed. A systematic search was conducted of EMBASE, Cochrane Library, PubMed and web of science by using Boolean search terms, from the establishment of the database until May 31, 2014. The bibliographies of all retrieved articles in English were searched. The search terms were: (epithelial cell suspension OR keratinocyte suspension) and chronic and wound. From the included, 6 studies are descriptive interventions and discussed the use of autologous keratinocyte suspension to treat 61 patients' chronic wound. The various methods of preparation of epidermal cell suspension are described. The advantages and shortcomings of different carriers for epidermal cell suspensions are also summarised. Both uncultured and cultured autologous epidermal cell suspensions have been used to treat chronic wounds. Although the limitations of these studies include the small number of patient populations with chronic wounds and many important problems that remain to be solved, autologous epidermal cell suspension is a promising treatment for chronic wounds. Copyright © 2015 Tissue Viability Society. Published by Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Chidamide Combined With R-GDP in Treating Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Diffuse Large B-cell Lymphoma (DLBCL)

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-12-12

    Chidamide; Lymphoma, B-Cell; Lymphoma, Large B-Cell, Diffuse; Neoplasm by Histology; Neoplasms; Lymphoproliferative Disorders; Lymphatic Diseases; Immunoproliferative Disorders; Immune System Diseases; Lymphoma, Non-Hodgkin; Cyclophosphamide; Rituximab; Gemcitabine; Cisplatin; Dexamethasone; HDAC Inhibitor

  11. Impact of Methadone on Cisplatin Treatment of Bladder Cancer Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Michalska, Marta; Schultze-Seemann, Susanne; Kuckuck, Irina; Katzenwadel, Arndt; Wolf, Philipp

    2018-03-01

    Cisplatin-based chemotherapy is the treatment of choice for advanced bladder cancer. Since many tumor cells show inherent or acquired cisplatin resistance, research is needed to improve the therapeutic efficacy. Since the analgesic methadone is discussed as being a sensitizer for chemotherapy, we tested its effects on the cisplatin treatment of bladder cancer cells. T24 and HT-1376 bladder cancer cells were incubated with cisplatin in combination with methadone. Cytotoxicity was examined using the WST-1 viability assay and induction of apoptosis was analyzed via phase-contrast microscopy, flow cytometry, and western blot analysis. Methadone was shown to enhance the cytotoxic effects of cisplatin on T24 cells based on the induction of apoptosis. In contrast, HT-1376 cells were identified as non-responders to methadone. Methadone could act as a chemosensitizer in the future treatment of advanced bladder cancer. Further research is needed to identify the underlying molecular mechanisms. Copyright© 2018, International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. George J. Delinasios), All rights reserved.

  12. Treatment of systemic sclerosis: potential role for stem cell transplantation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wen Xiong

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Wen Xiong, Chris T DerkDivision of Rheumatology, Thomas Jefferson University, Philadelphia, PA, 19107, USAAbstract: Hematopoietic stem cell transplantation may “reset” the immune reconstitution and induce self tolerance of autoreactive lymphocytes, and has been explored in the treatments for systemic sclerosis. Phase I/II trials have shown a satisfactory risk benefit ratio. The true benefit will be identified by two ongoing prospective, randomized phase III trials. Multipotent mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs possess antiproliferative, anti-inflammatory, and immunosuppressive properties. The use of MSCs has showed successful responses in patients with severe steroid-resistant acute graft versus host disease in phase II trials, and may be a potentially promising option for patients with systemic sclerosis.Keywords: scleroderma, systemic sclerosis, treatment, stem cells, transplant

  13. Skin bioengineering and stem cells for severe burn treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lataillade, J.J.; Trouillas, M.; Alexaline, M.; Brachet, M.; Bey, E.; Duhamel, P.; Leclerc, T.; Bargues, L.

    2015-01-01

    Severely burned patients need definitive and efficient wound coverage. The outcome of massive burns has improved with cultured epithelial auto-grafts (CEA). In spite of its fragility, percentage of success, cost of treatment and long-term tendency to contracture, this surgical technique has been developed in some burn centres. The first improvements involved combining CEA and dermis-like substitutes. Cultured skin substitutes provide faster skin closure and satisfying functional results. These methods have been used successfully in massive burns. A second improvement was to enable skin regeneration by using epidermal stem cells. Stem cells can differentiate into keratinocytes, to promote wound repair and to regenerate skin appendages. Human mesenchymal stem cells foster wound healing and were used in cutaneous radiation syndrome. Skin regeneration and tissue engineering methods remain a complex challenge and offer the possibility of new treatment for injured and burned patients. (authors)

  14. Real world data on primary treatment for mantle cell lymphoma

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Abrahamsson, Anna; Albertsson-Lindblad, Alexandra; Brown, Peter N

    2014-01-01

    There is consensus that young patients with mantle cell lymphoma (MCL) should receive intensive immunochemotherapy regimens, but optimal treatment of elderly patients as well for as patients with limited or indolent disease is not defined. Our aim was to evaluate and compare outcome in relation...... to prognostic factors and first-line treatment in patients with MCL in a population-based data set. Data were collected from the Swedish and Danish Lymphoma Registries from the period of 2000 to 2011. A total of 1389 patients were diagnosed with MCL. During this period, age-standardized incidence MCL increased......-nine (2.4%) patients followed a watch-and-wait approach and showed a 3-year OS of 79.8%. Among patients receiving systemic treatment, rituximab (n = 766; HR = 0.66; P = .001) and autologous stem cell transplant (n = 273; HR = 0.55; P = .004) were independently associated with improved OS in multivariate...

  15. Thermal plasma treatment of cell-phone waste : preliminary result

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ruj, B. [Central Mechanical Engineering Research Inst., Durgapur (India). Thermal Engineering Group; Chang, J.S.; Li, O.L. [McMaster Univ., Hamilton, ON (Canada). Dept. of Engineering Physics; Pietsch, G. [RWTH Aachen Univ., Aachen (Germany)

    2010-07-01

    The cell phone is an indispensable service facilitator, however, the disposal and recycling of cell phones is a major problem. While the potential life span of a mobile phone, excluding batteries, is over 10 years, most of the users upgrade their phones approximately four times during this period. Cell phone waste is significantly more hazardous than many other municipal wastes as it contains thousands of components made of toxic chemicals and metals like lead, cadmium, chromium, mercury, polyvinyl chlorides (PVC), brominated flame retardants, beryllium, antimony and phthalates. Cell phones also use many expensive rare metals. Since cell phones are made up of plastics, metals, ceramics, and trace other substances, primitive recycling or disposal of cell phone waste to landfills and incinerators creates irreversible environmental damage by polluting water and soil, and contaminating air. In order to minimize releases into the environment and threat to human health, the disposal of cell phones needs to be managed in an environmentally friendly way. This paper discussed a safer method of reducing the generation of syngas and hydrocarbons and metal recovery through the treatment of cell phone wastes by a thermal plasma. The presentation discussed the experiment, with particular reference to sample preparation; experimental set-up; and results four samples with different experimental conditions. It was concluded that the plasma treatment of cell phone waste in reduced condition generates gaseous components such as hydrogen, carbon monoxide, and hydrocarbons which are combustible. Therefore, this system is an energy recovery system that contributes to resource conservation and reduction of climate change gases. 5 refs., 2 tabs., 2 figs.

  16. NUP98-HOXA9-transgenic zebrafish develop a myeloproliferative neoplasm and provide new insight into mechanisms of myeloid leukaemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Forrester, A Michael; Grabher, Clemens; McBride, Eileen R; Boyd, Ellen R; Vigerstad, Märta H; Edgar, Alexander; Kai, Fui-Boon; Da'as, Sahar I; Payne, Elspeth; Look, A Thomas; Berman, Jason N

    2011-10-01

    NUP98-HOXA9 [t(7;11) (p15;p15)] is associated with inferior prognosis in de novo and treatment-related acute myeloid leukaemia (AML) and contributes to blast crisis in chronic myeloid leukaemia (CML). We have engineered an inducible transgenic zebrafish harbouring human NUP98-HOXA9 under the zebrafish spi1(pu.1) promoter. NUP98-HOXA9 perturbed zebrafish embryonic haematopoiesis, with upregulated spi1 expression at the expense of gata1a. Markers associated with more differentiated myeloid cells, lcp1, lyz, and mpx were also elevated, but to a lesser extent than spi1, suggesting differentiation of early myeloid progenitors may be impaired by NUP98-HOXA9. Following irradiation, NUP98-HOXA9-expressing embryos showed increased numbers of cells in G2-M transition compared to controls and absence of a normal apoptotic response, which may result from an upregulation of bcl2. These data suggest NUP98-HOXA9-induced oncogenesis may result from a combination of defects in haematopoiesis and an aberrant response to DNA damage. Importantly, 23% of adult NUP98-HOXA9-transgenic fish developed a myeloproliferative neoplasm (MPN) at 19-23 months of age. In summary, we have identified an embryonic haematopoietic phenotype in a transgenic zebrafish line that subsequently develops MPN. This tool provides a unique opportunity for high-throughput in vivo chemical modifier screens to identify novel therapeutic agents in high risk AML. © 2011 Blackwell Publishing Ltd.

  17. Role of Axumin PET Scan in Germ Cell Tumor

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-05-01

    Testis Cancer; Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Cancer; Germ Cell Tumor of Testis; Germ Cell Tumor, Testicular, Childhood; Testicular Neoplasms; Testicular Germ Cell Tumor; Testicular Yolk Sac Tumor; Testicular Choriocarcinoma; Testicular Diseases; Germ Cell Cancer Metastatic; Germ Cell Neoplasm of Retroperitoneum; Germ Cell Cancer, Nos

  18. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell-Derived Natural Killer Cells for Treatment of Ovarian Cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hermanson, David L; Bendzick, Laura; Pribyl, Lee; McCullar, Valarie; Vogel, Rachel Isaksson; Miller, Jeff S; Geller, Melissa A; Kaufman, Dan S

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can provide effective immunotherapy for ovarian cancer. Here, we evaluated the ability of NK cells isolated from peripheral blood (PB) and NK cells derived from induced pluripotent stem cell (iPSC) to mediate killing of ovarian cancer cells in a mouse xenograft model. A mouse xenograft model was used to evaluate the intraperitoneal delivery of three different NK cell populations: iPSC-derived NK cells, PB-NK cells that had been activated and expanded in long-term culture, and overnight activated PB-NK cells that were isolated through CD3/CD19 depletion of PB B and T cells. Bioluminescent imaging was used to monitor tumor burden of luciferase expressing tumor lines. Tumors were allowed to establish prior to administering NK cells via intraperitoneal injection. These studies demonstrate a single dose of any of the three NK cell populations significantly reduced tumor burden. When mice were given three doses of either iPSC-NK cells or expanded PB-NK cells, the median survival improved from 73 days in mice untreated to 98 and 97 days for treated mice, respectively. From these studies, we conclude iPSC-derived NK cells mediate antiovarian cancer killing at least as well as PB-NK cells, making these cells a viable resource for immunotherapy for ovarian cancer. Due to their ability to be easily differentiated into NK cells and their long-term expansion potential, iPSCs can be used to produce large numbers of well-defined NK cells that can be banked and used to treat a large number of patients including treatment with multiple doses if necessary. © 2015 AlphaMed Press.

  19. Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms: critical concepts and management recommendations from European LeukemiaNet.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Barbui, Tiziano; Barosi, Giovanni; Birgegard, Gunnar; Cervantes, Francisco; Finazzi, Guido; Griesshammer, Martin; Harrison, Claire; Hasselbalch, Hans Carl; Hehlmann, Rudiger; Hoffman, Ronald; Kiladjian, Jean-Jacques; Kröger, Nicolaus; Mesa, Ruben; McMullin, Mary F; Pardanani, Animesh; Passamonti, Francesco; Vannucchi, Alessandro M; Reiter, Andreas; Silver, Richard T; Verstovsek, Srdan; Tefferi, Ayalew

    2011-02-20

    We present a review of critical concepts and produce recommendations on the management of Philadelphia-negative classical myeloproliferative neoplasms, including monitoring, response definition, first- and second-line therapy, and therapy for special issues. Key questions were selected according the criterion of clinical relevance. Statements were produced using a Delphi process, and two consensus conferences involving a panel of 21 experts appointed by the European LeukemiaNet (ELN) were convened. Patients with polycythemia vera (PV) and essential thrombocythemia (ET) should be defined as high risk if age is greater than 60 years or there is a history of previous thrombosis. Risk stratification in primary myelofibrosis (PMF) should start with the International Prognostic Scoring System (IPSS) for newly diagnosed patients and dynamic IPSS for patients being seen during their disease course, with the addition of cytogenetics evaluation and transfusion status. High-risk patients with PV should be managed with phlebotomy, low-dose aspirin, and cytoreduction, with either hydroxyurea or interferon at any age. High-risk patients with ET should be managed with cytoreduction, using hydroxyurea at any age. Monitoring response in PV and ET should use the ELN clinicohematologic criteria. Corticosteroids, androgens, erythropoiesis-stimulating agents, and immunomodulators are recommended to treat anemia of PMF, whereas hydroxyurea is the first-line treatment of PMF-associated splenomegaly. Indications for splenectomy include symptomatic portal hypertension, drug-refractory painful splenomegaly, and frequent RBC transfusions. The risk of allogeneic stem-cell transplantation-related complications is justified in transplantation-eligible patients whose median survival time is expected to be less than 5 years.

  20. Advancements in stem cells treatment of skeletal muscle wasting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    mirella emeregalli

    2014-02-01

    Full Text Available Muscular dystrophies (MDs are a heterogeneous group of inherited disorders, in which progressive muscle wasting and weakness is often associated with exhaustion of muscle regeneration potential. Although physiological properties of skeletal muscle tissue are now well known, no treatments are effective for these diseases. Muscle regeneration was attempted by means transplantation of myogenic cells (from myoblast to embryonic stem cells and also by interfering with the malignant processes that originate in pathological tissues, such as uncontrolled fibrosis and inflammation. Taking into account the advances in the isolation of new subpopulation of stem cells and in the creation of artificial stem cell niches, we discuss how these emerging technologies offer great promises for therapeutic approaches to muscle diseases and muscle wasting associated with aging.

  1. Interdisciplinary Management of Cystic Neoplasms of the Pancreas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Linda S. Lee

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Cystic neoplasms of the pancreas are increasingly recognized due to the frequent use of abdominal imaging. It is reported that up to 20% of abdominal cross-sectional scans identify incidental asymptomatic pancreatic cysts. Proper characterization of pancreatic cystic neoplasms is important not only to recognize premalignant lesions that will require surgical resection, but also to allow nonoperative management of many cystic lesions that will not require resection with its inherent morbidity. Though reliable biomarkers are lacking, a wide spectrum of diagnostic modalities are available to evaluate pancreatic cystic neoplasms, including radiologic, endoscopic, laboratory, and pathologic analysis. An interdisciplinary approach to management of these lesions which incorporates recent, specialty-specific advances in the medical literature is herein suggested.

  2. The unregulated commercialization of stem cell treatments: a global perspective.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sipp, Douglas

    2011-12-01

    Research into the biological properties and clinical potential of stem cells has spurred strong public investment, industry development, media coverage, and patient interest in recent years. To date, however, few clinical applications of demonstrated safety and efficacy have been developed with the exception of uses of hematopoietic stem cells in the treatment of diseases of the blood and immune systems. This lack of an evidence basis notwithstanding, hundreds of companies and private clinics around the world now sell putative stem cell treatments for an enormously broad range of medical and quality-of-life conditions. This represents a major challenge for legitimate scientists working in the field, for authorities seeking to protect their constituencies, and for patients and consumers targeted by such companies' marketing strategies. In this review, I provide an overview of the global industry in pseudomedical stem cell treatments, with an investigation of claims in a single disease area (amyotrophic lateral sclerosis), and make recommendations for the introduction and enforcement of appropriate regulatory responses to this problem.

  3. Dasatinib and Doxorubicin Treatment of Sarcoma Initiating Cells: A Possible New Treatment Strategy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Aggerholm-Pedersen, Ninna; Demouth, Christina; Safwat, Akmal

    2016-01-01

    Background. One of the major challenges affecting sarcoma treatment outcome, particularly that of metastatic disease, is resistance to chemotherapy. Cancer-initiating cells are considered a major contributor to this resistance. Methods. An immortalised nontransformed human stromal (mesenchymal......) stem cell line hMSC-TERT4 and a transformed cell line hMSC-TERT20-CE8, known to form sarcoma-like tumours when implanted in immune-deficient mice, were used as models. Receptor tyrosine kinase (RTK) activation was analysed by RTK arrays and cellular viability after tyrosine kinases inhibitor (TKI...

  4. New targeted treatments for cutaneous T-cell Lymphomas

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martine Bagot

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Cutaneous T-cell lymphomas (CTCLs represent a group of rare and heterogeneous diseases that are very difficult to treat at advanced stages. The development of monoclonal antibodies is a new hope for the treatment of these diseases. Alemtuzumab (Campath is a humanized IgG1 kappa monoclonal antibody specific for CD52, an antigen expressed by most T and B lymphocytes. Alemtuzumab may frequently induce long-term remissions in patients with Sezary syndrome but high-dose treatments lead to severe cytopenia, immune depletion, and opportunistic infections. This treatment is less efficient in mycosis fungoides (MF. Brentuximab vedotin is a chimeric anti-CD30 monoclonal antibody conjugated to monomethyl auristatin E, a cytotoxic antitubulin agent. Brentuximab vedotin is a very interesting new treatment for advanced tumor MF, Sezary syndrome, and primary cutaneous CD30+ lymphoproliferative disorders. The main limiting adverse event is neurosensitive peripheral neuropathy. Mogamulizumab is a humanized anti-C-C chemokine receptor Type 4 monoclonal antibody with a defucosylated Fc region leading to increased antibody-dependent cellular cytotoxicity. Mogamulizumab is very efficient on aggressive peripheral T-cell lymphomas, particularly adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma and CTCLs, especially on the blood component of tumor cells. The main limiting events are related to the concomitant depletion of regulatory T-cells. IPH4102 is a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the immune receptor KIR3DL2/CD158k. Preclinical results with this antibody offer proofs of concept for the clinical development of IPH4102 to treat patients with advanced CTCL.

  5. Dendritic Cell-Based Immunotherapy Treatment for Glioblastoma Multiforme

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liu Yang

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Glioblastoma multiforme (GBM is the most malignant glioma and patients diagnosed with this disease had poor outcomes even treated with the combination of conventional treatment (surgery, chemotherapy, and radiation. Dendritic cells (DCs are the most powerful antigen presenting cells and DC-based vaccination has the potential to target and eliminate GBM cells and enhance the responses of these cells to the existing therapies with minimal damage to the healthy tissues around them. It can enhance recognition of GBM cells by the patients’ immune system and activate vast, potent, and long-lasting immune reactions to eliminate them. Therefore, this therapy can prolong the survival of GBM patients and has wide and bright future in the treatment of GBM. Also, the efficacy of this therapy can be strengthened in several ways at some degree: the manipulation of immune regulatory components or costimulatory molecules on DCs; the appropriate choices of antigens for loading to enhance the effectiveness of the therapy; regulation of positive regulators or negative regulators in GBM microenvironment.

  6. Unicentric Castleman’s Disease Masquerading Pancreatic Neoplasm

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Saurabh Jain

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Castleman’s disease is a rare nonclonal proliferative disorder of the lymph nodes with an unknown etiology. Common locations of Castleman’s disease are mediastinum, neck, axilla, and abdomen. Castleman’s disease of a peripancreatic location masquerading as pancreatic neoplasm is an even rarer entity. On search of published data, we came across about 17 cases published on peripancreatic Castleman’s disease until now. Here we are reporting a case of retropancreatic Castleman's disease masquerading as retroperitoneal neoplasm in a 46-year-old male patient.

  7. Assessing the occupational nature of malignant lung neoplasms

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sevc, J.; Klener, V.; Plank, V.

    1989-01-01

    The development of lung carcinoma in uranium miners is discussed. In spite of the decreasing radiation risks in mines, the absolute number of neoplasms has increased since the 1960's; this is due to the increasing number of miners, improved diagnostic methods and the aging of miners who thus enter higher age groups where a higher incidence of neoplasms can be expected. The probabilistic method was shown to be of help in deciding whether individual cases of lung carcinoma should be considered an occupational disease; new possible improvements of the method are suggested. (J.J.). 12 refs

  8. Proliferative, reparative, and reactive benign bone lesions that may be confused diagnostically with true osseous neoplasms.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Wick, Mark R

    2014-01-01

    Diagnostic problems attending intraosseous and parosteal pseudoneoplastic lesions can be radiographic, or histological, or both. Proliferations in this category may contain cellular fibro-osseous or chondro-osseous tissues that are difficult to separate microscopically from those seen in various true neoplasms of the bones. This review considers the clinicopathologic features of fibrous dysplasia, benign fibro-osseous lesions of the jawbones, osteofibrous dysplasia, metaphyseal fibrous defect, giant-cell reparative granuloma, "brown tumor" of hyperparathyroidism, synovial chondrometaplasia, aneurysmal bone cyst, tumefactive chronic osteomyelitis, proliferative Paget disease, and polyvinylpyrrolidone storage disease of bone.

  9. General Information about Myelodysplastic/Myeloproliferative Neoplasms

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... symptoms of chronic myelomonocytic leukemia include fever, weight loss, and feeling very tired. Certain factors affect prognosis (chance of recovery) and treatment options. Chronic myelomonocytic leukemia ...

  10. Induced Pluripotent Stem Cell for the Study and Treatment of Sickle Cell Anemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Luiza Cunha Junqueira Reis

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Sickle cell anemia (SCA is a monogenic disease of high mortality, affecting millions of people worldwide. There is no broad, effective, and safe definitive treatment for SCA, so the palliative treatments are the most used. The establishment of an in vitro model allows better understanding of how the disease occurs, besides allowing the development of more effective tests and treatments. In this context, iPSC technology is a powerful tool for basic research and disease modeling, and a promise for finding and screening more effective and safe drugs, besides the possibility of use in regenerative medicine. This work obtained a model for study and treatment of SCA using iPSC. Then, episomal vectors were used for reprogramming peripheral blood mononuclear cells to obtain integration-free iPSC. Cells were collected from patients treated with hydroxyurea and without treatment. The iPSCP Bscd lines were characterized for pluripotent and differentiation potential. The iPSC lines were differentiated into HSC, so that we obtained a dynamic and efficient protocol of CD34+CD45+ cells production. We offer a valuable tool for a better understanding of how SCA occurs, in addition to making possible the development of more effective drugs and treatments and providing better understanding of widely used treatments, such as hydroxyurea.

  11. Malignant Neoplasms in Patients With Rheumatoid Arthritis Treated With Tumor Necrosis Factor Inhibitors, Tocilizumab, Abatacept, or Rituximab in Clinical Practice: A Nationwide Cohort Study From Sweden.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wadström, Hjalmar; Frisell, Thomas; Askling, Johan

    2017-11-01

    Considering the widespread and increasing use of biological immunomodulators (biological disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs [bDMARDs]) to treat chronic inflammatory conditions, and the concern that immunomodulation may alter cancer risk and progression, the limited available data on use of these therapies as used in clinical practice and cancer risks are a concern. To assess the risk of incident malignant neoplasms in patients with rheumatoid arthritis (RA) treated with bDMARDs. This was a national register-based prospective cohort study of the public health care system in Sweden from 2006 to 2015. Cohorts of patients with RA initiating treatment with tocilizumab (n = 1798), abatacept (n = 2021), and rituximab (n = 3586), a tumor necrosis factor inhibitor (TNFi) as first-ever (n = 10 782) or second-ever (n = 4347) bDMARD, a biologics-naive cohort treated with conventional synthetic disease-modifying antirheumatic drugs (csDMARDs) (n = 46 610), and a general population comparator cohort (n = 107 491). Treatment with tocilizumab, abatacept, rituximab, or TNFi. Outcomes included a first invasive solid or hematologic malignant neoplasm, or skin cancer. Hazard ratios were calculated using Cox-regression, adjusted for age, sex, disease and treatment characteristics, and educational level. We identified a total of 15 129 initiations of TNFi as the first or second bDMARD, 7405 initiations of other bDMARDs, and 46 610 csDMARD users. The mean age varied from 58 to 64 years, and the proportion of female patients varied from 71% to 80%, across the 7 cohorts under study. The observed numbers of events (crude incidence per 100 000 person-years) for a first invasive solid or hematologic malignant neoplasm were 50 (959) for tocilizumab, 61 (1026) for abatacept, 141 (1074) for rituximab, 478 (978) for initiators of TNFi as first bDMARD, and 169 (917) for TNFi as second bDMARD. There were no statistically significant differences between

  12. Oligometastatic non-small-cell lung cancer: current treatment strategies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard PJ

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Patrick J Richard, Ramesh Rengan Department of Radiation Oncology, University of Washington, Seattle, WA, USA Abstract: The oligometastatic disease theory was initially described in 1995 by Hellman and Weichselbaum. Since then, much work has been performed to investigate its existence in many solid tumors. This has led to subclassifications of stage IV cancer, which could redefine our treatment approaches and the therapeutic outcomes for this historically “incurable” entity. With a high incidence of stage IV disease, non-small-cell lung cancer (NSCLC remains a difficult cancer to treat and cure. Recent work has proven the existence of an oligometastatic state in NSCLC in terms of properly selecting patients who may benefit from aggressive therapy and experience long-term overall survival. This review discusses the current treatment approaches used in oligometastatic NSCLC and provides the evidence and rationale for each approach. The prognostic factors of many trials are discussed, which can be used to properly select patients for aggressive treatment regimens. Future advances in both molecular profiling of NSCLC to find targetable mutations and investigating patient selection may increase the number of patients diagnosed with oligometastatic NSCLC. As this disease entity increases, it is of utmost importance for oncologists treating NSCLC to be aware of the current treatment strategies that exist and the potential advantages/disadvantages of each. Keywords: oligometastatic, non-small-cell lung cancer, oligoprogressive, treatment

  13. Second Malignant Neoplasms and Cardiovascular Disease Following Radiotherapy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ng, Andrea K.; Allan, James M.; Pui, Ching-Hon; Kennedy, Ann R.; Xu, X. George; Purdy, James A.; Applegate, Kimberly; Yahalom, Joachim; Constine, Louis S.; Gilbert, Ethel S.; Boice, John D.

    2012-01-01

    Second malignant neoplasms (SMNs) and cardiovascular disease (CVD) are among the most serious and life-threatening late adverse effects experienced by the growing number of cancer survivors worldwide and are due in part to radiotherapy. The National Council on Radiation Protection and Measurements (NCRP) convened an expert scientific committee to critically and comprehensively review associations between radiotherapy and SMNs and CVD, taking into account radiobiology; genomics; treatment (ie, radiotherapy with or without chemotherapy and other therapies); type of radiation; and quantitative considerations (ie, dose–response relationships). Major conclusions of the NCRP include: 1) the relevance of older technologies for current risk assessment when organ-specific absorbed dose and the appropriate relative biological effectiveness are taken into account and 2) the identification of critical research needs with regard to newer radiation modalities, dose–response relationships, and genetic susceptibility. Recommendation for research priorities and infrastructural requirements include 1) long-term large-scale follow-up of extant cancer survivors and prospectively treated patients to characterize risks of SMNs and CVD in terms of radiation dose and type; 2) biological sample collection to integrate epidemiological studies with molecular and genetic evaluations; 3) investigation of interactions between radiotherapy and other potential confounding factors, such as age, sex, race, tobacco and alcohol use, dietary intake, energy balance, and other cofactors, as well as genetic susceptibility; 4) focusing on adolescent and young adult cancer survivors, given the sparse research in this population; and 5) construction of comprehensive risk prediction models for SMNs and CVD to permit the development of follow-up guidelines and prevention and intervention strategies. PMID:22312134

  14. Role of mesenchymal stem cells in osteoarthritis treatment

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Kong

    2017-04-01

    Full Text Available As the most common form of joint disorder, osteoarthritis (OA imposes a tremendous burden on health care systems worldwide. Without effective cure, OA represents a unique opportunity for innovation in therapeutic development. In contrast to traditional treatments based on drugs, proteins, or antibodies, stem cells are poised to revolutionize medicine as they possess the capacity to replace and repair tissues and organs such as osteoarthritic joints. Among different types of stem cells, mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs are of mesoderm origin and have been shown to generate cells for tissues of the mesoderm lineage, thus, raising the hope for them being used to treat diseases such as OA. However, given their ability to differentiate into other cell types, MSCs have also been tested in treating a myriad of conditions from diabetes to Parkinson's disease, apparently of the ectoderm and endoderm lineages. There are ongoing debates whether MSCs can differentiate into lineages outside of the mesoderm and consequently their effectiveness in treating conditions from the ectoderm and endoderm lineages. In this review, we discuss the developmental origin of MSCs, their differentiation potential and immunomodulatory effects, as well as their applications in treating OA. We suggest further investigations into new therapies or combination therapies that may provide more effective treatment for bone and joint diseases. Furthermore, cell-based therapy and its associated safety and effectiveness should be carefully evaluated before clinical translation. This review provides updated information on recent approval of clinical trials and related applications of MSCs, and discusses additional efforts on cell-based therapy for treating OA and other joint and bone diseases.

  15. A nationwide population-based cross-sectional survey of health-related quality of life in patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms in Denmark (MPNhealthSurvey)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brochmann Mortensen, Nana; Flachs, Esben Meulengracht; Christensen, Anne Illemann

    2017-01-01

    of patients with myeloproliferative neoplasms (MPNs). In Denmark, all MPN patients are treated in public hospitals and treatments received are free of charge for these patients. Therefore, MPN patients receive the best available treatment to the extent of its suitability for them and if they wish to receive...

  16. Preimplantation HLA typing for stem cell transplantation treatment of hemoglobinopathies

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anver Kuliev

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Preimplantation genetic diagnosis (PGD for HLA typing is steadily becoming an option for at risk couples with thalassemic children, requiring HLA matched bone marrow transplantation treatment. The paper presents the world’s largest PGD experience of 475 cases for over 2 dozens thalassemia mutations, resulting in birth of 132 unaffected children. A total of 146 cases were performed together with preimplantation HLA typing, resulting in detection and transfer of HLA matched unaffected embryos in 83 of them, yielding the birth of 16 HLA matched children, potential donors for their affected siblings. The presented experience of HLA matched stem cell transplantation for thalassemia, following PGD demonstrated a successful hematopoietic reconstitution both for younger and older patients. The data show that PGD is an efficient approach for HLA matched stem cell transplantation treatment for thalassemia.

  17. Definitive treatment of a basal cell carcinoma on the upper lip through the oral administration of Vismodegib

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Strahil Strashilov

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Basal cell carcinoma is the most common malignant neoplasm of the skin of the face in old, caucasian humans. The tumour growth slow and rarely has metastases. The clinical presentation is different. The main method for treating is radical surgical excision, but if the tumour is very big or there are metastases, there is a very effective target therapy with the peroral capsules Vismodegib 150mg. In this case we introduce a patient whit cancer of upper lip of preoperative target therapy whit Vismodegib 150mg, which destroy the tumour cells and help us to make cosmetic surgical excision.

  18. Gold nanoparticle incorporation in the cancer cells : imaging and treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahn, Sungsook; Jung, Sung Yong; Seo, Eun Seok; Ryu, Jeongeun; Lee, Sang Joon

    2011-11-01

    Surface modified gold nanoparticles (~ 20 nm) are selectively incorporated in the various cancer cells. Depending on the attached molecules on the gold nanoparticle surface, incorporation efficiency of the gold nanoparticles in the cancer cells are differentiated. Two-photon fluorescence microscopy, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy (EDS) and second ion mass spectroscopy (SIMS) are utilized to quantify the gold nanoparticles incorporated in the cancer cells. Static images of the cancer cell are obtained by scanning electron microscopy (SEM) and zone-plate X-ray nanoscopy. On the other hand, dynamic flow images are captured by dynamic X-ray imaging. To enhance the selective incorporation into the cancer cells, specially designed aptamer is introduced on the gold nanoparticles, which changes the mechanisms of gold nanoparticle incorporation through the cancer cell membrane. Anti-cancer drugs are also incorporated, by which sustained drug delivery mechanisms are investigated. This study would contribute to the basic understanding on the nanoparticle- mediated disease treatment and advanced imaging technology.

  19. Stem Cells in the Treatment of Refractory Chronic Migraines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alexander Mauskop

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available Background: Autologous adipose-derived stromal vascular fraction (SVF, which is rich in mesenchymal stromal cells, has been reported to be effective for the treatment of trigeminal neuropathic pain and chronic migraine and tension-type headaches. It is possible that stem cell activity targets neurogenic inflammation, which is a well-documented aspect of migraine pathogenesis. Methods: Adult patients with severe migraine-related disability as measured by the Migraine Disability Assessment (MIDAS score who failed botulinum toxin injections and at least 3 prophylactic drugs were included in this study. The primary outcome measure was the change in MIDAS score 3 months after treatment. Standard liposuction was performed to obtain adipose tissue, from which SVF was isolated by centrifugation. A sample of each patient’s SVF was tested for the number of nucleated cells and their viability. Between 8 and 10 mL of SVF with 2.5–8.6 million viable cells were injected into the pericranial, neck, and trapezius muscles. Results: One man and 8 women were enrolled in the study. The mean age was 48 years, the mean duration of headaches was 16 years, the mean number of prophylactic drugs tried was 10, and the mean MIDAS score at baseline was 122. Three months after the procedure the mean MIDAS score was 88. Seven out of 9 patients had a decrease in their MIDAS score, but only 2 had meaningful improvement. Conclusion: The use of autologous adipose-derived SVF may be effective in the treatment of chronic refractory migraines. It is possible that the use of allogenic stem cells could offer a more practical and more effective approach.

  20. Synchronous sigmoid and caecal cancers together with a primary renal cell carcinoma.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Bhargava, A

    2012-06-01

    Multiple primary neoplasms, a common clinical entity, can be classified as synchronous or metachronous. Renal cell carcinoma, in particular, is associated with a high rate of multiple primary neoplasms.

  1. Novel Treatment of Small-Cell Neuroendocrine of the Vagina

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kathryn Kostamo

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Background. Primary vaginal small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma is an extremely rare and highly aggressive malignancy. Eighty-five percent of patients die within one year of diagnosis from metastatic disease despite multimodal therapy. Gene expression profiling of tumor tissue may be useful for treatment options for various malignancies. Case. A 34-year-old nulliparous woman was diagnosed with primary vaginal small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma. Twenty weeks after the initial visit, she was diagnosed with recurrence and started on chemoradiation based on the results of gene expression profile of tumor tissue. She died 34 months after the initial visit and had a 14-month progression-free survival (PFS. Conclusion. Gene expression profile of tumor tissue in the management of primary vaginal small-cell neuroendocrine carcinoma may be helpful in extending progression-free survival.

  2. The cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors in the treatment of leukemias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghelli Luserna di Rora', A; Iacobucci, I; Martinelli, G

    2017-03-29

    The inhibition of the DNA damage response (DDR) pathway in the treatment of cancers has recently reached an exciting stage with several cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors that are now being tested in several clinical trials in cancer patients. Although the great amount of pre-clinical and clinical data are from the solid tumor experience, only few studies have been done on leukemias using specific cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors. This review aims to summarize the most recent data found on the biological mechanisms of the response to DNA damages highlighting the role of the different elements of the DDR pathway in normal and cancer cells and focusing on the main genetic alteration or aberrant gene expression that has been found on acute and chronic leukemias. This review, for the first time, outlines the most important pre-clinical and clinical data available on the efficacy of cell cycle checkpoint inhibitors in single agent and in combination with different agents normally used for the treatment of acute and chronic leukemias.

  3. The Continuing Value of Ultrastructural Observation in Central Nervous System Neoplasms in Children

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Na Rae Kim

    2015-11-01

    Full Text Available Central nervous system (CNS neoplasms are the second most common childhood malignancy after leukemia and the most common solid organ neoplasm in children. Diagnostic dilemmas with small specimens from CNS neoplasms are often the result of multifactorial etiologies such as frozen or fixation artifact, biopsy size, or lack of knowledge about rare or unfamiliar entities. Since the late 1950s, ultrastructural examination has been used in the diagnosis of CNS neoplasms, though it has largely been replaced by immunohistochemical and molecular cytogenetic studies. Nowadays, pathologic diagnosis of CNS neoplasms is achieved through intraoperative cytology, light microscopy, immunohistochemistry, and molecular cytogenetic results. However, the utility of electron microscopy (EM in the final diagnosis of CNS neoplasms and investigation of its pathogenetic origin remains critical. Here, we reviewed the distinguishing ultrastructural features of pediatric CNS neoplasms and emphasize the continuing value of EM in the diagnosis of CNS neoplasms.

  4. Radiofrequency Ablation Treatment for Renal Cell Carcinoma: Early Clinical Experience

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Park, Seong Hoon; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Cho, Jin Han; Oh, Jong Young; Nam, Kyung Jin; Kwon, Hee Jin; Kim, Su Yeon; Kang, Myong Jin; Choi, Sun Seob; Sung, Gyung Tak [Dong-A University College of Medicine, Busan (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-08-15

    To evaluate the early clinical experience associated with radiofrequency (RF) ablation in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The RF ablation treatment was performed on 17 tumors from 16 patients (mean age, 60.5 years; range, 43 73 years) with RCC. The treatment indications were localized, solid renal mass, comorbidities, high operation risk, and refusal to perform surgery. All tumors were treated by a percutaneous CT (n = 10), followed by an US-guided (n = 2), laparoscopy-assisted US (n = 2), and an open (n = 2) RF ablation. Furthermore, patients underwent a follow- up CT at one day, one week, one month, three and six months, and then every six months from the onset of treatment. We evaluated the technical success, technical effectiveness, ablation zone, benign periablation enhancement, irregular peripheral enhancement, and complications. All 17 exophytic tumors (mean size, 2.2 cm; range, 1.1 5.0 cm) were completely ablated. Technical success and effectiveness was achieved in all cases and the mean follow-up period was 23.8 months (range, 17 33 months). A local recurrence was not detected in any of the cases; however, five patients developed complications as a result of treatment, including hematuria (n = 2), mild thermal injury of the psoas muscle (n = 1), mild hydronephrosis (n = 1), and fistula formation (n = 1). The RF ablation is an alternative treatment for exophytic RCCs and represents a promising treatment for some patients with small RCCs.

  5. Radiofrequency Ablation Treatment for Renal Cell Carcinoma: Early Clinical Experience

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Park, Seong Hoon; Yoon, Seong Kuk; Cho, Jin Han; Oh, Jong Young; Nam, Kyung Jin; Kwon, Hee Jin; Kim, Su Yeon; Kang, Myong Jin; Choi, Sun Seob; Sung, Gyung Tak

    2008-01-01

    To evaluate the early clinical experience associated with radiofrequency (RF) ablation in patients with renal cell carcinoma (RCC). The RF ablation treatment was performed on 17 tumors from 16 patients (mean age, 60.5 years; range, 43 73 years) with RCC. The treatment indications were localized, solid renal mass, comorbidities, high operation risk, and refusal to perform surgery. All tumors were treated by a percutaneous CT (n = 10), followed by an US-guided (n = 2), laparoscopy-assisted US (n = 2), and an open (n = 2) RF ablation. Furthermore, patients underwent a follow- up CT at one day, one week, one month, three and six months, and then every six months from the onset of treatment. We evaluated the technical success, technical effectiveness, ablation zone, benign periablation enhancement, irregular peripheral enhancement, and complications. All 17 exophytic tumors (mean size, 2.2 cm; range, 1.1 5.0 cm) were completely ablated. Technical success and effectiveness was achieved in all cases and the mean follow-up period was 23.8 months (range, 17 33 months). A local recurrence was not detected in any of the cases; however, five patients developed complications as a result of treatment, including hematuria (n = 2), mild thermal injury of the psoas muscle (n = 1), mild hydronephrosis (n = 1), and fistula formation (n = 1). The RF ablation is an alternative treatment for exophytic RCCs and represents a promising treatment for some patients with small RCCs

  6. Cryosurgery as Additional Treatment in Tenosynovial Giant Cell Tumors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    F. G. M. Verspoor

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Introduction. Tenosynovial giant cell tumors (TGCT emerge from the synovium and can behave aggressively. Surgical resection is the standard treatment. However, up to half of the patients with diffuse type show recurrences. Several additional treatments have been applied to reduce recurrences; none of these treatments was proven to be superior to surgical resection solely. This article describes the results of additional cryosurgery to surgical resection. Materials and Methods. We retrospectively evaluated 141 TGCT patients, between 1999 and 2007. Twelve patients had additional cryosurgery. The knee (n=8, hip (n=2, ankle (n=1, and elbow (n=1 were affected. Primary outcome variables were treatment indications, recurrences, and complications. Results. Indications for additional cryosurgery were extended disease, bone involvement, and locations that are difficult to surgically get disease-free such as cruciate ligaments. Five patients had recurrent disease, all of which had prior treatments. None of the primary treated patients had recurrent disease. One patient had a deep infection. Discussion. Cryosurgery may serve as an additional treatment for diffuse TCGT in selected cases. However, because of the small number of patients and the heterogeneous group we could not prove an advantage of additional cryosurgery over surgical resection only. Cryosurgery should be considered for further evaluation in a prospective study. If there is any effect it would be helpful, especially in patients with multiple TGCT recurrences.

  7. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath of the hand - magnetic resonance image and orthopaedic treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kirova, G.; Monovska, T.; Jablanski, V.; Alexieva, K.; Velev, M.

    2009-01-01

    Giant cell tumour of the tendon sheath (GCT-TS), also known as localized nodular tenosynovitis, is a benign neoplasm that occurs dominantly on the digits. These tumours most commonly occur in patients aged 30-50 years and are associated with degenerative joint disease. GCT-TS usually arises from the synovium of tendon sheets, affecting interfalangeal joints of the hand, feet, ankle and knees. Magnetic Resonance Imaging is able to depict characteristic signal intensities and can accurately assess the tumor size and degree of extent around the phalanx. We present a case of a 36 years-old male patient with GCT-TS in the flexor tendon of his left second finger, diagnosed with Magnetic Resonance imaging. The mass was excised widely with preservation of the flexor tendon without recurrence. (authors)

  8. Childhood neoplasms presenting at autopsy: A 20-year experience.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bryant, Victoria A; Booth, John; Palm, Liina; Ashworth, Michael; Jacques, Thomas S; Sebire, Neil J

    2017-09-01

    The aims of the review are to establish the number of undiagnosed neoplasms presenting at autopsy in a single centre and to determine the incidence and most common causes of sudden unexpected death due to neoplasia in infancy and childhood (SUDNIC). Retrospective observational study of paediatric autopsies performed on behalf of Her Majesty's Coroner over a 20-year period (1996-2015; n = 2,432). Neoplasms first diagnosed at autopsy were identified from an established database and cases meeting the criteria for sudden unexpected death were further categorised. Thirteen previously undiagnosed neoplasms were identified, including five haematological malignancies, two medulloblastomas, two neuroblastomas, two cardiac tumours and two malignancies of renal origin. Eight cases met the criteria for SUDNIC (0.33% of autopsies), the commonest group of which were haematological malignancies (n = 3). Neoplasms presenting as unexpected death in infancy and childhood and diagnosed at autopsy are rare. The findings suggest that haematological malignancies are the commonest cause of SUDNIC and highlight the importance of specialist autopsy in cases of sudden unexpected death. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  9. The radiotherapy value in recurrence control mammary neoplasm

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Torres Lopez, M.; Santini Blasco, A.

    1996-01-01

    In base on the retrospective analysis of 250 patient carrying of mammals neoplasms recurrence, their general characteristics are determined and the results are emphasized obtained by the radiotherapy, as well as the list that the indicative predict. It culminates in the necessity of indicating the adyuvance postoperative radiotherapy when factors unfavorable presage of recurrence(AU ) [es

  10. Solid pseudopapillary epithelial neoplasm – a rare but curable ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Background. Solid pseudopapillary epithelial neoplasms (SPENs) of the pancreas are rare but curable tumours that have a low-grade malignant potential and occur almost exclusively in young women, with an excellent prognosis after complete resection. This study examines the clinicopathological characteristics of these ...

  11. A retrospective study of ocular neoplasms in Benin City, Nigeria ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    The frequency of retinoblastoma was higher than previously reported while the frequency of choroidal malanoma was less than that seen in Literature. This may necessitate the need for further studies on retinoblastomas in Nigeria. KEY WORDS: Ocular Neoplasms, Malignant tumors, age, sex. Global Jnl Medical Sciences ...

  12. Situs inversus with renal neoplasm: a case report.

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Situs inversus with renal neoplasm: a case report. Je\\vell J MCS FACCP. Senior Consultant. Bowa K hlBChB hlsc (Glasgonl). Regstrar. Uni~ersity~Teaching Hospital, School of hledicine. University of Zambia. Correspondence to: Dr. Jewel1 J, Dept. of Surgery, UTH, P 0 Box 501 10, LUSAICA, ZAhlBIX. This is a case report ...

  13. Histologic and Immunohistochemical classification of 41 bovine adrenal gland neoplasms

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Grossi, Anette Blak; Leifsson, Páll S.; Jensen, Henrik Elvang

    2013-01-01

    Tumors of the adrenal glands are among the most frequent tumors in cattle; however, few studies have been conducted to describe their characteristics. The aim of this study was to classify 41 bovine adrenal neoplasms from 40 animals based on macroscopic and histologic examination, including...

  14. A Survey Of Cutaneous Neoplasms Among Horses Used For ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    A Survey Of Cutaneous Neoplasms Among Horses Used For Cultural Festivals In Borno State, Nigeria. ... Histologically, the papillomas were deeply subdivided into epithelial lobules with the outer and inner aspects of the epithelium running approximately parallel to each other. Irregular sub-dermal masses or cords of ...

  15. Cell mediated therapeutics for cancer treatment: Tumor homing cells as therapeutic delivery vehicles

    Science.gov (United States)

    Balivada, Sivasai

    Many cell types were known to have migratory properties towards tumors and different research groups have shown reliable results regarding cells as delivery vehicles of therapeutics for targeted cancer treatment. Present report discusses proof of concept for 1. Cell mediated delivery of Magnetic nanoparticles (MNPs) and targeted Magnetic hyperthermia (MHT) as a cancer treatment by using in vivo mouse cancer models, 2. Cells surface engineering with chimeric proteins for targeted cancer treatment by using in vitro models. 1. Tumor homing cells can carry MNPs specifically to the tumor site and tumor burden will decrease after alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure. To test this hypothesis, first we loaded Fe/Fe3O4 bi-magnetic NPs into neural progenitor cells (NPCs), which were previously shown to migrate towards melanoma tumors. We observed that NPCs loaded with MNPs travel to subcutaneous melanoma tumors. After alternating magnetic field (AMF) exposure, the targeted delivery of MNPs by the NPCs resulted in a mild decrease in tumor size (Chapter-2). Monocytes/macrophages (Mo/Ma) are known to infiltrate tumor sites, and also have phagocytic activity which can increase their uptake of MNPs. To test Mo/Ma-mediated MHT we transplanted Mo/Ma loaded with MNPs into a mouse model of pancreatic peritoneal carcinomatosis. We observed that MNP-loaded Mo/Ma infiltrated pancreatic tumors and, after AMF treatment, significantly prolonged the lives of mice bearing disseminated intraperitoneal pancreatic tumors (Chapter-3). 2. Targeted cancer treatment could be achieved by engineering tumor homing cell surfaces with tumor proteases cleavable, cancer cell specific recombinant therapeutic proteins. To test this, Urokinase and Calpain (tumor specific proteases) cleavable; prostate cancer cell (CaP) specific (CaP1 targeting peptide); apoptosis inducible (Caspase3 V266ED3)- rCasp3V266ED3 chimeric protein was designed in silico. Hypothesized membrane anchored chimeric protein (rCasp3V

  16. Cell death-based treatments of melanoma:conventional treatments and new therapeutic strategies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mattia, Gianfranco; Puglisi, Rossella; Ascione, Barbara; Malorni, Walter; Carè, Alessandra; Matarrese, Paola

    2018-01-25

    The incidence of malignant melanoma has continued to rise during the past decades. However, in the last few years, treatment protocols have significantly been improved thanks to a better understanding of the key oncogenes and signaling pathways involved in its pathogenesis and progression. Anticancer therapy would either kill tumor cells by triggering apoptosis or permanently arrest them in the G1 phase of the cell cycle. Unfortunately, melanoma is often refractory to commonly used anticancer drugs. More recently, however, some new anticancer strategies have been developed that are "external" to cancer cells, for example stimulating the immune system's response or inhibiting angiogenesis. In fact, the increasing knowledge of melanoma pathogenetic mechanisms, in particular the discovery of genetic mutations activating specific oncogenes, stimulated the development of molecularly targeted therapies, a form of treatment in which a drug (chemical or biological) is developed with the goal of exclusively destroying cancer cells by interfering with specific molecules that drive growth and spreading of the tumor. Again, after the initial exciting results associated with targeted therapy, tumor resistance and/or relapse of the melanoma lesion have been observed. Hence, very recently, new therapeutic strategies based on the modulation of the immune system function have been developed. Since cancer cells are known to be capable of evading immune-mediated surveillance, i.e., to block the immune system cell activity, a series of molecular strategies, including monoclonal antibodies, have been developed in order to "release the brakes" on the immune system igniting immune reactivation and hindering metastatic melanoma cell growth. In this review we analyze the various biological strategies underlying conventional chemotherapy as well as the most recently developed targeted therapies and immunotherapies, pointing at the molecular mechanisms of cell injury and death engaged by

  17. Age-specific incidence of all neoplasms after colorectal cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Levi, Fabio; Randimbison, Lalao; Blanc-Moya, Rafael; La Vecchia, Carlo

    2014-10-01

    Patients diagnosed with a specific neoplasm tend to have a subsequent excess risk of the same neoplasm. The age incidence of a second neoplasm at the same site is approximately constant with age, and consequently the relative risk is greater at younger age. It is unclear whether such a line of reasoning can be extended from a specific neoplasm to the incidence of all neoplasms in subjects diagnosed with a defined neoplasm. We considered the age-specific incidence of all non-hormone-related epithelial neoplasms after a first primary colorectal cancer (n = 9542) in the Vaud Cancer Registry data set. In subjects with a previous colorectal cancer, the incidence rate of all other epithelial non-hormone-related cancers was stable around 800 per 100,000 between age 30 and 60 years, and rose only about twofold to reach 1685 at age 70 to 79 years and 1826 per 100,000 at age 80 years or older. After excluding synchronous cancers, the rise was only about 1.5-fold, that is, from about 700 to 1000. In the general population, the incidence rate of all epithelial non-hormone-related cancers was 29 per 100,000 at age 30 to 39 years, and rose 30-fold to 883 per 100,000 at age 70 to 79 years. Excluding colorectal cancers, the rise of all non-hormone-related cancers was from 360 per 100,000 at age 40 to 49 years to 940 at age 70 to 79 years after colorectal cancer, and from 90 to 636 per 100,000 in the general population (i.e., 2.6- vs. 7.1-fold). The rise of incidence with age of all epithelial non-hormone-related second cancers after colorectal cancer is much smaller than in the general population. This can possibly be related to the occurrence of a single mutational event in a population of susceptible individuals, although alternative models are plausible within the complexity of the process of carcinogenesis. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. [Synchronous adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon and multifocal intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm of the pancreas in an elderly patient].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirarchi, Mariateresa; De Raffele, Emilio; Lega, Stefania; Calculli, Lucia; Vaccari, Samuele; Cola, Bruno

    2009-01-01

    Intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasms are a well-recognized pathologic entity of the pancreas that is being reported with increasing frequency. These tumours carry a relatively favourable prognosis and are frequently associated with extrapancreatic malignancies. The combination of advanced age and co-existence of two neoplasms challenges the planning of the best treatment option. A 78-year-old man presented with rectal bleeding which led to the diagnosis of a stenosing adenocarcinoma of the sigmoid colon. No metastatic lesions were present but a 30 mm intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with mural nodules was detected in the uncinate process of the pancreas. Small diffused dilations of the side branches were present in the body and tail of the gland. A two-stage procedure was planned: an R0 sigmoid resection was undertaken first with an uneventful postoperative course. Forty-five days later a pancreaticoduodenectomy was performed and the postoperative course was again uneventful apart from delayed gastric emptying. Histology showed a combined-type intraductal papillary mucinous neoplasm with foci of non-invasive carcinoma. The patient is still alive without evidence of cancer recurrence 33 month after the pancreatico-duodenectomy. The co-existence of a potentially malignant pancreatic tumour with an extra-pancreatic overt malignancy in elderly patients poses difficulties in the attempt to cure the patient with minimal morbidity. In the present case we considered a staged surgical procedure with the aim of reducing the perioperative risk, since the excision of the pancreatic neoplasm required a pancreaticoduodenectomy in an elderly patient.

  19. Oral cavity lymphoma as secondary AIDS-defining neoplasm in a patient on HAART with immune reconstitution

    OpenAIRE

    Corti,Marcelo; Solari,Rubén; Cangelosi,Diana; De Carolis,Luis; Schtirbu,Ricardo; Lewi,Daniel

    2007-01-01

    Lymphomas of the oral cavity are a rare complication of advanced HIV/AIDS disease. The clinical appearance of these neoplasms includes masses or ulcerative lesions that involve the oral soft tissue and the jaw as the predominant manifestation. We report the case of a patient with AIDS who developed diffuse large B-cell non-Hodgkin’s lymphoma of the oral cavity during highly active antiretroviral therapy, with undetectable plasma viral load and immune reconstitution.

  20. Vismodegib for the treatment of basal cell skin cancer.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poggi, Laura; Kolesar, Jill M

    2013-06-15

    The pharmacology, clinical efficacy, adverse effects, cost, and place in therapy of vismodegib are reviewed. Vismodegib, the first oral treatment for basal cell carcinoma (BCC), was recently approved for the treatment of patients with locally advanced or metastatic BCC whose cancer is refractory to standard treatments or who are not candidates for surgery or radiation. Vismodegib is a small molecule that potently inhibits signal transduction in the hedgehog signaling pathway, demonstrates nonlinear pharmacokinetics, and has a half-life of 13 days. Agents that increase gastrointestinal pH may reduce the solubility and bioavailability of vismodegib. It is effective in both locally advanced and metastatic BCCs, with response rates ranging from 30% to 60% in two clinical trials. Vismodegib is available as a 150-mg capsule, and the approved dosage is 150 mg orally once daily. The most common adverse effects of vismodegib include mild-to-moderate hair loss, muscle cramps, taste disturbance, and weight loss. The estimated cost of one month of treatment with vismodegib is $7500. Vismodegib was recently approved for the treatment of locally advanced or metastatic BCC that is refractory to standard treatments or if patients are not candidates for surgery or radiation. Vismodegib may have little effect on the treatment of BCC, given its high cost, the high cure rates achieved with standard therapies, and its unacceptable toxicity profile in patients with a non-life-threatening disease. However, vismodegib's novel mechanism of action, oral dosage form, preliminary efficacy, and tolerability compared with cytotoxic chemotherapy may make it an attractive candidate for the treatment of other cancers.

  1. Mesenchymal stem cells for the treatment of neurodegenerative disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Joyce, Nanette; Annett, Geralyn; Wirthlin, Louisa; Olson, Scott; Bauer, Gerhard; Nolta, Jan A

    2010-11-01

    Mesenchymal stem cells/marrow stromal cells (MSCs) present a promising tool for cell therapy, and are currently being tested in US FDA-approved clinical trials for myocardial infarction, stroke, meniscus injury, limb ischemia, graft-versus-host disease and autoimmune disorders. They have been extensively tested and proven effective in preclinical studies for these and many other disorders. There is currently a great deal of interest in the use of MSCs to treat neurodegenerative diseases, in particular for those that are fatal and difficult to treat, such as Huntington's disease and amyotrophic lateral sclerosis. Proposed regenerative approaches to neurological diseases using MSCs include cell therapies in which cells are delivered via intracerebral or intrathecal injection. Upon transplantation into the brain, MSCs promote endogenous neuronal growth, decrease apoptosis, reduce levels of free radicals, encourage synaptic connection from damaged neurons and regulate inflammation, primarily through paracrine actions. MSCs transplanted into the brain have been demonstrated to promote functional recovery by producing trophic factors that induce survival and regeneration of host neurons. Therapies will capitalize on the innate trophic support from MSCs or on augmented growth factor support, such as delivering brain-derived neurotrophic factor or glial-derived neurotrophic factor into the brain to support injured neurons, using genetically engineered MSCs as the delivery vehicles. Clinical trials for MSC injection into the CNS to treat traumatic brain injury and stroke are currently ongoing. The current data in support of applying MSC-based cellular therapies to the treatment of neurodegenerative disorders are discussed.

  2. Combined cisplatin and aurora inhibitor treatment increase neuroblastoma cell death but surviving cells overproduce BDNF

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alessio Polacchini

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Drug-resistance to chemotherapics in aggressive neuroblastoma (NB is characterized by enhanced cell survival mediated by TrkB and its ligand, brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF; thus reduction in BDNF levels represent a promising strategy to overcome drug-resistance, but how chemotherapics regulate BDNF is unknown. Here, cisplatin treatment in SK-N-BE neuroblastoma upregulated multiple BDNF transcripts, except exons 5 and 8 variants. Cisplatin increased BDNF mRNA and protein, and enhanced translation of a firefly reporter gene flanked by BDNF 5′UTR exons 1, 2c, 4 or 6 and 3′UTR-long. To block BDNF translation we focused on aurora kinases inhibitors which are proposed as new chemotherapeutics. NB cell survival after 24 h treatment was 43% with cisplatin, and 22% by cisplatin+aurora kinase inhibitor PHA-680632, while the aurora kinases inhibitor alone was less effective; however the combined treatment induced a paradoxical increase of BDNF in surviving cells with strong translational activation of exon6-3′UTR-long transcript, while translation of BDNF transcripts 1, 2C and 4 was suppressed. In conclusion, combined cisplatin and aurora kinase inhibitor treatment increases cell death, but induces BDNF overproduction in surviving cells through an aurora kinase-independent mechanism.

  3. Differential expression of the klf6 tumor suppressor gene upon cell damaging treatments in cancer cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gehrau, Ricardo C.; D'Astolfo, Diego S.; Andreoli, Veronica; Bocco, Jose L.; Koritschoner, Nicolas P.

    2011-01-01

    The mammalian Krueppel-like factor 6 (KLF6) is involved in critical roles such as growth-related signal transduction, cell proliferation and differentiation, development, apoptosis and angiogenesis. Also, KLF6 appears to be an emerging key factor during cancer development and progression. Its expression is thoroughly regulated by several cell-damaging stimuli. DNA damaging agents at lethal concentrations induce a p53-independent down-regulation of the klf6 gene. To investigate the impact of external stimuli on human klf6 gene expression, its mRNA level was analyzed using a cancer cell line profiling array system, consisting in an assortment of immobilized cDNAs from multiple cell lines treated with several cell-damaging agents at growth inhibitory concentrations (IC 50 ). Cell-damaging agents affected the klf6 expression in 62% of the cDNA samples, though the expression pattern was not dependent on the cell origin type. Interestingly, significant differences (p 50 concentrations of physical and chemical stimuli in a p53-dependent manner. Most of these agents are frequently used in cancer therapy. Induction of klf6 expression in the absence of functional p53 directly correlates with cell death triggered by these compounds, whereas it is down-regulated in p53+/+ cells. Hence, klf6 expression level could represent a valuable marker for the efficiency of cell death upon cancer treatment.

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  15. File list: NoD.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available NoD.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 No description Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/NoD.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  16. File list: Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... SRX739215,SRX739214,SRX739216,SRX739217 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  17. File list: Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  18. File list: Oth.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... SRX739214,SRX739215,SRX739217,SRX739216 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  19. File list: Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  20. File list: Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  1. File list: ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  2. File list: His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  3. File list: DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  4. File list: Oth.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms... SRX739215,SRX739214,SRX739216,SRX739217 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  5. File list: DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Prs.10.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  6. File list: His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  7. File list: ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms ...SRX739215,SRX739213,SRX739214,SRX739216,SRX739217 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Prs.50.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  8. File list: ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms ...SRX739215,SRX739213,SRX739214,SRX739216,SRX739217 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  9. File list: DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  10. File list: Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  11. File list: DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  12. File list: DNS.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Prs.20.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  13. File list: Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  14. File list: Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Unclassified Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Unc.Neu.10.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  15. File list: ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 All antigens Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/ALL.Neu.05.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  16. File list: DNS.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available DNS.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 DNase-seq Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms htt...p://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/DNS.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  17. File list: Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 TFs and others Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... SRX337965 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Oth.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  18. File list: His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 Histone Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms h...ttp://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/His.Neu.20.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...

  19. File list: InP.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available InP.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms mm9 Input control Prostate Prostatic Neoplasms SRX739213 http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/InP.Prs.05.AllAg.Prostatic_Neoplasms.bed ...

  20. File list: Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms [Chip-atlas[Archive

    Lifescience Database Archive (English)

    Full Text Available Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms mm9 RNA polymerase Neural Nerve Sheath Neoplasms... http://dbarchive.biosciencedbc.jp/kyushu-u/mm9/assembled/Pol.Neu.50.AllAg.Nerve_Sheath_Neoplasms.bed ...