WorldWideScience

Sample records for cell movement restriction

  1. Giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath restricting joint movement in the thumb: A case study and review of literature

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Muzaffer Durmus

    2015-04-01

    Full Text Available Giant cell tumors of the tendon sheath are the second most common type of subcutaneous benign tumors found in the hand. These tumors are slow growing soft tissue mases that develop over a long period of time and can occur at any age. Although such lesions are usually painless, there is a possibility of recurrence of the tumor. Patients should seek postoperative management in order to prevent any possibility of recurrence. In view of the current literature, we present a case involving a patient suffering from a multifocal giant cell tumor of the tendon sheath that restricted movement of the interphalangeal joints of the thumb. [Hand Microsurg 2015; 4(1.000: 16-19

  2. IS-linked movement of a restriction-modification system.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriko Takahashi

    Full Text Available Potential mobility of restriction-modification systems has been suggested by evolutionary/bioinformatic analysis of prokaryotic genomes. Here we demonstrate in vivo movement of a restriction-modification system within a genome under a laboratory condition. After blocking replication of a temperature-sensitive plasmid carrying a PaeR7I restriction-modification system in Escherichia coli cells, the plasmid was found integrated into the chromosome of the surviving cells. Sequence analysis revealed that, in the majority of products, the restriction-modification system was linked to chromosomal insertion sequences (ISs. Three types of products were: (I apparent co-integration of the plasmid and the chromosome at a chromosomal IS1 or IS5 copy (24/28 analyzed; (II de novo insertion of IS1 with the entire plasmid except for a 1-3 bp terminal deletion (2/28; and (III reciprocal crossing-over between the plasmid and the chromosome involving 1-3 bp of sequence identity (2/28. An R-negative mutation apparently decreased the efficiency of successful integration by two orders of magnitude. Reconstruction experiments demonstrated that the restriction-dependence was mainly due to selection against cells without proper integration: their growth was inhibited by the restriction enzyme action. These results demonstrate collaboration of a mobile element and a restriction-modification system for successful joint migration. This collaboration may have promoted the spread and, therefore, the long-term persistence of these complexes and restriction-modification systems in a wide range of prokaryotes.

  3. Company Law as a Restriction to Free Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Karsten Engsig

    2014-01-01

    Focusing on recent judgments from the Court of Justice of the European Union, this article investigates how the notion of ‘restriction’ – which is the first step in examining whether there is an infringement of the free movement rights – is used in cases involving company law measures....... There is evidence that non-discriminatory obstacles to free movement found in company law can be restrictions. However, recent cases show that the Court may be willing to apply a more restrictive approach where only non-discriminatory measures that have a qualified deterrent effect may constitute restrictions....

  4. 5 CFR 330.501 - General restriction on movement after competitive appointment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... 5 Administrative Personnel 1 2010-01-01 2010-01-01 false General restriction on movement after competitive appointment. 330.501 Section 330.501 Administrative Personnel OFFICE OF PERSONNEL MANAGEMENT CIVIL... Principles § 330.501 General restriction on movement after competitive appointment. An agency may promote...

  5. Does reduced movement restrictions and use of assistive devices affect rehabilitation outcome after total hip replacement?

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Petersen, Annemette Krintel; Søballe, Kjeld

    2014-01-01

    . DESIGN: Non-randomized, controlled study. SETTING: Inpatient. POPULATION: 365 consecutively included THR patients. METHODS: Patients included the 3 initial month of the study underwent rehabilitation with restrictions in hip movement and a standard package of assistive devices (restricted group...... IMPACT: It is possible to reduce movement restrictions and use of assistive devices considerably. More research on safety issues is needed to elucidate the effect of unrestricted rehabilitation on hip dislocation....

  6. The ability of external immobilizers to restrict movement of the cervical spine: a systematic review

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Holla, M.; Huisman, J.M.; Verdonschot, N.J.J.; Goosen, J.; Hosman, A.J.; Hannink, G.

    2016-01-01

    Purpose To review the ability of various types of external immobilizers to restrict cervical spine movement. Methods With a systematical review of original scientific articles, data on range of motion, type of used external immobilization device and risk of bias were extracted. The described extern

  7. 7 CFR 360.300 - General prohibitions and restrictions on the movement of noxious weeds; permits.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... of noxious weeds; permits. 360.300 Section 360.300 Agriculture Regulations of the Department of Agriculture (Continued) ANIMAL AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE NOXIOUS WEED REGULATIONS § 360.300 General prohibitions and restrictions on the movement of noxious weeds; permits. (a)...

  8. Breaking the fixed-arrival-time restriction in reaching movements of neural prosthetic devices.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Srinivasan, Lakshminarayan; da Silva, Marco

    2011-06-01

    We routinely generate reaching arm movements to function independently. For paralyzed users of upper extremity neural prosthetic devices, flexible, high-performance reaching algorithms will be critical to restoring quality-of-life. Previously, algorithms called real-time reach state equations (RSE) were developed to integrate the user's plan and execution-related neural activity to drive reaching movements to arbitrary targets. Preliminary validation under restricted conditions suggested that RSE might yield dramatic performance improvements. Unfortunately, real-world applications of RSE have been impeded because the RSE assumes a fixed, known arrival time. Recent animal-based prototypes attempted to break the fixed-arrival-time assumption by proposing a standard model (SM) that instead restricted the user's movements to a fixed, known set of targets. Here, we leverage general purpose filter design (GPFD) to break both of these critical restrictions, freeing the paralyzed user to make reaching movements to arbitrary target sets with various arrival times and definitive stopping. In silico validation predicts that the new approach, GPFD-RSE, outperforms the SM while offering greater flexibility. We demonstrate the GPFD-RSE against SM in the simulated control of an overactuated 3-D virtual robotic arm with a real-time inverse kinematics engine.

  9. Handheld cellular phones restrict head movements and range of visual regard.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thumser, Zachary C; Stahl, John S

    2013-02-01

    Numerous studies have reported the ability of mobile phones to distract users and thereby degrade performance of concurrent tasks. Less is known about whether the phone-holding posture can itself influence concurrent motor activities. Horizontal eye movements are often coordinated with head movements, particularly when the amplitude of the gaze shift is large. Holding a phone to one ear has been shown to restrict the range of spontaneously generated head movements. In order to determine whether the phone-holding posture also influences gaze, we recorded eye and head movements as volunteers looked about themselves spontaneously. Holding the phone to the ear narrowed the range of gaze, principally in subjects who exhibit a strong propensity to move the head with the eyes. We argue that visual exploration may be influenced by the balance between costs and benefits of turning the head, with the phone-holding posture increasing the costs. The effects on gaze would be seen most clearly in subjects who have a higher predilection for coupling eye and head movements. Conversely, this effect would be minimal if tested in tasks that rarely elicit head movements in the specific subjects being tested. The results emphasize the close coordination between eye and head movements, and have implications for the design of ergonomic studies comparing the effects of handheld vs. hands-free mobile phones on performance of specific tasks, such as driving.

  10. SUMO wrestling in cell movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Miia M Rytinki; Jorma J Palvimo

    2011-01-01

    @@ Small ubiquitin-like modifier(SUMO)proteins 1,2 and 3 can be covalently conjugated to specific lysine residues on target proteins in a process dubbed SUMOylation.This conserved posttranslational modification that was reported for the first time in 1996 has emerged as an important regulatory mechanism in cell physiology,especially in nuclear signaling,transport,transcription and DNA replication/repair[1,2].

  11. Zebrafish gastrulation: cell movements, signals, and mechanisms.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rohde, Laurel A; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2007-01-01

    Gastrulation is a morphogenetic process that results in the formation of the embryonic germ layers. Here we detail the major cell movements that occur during zebrafish gastrulation: epiboly, internalization, and convergent extension. Although gastrulation is known to be regulated by signaling pathways such as the Wnt/planar cell polarity pathway, many questions remain about the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms. Key factors that may play a role in gastrulation cell movements are cell adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangement. In addition, some of the driving force for gastrulation may derive from tissue interactions such as those described between the enveloping layer and the yolk syncytial layer. Future exploration of gastrulation mechanisms relies on the development of sensitive and quantitative techniques to characterize embryonic germ-layer properties.

  12. [Zebra fish cell movements during gastrulation].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhang, Ting; Mo, Xian-Ming

    2013-04-01

    During zebrafish gastrulation, large cellular rearrangements create the formation of the three germ layers, ectoderm, mesoderm, and endoderm. This process includes three types of conserved morphogenetic movement: epiboly, involution, and convergent extension. Specially, the anterior movement of prechordal plate progenitors is essential for the location and differentiation of mesendoderm progenitors, and the pechordal plate progenitors'coherent migration is thought to be a good model to study the mechanism of cell movement in vivo. Gastrulation migration is known to be controlled by many signaling pathways such as Wnt/planar cell polarity signaling; however, the underlying molecular mechanism for cellular behavior remains unknown. At present, it is generally agree that cell adhesion and cytoskeletal rearrangement are critical factors during zebrafish gastrulation cell migration. In addition, the role of extraembryonic tissue (yolk syncytial layer) during gastrulation is concerned increasingly. Here, we described the essential factors for controlling cellular behaviors and highlighted the major issues and questions that require further investigation during zebra fish gastrular cell migration in order to provide a complete map containing all the factors for regulating gastrulation cell migration and their interactions on a cellular level.

  13. Ultrasound Evaluation of the Combined Effects of Thoracolumbar Fascia Injury and Movement Restriction in a Porcine Model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bishop, James H; Fox, James R; Maple, Rhonda; Loretan, Caitlin; Badger, Gary J; Henry, Sharon M; Vizzard, Margaret A; Langevin, Helene M

    2016-01-01

    The persistence of back pain following acute back "sprains" is a serious public health problem with poorly understood pathophysiology. The recent finding that human subjects with chronic low back pain (LBP) have increased thickness and decreased mobility of the thoracolumbar fascia measured with ultrasound suggest that the fasciae of the back may be involved in LBP pathophysiology. This study used a porcine model to test the hypothesis that similar ultrasound findings can be produced experimentally in a porcine model by combining a local injury of fascia with movement restriction using a "hobble" device linking one foot to a chest harness for 8 weeks. Ultrasound measurements of thoracolumbar fascia thickness and shear plane mobility (shear strain) during passive hip flexion were made at the 8 week time point on the non-intervention side (injury and/or hobble). Injury alone caused both an increase in fascia thickness (p = .007) and a decrease in fascia shear strain on the non-injured side (p = .027). Movement restriction alone did not change fascia thickness but did decrease shear strain on the non-hobble side (p = .024). The combination of injury plus movement restriction had additive effects on reducing fascia mobility with a 52% reduction in shear strain compared with controls and a 28% reduction compared to movement restriction alone. These results suggest that a back injury involving fascia, even when healed, can affect the relative mobility of fascia layers away from the injured area, especially when movement is also restricted.

  14. Collective Cell Movement Promotes Synchronization of Coupled Genetic Oscillators

    OpenAIRE

    Uriu, Koichiro; Morelli, Luis G.

    2014-01-01

    Collective cell movement is a crucial component of embryonic development. Intercellular interactions regulate collective cell movement by allowing cells to transfer information. A key question is how collective cell movement itself influences information flow produced in tissues by intercellular interactions. Here, we study the effect of collective cell movement on the synchronization of locally coupled genetic oscillators. This study is motivated by the segmentation clock in zebrafish somito...

  15. Collective cell movement promotes synchronization of coupled genetic oscillators.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Uriu, Koichiro; Morelli, Luis G

    2014-07-15

    Collective cell movement is a crucial component of embryonic development. Intercellular interactions regulate collective cell movement by allowing cells to transfer information. A key question is how collective cell movement itself influences information flow produced in tissues by intercellular interactions. Here, we study the effect of collective cell movement on the synchronization of locally coupled genetic oscillators. This study is motivated by the segmentation clock in zebrafish somitogenesis, where short-range correlated movement of cells has been observed. We describe the segmentation clock tissue by a Voronoi diagram, cell movement by the force balance of self-propelled and repulsive forces between cells, the dynamics of the direction of self-propelled motion, and the synchronization of genetic oscillators by locally coupled phase oscillators. We find that movement with a correlation length of about 2 ∼ 3 cell diameters is optimal for the synchronization of coupled oscillators. Quantification of cell mixing reveals that this short-range correlation of cell movement allows cells to exchange neighbors most efficiently. Moreover, short-range correlated movement strongly destabilizes nonuniform spatial phase patterns, further promoting global synchronization. Our theoretical results suggest that collective cell movement may enhance the synchronization of the segmentation clock in zebrafish somitogenesis. More generally, collective cell movement may promote information flow in tissues by enhancing cell mixing and destabilizing spurious patterns.

  16. Tetherin restricts productive HIV-1 cell-to-cell transmission.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicoletta Casartelli

    Full Text Available The IFN-inducible antiviral protein tetherin (or BST-2/CD317/HM1.24 impairs release of mature HIV-1 particles from infected cells. HIV-1 Vpu antagonizes the effect of tetherin. The fate of virions trapped at the cell surface remains poorly understood. Here, we asked whether tetherin impairs HIV cell-to-cell transmission, a major means of viral spread. Tetherin-positive or -negative cells, infected with wild-type or DeltaVpu HIV, were used as donor cells and cocultivated with target lymphocytes. We show that tetherin inhibits productive cell-to-cell transmission of DeltaVpu to targets and impairs that of WT HIV. Tetherin accumulates with Gag at the contact zone between infected and target cells, but does not prevent the formation of virological synapses. In the presence of tetherin, viruses are then mostly transferred to targets as abnormally large patches. These viral aggregates do not efficiently promote infection after transfer, because they accumulate at the surface of target cells and are impaired in their fusion capacities. Tetherin, by imprinting virions in donor cells, is the first example of a surface restriction factor limiting viral cell-to-cell spread.

  17. Effects of weightlessness and movement restriction on the structure and metabolism of the soleus muscle in monkeys after space flight.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shenkman, B S; Belozerova, I N; Lee, Peter; Nemirovskaya, T L; Kozlovskaya, I B

    2003-09-01

    After humans and animals have been in conditions of real and modeled weightlessness, the most marked changes are seen in the "slow" tonic muscles, particularly soleus. Studies of the effects of weightlessness and movement restriction on the soleus muscle in monkeys demonstrated significant reductions in the sizes of slow and rapid fibers due mainly to the actions of real weightlessness (rather than movement restriction in the space capsule). Protein loss in soleus muscle fibers in monkeys following space flight was more marked than loss of other components, including water. The level of atrophy of soleus muscle fibers in these conditions was greater than the decrease in the number of capillaries. Succinate dehydrogenase activity in soleus muscle fibers decreased proportionally to the reduction in fiber size.

  18. 7 CFR 301.32 - Restrictions on interstate movement of regulated articles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    2010-01-01

    ... AND PLANT HEALTH INSPECTION SERVICE, DEPARTMENT OF AGRICULTURE DOMESTIC QUARANTINE NOTICES Fruit Flies... other requirements for the interstate movement of any of the fruit flies regulated under this...

  19. Restricted Arm Swing Affects Gait Stability and Increased Walking Speed Alters Trunk Movements in Children with Cerebral Palsy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delabastita, Tijs; Desloovere, Kaat; Meyns, Pieter

    2016-01-01

    Observational research suggests that in children with cerebral palsy, the altered arm swing is linked to instability during walking. Therefore, the current study investigates whether children with cerebral palsy use their arms more than typically developing children, to enhance gait stability. Evidence also suggests an influence of walking speed on gait stability. Moreover, previous research highlighted a link between walking speed and arm swing. Hence, the experiment aimed to explore differences between typically developing children and children with cerebral palsy taking into account the combined influence of restricting arm swing and increasing walking speed on gait stability. Spatiotemporal gait characteristics, trunk movement parameters and margins of stability were obtained using three dimensional gait analysis to assess gait stability of 26 children with cerebral palsy and 24 typically developing children. Four walking conditions were evaluated: (i) free arm swing and preferred walking speed; (ii) restricted arm swing and preferred walking speed; (iii) free arm swing and high walking speed; and (iv) restricted arm swing and high walking speed. Double support time and trunk acceleration variability increased more when arm swing was restricted in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children and children with unilateral cerebral palsy. Trunk sway velocity increased more when walking speed was increased in children with unilateral cerebral palsy compared to children with bilateral cerebral palsy and typically developing children and in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. Trunk sway velocity increased more when both arm swing was restricted and walking speed was increased in children with bilateral cerebral palsy compared to typically developing children. It is proposed that facilitating arm swing during gait rehabilitation can improve gait stability and decrease trunk movements in

  20. Planar cell polarity in coordinated and directed movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tada, Masazumi; Kai, Masatake

    2012-01-01

    Planar cell polarity is a fundamental concept to understanding the coordination of cell movements in the plane of a tissue. Since the planar cell polarity pathway was discovered in mesenchymal tissues involving cell interaction during vertebrate gastrulation, there is an emerging evidence that a variety of mesenchymal and epithelial cells utilize this genetic pathway to mediate the coordination of cells in directed movements. In this review, we focus on how the planar cell polarity pathway is mediated by migrating cells to communicate with one another in different developmental processes.

  1. Putting On The Breaks: Regulating Organelle Movements in Plant Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Julianna K.Vick; Andreas Nebenführ

    2012-01-01

    A striking characteristic of plant cells is that their organelles can move rapidly through the cell.This movement,commonly referred to as cytoplasmic streaming,has been observed for over 200 years,but we are only now beginning to decipher the mechanisms responsible for it.The identification of the myosin motor proteins responsible for these movements allows us to probe the regulatory events that coordinate organelle displacement with normal cell physiology.This review will highlight several recent developments that have provided new insight into the regulation of organelle movement,both at the cellular level and at the molecular level.

  2. Group choreography: mechanisms orchestrating the collective movement of border cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Montell, Denise J; Yoon, Wan Hee; Starz-Gaiano, Michelle

    2012-10-01

    Cell movements are essential for animal development and homeostasis but also contribute to disease. Moving cells typically extend protrusions towards a chemoattractant, adhere to the substrate, contract and detach at the rear. It is less clear how cells that migrate in interconnected groups in vivo coordinate their behaviour and navigate through natural environments. The border cells of the Drosophila melanogaster ovary have emerged as an excellent model for the study of collective cell movement, aided by innovative genetic, live imaging, and photomanipulation techniques. Here we provide an overview of the molecular choreography of border cells and its more general implications.

  3. Fate restriction and multipotency in retinal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Centanin, Lázaro; Hoeckendorf, Burkhard; Wittbrodt, Joachim

    2011-12-02

    Stem cells have the capacity to both self-renew and generate postmitotic cells. Long-term tracking of individual clones in their natural environment constitutes the ultimate way to validate postembryonic stem cells. We identify retinal stem cells (RSCs) using the spatiotemporal organization of the fish retina and follow the complete offspring of a single cell during the postnatal life. RSCs generate two tissues of the adult fish retina, the neural retina (NR) and the retinal-pigmented epithelium (RPE). Despite their common embryonic origin and tight coordination during continuous organ growth, we prove that NR and RPE are maintained by dedicated RSCs that contribute in a fate-restricted manner to either one or the other tissue. We show that in the NR, RSCs are multipotent and generate all neuron types and glia. The clonal origin of these different cell types from a multipotent NSC has far-reaching implications for cell type and tissue homeostasis.

  4. Structural and biomechanical basis of mitochondrial movement in eukaryotic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu M

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Min Wu,1 Aruna Kalyanasundaram,2 Jie Zhu1 1Laboratory of Biomechanics and Engineering, Institute of Biophysics, College of Science, Northwest A&F University, Yangling, Shaanxi, People's Republic of China; 2College of Pharmacology, University of Illinois at Chicago, Chicago, IL, USA Abstract: Mitochondria serve as energy-producing organelles in eukaryotic cells. In addition to providing the energy supply for cells, the mitochondria are also involved in other processes, such as proliferation, differentiation, information transfer, and apoptosis, and play an important role in regulation of cell growth and the cell cycle. In order to achieve these functions, the mitochondria need to move to the corresponding location. Therefore, mitochondrial movement has a crucial role in normal physiologic activity, and any mitochondrial movement disorder will cause irreparable damage to the organism. For example, recent studies have shown that abnormal movement of the mitochondria is likely to be the reason for Charcot–Marie–Tooth disease, amyotrophic lateral sclerosis, Alzheimer's disease, Huntington's disease, Parkinson's disease, and schizophrenia. So, in the cell, especially in the particular polarized cell, the appropriate distribution of mitochondria is crucial to the function and survival of the cell. Mitochondrial movement is mainly associated with the cytoskeleton and related proteins. However, those components play different roles according to cell type. In this paper, we summarize the structural basis of mitochondrial movement, including microtubules, actin filaments, motor proteins, and adaptin, and review studies of the biomechanical mechanisms of mitochondrial movement in different types of cells. Keywords: mitochondrial movement, microtubules, actin filaments, motor proteins, adaptin

  5. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Chengke; Nelson, Richard S

    2013-01-01

    Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV) requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement, and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton, and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  6. Integrin-independent movement of immune cells

    OpenAIRE

    Pinner, Sophie E; Sahai, Erik

    2009-01-01

    Cell motility requires the temporal and spatial coordination of the actin cytoskeleton with cell-matrix adhesions. Since their discovery more than 20 years ago, integrins have been at the center of cell-matrix adhesion research. Integrin-mediated adhesions link the actin network to the extracellular matrix and are commonly observed as cells migrate across rigid two-dimensional substrates. However, as more cell motility studies are being conducted in three-dimensional (3D) culture systems and ...

  7. Rights and Restrictions of EU Citizens within the Freedom of Movement of Persons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Duca

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available This Paper aims at presenting the risks and advantages of being a citizen of the European Union Member State/s, with respect to the Freedom of Movement of Persons, with focus on the Principle of Equality and Anti- Discrimination, as enshrined by the Treaties and other incident legislative acts, at first, and then as applied by the European Court of Justice via its established case law. Moreover, the two indicated Principles are quintessential when it comes to the rights pertaining to EU citizens, and therefore other Freedoms are interpreted in the light of Equality and Anti- Discrimination, e.g. Services, Capital etc. Regardless if one is a worker, a student or just someone who wishes to exercise his/her rights as an EU citizen in other capacities, it is highly desirable to understand the rationale behind those rights/freedoms.

  8. Restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategy for red blood cell transfusion

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Petersen, Marie W; Haase, Nicolai;

    2015-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: To compare the benefit and harm of restrictive versus liberal transfusion strategies to guide red blood cell transfusions. DESIGN: Systematic review with meta-analyses and trial sequential analyses of randomised clinical trials. DATA SOURCES: Cochrane central register of controlled...... trials, SilverPlatter Medline (1950 to date), SilverPlatter Embase (1980 to date), and Science Citation Index Expanded (1900 to present). Reference lists of identified trials and other systematic reviews were assessed, and authors and experts in transfusion were contacted to identify additional trials....... TRIAL SELECTION: Published and unpublished randomised clinical trials that evaluated a restrictive compared with a liberal transfusion strategy in adults or children, irrespective of language, blinding procedure, publication status, or sample size. DATA EXTRACTION: Two authors independently screened...

  9. Collective Movement of Epithelial Cells on a Collagen Gel Substrate

    OpenAIRE

    Haga, Hisashi; Irahara, Chikako; KOBAYASHI, Ryo; Nakagaki, Toshiyuki; Kawabata, Kazushige

    2004-01-01

    Collective cell movement acts as an efficient strategy in many physiological events, including wound healing, embryonic development, and morphogenesis. We found that epithelial cells (Madin-Darby canine kidney cell) migrated collectively along one direction on a collagen gel substrate. Time-lapse images of Madin-Darby canine kidney cells cultured on type-I collagen gels and glass substrates were captured by phase contrast microscopy equipped with an incubation system. On the gel substrate, th...

  10. Reduction in ultrasonic vocalizations in pups born to rapid eye movement sleep restricted mothers in rat model.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kamalesh K Gulia

    Full Text Available The effects of rapid eye movement sleep restriction (REMSR in rats during late pregnancy were studied on the ultrasonic vocalizations (USVs made by the pups. USVs are distress calls inaudible to human ears. Rapid eye movement (REM sleep was restricted in one group of pregnant rats for 22 hours, starting from gestational day 14 to 20, using standard single platform method. The USVs of male pups were recorded after a brief isolation from their mother for two minutes on alternate post-natal days, from day one till weaning. The USVs were recorded using microphones and were analysed qualitatively and quantitatively using SASPro software. Control pups produced maximum vocalization on post-natal days 9 to 11. In comparison, the pups born to REMSR mothers showed not only a reduction in vocalization but also a delay in peak call making days. The experimental group showed variations in the types and characteristics of call types, and alteration in temporal profile. The blunting of distress call making response in these pups indicates that maternal sleep plays a role in regulating the neural development involved in vocalizations and possibly in shaping the emotional behaviour in neonates. It is suggested that the reduced ultrasonic vocalizations can be utilized as a reliable early marker for affective state in rat pups. Such impaired vocalization responses could provide an important lead in understanding mother-child bonding for an optimal cognitive development during post-partum life. This is the first report showing a potential link between maternal REM sleep deprivation and the vocalization in neonates and infants.

  11. Imaging Tumor Cell Movement In Vivo

    OpenAIRE

    Entenberg, David; Kedrin, Dmitriy; Wyckoff, Jeffrey; Sahai, Erik; Condeelis, John; Segall, Jeffrey E

    2013-01-01

    This unit describes the methods that we have been developing for analyzing tumor cell motility in mouse and rat models of breast cancer metastasis. Rodents are commonly used both to provide a mammalian system for studying human tumor cells (as xenografts in immunocompromised mice) as well as for following the development of tumors from a specific tissue type in transgenic lines. The Basic Protocol in this unit describes the standard methods used for generation of mammary tumors and imaging th...

  12. Distribution of cow-calf producers' beliefs regarding gathering and holding their cattle and observing animal movement restrictions during an outbreak of foot-and-mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Delgado, Amy H; Norby, Bo; Scott, H Morgan; Dean, Wesley; McIntosh, W Alex; Bush, Eric

    2014-12-01

    The voluntary cooperation of producers with disease control measures such as movement restrictions and gathering cattle for testing, vaccination, or depopulation is critical to the success of many disease control programs. A cross-sectional survey was conducted in Texas in order to determine the distribution of key beliefs about obeying movement restrictions and gathering and holding cattle for disease control purposes. Two questionnaires were developed and distributed to separate representative samples of Texas cow-calf producers, respectively. The context for each behavior was provided through the use of scenarios in the questionnaire. Belief strength was measured using a 7-point Likert-like scale. Producers surveyed were unsure about the possible negative consequences of gathering and holding their cattle when requested by authorities, suggesting a key need for communication in this area during an outbreak. Respondents identified a lack of manpower and/or financial resources to gather and hold cattle as barriers to their cooperation with orders to gather and hold cattle. Producers also expressed uncertainty about the efficacy of movement restrictions to prevent the spread of foot-and-mouth disease and concern about possible feed shortages or animal suffering. However, there are emotional benefits to complying with movement restrictions and strong social expectations of cooperation with any movement bans put in place.

  13. Restriction of Receptor Movement Alters Cellular Response: Physical Force Sensing by EphA2

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Salaita, Khalid; Nair, Pradeep M; Petit, Rebecca S; Neve, Richard M; Das, Debopriya; Gray, Joe W; Groves, Jay T

    2009-09-09

    Activation of the EphA2 receptor tyrosine kinase by ephrin-A1 ligands presented on apposed cell surfaces plays important roles in development and exhibits poorly understood functional alterations in cancer. We reconstituted this intermembrane signaling geometry between live EphA2-expressing human breast cancer cells and supported membranes displaying laterally mobile ephrin-A1. Receptor-ligand binding, clustering, and subsequent lateral transport within this junction were observed. EphA2 transport can be blocked by physical barriers nanofabricated onto the underlying substrate. This physical reorganization of EphA2 alters the cellular response to ephrin-A1, as observed by changes in cytoskeleton morphology and recruitment of a disintegrin and metalloprotease 10. Quantitative analysis of receptor-ligand spatial organization across a library of 26 mammary epithelial cell lines reveals characteristic differences that strongly correlate with invasion potential. These observations reveal a mechanism for spatio-mechanical regulation of EphA2 signaling pathways.

  14. Cell entry of lymphocytic choriomeningitis virus is restricted in myotubes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Iwasaki, Masaharu; Urata, Shuzo; Cho, Yoshitake; Ngo, Nhi; de la Torre, Juan C

    2014-06-01

    In mice persistently infected since birth with the prototypic arenavirus lymphocytic choriomeningitis viurs, viral antigen and RNA are readily detected in most organs and cell types but remarkably absent in skeletal muscle. Here we report that mouse C2C12 myoblasts that are readily infected by LCMV, become highly refractory to LCMV infection upon their differentiation into myotubes. Myotube's resistance to LCMV was not due to an intracellular restriction of virus replication but rather an impaired cell entry mediated by the LCMV surface glycoprotein. Our findings provide an explanation for the observation that in LCMV carrier mice myotubes, which are constantly exposed to blood-containing virus, remain free of viral antigen and RNA despite myotubes express high levels of the LCMV receptor alpha dystroglycan and do not pose an intracellular blockade to LCMV multiplication.

  15. Cortactin mediated morphogenic cell movements during zebrafish (Danio rerio) gastrulation

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    YU Dan; ZHANG Peijun; ZHAN Xi

    2005-01-01

    Cell migration is essential to direct embryonic cells to specific sites at which their developmental fates are ultimately determined. However, the mechanism by which cell motility is regulated in embryonic development is largely unknown. Cortactin, a filamentous actin binding protein, is an activator of Arp2/3 complex in the nucleation of actin cytoskeleton at the cell leading edge and acts directly on the machinery of cell motility. To determine whether cortactin and Arp2/3 mediated actin assembly plays a role in the morphogenic cell movements during the early development of zebrafish, we initiated a study of cortactin expression in zebrafish embryos at gastrulating stages when massive cell migrations occur. Western blot analysis using a cortactin specific monoclonal antibody demonstrated that cortactin protein is abundantly present in embryos at the most early developmental stages. Immunostaining of whole-mounted embryo showed that cortactin immunoreactivity was associated with the embryonic shield, predominantly at the dorsal side of the embryos during gastrulation. In addition, cortactin was detected in the convergent cells of the epiblast and hypoblast, and later in the central nervous system. Immunofluorescent staining with cortactin and Arp3 antibodies also revealed that cortactin and Arp2/3 complex colocalized at the periphery and many patches associated with the cell-to-cell junction in motile embryonic cells. Therefore, our data suggest that cortactin and Arp2/3 mediated actin polymerization is implicated in the cell movement during gastrulation and perhaps the development of the central neural system as well.

  16. Centriole movements in mammalian epithelial cells during cytokinesis

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    Tanke Hans J; Ögmundsdottir Helga M; Vrolijk Johannes; Dirks Roeland W; Jonsdottir Asta; Eyfjörd Jorunn E; Szuhai Karoly

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background In cytokinesis, when the cleavage furrow has been formed, the two centrioles in each daughter cell separate. It has been suggested that the centrioles facilitate and regulate cytokinesis to some extent. It has been postulated that termination of cytokinesis (abscission) depends on the migration of a centriole to the intercellular bridge and then back to the cell center. To investigate the involvement of centrioles in cytokinesis, we monitored the movements of centrioles in...

  17. The cell biology of Tobacco mosaic virus replication and movement

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    Chengke eLiu

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Successful systemic infection of a plant by Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV requires three processes that repeat over time: initial establishment and accumulation in invaded cells, intercellular movement and systemic transport. Accumulation and intercellular movement of TMV necessarily involves intracellular transport by complexes containing virus and host proteins and virus RNA during a dynamic process that can be visualized. Multiple membranes appear to assist TMV accumulation, while membranes, microfilaments and microtubules appear to assist TMV movement. Here we review cell biological studies that describe TMV-membrane, -cytoskeleton and -other host protein interactions which influence virus accumulation and movement in leaves and callus tissue. The importance of understanding the developmental phase of the infection in relationship to the observed virus-membrane or -host protein interaction is emphasized. Utilizing the latest observations of TMV-membrane and -host protein interactions within our evolving understanding of the infection ontogeny, a model for TMV accumulation and intracellular spread in a cell biological context is provided.

  18. A complex choreography of cell movements shapes the vertebrate eye.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwan, Kristen M; Otsuna, Hideo; Kidokoro, Hinako; Carney, Keith R; Saijoh, Yukio; Chien, Chi-Bin

    2012-01-01

    Optic cup morphogenesis (OCM) generates the basic structure of the vertebrate eye. Although it is commonly depicted as a series of epithelial sheet folding events, this does not represent an empirically supported model. Here, we combine four-dimensional imaging with custom cell tracking software and photoactivatable fluorophore labeling to determine the cellular dynamics underlying OCM in zebrafish. Although cell division contributes to growth, we find it dispensable for eye formation. OCM depends instead on a complex set of cell movements coordinated between the prospective neural retina, retinal pigmented epithelium (RPE) and lens. Optic vesicle evagination persists for longer than expected; cells move in a pinwheel pattern during optic vesicle elongation and retinal precursors involute around the rim of the invaginating optic cup. We identify unanticipated movements, particularly of central and peripheral retina, RPE and lens. From cell tracking data, we generate retina, RPE and lens subdomain fate maps, which reveal novel adjacencies that might determine corresponding developmental signaling events. Finally, we find that similar movements also occur during chick eye morphogenesis, suggesting that the underlying choreography is conserved among vertebrates.

  19. SCARECROW-LIKE23 and SCARECROW jointly specify endodermal cell fate but distinctly control SHORT-ROOT movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Long, Yuchen; Goedhart, Joachim; Schneijderberg, Martinus; Terpstra, Inez; Shimotohno, Akie; Bouchet, Benjamin P; Akhmanova, Anna; Gadella, Theodorus W J; Heidstra, Renze; Scheres, Ben; Blilou, Ikram

    2015-11-01

    Intercellular signaling through trafficking of regulatory proteins is a widespread phenomenon in plants and can deliver positional information for the determination of cell fate. In the Arabidopsis root meristem, the cell fate determinant SHORT-ROOT (SHR), a GRAS domain transcription factor, acts as a signaling molecule from the stele to the adjacent layer to specify endodermal cell fate. Upon exiting the stele, SHR activates another GRAS domain transcription factor, SCARCROW (SCR), which, together with several BIRD/INDETERMINATE DOMAIN proteins, restricts movement of SHR to define a single cell layer of endodermis. Here we report that endodermal cell fate also requires the joint activity of both SCR and its closest homologue SCARECROW-LIKE23 (SCL23). We show that SCL23 protein moves with zonation-dependent directionality. Within the meristem, SCL23 exhibits short-ranged movement from ground tissue to vasculature. Away from the meristem, SCL23 displays long-range rootward movement into meristematic vasculature and a bidirectional radial spread, respectively. As a known target of SHR and SCR, SCL23 also interacts with SCR and SHR and can restrict intercellular outspread of SHR without relying on nuclear retention as SCR does. Collectively, our data show that SCL23 is a mobile protein that controls movement of SHR and acts redundantly with SCR to specify endodermal fate in the root meristem.

  20. Fv-1 locus restriction of mouse retroviruses in glucocorticoid-treated cells

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    Tennant, R.W.; Jones, S.C.; Otten, J.A.; Yang, W.K.; Brown, A.

    1978-08-01

    Treatment of mouse embryo cells with hydrocortisone (10/sup -6/M) or dexamethasone (10/sup -4/ to 10/sup -6/M) increases virus synthesis whether the cells are permissive or restrictive at the Fv-1 locus. However, the number of cells infected was not increased in either permissive or restrictive cells by treatment with either glucocorticoid, and the two-hit titration pattern in restrictive cells remained unaltered. Therefore, the enhancement of virus replication by the glucocorticoids is independent of Fv-1 restriction and appears to occur after the Fv-1 locus-sensitive step in virus synthesis.

  1. Restriction of human adenovirus replication in Chinese hamster cell lines and their hybrids with human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Radna, R L; Foellmer, B; Feldman, L A; Francke, U; Ozer, H L

    1987-11-01

    We have found that the replication of human adenovirus (Ad2) is restricted in multiple Chinese hamster cell lines including CHO and V79. The major site of restriction involves differential accumulation of late viral proteins as demonstrated by immunofluorescence assay and polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis with and without prior immunoprecipitation. Synthesis of fiber and penton base are markedly reduced, whereas others, such as the 100K polypeptide, are synthesized efficiently. This pattern of restriction is similar to that previously reported for Ad2 infection of several monkey cell lines; however, the restriction is more marked in the Chinese hamster cell lines. The restriction is most likely due to a deficient cellular function since stable cell hybrids between V79 or CHO and human cells are permissive for virus replication. By analysis of a series of hybrids with reduced numbers of human chromosomes, fiber synthesis was correlated with the presence of the short arm of human chromosome 3. More hybrids showed restoration of fiber synthesis than production of progeny virus, suggesting that more than one unlinked function is required for the latter.

  2. Exosomes released from breast cancer carcinomas stimulate cell movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dinari A Harris

    Full Text Available For metastasis to occur cells must communicate with to their local environment to initiate growth and invasion. Exosomes have emerged as an important mediator of cell-to-cell signalling through the transfer of molecules such as mRNAs, microRNAs, and proteins between cells. Exosomes have been proposed to act as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we study the effect of exosomes on cell migration, an important step in metastasis. We performed cell migration assays, endocytosis assays, and exosome proteomic profiling on exosomes released from three breast cancer cell lines that model progressive stages of metastasis. Results from these experiments suggest: (1 exosomes promote cell migration and (2 the signal is stronger from exosomes isolated from cells with higher metastatic potentials; (3 exosomes are endocytosed at the same rate regardless of the cell type; (4 exosomes released from cells show differential enrichment of proteins with unique protein signatures of both identity and abundance. We conclude that breast cancer cells of increasing metastatic potential secrete exosomes with distinct protein signatures that proportionally increase cell movement and suggest that released exosomes could play an active role in metastasis.

  3. Exosomes released from breast cancer carcinomas stimulate cell movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Harris, Dinari A; Patel, Sajni H; Gucek, Marjan; Hendrix, An; Westbroek, Wendy; Taraska, Justin W

    2015-01-01

    For metastasis to occur cells must communicate with to their local environment to initiate growth and invasion. Exosomes have emerged as an important mediator of cell-to-cell signalling through the transfer of molecules such as mRNAs, microRNAs, and proteins between cells. Exosomes have been proposed to act as regulators of cancer progression. Here, we study the effect of exosomes on cell migration, an important step in metastasis. We performed cell migration assays, endocytosis assays, and exosome proteomic profiling on exosomes released from three breast cancer cell lines that model progressive stages of metastasis. Results from these experiments suggest: (1) exosomes promote cell migration and (2) the signal is stronger from exosomes isolated from cells with higher metastatic potentials; (3) exosomes are endocytosed at the same rate regardless of the cell type; (4) exosomes released from cells show differential enrichment of proteins with unique protein signatures of both identity and abundance. We conclude that breast cancer cells of increasing metastatic potential secrete exosomes with distinct protein signatures that proportionally increase cell movement and suggest that released exosomes could play an active role in metastasis.

  4. Endogenous APOBEC3B restricts LINE-1 retrotransposition in transformed cells and human embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wissing, Silke; Montano, Mauricio; Garcia-Perez, Jose Luis; Moran, John V; Greene, Warner C

    2011-10-21

    Members of the APOBEC3 (A3) family of cytidine deaminase enzymes act as host defense mechanisms limiting both infections by exogenous retroviruses and mobilization of endogenous retrotransposons. Previous studies revealed that the overexpression of some A3 proteins could restrict engineered human Long INterspersed Element-1 (LINE-1 or L1) retrotransposition in HeLa cells. However, whether endogenous A3 proteins play a role in restricting L1 retrotransposition remains largely unexplored. Here, we show that HeLa cells express endogenous A3B and A3C, whereas human embryonic stem cells (hESCs) express A3B, A3C, A3DE, A3F, and A3G. To study the relative contribution of endogenous A3 proteins in restricting L1 retrotransposition, we first generated small hairpin RNAs (shRNAs) to suppress endogenous A3 mRNA expression, and then assessed L1 mobility using a cell-based L1 retrotransposition assay. We demonstrate that in both HeLa and hESCs, shRNA-based knockdown of A3B promotes a ∼2-3.7-fold increase in the retrotransposition efficiency of an engineered human L1. Knockdown of the other A3s produced no significant increase in L1 activity. Thus, A3B appears to restrict engineered L1 retrotransposition in a broad range of cell types, including pluripotent cells.

  5. Nitric oxide coordinates cell proliferation and cell movements during early development of Xenopus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Peunova, Natalia; Scheinker, Vladimir; Ravi, Kandasamy; Enikolopov, Grigori

    2007-12-15

    The establishment of a vertebrate body plan during embryogenesis is achieved through precise coordination of cell proliferation and morphogenetic cell movements. Here we show that nitric oxide (NO) suppresses cell division and facilitates cell movements during early development of Xenopus, such that inhibition of NO synthase (NOS) increases proliferation in the neuroectoderm and suppresses convergent extension in the axial mesoderm and neuroectoderm. NO controls cell division and cell movement through two separate signaling pathways. Both rely on RhoA-ROCK signaling but can be distinguished by the involvement of either guanylate cyclase or the planar cell polarity regulator Dishevelled. Through the cGMP-dependent pathway, NO suppresses cell division by negatively regulating RhoA and controlling the nuclear distribution of ROCK and p21WAF1. Through the cGMP-independent pathway, NO facilitates cell movement by regulating the intracellular distribution and level of Dishevelled and the activity of RhoA, thereby controlling the activity of ROCK and regulating actin cytoskeleton remodeling and cell polarization. Concurrent control by NO helps ensure that the crucial processes of cell proliferation and morphogenetic movements are coordinated during early development.

  6. Modeling crawling cell movement on soft engineered substrates.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löber, Jakob; Ziebert, Falko; Aranson, Igor S

    2014-03-07

    Self-propelled motion, emerging spontaneously or in response to external cues, is a hallmark of living organisms. Systems of self-propelled synthetic particles are also relevant for multiple applications, from targeted drug delivery to the design of self-healing materials. Self-propulsion relies on the force transfer to the surrounding. While self-propelled swimming in the bulk of liquids is fairly well characterized, many open questions remain in our understanding of self-propelled motion along substrates, such as in the case of crawling cells or related biomimetic objects. How is the force transfer organized and how does it interplay with the deformability of the moving object and the substrate? How do the spatially dependent traction distribution and adhesion dynamics give rise to complex cell behavior? How can we engineer a specific cell response on synthetic compliant substrates? Here we generalize our recently developed model for a crawling cell by incorporating locally resolved traction forces and substrate deformations. The model captures the generic structure of the traction force distribution and faithfully reproduces experimental observations, like the response of a cell on a gradient in substrate elasticity (durotaxis). It also exhibits complex modes of cell movement such as "bipedal" motion. Our work may guide experiments on cell traction force microscopy and substrate-based cell sorting and can be helpful for the design of biomimetic "crawlers" and active and reconfigurable self-healing materials.

  7. The Arabidopsis synaptotagmin SYTA regulates the cell-to-cell movement of diverse plant viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Asako eUchiyama

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available Synaptotagmins are a large gene family in animals that have been extensively characterized due to their role as calcium sensors to regulate synaptic vesicle exocytosis and endocytosis in neurons, and dense core vesicle exocytosis for hormone secretion from neuroendocrine cells. Thought to be exclusive to animals, synaptotagmins have recently been characterized in Arabidopsis thaliana, in which they comprise a five gene family. Using infectivity and leaf-based functional assays, we have shown that Arabidopsis SYTA regulates endocytosis and marks an endosomal vesicle recycling pathway to regulate movement protein-mediated trafficking of the Begomovirus Cabbage leaf curl virus (CaLCuV and the Tobamovirus Tobacco mosaic virus (TMV through plasmodesmata (Lewis and Lazarowitz, 2010. To determine whether SYTA has a central role in regulating the cell-to-cell trafficking of a wider range of diverse plant viruses, we extended our studies here to examine the role of SYTA in the cell-to-cell movement of additional plant viruses that employ different modes of movement, namely the Potyvirus Turnip mosaic virus (TuMV, the Caulimovirus Cauliflower mosaic virus (CaMV and the Tobamovirus Turnip vein clearing virus (TVCV, which in contrast to TMV does efficiently infect Arabidopsis. We found that both TuMV and TVCV systemic infection, and the cell-to-cell trafficking of the their movement proteins, were delayed in the Arabidopsis Col-0 syta-1 knockdown mutant. In contrast, CaMV systemic infection was not inhibited in syta-1. Our studies show that SYTA is a key regulator of plant virus intercellular movement, being necessary for the ability of diverse cell-to-cell movement proteins encoded by Begomoviruses (CaLCuV MP, Tobamoviruses (TVCV and TMV 30K protein and Potyviruses (TuMV P3N-PIPO to alter PD and thereby mediate virus cell-to-cell spread.

  8. The promises of stem cells: stem cell therapy for movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mochizuki, Hideki; Choong, Chi-Jing; Yasuda, Toru

    2014-01-01

    Despite the multitude of intensive research, the exact pathophysiological mechanisms underlying movement disorders including Parkinson's disease, multiple system atrophy and Huntington's disease remain more or less elusive. Treatments to halt these disease progressions are currently unavailable. With the recent induced pluripotent stem cells breakthrough and accomplishment, stem cell research, as the vast majority of scientists agree, holds great promise for relieving and treating debilitating movement disorders. As stem cells are the precursors of all cells in the human body, an understanding of the molecular mechanisms that govern how they develop and work would provide us many fundamental insights into human biology of health and disease. Moreover, stem-cell-derived neurons may be a renewable source of replacement cells for damaged neurons in movement disorders. While stem cells show potential for regenerative medicine, their use as tools for research and drug testing is thought to have more immediate impact. The use of stem-cell-based drug screening technology could be a big boost in drug discovery for these movement disorders. Particular attention should also be given to the involvement of neural stem cells in adult neurogenesis so as to encourage its development as a therapeutic option.

  9. Options for managing animal welfare on intensive pig farms confined by movement restrictions during an outbreak of foot and mouth disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    East, I J; Roche, S E; Wicks, R M; de Witte, K; Garner, M G

    2014-12-01

    An outbreak of foot and mouth disease in Australia would trigger a major disease control and eradication program that would include restriction of movement of live animals within defined disease control zones. Experiences from outbreaks in other countries show that restrictions that limit the ability to turn off stock can lead to animal welfare compromise on intensively managed farms that are not infected with the disease. Intensive pig farms are considered to be at high risk of developing welfare problems during a control program due to the imposed movement restrictions and limited space available to house growing pigs. This study was designed to investigate strategies that could be used to mitigate animal welfare problems on intensive pig farms during a simulated outbreak of foot and mouth disease in a livestock dense region of Australia. Three strategies for managing farms affected by animal welfare problems were assessed, including on-farm culling of grower and finisher pigs, on-farm culling of finisher pigs only, and permit-based movement of finisher pigs to slaughter at abattoir. Under traditional approaches of giving infected premises (IP) priority over culling of farms with welfare problems (WP), delays of up to 25 days were experienced prior to culling of WPs. Deployment of vaccination did little to reduce the delay to culling of WPs. These delays were sensitive to resources available for control, with reduced resources increasing the time until welfare problems were addressed. Assigning equal priority to all farms requiring culling regardless of status as IP or WP and culling each as they arose reduced the delay to culling of WPs to no more than 4 days without large increases in either the duration or the size of the outbreaks observed.

  10. Restricted 12p Amplification and RAS Mutation in Human Germ Cell Tumors of the Adult Testis

    Science.gov (United States)

    Roelofs, Helene; Mostert, Marijke C.; Pompe, Kirsten; Zafarana, Gaetano; van Oorschot, Monique; van Gurp, Ruud J. H. L. M.; Gillis, Ad J. M.; Stoop, Hans; Beverloo, Berna; Oosterhuis, J. Wolter; Bokemeyer, Carsten; Looijenga, Leendert H. J.

    2000-01-01

    Human testicular germ-cell tumors of young adults (TGCTs), both seminomas and nonseminomas, are characterized by 12p overrepresentation, mostly as isochromosomes, of which the biological and clinical significance is still unclear. A limited number of TGCTs has been identified with an additional high-level amplification of a restricted region of 12p including the K-RAS proto-oncogene. Here we show that the incidence of these restricted 12p amplifications is ∼8% in primary TGCTs. Within a single cell formation of i(12p) and restricted 12p amplification is mutually exclusive. The borders of the amplicons cluster in short regions, and the amplicon was never found in the adjacent carcinoma in situ cells. Seminomas with the restricted 12p amplification virtually lacked apoptosis and the tumor cells showed prolonged in vitro survival like seminoma cells with a mutated RAS gene. However, no differences in proliferation index between these different groups of seminomas were found. Although patients with a seminoma containing a homogeneous restricted 12p amplification presented at a significantly younger age than those lacking it, the presence of a restricted 12p amplification/RAS mutation did not predict the stage of the disease at clinical presentation and the treatment response of primary seminomas. In 55 primary and metastatic tumors from 44 different patients who failed cisplatinum-based chemotherapy, the restricted 12p amplification and RAS mutations had the same incidence as in the consecutive series of responding patients. These data support the model that gain of 12p in TGCTs is related to invasive growth. It allows tumor cells, in particular those showing characteristics of early germ cells (ie, the seminoma cells), to survive outside their specific microenvironment. Overexpression of certain genes on 12p probably inhibits apoptosis in these tumor cells. However, the copy numbers of the restricted amplification of 12p and K-RAS mutations do not predict response

  11. Planar cell polarity signaling in collective cell movements during morphogenesis and disease.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Soriano, Verónica; Belacortu, Yaiza; Paricio, Nuria

    2012-12-01

    Collective and directed cell movements are crucial for diverse developmental processes in the animal kingdom, but they are also involved in wound repair and disease. During these processes groups of cells are oriented within the tissue plane, which is referred to as planar cell polarity (PCP). This requires a tight regulation that is in part conducted by the PCP pathway. Although this pathway was initially characterized in flies, subsequent studies in vertebrates revealed a set of conserved core factors but also effector molecules and signal modulators, which build the fundamental PCP machinery. The PCP pathway in Drosophila regulates several developmental processes involving collective cell movements such as border cell migration during oogenesis, ommatidial rotation during eye development, and embryonic dorsal closure. During vertebrate embryogenesis, PCP signaling also controls collective and directed cell movements including convergent extension during gastrulation, neural tube closure, neural crest cell migration, or heart morphogenesis. Similarly, PCP signaling is linked to processes such as wound repair, and cancer invasion and metastasis in adults. As a consequence, disruption of PCP signaling leads to pathological conditions. In this review, we will summarize recent findings about the role of PCP signaling in collective cell movements in flies and vertebrates. In addition, we will focus on how studies in Drosophila have been relevant to our understanding of the PCP molecular machinery and will describe several developmental defects and human disorders in which PCP signaling is compromised. Therefore, new discoveries about the contribution of this pathway to collective cell movements could provide new potential diagnostic and therapeutic targets for these disorders.

  12. A multidirectional non-cell autonomous control and a genetic interaction restricting tobacco etch virus susceptibility in Arabidopsis.

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    Suresh Gopalan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Viruses constitute a major class of pathogens that infect a variety of hosts. Understanding the intricacies of signaling during host-virus interactions should aid in designing disease prevention strategies and in understanding mechanistic aspects of host and pathogen signaling machinery. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: An Arabidopsis mutant, B149, impaired in susceptibility to Tobacco etch virus (TEV, a positive strand RNA virus of picoRNA family, was identified using a high-throughput genetic screen and a counterselection scheme. The defects include initiation of infection foci, rate of cell-to-cell movement and long distance movement. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: The defect in infectivity is conferred by a recessive locus. Molecular genetic analysis and complementation analysis with three alleles of a previously published mutant lsp1 (loss of susceptibility to potyviruses indicate a genetic interaction conferring haploinsufficiency between the B149 locus and certain alleles of lsp1 resulting in impaired host susceptibility. The pattern of restriction of TEV foci on leaves at or near the boundaries of certain cell types and leaf boundaries suggest dysregulation of a multidirectional non-cell autonomous regulatory mechanism. Understanding the nature of this multidirectional signal and the molecular genetic mechanism conferring it should potentially reveal a novel arsenal in the cellular machinery.

  13. N-cadherin-mediated cell adhesion restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal neural tube.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chalasani, Kavita; Brewster, Rachel M

    2011-05-01

    Neural progenitors are organized as a pseudostratified epithelium held together by adherens junctions (AJs), multiprotein complexes composed of cadherins and α- and β-catenin. Catenins are known to control neural progenitor division; however, it is not known whether they function in this capacity as cadherin binding partners, as there is little evidence that cadherins themselves regulate neural proliferation. We show here that zebrafish N-cadherin (N-cad) restricts cell proliferation in the dorsal region of the neural tube by regulating cell-cycle length. We further reveal that N-cad couples cell-cycle exit and differentiation, as a fraction of neurons are mitotic in N-cad mutants. Enhanced proliferation in N-cad mutants is mediated by ligand-independent activation of Hedgehog (Hh) signaling, possibly caused by defective ciliogenesis. Furthermore, depletion of Hh signaling results in the loss of junctional markers. We therefore propose that N-cad restricts the response of dorsal neural progenitors to Hh and that Hh signaling limits the range of its own activity by promoting AJ assembly. Taken together, these observations emphasize a key role for N-cad-mediated adhesion in controlling neural progenitor proliferation. In addition, these findings are the first to demonstrate a requirement for cadherins in synchronizing cell-cycle exit and differentiation and a reciprocal interaction between AJs and Hh signaling.

  14. Rice dwarf phytoreovirus segment S6-encoded nonstructural protein has a cell-to-cell movement function.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yi; Bao, Yi M; Wei, Chun H; Kang, Zhen S; Zhong, Yong W; Mao, Peng; Wu, Gang; Chen, Zhang L; Schiemann, Joachim; Nelson, Richard S

    2004-05-01

    Rice dwarf virus (RDV) is a member of the genus Phytoreovirus, which is composed of viruses with segmented double-stranded RNA genomes. Proteins that support the intercellular movement of these viruses in the host have not been identified. Microprojectile bombardment was used to determine which open reading frames (ORFs) support intercellular movement of a heterologous virus. A plasmid containing an infectious clone of Potato virus X (PVX) defective in cell-to-cell movement and expressing either beta-glucuronidase or green fluorescent protein (GFP) was used for cobombardment with plasmids containing ORFs from RDV gene segments S1 through S12 onto leaves of Nicotiana benthamiana. Cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX was restored by cobombardment with a plasmid containing S6. In the absence of S6, no other gene segment supported movement. Identical results were obtained with Nicotiana tabacum, a host that allows fewer viruses to infect and spread within its tissue. S6 supported the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX in sink and source leaves of N. benthamiana. A mutant S6 lacking the translation start codon did not complement the cell-to-cell movement of the movement-defective PVX. An S6 protein product (Pns6)-enhanced GFP fusion was observed near or within cell walls of epidermal cells from N. tabacum. By immunocytochemistry, unfused Pns6 was localized to plasmodesmata in rice leaves infected with RDV. S6 thus encodes a protein with characteristics identical to those of other viral proteins required for the cell-to-cell movement of their genome and therefore is likely required for the cell-to-cell movement of RDV.

  15. CD1-Restricted T Cells at the Crossroad of Innate and Adaptive Immunity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pereira, Catia S.

    2016-01-01

    Lipid-specific T cells comprise a group of T cells that recognize lipids bound to the MHC class I-like CD1 molecules. There are four isoforms of CD1 that are expressed at the surface of antigen presenting cells and therefore capable of presenting lipid antigens: CD1a, CD1b, CD1c, and CD1d. Each one of these isoforms has distinct structural features and cellular localizations, which promotes binding to a broad range of different types of lipids. Lipid antigens originate from either self-tissues or foreign sources, such as bacteria, fungus, or plants and their recognition by CD1-restricted T cells has important implications in infection but also in cancer and autoimmunity. In this review, we describe the characteristics of CD1 molecules and CD1-restricted lipid-specific T cells, highlighting the innate-like and adaptive-like features of different CD1-restricted T cell subtypes. PMID:28070524

  16. Restriction of Rift Valley Fever Virus Virulence in Mosquito Cells

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    Sonja R. Gerrard

    2010-02-01

    Full Text Available Arboviruses are maintained in a natural cycle that requires blood-sucking arthropod and vertebrate hosts. Arboviruses are believed to persistently infect their arthropod host without overt pathology and cause acute infection with viremia in their vertebrate host. We have focused on elucidating how a specific arbovirus, Rift Valley fever (RVF virus, causes cytopathic effect in cells derived from vertebrates and non-cytopathic infection in cells derived from arthropods. We demonstrate that the vertebrate virulence factor, NSs, is functional in arthropod cells but is expressed at significantly lower levels in infected arthropod versus infected vertebrate cells.

  17. Effect of Cell Adhesion Molecule 1 Expression on Intracellular Granule Movement in Pancreatic α Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yokawa, Satoru; Furuno, Tadahide; Suzuki, Takahiro; Inoh, Yoshikazu; Suzuki, Ryo; Hirashima, Naohide

    2016-09-01

    Although glucagon secreted from pancreatic α cells plays a role in increasing glucose concentrations in serum, the mechanism regulating glucagon secretion from α cells remains unclear. Cell adhesion molecule 1 (CADM1), identified as an adhesion molecule in α cells, has been reported not only to communicate among α cells and between nerve fibers, but also to prevent excessive glucagon secretion from α cells. Here, we investigated the effect of CADM1 expression on the movement of intracellular secretory granules in α cells because the granule transport is an important step in secretion. Spinning disk microscopic analysis showed that granules moved at a mean velocity of 0.236 ± 0.010 μm/s in the mouse α cell line αTC6 that expressed CADM1 endogenously. The mean velocity was significantly decreased in CADM1-knockdown (KD) cells (mean velocity: 0.190 ± 0.016 μm/s). The velocity of granule movement decreased greatly in αTC6 cells treated with the microtubule-depolymerizing reagent nocodazole, but not in αTC6 cells treated with the actin-depolymerizing reagent cytochalasin D. No difference in the mean velocity was observed between αTC6 and CADM1-KD cells treated with nocodazole. These results suggest that intracellular granules in pancreatic α cells move along the microtubule network, and that CADM1 influences their velocity.

  18. Cytorhabdovirus P3 genes encode 30K-like cell-to-cell movement proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mann, Krin S; Bejerman, Nicolas; Johnson, Karyn N; Dietzgen, Ralf G

    2016-02-01

    Plant viruses encode movement proteins (MP) to facilitate cell-to-cell transport through plasmodesmata. In this study, using trans-complementation of a movement-defective turnip vein-clearing tobamovirus (TVCV) replicon, we show for the first time for cytorhabdoviruses (lettuce necrotic yellows virus (LNYV) and alfalfa dwarf virus (ADV)) that their P3 proteins function as MP similar to the TVCV P30 protein. All three MP localized to plasmodesmata when ectopically expressed. In addition, we show that these MP belong to the 30K superfamily since movement was inhibited by mutation of an aspartic acid residue in the critical 30K-specific LxD/N50-70G motif. We also report that Nicotiana benthamiana microtubule-associated VOZ1-like transcriptional activator interacts with LNYV P3 and TVCV P30 but not with ADV P3 or any of the MP point mutants. This host protein, which is known to interact with P3 of sonchus yellow net nucleorhabdovirus, may be involved in aiding the cell-to-cell movement of LNYV and TVCV.

  19. Auxin regulates SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphology restricting cell size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löfke, Christian; Dünser, Kai; Scheuring, David; Kleine-Vehn, Jürgen

    2015-03-05

    The control of cellular growth is central to multicellular patterning. In plants, the encapsulating cell wall literally binds neighbouring cells to each other and limits cellular sliding/migration. In contrast to its developmental importance, growth regulation is poorly understood in plants. Here, we reveal that the phytohormone auxin impacts on the shape of the biggest plant organelle, the vacuole. TIR1/AFBs-dependent auxin signalling posttranslationally controls the protein abundance of vacuolar SNARE components. Genetic and pharmacological interference with the auxin effect on vacuolar SNAREs interrelates with auxin-resistant vacuolar morphogenesis and cell size regulation. Vacuolar SNARE VTI11 is strictly required for auxin-reliant vacuolar morphogenesis and loss of function renders cells largely insensitive to auxin-dependent growth inhibition. Our data suggests that the adaptation of SNARE-dependent vacuolar morphogenesis allows auxin to limit cellular expansion, contributing to root organ growth rates.

  20. Complement-Opsonized HIV-1 Overcomes Restriction in Dendritic Cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wilfried Posch

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available DCs express intrinsic cellular defense mechanisms to specifically inhibit HIV-1 replication. Thus, DCs are productively infected only at very low levels with HIV-1, and this non-permissiveness of DCs is suggested to go along with viral evasion. We now illustrate that complement-opsonized HIV-1 (HIV-C efficiently bypasses SAMHD1 restriction and productively infects DCs including BDCA-1 DCs. Efficient DC infection by HIV-C was also observed using single-cycle HIV-C, and correlated with a remarkable elevated SAMHD1 T592 phosphorylation but not SAMHD1 degradation. If SAMHD1 phosphorylation was blocked using a CDK2-inhibitor HIV-C-induced DC infection was also significantly abrogated. Additionally, we found a higher maturation and co-stimulatory potential, aberrant type I interferon expression and signaling as well as a stronger induction of cellular immune responses in HIV-C-treated DCs. Collectively, our data highlight a novel protective mechanism mediated by complement opsonization of HIV to effectively promote DC immune functions, which might be in the future exploited to tackle HIV infection.

  1. Endothelial progenitor cells display clonal restriction in multiple myeloma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Dai Kezhi

    2006-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background In multiple myeloma (MM, increased neoangiogenesis contributes to tumor growth and disease progression. Increased levels of endothelial progenitor cells (EPCs contribute to neoangiogenesis in MM, and, importantly, covary with disease activity and response to treatment. In order to understand the mechanisms responsible for increased EPC levels and neoangiogenic function in MM, we investigated whether these cells were clonal by determining X-chromosome inactivation (XCI patterns in female patients by a human androgen receptor assay (HUMARA. In addition, EPCs and bone marrow cells were studied for the presence of clonotypic immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH gene rearrangement, which indicates clonality in B cells; thus, its presence in EPCs would indicate a close genetic link between tumor cells in MM and endothelial cells that provide tumor neovascularization. Methods A total of twenty-three consecutive patients who had not received chemotherapy were studied. Screening in 18 patients found that 11 displayed allelic AR in peripheral blood mononuclear cells, and these patients were further studied for XCI patterns in EPCs and hair root cells by HUMARA. In 2 patients whose EPCs were clonal by HUMARA, and in an additional 5 new patients, EPCs were studied for IGH gene rearrangement using PCR with family-specific primers for IGH variable genes (VH. Results In 11 patients, analysis of EPCs by HUMARA revealed significant skewing (≥ 77% expression of a single allele in 64% (n = 7. In 4 of these patients, XCI skewing was extreme (≥ 90% expression of a single allele. In contrast, XCI in hair root cells was random. Furthermore, PCR amplification with VH primers resulted in amplification of the same product in EPCs and bone marrow cells in 71% (n = 5 of 7 patients, while no IGH rearrangement was found in EPCs from healthy controls. In addition, in patients with XCI skewing in EPCs, advanced age was associated with poorer clinical status

  2. High expression of CD26 accurately identifies human bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted MAIT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Prabhat K; Wong, Emily B; Napier, Ruth J; Bishai, William R; Ndung'u, Thumbi; Kasprowicz, Victoria O; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Lewinsohn, David M; Gold, Marielle C

    2015-07-01

    Mucosa-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express the semi-invariant T-cell receptor TRAV1-2 and detect a range of bacteria and fungi through the MHC-like molecule MR1. However, knowledge of the function and phenotype of bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted TRAV1-2(+) MAIT cells from human blood is limited. We broadly characterized the function of MR1-restricted MAIT cells in response to bacteria-infected targets and defined a phenotypic panel to identify these cells in the circulation. We demonstrated that bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells shared effector functions of cytolytic effector CD8(+) T cells. By analysing an extensive panel of phenotypic markers, we determined that CD26 and CD161 were most strongly associated with these T cells. Using FACS to sort phenotypically defined CD8(+) subsets we demonstrated that high expression of CD26 on CD8(+)  TRAV1-2(+) cells identified with high specificity and sensitivity, bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells from human blood. CD161(hi) was also specific for but lacked sensitivity in identifying all bacteria-reactive MR1-restricted T cells, some of which were CD161(dim) . Using cell surface expression of CD8, TRAV1-2, and CD26(hi) in the absence of stimulation we confirm that bacteria-reactive T cells are lacking in the blood of individuals with active tuberculosis and are restored in the blood of individuals undergoing treatment for tuberculosis.

  3. Calorie restriction-mediated replicative lifespan extension in yeast is non-cell autonomous.

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    Szu-Chieh Mei

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available In laboratory yeast strains with Sir2 and Fob1 function, wild-type NAD+ salvage is required for calorie restriction (CR to extend replicative lifespan. CR does not significantly alter steady state levels of intracellular NAD+ metabolites. However, levels of Sir2 and Pnc1, two enzymes that sequentially convert NAD+ to nicotinic acid (NA, are up-regulated during CR. To test whether factors such as NA might be exported by glucose-restricted mother cells to survive later generations, we developed a replicative longevity paradigm in which mother cells are moved after 15 generations on defined media. The experiment reveals that CR mother cells lose the longevity benefit of CR when evacuated from their local environment to fresh CR media. Addition of NA or nicotinamide riboside (NR allows a moved mother to maintain replicative longevity despite the move. Moreover, conditioned medium from CR-treated cells transmits the longevity benefit of CR to moved mother cells. Evidence suggests the existence of a longevity factor that is dialyzable but is neither NA nor NR, and indicates that Sir2 is not required for the longevity factor to be produced or to act. Data indicate that the benefit of glucose-restriction is transmitted from cell to cell in budding yeast, suggesting that glucose restriction may benefit neighboring cells and not only an individual cell.

  4. Churchill regulates cell movement and mesoderm specification by repressing Nodal signaling

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    Mentzer Laura

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cell movements are essential to the determination of cell fates during development. The zinc-finger transcription factor, Churchill (ChCh has been proposed to regulate cell fate by regulating cell movements during gastrulation in the chick. However, the mechanism of action of ChCh is not understood. Results We demonstrate that ChCh acts to repress the response to Nodal-related signals in zebrafish. When ChCh function is abrogated the expression of mesodermal markers is enhanced while ectodermal markers are expressed at decreased levels. In cell transplant assays, we observed that ChCh-deficient cells are more motile than wild-type cells. When placed in wild-type hosts, ChCh-deficient cells often leave the epiblast, migrate to the germ ring and are later found in mesodermal structures. We demonstrate that both movement of ChCh-compromised cells to the germ ring and acquisition of mesodermal character depend on the ability of the donor cells to respond to Nodal signals. Blocking Nodal signaling in the donor cells at the levels of Oep, Alk receptors or Fast1 inhibited migration to the germ ring and mesodermal fate change in the donor cells. We also detect additional unusual movements of transplanted ChCh-deficient cells which suggests that movement and acquisition of mesodermal character can be uncoupled. Finally, we demonstrate that ChCh is required to limit the transcriptional response to Nodal. Conclusion These data establish a broad role for ChCh in regulating both cell movement and Nodal signaling during early zebrafish development. We show that chch is required to limit mesodermal gene expression, inhibit Nodal-dependant movement of presumptive ectodermal cells and repress the transcriptional response to Nodal signaling. These findings reveal a dynamic role for chch in regulating cell movement and fate during early development.

  5. Sleep restriction by forced activity reduces hippocampal cell proliferation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Roman, Viktor; Van der Borght, K; Leemburg, SA; Van der Zee, EA; Meerlo, P

    2005-01-01

    Mounting evidence suggests that sleep loss negatively affects learning and memory processes through disruption of hippocampal function. In the present study, we examined whether sleep loss alters the generation, differentiation, and survival of new cells in the dentate gyrus. Rats were sleep restric

  6. Back and forth between cell fate specification and movement during vertebrate gastrulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp; Solnica-Krezel, Lilianna

    2008-08-01

    Animal body plan arises during gastrulation and organogenesis by the coordination of inductive events and cell movements. Several signaling pathways, such as BMP, FGF, Hedgehog, Nodal, and Wnt have well-recognized instructive roles in cell fate specification during vertebrate embryogenesis. Growing evidence indicates that BMP, Nodal, and FGF signaling also regulate cell movements, and that they do so through mechanisms distinct from those that specify cell fates. Moreover, pathways controlling cell movements can also indirectly influence cell fate specification by regulating dimensions and relative positions of interacting tissues. The current challenge is to delineate the molecular mechanisms via which the major signaling pathways regulate cell fate specification and movements, and how these two processes are coordinated to ensure normal development.

  7. Vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein restricts cell-to-cell spread of Shigella flexneri at the cell periphery.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Soo Young; Gertler, Frank B; Goldberg, Marcia B

    2015-11-01

    Shigella spp. are intracellular bacterial pathogens that cause diarrhoeal disease in humans. Shigella utilize the host actin cytoskeleton to enter cells, move through the cytoplasm of cells and pass into adjacent cells. Ena/VASP family proteins are highly conserved proteins that participate in actin-dependent dynamic cellular processes. We tested whether Ena/VASP family members VASP (vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein), Mena (mammalian-enabled) or EVL (Ena-VASP-like) contribute to Shigella flexneri spread through cell monolayers. VASP and EVL restricted cell-to-cell spread without significantly altering actin-based motility, whereas Mena had no effect on these processes. Phosphorylation of VASP on Ser153, Ser235 and Thr274 regulated its subcellular distribution and function. VASP derivatives that lack the Ena/VASP homology 1 (EVH1) domain or contain a phosphoablative mutation of Ser153 were defective in restricting S. flexneri spread, indicating that the EVH1 domain and phosphorylation on Ser153 are required for this process. The EVH1 domain and Ser153 of VASP were required for VASP localization to focal adhesions, and localization of VASP to focal adhesions and/or the leading edge was required for restriction of spread. The contribution of the EVH1 domain was from both the donor and the recipient cell, whereas the contribution of Ser153 phosphorylation was only from the donor cell. Thus, unlike host proteins characterized in Shigella pathogenesis that promote bacterial spread, VASP and EVL function to limit it. The ability of VASP and EVL to limit spread highlights the critical role of focal adhesion complexes and/or the leading edge in bacterial passage between cells.

  8. Caloric restriction suppresses apoptotic cell death in the mammalian cochlea and leads to prevention of presbycusis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Someya, Shinichi; Yamasoba, Tatsuya; Weindruch, Richard; Prolla, Tomas A; Tanokura, Masaru

    2007-10-01

    Presbycusis is characterized by an age-related progressive decline of auditory function, and arises mainly from the degeneration of hair cells or spiral ganglion (SG) cells in the cochlea. Here we show that caloric restriction suppresses apoptotic cell death in the mouse cochlea and prevents late onset of presbycusis. Calorie restricted (CR) mice, which maintained body weight at the same level as that of young control (YC) mice, retained normal hearing and showed no cochlear degeneration. CR mice also showed a significant reduction in the number of TUNEL-positive cells and cleaved caspase-3-positive cells relative to middle-age control (MC) mice. Microarray analysis revealed that CR down-regulated the expression of 24 apoptotic genes, including Bak and Bim. Taken together, our findings suggest that loss of critical cells through apoptosis is an important mechanism of presbycusis in mammals, and that CR can retard this process by suppressing apoptosis in the inner ear tissue.

  9. MR1-restricted mucosal-associated invariant T cells and their activation during infectious diseases

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lauren J. Howson

    2015-06-01

    Full Text Available MR1-restricted MAIT cells recognize vitamin B metabolites, which are generated by a broad range of bacteria, from Escherichia coli to Mycobacterium tuberculosis and BCG. MAIT cells have been described as innate sensors of infection as they accumulate early in infected tissues. MAIT cells maintain an activated phenotype throughout the course of infections, secrete inflammatory cytokines and have the potential to directly kill infected cells, playing an important role in shaping the host response. In this review, we will discuss the current knowledge regarding the molecular mechanisms that underline MAIT cells activation in sterile and non-sterile inflammatory conditions.

  10. Tip cell-derived RTK signaling initiates cell movements in the Drosophila stomatogastric nervous system anlage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    González-Gaitán, M; Jäckle, H

    2000-10-01

    The stomatogastric nervous system (SNS) of Drosophila is a simply organized neural circuitry that innervates the anterior enteric system. Unlike the central and the peripheral nervous systems, the SNS derives from a compact epithelial anlage in which three invagination centers, each giving rise to an invagination fold headed by a tip cell, are generated. Tip cell selection involves lateral inhibition, a process in which Wingless (Wg) activity adjusts the range of Notch signaling. Here we show that RTK signaling mediated by the Drosophila homolog of the epidermal growth factor receptor, DER, plays a key role in two consecutive steps during early SNS development. Like Wg, DER signaling participates in adjusting the range of Notch-dependent lateral inhibition during tip cell selection. Subsequently, tip cells secrete the DER ligand Spitz and trigger local RTK signaling, which initiates morphogenetic movements resulting in the tip cell-directed invaginations within the SNS anlage.

  11. Downregulation of the NbNACa1 gene encoding a movement-protein-interacting protein reduces cell-to-cell movement of Brome mosaic virus in Nicotiana benthamiana.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kaido, Masanori; Inoue, Yosuke; Takeda, Yoshika; Sugiyama, Kazuhiko; Takeda, Atsushi; Mori, Masashi; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Okuno, Tetsuro; Mise, Kazuyuki

    2007-06-01

    The 3a movement protein (MP) plays a central role in the movement of the RNA plant virus, Brome mosaic virus (BMV). To identify host factor genes involved in viral movement, a cDNA library of Nicotiana benthamiana, a systemic host for BMV, was screened with far-Western blotting using a recombinant BMV MP as probe. One positive clone encoded a protein with sequence similarity to the alpha chain of nascent-polypeptide-associated complex from various organisms, which is proposed to contribute to the fidelity of translocation of newly synthesized proteins. The orthologous gene from N. benthamiana was designated NbNACa1. The binding of NbNACa1 to BMV MP was confirmed in vivo with an agroinfiltration-immunoprecipitation assay. To investigate the involvement of NbNACa1 in BMV multiplication, NbNACa1-silenced (GSNAC) transgenic N. benthamiana plants were produced. Downregulation of NbNACa1 expression reduced virus accumulation in inoculated leaves but not in protoplasts. A microprojectile bombardment assay to monitor BMV-MP-assisted viral movement demonstrated reduced virus spread in GSNAC plants. The localization to the cell wall of BMV MP fused to green fluorescent protein was delayed in GSNAC plants. From these results, we propose that NbNACa1 is involved in BMV cell-to-cell movement through the regulation of BMV MP localization to the plasmodesmata.

  12. Effects of melatonin or maternal nutrient restriction on vascularity and cell proliferation in the ovine placenta

    Science.gov (United States)

    Previously we reported increased umbilical artery blood flow in ewes supplemented with melatonin from mid- to late-pregnancy, while maternal nutrient restriction decreased uterine artery blood flow. To further unravel these responses, this study was designed to assess placental cell proliferation an...

  13. Stochastic dynamics of actin filaments in guard cells regulating chloroplast localization during stomatal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Xiu-Ling; Gao, Xin-Qi; Wang, Xue-Chen

    2011-08-01

    Actin filaments and chloroplasts in guard cells play roles in stomatal function. However, detailed actin dynamics vary, and the roles that they play in chloroplast localization during stomatal movement remain to be determined. We examined the dynamics of actin filaments and chloroplast localization in transgenic tobacco expressing green fluorescent protein (GFP)-mouse talin in guard cells by time-lapse imaging. Actin filaments showed sliding, bundling and branching dynamics in moving guard cells. During stomatal movement, long filaments can be severed into small fragments, which can form longer filaments by end-joining activities. With chloroplast movement, actin filaments near chloroplasts showed severing and elongation activity in guard cells during stomatal movement. Cytochalasin B treatment abolished elongation, bundling and branching activities of actin filaments in guard cells, and these changes of actin filaments, and as a result, more chloroplasts were localized at the centre of guard cells. However, chloroplast turning to avoid high light, and sliding of actin fragments near the chloroplast, was unaffected following cytochalasin B treatment in guard cells. We suggest that the sliding dynamics of actin may play roles in chloroplast turning in guard cells. Our results indicate that the stochastic dynamics of actin filaments in guard cells regulate chloroplast localization during stomatal movement.

  14. Evidence for restriction of fluid and solute movement across the glomerular capillary wall by the subpodocyte space.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Salmon, Andrew H J; Toma, Ildikó; Sipos, Arnold; Muston, P Robert; Harper, Steven J; Bates, David O; Neal, Christopher R; Peti-Peterdi, János

    2007-12-01

    The glomerular filtration barrier (GFB) is generally considered to consist of three layers: fenestrated glomerular endothelium, glomerular basement membrane, and filtration slits between adjacent podocyte foot processes. Detailed anatomic examination of the GFB has revealed a novel abluminal structure, the subpodocyte space (SPS), identified as the labyrinthine space between the underside of podocyte cell body/primary processes and the foot processes. The SPS covers 50-65% of the filtration surface of the GFB, indicating that SPS may influence glomerular permeability. We have examined the contribution of the SPS to the permeability characteristics of the GFB using multiphoton microscopy techniques in isolated, perfused glomeruli and in the intact kidney in vivo. SPS were identified using this technique, with comparable dimensions to SPS examined with electron microscopy. The passage of the intermediate-weight molecule rhodamine-conjugated 10-kDa dextran, but not the low-weight molecule lucifer yellow ( approximately 450 Da), accumulated in SPS-covered regions of the GFB, compared with GFB regions not covered by SPS ("naked regions"). Net lucifer yellow flux (taken to indicate fluid flux) through identifiable SPS regions was calculated to be 66-75% of that occurring through naked regions. These observations indicate both ultrafiltration and hydraulic resistance imparted by the SPS, demonstrating the potential physiological contribution of the SPS to glomerular permeability.

  15. Severe cell reduction in the future brain cortex in human growth-restricted fetuses and infants

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Samuelsen, Grethe B; Pakkenberg, Bente; Bogdanović, Nenad;

    2007-01-01

    OBJECTIVE: The objective of the study was to test the hypothesis that the total number of cells in the cortical part of the cerebral wall is the same in intrauterine growth-restricted (IUGR) fetuses, compared with normally grown fetuses. STUDY DESIGN: The total cell number in the cerebral wall...... with controls. The daily increase in brain cells in the future cortex was only half of that of the controls. In the 3 other developmental zones, no significant differences in cell numbers could be demonstrated. CONCLUSIONS: IUGR in humans is associated with a severe reduction in cortical growth...

  16. Representation of spontaneous movement by dopaminergic neurons is cell-type selective and disrupted in parkinsonism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dodson, Paul D; Dreyer, Jakob K; Jennings, Katie A; Syed, Emilie C J; Wade-Martins, Richard; Cragg, Stephanie J; Bolam, J Paul; Magill, Peter J

    2016-04-12

    Midbrain dopaminergic neurons are essential for appropriate voluntary movement, as epitomized by the cardinal motor impairments arising in Parkinson's disease. Understanding the basis of such motor control requires understanding how the firing of different types of dopaminergic neuron relates to movement and how this activity is deciphered in target structures such as the striatum. By recording and labeling individual neurons in behaving mice, we show that the representation of brief spontaneous movements in the firing of identified midbrain dopaminergic neurons is cell-type selective. Most dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta (SNc), but not in ventral tegmental area or substantia nigra pars lateralis, consistently represented the onset of spontaneous movements with a pause in their firing. Computational modeling revealed that the movement-related firing of these dopaminergic neurons can manifest as rapid and robust fluctuations in striatal dopamine concentration and receptor activity. The exact nature of the movement-related signaling in the striatum depended on the type of dopaminergic neuron providing inputs, the striatal region innervated, and the type of dopamine receptor expressed by striatal neurons. Importantly, in aged mice harboring a genetic burden relevant for human Parkinson's disease, the precise movement-related firing of SNc dopaminergic neurons and the resultant striatal dopamine signaling were lost. These data show that distinct dopaminergic cell types differentially encode spontaneous movement and elucidate how dysregulation of their firing in early Parkinsonism can impair their effector circuits.

  17. Genome modifications in plant cells by custom-made restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tzfira, Tzvi; Weinthal, Dan; Marton, Ira; Zeevi, Vardit; Zuker, Amir; Vainstein, Alexander

    2012-05-01

    Genome editing, i.e. the ability to mutagenize, insert, delete and replace sequences, in living cells is a powerful and highly desirable method that could potentially revolutionize plant basic research and applied biotechnology. Indeed, various research groups from academia and industry are in a race to devise methods and develop tools that will enable not only site-specific mutagenesis but also controlled foreign DNA integration and replacement of native and transgene sequences by foreign DNA, in living plant cells. In recent years, much of the progress seen in gene targeting in plant cells has been attributed to the development of zinc finger nucleases and other novel restriction enzymes for use as molecular DNA scissors. The induction of double-strand breaks at specific genomic locations by zinc finger nucleases and other novel restriction enzymes results in a wide variety of genetic changes, which range from gene addition to the replacement, deletion and site-specific mutagenesis of endogenous and heterologous genes in living plant cells. In this review, we discuss the principles and tools for restriction enzyme-mediated gene targeting in plant cells, as well as their current and prospective use for gene targeting in model and crop plants.

  18. CD1d-restricted peripheral T cell lymphoma in mice and humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bachy, Emmanuel; Urb, Mirjam; Chandra, Shilpi; Robinot, Rémy; Bricard, Gabriel; de Bernard, Simon; Traverse-Glehen, Alexandra; Gazzo, Sophie; Blond, Olivier; Khurana, Archana; Baseggio, Lucile; Heavican, Tayla; Ffrench, Martine; Crispatzu, Giuliano; Mondière, Paul; Schrader, Alexandra; Taillardet, Morgan; Thaunat, Olivier; Martin, Nadine; Dalle, Stéphane; Le Garff-Tavernier, Magali; Salles, Gilles; Lachuer, Joel; Hermine, Olivier; Asnafi, Vahid; Roussel, Mikael; Lamy, Thierry; Herling, Marco; Iqbal, Javeed; Buffat, Laurent; Marche, Patrice N.; Gaulard, Philippe; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Defrance, Thierry

    2016-01-01

    Peripheral T cell lymphomas (PTCLs) are a heterogeneous entity of neoplasms with poor prognosis, lack of effective therapies, and a largely unknown pathophysiology. Identifying the mechanism of lymphomagenesis and cell-of-origin from which PTCLs arise is crucial for the development of efficient treatment strategies. In addition to the well-described thymic lymphomas, we found that p53-deficient mice also developed mature PTCLs that did not originate from conventional T cells but from CD1d-restricted NKT cells. PTCLs showed phenotypic features of activated NKT cells, such as PD-1 up-regulation and loss of NK1.1 expression. Injections of heat-killed Streptococcus pneumonia, known to express glycolipid antigens activating NKT cells, increased the incidence of these PTCLs, whereas Escherichia coli injection did not. Gene expression profile analyses indicated a significant down-regulation of genes in the TCR signaling pathway in PTCL, a common feature of chronically activated T cells. Targeting TCR signaling pathway in lymphoma cells, either with cyclosporine A or anti-CD1d blocking antibody, prolonged mice survival. Importantly, we identified human CD1d-restricted lymphoma cells within Vδ1 TCR-expressing PTCL. These results define a new subtype of PTCL and pave the way for the development of blocking anti-CD1d antibody for therapeutic purposes in humans. PMID:27069116

  19. GAPDH--a recruits a plant virus movement protein to cortical virus replication complexes to facilitate viral cell-to-cell movement.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masanori Kaido

    2014-11-01

    Full Text Available The formation of virus movement protein (MP-containing punctate structures on the cortical endoplasmic reticulum is required for efficient intercellular movement of Red clover necrotic mosaic virus (RCNMV, a bipartite positive-strand RNA plant virus. We found that these cortical punctate structures constitute a viral replication complex (VRC in addition to the previously reported aggregate structures that formed adjacent to the nucleus. We identified host proteins that interacted with RCNMV MP in virus-infected Nicotiana benthamiana leaves using a tandem affinity purification method followed by mass spectrometry. One of these host proteins was glyceraldehyde 3-phosphate dehydrogenase-A (NbGAPDH-A, which is a component of the Calvin-Benson cycle in chloroplasts. Virus-induced gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A reduced RCNMV multiplication in the inoculated leaves, but not in the single cells, thereby suggesting that GAPDH-A plays a positive role in cell-to-cell movement of RCNMV. The fusion protein of NbGAPDH-A and green fluorescent protein localized exclusively to the chloroplasts. In the presence of RCNMV RNA1, however, the protein localized to the cortical VRC as well as the chloroplasts. Bimolecular fluorescence complementation assay and GST pulldown assay confirmed in vivo and in vitro interactions, respectively, between the MP and NbGAPDH-A. Furthermore, gene silencing of NbGAPDH-A inhibited MP localization to the cortical VRC. We discuss the possible roles of NbGAPDH-A in the RCNMV movement process.

  20. Growth factors and the kidney: regulation of epithelial cell movement and morphogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cantley, L G

    1996-12-01

    The control of epithelial cell movement and shape change is complex and requires regulation of a broad range of events including cell-cell adhesion contacts, cell-substratum interactions, and the actin cytoskeleton. Utilizing the hepatocyte growth factor tyrosine kinase receptor, c-met, the present review examines how growth factor receptors activate intracellular signaling pathways, which can then regulate the events necessary for epithelial cells to disassemble their existing structure, undergo extensive shape change and cell body movement, and reassemble into a polarized epithelium. The role of growth factor-mediated activation of the phosphoinositide 3-kinase, phospholipase C-gamma, c-src family members, and ras family members is addressed in relation to integrin-mediated cell-basement membrane contacts, cadherin-mediated cell-cell adhesions, and regulation of the actin cytoskeleton.

  1. From Agrobacterium to viral vectors: genome modification of plant cells by rare cutting restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marton, Ira; Honig, Arik; Omid, Ayelet; De Costa, Noam; Marhevka, Elena; Cohen, Barry; Zuker, Amir; Vainstein, Alexander

    2013-01-01

    Researchers and biotechnologists require methods to accurately modify the genome of higher eukaryotic cells. Such modifications include, but are not limited to, site-specific mutagenesis, site-specific insertion of foreign DNA, and replacement and deletion of native sequences. Accurate genome modifications in plant species have been rather limited, with only a handful of plant species and genes being modified through the use of early genome-editing techniques. The development of rare-cutting restriction enzymes as a tool for the induction of site-specific genomic double-strand breaks and their introduction as a reliable tool for genome modification in animals, animal cells and human cell lines have paved the way for the adaptation of rare-cutting restriction enzymes to genome editing in plant cells. Indeed, the number of plant species and genes which have been successfully edited using zinc finger nucleases (ZFNs), transcription activator-like effector nucleases (TALENs) and engineered homing endonucleases is on the rise. In our review, we discuss the basics of rare-cutting restriction enzyme-mediated genome-editing technology with an emphasis on its application in plant species.

  2. A20 restricts wnt signaling in intestinal epithelial cells and suppresses colon carcinogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ling Shao

    Full Text Available Colon carcinogenesis consists of a multistep process during which a series of genetic and epigenetic adaptations occur that lead to malignant transformation. Here, we have studied the role of A20 (also known as TNFAIP3, a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that restricts NFκB and cell death signaling, in intestinal homeostasis and tumorigenesis. We have found that A20 expression is consistently reduced in human colonic adenomas than in normal colonic tissues. To further investigate A20's potential roles in regulating colon carcinogenesis, we have generated mice lacking A20 specifically in intestinal epithelial cells and interbred these with mice harboring a mutation in the adenomatous polyposis coli gene (APC(min. While A20(FL/FL villin-Cre mice exhibit uninflamed intestines without polyps, A20(FL/FL villin-Cre APC(min/+ mice contain far greater numbers and larger colonic polyps than control APC(min mice. We find that A20 binds to the β-catenin destruction complex and restricts canonical wnt signaling by supporting ubiquitination and degradation of β-catenin in intestinal epithelial cells. Moreover, acute deletion of A20 from intestinal epithelial cells in vivo leads to enhanced expression of the β-catenin dependent genes cyclinD1 and c-myc, known promoters of colon cancer. Taken together, these findings demonstrate new roles for A20 in restricting β-catenin signaling and preventing colon tumorigenesis.

  3. Glial-restricted precursors as potential candidates for ALS cell-replacement therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kruminis-Kaszkiel, Ewa; Wojtkiewicz, Joanna; Maksymowicz, Wojciech

    2014-01-01

    Amyotrophic lateral sclerosis is a multifactorial progressive neurodegenerative disorder leading to severe disability and death within 3-5 years after diagnosis. The main mechanisms underlying the disease progression are poorly known but according to the current knowledge, neuroinflammation is a key player in motor neurons damage. Astrocytes constitute an important cell population involved in neuroinflammatory reaction. Many studies confirmed their striking connection with motor neuron pathology and therefore they might be a target for the treatment of ALS. Cell-based therapy appears to be a promising strategy. Since direct replacement or restoring of motor neurons using various stem cells is challenging, enrichment of healthy donor-derived astrocytes appears to be a more realistic and beneficial approach. The effects of astrocytes have been examined using transplantation of glial-restricted precursors (GRPs) that represent one of the earliest precursors within the oligodendrocytic and astrocytic cell lineage. In this review, we focused on evidence-based data on astrocyte replacement transplantation therapy using GRPs in animal models of motor neuron diseases. The efficacy of GRPs engrafting is very encouraging. Furthermore, the lesson learned from application of lineage-restricted precursors in spinal cord injury (SCI) indicates that differentiation of GRPs into astrocytes before transplantation might be more advantageous in the context of axon regeneration. To sum up, the studies of glial-restricted precursors have made a step forward to ALS research and might bring breakthroughs to the field of ALS therapy in the future.

  4. Evidence for a critical role of gene occlusion in cell fate restriction

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jedidiah Gaetz; Wei-Hua Yu; Andy Peng Xiang; Bruce T Lahn; Kayla L Clift; Croydon J Fernandes; Frank Fuxiang Mao; Jae Hyun Lee; Li Zhang; Samuel W Baker; Timothy J Looney; Kara M Foshay

    2012-01-01

    The progressive restriction of cell fate during lineage differentiation is a poorly understood phenomenon despite its ubiquity in multicellular organisms.We recently used a cell fusion assay to define a mode of epigenetic silencing that we termed "occlusion",wherein affected genes are silenced by cis-acting chromatin mechanisms irrespective of whether trans-acting transcriptional activators are present.We hypothesized that occlusion of lineage-inappropriate genes could contribute to cell fate restriction.Here,we test this hypothesis by introducing bacterial artificial chromosomes (BACs),which are devoid of chromatin modifications necessary for occlusion,into mouse fibroblasts.We found that BAC transgenes corresponding to occluded endogenous genes are expressed in most eases,whereas BAC transgenes corresponding to silent but non-occluded endogenous genes are not expressed.This indicates that the cellular milieu in trans supports the expression of most occluded genes in fibroblasts,and that the silent state of these genes is solely the consequence of occlusion in cis.For the BAC corresponding to the occluded myogenic master regulator Myf5,expression of the Myf5 transgene on the BAC triggered fibroblasts to acquire a muscle-like phenotype.These results provide compelling evidence for a critical role of gene occlusion in cell fate restriction.

  5. RESTRICTION ENDONUCLEASE ANALYSIS OF MITOCHONDRIAL DNA FROM HUMAN LUNG ADENOCARCINOMA CELL LINE SPC-A-1

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    HU Yide; QIAN Guisheng; CHEN Weizhong; LI Shuping; WANG Guansong; MAO Baoling

    1999-01-01

    Objective: To understand the role of mitochondrial DNA (mtDNA) in carcinogenesis. Methods: single-step method was used to isolate the mtDNA from human lung adenocarcinoma cell line SPC-A-1. The mtDNA was analyzed by restriction fragment length polymorphism (RFLP) with 11 kinds of restriction endonuclease, which were Pvu Ⅱ, Xho Ⅰ, Pst Ⅰ, EcoR Ⅰ,BstE Ⅱ, Hind Ⅲ, Hpa Ⅰ, Bcl Ⅰ, EcoR Ⅴ, Sca Ⅰ and Xba Ⅰ.Restriction map of mtDNA from SPC-A-1 cell was obtained by the single and double-digestion method.Results: It was found that no variation at 32 restrictionsites could be detected in the coding region of mtDNA from SPC-A-1 cell line. But a new site was found at nucleotide 16276 (EcoR Ⅴ) within the noncoding region.Conclusion: These results indicate that the primary structure of gene coding region of mtDNA isolated from SPC-A-1 cell is highly stable. While the major variation of nucleotide is probably located in the noncoding region.

  6. Mutation of a chloroplast-targeting signal in Alternanthera mosaic virus TGB3 impairs cell-to-cell movement and eliminates long-distance virus movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Hyoun-Sub; Vaira, Anna Maria; Bae, Hanhong; Bragg, Jennifer N; Ruzin, Steven E; Bauchan, Gary R; Dienelt, Margaret M; Owens, Robert A; Hammond, John

    2010-08-01

    Cell-to-cell movement of potexviruses requires coordinated action of the coat protein and triple gene block (TGB) proteins. The structural properties of Alternanthera mosaic virus (AltMV) TGB3 were examined by methods differentiating between signal peptides and transmembrane domains, and its subcellular localization was studied by Agrobacterium-mediated transient expression and confocal microscopy. Unlike potato virus X (PVX) TGB3, AltMV TGB3 was not associated with the endoplasmic reticulum, and accumulated preferentially in mesophyll cells. Deletion and site-specific mutagenesis revealed an internal signal VL(17,18) of TGB3 essential for chloroplast localization, and either deletion of the TGB3 start codon or alteration of the chloroplast-localization signal limited cell-to-cell movement to the epidermis, yielding a virus that was unable to move into the mesophyll layer. Overexpression of AltMV TGB3 from either AltMV or PVX infectious clones resulted in veinal necrosis and vesiculation at the chloroplast membrane, a cytopathology not observed in wild-type infections. The distinctive mesophyll and chloroplast localization of AltMV TGB3 highlights the critical role played by mesophyll targeting in virus long-distance movement within plants.

  7. Thymic anlage is colonized by progenitors restricted to T, NK, and dendritic cell lineages.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Masuda, Kyoko; Itoi, Manami; Amagai, Takashi; Minato, Nagahiro; Katsura, Yoshimoto; Kawamoto, Hiroshi

    2005-03-01

    It remains controversial whether the thymus-colonizing progenitors are committed to the T cell lineage. A major problem that has impeded the characterization of thymic immigrants has been that the earliest intrathymic progenitors thus far identified do not necessarily represent the genuine thymic immigrants, because their developmental potential should have been influenced by contact with the thymic microenvironment. In the present study, we examined the developmental potential of the ontogenically earliest thymic progenitors of day 11 murine fetus. These cells reside in the surrounding mesenchymal region and have not encountered thymic epithelial components. Flow cytometric and immunohistochemical analyses demonstrated that these cells are exclusively Lin(-)c-kit(+)IL-7R(+). Limiting dilution analyses disclosed that the progenitors with T cell potential were abundant, while those with B cell potential were virtually absent in the region of day 11 thymic anlage. Clonal analyses reveled that they are restricted to T, NK, and dendritic cell lineages. Each progenitor was capable of forming a large number of precursors that may clonally accommodate highly diverse TCRbeta chains. These results provide direct evidence that the progenitors restricted to the T/NK/dendritic cell lineage selectively immigrate into the thymus.

  8. Demonstration of a novel HIV-1 restriction phenotype from a human T cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yanxing Han

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: Although retroviruses may invade host cells, a productive infection can be established only after the virus counteracts inhibition from different types of host restriction factors. Fv1, APOBEC3G/F, TRIM5alpha, ZAP, and CD317 inhibit the replication of different retroviruses by interfering with viral uncoating, reverse transcription, nuclear import, RNA stability, and release. In humans, although APOBEC3G/3F and CD317 block HIV-1 replication, their antiviral activities are neutralized by viral proteins Vif and Vpu. So far, no human gene has been found to effectively block wild type HIV-1 replication under natural condition. Thus, identification of such a gene product would be of great medical importance for the development of HIV therapies. METHOD AND FINDINGS: In this study, we discovered a new type of host restriction against the wild type HIV-1 from a CD4/CXCR4 double-positive human T cell line. We identified a CEM-derived cell line (CEM.NKR that is highly resistant to productive HIV-1 infection. Viral production was reduced by at least 1000-fold when compared to the other permissive human T cell lines such as H9, A3.01, and CEM-T4. Importantly, this resistance was evident at extremely high multiplicity of infection. Further analyses demonstrated that HIV-1 could finish the first round of replication in CEM.NKR cells, but the released virions were poorly infectious. These virions could enter the target cells, but failed to initiate reverse transcription. Notably, this restriction phenotype was also present in CEM.NKR and 293T heterokaryons. CONCLUSIONS: These results clearly indicate that CEM.NKR cells express a HIV inhibitory gene(s. Further characterization of this novel gene product(s will reveal a new antiretroviral mechanism that directly inactivates wild type HIV-1.

  9. Calponin modulates the exclusion of Otx-expressing cells from convergence extension movements

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Morgan, R; Hooiveld, MHW; Pannese, M; Dati, G; Broders, F; Delarue, M; Thiery, JP; Boncinelli, E; Durston, AJ

    1999-01-01

    Otx2, a vertebrate homologue of the Drosophila orthodenticle gene, coordinates two processes in early embryonic development. Not only does it specify cell fate in the anterior regions of the embryo, it also prevents the cells that express it from participating in the convergence extension movements

  10. Distinct cell stress responses induced by ATP restriction in quiescent human fibroblasts

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nirupama Yalamanchili

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Quiescence is the prevailing state of many cell types under homeostatic conditions. Yet, surprisingly little is known about how quiescent cells respond to energetic and metabolic challenges. To better understand compensatory responses of quiescent cells to metabolic stress, we established, in human primary dermal fibroblasts, an experimental ‘energy restriction’ model. Quiescence was achieved by short-term culture in serum-deprived media and ATP supply restricted using a combination of glucose transport inhibitors and mitochondrial uncouplers. In aggregate, these measures led to markedly reduced intracellular ATP levels while not compromising cell viability over the observation period of 48 h. Analysis of the transcription factor landscape induced by this treatment revealed alterations in several signal transduction nodes beyond the expected biosynthetic adaptations. These included increased abundance of NF-κB regulated transcription factors and altered transcription factor subsets regulated by Akt and p53. The observed changes in gene regulation and corresponding alterations in key signaling nodes are likely to contribute to cell survival at intracellular ATP concentrations substantially below those achieved by growth factor deprivation alone. This experimental model provides a benchmark for the investigation of cell survival pathways and related molecular targets that are associated with restricted energy supply associated with biological aging and metabolic diseases.

  11. Functionalized iron oxide nanoparticles for controlling the movement of immune cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    White, Ethan E; Pai, Alex; Weng, Yiming; Suresh, Anil K; Van Haute, Desiree; Pailevanian, Torkom; Alizadeh, Darya; Hajimiri, Ali; Badie, Behnam; Berlin, Jacob M

    2015-05-07

    Immunotherapy is currently being investigated for the treatment of many diseases, including cancer. The ability to control the location of immune cells during or following activation would represent a powerful new technique for this field. Targeted magnetic delivery is emerging as a technique for controlling cell movement and localization. Here we show that this technique can be extended to microglia, the primary phagocytic immune cells in the central nervous system. The magnetized microglia were generated by loading the cells with iron oxide nanoparticles functionalized with CpG oligonucleotides, serving as a proof of principle that nanoparticles can be used to both deliver an immunostimulatory cargo to cells and to control the movement of the cells. The nanoparticle-oligonucleotide conjugates are efficiently internalized, non-toxic, and immunostimulatory. We demonstrate that the in vitro migration of the adherent, loaded microglia can be controlled by an external magnetic field and that magnetically-induced migration is non-cytotoxic. In order to capture video of this magnetically-induced migration of loaded cells, a novel 3D-printed "cell box" was designed to facilitate our imaging application. Analysis of cell movement velocities clearly demonstrate increased cell velocities toward the magnet. These studies represent the initial step towards our final goal of using nanoparticles to both activate immune cells and to control their trafficking within the diseased brain.

  12. Identification of genes that are essential to restrict genome duplication to once per cell division

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vassilev, Alex; Lee, Chrissie Y.; Vassilev, Boris; Zhu, Wenge; Ormanoglu, Pinar; Martin, Scott E.; DePamphilis, Melvin L.

    2016-01-01

    Nuclear genome duplication is normally restricted to once per cell division, but aberrant events that allow excess DNA replication (EDR) promote genomic instability and aneuploidy, both of which are characteristics of cancer development. Here we provide the first comprehensive identification of genes that are essential to restrict genome duplication to once per cell division. An siRNA library of 21,584 human genes was screened for those that prevent EDR in cancer cells with undetectable chromosomal instability. Candidates were validated by testing multiple siRNAs and chemical inhibitors on both TP53+ and TP53- cells to reveal the relevance of this ubiquitous tumor suppressor to preventing EDR, and in the presence of an apoptosis inhibitor to reveal the full extent of EDR. The results revealed 42 genes that prevented either DNA re-replication or unscheduled endoreplication. All of them participate in one or more of eight cell cycle events. Seventeen of them have not been identified previously in this capacity. Remarkably, 14 of the 42 genes have been shown to prevent aneuploidy in mice. Moreover, suppressing a gene that prevents EDR increased the ability of the chemotherapeutic drug Paclitaxel to induce EDR, suggesting new opportunities for synthetic lethalities in the treatment of human cancers. PMID:27144335

  13. CD8+ T cells specific for the islet autoantigen IGRP are restricted in their T cell receptor chain usage

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fuchs, Yannick F.; Eugster, Anne; Dietz, Sevina; Sebelefsky, Christian; Kühn, Denise; Wilhelm, Carmen; Lindner, Annett; Gavrisan, Anita; Knoop, Jan; Dahl, Andreas; Ziegler, Anette-G.; Bonifacio, Ezio

    2017-01-01

    CD8+ T cells directed against beta cell autoantigens are considered relevant for the pathogenesis of type 1 diabetes. Using single cell T cell receptor sequencing of CD8+ T cells specific for the IGRP265-273 epitope, we examined whether there was expansion of clonotypes and sharing of T cell receptor chains in autoreactive CD8+ T cell repertoires. HLA-A*0201 positive type 1 diabetes patients (n = 19) and controls (n = 18) were analysed. TCR α- and β-chain sequences of 418 patient-derived IGRP265-273-multimer+ CD8+ T cells representing 48 clonotypes were obtained. Expanded populations of IGRP265-273-specific CD8+ T cells with dominant clonotypes that had TCR α-chains shared across patients were observed. The SGGSNYKLTF motif corresponding to TRAJ53 was contained in 384 (91.9%) cells, and in 20 (41.7%) patient-derived clonotypes. TRAJ53 together with TRAV29/DV5 was found in 15 (31.3%) clonotypes. Using next generation TCR α-chain sequencing, we found enrichment of one of these TCR α-chains in the memory CD8+ T cells of patients as compared to healthy controls. CD8+ T cell clones bearing the enriched motifs mediated antigen-specific target cell lysis. We provide the first evidence for restriction of T cell receptor motifs in the alpha chain of human CD8+ T cells with specificity to a beta cell antigen. PMID:28300170

  14. Increased iron export by ferroportin induces restriction of HIV-1 infection in sickle cell disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kumari, Namita; Ammosova, Tatiana; Diaz, Sharmin; Lin, Xionghao; Niu, Xiaomei; Ivanov, Andrey; Jerebtsova, Marina; Dhawan, Subhash; Oneal, Patricia; Nekhai, Sergei

    2017-01-01

    The low incidence of HIV-1 infection in patients with sickle cell disease (SCD) and inhibition of HIV-1 replication in vitro under the conditions of low intracellular iron or heme treatment suggests a potential restriction of HIV-1 infection in SCD. We investigated HIV-1 ex vivo infection of SCD peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) and found that HIV-1 replication was inhibited at the level of reverse transcription (RT) and transcription. We observed increased expression of heme and iron-regulated genes, previously shown to inhibit HIV-1, including ferroportin, IKBα, HO-1, p21, and SAM domain and HD domain-containing protein 1 (SAMHD1). HIV-1 inhibition was less pronounced in hepcidin-treated SCD PBMCs and more pronounced in the iron or iron chelators treated, suggesting a key role of iron metabolism. In SCD PBMCs, labile iron levels were reduced and protein levels of ferroportin, HIF-1α, IKBα, and HO-1 were increased. Hemin treatment induced ferroportin expression and inhibited HIV-1 in THP-1 cells, mimicking the HIV-1 inhibition in SCD PBMCs, especially as hepcidin similarly prevented HIV-1 inhibition. In THP-1 cells with knocked down ferroportin, IKBα, or HO-1 genes but not HIF-1α or p21, HIV-1 was not inhibited by hemin. Activity of SAMHD1-regulatory CDK2 was decreased, and SAMHD1 phosphorylation was reduced in SCD PBMCs and hemin-treated THP-1 cells, suggesting SAMHD1-mediated HIV-1 restriction in SCD. Our findings point to ferroportin as a trigger of HIV-1 restriction in SCD settings, linking reduced intracellular iron levels to the inhibition of CDK2 activity, reduction of SAMHD1 phosphorylation, increased IKBα expression, and inhibition of HIV-1 RT and transcription.

  15. TNFAIP3 promotes survival of CD4 T cells by restricting MTOR and promoting autophagy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzawa, Yu; Oshima, Shigeru; Takahara, Masahiro; Maeyashiki, Chiaki; Nemoto, Yasuhiro; Kobayashi, Masanori; Nibe, Yoichi; Nozaki, Kengo; Nagaishi, Takashi; Okamoto, Ryuichi; Tsuchiya, Kiichiro; Nakamura, Tetsuya; Ma, Averil; Watanabe, Mamoru

    2015-01-01

    Autophagy plays important roles in metabolism, differentiation, and survival in T cells. TNFAIP3/A20 is a ubiquitin-editing enzyme that is thought to be a negative regulator of autophagy in cell lines. However, the role of TNFAIP3 in autophagy remains unclear. To determine whether TNFAIP3 regulates autophagy in CD4 T cells, we first analyzed Tnfaip3-deficient naïve CD4 T cells in vitro. We demonstrated that Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited reduced MAP1LC3/LC3 (microtubule-associated protein 1 light chain 3) puncta formation, increased mitochondrial content, and exaggerated reactive oxygen species (ROS) production. These results indicate that TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy after T cell receptor (TCR) stimulation in CD4 T cells. We then investigated the mechanism by which TNFAIP3 promotes autophagy signaling. We found that TNFAIP3 bound to the MTOR (mechanistic target of rapamycin) complex and that Tnfaip3-deficient cells displayed enhanced ubiquitination of the MTOR complex and MTOR activity. To confirm the effects of enhanced MTOR activity in Tnfaip3-deficient cells, we analyzed cell survival following treatment with Torin1, an MTOR inhibitor. Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells exhibited fewer cell numbers than the control cells in vitro and in vivo. In addition, the impaired survival of Tnfaip3-deficient cells was ameliorated with Torin1 treatment in vitro and in vivo. The effect of Torin1 was abolished by Atg5 deficiency. Thus, enhanced MTOR activity regulates the survival of Tnfaip3-deficient CD4 T cells. Taken together, our findings illustrate that TNFAIP3 restricts MTOR signaling and promotes autophagy, providing new insight into the manner in which MTOR and autophagy regulate survival in CD4 T cells.

  16. Autonomy and Non-autonomy of Angiogenic Cell Movements Revealed by Experiment-Driven Mathematical Modeling

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kei Sugihara

    2015-12-01

    Full Text Available Angiogenesis is a multicellular phenomenon driven by morphogenetic cell movements. We recently reported morphogenetic vascular endothelial cell (EC behaviors to be dynamic and complex. However, the principal mechanisms orchestrating individual EC movements in angiogenic morphogenesis remain largely unknown. Here we present an experiment-driven mathematical model that enables us to systematically dissect cellular mechanisms in branch elongation. We found that cell-autonomous and coordinated actions governed these multicellular behaviors, and a cell-autonomous process sufficiently illustrated essential features of the morphogenetic EC dynamics at both the single-cell and cell-population levels. Through refining our model and experimental verification, we further identified a coordinated mode of tip EC behaviors regulated via a spatial relationship between tip and follower ECs, which facilitates the forward motility of tip ECs. These findings provide insights that enhance our mechanistic understanding of not only angiogenic morphogenesis, but also other types of multicellular phenomenon.

  17. Protocadherin-19 and N-cadherin interact to control cell movements during anterior neurulation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biswas, Sayantanee; Emond, Michelle R; Jontes, James D

    2010-11-29

    The protocadherins comprise the largest subgroup within the cadherin superfamily, yet their cellular and developmental functions are not well understood. In this study, we demonstrate that pcdh 19 (protocadherin 19) acts synergistically with n-cadherin (ncad) during anterior neurulation in zebrafish. In addition, Pcdh 19 and Ncad interact directly, forming a protein-protein complex both in vitro and in vivo. Although both molecules are required for calcium-dependent adhesion in a zebrafish cell line, the extracellular domain of Pcdh 19 does not exhibit adhesive activity, suggesting that the involvement of Pcdh 19 in cell adhesion is indirect. Quantitative analysis of in vivo two-photon time-lapse image sequences reveals that loss of either pcdh 19 or ncad impairs cell movements during neurulation, disrupting both the directedness of cell movements and the coherence of movements among neighboring cells. Our results suggest that Pcdh 19 and Ncad function together to regulate cell adhesion and to mediate morphogenetic movements during brain development.

  18. Does reduced movement restrictions and use of assistive devices affect rehabilitation outcome after total hip replacement? A non-randomized, controlled study in 365 patients with six week follow up

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Mikkelsen, Lone Ramer; Petersen, Annemette Krintel; Søballe, Kjeld

    a standard package of assistive devices (restricted group, RG). This group was compared to patients included into the study the following 3 months with a less restricted hip movement regime and use of assistive devices according to individual needs (unrestricted group, UG). Questionnaires on function...... (difference ≤5 points). Yet, there is a beneficial or equal effect of the unrestricted regime concerning secondary outcomes. It seems possible to reduce the use of assistive devices considerably and thereby induce cost savings. More research on safety issues is needed to elucidate the effect of unrestricted...

  19. Exogenous DNA internalisation by sperm cells is improved by combining lipofection and restriction enzyme mediated integration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Churchil, R R; Gupta, J; Singh, A; Sharma, D

    2011-06-01

    1. Three types of exogenous DNA inserts, i.e. complete linearised pVIVO2-GFP/LacZ vector (9620 bp), the LacZ gene (5317 bp) and the GFP gene (2152 bp) were used to transfect chicken spermatozoa through simple incubation of sperm cells with insert. 2. PCR assay, Dot Blot hybridisation and Southern hybridisation showed the successful internalisation of exogenous DNA by chicken sperm cells. 3. Lipofection and Restriction Enzyme Mediated Integration (REMI) were used to improve the rate of internalisation of exogenous DNA by sperm cells. 4. Results from dot blot as well as Southern hybridisation were semi-quantified and improved exogenous DNA uptake by sperm cells through lipofection and REMI. Stronger signals were observed from hybridisation of LacZ as well as GFP specific probe with the DNA from lipofected exogenous DNA transfected sperm DNA in comparison with those transfected with nude exogenous DNA.

  20. Myosin inhibitors block accumulation movement of chloroplasts in Arabidopsis thaliana leaf cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paves, H; Truve, E

    2007-01-01

    Chloroplasts alter their distribution within plant cells depending on the external light conditions. Myosin inhibitors 2,3-butanedione monoxime (BDM), N-ethylmaleimide (NEM), and 1-(5-iodonaphthalene-1-sulfonyl)-1H-hexahydro-1,4-diazepine hydrochloride (ML-7) were used to study the possible role of myosins in chloroplast photorelocation in Arabidopsis thaliana mesophyll cells. None of these agents had an effect on the chloroplast high-fluence-rate avoidance movement but all of the three myosin inhibitors blocked the accumulation movement of chloroplasts after a high-fluence-rate irradiation of the leaves. The results suggest that myosins have a role in A. thaliana chloroplast photorelocation.

  1. Flexible nanopillars to regulate cell adhesion and movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chien, Fan-Ching; Dai, Yang-Hong; Kuo, Chiung Wen; Chen, Peilin

    2016-11-01

    Flexible polymer nanopillar substrates were used to systematically demonstrate cell alignment and migration guided by the directional formation of focal adhesions. The polymer nanopillar substrates were constructed to various height specifications to provide an extensive variation of flexibility; a rectangular arrangement created spatial confinement between adjacent nanopillars, providing less spacing in the horizontal and vertical directions. Three polymer nanopillar substrates with the diameter of 400 nm and the heights of 400, 800, and 1200 nm were fabricated. Super-resolution localization imaging and protein pair-distance analysis of vinculin proteins revealed that Chinese hamster ovary (CHO) cells formed mature focal adhesions on 1200 nm high nanopillar substrates by bending adjacent nanopillars to link dot-like adhesions. The spacing confinement of the adjacent nanopillars enhanced the orthogonal directionality of the formation tendency of the mature focal adhesions. The directional formation of the mature focal adhesions also facilitated the organization of actin filaments in the horizontal and vertical directions. Moreover, 78% of the CHO cells were aligned in these two directions, in conformity with the flexibility and nanotopographical cues of the nanopillars. Biased cell migration was observed on the 1200 nm high nanopillar substrates.

  2. Analysis and visualization of cell movement in the developing zebrafish brain.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Langenberg, Tobias; Dracz, Tadeusz; Oates, Andrew C; Heisenberg, Carl-Philip; Brand, Michael

    2006-04-01

    Detailed reconstruction of the spatiotemporal history of embryonic cells is key to understanding tissue formation processes but is often complicated by the large number of cells involved, particularly so in vertebrates. Through a combination of high-resolution time-lapse lineage tracing and antibody staining, we have analyzed the movement of mesencephalic and metencephalic cell populations in the early zebrafish embryo. To facilitate the analysis of our cell tracking data, we have created TracePilot, a software tool that allows interactive manipulation and visualization of tracking data. We demonstrate its utility by showing novel visualizations of cell movement in the developing zebrafish brain. TracePilot (http://www.mpi-cbg.de/tracepilot) is Java-based, available free of charge, and has a program structure that allows the incorporation of additional analysis tools.

  3. Computational cell model based on autonomous cell movement regulated by cell-cell signalling successfully recapitulates the "inside and outside" pattern of cell sorting

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ajioka Itsuki

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Development of multicellular organisms proceeds from a single fertilized egg as the combined effect of countless numbers of cellular interactions among highly dynamic cells. Since at least a reminiscent pattern of morphogenesis can be recapitulated in a reproducible manner in reaggregation cultures of dissociated embryonic cells, which is known as cell sorting, the cells themselves must possess some autonomous cell behaviors that assure specific and reproducible self-organization. Understanding of this self-organized dynamics of heterogeneous cell population seems to require some novel approaches so that the approaches bridge a gap between molecular events and morphogenesis in developmental and cell biology. A conceptual cell model in a computer may answer that purpose. We constructed a dynamical cell model based on autonomous cell behaviors, including cell shape, growth, division, adhesion, transformation, and motility as well as cell-cell signaling. The model gives some insights about what cellular behaviors make an appropriate global pattern of the cell population. Results We applied the model to "inside and outside" pattern of cell-sorting, in which two different embryonic cell types within a randomly mixed aggregate are sorted so that one cell type tends to gather in the central region of the aggregate and the other cell type surrounds the first cell type. Our model can modify the above cell behaviors by varying parameters related to them. We explored various parameter sets with which the "inside and outside" pattern could be achieved. The simulation results suggested that direction of cell movement responding to its neighborhood and the cell's mobility are important for this specific rearrangement. Conclusion We constructed an in silico cell model that mimics autonomous cell behaviors and applied it to cell sorting, which is a simple and appropriate phenomenon exhibiting self-organization of cell population. The model

  4. Factors that restrict the intestinal cell permeation of cyclic prodrugs of an opioid peptide (DADLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Hui; Chen, Weiqing; Andersen, Thomas E;

    2009-01-01

    inactive or substantially less active than PSC-833 in increasing the P(B) values of these prodrugs. These data suggest that, while P-gp plays a role, other factors (e.g., substrate activity for other efflux transporters and/or for metabolic enzymes) may contribute to restricting the permeation of AOA......The objective of this study was to elucidate the role of P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in restricting the intestinal mucosal permeation of cyclic prodrugs (AOA-DADLE, CA-DADLE, and OMCA-DADLE) of the opioid peptide DADLE (H-Tyr-D-Ala-Gly-Phe-D-Leu-OH). In the Caco-2 cell model, the high P......(app,BL-to-AP)/P(app,AP-to-BL) ratios of AOA-DADLE, CA-DADLE, and OMCA-DADLE (71-117) were significantly decreased by including known P-gp inhibitors, GF-12098, cyclosporine (CyA), or PSC-833, in the incubation media, suggesting that P-gp is restricting the AP-to-BL permeation of these cyclic prodrugs. In the in situ perfused rat...

  5. EphrinB3 restricts endogenous neural stem cell migration after traumatic brain injury.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dixon, Kirsty J; Mier, Jose; Gajavelli, Shyam; Turbic, Alisa; Bullock, Ross; Turnley, Ann M; Liebl, Daniel J

    2016-11-01

    Traumatic brain injury (TBI) leads to a series of pathological events that can have profound influences on motor, sensory and cognitive functions. Conversely, TBI can also stimulate neural stem/progenitor cell proliferation leading to increased numbers of neuroblasts migrating outside their restrictive neurogenic zone to areas of damage in support of tissue integrity. Unfortunately, the factors that regulate migration are poorly understood. Here, we examine whether ephrinB3 functions to restrict neuroblasts from migrating outside the subventricular zone (SVZ) and rostral migratory stream (RMS). We have previously shown that ephrinB3 is expressed in tissues surrounding these regions, including the overlying corpus callosum (CC), and is reduced after controlled cortical impact (CCI) injury. Our current study takes advantage of ephrinB3 knockout mice to examine the influences of ephrinB3 on neuroblast migration into CC and cortex tissues after CCI injury. Both injury and/or ephrinB3 deficiency led to increased neuroblast numbers and enhanced migration outside the SVZ/RMS zones. Application of soluble ephrinB3-Fc molecules reduced neuroblast migration into the CC after injury and limited neuroblast chain migration in cultured SVZ explants. Our findings suggest that ephrinB3 expression in tissues surrounding neurogenic regions functions to restrict neuroblast migration outside the RMS by limiting chain migration.

  6. Multiple tissue-specific isoforms of sulfatide activate CD1d-restricted type II NKT cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Blomqvist, Maria; Rhost, Sara; Teneberg, Susann;

    2009-01-01

    The glycosphingolipid sulfatide (SO(3)-3Galbeta1Cer) is a demonstrated ligand for a subset of CD1d-restricted NKT cells, which could regulate experimental autoimmune encephalomyelitis, a murine model for multiple sclerosis, as well as tumor immunity and experimental hepatitis. Native sulfatide...... is a mixture of sulfatide isoforms, i.e. sulfatide molecules with different long-chain bases and fatty acid chain lengths and saturation. Here, we demonstrate that sulfatide-specific CD1d-restricted murine NKT hybridomas recognized several different sulfatide isoforms. These included the physiologically...... isoforms by a CD1d-restricted NKT-cell clone, and suggest that sulfatide, a major component of the myelin sheet and pancreatic beta-cells, is one of several natural ligands for type II CD1d-restricted NKT cells....

  7. Over-expression of putative transcriptional coactivator KELP interferes with Tomato mosaic virus cell-to-cell movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sasaki, Nobumitsu; Ogata, Takuya; Deguchi, Masakazu; Nagai, Shoko; Tamai, Atsushi; Meshi, Tetsuo; Kawakami, Shigeki; Watanabe, Yuichiro; Matsushita, Yasuhiko; Nyunoya, Hiroshi

    2009-03-01

    Tomato mosaic virus (ToMV) encodes a movement protein (MP) that is necessary for virus cell-to-cell movement. We have demonstrated previously that KELP, a putative transcriptional coactivator of Arabidopsis thaliana, and its orthologue from Brassica campestris can bind to ToMV MP in vitro. In this study, we examined the effects of the transient over-expression of KELP on ToMV infection and the intracellular localization of MP in Nicotiana benthamiana, an experimental host of the virus. In co-bombardment experiments, the over-expression of KELP inhibited virus cell-to-cell movement. The N-terminal half of KELP (KELPdC), which had been shown to bind to MP, was sufficient for inhibition. Furthermore, the over-expression of KELP and KELPdC, both of which were co-localized with ToMV MP, led to a reduction in the plasmodesmal association of MP. In the absence of MP expression, KELP was localized in the nucleus and the cytoplasm by the localization signal in its N-terminal half. It was also shown that ToMV amplified normally in protoplasts prepared from leaf tissue that expressed KELP transiently. These results indicate that over-expressed KELP interacts with MP in vivo and exerts an inhibitory effect on MP function for virus cell-to-cell movement, but not on virus amplification in individual cells.

  8. Cell-type-restricted anti-cytokine therapy: TNF inhibition from one pathogenic source.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Efimov, Grigory A; Kruglov, Andrei A; Khlopchatnikova, Zoya V; Rozov, Fedor N; Mokhonov, Vladislav V; Rose-John, Stefan; Scheller, Jürgen; Gordon, Siamon; Stacey, Martin; Drutskaya, Marina S; Tillib, Sergei V; Nedospasov, Sergei A

    2016-03-15

    Overexpression of TNF contributes to pathogenesis of multiple autoimmune diseases, accounting for a remarkable success of anti-TNF therapy. TNF is produced by a variety of cell types, and it can play either a beneficial or a deleterious role. In particular, in autoimmunity pathogenic TNF may be derived from restricted cellular sources. In this study we evaluated the feasibility of cell-type-restricted TNF inhibition in vivo. To this end, we engineered MYSTI (Myeloid-Specific TNF Inhibitor)--a recombinant bispecific antibody that binds to the F4/80 surface molecule on myeloid cells and to human TNF (hTNF). In macrophage cultures derived from TNF humanized mice MYSTI could capture the secreted hTNF, limiting its bioavailability. Additionally, as evaluated in TNF humanized mice, MYSTI was superior to an otherwise analogous systemic TNF inhibitor in protecting mice from lethal LPS/D-Galactosamine-induced hepatotoxicity. Our results suggest a novel and more specific approach to inhibiting TNF in pathologies primarily driven by macrophage-derived TNF.

  9. The VP1u Receptor Restricts Parvovirus B19 Uptake to Permissive Erythroid Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leisi, Remo; Von Nordheim, Marcus; Ros, Carlos; Kempf, Christoph

    2016-01-01

    Parvovirus B19 (B19V) is a small non-enveloped virus and known as the causative agent for the mild childhood disease erythema infectiosum. B19V has an extraordinary narrow tissue tropism, showing only productive infection in erythroid precursor cells in the bone marrow. We recently found that the viral protein 1 unique region (VP1u) contains an N-terminal receptor-binding domain (RBD), which mediates the uptake of the virus into cells of the erythroid lineage. To further investigate the role of the RBD in connection with a B19V-unrelated capsid, we chemically coupled the VP1u of B19V to the bacteriophage MS2 capsid and tested the internalization capacity of the bioconjugate on permissive cells. In comparison, we studied the cellular uptake and infection of B19V along the erythroid differentiation. The results showed that the MS2-VP1u bioconjugate mimicked the specific internalization of the native B19V into erythroid precursor cells, which further coincides with the restricted infection profile. The successful mimicry of B19V uptake demonstrates that the RBD in the VP1u is sufficient for the endocytosis of the viral capsid. Furthermore, the recombinant VP1u competed with B19V uptake into permissive cells, thus excluding a significant alternative uptake mechanism by other receptors. Strikingly, the VP1u receptor appeared to be expressed only on erythropoietin-dependent erythroid differentiation stages that also provide the necessary intracellular factors for a productive infection. Taken together, these findings suggest that the VP1u binds to a yet-unknown erythroid-specific cellular receptor and thus restricts the virus entry to permissive cells. PMID:27690083

  10. Role of synchronous activation of cerebellar purkinje cell ensembles in multi-joint movement control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    T.M. Hoogland (Tycho); J.R. de Gruijl (Jornt); L. Witter (Laurens); M.I. Canto (Marcia Irene); C.I. de Zeeuw (Chris)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractIt is a longstanding question in neuroscience how elaborate multi-joint movements are coordinated coherently. Microzones of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) are thought to mediate this coordination by controlling the timing of particular motor domains. However, it remains to be elucidated

  11. Role of Synchronous Activation of Cerebellar Purkinje Cell Ensembles in Multi-joint Movement Control

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogland, Tycho M; De Gruijl, Jornt R; Witter, Laurens; Canto, Cathrin B; De Zeeuw, Chris I

    2015-01-01

    It is a longstanding question in neuroscience how elaborate multi-joint movements are coordinated coherently. Microzones of cerebellar Purkinje cells (PCs) are thought to mediate this coordination by controlling the timing of particular motor domains. However, it remains to be elucidated to what ext

  12. Cross-talk between cd1d-restricted nkt cells and γδ cells in t regulatory cell response

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Huber Sally A

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available Abstract CD1d is a non-classical major histocompatibility class 1-like molecule which primarily presents either microbial or endogenous glycolipid antigens to T cells involved in innate immunity. Natural killer T (NKT cells and a subpopulation of γδ T cells expressing the Vγ4 T cell receptor (TCR recognize CD1d. NKT and Vγ4 T cells function in the innate immune response via rapid activation subsequent to infection and secrete large quantities of cytokines that both help control infection and modulate the developing adaptive immune response. T regulatory cells represent one cell population impacted by both NKT and Vγ4 T cells. This review discusses the evidence that NKT cells promote T regulatory cell activation both through direct interaction of NKT cell and dendritic cells and through NKT cell secretion of large amounts of TGFβ, IL-10 and IL-2. Recent studies have shown that CD1d-restricted Vγ4 T cells, in contrast to NKT cells, selectively kill T regulatory cells through a caspase-dependent mechanism. Vγ4 T cell elimination of the T regulatory cell population allows activation of autoimmune CD8+ effector cells leading to severe cardiac injury in a coxsackievirus B3 (CVB3 myocarditis model in mice. CD1d-restricted immunity can therefore lead to either immunosuppression or autoimmunity depending upon the type of innate effector dominating during the infection.

  13. MHC CLASS-II-RESTRICTED T-CELL HYBRIDOMAS RECOGNIZING THE NUCLEOCAPSID PROTEIN OF AVIAN CORONAVIUS IBV

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    BOOTS, AMH; VANLIEROP, MJ; KUSTERS, JG; VANKOOTEN, PJS; VANDERZELIST, BAM; HENSEN, EJ; Boots, Annemieke

    1991-01-01

    Mice were immunized with purified infectious bronchitis virus (IBV), strain M41. Spleen cells, expanded in vitro by stimulation with M41, were immortalized by fusion to obtain T-cell hybridomas, and two major histocompatability complex (MHC) class II (I-E)-restricted T-cell hybridomas were selected

  14. Conflicts targeting epigenetic systems and their resolution by cell death: novel concepts for methyl-specific and other restriction systems.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ishikawa, Ken; Fukuda, Eri; Kobayashi, Ichizo

    2010-12-01

    Epigenetic modification of genomic DNA by methylation is important for defining the epigenome and the transcriptome in eukaryotes as well as in prokaryotes. In prokaryotes, the DNA methyltransferase genes often vary, are mobile, and are paired with the gene for a restriction enzyme. Decrease in a certain epigenetic methylation may lead to chromosome cleavage by the partner restriction enzyme, leading to eventual cell death. Thus, the pairing of a DNA methyltransferase and a restriction enzyme forces an epigenetic state to be maintained within the genome. Although restriction enzymes were originally discovered for their ability to attack invading DNAs, it may be understood because such DNAs show deviation from this epigenetic status. DNAs with epigenetic methylation, by a methyltransferase linked or unlinked with a restriction enzyme, can also be the target of DNases, such as McrBC of Escherichia coli, which was discovered because of its methyl-specific restriction. McrBC responds to specific genome methylation systems by killing the host bacterial cell through chromosome cleavage. Evolutionary and genomic analysis of McrBC homologues revealed their mobility and wide distribution in prokaryotes similar to restriction-modification systems. These findings support the hypothesis that this family of methyl-specific DNases evolved as mobile elements competing with specific genome methylation systems through host killing. These restriction systems clearly demonstrate the presence of conflicts between epigenetic systems.

  15. Endocytosis restricts Arabidopsis KNOLLE syntaxin to the cell division plane during late cytokinesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boutté, Yohann; Frescatada-Rosa, Márcia; Men, Shuzhen; Chow, Cheung-Ming; Ebine, Kazuo; Gustavsson, Anna; Johansson, Lenore; Ueda, Takashi; Moore, Ian; Jürgens, Gerd; Grebe, Markus

    2010-02-03

    Cytokinesis represents the final stage of eukaryotic cell division during which the cytoplasm becomes partitioned between daughter cells. The process differs to some extent between animal and plant cells, but proteins of the syntaxin family mediate membrane fusion in the plane of cell division in diverse organisms. How syntaxin localization is kept in check remains elusive. Here, we report that localization of the Arabidopsis KNOLLE syntaxin in the plane of cell division is maintained by sterol-dependent endocytosis involving a clathrin- and DYNAMIN-RELATED PROTEIN1A-dependent mechanism. On genetic or pharmacological interference with endocytosis, KNOLLE mis-localizes to lateral plasma membranes after cell-plate fusion. Fluorescence-loss-in-photo-bleaching and fluorescence-recovery-after-photo-bleaching experiments reveal lateral diffusion of GFP-KNOLLE from the plane of division to lateral membranes. In an endocytosis-defective sterol biosynthesis mutant displaying lateral KNOLLE diffusion, KNOLLE secretory trafficking remains unaffected. Thus, restriction of lateral diffusion by endocytosis may serve to maintain specificity of syntaxin localization during late cytokinesis.

  16. Cementum attachment protein manifestation is restricted to the mineralized tissue forming cells of the periodontium

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Bar-Kana, I.; Pitaru, S. [Tel Aviv Univ., Dept. of Oral Biology, Goldschleger School of dental Medicine (Israel); Savion, N. [Tel Aviv Univ., Goldschleger Eye Research Inst. (Israel); Narayanan, A.S. [Univ. of Washington, Dept. of Pathology, Faculty of Medicine (United States)

    1998-08-01

    The mechanisms that regulate cementogenesis are mainly unknown. A specific cementum attachment protein (CAP) has been recently partially characterized and found to be more efficient in supporting the attachment of alveolar bone cells (ABC) and periodontal ligament cells (PLC) than that of gingival fibroblasts (GF). The purpose of this study was to determine the capacity of human periodontal-derived cells to bind an express CAP and to relate these properties to their capacity to express alkaline phosphatase (AlP) and form mineralized tissue (MTF). ABC, PLC and GF were tested. Human stromal bone marrow cells (SBMC) and a cementoma-derived cell line (CC) served as controls. CAP binding was determined using {sup 125}I-CAP. The amount of MTF was assessed by alizarin red staining and image analysis determination of the amount of red-stained material. AlP and CAP expression were examined by histochemistry and immuno-chemistry, respectively. The highest expression of CAP was observed in CC, followed by PLC and ABC in decreasing order, whereas SBMC and GF did not express CAP, SBMC manifested the highest CAP binding capacity followed by CC, ABC, PLC and GF. MTF and AlP manifestation were greatest in SBMC, followed by ABC, PLC and CC. Collectively, the results indicate that CAP binding and secretion are not linked and that CAP manifestation is restricted to periodontal derived cell lineages with the potential of forming mineralized tissues. (au) 39 refs.

  17. Fibrocyte-like cells from intrauterine growth restriction placentas have a reduced ability to stimulate angiogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Meghan R; Winkler-Lowen, Bonnie; Jiang, Yanyan; Guilbert, Larry J; Davidge, Sandra T

    2013-09-01

    Intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) is a common complication of pregnancy whereby the fetus fails to achieve its genetic growth potential. Malformation of the placental vasculature is observed in IUGR and may be due to the development of the placenta in a chronically hypoxic environment. Recently, we identified that the predominant stromal cells in the angiogenic zones of the placenta are fibrocyte-like cells. The conditioned medium from fibrocyte-like cells (FcCM) has been shown to stimulate angiogenesis in vitro. Thus, we hypothesized that FcCM from IUGR cells would have a reduced ability to stimulate angiogenesis and that chronic hypoxia would decrease the ability of both normal and IUGR fibrocyte-like cells to stimulate angiogenesis. IUGR FcCM had a reduced ability to stimulate endothelial tubule-like structure formation and an increased ability to stimulate endothelial migration compared with normal FcCM. However, normal and IUGR FcCM produced in chronic hypoxia did not alter endothelial proliferation, migration, or tubule-like structure formation. IUGR FcCM was found to have reduced levels of the pro-angiogenic cytokine IL-8 and increased levels of the anti-angiogenic factors activin-A and pigment epithelium-derived growth factor. Thus, alterations in the ability of IUGR fibrocyte-like cells to stimulate angiogenesis may contribute to the development of vascular malformation in IUGR, but in vitro these changes cannot be attributed to a chronically hypoxic environment.

  18. In vivo analysis of Cajal body movement, separation, and joining in live human cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Platani, M; Goldberg, I; Swedlow, J R; Lamond, A I

    2000-12-25

    Cajal bodies (also known as coiled bodies) are subnuclear organelles that contain specific nuclear antigens, including splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and a subset of nucleolar proteins. Cajal bodies are localized in the nucleoplasm and are often found at the nucleolar periphery. We have constructed a stable HeLa cell line, HeLa(GFP-coilin), that expresses the Cajal body marker protein, p80 coilin, fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP-coilin). The localization pattern and biochemical properties of the GFP-coilin fusion protein are identical to the endogenous p80 coilin. Time-lapse recordings on 63 nuclei of HeLa(GFP-coilin) cells showed that all Cajal bodies move within the nucleoplasm. Movements included translocations through the nucleoplasm, joining of bodies to form larger structures, and separation of smaller bodies from larger Cajal bodies. Also, we observed Cajal bodies moving to and from nucleoli. The data suggest that there may be at least two classes of Cajal bodies that differ in their size, antigen composition, and dynamic behavior. The smaller size class shows more frequent and faster rates of movement, up to 0.9 microm/min. The GFP-coilin protein is dynamically associated with Cajal bodies as shown by changes in their fluorescence intensity over time. This study reveals an unexpectedly high level of movement and interactions of nuclear bodies in human cells and suggests that these movements may be driven, at least in part, by regulated mechanisms.

  19. Escargot Restricts Niche Cell to Stem Cell Conversion in the Drosophila Testis

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    Justin Voog

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Stem cells reside within specialized microenvironments, or niches, that control many aspects of stem cell behavior. Somatic hub cells in the Drosophila testis regulate the behavior of cyst stem cells (CySCs and germline stem cells (GSCs and are a primary component of the testis stem cell niche. The shutoff (shof mutation, characterized by premature loss of GSCs and CySCs, was mapped to a locus encoding the evolutionarily conserved transcription factor Escargot (Esg. Hub cells depleted of Esg acquire CySC characteristics and differentiate as cyst cells, resulting in complete loss of hub cells and eventually CySCs and GSCs, similar to the shof mutant phenotype. We identified Esg-interacting proteins and demonstrate an interaction between Esg and the corepressor C-terminal binding protein (CtBP, which was also required for maintenance of hub cell fate. Our results indicate that niche cells can acquire stem cell properties upon removal of a single transcription factor in vivo.

  20. Shoot circumnutation and winding movements require gravisensing cells-mediated graviresponse

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kitazawa, D.; Miyazawa, Y.; Fujii, N.; Nitasaka, E.; Takahashi, H.

    The stationary nature of plants distinguishes them from other organisms Because of this unique nature higher plants have evolved various mechanisms for responding to environmental cues enabling them to utilize limited resources or to escape from environmental stresses One of the most important mechanisms that plants have acquired is the ability to sense gravity and to use it as a basis for governing their growth orientation a process known as gravitropism In addition to gravitropism oscillatory movement termed circumnutation and winding movement of climbing plants are also important mechanisms that allow plants to elevate their apical meristems to higher positions and these movements are hypothesized to be gravity-related However the relationship between the graviresponse and these movements has not been clarified To verify the necessity of the graviresponse in these movements we used a climbing plant namely Japanese morning glory as a model plant for it has winding growth that allow us to approach the above-mentioned issues We analyzed two distinct mutant lines of morning glory weeping1 and weeping2 both of which have loss of shoot gravitropism Histological characterization revealed that weeping1 has defect in development of gravisensing cells i e endodermis whereas weeping2 has normally developed endodermis with their amyloplasts sediment in response to gravity These observations suggest that these mutants have defect at a different point in the process of the graviresponse cascade Moreover

  1. Restricted maternal nutrition alters myogenic regulatory factor expression in satellite cells of ovine offspring.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Raja, J S; Hoffman, M L; Govoni, K E; Zinn, S A; Reed, S A

    2016-07-01

    Poor maternal nutrition inhibits muscle development and postnatal muscle growth. Satellite cells are myogenic precursor cells that contribute to postnatal muscle growth, and their activity can be evaluated by the expression of several transcription factors. Paired-box (Pax)7 is expressed in quiescent and active satellite cells. MyoD is expressed in activated and proliferating satellite cells and myogenin is expressed in terminally differentiating cells. Disruption in the expression pattern or timing of expression of myogenic regulatory factors negatively affects muscle development and growth. We hypothesized that poor maternal nutrition during gestation would alter the in vitro temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin in satellite cells from offspring at birth and 3 months of age. Ewes were fed 100% or 60% of NRC requirements from day 31±1.3 of gestation. Lambs from control-fed (CON) or restricted-fed (RES) ewes were euthanized within 24 h of birth (birth; n=5) or were fed a control diet until 3 months of age (n=5). Satellite cells isolated from the semitendinosus muscle were used for gene expression analysis or cultured for 24, 48 or 72 h and immunostained for Pax7, MyoD or myogenin. Fusion index was calculated from a subset of cells allowed to differentiate. Compared with CON, temporal expression of MyoD and myogenin was altered in cultured satellite cells isolated from RES lambs at birth. The percent of cells expressing MyoD was greater in RES than CON (P=0.03) after 24 h in culture. After 48 h of culture, there was a greater percent of cells expressing myogenin in RES compared with CON (P0.05). In satellite cells from RES lambs at 3 months of age, the percent of cells expressing MyoD and myogenin were greater than CON after 72 h in culture (Psatellite cells of the offspring, which may reduce the pool of myoblasts, decrease myoblast fusion and contribute to the poor postnatal muscle growth previously observed in these animals.

  2. Ethanol Metabolism Alters Major Histocompatibility Complex Class I-Restricted Antigen Presentation In Liver Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Osna, Natalia A.; White, Ronda L.; Thiele, Geoffrey M.; Donohue, Terrence M.

    2009-01-01

    immune response. HCV infection impairs the functioning of these cells (1, 2). However, when clonal expansion of cytotoxic T-lymphocytes (CTLs) is established, the next important restriction for elimination of infected cells is the availability of peptide-MHC class I complexes, which are recognized by CTLs on the surface of target cells (hepatocytes). PMID:19195028

  3. Ret and Etv4 Promote Directed Movements of Progenitor Cells during Renal Branching Morphogenesis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Riccio

    2016-02-01

    Full Text Available Branching morphogenesis of the epithelial ureteric bud forms the renal collecting duct system and is critical for normal nephron number, while low nephron number is implicated in hypertension and renal disease. Ureteric bud growth and branching requires GDNF signaling from the surrounding mesenchyme to cells at the ureteric bud tips, via the Ret receptor tyrosine kinase and coreceptor Gfrα1; Ret signaling up-regulates transcription factors Etv4 and Etv5, which are also critical for branching. Despite extensive knowledge of the genetic control of these events, it is not understood, at the cellular level, how renal branching morphogenesis is achieved or how Ret signaling influences epithelial cell behaviors to promote this process. Analysis of chimeric embryos previously suggested a role for Ret signaling in promoting cell rearrangements in the nephric duct, but this method was unsuited to study individual cell behaviors during ureteric bud branching. Here, we use Mosaic Analysis with Double Markers (MADM, combined with organ culture and time-lapse imaging, to trace the movements and divisions of individual ureteric bud tip cells. We first examine wild-type clones and then Ret or Etv4 mutant/wild-type clones in which the mutant and wild-type sister cells are differentially and heritably marked by green and red fluorescent proteins. We find that, in normal kidneys, most individual tip cells behave as self-renewing progenitors, some of whose progeny remain at the tips while others populate the growing UB trunks. In Ret or Etv4 MADM clones, the wild-type cells generated at a UB tip are much more likely to remain at, or move to, the new tips during branching and elongation, while their Ret-/- or Etv4-/- sister cells tend to lag behind and contribute only to the trunks. By tracking successive mitoses in a cell lineage, we find that Ret signaling has little effect on proliferation, in contrast to its effects on cell movement. Our results show that Ret

  4. The influence of restricted feeding on glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing cells in the chicken small intestine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Monir, M M; Hiramatsu, K; Yamasaki, A; Nishimura, K; Watanabe, T

    2014-04-01

    The influence of restricted feeding on the distribution of glucagon-like peptide-1 (GLP-1)-containing endocrine cells in the chicken small intestine was investigated using immunohistochemical and morphometrical techniques. This study demonstrated that the restricted feeding had an influence on the activity of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the chicken small intestine. There were differences in the localization and the frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the small intestine between control and restricted groups, especially 25% feed supply group provided with 25% of the intake during the adapting period. GLP-1-immunoreactive cells in the control chickens were mainly located in epithelium from crypts to the lower part of intestinal villi. Those in restricted groups, however, tended to be located from crypts to the middle part of intestinal villi. The frequency of occurrence of GLP-1-immunoreactive cells was lowest in the control group, medium in 50% feed supply group and highest in 25% feed supply group at each intestinal region examined in this study, that is, increased with the advancement of restricting the amount of feed supply. These data show that the quantity of food intake is one of signals that have an influence on the secretion of GLP-1 from L cells in the chicken small intestine.

  5. Wolbachia restricts insect-specific flavivirus infection in Aedes aegypti cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sreenu, Vatipally B.; Mottram, Timothy; McFarlane, Melanie

    2016-01-01

    Mosquito-borne viruses are known to cause disease in humans and livestock and are often difficult to control due to the lack of specific antivirals and vaccines. The Wolbachia endosymbiont has been widely studied for its ability to restrict positive-strand RNA virus infection in mosquitoes, although little is known about the precise antiviral mechanism. In recent years, a variety of insect-specific viruses have been discovered in mosquitoes and an interaction with mosquito-borne viruses has been reported for some of them; however, nothing is known about the effect of Wolbachia on insect-specific virus infection in mosquitoes. Here, we show that transinfection of the Drosophila-derived wMelPop Wolbachia strain into Aedes aegypti-derived cells resulted in inhibition and even clearance of the persistent cell-fusing agent flavivirus infection in these cells. This broadens the antiviral activity of Wolbachia from acute infections to persistent infections and from arboviruses to mosquito-specific viruses. In contrast, no effect on the Phasi Charoen-like bunyavirus persistent infection in these cells was observed, suggesting a difference in Wolbachia inhibition between positive- and negative-strand RNA viruses. PMID:27692043

  6. Caloric restriction promotes cell survival in a mouse model of normal tension glaucoma

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Xiaoli; Kimura, Atsuko; Azuchi, Yuriko; Akiyama, Goichi; Noro, Takahiko; Harada, Chikako; Namekata, Kazuhiko; Harada, Takayuki

    2016-01-01

    Glaucoma is characterized by progressive degeneration of retinal ganglion cells (RGCs) and their axons. We previously reported that loss of glutamate transporters (EAAC1 or GLAST) in mice leads to RGC degeneration that is similar to normal tension glaucoma and these animal models are useful in examining potential therapeutic strategies. Caloric restriction has been reported to increase longevity and has potential benefits in injury and disease. Here we investigated the effects of every-other-day fasting (EODF), a form of caloric restriction, on glaucomatous pathology in EAAC1−/− mice. EODF suppressed RGC death and retinal degeneration without altering intraocular pressure. Moreover, visual impairment was ameliorated with EODF, indicating the functional significance of the neuroprotective effect of EODF. Several mechanisms associated with this neuroprotection were explored. We found that EODF upregulated blood β-hydroxybutyrate levels and increased histone acetylation in the retina. Furthermore, it elevated retinal mRNA expression levels of neurotrophic factors and catalase, whereas it decreased oxidative stress levels in the retina. Our findings suggest that EODF, a safe, non-invasive, and low-cost treatment, may be available for glaucoma therapy. PMID:27669894

  7. HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes identified in dengue viruses

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Duan Zhi-Liang

    2012-11-01

    -specific HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes (NS4a140-148 and NS2a144–152 and one cross-reactive HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes which is similar to a previously identified epitope were identified in D1V-D4V. Combining prediction algorithms and HLA transgenic mice is an effective strategy to identify HLA-restricted epitopes. Serotype-specific epitopes would be used to determine the protective role of serotype-specific CD8+ T cells, while cross-reactive epitopes may provide assistance in exploring the role of serotype cross-reactive CD8+ T cells in the immunopathogenesis of DHF/DSS.

  8. MHC class-I-restricted CD8 T cells play a protective role during primary Salmonella infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Seung-Joo; Dunmire, Samantha; McSorley, Stephen J

    2012-12-17

    Protective immunity against Salmonella infection is known to require CD4 Th1 cells and B cells, but the role of MHC class-I-restricted CD8 T cells is less clear. Previous studies have suggested that CD8 T cells participate in secondary, but not primary, bacterial clearance. However, these studies have used experimental models that are difficult to interpret and do not clearly isolate the role of MHC class-I-restricted CD8 T cells from other cell populations. Here, we examined the role of class-I-restricted T cells in protection against Salmonella infection using mice lacking all classical MHC class-Ia molecules, perforin, or granzyme B. Immunized K(b)D(b)-, perforin-, granzyme B-, or perforin/granzyme B-deficient mice were able to resolve secondary infection with virulent Salmonella, demonstrating that class-I-restricted CTLs are not required for acquired immunity. However, during primary infection with attenuated bacteria, bacterial clearance was delayed in each of these mouse strains when compared to wild-type mice. Taken together, these data demonstrate that CD8 T cells are not required for acquired immunity to Salmonella, but can play a protective role in resolving primary infection with attenuated bacteria.

  9. Downregulation of MMP1 in MDS-derived mesenchymal stromal cells reduces the capacity to restrict MDS cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Sida; Zhao, Youshan; Guo, Juan; Fei, Chengming; Zheng, Qingqing; Li, Xiao; Chang, Chunkang

    2017-01-01

    The role of mesenchymal stromal cells (MSCs) in the pathogenesis of myelodysplastic syndromes (MDS) has been increasingly addressed, but has yet to be clearly elucidated. In this investigation, we found that MDS cells proliferated to a greater extent on MDS-derived MSCs compared to normal MSCs. Matrix metalloproteinase 1(MMP1), which was downregulated in MDS-MSCs, was identified as an inhibitory factor of MDS cell proliferation, given that treatment with an MMP1 inhibitor or knock-down of MMP1 in normal MSCs resulted in increased MDS cell proliferation. Further investigations indicated that MMP1 induced apoptosis of MDS cells by interacting with PAR1 and further activating the p38 MAPK pathway. Inhibition of either PAR1 or p38 MAPK can reverse the apoptosis-inducing effect of MMP1. Taken together, these data indicate that downregulation of MMP1 in MSCs of MDS patients may contribute to the reduced capacity of MSCs to restrict MDS cell proliferation, which may account for the malignant proliferation of MDS cells. PMID:28262842

  10. MR1-restricted MAIT cells display ligand discrimination and pathogen selectivity through distinct T cell receptor usage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gold, Marielle C; McLaren, James E; Reistetter, Joseph A; Smyk-Pearson, Sue; Ladell, Kristin; Swarbrick, Gwendolyn M; Yu, Yik Y L; Hansen, Ted H; Lund, Ole; Nielsen, Morten; Gerritsen, Bram; Kesmir, Can; Miles, John J; Lewinsohn, Deborah A; Price, David A; Lewinsohn, David M

    2014-07-28

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) that detects microbial metabolites presented by the nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-like molecule MR1. The highly conserved nature of MR1 in conjunction with biased MAIT TCRα chain usage is widely thought to indicate limited ligand presentation and discrimination within a pattern-like recognition system. Here, we evaluated the TCR repertoire of MAIT cells responsive to three classes of microbes. Substantial diversity and heterogeneity were apparent across the functional MAIT cell repertoire as a whole, especially for TCRβ chain sequences. Moreover, different pathogen-specific responses were characterized by distinct TCR usage, both between and within individuals, suggesting that MAIT cell adaptation was a direct consequence of exposure to various exogenous MR1-restricted epitopes. In line with this interpretation, MAIT cell clones with distinct TCRs responded differentially to a riboflavin metabolite. These results suggest that MAIT cells can discriminate between pathogen-derived ligands in a clonotype-dependent manner, providing a basis for adaptive memory via recruitment of specific repertoires shaped by microbial exposure.

  11. Cbl enforces Vav1 dependence and a restricted pathway of T cell development.

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    Jeffrey Chiang

    Full Text Available Extensive studies of pre-TCR- and TCR-dependent signaling have led to characterization of a pathway deemed essential for efficient T cell development, and comprised of a cascade of sequential events involving phosphorylation of Lck and ZAP-70, followed by phosphorylation of LAT and SLP-76, and subsequent additional downstream events. Of interest, however, reports from our lab as well as others have indicated that the requirements for ZAP-70, LAT, and SLP-76 are partially reversed by inactivation of c-Cbl (Cbl, an E3 ubiquitin ligase that targets multiple molecules for ubiquitination and degradation. Analysis of signaling events in these Cbl knockout models, including the recently reported analysis of SLP-76 transgenes defective in interaction with Vav1, suggested that activation of Vav1 might be a critical event in alternative pathways of T cell development. To extend the analysis of signaling requirements for thymic development, we have therefore assessed the effect of Cbl inactivation on the T cell developmental defects that occur in Vav1-deficient mice. The defects in Vav1-deficient thymic development, including a marked defect in DN3-DN4 transition, were completely reversed by Cbl inactivation, accompanied by enhanced phosphorylation of PLC-γ1 and ERKs in response to pre-TCR/TCR cross-linking of Vav1⁻/⁻Cbl⁻/⁻ DP thymocytes. Taken together, these results suggest a substantially modified paradigm for pre-TCR/TCR signaling and T cell development. The observed consensus pathways of T cell development, including requirements for ZAP-70, LAT, SLP-76, and Vav1, appear to reflect the restriction by Cbl of an otherwise much broader set of molecular pathways capable of mediating T cell development.

  12. Dynamic Nucleosome Movement Provides Structural Information of Topological Chromatin Domains in Living Human Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shinkai, Soya; Nozaki, Tadasu; Maeshima, Kazuhiro

    2016-01-01

    The mammalian genome is organized into submegabase-sized chromatin domains (CDs) including topologically associating domains, which have been identified using chromosome conformation capture-based methods. Single-nucleosome imaging in living mammalian cells has revealed subdiffusively dynamic nucleosome movement. It is unclear how single nucleosomes within CDs fluctuate and how the CD structure reflects the nucleosome movement. Here, we present a polymer model wherein CDs are characterized by fractal dimensions and the nucleosome fibers fluctuate in a viscoelastic medium with memory. We analytically show that the mean-squared displacement (MSD) of nucleosome fluctuations within CDs is subdiffusive. The diffusion coefficient and the subdiffusive exponent depend on the structural information of CDs. This analytical result enabled us to extract information from the single-nucleosome imaging data for HeLa cells. Our observation that the MSD is lower at the nuclear periphery region than the interior region indicates that CDs in the heterochromatin-rich nuclear periphery region are more compact than those in the euchromatin-rich interior region with respect to the fractal dimensions as well as the size. Finally, we evaluated that the average size of CDs is in the range of 100–500 nm and that the relaxation time of nucleosome movement within CDs is a few seconds. Our results provide physical and dynamic insights into the genome architecture in living cells. PMID:27764097

  13. A dual inhibitory mechanism sufficient to maintain cell cycle restricted CENP-A assembly

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stankovic, Ana; Guo, Lucie Y.; Mata, João F.; Bodor, Dani L.; Cao, Xing-Jun; Bailey, Aaron O.; Shabanowitz, Jeffrey; Hunt, Donald F.; Garcia, Benjamin A.; Black, Ben E.; Jansen, Lars E.T

    2017-01-01

    Summary Chromatin featuring the H3 variant CENP-A at the centromere is critical for its mitotic function and epigenetic maintenance. Assembly of centromeric chromatin is restricted to G1 phase through inhibitory action of Cdk1/2 kinases in other phases of the cell cycle. Here, we identify the two key targets sufficient to maintain cell cycle control of CENP-A assembly. We uncovered a single phosphorylation site in the licensing factor M18BP1 and a cyclin A binding site in the CENP-A chaperone, HJURP, mediating specific inhibitory phosphorylation. Simultaneous expression of mutant proteins lacking these residues, results in complete uncoupling from the cell cycle. Consequently, CENP-A assembly is fully recapitulated under high Cdk activities, indistinguishable from G1 assembly. We find that Cdk-mediated inhibition is exerted by sequestering active factors away from the centromere. Finally, we show that displacement of M18BP1 from the centromere is critical for the assembly mechanism of CENP-A. PMID:28017591

  14. The potato virus X TGBp2 protein association with the endoplasmic reticulum plays a role in but is not sufficient for viral cell-to-cell movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitra, Ruchira; Krishnamurthy, Konduru; Blancaflor, Elison; Payton, Mark; Nelson, Richard S.; Verchot-Lubicz, Jeanmarie

    2003-01-01

    Potato virus X (PVX) TGBp1, TGBp2, TGBp3, and coat protein are required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Plasmids expressing GFP fused to TGBp2 were bombarded to leaf epidermal cells and GFP:TGBp2 moved cell to cell in Nicotiana benthamiana leaves but not in Nicotiana tabacum leaves. GFP:TGBp2 movement was observed in TGBp1-transgenic N. tabacum, indicating that TGBp2 requires TGBp1 to promote its movement in N. tabacum. In this study, GFP:TGBp2 was detected in a polygonal pattern that resembles the endoplasmic reticulum (ER) network. Amino acid sequence analysis revealed TGBp2 has two putative transmembrane domains. Two mutations separately introduced into the coding sequences encompassing the putative transmembrane domains within the GFP:TGBp2 plasmids and PVX genome, disrupted membrane binding of GFP:TGBp2, inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in N. benthamiana and TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum, and inhibited PVX movement. A third mutation, lying outside the transmembrane domains, had no effect on GFP:TGBp2 ER association or movement in N. benthamiana but inhibited GFP:TGBp2 movement in TGBp1-expressing N. tabacum and PVX movement in either Nicotiana species. Thus, ER association of TGBp2 may be required but not be sufficient for virus movement. TGBp2 likely provides an activity for PVX movement beyond ER association.

  15. Spatial moment dynamics for collective cell movement incorporating a neighbour-dependent directional bias.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Binny, Rachelle N; Plank, Michael J; James, Alex

    2015-05-06

    The ability of cells to undergo collective movement plays a fundamental role in tissue repair, development and cancer. Interactions occurring at the level of individual cells may lead to the development of spatial structure which will affect the dynamics of migrating cells at a population level. Models that try to predict population-level behaviour often take a mean-field approach, which assumes that individuals interact with one another in proportion to their average density and ignores the presence of any small-scale spatial structure. In this work, we develop a lattice-free individual-based model (IBM) that uses random walk theory to model the stochastic interactions occurring at the scale of individual migrating cells. We incorporate a mechanism for local directional bias such that an individual's direction of movement is dependent on the degree of cell crowding in its neighbourhood. As an alternative to the mean-field approach, we also employ spatial moment theory to develop a population-level model which accounts for spatial structure and predicts how these individual-level interactions propagate to the scale of the whole population. The IBM is used to derive an equation for dynamics of the second spatial moment (the average density of pairs of cells) which incorporates the neighbour-dependent directional bias, and we solve this numerically for a spatially homogeneous case.

  16. Condensin II subunit dCAP-D3 restricts retrotransposon mobilization in Drosophila somatic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Andrew T Schuster

    2013-10-01

    Full Text Available Retrotransposon sequences are positioned throughout the genome of almost every eukaryote that has been sequenced. As mobilization of these elements can have detrimental effects on the transcriptional regulation and stability of an organism's genome, most organisms have evolved mechanisms to repress their movement. Here, we identify a novel role for the Drosophila melanogaster Condensin II subunit, dCAP-D3 in preventing the mobilization of retrotransposons located in somatic cell euchromatin. dCAP-D3 regulates transcription of euchromatic gene clusters which contain or are proximal to retrotransposon sequence. ChIP experiments demonstrate that dCAP-D3 binds to these loci and is important for maintaining a repressed chromatin structure within the boundaries of the retrotransposon and for repressing retrotransposon transcription. We show that dCAP-D3 prevents accumulation of double stranded DNA breaks within retrotransposon sequence, and decreased dCAP-D3 levels leads to a precise loss of retrotransposon sequence at some dCAP-D3 regulated gene clusters and a gain of sequence elsewhere in the genome. Homologous chromosomes exhibit high levels of pairing in Drosophila somatic cells, and our FISH analyses demonstrate that retrotransposon-containing euchromatic loci are regions which are actually less paired than euchromatic regions devoid of retrotransposon sequences. Decreased dCAP-D3 expression increases pairing of homologous retrotransposon-containing loci in tissue culture cells. We propose that the combined effects of dCAP-D3 deficiency on double strand break levels, chromatin structure, transcription and pairing at retrotransposon-containing loci may lead to 1 higher levels of homologous recombination between repeats flanking retrotransposons in dCAP-D3 deficient cells and 2 increased retrotransposition. These findings identify a novel role for the anti-pairing activities of dCAP-D3/Condensin II and uncover a new way in which dCAP-D3/Condensin

  17. Interdisciplinary Evaluation of Broadly-Reactive HLA Class II Restricted Epitopes Eliciting HIV-Specific CD4+T Cell Responses

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Buggert, M.; Norström, M.; Lundegaard, Claus

    2011-01-01

    , the functional and immunodominant discrepancies of CD4+ T cell responses targeting promiscuous MHC II restricted HIV epitopes remains poorly defined. Thus, utilization of interdisciplinary approaches might aid revealing broadly- reactive peptides eliciting CD4 + T cell responses. Methods: We utilized the novel...... bioinformatic prediction program NetMHCIIpan to select 64 optimized MHC II restricted epitopes located in the HIV Gag, Pol, Env, Nef and Tat regions. The epitopes were selected to cover the global diversity of the virus (multiple subtypes) and the human immune system(diverse MHC II types). Optimized...

  18. Virus movements on the plasma membrane support infection and transmission between cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christoph J Burckhardt

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available How viruses are transmitted across the mucosal epithelia of the respiratory, digestive, or excretory tracts, and how they spread from cell to cell and cause systemic infections, is incompletely understood. Recent advances from single virus tracking experiments have revealed conserved patterns of virus movements on the plasma membrane, including diffusive motions, drifting motions depending on retrograde flow of actin filaments or actin tail formation by polymerization, and confinement to submicrometer areas. Here, we discuss how viruses take advantage of cellular mechanisms that normally drive the movements of proteins and lipids on the cell surface. A concept emerges where short periods of fast diffusive motions allow viruses to rapidly move over several micrometers. Coupling to actin flow supports directional transport of virus particles during entry and cell-cell transmission, and local confinement coincides with either nonproductive stalling or infectious endocytic uptake. These conserved features of virus-host interactions upstream of infectious entry offer new perspectives for anti-viral interference.

  19. Carbonic anhydrases are upstream regulators of CO2-controlled stomatal movements in guard cells

    KAUST Repository

    Hu, Honghong

    2009-12-13

    The continuing rise in atmospheric CO2 causes stomatal pores in leaves to close and thus globally affects CO2 influx into plants, water use efficiency and leaf heat stress. However, the CO2-binding proteins that control this response remain unknown. Moreover, which cell type responds to CO2, mesophyll or guard cells, and whether photosynthesis mediates this response are matters of debate. We demonstrate that Arabidopsis thaliana double-mutant plants in the beta-carbonic anhydrases betaCA1 and betaCA4 show impaired CO2-regulation of stomatal movements and increased stomatal density, but retain functional abscisic-acid and blue-light responses. betaCA-mediated CO2-triggered stomatal movements are not, in first-order, linked to whole leaf photosynthesis and can function in guard cells. Furthermore, guard cell betaca-overexpressing plants exhibit instantaneous enhanced water use efficiency. Guard cell expression of mammalian alphaCAII complements the reduced sensitivity of ca1 ca4 plants, showing that carbonic anhydrase-mediated catalysis is an important mechanism for betaCA-mediated CO2-induced stomatal closure and patch clamp analyses indicate that CO2/HCO3- transfers the signal to anion channel regulation. These findings, together with ht1-2 (ref. 9) epistasis analysis demonstrate that carbonic anhydrases function early in the CO2 signalling pathway, which controls gas-exchange between plants and the atmosphere.

  20. Tombusvirus-yeast interactions identify conserved cell-intrinsic viral restriction factors

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zsuzsanna eSasvari

    2014-08-01

    Full Text Available To combat viral infections, plants possess innate and adaptive immune pathways, such as RNA silencing, R gene and recessive gene-mediated resistance mechanisms. However, it is likely that additional cell-intrinsic restriction factors (CIRF are also involved in limiting plant virus replication. This review discusses novel CIRFs with antiviral functions, many of them RNA-binding proteins or affecting the RNA binding activities of viral replication proteins. The CIRFs against tombusviruses have been identified in yeast (Saccharomyces cerevisiae, which is developed as an advanced model organism. Grouping of the identified CIRFs based on their known cellular functions and subcellular localization in yeast reveals that TBSV replication is limited by a wide variety of host gene functions. Yeast proteins with the highest connectivity in the network map include the well-characterized Xrn1p 5’-3’ exoribonuclease, Act1p actin protein and Cse4p centromere protein. The protein network map also reveals an important interplay between the pro-viral Hsp70 cellular chaperone and the antiviral co-chaperones, and possibly key roles for the ribosomal or ribosome-associated factors. We discuss the antiviral functions of selected CIRFs, such as the RNA binding nucleolin, ribonucleases, WW-domain proteins, single- and multi-domain cyclophilins, TPR-domain co-chaperones and cellular ion pumps. These restriction factors frequently target the RNA-binding region in the viral replication proteins, thus interfering with the recruitment of the viral RNA for replication and the assembly of the membrane-bound viral replicase. Although many of the characterized CIRFs act directly against TBSV, we propose that the TPR-domain co-chaperones function as guardians of the cellular Hsp70 chaperone system, which is subverted efficiently by TBSV for viral replicase assembly in the absence of the TPR-domain co-chaperones.

  1. Cultured corneas show dendritic spread and restrict herpes simplex virus infection that is not observed with cultured corneal cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Thakkar, Neel; Jaishankar, Dinesh; Agelidis, Alex; Yadavalli, Tejabhiram; Mangano, Kyle; Patel, Shrey; Tekin, Sati Zeynep; Shukla, Deepak

    2017-01-01

    Herpes simplex virus-1 (HSV-1) causes life-long morbidities in humans. While fever blisters are more common, occasionally the cornea is infected resulting in vision loss. A very intriguing aspect of HSV-1 corneal infection is that the virus spread is normally restricted to only a small fraction of cells on the corneal surface that connect with each other in a dendritic fashion. Here, to develop a comprehensive understanding of the susceptibility of human corneal epithelial (HCE) cells to HSV-1 infection, we infected HCE cells at three different dosages of HSV-1 and measured the outcomes in terms of viral entry, gene and protein expression, viral replication and cytokine induction. In cultured cells, infectivity and cytokine induction were observed even at the minimum viral dosage tested, while a more pronounced dose-restricted infectivity was seen in ex vivo cultures of porcine corneas. Use of fluorescent HSV-1 virions demonstrated a pattern of viral spread ex vivo that mimics clinical findings. We conclude that HCE cell cultures are highly susceptible to infection whereas the cultured corneas demonstrate a higher ability to restrict the infection even in the absence of systemic immune system. The restriction is helped in part by local interferon response and the unique cellular architecture of the cornea. PMID:28198435

  2. From Genes to Morphogenetic Movements: How Cell-level Modeling Makes such Connections Possible

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brodland, G. Wayne

    2006-03-01

    New understanding provided by computational modeling makes it possible to identify, in detail, the sequence of events by which gene expression gives rise to specific morphogenetic movements. Convergent extension (CE), an important developmental process in which embryonic tissues undergo self-driven narrowing in one in-plane direction and expansion in the other, is one such example. CE is triggered by gene expression and, in amphibian gastrulae, involves cephalocaudal (CC) gradients of the morphogens Xbra and Chordin and signalling molecules that include planar cell polarity (PCP) and Wnt/Ca2+ (Nature 2004, 430: 305-306). When these pathways have established suitable biochemical conditions, cellular protrusions called lamellipodia, which previously arose with random orientations, form preferentially in the mediolateral (ML) direction. To investigate whether lamellipodium action has the mechanical capacity to drive cell intercalation and its attendant cell reshaping, the cell-level finite element model of Chen and Brodland (ASME J. Biomech. Eng., 2000, 122: 394-401) was modified so that lamellipodia could originate from randomly selected cells, connect to next-neighboring cells in the ML direction and then contract. The simulations show that lamellipodia with these characteristics can, indeed, drive CE and that adjacent tissue must resist ML narrowing in order for characteristically elongated cells to result, predictions that have been confirmed experimentally. When these meso-scale findings are integrated with tissue- and whole-embryo mechanics, multi-scale ``mechanical pathways'' become evident. These pathways, in turn, interface directly with known biochemical pathways to produce an unbroken causal sequence from gene expression to specific morphogentic movements.

  3. Efficacious early antiviral activity of HIV Gag- and Pol-specific HLA-B 2705-restricted CD8+ T cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Payne, Rebecca P; Kløverpris, Henrik; Sacha, Jonah B;

    2010-01-01

    control of HIV, we first characterized the CD8(+) T-cell responses of nine highly active antiretroviral therapy (HAART)-naïve B 2705-positive subjects. Unexpectedly, we observed a strong response to an HLA-B 2705-restricted Pol epitope, KRKGGIGGY (KY9), in 8/9 subjects. The magnitude of the KY9 response...

  4. Vehicles, Replicators, and Intercellular Movement of Genetic Information: Evolutionary Dissection of a Bacterial Cell

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Matti Jalasvuori

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Prokaryotic biosphere is vastly diverse in many respects. Any given bacterial cell may harbor in different combinations viruses, plasmids, transposons, and other genetic elements along with their chromosome(s. These agents interact in complex environments in various ways causing multitude of phenotypic effects on their hosting cells. In this discussion I perform a dissection for a bacterial cell in order to simplify the diversity into components that may help approach the ocean of details in evolving microbial worlds. The cell itself is separated from all the genetic replicators that use the cell vehicle for preservation and propagation. I introduce a classification that groups different replicators according to their horizontal movement potential between cells and according to their effects on the fitness of their present host cells. The classification is used to discuss and improve the means by which we approach general evolutionary tendencies in microbial communities. Moreover, the classification is utilized as a tool to help formulating evolutionary hypotheses and to discuss emerging bacterial pathogens as well as to promote understanding on the average phenotypes of different replicators in general. It is also discussed that any given biosphere comprising prokaryotic cell vehicles and genetic replicators may naturally evolve to have horizontally moving replicators of various types.

  5. Dietary restriction improves repopulation but impairs lymphoid differentiation capacity of hematopoietic stem cells in early aging.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tang, Duozhuang; Tao, Si; Chen, Zhiyang; Koliesnik, Ievgen Oleksandrovich; Calmes, Philip Gerald; Hoerr, Verena; Han, Bing; Gebert, Nadja; Zörnig, Martin; Löffler, Bettina; Morita, Yohei; Rudolph, Karl Lenhard

    2016-04-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) improves health, delays tissue aging, and elongates survival in flies and worms. However, studies on laboratory mice and nonhuman primates revealed ambiguous effects of DR on lifespan despite improvements in health parameters. In this study, we analyzed consequences of adult-onset DR (24 h to 1 yr) on hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) function. DR ameliorated HSC aging phenotypes, such as the increase in number of HSCs and the skewing toward myeloid-biased HSCs during aging. Furthermore, DR increased HSC quiescence and improved the maintenance of the repopulation capacity of HSCs during aging. In contrast to these beneficial effects, DR strongly impaired HSC differentiation into lymphoid lineages and particularly inhibited the proliferation of lymphoid progenitors, resulting in decreased production of peripheral B lymphocytes and impaired immune function. The study shows that DR-dependent suppression of growth factors and interleukins mediates these divergent effects caused by DR. Supplementation of insulin-like growth factor 1 partially reverted the DR-induced quiescence of HSCs, whereas IL-6/IL-7 substitutions rescued the impairment of B lymphopoiesis exposed to DR. Together, these findings delineate positive and negative effects of long-term DR on HSC functionality involving distinct stress and growth signaling pathways.

  6. SNARE-Mediated Cholesterol Movement to Mitochondria Supports Steroidogenesis in Rodent Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lin, Ye; Hou, Xiaoming; Shen, Wen-Jun; Hanssen, Ruth; Khor, Victor K; Cortez, Yuan; Roseman, Ann N; Azhar, Salman; Kraemer, Fredric B

    2016-02-01

    Vesicular transport involving soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein receptor (SNARE) proteins is known to be responsible for many major cellular activities. In steroidogenic tissues, chronic hormone stimulation results in increased expression of proteins involved in the steroidogenic pathway, whereas acute hormone stimulation prompts the rapid transfer of cholesterol to the inner mitochondrial membrane to be utilized as substrate for steroid hormone production. Several different pathways are involved in supplying cholesterol to mitochondria, but mobilization of stored cholesteryl esters appears to initially constitute the preferred source; however, the mechanisms mediating this cholesterol transfer are not fully understood. To study the potential contribution of SNARE proteins in steroidogenesis, we examined the expression levels of various SNARE proteins in response to hormone stimulation in steroidogenic tissues and cells and established an in vitro mitochondria reconstitution assay system to assess the contribution of various SNARE proteins on cholesterol delivery for steroidogenesis. Our results from reconstitution experiments along with knockdown studies in rat primary granulosa cells and in a Leydig cell line show that soluble N-ethylmaleimide sensitive factor attachment protein-α, synaptosomal-associated protein of 25 kDa, syntaxin-5, and syntaxin-17 facilitate the transport of cholesterol to mitochondria. Thus, although StAR is required for efficient cholesterol movement into mitochondria for steroidogenesis, specific SNAREs participate and are necessary to mediate cholesterol movement to mitochondria.

  7. Nicotine overrides DNA damage-induced G1/S restriction in lung cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Takashi Nishioka

    Full Text Available As an addictive substance, nicotine has been suggested to facilitate pro-survival activities (such as anchorage-independent growth or angiogenesis and the establishment of drug resistance to anticancer therapy. Tobacco smoking consists of a variety of carcinogens [such as benzopyrene (BP and nitrosamine derivatives] that are able to cause DNA double strand breaks. However, the effect of nicotine on DNA damage-induced checkpoint response induced by genotoxins remains unknown. In this study, we investigated the events occurred during G(1 arrest induced by γ-radiation or BP in nicotine-treated murine or human lung epithelial cells. DNA synthesis was rapidly inhibited after exposure to γ-radiation or BP treatment, accompanied with the activation of DNA damage checkpoint. When these cells were co-treated with nicotine, the growth restriction was compromised, manifested by upregulation of cyclin D and A, and attenuation of Chk2 phosphorylation. Knockdown of cyclin D or Chk2 by the siRNAs blocked nicotine-mediated effect on DNA damage checkpoint activation. However, nicotine treatment appeared to play no role in nocodazole-induced mitotic checkpoint activation. Overall, our study presented a novel observation, in which nicotine is able to override DNA damage checkpoint activated by tobacco-related carcinogen BP or γ-irradiation. The results not only indicates the potentially important role of nicotine in facilitating the establishment of genetic instability to promote lung tumorigenesis, but also warrants a dismal prognosis for cancer patients who are smokers, heavily exposed second-hand smokers or nicotine users.

  8. Direct ex vivo detection of HLA-DR3-restricted cytomegalovirus- and Mycobacterium tuberculosis-specific CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bronke, Corine; Palmer, Nanette M; Westerlaken, Geertje H A; Toebes, Mireille; van Schijndel, Gijs M W; Purwaha, Veenu; van Meijgaarden, Krista E; Schumacher, Ton N M; van Baarle, Debbie; Tesselaar, Kiki; Geluk, Annemieke

    2005-09-01

    In order to detect epitope-specific CD4+ T cells in mycobacterial or viral infections in the context of human class II major histocompatibility complex protein human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-DR3, two HLA-DR3 tetrameric molecules were successfully produced. One contained an immunodominant HLA-DR3-restricted T-cell epitope derived from the 65-kDa heat-shock protein of Mycobacterium tuberculosis, peptide 1-13. For the other tetramer, we used an HLA-DR3-restricted T-cell epitope derived from cytomegalovirus (CMV) pp65 lower matrix protein, peptide 510-522, which induced high levels of interferon (IFN)-gamma-producing CD4+ T cells in three of four HLA-DR3-positive CMV-seropositive individuals up to 0.84% of CD4+ T cells by intracellular cytokine staining. In peripheral blood mononuclear cells from M. tuberculosis-exposed, Mycobacterium bovis bacille Calmette-Guérin (BCG)-vaccinated, or CMV-seropositive individuals, we were able to directly detect with both tetramers epitope-specific T cells up to 0.62% and 0.45% of the CD4+ T-cell population reactive to M. tuberculosis and CMV, respectively. After a 6-day culture with peptide p510-522, the frequency of CMV-specific tetramer-binding T cells was expanded up to 9.90% tetramer+ CFSElow (5,6-carboxyfluorescein diacetate succinimidyl ester) cells within the CD4+ T-cell population, further confirming the specificity of the tetrameric molecules. Thus, HLA-DR3/peptide tetrameric molecules can be used to investigate HLA-DR3-restricted antigen-specific CD4+ T cells in clinical disease or after vaccination.

  9. Role of Rice stripe virus NSvc4 in cell-to-cell movement and symptom development in Nicotiana benthamiana

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yi eXu

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Our previous work has demonstrated that the NSvc4 protein of Rice stripe virus (RSV functions as a cell-to-cell movement protein. However, the mechanisms whereby RSV traffics through plasmodesmata (PD are unknown. Here we provide evidence that the NSvc4 moves on the actin filament and endoplasmic reticulum (ER network, but not microtubules, to reach cell wall PD. Disruption of cytoskeleton using different inhibitors altered NSvc4 localization to PD, thus impeding RSV infection of Nicotiana benthamiana. Sequence analyses and deletion mutagenesis experiment revealed that the N-terminal 125 amino acids (AAs of the NSvc4 determine PD targeting and that a transmembrane domain spanning AAs 106 to 125 is critical for PD localization. We also found that the NSvc4 protein can localize to chloroplasts in infected cells. Analyses using deletion mutants revealed that the N-terminal 73 AAs are essential for chloroplast localization. Furthermore, expression of NSvc4 from a Potato virus X (PVX vector resulted in more severe disease symptoms than PVX alone in systemically infected N. benthamiana leaves. Expression of NSvc4 in Spodoptera frugiperda 9 (Sf-9 cells did not elicit tubule formation, but instead resulted in punctate foci at the plasma membrane. These findings shed new light on our understanding of the movement mechanisms whereby RSV infects host plants.

  10. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lori B Huberman

    Full Text Available Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells.

  11. A model for cell wall dissolution in mating yeast cells: polarized secretion and restricted diffusion of cell wall remodeling enzymes induces local dissolution.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huberman, Lori B; Murray, Andrew W

    2014-01-01

    Mating of the budding yeast, Saccharomyces cerevisiae, occurs when two haploid cells of opposite mating types signal using reciprocal pheromones and receptors, grow towards each other, and fuse to form a single diploid cell. To fuse, both cells dissolve their cell walls at the point of contact. This event must be carefully controlled because the osmotic pressure differential between the cytoplasm and extracellular environment causes cells with unprotected plasma membranes to lyse. If the cell wall-degrading enzymes diffuse through the cell wall, their concentration would rise when two cells touched each other, such as when two pheromone-stimulated cells adhere to each other via mating agglutinins. At the surfaces that touch, the enzymes must diffuse laterally through the wall before they can escape into the medium, increasing the time the enzymes spend in the cell wall, and thus raising their concentration at the point of attachment and restricting cell wall dissolution to points where cells touch each other. We tested this hypothesis by studying pheromone treated cells confined between two solid, impermeable surfaces. This confinement increases the frequency of pheromone-induced cell death, and this effect is diminished by reducing the osmotic pressure difference across the cell wall or by deleting putative cell wall glucanases and other genes necessary for efficient cell wall fusion. Our results support the model that pheromone-induced cell death is the result of a contact-driven increase in the local concentration of cell wall remodeling enzymes and suggest that this process plays an important role in regulating cell wall dissolution and fusion in mating cells.

  12. Action of cytochalasin D on cells of established lines. III. Zeiosis and movements at the cell surface.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Godman, G C; Miranda, A F; Deitch, A D; Tanenbaum, S W

    1975-03-01

    The projection of knobby protuberances at the cell surface (zeiosis) is a general cellular response to cytochalasin D (CD), resulting from herniation of endoplasm through undefended places of the cortex during cell contractions and displacement of microfilaments induced by CD. Zeiosis is prevented by agents that interfere with the contractile response to CD, such as inhibitors of energy metabolism or cyclic AMP. The developed protrusions, which remain relatively stable in the presence of CD, contain chiefly mono- or subribosomes, and occasionally other organelles normally resident in endoplasm; compact microfilament felt occupies their bases and extends into their proximal stalks. Protein synthesis in the knobs is less than half of that in the polyribosome-containing endoplasm residual in the main body of the cell. Knobs first protrude singly near the margin of the contracting cells and rapidly cluster into small groups in the periphery even at lower temperature. The clusters then migrate centripetally and coalesce into a large aggregate near the apex of the immobilized and retracted cell: this movement is energy- and temperature-dependent. Aggregation is more prominent and stable in cell lines of epithelial derivation than in fibroblastic or other lines in which nuclear extrusion occurs more readily. The latter is regarded as a special manifestation of zeiosis. Macromarkers, such as latex spherules, migrate like the zeiotic knobs on the cell surfaces in the presence of CD. The aggregated knobs, although persistent for days in the presence of CD, are rapidly recessed after withdrawal of the agent as ruffling is resumed and the cells spread. These movements are discussed in terms of current concepts of mobility of the cell membrane.

  13. Emergence of large-scale cell morphology and movement from local actin filament growth dynamics.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Catherine I Lacayo

    2007-09-01

    Full Text Available Variations in cell migration and morphology are consequences of changes in underlying cytoskeletal organization and dynamics. We investigated how these large-scale cellular events emerge as direct consequences of small-scale cytoskeletal molecular activities. Because the properties of the actin cytoskeleton can be modulated by actin-remodeling proteins, we quantitatively examined how one such family of proteins, enabled/vasodilator-stimulated phosphoprotein (Ena/VASP, affects the migration and morphology of epithelial fish keratocytes. Keratocytes generally migrate persistently while exhibiting a characteristic smooth-edged "canoe" shape, but may also exhibit less regular morphologies and less persistent movement. When we observed that the smooth-edged canoe keratocyte morphology correlated with enrichment of Ena/VASP at the leading edge, we mislocalized and overexpressed Ena/VASP proteins and found that this led to changes in the morphology and movement persistence of cells within a population. Thus, local changes in actin filament dynamics due to Ena/VASP activity directly caused changes in cell morphology, which is coupled to the motile behavior of keratocytes. We also characterized the range of natural cell-to-cell variation within a population by using measurable morphological and behavioral features--cell shape, leading-edge shape, filamentous actin (F-actin distribution, cell speed, and directional persistence--that we have found to correlate with each other to describe a spectrum of coordinated phenotypes based on Ena/VASP enrichment at the leading edge. This spectrum stretched from smooth-edged, canoe-shaped keratocytes--which had VASP highly enriched at their leading edges and migrated fast with straight trajectories--to more irregular, rounder cells migrating slower with less directional persistence and low levels of VASP at their leading edges. We developed a mathematical model that accounts for these coordinated cell-shape and

  14. The dendritic cell subtype-restricted C-type lectin Clec9A is a target for vaccine enhancement

    OpenAIRE

    Caminschi, Irina; Proietto, Anna I.; Ahmet, Fatma; Kitsoulis, Susie; Shin Teh, Joo; Lo, Jennifer C. Y.; Rizzitelli, Alexandra; Wu, Li; Vremec, David; van Dommelen, Serani L.H.; Campbell, Ian K.; Maraskovsky, Eugene; Braley, Hal; Davey, Gayle M.; Mottram, Patricia

    2008-01-01

    A novel dendritic cell (DC)–restricted molecule, Clec9A, was identified by gene expression profiling of mouse DC subtypes. Based on sequence similarity, a human ortholog was identified. Clec9A encodes a type II membrane protein with a single extracellular C-type lectin domain. Both the mouse Clec9A and human CLEC9A were cloned and expressed, and monoclonal antibodies (mAbs) against each were generated. Surface staining revealed that Clec9A was selective for mouse DCs and was restricted to the...

  15. Hiding Lipid Presentation: Viral Interference with CD1d-Restricted Invariant Natural Killer T (iNKT Cell Activation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Maaike E. Ressing

    2012-10-01

    Full Text Available The immune system plays a major role in protecting the host against viral infection. Rapid initial protection is conveyed by innate immune cells, while adaptive immunity (including T lymphocytes requires several days to develop, yet provides high specificity and long-lasting memory. Invariant natural killer T (iNKT cells are an unusual subset of T lymphocytes, expressing a semi-invariant T cell receptor together with markers of the innate NK cell lineage. Activated iNKT cells can exert direct cytolysis and can rapidly release a variety of immune-polarizing cytokines, thereby regulating the ensuing adaptive immune response. iNKT cells recognize lipids in the context of the antigen-presenting molecule CD1d. Intriguingly, CD1d-restricted iNKT cells appear to play a critical role in anti-viral defense: increased susceptibility to disseminated viral infections is observed both in patients with iNKT cell deficiency as well as in CD1d- and iNKT cell-deficient mice. Moreover, viruses have recently been found to use sophisticated strategies to withstand iNKT cell-mediated elimination. This review focuses on CD1d-restricted lipid presentation and the strategies viruses deploy to subvert this pathway.

  16. Antenatal taurine reduces cerebral cell apoptosis in fetal rats with intrauterine growth restriction*

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Jing Liu; Xiaofeng Wang; Ying Liu; Na Yang; Jing Xu; Xiaotun Ren

    2013-01-01

    From pregnancy to parturition, Sprague-Dawley rats were daily administered a low protein diet to establish a model of intrauterine growth restriction. From the 12th day of pregnancy, 300 mg/kg rine was daily added to food until spontaneous delivery occurred. Brain tissues from normal neo-natal rats at 6 hours after delivery, neonatal rats with intrauterine growth restriction, and neonatal rats with intrauterine growth restriction undergoing taurine supplement were obtained for further experiments. The terminal deoxyribonucleotidyl transferase (TdT)-mediated biotin-16-dUTP nick-end labeling assay revealed that the number of apoptotic cel s in the brain tissue of neonatal rats with intrauterine growth restriction significantly increased. Taurine supplement in pregnant rats reduced cel apoptosis in brain tissue from neonatal rats with intrauterine growth restriction. nohistochemical staining revealed that taurine supplement increased glial cel line-derived neuro-trophic factor expression and decreased caspase-3 expression in the cerebral cortex of intrauterine growth-restricted fetal rats. These results indicate that taurine supplement reduces cel apoptosis through the glial cel line-derived neurotrophic factor-caspase-3 signaling pathway, resulting in a protective effect on the intrauterine growth-restricted fetal rat brain.

  17. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bacallao, Ketty; Monje, Paula V

    2015-01-01

    Isolated Schwann cells (SCs) respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1). To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP) and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC) agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC) activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC), a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the uncoupling of signals

  18. Requirement of cAMP signaling for Schwann cell differentiation restricts the onset of myelination.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ketty Bacallao

    Full Text Available Isolated Schwann cells (SCs respond to cAMP elevation by adopting a differentiated post-mitotic state that exhibits high levels of Krox-20, a transcriptional enhancer of myelination, and mature SC markers such as the myelin lipid galactocerebroside (O1. To address how cAMP controls myelination, we performed a series of cell culture experiments which compared the differentiating responses of isolated and axon-related SCs to cAMP analogs and ascorbate, a known inducer of axon ensheathment, basal lamina formation and myelination. In axon-related SCs, cAMP induced the expression of Krox-20 and O1 without a concomitant increase in the expression of myelin basic protein (MBP and without promoting axon ensheathment, collagen synthesis or basal lamina assembly. When cAMP was provided together with ascorbate, a dramatic enhancement of MBP expression occurred, indicating that cAMP primes SCs to form myelin only under conditions supportive of basal lamina formation. Experiments using a combination of cell permeable cAMP analogs and type-selective adenylyl cyclase (AC agonists and antagonists revealed that selective transmembrane AC (tmAC activation with forskolin was not sufficient for full SC differentiation and that the attainment of an O1 positive state also relied on the activity of the soluble AC (sAC, a bicarbonate sensor that is insensitive to forskolin and GPCR activation. Pharmacological and immunological evidence indicated that SCs expressed sAC and that sAC activity was required for morphological differentiation and the expression of myelin markers such as O1 and protein zero. To conclude, our data indicates that cAMP did not directly drive myelination but rather the transition into an O1 positive state, which is perhaps the most critical cAMP-dependent rate limiting step for the onset of myelination. The temporally restricted role of cAMP in inducing differentiation independently of basal lamina formation provides a clear example of the

  19. Coordinated cell-shape changes control epithelial movement in zebrafish and Drosophila.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Köppen, Mathias; Fernández, Beatriz García; Carvalho, Lara; Jacinto, Antonio; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2006-07-01

    Epithelial morphogenesis depends on coordinated changes in cell shape, a process that is still poorly understood. During zebrafish epiboly and Drosophila dorsal closure, cell-shape changes at the epithelial margin are of critical importance. Here evidence is provided for a conserved mechanism of local actin and myosin 2 recruitment during theses events. It was found that during epiboly of the zebrafish embryo, the movement of the outer epithelium (enveloping layer) over the yolk cell surface involves the constriction of marginal cells. This process depends on the recruitment of actin and myosin 2 within the yolk cytoplasm along the margin of the enveloping layer. Actin and myosin 2 recruitment within the yolk cytoplasm requires the Ste20-like kinase Msn1, an orthologue of Drosophila Misshapen. Similarly, in Drosophila, actin and myosin 2 localization and cell constriction at the margin of the epidermis mediate dorsal closure and are controlled by Misshapen. Thus, this study has characterized a conserved mechanism underlying coordinated cell-shape changes during epithelial morphogenesis.

  20. MicroRNA inhibition fine-tunes and provides robustness to the restriction point switch of the cell cycle

    Science.gov (United States)

    del Rosario, Ricardo C. H.; Damasco, Joseph Ray Clarence G.; Aguda, Baltazar D.

    2016-01-01

    The restriction point marks a switch in G1 from growth factor-dependent to growth factor-independent progression of the cell cycle. The proper regulation of this switch is important for normal cell processes; aberrations could result in a number of diseases such as cancer, neurodegenerative disorders, stroke and myocardial infarction. To further understand the regulation of the restriction point, we extended a mathematical model of the Rb-E2F pathway to include members of the microRNA cluster miR-17-92. Our mathematical analysis shows that microRNAs play an essential role in fine-tuning and providing robustness to the switch. We also demonstrate how microRNA regulation can steer cells in or out of cancer states. PMID:27610602

  1. Transcriptional Reprogramming of Mature CD4+ T helper Cells generates distinct MHC class II-restricted Cytotoxic T Lymphocytes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mucida, Daniel; Husain, Mohammad Mushtaq; Muroi, Sawako; van Wijk, Femke; Shinnakasu, Ryo; Naoe, Yoshinori; Reis, Bernardo Sgarbi; Huang, Yujun; Lambolez, Florence; Docherty, Michael; Attinger, Antoine; Shui, Jr-Wen; Kim, Gisen; Lena, Christopher J.; Sakaguchi, Shinya; Miyamoto, Chizuko; Wang, Peng; Atarashi, Koji; Park, Yunji; Nakayama, Toshinori; Honda, Kenya; Ellmeier, Wilfried; Kronenberg, Mitchell; Taniuchi, Ichiro; Cheroutre, Hilde

    2013-01-01

    TCRαβ thymocytes differentiate to either CD8αβ cytotoxic T lymphocytes or CD4+ T helper cells. This functional dichotomy is controlled by key transcription factors, including the T helper master regulator, ThPOK, which suppresses the cytolytic program in MHC class II-restricted CD4+ thymocytes. ThPOK continues to repress CD8-lineage genes in mature CD4+ T cells, even as they differentiate to T helper effector subsets. Here we show that the T helper-fate was not fixed and that mature antigen-stimulated CD4+ T cells could terminate Thpok expression and reactivate CD8-lineage genes. This unexpected plasticity resulted in the post-thymic termination of the T helper-program and the functional differentiation of distinct MHC class II-restricted CD4+ cytotoxic T lymphocytes. PMID:23334788

  2. Biomechanics of foetal movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nowlan, N C

    2015-01-02

    Foetal movements commence at seven weeks of gestation, with the foetal movement repertoire including twitches, whole body movements, stretches, isolated limb movements, breathing movements, head and neck movements, jaw movements (including yawning, sucking and swallowing) and hiccups by ten weeks of gestational age. There are two key biomechanical aspects to gross foetal movements; the first being that the foetus moves in a dynamically changing constrained physical environment in which the freedom to move becomes increasingly restricted with increasing foetal size and decreasing amniotic fluid. Therefore, the mechanical environment experienced by the foetus affects its ability to move freely. Secondly, the mechanical forces induced by foetal movements are crucial for normal skeletal development, as evidenced by a number of conditions and syndromes for which reduced or abnormal foetal movements are implicated, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip, arthrogryposis and foetal akinesia deformation sequence. This review examines both the biomechanical effects of the physical environment on foetal movements through discussion of intrauterine factors, such as space, foetal positioning and volume of amniotic fluid, and the biomechanical role of gross foetal movements in human skeletal development through investigation of the effects of abnormal movement on the bones and joints. This review also highlights computational simulations of foetal movements that attempt to determine the mechanical forces acting on the foetus as it moves. Finally, avenues for future research into foetal movement biomechanics are highlighted, which have potential impact for a diverse range of fields including foetal medicine, musculoskeletal disorders and tissue engineering.

  3. Biomechanics of foetal movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    N.C. Nowlan

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Foetal movements commence at seven weeks of gestation, with the foetal movement repertoire including twitches, whole body movements, stretches, isolated limb movements, breathing movements, head and neck movements, jaw movements (including yawning, sucking and swallowing and hiccups by ten weeks of gestational age. There are two key biomechanical aspects to gross foetal movements; the first being that the foetus moves in a dynamically changing constrained physical environment in which the freedom to move becomes increasingly restricted with increasing foetal size and decreasing amniotic fluid. Therefore, the mechanical environment experienced by the foetus affects its ability to move freely. Secondly, the mechanical forces induced by foetal movements are crucial for normal skeletal development, as evidenced by a number of conditions and syndromes for which reduced or abnormal foetal movements are implicated, such as developmental dysplasia of the hip, arthrogryposis and foetal akinesia deformation sequence. This review examines both the biomechanical effects of the physical environment on foetal movements through discussion of intrauterine factors, such as space, foetal positioning and volume of amniotic fluid, and the biomechanical role of gross foetal movements in human skeletal development through investigation of the effects of abnormal movement on the bones and joints. This review also highlights computational simulations of foetal movements that attempt to determine the mechanical forces acting on the foetus as it moves. Finally, avenues for future research into foetal movement biomechanics are highlighted, which have potential impact for a diverse range of fields including foetal medicine, musculoskeletal disorders and tissue engineering.

  4. A hybrid approach for predicting promiscuous MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes

    Indian Academy of Sciences (India)

    Manoj Bhasin; G P S Raghava

    2007-01-01

    In the present study, a systematic attempt has been made to develop an accurate method for predicting MHC class I restricted T cell epitopes for a large number of MHC class I alleles. Initially, a quantitative matrix (QM)-based method was developed for 47 MHC class I alleles having at least 15 binders. A secondary artificial neural network (ANN)-based method was developed for 30 out of 47 MHC alleles having a minimum of 40 binders. Combination of these ANN- and QM-based prediction methods for 30 alleles improved the accuracy of prediction by 6% compared to each individual method. Average accuracy of hybrid method for 30 MHC alleles is 92.8%. This method also allows prediction of binders for 20 additional alleles using QM that has been reported in the literature, thus allowing prediction for 67 MHC class I alleles. The performance of the method was evaluated using jack-knife validation test. The performance of the methods was also evaluated on blind or independent data. Comparison of our method with existing MHC binder prediction methods for alleles studied by both methods shows that our method is superior to other existing methods. This method also identifies proteasomal cleavage sites in antigen sequences by implementing the matrices described earlier. Thus, the method that we discover allows the identification of MHC class I binders (peptides binding with many MHC alleles) having proteasomal cleavage site at C-terminus. The user-friendly result display format (HTML-II) can assist in locating the promiscuous MHC binding regions from antigen sequence. The method is available on the web at www.imtech.res.in/raghava/nhlapred and its mirror site is available at http://bioinformatics.uams.edu/mirror/nhlapred/.

  5. Factors that restrict intestinal cell permeation of cyclic prodrugs of an opioid peptide (DADLE)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ouyang, Hui; Chen, Weiqing; Andersen, Thomas E;

    2009-01-01

    The objective of this study was to determine the relative importance of metabolism by cytochrome P450 (CYP) enzymes versus efflux by P-glycoprotein (P-gp) in restricting the intestinal mucosal permeation of cyclic prodrugs (AOA-DADLE, CA-DADLE, OMCA-DADLE) of the opioid peptide DADLE (H......-gp), not metabolic enzymes (e.g., CYP 3A, esterases), restrict the permeation of peptide prodrugs across the rat intestinal mucosa....

  6. Dynamics of change of lipid and monoamine metabolisms and the blood coagulation system during experimental atherosclerosis caused by restriction of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gvishiani, G. S.; Kobakhidze, N. G.

    1980-01-01

    Shifts in lipid, catecholamine, and blood coagulation systems following various periods (1, 2, 3, and 4 months) of experimentally induced atherosclerosis were studied. The same indices were studied in the tissues of the myocardium, liver, and brain stem-reticular formation after decapitation of the animals at the end of the experiment. Periodic motion restriction caused an increase in blood beta-lipoproteins in the rabbits at the beginning of the experiment. An increase in general cholesterol content and a decrease in the lecithincholesterol index were established at the end of the experiment. Myocardial beta-lipoprotein and brain stem reticular formation general cholesterol contents were elevated; catecholamine content was increased at the end of the experiment. In the initial months, free adrenaline basically increased, while in later months blood adrenaline decreased and blood noradrenaline increased.

  7. Identification of MHC class II restricted T-cell-mediated reactivity against MHC class I binding Mycobacterium tuberculosis peptides.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Mingjun; Tang, Sheila T; Stryhn, Anette; Justesen, Sune; Larsen, Mette V; Dziegiel, Morten H; Lewinsohn, David M; Buus, Søren; Lund, Ole; Claesson, Mogens H

    2011-04-01

    Major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I restricted cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are known to play an important role in the control of Mycobacterium tuberculosis infection so identification of CTL epitopes from M. tuberculosis is of importance for the development of effective peptide-based vaccines. In the present work, bioinformatics technology was employed to predict binding motifs of 9mer peptides derived from M. tuberculosis for the 12 HLA-I supertypes. Subsequently, the predicted peptides were synthesized and assayed for binding to HLA-I molecules in a biochemically based system. The antigenicity of a total of 157 peptides with measured affinity for HLA-I molecules of K(D) ≤ 500 nM were evaluated using peripheral blood T cells from strongly purified protein derivative reactive healthy donors. Of the 157 peptides, eight peptides (5%) were found to induce T-cell responses. As judged from blocking with HLA class I and II subtype antibodies in the ELISPOT assay culture, none of the eight antigenic peptides induced HLA class I restricted CD8(+) T-cell responses. Instead all responses were blocked by pan-HLA class II and anti-HLA-DR antibodies. In addition, CD4(+) T-cell depletion before the 10 days of expansion, resulted in total loss of reactivity in the ELISPOT culture for most peptide specificities. FACS analyses with intracellular interferon-γ staining of T cells expanded in the presence of M. tuberculosis peptides confirmed that the responsive cells were indeed CD4(+). In conclusion, T-cell immunity against HLA-I binding 9mer M. tuberculosis-derived peptides might in many cases turn out to be mediated by CD4(+) T cells and restricted by HLA-II molecules. The use of 9mer peptides recognized by both CD8(+) and CD4(+) T cells might be of importance for the development of future M. tuberculosis peptide-based vaccines.

  8. Restricted TET2 Expression in Germinal Center Type B Cells Promotes Stringent Epstein-Barr Virus Latency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wille, Coral K; Li, Yangguang; Rui, Lixin; Johannsen, Eric C; Kenney, Shannon C

    2017-03-01

    Epstein-Barr virus (EBV) latently infects normal B cells and contributes to the development of certain human lymphomas. Newly infected B cells support a highly transforming form (type III) of viral latency; however, long-term EBV infection in immunocompetent hosts is limited to B cells with a more restricted form of latency (type I) in which most viral gene expression is silenced by promoter DNA methylation. How EBV converts latency type is unclear, although it is known that type I latency is associated with a germinal center (GC) B cell phenotype, and type III latency with an activated B cell (ABC) phenotype. In this study, we have examined whether expression of TET2, a cellular enzyme that initiates DNA demethylation by converting 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), regulates EBV latency type in B cells. We found that TET2 expression is inhibited in normal GC cells and GC type lymphomas. In contrast, TET2 is expressed in normal naive B cells and ABC type lymphomas. We also demonstrate that GC type cell lines have increased 5mC levels and reduced 5hmC levels in comparison to those of ABC type lines. Finally, we show that TET2 promotes the ability of the EBV transcription factor EBNA2 to convert EBV-infected cells from type I to type III latency. These findings demonstrate that TET2 expression is repressed in GC cells independent of EBV infection and suggest that TET2 promotes type III EBV latency in B cells with an ABC or naive phenotype by enhancing EBNA2 activation of methylated EBV promoters.IMPORTANCE EBV establishes several different types of viral latency in B cells. However, cellular factors that determine whether EBV enters the highly transforming type III latency, versus the more restricted type I latency, have not been well characterized. Here we show that TET2, a cellular enzyme that initiates DNA demethylation by converting 5-methylcytosine (5mC) into 5-hydroxymethylcytosine (5hmC), regulates EBV latency type in B cells by

  9. Non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic activity of blood mononuclear cells stimulated with secreted mycobacterial proteins and other mycobacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Pedersen, B K

    1994-01-01

    Several observations indicate that non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity, mediated for example by natural killer cells and lymphokine-activated killer cells, may serve as an important antimicrobial defense mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to investigate...... the influences of different mycobacterial antigens on non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity and further to investigate the ways by which various lymphocyte subpopulations contribute to the development of this cytotoxicity. Non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity was induced following stimulation of mononuclear cells...... the influence of CD4+ cells on the development of non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity, blood mononuclear cells were depleted of CD4+ cells before antigen stimulation. When mononuclear cells were incubated with purified protein derivative or short-term culture filtrate in the absence of CD4+ cells, cytotoxic...

  10. Therapeutic Vaccination Using Cationic Liposome-Adjuvanted HIV Type 1 Peptides Representing HLA-Supertype-Restricted Subdominant T Cell Epitopes

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Román, Victor Raúl Gómez; Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov; Jensen, Sanne Skov;

    2013-01-01

    We have designed a therapeutic HIV-1 vaccine concept based on peptides together with the adjuvant CAF01. Peptides represented 15 HLA-supertype-restricted subdominant and conserved CD8 T cell epitopes and three CD4 T-helper cell epitopes. In this phase I clinical trial, safety and immunogenicity...... were assessed in untreated HIV-1-infected individuals in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa. Twenty-three HIV-1-infected individuals were randomized to receive placebo (n=5) or vaccine (n=18). Safety was appraised by clinical follow-up combined with monitoring of biochemistry, hematology, CD4 T cell counts......, and HIV-1 viral loads. T cell immunogenicity was monitored longitudinally by interferon (IFN)-γ ELISpot. New vaccine-specific T cell responses were induced in 6/14 vaccinees for whom ELISpot data were valid. CD4 T cell counts and viral loads were stable. The study shows that therapeutic immunization...

  11. Cancer mediates effector T cell dysfunction by targeting microRNAs and EZH2 via glycolysis restriction

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhao, Ende; Maj, Tomasz; Kryczek, Ilona; Li, Wei; Wu, Ke; Zhao, Lili; Wei, Shuang; Crespo, Joel; Wan, Shanshan; Vatan, Linda; Szeliga, Wojciech; Shao, Irene; Wang, Yin; Liu, Yan; Varambally, Sooryanarayana; Chinnaiyan, Arul M.; Welling, Theodore H.; Marquez, Victor E.; Kotarski, Jan; Wang, Hongbo; Wang, Zehua; Zhang, Yi; Liu, Rebecca; Wang, Guobin; Zou, Weiping

    2015-01-01

    Aerobic glycolysis regulates T cell function. However, if and how primary cancer alters T cell glycolytic metabolism and affects tumor immunity remains a question in cancer patients. Here we report that ovarian cancers imposed glucose restriction on T cells and dampened their function via maintaining high expression of microRNA101 and microRNA26a, which constrained expression of the methyltransferase EZH2. EZH2 activated the Notch pathway by suppressing Notch repressors, Numb and Fbxw7, via H3K27me3, and consequently stimulated T cell polyfunctional cytokine expression and promoted their survival via Bcl-2 signaling. Moreover, human shRNA-knockdown-EZH2-deficient T cells elicited poor anti-tumor immunity. EZH2+CD8+ T cells were associated with improved cancer patient survival. Together, the data unveil a novel metabolic target and mechanism of cancer immune evasion. PMID:26523864

  12. DNA methylation restricts lineage-specific functions of transcription factor Gata4 during embryonic stem cell differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Masaaki Oda

    2013-06-01

    Full Text Available DNA methylation changes dynamically during development and is essential for embryogenesis in mammals. However, how DNA methylation affects developmental gene expression and cell differentiation remains elusive. During embryogenesis, many key transcription factors are used repeatedly, triggering different outcomes depending on the cell type and developmental stage. Here, we report that DNA methylation modulates transcription-factor output in the context of cell differentiation. Using a drug-inducible Gata4 system and a mouse embryonic stem (ES cell model of mesoderm differentiation, we examined the cellular response to Gata4 in ES and mesoderm cells. The activation of Gata4 in ES cells is known to drive their differentiation to endoderm. We show that the differentiation of wild-type ES cells into mesoderm blocks their Gata4-induced endoderm differentiation, while mesoderm cells derived from ES cells that are deficient in the DNA methyltransferases Dnmt3a and Dnmt3b can retain their response to Gata4, allowing lineage conversion from mesoderm cells to endoderm. Transcriptome analysis of the cells' response to Gata4 over time revealed groups of endoderm and mesoderm developmental genes whose expression was induced by Gata4 only when DNA methylation was lost, suggesting that DNA methylation restricts the ability of these genes to respond to Gata4, rather than controlling their transcription per se. Gata4-binding-site profiles and DNA methylation analyses suggested that DNA methylation modulates the Gata4 response through diverse mechanisms. Our data indicate that epigenetic regulation by DNA methylation functions as a heritable safeguard to prevent transcription factors from activating inappropriate downstream genes, thereby contributing to the restriction of the differentiation potential of somatic cells.

  13. Glucose restriction induces cell death in parental but not in homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2-depleted RKO colon cancer cells: molecular mechanisms and implications for tumor therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Garufi, A; Ricci, A; Trisciuoglio, D; Iorio, E; Carpinelli, G; Pistritto, G; Cirone, M; D'Orazi, G

    2013-05-23

    Tumor cell tolerance to nutrient deprivation can be an important factor for tumor progression, and may depend on deregulation of both oncogenes and oncosuppressor proteins. Homeodomain-interacting protein kinase 2 (HIPK2) is an oncosuppressor that, following its activation by several cellular stress, induces cancer cell death via p53-dependent or -independent pathways. Here, we used genetically matched human RKO colon cancer cells harboring wt-HIPK2 (HIPK2(+/+)) or stable HIPK2 siRNA interference (siHIPK2) to investigate in vitro whether HIPK2 influenced cell death in glucose restriction. We found that glucose starvation induced cell death, mainly due to c-Jun NH2-terminal kinase activation, in HIPK2(+/+)cells compared with siHIPK2 cells that did not die. (1)H-nuclear magnetic resonance quantitative metabolic analyses showed a marked glycolytic activation in siHIPK2 cells. However, treatment with glycolysis inhibitor 2-deoxy-D-glucose induced cell death only in HIPK2(+/+) cells but not in siHIPK2 cells. Similarly, siGlut-1 interference did not re-establish siHIPK2 cell death under glucose restriction, whereas marked cell death was reached only after zinc supplementation, a condition known to reactivate misfolded p53 and inhibit the pseudohypoxic phenotype in this setting. Further siHIPK2 cell death was reached with zinc in combination with autophagy inhibitor. We propose that the metabolic changes acquired by cells after HIPK2 silencing may contribute to induce resistance to cell death in glucose restriction condition, and therefore be directly relevant for tumor progression. Moreover, elimination of such a tolerance might serve as a new strategy for cancer therapy.

  14. The relationship between interfragmentary movement and cell differentiation in early fracture healing under locking plate fixation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miramini, Saeed; Zhang, Lihai; Richardson, Martin; Mendis, Priyan; Oloyede, Adekunle; Ebeling, Peter

    2016-03-01

    Interfragmentary movement (IFM) at the fracture site plays an important role in fracture healing, particularly during its early stage, via influencing the mechanical microenvironment of mesenchymal stem cells within the fracture callus. However, the effect of changes in IFM resulting from the changes in the configuration of locking plate fixation on cell differentiation has not yet been fully understood. In this study, mechanical experiments on surrogate tibia specimens, manufactured from specially formulated polyurethane, were conducted to investigate changes in IFM of fractures under various locking plate fixation configurations and loading magnitudes. The effect of the observed IFM on callus cell differentiation was then further studied using computational simulation. We found that during the early stage, cell differentiation in the fracture callus is highly influenced by fracture gap size and IFM, which in turn, is highly sensitive to locking plate fixation configuration. The computational model predicted that a small gap size (e.g. 1 mm) under a relatively flexible configuration of locking plate fixation (larger bone-plate distances and working lengths) could experience excessive strain and fluid flow within the fracture site, resulting in excessive fibrous tissue differentiation and delayed healing. By contrast, a relatively flexible configuration of locking plate fixation was predicted to improve cartilaginous callus formation and bone healing for a relatively larger gap size (e.g. 3 mm). If further confirmed by animal and human studies, the research outcome of this paper may have implications for orthopaedic surgeons in optimising the application of locking plate fixations for fractures in clinical practice.

  15. An immunoinformatic approach for identification of Trypanosoma cruzi HLA-A2-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eickhoff, Christopher S; Van Aartsen, Daniel; Terry, Frances E; Meymandi, Sheba K; Traina, Mahmoud M; Hernandez, Salvador; Martin, William D; Moise, Leonard; De Groot, Annie S; Hoft, Daniel F

    2015-01-01

    Chagas disease is a major neglected tropical disease caused by persistent chronic infection with the protozoan parasite Trypanosoma cruzi. An estimated 8 million people are infected with T. cruzi, however only 2 drugs are approved for treatment and no vaccines are available. Thus there is an urgent need to develop vaccines and new drugs to prevent and treat Chagas disease. In this work, we identify T cell targets relevant for human infection with T. cruzi. The trans-sialidase (TS) gene family is a large family of homologous genes within the T. cruzi genome encoding over 1,400 members. There are 12 highly conserved TS gene family members which encode enzymatically active TS (functional TS; F-TS), while the remaining TS family genes are less conserved, enzymatically inactive and have been hypothesized to be involved in immune evasion (non-functional TS; NF-TS). We utilized immunoinformatic tools to identify HLA-A2-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes conserved within F-TS family members and NF-TS gene family members. We also utilized a whole-genome approach to identify T cell epitopes present within genes which have previously been shown to be expressed in life stages relevant for human infection (Non-TS genes). Thirty immunogenic HLA-A2-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes were identified using IFN-γ ELISPOT assays after vaccination of humanized HLA-A2 transgenic mice with mature dendritic cells pulsed with F-TS, NF-TS, and Non-TS peptide pools. The immunogenic HLA-A2-restricted T cell epitopes identified in this work may serve as potential components of an epitope-based T cell targeted vaccine for Chagas disease. PMID:26107442

  16. Dietary Restriction reduces hippocampal neurogenesis and granule cell neuron density without affecting the density of mossy fibers.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Staples, Miranda C; Fannon-Pavlich, McKenzie J; Mysore, Karthik K; Dutta, Rahul R; Ongjoco, Alexandria T; Quach, Leon W; Kharidia, Khush M; Somkuwar, Sucharita S; Mandyam, Chitra D

    2017-03-08

    The hippocampal formation undergoes significant morphological and functional changes after prolonged caloric and dietary restriction (DR). In this study we tested whether prolonged DR results in deleterious alterations in hippocampal neurogenesis, density of granule cell neurons and mossy fibers, all of which support plasticity in the dentate gyrus. Young adult animals either experienced free access to food (control condition), or every-other-day feeding regimen (DR condition) for 3 months. The number of Ki-67 cells and 28-day old 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine (BrdU) cells were quantified in the dorsal and ventral dentate gyrus to determine the effect of DR on cellular proliferation and survival of neural progenitor cells in the anatomically defined regions of the dentate gyrus. The density of granule cell neurons and synaptoporin were also quantified to determine the effect of DR on granule cell neurons and mossy fiber projections in the dentate gyrus. Our results show that DR increases cellular proliferation and concurrently reduces survival of newly born neurons in the ventral dentate gyrus without effecting the number of cells in the dorsal dentate gyrus. DR reduced density of granule cell neurons in the dorsal dentate gyrus. These alterations in the number of granule cell neurons did not affect mossy fiber density in DR animals, which was visualized as no differences in synaptoporin expression. Our findings demonstrate that granule cell neurons in the dentate gyrus are vulnerable to chronic DR and that the reorganization of granule cells in the dentate gyrus subregions is not producing concomitant alterations in dentate gyrus neuronal circuitry with this type of dietary restriction.

  17. Nuclear translocation of Cyclin B1 marks the restriction point for terminal cell cycle exit in G2 phase.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Müllers, Erik; Silva Cascales, Helena; Jaiswal, Himjyot; Saurin, Adrian T; Lindqvist, Arne

    2014-01-01

    Upon DNA damage, cell cycle progression is temporally blocked to avoid propagation of mutations. While transformed cells largely maintain the competence to recover from a cell cycle arrest, untransformed cells past the G1/S transition lose mitotic inducers, and thus the ability to resume cell division. This permanent cell cycle exit depends on p21, p53, and APC/C(Cdh1). However, when and how permanent cell cycle exit occurs remains unclear. Here, we have investigated the cell cycle response to DNA damage in single cells that express Cyclin B1 fused to eYFP at the endogenous locus. We find that upon DNA damage Cyclin B1-eYFP continues to accumulate up to a threshold level, which is reached only in G2 phase. Above this threshold, a p21 and p53-dependent nuclear translocation required for APC/C(Cdh1)-mediated Cyclin B1-eYFP degradation is initiated. Thus, cell cycle exit is decoupled from activation of the DNA damage response in a manner that correlates to Cyclin B1 levels, suggesting that G2 activities directly feed into the decision for cell cycle exit. Once Cyclin B1-eYFP nuclear translocation occurs, checkpoint inhibition can no longer promote mitotic entry or re-expression of mitotic inducers, suggesting that nuclear translocation of Cyclin B1 marks the restriction point for permanent cell cycle exit in G2 phase.

  18. A versatile complementation assay for cell-to-cell and long distance movements by cucumber mosaic virus based agro-infiltration.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Yan; Zhao, Xiaohui; Yao, Min; Li, Chun; Miriam, Karwitha; Zhang, Xue; Tao, Xiaorong

    2014-09-22

    Microinjection, bombardment or tobamovirus and potexvirus based assay has been developed to identify the putative movement protein (MP) or to characterize plasmodesma-mediated macromolecular transport. In this study, we developed a versatile complementation assay for the cell-to-cell and long distance movements of macromolecules by agro-infiltration based on the infectious clones of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV). The movement-deficient CMV reporter was constructed by replacing the MP on RNA 3 with ER targeted GFP. The ectopic expression of CMV MP was able to efficiently move the RNA3-MP::erGFP reporter from the original cell to neighboring cells, whereas CMV MP-M5 mutant was unable to initiate the movement. Importantly, the presence of CMV RNA1 and RNA2 can dramatically amplify the movement signals once the RNA3-MP::erGFP reporter moves out of the original cell. The appropriate observation time for this movement complementation assay was at 48-72 hours post infiltration (hpi), whereas the optimal incubation temperature was between 25 and 28 °C. The ectopic co-expression of MPs from other virus genera, NSm from tomato spotted wilt tospovirus (TSWV) or NSvc4 from rice stripe tenuivirus (RSV), could also facilitate the movement of the RNA3::erGFP reporter from the original cell into other cells. The chimeric mutant virus created by substituting the MP of CMV RNA3 with NSm from TSWV or NSvc4 from RSV move systemically in Nicotiana benthamiana plants by agro-infiltration. This agro-infiltration complementation assay is simple, efficient and reliable. Our approach provides an alternative and powerful tool with great potentials in identifying putative movement protein and characterizing macromolecular trafficking.

  19. Directional cell movements downstream of Gbx2 and Otx2 control the assembly of sensory placodes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ben Steventon

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Cranial placodes contribute to sensory structures including the inner ear, the lens and olfactory epithelium and the neurons of the cranial sensory ganglia. At neurula stages, placode precursors are interspersed in the ectoderm surrounding the anterior neural plate before segregating into distinct placodes by as yet unknown mechanisms. Here, we perform live imaging to follow placode progenitors as they aggregate to form the lens and otic placodes. We find that while placode progenitors move with the same speed as their non-placodal neighbours, they exhibit increased persistence and directionality and these properties are required to assemble morphological placodes. Furthermore, we demonstrate that these factors are components of the transcriptional networks that coordinate placode cell behaviour including their directional movements. Together with previous work, our results support a dual role for Otx and Gbx transcription factors in both the early patterning of the neural plate border and the later segregation of its derivatives into distinct placodes.

  20. Selective Rapid Eye Movement Sleep Deprivation Affects Cell Size and Number in Kitten Locus Coeruleus

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    James P Shaffery

    2012-05-01

    Full Text Available Cells in the locus coeruleus (LC constitute the sole source of norepinephrine (NE in the brain, and change their discharge rates according to vigilance state. In addition to its well established role in vigilance, NE affects synaptic plasticity in the postnatal critical period (CP of development. One form of CP synaptic plasticity affected by NE results from monocular occlusion, which leads to physiological and cytoarchitectural alterations in central visual areas. Selective suppression of rapid eye movement sleep (REMS in the CP kitten enhances the central effects of monocular occlusion. The mechanisms responsible for heightened cortical plasticity following REMS deprivation (REMSD remain undetermined. One possible mediator of an increase in plasticity is continuous NE outflow, which presumably persists during extended periods of REMSD. Tyrosine hydroxylase (TH is the rate-limiting enzyme in the synthesis of NE and serves as a marker for NE-producing cells. We selectively suppressed REMS in kittens for one week during the CP. The number and size of LC cells expressing immunoreactivity to tyrosine hydroxylase (TH-ir was assessed in age-matched REMS-deprived (RD-, treatment-control (TXC-, and home cage-reared (HCC animals. Sleep amounts and slow wave activity (SWA were also examined relative to baseline. Time spent in REMS during the study was lower in RD compared to TXC animals, and RD kittens increased SWA delta power in the latter half of the REMSD period. The estimated total number of TH-ir cells in LC was significantly lower in the RD- than in the TXC kittens and numerically lower than in HCC animals. The size of LC cells expressing TH-ir was greatest in the HCC group. They were significantly larger than the cells in the RD kittens. These data are consistent with a possible reduction in NE in forebrain areas, including visual cortex, caused by one week of REMSD.

  1. Secretion of IFN-γ but Not IL-17 by CD1d-Restricted NKT Cells Enhances Rejection of Skin Grafts Expressing Epithelial Cell-Derived Antigen

    OpenAIRE

    Mattarollo, Stephen R; Yong, Michelle; Tan, Lieven; Frazer, Ian H; Leggatt, Graham R

    2010-01-01

    NKT cells are key regulators of autoimmunity, tumor immune surveillance, and the immune response to pathogens. The role of NKT cells in regulating adaptive immunity to cutaneous Ags is largely unknown. This study explores the role of CD1d-restricted NKT cells in cross-priming of CD8 effector T cells to OVA expressed in epithelial keratinocytes (K5mOVA transgenic mouse). In a skin grafting model, we show that NKT cells enhance the rejection of K5mOVA skin grafts by promoting generation of OVA-...

  2. LACHESIS restricts gametic cell fate in the female gametophyte of Arabidopsis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rita Gross-Hardt

    2007-03-01

    Full Text Available In flowering plants, the egg and sperm cells form within haploid gametophytes. The female gametophyte of Arabidopsis consists of two gametic cells, the egg cell and the central cell, which are flanked by five accessory cells. Both gametic and accessory cells are vital for fertilization; however, the mechanisms that underlie the formation of accessory versus gametic cell fate are unknown. In a screen for regulators of egg cell fate, we isolated the lachesis (lis mutant which forms supernumerary egg cells. In lis mutants, accessory cells differentiate gametic cell fate, indicating that LIS is involved in a mechanism that prevents accessory cells from adopting gametic cell fate. The temporal and spatial pattern of LIS expression suggests that this mechanism is generated in gametic cells. LIS is homologous to the yeast splicing factor PRP4, indicating that components of the splice apparatus participate in cell fate decisions.

  3. HIPPO pathway members restrict SOX2 to the inner cell mass where it promotes ICM fates in the mouse blastocyst.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eryn Wicklow

    2014-10-01

    Full Text Available Pluripotent epiblast (EPI cells, present in the inner cell mass (ICM of the mouse blastocyst, are progenitors of both embryonic stem (ES cells and the fetus. Discovering how pluripotency genes regulate cell fate decisions in the blastocyst provides a valuable way to understand how pluripotency is normally established. EPI cells are specified by two consecutive cell fate decisions. The first decision segregates ICM from trophectoderm (TE, an extraembryonic cell type. The second decision subdivides ICM into EPI and primitive endoderm (PE, another extraembryonic cell type. Here, we investigate the roles and regulation of the pluripotency gene Sox2 during blastocyst formation. First, we investigate the regulation of Sox2 patterning and show that SOX2 is restricted to ICM progenitors prior to blastocyst formation by members of the HIPPO pathway, independent of CDX2, the TE transcription factor that restricts Oct4 and Nanog to the ICM. Second, we investigate the requirement for Sox2 in cell fate specification during blastocyst formation. We show that neither maternal (M nor zygotic (Z Sox2 is required for blastocyst formation, nor for initial expression of the pluripotency genes Oct4 or Nanog in the ICM. Rather, Z Sox2 initially promotes development of the primitive endoderm (PE non cell-autonomously via FGF4, and then later maintains expression of pluripotency genes in the ICM. The significance of these observations is that 1 ICM and TE genes are spatially patterned in parallel prior to blastocyst formation and 2 both the roles and regulation of Sox2 in the blastocyst are unique compared to other pluripotency factors such as Oct4 or Nanog.

  4. Identification and characterization of H-2d restricted CD4+ T cell epitopes on Lpp20 of Helicobacter pylori

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yan

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Previous investigation has demonstrated that CD4+ T cells play a crucial role in effective immunity against Helicobacter pylori (H.pylori infection. It has been well proved that Lpp20 is one of major protective antigens that induce immune responses after H.pylori invades host. Therefore it is valuable to identify CD4+ T cell epitopes on Lpp20, which is uncharacterized. Methods Putative epitopes of H-2d restricted CD4+ T cell on Lpp20 of H.pylori were predicted by the SYFPEITHI algorithm and then eight hypothetical epitope peptides were synthesized. After BALB/c mice were primed with recombinant Lpp20, splenic CD4+ T cells were isolated and stimulated with synthesized peptides to measure T cell proliferation and MHC restriction. Cytokine profile was determined by ELISA and real-time PCR. Two identified epitopes were used to immunize mice to investigate CD4+ T cell response by flow cytometry. Results Two of eight peptides were able to stimulate CD4+ T cell proliferation and were mapped to residues 83-97aa and 58-72aa on Lpp20 respectively. These two peptides additively stimulated Th1 cells to secrete IFN-γ. The percentage of CD4+ T cell from mice immunized with two identified epitopes respectively was higher than the control group. Conclusion The identification and characterization of two CD4+ T cell epitopes of Lpp20 helps understand the protective immunity of Lpp20 in H.pylori infection and design effective epitope vaccines against H.pylori.

  5. Non-major histocompatibility complex-restricted cytotoxic activity of blood mononuclear cells stimulated with secreted mycobacterial proteins and other mycobacterial antigens

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ravn, P; Pedersen, B K

    1994-01-01

    Several observations indicate that non-major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-restricted cytotoxicity, mediated for example by natural killer cells and lymphokine-activated killer cells, may serve as an important antimicrobial defense mechanism. The purpose of the present study was to investigate...... the influences of different mycobacterial antigens on non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity and further to investigate the ways by which various lymphocyte subpopulations contribute to the development of this cytotoxicity. Non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity was induced following stimulation of mononuclear cells......+ cells proliferated and expressed interleukin-2 receptors following stimulation with mycobacterial antigens. Depletion studies after antigen stimulation showed that the cytotoxic effector cells were CD16+ CD56+ and CD4-; the CD4+ cells alone did not mediate non-MHC-restricted cytotoxicity. To evaluate...

  6. The extended family of CD1d-restricted T cells: sifting through a mixed bag of TCRs, antigens and functions

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elodie eMacho-Fernandez

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer T (NKT cells comprise a family of specialized T cells that recognize lipid antigens presented by CD1d. Based on their T cell receptor (TCR usage and antigen-specificities, CD1d-restricted NKT cells have been divided into two main subsets: type I NKT cells that use a canonical invariant TCR α-chain and recognize α-galactosylceramide (α-GalCer, and type II NKT cells that use a more diverse αβ TCR repertoire and do not recognize α-GalCer. In addition, α-GalCer-reactive NKT cells that use non-canonical αβ TCRs and CD1d-restricted T cells that use γδ or δ/αβ TCRs have recently been identified, revealing further diversity among CD1d-restricted T cells. Importantly, in addition to their distinct antigen specificities, functional differences are beginning to emerge between the different members of the CD1d-restricted T cell family. In this review, while using type I NKT cells as comparison, we will focus on type II NKT cells and the other non-invariant CD1d-restricted T cell subsets, and discuss our current understanding of the antigens they recognize, the formation of stimulatory CD1d/antigen complexes, the modes of TCR-mediated antigen recognition, and the mechanisms and consequences of their activation that underlie their function in antimicrobial responses, antitumor immunity, and autoimmunity.

  7. SPATIAL AND TEMPORAL ANALYSIS OF HUMAN MOVEMENTS AND APPLICATIONS FOR DISASTER RESPONSE MANAGEMENT UTILIZING CELL PHONE USAGE DATA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    M. Yasumiishi

    2015-07-01

    Full Text Available As cell phone usage becomes a norm in our daily lives, analysis and application of the data has become part of various research fields. This study focuses on the application of cell phone usage data to disaster response management. Cell phones work as a communication link between emergency responders and victims during and after a major disaster. This study recognizes that there are two kinds of disasters, one with an advance warning, and one without an advance warning. Different movement distance between a day with a blizzard (advanced warning and a normal weather day was identified. In the scenario of a day with an extreme event without advanced warning (earthquake, factors that alter the phone users' movements were analyzed. Lastly, combining both cases, a conceptual model of human movement factors is proposed. Human movements consist of four factors that are push factors, movement-altering factors, derived attributes and constraint factors. Considering each category of factors in case of emergency, it should be necessary that we prepare different kinds of emergency response plans depending on the characteristics of a disaster.

  8. A novel lymphoid progenitor cell population (LSK(low)) is restricted by p18(INK4c).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Fang; Hao, Sha; Ma, Shihui; Cheng, Hui; Wang, Yajie; Zhou, Wen; Yuan, Weiping; Ema, Hideo; Cheng, Tao

    2016-09-01

    The cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitor CDKN2C (p18(INK4c)) restrains self-renewal in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) and participates in the development and maturation of lymphoid cells. Deficiency in p18 predisposes mice and humans to hematopoietic lymphoid malignancies such as T-cell leukemia and multiple myeloma. However, the mechanism by which p18 regulates differentiation from HSCs to lymphoid cells is poorly understood. In this study, we found that a progenitor population characterized by its expression of surface markers, Lin(-) Sca-1(+) c-Kit(low) (LSK(low)), was markedly expanded in the bone marrow of p18 knock-out (p18(-/-)) mice. This novel population possessed lymphoid differentiation potential, but not myeloid differentiation potential, both in vitro and in vivo. Whereas LSK(low) cells and common lymphoid progenitors (CLPs) overlapped functionally in generating lymphoid cells, they were distinct cell populations, because they had different gene expression profiles. Unlike CLPs, LSK(low) cells did not express the interleukin-7 receptor. LSK(low) cells were derived from HSCs and were independent of the p18-deleted microenvironment. This cell population may represent a previously unappreciated transitional stage from HSCs to lymphoid progenitors that is strictly restricted by p18 under physiological conditions. Likewise, LSK(low) might serve as a new cellular target of lymphoid malignances in the absence of p18.

  9. GABA agonist promoted formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to early development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Belhage, B; Hansen, G H; Schousboe, A;

    1988-01-01

    The ability of the GABA receptor agonist 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]pyridin-3-ol (THIP) to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells was tested using primary cultures of these neurons. Granule cells were exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 6 hr after......, respectively, 4, 7, 10 and 14 days in culture. It was found that THIP treatment of 4- and 7-day-old cultures led to formation of low affinity GABA receptors, whereas such receptors could not be detected after THIP treatment in the older cultures (10 and 14 days) in spite of the fact that these cultured granule...... cells expressed a high density of high affinity GABA receptors. It is concluded that the ability of THIP to promote formation of low affinity GABA receptors on cerebellar granule cells is restricted to an early developmental period....

  10. Two basic (hydrophilic) regions in the movement protein of Parietaria mottle virus have RNA binding activity and are required for cell-to-cell transport.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martínez, Carolina; Coll-Bonfill, Nuria; Aramburu, Jose; Pallás, Vicente; Aparicio, Frederic; Galipienso, Luis

    2014-05-12

    The movement protein (MP) of parietaria mottle virus (PMoV) is required for virus cell-to-cell movement. Bioinformatics analysis identified two hydrophilic non-contiguous regions (R1 and R2) rich in the basic amino acids lysine and arginine and with the predicted secondary structure of an α-helix. Different approaches were used to determine the implication of the R1 and R2 regions in RNA binding, plasmodesmata (PD) targeting and cell-to-cell movement. EMSA (Electrophoretic Mobility Shift Assay) showed that both regions have RNA-binding activity whereas that mutational analysis reported that either deletion of any of these regions, or loss of the basic amino acids, interfered with the viral intercellular movement. Subcellular localization studies showed that PMoV MP locates at PD. Mutants designed to impeded cell-to-cell movement failed to accumulate at PD indicating that basic residues in both R1 and R2 are critical for binding the MP at PD.

  11. Distinct glucose lowering and beta cell protective effects of vanadium and food restriction in streptozotocin-diabetes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cam, M C; Rodrigues, B; McNeill, J H

    1999-11-01

    Vanadium is an oral insulin-mimetic agent that diminishes hyperglycemia, improves beta-cell insulin store and secretory function, and can reverse the diabetic state chronically after withdrawal from treatment. As food restriction has been reported to enhance insulin sensitivity and reduce insulin demand, we assessed the contribution of a reduced food intake to the glucose lowering and beta-cell protective effects of vanadium. Streptozotocin (STZ)-diabetic rats were untreated (D) or administered vanadyl sulfate in the drinking water (DT) at one week prior to and for 5 weeks following the administration of STZ. An additional group was pair-fed (DP) with an equal amount of food as that consumed by the DT group. Shortly after the induction of diabetes, hyperglycemic D rats demonstrated a significant rise in plasma insulin to levels that initially exceeded that of the controls. This was followed by a steady reduction over several weeks, suggesting a gradual depletion of functional beta-cells. Both vanadium treatment and pair-feeding abolished the insulin hypersecretory response following STZ administration. Glucose lowering was enhanced in DT animals when administered higher concentrations of vanadium, despite no further reduction in food intake, and all DT animals (10/10) were normoglycemic by 5 weeks. Mean pancreatic insulin content in DT rats was improved fourfold and was associated with a greater number of granulated beta-cells. Conversely, food restriction only modestly improved glycemia and the pancreatic insulin store and, unlike DT, DP rats remained highly glucose-intolerant. At 5 weeks of diabetes, fed circulating glucose and insulin levels were strongly correlated (P=0.0002) in the D and DP groups, supporting the notion that glucose lowering with food restriction is dependent on improved plasma insulin levels. A separate correlation was observed in DT animals within a lower range of plasma insulin, suggesting that vanadium, unlike food restriction, reduced

  12. T-cell responses associated with neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia: isolation of HPA-1a-specific, HLA-DRB3*0101-restricted CD4+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ahlen, Maria Therese; Husebekk, Anne; Killie, Mette Kjaer; Skogen, Bjørn; Stuge, Tor B

    2009-04-16

    T-cell responses have been implicated in the development of HPA-1a-induced neonatal alloimmune thrombocytopenia (NAIT). However, HPA-1a-specific T cells have neither been isolated nor characterized. Here, we aimed to determine whether HPA-1a-specific T cells could be isolated from HPA-1a-immunized women. In the present study, peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from an HPA-1a-alloimmunized woman were cultured for weeks in the presence of HPA-1a peptide, labeled with CFSE, and assayed for antigen-specific proliferation. Individual proliferating cells were isolated by fluorescence-activated cell sorting and expanded in culture. Antigen specificity and HLA restriction were determined by cytokine secretion (enzyme-linked immunospot [ELISPOT]) and proliferation assays. Several CD3(+)CD4(+) T-cell clones were isolated that proliferated and secreted cytokines in response to HPA-1a peptide. Two of these clones have been established in long-term culture in our laboratory. Both of these recognize synthetic as well as naturally processed HPA-1a antigen, and the recognition is restricted by the MHC molecule HLA-DRB3*0101 that is strongly associated with NAIT. These HPA-1a-specific T-cell clones represent unambiguous evidence for the association of T-cell responses with NAIT, and they will serve as unique tools to elucidate the cellular immune response that may result in NAIT.

  13. Restrictive Factors and Historical Significance of Rectification Movement in the Later Anti-Japanese War%抗战后期敌后整风的制约因素与历史意义

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    向伟

    2015-01-01

    抗战后期,中共在全党开展整风学习运动。处在敌后的各根据地,尽管也都在规定时间内完成整风,但从当时的情况来看,这些根据地的整风受到诸多因素的制约,如党员干部对整风的重要性缺乏认识、敌后环境异常艰苦、党员与干部知识水平较低以及整风脱离实际等。分析敌后整风情况,无论从认识还是实践上,对于如今的党建工作也有一定的启发意义。%In the latter part of the Anti-Japanese War, the Chinese Communists Party carried out the rectification movement. Although the rectification was completed in a short time, from the point of view of the situation at that time, the rectification movement was restricted by many factors , such as the lack of understanding of importance of Party members and cadres ,the difficult environment in the enemy’s rear area, low level of knowledge and rectification from the reality etc. Analysis of rectification situation both from behind enemy lines, understanding and practice, also have certain enlightening significance for today ’s rectification learning.

  14. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longo Martins, Murillo; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen;

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti...... with reduced clearance rate and toxicity. X-rays and neutrons were used to investigate the carrier structure, as well as to assess the drug mobility within the bio-nanocomposite. From these unique data we show that partial mobility restriction of active groups of the drug molecule suggests why this carrier...

  15. Intracellular distribution, cell-to-cell trafficking and tubule-inducing activity of the 50 kDa movement protein of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus fused to green fluorescent protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Satoh, H; Matsuda, H; Kawamura, T; Isogai, M; Yoshikawa, N; Takahashi, T

    2000-08-01

    The 50 kDa protein (50KP) encoded by ORF2 of Apple chlorotic leaf spot virus (ACLSV) fused to green fluorescent protein (GFP) was expressed transiently in cells of Nicotiana occidentalis and Chenopodium quinoa leaves. Its intracellular distribution, cell-to-cell trafficking in leaf epidermis and tubule formation on the surface of protoplasts were analysed. The 50KP-GFP fluorescence was distributed as small irregular spots or a fibrous network structure on the periphery of epidermal cells and protoplasts of both plant species. In leaf epidermis of N. occidentalis, the protein spread from the cells that produced it into neighbouring cells in both young and mature leaves and targetted plasmodesmata in these cells. In contrast, GFP was restricted to single cells in most cases in mature leaves. When 50KP and GFP were co-expressed in leaf epidermis of N. occidentalis, GFP spread more widely from the initial cells that produced it than when GFP was expressed alone, suggesting that 50KP facilitated the cell-to-cell trafficking of GFP. 50KP-GFP was able to complement local spread of 50KP-deficient virus when expressed transiently in leaf epidermis of C. quinoa. Expression of 50KP-GFP in protoplasts resulted in the production of tubular structures protruding from the surface. Mutational analyses showed that the C-terminal region (aa 287-457) was not essential for localization to plasmodesmata, cell-to-cell trafficking, complementation of movement of 50KP-deficient virus or tubule formation on protoplasts. In contrast, deletions in the N-terminal region resulted in the complete disruption of all these activities.

  16. Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... t want them to. If you have a movement disorder, you experience these kinds of impaired movement. Dyskinesia ... movement and is a common symptom of many movement disorders. Tremors are a type of dyskinesia. Nerve diseases ...

  17. The effect of aging and caloric restriction on murine CD8+ T cell chemokine receptor gene expression

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mo RuRan

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The mechanism explaining the increased disease susceptibility in aging is not well understood. CD8+ T cells are crucial in anti-viral and anti-tumor responses. Although the chemokine system plays a critical role in CD8+ T cell function, very little is known about the relationship between aging and the T cell chemokine system. Results In this study we have examined the effect of aging on murine CD8+ T cell chemokine receptor gene expression. Freshly isolated splenic CD8+ T cells from old C57BL/6 mice were found to have higher CCR1, CCR2, CCR4, CCR5 and CXCR5, and lower CCR7 gene expression compared to their younger cohort. Anti-CD3/anti-CD28 stimulation elicited a similar robust chemokine receptor response from young and old CD8+ T cells. Western blot analyses confirmed elevated protein level of CCR4 and CCR5 in aged CD8+ T cells. Increases in T cell CCR1 and CCR5 expression also correlate to increased in vitro chemotaxis response to macrophage-inflammatory protein-1 α(MIP-1α. Finally, caloric restriction selectively prevents the loss of CD8+ T cell CCR7 gene expression in aging to the level that is seen in young CD8+ T cells. Conclusion These findings are consistent with the notion that aging exists in a state of low grade pro-inflammatory environment. In addition, our results provide a potential mechanism for the reported aging-associated impaired T cell lymphoid homing and allograft response, and reduced survival in sepsis.

  18. T cells detect intracellular DNA but fail to induce type I IFN responses: implications for restriction of HIV replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Randi K Berg

    Full Text Available HIV infects key cell types of the immune system, most notably macrophages and CD4+ T cells. Whereas macrophages represent an important viral reservoir, activated CD4+ T cells are the most permissive cell types supporting high levels of viral replication. In recent years, it has been appreciated that the innate immune system plays an important role in controlling HIV replication, e.g. via interferon (IFN-inducible restriction factors. Moreover, innate immune responses are involved in driving chronic immune activation and the pathogenesis of progressive immunodeficiency. Several pattern recognition receptors detecting HIV have been reported, including Toll-like receptor 7 and Retinoic-inducible gene-I, which detects viral RNA. Here we report that human primary T cells fail to induce strong IFN responses, despite the fact that this cell type does express key molecules involved in DNA signaling pathways. We demonstrate that the DNA sensor IFI16 migrates to sites of foreign DNA localization in the cytoplasm and recruits the signaling molecules stimulator of IFN genes and Tank-binding kinase, but this does not result in expression of IFN and IFN-stimulated genes. Importantly, we show that cytosolic DNA fails to affect HIV replication. However, exogenous treatment of activated T cells with type I IFN has the capacity to induce expression of IFN-stimulated genes and suppress HIV replication. Our data suggest the existence of an impaired DNA signaling machinery in T cells, which may prevent this cell type from activating cell-autonomous anti-HIV responses. This phenomenon could contribute to the high permissiveness of CD4+ T cells for HIV-1.

  19. É importante restringir a movimentação cefálica após a manobra de Epley? Is it important to restrict head movement after Epley maneuver?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fernando Freitas Ganança

    2005-12-01

    head movements and to use a cervical collar and group 2 patients were not informed about these postmaneuver restrictions. The patients from both groups were reevaluated one week after Epley maneuver, regarding the presence of symptoms and positional nystagmus. RESULTS: One week after Epley maneuver 82.1% of the patients from group 1 and 73.3% from group 2 didn't present positional nystagmus (p=0.421. There was a clinical improvement in 96.0% of the patients from group 1 and in 94.0% from group 2 (p=0.781. CONCLUSION: The use of postural restrictions in patients with benign paroxysmal positional vertigo of posterior canal didn't interfere in their clinical evaluation, one week after a unique Epley maneuver.

  20. Chloroplast movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wada, Masamitsu

    2013-09-01

    Chloroplast movement is important for plant survival under high light and for efficient photosynthesis under low light. This review introduces recent knowledge on chloroplast movement and shows how to analyze the responses and the moving mechanisms, potentially inspiring research in this field. Avoidance from the strong light is mediated by blue light receptor phototropin 2 (phot2) plausibly localized on the chloroplast envelop and accumulation at the week light-irradiated area is mediated by phot1 and phot2 localized on the plasma membrane. Chloroplasts move by chloroplast actin (cp-actin) filaments that must be polymerized by Chloroplast Unusual Positioning1 (CHUP1) at the front side of moving chloroplast. To understand the signal transduction pathways and the mechanism of chloroplast movement, that is, from light capture to motive force-generating mechanism, various methods should be employed based on the various aspects. Observation of chloroplast distribution pattern under different light condition by fixed cell sectioning is somewhat an old-fashioned technique but the most basic and important way. However, most importantly, precise chloroplast behavior during and just after the induction of chloroplast movement by partial cell irradiation using an irradiator with either low light or strong light microbeam should be recorded by time lapse photographs under infrared light and analyzed. Recently various factors involved in chloroplast movement, such as cp-actin filaments and CHUP1, could be traced in Arabidopsis transgenic lines with fluorescent protein tags under a confocal laser scanning microscope (CLSM) and/or a total internal reflection fluorescence microscope (TIRFM). These methods are listed and their advantages and disadvantages are evaluated.

  1. Identification and localization of minimal MHC-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes within the Plasmodium falciparum AMA1 protein

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sedegah Martha

    2010-08-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Plasmodium falciparum apical membrane antigen-1 (AMA1 is a leading malaria vaccine candidate antigen that is expressed by sporozoite, liver and blood stage parasites. Since CD8+ T cell responses have been implicated in protection against pre-erythrocytic stage malaria, this study was designed to identify MHC class I-restricted epitopes within AMA1. Methods A recombinant adenovirus serotype 5 vector expressing P. falciparum AMA1 was highly immunogenic when administered to healthy, malaria-naive adult volunteers as determined by IFN-γ ELISpot responses to peptide pools containing overlapping 15-mer peptides spanning full-length AMA1. Computerized algorithms (NetMHC software were used to predict minimal MHC-restricted 8-10-mer epitope sequences within AMA1 15-mer peptides active in ELISpot. A subset of epitopes was synthesized and tested for induction of CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses by ELISpot depletion and ICS assays. A 3-dimensional model combining Domains I + II of P. falciparum AMA1 and Domain III of P. vivax AMA1 was used to map these epitopes. Results Fourteen 8-10-mer epitopes were predicted to bind to HLA supertypes A01 (3 epitopes, A02 (4 epitopes, B08 (2 epitopes and B44 (5 epitopes. Nine of the 14 predicted epitopes were recognized in ELISpot or ELISpot and ICS assays by one or more volunteers. Depletion of T cell subsets confirmed that these epitopes were CD8+ T cell-dependent. A mixture of the 14 minimal epitopes was capable of recalling CD8+ T cell IFN-γ responses from PBMC of immunized volunteers. Thirteen of the 14 predicted epitopes were polymorphic and the majority localized to the more conserved front surface of the AMA1 model structure. Conclusions This study predicted 14 and confirmed nine MHC class I-restricted CD8+ T cell epitopes on AMA1 recognized in the context of seven HLA alleles. These HLA alleles belong to four HLA supertypes that have a phenotypic frequency between 23% - 100% in different human

  2. Plasma membrane localization of Solanum tuberosum remorin from group 1, homolog 3 is mediated by conformational changes in a novel C-terminal anchor and required for the restriction of potato virus X movement].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Perraki, Artemis; Cacas, Jean-Luc; Crowet, Jean-Marc; Lins, Laurence; Castroviejo, Michel; German-Retana, Sylvie; Mongrand, Sébastien; Raffaele, Sylvain

    2012-10-01

    The formation of plasma membrane (PM) microdomains plays a crucial role in the regulation of membrane signaling and trafficking. Remorins are a plant-specific family of proteins organized in six phylogenetic groups, and Remorins of group 1 are among the few plant proteins known to specifically associate with membrane rafts. As such, they are valuable to understand the molecular bases for PM lateral organization in plants. However, little is known about the structural determinants underlying the specific association of group 1 Remorins with membrane rafts. We used a structure-function approach to identify a short C-terminal anchor (RemCA) indispensable and sufficient for tight direct binding of potato (Solanum tuberosum) REMORIN 1.3 (StREM1.3) to the PM. RemCA switches from unordered to α-helical structure in a nonpolar environment. Protein structure modeling indicates that RemCA folds into a tight hairpin of amphipathic helices. Consistently, mutations reducing RemCA amphipathy abolished StREM1.3 PM localization. Furthermore, RemCA directly binds to biological membranes in vitro, shows higher affinity for Detergent-Insoluble Membranes lipids, and targets yellow fluorescent protein to Detergent-Insoluble Membranes in vivo. Mutations in RemCA resulting in cytoplasmic StREM1.3 localization abolish StREM1.3 function in restricting potato virus X movement. The mechanisms described here provide new insights on the control and function of lateral segregation of plant PM.

  3. Involvement of conventional kinesin in glucose-stimulated secretory granule movements and exocytosis in clonal pancreatic beta-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Varadi, Aniko; Ainscow, Edward K; Allan, Victoria J; Rutter, Guy A

    2002-11-01

    Recruitment of secretory vesicles to the cell surface is essential for the sustained secretion of insulin in response to glucose. At present, the molecular motors involved in this movement, and the mechanisms whereby they may be regulated, are undefined. To investigate the role of kinesin family members, we labelled densecore vesicles in clonal beta-cells using an adenovirally expressed, vesicle-targeted green fluorescent protein (phogrin.EGFP), and employed immunoadsorption to obtain highly purified insulin-containing vesicles. Whereas several kinesin family members were expressed in this cell type, only conventional kinesin heavy chain (KHC) was detected in vesicle preparations. Expression of a dominant-negative KHC motor domain (KHC(mut)) blocked all vesicular movements with velocity >0.4 micro m second(-1), which demonstrates that kinesin activity was essential for vesicle motility in live beta-cells. Moreover, expression of KHC(mut) strongly inhibited the sustained, but not acute, stimulation of secretion by glucose. Finally, vesicle movement was stimulated by ATP dose-dependently in permeabilized cells, which suggests that glucose-induced increases in cytosolic [ATP] mediate the effects of the sugar in vivo, by enhancing kinesin activity. These data therefore provide evidence for a novel mechanism whereby glucose may enhance insulin release.

  4. The microRNA bantam regulates a developmental transition in epithelial cells that restricts sensory dendrite growth.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jiang, Nan; Soba, Peter; Parker, Edward; Kim, Charles C; Parrish, Jay Z

    2014-07-01

    As animals grow, many early born structures grow by cell expansion rather than cell addition; thus growth of distinct structures must be coordinated to maintain proportionality. This phenomenon is particularly widespread in the nervous system, with dendrite arbors of many neurons expanding in concert with their substrate to sustain connectivity and maintain receptive field coverage as animals grow. After rapidly growing to establish body wall coverage, dendrites of Drosophila class IV dendrite arborization (C4da) neurons grow synchronously with their substrate, the body wall epithelium, providing a system to study how proportionality is maintained during animal growth. Here, we show that the microRNA bantam (ban) ensures coordinated growth of C4da dendrites and the epithelium through regulation of epithelial endoreplication, a modified cell cycle that entails genome amplification without cell division. In Drosophila larvae, epithelial endoreplication leads to progressive changes in dendrite-extracellular matrix (ECM) and dendrite-epithelium contacts, coupling dendrite/substrate expansion and restricting dendrite growth beyond established boundaries. Moreover, changes in epithelial expression of cell adhesion molecules, including the beta-integrin myospheroid (mys), accompany this developmental transition. Finally, endoreplication and the accompanying changes in epithelial mys expression are required to constrain late-stage dendrite growth and structural plasticity. Hence, modulating epithelium-ECM attachment probably influences substrate permissivity for dendrite growth and contributes to the dendrite-substrate coupling that ensures proportional expansion of the two cell types.

  5. Development of a diverse human T-cell repertoire despite stringent restriction of hematopoietic clonality in the thymus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brugman, Martijn H; Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; van Eggermond, Marja; Wolvers-Tettero, Ingrid; Langerak, Anton W; de Haas, Edwin F E; Bystrykh, Leonid V; van Rood, Jon J; de Haan, Gerald; Fibbe, Willem E; Staal, Frank J T

    2015-11-03

    The fate and numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny that seed the thymus constitute a fundamental question with important clinical implications. HSC transplantation is often complicated by limited T-cell reconstitution, especially when HSC from umbilical cord blood are used. Attempts to improve immune reconstitution have until now been unsuccessful, underscoring the need for better insight into thymic reconstitution. Here we made use of the NOD-SCID-IL-2Rγ(-/-) xenograft model and lentiviral cellular barcoding of human HSCs to study T-cell development in the thymus at a clonal level. Barcoded HSCs showed robust (>80% human chimerism) and reproducible myeloid and lymphoid engraftment, with T cells arising 12 wk after transplantation. A very limited number of HSC clones (thymus, with further restriction of the number of clones during subsequent development. Nevertheless, T-cell receptor rearrangements were polyclonal and showed a diverse repertoire, demonstrating that a multitude of T-lymphocyte clones can develop from a single HSC clone. Our data imply that intrathymic clonal fitness is important during T-cell development. As a consequence, immune incompetence after HSC transplantation is not related to the transplantation of limited numbers of HSC but to intrathymic events.

  6. Successful transplantation of human hepatic stem cells with restricted localization to liver using hyaluronan grafts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Turner, Rachael A; Wauthier, Eliane; Lozoya, Oswaldo; McClelland, Randall; Bowsher, James E; Barbier, Claire; Prestwich, Glenn; Hsu, Edward; Gerber, David A; Reid, Lola M

    2013-02-01

    Cell therapies are potential alternatives to organ transplantation for liver failure or dysfunction but are compromised by inefficient engraftment, cell dispersal to ectopic sites, and emboli formation. Grafting strategies have been devised for transplantation of human hepatic stem cells (hHpSCs) embedded into a mix of soluble signals and extracellular matrix biomaterials (hyaluronans, type III collagen, laminin) found in stem cell niches. The hHpSCs maintain a stable stem cell phenotype under the graft conditions. The grafts were transplanted into the livers of immunocompromised murine hosts with and without carbon tetrachloride treatment to assess the effects of quiescent versus injured liver conditions. Grafted cells remained localized to the livers, resulting in a larger bolus of engrafted cells in the host livers under quiescent conditions and with potential for more rapid expansion under injured liver conditions. By contrast, transplantation by direct injection or via a vascular route resulted in inefficient engraftment and cell dispersal to ectopic sites. Transplantation by grafting is proposed as a preferred strategy for cell therapies for solid organs such as the liver.

  7. act up controls actin polymerization to alter cell shape and restrict Hedgehog signaling in the Drosophila eye disc.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benlali, A; Draskovic, I; Hazelett, D J; Treisman, J E

    2000-04-28

    Cells in the morphogenetic furrow of the Drosophila eye disc undergo a striking shape change immediately prior to their neuronal differentiation. We have isolated mutations in a novel gene, act up (acu), that is required for this shape change. acu encodes a homolog of yeast cyclase-associated protein, which sequesters monomeric actin; we show that acu is required to prevent actin filament polymerization in the eye disc. In contrast, profilin promotes actin filament polymerization, acting epistatically to acu. However, both acu and profilin are required to prevent premature Hedgehog-induced photoreceptor differentiation ahead of the morphogenetic furrow. These findings suggest that dynamic changes in actin filaments alter cell shape to control the movement of signals that coordinate a wave of differentiation.

  8. Loss of cofilin 1 disturbs actin dynamics, adhesion between enveloping and deep cell layers and cell movements during gastrulation in zebrafish.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chun-Wei Lin

    Full Text Available During gastrulation, cohesive migration drives associated cell layers to the completion of epiboly in zebrafish. The association of different layers relies on E-cadherin based cellular junctions, whose stability can be affected by actin turnover. Here, we examined the effect of malfunctioning actin turnover on the epibolic movement by knocking down an actin depolymerizing factor, cofilin 1, using antisense morpholino oligos (MO. Knockdown of cfl1 interfered with epibolic movement of deep cell layer (DEL but not in the enveloping layer (EVL and the defect could be specifically rescued by overexpression of cfl1. It appeared that the uncoordinated movements of DEL and EVL were regulated by the differential expression of cfl1 in the DEL, but not EVL as shown by in situ hybridization. The dissociation of DEL and EVL was further evident by the loss of adhesion between layers by using transmission electronic and confocal microscopy analyses. cfl1 morphants also exhibited abnormal convergent extension, cellular migration and actin filaments, but not involution of hypoblast. The cfl1 MO-induced cell migration defect was found to be cell-autonomous in cell transplantation assays. These results suggest that proper actin turnover mediated by Cfl1 is essential for adhesion between DEL and EVL and cell movements during gastrulation in zebrafish.

  9. P44/WDR77 restricts the sensitivity of proliferating cells to TGFβ signaling

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yi, Pengfei [Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430022 (China); Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Gao, Shen [Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Gu, Zhongping [Department of Thoracic Surgery, Tangdu Hospital, Fourth Military Medical University, Xi’an 710038 (China); Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States); Huang, Tao [Department of Breast and Thyroid Surgery, Union Hospital, Tongji Medical College, Huazhong University of Science and Technology, 1277 Jiefang Road, Wuhan, Hubei 430022 (China); Wang, Zhengxin, E-mail: zhenwang@mdanderson.org [Department of Cancer Biology, The University of Texas MD Anderson Cancer Center, Houston, TX 77030 (United States)

    2014-07-18

    Highlights: • P44/WDR77 causes proliferating cells to become non-responsive to TGFβ signaling. • P44/WDR77 down-regulates TβRII and TβR2 expression. • P44/WDR77 down-regulated TGFβ signaling correlates with lung tumorigenesis. - Abstract: We previously reported that a novel WD-40 domain-containing protein, p44/WDR77, drives quiescent epithelial cells to re-enter the cell cycle and plays an essential role for growth of lung and prostate cancer cells. Transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ) signaling is important in the maintenance of non-transformed cells in the quiescent or slowly cycling stage. However, both non-transformed proliferating cells and human cancer cells are non-responsive to endogenous TGFβ signaling. The mechanism by which proliferating cells become refractory to TGFβ inhibition is not well established. Here, we found that silencing p44/WDR77 increased cellular sensitivity to TGFβ signaling and that this was inversely correlated with decreased cell proliferation. Smad2 or 3 phosphorylation, TGFβ-mediated transcription, and TGFβ2 and TGFβ receptor type II (TβRII) expression were dramatically induced by silencing of p44/WDR77. These data support the hypothesis that p44/WDR77 down-regulates the expression of the TGFβ ligand and its receptor, thereby leading to a cellular non-response to TGFβ signaling. Finally, we found that p44/WDR77 expression was correlated with cell proliferation and decreased TGFβ signaling during lung tumorigenesis. Together, these results suggest that p44/WDR77 expression causes the non-sensitivity of proliferating cells to TGFβ signaling, thereby contributing to cellular proliferation during lung tumorigenesis.

  10. A bHLH-Based Feedback Loop Restricts Vascular Cell Proliferation in Plants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vera-Sirera, Francisco; Rybel, de B.P.M.; Urbez, Cristina; Kouklas, Evangelos; Pesquera, Marta; Alvarez-Mahecha, Juan Camilo; Minguet, Eugenio; Tuominen, Hanneke; Carbonell, Juan; Borst, J.W.; Weijers, D.; Blazquez, Miguel

    2015-01-01

    Control of tissue dimensions in multicellular organisms requires the precise quantitative regulation of mitotic activity. In plants, where cells are immobile,
    tissue size is achieved through control of both cell division orientation and mitotic rate. The bHLH transcription factor heterodimer for

  11. Delineation of Several DR-Restricted Tetanus Toxin T Cell Epitopes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Demotz, Stephane; Lanzavecchia, Antonio; Eisel, Ulrich; Niemann, Heiner; Widmann, Christian; Corradin, Giampietro

    1989-01-01

    We have characterized five human T cell clones specific for tetanus toxin. The combination of different techniques allowed us to precisely map two T cell epitopes within fragments 830-843 and 1273-1284 of tetanus toxin, as formally demonstrated by the use of corresponding synthetic peptides. The thr

  12. Confocal restricted-height imaging of suspension cells (CRISC) in a PDMS microdevice during apoptosis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Munoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Green, Douglas R.; Berg, van den Albert

    2005-01-01

    We have monitored and imaged cell death induced in human leukemic U937 cells over time using three-color confocal imaging. Three different apoptotic inducers, anti-Fas, TNF- and Etoposide were used. Individual cascaded events such as loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, exposure of phospha

  13. Confocal restricted-height imaging of suspension cells (CRISC) in a PDMS microdevice during apoptosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Muñoz-Pinedo, Cristina; Green, Douglas R; van den Berg, Albert

    2005-06-01

    We have monitored and imaged cell death induced in human leukemic U937 cells over time using three-color confocal imaging. Three different apoptotic inducers, anti-Fas, TNF-alpha and Etoposide were used. Individual cascaded events such as loss of mitochondrial transmembrane potential, exposure of phosphatidyl-serine, membrane blebbing and permeabilization of the cell membrane have been observed in real time with different individual cells. From the results, an interesting heterogeneicity in the apoptotic phenotype has been observed. The CRISC method is easy to use and provides biologist with a powerful additional tool to study in real-time processes of several hours of duration such as apoptosis. We predict that the period of cell viability obtained after protein coating of the PDMS devices (>80 h) will also allow monitoring of other biological processes of longer duration or long onset time, such as mitosis, phagocytosis and differentiation.

  14. Restrictions in cell cycle progression of adult vestibular supporting cells in response to ectopic cyclin D1 expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Heidi Loponen

    Full Text Available Sensory hair cells and supporting cells of the mammalian inner ear are quiescent cells, which do not regenerate. In contrast, non-mammalian supporting cells have the ability to re-enter the cell cycle and produce replacement hair cells. Earlier studies have demonstrated cyclin D1 expression in the developing mouse supporting cells and its downregulation along maturation. In explant cultures of the mouse utricle, we have here focused on the cell cycle control mechanisms and proliferative potential of adult supporting cells. These cells were forced into the cell cycle through adenoviral-mediated cyclin D1 overexpression. Ectopic cyclin D1 triggered robust cell cycle re-entry of supporting cells, accompanied by changes in p27(Kip1 and p21(Cip1 expressions. Main part of cell cycle reactivated supporting cells were DNA damaged and arrested at the G2/M boundary. Only small numbers of mitotic supporting cells and rare cells with signs of two successive replications were found. Ectopic cyclin D1-triggered cell cycle reactivation did not lead to hyperplasia of the sensory epithelium. In addition, a part of ectopic cyclin D1 was sequestered in the cytoplasm, reflecting its ineffective nuclear import. Combined, our data reveal intrinsic barriers that limit proliferative capacity of utricular supporting cells.

  15. Bacterial CD1d-restricted glycolipids induce IL-10 production by human regulatory T cells upon cross-talk with invariant NKT cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Venken, Koen; Decruy, Tine; Aspeslagh, Sandrine; Van Calenbergh, Serge; Lambrecht, Bart N; Elewaut, Dirk

    2013-09-01

    Invariant NKT (iNKT) cells and CD4(+)CD25(+)FOXP3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) are important immune regulatory T cells with Ag reactivity to glycolipids and peptides, respectively. However, the functional interplay between these cells in humans is poorly understood. We show that Tregs suppress iNKT cell proliferation induced by CD1d-restricted glycolipids, including bacterial-derived diacylglycerols, as well as by innate-like activation. Inhibition was related to the potency of iNKT agonists, making diacylglycerol iNKT responses very prone to suppression. Cytokine production by iNKT cells was differentially modulated by Tregs because IL-4 production was reduced more profoundly compared with IFN-γ. A compelling observation was the significant production of IL-10 by Tregs after cell contact with iNKT cells, in particular in the presence of bacterial diacylglycerols. These iNKT-primed Tregs showed increased FOXP3 expression and superior suppressive function. Suppression of iNKT cell responses, but not conventional T cell responses, was IL-10 dependent, suggesting that there is a clear difference in mechanism between the Treg-mediated inhibition of these cell types. Our data highlight a physiologically relevant interaction between human iNKT and Tregs upon pathogen-derived glycolipid recognition that has a significant impact on the design of iNKT cell-based therapeutics.

  16. Lipid raft association restricts CD44-ezrin interaction and promotion of breast cancer cell migration.

    LENUS (Irish Health Repository)

    Donatello, Simona

    2012-12-01

    Cancer cell migration is an early event in metastasis, the main cause of breast cancer-related deaths. Cholesterol-enriched membrane domains called lipid rafts influence the function of many molecules, including the raft-associated protein CD44. We describe a novel mechanism whereby rafts regulate interactions between CD44 and its binding partner ezrin in migrating breast cancer cells. Specifically, in nonmigrating cells, CD44 and ezrin localized to different membranous compartments: CD44 predominantly in rafts, and ezrin in nonraft compartments. After the induction of migration (either nonspecific or CD44-driven), CD44 affiliation with lipid rafts was decreased. This was accompanied by increased coprecipitation of CD44 and active (threonine-phosphorylated) ezrin-radixin-moesin (ERM) proteins in nonraft compartments and increased colocalization of CD44 with the nonraft protein, transferrin receptor. Pharmacological raft disruption using methyl-β-cyclodextrin also increased CD44-ezrin coprecipitation and colocalization, further suggesting that CD44 interacts with ezrin outside rafts during migration. Conversely, promoting CD44 retention inside lipid rafts by pharmacological inhibition of depalmitoylation virtually abolished CD44-ezrin interactions. However, transient single or double knockdown of flotillin-1 or caveolin-1 was not sufficient to increase cell migration over a short time course, suggesting complex crosstalk mechanisms. We propose a new model for CD44-dependent breast cancer cell migration, where CD44 must relocalize outside lipid rafts to drive cell migration. This could have implications for rafts as pharmacological targets to down-regulate cancer cell migration.

  17. Identification of a dengue virus-specific HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T cell epitope.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wen, Jinsheng; Duan, Zhiliang; Jiang, Lifang

    2010-04-01

    In this study, a combination of epitope-prediction programs and in vitro assays was used to identify dengue virus (DENV)-specific CD8(+) T cell epitopes. Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from patients who recovered from dengue fever were stimulated with candidate epitope peptides derived from DENV, which were predicted by using SYFPEITHI and RANKpep epitope-prediction programs. The IFN-gamma ELISpot results and the results of intracellular staining of IFN-gamma showed that peptides NS4b_40 (TLYAVATTI), E_256 (QEGAMHTAL), NS3_205 (LPAIVREAI), NS5_210 (SRNSTHEMY), and NS3_207 (AIVREAIKR) could induce the recall response of CD8(+) T cells. Furthermore, the results of the MHC-peptide complex stabilization assay revealed that peptide NS4b_40 (TLYAVATTI) has a high affinity for HLA-A*0201 molecules. The IFN-gamma ELISpot results and staining of intracellular IFN-gamma confirmed that this peptide could induce high-level CD8(+) T cell response in HLA-A*0201 positive PBMCs. Peptide NS4b_40 (TLYAVATTI) was identified as a novel DENV-specific HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8(+) T cell epitope.

  18. A conserved chromatin architecture marks and maintains the restricted germ cell lineage in worms and flies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaner, Christine E; Deshpande, Girish; Schedl, Paul D; Kelly, William G

    2003-11-01

    In C. elegans, mRNA production is initially repressed in the embryonic germline by a protein unique to C. elegans germ cells, PIE-1. PIE-1 is degraded upon the birth of the germ cell precursors, Z2 and Z3. We have identified a chromatin-based mechanism that succeeds PIE-1 repression in these cells. A subset of nucleosomal histone modifications, methylated lysine 4 on histone H3 (H3meK4) and acetylated lysine 8 on histone H4 (H4acetylK8), are globally lost and the DNA appears more condensed. This coincides with PIE-1 degradation and requires that germline identity is not disrupted. Drosophila pole cell chromatin also lacks H3meK4, indicating that a unique chromatin architecture is a conserved feature of embryonic germ cells. Regulation of the germline-specific chromatin architecture requires functional nanos activity in both organisms. These results indicate that genome-wide repression via a nanos-regulated, germ cell-specific chromatin organization is a conserved feature of germline maintenance during embryogenesis.

  19. Real-time detection of α1A-AR movement stimulated by phenylephrine in single living cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Ning XU; Zhang-yi LIANG; Ming XU; Ying-hua GUAN; Qi-hua HE; Qi-de HAN; Xin-sheng ZHAO; You-yi ZHANG

    2007-01-01

    Aim: To investigate the movement of α1A-adrenergic receptors(α1A-AR) stimu-lated by agonist, phenylephrine (PE), and the dynamics of receptor movement in real time in single living cells with millisecond resolution.Methods: We labeled α1A-AR using the monoclonal, anti-FLAG (a kind of tag) antibody and Cy3-conju-gated goat anti-mouse IgG and recorded the trajectory of their transport process in living HEK293A cells stimulated by agonist, PE, and then analyzed their dy-namic properties.Results: The specific detection of α1A-AR on the surface of living HEK293A-α1A cells was achieved. α1A-AR internalize under the stimulation of PE. After the cells were stimulated with PE for 20 rain, apparent colocalization was found between α1A-AR and F-actins. After 40 min stimulation of PE, trajecto-ries of approximate linear motion in HEK293A-α1A cells were recorded, and their velocity was calculated. Condusion: The specific labeling method on the living cell surface provides a convenient means of real-time detection of the behavior of surface receptors. By this method we were able to specifically detectα1A-AR and record the behavior of individual particles of receptors with 50 ms exposure time in real time in single living cells.

  20. A1 demonstrates restricted tissue distribution during embryonic development and functions to protect against cell death.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carrió, R.; López-Hoyos, M.; Jimeno, J.; Benedict, M. A.; Merino, R.; Benito, A.; Fernández-Luna, J. L.; Núñez, G.; García-Porrero, J. A.; Merino, J.

    1996-01-01

    Members of the bcl-2 gene family are essential regulators of cell survival in a wide range of biological processes. A1, a member of the family, is known to be expressed in certain adult tissues. However, the precise tissue distribution and function of A1 remains poorly understood. We show here that A1 is expressed in multiple tissues during murine embryonic development. In the embryo, A1 was detected first at embryonic day 11.5 in liver, brain, and limbs. At day 13.5 of gestation, A1 expression was observed in the central nervous system, liver, perichondrium, and digital zones of developing limbs in a pattern different from that of bcl-X. In the central nervous system of 15.5-day embryos, A1 was expressed at high levels in the ventricular zone and cortical plate of brain cortex. Significantly, the interdigital zones of limbs and the intermediate region of the developing brain cortex, two sites associated with extensive cell death, were devoid of A1 and bcl-X. The expression of A1 was retained in many adult tissues. To assess the ability of A1 to modulate cell death, stable transfectants expressing different amounts of A1 protein were generated in K562 cells. Expression of A1 was associated with retardation of apoptotic cell death induced by actinomycin D and cycloheximide as well as by okadaic acid. Confocal microscopy showed that the A1 protein was localized to the cytoplasm in a pattern similar to that of Bcl-2. These results demonstrate that the expression of A1 is wider than previously reported in adult tissues. Furthermore, its distribution in multiple tissues of the embryo suggests that A1 plays a role in the regulation of physiological cell death during embryonic development. Images Figure 1 Figure 2 Figure 3 Figure 5 PMID:8952545

  1. Ablation of STAT3 in the B Cell Compartment Restricts Gammaherpesvirus Latency In Vivo

    Science.gov (United States)

    Reddy, Sandeep Steven; Foreman, Hui-Chen Chang; Sioux, Thubten Ozula; Park, Gee Ho; Poli, Valeria; Reich, Nancy C.

    2016-01-01

    ABSTRACT A challenging property of gammaherpesviruses is their ability to establish lifelong persistence. The establishment of latency in B cells is thought to involve active virus engagement of host signaling pathways. Pathogenic effects of these viruses during latency or following reactivation can be devastating to the host. Many cancers, including those associated with members of the gammaherpesvirus family, Kaposi’s sarcoma-associated herpesvirus and Epstein-Barr virus, express elevated levels of active host signal transducer and activator of transcription-3 (STAT3). STAT3 is activated by tyrosine phosphorylation in response to many cytokines and can orchestrate effector responses that include proliferation, inflammation, metastasis, and developmental programming. However, the contribution of STAT3 to gammaherpesvirus pathogenesis remains to be completely understood. This is the first study to have identified STAT3 as a critical host determinant of the ability of gammaherpesvirus to establish long-term latency in an animal model of disease. Following an acute infection, murine gammaherpesvirus 68 (MHV68) established latency in resident B cells, but establishment of latency was dramatically reduced in animals with a B cell-specific STAT3 deletion. The lack of STAT3 in B cells did not impair germinal center responses for immunoglobulin (Ig) class switching in the spleen and did not reduce either total or virus-specific IgG titers. Although ablation of STAT3 in B cells did not have a global effect on these assays of B cell function, it had long-term consequences for the viral load of the host, since virus latency was reduced at 6 to 8 weeks postinfection. Our findings establish host STAT3 as a mediator of gammaherpesvirus persistence. PMID:27486189

  2. Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus coat protein is essential for cell-to-cell and long-distance movement but not for viral RNA replication.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shengniao Niu

    Full Text Available Hibiscus chlorotic ringspot virus (HCRSV is a member of the genus Carmovirus in the family Tombusviridae. In order to study its coat protein (CP functions on virus replication and movement in kenaf (Hibiscus cannabinus L., two HCRSV mutants, designated as p2590 (A to G in which the first start codon ATG was replaced with GTG and p2776 (C to G in which proline 63 was replaced with alanine, were constructed. In vitro transcripts of p2590 (A to G were able to replicate to a similar level as wild type without CP expression in kenaf protoplasts. However, its cell-to-cell movement was not detected in the inoculated kenaf cotyledons. Structurally the proline 63 in subunit C acts as a kink for β-annulus formation during virion assembly. Progeny of transcripts derived from p2776 (C to G was able to move from cell-to-cell in inoculated cotyledons but its long-distance movement was not detected. Virions were not observed in partially purified mutant virus samples isolated from 2776 (C to G inoculated cotyledons. Removal of the N-terminal 77 amino acids of HCRSV CP by trypsin digestion of purified wild type HCRSV virions resulted in only T = 1 empty virus-like particles. Taken together, HCRSV CP is dispensable for viral RNA replication but essential for cell-to-cell movement, and virion is required for the virus systemic movement. The proline 63 is crucial for HCRSV virion assembly in kenaf plants and the N-terminal 77 amino acids including the β-annulus domain is required in T = 3 assembly in vitro.

  3. Drosophila Pez acts in Hippo signaling to restrict intestinal stem cell proliferation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poernbacher, Ingrid; Baumgartner, Roland; Marada, Suresh K;

    2012-01-01

    The conserved Hippo signaling pathway acts in growth control and is fundamental to animal development and oncogenesis. Hippo signaling has also been implicated in adult midgut homeostasis in Drosophila. Regulated divisions of intestinal stem cells (ISCs), giving rise to an ISC and an enteroblast...... (EB) that differentiates into an enterocyte (EC) or an enteroendocrine (EE) cell, enable rapid tissue turnover in response to intestinal stress. The damage-related increase in ISC proliferation requires deactivation of the Hippo pathway and consequential activation of the transcriptional coactivator...

  4. Dietary restriction and fasting arrest B and T cell development and increase mature B and T cell numbers in bone marrow.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shushimita, Shushimita; de Bruijn, Marjolein J W; de Bruin, Ron W F; IJzermans, Jan N M; Hendriks, Rudi W; Dor, Frank J M F

    2014-01-01

    Dietary restriction (DR) delays ageing and extends life span. Both long- and short-term DR, as well as short-term fasting provide robust protection against many "neuronal and surgery related damaging phenomena" such as Parkinson's disease and ischemia-reperfusion injury. The exact mechanism behind this phenomenon has not yet been elucidated. Its anti-inflammatory actions prompted us to thoroughly investigate the consequences of DR and fasting on B and T cell compartments in primary and secondary lymphoid organs of male C57Bl/6 mice. In BM we found that DR and fasting cause a decrease in the total B cell population and arrest early B cell development, while increasing the number of recirculating mature B cells. In the fasting group, a significant reduction in peripheral B cell counts was observed in both spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN). Thymopoiesis was arrested significantly at double negative DN2 stage due to fasting, whereas DR resulted in a partial arrest of thymocyte development at the DN4 stage. Mature CD3(+) T cell populations were increased in BM and decreased in both spleen and mLN. Thus, DR arrests B cell development in the BM but increases the number of recirculating mature B cells. DR also arrests maturation of T cells in thymus, resulting in depletion of mature T cells from spleen and mLN while recruiting them to the BM. The functional relevance in relation to protection against organ damage needs to be determined.

  5. Dietary restriction and fasting arrest B and T cell development and increase mature B and T cell numbers in bone marrow.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shushimita Shushimita

    Full Text Available Dietary restriction (DR delays ageing and extends life span. Both long- and short-term DR, as well as short-term fasting provide robust protection against many "neuronal and surgery related damaging phenomena" such as Parkinson's disease and ischemia-reperfusion injury. The exact mechanism behind this phenomenon has not yet been elucidated. Its anti-inflammatory actions prompted us to thoroughly investigate the consequences of DR and fasting on B and T cell compartments in primary and secondary lymphoid organs of male C57Bl/6 mice. In BM we found that DR and fasting cause a decrease in the total B cell population and arrest early B cell development, while increasing the number of recirculating mature B cells. In the fasting group, a significant reduction in peripheral B cell counts was observed in both spleen and mesenteric lymph nodes (mLN. Thymopoiesis was arrested significantly at double negative DN2 stage due to fasting, whereas DR resulted in a partial arrest of thymocyte development at the DN4 stage. Mature CD3(+ T cell populations were increased in BM and decreased in both spleen and mLN. Thus, DR arrests B cell development in the BM but increases the number of recirculating mature B cells. DR also arrests maturation of T cells in thymus, resulting in depletion of mature T cells from spleen and mLN while recruiting them to the BM. The functional relevance in relation to protection against organ damage needs to be determined.

  6. Dynamic imaging of experimental Leishmania donovani-induced hepatic granulomas detects Kupffer cell-restricted antigen presentation to antigen-specific CD8 T cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lynette Beattie

    2010-03-01

    Full Text Available Kupffer cells (KCs represent the major phagocytic population within the liver and provide an intracellular niche for the survival of a number of important human pathogens. Although KCs have been extensively studied in vitro, little is known of their in vivo response to infection and their capacity to directly interact with antigen-specific CD8(+ T cells. Here, using a combination of approaches including whole mount and thin section confocal microscopy, adoptive cell transfer and intra-vital 2-photon microscopy, we demonstrate that KCs represent the only detectable population of mononuclear phagocytes within granulomas induced by Leishmania donovani infection that are capable of presenting parasite-derived peptide to effector CD8(+ T cells. This restriction of antigen presentation to KCs within the Leishmania granuloma has important implications for the identification of new candidate vaccine antigens and for the design of novel immuno-therapeutic interventions.

  7. ERG promotes the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells by restricting their differentiation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Knudsen, Kasper Jermiin; Rehn, Matilda Carolina; Hasemann, Marie Sigurd;

    2015-01-01

    The balance between self-renewal and differentiation is crucial for the maintenance of hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Whereas numerous gene regulatory factors have been shown to control HSC self-renewal or drive their differentiation, we have relatively few insights into transcription factors...

  8. Extra-Low-Frequency Magnetic Fields alter Cancer Cells through Metabolic Restriction

    CERN Document Server

    Li, Ying

    2012-01-01

    Background: Biological effects of extra-low-frequency (ELF) magnetic fields (MF) have lacked a credible mechanism of interaction between MFs and living material. Objectives: Examine the effect of ELF-MFs on cancer cells. Methods: Five cancer cell lines were exposed to ELF-MFs within the range of 0.025 to 5 microT, and the cells were examined for karyotype changes after 6 days. Results: All cancer cells lines lost chromosomes from MF exposure, with a mostly flat dose-response. Constant MF exposures for three weeks allow a rising return to the baseline, unperturbed karyotypes. From this point, small MF increases or decreases are again capable of inducing karyotype contractions. Our data suggests that the karyotype contractions are caused by MF interference with mitochondria's ATP synthase (ATPS), compensated by the action of AMP-activated Protein Kinase (AMPK). The effects of MFs are similar to those of the ATPS inhibitor oligomycin. They are amplified by metformin, an AMPK stimulator, and attenuated by resisti...

  9. XIAP Restricts TNF- and RIP3-Dependent Cell Death and Inflammasome Activation

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Yabal, Monica; Müller, Nicole; Adler, Heiko;

    2014-01-01

    X-linked inhibitor of apoptosis protein (XIAP) has been identified as a potent regulator of innate immune responses, and loss-of-function mutations in XIAP cause the development of the X-linked lymphoproliferative syndrome type 2 (XLP-2) in humans. Using gene-targeted mice, we show that loss...... but proceeds independently of caspase-1/caspase-11 or caspase-8 function. Loss of XIAP results in aberrantly elevated ubiquitylation of RIP1 outside of TNFR complex I. Virally infected Xiap(-/-) mice present with symptoms reminiscent of XLP-2. Our data show that XIAP controls RIP3-dependent cell death and IL-1...... of XIAP or deletion of its RING domain lead to excessive cell death and IL-1β secretion from dendritic cells triggered by diverse Toll-like receptor stimuli. Aberrant IL-1β secretion is TNF dependent and requires RIP3 but is independent of cIAP1/cIAP2. The observed cell death also requires TNF and RIP3...

  10. Temporal restriction of pancreatic branching competence during embryogenesis is mirrored in differentiating embryonic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lim, Sue Mei; Li, Xueling; Schiesser, Jacqueline; Holland, Andrew M; Elefanty, Andrew G; Stanley, Edouard G; Micallef, Suzanne J

    2012-07-01

    To develop methods for the generation of insulin-producing β-cells for the treatment of diabetes, we have used GFP-tagged embryonic stem cells (ESCs) to elucidate the process of pancreas development. Using the reporter Pdx1(GFP/w) ESC line, we have previously described a serum-free differentiation protocol in which Pdx1-GFP(+) cells formed GFP bright (GFP(br)) epithelial buds that resembled those present in the developing mouse pancreas. In this study we extend these findings to demonstrate that these cells can undergo a process of branching morphogenesis, similar to that seen during pancreatic development of the mid-gestation embryo. These partially disaggregated embryoid bodies containing GFP(br) buds initially form epithelial ring-like structures when cultured in Matrigel. After several days in culture, these rings undergo a process of proliferation and form a ramified network of epithelial branches. Comparative analysis of explanted dissociated pancreatic buds from E13.5 Pdx1(GFP/w) embryos and ESC-derived GFP(br) buds reveal a similar process of proliferation and branching, with both embryonic Pdx1(GFP/w) branching pancreatic epithelium and ESC-derived GFP(br) branching organoids expressing markers representing epithelial (EpCAM and E-Cadherin), ductal (Mucin1), exocrine (Amylase and Carboxypeptidase 1A), and endocrine cell types (Glucagon and Somatostatin). ESC-derived branching structures also expressed a suite of genes indicative of ongoing pancreatic differentiation, paralleling gene expression within similar structures derived from the E13.5 fetal pancreas. In summary, differentiating mouse ESCs can generate pancreatic material that has significant similarity to the fetal pancreatic anlagen, providing an in vitro platform for investigating the cellular and molecular mechanisms underpinning pancreatic development.

  11. Restricted Airspace

    Data.gov (United States)

    Federal Laboratory Consortium — Redstone Technical Test Center has restricted airspace up to 30,000 feet ASL. Airspace encompasses R-2104 (Redstone). Airspace is used extensively for airborne/UAV...

  12. Isolation of a T-cell clone showing HLA-DRB1*0405-restricted cytotoxicity for hematopoietic cells in a patient with aplastic anemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakao, S; Takami, A; Takamatsu, H; Zeng, W; Sugimori, N; Yamazaki, H; Miura, Y; Ueda, M; Shiobara, S; Yoshioka, T; Kaneshige, T; Yasukawa, M; Matsuda, T

    1997-05-15

    The existence of T cells capable of inhibiting in vitro hematopoiesis has been shown in aplastic anemia (AA), although whether such inhibition is mediated by a specific immune reaction involving an HLA allele remained unknown. We isolated a CD4+ Vbeta21+ T-cell clone that was most dominant among Vbeta21+ T cells in the bone marrow (BM) of an AA patient whose HLA-DRB1 alleles included 1501 and 0405. The T-cell clone named NT4.2 lysed an autologous Epstein-Barr virus-transformed lymphoblastoid cell line (LCL) and phytohemagglutinin-stimulated lymphocytes (PHA-blasts) as well as allogeneic LCLs sharing HLA-DRB1*0405. Cytotoxicity against LCL cells and PHA-blasts by NT4.2 was blocked by anti-HLA-DR monoclonal antibody (MoAb) or anti-CD3 MoAb. NT4.2 also lysed autologous BM mononuclear cells enriched with CD34+ cells that had been cultured for one week in the presence of colony-stimulating factors as well as allogeneic CD34+ cells of a normal individual carrying HLA-DRB1*0405, cultured in the same way. Moreover, NT4.2 strongly inhibited colony formation by hematopoietic progenitor cells derived from cultured CD34+ cells sharing HLA-DRB1*0405. These results indicate that the AA patient has T cells capable of killing hematopoietic cells in an HLA-DRB1*0405-restricted manner and that such cytotoxic T cells may contribute to the pathogenesis of AA.

  13. Passive leg movement enhances interstitial VEGF protein, endothelial cell proliferation, and eNOS mRNA content in human skeletal muscle

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hellsten, Ylva; Rufener, Nora; Nielsen, Jens J;

    2008-01-01

    were analyzed for mRNA content of VEGF, endothelial nitric oxide synthase (eNOS), and matrix metalloproteinase-2 (MMP-2). The passive leg movement caused an increase (P ... to cultured endothelial cells revealed that dialysate obtained during leg movement induced a 3.2-fold higher proliferation rate (P MMP-2 mRNA levels were...

  14. Deregulation of apoptotic volume decrease and ionic movements in multidrug-resistant tumor cells: role of chloride channels

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Poulsen, Kristian Arild; Andersen, E C; Hansen, C F;

    2010-01-01

    Changes in cell volume and ion gradients across the plasma membrane play a pivotal role in the initiation of apoptosis. Here we explore the kinetics of apoptotic volume decrease (AVD) and ion content dynamics in wild-type (WT) and multidrug-resistant (MDR) Ehrlich ascites tumor cells (EATC). In WT......3728 inhibited AVD and completely abolished the differences in AVD, ionic movements, and caspase 3 activation between WT and MDR EATC. Finally, the maximal capacity of volume-regulated anion channel was found to be strongly repressed in MDR EATC. Together, these data suggest that impairment of AVD...

  15. Sculpting MHC class II-restricted self and non-self peptidome by the class I Ag-processing machinery and its impact on Th-cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spencer, Charles T; Dragovic, Srdjan M; Conant, Stephanie B; Gray, Jennifer J; Zheng, Mu; Samir, Parimal; Niu, Xinnan; Moutaftsi, Magdalini; Van Kaer, Luc; Sette, Alessandro; Link, Andrew J; Joyce, Sebastian

    2013-05-01

    It is generally assumed that the MHC class I antigen (Ag)-processing (CAP) machinery - which supplies peptides for presentation by class I molecules - plays no role in class II-restricted presentation of cytoplasmic Ags. In striking contrast to this assumption, we previously reported that proteasome inhibition, TAP deficiency or ERAAP deficiency led to dramatically altered T helper (Th)-cell responses to allograft (HY) and microbial (Listeria monocytogenes) Ags. Herein, we tested whether altered Ag processing and presentation, altered CD4(+) T-cell repertoire, or both underlay the above finding. We found that TAP deficiency and ERAAP deficiency dramatically altered the quality of class II-associated self peptides suggesting that the CAP machinery impacts class II-restricted Ag processing and presentation. Consistent with altered self peptidomes, the CD4(+) T-cell receptor repertoire of mice deficient in the CAP machinery substantially differed from that of WT animals resulting in altered CD4(+) T-cell Ag recognition patterns. These data suggest that TAP and ERAAP sculpt the class II-restricted peptidome, impacting the CD4(+) T-cell repertoire, and ultimately altering Th-cell responses. Together with our previous findings, these data suggest multiple CAP machinery components sequester or degrade MHC class II-restricted epitopes that would otherwise be capable of eliciting functional Th-cell responses.

  16. Restricted mobility of specific functional groups reduces anti-cancer drug activity in healthy cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Longo Martins, Murillo; Ignazzi, Rosanna; Eckert, Juergen

    2016-01-01

    The most common cancer treatments currently available are radio- and chemo-therapy. These therapies have, however, drawbacks, such as, the reduction in quality of life and the low efficiency of radiotherapy in cases of multiple metastases. To lessen these effects, we have encapsulated an anti-cancer...... drug into a biocompatible matrix. In-vitro assays indicate that this bio-nanocomposite is able to interact and cause morphological changes in cancer cells. Meanwhile, no alterations were observed in monocytes and fibroblasts, indicating that this system might carry the drug in living organisms...

  17. MR1-restricted MAIT cells display ligand discrimination and pathogen selectivity through distinct T cell receptor usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gold, Marielle C.; McLaren, James E.; Reistetter, Joseph A.

    2015-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) that detects microbial metabolites presented by the nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-like molecule MR1. The highly conserved nature of MR1 in conjunction with biased MAIT TCRα chain usage...... is widely thought to indicate limited ligand presentation and discrimination within a pattern-like recognition system. Here, we evaluated the TCR repertoire of MAIT cells responsive to three classes of microbes. Substantial diversity and heterogeneity were apparent across the functional MAIT cell repertoire...... with this interpretation, MAIT cell clones with distinct TCRs responded differentially to a riboflavin metabolite. These results suggest that MAIT cells can discriminate between pathogen-derived ligands in a clonotype-dependent manner, providing a basis for adaptive memory via recruitment of specific repertoires shaped...

  18. MR1-restricted MAIT cells display ligand discrimination and pathogen selectivity through distinct T cell receptor usage

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gold, Marielle C.; McLaren, James E.; Reistetter, Joseph A.

    2014-01-01

    Mucosal-associated invariant T (MAIT) cells express a semi-invariant T cell receptor (TCR) that detects microbial metabolites presented by the nonpolymorphic major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-like molecule MR1. The highly conserved nature of MR1 in conjunction with biased MAIT TCRα chain usage...... is widely thought to indicate limited ligand presentation and discrimination within a pattern-like recognition system. Here, we evaluated the TCR repertoire of MAIT cells responsive to three classes of microbes. Substantial diversity and heterogeneity were apparent across the functional MAIT cell repertoire...... with this interpretation, MAIT cell clones with distinct TCRs responded differentially to a riboflavin metabolite. These results suggest that MAIT cells can discriminate between pathogen-derived ligands in a clonotype-dependent manner, providing a basis for adaptive memory via recruitment of specific repertoires shaped...

  19. Fiber mediated receptor masking in non-infected bystander cells restricts adenovirus cell killing effect but promotes adenovirus host co-existence.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johan Rebetz

    Full Text Available The basic concept of conditionally replicating adenoviruses (CRAD as oncolytic agents is that progenies generated from each round of infection will disperse, infect and kill new cancer cells. However, CRAD has only inhibited, but not eradicated tumor growth in xenograft tumor therapy, and CRAD therapy has had only marginal clinical benefit to cancer patients. Here, we found that CRAD propagation and cancer cell survival co-existed for long periods of time when infection was initiated at low multiplicity of infection (MOI, and cancer cell killing was inefficient and slow compared to the assumed cell killing effect upon infection at high MOI. Excessive production of fiber molecules from initial CRAD infection of only 1 to 2% cancer cells and their release prior to the viral particle itself caused a tropism-specific receptor masking in both infected and non-infected bystander cells. Consequently, the non-infected bystander cells were inefficiently bound and infected by CRAD progenies. Further, fiber overproduction with concomitant restriction of adenovirus spread was observed in xenograft cancer therapy models. Besides the CAR-binding Ad4, Ad5, and Ad37, infection with CD46-binding Ad35 and Ad11 also caused receptor masking. Fiber overproduction and its resulting receptor masking thus play a key role in limiting CRAD functionality, but potentially promote adenovirus and host cell co-existence. These findings also give important clues for understanding mechanisms underlying the natural infection course of various adenoviruses.

  20. Peptide Immunization Elicits Polyomavirus-Specific MHC Class Ib-Restricted CD8 T Cells in MHC Class Ia Allogeneic Mice

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hofstetter, Amelia R.; Evavold, Brian D.

    2013-01-01

    Abstract Unlike the polymorphic MHC class Ia molecules, MHC class Ib molecules are oligomorphic or nonpolymorphic. We recently discovered a protective CD8 T cell response to mouse polyomavirus (MPyV) in H-2b haplotype mice that is restricted by H2-Q9, a member of the Qa-2 MHC class Ib family. Here, we demonstrate that immunization with a peptide corresponding to a virus capsid-derived peptide presented by Q9 also elicits MHC class Ib-restricted MPyV-specific CD8 T cells in mice of H-2s and H-2g7 strains. These findings support the concept that immunization with a single MHC class Ib-restricted peptide can expand CD8 T cells in MHC class Ia allogeneic hosts. PMID:23374150

  1. Oxygen restriction increases the infective potential of Listeria monocytogenes in vitro in Caco-2 cells and in vivo in guinea pigs

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Andersen, Jens Bo; Roldgaard, Bent; Christensen, Bjarke Bak

    2007-01-01

    : Infection of Caco-2 cells revealed that Listeria cultivated under oxygen-restricted conditions were approximately 100 fold more invasive than similar cultures grown without oxygen restriction. This was observed for exponentially growing bacteria, as well as for stationary-phase cultures. Oral dosage......Background: Listeria monocytogenes has been implicated in several food borne outbreaks as well as sporadic cases of disease. Increased understanding of the biology of this organism is important in the prevention of food borne listeriosis. The infectivity of Listeria monocytogenes ScottA, cultivated...... with and without oxygen restriction, was compared in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescent protein labels were applied to allow certain identification of Listeria cells from untagged bacteria in in vivo samples, and to distinguish between cells grown under different conditions in mixed infection experiments. Results...

  2. APM_GUI: analyzing particle movement on the cell membrane and determining confinement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Menchón Silvia A

    2012-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Single-particle tracking is a powerful tool for tracking individual particles with high precision. It provides useful information that allows the study of diffusion properties as well as the dynamics of movement. Changes in particle movement behavior, such as transitions between Brownian motion and temporary confinement, can reveal interesting biophysical interactions. Although useful applications exist to determine the paths of individual particles, only a few software implementations are available to analyze these data, and these implementations are generally not user-friendly and do not have a graphical interface,. Results Here, we present APM_GUI (Analyzing Particle Movement, which is a MatLab-implemented application with a Graphical User Interface. This user-friendly application detects confined movement considering non-random confinement when a particle remains in a region longer than a Brownian diffusant would remain. In addition, APM_GUI exports the results, which allows users to analyze this information using software that they are familiar with. Conclusions APM_GUI provides an open-source tool that quantifies diffusion coefficients and determines whether trajectories have non-random confinements. It also offers a simple and user-friendly tool that can be used by individuals without programming skills.

  3. Controlled meal frequency without caloric restriction alters peripheral blood mononuclear cell cytokine production

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Longo Dan L

    2011-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Intermittent fasting (IF improves healthy lifespan in animals by a mechanism involving reduced oxidative damage and increased resistance to stress. However, no studies have evaluated the impact of controlled meal frequency on immune responses in human subjects. Objective A study was conducted to establish the effects of controlled diets with different meal frequencies, but similar daily energy intakes, on cytokine production in healthy male and female subjects. Design In a crossover study design with an intervening washout period, healthy normal weight middle-age male and female subjects (n = 15 were maintained for 2 months on controlled on-site one meal per day (OMD or three meals per day (TMD isocaloric diets. Serum samples and peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs culture supernatants from subjects were analyzed for the presence of inflammatory markers using a multiplex assay. Results There were no significant differences in the inflammatory markers in the serum of subjects on the OMD or TMD diets. There was an increase in the capacity of PBMCs to produce cytokines in subjects during the first month on the OMD or TMD diets. Lower levels of TNF-α, IL-17, MCP-1 and MIP-1β were produced by PBMCs from subjects on the OMD versus TMD diet. Conclusions PBMCs of subjects on controlled diets exhibit hypersensitivities to cellular stimulation suggesting that stress associated with altered eating behavior might affect cytokine production by immune cells upon stimulation. Moreover, stimulated PBMCs derived from healthy individuals on a reduced meal frequency diet respond with a reduced capability to produce cytokines.

  4. Exosomes in human semen restrict HIV-1 transmission by vaginal cells and block intravaginal replication of LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus complex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madison, Marisa N; Jones, Philip H; Okeoma, Chioma M

    2015-08-01

    Exosomes are membranous extracellular nanovesicles secreted by diverse cell types. Exosomes from healthy human semen have been shown to inhibit HIV-1 replication and to impair progeny virus infectivity. In this study, we examined the ability of healthy human semen exosomes to restrict HIV-1 and LP-BM5 murine AIDS virus transmission in three different model systems. We show that vaginal cells internalize exosomes with concomitant transfer of functional mRNA. Semen exosomes blocked the spread of HIV-1 from vaginal epithelial cells to target cells in our cell-to-cell infection model and suppressed transmission of HIV-1 across the vaginal epithelial barrier in our trans-well model. Our in vivo model shows that human semen exosomes restrict intravaginal transmission and propagation of murine AIDS virus. Our study highlights an antiretroviral role for semen exosomes that may be harnessed for the development of novel therapeutic strategies to combat HIV-1 transmission.

  5. A novel HIV-1 restriction factor that is biologically distinct from APOBEC3 cytidine deaminases in a human T cell line CEM.NKR

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhou Tao

    2009-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Isolation of novel retroviral restriction factors will open new avenues for anti-HIV/AIDS treatment. Although HIV-1 replication is restricted by APOBEC3G/APOBEC3F, TRIM5α, and CD317, none defend HIV-1 infection under natural conditions. Previously, we demonstrated a host factor from the human T cell line CEM.NKR that potently restricted wild-type HIV-1 replication. Interestingly, this restriction resembled the APOBEC3G/APOBEC3F pattern in that viral replication was inhibited from the second round of replication cycle at a post-entry step. Results Here, we further characterized this factor and found it distinguishable from the known anti-HIV APOBEC3 proteins. Although CEM.NKR cells expressed both APOBEC3G and APOBEC3F, their levels were at least 10 or 4-fold lower than those in H9 cells, and importantly, Vif effectively neutralized their activity. Among eight subclones isolated from CEM.NKR cells, one was relatively permissive, four were semi-permissive, and three were completely non-permissive for HIV-1 replication. When the levels of APOBEC3 expression were determined, all these clones retained similar low levels of APOBEC3DE, APOBEC3F, APOBEC3G and APOBEC3H expression, and no APOBEC3B expression was detected. Since the vif from SIVmac can effectively neutralize APOBEC3B and APOBEC3H, recombinant HIV-1 expressing this SIV gene were created. However, these viruses still failed to replicate in CEM.NKR cells. We also confirmed that HIV-1 restriction in CEM.NKR was not due to a loss of calnexin expression. Conclusion Taken together, these results not only demonstrate that all these aforementioned anti-HIV APOBEC3 proteins do not contribute to this HIV-1 restriction, but also shed light on a novel and potent HIV-1 inhibitor in CEM.NKR cells.

  6. Stimulation of circus movement by activin, bFGF and TGF-beta 2 in isolated animal cap cells of Xenopus laevis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Minoura, I; Nakamura, H; Tashiro, K; Shiokawa, K

    1995-01-01

    Lobopodium is a hyaline cytoplasmic protrusion which rotates circumferencially around a cell. This movement is called circus movement, which is seen in dissociated cells of amphibian embryos. Relative abundance of the lobopodia-forming cells changes temporally and spatially within Xenopus embryos, reflecting stage-dependent difference of morphogenetic movements. The lobopodia-forming activity of dissociated animal cap cells was stimulated strongly by activin and bFGF, and weakly by TGF-beta 2. In addition, activin A was found to stimulate cellular attachment to the substratum when the cultivation lasted long. Thus, mesoderm-inducing growth factors stimulate lobopodia formation and cellular movements which may be necessary for gastrulation and neurulation in Xenopus early embryos.

  7. Macrophage-tumour cell interactions: identification of MUC1 on breast cancer cells as a potential counter-receptor for the macrophage-restricted receptor, sialoadhesin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nath, D; Hartnell, A; Happerfield, L; Miles, D W; Burchell, J; Taylor-Papadimitriou, J; Crocker, P R

    1999-10-01

    In many carcinomas, infiltrating macrophages are commonly found closely associated with tumour cells but little is known concerning the nature or significance of adhesion molecules involved in these cellular interactions. Here we demonstrate in primary human breast cancers that sialoadhesin (Sn), a macrophage-restricted adhesion molecule, is frequently expressed on infiltrating cells that often make close contact with breast carcinoma cells. To determine whether Sn could act as a specific receptor for ligands on breast cancer cell lines, binding assays were performed with a recombinant form of the protein fused to the Fc portion of human immunoglobulin G1 (IgG1) (Sn-Fc). Sn-Fc was found to bind specifically and in a sialic acid-dependent manner to the breast cancer cell lines MCF-7, T47.D and BT-20 both in solid- and solution-phase binding assays. To investigate the nature of the sialoglycoproteins recognized by Sn on breast cancer cells, MCF-7 cells were labelled with [6-3H]glucosamine. Following precipitation with Sn-Fc, a major band of approximately 240000 MW was revealed, which was shown in reprecipitation and Western blotting experiments to be the epithelial mucin, MUC1.

  8. Peripheral blood-derived bovine dendritic cells promote IgG1-restricted B cell responses in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bajer, Anna A; Garcia-Tapia, David; Jordan, Kimberly R; Haas, Karen M; Werling, Dirk; Howard, Chris J; Estes, D Mark

    2003-01-01

    Regulation of humoral responses involves multiple cell types including the requirements for cognate interactions between T and B cells to drive CD40-dependent responses to T-dependent antigens. A third cell type has also been shown to play an essential role, the dendritic cell (DC). We demonstrate that bovine peripheral blood-derived (PB)-DC are similar in function to features described for human interstitial DC including the production of signature type 2 cytokines [interleukin (IL)-13, IL-10]. PB-DC express moderate-to-high costimulatory molecule expression, and major histocompatibility complex class II is negative for CD14 expression and has low or no expression of CD11c. Consistent with the interstitial phenotype is the ability of PB-DC to influence B cell activation and differentiation via direct expression of CD40L and type 2 cytokines. Collectively, these results suggest that direct B cell-DC interactions may promote an immunoglobulin-isotype expression pattern consistent with type 2 responses, independent of direct T cell involvement.

  9. Calcium movement, graviresponsiveness and the structure of columella cells and columella tissues in roots of Allium cepa L

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moore, R.

    1985-01-01

    Roots of Allium cepa L. cv. Yellow are differentially responsive to gravity. Long (e.g. 40 mm) roots are strongly graviresponsive, while short (c.g. 4 mm) roots are minimally responsive to gravity. Although columella cells of graviresponsive roots are larger than those of nongraviresponsive roots, they partition their volumes to cellular organelles similarly. The movement of amyloplasts and nuclei in columella cells of horizontally-oriented roots correlates positively with the onset of gravicurvature. Furthermore, there is no significant difference in the rates of organellar redistribution when graviresponsive and nongraviresponsive roots are oriented horizontally. The more pronounced graviresponsiveness of longer roots correlates positively with (1) their caps being 9-6 times more voluminous, (2) their columella tissues being 42 times more voluminous, (3) their caps having 15 times more columella cells, and (4) their columella tissues having relative volumes 4.4 times larger than those of shorter, nongraviresponsive roots. Graviresponsive roots that are oriented horizontally are characterized by a strongly polar movement of 45Ca2+ across the root tip from the upper to the lower side, while similarly oriented nongraviresponsive roots exhibit only a minimal polar transport of 45Ca2+. These results indicate that the differential graviresponsiveness of roots of A. cepa is probably not due to either (1) ultrastructural differences in their columella cells, (2) differences in the rates of organellar redistribution when roots are oriented horizontally. Rather, these results indicate the graviresponsiveness may require an extensive columella tissue, which, in turn, may be necessary for polar movement of 45Ca2+ across the root tip.

  10. Restrictive Palivizumab Use Does Not Lead to Increased Morbidity and Mortality in Pediatric Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Teusink-Cross, Ashley; Davies, Stella M; Danziger-Isakov, Lara; El-Bietar, Javier; Grimley, Michael S

    2016-10-01

    Respiratory syncytial virus (RSV) is a common cause of infection in immunocompromised patients and can lead to significant morbidity and mortality in pediatric hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT) patients and patients with a primary immune deficiency (PID). Palivizumab is a humanized monoclonal antibody that targets the F glycoprotein on the surface of the RSV virus, preventing RSV replication. Palivizumab was initially licensed for the prevention of RSV infections in children at high risk of severe disease. Since licensure, the American Academy of Pediatrics (AAP) has issued guidelines to help ensure appropriate use of palivizumab in pediatric patients. In the 2014 edition of the guidelines, the AAP recognizes that severe and fatal disease secondary to RSV can be seen in patients receiving chemotherapy or patients who are immunocompromised because of other conditions. However, they recognize that no large clinical trials exist to support the use of palivizumab, and efficacy and safety data in this population are limited. Despite this, the AAP recommends considering prophylaxis for children younger than 24 months who are profoundly immunocompromised during the RSV season. Because of the high cost of palivizumab, the uncertainty of its efficacy as prophylaxis in hospitalized pediatric HSCT and PID patients, and secondary to recent data from our center that suggested immunocompromised patients diagnosed with RSV did not have worse outcomes, we implemented very restrictive criteria for the use of palivizumab in the 2015 to 2016 RSV season in our pediatric HSCT population. Despite these strict criteria, there was no change in the number of patients developing RSV during this season compared with previous seasons, and there was no change in RSV course in those patients developing RSV compared with previous seasons. Restricted use also resulted in a significant dose and cost savings. Based on our experience, we recommend only administering prophylaxis

  11. Propranolol Restricts the Mobility of Single EGF-Receptors on the Cell Surface before Their Internalization

    Science.gov (United States)

    Otero, Carolina; Linke, Max; Sanchez, Paula; González, Alfonso; Schaap, Iwan A. T.

    2013-01-01

    The epidermal growth factor receptor is involved in morphogenesis, proliferation and cell migration. Its up-regulation during tumorigenesis makes this receptor an interesting therapeutic target. In the absence of the ligand, the inhibition of phosphatidic acid phosphohydrolase activity by propranolol treatment leads to internalization of empty/inactive receptors. The molecular events involved in this endocytosis remain unknown. Here, we quantified the effects of propranolol on the mobility of single quantum-dot labelled receptors before the actual internalization took place. The single receptors showed a clear stop-and-go motion; their diffusive tracks were continuously interrupted by sub-second stalling events, presumably caused by transient clustering. In the presence of propranolol we found that: i) the diffusion rate reduced by 22 %, which indicates an increase in drag of the receptor. Atomic force microscopy measurements did not show an increase of the effective membrane tension, such that clustering of the receptor remains the likely mechanism for its reduced mobility. ii) The receptor got frequently stalled for longer periods of multiple seconds, which may signal the first step of the internalization process. PMID:24349439

  12. Striking movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Dahl, Sofia

    2011-01-01

    note onsets and short interaction times between player and instrument do not allow for much adjustment once a stroke is initiated. The paper surveys research that shows a close relationship between movement and sound production, and how playing conditions such as tempo and the rebound after impact...... affect the movements. Furthermore, I discuss differences in movement organization, and visual information from striking movements....

  13. Oxygen restriction increases the infective potential of Listeria monocytogenes in vitro in Caco-2 cells and in vivo in guinea pigs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Licht Tine

    2007-06-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Listeria monocytogenes has been implicated in several food borne outbreaks as well as sporadic cases of disease. Increased understanding of the biology of this organism is important in the prevention of food borne listeriosis. The infectivity of Listeria monocytogenes ScottA, cultivated with and without oxygen restriction, was compared in vitro and in vivo. Fluorescent protein labels were applied to allow certain identification of Listeria cells from untagged bacteria in in vivo samples, and to distinguish between cells grown under different conditions in mixed infection experiments. Results Infection of Caco-2 cells revealed that Listeria cultivated under oxygen-restricted conditions were approximately 100 fold more invasive than similar cultures grown without oxygen restriction. This was observed for exponentially growing bacteria, as well as for stationary-phase cultures. Oral dosage of guinea pigs with Listeria resulted in a significantly higher prevalence (p Listeria in fecal samples was observed after dosage with oxygen-restricted bacteria. These differences were seen after challenge with single Listeria cultures, as well as with a mixture of two cultures grown with and without oxygen restriction. Conclusion Our results show for the first time that the environmental conditions to which L. monocytogenes is exposed prior to ingestion are decisive for its in vivo infective potential in the gastrointestinal tract after passage of the gastric barrier. This is highly relevant for safety assessment of this organism in food.

  14. Ser/Thr kinase-like protein of Nicotiana benthamiana is involved in the cell-to-cell movement of Bamboo mosaic virus.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shun-Fang Cheng

    Full Text Available To investigate the plant genes affected by Bamboo mosaic virus (BaMV infection, we applied a cDNA-amplified fragment length polymorphism technique to screen genes with differential expression. A serine/threonine kinase-like (NbSTKL gene of Nicotiana benthamiana is upregulated after BaMV infection. NbSTKL contains the homologous domain of Ser/Thr kinase. Knocking down the expression of NbSTKL by virus-induced gene silencing reduced the accumulation of BaMV in the inoculated leaves but not in the protoplasts. The spread of GFP-expressing BaMV in the inoculated leaves is also impeded by a reduced expression of NbSTKL. These data imply that NbSTKL facilitates the cell-to-cell movement of BaMV. The subcellular localization of NbSTKL is mainly on the cell membrane, which has been confirmed by mutagenesis and fractionation experiments. Combined with the results showing that active site mutation of NbSTKL does not change its subcellular localization but significantly affects BaMV accumulation, we conclude that NbSTKL may regulate BaMV movement on the cell membrane by its kinase-like activity. Moreover, the transient expression of NbSTKL does not significantly affect the accumulation of Cucumber mosaic virus (CMV and Potato virus X (PVX; thus, NbSTKL might be a specific protein facilitating BaMV movement.

  15. H2-M3-restricted CD8+ T cells induced by peptide-pulsed dendritic cells confer protection against Mycobacterium tuberculosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Doi, Takehiko; Yamada, Hisakata; Yajima, Toshiki; Wajjwalku, Worawidh; Hara, Toshiro; Yoshikai, Yasunobu

    2007-03-15

    One of the oligopolymorphic MHC class Ib molecules, H2-M3, presents N-formylated peptides derived from bacteria. In this study, we tested the ability of an H2-M3-binding peptide, TB2, to induce protection in C57BL/6 mice against Mycobacterium tuberculosis. Immunization with bone marrow-derived dendritic cell (BMDC) pulsed with TB2 or a MHC class Ia-binding peptide, MPT64(190-198) elicited an expansion of Ag-specific CD8+ T cells in the spleen and the lung. The number of TB2-specific CD8+ T cells reached a peak on day 6, contracted with kinetics similar to MPT64(190-198)-specific CD8+ T cells and was maintained at an appreciable level for at least 60 days. The TB2-specific CD8+ T cells produced less effector cytokines but have stronger cytotoxic activity than MPT64(190-198)-specific CD8+ T cells. Mice immunized with TB2-pulsed BMDC as well as those with MPT64(190-198)-pulsed BMDC showed significant protection against an intratracheal challenge with M. tuberculosis H37Rv. However, histopathology of the lung in mice immunized with TB2-pulsed BMDC was different from mice immunized with MPT64(190-198)-pulsed BMDC. Our results suggest that immunization with BMDC pulsed with MHC class Ib-restricted peptides would be a useful vaccination strategy against M. tuberculosis.

  16. Tetherin does not significantly restrict dendritic cell-mediated HIV-1 transmission and its expression is upregulated by newly synthesized HIV-1 Nef

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wu Li

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Dendritic cells (DCs are among the first cells to encounter HIV-1 and play important roles in viral transmission and pathogenesis. Immature DCs allow productive HIV-1 replication and long-term viral dissemination. The pro-inflammatory factor lipopolysaccharide (LPS induces DC maturation and enhances the efficiency of DC-mediated HIV-1 transmission. Type I interferon (IFN partially inhibits HIV-1 replication and cell-cell transmission in CD4+ T cells and macrophages. Tetherin is a type I IFN-inducible restriction factor that blocks HIV-1 release and modulates CD4+ T cell-mediated cell-to-cell transmission of HIV-1. However, the role of type I IFN and tetherin in HIV-1 infection of DCs and DC-mediated viral transmission remains unknown. Results We demonstrated that IFN-alpha (IFNα-induced mature DCs restricted HIV-1 replication and trans-infection of CD4+ T cells. Tetherin expression in monocyte-derived immature DCs was undetectable or very low. High levels of tetherin were transiently expressed in LPS- and IFNα-induced mature DCs, while HIV-1 localized into distinct patches in these DCs. Knockdown of induced tetherin in LPS- or IFNα-matured DCs modestly enhanced HIV-1 transmission to CD4+ T cells, but had no significant effect on wild-type HIV-1 replication in mature DCs. Intriguingly, we found that HIV-1 replication in immature DCs induced significant tetherin expression in a Nef-dependent manner. Conclusions The restriction of HIV-1 replication and transmission in IFNα-induced mature DCs indicates a potent anti-HIV-1 response; however, high levels of tetherin induced in mature DCs cannot significantly restrict wild-type HIV-1 release and DC-mediated HIV-1 transmission. Nef-dependent tetherin induction in HIV-1-infected immature DCs suggests an innate immune response of DCs to HIV-1 infection.

  17. Restrictive dermopathy and fetal behaviour

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Mulder, EJH; Beemer, FA; Stoutenbeek, P

    2001-01-01

    We report three siblings from consecutive pregnancies affected with restrictive dermopathy (RD). During the second pregnancy, fetal behavioural development and growth were studied extensively using ultrasound at 1-4 week intervals. Dramatic and sudden changes occurred in fetal body movements and gro

  18. Caloric Restriction reduces inflammation and improves T cell-mediated immune response in obese mice but concomitant consumption of curcumin/piperine adds no further benefit

    Science.gov (United States)

    Obesity is associated with low-grade inflammation and impaired immune response. Caloric restriction (CR) has been shown to inhibit inflammatory response and enhance cell-mediated immune function. Curcumin, the bioactive phenolic component of turmeric spice, is proposed to have anti-obesity and anti-...

  19. Identification of a cross-reactive HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted CD4 T cell response directed against cholesterol-binding cytolysins from two different pathogens.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paschen, Annette; Song, Mingxia; Schenk, Simone; Janda, Jozef; Nguyen, Xuan Duc; Osen, Wolfram; Schadendorf, Dirk; Geginat, Gernot

    2006-07-01

    Cholesterol-binding cytolysins constitute an evolutionarily conserved family of pore-forming proteins expressed by different gram-positive pathogens. Listeriolysin O, one well-characterized member of the cytolysin family, is also known to induce specific CD4 and CD8 T cell responses upon infection of mice with Listeria monocytogenes. Here we describe an HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted listeriolysin O-derived T cell epitope that is conserved among several members of the cytolysin family. An HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted CD4+ T cell line, established from spleen lymphocytes of L. monocytogenes-infected HLA-DRB1*0301-transgenic mice, cross-reacted with a homologous peptide from perfringolysin O, a cytolysin expressed by Clostridium perfringens. Ex vivo analysis of infected mice revealed an even broader cross-reaction of T cells with homologous peptides derived from perfringolysin O, streptolysin O, and cereolysin O. Interestingly, a cross-reactive memory CD4+ T cell response against the homologous peptides derived from listeriolysin O and perfringolysin O could also be detected in the blood from healthy HLA-DRB1*0301+ human donors. Remarkably, this response was even present in donors who did not exhibit a memory T cell reactivity against a second, non-conserved HLA-DRB1*0301-restricted LLO-derived CD4 T cell epitope, suggesting that cytolysin-producing bacteria other than L. monocytogenes can stimulate a cross-reactive cytolysin-specific immunity.

  20. Completion of hepatitis C virus replication cycle in heterokaryons excludes dominant restrictions in human non-liver and mouse liver cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne Frentzen

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Hepatitis C virus (HCV is hepatotropic and only infects humans and chimpanzees. Consequently, an immunocompetent small animal model is lacking. The restricted tropism of HCV likely reflects specific host factor requirements. We investigated if dominant restriction factors expressed in non-liver or non-human cell lines inhibit HCV propagation thus rendering these cells non-permissive. To this end we explored if HCV completes its replication cycle in heterokaryons between human liver cell lines and non-permissive cell lines from human non-liver or mouse liver origin. Despite functional viral pattern recognition pathways and responsiveness to interferon, virus production was observed in all fused cells and was only ablated when cells were treated with exogenous interferon. These results exclude that constitutive or virus-induced expression of dominant restriction factors prevents propagation of HCV in these cell types, which has important implications for HCV tissue and species tropism. In turn, these data strongly advocate transgenic approaches of crucial human HCV cofactors to establish an immunocompetent small animal model.

  1. Cell type-restricted activity of hnRNPM promotes breast cancer metastasis via regulating alternative splicing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Yilin; Gao, Xin D; Lee, Jae-Hyung; Huang, Huilin; Tan, Haiyan; Ahn, Jaegyoon; Reinke, Lauren M; Peter, Marcus E; Feng, Yue; Gius, David; Siziopikou, Kalliopi P; Peng, Junmin; Xiao, Xinshu; Cheng, Chonghui

    2014-06-01

    Tumor metastasis remains the major cause of cancer-related death, but its molecular basis is still not well understood. Here we uncovered a splicing-mediated pathway that is essential for breast cancer metastasis. We show that the RNA-binding protein heterogeneous nuclear ribonucleoprotein M (hnRNPM) promotes breast cancer metastasis by activating the switch of alternative splicing that occurs during epithelial-mesenchymal transition (EMT). Genome-wide deep sequencing analysis suggests that hnRNPM potentiates TGFβ signaling and identifies CD44 as a key downstream target of hnRNPM. hnRNPM ablation prevents TGFβ-induced EMT and inhibits breast cancer metastasis in mice, whereas enforced expression of the specific CD44 standard (CD44s) splice isoform overrides the loss of hnRNPM and permits EMT and metastasis. Mechanistically, we demonstrate that the ubiquitously expressed hnRNPM acts in a mesenchymal-specific manner to precisely control CD44 splice isoform switching during EMT. This restricted cell-type activity of hnRNPM is achieved by competition with ESRP1, an epithelial splicing regulator that binds to the same cis-regulatory RNA elements as hnRNPM and is repressed during EMT. Importantly, hnRNPM is associated with aggressive breast cancer and correlates with increased CD44s in patient specimens. These findings demonstrate a novel molecular mechanism through which tumor metastasis is endowed by the hnRNPM-mediated splicing program.

  2. A novel HLA-B18 restricted CD8+ T cell epitope is efficiently cross-presented by dendritic cells from soluble tumor antigen.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rona Y Zhao

    Full Text Available NY-ESO-1 has been a major target of many immunotherapy trials because it is expressed by various cancers and is highly immunogenic. In this study, we have identified a novel HLA-B*1801-restricted CD8(+ T cell epitope, NY-ESO-1(88-96 (LEFYLAMPF and compared its direct- and cross-presentation to that of the reported NY-ESO-1(157-165 epitope restricted to HLA-A*0201. Although both epitopes were readily cross-presented by DCs exposed to various forms of full-length NY-ESO-1 antigen, remarkably NY-ESO-1(88-96 is much more efficiently cross-presented from the soluble form, than NY-ESO-1(157-165. On the other hand, NY-ESO-1(157-165 is efficiently presented by NY-ESO-1-expressing tumor cells and its presentation was not enhanced by IFN-γ treatment, which induced immunoproteasome as demonstrated by Western blots and functionally a decreased presentation of Melan A(26-35; whereas NY-ESO-1(88-96 was very inefficiently presented by the same tumor cell lines, except for one that expressed high level of immunoproteasome. It was only presented when the tumor cells were first IFN-γ treated, followed by infection with recombinant vaccinia virus encoding NY-ESO-1, which dramatically increased NY-ESO-1 expression. These data indicate that the presentation of NY-ESO-1(88-96 is immunoproteasome dependent. Furthermore, a survey was conducted on multiple samples collected from HLA-B18(+ melanoma patients. Surprisingly, all the detectable responses to NY-ESO-1(88-96 from patients, including those who received NY-ESO-1 ISCOMATRIX™ vaccine were induced spontaneously. Taken together, these results imply that some epitopes can be inefficiently presented by tumor cells although the corresponding CD8(+ T cell responses are efficiently primed in vivo by DCs cross-presenting these epitopes. The potential implications for cancer vaccine strategies are further discussed.

  3. The ability of PVX p25 to form RL structures in plant cells is necessary for its function in movement, but not for its suppression of RNA silencing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yan, Fei; Lu, Yuwen; Lin, Lin; Zheng, Hongying; Chen, Jianping

    2012-01-01

    The p25 triple gene block protein of Potato virus X (PVX) is multifunctional, participating in viral movement and acting as a suppressor of RNA silencing. The cell-to-cell movement of PVX is known to depend on the suppression function of p25. GFP-fused p25 accumulates in rod-like (RL) structures with intense fluorescence in cells. By monitoring the location of fluorescence at different times, we have now shown that the RL structure is composed of filaments. P25 mutants without the conditional ability to recover movement function could not form RL structures while the mutants that had the ability did form the structure, suggesting that the ability of p25 to form RL structures is necessary for its function in cell-to-cell movement, but not for its suppressor function. Moreover, chemical inhibition of microfilaments in cells destroyed the formation of the complete RL structure. Additionally, TGBp2 and TGBp3 were recruited into the RL structure, suggesting a relationship between the TGBps in virus movement.

  4. Evaluation of agglutination strength by a flow-induced cell movement assay based surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sudprasert, Krisda; Peungthum, Patjaree; Vongsakulyanon, Apirom; Amarit, Ratthasart; Somboonkaew, Armote; Sutapun, Boonsong; Kitpoka, Pimpun; Kunakorn, Mongkol; Srikhirin, Toemsak

    2015-02-07

    A flow-induced cell movement assay combined with a surface plasmon resonance (SPR) technique was developed to quantify the agglutination strength, derived from the standard tube-agglutination test. Red blood cells (RBCs), based on the ABO blood group system, were specifically captured by anti-A and/or anti-B antibodies immobilized on a sensor surface. The agglutination strength corresponds to the amount of antigen-antibody interactions or the strength of RBC adhesion. Under a shear flow, the adherent RBCs were forced to move out of the region of interest with different average cell velocities (vc) depending upon the adhesion strength and wall shear stress (WSS). That is, a higher adhesion strength (higher agglutination strength) or lower WSS represents a lower vc or vice versa. In this work, the agglutination strength was derived from the vc that was calculated from the time derivative of the relative SPR signal by using a simple model of cell movement response, whose validity was verified. The vc values of different samples were correlated with their agglutination strengths at a given WSS and antibody surface density. The vc decreased as the agglutination strength increased, which can be considered as a linear regression. The coefficient of variation of the calculated vc decreased to 0.1 as vc increased to 30 μm min(-1). The sensitivity of this assay can be controlled by optimizing the antibody surface density or the WSS. This assay has the capability to resolve the antigen density of A1 and B RBCs from that of A1B RBCs.

  5. Identification of conserved subdominant HIV Type 1 CD8(+) T Cell epitopes restricted within common HLA Supertypes for therapeutic HIV Type 1 vaccines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Kløverpris, Henrik; Jensen, Kristoffer Jarlov;

    2012-01-01

    The high HIV-1 prevalence, up to 4.6% in Guinea-Bissau, West Africa, makes it a relevant location for testing of therapeutic vaccines. With the aim of performing a clinical study in Guinea-Bissau, after first testing the vaccine for safety in Denmark, Europe, we here describe the design...... of a universal epitope peptide-based T cell vaccine with relevance for any geographic locations. The two major obstacles when designing such a vaccine are the high diversities of the HIV-1 genome and of the human major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class I. We selected 15 CD8-restricted epitopes predicted......-specific, HLA-restricted T cell specificities using peptide-MHC class I tetramer labeling of CD8(+) T cells from HIV-1-infected individuals. The selected vaccine epitopes are infrequently targeted in HIV-1-infected individuals from both locations. Moreover, we HLA-typed HIV-1-infected individuals...

  6. Development of a T cell receptor targeting an HLA-A*0201 restricted epitope from the cancer-testis antigen SSX2 for adoptive immunotherapy of cancer.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Daniel Abate-Daga

    Full Text Available The clinical success of adoptive immunotherapy of cancer relies on the selection of target antigens that are highly expressed in tumor cells but absent in essential normal tissues. A group of genes that encode the cancer/testis or cancer germline antigens have been proposed as ideal targets for immunotherapy due to their high expression in multiple cancer types and their restricted expression in immunoprivileged normal tissues. In the present work we report the isolation and characterization of human T cell receptors (TCRs with specificity for synovial sarcoma X breakpoint 2 (SSX2, a cancer/testis antigen expressed in melanoma, prostate cancer, lymphoma, multiple myeloma and pancreatic cancer, among other tumors. We isolated seven HLA-A2 restricted T cell receptors from natural T cell clones derived from tumor-infiltrated lymph nodes of two SSX2-seropositive melanoma patients, and selected four TCRs for cloning into retroviral vectors. Peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBL transduced with three of four SSX2 TCRs showed SSX241-49 (KASEKIFYV peptide specific reactivity, tumor cell recognition and tetramer binding. One of these, TCR-5, exhibited tetramer binding in both CD4 and CD8 cells and was selected for further studies. Antigen-specific and HLA-A*0201-restricted interferon-γ release, cell lysis and lymphocyte proliferation was observed following culture of TCR engineered human PBL with relevant tumor cell lines. Codon optimization was found to increase TCR-5 expression in transduced T cells, and this construct has been selected for development of clinical grade viral vector producing cells. The tumor-specific pattern of expression of SSX2, along with the potent and selective activity of TCR-5, makes this TCR an attractive candidate for potential TCR gene therapy to treat multiple cancer histologies.

  7. Cell biology in orthodontic tooth movement: The known and the unknown

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    REN Yi-jin

    2005-01-01

    This review is aimed at providing, at the cellular level, a concise and complete overview of the important knowledge on the mechanism of orthodontic tooth movement to orthodontists and postgraduates who are involved or interested in basic research. The construction of this article was oriented to the following key questions: Where an osteoclast starts to its first resorption site? When the cascade of a resorption cycle starts? What are the factors involved in bone remodeling and how they orchestrate? What happens before and after the formation of a resorption pit? Major findings in these aspects were summarized and discussed. In addition, related biological phenomenon such as orthodontically induced root resorption was intensively reviewed. By means of an updated and systematic review, the author intended to introduce more biological evidence to orthodontic intervention and to encourage evidence-based treatment in daily orthodontic practice.

  8. Shadowing on Apollo 12 Solar Cells and Possible Movement of the ALSEP Central Station

    Science.gov (United States)

    Berman, Paul A.; Williams, David R.

    2014-01-01

    A fortuitous arrangement of a west-facing solar cell and a bracket on the Apollo 12 ALSEP (Apollo Lunar Surface Experiments Package) has allowed us to precisely determine the relative position of the Sun near sunset relative to the Apollo 12 central station over a period of nearly 8 years. The small bracket, mounted on the central station due west of the cell, casts a shadow on the cell near sunset, decreasing the output of the cell proportional to the area of shadow covering the cell. The pattern of shadowing by the bracket gives good agreement with the known change of solar azimuth on a yearly timescale, but the pattern gradually but constantly changed from year-to-year, in a manner inconsistent with the known and changing position of the Sun.

  9. Differential in vivo clearance and response to secondary heterologous infections by H2(b)-restricted dengue virus-specific CD8+ T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Beaumier, Coreen M; Jaiswal, Smita; West, Kim Y; Friberg, Heather; Mathew, Anuja; Rothman, Alan L

    2010-10-01

    Cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) are hypothesized to play a role in clearance during primary dengue virus (DENV) infections, and contribute to immunopathology during secondary heterologous infections in humans. We previously reported skewed T-cell responses to secondary DENV infection in BALB/c (H-2(d)) mice, reproducing characteristics of human DENV infection. To set the stage for using widely available transgenic and knockout mice, we extended these studies to identify DENV-specific T-cell responses in C57BL/6 (H-2(b)) mice. We identified dominant CD8+ T-cell responses to H-2D(b)-restricted epitopes on the DENV NS4a (aa 249-265) and NS5 (aa 521-537) proteins. High frequencies of IFN-γ- and TNF-α-producing T cells directed at both epitopes were detected following primary infection with all four DENV serotypes, and were augmented by secondary DENV infections. In vivo cytotoxicity assays demonstrated rapid clearance of target cells pulsed with the NS4a peptide; in contrast, NS5 peptide-pulsed target cells were poorly cleared in vivo. These data characterize two H-2(b)-restricted T-cell epitopes displaying divergent in vivo function. These results should facilitate further studies of the in vivo effects of DENV-specific T cells, including the use of genetically modified mouse strains.

  10. In vitro and in vivo analyses of a genetically—restricted antigen specific factor from mixed cell cultures of macrophage,T and B lymphocytes

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHAURMW; LAUASK

    1990-01-01

    An immunostimulatory factor was identified to be secreted by antigen-pulsed macrophages.This factor was able to induce the generation of antigen specific T helper lymphocytes in vitro as well as in vivo.Further in vitro experiments testing for the genetic restriction of this factor indicated that it is a geneticallyrestricted antigen specific factor (ASF).The Cunningham plaque assay was used to quantify the generation of T helper lymphocytes by measuring the number of plaque forming cells after sequential incubations of antigen-qulsed macrophages with T lymphocytes,and then spleen cells,and finally the TNP-coated sheep red blood cells.

  11. MHC-I-restricted epitopes conserved among variola and other related orthopoxviruses are recognized by T cells 30 years after vaccination

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tang, Sheila Tuyet; Wang, M.; Lamberth, K.;

    2008-01-01

    It is many years since the general population has been vaccinated against smallpox virus. Here, we report that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I restricted T cell epitopes can be recognized more than 30 years after vaccination. Using bioinformatic methods, we predicted 177 potential cytotoxic...... to a better understanding of poxvirus immunity and may aid in the development of new improved vaccines and diagnostic tools.......It is many years since the general population has been vaccinated against smallpox virus. Here, we report that human leukocyte antigen (HLA) class I restricted T cell epitopes can be recognized more than 30 years after vaccination. Using bioinformatic methods, we predicted 177 potential cytotoxic T...... lymphocyte epitopes. Eight epitopes were confirmed to stimulate IFN-gamma release by T cells in smallpox-vaccinated subjects. The epitopes were restricted by five supertypes (HLA-A1, -A2, -A24 -A26 and -B44). Significant T cell responses were detected against 8 of 45 peptides with an HLA class I affinity...

  12. Movement as utopia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Couton, Philippe; López, José Julián

    2009-10-01

    Opposition to utopianism on ontological and political grounds has seemingly relegated it to a potentially dangerous form of antiquated idealism. This conclusion is based on a restrictive view of utopia as excessively ordered panoptic discursive constructions. This overlooks the fact that, from its inception, movement has been central to the utopian tradition. The power of utopianism indeed resides in its ability to instantiate the tension between movement and place that has marked social transformations in the modern era. This tension continues in contemporary discussions of movement-based social processes, particularly international migration and related identity formations, such as open borders transnationalism and cosmopolitanism. Understood as such, utopia remains an ongoing and powerful, albeit problematic instrument of social and political imagination.

  13. Mechanics of circadian pulvini movements in Phaseolus coccineus L. : Shape and arrangement of motor cells, micellation of motor cell walls, and bulk moduli of extensibility ([Formula: see text]).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mayer, W E; Flach, D; Raju, M V; Starrach, N; Wiech, E

    1985-03-01

    The circadian movement of the lamina of primary leaves of Phaseolus coccineus L. is mediated by antagonistic changes in the length of the extensor and flexor cells of the laminar pulvinus. The cortex of the pulvinus is a concentric structure composed of hexagonal disc-like cells, arranged in longitudinal rows around the central stele. Observations with polarization optics indicate that the cellulose microfibrils are oriented in a hoop-like fashion in the longitudinal walls of the motor cells. This micellation is the structural basis of the anisotropic properties of the cells: tangential sections of the extensor and flexor placed in hypotonic mannitol solutions showed changes only in length. As a consequence a linear correlation between length and volume was found in these sections. Based on the relationship between the water potential (which is changed by different concentrations of mannitol) and the relative volume of the sections and on the osmotic pressure at 50% incipient plasmolysis, osmotic diagrams were constructed for extensor and flexor tissues (cut during night position of the pulvinus). The bulk moduli of extensibility, [Formula: see text], were estimated from these diagrams. Under physiological conditions the [Formula: see text] values were rather low (in extensor tissue below 10 bar, in flexor tissue between 10 to 15 bar), indicating a high extensibility of the longitudinal walls of the motor cells. They are strongly dependent on the turgor pressure at the limits of the physiological pressure range.In well-watered plants, the water potentials of the extensor and flexor tissues were surprisingly low,-12 bar and-8 bar, respectively. This means that the cells in situ are by no means fully turgid. On the contrary, the cell volume in situ is similar to the volume at the point of incipient plasmolysis: the cell volumes of extensor and flexor cells in situ were only 1.01 times and 1.1 times larger, respectively, than at the point of incipient plasmolysis

  14. Live-Cell Imaging of Dual-Labeled Golgi Stacks in Tobacco BY-2 Cells Reveals Similar Behaviors for Different Cisternae during Movement and Brefeldin A Treatment

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Stephanie L. Madison; Andreas Nebenführ

    2011-01-01

    In plant cells,the Golgi apparatus consists of numerous stacks that,in turn,are composed of several flattened cisternae with a clear cis-to-trans polarity.During normal functioning within living cells,this unusual organelle displays a wide range of dynamic behaviors such as whole stack motility,constant membrane flux through the cisternae,and Golgi enzyme recycling through the ER.In order to further investigate various aspects of Golgi stack dynamics and integrity,we co-expressed pairs of established Golgi markers in tobacco BY-2 cells to distinguish sub-compartments of the Golgi during monensin treatments,movement,and brefeldin A (BFA)-induced disassembly.A combination of cis and trans markers revealed that Golgi stacks remain intact as they move through the cytoplasm.The Golgi stack orientation during these movements showed a slight preference for the cis side moving ahead,but trans cisternae were also found at the leading edge.During BFA treatments,the different sub-compartments of about half of the observed stacks fused with the ER sequentially; however,no consistent order could be detected.In contrast,the ionophore monensin resulted in swelling of trans cisternae while medial and particularly cis cisternae were mostly unaffected.Our results thus demonstrate a remarkable equivalence of the different cisternae with respect to movement and BFA-induced fusion with the ER.In addition,we propose that a combination of dual-label fluorescence microscopy and drug treatments can provide a simple alternative approach to the determination of protein localization to specific Golgi sub-compartments.

  15. Multifunctional cytomegalovirus (CMV)-specific CD8(+) T cells are not restricted by telomere-related senescence in young or old adults.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Riddell, Natalie E; Griffiths, Stephen J; Rivino, Laura; King, David C B; Teo, Guo H; Henson, Sian M; Cantisan, Sara; Solana, Rafael; Kemeny, David M; MacAry, Paul A; Larbi, Anis; Akbar, Arne N

    2015-04-01

    Antigen-specific multifunctional T cells that secrete interferon-γ, interleukin-2 and tumour necrosis factor-α simultaneously after activation are important for the control of many infections. It is unclear if these CD8(+) T cells are at an early or late stage of differentiation and whether telomere erosion restricts their replicative capacity. We developed a multi-parameter flow cytometric method for investigating the relationship between differentiation (CD45RA and CD27 surface phenotype), function (cytokine production) and replicative capacity (telomere length) in individual cytomegalovirus (CMV) antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells. This involves surface and intracellular cell staining coupled to fluorescence in situ hybridization to detect telomeres (flow-FISH). The end-stage/senescent CD8(+)  CD45RA(+)  CD27(-) T-cell subset increases significantly during ageing and this is exaggerated in CMV immune-responsive subjects. However, these end-stage cells do not have the shortest telomeres, implicating additional non-telomere-related mechanisms in inducing their senescence. The telomere lengths in total and CMV (NLV)-specific CD8(+) T cells in all four subsets defined by CD45RA and CD27 expression were significantly shorter in old compared with young individuals in both a Caucasian and an Asian cohort. Following stimulation by anti-CD3 or NLV peptide, similar proportions of triple-cytokine-producing cells are found in CD8(+) T cells at all stages of differentiation in both age groups. Furthermore, these multi-functional cells had intermediate telomere lengths compared with cells producing only one or two cytokines after activation. Therefore, global and CMV (NLV)-specific CD8(+) T cells that secrete interferon-γ, interleukin-2 and tumour necrosis factor-α are at an intermediate stage of differentiation and are not restricted by excessive telomere erosion.

  16. [Stereotypic movements].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernández-Alvarez, E

    2003-02-01

    Stereotypic movements are repetitive patterns of movement with certain peculiar features that make them especially interesting. Their physiopathology and their relationship with the neurobehavioural disorders they are frequently associated with are unknown. In this paper our aim is to offer a simple analysis of their dominant characteristics, their differentiation from other processes and a hypothesis of the properties of stereotypic movements, which could all set the foundations for research work into their physiopathology.

  17. Effect of methoxychlor on Ca(2+) movement and viability in MDCK renal tubular cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cheng, He-Hsiung; Lu, Yi-Chau; Lu, Ti; Cheng, Jin-Shiung; Mar, Guang-Yuan; Fang, Yi-Chien; Chai, Kuo-Liang; Jan, Chung-Ren

    2012-10-01

    The effect of the insecticide methoxychlor on the physiology of renal tubular cells is unknown. This study aimed to explore the effect of methoxychlor on cytosolic Ca(2+) concentrations ([Ca(2+) ](i) ) in MDCK renal tubular cells using the Ca(2+) -sensitive fluorescent dye fura-2. Methoxychlor at 5-20 μM increased [Ca(2+) ](i) in a concentration-dependent manner. The signal was reduced by 80% by removing extracellular Ca(2+) . Methoxychlor-induced Ca(2+) entry was not affected by nifedipine and SK&F96365 but was inhibited by econazole and protein kinase C modulators. In Ca(2+) -free medium, treatment with the endoplasmic reticulum Ca(2+) pump inhibitor thapsigargin or 2,5-di-tert-butylhydroquinone (BHQ) partly inhibited methoxychlor-induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rise. Incubation with methoxychlor also inhibited thapsigargin- or BHQ-induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rise. Inhibition of phospholipase C with U73122 nearly abolished methoxychlor-induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rise. At 5-15 μM, methoxychlor slightly increased cell viability, whereas at 20 μM, it decreased viability. The cytotoxic effect of methoxychlor was not reversed by chelating cytosolic Ca(2+) with 1,2-bis(2-aminophenoxy)ethane-N,N,N,N-tetraacetic acid/AM (BAPTA/AM). Annexin V-FITC data suggest that 10 μM methoxychlor inhibited apoptosis, while 20 μM methoxychlor enhanced apoptosis. Methoxychlor (10 and 20 μM) increased the production of reactive oxygen species. Together, in renal tubular cells, methoxychlor induced [Ca(2+) ](i) rise by inducing phospholipase C-dependent Ca(2+) release from multiple stores and Ca(2+) entry via protein kinase C- and econazole-sensitive channels. Methoxychlor slightly enhanced or inhibited cell viability in a concentration-dependent, Ca(2+) -independent manner. Methoxychlor induced cell death that may involve apoptosis via mitochondrial pathways.

  18. MHC class II restricted innate-like double negative T cells contribute to optimal primary and secondary immunity to Leishmania major.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zhirong Mou

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available Although it is generally believed that CD4(+ T cells play important roles in anti-Leishmania immunity, some studies suggest that they may be dispensable, and that MHC II-restricted CD3(+CD4(-CD8(- (double negative, DN T cells may be more important in regulating primary anti-Leishmania immunity. In addition, while there are reports of increased numbers of DN T cells in Leishmania-infected patients, dogs and mice, concrete evidence implicating these cells in secondary anti-Leishmania immunity has not yet been documented. Here, we report that DN T cells extensively proliferate and produce effector cytokines (IFN-γ, TNF and IL-17 and granzyme B (GrzB in the draining lymph nodes and spleens of mice following primary and secondary L. major infections. DN T cells from healed mice display functional characteristics of protective anti-Leishmania memory-like cells: rapid and extensive proliferation and effector cytokines production following L. major challenge in vitro and in vivo. DN T cells express predominantly (> 95% alpha-beta T cell receptor (αβ TCR, are Leishmania-specific, restricted mostly by MHC class II molecules and display transcriptional profile of innate-like genes. Using in vivo depletion and adoptive transfer studies, we show that DN T cells contribute to optimal primary and secondary anti-Leishmania immunity in mice. These results directly identify DN T cells as important players in effective and protective primary and secondary anti-L. major immunity in experimental cutaneous leishmaniasis.

  19. Ca2+ movement in smooth muscle cells studied with one- and two-dimensional diffusion models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kargacin, G; Fay, F S

    1991-11-01

    Although many of the processes involved in the regulation of Ca2+ in smooth muscle have been studied separately, it is still not well known how they are integrated into an overall regulatory system. To examine this question and to study the time course and spatial distribution of Ca2+ in cells after activation, one- and two-dimensional diffusion models of the cell that included the major processes thought to be involved in Ca regulation were developed. The models included terms describing Ca influx, buffering, plasma membrane extrusion, and release and reuptake by the sarcoplasmic reticulum. When possible these processes were described with known parameters. Simulations with the models indicated that the sarcoplasmic reticulum Ca pump is probably primarily responsible for the removal of cytoplasmic Ca2+ after cell activation. The plasma membrane Ca-ATPase and Na/Ca exchange appeared more likely to be involved in the long term regulation of Ca2+. Pumping processes in general had little influence on the rate of rise of Ca transients. The models also showed that spatial inhomogeneities in Ca2+ probably occur in cells during the spread of the Ca signal following activation and during the subsequent return of Ca2+ to its resting level.

  20. Calorie restriction and stroke

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Manzanero Silvia

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Stroke, a major cause of disability and mortality in the elderly, occurs when a cerebral blood vessel is occluded or ruptured, resulting in ischemic damage and death of brain cells. The injury mechanism involves metabolic and oxidative stress, excitotoxicity, apoptosis and inflammatory processes, including activation of glial cells and infiltration of leukocytes. In animal models, dietary energy restriction, by daily calorie reduction (CR or intermittent fasting (IF, extends lifespan and decreases the development of age-related diseases. Dietary energy restriction may also benefit neurons, as suggested by experimental evidence showing that CR and IF protect neurons against degeneration in animal models. Recent findings by our group and others suggest the possibility that dietary energy restriction may protect against stroke induced brain injury, in part by inducing the expression of neurotrophic factors, such as brain-derived neurotrophic factor (BDNF and basic fibroblast growth factor (bFGF; protein chaperones, including heat shock protein 70 (Hsp70 and glucose regulated protein 78 (GRP78; antioxidant enzymes, such as superoxide dismutases (SOD and heme oxygenase-1 (HO-1, silent information regulator T1 (SIRT1, uncoupling proteins and anti-inflammatory cytokines. This article discusses the protective mechanisms activated by dietary energy restriction in ischemic stroke.

  1. Human HLA-A*02:01/CHM1+ allo-restricted T cell receptor transgenic CD8+ T cells specifically inhibit Ewing sarcoma growth in vitro and in vivo.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Blaeschke, Franziska; Thiel, Uwe; Kirschner, Andreas; Thiede, Melanie; Rubio, Rebeca Alba; Schirmer, David; Kirchner, Thomas; Richter, Günther H S; Mall, Sabine; Klar, Richard; Riddell, Stanley; Busch, Dirk H; Krackhardt, Angela; Grunewald, Thomas G P; Burdach, Stefan

    2016-07-12

    The endochondral bone protein Chondromodulin-I (CHM1) provides oncogene addiction in Ewing sarcoma (ES). We pre-clinically tested the targetability of CHM1 by TCR transgenic, allo-restricted, peptide specific T cells to treat ES. We previously generated allo-restricted wildtype CD8+ T cells directed against the ES specific antigen CHM1319 causing specific responses against ES. However, utilization of these cells in current therapy protocols is hampered due to high complexity in production, relatively low cell numbers, and rapid T cell exhaustion.In order to provide off-the-shelf products in the future, we successfully generated HLA-A*02:01-restricted T cell receptor (TCR) transgenic T cells directed against CHM1319 by retroviral transduction.After short-term expansion a 100% purified CHM1319-TCR-transgenic T cell population expressed a CD62L+/CD45RO and CD62L+/CD45RA+ phenotype. These cells displayed specific in vitro IFNg and granzyme B release in co-culture with HLA-A*02:01+ ES cell lines expressing CHM1. When co-injected with ES cells in Rag2-/-É£c-/- mice, CHM1-specific TCR-transgenic T cells significantly inhibited the formation of lung and liver metastases in contrast to control mice. Lungs and livers of representative mice displayed CD8+ T cell infiltration in the presence (control group treated with unspecific T cells) and in the absence (study group) of metastatic disease, respectively. Furthermore, mice receiving unspecific T cells showed signs of graft-versus-host-disease in contrast to all mice, receiving CHM1319-TCR-transgenic T cells.CHM1319 specific TCR-transgenic T cells were successfully generated causing anti-ES responses in vitro and in vivo. In the future, CHM1319-TCR-transgenic T cells may control minimal residual disease rendering donor lymphocyte infusions more efficacious and less toxic.

  2. The Research of Movement Simulation in Bianzhong Choreography

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    CHEN QIXIANG; SUN JUNYI; CHEN XIAOWEI; SHENG JIANHUI

    2007-01-01

    This paper introduces the process of producing movement database on a virtual model for the Bianzhong choreography. It focuses on analyzing the movement taxonomy and corresponding relationship under the dancing syntax. We study the movement style identification theory based on the emotion model, present a movement connection method by defining the attributes of characteristically movement units and their related restriction, and give the application framework of the method in Movement Compilation System.

  3. In Vivo Analysis of Cajal Body Movement, Separation, and Joining in Live Human Cells

    OpenAIRE

    Platani, Melpomeni; Goldberg, Ilya; Swedlow, Jason R.; Lamond, Angus I.

    2000-01-01

    Cajal bodies (also known as coiled bodies) are subnuclear organelles that contain specific nuclear antigens, including splicing small nuclear ribonucleoproteins (snRNPs) and a subset of nucleolar proteins. Cajal bodies are localized in the nucleoplasm and are often found at the nucleolar periphery. We have constructed a stable HeLa cell line, HeLaGFP-coilin, that expresses the Cajal body marker protein, p80 coilin, fused to the green fluorescent protein (GFP-coilin). The localization pattern ...

  4. Breast cancer cell movement: imaging invadopodia by TIRF and IRM microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Xu, Xuehua; Johnson, Peter; Mueller, Susette C

    2009-01-01

    Invadopodia are hair-like membrane protrusions projecting from the ventral side of the plasma membrane of tumor cells invading into an extracellular matrix (ECM). Formation of invadopodia and phagocytosis of partially degraded ECM is correlated with invasiveness of cancer cells. Many proteins associated with actin-rich punctae associated with invadopodia have been identified. However, the dynamic temporal and spatial relationship of invadopodia-related proteins and the mechanisms required for invadopodia formation remain largely unknown. Total Internal Reflection Fluorescence (TIRF) microscopy provides a powerful tool to directly visualize the dynamic membrane transportation of invadopodia-related, GFP-tagged proteins and to simultaneously monitor invadopodia formation by observation of localized degradation and phagocytosis of fluorescently labeled gelatin. Cell-substratum contacts can be visualized using a related technique, Interference Reflection Microscopy (IRM). In this chapter, we provide detailed methodologies to monitor the dynamic localizations of c-Src-eGFP using two-color TIRF microscopy along with IRM to simultaneously visualize translocation of c-Src-eGFP and invadopodia formation by degradation of AlexaFluor 568-labeled gelatin.

  5. Kinematic assessment of stereotypy in spontaneous movements in infants

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Karch, Dominik; Kang, Keun-Sun; Wochner, Katarzyna; Philippi, Heike; Hadders-Algra, Mijna; Pietz, Joachim; Dickhaus, Hartmut

    2012-01-01

    Movement variation constitutes a crucial feature of infant motor development. Reduced variation of spontaneous infant movements, i.e. stereotyped movements, may indicate severe neurological deficit at an early stage. Hitherto evaluation of movement variation has been mainly restricted to subjective

  6. Alanine scanning of cucumber mosaic virus (CMV 2b protein identifies different positions for cell-to-cell movement and gene silencing suppressor activity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Katalin Nemes

    Full Text Available The multifunctional 2b protein of CMV has a role in the long distance and local movement of the virus, in symptom formation, in evasion of defense mediated by salicylic acid as well as in suppression of RNA silencing. The role of conserved amino acid sequence domains were analyzed previously in the protein function, but comprehensive analysis of this protein was not carried out until recently. We have analyzed all over the 2b protein by alanine scanning mutagenesis changing three consecutive amino acids (aa to alanine. We have identified eight aa triplets as key determinants of the 2b protein function in virus infection. Four of them (KKQ/22-24/AAA, QNR/31-33/AAA, RER/34-36/AAA, SPS/40-42/AAA overlap with previously determined regions indispensable in gene silencing suppressor function. We have identified two additional triplets necessary for the suppressor function of the 2b protein (LPF/55-57/AAA, NVE/10-12/AAA, and two other positions were required for cell-to-cell movement of the virus (MEL/1-3/AAA, RHV/70-72/AAA, which are not essential for suppressor activity.

  7. Optical high-resolution analysis of rotational movement: testing circular spatial filter velocimetry (CSFV) with rotating biological cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schaeper, M.; Schmidt, R.; Kostbade, R.; Damaschke, N.; Gimsa, J.

    2016-07-01

    Circular spatial filtering velocimetry (CSFV) was tested during the microscopic registration of the individual rotations of baker’s yeast cells. Their frequency-dependent rotation (electrorotation; ER) was induced in rotating electric fields, which were generated in a glass chip chamber with four electrodes (600 μm tip-to-tip distance). The electrodes were driven with sinusoidal quadrature signals of 5 or 8 V PP with frequencies up to 3 MHz. The observed cell rotation was of the order of 1-100 s per revolution. At each measuring frequency, the independent rotations of up to 20 cells were simultaneously recorded with a high-speed camera. CSFV was software-implemented using circular spatial filters with harmonic gratings. ER was proportional to the phase shift between the values of the spatial filtering signal of consecutive frames. ER spectra obtained by CSFV from the rotation velocities at different ER-field frequencies agreed well with manual measurements and theoretical spectra. Oscillations in the rotation velocity of a single cell in the elliptically polarized field near an electrode, which were resolved by CSFV, could not be visually discerned. ER step responses after field-on were recorded at 2500 frames per second. Analysis proved the high temporal resolution of CSFV and revealed a largely linear torque-friction relation during the acceleration phase of ER. Future applications of CSFV will allow for the simple and cheap automated high-resolution analysis of rotational movements where mechanical detection has too low a resolution or is not possible, e.g. in polluted environments or for gas and fluid vortices, microscopic objects, etc.

  8. Cost-effective screening methods for various single gene defects in single cells using high magnesium and total ionic strength and restriction enzymes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsai, Y H

    2000-12-01

    A reliable cost-effective protocol for the diagnosis of various defective genes in single blastomeres from preimplantation embryos has been established. Single cells were lysed in alkali buffer followed by neutralization and addition of a solution containing a high concentration of sulfhydryl reducing agents and MgCl(2) in relatively high ionic strength (0.45) (solution M) with or without restriction enzyme(s). The reaction mixture was incubated at 37 degrees C for 15 min followed by heat denaturation at 95 degrees C for 10 min. Respective polymerase chain reaction (PCR) mixture was then added to amplify each designated DNA region. The treatment of neutralized single cell lysate with adequate restriction enzyme(s) which do not cleave the target DNA sequences but shortens the genomic template DNA strands. This may facilitate primer-template annealing. The subsequent heat denaturation of the cell lysate in solution M indeed gave better signals of amplified DNA fragments on polyacrylamide gels. Defects in Tay Sachs exons 11 and 12, CF-DeltaF508 and CF-N1303K, and genomic sequences of ZFX/ZFY were successfully detected on gels after one-step PCR amplification, especially those cell lysates treated with restriction enzymes. In conclusion, a cost-effective one-step PCR method for amplifying various specific genomic regions containing a single gene defect in single cells has been established. This protocol may be applied to genetic screening for many single defective genes of biopsied single blastomeres from preimplantation in vitro fertilization (IVF) embryos.

  9. Peptide-loaded dendritic cells prime and activate MHC-class I-restricted T cells more efficiently than protein-loaded cross-presenting DC

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Met, Ozcan; Buus, Søren; Claesson, Mogens H

    2003-01-01

    -pulsed DC. Moreover, SIINFEKL-loaded DC were up to 50 times more efficient than DC-pulsed with OVA-protein for generation of an H-2K(b)-restricted response. Immunization of mice with SIINFEKL-loaded DC resulted in a much stronger H-2K(b)-restricted response than immunization with OVA-pulsed DC. These data...

  10. Endogenous origins of HIV-1 G-to-A hypermutation and restriction in the nonpermissive T cell line CEM2n.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eric W Refsland

    Full Text Available The DNA deaminase APOBEC3G converts cytosines to uracils in retroviral cDNA, which are immortalized as genomic strand G-to-A hypermutations by reverse transcription. A single round of APOBEC3G-dependent mutagenesis can be catastrophic, but evidence suggests that sublethal levels contribute to viral genetic diversity and the associated problems of drug resistance and immune escape. APOBEC3G exhibits an intrinsic preference for the second cytosine in a 5'CC dinucleotide motif leading to 5'GG-to-AG mutations. However, an additional hypermutation signature is commonly observed in proviral sequences from HIV-1 infected patients, 5'GA-to-AA, and it has been attributed controversially to one or more of the six other APOBEC3 deaminases. An unambiguous resolution of this problem has been difficult to achieve, in part due to dominant effects of protein over-expression. Here, we employ gene targeting to dissect the endogenous APOBEC3 contribution to Vif-deficient HIV-1 restriction and hypermutation in a nonpermissive T cell line CEM2n. We report that APOBEC3G-null cells, as predicted from previous studies, lose the capacity to inflict 5'GG-to-AG mutations. In contrast, APOBEC3F-null cells produced viruses with near-normal mutational patterns. Systematic knockdown of other APOBEC3 genes in an APOBEC3F-null background revealed a significant contribution from APOBEC3D in promoting 5'GA-to-AA hypermutations. Furthermore, Vif-deficient HIV-1 restriction was strong in parental CEM2n and APOBEC3D-knockdown cells, partially alleviated in APOBEC3G- or APOBEC3F-null cells, further alleviated in APOBEC3F-null/APOBEC3D-knockdown cells, and alleviated to the greatest extent in APOBEC3F-null/APOBEC3G-knockdown cells revealing clear redundancy in the HIV-1 restriction mechanism. We conclude that endogenous levels of APOBEC3D, APOBEC3F, and APOBEC3G combine to restrict Vif-deficient HIV-1 and cause the hallmark dinucleotide hypermutation patterns in CEM2n. Primary T

  11. A novel lineage transcription factor based analysis reveals differences in T helper cell subpopulation development in infected and intrauterine growth restricted (IUGR) piglets.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ebner, F; Rausch, S; Scharek-Tedin, L; Pieper, R; Burwinkel, M; Zentek, J; Hartmann, S

    2014-10-01

    Research in mouse and human clearly identified subsets of T helper (Th) cells based on nuclear expression of specific lineage transcription factors. In swine, however, transcription factor based detection of functional subpopulations of porcine Th cells by flow cytometry is so far limited to regulatory T cells via Foxp3. T-bet and GATA-3 are the transcription factors that regulate commitment to Th1 or Th2 cells, respectively. In this study we prove GATA-3 and T-bet expression in porcine CD4(+) cells polarized in vitro. Importantly, GATA-3 and T-bet expressing cells were detectable in pigs infected with pathogens associated with Th2 and Th1 immune responses. Increased frequencies of GATA-3 positive CD4(+) cells are found in vivo in pigs experimentally infected with the nematode Trichuris suis, whereas porcine reproductive and respiratory syndrome virus (PRRSV) infection elicited T-bet positive CD4(+) T cells. Analysing the immune status of pre-weaning piglets with intrauterine growth restriction (IUGR) we found an increased expression of Foxp3, T-bet and GATA-3 in CD4(+) and CD4(+)CD8(+) double-positive T cells in systemic and intestinal compartments of IUGR piglets. Hence, we established the detection of porcine Th1 and Th2 cells via T-bet and GATA-3 and show that the porcine lineage transcription factors are differentially regulated very early in life depending on the developmental status.

  12. B-cell responses to pregnancy-restricted and -unrestricted Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 antigens in Ghanaian women naturally exposed to malaria parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ampomah, Paulina; Stevenson, Liz; Ofori, Michael F;

    2014-01-01

    -linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and memory B-cell frequencies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay in a cohort of P. falciparum-exposed nonpregnant Ghanaian women. The antigens used were a VAR2CSA-type PfEMP1 (IT4VAR04) with expression restricted to parasites infecting the placenta, as well as two...... immunity probably reflect the clonal antigenic variation and allelic polymorphism of PfEMP1. However, it is likely that other immune-evasive mechanisms are also involved, such as interference with formation and maintenance of immunological memory. We measured PfEMP1-specific antibody levels by enzyme...... commonly recognized PfEMP1 proteins (HB3VAR06 and IT4VAR60) implicated in rosetting and not pregnancy restricted. This enabled, for the first time, a direct comparison in the same individuals of immune responses specific for a clinically important parasite antigen expressed only during well-defined periods...

  13. Induction of an antitumor response using dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructs encoding the HLA-A*02:01-restricted epitopes of tumor-associated antigens in culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sennikov, Sergey Vital'evich; Shevchenko, Julia Alexandrovna; Kurilin, Vasilii Vasil'evich; Khantakova, Julia Nikolaevna; Lopatnikova, Julia Anatol'evna; Gavrilova, Elena Vasil'evna; Maksyutov, Rinat Amirovich; Bakulina, Anastasiya Yur'evna; Sidorov, Sergey Vasil'evich; Khristin, Alexander Alexandrovich; Maksyutov, Amir Zakievich

    2016-02-01

    Advances in oncoimmunology related to the definition of the basic mechanisms of the formation of antitumor immune response, as well as the opening of tumor-associated antigens recognized by immune cells, allowed to start developing ways to influence the effector cells of the immune system to generate effective antitumor cytotoxic response. We investigated the possibility to stimulate an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients by dendritic cells transfected with HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs. We isolated dendritic cells from peripheral blood monocytes and delivered our constructs to these cells by magnetic transfection. Additionally, a series of experiments with loading of dendritic cells with autologous tumor cell lysate antigens was conducted. We have shown that dendritic cells transfected with the HLA-A*02:01-restricted DNA constructs are effective in inducing an antitumor response in a culture of mononuclear cells of breast cancer patients. Dendritic cells transfected with DNA constructor dendritic cells loaded with lysate antigens revealed a comparable stimulated cytotoxic response of mononuclear cells to these two ways of antigen delivery. We conclude that using DNA constructs in conjunction with patient stratification by HLA type allows the application of transfected DCs as an effective method to stimulate antitumor immunity in vitro.

  14. Nephrotoxicity of Bence-Jones proteins: correlation with endocytosis by BHK cells and intracellular movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Lucia Nicastri

    2001-06-01

    Full Text Available The aim of this investigation was to evaluate the endocytosis of two Bence-Jones proteins by renal cells in order to elucidate the interference of their physical and chemical characteristics on nephrotoxicity. Bence-Jones proteins (AK and GL were purified and isolated from the urine of two patients with multiple myeloma. The isotype of both proteins was characterised as being human monoclonal lambda light chain. The AK protein presented mainly an Ip>7.0, a high content of galactose and a low amount of sialic acid molecules. On the other hand, the GL protein presented a single band with an Ip of 4.3, a higher level of sialic acid and a reduced amount of galactose, in comparison with the AK protein. Baby Hamster Kidney (BHK cells were maintained in culture in bottles at 37ºC, using DMEM culture media supplemented with 10% of calf serum with a pH of 7.4. Once the monolayer was observed to be confluent, the BHK cells were incubated with the two proteins, dissolved in a serum-free medium for 1, 5, 15, 30, 60 minutes and 24 hours. Control cells were established omitting the incubation with Bence-Jones proteins, but maintaining all of the other conditions. After, this the cells were washed, trypsinised, centrifuged and fixed in a solution of 4% paraformaldehyde and 0.5% glutaraldehyde on a 0.1 M, pH 7.4 phosphate buffer. Cells were processed for immunocytochemical reactions by using protein A coupled with colloidal gold and further silver enhancement. Semi-thin sections of the pellets were obtained and submitted to the cytochemical reactions. Detection of labelling was made by using light microscopy. It was observed that GL protein tended to be directed towards a perinuclear position, whereas the AK protein tended to suffer lysosomal deviation, suggesting that there is a direct contribution of physical and chemical characteristics on intracellular direction taken by Bence-Jones proteins.O objetivo deste trabalho foi avaliar a endocitose de duas prote

  15. Early-age feed restriction affects viability and gene expression of satellite cells isolated from the gastrocnemius muscle of broiler chicks

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Li Yue

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Muscle growth depends on the fusion of proliferate satellite cells to existing myofibers. We reported previously that 0–14 day intermittent feeding led to persistent retardation in myofiber hypertrophy. However, how satellite cells respond to such nutritional insult has not been adequately elucidated. Results One-day-old broiler chicks were allocated to control (Con, ad libitum feeding, intermittent feeding (IF, feed provided on alternate days and re-feeding (RF, 2 days ad libitum feeding after 12 days of intermittent feeding groups. Chickens were killed on Day 15 and satellite cells were isolated. When cultured, satellite cells from the IF group demonstrated significant retardation in proliferation and differentiation potential, while RF partly restored the proliferation rate and differentiation potential of the satellite cells. Significant up-regulation of insulin like growth factor I receptor (IGF-IR (P0.05 and thyroid hormone receptor α (TRα (P0.05, and down-regulation of growth hormone receptor (GHR (P0.01 and IGF-I (P0.01 mRNA expression was observed in freshly isolated IF satellite cells when compared with Con cells. In RF cells, the mRNA expression of IGF-I was higher (P0.05 and of TRα was lower (P0.01 than in IF cells, suggesting that RF restored the mRNA expression of TRα and IGF-I, but not of GHR and IGF-IR. The Bax/Bcl-2 ratio tended to increase in the IF group, which was reversed in the RF group (P0.05, indicating that RF reduced the pro-apoptotic influence of IF. Moreover, no significant effect of T3 was detected on cell survival in IF cells compared with Con (PP0.05 cells. Conclusions These data suggest that early-age feed restriction inhibits the proliferation and differentiation of satellite cells, induces changes in mRNA expression of the GH/IGF-I and thyroid hormone receptors in satellite cells, as well as blunted sensitivity of satellite cells to T3, and that RF partially reverses these effects. Thus

  16. Fetal jaw movement affects condylar cartilage development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Habib, H; Hatta, T; Udagawa, J; Zhang, L; Yoshimura, Y; Otani, H

    2005-05-01

    Using a mouse exo utero system to examine the effects of fetal jaw movement on the development of condylar cartilage, we assessed the effects of restraint of the animals' mouths from opening, by suture, at embryonic day (E)15.5. We hypothesized that pre-natal jaw movement is an important mechanical factor in endochondral bone formation of the mandibular condyle. Condylar cartilage was reduced in size, and the bone-cartilage margin was ill-defined in the sutured group at E18.5. Volume, total number of cells, and number of 5-bromo-2'-deoxyuridine-positive cells in the mesenchymal zone were lower in the sutured group than in the non-sutured group at E16.5 and E18.5. Hypertrophic chondrocytes were larger, whereas fewer apoptotic chondrocytes and osteoclasts were observed in the hypertrophic zone in the sutured group at E18.5. Analysis of our data revealed that restricted fetal TMJ movement influences the process of endochondral bone formation of condylar cartilage.

  17. The Presence of HLA-E-Restricted, CMV-Specific CD8+ T Cells in the Blood of Lung Transplant Recipients Correlates with Chronic Allograft Rejection.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lucy C Sullivan

    Full Text Available The human cytomegalovirus (CMV immune evasion protein, UL40, shares an identical peptide sequence with that found in the leader sequence of many human leukocyte antigen (HLA-C alleles and when complexed with HLA-E, can modulate NK cell functions via interactions with the CD94-NKG2 receptors. However the UL40-derived sequence can also be immunogenic, eliciting robust CD8+ T cell responses. In the setting of solid organ transplantation these T cells may not only be involved in antiviral immunity but also can potentially contribute to allograft rejection when the UL40 epitope is also present in allograft-encoded HLA. Here we assessed 15 bilateral lung transplant recipients for the presence of HLA-E-restricted UL40 specific T cells by tetramer staining of peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC. UL40-specific T cells were observed in 7 patients post-transplant however the magnitude of the response varied significantly between patients. Moreover, unlike healthy CMV seropositive individuals, longitudinal analyses revealed that proportions of such T cells fluctuated markedly. Nine patients experienced low-grade acute cellular rejection, of which 6 also demonstrated UL40-specific T cells. Furthermore, the presence of UL40-specific CD8+ T cells in the blood was significantly associated with allograft dysfunction, which manifested as Bronchiolitis Obliterans Syndrome (BOS. Therefore, this study suggests that minor histocompatibility antigens presented by HLA-E can represent an additional risk factor following lung transplantation.

  18. Polycomb group genes Psc and Su(z)2 restrict follicle stem cell self-renewal and extrusion by controlling canonical and noncanonical Wnt signaling.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Xinghua; Han, Yue; Xi, Rongwen

    2010-05-01

    Stem cells are critical for maintaining tissue homeostasis and are commonly governed by their niche microenvironment, although the intrinsic mechanisms controlling their multipotency are poorly understood. Polycomb group (PcG) genes are epigenetic silencers, and have emerged recently as important players in maintaining stem cell multipotency by preventing the initiation of differentiation programs. Here we describe an unexpected role of specific PcG genes in allowing adult stem cell differentiation and preventing stem cell-derived tumor development. We show that Posterior sex combs (Psc), which encodes a core Polycomb-repressive complex 1 (PRC1) component, functions redundantly with a similar gene, Suppressor of zeste two [Su(z)2], to restrict follicle stem cell (FSC) self-renewal in the Drosophila ovary. FSCs carrying deletion mutations of both genes extrude basally from the epithelium and continue to self-propagate at ectopic sites, leading to the development of FSC-like tumors. Furthermore, we show that the propagation of the mutant cells is driven by sustained activation of the canonical Wnt signaling pathway, which is essential for FSC self-renewal, whereas the epithelial extrusion is mediated through the planar cell polarity pathway. This study reveals a novel mechanism of epithelial extrusion, and indicates a novel role of polycomb function in allowing adult stem cell differentiation by antagonizing self-renewal programs. Given evolutionary conservation of PcG genes from Drosophila to mammals, they could have similar functions in mammalian stem cells and cancer.

  19. Restricted use of fetal VH3 immunoglobulin genes by unselected B cells in the adult. Predominance of 56p1-like VH genes in common variable immunodeficiency.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Braun, J; Berberian, L; King, L; Sanz, I; Govan, H L

    1992-05-01

    The large VH3 family of human immunoglobulin genes is commonly used throughout B cell ontogeny. However, B cells of the fetus and certain autoantibody-producing clones are restricted to a recurrent subset of VH3 genes, and VH3 B cells are deficient in certain immunodeficiency diseases. In this study, we have sequenced a set of rearranged VH3 genes generated by genomic polymerase chain reaction (PCR) from normal adults and those with common variable immunodeficiency (CVI). In both groups, all cones were readily identifiable with the fetal VH3 subset, and were further distinguished by limited DH motifs and exclusive use of JH4. In CVI, the residual population of VH3 B cells were notable for predominant use of 56p1-like VH genes. All clones displayed sequence divergence (including somatic mutation) with evidence of strong selection against complementarity-determining region (CDR) coding change. A survey of other V gene families indicates that human V gene diversity may be restricted in general by germline mechanisms. These findings suggest that the expressed antibody repertoire in the human adult may be much smaller than anticipated, and selected by processes in part distinct from the paradigm of maximal antigen-binding diversity.

  20. Nossa notação m' na prova de Rorschach: ampliação e restrição do fator m de Klopfer Our m' determinant in the Rorschach's test, enlarging and restricting "inanimate movement" score

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aníbal Silveira

    1972-06-01

    Full Text Available Julgamos oportuna e necessária a diferenciação de fatores "movimento" efetuada por Klopfer, entre os quais a categoria a que denominou "movimento inanimado", como integrante do grupo "movimentos menores". O significado particular de semelhantes fatores foi claramente acentuado por Piotrowski quando redefiniu todos os elementos psicodiagnósticos. E acreditamos que o próprio Rorschach faria essa diversificação de determinantes. Pessoalmente, utilizamos a categoria m de Klopfer e de Piotrowski de modo algo diverso. Por um lado, não incluimos aí máscara, nem mímica expressiva, nem expressões emocionais, nem movimentos parciais. Por outro, classificamos nesse grupo movimento humano ou de animal, toda vez que não resulte diretamente da configuração da mancha como elemento formal, mas da reação subjetiva do examinando ante a cinestesia percebida. Como condição básica para a classificação, é indispensável que esteja clara a sensação de tensão muscular — como é exigido desde Rorschach para M;e como traço comum a todas as interpretações da rubrica — sejam abstrações, sejam seres inanimados: (a intenção, bloqueio, incapacidade, por exemplo, ou (b atividade de elementos da natureza. Devido a esse caráter subjetivo, anotamos m'em vez de m. Essas duas maneiras (a e (b de o probando interpretar movimento, já encontramos em Rorschach, respectivamente nos Exemplosdo Psychodiagnostik e da Contribuição póstuma. E tanto uma como outra podem decorrer, em última análise, quer de fuga ante estímulos emocionais, quer de capacidade mental muito elevada.Klopfer's differentiation of movement scores, among which "inanimate movement" integrating the "minor movements" group, was no doubt opportune and needed. Their peculiar meaning has been clearly stressed and enriched by Piotrowski in his reformulation of Rorschach variables. It is our belief that Rorschach himself would take such step. Our criteria for scoring this

  1. IgE production after antigen-specific and cognate activation of HLA-DPw4-restricted T-cell clones, by 78% of randomly selected B-cell donors

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Baselmans, PJ; Pollabauer, EM; van Reijsen, FC; Heystek, HC; Hren, A; Stumptner, P; Tilanus, MGJ; Vooijs, WC; Mudde, GC

    2000-01-01

    The frequency of expression of the MHC class II antigen, HLA-DPw4, in the caucasoid population is approximately 78%, and is unmatched by phenotypic frequencies of other HLA class II molecules. Here we describe three human Der-P1-specific T-cell clones (TCC), restricted by the HLA-DPw4-variant HLA-DP

  2. Restriction beyond the restriction point: mitogen requirement for G2 passage

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    te Riele Hein

    2006-05-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Cell proliferation is dependent on mitogenic signalling. When absent, normal cells cannot pass the G1 restriction point, resulting in cell cycle arrest. Passage through the G1 restriction point involves inactivation of the retinoblastoma protein family. Consequently, loss of the retinoblastoma protein family leads to loss of the G1 restriction point. Recent work in our lab has revealed that cells possess yet another mechanism that restricts proliferation in the absence of mitogens: arrest in the G2 phase of the cell cycle. Here, we discuss the similarities and differences between these restriction points and the roles of cyclin-dependent kinase inhibitors (CKIs herein.

  3. Pineal gland expression of the transcription factor Egr-1 is restricted to a population of glia that are distinct from nestin-immunoreactive cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Man, Pui-Sin; Carter, David A

    2008-02-01

    Egr-1 is a plasticity-related transcription factor that has been implicated in circadian regulation of the pineal gland. In the present study we have investigated the cellular expression pattern of Egr-1 in the adult rat pineal. Egr-1 protein is restricted to the nucleus of a sub-population of cells. These cells were characterised using a new transgenic rat model (egr-1-d2EGFP) in which green fluorescent protein is driven by the egr-1 promoter. Cellular filling by GFP revealed that Egr-1-positive cells exhibited processes, indicating a glial cell-type morphology. This was confirmed by co-localizing the GFP-filled processes with vimentin and S-100beta. However, GFP/Egr-1 is expressed in only a tiny minority of the previously identified Id-1/vimentin-positive glial cells and therefore represents a novel sub-set of this (GFAP-negative) glial population. We have also demonstrated for the first time an extensive network of nestin-positive cells throughout the adult pineal gland, however these cells do not co-express Egr-1. Our studies have therefore broadened our understanding of the cell populations that constitute the adult pineal. Cellular localization of Egr-1 has revealed that this factor does not appear to be directly involved in pinealocyte production of melatonin but is required in a sub-set of pineal glia.

  4. Gamma-aminobutyric acid agonist-induced alterations in the ultrastructure of cultured cerebellar granule cells is restricted to early development

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Gert Helge; Belhage, B; Schousboe, A;

    1988-01-01

    The effect of 4,5,6,7-tetrahydroisoxazolo[5,4-c]-pyridin-3-ol (THIP) on the ultrastructural composition of cultured cerebellar granule cells was investigated during development by quantitative electron microscopy (morphometric analysis). Granule cells were exposed to THIP (150 microM) for 6 h after...... 7 and 14 days, respectively, in culture. THIP treatment of 7-day-old cultures led to a statistically significant increase in the cytoplasmic density of rough endoplasmic reticulum, Golgi apparatus, vesicles, and coated vesicles, whereas no significant increase in the cytoplasmic density...... of these organelles was observed in 14-day-old cultures exposed to THIP for 6 h. These findings show that the effect of THIP on the ultrastructural composition of cultured cerebellar granule cells is restricted to early development....

  5. The Drosophila insulin-degrading enzyme restricts growth by modulating the PI3K pathway in a cell-autonomous manner.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Galagovsky, Diego; Katz, Maximiliano J; Acevedo, Julieta M; Sorianello, Eleonora; Glavic, Alvaro; Wappner, Pablo

    2014-03-01

    Mammalian insulin-degrading enzyme (IDE) cleaves insulin, among other peptidic substrates, but its function in insulin signaling is elusive. We use the Drosophila system to define the function of IDE in the regulation of growth and metabolism. We find that either loss or gain of function of Drosophila IDE (dIDE) can restrict growth in a cell-autonomous manner by affecting both cell size and cell number. dIDE can modulate Drosophila insulin-like peptide 2 levels, thereby restricting activation of the phosphatidylinositol-3-phosphate kinase pathway and promoting activation of Drosophila forkhead box, subgroup O transcription factor. Larvae reared in high sucrose exhibit delayed developmental timing due to insulin resistance. We find that dIDE loss of function exacerbates this phenotype and that mutants display increased levels of circulating sugar, along with augmented expression of a lipid biosynthesis marker. We propose that dIDE is a modulator of insulin signaling and that its loss of function favors insulin resistance, a hallmark of diabetes mellitus type II.

  6. Inhibition of endogenous hydrogen sulfide production in clear-cell renal cell carcinoma cell lines and xenografts restricts their growth, survival and angiogenic potential.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sonke, Eric; Verrydt, Megan; Postenka, Carl O; Pardhan, Siddika; Willie, Chantalle J; Mazzola, Clarisse R; Hammers, Matthew D; Pluth, Michael D; Lobb, Ian; Power, Nicholas E; Chambers, Ann F; Leong, Hon S; Sener, Alp

    2015-09-15

    Clear cell renal cell carcinoma (ccRCC) is characterized by Von Hippel-Lindau (VHL)-deficiency, resulting in pseudohypoxic, angiogenic and glycolytic tumours. Hydrogen sulfide (H2S) is an endogenously-produced gasotransmitter that accumulates under hypoxia and has been shown to be pro-angiogenic and cytoprotective in cancer. It was hypothesized that H2S levels are elevated in VHL-deficient ccRCC, contributing to survival, metabolism and angiogenesis. Using the H2S-specific probe MeRhoAz, it was found that H2S levels were higher in VHL-deficient ccRCC cell lines compared to cells with wild-type VHL. Inhibition of H2S-producing enzymes could reduce the proliferation, metabolism and survival of ccRCC cell lines, as determined by live-cell imaging, XTT/ATP assay, and flow cytometry respectively. Using the chorioallantoic membrane angiogenesis model, it was found that systemic inhibition of endogenous H2S production was able to decrease vascularization of VHL-deficient ccRCC xenografts. Endogenous H2S production is an attractive new target in ccRCC due to its involvement in multiple aspects of disease.

  7. Ancestral trees for modeling stem cell lineages genetically rather than functionally: understanding mutation accumulation and distinguishing the restrictive cancer stem cell propagation theory and the unrestricted cell propagation theory of human tumorigenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shibata, Darryl K; Kern, Scott E

    2008-01-01

    Cancer stem cells either could be rare or common in tumors, constituting the major distinction between the two fundamentally opposed theoretical models of tumor progression: A newer and restrictive stem cell propagation model, in which the stem cells are a small and special minority of the tumor cells, and a standard older model, an unrestricted cell proliferation theory, in which many or most tumor cells are capable of indefinite generations of cell division. Stem cells of tumors are difficult to quantitate using functional assays, and the validity of the most common assays is seriously questioned. Nonetheless, stem cells are an essential component of any tumorigenesis model. Alternative approaches to studying tumor stem cells should be explored. Cell populations can be conceived of as having a genealogy, a relationship of cells to their ancestral lineage, from the zygote to the adult cells or neoplasms. Models using ancestral trees thus offer an anatomic and genetic means to "observe" stem cells independent of artificial conditions. Ancestral trees broaden our attention backward along a lineage, to the zygote stage, and thereby add insight into how the mutations of tumors accumulate. It is possible that a large fraction of mutations in a tumor originate from normal, endogenous, replication errors (nearly all being passenger mutations) occurring prior to the emergence of the first transformed cell. Trees can be constructed from experimental measurements - molecular clocks - of real human tissues and tumors. Detailed analysis of single-cell methylation patterns, heritable yet slightly plastic, now can provide this information in the necessary depth. Trees based on observations of molecular clocks may help us to distinguish between competing theories regarding the proliferative properties among cells of actual human tumors, to observe subtle and difficult phenomena such as the extinction of stem lineages, and to address the origins and rates of mutations in various

  8. Human CD4(+) T Cell Responses to an Attenuated Tetravalent Dengue Vaccine Parallel Those Induced by Natural Infection in Magnitude, HLA Restriction, and Antigen Specificity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Angelo, Michael A; Grifoni, Alba; O'Rourke, Patrick H; Sidney, John; Paul, Sinu; Peters, Bjoern; de Silva, Aruna D; Phillips, Elizabeth; Mallal, Simon; Diehl, Sean A; Kirkpatrick, Beth D; Whitehead, Stephen S; Durbin, Anna P; Sette, Alessandro; Weiskopf, Daniela

    2017-03-01

    Dengue virus (DENV) is responsible for growing numbers of infections worldwide and has proven to be a significant challenge for vaccine development. We previously demonstrated that CD8(+) T cell responses elicited by a dengue live attenuated virus (DLAV) vaccine resemble those observed after natural infection. In this study, we screened peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) from donors vaccinated with a tetravalent DLAV vaccine (TV005) with pools of dengue virus-derived predicted major histocompatibility complex (MHC) class II binding peptides. The definition of CD4(+) T cell responses after live vaccination is important because CD4(+) T cells are known contributors to host immunity, including cytokine production, help for CD8(+) T and B cells, and direct cytotoxicity against infected cells. While responses to all antigens were observed, DENV-specific CD4(+) T cells were focused predominantly on the capsid and nonstructural NS3 and NS5 antigens. Importantly, CD4(+) T cell responses in vaccinees were similar in magnitude and breadth to those after natural infection, recognized the same antigen hierarchy, and had similar profiles of HLA restriction. We conclude that TV005 vaccination has the capacity to elicit CD4(+) cell responses closely mirroring those observed in a population associated with natural immunity.IMPORTANCE The development of effective vaccination strategies against dengue virus infection is of high global public health interest. Here we study the CD4 T cell responses elicited by a tetravalent live attenuated dengue vaccine and show that they resemble responses seen in humans naturally exposed to dengue virus. This is an important issue, since it is likely that optimal immunity induced by a vaccine requires induction of CD4(+) responses against the same antigens as those recognized as dominant in natural infection. Detailed knowledge of the T cell response may further contribute to the identification of robust correlates of protection against

  9. Restricted growth of U-type infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout cells may be linked to casein kinase II activity

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J.-W.; Moon, C.H.; Harmache, A.; Wargo, A.R.; Purcell, M.K.; Bremont, M.; Kurath, G.

    2011-01-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that a representative M genogroup type strain of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from rainbow trout grows well in rainbow trout-derived RTG-2 cells, but a U genogroup type strain from sockeye salmon has restricted growth, associated with reduced genome replication and mRNA transcription. Here, we analysed further the mechanisms for this growth restriction of U-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells, using strategies that assessed differences in viral genes, host immune regulation and phosphorylation. To determine whether the viral glycoprotein (G) or non-virion (NV) protein was responsible for the growth restriction, four recombinant IHNV viruses were generated in which the G gene of an infectious IHNV clone was replaced by the G gene of U- or M-type IHNV and the NV gene was replaced by NV of U- or M-type IHNV. There was no significant difference in the growth of these recombinants in RTG-2 cells, indicating that G and NV proteins are not major factors responsible for the differential growth of the U- and M-type strains. Poly I:C pretreatment of RTG-2 cells suppressed the growth of both U- and M-type IHNV, although the M virus continued to replicate at a reduced level. Both viruses induced type 1 interferon (IFN1) and the IFN1 stimulated gene Mx1, but the expression levels in M-infected cells were significantly higher than in U-infected cells and an inhibitor of the IFN1-inducible protein kinase PKR, 2-aminopurine (2-AP), did not affect the growth of U- or M-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells. These data did not indicate a role for the IFN1 system in the restricted growth of U-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells. Prediction of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites in the viral phosphoprotein (P) using the NetPhosK program revealed differences between U- and M-type P genes at five phosphorylation sites. Pretreatment of RTG-2 cells with a PKC inhibitor or a p38MAPK inhibitor did not affect the growth of the U- and M-type viruses. However, 100 μm of the

  10. Restricted growth of U-type infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) in rainbow trout cells may be linked to casein kinase II activity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Park, J W; Moon, C H; Harmache, A; Wargo, A R; Purcell, M K; Bremont, M; Kurath, G

    2011-02-01

    Previously, we demonstrated that a representative M genogroup type strain of infectious haematopoietic necrosis virus (IHNV) from rainbow trout grows well in rainbow trout-derived RTG-2 cells, but a U genogroup type strain from sockeye salmon has restricted growth, associated with reduced genome replication and mRNA transcription. Here, we analysed further the mechanisms for this growth restriction of U-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells, using strategies that assessed differences in viral genes, host immune regulation and phosphorylation. To determine whether the viral glycoprotein (G) or non-virion (NV) protein was responsible for the growth restriction, four recombinant IHNV viruses were generated in which the G gene of an infectious IHNV clone was replaced by the G gene of U- or M-type IHNV and the NV gene was replaced by NV of U- or M-type IHNV. There was no significant difference in the growth of these recombinants in RTG-2 cells, indicating that G and NV proteins are not major factors responsible for the differential growth of the U- and M-type strains. Poly I:C pretreatment of RTG-2 cells suppressed the growth of both U- and M-type IHNV, although the M virus continued to replicate at a reduced level. Both viruses induced type 1 interferon (IFN1) and the IFN1 stimulated gene Mx1, but the expression levels in M-infected cells were significantly higher than in U-infected cells and an inhibitor of the IFN1-inducible protein kinase PKR, 2-aminopurine (2-AP), did not affect the growth of U- or M-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells. These data did not indicate a role for the IFN1 system in the restricted growth of U-type IHNV in RTG-2 cells. Prediction of kinase-specific phosphorylation sites in the viral phosphoprotein (P) using the NetPhosK program revealed differences between U- and M-type P genes at five phosphorylation sites. Pretreatment of RTG-2 cells with a PKC inhibitor or a p38MAPK inhibitor did not affect the growth of the U- and M-type viruses. However, 100 μm of the

  11. Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin disrupts TCR signaling in CD1d-restricted NKT cells leading to functional anergy.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sunil K Joshi

    2009-09-01

    Full Text Available Exogenous CD1d-binding glycolipid (alpha-Galactosylceramide, alpha-GC stimulates TCR signaling and activation of type-1 natural killer-like T (NKT cells. Activated NKT cells play a central role in the regulation of adaptive and protective immune responses against pathogens and tumors. In the present study, we tested the effect of Bacillus anthracis lethal toxin (LT on NKT cells both in vivo and in vitro. LT is a binary toxin known to suppress host immune responses during anthrax disease and intoxicates cells by protective antigen (PA-mediated intracellular delivery of lethal factor (LF, a potent metalloprotease. We observed that NKT cells expressed anthrax toxin receptors (CMG-2 and TEM-8 and bound more PA than other immune cell types. A sub-lethal dose of LT administered in vivo in C57BL/6 mice decreased expression of the activation receptor NKG2D by NKT cells but not by NK cells. The in vivo administration of LT led to decreased TCR-induced cytokine secretion but did not affect TCR expression. Further analysis revealed LT-dependent inhibition of TCR-stimulated MAP kinase signaling in NKT cells attributable to LT cleavage of the MAP kinase kinase MEK-2. We propose that Bacillus anthracis-derived LT causes a novel form of functional anergy in NKT cells and therefore has potential for contributing to immune evasion by the pathogen.

  12. Mixed Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Brabrand, Helle

    2010-01-01

    Mixed Movements is a research project engaged in performance-based architectural drawing. Architectonic implementation questions relations between the human body and a body of architecture by the different ways we handle drawing materials. A drawing may explore architectonic problems at other...... levels than those related to building, and this exploration is a special challenge and competence implicit artistic development work. The project Mixed Movements generates drawing-material, not primary as representation, but as a performance-based media, making the body being-in-the-media felt and appear...... as possible operational moves....

  13. CD8(+) T cells specific to a single Yersinia pseudotuberculosis epitope restrict bacterial replication in the liver but fail to provide sterilizing immunity.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shen, Haiqian; Gonzalez-Juarbe, Norberto; Blanchette, Krystle; Crimmins, Gregory; Bergman, Molly A; Isberg, Ralph R; Orihuela, Carlos J; Dube, Peter H

    2016-09-01

    CD8(+) T cells use contact-dependent cytolysis of target cells to protect the host against intracellular pathogens. We have previously shown that CD8(+) T cells and perforin are required to protect against the extracellular pathogen Yersinia pseudotuberculosis. Here we establish an experimental system where CD8(+) T cells specific to a single model antigen are the only memory response present at time of challenge. Using mice immunized with a vaccine strain of Listeria monocytogenes that expresses secreted ovalbumin (Lm-OVA), we show that OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells are generated and provide limited protection against challenge with virulent OVA(+)Y. pseudotuberculosis. Perforin expression by OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells was required, as Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-deficient mice showed higher bacterial burden as compared to Lm-OVA-immunized perforin-sufficient mice. Surprisingly, antigen-specific T cell protection waned over time, as Lm-OVA-immune mice eventually succumbed to Yersinia infection. Kinetic analysis of infection in mice with and without OVA-specific CD8(+) T cells revealed that bacterial numbers increased sharply in OVA-naïve mice until death, while OVA-immune mice held bacterial burden to a lower level throughout the duration of illness until death. Clonal analysis of bacterial populations in OVA-naïve and OVA-immune mice at distinct time points revealed equivalent and severe bottle-neck effects for bacteria in both sets of mice immediately after intravenous challenge, demonstrating a dominant role for other aspects of the immune system regardless of CD8(+) T cell status. These studies indicate that CD8(+) T cells against a single antigen can restrict Y. pseudotuberculosis colonization in a perforin-dependent manner, but ultimately are insufficient in their ability to provide sterilizing immunity and protect against death.

  14. Utilization of replication-competent XMRV reporter-viruses reveals severe viral restriction in primary human cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Martina Stürzel

    Full Text Available The gammaretrovirus termed xenotropic murine leukemia virus-related virus (XMRV was described to be isolated from prostate cancer tissue biopsies and from blood of patients suffering from chronic fatigue syndrome. However, many studies failed to detect XMRV and to verify these disease associations. Data suggesting the contamination of specimens in particular by PCR-based methods and recent reports demonstrating XMRV generation via recombination of two murine leukemia virus precursors raised serious doubts about XMRV being a genuine human pathogen. To elucidate cell tropism of XMRV, we generated replication competent XMRV reporter viruses encoding a green fluorescent protein or a secretable luciferase as tools to analyze virus infection of human cell lines or primary human cells. Transfection of proviral DNAs into LNCaP prostate cancer cells resulted in readily detectably reporter gene expression and production of progeny virus. Inoculation of known XMRV susceptible target cells revealed that these virions were infectious and expressed the reporter gene, allowing for a fast and highly sensitive quantification of XMRV infection. Both reporter viruses were capable of establishing a spreading infection in LNCaP and Raji B cells and could be easily passaged. However, after inoculation of primary human blood cells such as CD4 T cells, macrophages or dendritic cells, infection rates were very low, and a spreading infection was never established. In line with these results we found that supernatants derived from these XMRV infected primary cell types did not contain infectious virus. Thus, although XMRV efficiently replicated in some human cell lines, all tested primary cells were largely refractory to XMRV infection and did not support viral spread. Our results provide further evidence that XMRV is not a human pathogen.

  15. Secreted Vago restricts West Nile virus infection in Culex mosquito cells by activating the Jak-STAT pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paradkar, Prasad N; Trinidad, Lee; Voysey, Rhonda; Duchemin, Jean-Bernard; Walker, Peter J

    2012-11-13

    Although West Nile virus (WNV) and other arthropod-borne viruses are a major public health problem, the mechanisms of antiviral immunity in mosquitoes are poorly understood. Dicer-2, responsible for the RNAi-mediated response through the C-terminal RNase-III domain, also contains an N-terminal DExD/H-box helicase domain similar to mammalian RIG-I/MDA5 which, in Drosophila, was found to be required for activation of an antiviral gene, Vago. Here we show that the Culex orthologue of Vago (CxVago) is up-regulated in response to WNV infection in a Dicer-2-dependent manner. Further, our data show that CxVago is a secreted peptide that restricts WNV infection by activation of the Jak-STAT pathway. Thus, Vago appears to function as an IFN-like antiviral cytokine in mosquitoes.

  16. The expression of a chimeric Phaseolus vulgaris nodulin 30-GUS gene is restricted to the rhizobially infected cells in transgenic Lotus corniculatus nodules.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carsolio, C; Campos, F; Sánchez, F; Rocha-Sosa, M

    1994-12-01

    In Phaseolus vulgaris there is a nodulin family, Npv30, of ca. 30 kDa, as detected in an in vitro translation assay [2]. We isolated a gene (npv30-1) for one of the members of this family. The nucleotide sequence of the promoter of npv30-1 contains nodule-specific motifs common to other late nodulin genes. The promoter was fused to the GUS reporter gene; this chimeric fusion was introduced into Lotus corniculatus via Agrobacterium rhizogenes transformation. GUS activity was only detected in the infected cells of the nodules of transgenic plants. By contrast, the expression of a 35S-GUS construct was restricted to the uninfected cells and the vascular tissue.

  17. A dynamic pressure view cell for acoustic stimulation of fluids—Micro-bubble generation and fluid movement in porous media

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stewart, Robert A.; Shaw, J. M.

    2015-09-01

    The development and baseline operation of an acoustic view cell for observing fluids, and fluid-fluid and fluid-solid interfaces in porous media over the frequency range of 10-5000 Hz is described. This range includes the industrially relevant frequency range 500-5000 Hz that is not covered by existing devices. Pressure waveforms of arbitrary shape are generated in a 17.46 mm ID by 200 mm and 690.5 mm long glass tubes at flow rates up to 200 ml/min using a syringe pump. Peak-to-peak amplitudes exceeding 80 kPa are readily realized at frequencies from 10 to 5000 Hz in bubble free fluids when actuated with 20 Vpp as exemplified using castor oil. At resonant frequencies, peak-to-peak pressure amplitudes exceeding 500 kPa were obtained (castor oil at 2100 Hz when actuated with 20 Vpp). Impacts of vibration on macroscopic liquid-liquid and liquid-vapour interfaces and interface movement are illustrated. Pressure wave transmission and attenuation in a fluid saturated porous medium, randomly packed 250-330 μm spherical silica beads, is also demonstrated. Attenuation differences and frequency shifts in resonant peaks are used to detect the presence and generation of dispersed micro-bubbles (outcomes. This knowledge will inform laboratory and pilot scale process studies, where nuisance vibrations may affect the interpretation of process outcomes, and large scale or in situ processes in aquifers or hydrocarbon reservoirs where imposed vibration may be deployed to improve aspects of process performance. Future work will include miscible interface observation and quantitative measurements in the bulk and in porous media where the roles of micro-bubbles comprise subjects of special interest.

  18. Adjuvanted HLA-supertype restricted subdominant peptides induce new T-cell immunity during untreated HIV-1-infection

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Karlsson, Ingrid; Brandt, Lea; Vinner, Lasse

    2013-01-01

    -cell responses specific for one or more vaccine epitopes were induced in 10/10 vaccinees. The responses were dominated by CD107a and MIP1β expression. There were no significant changes in HIV-1 viral load or CD4 T-cell counts. Our study demonstrates that the peptide/CAF01 vaccine is safe and that it is possible...

  19. Development of a diverse human T-cell repertoire despite stringent restriction of hematopoietic clonality in the thymus

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Brugman, Martijn H.; Wiekmeijer, Anna-Sophia; van Eggermond, Marja; Wolvers-Tettero, Ingrid; Langerak, Anton W.; de Haas, Edwin F. E.; Bystrykh, Leonid V.; van Rood, Jon J.; de Haan, Gerald; Fibbe, Willem E.; Staal, Frank J. T.

    2015-01-01

    The fate and numbers of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and their progeny that seed the thymus constitute a fundamental question with important clinical implications. HSC transplantation is often complicated by limited T-cell reconstitution, especially when HSC from umbilical cord blood are used. Att

  20. Progressive developmental restriction, acquisition of left-right identity and cell growth behavior during lobe formation in mouse liver development.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Weiss, Mary C; Le Garrec, Jean-Francois; Coqueran, Sabrina; Strick-Marchand, Helene; Buckingham, Margaret

    2016-04-01

    To identify cell-based decisions implicated in morphogenesis of the mammalian liver, we performed clonal analysis of hepatocytes/hepatoblasts in mouse liver development, using a knock-in allele of Hnf4a/laacZ This transgene randomly undergoes a low frequency of recombination that generates a functional lacZ gene that produces β-galactosidase in tissues in which Hnf4a is expressed. Two types of β-galactosidase-positive clones were found. Most have undergone three to eight cell divisions and result from independent events (Luria-Delbrück fluctuation test); we calculate that they arose between E8.5 and E13.5. A second class was mega-clones derived from early endoderm progenitors, generating many descendants. Some originated from multi-potential founder cells, with labeled cells in the liver, pancreas and/or intestine. A few mega-clones populate only one side of the liver, indicating hepatic cell chirality. The patterns of labeled cells indicate cohesive and often oriented growth, notably in broad radial stripes, potentially implicated in the formation of liver lobes. This retrospective clonal analysis gives novel insights into clonal origins, cell behavior of progenitors and distinct properties of endoderm cells that underlie the formation and morphogenesis of the liver.

  1. Host range restriction of vaccinia virus in Chinese hamster ovary cells: relationship to shutoff of protein synthesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Drillien, R; Spehner, D; Kirn, A

    1978-12-01

    Chinese hamster ovary cells were found to be nonpermissive for vaccinia virus. Although early virus-induced events occurred in these cells (RNA and polypeptide synthesis), subsequent events appeared to be prevented by a very rapid and nonselective shutoff of protein synthesis. Within less than 2 h after infection, both host and viral protein syntheses were arrested. At low multiplicities of infection, inhibition of RNA synthesis with cordycepin resulted in failure of the virus to block protein synthesis. Moreover, infection of the cells in the presence of cycloheximide prevented the immediate onset of shutoff after reversal of cycloheximide. Inactivation of virus particles by UV irradiation also impaired the capacity of the virus to inhibit protein synthesis. These results suggested that an early vaccinia virus-coded product was implicated in the shutoff of protein synthesis. Either the nonpermissive Chinese hamster ovary cells were more sensitive to this inhibition than permissive cells, or a regulatory control of the vaccinia shutoff function was defective.

  2. E1A,E1B double-restricted adenovirus enhances the cytotoxicity and antitumor activity of gemcitabine to renal cell carcinoma

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    WANG Hua; Makoto Satoh; CHEN Gui-ping; LI De-chuan; Hirofumi Hamada; Yoichi Arai

    2011-01-01

    Background Our previous studies have demonstrated potent oncolysis efficacy of the E1A,E1B double-restricted replication-competent oncolytic adenovirus AxdAdB-3 for treatment of bladder cancer. Here,we reported the feasibility and efficacy of AxdAdB-3 alone,or in combination with gemcitabine for treating renal cell carcinoma.Methods Cytopathic effects of AxdAdB-3 were evaluated in human renal cell carcinoma cell lines TOS-1,TOS-2,TOS-3,TOS-3LN,SMKT-R3,SMKT-R4 and ACHN,and in normal human renal proximal tubule epithelial cells (RPTEC).AxdAdB-3 induced down-regulation of the cell cycle was determined by flow cytometry. Combination therapies of AxdAdB-3 with gemcitabine were evaluated in vitro and in vivo on subcutaneous TOS-3LN tumors in a severe combined immunodeficiency disease (SCID) mouse model.Results AxdAdB-3 was potently cytopathic against the tested most renal cell carcinoma cell lines including TOS-2,TOS-3,TOS-3LN,SMKT-R3 and SMKT-R4,while normal human RPTEC were not destroyed. AxdAdB-3 effectively induced cell cycle S-phase entry. Combined therapy of AxdAdB-3 with gemcitabine demonstrated stronger antitumor effects in vitro and in vivo compared with either AxdAdB-3 or gemcitabine alone.Conclusion AxdAdB-3 alone,or in combination with gemcitabine may be a promising strategy against renal cell carcinoma.

  3. IL-27 receptor signalling restricts the formation of pathogenic, terminally differentiated Th1 cells during malaria infection by repressing IL-12 dependent signals.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ana Villegas-Mendez

    Full Text Available The IL-27R, WSX-1, is required to limit IFN-γ production by effector CD4⁺ T cells in a number of different inflammatory conditions but the molecular basis of WSX-1-mediated regulation of Th1 responses in vivo during infection has not been investigated in detail. In this study we demonstrate that WSX-1 signalling suppresses the development of pathogenic, terminally differentiated (KLRG-1⁺ Th1 cells during malaria infection and establishes a restrictive threshold to constrain the emergent Th1 response. Importantly, we show that WSX-1 regulates cell-intrinsic responsiveness to IL-12 and IL-2, but the fate of the effector CD4⁺ T cell pool during malaria infection is controlled primarily through IL-12 dependent signals. Finally, we show that WSX-1 regulates Th1 cell terminal differentiation during malaria infection through IL-10 and Foxp3 independent mechanisms; the kinetics and magnitude of the Th1 response, and the degree of Th1 cell terminal differentiation, were comparable in WT, IL-10R1⁻/⁻ and IL-10⁻/⁻ mice and the numbers and phenotype of Foxp3⁺ cells were largely unaltered in WSX-1⁻/⁻ mice during infection. As expected, depletion of Foxp3⁺ cells did not enhance Th1 cell polarisation or terminal differentiation during malaria infection. Our results significantly expand our understanding of how IL-27 regulates Th1 responses in vivo during inflammatory conditions and establishes WSX-1 as a critical and non-redundant regulator of the emergent Th1 effector response during malaria infection.

  4. Conservation and diversity of influenza A H1N1 HLA-restricted T cell epitope candidates for epitope-based vaccines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Paul Thiamjoo Tan

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: The immune-related evolution of influenza viruses is exceedingly complex and current vaccines against influenza must be reformulated for each influenza season because of the high degree of antigenic drift among circulating influenza strains. Delay in vaccine production is a serious problem in responding to a pandemic situation, such as that of the current H1N1 strain. Immune escape is generally attributed to reduced antibody recognition of the viral hemagglutinin and neuraminidase proteins whose rate of mutation is much greater than that of the internal non-structural proteins. As a possible alternative, vaccines directed at T cell epitope domains of internal influenza proteins, that are less susceptible to antigenic variation, have been investigated. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: HLA transgenic mouse strains expressing HLA class I A*0201, A*2402, and B*0702, and class II DRB1*1501, DRB1*0301 and DRB1*0401 were immunized with 196 influenza H1N1 peptides that contained residues of highly conserved proteome sequences of the human H1N1, H3N2, H1N2, H5N1, and avian influenza A strains. Fifty-four (54 peptides that elicited 63 HLA-restricted peptide-specific T cell epitope responses were identified by IFN-gamma ELISpot assay. The 54 peptides were compared to the 2007-2009 human H1N1 sequences for selection of sequences in the design of a new candidate H1N1 vaccine, specifically targeted to highly-conserved HLA-restricted T cell epitopes. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: Seventeen (17 T cell epitopes in PB1, PB2, and M1 were selected as vaccine targets based on sequence conservation over the past 30 years, high functional avidity, non-identity to human peptides, clustered localization, and promiscuity to multiple HLA alleles. These candidate vaccine antigen sequences may be applicable to any avian or human influenza A virus.

  5. Carbohydrate restriction and dietary cholesterol modulate the expression of HMG-CoA reductase and the LDL receptor in mononuclear cells from adult men

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Volek Jeff S

    2007-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract The liver is responsible for controlling cholesterol homeostasis in the body. HMG-CoA reductase and the LDL receptor (LDL-r are involved in this regulation and are also ubiquitously expressed in all major tissues. We have previously shown in guinea pigs that there is a correlation in gene expression of HMG-CoA reductase and the LDL-r between liver and mononuclear cells. The present study evaluated human mononuclear cells as a surrogate for hepatic expression of these genes. The purpose was to evaluate the effect of dietary carbohydrate restriction with low and high cholesterol content on HMG-CoA reductase and LDL-r mRNA expression in mononuclear cells. All subjects were counseled to consume a carbohydrate restricted diet with 10–15% energy from carbohydrate, 30–35% energy from protein and 55–60% energy from fat. Subjects were randomly assigned to either EGG (640 mg/d additional dietary cholesterol or SUB groups [equivalent amount of egg substitute (0 dietary cholesterol contributions per day] for 12 weeks. At the end of the intervention, there were no changes in plasma total or LDL cholesterol (LDL-C compared to baseline (P > 0.10 or differences in plasma total or LDL-C between groups. The mRNA abundance for HMG-CoA reductase and LDL-r were measured in mononuclear cells using real time PCR. The EGG group showed a significant decrease in HMG-CoA reductase mRNA (1.98 ± 1.26 to 1.32 ± 0.92 arbitrary units P

  6. Dietary restriction and fasting arrest B and T cell development and increase mature B and T cell numbers in bone marrow

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Shushimita; M.J.W. de Bruijn (Marjolein); R.W.F. de Bruin (Ron); J.N.M. IJzermans (Jan); R.W. Hendriks (Rudi); F.J.M.F. Dor (Frank)

    2014-01-01

    textabstractDietary restriction (DR) delays ageing and extends life span. Both long- and short-term DR, as well as short-term fasting provide robust protection against many "neuronal and surgery related damaging phenomena" such as Parkinson's disease and ischemia-reperfusion injury. The exact mechan

  7. Silencing of E2F3 suppresses tumor growth of Her2+ breast cancer cells by restricting mitosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Miyoung; Oprea-Ilies, Gabriela; Saavedra, Harold I

    2015-11-10

    The E2F transcriptional activators E2F1, E2F2 and E2F3a regulate many important cellular processes, including DNA replication, apoptosis and centrosome duplication. Previously, we demonstrated that silencing E2F1 or E2F3 suppresses centrosome amplification (CA) and chromosome instability (CIN) in Her2+ breast cancer cells without markedly altering proliferation. However, it is unknown whether and how silencing a single E2F activator, E2F3, affects malignancy of human breast cancer cells. Thus, we injected HCC1954 Her2+ breast cancer cells silenced for E2F3 into mammary fat pads of immunodeficient mice and demonstrated that loss of E2F3 retards tumor growth. Surprisingly, silencing of E2F3 led to significant reductions in mitotic indices relative to vector controls, while the percentage of cells undergoing S phase were not affected. Nek2 is a mitotic kinase commonly upregulated in breast cancers and a critical regulator of Cdk4- or E2F-mediated CA. In this report, we found that Nek2 overexpression rescued back the CA caused by silencing of shE2F3. However, the effects of Nek2 overexpression in affecting tumor growth rates of shE2F3 and shE2F3; GFP cells were inconclusive. Taken together, our results indicate that E2F3 silencing decreases mammary tumor growth by reducing percentage of cells undergoing mitosis.

  8. Expression of p13MTCP1 is restricted to mature T-cell proliferations with t(X;14) translocations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Madani, A; Choukroun, V; Soulier, J; Cacheux, V; Claisse, J F; Valensi, F; Daliphard, S; Cazin, B; Levy, V; Leblond, V; Daniel, M T; Sigaux, F; Stern, M H

    1996-03-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia (T-PLL), a rare form of mature T-cell leukemias, and ataxia telangiectasia clonal proliferation, a related condition occurring in patients suffering from ataxia telangiectasia, have been associated to translocations involving the 14q32.1 or Xq28 regions, where are located the TCL1 and MTCP1 putative oncogenes, respectively. The MTCP1 gene is involved in the t(X;14)(q28;q11) translocation associated with these T-cell proliferations. Alternative splicing generates type A and B transcripts that potentially encode two entirely distinct proteins; type A transcripts code for a small mitochondrial protein, p8MTCP1, and type B transcripts, containing an additional open reading frame, may code for 107 amino-acid protein, p13MTCP1. The recently cloned TCL1 gene, also involved in translocations and inversions associated with T-cell proliferations, codes for a 14-kD protein that displays significant homology with p13MTCP1. We have generated rabbit antisera against this putative p13MTCP1 protein and screened for expression of p13MTCP1 normal lymphoid tissues and 33 cases of immature and mature lymphoid T-cell proliferations using a sensitive Western blot assay. We also investigated the MTCP1 locus configuration by Southern blot analysis. The p13MTCP1 protein was detected in the three T-cell proliferations with MTCP1 rearrangements because of t(X;14) translocations, but neither in normal resting and activated lymphocytes nor in the other T-cell leukemias. Our data support the hypothesis that p13MTCP1 and p14TCL1 form a new protein family that plays a key role in the pathogenesis of T-PLL and related conditions.

  9. Gracious Movement

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lev Kreft

    2012-07-01

    Full Text Available In 1984 Christopher Cordner offered a critical view on theories of graceful movement in sport developed by Ng. G. Wulk, David Best and Joseph Kupfer. In 2001 Paul Davis criticized his view. Cordner responded, rejecting all the criticism. More than a century before, Herbert Spencer and Jean-Marie Guyau had a similar controversy over grace. Both exchanges of opinion involve three positions: that grace is the most efficient movement and therefore something quantitative and measurable; that grace is expression of the wholeness of person and the world; and that grace is something which neither science nor philosophy can explain. To clarify these conflicting issues, this article proposes to examine the history of the notion which goes back to the Latin gratia and has root in the Ancient Greek charis, and to apply the concepts of cultural anchor and thin coherence, following John R. Searle’s explanation that we produce epistemically objective accounts of ontologically subjective reality.

  10. Antinuclear movement

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Young Hee; Im, Jaeg Yeong

    1988-08-15

    This book is for antinuclear movement. So, this book introduces many articles on nuclear issues of Asia and the pacific area. The titles of articles are the crusades of Reagan by Werner Plaha, contending between super powers in Europe by Alva Reimer Myrdal, claims of resistance by Daniel Ellsberg, nuclear and the Korean Peninsula by Go, Seung Woo, Liberation but of belief of nuclear weapon by Lee, Young Hee and nuclear weapon in Korea by peter Haze.

  11. The role of cell wall-based defences in the early restriction of non-pathogenic hrp mutant bacteria in Arabidopsis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mitchell, Kathy; Brown, Ian; Knox, Paul; Mansfield, John

    2015-04-01

    We have investigated the cause of the restricted multiplication of hrp mutant bacteria in leaves of Arabidopsis. Our focus was on early interactions leading to differentiation between virulent wild-type and non-pathogenic hrpA mutant strains of Pseudomonas syringae pv. tomato. An initial drop in recoverable bacteria detected 0-4 h after inoculation with either strain was dependent on a functional FLS2 receptor and H2O2 accumulation in challenged leaves. Wild-type bacteria subsequently multiplied rapidly whereas the hrpA mutant was restricted within 6 h. Despite the early restriction, the hrpA mutant was still viable several days after inoculation. Analysis of intercellular washing fluids (IWFs), showed that high levels of nutrients were readily available to bacteria in the apoplast and that no diffusible inhibitors were produced in response to bacterial challenge. Histochemical and immunocytochemical methods were used to detect changes in polysaccharides (callose, two forms of cellulose, and pectin), arabinogalactan proteins (AGPs), H2O2 and peroxidase. Quantitative analysis showed very similar changes in localisation of AGPs, cellulose epitopes and callose 2 and 4 h after inoculation with either strain. However from 6 to 12 h after inoculation papillae expanded only next to the hrp mutant. In contrast to the similar patterns of secretory activity recorded from mesophyll cells, accumulation of H2O2 and peroxidase was significantly greater around the hrpA mutant within the first 4h after inoculation. A striking differential accumulation of H2O2 was also found in chloroplasts in cells next to the mutant. Ascorbate levels were lower in the IWFs recovered from sites inoculated with the hrp mutant than with wild-type bacteria. The critical response, observed at the right time and place to explain the observed differential behaviour of wild-type and hrpA mutant bacteria was the accumulation of H2O2, probably generated through Type III peroxidase activity and in

  12. Caloric restriction and the adipokine leptin alter the SDF-1 signaling axis in bone marrow and in bone marrow derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Periyasamy-Thandavan, Sudharsan; Herberg, Samuel; Arounleut, Phonepasong; Upadhyay, Sunil; Dukes, Amy; Davis, Colleen; Johnson, Maribeth; McGee-Lawrence, Meghan; Hamrick, Mark W; Isales, Carlos M; Hill, William D

    2015-07-15

    Growing evidence suggests that the chemokine stromal cell-derived factor-1 (SDF-1) is essential in regulating bone marrow (BM) derived mesenchymal stromal/stem cell (BMSC) survival, and differentiation to either a pro-osteogenic or pro-adipogenic fate. This study investigates the effects of caloric restriction (CR) and leptin on the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis in bone and BM tissues in the context of age-associated bone loss. For in vivo studies, we collected bone, BM cells and BM interstitial fluid from 12 and 20 month-old C57Bl6 mice fed ad-libitum (AL), and 20-month-old mice on long-term CR with, or without, intraperitoneal injection of leptin for 10 days (10 mg/kg). To mimic conditions of CR in vitro, 18 month murine BMSCs were treated with (1) control (Ctrl): normal proliferation medium, (2) nutrient restriction (NR): low glucose, low serum medium, or (3) NR + leptin: NR medium + 100 ng/ml leptin for 6-48 h. In BMSCs both protein and mRNA expression of SDF-1 and CXCR4 were increased by CR and CR + leptin. In contrast, the alternate SDF-1 receptor CXCR7 was decreased, suggesting a nutrient signaling mediated change in SDF-1 axis signaling in BMSCs. However, in bone SDF-1, CXCR4 and 7 gene expression increase with age and this is reversed with CR, while addition of leptin returns this to the "aged" level. Histologically bone formation was lower in the calorically restricted mice and BM adipogenesis increased, both effects were reversed with the 10 day leptin treatment. This suggests that in bone CR and leptin alter the nutrient signaling pathways in different ways to affect the local action of the osteogenic cytokine SDF-1. Studies focusing on the molecular interaction between nutrient signaling by CR, leptin and SDF-1 axis may help to address age-related musculoskeletal changes.

  13. Differential Control of BST2 Restriction and Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Antiviral Response by Antagonists Encoded by HIV-1 Group M and O Strains.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bego, Mariana G; Cong, Lijun; Mack, Katharina; Kirchhoff, Frank; Cohen, Éric A

    2016-11-15

    BST2/tetherin is a type I interferon (IFN-I)-stimulated host factor that restricts the release of HIV-1 by entrapping budding virions at the cell surface. This membrane-associated protein can also engage and activate the plasmacytoid dendritic cell (pDC)-specific immunoglobulin-like transcript 7 (ILT7) inhibitory receptor to downregulate the IFN-I response by pDCs. Pandemic HIV-1 group M uses Vpu (M-Vpu) to counteract the two BST2 isoforms (long and short) that are expressed in human cells. M-Vpu efficiently downregulates surface long BST2, while it displaces short BST2 molecules away from viral assembly sites. We recently found that this attribute is used by M-Vpu to activate the BST2/ILT7-dependent negative-feedback pathway and to suppress pDC IFN-I responses during sensing of infected cells. However, whether this property is conserved in endemic HIV-1 group O, which has evolved Nef (O-Nef) to counteract specifically the long BST2 isoform, remains unknown. In the present study, we validated that O-Nefs have the capacity to downregulate surface BST2 and enhance HIV-1 particle release although less efficiently than M-Vpu. In contrast to M-Vpu, O-Nef did not efficiently enhance viral spread in T cell culture or displace short BST2 from viral assembly sites to prevent its occlusion by tethered HIV-1 particles. Consequently, O-Nef impairs the ability of BST2 to activate negative ILT7 signaling to suppress the IFN-I response by pDC-containing peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) during sensing of infected cells. These distinctive features of BST2 counteraction by O-Nefs may in part explain the limited spread of HIV-1 group O in the human population.

  14. Interactions of opsonized immune complexes with whole blood cells: binding to erythrocytes restricts complex uptake by leucocyte populations

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, C H; Svehag, S E; Marquart, H V;

    1994-01-01

    The binding of opsonized, fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA)/rabbit anti-BSA complexes (IC) to washed human whole blood cells and isolated leucocytes in the presence of autologous serum was investigated by flow cytometry. In the presence of erythrocytes (E), the IC-binding to granulo......The binding of opsonized, fluorescein-labelled bovine serum albumin (BSA)/rabbit anti-BSA complexes (IC) to washed human whole blood cells and isolated leucocytes in the presence of autologous serum was investigated by flow cytometry. In the presence of erythrocytes (E), the IC...

  15. TNF-Mediated Restriction of Arginase 1 Expression in Myeloid Cells Triggers Type 2 NO Synthase Activity at the Site of Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Schleicher, Ulrike; Paduch, Katrin; Debus, Andrea; Obermeyer, Stephanie; König, Till; Kling, Jessica C; Ribechini, Eliana; Dudziak, Diana; Mougiakakos, Dimitrios; Murray, Peter J; Ostuni, Renato; Körner, Heinrich; Bogdan, Christian

    2016-05-01

    Neutralization or deletion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF) causes loss of control of intracellular pathogens in mice and humans, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we found that TNF antagonized alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells by IL-4. TNF inhibited IL-4-induced arginase 1 (Arg1) expression by decreasing histone acetylation, without affecting STAT6 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. In Leishmania major-infected C57BL/6 wild-type mice, type 2 nitric oxide (NO) synthase (NOS2) was detected in inflammatory dendritic cells or macrophages, some of which co-expressed Arg1. In TNF-deficient mice, Arg1 was hyperexpressed, causing an impaired production of NO in situ. A similar phenotype was seen in L. major-infected BALB/c mice. Arg1 deletion in hematopoietic cells protected these mice from an otherwise lethal disease, although their disease-mediating T cell response (Th2, Treg) was maintained. Thus, deletion or TNF-mediated restriction of Arg1 unleashes the production of NO by NOS2, which is critical for pathogen control.

  16. TNF-Mediated Restriction of Arginase 1 Expression in Myeloid Cells Triggers Type 2 NO Synthase Activity at the Site of Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ulrike Schleicher

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available Neutralization or deletion of tumor necrosis factor (TNF causes loss of control of intracellular pathogens in mice and humans, but the underlying mechanisms are incompletely understood. Here, we found that TNF antagonized alternative activation of macrophages and dendritic cells by IL-4. TNF inhibited IL-4-induced arginase 1 (Arg1 expression by decreasing histone acetylation, without affecting STAT6 phosphorylation and nuclear translocation. In Leishmania major-infected C57BL/6 wild-type mice, type 2 nitric oxide (NO synthase (NOS2 was detected in inflammatory dendritic cells or macrophages, some of which co-expressed Arg1. In TNF-deficient mice, Arg1 was hyperexpressed, causing an impaired production of NO in situ. A similar phenotype was seen in L. major-infected BALB/c mice. Arg1 deletion in hematopoietic cells protected these mice from an otherwise lethal disease, although their disease-mediating T cell response (Th2, Treg was maintained. Thus, deletion or TNF-mediated restriction of Arg1 unleashes the production of NO by NOS2, which is critical for pathogen control.

  17. A HLA-A2 restricted human CTL line recognizes a novel tumor cell expressed p53 epitope

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, Peter A; Claesson, Mogens H

    2002-01-01

    , the CTL line, which expressed relatively low affinity for the HLA-A2/peptide complex, was able to kill 3 different HLA-A2(+) p53 mutated tumor cell lines. The present and our previous observations expand the number of p53-derived peptides suitable for vaccination protocols for cancer patients with p53......A p53 peptide-specific CTL line was generated through stimulation with autologous monocyte-derived dendritic cells (DC) pulsed with wild-type HLA-A2 binding p53 derived peptides. A p53 peptide-specific CD8(+) CTL line was established from a healthy HLA-A2 positive donor. The CTL line...... was characterized with respect to specificity, affinity and killing of cell lines derived from p53 mutated spontaneous tumors. The CTL line demonstrated lysis of p53(139-147) pulsed target cells and cold target inhibition experiments as well as antibody blocking confirmed that the killing was epitope-specific, HLA...

  18. Preformed purified peptide/major histocompatibility class I complexes are potent stimulators of class I-restricted T cell hybridomas

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Stryhn, A; Pedersen, L O; Ortiz-Navarrete, V;

    1994-01-01

    and quantitated. Latex particles were subsequently coated with known amounts of preformed complexes and used to stimulate the T cell hybridomas. Stimulation was specific, i.e. only the appropriate peptide/class I combination were stimulatory, and quite sensitive, i.e. as little as 300 complexes per bead could...

  19. Effects of food restriction on glucose tolerance, insulin secretion, and islet-cell proliferation in pregnant rats

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Nieuwenhuizen, AG; Schuiling, GA; Seijsener, AFJ; Moes, H; Koiter, TR

    1999-01-01

    Pregnancy is associated with increased glucose-stimulated insulin secretion and increased pancreatic is in-cell proliferation. In the present study it was investigated whether increased food intake, as occurs during pregnancy, Is Involved in the regulation of these phenomena. From Day 0 of pregnancy

  20. Selective Targeting and Restrictive Damage for Nonspecific Cells by Pulsed Laser-Activated Hyaluronan-Gold Nanoparticles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rau, Lih-Rou; Tsao, Shu-Wei; Liaw, Jiunn-Woei; Tsai, Shiao-Wen

    2016-08-08

    Herein, we describe an approach that immobilizes low-molecular-weight hyaluronic acid (low-MW HA) on the surface of gold nanoparticles (GNPs), which can serve as a cellular probe and photodamage media, to evaluate the selectivity and efficiency of HA-based GNPs (HGNPs) as a mediator of laser-induced photothermal cell damage. In addition, it is known that solid tumors contain a higher content of low-MW HA than normal tissues. Thus, we used low-MW HA rather than high-MW HA used in other studies. In the present study, we conjugated low-MW HA, which is a linear polysaccharide with a disaccharide repeat unit, to prevent a reduction of the ligand-receptor binding efficiency in contrast to the conjugation of protein or peptides, which have unique three-dimensional structures. Three cell lines-MDA-MB-435 S (with CD44), MDA-MB-453 and NIH/3T3 (both are without CD44)-were investigated in the study, and qualitative observations were conducted by dark-field microscopy and laser scanning confocal microscopy (LSCM). In addition, quantitative measurements calculated using inductively coupled plasma emissions were taken for comparison. Our results showed that within the same treatment time, the uptake dosage of HGNPs by the MDA-MB-435 S cells was higher than that by the MDA-MB-453 and NIH 3T3 cells. Meanwhile, HGNPs uptake by the untreated MDA-MB-435 S cells was higher than that of MDA-MB-435 S cells with CD44 blocked by antibodies or silencing CD44 expression. This result implies that receptor-mediated endocytosis can enhance the cellular uptake of HGNPs. In addition, when exposed to a low-power pulsed laser, the former cell morphologies showed a more laser-induced giant plasma membrane vesicles (GPMV) than the latter morphologies. Therefore, this study utilized the specific photothermal property of HA-modified GNPs with laser-induced blebs to create a possible new method for medical applications.

  1. Music, Movement and Marimba: An Investigation of the Role of Movement and Gesture in Communicating Musical Expression to an Audience

    Science.gov (United States)

    Broughton, Mary; Stevens, Catherine

    2009-01-01

    The experiment reported in this article investigated the assumption that visual movement plays a role in musician-to-audience communication in marimba performance. Body movement is of particular relevance here as the expressive capabilities of the marimba are relatively restricted, and the movements required to play it are visible. Twenty-four…

  2. The receptor for urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPAR) controls plasticity of cancer cell movement in mesenchymal and amoeboid migration style.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Margheri, Francesca; Luciani, Cristina; Taddei, Maria Letizia; Giannoni, Elisa; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Chillà, Anastasia; Chiarugi, Paola; Fibbi, Gabriella; Del Rosso, Mario

    2014-03-30

    The receptor for the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) is up-regulated in malignant tumors. Historically the function of uPAR in cancer cell invasion is strictly related to its property to promote uPA-dependent proteolysis of extracellular matrix and to open a path to malignant cells. These features are typical of mesenchymal motility. Here we show that the full-length form of uPAR is required when prostate and melanoma cancer cells convert their migration style from the "path generating" mesenchymal to the "path finding" amoeboid one, thus conferring a plasticity to tumor cell invasiveness across three-dimensional matrices. Indeed, in response to a protease inhibitors-rich milieu, prostate and melanoma cells activated an amoeboid invasion program connoted by retraction of cell protrusions, RhoA-mediated rounding of the cell body, formation of a cortical ring of actin and a reduction of Rac-1 activation. While the mesenchymal movement was reduced upon silencing of uPAR expression, the amoeboid one was almost completely abolished, in parallel with a deregulation of small Rho-GTPases activity. In melanoma and prostate cancer cells we have shown uPAR colocalization with β1/β3 integrins and actin cytoskeleton, as well integrins-actin co-localization under both mesenchymal and amoeboid conditions. Such co-localizations were lost upon treatment of cells with a peptide that inhibits uPAR-integrin interactions. Similarly to uPAR silencing, the peptide reduced mesenchymal invasion and almost abolished the amoeboid one. These results indicate that full-length uPAR bridges the mesenchymal and amoeboid style of movement by an inward-oriented activity based on its property to promote integrin-actin interactions and the following cytoskeleton assembly.

  3. The receptor for urokinase-plasminogen activator (uPAR) controls plasticity of cancer cell movement in mesenchymal and amoeboid migration style

    Science.gov (United States)

    Taddei, Maria Letizia; Giannoni, Elisa; Laurenzana, Anna; Biagioni, Alessio; Chillà, Anastasia; Chiarugi, Paola; Fibbi, Gabriella; Rosso1, Mario Del

    2014-01-01

    The receptor for the urokinase plasminogen activator (uPAR) is up-regulated in malignant tumors. Historically the function of uPAR in cancer cell invasion is strictly related to its property to promote uPA-dependent proteolysis of extracellular matrix and to open a path to malignant cells. These features are typical of mesenchymal motility. Here we show that the full-length form of uPAR is required when prostate and melanoma cancer cells convert their migration style from the “path generating” mesenchymal to the “path finding” amoeboid one, thus conferring a plasticity to tumor cell invasiveness across three-dimensional matrices. Indeed, in response to a protease inhibitors-rich milieu, prostate and melanoma cells activated an amoeboid invasion program connoted by retraction of cell protrusions, RhoA-mediated rounding of the cell body, formation of a cortical ring of actin and a reduction of Rac-1 activation. While the mesenchymal movement was reduced upon silencing of uPAR expression, the amoeboid one was almost completely abolished, in parallel with a deregulation of small Rho-GTPases activity. In melanoma and prostate cancer cells we have shown uPAR colocalization with β1/β3 integrins and actin cytoskeleton, as well integrins-actin co-localization under both mesenchymal and amoeboid conditions. Such co-localizations were lost upon treatment of cells with a peptide that inhibits uPAR-integrin interactions. Similarly to uPAR silencing, the peptide reduced mesenchymal invasion and almost abolished the amoeboid one. These results indicate that full-length uPAR bridges the mesenchymal and amoeboid style of movement by an inward-oriented activity based on its property to promote integrin-actin interactions and the following cytoskeleton assembly. PMID:24681666

  4. B-cell responses to pregnancy-restricted and -unrestricted Plasmodium falciparum erythrocyte membrane protein 1 antigens in Ghanaian women naturally exposed to malaria parasites

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Ampomah, Paulina; Stevenson, Liz; Ofori, Michael F;

    2014-01-01

    Protective immunity to Plasmodium falciparum malaria acquired after natural exposure is largely antibody mediated. IgG-specific P. falciparum EMP1 (PfEMP1) proteins on the infected erythrocyte surface are particularly important. The transient antibody responses and the slowly acquired protective...... immunity probably reflect the clonal antigenic variation and allelic polymorphism of PfEMP1. However, it is likely that other immune-evasive mechanisms are also involved, such as interference with formation and maintenance of immunological memory. We measured PfEMP1-specific antibody levels by enzyme......-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA) and memory B-cell frequencies by enzyme-linked immunosorbent spot (ELISPOT) assay in a cohort of P. falciparum-exposed nonpregnant Ghanaian women. The antigens used were a VAR2CSA-type PfEMP1 (IT4VAR04) with expression restricted to parasites infecting the placenta, as well as two...

  5. Acute response of peripheral CCr5 chemoreceptor and NK cells in individuals submitted to a single session of low-intensity strength exercise with blood flow restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dorneles, Gilson Pires; Colato, Alana Schraiber; Galvão, Simone Lunelli; Ramis, Thiago Rozales; Ribeiro, Jerri Luiz; Romão, Pedro Roosevelt; Peres, Alessandra

    2016-07-01

    The purpose of this study was to compare the peripheral expression of natural killers and CCR5 in a session of low-intensity strength training with vascular occlusion and in high-intensity training. Young males were randomized into session groups of a high-intensity strength training (HI) and a session group of low-intensity strength training with vascular occlusion (LI-BFR). The exercise session consisted in knee extension and bicep curl in 80% 1RM (HI) and 30% 1RM (LI-BFR) with equalized volumes. Blood collection was made before, immediately after and 24 h after each training session. Immunophenotyping was carried out through CD195+ (CCR5) e CD3-CD16+CD56+ (NK) in peripheral blood and analysed by flow cytometry and presented in frequency (%). Peripheral frequency of NK cells showed no significant difference in LI-BFR group in time effect, while a gradual reduction of NK cells was identified in HI group in before-24 h postexercise and after-24 h postexercise comparison. However, significant differences have been found in relative change of NK cells immediately after exercise between sessions. In addition, HI and LI-BFR groups showed a significant reduction in the cells expressed CCR5 during 24 h postsession compared to the postsession, but CCR5 also differed when comparing before-24 h after session in the HI group. No differences were observed amongst the groups. LIO induced CCR5 response similar to the HI session, while the NK cells remained in similar frequency during the studied moments in LI-BFR, but not in HI group, suggesting that local hypoxia created by the blood flow restriction was able to prevent a change in the frequency of peripheral cells and a possible immunosuppression.

  6. Computational movement analysis

    CERN Document Server

    Laube, Patrick

    2014-01-01

    This SpringerBrief discusses the characteristics of spatiotemporal movement data, including uncertainty and scale. It investigates three core aspects of Computational Movement Analysis: Conceptual modeling of movement and movement spaces, spatiotemporal analysis methods aiming at a better understanding of movement processes (with a focus on data mining for movement patterns), and using decentralized spatial computing methods in movement analysis. The author presents Computational Movement Analysis as an interdisciplinary umbrella for analyzing movement processes with methods from a range of fi

  7. Correlation between chloride flux via the mitochondria-rich cells and transepithelial water movement in isolated frog skin (Rana esculenta)

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Robert

    1995-01-01

    Antidiuretic hormone; chloride transport; electroosmosis; Frog skin; Intercalated cells; Local osmosis; Mitochondria-rich cells.......Antidiuretic hormone; chloride transport; electroosmosis; Frog skin; Intercalated cells; Local osmosis; Mitochondria-rich cells....

  8. IL-27 in human secondary lymphoid organs attracts myeloid dendritic cells and impairs HLA class I-restricted antigen presentation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morandi, Fabio; Di Carlo, Emma; Ferrone, Soldano; Petretto, Andrea; Pistoia, Vito; Airoldi, Irma

    2014-03-15

    Different cytokines play crucial roles in inflammation and in polarizing immune responses, including IL-27 that exerts pro- and anti-inflammatory functions. Although the activity of IL-27 is well characterized in murine immune cells, only limited information is available regarding the natural cellular sources of IL-27 in humans and its effects on human immune cells. Dendritic cells (DCs) are the most potent professional APCs that in the immature state are positioned throughout peripheral tissues by acting as sentinels, sensing the presence of Ags. Activated DCs migrate into the lymph nodes and direct Ag-specific T cell responses, thus acting as key players in both adaptive and innate immunity. In this study we asked whether IL-27 is produced by human secondary lymphoid organs and what is its functional role on human DCs. To our knowledge, we provide the first evidence that 1) in lymph nodes, macrophages are the major source for IL-27; 2) immature and mature human DCs express functional IL-27R; 3) IL-27 exerts immunosuppressive activity by crippling the Ag processing machinery in immature DCs under steady-state conditions and after pulsing with a viral Ag; and 4) IL-27 is chemotactic for human DCs. Our findings highlight novel mechanisms underlying the immunosuppressive activity of IL-27, suggesting that this cytokine may function as a homeostatic cytokine in secondary lymphoid organs by limiting duration and/or intensity of ongoing adaptive immune responses. The results presented in this study pave the way to future studies aimed at investigating whether dysregulation of IL-27 expression and function may be involved in pathogenesis of autoimmune disease and cancer.

  9. Intercellular communication in Arabidopsis thaliana pollen discovered via AHG3 transcript movement from the vegetative cell to sperm

    Science.gov (United States)

    An Arabidopsis pollen grain (male gametophyte) consists of three cells: the vegetative cell, which forms the pollen tube, and two sperm cells enclosed within the vegetative cell. It is still unclear if there is intercellular communication between the vegetative cell and the sperm cells. Here we show...

  10. Restricted VH/VL usage and limited mutations in gluten-specific IgA of coeliac disease lesion plasma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Steinsbø, Øyvind; Henry Dunand, Carole J; Huang, Min; Mesin, Luka; Salgado-Ferrer, Marlene; Lundin, Knut E A; Jahnsen, Jørgen; Wilson, Patrick C; Sollid, Ludvig M

    2014-06-09

    Coeliac disease (CD), an enteropathy caused by cereal gluten ingestion, is characterized by CD4(+) T cells recognizing deamidated gluten and by antibodies reactive to gluten or the self-antigen transglutaminase 2 (TG2). TG2-specific immunoglobulin A (IgA) of plasma cells (PCs) from CD lesions have limited somatic hypermutation (SHM). Here we report that gluten-specific IgA of lesion-resident PCs share this feature. Monoclonal antibodies were expression cloned from single PCs of patients either isolated from cultures with reactivity to complex deamidated gluten antigen or by sorting with gluten peptide tetramers. Typically, the antibodies bind gluten peptides related to T-cell epitopes and many have higher reactivity to deamidated peptides. There is restricted VH and VL combination and usage among the antibodies. Limited SHM suggests that a common factor governs the mutation level in PCs producing TG2- and gluten-specific IgA. The antibodies have potential use for diagnosis of CD and for detection of gluten.

  11. 3' UTR-dependent, miR-92-mediated restriction of Tis21 expression maintains asymmetric neural stem cell division to ensure proper neocortex size.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fei, Ji-Feng; Haffner, Christiane; Huttner, Wieland B

    2014-04-24

    Mammalian neocortex size primarily reflects the number and mode of divisions of neural stem and progenitor cells. Cortical stem cells (apical progenitors) switching from symmetric divisions, which expand their population, to asymmetric divisions, which generate downstream neuronal progenitors (basal progenitors), start expressing Tis21, a so-called antiproliferative/prodifferentiative gene. Tis21 encodes a small (17.5 kDa), functionally poorly characterized protein and a relatively large (2 kb), highly conserved 3' UTR. Here, we show that mice lacking the Tis21 3' UTR develop a microcephalic neocortex with fewer neurons, notably in the upper layers. This reflects a progressive decrease in basal progenitors, which in turn is due to a fraction of apical progenitors prematurely switching from asymmetric self-renewing to symmetric self-consuming divisions. This switch is caused by the markedly increased Tis21 protein level resulting from lack of microRNA-, notably miR-92-, dependent restriction of Tis21 expression. Our data show that a premature onset of consumptive neural stem cell divisions can lead to microcephaly.

  12. Autoimmune movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mckeon, Andrew; Vincent, Angela

    2016-01-01

    Autoimmune movement disorders encapsulate a large and diverse group of neurologic disorders occurring either in isolation or accompanying more diffuse autoimmune encephalitic illnesses. The full range of movement phenomena has been described and, as they often occur in adults, many of the presentations can mimic neurodegenerative disorders, such as Huntington disease. Disorders may be ataxic, hypokinetic (parkinsonism), or hyperkinetic (myoclonus, chorea, tics, and other dyskinetic disorders). The autoantibody targets are diverse and include neuronal surface proteins such as leucine-rich, glioma-inactivated 1 (LGI1) and glycine receptors, as well as antibodies (such as intracellular antigens) that are markers of a central nervous system process mediated by CD8+ cytotoxic T cells. However, there are two conditions, stiff-person syndrome (also known as stiff-man syndrome) and progressive encephalomyelitis with rigidity and myoclonus (PERM), that are always autoimmune movement disorders. In some instances (such as Purkinje cell cytoplasmic antibody-1 (PCA-1) autoimmunity), antibodies detected in serum and cerebrospinal fluid can be indicative of a paraneoplastic cause, and may direct the cancer search. In other instances (such as 65kDa isoform of glutamic acid decarboxylase (GAD65) autoimmunity), a paraneoplastic cause is very unlikely, and early treatment with immunotherapy may promote improvement or recovery. Here we describe the different types of movement disorder and the clinical features and antibodies associated with them, and discuss treatment.

  13. Adipogenic placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells are not lineage restricted by withdrawing extrinsic factors: developing a novel visual angle in stem cell biology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C; Cao, H; Pan, X; Li, J; He, J; Pan, Q; Xin, J; Yu, X; Li, J; Wang, Y; Zhu, D; Li, L

    2016-03-17

    Current evidence implies that differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) can act as progenitor cells and transdifferentiate across lineage boundaries. However, whether this unrestricted lineage has specificities depending on the stem cell type is unknown. Placental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PDMSCs), an easily accessible and less invasive source, are extremely useful materials in current stem cell therapies. No studies have comprehensively analyzed the transition in morphology, surface antigens, metabolism and multilineage potency of differentiated PDMSCs after their dedifferentiation. In this study, we showed that after withdrawing extrinsic factors, adipogenic PDMSCs reverted to a primitive cell population and retained stem cell characteristics. The mitochondrial network during differentiation and dedifferentiation may serve as a marker of absent or acquired pluripotency in various stem cell models. The new population proliferated faster than unmanipulated PDMSCs and could be differentiated into adipocytes, osteocytes and hepatocytes. The cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) signaling pathway and extracellular matrix (ECM) components modulate cell behavior and enable the cells to proliferate or differentiate during the differentiation, dedifferentiation and redifferentiation processes in our study. These observations indicate that the dedifferentiated PDMSCs are distinguishable from the original PDMSCs and may serve as a novel source in stem cell biology and cell-based therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, whether PDMSCs differentiated into other lineages can be dedifferentiated to a primitive cell population needs to be investigated.

  14. Adipogenic placenta-derived mesenchymal stem cells are not lineage restricted by withdrawing extrinsic factors: developing a novel visual angle in stem cell biology

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hu, C; Cao, H; Pan, X; Li, J; He, J; Pan, Q; Xin, J; Yu, X; Li, J; Wang, Y; Zhu, D; Li, L

    2016-01-01

    Current evidence implies that differentiated bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells (BMMSCs) can act as progenitor cells and transdifferentiate across lineage boundaries. However, whether this unrestricted lineage has specificities depending on the stem cell type is unknown. Placental-derived mesenchymal stem cells (PDMSCs), an easily accessible and less invasive source, are extremely useful materials in current stem cell therapies. No studies have comprehensively analyzed the transition in morphology, surface antigens, metabolism and multilineage potency of differentiated PDMSCs after their dedifferentiation. In this study, we showed that after withdrawing extrinsic factors, adipogenic PDMSCs reverted to a primitive cell population and retained stem cell characteristics. The mitochondrial network during differentiation and dedifferentiation may serve as a marker of absent or acquired pluripotency in various stem cell models. The new population proliferated faster than unmanipulated PDMSCs and could be differentiated into adipocytes, osteocytes and hepatocytes. The cell adhesion molecules (CAMs) signaling pathway and extracellular matrix (ECM) components modulate cell behavior and enable the cells to proliferate or differentiate during the differentiation, dedifferentiation and redifferentiation processes in our study. These observations indicate that the dedifferentiated PDMSCs are distinguishable from the original PDMSCs and may serve as a novel source in stem cell biology and cell-based therapeutic strategies. Furthermore, whether PDMSCs differentiated into other lineages can be dedifferentiated to a primitive cell population needs to be investigated. PMID:26986509

  15. Functional and Structural Characterization of a Novel HLA-DRB1*04:01-Restricted α-enolase T Cell Epitope in Rheumatoid Arthritis

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christina Gerstner

    2016-11-01

    Full Text Available Antibodies to citrullinated proteins, common in Rheumatoid Arthritis (RA patients, are strongly associated to a specific set of HLA-DR alleles including HLA-DRB1*04:01, *04:04 and *01:01. Here, we first demonstrate that autoantibody levels towards the dominant citrullinated B cell epitope from α-enolase are significantly elevated in HLA-DRB1*04:01-positive RA patients. Furthermore, we identified α-enolase-derived T cell epitopes and demonstrated that native and citrullinated versions of several peptides bind with different affinities to HLA-DRB1*04:01, *04:04 and *01:01. The citrulline residues in the eight identified peptides are distributed throughout the entire length of the presented epitopes and more specifically, localized at peptide positions p-2, p2, p4, p6, p7, p10 and p11. Importantly, in contrast to its native version peptide 26 (TSKGLFRAAVPSGAS, the HLA-DRB1*04:01-restricted citrullinated peptide Cit26 (TSKGLFCitAAVPSGAS elicited significant functional T cell responses in primary cells from RA patients. Comparative analysis of the crystal structures of HLA-DRB1*04:01 in complex with peptide 26 or Cit26 demonstrated that the post-translational modification did not alter the conformation of the peptide. And since citrullination is the only structural difference between the two complexes this indicates that the neo-antigen Cit26 is recognized by T cells with high specificity to the citrulline residue.

  16. Identification and immunogenicity of two new HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitopes on dengue NS1 protein.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tian, Jiang; Zeng, Gucheng; Pang, Xianwu; Liang, Mifang; Zhou, Junmei; Fang, Danyun; Liu, Yan; Li, Dexin; Jiang, Lifang

    2012-04-01

    Immunopathogenesis of dengue virus (DEN) infection remains poorly studied. Identification and characterization of human CD8(+) T-cell epitopes on DEN are necessary for a better understanding of the immunopathogenesis of dengue infection and would facilitate the development of immunotherapy and vaccines to protect from dengue infection. Here, we identified two new HLA-A*0201-restricted CD8(+) T-cell epitopes, DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) and DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005) that are conserved in three or four major DEN serotypes, respectively. Unexpectedly, we found that immunization of HLA-A*0201 transgenic mice with DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) or DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005) epitope peptide induced de novo synthesis of tumor necrosis factor (TNF)-α and IFN-γ, two important pro-inflammatory molecules that are hard to be detected directly without in vitro antigenic re-stimulation. Importantly, we demonstrated that CD8(+) T cells specifically activated by DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) or DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005) epitope peptide induced de novo synthesis of perforin. Furthermore, we observed that DEN-4 NS1(990)(-998) or DEN-4 NS1(997)(-1005)-specific CD8(+) T cells capable of producing large amounts of perforin, TNF-α and IFN-γ preferentially displayed CD27(+)CD45RA(-), but not CD27(-)CD45RA(+), phenotypes. This study, therefore, suggested the importance of synergistic effects of pro-inflammatory cytokines and cytotoxic molecules which were produced by dengue-specific CD8(+) T cells in immunopathogenesis or anti-dengue immunity during dengue infection.

  17. The archipelago ubiquitin ligase subunit acts in target tissue to restrict tracheal terminal cell branching and hypoxic-induced gene expression.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nathan T Mortimer

    Full Text Available The Drosophila melanogaster gene archipelago (ago encodes the F-box/WD-repeat protein substrate specificity factor for an SCF (Skp/Cullin/F-box-type polyubiquitin ligase that inhibits tumor-like growth by targeting proteins for degradation by the proteasome. The Ago protein is expressed widely in the fly embryo and larva and promotes degradation of pro-proliferative proteins in mitotically active cells. However the requirement for Ago in post-mitotic developmental processes remains largely unexplored. Here we show that Ago is an antagonist of the physiologic response to low oxygen (hypoxia. Reducing Ago activity in larval muscle cells elicits enhanced branching of nearby tracheal terminal cells in normoxia. This tracheogenic phenotype shows a genetic dependence on sima, which encodes the HIF-1α subunit of the hypoxia-inducible transcription factor dHIF and its target the FGF ligand branchless (bnl, and is enhanced by depletion of the Drosophila Von Hippel Lindau (dVHL factor, which is a subunit of an oxygen-dependent ubiquitin ligase that degrades Sima/HIF-1α protein in metazoan cells. Genetic reduction of ago results in constitutive expression of some hypoxia-inducible genes in normoxia, increases the sensitivity of others to mild hypoxic stimulus, and enhances the ability of adult flies to recover from hypoxic stupor. As a molecular correlate to these genetic data, we find that Ago physically associates with Sima and restricts Sima levels in vivo. Collectively, these findings identify Ago as a required element of a circuit that suppresses the tracheogenic activity of larval muscle cells by antagonizing the Sima-mediated transcriptional response to hypoxia.

  18. Caloric restriction restores the chronological life span of the Goa1 null mutant of Candida albicans in spite of high cell levels of ROS.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Hui; Calderone, Richard; Sun, Nuo; Wang, Yun; Li, Dongmei

    2012-12-01

    The Candida albicans Goa1p is required for mitochondrial functions. In a strain lacking GOA1 (GOA31), respiration, mitochondrial membrane potential, complex I (CI) activity of the electron transport chain, and ATP synthesis are significantly decreased. A shortened chronological life span (CLS) of GOA31 occurs in 2% glucose that is associated with an increase in cell reactive oxidant species (ROS) and apoptosis. We now show that caloric restriction (CR) in media containing 0.5% glucose instead of 2% glucose-SC extends the CLS to the level of parental and gene-reconstituted strains. Paradoxically, ROS levels in GOA31 far exceed those of control strains in 0.5% glucose and, as a consequence, increased lipid peroxidation occurs even though CLS is restored. Microarray analysis was used to characterize transcriptional changes during CR in GOA31. We found that CR shifts cells of all strains to a non-glucose carbon metabolism (β-oxidation). Our model of ROS formation in GOA31 follows the paradigm that the generation of oxygen radicals from β-oxidation of cell lipids via FADH(2) (CII) and NADH (CI) creates an unfavorable cellular FADH(2)/NADH ratio that causes a transient overload in CII activity resulting in excess free cell radicals. In GOA31 the CI and peroxisomal dysfunctions increase the levels of ROS compared to control strains. Recovery from high levels of ROS may be associated with an increase in iron and sugar transporters, as well as an anti-stress response that includes the SOD1 and GPX1. Thus, CR creates a favorable growth environment, but cells of GOA31 must overcome a high but transient ROS production.

  19. Isolation of human CD4/CD8 double-positive, graft-versus-host disease-protective, minor histocompatibility antigen-specific regulatory T cells and of a novel HLA-DR7-restricted HY-specific CD4 clone.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eljaafari, Assia; Yuruker, Ozel; Ferrand, Christophe; Farre, Annie; Addey, Caroline; Tartelin, Marie-Laure; Thomas, Xavier; Tiberghien, Pierre; Simpson, Elizabeth; Rigal, Dominique; Scott, Diane

    2013-01-01

    Minor histocompatibility (H) Ags are classically described as self-peptides derived from intracellular proteins that are expressed at the cell surface by MHC class I and class II molecules and that induce T cell alloresponses. We have isolated three different T cell populations from a skin biopsy of a patient suffering from acute graft-versus-host disease following sex-mismatched HLA-identical bone marrow transplantation. The first population was: 1) CD4(+)/CD8(+) double-positive; 2) specific for an HLA class I-restricted autosomal Ag; 3) expressed a Tr1 profile with high levels of IL-10, but low IL-2 and IFN-γ; and 4) exerted regulatory function in the presence of recipient APCs. The second was CD8 positive, specific for an HLA class I-restricted autosomally encoded minor H Ag, but was only weakly cytotoxic. The third was CD4 single positive, specific for an HLA-DR7-restricted HY epitope and exerted both proliferative and cytotoxic functions. Identification of the peptide recognized by these latter cells revealed a new human HY epitope, TGKIINFIKFDTGNL, encoded by RPS4Y and restricted by HLA-DR7. In this paper, we show human CD4/CD8 double-positive, acute graft-versus-host disease-protective, minor H Ag-specific regulatory T cells and identify a novel HLA-DR7/ HY T cell epitope, encoded by RPS4Y, a potential new therapeutic target.

  20. Automatic Chloroplast Movement Analysis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johansson, Henrik; Zeidler, Mathias

    2016-01-01

    In response to low or high intensities of light, the chloroplasts in the mesophyll cells of the leaf are able to increase or decrease their exposure to light by accumulating at the upper and lower sides or along the side walls of the cell respectively. This movement, regulated by the phototropin blue light photoreceptors phot1 and phot2, results in a decreased or increased transmission of light through the leaf. This way the plant is able to optimize harvesting of the incoming light or avoid damage caused by excess light. Here we describe a method that indirectly measures the movement of chloroplasts by taking advantage of the resulting change in leaf transmittance. By using a microplate reader, quantitative measurements of chloroplast accumulation or avoidance can be monitored over time, for multiple samples with relatively little hands-on time.

  1. HDAC6 Inhibitors Rescued the Defective Axonal Mitochondrial Movement in Motor Neurons Derived from the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with HSPB1 Mutation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Ji-Yon; Woo, So-Youn; Hong, Young Bin; Choi, Heesun; Kim, Jisoo; Choi, Hyunjung; Mook-Jung, Inhee; Ha, Nina; Kyung, Jangbeen; Koo, Soo Kyung; Jung, Sung-Chul; Choi, Byung-Ok

    2016-01-01

    The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2F (CMT2F) and distal hereditary motor neuropathy 2B (dHMN2B) are caused by autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of the heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1) gene and there are no specific therapies available yet. Here, we assessed the potential therapeutic effect of HDAC6 inhibitors on peripheral neuropathy with HSPB1 mutation using in vitro model of motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs) of CMT2F and dHMN2B patients. The absolute velocity of mitochondrial movements and the percentage of moving mitochondria in axons were lower both in CMT2F-motor neurons and in dHMN2B-motor neurons than those in controls, and the severity of the defective mitochondrial movement was different between the two disease models. CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons also showed reduced α-tubulin acetylation compared with controls. The newly developed HDAC6 inhibitors, CHEMICAL X4 and CHEMICAL X9, increased acetylation of α-tubulin and reversed axonal movement defects of mitochondria in CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons. Our results suggest that the neurons derived from patient-specific iPSCs can be used in drug screening including HDAC6 inhibitors targeting peripheral neuropathy.

  2. HDAC6 Inhibitors Rescued the Defective Axonal Mitochondrial Movement in Motor Neurons Derived from the Induced Pluripotent Stem Cells of Peripheral Neuropathy Patients with HSPB1 Mutation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ji-Yon Kim

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The Charcot-Marie-Tooth disease 2F (CMT2F and distal hereditary motor neuropathy 2B (dHMN2B are caused by autosomal dominantly inherited mutations of the heat shock 27 kDa protein 1 (HSPB1 gene and there are no specific therapies available yet. Here, we assessed the potential therapeutic effect of HDAC6 inhibitors on peripheral neuropathy with HSPB1 mutation using in vitro model of motor neurons derived from induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs of CMT2F and dHMN2B patients. The absolute velocity of mitochondrial movements and the percentage of moving mitochondria in axons were lower both in CMT2F-motor neurons and in dHMN2B-motor neurons than those in controls, and the severity of the defective mitochondrial movement was different between the two disease models. CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons also showed reduced α-tubulin acetylation compared with controls. The newly developed HDAC6 inhibitors, CHEMICAL X4 and CHEMICAL X9, increased acetylation of α-tubulin and reversed axonal movement defects of mitochondria in CMT2F-motor neurons and dHMN2B-motor neurons. Our results suggest that the neurons derived from patient-specific iPSCs can be used in drug screening including HDAC6 inhibitors targeting peripheral neuropathy.

  3. ATR-p53 restricts homologous recombination in response to replicative stress but does not limit DNA interstrand crosslink repair in lung cancer cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bianca M Sirbu

    Full Text Available Homologous recombination (HR is required for the restart of collapsed DNA replication forks and error-free repair of DNA double-strand breaks (DSB. However, unscheduled or hyperactive HR may lead to genomic instability and promote cancer development. The cellular factors that restrict HR processes in mammalian cells are only beginning to be elucidated. The tumor suppressor p53 has been implicated in the suppression of HR though it has remained unclear why p53, as the guardian of the genome, would impair an error-free repair process. Here, we show for the first time that p53 downregulates foci formation of the RAD51 recombinase in response to replicative stress in H1299 lung cancer cells in a manner that is independent of its role as a transcription factor. We find that this downregulation of HR is not only completely dependent on the binding site of p53 with replication protein A but also the ATR/ATM serine 15 phosphorylation site. Genetic analysis suggests that ATR but not ATM kinase modulates p53's function in HR. The suppression of HR by p53 can be bypassed under experimental conditions that cause DSB either directly or indirectly, in line with p53's role as a guardian of the genome. As a result, transactivation-inactive p53 does not compromise the resistance of H1299 cells to the interstrand crosslinking agent mitomycin C. Altogether, our data support a model in which p53 plays an anti-recombinogenic role in the ATR-dependent mammalian replication checkpoint but does not impair a cell's ability to use HR for the removal of DSB induced by cytotoxic agents.

  4. Circumsporozoite Protein-Specific Kd-Restricted CD8+ T Cells Mediate Protective Antimalaria Immunity in Sporozoite-Immunized MHC-I-Kd Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jing Huang

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Although the roles of CD8+ T cells and a major preerythrocytic antigen, the circumsporozoite (CS protein, in contributing protective antimalaria immunity induced by radiation-attenuated sporozoites, have been shown by a number of studies, the extent to which these players contribute to antimalaria immunity is still unknown. To address this question, we have generated C57BL/6 (B6 transgenic (Tg mice, expressing Kd molecules under the MHC-I promoter, called MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice. In this study, we first determined that a single immunizing dose of IrPySpz induced a significant level of antimalaria protective immunity in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice but not in B6 mice. Then, by depleting various T-cell subsets in vivo, we determined that CD8+ T cells are the main mediator of the protective immunity induced by IrPySpz. Furthermore, when we immunized (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice with IrPySpz after crossing MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice with PyCS-transgenic mice (CS-Tg, which are unable to mount PyCS-specific immunity, we found that IrPySpz immunization failed to induce protective antimalaria immunity in (MHC-I-Kd-Tg × CS-Tg F1 mice, thus indicating the absence of PyCS antigen-dependent immunity in these mice. These results indicate that protective antimalaria immunity induced by IrPySpz in MHC-I-Kd-Tg mice is mediated by CS protein-specific, Kd-restricted CD8+ T cells.

  5. Overcoming CD4 Th1 Cell Fate Restrictions to Sustain Antiviral CD8 T Cells and Control Persistent Virus Infection

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laura M. Snell

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Viral persistence specifically inhibits CD4 Th1 responses and promotes Tfh immunity, but the mechanisms that suppress Th1 cells and the disease consequences of their loss are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the loss of CD4 Th1 cells specifically leads to progressive CD8 T cell decline and dysfunction during viral persistence. Therapeutically reconstituting CD4 Th1 cells restored CD4 T cell polyfunctionality, enhanced antiviral CD8 T cell numbers and function, and enabled viral control. Mechanistically, combined interaction of PD-L1 and IL-10 by suppressive dendritic cell subsets inhibited new CD4 Th1 cells in both acute and persistent virus infection, demonstrating an unrecognized suppressive function for PD-L1 in virus infection. Thus, the loss of CD4 Th1 cells is a key event leading to progressive CD8 T cell demise during viral persistence with important implications for restoring antiviral CD8 T cell immunity to control persistent viral infection.

  6. Overcoming CD4 Th1 Cell Fate Restrictions to Sustain Antiviral CD8 T Cells and Control Persistent Virus Infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Snell, Laura M; Osokine, Ivan; Yamada, Douglas H; De la Fuente, Justin Rafael; Elsaesser, Heidi J; Brooks, David G

    2016-09-20

    Viral persistence specifically inhibits CD4 Th1 responses and promotes Tfh immunity, but the mechanisms that suppress Th1 cells and the disease consequences of their loss are unclear. Here, we demonstrate that the loss of CD4 Th1 cells specifically leads to progressive CD8 T cell decline and dysfunction during viral persistence. Therapeutically reconstituting CD4 Th1 cells restored CD4 T cell polyfunctionality, enhanced antiviral CD8 T cell numbers and function, and enabled viral control. Mechanistically, combined interaction of PD-L1 and IL-10 by suppressive dendritic cell subsets inhibited new CD4 Th1 cells in both acute and persistent virus infection, demonstrating an unrecognized suppressive function for PD-L1 in virus infection. Thus, the loss of CD4 Th1 cells is a key event leading to progressive CD8 T cell demise during viral persistence with important implications for restoring antiviral CD8 T cell immunity to control persistent viral infection.

  7. Cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector C is reduced by caloric restriction and regulates adipocyte lipid metabolism.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Magnusson, Björn; Gummesson, Anders; Glad, Camilla A M; Goedecke, Julia H; Jernås, Margareta; Lystig, Theodore C; Carlsson, Björn; Fagerberg, Björn; Carlsson, Lena M S; Svensson, Per-Arne

    2008-09-01

    Members of the cell death-inducing DFF45-like effector (CIDE) gene family have been shown to regulate lipid metabolism. In this article, we report that the third member of the human CIDE family, CIDEC, is down-regulated in response to a reduced caloric intake. The down-regulation was demonstrated by microarray and real-time polymerase chain reaction analysis of subcutaneous adipose tissue in 2 independent studies on obese patients undergoing treatment with a very low calorie diet. By analysis of CIDEC expression in 65 human tissues, we conclude that human CIDEC is predominantly expressed in subcutaneous adipocytes. Together, these observations led us to investigate the effect of decreased CIDEC expression in cultured 3T3-L1 adipocytes. Small interfering RNA-mediated knockdown of CIDEC resulted in an increased basal release of nonesterified fatty acids, decreased responsiveness to adrenergic stimulation of lipolysis, and increased oxidation of endogenous fatty acids. Thus, we suggest that CIDEC is a regulator of adipocyte lipid metabolism and may be important for the adipocyte to adapt to changes in energy availability.

  8. Claudin-5 is restricted to the tight junction region of uterine epithelial cells in the uterus of pregnant/gravid squamate reptiles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Biazik, Joanna M; Thompson, Michael B; Murphy, Christopher R

    2008-05-01

    Claudin-5, a tight junctional protein associated with ion and size selectivity, has been found in the uterus of skinks. This study has generated critical information about the molecular assembly of the tight junction at various stages of the reproductive cycle in the skink uterus. Recent studies looking at tight junctional proteins found occludin expression in the tight junction region of uterine epithelial cells in the skink uterus; however, occludin did not disclose any further information about the ions and size of ions permeating across the paracellular pathway. A approximately 22-kDa claudin-5 band was detected in the uterus of the skinks present in this study and immunohistochemistry revealed that claudin-5 redistributes to the tight junction region of the lateral plasma membrane of uterine epithelial cells in late stage pregnancy/gravidity. This finding indicates that the tight junction becomes more assembled to precisely regulate ion and solute permeation in late stage pregnancy/gravidity. Claudin-5 with its functional role as a molecular sieve due to the formation of ion and size selective pores suggests that permeation of ions smaller than 0.8 kDa are restricted when claudin-5 is redistributed to the tight junction region of the later plasma membrane. This report is the first description of the molecular mechanisms that may be involved in regulating nutrient provision in the reptilian uterus.

  9. EFFECTS OF RESTRICTED BASILAR PAPILLAR LESIONS AND HAIR CELL REGENERATION ON AUDITORY FOREBRAIN FREQUENCY ORGANIZATION IN ADULT EUROPEAN STARLINGS

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Dexter R. F.; Brown, Mel; Kamke, Marc R.; Rubel, Edwin W

    2009-01-01

    The frequency organization of neurons in the forebrain Field L complex (FLC) of adult starlings was investigated to determine the effects of hair cell (HC) destruction in the basal portion of the basilar papilla (BP) and of subsequent HC regeneration. Conventional microelectrode mapping techniques were used in normal starlings and in lesioned starlings either 2 days or 6–10 weeks after aminoglycoside treatment. Histological examination of the BP and recordings of auditory brainstem evoked responses confirmed massive loss of HCs in the basal portion of the BP and hearing losses at frequencies above 2 kHz in starlings tested 2 days after aminoglycoside treatment. In these birds, all neurons in the region of the FLC in which CFs normally increase from 2 to 6 kHz had characteristic frequency (CF) in the range 2–4 kHz. The significantly elevated thresholds of responses in this region of altered tonotopic organization indicated that they were the residue of pre-lesion responses and did not reflect central nervous system plasticity. In the long-term recovery birds, there was histological evidence of substantial HC regeneration. The tonotopic organization of the high frequency region of the FLC did not differ from that in normal starlings, but the mean threshold at CF in this frequency range was intermediate between the values in the normal and lesioned short-recovery groups. The recovery of normal tonotopicity indicates considerable stability of the topography of neuronal connections in the avian auditory system, but the residual loss of sensitivity suggests deficiencies in high-frequency HC function. PMID:19474314

  10. Effects of restricted basilar papillar lesions and hair cell regeneration on auditory forebrain frequency organization in adult European starlings.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Irvine, Dexter R F; Brown, Mel; Kamke, Marc R; Rubel, Edwin W

    2009-05-27

    The frequency organization of neurons in the forebrain Field L complex (FLC) of adult starlings was investigated to determine the effects of hair cell (HC) destruction in the basal portion of the basilar papilla (BP) and of subsequent HC regeneration. Conventional microelectrode mapping techniques were used in normal starlings and in lesioned starlings either 2 d or 6-10 weeks after aminoglycoside treatment. Histological examination of the BP and recordings of auditory brainstem evoked responses confirmed massive loss of HCs in the basal portion of the BP and hearing losses at frequencies >2 kHz in starlings tested 2 d after aminoglycoside treatment. In these birds, all neurons in the region of the FLC in which characteristic frequencies (CFs) normally increase from 2 to 6 kHz had CF in the range of 2-4 kHz. The significantly elevated thresholds of responses in this region of altered tonotopic organization indicated that they were the residue of prelesion responses and did not reflect CNS plasticity. In the long-term recovery birds, there was histological evidence of substantial HC regeneration. The tonotopic organization of the high-frequency region of the FLC did not differ from that in normal starlings, but the mean threshold at CF in this frequency range was intermediate between the values in the normal and lesioned short-recovery groups. The recovery of normal tonotopicity indicates considerable stability of the topography of neuronal connections in the avian auditory system, but the residual loss of sensitivity suggests deficiencies in high-frequency HC function.

  11. Expression of Interferon γ by Decidual Cells and Natural Killer Cells at the Human Implantation Site: Implications for Preeclampsia, Spontaneous Abortion, and Intrauterine Growth Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Chie-Pein; Piao, Longzhu; Chen, Xilin; Yu, Jianhua; Masch, Rachel; Schatz, Frederick; Lockwood, Charles J; Huang, S Joseph

    2015-11-01

    Human first-trimester decidual cells (FTDCs) chemoattract CXCR3-expressing circulating CD56(bright)CD16(-) natural killer (NK) cells, which increase uteroplacental blood flow by remodeling spiral arteries and arterioles. This recruitment reflects elevated FTDC expression of NK cell-recruiting induced protein 10 and interferon (IFN)-inducible T-cell-α chemoattractant produced in response to the synergistic effects of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF-α) and IFN-γ stimulation. Decidual macrophages express TNF-α, whereas the cellular origin of IFN-γ is unclear. Therefore, this study aims to identify the cell source(s) of IFN-γ in human first trimester decidua. Immunostaining of decidual sections revealed that both FTDCs and decidual NK (dNK) cells express IFN-γ. Although individual dNK cells express higher IFN-γ levels, the more numerous FTDCs account for greater proportion of total IFN-γ immunostaining. Freshly isolated FTDCs express greater IFN-γ staining than dNK cells as measured by flow cytometry, whereas incubation of dNK cells with documented NK cell activators significantly increases IFN-γ above FTDC levels. Confluent FTDCs intrinsically produce, but paradoxically respond to, exogenous IFN-γ.

  12. A HEV-restricted sulfotransferase is expressed in rheumatoid arthritis synovium and is induced by lymphotoxin-α/β and TNF-α in cultured endothelial cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Palao Guillermo

    2005-03-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The recruitment of lymphocytes to secondary lymphoid organs relies on interactions of circulating cells with high endothelial venules (HEV. HEV are exclusive to these organs under physiological conditions, but they can develop in chronically-inflamed tissues. The interaction of L-selectin on lymphocytes with sulfated glycoprotein ligands on HEV results in lymphocyte rolling, which represents the initial step in lymphocyte homing. HEV expression of GlcNAc6ST-2 (also known as HEC-GlcNAc6ST, GST-3, LSST or CHST4, an HEV-restricted sulfotransferase, is essential for the elaboration of L-selectin functional ligands as well as a critical epitope recognized by MECA-79 mAb. Results We examined the expression of GlcNAc6ST-2 in relationship to the MECA-79 epitope in rheumatoid arthritis (RA synovial vessels. Expression of GlcNAc6ST-2 was specific to RA synovial tissues as compared to osteoarthritis synovial tissues and localized to endothelial cells of HEV-like vessels and small flat-walled vessels. Double MECA-79 and GlcNAc6ST-2 staining showed colocalization of the MECA-79 epitope and GlcNAc6ST-2. We further found that both TNF-α and lymphotoxin-αβ induced GlcNAc6ST-2 mRNA and protein in cultured human umbilical vein endothelial cells. Conclusion These observations demonstrate that GlcNAc6ST-2 is induced in RA vessels and provide potential cytokine pathways for its induction. GlcNAc6ST-2 is a novel marker of activated vessels within RA ectopic lymphoid aggregates. This enzyme represents a potential therapeutic target for RA.

  13. Circulating preproinsulin signal peptide-specific CD8 T cells restricted by the susceptibility molecule HLA-A24 are expanded at onset of type 1 diabetes and kill β-cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kronenberg, Deborah; Knight, Robin R; Estorninho, Megan; Ellis, Richard J; Kester, Michel G; de Ru, Arnoud; Eichmann, Martin; Huang, Guo C; Powrie, Jake; Dayan, Colin M; Skowera, Ania; van Veelen, Peter A; Peakman, Mark

    2012-07-01

    Type 1 diabetes results from T cell-mediated β-cell destruction. The HLA-A*24 class I gene confers significant risk of disease and early onset. We tested the hypothesis that HLA-A24 molecules on islet cells present preproinsulin (PPI) peptide epitopes to CD8 cytotoxic T cells (CTLs). Surrogate β-cell lines secreting proinsulin and expressing HLA-A24 were generated and their peptide ligandome examined by mass spectrometry to discover naturally processed and HLA-A24-presented PPI epitopes. A novel PPI epitope was identified and used to generate HLA-A24 tetramers and examine the frequency of PPI-specific T cells in new-onset HLA-A*24(+) patients and control subjects. We identified a novel naturally processed and HLA-A24-presented PPI signal peptide epitope (PPI(3-11); LWMRLLPLL). HLA-A24 tetramer analysis reveals a significant expansion of PPI(3-11)-specific CD8 T cells in the blood of HLA-A*24(+) recent-onset patients compared with HLA-matched control subjects. Moreover, a patient-derived PPI(3-11)-specific CD8 T-cell clone shows a proinflammatory phenotype and kills surrogate β-cells and human HLA-A*24(+) islet cells in vitro. These results indicate that the type 1 diabetes susceptibility molecule HLA-A24 presents a naturally processed PPI signal peptide epitope. PPI-specific, HLA-A24-restricted CD8 T cells are expanded in patients with recent-onset disease. Human islet cells process and present PPI(3-11), rendering themselves targets for CTL-mediated killing.

  14. A highly restricted T-cell receptor dominates the CD8+ T-cell response to parvovirus B19 infection in HLA-A*2402-positive individuals

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kasprowicz, V; Jeffery, K; Broliden, K;

    2006-01-01

    Six of seven HLA-A*2402-positive individuals with acute parvovirus B19 infections made vigorous CD8-positive cytotoxic T-cell (CTL) responses to the viral epitope FYTPLADQF. All responders showed highly focused T-cell receptor (TCR) usage, using almost exclusively BV5.1. The BV5.1 TCR dominated...

  15. Preliminary exploration of HLA-A 1101-restricted human cytomegalovirus glycoprotein B-specific CD8⁺ T cells in allogeneic stem-cell transplant recipients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Anbing; Hu, Jianhua; Wu, Wei; Huang, Yaping; Liang, Hanying; Wang, Huiqi; Yang, Rong; Fan, Jun

    2014-08-08

    T-cell responses directed against human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) glycoprotein B (gB) contribute to protective immunity against HCMV infection in both animal models and humans. However, the gB-specific human CD8(+) T cell responses remain poorly understood. gB antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells were stained with seven major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-peptide pentamers in 16 human leukocyte antigen (HLA)-A 1101-positive, HCMV-seropositive patients following hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). Of these seven pentamers, the most frequent CD8(+) T-cell responses were directed against the gB332-340 peptide. These gB332-340-specific CD8(+) T cells were strongly associated with the presence of plasma HCMV immunoglobulin M in all HSCT recipients and exhibited a probable causal relationship with the level of pp65 antigenemia. Together, these data suggest a role for gB332-340-specific CD8(+) T cells in HCMV reactivation after HSCT. Furthermore, the pentamer assay may be valuable in detecting antigen-specific CD8(+) T cells.

  16. Ectopic overexpression of engrailed-2 in cerebellar Purkinje cells causes restricted cell loss and retarded external germinal layer development at lobule junctions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Baader, S L; Sanlioglu, S; Berrebi, A S; Parker-Thornburg, J; Oberdick, J

    1998-03-01

    Members of the En and Wnt gene families seem to play a key role in the early specification of the brain territory that gives rise to the cerebellum, the midhindbrain junction. To analyze the possible continuous role of the En and Wnt signaling pathway in later cerebellar patterning and function, we expressed En-2 ectopically in Purkinje cells during late embryonic and postnatal cerebellar development. As a result of this expression, the cerebellum is greatly reduced in size, and Purkinje cell numbers throughout the cerebellum are reduced by more than one-third relative to normal animals. Detailed analysis of both adult and developing cerebella reveals a pattern of selectivity to the loss of Purkinje cells and other cerebellar neurons. This is observed as a general loss of prominence of cerebellar fissures that is highlighted by a total loss of sublobular fissures. In contrast, mediolateral patterning is generally only subtly affected. That En-2 overexpression selectively affects Purkinje cells in the transition zone between lobules is evidenced by direct observation of selective Purkinje cell loss in certain fissures and by the observation that growth and migration of the external germinal layer (EGL) is selectively retarded in the deep fissures during early postnatal development. Thus, in addition to demonstrating the critical role of Purkinje cells in the generation and migration of granule cells, the heterogeneous distribution of cellular effects induced by ectopic En expression suggests a relatively late morphogenetic role for this and other segment polarity proteins, mainly oriented at lobule junctions.

  17. PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 and PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED1 Mediate Photorelocation Movements of Both Chloroplasts and Nuclei.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Higa, Takeshi; Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2015-10-01

    Organelle movement and positioning play important roles in fundamental cellular activities and adaptive responses to environmental stress in plants. To optimize photosynthetic light utilization, chloroplasts move toward weak blue light (the accumulation response) and escape from strong blue light (the avoidance response). Nuclei also move in response to strong blue light by utilizing the light-induced movement of attached plastids in leaf cells. Blue light receptor phototropins and several factors for chloroplast photorelocation movement have been identified through molecular genetic analysis of Arabidopsis (Arabidopsis thaliana). PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1 (PMI1) is a plant-specific C2-domain protein that is required for efficient chloroplast photorelocation movement. There are two PLASTID MOVEMENT IMPAIRED1-RELATED (PMIR) genes, PMIR1 and PMIR2, in the Arabidopsis genome. However, the mechanism in which PMI1 regulates chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements and the involvement of PMIR1 and PMIR2 in these organelle movements remained unknown. Here, we analyzed chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mutant lines of PMI1, PMIR1, and PMIR2. In mesophyll cells, the pmi1 single mutant showed severe defects in both chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements resulting from the impaired regulation of chloroplast-actin filaments. In pavement cells, pmi1 mutant plants were partially defective in both plastid and nuclear photorelocation movements, but pmi1pmir1 and pmi1pmir1pmir2 mutant lines lacked the blue light-induced movement responses of plastids and nuclei completely. These results indicated that PMI1 is essential for chloroplast and nuclear photorelocation movements in mesophyll cells and that both PMI1 and PMIR1 are indispensable for photorelocation movements of plastids and thus, nuclei in pavement cells.

  18. An immunodominant HLA-A*1101-restricted CD8+ T-cell response targeting hepatitis B surface antigen in chronic hepatitis B patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Xiaoling; Wang, Wenbo; Wang, Shufeng; Meng, Gang; Zhang, Mengjun; Ni, Bing; Wu, Yuzhang; Wang, Li

    2013-12-01

    Hepatitis B virus (HBV) infection is a worldwide public health problem. HBV-specific CD8(+) CTLs are vital for viral clearance. Identification of immunodominant CTL epitopes from HBV-associated antigens is necessary for therapeutic vaccine development. We showed that the HLA-A*1101 allele is one of the most common alleles in both healthy individuals and chronic hepatitis B (CHB) patients in the Chongqing area, China. However, less than 10% of epitopes of HBV-associated antigens have been identified in an HLA-A*1101 context. Here, we describe an immunodominant CD8(+) T-cell response targeting a hepatitis B surface antigen determinant (HBs(295-304)) restricted by HLA-A*1101 in both healthy individuals and CHB patients. Moreover, HBs(295-304) is more immunogenic for CTL induction than a known naturally HLA-A*1101-processed epitope from hepatitis B core antigen (HBc(88-96)). Therefore, the newly identified epitope, HBs(295-304), will benefit the development of immunotherapeutic approaches for HBV infection.

  19. Oncogenic pathways impinging on the G2-restriction point

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Foijer, F; Simonis, M; van Vliet, M; Wessels, L; Kerkhoven, R; Sorger, P K; Te Riele, H

    2008-01-01

    In the absence of mitogenic stimuli, cells normally arrest in G(1/0), because they fail to pass the G1-restriction point. However, abrogation of the G1-restriction point (by loss of the retinoblastoma gene family) reveals a second-restriction point that arrests cells in G2. Serum-starvation-induced

  20. The broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 restricts chlamydial inclusion development and bacterial growth and localizes to host cell lipid droplets within treated cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sandoz, Kelsi M; Valiant, William G; Eriksen, Steven G; Hruby, Dennis E; Allen, Robert D; Rockey, Daniel D

    2014-07-01

    Novel broad-spectrum antimicrobials are a critical component of a strategy for combating antibiotic-resistant pathogens. In this study, we explored the activity of the broad-spectrum antiviral compound ST-669 for activity against different intracellular bacteria and began a characterization of its mechanism of antimicrobial action. ST-669 inhibits the growth of three different species of chlamydia and the intracellular bacterium Coxiella burnetii in Vero and HeLa cells but not in McCoy (murine) cells. The antichlamydial and anti-C. burnetii activity spectrum was consistent with those observed for tested viruses, suggesting a common mechanism of action. Cycloheximide treatment in the presence of ST-669 abrogated the inhibitory effect, demonstrating that eukaryotic protein synthesis is required for tested activity. Immunofluorescence microscopy demonstrated that different chlamydiae grow atypically in the presence of ST-669, in a manner that suggests the compound affects inclusion formation and organization. Microscopic analysis of cells treated with a fluorescent derivative of ST-669 demonstrated that the compound localized to host cell lipid droplets but not to other organelles or the host cytosol. These results demonstrate that ST-669 affects intracellular growth in a host-cell-dependent manner and interrupts proper development of chlamydial inclusions, possibly through a lipid droplet-dependent process.

  1. Changes in leaf optical properties associated with light-dependent chloroplast movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Davis, Phillip A; Caylor, Steven; Whippo, Craig W; Hangarter, Roger P

    2011-12-01

    We surveyed 24 plant species to examine how leaf anatomy influenced chloroplast movement and how the optical properties of leaves change with chloroplast position. All species examined exhibited light-dependent chloroplast movements but the associated changes in leaf absorptance varied considerably in magnitude. Chloroplast movement-dependent changes in leaf absorptance were greatest in shade species, in which absorptance changes of >10% were observed between high- and low-light treatments. Using the Kubelka-Munk theory, we found that changes in the absorption (k) and chlorophyll a absorption efficiency (k*) associated with chloroplast movement correlated with cell diameter, such that the narrower, more columnar cells found in sun leaves restricted the ability of chloroplasts to move. The broader, more spherical cells of shade leaves allowed greater chloroplast rearrangements and in low-light conditions allowed efficient light capture. Across the species tested, light-dependent chloroplast movements modulated leaf optical properties and light absorption efficiency by manipulating the package (sieve or flattening) effect but not the detour (path lengthening) effect.

  2. Restrictions and Proportionality

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Werlauff, Erik

    2009-01-01

    The article discusses three central aspects of the freedoms under European Community law, namely 1) the prohibition against restrictions as an important extension of the prohibition against discrimination, 2) a prohibition against exit restrictions which is just as important as the prohibition...... against host country restrictions, but which is often not recognised to the same extent by national law, and 3) the importance of also identifying and recognising an exit restriction, so that it is possible to achieve the required test of appropriateness and proportionality in relation to the rule...

  3. Harpagoside attenuates MPTP/MPP⁺ induced dopaminergic neurodegeneration and movement disorder via elevating glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sun, Xiaoyu; Xiong, Zhongkui; Zhang, Yongfang; Meng, Ya; Xu, Gang; Xia, Zhiming; Li, Jiamei; Zhang, Rui; Ke, Zunji; Xia, Zongqin; Hu, Yaer

    2012-03-01

    Parkinson's disease is a chronic neurodegenerative movement disorder characterized by the loss of dopaminergic neurons in the substantia nigra pars compacta. New therapeutic approaches aiming at delaying or reversing the neurodegenerative process are under active investigations. In this work, we found that harpagoside, an iridoid purified from the Chinese medicinal herb Scrophularia ningpoensis, could not only prevent but also rescue the dopaminergic neurodegeneration in MPTP/MPP(+) intoxication with promising efficacy. Firstly, in cultured mesencephalic neurons, harpagoside significantly attenuated the loss of TH-positive neuron numbers and the shortening of axonal length. Secondly, in a chronic MPTP mouse model, harpagoside dose-dependently improved the loco-motor ability (rotarod test), increased the TH-positive neuron numbers in the substantia nigra pars compacta (unbiased stereological counting) and increased the striatal DAT density ((125) I-FP-CIT autoradiography). Thirdly, harpagoside markedly elevated the GDNF mRNA and GDNF protein levels in MPTP/MPP(+) lesioned models. However, the protecting effect of harpagoside on the dopaminergic degeneration disappeared when the intrinsic GDNF action was blocked by either the Ret inhibitor PP1 or the neutralizing anti-GDNF antibody. Taken together, we conclude that harpagoside attenuates the dopaminergic neurodegeneration and movement disorder mainly through elevating glial cell line-derived neurotrophic factor.

  4. Examining Restricted and Repetitive Behaviors in Young Children with Autism Spectrum Disorder during Two Observational Contexts

    Science.gov (United States)

    Stronach, Sheri; Wetherby, Amy M.

    2014-01-01

    This prospective study of the FIRST WORDS® Project examined restricted and repetitive behaviors in a sample of 55 toddlers at a mean age of 20 months who were later diagnosed with autism spectrum disorder. Restricted and repetitive behaviors were coded using the Repetitive Movement and Restricted Interest Scales in two video-recorded observation…

  5. SAMHD1 restricts HIV-1 infection in dendritic cells (DCs by dNTP depletion, but its expression in DCs and primary CD4+ T-lymphocytes cannot be upregulated by interferons

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    St Gelais Corine

    2012-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background SAMHD1 is an HIV-1 restriction factor in non-dividing monocytes, dendritic cells (DCs, macrophages, and resting CD4+ T-cells. Acting as a deoxynucleoside triphosphate (dNTP triphosphohydrolase, SAMHD1 hydrolyzes dNTPs and restricts HIV-1 infection in macrophages and resting CD4+ T-cells by decreasing the intracellular dNTP pool. However, the intracellular dNTP pool in DCs and its regulation by SAMHD1 remain unclear. SAMHD1 has been reported as a type I interferon (IFN-inducible protein, but whether type I IFNs upregulate SAMHD1 expression in primary DCs and CD4+ T-lymphocytes is unknown. Results Here, we report that SAMHD1 significantly blocked single-cycle and replication-competent HIV-1 infection of DCs by decreasing the intracellular dNTP pool and thereby limiting the accumulation of HIV-1 late reverse transcription products. Type I IFN treatment did not upregulate endogenous SAMHD1 expression in primary DCs or CD4+ T-lymphocytes, but did in HEK 293T and HeLa cell lines. When SAMHD1 was over-expressed in these two cell lines to achieve higher levels than that in DCs, no HIV-1 restriction was observed despite partially reducing the intracellular dNTP pool. Conclusions Our results suggest that SAMHD1-mediated reduction of the intracellular dNTP pool in DCs is a common mechanism of HIV-1 restriction in myeloid cells. Endogenous expression of SAMHD1 in primary DCs or CD4+ T-lymphocytes is not upregulated by type I IFNs.

  6. Induction of CD8 T-cell responses restricted to multiple HLA class I alleles in a cancer patient by immunization with a 20-mer NY-ESO-1f (NY-ESO-1 91-110) peptide.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eikawa, Shingo; Kakimi, Kazuhiro; Isobe, Midori; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Luescher, Immanuel; Ohue, Yoshihiro; Ikeuchi, Kazuhiro; Uenaka, Akiko; Nishikawa, Hiroyoshi; Udono, Heiichiro; Oka, Mikio; Nakayama, Eiichi

    2013-01-15

    Immunogenicity of a long 20-mer NY-ESO-1f peptide vaccine was evaluated in a lung cancer patient TK-f01, immunized with the peptide with Picibanil OK-432 and Montanide ISA-51. We showed that internalization of the peptide was necessary to present CD8 T-cell epitopes on APC, contrasting with the direct presentation of the short epitope. CD8 T-cell responses restricted to all five HLA class I alleles were induced in the patient after the peptide vaccination. Clonal analysis showed that B*35:01 and B*52:01-restricted CD8 T-cell responses were the two dominant responses. The minimal epitopes recognized by A*24:02, B*35:01, B*52:01 and C*12:02-restricted CD8 T-cell clones were defined and peptide/HLA tetramers were produced. NY-ESO-1 91-101 on A*24:02, NY-ESO-1 92-102 on B*35:01, NY-ESO-1 96-104 on B*52:01 and NY-ESO-1 96-104 on C*12:02 were new epitopes first defined in this study. Identification of the A*24:02 epitope is highly relevant for studying the Japanese population because of its high expression frequency (60%). High affinity CD8 T-cells recognizing tumor cells naturally expressing the epitopes and matched HLA were induced at a significant level. The findings suggest the usefulness of a long 20-mer NY-ESO-1f peptide harboring multiple CD8 T-cell epitopes as an NY-ESO-1 vaccine. Characterization of CD8 T-cell responses in immunomonitoring using peptide/HLA tetramers revealed that multiple CD8 T-cell responses comprised the dominant response.

  7. Restriction of cell surface expression of Sendai virus hemagglutinin-neuraminidase glycoprotein correlates with its higher instability in persistently and standard plus defective interfering virus infected BHK-21 cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Roux, L.; Beffy, P.; Portner, A.

    1984-10-15

    To gain an understanding of the mechanism(s) by which Sendai virus generates a persistent infection, the expression of the hemagglutinin-neuraminidase (HN) and fusion (Fo) glycoproteins at the surfaces of BHK-21 cells infected with standard virus, a mixture of standard and defective interfering (DI) particles (mixed virus infection), and during persistent infection was investigated. The expression of HN and Fo was measured on the surfaces of infected cells by the binding of anti-HN and anti-Fo monoclonal antibodies. The results show that HN expression was restricted relative to Fo during mixed virus and persistent infections. The decreased levels of HN were investigated further by pulse-chase experiments which revealed that HN has an increased turnover rate in persistently infected cells and, to a lesser extent, in mixed virus infected cells. In analyzing the (/sup 35/S)methionine-labeled protein composition of virus particles produced during the pulse-chase experiments, the increased turnover of newly synthesized HN was found to correlate with its decreased incorporation into virus particles. Interestingly, the poor HN incorporation also correlates with less efficient incorporation of the matrix M protein into virus particles.

  8. mTOR signaling and its involvement in the regulation of cell movements through remodeling the cytoskeleton architecture

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kosach V. R.

    2015-02-01

    Full Text Available mTOR kinase is one of the basic links at the crossroad of several signal transduction pathways. De­re­gulated mTOR kinase signaling accompanies the progress of cancer, diabetes, neurodegenerative disorders and aging. Implication of mTOR inhibitor rapamycin decreases migration and invasion of malignant cells, and metastasis formation. However, a precise mechanism of the regulation of cellular locomotion by mTOR kinase is not fully understood. This article focuses on the recent findings that demonstrated a possible role of mTOR kinase in the regulation of cytoskeleton remodeling and cell migration properties. Detailed studies on this non-canonical mTOR function will extend our knowledge about cell migration and metastasis formation and might improve anti-cancer therapeutic approaches.

  9. Tetraspanin CD82 inhibits protrusion and retraction in cell movement by attenuating the plasma membrane-dependent actin organization.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Wei M Liu

    Full Text Available To determine how tetraspanin KAI1/CD82, a tumor metastasis suppressor, inhibits cell migration, we assessed which cellular events critical for motility are altered by KAI1/CD82 and how KAI1/CD82 regulates these events. We found that KAI1/CD82-expressing cells typically exhibited elongated cellular tails and diminished lamellipodia. Live imaging demonstrated that the polarized protrusion and retraction of the plasma membrane became deficient upon KAI1/CD82 expression. The deficiency in developing these motility-related cellular events was caused by poor formations of actin cortical network and stress fiber and by aberrant dynamics in actin organization. Rac1 activity was reduced by KAI1/CD82, consistent with the diminution of lamellipodia and actin cortical network; while the growth factor-stimulated RhoA activity was blocked by KAI1/CD82, consistent with the loss of stress fiber and attenuation in cellular retraction. Upon KAI1/CD82 expression, Rac effector cofilin was not enriched at the cell periphery to facilitate lamellipodia formation while Rho kinase exhibited a significantly lower activity leading to less retraction. Phosphatidylinositol 4, 5-biphosphate, which initiates actin polymerization from the plasma membrane, became less detectable at the cell periphery in KAI1/CD82-expressing cells. Moreover, KAI1/CD82-induced phenotypes likely resulted from the suppression of multiple signaling pathways such as integrin and growth factor signaling. In summary, at the cellular level KAI1/CD82 inhibited polarized protrusion and retraction events by disrupting actin reorganization; at the molecular level, KAI1/CD82 deregulated Rac1, RhoA, and their effectors cofilin and Rho kinase by perturbing the plasma membrane lipids.

  10. Effects of realimentation after nutrient restriction during mid- to late gestation on pancreatic digestive enzymes, serum insulin and glucose levels, and insulin-containing cell cluster morphology.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Keomanivong, F E; Camacho, L E; Lemley, C O; Kuemper, E A; Yunusova, R D; Borowicz, P P; Kirsch, J D; Vonnahme, K A; Caton, J S; Swanson, K C

    2016-04-14

    This study examined effects of stage of gestation and nutrient restriction with subsequent realimentation on maternal and foetal bovine pancreatic function. Dietary treatments were assigned on day 30 of pregnancy and included: control (CON; 100% requirements; n = 18) and restricted (R; 60% requirements; n = 30). On day 85, cows were slaughtered (CON, n = 6; R, n = 6), remained on control (CC; n = 12) and restricted (RR; n = 12), or realimented to control (RC; n = 11). On day 140, cows were slaughtered (CC, n = 6; RR, n = 6; RC, n = 5), remained on control (CCC, n = 6; RCC, n = 5) or realimented to control (RRC, n = 6). On day 254, the remaining cows were slaughtered and serum samples were collected from the maternal jugular vein and umbilical cord to determine insulin and glucose concentrations. Pancreases from cows and foetuses were removed, weighed, and subsampled for enzyme and histological analysis. As gestation progressed, maternal pancreatic α-amylase activity decreased and serum insulin concentrations increased (p ≤ 0.03). Foetal pancreatic trypsin activity increased (p enzymes are influenced by nutrient restriction and there is a potential for programming of increased foetal digestive enzyme production resulting from previous maternal nutrient restriction.

  11. Movement disorders and sleep.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Driver-Dunckley, Erika D; Adler, Charles H

    2012-11-01

    This article summarizes what is currently known about sleep disturbances in several movement disorders including Parkinson disease, essential tremor, parkinsonism, dystonia, Huntington disease, myoclonus, and ataxias. There is an association between movement disorders and sleep. In some cases the prevalence of sleep disorders is much higher in patients with movement disorder, such as rapid eye movement sleep behavior disorder in Parkinson disease. In other cases, sleep difficulties worsen the involuntary movements. In many cases the medications used to treat patients with movement disorder disturb sleep or cause daytime sleepiness. The importance of discussing sleep issues in patients with movement disorders cannot be underestimated.

  12. Threshold for ion movements in wood cell walls below fiber saturation observed by X-ray fluorescence microscopy (XFM)

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zelinka, Samuel L.; Gleber, Sophie-Charlotte; Vogt, Stefan; Rodriguez Lopez, Gabriela M.; Jakes, Joseph E.

    2015-05-01

    Diffusion of chemicals and ions through the wood cell wall plays an important role in wood damage mechanisms. In the present work, free diffusion of ions through wood secondary walls and middle lamellae has been investigated as a function of moisture content (MC) and anatomical direction. Various ions (K, Cl, Zn, Cu) were injected into selected regions of 2 mu m thick wood sections with a microinjector and then the ion distribution was mapped by means of X-ray fluorescence microscopy with submicron spatial resolution. The MC of the wood was controlled in situ by means of climatic chamber with controlled relative humidity (RH). For all ions investigated, there was a threshold RH below which the concentration profiles did not change. The threshold RH depended upon ionic species, cell wall layer, and wood anatomical orientation. Above the threshold RH, differences in mobility among ions were observed and the mobility depended upon anatomical direction and cell wall layer. These observations support a recently proposed percolation model of electrical conduction in wood. The results contribute to understanding the mechanisms of fungal decay and fastener corrosion that occur below the fiber saturation point.

  13. A large population of small chloroplasts in tobacco leaf cells allows more effective chloroplast movement than a few enlarged chloroplasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jeong, Won Joong; Park, Youn-Il; Suh, KyeHong; Raven, John A; Yoo, Ook Joon; Liu, Jang Ryol

    2002-05-01

    We generated transgenic tobacco (Nicotiana tabacum cv Xanthi) plants that contained only one to three enlarged chloroplasts per leaf mesophyll cell by introducing NtFtsZ1-2, a cDNA for plastid division. These plants were used to investigate the advantages of having a large population of small chloroplasts rather than a few enlarged chloroplasts in a leaf mesophyll cell. Despite the similarities in photosynthetic components and ultrastructure of photosynthetic machinery between wild-type and transgenic plants, the overall growth of transgenic plants under low- and high-light conditions was retarded. In wild-type plants, the chloroplasts moved toward the face position under low light and toward the profile position under high-light conditions. However, chloroplast rearrangement in transgenic plants in response to light conditions was not evident. In addition, transgenic plant leaves showed greatly diminished changes in leaf transmittance values under both light conditions, indicating that chloroplast rearrangement was severely retarded. Therefore, under low-light conditions the incomplete face position of the enlarged chloroplasts results in decreased absorbance of light energy. This, in turn, reduces plant growth. Under high-light conditions, the amount of absorbed light exceeds the photosynthetic utilization capacity due to the incomplete profile position of the enlarged chloroplasts, resulting in photodamage to the photosynthetic machinery, and decreased growth. The presence of a large number of small and/or rapidly moving chloroplasts in the cells of higher land plants permits more effective chloroplast phototaxis and, hence, allows more efficient utilization of low-incident photon flux densities. The photosynthetic apparatus is, consequently, protected from damage under high-incident photon flux densities.

  14. Long-term moderate calorie restriction inhibits inflammation without impairing cell-mediated immunity: a randomized controlled trial in non obese humans

    Science.gov (United States)

    Calorie restriction (CR) inhibits inflammation and slows aging in many animal species, but in rodents housed in pathogen-free facilities, CR impairs immunity against certain pathogens. However, little is known about the effects of long-term moderate CR on immune function in humans. In this multi-cen...

  15. Movement and Space

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Riisgaard Hansen, Thomas; Eriksson, Eva; Lykke-Olesen, Andreas

    2005-01-01

    In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement-based intera......In this paper we explore the space in which movement based interaction takes place. We have in several projects explored how fixed and mobile cameras can be used in movement based interaction and will shortly describe these projects. Based on our experience with working with movement...

  16. Humanized mice dually challenged with R5 and X4 HIV-1 show preferential R5 viremia and restricted X4 infection of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Terahara, Kazutaka; Ishige, Masayuki; Ikeno, Shota; Okada, Seiji; Kobayashi-Ishihara, Mie; Ato, Manabu; Tsunetsugu-Yokota, Yasuko

    2015-05-01

    CCR5-tropic (R5) immunodeficiency virus type 1 (HIV-1) strains are highly transmissible during the early stage of infection in humans, whereas CXCR4-tropic (X4) strains are less transmissible. This study aimed to explore the basis for early phase R5 and X4 HIV-1 infection in vivo by using humanized mice dually challenged with R5 HIV-1NLAD8-D harboring DsRed and X4 HIV-1(NL-E) harboring EGFP. Whereas R5 HIV-1 replicated well, X4 HIV-1 caused only transient viremia with variable kinetics; however, this was distinct from the low level but persistent viremia observed in mice challenged with X4 HIV-1 alone. Flow cytometric analysis of HIV-1-infected cells revealed that X4 HIV-1 infection of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells was significantly suppressed in the presence of R5 HIV-1. X4 HIV-1 was more cytopathic than R5 HIV-1; however, this was not the cause of restricted X4 HIV-1 infection because there were no significant differences in the mortality rates of CCR5(+) and CCR5(-) cells within the X4 HIV-1-infected cell populations. Taken together, these results suggest that restricted infection of CCR5(+)CD4(+) T cells by X4 HIV-1 (occurring via a still-to-be-identified mechanism) might contribute to the preferential transmission of R5 HIV-1 during the early phase of infection.

  17. A novel immunodominant CD8+ T cell response restricted by a common HLA-C allele targets a conserved region of Gag HIV-1 clade CRF01_AE infected Thais.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Supranee Buranapraditkun

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: CD8+ T cell responses play an important role in the control of HIV-1. The extensive sequence diversity of HIV-1 represents a critical hurdle to developing an effective HIV-1 vaccine, and it is likely that regional-specific vaccine strains will be required to overcome the diversity of the different HIV-1 clades distributed world-wide. Unfortunately, little is known about the CD8+ T cell responses against CRF01_AE, which is responsible for the majority of infections in Southeast Asia. METHODOLOGY/PRINCIPAL FINDINGS: To identify dominant CD8+ T cell responses recognized in HIV-1 clade CRF01_AE infected subjects we drew upon data from an immunological screen of 100 HIV-1 clade CRF01_AE infected subjects using IFN-gamma ELISpot to characterize a novel immunodominant CD8+ T cell response in HIV-1 Gag restricted by HLA-Cw*0102 (p24, (277YSPVSILDI(285, YI9. Over 75% of Cw*0102+ve subjects targeted this epitope, representing the strongest response in more than a third of these individuals. This novel CD8 epitope was located in a highly conserved region of HIV-1 Gag known to contain immunodominant CD8 epitopes, which are restricted by HLA-B*57 and -B*27 in clade B infection. Nonetheless, viral escape in this epitope was frequently observed in Cw*0102+ve subjects, suggestive of strong selection pressure being exerted by this common CD8+ T cell response. CONCLUSIONS/SIGNIFICANCE: As HLA-Cw*0102 is frequently expressed in the Thai population (allelic frequency of 16.8%, this immunodominant Cw*0102-restricted Gag epitope may represent an attractive candidate for vaccines specific to CRF01_AE and may help facilitate further studies of immunopathogenesis in this understudied HIV-1 clade.

  18. Research on virtual actor action editing and movement control

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wenhu QIN; Yuhui WU; Zhengxu ZHAO

    2008-01-01

    To directly use a virtual surface model for action editing and movement control, a general method for creating virtual actor skeleton models and controlling movement is presented. The method includes judging borderlines of the block virtual surface model, calculat-ing the joints, confirming the above block, and using the block hierarchical layout to create the skeleton model. Then, according to the virtual actor model and move-ment restriction, the study focuses on the generation of movement animation using the key frame technique and smoothing movement technique by automatically adding animation and adjusting the actor's pose by different weights on movement amplitude. Finally, movement control of the actor in the virtual environment is implemented by real-time control and path point control, which achieve a good result.

  19. Late gestational nutrient restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Tygesen, Malin Plumhoff; Nielsen, Mette Olaf; Nørgaard, Peder;

    2008-01-01

    We investigated the effect of 50% nutrient restriction during the last 6 weeks of gestation on twin-pregnant ewes' plasma glucose, non-esterified fatty acid, ß-hydroxybutyrate, insulin, IGF-1 and leptin concentrations and the effects on lamb birth weight and ewes' lactation performance. Plasma...... metabolite and hormone concentrations in restricted ewes suggest that maternal tissues were being mobilised. Despite the ewes' adaptations their lambs weighed significantly less at birth. Furthermore, colostrum and milk yields were markedly reduced up until the latest measurement at 3 weeks post partum...

  20. Stereotypic movement disorder

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... page: //medlineplus.gov/ency/article/001548.htm Stereotypic movement disorder To use the sharing features on this page, please enable JavaScript. Stereotypic movement disorder is a condition in which a person makes ...

  1. Eye Movement Disorders

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... work properly. There are many kinds of eye movement disorders. Two common ones are Strabismus - a disorder in ... the eyes, sometimes called "dancing eyes" Some eye movement disorders are present at birth. Others develop over time ...

  2. Tectonic Plate Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Landalf, Helen

    1998-01-01

    Presents an activity that employs movement to enable students to understand concepts related to plate tectonics. Argues that movement brings topics to life in a concrete way and helps children retain knowledge. (DDR)

  3. 热量限制对SH-SY5Y细胞氧化损伤的影响%Effect of Caloric Restriction on Oxidative Damage in Human Neuroblastoma Cell Line SH-SY5Y Cells

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    陈娟; 张景燕; 王蓉; 赵静姝; 郭瑾; 吴燕川; 赵志炜

    2012-01-01

    Objective To observe the effect of caloric restriction on oxidative damage in human neuroblastoma cell line SH-SY5Y cells in vitro. Methods To establish an in vitro model of H2O2-induced oiidative stress damage of SH-SY5Y cells. SH-SY5Y cells were cultured in vitro. The cells were divided into four groups: control group, H2O2 (250μmol/L) group, low glucose (2g/L) group, and low glucose + H2 O2 group. Cell morphology, thiazolyl blue (MTT) metabolism rate, and lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) leakage rate were measured to observe the cell growth status in different groups. Results Compared with the control group, the MTT metabolism rate in the cells treated with 50 μmol/L H2O2 for one hour was not significantly changed (P >0. 05) , but it was significantly decreased in the 100, 250, 500, 1000 μmol/ L H202-treated groups than that of control group (P 0. 05) . The LDH leakage rate of the low glucose + H202group cultured for 7 hours was slightly higher than that of cells cultured for 1 hour (P >0. 05) . The histological observation revealed that the morphology of cells treated with low glucose was similar to that of the control group, and it was similar at one hour after H202 added. At 7 hours after addition of H202, the cells of the low glucose group and control group had well streching cytoplasmic projections, but in the H202 group, the cell number was significantly reduced, with a lot of dead cells, and the cells became rounded in shape and with poor adherence and transparence. Conclusion Caloric restriction can improve the viability and anti-oxidative stress ability of neurons, and reduce the cell mortality.%目的 观察热量限制培养条件下,SH-SY5Y细胞抗氧化应激损伤的能力.方法 建立过氧化氢诱导的SH-SY5Y细胞损伤模型.体外培养SH-SY5Y细胞,分为对照组、损伤组(50、100、250、500、1 000 μmol/L H2O2)、低糖组(2 g/L)、低糖+损伤组,进行细胞形态观察、测定各组细胞的噻唑蓝(MTT)代谢率、乳

  4. Linking Literacy and Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pica, Rae

    2010-01-01

    There are many links between literacy and movement. Movement and language are both forms of communication and self-expression. Rhythm is an essential component of both language and movement. While people may think of rhythm primarily in musical terms, there is a rhythm to words and sentences as well. Individuals develop an internal rhythm when…

  5. Predicate Movements in Chinese

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shou-hsin, Teng

    1975-01-01

    The movements of such higher predicates as time, locative, and complementation verbs are studied, and Tai's Predicate Placement Constraint is rejected as an incorrect account of predicate movements in Chinese. It is proposed, on the other hand, that there is only leftward movement involving predicates in Chinese. (Author)

  6. Social movements and science

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Jamison, Andrew

    2006-01-01

    The article examines the role of social movements in the development of scientific knowledge. Interactions between social movements and science in broad, historical terms are discussed. The relations between the new social movements of the 1960s and 1970s and changes in the contemporary scientific...

  7. Definition of the region on NS3 which contains multiple epitopes recognized by dengue virus serotype-cross-reactive and flavivirus-cross-reactive, HLA-DPw2-restricted CD4+ T cell clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Okamoto, Y; Kurane, I; Leporati, A M; Ennis, F A

    1998-04-01

    The epitopes recognized by six CD4+ CD8- cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) clones established from a dengue-3 virus-immune donor were defined. (i) Three CTL clones, JK10, JK34 and JK39, were cross-reactive for dengue virus types 1-4. (ii) One clone, JK28, was cross-reactive for dengue virus types 1-4 and West Nile virus. (iii) Two clones, JK26 and JK49, were cross-reactive for dengue virus types 1-4, West Nile virus and yellow fever virus. The clones, except for JK49, recognized the same epitope on NS3 in an HLA-DPw2-restricted fashion. The smallest synthetic peptide recognized by the five CTL clones was a 10 aa peptide which comprises aa 255-264 on dengue virus NS3. JK49 recognized the overlapping epitope which comprises aa 257-266 in an HLA-DPw2-restricted fashion. Analysis of T cell receptor (TCR) usage by these T cell clones revealed that (i) JK10 and JK34 use V alpha11, and JK34 and JK28 use V beta23, and (ii) the amino acid sequences of the V(D)J junctional region of the TCR were different among these five CTL clones. There were, however, single amino acid conservations among TCRs of some of these T cell clones. These results indicate that the region on NS3 which comprises aa 255-266 contains multiple epitopes recognized by dengue serotype-cross-reactive and flavivirus-cross-reactive CD4+ CTL in an HLA-DPw2-restricted fashion and that a single epitope can be recognized by T cells which have heterogeneous virus specificities.

  8. Training Restricted Boltzmann Machines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fischer, Asja

    Restricted Boltzmann machines (RBMs) are probabilistic graphical models that can also be interpreted as stochastic neural networks. Training RBMs is known to be challenging. Computing the likelihood of the model parameters or its gradient is in general computationally intensive. Thus, training...

  9. Bilinear Fourier restriction theorems

    CERN Document Server

    Demeter, Ciprian

    2012-01-01

    We provide a general scheme for proving $L^p$ estimates for certain bilinear Fourier restrictions outside the locally $L^2$ setting. As an application, we show how such estimates follow for the lacunary polygon. In contrast with prior approaches, our argument avoids any use of the Rubio de Francia Littlewood--Paley inequality.

  10. Restriction/modification polypeptides, polynucleotides, and methods

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Westpheling, Janet; Chung, DaeHwan; Huddleston, Jennifer; Farkas, Joel A

    2015-02-24

    The present invention relates to the discovery of a novel restriction/modification system in Caldicellulosiruptor bescii. The discovered restriction enzyme is a HaeIII-like restriction enzyme that possesses a thermophilic activity profile. The restriction/modification system also includes a methyltransferase, M.CbeI, that methylates at least one cytosine residue in the CbeI recognition sequence to m.sup.4C. Thus, the invention provides, in various aspects, isolated CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides, or biologically active fragments thereof; isolated polynucleotides that encode the CbeI or M.CbeI polypeptides or biologically active fragments thereof, including expression vectors that include such polynucleotide sequences; methods of digesting DNA using a CbeI polypeptide; methods of treating a DNA molecule using a M.CbeI polypeptide; and methods of transforming a Caldicellulosiruptor cell.

  11. Movement directionality in collective migration of germ layer progenitors.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Arboleda-Estudillo, Yohanna; Krieg, Michael; Stühmer, Jan; Licata, Nicholas A; Muller, Daniel J; Heisenberg, Carl-Philipp

    2010-01-26

    Collective cell migration, the simultaneous movement of multiple cells that are connected by cell-cell adhesion, is ubiquitous in development, tissue repair, and tumor metastasis [1, 2]. It has been hypothesized that the directionality of cell movement during collective migration emerges as a collective property [3, 4]. Here we determine how movement directionality is established in collective mesendoderm migration during zebrafish gastrulation. By interfering with two key features of collective migration, (1) having neighboring cells and (2) adhering to them, we show that individual mesendoderm cells are capable of normal directed migration when moving as single cells but require cell-cell adhesion to participate in coordinated and directed migration when moving as part of a group. We conclude that movement directionality is not a de novo collective property of mesendoderm cells but rather a property of single mesendoderm cells that requires cell-cell adhesion during collective migration.

  12. Proliferation of myogenic stem cells in human skeletal muscle in response to low-load resistance training with blood-flow restriction

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Nielsen, Jakob Lindberg; Aagaard, Per; Bech, Rune Dueholm

    2012-01-01

    exercise (20% 1RM) to concentric failure during blood-flow restriction (BFR) of the proximal thigh (100 mmHg), while eight work-matched controls (21.9±3.0 yrs) trained without BFR (CON). 23 training sessions were performed within 19 days. Maximal isometric knee extensor strength (MVC) was examined pre...... and post training, while muscle biopsies were obtained at baseline (Pre), after 8 days intervention (Mid8) and 3 (Post3) and 10 days (Post10) post training to examine changes in myofibre area (MFA), MSC and myonuclei number. MVC increased by 7.1% (Post5) and 10.6% (Post12) (P...

  13. Restricted and quasi-toral restricted Lie-Rinehart algebras

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sun Bing

    2015-09-01

    Full Text Available In this paper, we introduce the definition of restrictable Lie-Rinehart algebras, the concept of restrictability is by far more tractable than that of a restricted Lie-Rinehart algebra. Moreover, we obtain some properties of p-mappings and restrictable Lie-Rinehart algebras. Finally, we give some sufficient conditions for the commutativity of quasi-toral restricted Lie-Rinehart algebras and study how a quasi-toral restricted Lie-Rinehart algebra with zero center and of minimal dimension should be.

  14. Restriction of Helmholtz Model

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    V.M. Polunin

    2014-07-01

    Full Text Available The results of the experimental studies of physical mechanisms of energy dissipation in the oscillating system in which air cavity held by the forces of magnetic levitation is used as the elastic element, and magnetic fluid prepared on the basis of dispersing media with different viscosity level is used as the inertial element are considered in the article. Based on the obtained results the conclusion on the restriction of the applicability of Helmholtz equation, caused by boundary effects is made.

  15. License restrictions at Barnwell

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Autry, V.R. [S.C. Dept. of Health and Environmental Control, Columbia, SC (United States). Bureau of Radiological Health

    1991-12-31

    The State of South Carolina was delegated the authority by the US Nuclear Regulatory Commission to regulate the receipt, possession, use and disposal of radioactive material as an Agreement State. Since 1970, the state has been the principal regulatory authority for the Barnwell Low-Level Waste Disposal Facility operated by Chem-Nuclear Systems, Inc. The radioactive material license issued authorizing the receipt and disposal of low-level waste contains numerous restrictions to ensure environmental protection and compliance with shallow land disposal performance criteria. Low-level waste has evolved from minimally contaminated items to complex waste streams containing high concentrations of radionuclides and processing chemicals which necessitated these restrictions. Additionally, some waste with their specific radionuclides and concentration levels, many classified as low-level radioactive waste, are not appropriate for shallow land disposal unless additional precautions are taken. This paper will represent a number of these restrictions, the rationale for them, and how they are being dealt with at the Barnwell disposal facility.

  16. Combining positional scanning peptide libraries, HLA-DR transfectants and bioinformatics to dissect the epitope spectrum of HLA class II cross-restricted CD4+ T cell clones.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sospedra, Mireia; Zhao, Yingdong; Giulianotti, Marc; Simon, Richard; Pinilla, Clemencia; Martin, Roland

    2010-02-28

    The use of positional scanning peptide libraries in combination with biometrical analysis is one of the few approaches, which allows the identification of stimulatory peptides for T cells of unknown specificity. Despite the successful application of this strategy in different studies, not every T cell is suited for analysis. For as yet unknown reasons some T cells do not recognize these highly complex libraries, and even more importantly the predictive capacity of the current approach shows high variability among individual T cell clones and their TCRs. A number of factors probably contribute to differences in T cell recognition and have to be taken into account in order to overcome these difficulties. Our results suggest that the ability of some T cells to recognize peptides in the context of more than one HLA class II molecule expressed by autologous APCs could diminish the predictive capacity of the approach. In contrast, the use of B cell lines expressing single HLA class II molecules as APCs instead of autologous peripheral blood mononuclear cells markedly improves the capacity to identify target peptides for this type of T cells.

  17. Calibrating the X-ray attenuation of liquid water and correcting sample movement artefacts during in operando synchrotron X-ray radiographic imaging of polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ge, Nan; Chevalier, Stéphane; Hinebaugh, James; Yip, Ronnie; Lee, Jongmin; Antonacci, Patrick; Kotaka, Toshikazu; Tabuchi, Yuichiro; Bazylak, Aimy

    2016-03-01

    Synchrotron X-ray radiography, due to its high temporal and spatial resolutions, provides a valuable means for understanding the in operando water transport behaviour in polymer electrolyte membrane fuel cells. The purpose of this study is to address the specific artefact of imaging sample movement, which poses a significant challenge to synchrotron-based imaging for fuel cell diagnostics. Specifically, the impact of the micrometer-scale movement of the sample was determined, and a correction methodology was developed. At a photon energy level of 20 keV, a maximum movement of 7.5 µm resulted in a false water thickness of 0.93 cm (9% higher than the maximum amount of water that the experimental apparatus could physically contain). This artefact was corrected by image translations based on the relationship between the false water thickness value and the distance moved by the sample. The implementation of this correction method led to a significant reduction in false water thickness (to ∼0.04 cm). Furthermore, to account for inaccuracies in pixel intensities due to the scattering effect and higher harmonics, a calibration technique was introduced for the liquid water X-ray attenuation coefficient, which was found to be 0.657 ± 0.023 cm(-1) at 20 keV. The work presented in this paper provides valuable tools for artefact compensation and accuracy improvements for dynamic synchrotron X-ray imaging of fuel cells.

  18. The mathematics of movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Johnson, D.H.

    1999-01-01

    Review of: Quantitative Analysis of Movement: Measuring and Modeling Population Redistribution in Animals and Plants. Peter Turchin. 1998. Sinauer Associates, Sunderland, MA. 306 pages. $38.95 (paper).

  19. Molecular basis of chloroplast photorelocation movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kong, Sam-Geun; Wada, Masamitsu

    2016-03-01

    Chloroplast photorelocation movement is an essential physiological response for sessile plant survival and the optimization of photosynthetic ability. Simple but effective experiments on the physiological, cell biological and molecular genetic aspects have been widely used to investigate the signaling components of chloroplast photorelocation movement in Arabidopsis for the past few decades. Although recent knowledge on chloroplast photorelocation movement has led us to a deeper understanding of its physiological and molecular basis, the biochemical roles of the downstream factors remain largely unknown. In this review, we briefly summarize recent advances regarding chloroplast photorelocation movement and propose that a new high-resolution approach is necessary to investigate the molecular mechanism underlying actin-based chloroplast photorelocation movement.

  20. The immunodominant HLA-A2-restricted MART-1 epitope is not presented on the surface of many melanoma cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sørensen, Rikke Baek; Junker, Niels; Kirkin, Alexei;

    2009-01-01

    of the melanoma cells with the MART-1 epitope. Thus, the very frequently used MART-1 epitope was not expressed on the surface of many melanoma cell lines. Our data emphasize that the selected tumor antigens and/or epitopes are critical for the outcome of anti-cancer immunotherapy....

  1. T cell retargeting with MHC class I-restricted antibodies: the CD28 costimulatory domain enhances antigen-specific cytotoxicity and cytokine production

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    R.A. Willemsen (Ralph); C. Ronteltap; P. Chames; J.E.M.A. Debets (Reno); R.L.H. Bolhuis (Reinder)

    2005-01-01

    textabstractT cells require both primary and costimulatory signals for optimal activation. The primary Ag-specific signal is delivered by engagement of the TCR. The second Ag-independent costimulatory signal is mediated by engagement of the T cell surface costimulatory molecule CD2

  2. Priming by Chemokines Restricts Lateral Mobility of the Adhesion Receptor LFA-1 and Restores Adhesion to ICAM-1 Nano-Aggregates on Human Mature Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgman, K.J.; Zanten, T.S. van; Manzo, C.; Cabezon, R.; Cambi, A.; Benitez-Ribas, D.; Garcia-Parajo, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    LFA-1 is a leukocyte specific beta2 integrin that plays a major role in regulating adhesion and migration of different immune cells. Recent data suggest that LFA-1 on mature dendritic cells (mDCs) may function as a chemokine-inducible anchor during homing of DCs through the afferent lymphatics into

  3. Priming by Chemokines Restricts Lateral Mobility of the Adhesion Receptor LFA-1 and Restores Adhesion to ICAM-1 Nano-Aggregates on Human Mature Dendritic Cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Borgman, K.J.; Zanten, van T.S.; Manzo, C.; Cabezon, R.; Cambi, A.; Benitez-Ribas, D.; Garcia Parajo, M.F.

    2014-01-01

    LFA-1 is a leukocyte specific β2 integrin that plays a major role in regulating adhesion and migration of different immune cells. Recent data suggest that LFA-1 on mature dendritic cells (mDCs) may function as a chemokine-inducible anchor during homing of DCs through the afferent lymphatics into the

  4. Expression of late viral proteins is restricted in nasal mucosal leucocytes but not in epithelial cells during early-stage equine herpes virus-1 infection.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gryspeerdt, Annick C; Vandekerckhove, Annelies P; Baghi, Hossein Bannazadeh; Van de Walle, Gerlinde R; Nauwynck, Hans J

    2012-08-01

    Equine herpes virus (EHV)-1 replicates in the epithelial cells of the upper respiratory tract and reaches the lamina propria and bloodstream in infected mononuclear cells. This study evaluated expression of the late viral proteins gB, gC, gD and gM in respiratory epithelial and mononuclear cells using: (1) epithelial-like rabbit kidney cells and peripheral blood mononuclear cells infected with EHV-1 in vitro; (2) an equine ex vivo nasal explant system; and (3) nasal mucosa tissue of ponies infected in vivo. The viral proteins were expressed in all late-infected epithelial cells, whereas expression was not observed in infected leucocytes where proteins gB and gM were expressed in 60-90%, and proteins gC and gD in only 20% of infected cells, respectively. The results indicate that expression of these viral proteins during early-stage EHV-1 infection is highly dependent on the cell type infected.

  5. C/EBPα Is Dispensable for the Ontogeny of PD-1+ CD4+ Memory T Cells but Restricts Their Expansion in an Age-Dependent Manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrie, Ida Christine; Ohlsson, Ewa; Hasemann, Marie Sigurd;

    2014-01-01

    Ageing and cancer is often associated with altered T cell distributions and this phenomenon has been suggested to be the main driver in the development of immunosenescence. Memory phenotype PD-1+ CD4+ T cells accumulate with age and during leukemic development, and they might account...... for the alleviation of ageing/cancer-associated immunosenescence....

  6. Allogeneic HLA-A*02-Restricted WT1-Specific T Cells from Mismatched Donors Are Highly Reactive but Show Off-Target Promiscuity

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Falkenburg, Willem J. J.; Melenhorst, J. Joseph; van de Meent, Marian; Kester, Michel G. D.; Hombrink, Pleun; Heemskerk, Mirjam H. M.; Hagedoorn, Renate S.; Gostick, Emma; Price, David A.; Falkenburg, J. H. Frederik; Barrett, A. John; Jedema, Inge

    2011-01-01

    T cells recognizing tumor-associated Ags such as Wilms tumor protein (WT1) are thought to exert potent antitumor reactivity. However, no consistent high-avidity T cell responses have been demonstrated in vaccination studies with WT1 as target in cancer immunotherapy. The aim of this study was to inv

  7. C/EBPα is dispensable for the ontogeny of PD-1+ CD4+ memory T cells but restricts their expansion in an age-dependent manner

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Norrie, Ida Christine; Ohlsson, Ewa; Nielsen, Olaf;

    2014-01-01

    Ageing and cancer is often associated with altered T cell distributions and this phenomenon has been suggested to be the main driver in the development of immunosenescence. Memory phenotype PD-1+ CD4+ T cells accumulate with age and during leukemic development, and they might account....../EBPα-deficiency in the lymphoid compartment had no effect on leukemic development and did not affect the accumulation of PD-1+ CD4+ T cells. Thus, in addition to contradict earlier suggestions of a role for C/EBPα in immunosenescence, these findings efficiently discard the potential of using C/EBPα as a target...... for the attenuated T cell response in elderly or diseased individuals. The transcription factor C/EBPα has been suggested to be responsible for the accumulation as well as for the senescent features of these cells including impaired TCR signaling and decreased proliferation. Thus modulating the activity of C...

  8. IL-34 is a tissue-restricted ligand of CSF1R required for the development of Langerhans cells and microglia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Yaming; Szretter, Kristy J; Vermi, William; Gilfillan, Susan; Rossini, Cristina; Cella, Marina; Barrow, Alexander D; Diamond, Michael S; Colonna, Marco

    2012-08-01

    The differentiation of bone marrow-derived progenitor cells into monocytes, tissue macrophages and some dendritic cell (DC) subtypes requires the growth factor CSF1 and its receptor, CSF1R. Langerhans cells (LCs) and microglia develop from embryonic myeloid precursor cells that populate the epidermis and central nervous system (CNS) before birth. Notably, LCs and microglia are present in CSF1-deficient mice but absent from CSF1R-deficient mice. Here we investigated whether an alternative CSF1R ligand, interleukin 34 (IL-34), is responsible for this discrepancy. Through the use of IL-34-deficient (Il34(LacZ/LacZ)) reporter mice, we found that keratinocytes and neurons were the main sources of IL-34. Il34(LacZ/LacZ) mice selectively lacked LCs and microglia and responded poorly to skin antigens and viral infection of the CNS. Thus, IL-34 specifically directs the differentiation of myeloid cells in the skin epidermis and CNS.

  9. Nonclassical antigen-processing pathways are required for MHC class II-restricted direct tumor recognition by NY-ESO-1-specific CD4(+) T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsuzaki, Junko; Tsuji, Takemasa; Luescher, Immanuel; Old, Lloyd J; Shrikant, Protul; Gnjatic, Sacha; Odunsi, Kunle

    2014-04-01

    Tumor antigen-specific CD4(+) T cells that directly recognize cancer cells are important for orchestrating antitumor immune responses at the local tumor sites. However, the mechanisms of direct MHC class II (MHC-II) presentation of intracellular tumor antigen by cancer cells are poorly understood. We found that two functionally distinct subsets of CD4(+) T cells were expanded after HLA-DPB1*04 (DP04)-binding NY-ESO-1157-170 peptide vaccination in patients with ovarian cancer. Although both subsets recognized exogenous NY-ESO-1 protein pulsed on DP04(+) target cells, only one type recognized target cells with intracellular expression of NY-ESO-1. The tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells more efficiently recognized the short 8-9-mer peptides than the non-tumor-recognizing CD4(+) T cells. In addition to endosomal/lysosomal proteases that are typically involved in MHC-II antigen presentation, several pathways in the MHC class I presentation pathways, such as the proteasomal degradation and transporter-associated with antigen-processing-mediated peptide transport, were also involved in the presentation of intracellular NY-ESO-1 on MHC-II. The presentation was inhibited significantly by primaquine, a small molecule that inhibits endosomal recycling, consistent with findings that pharmacologic inhibition of new protein synthesis enhances antigen presentation. Together, our data demonstrate that cancer cells selectively present peptides from intracellular tumor antigens on MHC-II by multiple nonclassical antigen-processing pathways. Harnessing the direct tumor-recognizing ability of CD4(+) T cells could be a promising strategy to enhance antitumor immune responses in the immunosuppressive tumor microenvironment.

  10. T cell-independent IgA class switch recombination is restricted to the GALT and occurs prior to manifest germinal center formation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bergqvist, Peter; Stensson, Anneli; Lycke, Nils Y; Bemark, Mats

    2010-04-01

    Recently, we reported that CD40(-/-) mice, exhibiting exclusively T cell-independent IgA class switch recombination (CSR), demonstrated near normal levels of IgA plasma cells in the gut lamina propria (LP), despite the complete lack of germinal centers (GCs). In this study, we have extended our analysis focusing on how to reconcile these findings using flow cytometry and molecular markers for IgA CSR. In agreement with our previous results with small intestinal LP, the colon LP was found to host IgA CSR only when lymphoid follicles were present. Thus, no IgA CSR was observed in the nonorganized colon LP. By contrast, the Peyer's patch (PP) was the dominant IgA CSR site in both CD40(-/-) and wild type (WT) mice, and they both hosted similar levels of mRNA expression for B cell activating factor of the TNF family, a proliferation inducing ligand, and inducible NO synthase, potential switch-factors for IgA. Unexpectedly, we found that PP B cells undergoing IgA CSR were GL7-intermediate. These cells had not undergone somatic hypermutations (SHMs), whereas GL7-high cells in WT PP, which exhibited GCs, were heavily mutated. Moreover, IgA plasma cells in the LP of CD40(-/-) mice demonstrated few mutations in their Ig V regions, whereas WT LP B cells from different sites showed extensive SHMs, which were also clonally related. Therefore, IgA CSR can occur in PP at a stage preceding manifest GC (GL7-intermediate), whereas SHM require GC formations (GL7-high). These findings reconcile that IgA CSR can occur in PP in the absence of GC with the fact that CD40(-/-) mice host near normal levels of IgA plasma cells in the LP.

  11. [Dance/Movement Therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fenichel, Emily, Ed.

    1994-01-01

    This newsletter theme issue focuses on dance, play, and movement therapy for infants and toddlers with disabilities. Individual articles are: "Join My Dance: The Unique Movement Style of Each Infant and Toddler Can Invite Communication, Expression and Intervention" (Suzi Tortora); "Dynamic Play Therapy: An Integrated Expressive Arts Approach to…

  12. Exploring pedestrian movement patterns

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Orellana, D.A.

    2012-01-01

    The main objective of this thesis is to develop an approach for exploring, analysing and interpreting movement patterns of pedestrians interacting with the environment. This objective is broken down in sub-objectives related to four research questions. A case study of the movement of visitors in a n

  13. Randomness Of Amoeba Movements

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hashiguchi, S.; Khadijah, Siti; Kuwajima, T.; Ohki, M.; Tacano, M.; Sikula, J.

    2005-11-01

    Movements of amoebas were automatically traced using the difference between two successive frames of the microscopic movie. It was observed that the movements were almost random in that the directions and the magnitudes of the successive two steps are not correlated, and that the distance from the origin was proportional to the square root of the step number.

  14. Melanomas prevent endothelial cell death under restrictive culture conditions by signaling through AKT and p38 MAPK/ ERK-1/2 cascades

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Mooppilmadham Das (Asha); M. Pescatori (Mario); C.E. Vermeulen (Cindy); J.A.P. Rens (Joost); A.L.B. Seynhaeve (Ann); G.A. Koning (Gerben); A.M.M. Eggermont (Alexander); T.L.M. ten Hagen (Timo)

    2016-01-01

    textabstractAlthough melanoma progression and staging is clinically well characterized, a large variation is observed in pathogenesis, progression, and therapeutic responses. Clearly, intrinsic characteristics of melanoma cells contribute to this variety. An important factor, in both progression of

  15. Human Cytomegalovirus and Human Umbilical Vein Endothelial Cells: Restriction of Primary Isolation to Blood Samples and Susceptibilities of Clinical Isolates from Other Sources to Adaptation

    OpenAIRE

    2002-01-01

    In immunocompromised patients with disseminated infection, human cytomegalovirus (HCMV) is widespread in the microvascular endothelium of multiple organs. Human umbilical vein endothelial cells (HUVEC) were used in parallel to human embryonic lung fibroblasts (HELF) to recover HCMV from blood samples of immunocompromised patients. Using the shell vial technique, comparable median numbers of p72-positive HUVEC and HELF cells were found with the 26 HCMV-positive buffy coat samples out of 150 ex...

  16. Coding of movements in the motor cortex.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgopoulos, Apostolos P; Carpenter, Adam F

    2015-08-01

    The issue of coding of movement in the motor cortex has recently acquired special significance due to its fundamental importance in neuroprosthetic applications. The challenge of controlling a prosthetic arm by processed motor cortical activity has opened a new era of research in applied medicine but has also provided an 'acid test' for hypotheses regarding coding of movement in the motor cortex. The successful decoding of movement information from the activity of motor cortical cells using their directional tuning and population coding has propelled successful neuroprosthetic applications and, at the same time, asserted the utility of those early discoveries, dating back to the early 1980s.

  17. Functional, non-clonal IgMa-restricted B cell receptor interactions with the HIV-1 envelope gp41 membrane proximal external region.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Laurent Verkoczy

    Full Text Available The membrane proximal external region (MPER of HIV-1 gp41 has several features that make it an attractive antibody-based vaccine target, but eliciting an effective gp41 MPER-specific protective antibody response remains elusive. One fundamental issue is whether the failure to make gp41 MPER-specific broadly neutralizing antibodies like 2F5 and 4E10 is due to structural constraints with the gp41 MPER, or alternatively, if gp41 MPER epitope-specific B cells are lost to immunological tolerance. An equally important question is how B cells interact with, and respond to, the gp41 MPER epitope, including whether they engage this epitope in a non-canonical manner i.e., by non-paratopic recognition via B cell receptors (BCR. To begin understanding how B cells engage the gp41 MPER, we characterized B cell-gp41 MPER interactions in BALB/c and C57BL/6 mice. Surprisingly, we found that a significant (approximately 7% fraction of splenic B cells from BALB/c, but not C57BL/6 mice, bound the gp41 MPER via their BCRs. This strain-specific binding was concentrated in IgM(hi subsets, including marginal zone and peritoneal B1 B cells, and correlated with enriched fractions (approximately 15% of gp41 MPER-specific IgM secreted by in vitro-activated splenic B cells. Analysis of Igh(a (BALB/c and Igh(b (C57BL/6 congenic mice demonstrated that gp41 MPER binding was controlled by determinants of the Igh(a locus. Mapping of MPER gp41 interactions with IgM(a identified MPER residues distinct from those to which mAb 2F5 binds and demonstrated the requirement of Fc C(H regions. Importantly, gp41 MPER ligation produced detectable BCR-proximal signaling events, suggesting that interactions between gp41 MPER and IgM(a determinants may elicit partial B cell activation. These data suggest that low avidity, non-paratopic interactions between the gp41 MPER and membrane Ig on naïve B cells may interfere with or divert bnAb responses.

  18. Tamarix gallica phenolics protect IEC-6 cells against H2O2 induced stress by restricting oxidative injuries and MAPKs signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bettaib, Jamila; Talarmin, Hélène; Droguet, Mickaël; Magné, Christian; Boulaaba, Mondher; Giroux-Metges, Marie-Agnès; Ksouri, Riadh

    2017-02-26

    Polyphenolic compounds gained interest in the pharmaceutical research area due to their beneficial properties. Herein, antioxidant and cytoprotective capacities of T. gallica extract on H2O2-challenged rat small intestine epithelial cells were investigated. To set stress conditions, IEC-6 cultures were challenged with numerous H2O2 doses and durations. Then, 40μM H2O2 during 4h were selected to assess the cytoprotective effect of different T. gallica extract concentrations. Oxidative parameters, measured through CAT and SOD activities as well as MDA quantification were assessed. In addition, the expression of possibly involved MAPKs was also valued. Main results reported that T. gallica was rich in polyphenols and exhibited an important antioxidant activity (DPPH Assay, IC50=6μgmL(-1); ABTS(+) test, IC50=50μgmL(-1); Fe-reducing power, EC50=100μgmL(-1)). The exposure of IEC-6 cultures to 40μM H2O2 during 4h caused oxidative stress manifested by (i) over 70% cell mortality, (ii) over-activity of CAT (246%), (iii) excess in MDA content (18.4nmolmg(-1)) and (iiii) a trigger of JNK phosphorylation. Pretreatment with T. gallica extract, especially when used at 0.25μgmL(-1), restored cell viability to 122%, and normal cell morphology in H2O2-chalenged cells. In addition, this extract normalized CAT activity and MDA content (100% and 14.7nmolmg(-1), respectively) to their basal levels as compared to control cells. Furthermore, stopping cell death seems to be due to dephosphorylated JNK MAPK exerted by T. gallica bioactive compounds. In all, T. gallica components provided a cross-talk between regulatory pathways leading to an efficient cytoprotection against harmful oxidative stimulus.

  19. Very strict selectional restrictions

    CERN Document Server

    Laporte, Eric; Dias, Maria Carmelita P

    2007-01-01

    We discuss the characteristics and behaviour of two parallel classes of verbs in two Romance languages, French and Portuguese. Examples of these verbs are Port. abater [gado] and Fr. abattre [b\\'etail], both meaning "slaughter [cattle]". In both languages, the definition of the class of verbs includes several features: - They have only one essential complement, which is a direct object. - The nominal distribution of the complement is very limited, i.e., few nouns can be selected as head nouns of the complement. However, this selection is not restricted to a single noun, as would be the case for verbal idioms such as Fr. monter la garde "mount guard". - We excluded from the class constructions which are reductions of more complex constructions, e.g. Port. afinar [instrumento] com "tune [instrument] with".

  20. Common themes in centriole and centrosome movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vaughan, Sue; Dawe, Helen R

    2011-01-01

    Centrioles are found in nearly all eukaryotic cells and are required for growth and maintenance of the radial array of microtubules, the mitotic spindle, and cilia and flagella. Different types of microtubule structures are often required at different places in a given cell; centrioles must move around to nucleate these varied structures. Here, we draw together recent data on diverse centriole movements to decipher common themes in how centrioles move. Par proteins establish and maintain the required cellular asymmetry. The actin cytoskeleton facilitates movement of multiple basal bodies. Microtubule forces acting on the cell cortex, and nuclear-cytoskeletal links, are important for positioning individual centrosomes, and during cell division. Knowledge of these common mechanisms can inform the study of centriole movements across biology.

  1. RNA silencing movement in plants

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Glykeria Mermigka; Frederic Verret; Kriton Kalantidis

    2016-01-01

    Multicellular organisms, like higher plants, need to coordinate their growth and development and to cope with environmental cues. To achieve this, various signal molecules are transported between neighboring cells and distant organs to control the fate of the recipient cells and organs. RNA silencing produces cell non-autonomous signal molecules that can move over short or long distances leading to the sequence specific silencing of a target gene in a well defined area of cells or throughout the entire plant, respectively. The nature of these signal molecules, the route of silencing spread, and the genes involved in their production, movement and reception are discussed in this review. Additionally, a short section on features of silencing spread in animal models is presented at the end of this review.

  2. Synthesis and antiproliferative activity of conformationally restricted 1,2,3-triazole analogues of combretastatins in the sea urchin embryo model and against human cancer cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Demchuk, Dmitry V; Samet, Alexander V; Chernysheva, Natalia B; Ushkarov, Vladimir I; Stashina, Galina A; Konyushkin, Leonid D; Raihstat, Mikhail M; Firgang, Sergei I; Philchenkov, Alex A; Zavelevich, Michael P; Kuiava, Ludmila M; Chekhun, Vasyl F; Blokhin, Dmitry Yu; Kiselyov, Alex S; Semenova, Marina N; Semenov, Victor V

    2014-01-15

    A series of 1,5-diaryl- and 4,5-diaryl-1,2,3-triazole derivatives of combretastatin A4 were synthesized and evaluated as antimitotic microtubule destabilizing agents using the sea urchin embryo model. Structure-activity relationship studies identified compounds substituted with 3,4,5-trimethoxyphenyl and 3,4-methylenedioxy-5-methoxyphenyl ring A and 4-methoxyphenyl ring B as potent antiproliferative agents with high cytotoxicity against a panel of human cancer cell lines including multi-drug resistant cells. 4,5-Diaryl-1,2,3-triazoles (C-C geometry) were found to be considerably more active than the respective 1,5-diaryl-1,2,3-triazoles (N-C geometry). Compound 10ad' induced G2/M cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in human T-leukemia Jurkat cells via caspase 2/3/9 activation and downregulation of the antiapoptotic protein XIAP. A mitotic catastrophe has been evaluated as another possible cell death mode.

  3. RE1 silencing transcription factor/neuron-restrictive silencing factor regulates expansion of adult mouse subventricular zone-derived neural stem/progenitor cells in vitro.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soldati, Chiara; Caramanica, Pasquale; Burney, Matthew J; Toselli, Camilla; Bithell, Angela; Augusti-Tocco, Gabriella; Stanton, Lawrence W; Biagioni, Stefano; Buckley, Noel J; Cacci, Emanuele

    2015-08-01

    Adult neural stem cell (aNSC) activity is tuned by external stimuli through the recruitment of transcription factors. This study examines the RE1 silencing transcription factor (REST) in neural stem/progenitor cells isolated from the subventricular zone of adult mouse brain and provides the first extensive characterization of REST-mediated control of the cellular and molecular properties. This study shows that REST knockdown affects the capacity of progenitor cells to generate neurospheres, reduces cell proliferation, and triggers cell differentiation despite the presence of growth factors. Genome- and transcriptome-wide analyses show that REST binding sites are significantly enriched in genes associated with synaptic transmission and nervous system development and function. Seeking candidate regulators of aNSC function, this study identifies a member of the bone morphogenetic protein (BMP) family, BMP6, the mRNA and protein of which increased after REST knockdown. The results of this study extend previous findings, demonstrating a reciprocal control of REST expression by BMPs. Administration of exogenous BMP6 inhibits aNSC proliferation and induces the expression of the astrocytic marker glial fibrillary acidic protein, highlighting its antimitogenic and prodifferentiative effects. This study suggests that BMP6 produced in a REST-regulated manner together with other signals can contribute to regulation of NSC maintenance and fate.

  4. Purkinje-cell-restricted restoration of Kv3.3 function restores complex spikes and rescues motor coordination in Kcnc3 mutants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hurlock, Edward C; McMahon, Anne; Joho, Rolf H

    2008-04-30

    The fast-activating/deactivating voltage-gated potassium channel Kv3.3 (Kcnc3) is expressed in various neuronal cell types involved in motor function, including cerebellar Purkinje cells. Spinocerebellar ataxia type 13 (SCA13) patients carrying dominant-negative mutations in Kcnc3 and Kcnc3-null mutant mice both display motor incoordination, suggested in mice by increased lateral deviation while ambulating and slips on a narrow beam. Motor skill learning, however, is spared. Mice lacking Kcnc3 also exhibit muscle twitches. In addition to broadened spikes, recordings of Kcnc3-null Purkinje cells revealed fewer spikelets in complex spikes and a lower intraburst frequency. Targeted reexpression of Kv3.3 channels exclusively in Purkinje cells in Kcnc3-null mice as well as in mice also heterozygous for Kv3.1 sufficed to restore simple spike brevity along with normal complex spikes and to rescue specifically coordination. Therefore, spike parameters requiring Kv3.3 function in Purkinje cells are involved in the ataxic null phenotype and motor coordination, but not motor learning.

  5. Crowding during restricted and free viewing.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wallace, Julian M; Chiu, Michael K; Nandy, Anirvan S; Tjan, Bosco S

    2013-05-24

    Crowding impairs the perception of form in peripheral vision. It is likely to be a key limiting factor of form vision in patients without central vision. Crowding has been extensively studied in normally sighted individuals, typically with a stimulus duration of a few hundred milliseconds to avoid eye movements. These restricted testing conditions do not reflect the natural behavior of a patient with central field loss. Could unlimited stimulus duration and unrestricted eye movements change the properties of crowding in any fundamental way? We studied letter identification in the peripheral vision of normally sighted observers in three conditions: (i) a fixation condition with a brief stimulus presentation of 250 ms, (ii) another fixation condition but with an unlimited viewing time, and (iii) an unrestricted eye movement condition with an artificial central scotoma and an unlimited viewing time. In all conditions, contrast thresholds were measured as a function of target-to-flanker spacing, from which we estimated the spatial extent of crowding in terms of critical spacing. We found that presentation duration beyond 250 ms had little effect on critical spacing with stable gaze. With unrestricted eye movements and a simulated central scotoma, we found a large variability in critical spacing across observers, but more importantly, the variability in critical spacing was well correlated with the variability in target eccentricity. Our results assure that the large body of findings on crowding made with briefly presented stimuli remains relevant to conditions where viewing time is unconstrained. Our results further suggest that impaired oculomotor control associated with central vision loss can confound peripheral form vision beyond the limits imposed by crowding.

  6. Auxin and chloroplast movements.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Eckstein, Aleksandra; Krzeszowiec, Weronika; Waligórski, Piotr; Gabryś, Halina

    2016-03-01

    Auxin is involved in a wide spectrum of physiological processes in plants, including responses controlled by the blue light photoreceptors phototropins: phototropic bending and stomatal movement. However, the role of auxin in phototropin-mediated chloroplast movements has never been studied. To address this question we searched for potential interactions between auxin and the chloroplast movement signaling pathway using different experimental approaches and two model plants, Arabidopsis thaliana and Nicotiana tabacum. We observed that the disturbance of auxin homeostasis by shoot decapitation caused a decrease in chloroplast movement parameters, which could be rescued by exogenous auxin application. In several cases, the impairment of polar auxin transport, by chemical inhibitors or in auxin carrier mutants, had a similar negative effect on chloroplast movements. This inhibition was not correlated with changes in auxin levels. Chloroplast relocations were also affected by the antiauxin p-chlorophenoxyisobutyric acid and mutations in genes encoding some of the elements of the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA auxin receptor complex. The observed changes in chloroplast movement parameters are not prominent, which points to a modulatory role of auxin in this process. Taken together, the obtained results suggest that auxin acts indirectly to regulate chloroplast movements, presumably by regulating gene expression via the SCF(TIR1)-Aux/IAA-ARF pathway. Auxin does not seem to be involved in controlling the expression of phototropins.

  7. Proteasomal degradation of TRIM5alpha during retrovirus restriction.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Christopher James Rold

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available The host protein TRIM5alpha inhibits retroviral infection at an early post-penetration stage by targeting the incoming viral capsid. While the detailed mechanism of restriction remains unclear, recent studies have implicated the activity of cellular proteasomes in the restriction of retroviral reverse transcription imposed by TRIM5alpha. Here, we show that TRIM5alpha is rapidly degraded upon encounter of a restriction-susceptible retroviral core. Inoculation of TRIM5alpha-expressing human 293T cells with a saturating level of HIV-1 particles resulted in accelerated degradation of the HIV-1-restrictive rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha protein but not the nonrestrictive human TRIM5alpha protein. Exposure of cells to HIV-1 also destabilized the owl monkey restriction factor TRIMCyp; this was prevented by addition of the inhibitor cyclosporin A and was not observed with an HIV-1 virus containing a mutation in the capsid protein that relieves restriction by TRIMCyp IVHIV. Likewise, human TRIM5alpha was rapidly degraded upon encounter of the restriction-sensitive N-tropic murine leukemia virus (N-MLV but not the unrestricted B-MLV. Pretreatment of cells with proteasome inhibitors prevented the HIV-1-induced loss of both rhesus macaque TRIM5alpha and TRIMCyp proteins. We also detected degradation of endogenous TRIM5alpha in rhesus macaque cells following HIV-1 infection. We conclude that engagement of a restriction-sensitive retrovirus core results in TRIM5alpha degradation by a proteasome-dependent mechanism.

  8. Structure and Function of HLA-A*02-Restricted Hantaan Virus Cytotoxic T Cell Epitope that Mediates Effective Protective Responses in HLA-A2.1/Kb Transgenic Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ying Ma

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available Hantavirus infections cause severe emerging diseases in humans and are associated with high mortality rates; therefore, they have become a global public health concern. Our previous study showed that the CD8+ T-cell epitope aa129-aa137 (FVVPILLKA, FA9 of the Hantaan virus (HTNV nucleoprotein (NP, restricted by human leukocyte antigen (HLA-A*02, induced specific CD8+ T-cell responses that controlled HTNV infection in humans. However, the in vivo immunogenicity of peptide FA9 and the effect of FA9-specific CD8+ T-cell immunity remain unclear. Here, based on a detailed structural analysis of the peptide FA9/HLA-A*0201 complex and functional investigations using HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice, we found that the overall structure of the peptide FA9/HLA-A*0201 complex displayed a typical MHC class I fold with Val2 and Ala9 as primary anchor residues and Val3 and Leu7 as secondary anchor residues that allow peptide FA9 to bind tightly with an HLA-A*0201 molecule. Residues in the middle portion of peptide FA9 extruding out of the binding groove may be the sites that allow for recognition by T cell receptors. Immunization with peptide FA9 in HLA-A2.1/Kb transgenic mice induced FA9-specific cytotoxic T cell responses characterized by the induction of high expression levels of IFN-γ, TNF-α, granzyme B, and CD107a. In an HTNV challenge trial, significant reductions in the levels of both the antigens and the HTNV RNA loads were observed in the liver, spleen and kidneys of transgenic mice pre-vaccinated with peptide FA9. Thus, our findings highlight the ability of HTNV epitope-specific CD8+ T-cell immunity to control HTNV and support the possibility that the HTNV-NP FA9 peptide, naturally processed in vivo in an HLA-A*02-restriction manner, may be a good candidate for the development HTNV peptide vaccines.

  9. Proteomic Characterization of Stomatal Movement

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Sixue Chen

    2012-01-01

    Stomata on leaf epidermis formed by pairs of guard cells control CO2 intake and water transpiration,and respond to different environmental conditions.Stress induced stomatal closure is mediated via an intricate hormone network in guard cells.Here we report absicic acid (ABA) and methyl jasmonate (MeJA) responsive proteins and redox sensitive proteins.Both ABA and MeJA cause stomatal movement and H2O2 production.Using an isobaric tags for relative and absolute quantitation approach,we have identified many ABA and/or MeJA responsive proteins in B.napus guard cells.Most of the genes encoding these proteins contain hormone responsive elements in the promoters,indicating that they are potentially regulated at the transcriptional level.The protein level changes were validated using Western blot analysis.We have also identified redox responsive proteins in the above signaling processes.The identification of the hormone responsive proteins and redox state changes has revealed interesting molecular mechanisms underlying guard cell functions in stomatal movement.The knowledge has great potential to be applied to crop engineering for enhanced yield and stress tolerance.

  10. Part I: Minicircle vector technology limits DNA size restrictions on ex vivo gene delivery using nanoparticle vectors: Overcoming a translational barrier in neural stem cell therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fernandes, Alinda R; Chari, Divya M

    2016-09-28

    Genetically engineered neural stem cell (NSC) transplant populations offer key benefits in regenerative neurology, for release of therapeutic biomolecules in ex vivo gene therapy. NSCs are 'hard-to-transfect' but amenable to 'magnetofection'. Despite the high clinical potential of this approach, the low and transient transfection associated with the large size of therapeutic DNA constructs is a critical barrier to translation. We demonstrate for the first time that DNA minicircles (small DNA vectors encoding essential gene expression components but devoid of a bacterial backbone, thereby reducing construct size versus conventional plasmids) deployed with magnetofection achieve the highest, safe non-viral DNA transfection levels (up to 54%) reported so far for primary NSCs. Minicircle-functionalized magnetic nanoparticle (MNP)-mediated gene delivery also resulted in sustained gene expression for up to four weeks. All daughter cell types of engineered NSCs (neurons, astrocytes and oligodendrocytes) were transfected (in contrast to conventional plasmids which usually yield transfected astrocytes only), offering advantages for targeted cell engineering. In addition to enhancing MNP functionality as gene delivery vectors, minicircle technology provides key benefits from safety/scale up perspectives. Therefore, we consider the proof-of-concept of fusion of technologies used here offers high potential as a clinically translatable genetic modification strategy for cell therapy.

  11. Specific killing of P53 mutated tumor cell lines by a cross-reactive human HLA-A2-restricted P53-specific CTL line

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Würtzen, P A; Pedersen, L O; Poulsen, H S;

    2001-01-01

    53(65-73) and p53(187-197) peptides was obtained in the T-cell lines. Interestingly, cold target inhibition experiments demonstrated that the simultaneous recognition of the 2 peptides was the result of cross-reactivity, which was confirmed by killing experiments at the clonal CTL level. Furthermore...

  12. The Length Distribution of Class I-Restricted T Cell Epitopes Is Determined by Both Peptide Supply and MHC Allele-Specific Binding Preference

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Trolle, Thomas; McMurtrey, Curtis P.; Sidney, John;

    2016-01-01

    HLA class I-binding predictions are widely used to identify candidate peptide targets of human CD8+ T cell responses. Many such approaches focus exclusively on a limited range of peptide lengths, typically 9 aa and sometimes 9-10 aa, despite multiple examples of dominant epitopes of other lengths...

  13. Studying Social Movements

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Uldam, Julie; McCurdy, Patrick

    2013-01-01

    The research method of participant observation has long been used by scholars interested in the motivations, dynamics, tactics and strategies of social movements from a movement perspective. Despite participant observation being a common research method, there have been very few efforts to bring...... and then draws specific links to how the method has been used in the study of activism and social movements. In doing so, this article brings together key academic debates on participant observation, which have been considered separately, such as insider/outsider and overt/covert, but not previously been brought...

  14. Social movements in health.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, Theodore M; Fee, Elizabeth

    2014-01-01

    Most public health practitioners know that public health has relied on biomedical advances and administrative improvements, but it is less commonly understood that social movements in health have also been sources of motivation for population health advances. This review considers the impacts of social movements focused on urban conditions and health, on the health of children, and on behavioral and substance-related determinants of health and illustrates how these movements have significantly influenced public health activities and programs. We hope this review will motivate public health workers to make common cause with social activists and to encourage social activists to ally with public health professionals.

  15. Social movements and human rights rhetoric in tobacco control.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Jacobson, P D; Banerjee, A

    2005-08-01

    After achieving breathtaking successes in securing state and local restrictions on smoking in public places and restricting youth access to tobacco products, the tobacco movement faces difficult decisions on its future strategic directions. The thesis of this article is that the tobacco control movement is at a point of needing to secure its recent successes and avoiding any public retrenchment. To do so requires rethinking the movement's strategic direction. We use the familiar trans-theoretical model of change to describe where the movement is currently and the threats it faces. The new tobacco control strategy should encompass a focus on voluntary non-smoking strategies, use human rights rhetoric to its advantage, and strengthen the public health voice to be more effective in political battles. In developing a new strategy, tobacco control advocates need to build a social movement based on a more forceful public health voice, along with the strategic use of human rights rhetoric, to focus on the power of voluntary non-smoking efforts. Using human rights rhetoric can help frame the movement in ways that have traditionally appealed to the American public. Perhaps more importantly, doing so can help infuse the tobacco control movement with a broader sense of purpose and mission.

  16. Restricted TCR-alpha CDR3 diversity disadvantages natural regulatory T cell development in the B6.2.16 beta-chain transgenic mouse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Yogesh; Ferreira, Cristina; Chan, Andrew C Y; Dyson, Julian; Garden, Oliver A

    2010-09-15

    To date, analysis of mice expressing TCR-beta transgenes derived from CD4(+) T cell clones has demonstrated equivalent or higher TCR diversity in naturally occurring regulatory CD4(+) T cells (Tregs) versus conventional CD4(+) T cells (Tcons). However, TCR-alpha-chain diversity in these mice may be influenced by the inherent bias toward the CD4(+) lineage in the selected repertoires. We wished to determine whether the choice of TCR-beta-chain influences the relative diversity of the Treg and Tcon repertoires, examining as a model the B6.2.16beta-transgenic mouse, in which the fixed beta-chain is derived from a CD8(+) T cell clone. B6.2.16beta Treg thymocytes showed significantly lower TRAV17 (AV9) CDR3 sequence diversity than both syngeneic Tcon thymocytes, and Treg and Tcon thymocytes from wild-type C57BL/6 (B6) mice. The ratio of single-positive CD4(+)/single-positive CD8(+) thymocytes in B6.2.16beta mice was similar to that in B6, yet both the proportional frequency and absolute number of CD4(+)Foxp3(+) cells was significantly lower in the thymi and peripheral lymph nodes of B6.2.16beta mice. Furthermore, B6 + B6.2.16beta-->B6 mixed bone marrow chimeras revealed that the transgenic beta-chain disadvantaged Treg development in a competitive environment. These data underline the importance of the beta-chain in assessments of Treg alpha-chain diversity and provide further support for the notion that interclonal competition for entry into the Treg lineage is a significant factor in determining the composition of this lineage.

  17. Identification of an HLA-A* 0201-restricted CD8+ T-cell epitope SSp-1 of SARS-CoV spike protein

    Institute of Scientific and Technical Information of China (English)

    Wang B; Yu Y; Wang X; Yang R; Cao X; Chen H; Jiang X; Zhang M; Wan T; Li N; Zhou X; Wu Y; Yang F

    2004-01-01

    A novel coronavirus, severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS)-associated coronavirus (SARS-CoV), has been identified as the causal agent of SARS. Spike (S) protein is a major structural glycoprotein of the SARS virus and a potential target for SARS-specific cell-mediated immune responses. A panel of S protein-derived peptides was tested for their binding affinity to HLA-A * 0201 molecules. Peptides with high affinity for HLA-A * 0201 were then assessed for their capacity to elicit specific immune responses mediated by cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTLs) both in vivo, in HLA-A2. 1/Kb transgenic mice, and in vitro, from peripheral blood lymphocytes (PBLs) harvested from healthy HLA-A2.1 + donors. SARS-CoV protein-derived peptide-1 (SSp-1 RLNEVAKNL), induced peptide-specific CTLs both in vivo (transgenic mice) and in vitro (human PBLs), which specifically released interferon-gamma (IFN-gamma) upon stimulation with SSp-1-pulsed autologous dendritic cells (DCs) or T2 cells. SSp-1-specific CTLs also lysed major histocompatibility complex (MHC)-matched tumor cell lines engineered to express S proteins. HLA-A * 0201-SSp-1 tetramer staining revealed the presence of significant populations of SSp-1-specific CTLs in SSp-1-induced CD8+ T cells. We propose that the newly identified epitope SSp-1 will help in the characterization of virus control mechanisms and immunopathology in SARS-CoV infection, and may be relevant to the development of immunotherapeutic approaches for SARS.

  18. Restriction of GAGE protein expression to subpopulations of cancer cells is independent of genotype and may limit the use of GAGE proteins as targets for cancer immunotherapy

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gjerstorff, M F; Johansen, L E; Nielsen, O

    2006-01-01

    The GAGE cancer testis antigen gene family encodes products that can be recognized by autologous T cells, and GAGE proteins have been suggested as potential targets for cancer immunotherapy. Analysis of GAGE expression in tumours has primarily been performed at the level of gene transcription......, whereas little is known about GAGE expression at the protein level. To evaluate the potential of GAGE proteins as targets for cancer-specific immunotherapy, we studied the expression of these proteins in normal and malignant cells/tissues using a novel panel of monoclonal antibodies. Immunohistochemical...... analysis of more than 250 cancer specimens demonstrated that GAGE proteins were frequently expressed in numerous cancer types and correlated with the expression of the cancer testis antigens MAGE-A1 and NY-ESO-1. Significant intercellular and subcellular differences in GAGE protein levels were observed...

  19. Cardiac-Restricted IGF-1Ea Overexpression Reduces the Early Accumulation of Inflammatory Myeloid Cells and Mediates Expression of Extracellular Matrix Remodelling Genes after Myocardial Infarction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Enrique Gallego-Colon

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Strategies to limit damage and improve repair after myocardial infarct remain a major therapeutic goal in cardiology. Our previous studies have shown that constitutive expression of a locally acting insulin-like growth factor-1 Ea (IGF-1Ea propeptide promotes functional restoration after cardiac injury associated with decreased scar formation. In the current study, we investigated the underlying molecular and cellular mechanisms behind the enhanced functional recovery. We observed improved cardiac function in mice overexpressing cardiac-specific IGF-1Ea as early as day 7 after myocardial infarction. Analysis of gene transcription revealed that supplemental IGF-1Ea regulated expression of key metalloproteinases (MMP-2 and MMP-9, their inhibitors (TIMP-1 and TIMP-2, and collagen types (Col 1α1 and Col 1α3 in the first week after injury. Infiltration of inflammatory cells, which direct the remodelling process, was also altered; in particular there was a notable reduction in inflammatory Ly6C+ monocytes at day 3 and an increase in anti-inflammatory CD206+ macrophages at day 7. Taken together, these results indicate that the IGF-1Ea transgene shifts the balance of innate immune cell populations early after infarction, favouring a reduction in inflammatory myeloid cells. This correlates with reduced extracellular matrix remodelling and changes in collagen composition that may confer enhanced scar elasticity and improved cardiac function.

  20. The Circular Camera Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hansen, Lennard Højbjerg

    2014-01-01

    It has been an accepted precept in film theory that specific stylistic features do not express specific content. Nevertheless, it is possible to find many examples in the history of film in which stylistic features do express specific content: for instance, the circular camera movement is used...... such as the circular camera movement. Keywords: embodied perception, embodied style, explicit narration, interpretation, style pattern, television style...

  1. Property Rights, Restrictions and Responsibilities

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Enemark, Stig

    Land Administration Systems are the basis for conceptualizing rights, restrictions and responsibilities related to people, policies and places. Property rights are normally concerned with ownership and tenure whereas restrictions usually control use and activities on land. Responsibilities relate...... more to a social, ethical commitment or attitude to environmental sustainability and good husbandry. This paper provides an overall understanding of the concept of land administration systems for dealing with rights, restrictions and responsibilities in future spatially enabled government. Finally...

  2. Enhancing the output current of a CdTe solar cell via a CN-free hydrocarbon luminescent down-shifting fluorophore with intramolecular energy transfer and restricted internal rotation characteristics.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Yilin; Olsen, Joseph; Dong, Wen-Ji

    2015-04-01

    A CN-free hydrocarbon fluorophore (Perylene-TPE) was synthesized as a new luminescent down-shifting (LDS) material. Its photophysical properties in both the solution state and the solid state were studied. The unity fluorescence quantum yield of Perylene-TPE observed in its solid state is considered to be from the characteristics of intramolecular energy transfer (IET) and restricted internal rotation (RIR). This is supported by the results from theoretical calculations and spectroscopic measurements. For the photovoltaic application of Perylene-TPE, a theoretical modeling study suggests that using the LDS film of Perylene-TPE may increase the output short circuit current density (Jsc) of a CdTe solar cell by 2.95%, enhance the spectral response of a CdTe solar cell at 400 nm by 41%, and shift the incident solar photon distribution from short-wavelength (500 nm). Experimentally, placing a LDS film of Perylene-TPE on a CdTe solar cell can enhance its output Jsc by as high as 3.30 ± 0.31%, which is comparable to the current commercially available LDS material – Y083 (3.28% ± 0.37%).

  3. Extreme calorie restriction and energy source starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae represent distinct physiological states

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Boender, L.G.M.; Almering, M.J.H.; Dijk, M.; Van Maris, A.J.A.; De Winde, J.H.; Pronk, J.T.; Daran-Lapujade, P.

    2011-01-01

    Cultivation methods used to investigate microbial calorie restriction often result in carbon and energy starvation. This study aims to dissect cellular responses to calorie restriction and starvation in Saccharomyces cerevisiae by using retentostat cultivation. In retentostats, cells are continuousl

  4. MIRROR MOVEMENT: A CASE REPORT

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    AA. Momen

    2008-11-01

    Full Text Available Mirror movement is an interesting but often overlooked neurological soft sign;these movements are described as simultaneous contralateral, involuntary, identical movements that accompany voluntary movements. This neurologic problem is very rarely seen in children; in familial cases there is a positive history of these movements in parents, diminishing with time. Here, we have presented the case of an 11-year old girl with mirror movements in her upper limbs which interfered with her hand writing. Her neurological examination revealed normal results. In this report, we have tried to explain some of the pathophysiologic mechanisms related to these abnormal movements.Keywords:Mirror Movements, Children, Soft neurologic sign

  5. Priming by chemokines restricts lateral mobility of the adhesion receptor LFA-1 and restores adhesion to ICAM-1 nano-aggregates on human mature dendritic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kyra J E Borgman

    Full Text Available LFA-1 is a leukocyte specific β2 integrin that plays a major role in regulating adhesion and migration of different immune cells. Recent data suggest that LFA-1 on mature dendritic cells (mDCs may function as a chemokine-inducible anchor during homing of DCs through the afferent lymphatics into the lymph nodes, by transiently switching its molecular conformational state. However, the role of LFA-1 mobility in this process is not yet known, despite that the importance of lateral organization and dynamics for LFA-1-mediated adhesion regulation is broadly recognized. Using single particle tracking approaches we here show that LFA-1 exhibits higher mobility on resting mDCs compared to monocytes. Lymphoid chemokine CCL21 stimulation of the LFA-1 high affinity state on mDCs, led to a significant reduction of mobility and an increase on the fraction of stationary receptors, consistent with re-activation of the receptor. Addition of soluble monomeric ICAM-1 in the presence of CCL21 did not alter the diffusion profile of LFA-1 while soluble ICAM-1 nano-aggregates in the presence of CCL21 further reduced LFA-1 mobility and readily bound to the receptor. Overall, our results emphasize the importance of LFA-1 lateral mobility across the membrane on the regulation of integrin activation and its function as adhesion receptor. Importantly, our data show that chemokines alone are not sufficient to trigger the high affinity state of the integrin based on the strict definition that affinity refers to the adhesion capacity of a single receptor to its ligand in solution. Instead our data indicate that nanoclustering of the receptor, induced by multi-ligand binding, is required to maintain stable cell adhesion once LFA-1 high affinity state is transiently triggered by inside-out signals.

  6. Priming by chemokines restricts lateral mobility of the adhesion receptor LFA-1 and restores adhesion to ICAM-1 nano-aggregates on human mature dendritic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Borgman, Kyra J E; van Zanten, Thomas S; Manzo, Carlo; Cabezón, Raquel; Cambi, Alessandra; Benítez-Ribas, Daniel; Garcia-Parajo, Maria F

    2014-01-01

    LFA-1 is a leukocyte specific β2 integrin that plays a major role in regulating adhesion and migration of different immune cells. Recent data suggest that LFA-1 on mature dendritic cells (mDCs) may function as a chemokine-inducible anchor during homing of DCs through the afferent lymphatics into the lymph nodes, by transiently switching its molecular conformational state. However, the role of LFA-1 mobility in this process is not yet known, despite that the importance of lateral organization and dynamics for LFA-1-mediated adhesion regulation is broadly recognized. Using single particle tracking approaches we here show that LFA-1 exhibits higher mobility on resting mDCs compared to monocytes. Lymphoid chemokine CCL21 stimulation of the LFA-1 high affinity state on mDCs, led to a significant reduction of mobility and an increase on the fraction of stationary receptors, consistent with re-activation of the receptor. Addition of soluble monomeric ICAM-1 in the presence of CCL21 did not alter the diffusion profile of LFA-1 while soluble ICAM-1 nano-aggregates in the presence of CCL21 further reduced LFA-1 mobility and readily bound to the receptor. Overall, our results emphasize the importance of LFA-1 lateral mobility across the membrane on the regulation of integrin activation and its function as adhesion receptor. Importantly, our data show that chemokines alone are not sufficient to trigger the high affinity state of the integrin based on the strict definition that affinity refers to the adhesion capacity of a single receptor to its ligand in solution. Instead our data indicate that nanoclustering of the receptor, induced by multi-ligand binding, is required to maintain stable cell adhesion once LFA-1 high affinity state is transiently triggered by inside-out signals.

  7. Transfusion requirements in septic shock (TRISS) trial - comparing the effects and safety of liberal versus restrictive red blood cell transfusion in septic shock patients in the ICU

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Holst, Lars B; Haase, Nicolai; Wetterslev, Jørn

    2013-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Transfusion of red blood cells (RBC) is recommended in septic shock and the majority of these patients receive RBC transfusion in the intensive care unit (ICU). However, benefit and harm of RBCs have not been established in this group of high-risk patients. METHODS: The Transfusion...... and transfusion-related circulatory overload, and acute lung injury) and mortality at 28 days, 6 months and 1 year.The sample size will enable us to detect a 9% absolute difference in 90-day mortality assuming a 45% event rate with a type 1 error rate of 5% and power of 80%. An interim analysis will be performed...

  8. Caloric restriction confers persistent anti-oxidative, pro-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory effects and promotes anti-aging miRNA expression profile in cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells of aged rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Csiszar, Anna; Gautam, Tripti; Sosnowska, Danuta; Tarantini, Stefano; Banki, Eszter; Tucsek, Zsuzsanna; Toth, Peter; Losonczy, Gyorgy; Koller, Akos; Reglodi, Dora; Giles, Cory B; Wren, Jonathan D; Sonntag, William E; Ungvari, Zoltan

    2014-08-01

    In rodents, moderate caloric restriction (CR) without malnutrition exerts significant cerebrovascular protective effects, improving cortical microvascular density and endothelium-dependent vasodilation, but the underlying cellular mechanisms remain elusive. To elucidate the persisting effects of CR on cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells (CMVECs), primary CMVECs were isolated from young (3 mo old) and aged (24 mo old) ad libitum-fed and aged CR F344xBN rats. We found an age-related increase in cellular and mitochondrial oxidative stress, which is prevented by CR. Expression and transcriptional activity of Nrf2 are both significantly reduced in aged CMVECs, whereas CR prevents age-related Nrf2 dysfunction. Expression of miR-144 was upregulated in aged CMVECs, and overexpression of miR-144 significantly decreased expression of Nrf2 in cells derived from both young animals and aged CR rats. Overexpression of a miR-144 antagomir in aged CMVECs significantly decreases expression of miR-144 and upregulates Nrf2. We found that CR prevents age-related impairment of angiogenic processes, including cell proliferation, adhesion to collagen, and formation of capillary-like structures and inhibits apoptosis in CMVECs. CR also exerts significant anti-inflammatory effects, preventing age-related increases in the transcriptional activity of NF-κB and age-associated pro-inflammatory shift in the endothelial secretome. Characterization of CR-induced changes in miRNA expression suggests that they likely affect several critical functions in endothelial cell homeostasis. The predicted regulatory effects of CR-related differentially expressed miRNAs in aged CMVECs are consistent with the anti-aging endothelial effects of CR observed in vivo. Collectively, we find that CR confers persisting anti-oxidative, pro-angiogenic, and anti-inflammatory cellular effects, preserving a youthful phenotype in rat cerebromicrovascular endothelial cells, suggesting that through these effects CR may

  9. In silico analysis of six known Leishmania major antigens and in vitro evaluation of specific epitopes eliciting HLA-A2 restricted CD8 T cell response.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Negar Seyed

    2011-09-01

    Full Text Available BACKGROUND: As a potent CD8(+ T cell activator, peptide vaccine has found its way in vaccine development against intracellular infections and cancer, but not against leishmaniasis. The first step toward a peptide vaccine is epitope mapping of different proteins according to the most frequent HLA types in a population. METHODS AND FINDINGS: Six Leishmania (L. major-related candidate antigens (CPB,CPC,LmsTI-1,TSA,LeIF and LPG-3 were screened for potential CD8(+ T cell activating 9-mer epitopes presented by HLA-A*0201 (the most frequent HLA-A allele. Online software including SYFPEITHI, BIMAS, EpiJen, Rankpep, nHLApred, NetCTL and Multipred were used. Peptides were selected only if predicted by almost all programs, according to their predictive scores. Pan-A2 presentation of selected peptides was confirmed by NetMHCPan1.1. Selected peptides were pooled in four peptide groups and the immunogenicity was evaluated by in vitro stimulation and intracellular cytokine assay of PBMCs from HLA-A2(+ individuals recovered from L. major. HLA-A2(- individuals recovered from L. major and HLA-A2(+ healthy donors were included as control groups. Individual response of HLA-A2(+ recovered volunteers as percent of CD8(+/IFN-γ(+ T cells after in vitro stimulation against peptide pools II and IV was notably higher than that of HLA-A2(- recovered individuals. Based on cutoff scores calculated from the response of HLA-A2(- recovered individuals, 31.6% and 13.3% of HLA-A2(+ recovered persons responded above cutoff in pools II and IV, respectively. ELISpot and ELISA results confirmed flow cytometry analysis. The response of HLA-A2(- recovered individuals against peptide pools I and III was detected similar and even higher than HLA-A2(+ recovered individuals. CONCLUSION: Using in silico prediction we demonstrated specific response to LmsTI-1 (pool II and LPG-3- (pool IV related peptides specifically presented in HLA-A*0201 context. This is among the very few reports

  10. Professionalization and the Null Curriculum: The Case of the Popular Eugenics Movement and American Educational Studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Selden, Steven

    1987-01-01

    Presents an essay review of three recent books on eugenics, a once popular quasiscientific and politically conservative social movement devoted to the improvement of humankind through programs of selective breeding and marriage restriction. States that educators must study and come to grips with the meaning of this movement in order to appreciate…

  11. Maternal dietary restriction alters offspring's sleep homeostasis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Noriyuki Shimizu

    Full Text Available Nutritional state in the gestation period influences fetal growth and development. We hypothesized that undernutrition during gestation would affect offspring sleep architecture and/or homeostasis. Pregnant female mice were assigned to either control (fed ad libitum; AD or 50% dietary restriction (DR groups from gestation day 12 to parturition. After parturition, dams were fed AD chow. After weaning, the pups were also fed AD into adulthood. At adulthood (aged 8-9 weeks, we carried out sleep recordings. Although offspring mice displayed a significantly reduced body weight at birth, their weights recovered three days after birth. Enhancement of electroencephalogram (EEG slow wave activity (SWA during non-rapid eye movement (NREM sleep was observed in the DR mice over a 24-hour period without changing the diurnal pattern or amounts of wake, NREM, or rapid eye movement (REM sleep. In addition, DR mice also displayed an enhancement of EEG-SWA rebound after a 6-hour sleep deprivation and a higher threshold for waking in the face of external stimuli. DR adult offspring mice exhibited small but significant increases in the expression of hypothalamic peroxisome proliferator-activated receptor α (Pparα and brain-specific carnitine palmitoyltransferase 1 (Cpt1c mRNA, two genes involved in lipid metabolism. Undernutrition during pregnancy may influence sleep homeostasis, with offspring exhibiting greater sleep pressure.

  12. Posttraumatic functional movement disorders.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ganos, C; Edwards, M J; Bhatia, K P

    2017-01-01

    Traumatic injury to the nervous system may account for a range of neurologic symptoms. Trauma location and severity are important determinants of the resulting symptoms. In severe head injury with structural brain abnormalities, the occurrence of trauma-induced movement disorders, most commonly hyperkinesias such as tremor and dystonia, is well recognized and its diagnosis straightforward. However, the association of minor traumatic events, which do not lead to significant persistent structural brain damage, with the onset of movement disorders is more contentious. The lack of clear clinical-neuroanatomic (or symptom lesion) correlations in these cases, the variable timing between traumatic event and symptom onset, but also the presence of unusual clinical features in a number of such patients, which overlap with signs encountered in patients with functional neurologic disorders, contribute to this controversy. The purpose of this chapter is to provide an overview of the movement disorders, most notably dystonia, that have been associated with peripheral trauma and focus on their unusual characteristics, as well as their overlap with functional neurologic disorders. We will then provide details on pathophysiologic views that relate minor peripheral injuries to the development of movement disorders and compare them to knowledge from primary organic and functional movement disorders. Finally, we will comment on the appropriate management of these disorders.

  13. Mechanisms of Salmonella Typhi Host Restriction.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Spanò, Stefania

    2016-01-01

    Salmonella enterica serovar Typhi (S. Typhi) is the cause of typhoid fever, a life-threatening bacterial infection that is very common in the developing world. Recent spread of antimicrobial resistant isolates of S. Typhi makes typhoid fever, a global public health risk. Despite being a common disease, still very little is known about the molecular mechanisms underlying typhoid fever and S. Typhi pathogenesis. In contrast to other Salmonellae, S. Typhi can only infect humans. The molecular bases of this human restriction are mostly unknown. Recent studies identified a novel pathway that contributes to S. Typhi human restriction and is required for killing S. Typhi in macrophages of nonsusceptible species. The small Rab GTPase Rab32 and its guanine nucleotide exchange factor BLOC-3 are the critical components of this pathway. These proteins were already well known as important regulators of intracellular membrane transport. In particular, they are central for the transport of enzymes that synthetize melanin in pigment cells. The recent findings that Rab32 and BLOC-3 are required for S. Typhi host restriction point out to a novel mechanism restricting the growth of bacterial pathogen, dependent on the transport of still unknown molecule(s) to the S. Typhi vacuole. The identification of this novel antimicrobial pathway constitutes a critical starting point to study molecular mechanisms killing bacterial pathogens and possibly identify novel antimicrobial molecules.

  14. Energy-restricted diets result in higher numbers of CD4+, CD8+, immunoglobulins (A, M, and G), and CD45RA cells in spleen and CD4+, immunoglobulin A, and CD45RA cells in colonic lamina propria of rats.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nayak, Bob N; Friel, James K; Rempel, Curtis B; Jones, Peter J H

    2009-07-01

    Dietary energy restriction (ER) offers certain health benefits, particularly when ER is controlled through manipulation of dietary fats. Our hypothesis is that cellular immunity is modulated by dietary ER. Furthermore, we believe that the immune response may differ between spleen and colon because their lymphatic and vascular organization is different. The objective of the study was to test this hypothesis by determining the effects of dietary ER through manipulation of energy intake from high-fat (HF) diets on the expression and frequency of the CD4(+) (T-helper/T-inducer) and CD8(+) (T-cytotoxic/T-suppressor) cells, CD45RA (B-cell-specific marker), and immunoglobulins (Ig) A-, G-, and M-bearing cells in spleen and colon in rats by immunohistochemical method. Rats fed the HF diet had a significantly (P < .05) reduced number of immune cells as compared with those fed ER diets. Energy-restricted diet-fed rats showed higher (P < .05) numbers of CD4(+), CD8(+), IgA, IgM, IgG, and CD45RA cells in spleen and CD4(+), IgA, and CD45RA cells in colonic lamina propria. The IgA-containing cells were markedly higher in the colon compared with the spleen. No change occurred in the number of IgM- and IgG-containing cells in colonic tissues between groups, except for the 20% ER group where IgM-labeled cells were higher (P < .05) compared with HF and 40% ER groups. These findings suggest that ER may modulate adaptive immune function and that CD4(+) and IgA cells may serve as biological indicators for dietary energy-modulated immunoresponse in spleen and colon, respectively.

  15. Legacy of the Environmental Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Albrecht, Stan L.

    1976-01-01

    An effort to select an important contemporary social movement (the environmental movement) and to assess some of the important impacts it has had on the larger society. This review of the environmental movement indicates it may be following a path similiar to the life-cycle of previous movements. (Author/BT)

  16. Chloroplast avoidance movement reduces photodamage in plants.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kasahara, Masahiro; Kagawa, Takatoshi; Oikawa, Kazusato; Suetsugu, Noriyuki; Miyao, Mitsue; Wada, Masamitsu

    When plants are exposed to light levels higher than those required for photosynthesis, reactive oxygen species are generated in the chloroplasts and cause photodamage. This can occur even under natural growth conditions. To mitigate photodamage, plants have developed several protective mechanisms. One is chloroplast avoidance movement, in which chloroplasts move from the cell surface to the side walls of cells under high light conditions, although experimental support is still awaited. Here, using different classes of mutant defective in chloroplast avoidance movement, we show that these mutants are more susceptible to damage in high light than wild-type plants. Damage of the photosynthetic apparatus and subsequent bleaching of leaf colour and necrosis occur faster under high light conditions in the mutants than in wild-type plants. We conclude that chloroplast avoidance movement actually decreases the amount of light absorption by chloroplasts, and might therefore be important to the survival of plants under natural growth conditions.

  17. Calorie restriction decreases murine and human pancreatic tumor cell growth, nuclear factor-κB activation, and inflammation-related gene expression in an insulin-like growth factor-1-dependent manner.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alison E Harvey

    Full Text Available Calorie restriction (CR prevents obesity and has potent anticancer effects that may be mediated through its ability to reduce serum growth and inflammatory factors, particularly insulin-like growth factor (IGF-1 and protumorigenic cytokines. IGF-1 is a nutrient-responsive growth factor that activates the inflammatory regulator nuclear factor (NF-κB, which is linked to many types of cancers, including pancreatic cancer. We hypothesized that CR would inhibit pancreatic tumor growth through modulation of IGF-1-stimulated NF-κB activation and protumorigenic gene expression. To test this, 30 male C57BL/6 mice were randomized to either a control diet consumed ad libitum or a 30% CR diet administered in daily aliquots for 21 weeks, then were subcutaneously injected with syngeneic mouse pancreatic cancer cells (Panc02 and tumor growth was monitored for 5 weeks. Relative to controls, CR mice weighed less and had decreased serum IGF-1 levels and smaller tumors. Also, CR tumors demonstrated a 70% decrease in the expression of genes encoding the pro-inflammatory factors S100a9 and F4/80, and a 56% decrease in the macrophage chemoattractant, Ccl2. Similar CR effects on tumor growth and NF-κB-related gene expression were observed in a separate study of transplanted MiaPaCa-2 human pancreatic tumor cell growth in nude mice. In vitro analyses in Panc02 cells showed that IGF-1 treatment promoted NF-κB nuclear localization, increased DNA-binding of p65 and transcriptional activation, and increased expression of NF-κB downstream genes. Finally, the IGF-1-induced increase in expression of genes downstream of NF-κB (Ccdn1, Vegf, Birc5, and Ptgs2 was decreased significantly in the context of silenced p65. These findings suggest that the inhibitory effects of CR on Panc02 pancreatic tumor growth are associated with reduced IGF-1-dependent NF-κB activation.

  18. Music, Movement, and Poetry.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Carmichael, Karla D.

    This paper's premise is that music, movement, and poetry are unique and creative methods to be used by the counselor in working with both children and adults. Through these media, the counselor generates material for the counseling session that may not be available through more traditional "talk therapies." The choice of music as a counseling…

  19. Mungiki as Youth Movement

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Rasmussen, Jacob

    2010-01-01

    Like many other African countries, Kenya has a large and growing youth population. Some of the youths are mobilized into militant and political networks; one of these is the Mungiki movement. The article explores Mungiki’s combination of politics, religion and Kikuyu traditions. Using the examples...

  20. Measuring Facial Movement

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ekman, Paul; Friesen, Wallace V.

    1976-01-01

    The Facial Action Code (FAC) was derived from an analysis of the anatomical basis of facial movement. The development of the method is explained, contrasting it to other methods of measuring facial behavior. An example of how facial behavior is measured is provided, and ideas about research applications are discussed. (Author)

  1. Psychogenic Movement Disorders

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chakravarty Ambar

    2004-01-01

    Full Text Available Psychogenic movement Disorders (PMD may result from somatoform disorders, factitious disorders, malingering, depression anxiety disorders and less frequently, histrionic personality disorders. First recognized by Henry Head in early twentieth century, PMD s commonly encountered and clues to their differentiation from organic disease. A generally accepted management protocol has been outlined.

  2. The Hopi Traditionalist Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Clemmer, Richard O.

    1994-01-01

    Traces development of Hopi Traditionalism since 1906 as a social movement within the context of Hopi culture and sociopolitical history. Discusses the role of ideology in mediating political and economic conditions of history and collective cultural consciousness. Offers conclusions about the political role of indigenous culture and culturally…

  3. The Mastery of Movement.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Laban, Rudolf; Ullmann, Lisa

    In this third edition, some amendments and additions have been made to the original text, first published in 1950. As in past editions, the relationship between the inner motivation of movement and the outer functioning of the body is explored. Acting and dancing are shown as activi