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Sample records for cell leukemia leukemic

  1. Nature of leukemic stem cells in murine myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yoshida, K.; Nemoto, K.; Nishimura, M.; Hayata, I.; Inoue, T.; Seki, M.

    1986-01-01

    We investigated the nature of myelogenous leukemic stem cells in mice. L-8057, a megakaryoblastic leukemia cell line used in this study, produces in vivo and in vitro colonies. By means of typical chromosomal aberrations in L-8057, one can conveniently detect the origin of the cells in each colony derived from a leukemic stem cell. Direct evidence of whether cells from each colony had leukemogenicity in recipient mice was successfully obtained by the colony transplantation assay. Both leukemic colony-forming unit-spleen (L-CFU-s) and leukemic colony-forming unit-culture (L-CFU-c) in L-8057 may have belonged to the same differentiating stage in the stem cells because of their similar radiosensitivity, although some parts of the L-CFU of L-8057 seemed to have lost their capability to regenerate L-CFU-s when the cells were plated in dishes. This leukemic stem cell preserves high self-renewal ability in vitro after 10 passages. In addition, in vitro colony formation by this leukemic cell during the above course of serial passages did not require any additional exogenous stimulators. The same sort of trials have been made on other types of leukemias. Leukemic stem cells showed remarkable variety in their response to stimulating factors and in their self-renewal activity, which suggests that they may have consisted of heterogeneous populations

  2. Leukemic meningitis in a patient with hairy cell leukemia. A case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wolfe, D.W.; Scopelliti, J.A.; Boselli, B.D.

    1984-01-01

    Central nervous system involvement has not previously been described in patients with hairy cell leukemia (HCL). A patient is reported who presented with meningeal involvement as his initial symptom of HCL. Diagnosis was established by morphologic and cytochemical studies of his cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) and bone marrow. Treatment with whole-brain irradiation and intrathecal chemotherapy was successful in clearing leukemic cells from the CSF with resolution of symptoms

  3. Clonal evolution of pre-leukemic hematopoietic stem cells precedes human acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Majeti, Ravindra

    2014-01-01

    Massively parallel DNA sequencing has uncovered recurrent mutations in many human cancers. In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), cancer genome/exome resequencing has identified numerous recurrently mutated genes with an average of 5 mutations in each case of de novo AML. In order for these multiple mutations to accumulate in a single lineage of cells, they are serially acquired in clones of self-renewing hematopoietic stem cells (HSC), termed pre-leukemic HSC. Isolation and characterization of pre-leukemic HSC have shown that their mutations are enriched in genes involved in regulating DNA methylation, chromatin modifications, and the cohesin complex. On the other hand, genes involved in regulating activated signaling are generally absent. Pre-leukemic HSC have been found to persist in clinical remission and may ultimately give rise to relapsed disease through the acquisition of novel mutations. Thus, pre-leukemic HSC may constitute a key cellular reservoir that must be eradicated for long-term cures. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  4. Properties of murine leukemia viruses produced by leukemic cells established from NIH Swiss mice with radiation-induced leukemia

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    Okumoto, Masaaki; Nishikawa, Ryosuke; Takamori, Yasuhiko; Iwai, Yoshiaki; Iwai, Mineko [Radiation Center of Osaka Prefecture, Sakai (Japan); Imai, Shunsuke; Morimoto, Junji; Tsubura, Yoshihiko

    1984-06-01

    Three leukemic cell lines, designated NIH-RL1, NIH-RL2 and NFS-RL1, were established from spleen and thymuses of NIH Swiss and NFS mice with radiation-induced leukemia. The culture fluids of these cell lines contained RNA-dependent DNA polymerase (RDDP) activities associated with particles of buoyant density of 1.15-1.17 (g/cm/sup 3/). The divalent cation reqirement of these enzymes was characteristic for that of murine leukemia viruses. In competition radioimmunoassay, a major core protein, p30, was detected in culture fluid of each leukemic cell line. Competition curves of viral p30 produced by these cell lines revealed that these viruses were very similar to those of xenotropic viruses of NZB mice. These viruses were undetectable both by XC plaque assay using SC-1 cells as an indicator cell, and by mink S/sup +/L/sup -/ focus induction assay. These viruses also lacked productive infectivity to mink lung cells (CCL-64), and were nononcogenic in syngeneic mice when the viruses were intrathymically inoculated.

  5. Profound radiosensitivity in leukemic T-cell lines and T-cell-type acute lymphoblastic leukemia demonstrated by sodium [51Cr]chromate labeling

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakazawa, S.; Minowada, J.; Tsubota, T.; Sinks, L.F.

    1978-01-01

    Radiation sensitivity was determined by measuring spontaneous release from 51 Cr-labeled cells in various lymphoid cell populations. Among six leukemia T-cell lines originating from acute lymphoblastic leukemia, four such lines were found to be highly radiosensitive. In contrast, two of the leukemic T-cell lines and four normal control B-cell lines were not radiosensitive. Thymocytes from six patients and leukemia T-cell blasts from three patients with T-cell leukemia were likewise found to be highly radiosensitive, whereas leukemic blasts from six patients with null-cell (non-T, non-B-cell) acute lymphoblastic leukemia were not radiosensitive. Normal peripheral blood lymphocytes and mitogen-induced normal lymphoblasts were found not to be radiosensitive. The results indicate that measurement of the radiation sensitivity of acute leukemic blasts may have a therapeutic significance in coping with the heterogeneous nature of individual leukemia cases

  6. Correlation of total body potassium and leukemic cell mass in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chandra, P.; Sawitsky, A.; Chanana, A.D.; Chikkappa, G.; Cohn, S.H.; Rai, K.R.; Cronkity, E.P.

    1979-01-01

    Total body leukemic mass in patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was measured by quantitation of total body potassium (TBK) with a whole-body counter. In addition, the predicted normal total body potassium (Kp) for each patient was calculated from an empirically derived relationship involving height, weight age, and sex. Both the absolute TBK and the relative excess of total body potassium (TBK/Kp) were related to the stage of disease. Patients in the early stages of CLL were found to have lower TBK and TBK/Kp than patients in the late stages of disease. Both of these parameters increased with the successively advanced stages of the disease. The clinically monitored reduction of leukemic cell mass following therapy was accompanied by reductions in TBK and TBK/Kp. Data presented support the notion that TBK/Kp is a useful indicator of the total body leukemic mass. Futhermore, the results of these studies quantitatively validate the proposed clinical staging system for CLL. Quantitation of TBK by a whole-body counter is an accurate and noninvasive procedure and does not require administration of isotopes

  7. Leukemic blast cell colony formation in semisolid culture with erythropoietin: a case report of acute poorly differentiated erythroid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tomonaga, M; Jinnai, I; Tagawa, M; Amenomori, T; Nishino, K; Yao, E; Nonaka, H; Kuriyama, K; Yoshida, Y; Matsuo, T

    1987-02-01

    The bone marrow of a patient with acute undifferentiated leukemia developed unique colonies after a 14-day culture in erythropoietin (EPO)-containing methylcellulose. The colonies consisted of 20 to 200 nonhemoglobinized large blast cells. Cytogenetic analysis of single colonies revealed hypotetraploid karyotypes with several marker chromosomes that were identical to those found in directly sampled bone marrow. The concurrently formed erythroid bursts showed only normal karyotypes. No leukemic colony formation was observed in other culture systems with either colony-stimulating activity (CSA) or phytohemagglutinin-stimulated leukocyte-conditioned medium (PHA-LCM). The leukemic colonies exhibited a complete EPO-dose dependency similar to that of the patient's normal BFU-E. Although cytochemical and immunologic marker studies of the bone marrow cells failed to clarify the cell lineage of the leukemic cells with extraordinarily large cell size, ultrastructural study revealed erythroid differentiation such as siderosome formation in the cytoplasm and ferritin particles in the rhophecytosis invaginations. These findings indicate that the patient had poorly differentiated erythroid leukemia and that some of the clonogenic cells might respond to EPO in vitro. Corresponding to this biological feature, the leukemic cells were markedly decreased in number in response to repeated RBC transfusions, and partial remission was obtained. These observations suggest that erythroid leukemia distinct from erythroleukemia (M6) with a myeloblastic component, can develop as a minor entity of human acute leukemia.

  8. Co-culture with podoplanin+ cells protects leukemic blast cells with leukemia-associated antigens in the tumor microenvironment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Ji Yoon; Han, A-Reum; Lee, Sung-Eun; Min, Woo-Sung; Kim, Hee-Je

    2016-05-01

    Podoplanin+ cells are indispensable in the tumor microenvironment. Increasing evidence suggests that podoplanin may support the growth and metastasis of solid tumors; however, to the best of our knowledge no studies have determined whether or not podoplanin serves a supportive role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The effects of co‑culture with podoplanin+ cells on the cellular activities of the leukemic cells, such as apoptosis and cell proliferation, in addition to the expression of podoplanin in leukemic cells, were investigated. Due to the fact that genetic abnormalities are the primary cause of leukemogenesis, the overexpression of the fibromyalgia‑like tyrosine kinase‑3 gene in colony forming units was also examined following cell sorting. Podoplanin+ cells were found to play a protective role against apoptosis in leukemic cells and to promote cell proliferation. Tumor‑associated antigens, including Wilms' tumor gene 1 and survivin, were increased when leukemic cells were co‑cultured with podoplanin+ cells. In combination, the present results also suggest that podoplanin+ cells can function as stromal cells for blast cell retention in the AML tumor microenvironment.

  9. [Expression of c-MPL in leukemic stem cells from acute myeloid leukemia patients].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Pei; Qiu, Shao-Wei; Rao, Qing; Lin, Dong; Xing, Hai-Yan; Tang, Ke-Jing; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Min; Wang, Jian-Xiang

    2012-10-01

    This study was aimed to investigate the expression of c-MPL in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and the correlation of the c-MPL expression with CD34 and CD38, so as to define the expression of c-MPL in leukemic stem cells. The expression levels of CD34, CD38 and c-MPL were detected by flow cytometry in bone marrow cells from 29 newly diagnosed AML patients. The relationship of c-MPL positive cell ratio with clinical parameters and correlation of c-MPL with CD34 and CD38 expression in AML patients were analyzed. The results showed that expression level of c-MPL in AML patients was significantly higher than that of normal controls (P MPL did not correlate with age, sex, white blood cell count, AML1-ETO fusion gene and remission after chemotherapy, but the expression of c-MPL in M2 and M5 patients was higher than that of normal control (P MPL in CD34 positive AML patients was obviously higher than that in CD34 negative AML patients (P MPL was significantly higher expressed in CD34(+) cells than that in CD34(-) cells (P MPL expression was not significantly different between CD34(+)CD38(-) and CD34(+)CD38(-) cell groups. Positive correlation between c-MPL and CD34 expression was observed (r = 0.380, P = 0.042). It is concluded that expression of c-MPL is higher in AML patients, and positively correlates with the expression level of CD34. The c-MPL expresses in leukemic stem cells.

  10. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing leukemic dendritic cells impair a leukemia-specific immune response by inducing potent T regulatory cells

    OpenAIRE

    Curti, A; Trabanelli, S; Onofri, C; Aluigi, M; Salvestrini, V; Ocadlikova, D; Evangelisti, C; Rutella, S; De Cristofaro, R; Ottaviani, E; Baccarani, M; Lemoli, RM

    2010-01-01

    Background: The immunoregulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, which catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan into kynurenine, is expressed in a significant subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, resulting in the inhibition of T-cell proliferation and the induction of regulatory T cells. Acute myeloid leukemia cells can be differentiated into dendritic cells, which have increased immunogenicity and have been proposed as vaccines against leukemia.\\ud Design and Methods: Leukemic d...

  11. NF-κB in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Oncogenic Functions in Leukemic and in Microenvironmental Cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Santos, Nuno R. dos; Ghezzo, Marinella N.; Silva, Ricardo C. da; Fernandes, Mónica T.

    2010-01-01

    Two main NF-κB signaling pathways, canonical and noncanonical, performing distinct functions in organisms have been characterized. Identification of mutations in genes encoding components of these NF-κB signaling pathways in lymphoid malignancies confirmed their key role in leukemogenesis. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of thymocytes that despite significant therapeutic advances can still be fatal. Although mutations in NF-κB genes have not been reported in T-ALL, NF-κB constitutive activation in human T-ALL and in acute T-cell leukemia mouse models has been observed. Although these studies revealed activation of members of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in acute T-cell leukemia, only inhibition of canonical NF-κB signaling was shown to impair leukemic T cell growth. Besides playing an important pro-oncogenic role in leukemic T cells, NF-κB signaling also appears to modulate T-cell leukemogenesis through its action in microenvironmental stromal cells. This article reviews recent data on the role of these transcription factors in T-ALL and pinpoints further research crucial to determine the value of NF-κB inhibition as a means to treat T-ALL

  12. NF-κB in T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: Oncogenic Functions in Leukemic and in Microenvironmental Cells

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    Santos, Nuno R. dos, E-mail: nrsantos@ualg.pt; Ghezzo, Marinella N.; Silva, Ricardo C. da; Fernandes, Mónica T. [IBB-Institute for Biotechnology and Bioengineering, Centre for Molecular and Structural Biomedicine (CBME), University of Algarve, Campus de Gambelas, 8005-139 Faro (Portugal)

    2010-11-05

    Two main NF-κB signaling pathways, canonical and noncanonical, performing distinct functions in organisms have been characterized. Identification of mutations in genes encoding components of these NF-κB signaling pathways in lymphoid malignancies confirmed their key role in leukemogenesis. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive malignancy of thymocytes that despite significant therapeutic advances can still be fatal. Although mutations in NF-κB genes have not been reported in T-ALL, NF-κB constitutive activation in human T-ALL and in acute T-cell leukemia mouse models has been observed. Although these studies revealed activation of members of both canonical and noncanonical NF-κB pathways in acute T-cell leukemia, only inhibition of canonical NF-κB signaling was shown to impair leukemic T cell growth. Besides playing an important pro-oncogenic role in leukemic T cells, NF-κB signaling also appears to modulate T-cell leukemogenesis through its action in microenvironmental stromal cells. This article reviews recent data on the role of these transcription factors in T-ALL and pinpoints further research crucial to determine the value of NF-κB inhibition as a means to treat T-ALL.

  13. ROLE OF LEUKEMIC STEM CELLS IN THE CHRONIC MYELOID LEUKEMIA PATHOGENESIS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sviezhentseva IO

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available The presence of leukemic stem cells (LSC in the bone marrow of patients with chronic myeloid leukemia (CML is the cause of relapses as a result of the treatment with chemotherapeutic agents and target therapy drugs. This is due to the ability of LSC to attach itself to the microenvironment cells and to remain at rest for a long time. Vascular and osteoblasts niche play a very important role in this process. However, for being in G0 phase LSC have direct contact with the cellular elements of bone marrow microenvironment. So LSK contact with mesenchymal cells of bone marrow using the appendixes, connecting components invaginations and lint. The cadherins and integrins are important in the interaction of osteoblasts niche. They are able to activate intracellular signaling cascades that provide resting state of LSK. In addition, a bone marrow niche provides changes of LSC oxidative metabolism, which also plays an important role for cell entry into the G0 phase. Further, LSC also have certain physiological properties, which play an important role in the drug resistance formation, particularly drugs with targeted actions - tyrosine kinase inhibitors. LSK characterized by a high level of BCR-ABL expression and their population can have a lot of point mutations in the bcr-abl gene in the same patient. This leads to the fact that the taken medicines dose does not act against LSK, reducing the number of a whole leukemic cells clone. However, complete LSC elimination from the the patient’s bone marrow need search the main differences between the LSC and normal HSC. After the literature analysis it was found that LSC have several significant differences such as the ability to cause leukemia during the transplantation to immunodeficient animals, this leukemia is morphologically and phenotypically similar to the original tumor, in addition the LSC can be transmitted from animal to animal. In addition, the LSC is also characterized by the mutations presence

  14. Hematopoietic stem cells can be separated from leukemic cells in a subgroup of adult acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Foerner, Elena; Buss, Eike; Jauch, Anna; Eckstein, Volker; Wuchter, Patrick; Ho, Anthony D; Lutz, Christoph

    2017-06-01

    In B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) separation of normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) has so far been limited to a subgroup of patients. As aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH)-activity is enriched in various stem cells we investigated its value for HSC isolation in adult B-ALL. Based on ALDH-activity patients could be stratified in ALDH-numerous (≥1.9% ALDH +  cells) and ALDH-rare (cells) cases. In ALDH-rare B-ALL clonal-marker negative HSC could be separated by the CD34 + CD38 - ALDH +  phenotype, whereas this separation was not possible in ALDH-numerous B-ALL. Functional analysis confirmed the HSC-potential of isolated cells, which were uniformly CD19-negative. However, addition of ALDH-activity further improved HSC-purity. In summary, we provide a method to separate functionally normal HSC from leukemic cells in a subgroup of B-ALL patients that can be identified prospectively. This protocol thereby facilitates comparative analyses of matched HSC and leukemic cells in order to improve our understanding of leukemia evolution.

  15. Identification of residual leukemic cells by flow cytometry in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: verification of leukemic state by flow-sorting and molecular/cytogenetic methods

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Obro, Nina F; Ryder, Lars P; Madsen, Hans O

    2012-01-01

    Reduction in minimal residual disease, measured by real-time quantitative PCR or flow cytometry, predicts prognosis in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We explored whether cells reported as minimal residual disease by flow cytometry represent the malignant clone harboring...... clone-specific genomic markers (53 follow-up bone marrow samples from 28 children with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia). Cell populations (presumed leukemic and non-leukemic) were flow-sorted during standard flow cytometry-based minimal residual disease monitoring and explored by PCR and....../or fluorescence in situ hybridization. We found good concordance between flow cytometry and genomic analyses in the individual flow-sorted leukemic (93% true positive) and normal (93% true negative) cell populations. Four cases with discrepant results had plausible explanations (e.g. partly informative...

  16. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-expressing leukemic dendritic cells impair a leukemia-specific immune response by inducing potent T regulatory cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Curti, Antonio; Trabanelli, Sara; Onofri, Chiara; Aluigi, Michela; Salvestrini, Valentina; Ocadlikova, Darina; Evangelisti, Cecilia; Rutella, Sergio; De Cristofaro, Raimondo; Ottaviani, Emanuela; Baccarani, Michele; Lemoli, Roberto M

    2010-12-01

    The immunoregulatory enzyme indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase, which catalyzes the conversion of tryptophan into kynurenine, is expressed in a significant subset of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, resulting in the inhibition of T-cell proliferation and the induction of regulatory T cells. Acute myeloid leukemia cells can be differentiated into dendritic cells, which have increased immunogenicity and have been proposed as vaccines against leukemia. Leukemic dendritic cells were generated from acute myeloid leukemia cells and used as stimulators in functional assays, including the induction of regulatory T cells. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase expression in leukemic dendritic cells was evaluated at molecular, protein and enzymatic levels. We demonstrate that, after differentiation into dendritic cells, both indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-negative and indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-positive acute myeloid leukemia samples show induction and up-regulation of indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase gene and protein, respectively. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-positive acute myeloid leukemia dendritic cells catabolize tryptophan into kynurenine metabolite and inhibit T-cell proliferation through an indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-dependent mechanism. Moreover, indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-positive leukemic dendritic cells increase the number of allogeneic and autologous CD4(+)CD25(+) Foxp3(+) T cells and this effect is completely abrogated by the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-inhibitor, 1-methyl tryptophan. Purified CD4(+)CD25(+) T cells obtained from co-culture with indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase-positive leukemic dendritic cells act as regulatory T cells as they inhibit naive T-cell proliferation and impair the complete maturation of normal dendritic cells. Importantly, leukemic dendritic cell-induced regulatory T cells are capable of in vitro suppression of a leukemia-specific T cell-mediated immune response, directed against the leukemia-associated antigen, Wilms' tumor protein. These data identify

  17. Fundamental studies of leukemic cell labeling with /sup 111/In-oxine and their applications to cell kinetics in patients with acute leukemia

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    Takagi, Yuhkoh; Matsuda, Shin; Uchida, Tatsumi; Kariyone, Shigeo [Fukushima Medical Coll. (Japan)

    1984-04-01

    Fundamental studies of leukemic cell labeling with /sup 111/In-oxine and their applications to leukemic cell kinetics in five patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) were examined. Labeling efficiency of leukemic cells was 80.3 +- 3.6% for more than 1 x 10/sup 8/ cells at room temperature for 20 minutes of incubation followed by two times washes. Cell viability determined by means of trypanblue exclusion test was 95.3 +- 2.6%. In vitro elution rate of /sup 111/In from the labeled cells during 12 hours was 10.0 +- 1.2%. The disappearance curves of labeled leukemic cells in AMLs followed a single exponential fashion, and the half time of disappearance (T 1/2) ranged from 9.6 to 31.8 hours. Total blood leukemic cell pool (TBLCP) calculated with the dilution principles of radioisotopes correlated significantly with the leukemic cell counts (LC) in the peripheral blood (Y = 0.32 + 1.94X, r = 0.99). In the studies of organ distribution which were observed and analyzed with gamma camera and computer, labeled leukemic cells passed through lungs within 15 minutes. Radioactivity in the spleen increased rapidly for 30 - 60 minutes, then reached a plateau. Hepatic radioactivity showed a temporary decrease during 10 - 60 minutes following the moderate accumulation in initial 10 minutes. In two cases, bone marrow was visualized 24 hours after the injection. Radioactivity of the leukemic cells isolated from the bone marrow at 22 hours after the injection in one case was one third of the radioactivity in leukemic cells obtained from the peripheral blood at the same time.

  18. Fundamental studies of leukemic cell labeling with 111 In-oxine and their applications to cell kinetics in patients with acute leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Takagi, Yuhkoh; Matsuda, Shin; Uchida, Tatsumi; Kariyone, Shigeo

    1984-01-01

    Fundamental studies of leukemic cell labeling with 111 In-oxine and their applications to leukemic cell kinetics in five patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) were examined. Labeling efficiency of leukemic cells was 80.3 +- 3.6% for more than 1 x 10 8 cells at room temperature for 20 minutes of incubation followed by two times washes. Cell viability determined by means of trypanblue exclusion test was 95.3 +- 2.6%. In vitro elution rate of 111 In from the labeled cells during 12 hours was 10.0 +- 1.2%. The disappearance curves of labeled leukemic cells in AMLs followed a single exponential fashion, and the half time of disappearance (T 1/2) ranged from 9.6 to 31.8 hours. Total blood leukemic cell pool (TBLCP) calculated with the dilution principles of radioisotopes correlated significantly with the leukemic cell counts (LC) in the peripheral blood (Y = 0.32 + 1.94X, r = 0.99). In the studies of organ distribution which were observed and analized with gamma camera and computer, labeled leukemic cells passed through lungs within 15 minutes. Radioactivity in the spleen increased rapidly for 30 - 60 minutes, then reached a plateau. Hepatic radioactivity showed a temporary decrease during 10 - 60 minutes following the moderate accumulation in initial 10 minutes. In two cases, bone marrow was visualized 24 hours after the injection. Radioactivity of the leukemic cells isolated from the bone marrow at 22 hours after the injection in one case was one third of the radioactivity in leukemic cells obtained from the peripheral blood at the same time. (author)

  19. Leukemic cell labeling with indium-111-oxine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uchida, T.; Takagi, Y.; Matsuda, S.; Yui, T.; Ishibashi, T.; Kimura, H.; Kariyone, S.

    1984-01-01

    Leukemic cells were labeled with In-111-oxine in patients with acute leukemia. In vitro labeling studies revealed that labeling efficiency reached maximum 80.8 +- 3.6% (mean +- 1SD) by 2 times washes after 20 minutes incubation time. Cell viability was assessed by trypan blue exclusion test and in vitro culture of leukemic cells, which showed no cellular damage during labeling procedure. Elution of In-111 from the labeled cells was 10.0 +- 1.2% at 12 hours after labeling. For in vivo leukemic cell kinetic studies, more than 10/sup 8/ leukemic cells separated from Ficoll-Hypacque sedimentation were labeled by 30 minutes of In-111-oxine incubation and two times washes at 37 0 C. In vivo studies were performed in 7 patients with acute myeloblastic, lymphoblastic leukemia and blastic crisis of chronic myelocytic leukemia. Labeled leukemic cells disappeared in single exponential fashion with half life of 9.6 to 31.8 hours. Total leukemic cell pool in peripheral circulation was calculated, which correlated well with peripheral leukemic cell counts (r=0.99). No relationship was observed between total leukemic cell pool and leukemic cell turnover rate. Migration patterns of labeled leukemic cells showed that pulmonary uptake was evident within 15 minutes after the infusion and returned to base-line. Splenic and hepatic uptake showed gradual increase up to 24 hours. Bone marrow accumulation was shown only in 2 cases. Presently, there are no suitable radionuclides for leukemic cell labeling. In-111-oxine labeled leukemic cells would overcome this difficulty

  20. Interaction between the immune system and acute myeloid leukemia: A model incorporating promotion of regulatory T cell expansion by leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nishiyama, Yoshiaki; Saikawa, Yutaka; Nishiyama, Nobuaki

    2018-03-01

    Population dynamics of regulatory T cells (Treg) are crucial for the underlying interplay between leukemic and immune cells in progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). The goal of this work is to elucidate the dynamics of a model that includes Treg, which can be qualitatively assessed by accumulating clinical findings on the impact of activated immune cell infusion after selective Treg depletion. We constructed an ordinary differential equation model to describe the dynamics of three components in AML: leukemic blast cells, mature regulatory T cells (Treg), and mature effective T cells (Teff), including cytotoxic T lymphocytes. The model includes promotion of Treg expansion by leukemic blast cells, leukemic stem cell and progenitor cell targeting by Teff, and Treg-mediated Teff suppression, and exhibits two coexisting, stable steady states, corresponding to high leukemic cell load at diagnosis or relapse, and to long-term complete remission. Our model is capable of explaining the clinical findings that the survival of patients with AML after allogeneic stem cell transplantation is influenced by the duration of complete remission, and that cut-off minimal residual disease thresholds associated with a 100% relapse rate are identified in AML. Copyright © 2018 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  1. Leukemic transformation of donor spleen cells following their transplantation into supralethally irradiated mice with pre-existing viral leukemia. [X Radiation

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    Kuhnert, P M; OKunewick, J P; Erhard, P

    1974-01-01

    Fialkow et al. previously reported leukemia induction in donor-type cells after treating patients for acute lymphoblastic leukemia with total-body irradiation and hematopoietic cell transplantation. Utilizing a murine model and paralleling their treatment protocol, we have documented that induction of leukemia can occur in normal donor cells transplanted into Rauscher viral leukemic mice at 0, 1 and 2 days after irradiation. The induction of leukemia in the grafted cells was verified by: the occurrence of splenomegaly; and secondary spleen cell transplants, whereby the secondary donors were transplanted mice still alive at 30 days and the secondary recipients were normal unirradiated mice. The spleen weights of the grafted leukemic mice were found to be significantly greater than those of the controls and all secondary recipients that received spleen cells from the primary grafted leukemic mice also died of leukemia. Verification that the regenerating hematopoietic tissue was from donor (males) and not host source (females) was accomplished by spleen chromosome preparations taken from randomly selected mice at 14 and at 30 days after cell transplantation. In these preparations, the Y chromosome was clearly distinguishable on the basis of size, shape, and differential staining. The data indicate that induction of leukemia after whole-body irradiation and hematopoietic cell transplantation can occur in immunologically matched donor cells when a viral agent is present and that the incidence of this induction is not affected by a time delay between irradiation and transplant.

  2. Identification of residual leukemic cells by flow cytometry in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia: verification of leukemic state by flow-sorting and molecular/cytogenetic methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Øbro, Nina F; Ryder, Lars P; Madsen, Hans O; Andersen, Mette K; Lausen, Birgitte; Hasle, Henrik; Schmiegelow, Kjeld; Marquart, Hanne V

    2012-01-01

    Reduction in minimal residual disease, measured by real-time quantitative PCR or flow cytometry, predicts prognosis in childhood B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia. We explored whether cells reported as minimal residual disease by flow cytometry represent the malignant clone harboring clone-specific genomic markers (53 follow-up bone marrow samples from 28 children with B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia). Cell populations (presumed leukemic and non-leukemic) were flow-sorted during standard flow cytometry-based minimal residual disease monitoring and explored by PCR and/or fluorescence in situ hybridization. We found good concordance between flow cytometry and genomic analyses in the individual flow-sorted leukemic (93% true positive) and normal (93% true negative) cell populations. Four cases with discrepant results had plausible explanations (e.g. partly informative immunophenotype and antigen modulation) that highlight important methodological pitfalls. These findings demonstrate that with sufficient experience, flow cytometry is reliable for minimal residual disease monitoring in B-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia, although rare cases require supplementary PCR-based monitoring.

  3. Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Cells Contribute to the Stromal Myofibroblasts in Leukemic NOD/SCID Mouse In Vivo

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ryosuke Shirasaki

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available We recently reported that chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells converted into myofibroblasts to create a microenvironment for proliferation of CML cells in vitro. To analyze a biological contribution of CML-derived myofibroblasts in vivo, we observed the characters of leukemic nonobese diabetes/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mouse. Bone marrow nonadherent mononuclear cells as well as human CD45-positive cells obtained from CML patients were injected to the irradiated NOD/SCID mice. When the chimeric BCR-ABL transcript was demonstrated in blood, human CML cells were detected in NOD/SCID murine bone marrow. And CML-derived myofibroblasts composed with the bone marrow-stroma, which produced significant amounts of human vascular endothelial growth factor A. When the parental CML cells were cultured with myofibroblasts separated from CML cell-engrafted NOD/SCID murine bone marrow, CML cells proliferated significantly. These observations indicate that CML cells make an adequate microenvironment for their own proliferation in vivo.

  4. Novel quinazolinone MJ-29 triggers endoplasmic reticulum stress and intrinsic apoptosis in murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells and inhibits leukemic mice.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Chi-Cheng Lu

    Full Text Available The present study was to explore the biological responses of the newly compound, MJ-29 in murine myelomonocytic leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vitro and in vivo fates. We focused on the in vitro effects of MJ-29 on ER stress and mitochondria-dependent apoptotic death in WEHI-3 cells, and to hypothesize that MJ-29 might fully impair the orthotopic leukemic mice. Our results indicated that a concentration-dependent decrease of cell viability was shown in MJ-29-treated cells. DNA content was examined utilizing flow cytometry, whereas apoptotic populations were determined using annexin V/PI, DAPI staining and TUNEL assay. Increasing vital factors of mitochondrial dysfunction by MJ-29 were further investigated. Thus, MJ-29-provaked apoptosis of WEHI-3 cells is mediated through the intrinsic pathway. Importantly, intracellular Ca(2+ release and ER stress-associated signaling also contributed to MJ-29-triggered cell apoptosis. We found that MJ-29 stimulated the protein levels of calpain 1, CHOP and p-eIF2α pathways in WEHI-3 cells. In in vivo experiments, intraperitoneal administration of MJ-29 significantly improved the total survival rate, enhanced body weight and attenuated enlarged spleen and liver tissues in leukemic mice. The infiltration of immature myeloblastic cells into splenic red pulp was reduced in MJ-29-treated leukemic mice. Moreover, MJ-29 increased the differentiations of T and B cells but decreased that of macrophages and monocytes. Additionally, MJ-29-stimulated immune responses might be involved in anti-leukemic activity in vivo. Based on these observations, MJ-29 suppresses WEHI-3 cells in vitro and in vivo, and it is proposed that this potent and selective agent could be a new chemotherapeutic candidate for anti-leukemia in the future.

  5. Leukemic Cells "Gas Up" Leaky Bone Marrow Blood Vessels.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Itkin, Tomer; Rafii, Shahin

    2017-09-11

    In this issue of Cancer Cell, Passaro et al. demonstrate how leukemia through aberrant induction of reactive oxygen species and nitric oxide production trigger marrow vessel leakiness, instigating pro-leukemic function. Disrupted tumor blood vessels promote exhaustion of non-malignant stem and progenitor cells and may facilitate leukemia relapse following chemotherapeutic treatment. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  6. Quantitative assay for the number of leukemic spleen colony forming unit in radiation-induced murine myeloid leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Nara, N [Tokyo Medical and Dental Univ. (Japan). School of Medicine; Bessho, M

    1981-11-01

    In mice with myelogenous leukemia, leukemic spleen colony forming units were assayed quantitatively. When 5 x 10/sup 3/ - 2 x 10/sup 4/ leukemic cells were transplanted to other mice of the same strain, a rectilinear relationship (p < 0.01) was found between the number of the cells transplanted and that of the colonies formed on the surface of the spleen. From these results, the authors considered that myelogenous leukemia in mice is an adequate model for acute myelogenous leukemia in human adults, and that the quantitative assay of the leukemic colony forming units can be used for sensitivity tests of antileukemic agents.

  7. Predicting radiation effects on the development of leukemic stem cells based on studies of leukemias induced by high- and low-dose-rate radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirouchi, Tokuhisa

    2012-01-01

    One of the most important causes of radiation-induced cancers, particularly leukemia, is gene mutations resulting from single and double strand breaks in the DNA. Tanaka et al. (2003) reported life shortening in specific pathogen free male and female B6C3F1 mice continuously exposed to γ rays at a low dose rate of 20 mGy/22 h/d for 400 days from 8 weeks of age. Early death due to cancer, mostly malignant lymphomas, was observed in both sexes. A significant increase in the incidence of myeloid leukemia, resulting in early death, was also reported in males. It is expected however, that at 20 mGy/22 h/d, which is equivalent to a dose of 15 μGy/min, DNA strand breaks induced in these cells are repaired soon after they occur. Murine leukemias induced by high-dose-rate radiation were also found in males, and 80% of the mice with leukemia had hemizygous deletions in chromosome 2 around the PU.1 gene and they appeared to be derived from DNA strand breaks. Majority of these leukemia showing hemizygous deletions in chromosome 2 revealed point mutations in the remaining alleles resulting in PU.1 inactivation, which was reported to be related to leukemogenesis. These point mutations are assumed to be independent of DNA strand breaks that occur immediately after irradiation, as they appear at later time after irradiation. This review discusses the effect of radiation-induced DNA strand breaks and also mutagenesis induced independently of DNA strand breaks in hematopoietic cells contributing to the development of the first leukemic stem cell. (author)

  8. Brief Report: Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Reprogramming to Pluripotency Is a Rare Event and Selects for Patient Hematopoietic Cells Devoid of Leukemic Mutations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lee, Jong-Hee; Salci, Kyle R; Reid, Jennifer C; Orlando, Luca; Tanasijevic, Borko; Shapovalova, Zoya; Bhatia, Mickie

    2017-09-01

    Induced pluripotent stem cell reprogramming has provided critical insights into disease processes by modeling the genetics and related clinical pathophysiology. Human cancer represents highly diverse genetics, as well as inter- and intra-patient heterogeneity, where cellular model systems capable of capturing this disease complexity would be invaluable. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) represents one of most heterogeneous cancers and has been divided into genetic subtypes correlated with unique risk stratification over the decades. Here, we report our efforts to induce pluripotency from the heterogeneous population of human patients that represents this disease in the clinic. Using robust optimized reprogramming methods, we demonstrate that reprogramming of AML cells harboring leukemic genomic aberrations is a rare event with the exception of those with de novo mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) mutations that can be reprogrammed and model drug responses in vitro. Our findings indicate that unlike hematopoietic cells devoid of genomic aberrations, AML cells harboring driver mutations are refractory to reprogramming. Expression of MLL fusion proteins in AML cells did not contribute to induced reprogramming success, which continued to select for patient derived cells devoid of AML patient-specific aberrations. Our study reveals that unanticipated blockades to achieving pluripotency reside within the majority of transformed AML patient cells. Stem Cells 2017;35:2095-2102. © 2017 AlphaMed Press.

  9. Radiobiological heterogeneity of leukemic lymphocyte precursors from acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Uckun, F.M.; Kim, T.H.; Ramsay, N.C.; Min, W.S.; Song, C.W.

    1989-01-01

    The report outlines the authors' findings on the radiobiological features of leukemic lymphocyte precursors from acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patients. A marked heterogeneity existed between different cell lines, with a remarkable radioresistance and repair capacity in some ALL patients and an acute radiosensitivity in the absence of a detectable repair capacity in others. (U.K.)

  10. Autocrine stimulation of VEGFR-2 activates human leukemic cell growth and migration

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dias, Sergio; Hattori, Koichi; Zhu, Zhenping; Heissig, Beate; Choy, Margaret; Lane, William; Wu, Yan; Chadburn, Amy; Hyjek, Elizabeth; Gill, Muhammad; Hicklin, Daniel J.; Witte, Larry; Moore, M.A.S.; Rafii, Shahin

    2000-01-01

    Emerging data suggest that VEGF receptors are expressed by endothelial cells as well as hematopoietic stem cells. Therefore, we hypothesized that functional VEGF receptors may also be expressed in malignant counterparts of hematopoietic stem cells such as leukemias. We demonstrate that certain leukemias not only produce VEGF but also express functional VEGFR-2 in vivo and in vitro, resulting in the generation of an autocrine loop that may support leukemic cell survival and proliferation. Approximately 50% of freshly isolated leukemias expressed mRNA and protein for VEGFR-2. VEGF165 induced phosphorylation of VEGFR-2 and increased proliferation of leukemic cells, demonstrating these receptors were functional. VEGF165 also induced the expression of MMP-9 by leukemic cells and promoted their migration through reconstituted basement membrane. The neutralizing mAb IMC-1C11, specific to human VEGFR-2, inhibited leukemic cell survival in vitro and blocked VEGF165-mediated proliferation of leukemic cells and VEGF-induced leukemic cell migration. Xenotransplantation of primary leukemias and leukemic cell lines into immunocompromised nonobese diabetic mice resulted in significant elevation of human, but not murine, VEGF in plasma and death of inoculated mice within 3 weeks. Injection of IMC-1C11 inhibited proliferation of xenotransplanted human leukemias and significantly increased the survival of inoculated mice. Interruption of signaling by VEGFRs, particularly VEGFR-2, may provide a novel strategy for inhibiting leukemic cell proliferation. PMID:10953026

  11. Gemtuzumab Ozogamicin (GO Inclusion to Induction Chemotherapy Eliminates Leukemic Initiating Cells and Significantly Improves Survival in Mouse Models of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Cathy C Zhang

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available Gemtuzumab ozogamicin (GO is an anti-CD33 antibody-drug conjugate for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML. Although GO shows a narrow therapeutic window in early clinical studies, recent reports detailing a modified dosing regimen of GO can be safely combined with induction chemotherapy, and the combination provides significant survival benefits in AML patients. Here we tested whether the survival benefits seen with the combination arise from the enhanced reduction of chemoresidual disease and leukemic initiating cells (LICs. Herein, we use cell line and patient-derived xenograft (PDX AML models to evaluate the combination of GO with daunorubicin and cytarabine (DA induction chemotherapy on AML blast growth and animal survival. DA chemotherapy and GO as separate treatments reduced AML burden but left significant chemoresidual disease in multiple AML models. The combination of GO and DA chemotherapy eliminated nearly all AML burden and extended overall survival. In two small subsets of AML models, chemoresidual disease following DA chemotherapy displayed hallmark markers of leukemic LICs (CLL1 and CD34. In vivo, the two chemoresistant subpopulations (CLL1+/CD117− and CD34+/CD38+ showed higher ability to self-renewal than their counterpart subpopulations, respectively. CD33 was coexpressed in these functional LIC subpopulations. We demonstrate that the GO and DA induction chemotherapy combination more effectively eliminates LICs in AML PDX models than either single agent alone. These data suggest that the survival benefit seen by the combination of GO and induction chemotherapy, nonclinically and clinically, may be attributed to the enhanced reduction of LICs.

  12. Anti-leukemic effect of a synthetic compound, (±) trans-dihydronarciclasine (HYU-01) via cell-cycle arrest and apoptosis in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kim, Seo Ju; Park, Hyun Ki; Kim, Ju Young; Yoon, Jin Sun; Kim, Eun Shil; Cho, Cheon-Gyu; Kim, Byoung Kook; Park, Byeong Bae; Lee, Young Yiul

    2012-10-01

    (±) trans-Dihydronarciclasine, isolated from Chinese medicinal plant Zephyranthes candida, has been shown to possess quite potent anti-tumoral effect against selected human cancer cell lines. However, little is known about the anti-tumoral effect of (±) trans-dihydronarciclasine in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). This study was performed to investigate the effect of a novel synthetic (±) trans-dihydronarciclasine (code name; HYU-01) in AML. The HYU-01 inhibited the proliferation of various AML cell lines including HL-60 as well as primary leukemic blasts in a dose-dependent manner. To investigate the mechanism of the anti-proliferative effect of HYU-01, cell-cycle analysis was attempted in HL-60 cells, resulting in G1 arrest. The expression levels of CDK2, CDK4, CDK6, cyclin E, and cyclin A were decreased in a time-dependent manner. In addition, HYU-01 up-regulated the expression of the p27, and markedly enhanced the binding of p27 with CDK2, 4, and 6, ultimately resulting in the decrease of their kinase activities. Furthermore, HYU-01 induced the apoptosis through the induction of proapoptotic molecules and reduction of antiapoptotic molecules in association with the activation of caspase-3, -8, and -9. These results suggest that HYU-01 may inhibit the proliferation of HL-60 cells, via apoptosis, as well as G1 block in association with the induction of p27. © 2012 The Authors APMIS © 2012 APMIS.

  13. Characterization of activating mutations of NOTCH3 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia and anti-leukemic activity of NOTCH3 inhibitory antibodies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bernasconi-Elias, P; Hu, T; Jenkins, D; Firestone, B; Gans, S; Kurth, E; Capodieci, P; Deplazes-Lauber, J; Petropoulos, K; Thiel, P; Ponsel, D; Hee Choi, S; LeMotte, P; London, A; Goetcshkes, M; Nolin, E; Jones, M D; Slocum, K; Kluk, M J; Weinstock, D M; Christodoulou, A; Weinberg, O; Jaehrling, J; Ettenberg, S A; Buckler, A; Blacklow, S C; Aster, J C; Fryer, C J

    2016-11-24

    Notch receptors have been implicated as oncogenic drivers in several cancers, the most notable example being NOTCH1 in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). To characterize the role of activated NOTCH3 in cancer, we generated an antibody that detects the neo-epitope created upon gamma-secretase cleavage of NOTCH3 to release its intracellular domain (ICD3), and sequenced the negative regulatory region (NRR) and PEST (proline, glutamate, serine, threonine) domain coding regions of NOTCH3 in a panel of cell lines. We also characterize NOTCH3 tumor-associated mutations that result in activation of signaling and report new inhibitory antibodies. We determined the structural basis for receptor inhibition by obtaining the first co-crystal structure of a NOTCH3 antibody with the NRR protein and defined two distinct epitopes for NRR antibodies. The antibodies exhibit potent anti-leukemic activity in cell lines and tumor xenografts harboring NOTCH3 activating mutations. Screening of primary T-ALL samples reveals that 2 of 40 tumors examined show active NOTCH3 signaling. We also identified evidence of NOTCH3 activation in 12 of 24 patient-derived orthotopic xenograft models, 2 of which exhibit activation of NOTCH3 without activation of NOTCH1. Our studies provide additional insights into NOTCH3 activation and offer a path forward for identification of cancers that are likely to respond to therapy with NOTCH3 selective inhibitory antibodies.

  14. Novel therapeutic strategies to target leukemic cells that hijack compartmentalized continuous hematopoietic stem cell niches

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hira, Vashendriya V. V.; van Noorden, Cornelis J. F.; Carraway, Hetty E.; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P.; Molenaar, Remco J.

    2017-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells hijack hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches in the bone marrow and become leukemic stem cells (LSCs) at the expense of normal HSCs. LSCs are quiescent and resistant to chemotherapy and can cause relapse of the disease. HSCs in niches are

  15. Analysis of the surface membrane of iodinated leukemic cells by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ishitani, Kunihiko; Ikeda, Akira; Tamura, Minoru; Takeuchi, Hidekazu; Ihara, Koji

    1980-01-01

    Surface proteins of human leukemic cells were labeled selectively by lactoperoxydase catalysed-iodination and examined by SDS-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis. The electrophoretic pattern of the surface membranes of cells from a patients with chronic mylogeneous leukemia in blast crisis was of B cell type and showed Ia like antigen. Leukemic cells from a patient with hairly cell leukemia also expressed the pattern of B cell type when tested by this method the technique of iodinating cell surface with lactoperoxidase is useful in characterization of leukemia cells for diagnosis and monitoring of clinical course. (author)

  16. In vitro gamma irradiation Medical Center of leukemic cells in mice, rats, and guinea pigs

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gross, L.; Dreyfuss, Y.; Ehrenreich, T.; Feldman, D.; Limbert, L.M.

    1980-01-01

    In vitro gamma irradiation of virus-induced (Gross) mouse leukemia cells at doses of 350 to 1600 rads (1 rad = 0.01 gray) had no effect on their ability to induce leukemia, usually within 2 weeks, after transplantation into syngeneic mice. However, when cells irradiated at doses of 2000-20,000 rads were transplanted, they induced leukemia after a latency period exceeding 2.5 months, similar to the results observed in mice inoculated with filtered mouse leukemia extracts. Similar results were also obtained after irradiation of leukemic cells derived from rats in which leukemia had been induced by rat-adapted mouse leukemia virus. Apparently, gamma irradiation at a dose of, or exceeding, 2000 rads, inhibits the ability of mouse and rat leukemic cells to induce leukemia after transplantation into syngeneic hosts; however, it does not inactivate the virus carried by such cells nor prevent it from inducing leukemia. [In previous experiments, doses of more than 4,500,000 rads were needed to inactivate the passage A (Gross) leukemia virus carried in either mouse or rat leukemic cells.] In vitro gamma irradiation of L2C guinea pig leukemic cells at doses of 750 to 2500 rads had no apparent effect on their ability to induce leukemia after transplantation into strain 2 guinea pigs. However, irradiation at doses of 3250 to 20,000 rads inactivated their ability to do so. The morphology of mouse, rat, and guinea pig leukemic cells and the virus particles present in such cells was not affected by irradiation at doses of 20,000 rads

  17. Positive /sup 111/In-granulocyte scintigraphy in a patient with focal leukemic blast cell infiltrations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Syrjaelae, M; Remes, K; Paavonen, T; Liewendahl, K

    1985-06-01

    A patient with acute myeloid leukemia was investigated with /sup 111/In-granulocyte scintigraphy to reveal possible sites of infection. /sup 111/In-granulocytes accumulated in areas of leukemia blast cell infiltration leading to a false-positive scintigram. This possibility must be kept in mind when studying leukemic patients using labeled leukocytes.

  18. An evidence for adhesion-mediated acquisition of acute myeloid leukemic stem cell-like immaturities

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Funayama, Keiji; Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi; Asano, Shigetaka

    2010-01-01

    For long-term survival in vitro and in vivo of acute myeloid leukemia cells, their adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells is indispensable. However, it is still unknown if these events are uniquely induced by the leukemic stem cells. Here we show that TF-1 human leukemia cells, once they have formed a cobblestone area by adhering to mouse bone marrow-derived MS-5 cells, can acquire some leukemic stem cell like properties in association with a change in the CD44 isoform-expression pattern and with an increase in a set of related microRNAs. These findings strongly suggest that at least some leukemia cells can acquire leukemic stem cell like properties in an adhesion-mediated stochastic fashion.

  19. An evidence for adhesion-mediated acquisition of acute myeloid leukemic stem cell-like immaturities

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Funayama, Keiji; Shimane, Miyuki; Nomura, Hitoshi [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan); Asano, Shigetaka, E-mail: asgtkmd@waseda.jp [Department of Integrative Bioscience and Biomedical Engineering, Waseda University, 4-3-1 Ohkubo, Shinjuku-ku, Tokyo 169-8555 (Japan)

    2010-02-12

    For long-term survival in vitro and in vivo of acute myeloid leukemia cells, their adhesion to bone marrow stromal cells is indispensable. However, it is still unknown if these events are uniquely induced by the leukemic stem cells. Here we show that TF-1 human leukemia cells, once they have formed a cobblestone area by adhering to mouse bone marrow-derived MS-5 cells, can acquire some leukemic stem cell like properties in association with a change in the CD44 isoform-expression pattern and with an increase in a set of related microRNAs. These findings strongly suggest that at least some leukemia cells can acquire leukemic stem cell like properties in an adhesion-mediated stochastic fashion.

  20. Autocrine Signaling by Wnt-5a Deregulates Chemotaxis of Leukemic Cells and Predicts Clinical Outcome in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Janovská, P.; Poppová, L.; Plevová, K.; Plesingerova, E.; Behal, M.; Kaucká, M.; Ovesná, P.; Hlozkova, M.; Borský, M.; Stehlíková, O.; Brychtová, Y.; Doubek, M.; Machalova, M.; Baskar, S.; Kozubík, Alois; Pospíšilová, Š.; Pavlová, Š.; Bryja, Vítězslav

    2016-01-01

    Roč. 22, č. 2 (2016), s. 459-469 ISSN 1078-0432 Institutional support: RVO:68081707 Keywords : receptor tyrosine kinase * cd38 expression * mutation status * cll cells Subject RIV: BO - Biophysics Impact factor: 9.619, year: 2016

  1. Clinical impact of leukemic blast heterogeneity at diagnosis in cytogenetic intermediate-risk acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Hoffmann, Marianne Hutchings; Klausen, Tobias Wirenfeldt; Boegsted, Martin

    2012-01-01

    Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact.......Individual cellular heterogeneity within the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) bone marrow samples can be observed by multi parametric flow cytometry analysis (MFC) indicating that immunophenotypic screening for leukemic blast subsets may have prognostic impact....

  2. Novel cytotoxic exhibition mode of antimicrobial peptide anoplin in MEL cells, the cell line of murine Friend leukemia virus-induced leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zhu, Li-Na; Fu, Cai-Yun; Zhang, Shi-Fu; Chen, Wei; Jin, Yuan-Ting; Zhao, Fu-Kun

    2013-09-01

    Anoplin is a recently discovered antimicrobial peptide (AMP) isolated from the venom sac of the spider wasp Anoplius samariensis, and it is one of the shortest α-helical AMP found naturally to date consisting of only ten amino acids. Previous results showed that anoplin exhibits potent antimicrobial activity but little hemolytic activity. In this study, we synthesized anoplin, studied its cytotoxicity in Friend virus-induced leukemia cells [murine erythroleukemia (MEL) cells], and proposed its possible mechanism. Our results showed that anoplin could inhibit the proliferation of MEL cells in a dose-dependent and time-dependent manner via disrupting the integrity of cell membrane, which indicated that anoplin exerts its cytotoxicity efficacy. In addition, the cell cycle distribution of MEL cells was arrested in the G₀/G₁ phase significantly. However, anoplin could not induce obvious apoptosis in MEL cells, as well as anoplin could not induce visible changes on morphology and quantity in the bone marrow cells isolated from normal mice. All of these results indicate that anoplin, as generally believed, is a selective AMP, a value characteristic in the design of safe therapeutic agents. The cytotoxicity of anoplin on MEL cells was mainly attributable to the plasma membrane perturbation and also to the intracellular events such as the arrest of cell cycle. Although this is an initial study that explored the activity of anoplin in vitro rather than in vivo, with the increasing resistance of conventional chemotherapy, there is no doubt that anoplin has desirable feature to be developed as a novel and selective anticancer agent. Copyright © 2013 European Peptide Society and John Wiley & Sons, Ltd.

  3. A novel application of furazolidone: anti-leukemic activity in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xueqing Jiang

    Full Text Available Acute myeloid leukemia (AML is the most common malignant myeloid disorder of progenitor cells in myeloid hematopoiesis and exemplifies a genetically heterogeneous disease. The patients with AML also show a heterogeneous response to therapy. Although all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA has been successfully introduced to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL, it is rather ineffective in non-APL AML. In our present study, 1200 off-patent marketed drugs and natural compounds that have been approved by the Food and Drug Administration (FDA were screened for anti-leukemia activity using the retrovirus transduction/transformation assay (RTTA. Furazolidone (FZD was shown to inhibit bone marrow transformation mediated by several leukemia fusion proteins, including AML1-ETO. Furazolidone has been used in the treatment of certain bacterial and protozoan infections in human and animals for more than sixty years. We investigated the anti-leukemic activity of FZD in a series of AML cells. FZD displayed potent antiproliferative properties at submicromolar concentrations and induced apoptosis in AML cell lines. Importantly, FZD treatment of certain AML cells induced myeloid cell differentiation by morphology and flow cytometry for CD11b expression. Furthermore, FZD treatment resulted in increased stability of tumor suppressor p53 protein in AML cells. Our in vitro results suggest furazolidone as a novel therapeutic strategy in AML patients.

  4. Idarubicin induces mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in leukemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ristic, Biljana; Bosnjak, Mihajlo; Arsikin, Katarina; Mircic, Aleksandar; Suzin-Zivkovic, Violeta; Bogdanovic, Andrija; Perovic, Vladimir; Martinovic, Tamara; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir; Trajkovic, Vladimir; Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica

    2014-01-01

    We investigated if the antileukemic drug idarubicin induces autophagy, a process of programmed cellular self-digestion, in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining demonstrated the presence of autophagic vesicles and intracellular acidification, respectively, in idarubicin-treated REH leukemic cell line. Idarubicin increased punctuation/aggregation of microtubule-associated light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced the conversion of LC3B-I to autophagosome-associated LC3B-II in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors, and promoted the degradation of the selective autophagic target p62, thus indicating the increase in autophagic flux. Idarubicin inhibited the phosphorylation of the main autophagy repressor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target p70S6 kinase. The treatment with the mTOR activator leucine prevented idarubicin-mediated autophagy induction. Idarubicin-induced mTOR repression was associated with the activation of the mTOR inhibitor AMP-activated protein kinase and down-regulation of the mTOR activator Akt. The suppression of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or LC3B and beclin-1 genetic knockdown rescued REH cells from idarubicin-mediated oxidative stress, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Idarubicin also caused mTOR inhibition and cytotoxic autophagy in K562 leukemic cell line and leukocytes from chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but not healthy controls. By demonstrating mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in idarubicin-treated leukemic cells, our results warrant caution when considering combining idarubicin with autophagy inhibitors in leukemia therapy. - Highlights: • Idarubicin induces autophagy in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. • Idarubicin induces autophagy by inhibiting mTOR in leukemic cells. • mTOR suppression by idarubicin is associated with AMPK activation and Akt blockade.

  5. Idarubicin induces mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in leukemic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ristic, Biljana [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Bosnjak, Mihajlo [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Arsikin, Katarina [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Mircic, Aleksandar; Suzin-Zivkovic, Violeta [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Bogdanovic, Andrija [Clinic for Hematology, Clinical Centre of Serbia, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Perovic, Vladimir [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Martinovic, Tamara; Kravic-Stevovic, Tamara; Bumbasirevic, Vladimir [Institute of Histology and Embryology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Belgrade (Serbia); Trajkovic, Vladimir, E-mail: vtrajkovic@med.bg.ac.rs [Institute of Microbiology and Immunology, School of Medicine, University of Belgrade, Dr. Subotica 1, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia); Harhaji-Trajkovic, Ljubica, E-mail: buajk@yahoo.com [Institute for Biological Research, University of Belgrade, Belgrade, Despot Stefan Blvd. 142, 11000 Belgrade (Serbia)

    2014-08-01

    We investigated if the antileukemic drug idarubicin induces autophagy, a process of programmed cellular self-digestion, in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. Transmission electron microscopy and acridine orange staining demonstrated the presence of autophagic vesicles and intracellular acidification, respectively, in idarubicin-treated REH leukemic cell line. Idarubicin increased punctuation/aggregation of microtubule-associated light chain 3B (LC3B), enhanced the conversion of LC3B-I to autophagosome-associated LC3B-II in the presence of proteolysis inhibitors, and promoted the degradation of the selective autophagic target p62, thus indicating the increase in autophagic flux. Idarubicin inhibited the phosphorylation of the main autophagy repressor mammalian target of rapamycin (mTOR) and its downstream target p70S6 kinase. The treatment with the mTOR activator leucine prevented idarubicin-mediated autophagy induction. Idarubicin-induced mTOR repression was associated with the activation of the mTOR inhibitor AMP-activated protein kinase and down-regulation of the mTOR activator Akt. The suppression of autophagy by pharmacological inhibitors or LC3B and beclin-1 genetic knockdown rescued REH cells from idarubicin-mediated oxidative stress, mitochondrial depolarization, caspase activation and apoptotic DNA fragmentation. Idarubicin also caused mTOR inhibition and cytotoxic autophagy in K562 leukemic cell line and leukocytes from chronic myeloid leukemia patients, but not healthy controls. By demonstrating mTOR-dependent cytotoxic autophagy in idarubicin-treated leukemic cells, our results warrant caution when considering combining idarubicin with autophagy inhibitors in leukemia therapy. - Highlights: • Idarubicin induces autophagy in leukemic cell lines and primary leukemic cells. • Idarubicin induces autophagy by inhibiting mTOR in leukemic cells. • mTOR suppression by idarubicin is associated with AMPK activation and Akt blockade.

  6. Novel therapeutic strategies to target leukemic cells that hijack compartmentalized continuous hematopoietic stem cell niches.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hira, Vashendriya V V; Van Noorden, Cornelis J F; Carraway, Hetty E; Maciejewski, Jaroslaw P; Molenaar, Remco J

    2017-08-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia and acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells hijack hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) niches in the bone marrow and become leukemic stem cells (LSCs) at the expense of normal HSCs. LSCs are quiescent and resistant to chemotherapy and can cause relapse of the disease. HSCs in niches are needed to generate blood cell precursors that are committed to unilineage differentiation and eventually production of mature blood cells, including red blood cells, megakaryocytes, myeloid cells and lymphocytes. Thus far, three types of HSC niches are recognized: endosteal, reticular and perivascular niches. However, we argue here that there is only one type of HSC niche, which consists of a periarteriolar compartment and a perisinusoidal compartment. In the periarteriolar compartment, hypoxia and low levels of reactive oxygen species preserve the HSC pool. In the perisinusoidal compartment, hypoxia in combination with higher levels of reactive oxygen species enables proliferation of progenitor cells and their mobilization into the circulation. Because HSC niches offer protection to LSCs against chemotherapy, we review novel therapeutic strategies to inhibit homing of LSCs in niches for the prevention of dedifferentiation of leukemic cells into LSCs and to stimulate migration of leukemic cells out of niches. These strategies enhance differentiation and proliferation and thus sensitize leukemic cells to chemotherapy. Finally, we list clinical trials of therapies that tackle LSCs in HSC niches to circumvent their protection against chemotherapy. Copyright © 2017 The Authors. Published by Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  7. Allogeneic cellular immunotherapy for chronic B-cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Hoogendoorn, Mels

    2007-01-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT) following reduced-intensity conditioning (RIC) as treatment modality has curative potential in patients suffering from chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) or mantle cell lymphoma (MCL), illustrating susceptibility of these leukemic cells for the

  8. NKp46 identifies an NKT cell subset susceptible to leukemic transformation in mouse and human

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Jianhua; Mitsui, Takeki; Wei, Min; Mao, Hsiaoyin; Butchar, Jonathan P.; Shah, Mithun Vinod; Zhang, Jianying; Mishra, Anjali; Alvarez-Breckenridge, Christopher; Liu, Xingluo; Liu, Shujun; Yokohama, Akihiko; Trotta, Rossana; Marcucci, Guido; Benson, Don M.; Loughran, Thomas P.; Tridandapani, Susheela; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2011-01-01

    IL-15 may have a role in the development of T cell large granular lymphocyte (T-LGL) or NKT leukemias. However, the mechanisms of action and the identity of the cell subset that undergoes leukemic transformation remain elusive. Here we show that in both mice and humans, NKp46 expression marks a minute population of WT NKT cells with higher activity and potency to become leukemic. Virtually 100% of T-LGL leukemias in IL-15 transgenic mice expressed NKp46, as did a majority of human T-LGL leukemias. The minute NKp46+ NKT population, but not the NKp46– NKT population, was selectively expanded by overexpression of endogenous IL-15. Importantly, IL-15 transgenic NKp46– NKT cells did not become NKp46+ in vivo, suggesting that NKp46+ T-LGL leukemia cells were the malignant counterpart of the minute WT NKp46+ NKT population. Mechanistically, NKp46+ NKT cells possessed higher responsiveness to IL-15 in vitro and in vivo compared with that of their NKp46– NKT counterparts. Furthermore, interruption of IL-15 signaling using a neutralizing antibody could prevent LGL leukemia in IL-15 transgenic mice. Collectively, our data demonstrate that NKp46 identifies a functionally distinct NKT subset in mice and humans that appears to be directly susceptible to leukemic transformation when IL-15 is overexpressed. Thus, IL-15 signaling and NKp46 may be useful targets in the treatment of patients with T-LGL or NKT leukemia. PMID:21364281

  9. Leukemia - B-Cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Leukemia - B-cell Prolymphocytic Leukemia and Hairy Cell Leukemia Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options About Clinical Trials Latest Research ...

  10. Leukemic optic neuropathy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Brown, G C; Shields, J A; Augsburger, J J; Serota, F T; Koch, P

    1981-03-01

    The clinical course and ophthalmic manifestations of an eight year old child with acute undifferentiated leukemia and unilateral blindness secondary to leukemic optic nerve head infiltration are described. At autopsy the involved nerve head and peripapillary retina demonstrated massive leukemic cell infiltration and hemorrhagic necrosis. This manifestation of leukemia is quite uncommon and prognosis for life in such cases is poor with existing methods of therapy.

  11. Anti-leukemic therapies induce cytogenetic changes of human bone marrow-derived mesenchymal stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yeh, Su-Peng; Lo, Wen-Jyi; Lin, Chiao-Lin; Liao, Yu-Min; Lin, Chen-Yuan; Bai, Li-Yuan; Liang, Ji-An; Chiu, Chang-Fang

    2012-02-01

    Both bone marrow hematopoietic cells (BM-HCs) and mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSCs) may have cytogenetic aberrations in leukemic patients, and anti-leukemic therapy may induce cytogenetic remission of BM-HCs. The impact of anti-leukemic therapy on BM-MSCs remains unknown. Cytogenetic studies of BM-MSCs from 15 leukemic patients with documented cytogenetic abnormalities of BM-HCs were investigated. To see the influence of anti-leukemic therapy on BM-MSCs, cytogenetic studies were carried out in seven of them after the completion of anti-leukemic therapy, including anthracycline/Ara-C-based chemotherapy in two patients, high-dose busulfan/cyclophosphamide-based allogeneic transplantation in two patients, and total body irradiation (TBI)-based allogeneic transplantation in three patients. To simulate the effect of TBI in vitro, three BM-MSCs from one leukemic patient and two normal adults were irradiated using the same dosage and dosing schedule of TBI and cytogenetics were re-examined after irradiation. At the diagnosis of leukemia, two BM-MSCs had cytogenetic aberration, which were completely different to their BM-HCs counterpart. After the completion of anti-leukemic therapy, cytogenetic aberration was no longer detectable in one patient. Unexpectedly, BM-MSCs from three patients receiving TBI-based allogeneic transplantation acquired new, clonal cytogenetic abnormalities after transplantation. Similarly, complex cytogenetic abnormalities were found in all the three BM-MSCs exposed to in vitro irradiation. In conclusion, anti-leukemic treatments induce not only "cytogenetic remission" but also new cytogenetic abnormalities of BM-MSCs. TBI especially exerts detrimental effect on the chromosomal integrity of BM-MSCs and highlights the equal importance of investigating long-term adverse effect of anti-leukemic therapy on BM-MSCs as opposed to beneficial effect on BM-HCs.

  12. Exploiting mitochondrial dysfunction for effective elimination of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jérome Kluza

    Full Text Available Challenges today concern chronic myeloid leukemia (CML patients resistant to imatinib. There is growing evidence that imatinib-resistant leukemic cells present abnormal glucose metabolism but the impact on mitochondria has been neglected. Our work aimed to better understand and exploit the metabolic alterations of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells. Imatinib-resistant cells presented high glycolysis as compared to sensitive cells. Consistently, expression of key glycolytic enzymes, at least partly mediated by HIF-1α, was modified in imatinib-resistant cells suggesting that imatinib-resistant cells uncouple glycolytic flux from pyruvate oxidation. Interestingly, mitochondria of imatinib-resistant cells exhibited accumulation of TCA cycle intermediates, increased NADH and low oxygen consumption. These mitochondrial alterations due to the partial failure of ETC were further confirmed in leukemic cells isolated from some imatinib-resistant CML patients. As a consequence, mitochondria generated more ROS than those of imatinib-sensitive cells. This, in turn, resulted in increased death of imatinib-resistant leukemic cells following in vitro or in vivo treatment with the pro-oxidants, PEITC and Trisenox, in a syngeneic mouse tumor model. Conversely, inhibition of glycolysis caused derepression of respiration leading to lower cellular ROS. In conclusion, these findings indicate that imatinib-resistant leukemic cells have an unexpected mitochondrial dysfunction that could be exploited for selective therapeutic intervention.

  13. Studies by radioiodination of normal adult, fetal and leukemic cell membranes

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kannourakis, G; Cauchi, M N [Department of Pathology and Immunology, Monash Medical School, Melbourne, Australia

    1978-01-01

    A comparison was made between cord blood lymphocytes, normal adult lymphocytes and leukemic cells after membrane iodination with lactoperoxidase. A double-labeling technique using lactoperoxidase iodination with /sup 125/I and /sup 131/I followed by analysis on polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis revealed a number of membrane differences between leukemic, normal and fetal cells. There was a reduction in the 70,000 molecular weight component in cord blood cells compared to adult lymphocytes, and an increase in membrane peptides with molecular weights of 35,000, 20,000, 9,000 and 4,000. Although smaller molecular weight peptides were also present in chronic lymphatic leukemia as well as acute myeloid leukemia, these were shown to be distinct from fetal type membrane components.

  14. Effect of dioxin on normal and leukemic human hematopoietic cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lambertenghi-Deliliers, G.; Soligo, D. [Univ. degli Studi, Milan (Italy). Dipt. die Ematologia, Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS; Fracchiolla, N.S. [Ospedale Maggiore Policlinico IRCCS, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Ematologia; Servida, F. [Fondazione Matarelli, Milan (Italy); Bertazzi, P.A. [Istituti Clinici di Perfezionamento, Milan (Italy). Dipt. di Medicina del Lavoro

    2004-09-15

    2,3,7,8-Tetrachlorodibenzo-p-dioxin (TCDD) arises from chlorination of phenolic substrates or from partial combustion of organic materials in the presence of chlorine sources. TCDD has a large number of biological effects such as long-lasting skin disease, cardiovascular disease, diabete and cancer. TCDD is the prototypical agonist of the aryl hydrocarbon receptor (AhR), a member of the erb-A family that also includes the receptors for steroids, thyroid hormones, peroxisome proliferators and retinoids. When bound to dioxin, the AhR can bind to DNA and alter the expression of some genes including cytokines and growth factors. In this study, we analyzed the effect of escalating doses of TCDD on human CD34{sup +} progenitor cells from the leukapheresis of normal donors stimulated with G-CSF as well as the human myeloid leukemic cell lines HL60 (promyelocytic leukemia) and K562 (chronic myelogenous leukemia). The possible specific modulation of gene expression induced by the TCDD exposure was then tested by means of microarray analyses.

  15. Proteinase-Activated Receptor 1 (PAR1 regulates leukemic stem cell functions.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Nicole Bäumer

    Full Text Available External signals that are mediated by specific receptors determine stem cell fate. The thrombin receptor PAR1 plays an important role in haemostasis, thrombosis and vascular biology, but also in tumor biology and angiogenesis. Its expression and function in hematopoietic stem cells is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed expression and function of PAR1 in primary hematopoietic cells and their leukemic counterparts. AML patients' blast cells expressed much lower levels of PAR1 mRNA and protein than CD34+ progenitor cells. Constitutive Par1-deficiency in adult mice did not affect engraftment or stem cell potential of hematopoietic cells. To model an AML with Par1-deficiency, we retrovirally introduced the oncogene MLL-AF9 in wild type and Par1-/- hematopoietic progenitor cells. Par1-deficiency did not alter initial leukemia development. However, the loss of Par1 enhanced leukemic stem cell function in vitro and in vivo. Re-expression of PAR1 in Par1-/- leukemic stem cells delayed leukemogenesis in vivo. These data indicate that Par1 contributes to leukemic stem cell maintenance.

  16. Proteinase-Activated Receptor 1 (PAR1) regulates leukemic stem cell functions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bäumer, Nicole; Krause, Annika; Köhler, Gabriele; Lettermann, Stephanie; Evers, Georg; Hascher, Antje; Bäumer, Sebastian; Berdel, Wolfgang E; Müller-Tidow, Carsten; Tickenbrock, Lara

    2014-01-01

    External signals that are mediated by specific receptors determine stem cell fate. The thrombin receptor PAR1 plays an important role in haemostasis, thrombosis and vascular biology, but also in tumor biology and angiogenesis. Its expression and function in hematopoietic stem cells is largely unknown. Here, we analyzed expression and function of PAR1 in primary hematopoietic cells and their leukemic counterparts. AML patients' blast cells expressed much lower levels of PAR1 mRNA and protein than CD34+ progenitor cells. Constitutive Par1-deficiency in adult mice did not affect engraftment or stem cell potential of hematopoietic cells. To model an AML with Par1-deficiency, we retrovirally introduced the oncogene MLL-AF9 in wild type and Par1-/- hematopoietic progenitor cells. Par1-deficiency did not alter initial leukemia development. However, the loss of Par1 enhanced leukemic stem cell function in vitro and in vivo. Re-expression of PAR1 in Par1-/- leukemic stem cells delayed leukemogenesis in vivo. These data indicate that Par1 contributes to leukemic stem cell maintenance.

  17. Transglutaminase 2 expression in acute myeloid leukemia: Association with adhesion molecule expression and leukemic blast motility

    Science.gov (United States)

    Meyer, Stefan; Ravandi-Kashani, Farhad; Borthakur, Gautam; Coombes, Kevin R.; Zhang, Nianxiang; Kornblau, Steven

    2016-01-01

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is a heterogenous disease with differential oncogene association, outcome and treatment regimens. Treatment strategies for AML have improved outcome but despite increased molecular biological information AML is still associated with poor prognosis. Proteomic analysis on the effects of a range of leukemogenic oncogenes showed that the protein transglutaminase 2 (TG2) is expressed at greater levels as a consequence of oncogenic transformation. Further analysis of this observation was performed with 511 AML samples using reverse phase proteomic arrays, demonstrating that TG2 expression was higher at relapse than diagnosis in many cases. In addition elevated TG2 expression correlated with increased expression of numerous adhesion proteins and many apoptosis regulating proteins, two processes related to leukemogenesis. TG2 has previously been linked to drug resistance in cancer and given the negative correlation between TG2 levels and peripheral blasts observed increased TG2 levels may lead to the protection of the leukemic stem cell due to increased adhesion/reduced motility. TG2 may therefore form part of a network of proteins that define poor outcome in AML patients and potentially offer a target to sensitize AML stem cells to drug treatment. PMID:23576428

  18. Heterogeneity of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    OpenAIRE

    Sabbath, K D; Ball, E D; Larcom, P; Davis, R B; Griffin, J D

    1985-01-01

    The expression of differentiation-associated surface antigens by the clonogenic leukemic cells from 20 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was studied with a panel of seven cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies (anti-Ia, -MY9, -PM-81, -AML-2-23, -Mol, -Mo2, and -MY3). The surface antigen phenotypes of the clonogenic cells were compared with the phenotypes of the whole leukemic cell population, and with the phenotypes of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. In each case the clonogenic ...

  19. Identification of hepatic niche harboring human acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells via the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Itaru Kato

    Full Text Available In acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL patients, the bone marrow niche is widely known to be an important element of treatment response and relapse. Furthermore, a characteristic liver pathology observed in ALL patients implies that the hepatic microenvironment provides an extramedullary niche for leukemic cells. However, it remains unclear whether the liver actually provides a specific niche. The mechanism underlying this pathology is also poorly understood. Here, to answer these questions, we reconstituted the histopathology of leukemic liver by using patients-derived primary ALL cells into NOD/SCID/Yc (null mice. The liver pathology in this model was similar to that observed in the patients. By using this model, we clearly demonstrated that bile duct epithelial cells form a hepatic niche that supports infiltration and proliferation of ALL cells in the liver. Furthermore, we showed that functions of the niche are maintained by the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis, proposing a novel therapeutic approach targeting the extramedullary niche by inhibition of the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis. In conclusion, we demonstrated that the liver dissemination of leukemia is not due to nonselective infiltration, but rather systematic invasion and proliferation of leukemic cells in hepatic niche. Although the contribution of SDF-1/CXCR4 axis is reported in some cancer cells or leukemic niches such as bone marrow, we demonstrated that this axis works even in the extramedullary niche of leukemic cells. Our findings form the basis for therapeutic approaches that target the extramedullary niche by inhibiting the SDF-1/CXCR4 axis.

  20. Normal and Leukemic Hematopoiesis

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Vercauteren, Suzanne Maria

    2003-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a clonal myeloproliferative disease characterized by an uncontrolled proliferation and block in differentiation of myeloid committed blood cells in the bone marrow. Despite the lack of mature cells derived from the leukemic clone in the majority of AML patients, AML

  1. Autonomous growth potential of leukemia blast cells is associated with poor prognosis in human acute leukemias

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jakubowski Ann A

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available Abstract We have described a severe combined immunodeficiency (SCID mouse model that permits the subcutaneous growth of primary human acute leukemia blast cells into a measurable subcutaneous nodule which may be followed by the development of disseminated disease. Utilizing the SCID mouse model, we examined the growth potential of leukemic blasts from 133 patients with acute leukemia, (67 acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL and 66 acute myeloid leukemia (AML in the animals after subcutaneous inoculation without conditioning treatment. The blasts displayed three distinct growth patterns: "aggressive", "indolent", or "no tumor growth". Out of 133 leukemias, 45 (33.8% displayed an aggressive growth pattern, 14 (10.5% displayed an indolent growth pattern and 74 (55.6% did not grow in SCID mice. The growth probability of leukemias from relapsed and/or refractory disease was nearly 3 fold higher than that from patients with newly diagnosed disease. Serial observations found that leukemic blasts from the same individual, which did not initiate tumor growth at initial presentation and/or at early relapse, may engraft and grow in the later stages of disease, suggesting that the ability of leukemia cells for engraftment and proliferation was gradually acquired following the process of leukemia progression. Nine autonomous growing leukemia cell lines were established in vitro. These displayed an aggressive proliferation pattern, suggesting a possible correlation between the capacity of human leukemia cells for autonomous proliferation in vitro and an aggressive growth potential in SCID mice. In addition, we demonstrated that patients whose leukemic blasts displayed an aggressive growth and dissemination pattern in SClD mice had a poor clinical outcome in patients with ALL as well as AML. Patients whose leukemic blasts grew indolently or whose leukemia cells failed to induce growth had a significantly longer DFS and more favorable clinical course.

  2. Musashi2 modulates K562 leukemic cell proliferation and apoptosis involving the MAPK pathway

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Zhang, Huijuan; Tan, Shi; Wang, Juan; Chen, Shana; Quan, Jing; Xian, Jingrong; Zhang, Shuai shuai; He, Jingang; Zhang, Ling, E-mail: lingzhang@cqmu.edu.cn

    2014-01-01

    The RNA-binding protein Musashi2 (Msi2) has been identified as a master regulator within a variety of stem cell populations via the regulation of translational gene expression. A recent study has suggested that Msi2 is strongly expressed in leukemic cells of acute myeloid leukemia patients, and elevated Msi2 is associated with poor prognosis. However, the potential role of Msi2 in leukemogenesis is still not well understood. Here, we investigated the effect of Msi2 knockdown on the biological properties of leukemic cells. High expression of Msi2 was found in K562 and KG-1a leukemic cell lines, and low expression was observed in the U937 cell line. We transduced K562 cells with two independent adenoviral shRNA vectors targeting Msi2 and confirmed knockdown of Msi2 at the mRNA and protein levels. Msi2 silencing inhibited cell growth and caused cell cycle arrest by increasing the expression of p21 and decreasing the expression of cyclin D1 and cdk2. In addition, knockdown of Msi2 promoted cellular apoptosis via the upregulation of Bax and downregulation of Bcl-2 expression. Furthermore, Msi2 knockdown resulted in the inactivation of the ERK/MAPK and p38/MAPK pathways, but no remarkable change in p-AKT was observed. These data provide evidence that Msi2 plays an important role in leukemogenesis involving the MAPK signaling pathway, which indicates that Msi2 may be a novel target for leukemia treatment. - Highlights: • Knockdown of Msi2 inhibited K562 cell growth and arrested cell cycle progression. • Knockdown of Msi2 induced K562 cell apoptosis via the regulation of Bax and Bcl-2. • The MAPK pathway was involved in the process of Msi2-mediated leukemogenesis. • Our data indicate that Msi2 is a potential new target for leukemia treatment.

  3. Activation of the complement cascade enhances motility of leukemic cells by downregulating expression of HO-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, A; Borkowska-Rzeszotek, S; Kubis, E; Bujko, K; Brzeźniakiewicz-Janus, K; Bolkun, L; Kloczko, J; Moniuszko, M; Basak, G W; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Ratajczak, M Z

    2017-02-01

    As a crucial arm of innate immunity, the complement cascade (ComC) is involved both in mobilization of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow (BM) into peripheral blood and in their homing to BM. Despite the fact that ComC cleavage fragments alone do not chemoattract normal HSPCs, we found that leukemia cell lines as well as clonogenic blasts from chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia patients respond robustly to C3 and C5 cleavage fragments by chemotaxis and increased adhesion. This finding was supported by the detection of C3a and C5a receptors in cells from human malignant hematopoietic cell lines and patient blasts at the mRNA (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) and protein level (fluorescence-activated cell sorting), and by the demonstration that these receptors respond to stimulation by C3a and C5a by phosphorylation of p42/44 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and protein kinase B (PKB/AKT). We also found that inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is a negative regulator of ComC-mediated trafficking of leukemic cells, and that stimulation of leukemic cells by C3 or C5 cleavage fragments activates p38 MAPK, which downregulates HO-1 expression, rendering cells more mobile. We conclude that activation of the ComC in leukemia/lymphoma patients (for example, as a result of accompanying infections) enhances the motility of malignant cells and contributes to their spread in a p38 MAPK-HO-1-dependent manner. Therefore, inhibition of p38 MAPK or upregulation of HO-1 by small-molecule modulators would have a beneficial effect on ameliorating cell migration-mediated expansion of leukemia/lymphoma cells when the ComC becomes activated.

  4. Activation of the complement cascade enhances motility of leukemic cells by downregulating expression of HO-1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Abdelbaset-Ismail, A; Borkowska-Rzeszotek, S; Kubis, E; Bujko, K; Brzeźniakiewicz-Janus, K; Bolkun, L; Kloczko, J; Moniuszko, M; Basak, G W; Wiktor-Jedrzejczak, W; Ratajczak, M Z

    2017-01-01

    As a crucial arm of innate immunity, the complement cascade (ComC) is involved both in mobilization of normal hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPCs) from bone marrow (BM) into peripheral blood and in their homing to BM. Despite the fact that ComC cleavage fragments alone do not chemoattract normal HSPCs, we found that leukemia cell lines as well as clonogenic blasts from chronic myeloid leukemia and acute myeloid leukemia patients respond robustly to C3 and C5 cleavage fragments by chemotaxis and increased adhesion. This finding was supported by the detection of C3a and C5a receptors in cells from human malignant hematopoietic cell lines and patient blasts at the mRNA (reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction) and protein level (fluorescence-activated cell sorting), and by the demonstration that these receptors respond to stimulation by C3a and C5a by phosphorylation of p42/44 and p38 mitogen-activated protein kinases (MAPK), and protein kinase B (PKB/AKT). We also found that inducible heme oxygenase 1 (HO-1) is a negative regulator of ComC-mediated trafficking of leukemic cells, and that stimulation of leukemic cells by C3 or C5 cleavage fragments activates p38 MAPK, which downregulates HO-1 expression, rendering cells more mobile. We conclude that activation of the ComC in leukemia/lymphoma patients (for example, as a result of accompanying infections) enhances the motility of malignant cells and contributes to their spread in a p38 MAPK–HO-1-dependent manner. Therefore, inhibition of p38 MAPK or upregulation of HO-1 by small-molecule modulators would have a beneficial effect on ameliorating cell migration-mediated expansion of leukemia/lymphoma cells when the ComC becomes activated. PMID:27451975

  5. Leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina: a case report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Young Hwan

    2008-01-01

    The CNS involvement by leukemia may either be meningeal or parenchymal, although meningeal infiltration of leukemic cells, known as leukemic meningitis is more common. We report a case of leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina in a patient with an acute lymphoblastic crisis which transformed from the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia. An MR image revealed diffuse enlargement and peripheral ring enhancement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina

  6. Leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina: a case report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Lee, Dong Hyun; Kim, Ho Kyun; Lee, Young Hwan [School of Medicine, Catholic University of Daegu, Daegu (Korea, Republic of)

    2008-07-15

    The CNS involvement by leukemia may either be meningeal or parenchymal, although meningeal infiltration of leukemic cells, known as leukemic meningitis is more common. We report a case of leukemic meningitis involving the cauda equina in a patient with an acute lymphoblastic crisis which transformed from the chronic phase of chronic myeloid leukemia. An MR image revealed diffuse enlargement and peripheral ring enhancement of the nerve roots of the cauda equina.

  7. Apoptosis induction in MV4-11 and K562 human leukemic cells by Pereskia sacharosa (Cactaceae) leaf crude extract.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Asmaa, Mat Jusoh Siti; Al-Jamal, Hamid Ali Nagi; Ang, Cheng Yong; Asan, Jamaruddin Mat; Seeni, Azman; Johan, Muhammad Farid

    2014-01-01

    Pereskia sacharosa is a genus of cacti widely used in folk medicine for cancer-related treatment. Anti-proliferative effects have been studied in recent years against colon, breast, cervical and lung cancer cell lines, with promising results. We here extended study of anti-proliferative effects to a blood malignancy, leukemia. Two leukemic cell lines, MV4-11 (acute myeloid leukemia) and K562 (chronic myeloid leukemia), were studied. IC50 concentrations were determined and apoptosis and cell cycle regulation were studied by flow cytometric analysis. The expression of apoptosis and cell-cycle related regulatory proteins was assessed by Western blotting. P sacharosa inhibited growth of MV4-11 and K562 cells in a dose-dependent manner. The mode of cell death was via induction of intrinsic apoptotic pathways and cell cycle arrest. There was profound up-regulation of cytochrome c, caspases, p21 and p53 expression and repression of Akt and Bcl-2 expression in treated cells. These results suggest that P sacharosa induces leukemic cell death via apoptosis induction and changes in cell cycle checkpoint, thus deserves further study for anti-leukemic potential.

  8. Trisomy 4 in a case of acute undifferentiated myeloblastic leukemia with hand-mirror cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kao, Y S; McCormick, C; Vial, R

    1990-04-01

    A case of acute undifferentiated myelocytic leukemic with trisomy 4 is described. The patient is a 61-year-old woman who developed leukemia 4 1/2 years after receiving radiation therapy for uterine carcinoma. Many leukemic cells exhibited hand-mirror configuration after the bone marrow aspirate was left at room temperature overnight. The relationship between trisomy 4 and hand-mirror cells in acute myelocytic leukemia is unknown.

  9. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Wang, Jiying; Rao, Qing; Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang

    2009-01-01

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  10. Overexpression of Rac1 in leukemia patients and its role in leukemia cell migration and growth

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Wang, Jiying [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Rao, Qing, E-mail: raoqing@gmail.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China); Wang, Min; Wei, Hui; Xing, Haiyan; Liu, Hang; Wang, Yanzhong; Tang, Kejing; Peng, Leiwen; Tian, Zheng; Wang, Jianxiang [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, 288 Nanjing Road, Tianjin 300020 (China)

    2009-09-04

    Rac1 belongs to the Rho family that act as critical mediators of signaling pathways controlling cell migration and proliferation and contributes to the interactions of hematopoietic stem cells with their microenvironment. Alteration of Rac1 might result in unbalanced interactions and ultimately lead to leukemogenesis. In this study, we analyze the expression of Rac1 protein in leukemia patients and determine its role in the abnormal behaviours of leukemic cells. Rac1 protein is overexpressed in primary acute myeloid leukemia cells as compared to normal bone marrow mononuclear cells. siRNA-mediated silencing of Rac1 in leukemia cell lines induced inhibition of cell migration, proliferation, and colony formation. Additionally, blocking Rac1 activity by an inhibitor of Rac1-GTPase, NSC23766, suppressed cell migration and growth. We conclude that overexpression of Rac1 contributes to the accelerated migration and high proliferation potential of leukemia cells, which could be implicated in leukemia development and progression.

  11. Establishing long-term cultures with self-renewing acute myeloid leukemia stem/progenitor cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Gosliga, Djoke; Schepers, Hein; Rizo, Aleksandra; van der Kolk, Dorina; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2007-01-01

    Objective. With the emergence of the concept of the leukemia stem cell, assays to study them remain pivotal in understanding (leukemic) stem cell biology. Methods. We have cultured acute myeloid leukemia CD34(+) cells on bone marrow stroma. Long-term expansion was monitored and self-renewal was

  12. Aberrant methylation of the M-type phospholipase A2 receptor gene in leukemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Menschikowski, Mario; Platzbecker, Uwe; Hagelgans, Albert; Vogel, Margot; Thiede, Christian; Schönefeldt, Claudia; Lehnert, Renate; Eisenhofer, Graeme; Siegert, Gabriele

    2012-01-01

    The M-type phospholipase A2 receptor (PLA2R1) plays a crucial role in several signaling pathways and may act as tumor-suppressor. This study examined the expression and methylation of the PLA2R1 gene in Jurkat and U937 leukemic cell lines and its methylation in patients with myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS) or acute leukemia. Sites of methylation of the PLA2R1 locus were identified by sequencing bisulfite-modified DNA fragments. Methylation specific-high resolution melting (MS-HRM) analysis was then carried out to quantify PLA2R1 methylation at 5-CpG sites identified with differences in methylation between healthy control subjects and leukemic patients using sequencing of bisulfite-modified genomic DNA. Expression of PLA2R1 was found to be completely down-regulated in Jurkat and U937 cells, accompanied by complete methylation of PLA2R1 promoter and down-stream regions; PLA2R1 was re-expressed after exposure of cells to 5-aza-2´-deoxycytidine. MS-HRM analysis of the PLA2R1 locus in patients with different types of leukemia indicated an average methylation of 28.9% ± 17.8%, compared to less than 9% in control subjects. In MDS patients the extent of PLA2R1 methylation significantly increased with disease risk. Furthermore, measurements of PLA2R1 methylation appeared useful for predicting responsiveness to the methyltransferase inhibitor, azacitidine, as a pre-emptive treatment to avoid hematological relapse in patients with high-risk MDS or acute myeloid leukemia. The study shows for the first time that PLA2R1 gene sequences are a target of hypermethylation in leukemia, which may have pathophysiological relevance for disease evolution in MDS and leukemogenesis

  13. Uncontrolled hypertension secondary to leukemic cell infiltration of kidneys in a hemodialysis patient

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kultigin Turkmen

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available Kultigin Turkmen1, Lutfullah Altintepe2, Ibrahim Guney2, Ismet Aydogdu3, Osman Koc4, Mehmet Ali Erkut5, Halil Zeki Tonbul11Department of Nephrology, Meram School of Medicine, Selcuk University, 2Meram Training and Research Hospital, Selcuk University, 3Department of Hematology, Meram School of Medicine, Selcuk University, 4Department of Radiology, Meram School of Medicine, Selcuk University, 5Department of Hematology, Meram Training and Research Hospital, Selcuk UniversityAbstract: Leukemic infiltration of the kidney is usually silent, and the admission of the patients with renal dysfunction or acute kidney injury is uncommon. We present a 34-year old hemodialysis patient with new onset of uncontrolled hypertension, erythropoietin-resistant anemia, thrombocytopenia, and Bell’s palsy. On admission, his blood pressure (BP was 210/110 mmHg and he had petechiae and purpura at upper and lower extremities. Renal ultrasonography (USG showed bilaterally enlarged kidneys without hydronephrosis, unlike his previous USG, which determined bilaterally atrophic kidneys. Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, hypertensive crisis due to bilateral leukemic cell infiltration of kidneys, tumor lysis syndrome, and leukemic involvement of the facial nerve were diagnosed. Despite intense antihypertensive management, his BP was not controlled. After prednisolone, daunorubicine, and vincristine therapy, the size of kidneys diminished and his BP dropped under normal range. In conclusion, pathological findings such as uncontrolled hypertension, flank pain, skin rashes, and abnormal blood count should be considered carefully, even in patients with end-stage renal disease receiving renal replacement therapy.Keywords: leukemic cell infiltration, uncontrolled hypertension, hemodialysis

  14. Demonstration of interleukin-1 beta transcripts in acute myeloblastic leukemic cells by in situ hybridization.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakamura, M; Kanakura, Y; Furukawa, Y; Ernst, T J; Griffin, J D

    1990-07-01

    The cells from some patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia will secrete autostimulatory cytokines in tissue culture without the addition of stimulators such as phorbol 12-myristate 13-acetate. Production of interleukin-1 beta (IL-1 beta), for example, has been observed in up to 50% of cases. In order to investigate the nature of the cell secreting IL-1 beta in AML, we used an antisense RNA probe to detect specific IL-1 beta transcripts in individual leukemic cells by in situ hybridization. In fresh, uncultured cells, IL-1 beta transcripts were observed in 1-40% of undifferentiated leukemic blast cells in 17 of 19 cases. In situ hybridization was at least as sensitive as Northern blot analysis in detecting IL-1 beta transcripts. No correlation of IL-1 beta transcript expression with FAB classification was observed. Normal blood and bone marrow mononuclear cells did not contain cells expressing IL-1 beta transcripts. These results support the concept that the regulation of cytokine genes in AML cells is aberrant.

  15. Flow cytometric analysis of expression of interleukin-2 receptor beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hoshino, S.; Oshimi, K.; Tsudo, M.; Miyasaka, M.; Teramura, M.; Masuda, M.; Motoji, T.; Mizoguchi, H.

    1990-01-01

    We analyzed the expression of the interleukin-2 receptor (IL-2R) beta chain (p70-75) on various leukemic cells from 44 patients by flow cytometric analysis using the IL-2R beta chain-specific monoclonal antibody, designated Mik-beta 1. Flow cytometric analysis demonstrated the expression of the IL-2R beta chain on granular lymphocytes (GLs) from all eight patients with granular lymphocyte proliferative disorders (GLPDs), on adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) cells from all three patients with ATL, and on T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cells from one of three patients with T-ALL. Although GLs from all the GLPD patients expressed the IL-2R beta chain alone and not the IL-2R alpha chain (Tac-antigen: p55), ATL and T-ALL cells expressing the beta chain coexpressed the alpha chain. In two of seven patients with common ALL (cALL) and in both patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia, the leukemic cells expressed the alpha chain alone. Neither the alpha chain nor the beta chain was expressed on leukemic cells from the remaining 28 patients, including all 18 patients with acute nonlymphocytic leukemia, five of seven patients with cALL, all three patients with multiple myeloma, and two of three patients with T-ALL. These results indicate that three different forms of IL-2R chain expression exist on leukemic cells: the alpha chain alone; the beta chain alone; and both the alpha and beta chains. To examine whether the results obtained by flow cytometric analysis actually reflect functional aspects of the expressed IL-2Rs, we studied the specific binding of 125I-labeled IL-2 (125I-IL-2) to leukemic cells in 18 of the 44 patients. In addition, we performed 125I-IL-2 crosslinking studies in seven patients. The results of IL-2R expression of both 125I-IL-2 binding assay and crosslinking studies were in agreement with those obtained by flow cytometric analysis

  16. Resistance of some leukemic blasts to lysis by lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Panayotides, P; Sjoegren, A -M; Reizenstein, P; Porwit, A. Immunopathology Lab., Dept. of Pathology, Karolinska Hospital, Stockholm; Wasserman, J

    1988-01-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMC) from healthy donors and AML patients in remission were stimulated with phytohemagglutinin (PHA) and recombinant interleukin-2 (IL-2). These stimulated cells (lymphokine activated killer (LAK) cells) showed increased DNA synthesis as measured by /sup 3/H-Thymidine uptake. A synergistic effect of PHA and IL-2 was found. LAK cells' ability to kill acute myeloid leukemia (AML) blasts was investigated by the /sup 51/Cr release assay. LAK cells showed a cytotoxicity (over 10% specific /sup 51/Cr release) against 9/12 leukemic blasts, even at effector/target (E/T) ratios as low as 5:1. However, on average only 22.2% (SD 11.8) and 36.5% (SD 12.5) /sup 51/Cr release were obtained in 4- and 18-hour cytotoxicity assays, respectively, at an E/T ratio of 20:1. Leukemic blasts in 3/12 AML cases and normal PBMC were entirely resistant to lysis, even at an E/T ratio of 80:1. Susceptibility to lysis was not correlated to peanut-agglutinin receptor expression. LAK cells were more cytotoxic towards the K-562 cell line (natural killer activity) than unstimulated PBMC.

  17. A model with competition between the cell lines in leukemia under treatment

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Halanay, A.; Cândea, D.; Rădulescu, R.

    2014-01-01

    The evolution of leukemia is modeled with a delay differential equation model of four cell populations: two populations (healthy and leukemic) ) of stem-like cells involving a larger category consisting of proliferating stem and progenitor cells with self-renew capacity and two populations (healthy and leukemic) of mature cells, considering the competition of healthy vs. leukemic cell populations and three types of division that a stem-like cell can exhibit: self-renew, asymmetric division and differentiation. In the model it is assumed that the treatment acts on the proliferation rate of the leukemic stem cells and on the apoptosis of stem and mature cells. The emphasis in this model is on establishing relevant parameters for chronic and acute manifestations of leukemia. Stability of equilibria is investigated and sufficient conditions for local asymptotic stability will be given using a Lyapunov-Krasovskii functional

  18. Adhesion molecule profiles of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas in the leukemic phase

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    D.M. Matos

    2006-10-01

    Full Text Available We evaluated the expression of 10 adhesion molecules on peripheral blood tumor cells of 17 patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia, 17 with mantle-cell lymphoma, and 13 with nodal or splenic marginal B-cell lymphoma, all in the leukemic phase and before the beginning of any therapy. The diagnosis of B-cell non-Hodgkin's lymphomas was based on cytological, histological, immunophenotypic, and molecular biology methods. The mean fluorescence intensity of the adhesion molecules in tumor cells was measured by flow cytometry of CD19-positive cells and differed amongst the types of lymphomas. Comparison of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and mantle-cell lymphoma showed that the former presented a higher expression of CD11c and CD49c, and a lower expression of CD11b and CD49d adhesion molecules. Comparison of chronic lymphocytic leukemia and marginal B-cell lymphoma showed that the former presented a higher expression of CD49c and a lower expression of CD11a, CD11b, CD18, CD49d, CD29, and CD54. Finally, comparison of mantle-cell lymphoma and marginal B-cell lymphoma showed that marginal B-cell lymphoma had a higher expression of CD11a, CD11c, CD18, CD29, and CD54. Thus, the CD49c/CD49d pair consistently demonstrated a distinct pattern of expression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia compared with mantle-cell lymphoma and marginal B-cell lymphoma, which could be helpful for the differential diagnosis. Moreover, the distinct profiles of adhesion molecules in these diseases may be responsible for their different capacities to invade the blood stream.

  19. Altered expression of asparagine synthetase mRNA in human leukemic and carcinoma cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Goodwin, L.O.; Guzowski, D.E.; Millan, C.A. [North Shore Univ. Hospital/Cornell Univ. Medical College, Manhasset, NY (United States)] [and others

    1994-09-01

    Asparagine synthetase (AS) is the enzyme responsible for the ATP-dependant conversion of aspartic acid to asparagine. The AS gene is expressed constitutively in most mammalian cells, including cells of the lymphoid lineage, as a 2 kb mRNA. In some leukemic phenotypes, AS expression is abrogated, resulting in no detectable enzyme activity. These cells are rendered sensitive to killing by L-asparaginase, which destroys extracellular asparagine. Prolonged treatment of leukemic cells with this agent can lead to resistance and the reappearance of AS activity, suggesting derepression of the AS gene, which has been shown to be regulated by intracellular levels of asparagine. Modulation of AS expression by asparagine employs cis and trans-acting elements involved in transcriptional and translational regulation. We have cloned and sequenced the human AS gene and surrounding sequence elements as well as the full-length cDNA. Using probes specific to the third and fourth exons of AS, we have identified an additional higher molecular weight mRNA (2.7 kb) in Northern blots derived from a chronic myelogenous leukemia and a colon carcinoma but not in normal lymphocytic or other human cell lines. We speculate that elements present in the cancer-derived mRNAs may be involved in the derepression of AS activity. This hypothesis is being evaluated by RNase protection assays using RNA isolated from a variety of human cell lines to characterize and elucidate the nature of this additional AS encoded message.

  20. Graft-versus-Leukemia Effect Following Hematopoietic Stem Cell Transplantation for Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Anne M. Dickinson

    2017-06-01

    Full Text Available The success of hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT lies with the ability of the engrafting immune system to remove residual leukemia cells via a graft-versus-leukemia effect (GvL, caused either spontaneously post-HSCT or via donor lymphocyte infusion. GvL effects can also be initiated by allogenic mismatched natural killer cells, antigen-specific T cells, and activated dendritic cells of leukemic origin. The history and further application of this GvL effect and the main mechanisms will be discussed and reviewed in this chapter.

  1. Elimination of acute muelogenous leukemic cells from marrow and tumor suspensions in the rat with 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sharkis, S.J.; Santos, G.W.; Colvin, M.

    1980-01-01

    Cell suspensions of normal rat marrow mixed with rat acute myelogenous leukemic cells were prepared and incubated in vitro with graded doses of 4-hydroperoxycyclophosphamide (4HC). The cell suspensions were injected into rats prepared with a lethal dose of total body irradiation. Animals injected with these cells survived fatal irradiation induced aplasia. In a dose related manner 4HC was able to purge tumor cells from the cell mixtures. Thus, animals given cell suspensions incubated with the lower doses of 4HC showed prolonged survived before death from leukemia and animals given cell suspensions incubated with higher doses of 4HC survival lethal irradiation without the subsequent appearance of leukemia. These studies clearly establish that tumor cells may be eliminated from normal marrow suspensions without completely destroying the pluripotent stem cells

  2. Anti-leukemic activity of bortezomib and carfilzomib on B-cell precursor ALL cell lines.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kazuya Takahashi

    Full Text Available Prognosis of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL has been dramatically improved. However, prognosis of the cases refractory to primary therapy is still poor. Recent phase 2 study on the efficacy of combination chemotherapy with bortezomib (BTZ, a proteasome inhibitor, for refractory childhood ALL demonstrated favorable clinical outcomes. However, septic death was observed in over 10% of patients, indicating the necessity of biomarkers that could predict BTZ sensitivity. We investigated in vitro BTZ sensitivity in a large panel of ALL cell lines that acted as a model system for refractory ALL, and found that Philadelphia chromosome-positive (Ph+ ALL, IKZF1 deletion, and biallelic loss of CDKN2A were associated with favorable response. Even in Ph-negative ALL cell lines, IKZF1 deletion and bilallelic loss of CDKN2A were independently associated with higher BTZ sensitivity. BTZ showed only marginal cross-resistance to four representative chemotherapeutic agents (vincristine, dexamethasone, l-asparaginase, and daunorubicin in B-cell precursor-ALL cell lines. To improve the efficacy and safety of proteasome inhibitor combination chemotherapy, we also analyzed the anti-leukemic activity of carfilzomib (CFZ, a second-generation proteasome inhibitor, as a substitute for BTZ. CFZ showed significantly higher activity than BTZ in the majority of ALL cell lines except for the P-glycoprotein-positive t(17;19 ALL cell lines, and IKZF1 deletion was also associated with a favorable response to CFZ treatment. P-glycoprotein inhibitors effectively restored the sensitivity to CFZ, but not BTZ, in P-glycoprotein-positive t(17;19 ALL cell lines. P-glycoprotein overexpressing ALL cell line showed a CFZ-specific resistance, while knockout of P-glycoprotein by genome editing with a CRISPR/Cas9 system sensitized P-glycoprotein-positive t(17;19 ALL cell line to CFZ. These observations suggested that IKZF1 deletion could be a useful biomarker to predict good

  3. Inhibition of time-dependent enhancement of amino acid transport by leukemic leukocytes: a possible index of the sensitivity of cells to drugs

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Frengley, P A; Peck, W A; Lichtman, M A

    1975-01-01

    Leukemic leukocytes increase their rates of alpha aminoisobutyric acid (AIB) accumulation when incubated for prolonged periods in amino acid deficient media. The time-dependent increase was prevented by concurrent exposure of cells to cycloheximide or actinomycin D in vitro. In addition, the increase in AIB uptake was not present in leukemic blasts studied in vitro when the cells were obtained from subjects with acute myeloblastic leukemia who had received antileukemic therapy. Cortisol added to cell suspensions in vitro inhibited the development of time-dependent increases in AIB uptake in lymphoid cells, but accentuated the process slightly in myeloblasts. Cortisol administered to a subject with CLL by infusion reduced the time-dependent increase in AIB uptake by CLL cells subsequently studied in vitro. These data indicate that the time-dependent increase in AIB uptake may be a means of testing the sensitivity of leukemic cells to drugs.

  4. Ex vivo assays to study self-renewal, long-term expansion, and leukemic transformation of genetically modified human hematopoietic and patient-derived leukemic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi; Carretta, Marco; Capala, Marta; Schepers, Hein; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2014-01-01

    With the emergence of the concept of the leukemic stem cell (LSC), assays to study them remain pivotal in understanding (leukemic) stem cell biology. Although the in vivo NOD-SCID or NSG xenotransplantation model is currently still the favored assay of choice in most cases, this system has some

  5. Analysis of myelomonocytic leukemic differentiation by a cell surface marker panel including a fucose-binding lectin from Lotus tetragonolobus.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Elias, L; Van Epps, D E

    1984-06-01

    The fucose-binding lectin from Lotus tetragonolobus ( FBL -L) has been previously shown to bind specifically to normal cells of the myeloid and monocytic lineages. The purpose of this study was to explore the utility of fluoresceinated FBL -L as a leukemia differentiation marker in conjunction with a panel of other frequently used surface markers (Fc receptor, HLA-DR, OKM1, and antimonocyte antibody). FBL -L reacted with leukemic cells in 8/9 cases of clinically recognized acute myeloid leukemia, including myeloid blast crisis of chronic granulocytic leukemia, 3/3 cases of chronic phase chronic myelogenous leukemia, and in 2/7 cases of clinically undifferentiated acute leukemia. Correlations were noted between reactivity with FBL -L, and DR and Fc receptor expression. Among continuous cell lines, FBL -L bound with high intensity to a majority of HL-60 and U937 cells. The less well differentiated myeloblast cell lines, KG-1, KG1a , and HL-60 blast II, exhibited less FBL -L binding than HL-60 and U937. A moderate proportion of K562 cells exhibited low level binding of FBL -L. Several lymphoblastic cell lines exhibited a pattern of low intensity binding that was distinguishable from the high intensity binding pattern of the myeloblastic lines. FBL -L reactivity of U937 was enhanced by induction of differentiation with leukocyte conditioned medium, but not dimethylsulfoxide. Such treatments induced contrasting patterns of change of HL-60 and U937 when labeled with OKM1, alpha-Mono, and HLA-DR. These studies demonstrate the application of FBL -L to analysis and quantitation of myelomonocytic leukemic differentiation.

  6. Defective quorum sensing of acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells: evidence of collective behavior of leukemic populations as semi-autonomous aberrant ecosystems

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, Sapan J; Dao, Su; Darie, Costel C; Clarkson, Bayard D

    2016-01-01

    Quorum sensing (QS) is a generic term used to describe cell-cell communication and collective decision making by bacterial and social insects to regulate the expression of specific genes in controlling cell density and other properties of the populations in response to nutrient supply or changes in the environment. QS mechanisms also have a role in higher organisms in maintaining homeostasis, regulation of the immune system and collective behavior of cancer cell populations. In the present study, we used a p190BCR-ABL driven pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL3) cell line derived from the pleural fluid of a terminally ill patient with ALL to test the QS hypothesis in leukemia. ALL3 cells don’t grow at low density (LD) in liquid media but grow progressively faster at increasingly high cell densities (HD) in contrast to other established leukemic cell lines that grow well at very low starting cell densities. The ALL3 cells at LD are poised to grow but shortly die without additional stimulation. Supernates of ALL3 cells (HDSN) and some other primary cells grown at HD stimulate the growth of the LD ALL3 cells without which they won’t survive. To get further insight into the activation processes we performed microarray analysis of the LD ALL3 cells after stimulation with ALL3 HDSN at days 1, 3, and 6. This screen identified several candidate genes, and we linked them to signaling networks and their functions. We observed that genes involved in lipid, cholesterol, fatty acid metabolism, and B cell activation are most up- or down-regulated upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells using HDSN. We also discuss other pathways that are differentially expressed upon stimulation of the LD ALL3 cells. Our findings suggest that the Ph+ ALL population achieves dominance by functioning as a collective aberrant ecosystem subject to defective quorum-sensing regulatory mechanisms. PMID:27429840

  7. TLX1 and NOTCH coregulate transcription in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    OpenAIRE

    Riz, Irene; Hawley, Teresa S; Luu, Truong V; Lee, Norman H; Hawley, Robert G

    2010-01-01

    Abstract Background The homeobox gene TLX1 (for T-cell leukemia homeobox 1, previously known as HOX11) is inappropriately expressed in a major subgroup of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) where it is strongly associated with activating NOTCH1 mutations. Despite the recognition that these genetic lesions cooperate in leukemogenesis, there have been no mechanistic studies addressing how TLX1 and NOTCH1 functionally interact to promote the leukemic phenotype. Results Global gene expre...

  8. Reduced hematopoietic stem cell frequency predicts outcome in acute myeloid leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Stiehl, Thomas; Raffel, Simon; Hoang, Van T.; Hoffmann, Isabel; Poisa-Beiro, Laura; Saeed, Borhan R.; Blume, Rachel; Manta, Linda; Eckstein, Volker; Bochtler, Tilmann; Wuchter, Patrick; Essers, Marieke; Jauch, Anna; Trumpp, Andreas; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Ho, Anthony D.; Lutz, Christoph

    2017-01-01

    In patients with acute myeloid leukemia and low percentages of aldehyde-dehydrogenase-positive cells, non-leukemic hematopoietic stem cells can be separated from leukemic cells. By relating hematopoietic stem cell frequencies to outcome we detected poor overall- and disease-free survival of patients with low hematopoietic stem cell frequencies. Serial analysis of matched diagnostic and follow-up samples further demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cells increased after chemotherapy in patients who achieved durable remissions. However, in patients who eventually relapsed, hematopoietic stem cell numbers decreased dramatically at the time of molecular relapse demonstrating that hematopoietic stem cell levels represent an indirect marker of minimal residual disease, which heralds leukemic relapse. Upon transplantation in immune-deficient mice cases with low percentages of hematopoietic stem cells of our cohort gave rise to leukemic or no engraftment, whereas cases with normal hematopoietic stem cell levels mostly resulted in multi-lineage engraftment. Based on our experimental data, we propose that leukemic stem cells have increased niche affinity in cases with low percentages of hematopoietic stem cells. To validate this hypothesis, we developed new mathematical models describing the dynamics of healthy and leukemic cells under different regulatory scenarios. These models suggest that the mechanism leading to decreases in hematopoietic stem cell frequencies before leukemic relapse must be based on expansion of leukemic stem cells with high niche affinity and the ability to dislodge hematopoietic stem cells. Thus, our data suggest that decreasing numbers of hematopoietic stem cells indicate leukemic stem cell persistence and the emergence of leukemic relapse. PMID:28550184

  9. Reduced hematopoietic stem cell frequency predicts outcome in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Wenwen; Stiehl, Thomas; Raffel, Simon; Hoang, Van T; Hoffmann, Isabel; Poisa-Beiro, Laura; Saeed, Borhan R; Blume, Rachel; Manta, Linda; Eckstein, Volker; Bochtler, Tilmann; Wuchter, Patrick; Essers, Marieke; Jauch, Anna; Trumpp, Andreas; Marciniak-Czochra, Anna; Ho, Anthony D; Lutz, Christoph

    2017-09-01

    In patients with acute myeloid leukemia and low percentages of aldehyde-dehydrogenase-positive cells, non-leukemic hematopoietic stem cells can be separated from leukemic cells. By relating hematopoietic stem cell frequencies to outcome we detected poor overall- and disease-free survival of patients with low hematopoietic stem cell frequencies. Serial analysis of matched diagnostic and follow-up samples further demonstrated that hematopoietic stem cells increased after chemotherapy in patients who achieved durable remissions. However, in patients who eventually relapsed, hematopoietic stem cell numbers decreased dramatically at the time of molecular relapse demonstrating that hematopoietic stem cell levels represent an indirect marker of minimal residual disease, which heralds leukemic relapse. Upon transplantation in immune-deficient mice cases with low percentages of hematopoietic stem cells of our cohort gave rise to leukemic or no engraftment, whereas cases with normal hematopoietic stem cell levels mostly resulted in multi-lineage engraftment. Based on our experimental data, we propose that leukemic stem cells have increased niche affinity in cases with low percentages of hematopoietic stem cells. To validate this hypothesis, we developed new mathematical models describing the dynamics of healthy and leukemic cells under different regulatory scenarios. These models suggest that the mechanism leading to decreases in hematopoietic stem cell frequencies before leukemic relapse must be based on expansion of leukemic stem cells with high niche affinity and the ability to dislodge hematopoietic stem cells. Thus, our data suggest that decreasing numbers of hematopoietic stem cells indicate leukemic stem cell persistence and the emergence of leukemic relapse. Copyright© 2017 Ferrata Storti Foundation.

  10. Inhibitory effect of turmeric curcuminoids on FLT3 expression and cell cycle arrest in the FLT3-overexpressing EoL-1 leukemic cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tima, Singkome; Ichikawa, Hideki; Ampasavate, Chadarat; Okonogi, Siriporn; Anuchapreeda, Songyot

    2014-04-25

    Leukemia is a hematologic malignancy with a frequent incidence and high mortality rate. Previous studies have shown that the FLT3 gene is overexpressed in leukemic blast cells, especially in acute myeloid leukemia. In this study, a commercially available curcuminoid mixture (1), pure curcumin (2), pure demethoxycurcumin (3), and pure bisdemethoxycurcumin (4) were investigated for their inhibitory effects on cell growth, FLT3 expression, and cell cycle progression in an FLT3-overexpressing EoL-1 leukemic cell line using an MTT assay, Western blotting, and flow cytometry, respectively. The mixture (1) and compounds 2-4 demonstrated cytotoxic effects with IC50 values ranging from 6.5 to 22.5 μM. A significant decrease in FLT3 protein levels was found after curcuminoid treatment with IC20 doses, especially with mixture 1 and compound 2. In addition, mixture 1 and curcumin (2) showed activity on cell cycle arrest at the G0/G1 phase and decreased the FLT3 and STAT5A protein levels in a dose-dependent manner. Compound 2 demonstrated the greatest potential for inhibiting cell growth, cell cycle progression, and FLT3 expression in EoL-1 cells. This investigation has provided new findings regarding the effect of turmeric curcuminoids on FLT3 expression in leukemic cells.

  11. An antigen shared by human granulocytes, monocytes, marrow granulocyte precursors and leukemic blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shumak, K H; Rachkewich, R A

    1983-01-01

    An antibody to human granulocytes was raised in rabbits by immunization with granulocytes pretreated with rabbit antibody to contaminating antigens. The antibody reacted not only with granulocytes but also with monocytes and bone marrow granulocyte precursors including colony-forming units in culture (CFU-C). In tests with leukemic cells, the antibody reacted with blasts from most (8 of 9) patients with acute myelomonoblastic leukemia and from some patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia, morphologically undifferentiated acute leukemia and chronic myelogenous leukemia in blast crisis. The antibody did not react with blasts from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia nor with leukemic cells from patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

  12. Noninvasive identification of subcellular organization and nuclear morphology features associated with leukemic cells using light-scattering spectroscopy

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hsiao, Austin; Hunter, Martin; Greiner, Cherry; Gupta, Sharad; Georgakoudi, Irene

    2011-03-01

    Leukemia is the most common and deadly cancer among children and one of the most prevalent cancers among adults. Improvements in its diagnosis and monitoring of leukemic patients could have a significant impact in their long-term treatment. We demonstrate that light-scattering spectroscopy (LSS)-based approaches could serve as a tool to achieve this goal. Specifically, we characterize the light scattering properties of leukemic (NALM-6) cells and compare them to those of normal lymphocytes and granulocytes in the 440-710 nm range, over +/-4 deg about the exact backscattering direction. We find that the LSS spectra are well described by an inverse power-law wavelength dependence, with a power exponent insensitive to the scattering angle but significantly higher for leukemic cells than for normal leukocytes. This is consistent with differences in the subcellular morphology of these cells, detected in differential interference contrast images. Furthermore, the residual light-scattering signal, extracted after subtracting the inverse power-law fit from the data, can be analyzed assuming a Gaussian distribution of spherical scatterers using Mie theory. This analysis yields scatterer sizes that are consistent with the diameters of cell nuclei and allows the detection of the larger nuclei of NALM-6 cells compared to those of lymphocytes and granulocytes.

  13. Lack of correlation between immunologic markers and cell surface ultrastructure in the leukemic phase of lymphoproliferative diseases

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Golomb, Harvey M.; Simon, Deberah

    1977-01-01

    In a prospective study of malignant cells from 13 patients with the leukemic phase of lymphoproliferative diseases, we wished to determine whether any correlation between the immunologic markers and the cell surface ultrastructure. Five patients had chronic lymphocytic leukemia, four had malignant lymphomas, poorly differentiated lymphocytic type, two had the Sezary syndrome, and one each had acute prolymphocytic leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia. Cell separation and isolation was done at room temperature for all specimens. Immunologic markers tested for were surface immunoglobins, a B-cell property, and E-rosettes, a T-cell property. Three patients had T-cell diseases, 6 had B-cell diseases, and 4 were classified as ''null.'' All but one patient had moderate to large numbers of microvilli on their malignant cells. The single exception had a typical B-cell form of chronic lymphocytic leukemia. There appears to be no correlation between immunologic markers and cell surface ultrastructure; therefore, SEM appears not to be valuable in the diagnosis or classification of immunologic sub-types of certain lymphoproliferative diseases.

  14. Defective immunoregulatory T-cell function in chronic lymphocytic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Han, T.; Ozer, H.; Henderson, E.S.; Dadey, B.; Nussbaum-Blumenson, A.; Barcos, M.

    1981-01-01

    Chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) of B-cell origin results in the malignant proliferation of small immunoglobulin-bearing lymphocytes. There is currently a controversy in the literature regarding both the ability of this leukemic population to differentiate into mature plasma cells, as well as the ability of apparently normal T cells from these patients to regulate allogeneic B-cell differentiation. In the present study we have examined the lymphocytes of CLL patients in various clinical stages of their disease and with different surface phenotypes of their leukemic B-cell population. Our results show that leukemic CLL B cells from all 20 patients (including one patient with a monoclonal IgM paraprotein and another with a monoclonal IgG paraprotein) are incapable of further differentiation even in the absence of suppressor T cells and the presence of helper T lymphocytes. This lack of capacity to differentiate is unaffected by clinical stage, by therapy, or by the phenotype of the malignant population. Since the leukemic B population did not suppress normal allogeneic B-cell differentiation, the maturation deficit is evidently intrinsic to the leukemic clone rather than a result of activity of non-T suppressor cells. T helper function was also variably depressed in the blood of some patients with CLL, and this depression did not correlate with clinical stage, with therapy, or with the degree of lymphocytosis. Dysfunction of radiosensitive T suppressor cells was found to be the most consistent regulatory deficit of CLL T cells. Each of 11 patients whose leukemic cell population was of the μdelta, μα, or μ phenotype had both helper and suppressor cell defects

  15. Leukemic Oral Manifestations and their Management.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Francisconi, Carolina Favaro; Caldas, Rogerio Jardim; Oliveira Martins, Lazara Joyce; Fischer Rubira, Cassia Maria; da Silva Santos, Paulo Sergio

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is the most common neoplastic disease of the white blood cells which is important as a pediatric malignancy. Oral manifestations occur frequently in leukemic patients and may present as initial evidence of the disease or its relapse. The symptoms include gingival enlargement and bleeding, oral ulceration, petechia, mucosal pallor, noma, trismus and oral infections. Oral lesions arise in both acute and chronic forms of all types of leukemia. These oral manifestations either may be the result of direct infiltration of leukemic cells (primary) or secondary to underlying thrombocytopenia, neutropenia, or impaired granulocyte function. Despite the fact that leukemia has long been known to be associated with oral lesions, the available literature on this topic consists mostly of case reports, without data summarizing the main oral changes for each type of leukemia. Therefore, the present review aimed at describing oral manifestations of all leukemia types and their dental management. This might be useful in early diagnosis, improving patient outcomes.

  16. Relapsed Acute Promyelocytic Leukemia Lacks "Classic" Leukemic Promyelocyte Morphology and Can Create Diagnostic Challenges.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dayton, Vanessa J; McKenna, Robert W; Yohe, Sophia L; Dolan, Michelle M; Courville, Elizabeth; Alvarez, Harold; Linden, Michael A

    2017-01-01

    Although current therapies for acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL), such as all- trans retinoic acid and arsenic trioxide, usually result in remission, some patients relapse. Early recognition of relapse is critical for prompt intervention. In this study, we systematically reviewed morphologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic findings in paired diagnostic and relapsed APL cases and describe and quantify the changes in blast morphology at relapse. By electronic database search, we identified eight paired diagnostic and relapsed APL cases for which peripheral blood or bone marrow smears were available for review. For two cases, diagnostic material was available for relapse after hematopoietic cell transplantation. Neoplastic hypergranular or microgranular promyelocytes with indented or bivalve nuclei predominated at diagnosis in all patients. Most patients had undifferentiated blasts at relapse and/or hypergranular blast equivalents with round to oval nuclei. Classic acute promyelocytic leukemia cells with bivalve nuclei and bundles of cytoplasmic Auer rods were easily identifiable in fewer than half of cases at diagnosis and rare to absent in all relapsed cases. Morphologic features of relapsed APL overlap with other types of acute myeloid leukemia, creating diagnostic challenges, especially if no history is available when relapsing patients seek treatment for care. © American Society for Clinical Pathology, 2017. All rights reserved. For permissions, please e-mail: journals.permissions@oup.com

  17. Therapeutic Effects of Myeloid Cell Leukemia-1 siRNA on Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hadi Karami

    2014-05-01

    Full Text Available Purpose: Up-regulation of Mcl-1, a known anti-apoptotic protein, is associated with the survival and progression of various malignancies including leukemia. The aim of this study was to explore the effect of Mcl-1 small interference RNA (siRNA on the proliferation and apoptosis of HL-60 acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Methods: siRNA transfection was performed using Lipofectamine™2000 reagent. Relative mRNA and protein expressions were quantified by quantitative real-time PCR and Western blotting, respectively. Trypan blue assay was performed to assess tumor cell proliferation after siRNA transfection. The cytotoxic effect of Mcl-1 siRNA on leukemic cells was measured using MTT assay. Apoptosis was detected using ELISA cell death assay. Results: Mcl-1 siRNA clearly lowered both Mcl-1 mRNA and protein levels in a time-dependent manner, leading to marked inhibition of cell survival and proliferation. Furthermore, Mcl-1 down-regulation significantly enhanced the extent of HL-60 apoptotic cells. Conclusion: Our results suggest that the down-regulation of Mcl-1 by siRNA can effectively trigger apoptosis and inhibit the proliferation of leukemic cells. Therefore, Mcl-1 siRNA may be a potent adjuvant in AML therapy.

  18. Cannabidiol Reduces Leukemic Cell Size – But Is It Important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenderoglou, Nikoletta; Macpherson, Tara; Wright, Karen L.

    2017-01-01

    The anti-cancer effect of the plant-derived cannabinoid, cannabidiol, has been widely demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro. However, this body of preclinical work has not been translated into clinical use. Key issues around this failure can be related to narrow dose effects, the cell model used and incomplete efficacy. A model of acute lymphoblastic disease, the Jurkat T cell line, has been used extensively to study the cannabinoid system in the immune system and cannabinoid-induced apoptosis. Using these cells, this study sought to investigate the outcome of those remaining viable cells post-treatment with cannabidiol, both in terms of cell size and tracking any subsequent recovery. The phosphorylation status of the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and the downstream target ribosomal protein S6, were measured. The ability of cannabidiol to exert its effect on cell viability was also evaluated in physiological oxygen conditions. Cannabidiol reduced cell viability incompletely, and slowed the cell cycle with fewer cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Cannabidiol reduced phosphorylation of mTOR, PKB and S6 pathways related to survival and cell size. The remaining population of viable cells that were cultured in nutrient rich conditions post-treatment were able to proliferate, but did not recover to control cell numbers. However, the proportion of viable cells that were gated as small, increased in response to cannabidiol and normally sized cells decreased. This proportion of small cells persisted in the recovery period and did not return to basal levels. Finally, cells grown in 12% oxygen (physiological normoxia) were more resistant to cannabidiol. In conclusion, these results indicate that cannabidiol causes a reduction in cell size, which persists post-treatment. However, resistance to cannabidiol under physiological normoxia for these cells would imply that cannabidiol may not be useful in the clinic as an anti-leukemic agent. PMID

  19. Cannabidiol Reduces Leukemic Cell Size - But Is It Important?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kalenderoglou, Nikoletta; Macpherson, Tara; Wright, Karen L

    2017-01-01

    The anti-cancer effect of the plant-derived cannabinoid, cannabidiol, has been widely demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro . However, this body of preclinical work has not been translated into clinical use. Key issues around this failure can be related to narrow dose effects, the cell model used and incomplete efficacy. A model of acute lymphoblastic disease, the Jurkat T cell line, has been used extensively to study the cannabinoid system in the immune system and cannabinoid-induced apoptosis. Using these cells, this study sought to investigate the outcome of those remaining viable cells post-treatment with cannabidiol, both in terms of cell size and tracking any subsequent recovery. The phosphorylation status of the mammalian Target of Rapamycin (mTOR) signaling pathway and the downstream target ribosomal protein S6, were measured. The ability of cannabidiol to exert its effect on cell viability was also evaluated in physiological oxygen conditions. Cannabidiol reduced cell viability incompletely, and slowed the cell cycle with fewer cells in the G2/M phase of the cell cycle. Cannabidiol reduced phosphorylation of mTOR, PKB and S6 pathways related to survival and cell size. The remaining population of viable cells that were cultured in nutrient rich conditions post-treatment were able to proliferate, but did not recover to control cell numbers. However, the proportion of viable cells that were gated as small, increased in response to cannabidiol and normally sized cells decreased. This proportion of small cells persisted in the recovery period and did not return to basal levels. Finally, cells grown in 12% oxygen (physiological normoxia) were more resistant to cannabidiol. In conclusion, these results indicate that cannabidiol causes a reduction in cell size, which persists post-treatment. However, resistance to cannabidiol under physiological normoxia for these cells would imply that cannabidiol may not be useful in the clinic as an anti-leukemic agent.

  20. Surface topography of hairy cell leukemia cells compared to other leukemias as seen by scanning electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polliack, Aaron; Tadmor, Tamar

    2011-06-01

    This short review deals with the ultrastructural surface architecture of hairy cell leukemia (HCL) compared to other leukemic cells, as seen by scanning electron microscopy (SEM). The development of improved techniques for preparing blood cells for SEM in the 1970s readily enabled these features to be visualized more accurately. This review returns us to the earlier history of SEM, when the surface topography of normal and neoplastic cells was visualized and reported for the first time, in an era before the emergence and use of monoclonal antibodies and flow cytometry, now used routinely to define cells by their immunophenotype. Surface microvilli are characteristic for normal and leukemic lymphoid cells, myelo-monocytic cells lack microvilli and show surface ruffles, while leukemic plasma and myeloma cells and megakaryocytes display large surface blebs. HCL cell surfaces are complex and typically 'hybrid' in nature, displaying both lymphoid and monocytic features with florid ruffles of varying sizes interspersed with clumps of short microvilli cytoplasm. The surface features of other leukemic cells and photomicrographs of immuno-SEM labeling of cells employing antibodies and colloidal gold, reported more than 20 years ago, are shown.

  1. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Forester, Craig M.; Braunreiter, Chi L.; Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab; Hedlund, Gary L.

    2009-01-01

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  2. Tumefactive intracranial presentation of precursor B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Forester, Craig M. [University of Utah, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Braunreiter, Chi L. [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Helen DeVos Children' s Hospital, Department of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Grand Rapids, MI (United States); Yaish, Hasan; Afify, Zeinab [University of Utah, Division of Pediatric Hematology Oncology, Primary Children' s Medical Center, Salt Lake City, UT (United States); Hedlund, Gary L. [Primary Children' s Medical Center, Department of Pediatric Radiology, Salt Lake City, UT (United States)

    2009-11-15

    In children, leukemia is the most common malignancy, and approximately 75% of leukemias are acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Central nervous system leukemia is found at diagnosis in fewer than 5% of children with ALL. Leukemic intracranial masses have been described with acute myeloid leukemia, but ALL presenting as a mass lesion is rare. We describe a unique case of an intracranial confirmed precursor B cell (pre-B) ALL mass in a 13-year-old girl that was diagnosed by brain CT, MRI and cerebral angiography, and confirmed by biopsy. This report details pertinent history and distinguishing imaging features of an intracranial ALL tumefaction. (orig.)

  3. Limiting-dilution analysis for the determination of leukemic cell frequencies after bone marrow decontamination with mafosfamide or merocyanine 540

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Porcellini, A.; Talevi, N.; Marchetti-Rossi, M.T.; Palazzi, M.; Manna, A.; Sparaventi, G.; Delfini, C.; Valentini, M.

    1987-01-01

    To stimulate a leukemia remission marrow, cell suspensions of normal human bone marrow were mixed with human acute lymphoblastic or myelogenous leukemic cells of the CCRF-SF, Nalm-6, and K-562 lines. The cell mixtures were incubated in vitro with mafosfamide (AZ) or with the photoreactive dye merocyanine 540 (MC-540). A quantity of 10(4) cells of the treated suspensions was dispensed into microculture plates, and graded cell numbers of the line used to contaminate the normal marrow were added. Limiting-dilution analysis was used to estimate the frequency of leukemia cells persisting after treatment with the decontaminating agents. Treatment with AZ or MC-540 produced a total elimination (ie, 6 logs or 5.3 logs respectively) of B cell acute leukemia cells (CCRF-SB), whereas nearly 1.7 logs and 2 logs of K-562 acute myelogenous blasts were still present in the cell mixtures after treatment with MC-540 and AZ, respectively. Treatment of the Nalm-6-contaminated cell mixtures with AZ resulted in 100% elimination of clonogenic cells, whereas nearly 80% decontamination was obtained with MC-540. Our results suggest that treatment with AZ could be an effective method of eliminating clonogenic tumor cells from human bone marrow. MC-540, shown by previous studies to spare sufficient pluripotential stem cells to ensure hemopoietic reconstitution in the murine model and in clinical application, has comparable effects and merits trials for possible clinical use in autologous bone marrow transplantation

  4. Limiting-dilution analysis for the determination of leukemic cell frequencies after bone marrow decontamination with mafosfamide or merocyanine 540

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Porcellini, A.; Talevi, N.; Marchetti-Rossi, M.T.; Palazzi, M.; Manna, A.; Sparaventi, G.; Delfini, C.; Valentini, M.

    1987-11-01

    To stimulate a leukemia remission marrow, cell suspensions of normal human bone marrow were mixed with human acute lymphoblastic or myelogenous leukemic cells of the CCRF-SF, Nalm-6, and K-562 lines. The cell mixtures were incubated in vitro with mafosfamide (AZ) or with the photoreactive dye merocyanine 540 (MC-540). A quantity of 10(4) cells of the treated suspensions was dispensed into microculture plates, and graded cell numbers of the line used to contaminate the normal marrow were added. Limiting-dilution analysis was used to estimate the frequency of leukemia cells persisting after treatment with the decontaminating agents. Treatment with AZ or MC-540 produced a total elimination (ie, 6 logs or 5.3 logs respectively) of B cell acute leukemia cells (CCRF-SB), whereas nearly 1.7 logs and 2 logs of K-562 acute myelogenous blasts were still present in the cell mixtures after treatment with MC-540 and AZ, respectively. Treatment of the Nalm-6-contaminated cell mixtures with AZ resulted in 100% elimination of clonogenic cells, whereas nearly 80% decontamination was obtained with MC-540. Our results suggest that treatment with AZ could be an effective method of eliminating clonogenic tumor cells from human bone marrow. MC-540, shown by previous studies to spare sufficient pluripotential stem cells to ensure hemopoietic reconstitution in the murine model and in clinical application, has comparable effects and merits trials for possible clinical use in autologous bone marrow transplantation.

  5. Human monoclonal antibodies reactive with human myelomonocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Posner, M R; Santos, D J; Elboim, H S; Tumber, M B; Frackelton, A R

    1989-04-01

    Peripheral blood mononuclear cells from a patient with chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML), in remission, were depleted of CD8-positive T-cells and cultured with Epstein-Barr virus. Four of 20 cultures (20%) secreted human IgG antibodies selectively reactive with the cell surfaces of certain human leukemia cell lines. Three polyclonal, Epstein-Barr virus-transformed, B-cell lines were expanded and fused with the human-mouse myeloma analogue HMMA2.11TG/O. Antibody from secreting clones HL 1.2 (IgG1), HL 2.1 (IgG3), and HL 3.1 (IgG1) have been characterized. All three react with HL-60 (promyelocytic), RWLeu4 (CML promyelocytic), and U937 (monocytic), but not with KG-1 (myeloblastic) or K562 (CML erythroid). There is no reactivity with T-cell lines, Burkitt's cell lines, pre-B-leukemia cell lines, or an undifferentiated CML cell line, BV173. Leukemic cells from two of seven patients with acute myelogenous leukemia and one of five with acute lymphocytic leukemia react with all three antibodies. Normal lymphocytes, monocytes, polymorphonuclear cells, red blood cells, bone marrow cells, and platelets do not react. Samples from patients with other diverse hematopoietic malignancies showed no reactivity. Immunoprecipitations suggest that the reactive antigen(s) is a lactoperoxidase iodinatable series of cell surface proteins with molecular weights of 42,000-54,000 and a noniodinatable protein with a molecular weight of 82,000. Based on these data these human monoclonal antibodies appear to react with myelomonocytic leukemic cells and may detect a leukemia-specific antigen or a highly restricted differentiation antigen.

  6. Targeting Toll-like receptor 7/8 enhances uptake of apoptotic leukemic cells by monocyte-derived dendritic cells but interferes with subsequent cytokine-induced maturation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van den Ancker, Willemijn; van Luijn, Marvin M; Ruben, Jurjen M; Westers, Theresia M; Bontkes, Hetty J; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; de Gruijl, Tanja D; van de Loosdrecht, Arjan A

    2011-01-01

    Therapeutic vaccination with dendritic cells (DC) is an emerging investigational therapy for eradication of minimal residual disease in acute myeloid leukemia. Various strategies are being explored in manufacturing DC vaccines ex vivo, e.g., monocyte-derived DC (MoDC) loaded with leukemia-associated antigens (LAA). However, the optimal source of LAA and the choice of DC-activating stimuli are still not well defined. Here, loading with leukemic cell preparations (harboring both unknown and known LAA) was explored in combination with a DC maturation-inducing cytokine cocktail (CC; IL-1β, IL-6, TNF-α, and PGE(2)) and Toll-like receptor ligands (TLR-L) to optimize uptake. Since heat shock induced apoptotic blasts were more efficiently taken up than lysates, we focused on uptake of apoptotic leukemic cells. Uptake of apoptotic blast was further enhanced by the TLR7/8-L R848 (20-30%); in contrast, CC-induced maturation inhibited uptake. CC, and to a lesser extent R848, enhanced the ability of MoDC to migrate and stimulate T cells. Furthermore, class II-associated invariant chain peptide expression was down-modulated after R848- or CC-induced maturation, indicating enhanced processing and presentation of antigenic peptides. To improve both uptake and maturation, leukemic cells and MoDC were co-incubated with R848 for 24 h followed by addition of CC. However, this approach interfered with CC-mediated MoDC maturation as indicated by diminished migratory and T cell stimulatory capacity, and the absence of IL-12 production. Taken together, our data demonstrate that even though R848 improved uptake of apoptotic leukemic cells, the sequential use of R848 and CC is counter-indicated due to its adverse effects on MoDC maturation.

  7. Canthin-6-one induces cell death, cell cycle arrest and differentiation in human myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vieira Torquato, Heron F; Ribeiro-Filho, Antonio C; Buri, Marcus V; Araújo Júnior, Roberto T; Pimenta, Renata; de Oliveira, José Salvador R; Filho, Valdir C; Macho, Antonio; Paredes-Gamero, Edgar J; de Oliveira Martins, Domingos T

    2017-04-01

    Canthin-6-one is a natural product isolated from various plant genera and from fungi with potential antitumor activity. In the present study, we evaluate the antitumor effects of canthin-6-one in human myeloid leukemia lineages. Kasumi-1 lineage was used as a model for acute myeloid leukemia. Cells were treated with canthin-6-one and cell death, cell cycle and differentiation were evaluated in both total cells (Lin + ) and leukemia stem cell population (CD34 + CD38 - Lin -/low ). Among the human lineages tested, Kasumi-1 was the most sensitive to canthin-6-one. Canthin-6-one induced cell death with apoptotic (caspase activation, decrease of mitochondrial potential) and necrotic (lysosomal permeabilization, double labeling of annexin V/propidium iodide) characteristics. Moreover, canthin-6-one induced cell cycle arrest at G 0 /G 1 (7μM) and G 2 (45μM) evidenced by DNA content, BrdU incorporation and cyclin B1/histone 3 quantification. Canthin-6-one also promoted differentiation of Kasumi-1, evidenced by an increase in the expression of myeloid markers (CD11b and CD15) and the transcription factor PU.1. Furthermore, a reduction of the leukemic stem cell population and clonogenic capability of stem cells were observed. These results show that canthin-6-one can affect Kasumi-1 cells by promoting cell death, cell cycle arrest and cell differentiation depending on concentration used. Canthin-6-one presents an interesting cytotoxic activity against leukemic cells and represents a promising scaffold for the development of molecules for anti-leukemic applications, especially by its anti-leukemic stem cell activity. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  8. Paraptosis cell death induction by the thiamine analog benfotiamine in leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Naomi Sugimori

    Full Text Available Benfotiamine is a synthetic thiamine analogue that stimulates transketolase, a cellular enzyme essential for glucose metabolism. Currently, benfotiamine is used to treat diabetic neuropathy. We recently reported that oral benfotiamine induced a temporary but remarkable recovery from acute myeloid leukemia in an elderly patient who was ineligible for standard chemotherapy due to dementia and renal failure. In the present study we present evidences that benfotiamine possess antitumor activity against leukemia cells. In a panel of nine myeloid leukemia cell lines benfotiamine impaired the viability of HL-60, NB4, K562 and KG1 cells and also inhibited the growing of primary leukemic blasts. The antitumor activity of benfotiamine is not mediated by apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy, but rather occurs though paraptosis cell death induction. Mechanistic studies revealed that benfotiamine inhibited the activity of constitutively active ERK1/2 and concomitantly increased the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 kinase in leukemic cells. In addition, benfotiamine induced the down regulation of the cell cycle regulator CDK3 which resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest in the sensitive leukemic cells. Moreover, combination index studies showed that benfotiamine enhanced the antiproliferative activities of cytarabine against leukemia cells. These findings suggest that benfotiamine has antitumor therapeutic potential.

  9. Paraptosis cell death induction by the thiamine analog benfotiamine in leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sugimori, Naomi; Espinoza, J Luis; Trung, Ly Quoc; Takami, Akiyoshi; Kondo, Yukio; An, Dao Thi; Sasaki, Motoko; Wakayama, Tomohiko; Nakao, Shinji

    2015-01-01

    Benfotiamine is a synthetic thiamine analogue that stimulates transketolase, a cellular enzyme essential for glucose metabolism. Currently, benfotiamine is used to treat diabetic neuropathy. We recently reported that oral benfotiamine induced a temporary but remarkable recovery from acute myeloid leukemia in an elderly patient who was ineligible for standard chemotherapy due to dementia and renal failure. In the present study we present evidences that benfotiamine possess antitumor activity against leukemia cells. In a panel of nine myeloid leukemia cell lines benfotiamine impaired the viability of HL-60, NB4, K562 and KG1 cells and also inhibited the growing of primary leukemic blasts. The antitumor activity of benfotiamine is not mediated by apoptosis, necrosis or autophagy, but rather occurs though paraptosis cell death induction. Mechanistic studies revealed that benfotiamine inhibited the activity of constitutively active ERK1/2 and concomitantly increased the phosphorylation of JNK1/2 kinase in leukemic cells. In addition, benfotiamine induced the down regulation of the cell cycle regulator CDK3 which resulted in G1 cell cycle arrest in the sensitive leukemic cells. Moreover, combination index studies showed that benfotiamine enhanced the antiproliferative activities of cytarabine against leukemia cells. These findings suggest that benfotiamine has antitumor therapeutic potential.

  10. The in-vitro study of human blood leukemic cells by pulsed NMR

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zulkarnaen, M.; Munawir; Wibowo, Tono; Suyitno, Gogot

    1983-01-01

    The diagram of leukemic cells in human blood has been studied by using the NMR longitudinal relaxation technique. The observation was treated in whole blood, serum and blood cell. Every result was compared with previous observation and show that the values of the proton longitudinal relaxation in the leukemic whole blood almost twice or more that of normal blood, while in the serum and the blood cell, the values are nearly the same. (author)

  11. Heterogeneity of clonogenic cells in acute myeloblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sabbath, K D; Ball, E D; Larcom, P; Davis, R B; Griffin, J D

    1985-02-01

    The expression of differentiation-associated surface antigens by the clonogenic leukemic cells from 20 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) was studied with a panel of seven cytotoxic monoclonal antibodies (anti-Ia, -MY9, -PM-81, -AML-2-23, -Mol, -Mo2, and -MY3). The surface antigen phenotypes of the clonogenic cells were compared with the phenotypes of the whole leukemic cell population, and with the phenotypes of normal hematopoietic progenitor cells. In each case the clonogenic leukemic cells were found within a distinct subpopulation that was less "differentiated" than the total cell population. Clonogenic leukemic cells from different patients could be divided into three phenotype groups. In the first group (7 of 20 cases), the clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of the normal multipotent colony-forming cell (Ia, MY9). These cases tended to have "undifferentiated" (FAB M1) morphology, and the total cell population generally lacked expression of "late" monocyte antigens such as MY3 and Mo2. A second group (seven cases) of clonogenic cells expressed surface antigens characteristic of an "early" (day 14) colony-forming unit granulocyte-monocyte (CFU-GM), and a third group (six cases) was characteristic of a "late" (day 7) CFU-GM. The cases in these latter two groups tended to have myelomonocytic (FAB M4) morphology and to express monocyte surface antigens. These results suggest that the clonogenic cells are a distinct subpopulation in all cases of AML, and may be derived from normal hematopoietic progenitor cells at multiple points in the differentiation pathway. The results further support the possibility that selected monoclonal antibodies have the potential to purge leukemic clonogenic cells from bone marrow in some AML patients without eliminating critical normal progenitor cells.

  12. Glucocorticoid receptors on leukemic cells as evidenced by dexamethasone-induced cytolysis and /sup 3/H-dexamethasone binding

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Thraenhardt, H; Haefer, R; Zintl, F

    1987-01-01

    The presence of glucocorticoid receptors on the leukemic cells of 33 patients affected with acute lymphatic leukemia (ALL) and 6 patients affected with acute myeloic leukemia (AML) was investigated by dexamethasone-induced cytolysis and (/sup 3/H)-dexamethasone binding. The tests undertaken proved that after 20 hours of incubation 9 of 26 non-T-non-B-ALL (c-ALL and unclassified ALL) and 2 of AML were lysed with dexamethasone; blood lymphocytes and bone marrow leukocytes of healthy donors, however, were not affected. Non-T-non-B-ALL and AML were able to bind essentially more (/sup 3/H)-dexamethasone than T-ALL. There existed no correlation between dexamethasone binding and dexamethasone-induced cytolysis.

  13. Transformation of bone marrow stem-cells and radiation-induced myeloid leukemia in mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hirashima, K.; Bessho, M.; Hayata, I.; Nara, N.; Kawase, Y.; Ohtani, M.

    1982-01-01

    After a single whole-body X-irradiation of 300R to male RFM/MsNrs strain mice, the occurrence of myeloid leukemia initiated since four months and ceased at eleven months after irradiation. The cumulative incidence reached 24.5%. A time course study on the kinetics of pluripotential stem-cells (CFU-S) and granuloid committed stem-cells (CFU-C) in the marrow after 300R was also performed. The repopulation of CFU-S was accomplished within one month whereas that of CFU-C needed 210 days after irradiation. The incidence of leukemia was very rare after the complete repopulation of CFU-C. Simultaneously, collected spleen cells from the irradiated mice without overt leukemia were transplanted into 300-600R irradiated recipients of another sex. Three months thereafter, recipients were sacrificed to detect leukemic changes and the origin of leukemic cells by chromosome analysis. The results revealed that leukemic cell transformation of donor cells began 18 days after irradiation and on an average, 37.1% of the irradiated mice carried potentially leukemic cells for seven months after exposure, whereas none of the unirradiated mice carried leukemic cells at 7 months after irradiation. To investigate host factor(s) contributing to the proliferation of leukemic cells, the suppression of cellular immunity after 300R was measured by GVH mortality assay. However, the recovery of cellular immunity was observed until three months after irradiation and the role of cellular immunity to proliferation of leukemic cells after three months was negligible. (author)

  14. TRIM32 promotes retinoic acid receptor α-mediated differentiation in human promyelogenous leukemic cell line HL60

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Tomonobu; Okumura, Fumihiko; Iguchi, Akihiro; Ariga, Tadashi; Hatakeyama, Shigetsugu

    2012-01-01

    Highlights: ► TRIM32 enhanced RARα-mediated transcriptional activity even in the absence of RA. ► TRIM32 stabilized RARα in the human promyelogenous leukemic cell line HL60. ► Overexpression of TRIM32 in HL60 cells induced granulocytic differentiation. ► TRIM32 may function as a coactivator for RARα-mediated transcription in APL cells. -- Abstract: Ubiquitination, one of the posttranslational modifications, appears to be involved in the transcriptional activity of nuclear receptors including retinoic acid receptor α (RARα). We previously reported that an E3 ubiquitin ligase, TRIM32, interacts with several important proteins including RARα and enhances transcriptional activity of RARα in mouse neuroblastoma cells and embryonal carcinoma cells. Retinoic acid (RA), which acts as a ligand to nuclear receptors including RARα, plays crucial roles in development, differentiation, cell cycles and apoptosis. In this study, we found that TRIM32 enhances RARα-mediated transcriptional activity even in the absence of RA and stabilizes RARα in the human promyelogenous leukemic cell line HL60. Moreover, we found that overexpression of TRIM32 in HL60 cells suppresses cellular proliferation and induces granulocytic differentiation even in the absence of RA. These findings suggest that TRIM32 functions as one of the coactivators for RARα-mediated transcription in acute promyelogenous leukemia (APL) cells, and thus TRIM32 may become a potentially therapeutic target for APL.

  15. Do endothelial cells belong to the primitive stem leukemic clone in CML? Role of extracellular vesicles.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ramos, Teresa L; Sánchez-Abarca, Luis Ignacio; López-Ruano, Guillermo; Muntión, Sandra; Preciado, Silvia; Hernández-Ruano, Montserrat; Rosado, Belén; de las Heras, Natalia; Chillón, M Carmen; Hernández-Hernández, Ángel; González, Marcos; Sánchez-Guijo, Fermín; Del Cañizo, Consuelo

    2015-08-01

    The expression of BCR-ABL in hematopoietic stem cells is a well-defined primary event in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). Some reports have described the presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells from CML patients, suggesting the origin of the disease in a primitive hemangioblastic cell. On the other hand, extracellular vesicles (EVs) released by CML leukemic cells are involved in the angiogenesis modulation process. In the current work we hypothesized that EVs released from BCR-ABL(+) cells may carry inside the oncogene that can be transferred to endothelial cells leading to the expression of both BCR-ABL transcript and the oncoprotein. EVs from K562 cells and plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients were isolated by ultracentrifugation. RT-PCR analysis detected the presence of BCR-ABL RNA in the EVs isolated from both K562 cells and plasma of CML patients. The incorporation of these EVs into endothelial cells was demonstrated by flow cytometry and fluorescence microscopy showed that after 24h of incubation most EVs were incorporated. BCR-ABL transcripts were detected in all experiments on endothelial cells incubated with EVs from both sources. The presence of BCR-ABL on endothelial cells incubated with Philadelphia(+) EVs was also confirmed by Western blot assays. In summary, endothelial cells acquire BCR-ABL RNA and the oncoprotein after incubation with EVs released from Ph(+) positive cells (either from K562 cells or from plasma of newly diagnosed CML patients). This results challenge the hypothesis that endothelial cells may be part of the Philadelphia(+) clone in CML. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  16. The Leukemic Stem Cell Niche: Adaptation to “Hypoxia” versus Oncogene Addiction

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giulia Cheloni

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Previous studies based on low oxygen concentrations in the incubation atmosphere revealed that metabolic factors govern the maintenance of normal hematopoietic or leukemic stem cells (HSC and LSC. The physiological oxygen concentration in tissues ranges between 0.1 and 5.0%. Stem cell niches (SCN are placed in tissue areas at the lower end of this range (“hypoxic” SCN, to which stem cells are metabolically adapted and where they are selectively hosted. The data reported here indicated that driver oncogenic proteins of several leukemias are suppressed following cell incubation at oxygen concentration compatible with SCN physiology. This suppression is likely to represent a key positive regulator of LSC survival and maintenance (self-renewal within the SCN. On the other hand, LSC committed to differentiation, unable to stand suppression because of addiction to oncogenic signalling, would be unfit to home in SCN. The loss of oncogene addiction in SCN-adapted LSC has a consequence of crucial practical relevance: the refractoriness to inhibitors of the biological activity of oncogenic protein due to the lack of their molecular target. Thus, LSC hosted in SCN are suited to sustain the long-term maintenance of therapy-resistant minimal residual disease.

  17. Differential Activity of Voltage- and Ca2+-Dependent Potassium Channels in Leukemic T Cell Lines: Jurkat Cells Represent an Exceptional Case

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Salvador Valle-Reyes

    2018-05-01

    Full Text Available Activation of resting T cells relies on sustained Ca2+ influx across the plasma membrane, which in turn depends on the functional expression of potassium channels, whose activity repolarizes the membrane potential. Depending on the T-cells subset, upon activation the expression of Ca2+- or voltage-activated K+ channels, KCa or Kv, is up-regulated. In this study, by means of patch-clamp technique in the whole cell mode, we have studied in detail the characteristics of Kv and KCa currents in resting and activated human T cells, the only well explored human T-leukemic cell line Jurkat, and two additional human leukemic T cell lines, CEM and MOLT-3. Voltage dependence of activation and inactivation of Kv1.3 current were shifted up to by 15 mV to more negative potentials upon a prolonged incubation in the whole cell mode and displayed little difference at a stable state in all cell lines but CEM, where the activation curve was biphasic, with a high and low potential components. In Jurkat, KCa currents were dominated by apamine-sensitive KCa2.2 channels, whereas only KCa3.1 current was detected in healthy T and leukemic CEM and MOLT-3 cells. Despite a high proliferation potential of Jurkat cells, Kv and KCa currents were unexpectedly small, more than 10-fold lesser as compared to activated healthy human T cells, CEM and MOLT-3, which displayed characteristic Kv1.3high:KCa3.1high phenotype. Our results suggest that Jurkat cells represent perhaps a singular case and call for more extensive studies on primary leukemic T cell lines as well as a verification of the therapeutic potential of specific KCa3.1 blockers to combat acute lymphoblastic T leukemias.

  18. Involvement of CD147 on multidrug resistance through the regulation of P-glycoprotein expression in K562/ADR leukemic cell line

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Aoranit Somno

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available The relationship between P-gp and CD147 in the regulation of MDR in leukemic cells has not been reported. This study aimed to investigate the correlation between CD147 and P-gp in the regulation of drug resistance in the K562/ADR leukemic cell line. The results showed that drug-resistant K562/ADR cells expressed significantly higher P-gp and CD147 levels than drug-free K562/ADR cells. To determine the regulatory effect of CD147 on P-gp expression, anti-CD147 antibody MEM-M6/6 significantly decreased P-gp and CD147 mRNA and protein levels. This is the first report to show that CD147 mediates MDR in leukemia through the regulation of P-gp expression.

  19. NO-donating aspirin inhibits the growth of leukemic Jurkat cells and modulates β-catenin expression

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nath, Niharika; Labaze, Georges; Rigas, Basil; Kashfi, Khosrow

    2004-01-01

    β-Catenin has been implicated in leukemic cell proliferation. We compared the effects of aspirin (ASA) and the ortho, meta, and para positional isomers of NO-donating aspirin (NO-ASA) on cell growth and β-catenin expression in human Jurkat T leukemic cells. Cell growth inhibition was strong: IC 50 for p-, o-, and m- were 20 ± 1.6 (mean ± SEM), 15 ± 1.5, and 200 ± 12 μM, respectively, in contrast to that of ASA (3200 ± 375 μM). The para isomer of NO-ASA degraded β-catenin in a dose- and time-dependent manner coinciding with increasing expression of activated caspase-3. The caspase inhibitor ZVAD blocked β-catenin cleavage by p-NO-ASA and partially reversed cell growth inhibition by p-NO-ASA but not that by ASA. A denitrated analog of p-NO-ASA did not degrade β-catenin indicating the importance of the NO-donating moiety. Our findings suggest that NO-ASA merits further study as an agent against leukemia

  20. Human TM9SF4 Is a New Gene Down-Regulated by Hypoxia and Involved in Cell Adhesion of Leukemic Cells.

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    Rosa Paolillo

    Full Text Available The transmembrane 9 superfamily protein member 4, TM9SF4, belongs to the TM9SF family of proteins highly conserved through evolution. TM9SF4 homologs, previously identified in many different species, were mainly involved in cellular adhesion, innate immunity and phagocytosis. In human, the function and biological significance of TM9SF4 are currently under investigation. However, TM9SF4 was found overexpressed in human metastatic melanoma and in a small subset of acute myeloid leukemia (AMLs and myelodysplastic syndromes, consistent with an oncogenic function of this gene.In this study, we first analyzed the expression and regulation of TM9SF4 in normal and leukemic cells and identified TM9SF4 as a gene highly expressed in human quiescent CD34+ hematopoietic progenitor cells (HPCs, regulated during monocytic and granulocytic differentiation of HPCs, both lineages giving rise to mature myeloid cells involved in adhesion, phagocytosis and immunity. Then, we found that TM9SF4 is markedly overexpressed in leukemic cells and in AMLs, particularly in M2, M3 and M4 AMLs (i.e., in AMLs characterized by the presence of a more or less differentiated granulocytic progeny, as compared to normal CD34+ HPCs. Proliferation and differentiation of HPCs occurs in hypoxia, a physiological condition in bone marrow, but also a crucial component of cancer microenvironment. Here, we investigated the impact of hypoxia on TM9SF4 expression in leukemic cells and identified TM9SF4 as a direct target of HIF-1α, downregulated in these cells by hypoxia. Then, we found that the hypoxia-mediated downregulation of TM9SF4 expression is associated with a decrease of cell adhesion of leukemic cells to fibronectin, thus demonstrating that human TM9SF4 is a new molecule involved in leukemic cell adhesion.Altogether, our study reports for the first time the expression of TM9SF4 at the level of normal and leukemic hematopoietic cells and its marked expression at the level of AMLs

  1. Dendritic cells (DCs) can be successfully generated from leukemic blasts in individual patients with AML or MDS: an evaluation of different methods.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kremser, Andreas; Dressig, Julia; Grabrucker, Christine; Liepert, Anja; Kroell, Tanja; Scholl, Nina; Schmid, Christoph; Tischer, Johanna; Kufner, Stefanie; Salih, Helmut; Kolb, Hans Jochem; Schmetzer, Helga

    2010-01-01

    Myeloid-leukemic cells (AML, MDS, CML) can be differentiated to leukemia-derived dendritic cell [DC (DCleu)] potentially presenting the whole leukemic antigen repertoire without knowledge of distinct leukemia antigens and are regarded as promising candidates for a vaccination strategy. We studied the capability of 6 serum-free DC culture methods, chosen according to different mechanisms, to induce DC differentiation in 137 cases of AML and 52 cases of MDS. DC-stimulating substances were cytokines ("standard-medium", "MCM-Mimic", "cytokine-method"), bacterial lysates ("Picibanil"), double-stranded RNA ["Poly (I:C)"] or a cytokine bypass method ("Ca-ionophore"). The quality/quantity of DC generated was estimated by flow cytometry studying (co) expressions of "DC"antigens, costimulatory, maturation, and blast-antigens. Comparing these methods on average 15% to 32% DC, depending on methods used, could be obtained from blast-containing mononuclear cells (MNC) in AML/MDS cases with a DC viability of more than 60%. In all, 39% to 64% of these DC were mature; 31% to 52% of leukemic blasts could be converted to DCleu and DCleu-proportions in the suspension were 2% to 70% (13%). Average results of all culture methods tested were comparable, however not every given case of AML could be differentiated to DC with 1 selected method. However performing a pre-analysis with 3 DC-generating methods (MCM-Mimic, Picibanil, Ca-ionophore) we could generate DC in any given case. Functional analyses provided proof, that DC primed T cells to antileukemia-directed cytotoxic cells, although an anti-leukemic reaction was not achieved in every case. In summary our data show that a successful, quantitative DC/DCleu generation is possible with the best of 3 previously tested methods in any given case. Reasons for different functional behaviors of DC-primed T cells must be evaluated to design a practicable DC-based vaccination strategy.

  2. Imatinib treatment induces CD5+ B lymphocytes and IgM natural antibodies with anti-leukemic reactivity in patients with chronic myelogenous leukemia.

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    Silvia Catellani

    Full Text Available Imatinib mesylate is a first line treatment of Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia and of a rare form of gastrointestinal stromal cancer, where the response to the drug is also linked to the immune system activation with production of antineoplastic cytokines. In this study, forty patients in the chronic phase of disease, treated with imatinib mesylate, were analyzed. Bone marrow aspirates were drawn at diagnosis, after 3, 6, 12, 18 months for haematological, cytofluorimetric, cytogenetic, biomolecular evaluation and cytokine measurement. Responder and non responder patients were defined according to the European LeukemiaNet recommendations. In responder patients (n = 32, the percentage of bone marrow CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ lymphocytes, and the plasma levels of IgM, were significantly higher, at 3 months and up to 9 months, than in non responders. These IgM reacted with O-linked sugars expressed by leukemic cells and could induce tumor cell apoptosis. In responder patients the stromal-derived factor-1 and the B-lymphocyte-activating factor of the tumor necrosis factor family significantly raised in the bone marrow after imatinib administration, together with the bone morphogenetic proteins-2 and -7. All patients with high number of CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ cells and high stromal-derived factor-1 and B lymphocyte activating factor levels, underwent complete cytogenetic and/or molecular remission by 12 months. We propose that CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ lymphocytes producing anti-carbohydrate antibodies with anti-tumor activity, might contribute to the response to imatinib treatment. As in multivariate analysis bone marrow CD20(+CD5(+sIgM(+ cells and stromal-derived factor-1 and B-lymphocyte-activating factor levels were significantly related to cytogenetical and molecular changes, they might contribute to the definition of the pharmacological response.

  3. Comparison of edge detection techniques for M7 subtype Leukemic cell in terms of noise filters and threshold value

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    Abdul Salam Afifah Salmi

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available This paper will focus on the study and identifying various threshold values for two commonly used edge detection techniques, which are Sobel and Canny Edge detection. The idea is to determine which values are apt in giving accurate results in identifying a particular leukemic cell. In addition, evaluating suitability of edge detectors are also essential as feature extraction of the cell depends greatly on image segmentation (edge detection. Firstly, an image of M7 subtype of Acute Myelocytic Leukemia (AML is chosen due to its diagnosing which were found lacking. Next, for an enhancement in image quality, noise filters are applied. Hence, by comparing images with no filter, median and average filter, useful information can be acquired. Each threshold value is fixed with value 0, 0.25 and 0.5. From the investigation found, without any filter, Canny with a threshold value of 0.5 yields the best result.

  4. Effects of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor and interleukin 6 on the growth of leukemic blasts in suspension culture.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tsao, C J; Cheng, T Y; Chang, S L; Su, W J; Tseng, J Y

    1992-05-01

    We examined the stimulatory effects of recombinant human granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor (GM-CSF) and interleukin 6 (IL)-6 on the in vitro proliferation of leukemic blast cells from patients with acute leukemia. Bone marrow or peripheral blood leukemic blast cells were obtained from 21 patients, including 14 cases of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), four cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), two cases of acute undifferentiated leukemia, and one case of acute mixed-lineage leukemia. The proliferation of leukemic blast cells was evaluated by measuring the incorporation of 3H-thymidine into cells incubated with various concentrations of cytokines for 3 days. GM-CSF stimulated the DNA synthesis (with greater than 2.0 stimulation index) of blast cells in 9 of 14 (64%) AML cases, two cases of acute undifferentiated leukemia and one case of acute mixed-lineage leukemia. Only two cases of AML blasts responded to IL-6 to grow in the short-term suspension cultures. GM-CSF and IL-6 did not display a synergistic effect on the growth of leukemic cells. Moreover, GM-CSF and IL-6 did not stimulate the proliferation of ALL blast cells. Binding study also revealed the specific binding of GM-CSF on the blast cells of acute undifferentiated leukemia and acute mixed-lineage leukemia. Our results indicated that leukemic blast cells of acute undifferentiated leukemia and acute mixed-lineage leukemia possessed functional GM-CSF receptors.

  5. GPR84 sustains aberrant β-catenin signaling in leukemic stem cells for maintenance of MLL leukemogenesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dietrich, Philipp A; Yang, Chen; Leung, Halina H L; Lynch, Jennifer R; Gonzales, Estrella; Liu, Bing; Haber, Michelle; Norris, Murray D; Wang, Jianlong; Wang, Jenny Yingzi

    2014-11-20

    β-catenin is required for establishment of leukemic stem cells (LSCs) in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Targeted inhibition of β-catenin signaling has been hampered by the lack of pathway components amenable to pharmacologic manipulation. Here we identified a novel β-catenin regulator, GPR84, a member of the G protein-coupled receptor family that represents a highly tractable class of drug targets. High GPR84 expression levels were confirmed in human and mouse AML LSCs compared with hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs). Suppression of GPR84 significantly inhibited cell growth by inducing G1-phase cell-cycle arrest in pre-LSCs, reduced LSC frequency, and impaired reconstitution of stem cell-derived mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) AML, which represents an aggressive and drug-resistant subtype of AML. The GPR84-deficient phenotype in established AML could be rescued by expression of constitutively active β-catenin. Furthermore, GPR84 conferred a growth advantage to Hoxa9/Meis1a-transduced stem cells. Microarray analysis demonstrated that GPR84 significantly upregulated a small set of MLL-fusion targets and β-catenin coeffectors, and downregulated a hematopoietic cell-cycle inhibitor. Altogether, our data reveal a previously unrecognized role of GPR84 in maintaining fully developed AML by sustaining aberrant β-catenin signaling in LSCs, and suggest that targeting the oncogenic GPR84/β-catenin signaling axis may represent a novel therapeutic strategy for AML. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  6. Isolation of a novel chronic lymphocytic leukemic (CLL) cell line and development of an in vivo mouse model of CLL.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kellner, Joshua; Wierda, William; Shpall, Elizabeth; Keating, Michael; McNiece, Ian

    2016-01-01

    Leukemic cell lines have become important tools for studies of disease providing a monoclonal cell population that can be extensively expanded in vitro while preserving leukemic cellular characteristics. However, studies of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) have been impeded in part by the lack of continuous human cell lines. CLL cells have a high spontaneous apoptosis rate in vitro and exhibit minimal proliferation in xenograft models. Therefore, there is a need for development of primary CLL cell lines and we describe the isolation of such a line from the bone marrow of a CLL patient (17p deletion and TP53 mutation) which has been in long term culture for more than 12 months with continuous proliferation. The CLL cell line (termed MDA-BM5) which was generated in vitro with continuous co-culture on autologous stromal cells is CD19+CD5+ and shows an identical pattern of somatic hypermutation as determined in the patient's bone marrow (BM), confirming the origin of the cells from the original CLL clone. MDA-BM5 cells were readily transplantable in NOD/SCID gamma null mice (NSG) with disease developing in the BM, liver and spleen. BM cells from quaternary serial transplantation in NSG mice demonstrated the presence of CD19+CD5+ cells with Ig restricted to lambda which is consistent with the original patient cells. These studies describe a new CLL cell line from a patient with del(17p) that provides a unique model for in vitro and in vivo studies. Copyright © 2015 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  7. Development Refractoriness of MLL-Rearranged Human B Cell Acute Leukemias to Reprogramming into Pluripotency

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    Alvaro Muñoz-López

    2016-10-01

    Full Text Available Induced pluripotent stem cells (iPSCs are a powerful tool for disease modeling. They are routinely generated from healthy donors and patients from multiple cell types at different developmental stages. However, reprogramming leukemias is an extremely inefficient process. Few studies generated iPSCs from primary chronic myeloid leukemias, but iPSC generation from acute myeloid or lymphoid leukemias (ALL has not been achieved. We attempted to generate iPSCs from different subtypes of B-ALL to address the developmental impact of leukemic fusion genes. OKSM(L-expressing mono/polycistronic-, retroviral/lentiviral/episomal-, and Sendai virus vector-based reprogramming strategies failed to render iPSCs in vitro and in vivo. Addition of transcriptomic-epigenetic reprogramming “boosters” also failed to generate iPSCs from B cell blasts and B-ALL lines, and when iPSCs emerged they lacked leukemic fusion genes, demonstrating non-leukemic myeloid origin. Conversely, MLL-AF4-overexpressing hematopoietic stem cells/B progenitors were successfully reprogrammed, indicating that B cell origin and leukemic fusion gene were not reprogramming barriers. Global transcriptome/DNA methylome profiling suggested a developmental/differentiation refractoriness of MLL-rearranged B-ALL to reprogramming into pluripotency.

  8. Plasma cell leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Fernández de Larrea, C; Kyle, R A; Durie, B G M

    2013-01-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare and aggressive variant of myeloma characterized by the presence of circulating plasma cells. It is classified as either primary PCL occurring at diagnosis or as secondary PCL in patients with relapsed/refractory myeloma. Primary PCL is a distinct clinic......-pathological entity with different cytogenetic and molecular findings. The clinical course is aggressive with short remissions and survival duration. The diagnosis is based upon the percentage (≥ 20%) and absolute number (≥ 2 × 10(9)/l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. It is proposed that the thresholds...... regimens and bortezomib-based regimens are recommended followed by high-dose therapy with autologous stem cell transplantation if feasible. Allogeneic transplantation can be considered in younger patients. Prospective multicenter studies are required to provide revised definitions and better understanding...

  9. Interleukin 1 as an autocrine growth factor for acute myeloid leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cozzolino, F.; Rubartelli, A.; Aldinucci, D.; Sitia, R.; Torcia, M.; Shaw, A.; Di Guglielmo, R.

    1989-01-01

    Production of interleukin 1 (IL-1) by leukemic cells was studied in 13 cases of acute myeloid leukemia. Intracytoplasmic immunofluorescence studies showed that the cells invariably contained the cytokine. Endogenous labeling studies demonstrated that acute myeloid leukemia cells produced either only the 33-kDa propeptide or both the propeptide and the 17-kDa mature form of IL-1β. The 33-kDa propeptide IL-1α was always produced but was less frequently released. Involvement of IL-1 in leukemic cell growth was investigated using two antibodies specific for IL-1 subtypes, which inhibited spontaneous cell proliferation in the six cases studied. After acid treatment of the cells, a surface receptor for IL-1 could be demonstrated, which mediated 125 I-labeled IL-1-specific uptake by leukemic cells. Furthermore, recombinant IL-1α or IL-1β induced significant cell proliferation in 10 12 cases. The above findings were uncorrelated with the cytologic type (French-American-British classification) of leukemia. The studies suggest that IL-1 may act as an autocrine growth factor in most cases of acute myeloid leukemia

  10. Generation of TCR-Expressing Innate Lymphoid-like Helper Cells that Induce Cytotoxic T Cell-Mediated Anti-leukemic Cell Response.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ueda, Norihiro; Uemura, Yasushi; Zhang, Rong; Kitayama, Shuichi; Iriguchi, Shoichi; Kawai, Yohei; Yasui, Yutaka; Tatsumi, Minako; Ueda, Tatsuki; Liu, Tian-Yi; Mizoro, Yasutaka; Okada, Chihiro; Watanabe, Akira; Nakanishi, Mahito; Senju, Satoru; Nishimura, Yasuharu; Kuzushima, Kiyotaka; Kiyoi, Hitoshi; Naoe, Tomoki; Kaneko, Shin

    2018-06-05

    CD4 + T helper (Th) cell activation is essential for inducing cytotoxic T lymphocyte (CTL) responses against malignancy. We reprogrammed a Th clone specific for chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML)-derived b3a2 peptide to pluripotency and re-differentiated the cells into original TCR-expressing T-lineage cells (iPS-T cells) with gene expression patterns resembling those of group 1 innate lymphoid cells. CD4 gene transduction into iPS-T cells enhanced b3a2 peptide-specific responses via b3a2 peptide-specific TCR. iPS-T cells upregulated CD40 ligand (CD40L) expression in response to interleukin-2 and interleukin-15. In the presence of Wilms tumor 1 (WT1) peptide, antigen-specific dendritic cells (DCs) conditioned by CD4-modified CD40L high iPS-T cells stimulated WT1-specific CTL priming, which eliminated WT1 peptide-expressing CML cells in vitro and in vivo. Thus, CD4 modification of CD40L high iPS-T cells generates innate lymphoid helper-like cells inducing bcr-abl-specific TCR signaling that mediates effectiveanti-leukemic CTL responses via DC maturation, showing potential for adjuvant immunotherapy against leukemia. Copyright © 2018 The Authors. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  11. Role of the B-cell receptor in chronic lymphocytic leukemia: where do we stand?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fais, Franco; Bruno, Silvia; Ghiotto, Fabio

    2010-01-01

    The past 15 years have witnessed an enormous effort in studying B-cell Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia. A great number of researches brought significant novel information and a better understanding of the natural history of this disease. This mini review will focus on the studies related to the Immunoglobulin variable (IgV) genes rearrangements that compose the B-cell receptor (BcR) of the leukemic clones. These studies have defined a role for the antigen(s) in the paths that lead to leukemic clone generation/expansion and underscore the informative value represented by BcR analyses.

  12. Molecular dynamics study of lipid bilayers modeling the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and leukemic GRSL cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andoh, Yoshimichi; Okazaki, Susumu; Ueoka, Ryuichi

    2013-04-01

    Molecular dynamics (MD) calculations for the plasma membranes of normal murine thymocytes and thymus-derived leukemic GRSL cells in water have been performed under physiological isothermal-isobaric conditions (310.15K and 1 atm) to investigate changes in membrane properties induced by canceration. The model membranes used in our calculations for normal and leukemic thymocytes comprised 23 and 25 kinds of lipids, respectively, including phosphatidylcholine, phosphatidylethanolamine, phosphatidylserine, phosphatidylinositol, sphingomyelin, lysophospholipids, and cholesterol. The mole fractions of the lipids adopted here were based on previously published experimental values. Our calculations clearly showed that the membrane area was increased in leukemic cells, and that the isothermal area compressibility of the leukemic plasma membranes was double that of normal cells. The calculated membranes of leukemic cells were thus considerably bulkier and softer in the lateral direction compared with those of normal cells. The tilt angle of the cholesterol and the conformation of the phospholipid fatty acid tails both showed a lower level of order in leukemic cell membranes compared with normal cell membranes. The lateral radial distribution function of the lipids also showed a more disordered structure in leukemic cell membranes than in normal cell membranes. These observations all show that, for the present thymocytes, the lateral structure of the membrane is considerably disordered by canceration. Furthermore, the calculated lateral self-diffusion coefficient of the lipid molecules in leukemic cell membranes was almost double that in normal cell membranes. The calculated rotational and wobbling autocorrelation functions also indicated that the molecular motion of the lipids was enhanced in leukemic cell membranes. Thus, here we have demonstrated that the membranes of thymocyte leukemic cells are more disordered and more fluid than normal cell membranes. Copyright © 2013

  13. F-box protein FBXL2 targets cyclin D2 for ubiquitination and degradation to inhibit leukemic cell proliferation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Bill B.; Glasser, Jennifer R.; Coon, Tiffany A.; Zou, Chunbin; Miller, Hannah L.; Fenton, Moon; McDyer, John F.; Boyiadzis, Michael

    2012-01-01

    Hematologic maligancies exhibit a growth advantage by up-regulation of components within the molecular apparatus involved in cell-cycle progression. The SCF (Skip-Cullin1-F-box protein) E3 ligase family provides homeostatic feedback control of cell division by mediating ubiquitination and degradation of cell-cycle proteins. By screening several previously undescribed E3 ligase components, we describe the behavior of a relatively new SCF subunit, termed FBXL2, that ubiquitinates and destabilizes cyclin D2 protein leading to G0 phase arrest and apoptosis in leukemic and B-lymphoblastoid cell lines. FBXL2 expression was strongly suppressed, and yet cyclin D2 protein levels were robustly expressed in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) and acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) patient samples. Depletion of endogenous FBXL2 stabilized cyclin D2 levels, whereas ectopically expressed FBXL2 decreased cyclin D2 lifespan. FBXL2 did not bind a phosphodegron within its substrate, which is typical of other F-box proteins, but uniquely targeted a calmodulin-binding signature within cyclin D2 to facilitate its polyubiquitination. Calmodulin competes with the F-box protein for access to this motif where it bound and protected cyclin D2 from FBXL2. Calmodulin reversed FBXL2-induced G0 phase arrest and attenuated FBXL2-induced apoptosis of lymphoblastoid cells. These results suggest an antiproliferative effect of SCFFBXL2 in lymphoproliferative malignancies. PMID:22323446

  14. Catch me if you can: Leukemia Escape after CD19-Directed T Cell Immunotherapies

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    Marco Ruella

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Immunotherapy is the revolution in cancer treatment of this last decade. Among multiple approaches able to harness the power of the immune system against cancer, T cell based immunotherapies represent one of the most successful examples. In particular, biotechnological engineering of protein structures, like the T cell receptor or the immunoglobulins, allowed the generation of synthetic peptides like chimeric antigen receptors and bispecific antibodies that are able to redirect non-tumor specific T cells to recognize and kill leukemic cells. The anti-CD19/CD3 bispecific antibody blinatumomab and anti-CD19 chimeric antigen receptor T cells (CART19 have produced deep responses in patients with relapsed and refractory B-cell acute leukemias. However, although the majority of these patients responds to anti-CD19 immunotherapy, a subset of them still relapses. Interestingly, a novel family of leukemia escape mechanisms has been described, all characterized by the apparent loss of CD19 on the surface of leukemic blasts. This extraordinary finding demonstrates the potent selective pressure of CART19/blinatumomab that drives extreme and specific escape strategies by leukemic blasts. Patients with CD19-negative relapsed leukemia have very poor prognosis and novel approaches to treat and ideally prevent antigen-loss are direly needed. In this review we discuss the incidence, mechanisms and therapeutic approaches for CD19-negative leukemia relapses occuring after CD19-directed T cell immunotherapies and present our future perspective.

  15. Leukomogenic factors downregulate heparanase expression in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Eshel, Rinat; Ben-Zaken, Olga; Vainas, Oded; Nadir, Yona; Minucci, Saverio; Polliack, Aaron; Naparstek, Ella; Vlodavsky, Israel; Katz, Ben-Zion

    2005-01-01

    Heparanase is a heparan sulfate-degrading endoglycosidase expressed by mature monocytes and myeloid cells, but not by immature hematopoietic progenitors. Heparanase gene expression is upregulated during differentiation of immature myeloid cells. PML-RARα and PLZF-RARα fusion gene products associated with acute promyelocytic leukemia abrogate myeloid differentiation and heparanase expression. AML-Eto, a translocation product associated with AML FAB M2, also downregulates heparanase gene expression. The common mechanism that underlines the activity of these three fusion gene products involves the recruitment of histone deacetylase complexes to specific locations within the DNA. We found that retinoic acid that dissociates PML-RARα from the DNA, and which is used to treat acute promyelocytic leukemia patients, restores heparanase expression to normal levels in an acute promyelocytic leukemia cell line. The retinoic acid effects were also observed in primary acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and in a retinoic acid-treated acute promyelocytic leukemia patient. Histone deacetylase inhibitor reverses the downregulation of heparanase expression induced by the AML-Eto fusion gene product in M2 type AML. In summary, we have characterized a link between leukomogenic factors and the downregulation of heparanase in myeloid leukemic cells

  16. Targeting Aberrant Glutathione Metabolism to Eradicate Human Acute Myelogenous Leukemia Cells*

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pei, Shanshan; Minhajuddin, Mohammad; Callahan, Kevin P.; Balys, Marlene; Ashton, John M.; Neering, Sarah J.; Lagadinou, Eleni D.; Corbett, Cheryl; Ye, Haobin; Liesveld, Jane L.; O'Dwyer, Kristen M.; Li, Zheng; Shi, Lei; Greninger, Patricia; Settleman, Jeffrey; Benes, Cyril; Hagen, Fred K.; Munger, Joshua; Crooks, Peter A.; Becker, Michael W.; Jordan, Craig T.

    2013-01-01

    The development of strategies to eradicate primary human acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells is a major challenge to the leukemia research field. In particular, primitive leukemia cells, often termed leukemia stem cells, are typically refractory to many forms of therapy. To investigate improved strategies for targeting of human AML cells we compared the molecular mechanisms regulating oxidative state in primitive (CD34+) leukemic versus normal specimens. Our data indicate that CD34+ AML cells have elevated expression of multiple glutathione pathway regulatory proteins, presumably as a mechanism to compensate for increased oxidative stress in leukemic cells. Consistent with this observation, CD34+ AML cells have lower levels of reduced glutathione and increased levels of oxidized glutathione compared with normal CD34+ cells. These findings led us to hypothesize that AML cells will be hypersensitive to inhibition of glutathione metabolism. To test this premise, we identified compounds such as parthenolide (PTL) or piperlongumine that induce almost complete glutathione depletion and severe cell death in CD34+ AML cells. Importantly, these compounds only induce limited and transient glutathione depletion as well as significantly less toxicity in normal CD34+ cells. We further determined that PTL perturbs glutathione homeostasis by a multifactorial mechanism, which includes inhibiting key glutathione metabolic enzymes (GCLC and GPX1), as well as direct depletion of glutathione. These findings demonstrate that primitive leukemia cells are uniquely sensitive to agents that target aberrant glutathione metabolism, an intrinsic property of primary human AML cells. PMID:24089526

  17. CD25 targeted therapy of chemotherapy resistant leukemic stem cells using DR5 specific TRAIL peptide

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jayaprakasam Madhumathi

    2017-03-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapy resistant leukemic stem cells (LSCs are being targeted as a modern therapeutic approach to prevent disease relapse. LSCs isolated from methotrexate resistant side population (SP of leukemic cell lines HL60 and MOLT4 exhibited high levels of CD25 and TRAIL R2/DR5 which are potential targets. Recombinant immunotoxin conjugating IL2α with TRAIL peptide mimetic was constructed for DR5 receptor specific targeting of LSCs and were tested in total cell population and LSCs. IL2-TRAIL peptide induced apoptosis in drug resistant SP cells from cell lines and showed potent cytotoxicity in PBMCs derived from leukemic patients with an efficacy of 81.25% in AML and 100% in CML, ALL and CLL. IL2-TRAIL peptide showed cytotoxicity in relapsed patient samples and was more effective than TRAIL or IL2-TRAIL proteins. Additionally, DR5 specific IL2-TRAIL peptide was effective in targeting and killing LSCs purified from cell lines [IC50: 952 nM in HL60, 714 nM in MOLT4] and relapsed patient blood samples with higher efficacy (85% than IL2-TRAIL protein (46%. Hence, CD25 and DR5 specific targeting by IL2-TRAIL peptide may be an effective strategy for targeting drug resistant leukemic cells and LSCs.

  18. Leu-9 (CD 7) positivity in acute leukemias: a marker of T-cell lineage?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ben-Ezra, J; Winberg, C D; Wu, A; Rappaport, H

    1987-01-01

    Monoclonal antibody Leu-9 (CD 7) has been reported to be a sensitive and specific marker for T-cell lineage in leukemic processes, since it is positive in patients whose leukemic cells fail to express other T-cell antigens. To test whether Leu-9 is indeed specific for T-cell leukemias, we examined in detail 10 cases of acute leukemia in which reactions were positive for Leu-9 and negative for other T-cell-associated markers including T-11, Leu-1, T-3, and E-rosettes. Morphologically and cytochemically, 2 of these 10 leukemias were classified as lymphoblastic, 4 as myeloblastic, 2 as monoblastic, 1 as megakaryoblastic, and 1 as undifferentiated. The case of acute megakaryoblastic leukemia is the first reported case to be Leu-9 positive. None of the 10 were TdT positive. Of six cases (two monoblastic, one lymphoblastic, one myeloblastic, one megakaryoblastic, and one undifferentiated) in which we evaluated for DNA gene rearrangements, only one, a peroxidase-positive leukemia, showed a novel band on study of the T-cell-receptor beta-chain gene. We therefore conclude that Leu-9 is not a specific marker to T-cell lineage and that, in the absence of other supporting data, Leu-9 positivity should not be used as the sole basis of classifying an acute leukemia as being T-cell derived.

  19. IN SILICO MODELLING OF CYTOTOXIC BEHAVIOUR OF ANTI-LEUKEMIC COMPOUNDS ON HL-60 CELL LINE

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    David Ebuka Arthur

    2016-05-01

    Full Text Available This research employs multiple linear regression technique in the modelling of some potent anti-leukemic compounds using paDEL molecular descriptor software calculator, to identify the best relationship between the chemical structure and toxicities of the anticancer datasets against some leukemic cell lines (HL-60. Statistical parameters such as Q2 and R2pred (test set were computed to validate the strength of the model, while Williams plot was used to assess its applicability domain. The mean effects of the molecular descriptors in the models were calculated to illuminate the principal properties of the molecules responsible for their cytotoxicity.

  20. Fludarabine-mediated circumvention of cytarabine resistance is associated with fludarabine triphosphate accumulation in cytarabine-resistant leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yamamoto, Shuji; Yamauchi, Takahiro; Kawai, Yasukazu; Takemura, Haruyuki; Kishi, Shinji; Yoshida, Akira; Urasaki, Yoshimasa; Iwasaki, Hiromichi; Ueda, Takanori

    2007-02-01

    The combination of cytarabine (ara-C) with fludarabine is a common approach to treating resistant acute myeloid leukemia. Success depends on a fludarabine triphosphate (F-ara-ATP)-mediated increase in the active intracellular metabolite of ara-C, ara-C 5'-triphosphate (ara-CTP). Therapy-resistant leukemia may exhibit ara-C resistance, the mechanisms of which might induce cross-resistance to fludarabine with reduced F-ara-ATP formation. The present study evaluated the effect of combining ara-C and fludarabine on ara-C-resistant leukemic cells in vitro. Two variant cell lines (R1 and R2) were 8-fold and 10-fold more ara-C resistant, respectively, than the parental HL-60 cells. Reduced deoxycytidine kinase activity was demonstrated in R1 and R2 cells, and R2 cells also showed an increase in cytosolic 5'-nucleotidase II activity. Compared with HL-60 cells, R1 and R2 cells produced smaller amounts of ara-CTP. Both variants accumulated less F-ara-ATP than HL-60 cells and showed cross-resistance to fludarabine nucleoside (F-ara-A). R2 cells, however, accumulated much smaller amounts of F-ara-ATP and were more F-ara-A resistant than R1 cells. In HL-60 and R1 cells, F-ara-A pretreatment followed by ara-C incubation produced F-ara-ATP concentrations sufficient for augmenting ara-CTP production, thereby enhancing ara-C cytotoxicity. No potentiation was observed in R2 cells. Nucleotidase might preferentially degrade F-ara-A monophosphate over ara-C monophosphate, leading to reduced F-ara-ATP production and thereby compromising the F-ara-A-mediated potentiation of ara-C cytotoxicity in R2 cells. Thus, F-ara-A-mediated enhancement of ara-C cytotoxicity depended on F-ara-ATP accumulation in ara-C-resistant leukemic cells but ultimately was associated with the mechanism of ara-C resistance.

  1. Radiation responses of hematopoietic-cells and inducing acute myeloid leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ojima, Mitsuaki; Hirouchi, Tokuhisa

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia has consistently held the interest of researchers from the beginning of radiation carcinogenesis. One of the major reasons for this interest is the availability of several strains of mice that develop leukemia following radiation exposure after a short latency period that resemble those found in A-Bomb survivors. Previous studies have shown that rAML (Radiation-induced Acute Myeloid Leukemia) in mice show inactivation of Sfpi1 gene and a hemizygous deletion in chromosome 2. Leukemic stem cells in murine rAML have been reported to share some characteristics with common myeloid progenitor cells. In this review, we will discuss the possible mechanisms in the development of rAML stem cells, focusing on the alterations found in the leukemic stem cells and as well as the environment in which these leukemic stem cells are developed, such cytokine expression, as Well as alterations that may be found in other cells residing in the bone marrow. Hematopoietic stem cells respond to radiation exposure both as a single cell and as a part of the differentiating hematopoietic tissue for several months prior to its transformation to a rAML stem cell. It is however unclear how these 2 responses contribute to the development of the rAML stem cell. This review covers previous reports and examines the development of the rAML stem cell in detail. (author)

  2. 5-Aza-2'-deoxycytidine synergistic action with thymidine on leukemic cells and interaction of 5-aza-dCMP with dCMP deaminase

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Momparler, R.L.; Bartolucci, S.; Bouchard, J.; Momparler, L.F.; Raia, C.A.; Rossi, M.

    1986-01-01

    The authors observe a synergistic antineoplastic effect between 5-AZA-dCR and dTR on leukemia cells in culture. In order to understand the mechanism behind this interaction the authors investigate the effects of dTTP on the deamination of 5-aza-2'-deoxycytidine-5'-monophosphate (5-AZA-dCMP) by dCMP deaminase. The effects of 5-AZA-dCTP on this enzyme is also studied. The incorporation of tritium-5-AZA-Cdr into DNA of leukemic cells was performed. The amount of radioactivity incorproated into DNA was determined by trapping the cells on GF/C glass fiber filters and washing with cold TCA. It is shown that the modulation of the atieoplastic activity of deoxycytidine analogs by allosteric effectors such as dTTP may have the potential to increase the effectiveness of the chemotherapy for acute leukemia

  3. Loss of quiescence and self-renewal capacity of hematopoietic stem cell in an in vitro leukemic niche.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Vanegas, Natalia-Del Pilar; Vernot, Jean-Paul

    2017-01-01

    Leukemic and mesenchymal stem cells interact in the leukemic microenvironment and affect each other differently. This interplay has also important implications for the hematopoietic stem cell (HSC) biology and function. This study evaluated human HSC self-renewal potential and quiescence in an in vitro leukemic niche without leukemic cells. A leukemic niche was established by co-culturing mesenchymal stem cells with a fresh conditioned medium obtained from a leukemic (REH) cell line. After 3 days, the REH-conditioned medium was removed and freshly isolated CD34+ at a density of up to 100,000 cells/ml were added to the leukemic niche. CD34+ cell evaluations (cell cycle, self-renewal gene expression and migration capacity) were performed after 3 further days of co-culture. Additionally, we preliminary investigated the soluble factors present in the leukemic niche and their effect on the mesenchymal stem cells. Statistical significance was assessed by Student's t test or the nonparametric test Kolmogorov-Smirnov. By co-culturing normal mesenchymal stem cells with the REH-conditioned medium we showed that hematopoietic stem cells, normally in a quiescent state, enter cell cycle and proliferate. This loss of quiescence was accompanied by an increased expression of Ki-67 and c-Myc, two well-known cell proliferation-associated markers. Two central regulators of quiescence GATA2 and p53 were also down regulated. Importantly, two genes involved in HSC self-renewal, Klf4 and the histone-lysine N -methyltransferase enzyme Ezh2, were severely affected. On the contrary, c-Kit expression, the stem cell factor receptor, was upregulated in hematopoietic stem cells when compared to the normal niche. Interestingly, mesenchymal stem cells incubated with the REH-conditioned medium stopped growing, showed a flattened morphology with the appearance of small vacuoles, and importantly, became positive for the senescence-associated beta-galactosidase activity. Evaluation of the leukemic

  4. Phenotypic and Functional Alterations of Hematopoietic Stem and Progenitor Cells in an In Vitro Leukemia-Induced Microenvironment

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    Jean-Paul Vernot

    2017-02-01

    Full Text Available An understanding of the cell interactions occurring in the leukemic microenvironment and their functional consequences for the different cell players has therapeutic relevance. By co-culturing mesenchymal stem cells (MSC with the REH acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL cell line, we have established an in vitro leukemic niche for the functional evaluation of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSPC, CD34+ cells. We showed that the normal homeostatic control exerted by the MSC over the HSPC is considerably lost in this leukemic microenvironment: HSPC increased their proliferation rate and adhesion to MSC. The adhesion molecules CD54 and CD44 were consequently upregulated in HSPC from the leukemic niche. Consequently, with this adhesive phenotype, HSPC showed less Stromal derived factor-1 (SDF-1-directed migration. Interestingly, multipotency was severely affected with an important reduction in the absolute count and the percentage of primitive progenitor colonies. It was possible to simulate most of these HSPC alterations by incubation of MSC with a REH-conditioned medium, suggesting that REH soluble factors and their effect on MSC are important for the observed changes. Of note, these HSPC alterations were reproduced when primary leukemic cells from an ALL type B (ALL-B patient were used to set up the leukemic niche. These results suggest that a general response is induced in the leukemic niche to the detriment of HSPC function and in favor of leukemic cell support. This in vitro leukemic niche could be a valuable tool for the understanding of the molecular events responsible for HSPC functional failure and a useful scenario for therapeutic evaluation.

  5. Adaptive Immunity to Leukemia Is Inhibited by Cross-Reactive Induced Regulatory T Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manlove, Luke S; Berquam-Vrieze, Katherine E; Pauken, Kristen E; Williams, Richard T; Jenkins, Marc K; Farrar, Michael A

    2015-10-15

    BCR-ABL(+) acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have transient responses to current therapies. However, the fusion of BCR to ABL generates a potential leukemia-specific Ag that could be a target for immunotherapy. We demonstrate that the immune system can limit BCR-ABL(+) leukemia progression although ultimately this immune response fails. To address how BCR-ABL(+) leukemia escapes immune surveillance, we developed a peptide: MHC class II tetramer that labels endogenous BCR-ABL-specific CD4(+) T cells. Naive mice harbored a small population of BCR-ABL-specific T cells that proliferated modestly upon immunization. The small number of naive BCR-ABL-specific T cells was due to negative selection in the thymus, which depleted BCR-ABL-specific T cells. Consistent with this observation, we saw that BCR-ABL-specific T cells were cross-reactive with an endogenous peptide derived from ABL. Despite this cross-reactivity, the remaining population of BCR-ABL reactive T cells proliferated upon immunization with the BCR-ABL fusion peptide and adjuvant. In response to BCR-ABL(+) leukemia, BCR-ABL-specific T cells proliferated and converted into regulatory T (Treg) cells, a process that was dependent on cross-reactivity with self-antigen, TGF-β1, and MHC class II Ag presentation by leukemic cells. Treg cells were critical for leukemia progression in C57BL/6 mice, as transient Treg cell ablation led to extended survival of leukemic mice. Thus, BCR-ABL(+) leukemia actively suppresses antileukemia immune responses by converting cross-reactive leukemia-specific T cells into Treg cells. Copyright © 2015 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  6. Expression profile of CREB knockdown in myeloid leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Pellegrini, Matteo; Cheng, Jerry C; Voutila, Jon; Judelson, Dejah; Taylor, Julie; Nelson, Stanley F; Sakamoto, Kathleen M

    2008-01-01

    The cAMP Response Element Binding Protein, CREB, is a transcription factor that regulates cell proliferation, differentiation, and survival in several model systems, including neuronal and hematopoietic cells. We demonstrated that CREB is overexpressed in acute myeloid and leukemia cells compared to normal hematopoietic stem cells. CREB knockdown inhibits leukemic cell proliferation in vitro and in vivo, but does not affect long-term hematopoietic reconstitution. To understand downstream pathways regulating CREB, we performed expression profiling with RNA from the K562 myeloid leukemia cell line transduced with CREB shRNA. By combining our expression data from CREB knockdown cells with prior ChIP data on CREB binding we were able to identify a list of putative CREB regulated genes. We performed extensive analyses on the top genes in this list as high confidence CREB targets. We found that this list is enriched for genes involved in cancer, and unexpectedly, highly enriched for histone genes. Furthermore, histone genes regulated by CREB were more likely to be specifically expressed in hematopoietic lineages. Decreased expression of specific histone genes was validated in K562, TF-1, and primary AML cells transduced with CREB shRNA. We have identified a high confidence list of CREB targets in K562 cells. These genes allow us to begin to understand the mechanisms by which CREB contributes to acute leukemia. We speculate that regulation of histone genes may play an important role by possibly altering the regulation of DNA replication during the cell cycle

  7. Succesful therapy of viral leukemia by transplantation of histocompatibly unmatched marrow

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Meredith, R.F.; OKunewick, J.P.; Kuhnert, P.M.; Brozovich, B.J.; Weaver, E.V.

    1978-01-01

    The therapeutic effectiveness on murine viral-leukemia of allogeneic or hybrid hematopoietic cells transplanted from leukemia-virus resistant donors was evaluated and compared with that of syngeneic cells. Transplantation of syngeneic cells gave no protection to the viral-leukemic mice. Transplantation of spleen cells from allogeneic donors resulted in early deaths of both leukemic and non-leukemic recipients. Transplantation of hybrid spleen cells resulted in no long-term survival of the leukemic mice. However, there were a number of long-term survivors among the leukemic recipients of allogeneic or hybrid marrow cells. Engraftment of allogeneic marrow resulted in a large number of survivors. Hybrid marrow recipients showed an even better survival, but some leukemia relapses. Tests of the longterm survivors revealed that even though they gave no evidence of leukemia they still harbored the active virus. This suggests that the mechanism of protection may be related to some inherent characteristic of the donor cells rendering them refractory to viral transformation. A difference in graft-versus-host (GvH) response between the leukemic and control mice was also found after transplantation of allogeneic cells. While all of the controls died of GvH reaction, none of the leukemic recipients showed severe GvH response, suggesting a possible effect of the leukemia on histocompatibility. No GvH reaction was found with hybrid marrow engraftment, although some of the leukemic recipients reconstituted with F 1 cells did die of leukemic relapse. (author)

  8. Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leukemia is cancer of the white blood cells. White blood cells help your body fight infection. Your blood cells form in your bone marrow. In leukemia, the bone marrow produces abnormal white blood cells. ...

  9. on Lymphoblastic Leukemia Jurkat Cells

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    human tumor cell line (Hela) by using MTT assay. [13]. In the present study, we have observed the cytotoxic effect of ethanolic extract of C. arvensis against Jurkat cells, a human lymphoblastic leukemia cell line, by using Trypan blue, MTS assay and FACS analysis. It was shown from the trypan blue exclusion assay that ...

  10. Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Visser, L; Shaw, A; Slupsky, J; Vos, H; Poppema, S

    Monoclonal antibodies reactive with hairy cell leukemia were developed to aid in the diagnosis of this subtype of B cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia and to gain better insight into the origin of hairy cells. Three antibodies were found to be of value in the diagnosis of hairy cell leukemia.

  11. Kelainan Hemostasis pada Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Zelly Dia Rofinda

    2012-09-01

    Full Text Available AbstrakLatar belakang: Leukemia adalah penyakit keganasan pada jaringan hematopoietik yang ditandai denganpenggantian elemen sumsum tulang normal oleh sel darah abnormal atau sel leukemik. Salah satu manifestasi klinisdari leukemia adalah perdarahan yang disebabkan oleh berbagai kelainan hemostasis.Kelainan hemostasis yang dapat terjadi pada leukemia berupa trombositopenia, disfungsi trombosit,koagulasi intravaskuler diseminata, defek protein koagulasi, fibrinolisis primer dan trombosis. Patogenesis danpatofosiologi kelainan hemostasis pada leukemia tersebut terjadi dengan berbagai mekanisme.Kata kunci: leukemia, kelainan hemostasisAbstractBackground: AbstractLeukemia is a malignancy of hematopoietic tissue which is characterized bysubstituted of bone marrow element with abnormal blood cell or leukemic cell. One of clinical manifestation ofleukemia is bleeding that is caused by several hemostasis disorders.Hemostasis disorders in leukemia such asthrombocytopenia, platelet dysfunction, disseminated intravascular coagulation, coagulation protein defect, primaryfibrinolysis and thrombosis. Pathogenesis and pathophysiology of thus hemostasis disorders in leukemia occur withdifferent mechanism.Keywords: leukemia, hemostasis disorder

  12. Quantitation of human thymus/leukemia-associated antigen by radioimmunoassay in different forms of leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chechik, B E; Jason, J; Shore, A; Baker, M; Dosch, H M; Gelfand, E W

    1979-12-01

    Using a radioimmunoassay, increased levels of a human thymus/leukemia-associated antigen (HThy-L) have been detected in leukemic cells and plasma from most patients with E-rosette-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and a number of patients with E-rosette-negative ALL, acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML), acute monomyelocytic leukemia (AMML), and acute undifferentiated leukemia (AVL). Low levels of HThy-L have been demonstrated in white cells from patients with chronic myelocytic leukemia (stable phase) and in mononuclear cells from patients with chronic lymphatic leukemia. The relationship between HThy-L and differentiation of hematopoietic cells is discussed.

  13. Documentation of normal and leukemic myelopoietic progenitor cells with high-resolution phase-contrast time-lapse cinematography.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Boll, I T

    2001-08-01

    The high-resolution phase-contrast, time-lapse cinematography using oil immersion lenses and 16-mm film demonstrates the kinetic cell events as maturation, locomotion, mitosis, and apoptosis of cells cultivated at 37 degrees C for up to 10 days. 0.5 v/v frozen-thawed sera with presumably high cytokine concentrations were added to the plasma or agar clot. Vital progenitor cells from human bone marrow and blood have a large, bright, unstructured nucleus with a large nucleolus and a narrow rim of cytoplasm (nuclear/cytoplasmic volume ratio = 0.7). Their nuclei are 6-14 micrometer in diameter and double their volume within 8 h. Many (70%) move at a mean speed of 2 micrometer/min, and many (30%) multiply with alpha-2alpha mitoses, generating progenitor cell families. Various disturbances during the course of mitosis lead to the formation of polyploid cells, thereby yielding the megakaryocytic cell line. Some of the progenitor cells undergo asymmetric alpha-alphan mitoses: One of the two initially identical daughter cells remains a progenitor cell in the morphological sense, whereas the other daughter cell - depending on the size of its mother cell - matures in the same culture medium to form a granulocytopoietic, monocytopoietic or erythrocytopoietic cell line. - In acute myeloid leukemias (AML), the blasts and their nuclei are slightly larger than the corresponding progenitor cells and move faster (5 micrometer/min). Symmetric alpha-2alpha mitoses permit unlimited multiplication of the leukemic blasts if contact with cytotoxic lymphocytes does not render them apoptotic. This results in more stromal cells than normal. Granulocytopenia, monocytopenia, and anemia occur due to the genetic impairment of signaling control for asymmetric alpha-alphan mitoses, and thrombocytopenia occurs due to the reduction in polyploidization. Copyright 2001 S. Karger GmbH, Freiburg

  14. Identification of CD34+ and CD34− leukemia-initiating cells in MLL-rearranged human acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Aoki, Yuki; Watanabe, Takashi; Saito, Yoriko; Kuroki, Yoko; Hijikata, Atsushi; Takagi, Masatoshi; Tomizawa, Daisuke; Eguchi, Mariko; Eguchi-Ishimae, Minenori; Kaneko, Akiko; Ono, Rintaro; Sato, Kaori; Suzuki, Nahoko; Fujiki, Saera; Koh, Katsuyoshi; Ishii, Eiichi; Shultz, Leonard D.; Ohara, Osamu; Mizutani, Shuki

    2015-01-01

    Translocation of the mixed-lineage leukemia (MLL) gene with AF4, AF9, or ENL results in acute leukemia with both lymphoid and myeloid involvement. We characterized leukemia-initiating cells (LICs) in primary infant MLL-rearranged leukemia using a xenotransplantation model. In MLL-AF4 patients, CD34+CD38+CD19+ and CD34−CD19+ cells initiated leukemia, and in MLL-AF9 patients, CD34−CD19+ cells were LICs. In MLL-ENL patients, either CD34+ or CD34− cells were LICs, depending on the pattern of CD34 expression. In contrast, in patients with these MLL translocations, CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− cells were enriched for normal hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) with in vivo long-term multilineage hematopoietic repopulation capacity. Although LICs developed leukemic cells with clonal immunoglobulin heavy-chain (IGH) rearrangement in vivo, CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− cells repopulated recipient bone marrow and spleen with B cells, showing broad polyclonal IGH rearrangement and recipient thymus with CD4+ single positive (SP), CD8+ SP, and CD4+CD8+ double-positive (DP) T cells. Global gene expression profiling revealed that CD9, CD32, and CD24 were over-represented in MLL-AF4, MLL-AF9, and MLL-ENL LICs compared with normal HSCs. In patient samples, these molecules were expressed in CD34+CD38+ and CD34− LICs but not in CD34+CD38−CD19−CD33− HSCs. Identification of LICs and LIC-specific molecules in primary human MLL-rearranged acute lymphoblastic leukemia may lead to improved therapeutic strategies for MLL-rearranged leukemia. PMID:25538041

  15. Migration of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells into human bone marrow stroma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Makrynikola, V; Bianchi, A; Bradstock, K; Gottlieb, D; Hewson, J

    1994-10-01

    Most cases of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) arise from malignant transformation of B-cell precursors in the bone marrow. Recent studies have shown that normal and leukemic B-cell precursors bind to bone marrow stromal cells through the beta-1 integrins VLA-4 and VLA-5, thereby exposing early lymphoid cells to regulatory cytokines. It has been recently reported that the pre-B cell line NALM-6 is capable of migrating under layers of murine stromal cells in vitro (Miyake et al. J Cell Biol 1992;119:653-662). We have further analyzed leukemic cell motility using human bone marrow fibroblasts (BMF) as a stromal layer. The precursor-B ALL cell line NALM-6 rapidly adhered to BMF, and underwent migration or tunneling into BMF layers within 5 h, as demonstrated by light and electron microscopy, and confirmed by a chromium-labeling assay. Migration was also observed with the precursor-B ALL lines Reh and KM-3, with a T leukemia line RPMI-8402, the monocytic line U937, and the mature B line Daudi. In contrast, mature B (Raji), myeloid (K562, HL-60), and T lines (CCRF-CEM, MOLT-4) did not migrate. When cases of leukemia were analyzed, BMF migration was largely confined to precursor-B ALL, occurring in eight of 13 cases tested. Of other types of leukemia, migration was observed in one of four cases of T-ALL, but no evidence was seen in six acute myeloid leukemias and two patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia. Only minimal migration into BMF was observed with purified sorted CD10+ CD19+ early B cells from normal adult marrow, while normal mature B lymphocytes from peripheral blood did not migrate. ALL migration was inhibited by monoclonal antibodies to the beta sub-unit of the VLA integrin family, and by a combination of antibodies to VLA-4 and VLA-5. Partial inhibition was also observed when leukemic cells were incubated with antibodies to VLA-4, VLA-5, or VLA-6 alone. In contrast, treatment of stromal cells with antibodies to vascular cell adhesion molecule or

  16. Anti-Leukemic Activity of Shikonin: Role of ERP57 in Shikonin Induced Apoptosis in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Rachana Trivedi

    2016-07-01

    Full Text Available Background/Aims: ER-Stress and activation of unfolded protein response belong to the major factors involved in chemoresistance in cancer cells. In this study we investigated the effect of shikonin on the survival of acute myeloid leukemia cells and the role of ER-stress protein ERP57, a protein disulfide isomerase, in improvement of chemotherapy. Methods: Using MTT assay we studied cytotoxic effects of shikonin on HL-60 cells. The flow cytometry was adopted to examine the shikonin induced mode of cell death in HL-60 cells. The overall protein expression alteration resulting from shikonin treatment was investigated using proteomics methods. Western blotting was performed to quantify the alteration in protein expression in HL-60 after shikonin treatment. Silencing and overexpression studies were carried out to highlight the therapeutic role of ERP57 in shikonin effect on AML cells. Results: Shikonin induces apoptosis in HL-60 cells without significant effect on Primary cells from healthy volunteers. The apoptotic effect was dose and time dependent and was accompanied by strong alteration in cell proteome. Among the proteins targeted by shikonin, ERP57 was significantly downregulated in HL-60 after treatment. Compared to healthy control ERP57 was found to be highly expressed in AML cell line HL60 and was downregulated after shikonin treatment. Overexpression of ERP57 protected HL-60 from shikonin induced apoptosis, whereas knockdown of ERP57 expression resulted in increase in shikonin induced apoptosis. Conclusions: Our results demonstrate that ERP57 plays a crucial role in resistance towards shikonin induced apoptosis in AML cells. Targeting of ERP57 might offer a new therapeutic option for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia.

  17. Synergistic apoptosis induction in leukemic cells by the phosphatase inhibitor salubrinal and proteasome inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Hannes C A Drexler

    Full Text Available Cells adapt to endoplasmic reticulum (ER-stress by arresting global protein synthesis while simultaneously activating specific transcription factors and their downstream targets. These processes are mediated in part by the phosphorylation-dependent inactivation of the translation initiation factor eIF2alpha. Following restoration of homeostasis protein synthesis is resumed when the serine/threonine-protein phosphatase PP1 dephosphorylates and reactivates eIF2alpha. Proteasome inhibitors, used to treat multiple myeloma patients evoke ER-stress and apoptosis by blocking the ER-associated degradation of misfolded proteins (ERAD, however, the role of eIF2alpha phosphorylation in leukemic cells under conditions of proteasome inhibitor-mediated ER stress is currently unclear.Bcr-Abl-positive and negative leukemic cell lines were used to investigate the functional implications of PP1-related phosphatase activities on eIF2alpha phosphorylation in proteasome inhibitor-mediated ER stress and apoptosis. Rather unexpectedly, salubrinal, a recently identified PP1 inhibitor capable to protect against ER stress in various model systems, strongly synergized with proteasome inhibitors to augment apoptotic death of different leukemic cell lines. Salubrinal treatment did not affect the phosphorlyation status of eIF2alpha. Furthermore, the proapoptotic effect of salubrinal occurred independently from the chemical nature of the proteasome inhibitor, was recapitulated by a second unrelated phosphatase inhibitor and was unaffected by overexpression of a dominant negative eIF2alpha S51A variant that can not be phosphorylated. Salubrinal further aggravated ER-stress and proteotoxicity inflicted by the proteasome inhibitors on the leukemic cells since characteristic ER stress responses, such as ATF4 and CHOP synthesis, XBP1 splicing, activation of MAP kinases and eventually apoptosis were efficiently abrogated by the translational inhibitor cycloheximide.Although PP1

  18. The acute monocytic leukemias: multidisciplinary studies in 45 patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Straus, D J; Mertelsmann, R; Koziner, B; McKenzie, S; de Harven, E; Arlin, Z A; Kempin, S; Broxmeyer, H; Moore, M A; Menendez-Botet, C J; Gee, T S; Clarkson, B D

    1980-11-01

    The clinical and laboratory features of 37 patients with variants of acute monocytic leukemia are described. Three of these 37 patients who had extensive extramedullary leukemic tissue infiltration are examples of true histiocytic "lymphomas." Three additional patients with undifferentiated leukemias, one patient with refractory anemia with excess of blasts, one patient with chronic myelomonocytic leukemia, one patient with B-lymphocyte diffuse "histiocytic" lymphoma and one patient with "null" cell, terminal deoxynucleotidyl transferase-positive lymphoblastic lymphoma had bone marrow cells with monocytic features. Another patient had dual populations of lymphoid and monocytoid leukemic cells. The true monocytic leukemias, acute monocytic leukemia (AMOL) and acute myelomonocytic leukemia (AMMOL), are closely related to acute myelocytic leukemia (AML) morphologically and by their response to chemotherapy. like AML, the leukemic cells from the AMMOL and AMOL patients form leukemic clusters in semisolid media. Cytochemical staining of leukemic cells for nonspecific esterases, presence of Fc receptor on the cell surface, phagocytic ability, low TdT activity, presence of surface "ruffles" and "ridges" on scanning EM, elevations of serum lysozyme, and clinical manifestations of leukemic tissue infiltration are features which accompanied monocytic differentiation in these cases.

  19. Plasma cell leukemia: update on biology and therapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mina, Roberto; D'Agostino, Mattia; Cerrato, Chiara; Gay, Francesca; Palumbo, Antonio

    2017-07-01

    Plasma cell leukemia (PCL) is a rare, but very aggressive, plasma cell dyscrasia, representing a distinct clinicopathological entity as compared to multiple myeloma (MM), with peculiar biological and clinical features. A hundred times rarer than MM, the disease course is characterized by short remissions and poor survival. PCL is defined by an increased percentage (>20%) and absolute number (>2 × 10 9 /l) of plasma cells in the peripheral blood. PCL is defined as 'primary' when peripheral plasmacytosis is detected at diagnosis, 'secondary' when leukemization occurs in a patient with preexisting MM. Novel agents have revolutionized the outcomes of MM patients and have been introduced also for the treatment of PCL. Here, we provide an update on biology and treatment options for PCL.

  20. Human surfactant protein D alters oxidative stress and HMGA1 expression to induce p53 apoptotic pathway in eosinophil leukemic cell line.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lakshna Mahajan

    Full Text Available Surfactant protein D (SP-D, an innate immune molecule, has an indispensable role in host defense and regulation of inflammation. Immune related functions regulated by SP-D include agglutination of pathogens, phagocytosis, oxidative burst, antigen presentation, T lymphocyte proliferation, cytokine secretion, induction of apoptosis and clearance of apoptotic cells. The present study unravels a novel ability of SP-D to reduce the viability of leukemic cells (eosinophilic leukemic cell line, AML14.3D10; acute myeloid leukemia cell line, THP-1; acute lymphoid leukemia cell lines, Jurkat, Raji; and human breast epithelial cell line, MCF-7, and explains the underlying mechanisms. SP-D and a recombinant fragment of human SP-D (rhSP-D induced G2/M phase cell cycle arrest, and dose and time-dependent apoptosis in the AML14.3D10 eosinophilic leukemia cell line. Levels of various apoptotic markers viz. activated p53, cleaved caspase-9 and PARP, along with G2/M checkpoints (p21 and Tyr15 phosphorylation of cdc2 showed significant increase in these cells. We further attempted to elucidate the underlying mechanisms of rhSP-D induced apoptosis using proteomic analysis. This approach identified large scale molecular changes initiated by SP-D in a human cell for the first time. Among others, the proteomics analysis highlighted a decreased expression of survival related proteins such as HMGA1, overexpression of proteins to protect the cells from oxidative burst, while a drastic decrease in mitochondrial antioxidant defense system. rhSP-D mediated enhanced oxidative burst in AML14.3D10 cells was confirmed, while antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine, abrogated the rhSP-D induced apoptosis. The rhSP-D mediated reduced viability was specific to the cancer cell lines and viability of human PBMCs from healthy controls was not affected. The study suggests involvement of SP-D in host's immunosurveillance and therapeutic potential of rhSP-D in the eosinophilic leukemia and

  1. Ex vivo assays to study self-renewal and long-term expansion of genetically modified primary human acute myeloid leukemia stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Schepers, Hein

    2009-01-01

    With the emergence of the concept of the leukemia stem cell, assays to study them remain pivotal in understanding (leukemic) stem cell biology. Although the in vivo NOD-SCID xenotransplantation model is still the favored model of choice in most cases, this system has some limitations as well, such

  2. Simple and efficient expression of codon-optimized mouse leukemia ...

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    Purpose: To obtain a higher yield of mouse leukemia inhibitory factor to maintain the proliferation potential of pluripotent ... It induces mouse myeloid leukemic M1 cells of terminal ... induces the production of acute phase proteins by lipocyte ...

  3. Acute Respiratory Failure in 3 Children With Juvenile Myelomonocytic Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Britt; Hellebostad, Marit; Ifversen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare hematopoietic stem cell disease in children with features of both myelodysplasia and myeloproliferation. Extramedullary involvement has been reported and pulmonary involvement secondary to leukemic infiltration is an initial manifestation, which may result...

  4. Human T cell leukemia virus type I prevents cell surface expression of the T cell receptor through down-regulation of the CD3-gamma, -delta, -epsilon, and -zeta genes

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    de Waal Malefyt, R.; Yssel, H.; Spits, H.; de Vries, J. E.; Sancho, J.; Terhorst, C.; Alarcon, B.

    1990-01-01

    Infection and transformation by human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) up-regulates expression of several inducible genes including those coding for cytokines involved in the proliferation of normal and leukemic T cells. We demonstrate that HTLV-I can also shut off expression of the CD3-gamma,

  5. Hairy cell leukemia-variant

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Quadri, Mohammad I.; Al-Sheikh, Iman H.

    2001-01-01

    Hairy cell leukaemia variant is a very rare chronic lymphoproliferative disorder and is closely related to hairy cell leukemia. We hereby describe a case of hairy cell leukaemia variant for the first time in Saudi Arabia. An elderly Saudi man presented with pallor, massive splenomegaly, and moderate hepatomegaly. Hemoglobin was 7.7 g/dl, Platelets were 134 x109/l and white blood count was 140x10 9/l with 97% being abnormal lymphoid cells with cytoplasmic projections. The morphology, cytochemistry, and immunophenotype of the lymphoid cells were classical of hairy cell leukaemia variant. The bone marrow was easily aspirated and findings were consistent with hairy cell leukaemia variant. (author)

  6. Single cell analysis of normal and leukemic hematopoiesis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Povinelli, Benjamin J; Rodriguez-Meira, Alba; Mead, Adam J

    2018-02-01

    The hematopoietic system is well established as a paradigm for the study of cellular hierarchies, their disruption in disease and therapeutic use in regenerative medicine. Traditional approaches to study hematopoiesis involve purification of cell populations based on a small number of surface markers. However, such population-based analysis obscures underlying heterogeneity contained within any phenotypically defined cell population. This heterogeneity can only be resolved through single cell analysis. Recent advances in single cell techniques allow analysis of the genome, transcriptome, epigenome and proteome in single cells at an unprecedented scale. The application of these new single cell methods to investigate the hematopoietic system has led to paradigm shifts in our understanding of cellular heterogeneity in hematopoiesis and how this is disrupted in disease. In this review, we summarize how single cell techniques have been applied to the analysis of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells in normal and malignant hematopoiesis, with a particular focus on recent advances in single-cell genomics, including how these might be utilized for clinical application. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Ltd.

  7. Expression of MIF and CD74 in leukemic cell lines: correlation to DR expression destiny.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgouli, Mirella; Papadimitriou, Lina; Glymenaki, Maria; Patsaki, Valia; Athanassakis, Irene

    2016-06-01

    Invariant chain (Ii) or CD74 is a non-polymorphic glycoprotein, which apart from its role as a chaperone dedicated to MHCII molecules, is known to be a high-affinity receptor for macrophage migration inhibitory factor (MIF). The present study aimed to define the roles of CD74 and MIF in the immune surveillance escape process. Towards this direction, the cell lines HL-60, Raji, K562 and primary pre-B leukemic cells were examined for expression and secretion of MIF. Flow cytometry analysis detected high levels of MIF and intracellular/membrane CD74 expression in all leukemic cells tested, while MIF secretion was shown to be inversely proportional to intracellular HLA-DR (DR) expression. In the MHCII-negative cells, IFN-γ increased MIF expression and induced its secretion in HL-60 and K562 cells, respectively. In K562 cells, CD74 (Iip33Iip35) was shown to co-precipitate with HLA-DOβ (DOβ), inhibiting thus MIF or DR binding. Induced expression of DOα in K562 (DOα-DOβ+) cells in different transfection combinations decreased MIF expression and secretion, while increasing surface DR expression. Thus, MIF could indeed be part of the antigen presentation process.

  8. Correlation of chromosome patterns in leukemic cells of patients with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1989-10-01

    We have identified two new recurring translocations involving chromosome 5; one is a 3;5 translocation and the other involves a rearrangement between chromosomes 5 and 7. The first is t(3;5)(q25.1;q35). We studied five patients with AML and a t(3;5) in their leukemic cells. At diagnosis, four of the patients had a t(3;5) as their sole karyotypic anomaly; the remaining patient had additional structural and numerical abnormalities. Careful cytogenetic analysis indicated that the breakpoints of this rearrangement were 3q25.1 and 5q34, in contrast to the various breakpoints reported in earlier studies (3q21 to 3q25 and 5q31 to 5q35). The karyotypic, morphologic, and clinical characteristics of this group, as well as those of 15 previously reported patients with the t(3;5), were compared to identify any features that might warrant consideration of this anomaly as a specific syndrome. The median age of the group, 37 years, as younger than that of all patients with AML, 49 years. A preceding myelodysplastic syndrome was observed in three patients. We have no information regarding the occupation of most of these patients. Except for acute promyelocytic leukemia, each morphologic subtype occurred in these patients; however, the frequency of erythroleukemia (M6) was much greater than expected. 11 refs., 2 figs., 5 tabs

  9. Modulation of P-glycoprotein-mediated multidrug resistance in K562 leukemic cells by indole-3-carbinol

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Arora, Annu; Seth, Kavita; Kalra, Neetu; Shukla, Yogeshwer

    2005-01-01

    Resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs is one of the major problems in the treatment of cancer. P-glycoprotein (P-gp) encoded by the mdr gene is a highly conserved protein, acts as a multidrug transporter, and has a major role in multiple drug resistance (MDR). Targeting of P-gp by naturally occurring compounds is an effective strategy to overcome MDR. Indole-3-carbinol (I3C), a glucosinolates present in cruciferous vegetables, is a promising chemopreventive agent as it is reported to possess antimutagenic, antitumorigenic, and antiestrogenic properties in experimental studies. In the present investigation, the potential of I3C to modulate P-gp expression was evaluated in vinblastine (VBL)-resistant K562 human leukemic cells. The resistant K562 cells (K562/R10) were found to be cross-resistant to vincristine (VCR), doxorubicin (DXR), and other antineoplastic agents. I3C at a nontoxic dose (10 x 10 -3 M) enhanced the cytotoxic effects of VBL time dependently in VBL-resistant human leukemia (K562/R10) cells but had no effect on parent-sensitive cells (K562/S). The Western blot analysis of K 562/R 10 cells showed that I3C downregulates the induced levels of P-gp in resistant cells near to normal levels. The quantitation of immunocytochemically stained K562/R10 cells showed 24%, 48%, and 80% decrease in the levels of P-gp by I3C for 24, 48, and 72 h of incubation. The above features thus indicate that I3C could be used as a novel modulator of P-gp-mediated multidrug resistance in vitro and may be effective as a dietary adjuvant in the treatment of MDR cancers

  10. Cannabidiol Reduces Leukemic Cell Size ? But Is It Important?

    OpenAIRE

    Kalenderoglou, Nikoletta; Macpherson, Tara; Wright, Karen L.

    2017-01-01

    The anti-cancer effect of the plant-derived cannabinoid, cannabidiol, has been widely demonstrated both in vivo and in vitro. However, this body of preclinical work has not been translated into clinical use. Key issues around this failure can be related to narrow dose effects, the cell model used and incomplete efficacy. A model of acute lymphoblastic disease, the Jurkat T cell line, has been used extensively to study the cannabinoid system in the immune system and cannabinoid-induced apoptos...

  11. Alternative Splice Variants Modulates Dominant-Negative Function of Helios in T-Cell Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shaorong Zhao

    Full Text Available The molecular defects which lead to multistep incidences of human T-cell leukemia have yet to be identified. The DNA-binding protein Helios (known as IKZF2, a member of the Ikaros family of Krüppel-like zinc-finger proteins, functions pivotally in T-cell differentiation and activation. In this study, we identify three novel short Helios splice variants which are T-cell leukemic specific, and demonstrate their dominant-negative function. We then test the cellular localization of distinct Helios isoforms, as well as their capability to form heterodimer with Ikaros, and the association with complexes comprising histone deacetylase (HDAC. In addition, the ectopic expression of T-cell leukemic Helios isoforms interferes with T-cell proliferation and apoptosis. The gene expression profiling and pathway analysis indicated the enrichment of signaling pathways essential for gene expression, translation, cell cycle checkpoint, and response to DNA damage stimulus. These data indicate the molecular function of Helios to be involved in the leukemogenesis and phenotype of T-cell leukemia, and also reveal Helios deregulation as a novel marker for T-cell leukemia.

  12. Fc-receptors and surface immunoglobulins in cells of the hairy cell leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rieber, E P; Linke, R P; Riethmueller, G [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. fuer Experimentelle Chirurgie und Immunologie; Heyden, H.W. von; Waller, H D [Tuebingen Univ. (Germany, F.R.). Abt. Innere Medizin 2

    1976-01-01

    Using /sup 125/I-labelled aggregated IgG in a quantitative assay a strong expression of Fc-receptors was found on the leukemic cells of a patient with hairy cell leukemia. The Fc-receptor activity on these cells was much higher than that on monocytes and B-lymphocytes from normal blood. Surface immunoglobulins were detected by radioautography using radioactively labelled (Fab')/sub 2/-fragments of monospecific antibodies directed against immunoglobulin heavy chains. Prior to radioautography the cells were stained for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase. It is found that all cells containing this enzyme bore delta-chains on their surface. On more than 90% of these cells a simultaneous expression of ..mu..-chains was detected. ..gamma..-chains could only be demonstrated on cells which were negative for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase; part of these cells, however, were hairy cells by morphological criteria.

  13. Fc-receptors and surface immunoglobulins in cells of the hairy cell leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rieber, E.P.; Linke, R.P.; Riethmueller, G.; Heyden, H.W. von; Waller, H.D.

    1976-01-01

    Using 125 I-labelled aggregated IgG in a quantitative assay a strong expression of Fc-receptors was found on the leukemic cells of a patient with hairy cell leukemia. The Fc-receptor activity on these cells was much higher than that on monocytes and B-lymphocytes from normal blood. Surface immunoglobulins were detected by radioautography using radioactively labelled (Fab') 2 -fragments of monospecific antibodies directed against immunoglobulin heavy chains. Prior to radioautography the cells were stained for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase. It is found that all cells containing this enzyme bore delta-chains on their surface. On more than 90% of these cells a simultaneous expression of μ-chains was detected. γ-chains could only be demonstrated on cells which were negative for the tartrate resistant acid phosphatase; part of these cells, however, were hairy cells by morphological criteria. (orig.) [de

  14. T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Graham, Robbie L.; Cooper, Barry; Krause, John R.

    2013-01-01

    T-cell prolymphocytic leukemia is a rare and unusual malignancy characterized by the proliferation of small- to medium-sized prolymphocytes of postthymic origin with distinctive clinical, morphologic, immunophenotypic, and cytogenetic features. Involvement of the peripheral blood, bone marrow, lymph nodes, liver, spleen, and skin can occur. The clinical course is typically very aggressive with poor response to conventional chemotherapy and short survival rates, and the only potential long-ter...

  15. Apoptosis induction by Maackia amurensis agglutinin in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Kapoor, Sarika; Marwaha, Ram; Majumdar, Siddhartha

    2007-01-01

    acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) as compared to cells from children with non-hematological disorders ("Controls"). MAA recognized a 66 kDa sialoglycoprotein present in membrane fraction of ALL cells. Moreover, MAA induced apoptosis in ALL cells was found to be reduced significantly in presence of GM2...

  16. Anti-ATLA (antibody to adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma virus-associated antigen)-negative adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shimoyama, M; Minato, K; Tobinai, K; Nagai, M; Setoya, T; Watanabe, S; Hoshino, H; Miwa, M; Nagoshi, H; Ichiki, N; Fukushima, N; Sugiura, K; Funaki, N

    1983-01-01

    Five cases of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATL) having typical clinicohematologic and morphologic features but negative for anti-ATLA [antibody to ATL virus (ATLV)-associated antigen (ATLA)] are presented. Some differences in immunologic, epidemiologic, and serologic data between anti-ATLA-positive and -negative ATLs are also described. Expression of ATLA in early primary cultured leukemic cells was found to be negative in three patients tested (Cases 1, 2 and 4), however, a long-term cultured cell line, ATL-6A, derived from peripheral blood leukemia cells from Case 1, was found to express ATLA. Mother of Case 1 and a daughter of Case 2 were anti-ATLA negative. These results indicate that ATLV was involved in certain anti-ATLA-negative ATL patients, at least in Case 1, and that the patient had no detectable immune response against ATLV and ATLA. However, in other cases in which no ATLA reactivity of serum and no ATLA expression in cultured leukemic cells were observed, another possibility such as activation of an unknown cellular oncogene specific for ATL without ATLV involvement may be considered. In order to prove these possibilities definitely, it is necessary to elucidate whether or not proviral DNA of ATLV is integrated into chromosomal DNA of ATL cells and to find a cellular oncogene specific for ATL in the future.

  17. Stable curcumin-loaded polymeric micellar formulation for enhancing cellular uptake and cytotoxicity to FLT3 overexpressing EoL-1 leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Tima, Singkome; Anuchapreeda, Songyot; Ampasavate, Chadarat; Berkland, Cory; Okonogi, Siriporn

    2017-05-01

    The present study aims to develop a stable polymeric micellar formulation of curcumin (CM) with improved solubility and stability, and that is suitable for clinical applications in leukemia patients. CM-loaded polymeric micelles (CM-micelles) were prepared using poloxamers. The chemical structure of the polymers influenced micellar properties. The best formulation of CM-micelles, namely CM-P407, was obtained from poloxamer 407 at drug to polymer ratio of 1:30 and rehydrated with phosphate buffer solution pH 7.4. CM-P407 exhibited the smallest size of 30.3±1.3nm and highest entrapment efficiency of 88.4±4.1%. When stored at -80°C for 60days, CM-P407 retained high protection of CM and had no significant size change. In comparison with CM solution in dimethyl sulfoxide (CM-DMSO), CM kinetic degradation in both formulations followed a pseudo-first-order reaction, but the half-life of CM in CM-P407 was approx. 200 times longer than in CM-DMSO. Regarding the activity against FLT3 overexpressing EoL-1 leukemic cells, CM-P407 showed higher cytotoxicity than CM-DMSO. Moreover, intracellular uptake to leukemic cells of CM-P407 was 2-3 times greater than that of CM-DMSO. These promising results for CM-P407 will be further investigated in rodents and in clinical studies for leukemia treatment. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  18. Resveratrol protects leukemic cells against cytotoxicity induced by proteasome inhibitors via induction of FOXO1 and p27Kip1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Niu, Xiao-Fang; Liu, Bao-Qin; Du, Zhen-Xian; Gao, Yan-Yan; Li, Chao; Li, Ning; Guan, Yifu; Wang, Hua-Qin

    2011-01-01

    It was reported recently that resveratrol could sensitize a number of cancer cells to the antitumoral effects of some conventional chemotherapy drugs. The current study was designed to investigate whether resveratrol could sensitize leukemic cells to proteasome inhibitors. Leukemic cells were treated with MG132 alone or in combination with resveratrol. Cell viability was investigated using MTT assay, and induction of apoptosis and cell cycle distribution was measured using flow cytometry. Western blot and real-time RT-PCR were used to investigate the expression of FOXO1 and p27 Kip1 . CHIP was performed to investigate the binding of FOXO1 to the p27 Kip1 promoter. Resveratrol strongly reduced cytotoxic activities of proteasome inhibitors against leukemic cells. MG132 in combination with resveratrol caused cell cycle blockade at G1/S transition via p27 Kip1 accumulation. Knockdown of p27 Kip1 using siRNA dramatically attenuated the protective effects of resveratrol on cytotoxic actions of proteasome inhibitors against leukemic cells. Resveratrol induced FOXO1 expression at the transcriptional level, while MG132 increased nuclear distribution of FOXO1. MG132 in combination with resveratrol caused synergistic induction of p27 Kip1 through increased recruitment of FOXO1 on the p27 Kip1 promoter. Resveratrol may have the potential to negate the cytotoxic effects of proteasome inhibitors via regulation of FOXO1 transcriptional activity and accumulation of p27 Kip1

  19. A cationic amphiphilic peptide ABP-CM4 exhibits selective cytotoxicity against leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chen, Yu Qing; Min, Cui; Sang, Ming; Han, Yang Yang; Ma, Xiao; Xue, Xiao Qing; Zhang, Shuang Quan

    2010-08-01

    Some cationic antibacterial peptides exhibit a broad spectrum of cytotoxic activity against cancer cells, which could provide a new class of anticancer drugs. In the present study, the anticancer activity of ABP-CM4, an antibacterial peptide from Bombyx mori, against leukemic cell lines THP-1, K562 and U937 was evaluated, and the cytotoxicity compared with the effects on non-cancerous mammalian cells, including peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs), HEK-293 and erythrocytes. ABP-CM4 reduced the number of viable cells of the leukemic cell lines after exposure for 24h. The reduction was concentration dependent, and the IC50 values ranged from 14 to 18 microM. Conversely, ABP-CM4, even at 120 microM, exhibited no cytotoxicity toward HEK-293 or PBMCs, indicating that there was no significant effect on these two types of non-cancer cells. ABP-CM4 at a concentration of 200 microM had no hemolytic activity on mammalian erythrocytes. Together, these results suggested a selective cytotoxicity in leukemia cells. Flow cytometry demonstrated that the binding activity of ABP-CM4 to leukemia cells was much higher than that to HEK-293 or PBMCs, and there was almost no binding to erythrocytes. FITC-labeled ABP-CM4 molecules were examined under a confocal microscope and found to be concentrated at the surface of leukemia cells and changes of the cell membrane were determined by a cell permeability assay, which led us to the conclusion that ABP-CM4 could act at the cell membrane for its anticancer activity on leukemia cells. Collectively, our results indicated that ABP-CM4 has the potential for development as a novel antileukemic agent. Copyright 2010 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  20. Treatment of Aggressive NK-Cell Leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Boysen, Anders Kindberg; Jensen, Paw; Johansen, Preben

    2011-01-01

    Aggressive NK-cell leukemia is a rare malignancy with neoplastic proliferation of natural killer cells. It often presents with constitutional symptoms, a rapid declining clinical course, and a poor prognosis with a median survival of a few months. The disease is usually resistant to cytotoxic...... literature concerning treatment of aggressive NK-cell leukemia....

  1. Analysis of CTCL cell lines reveals important differences between mycosis fungoides/Sézary syndrome vs. HTLV-1+ leukemic cell lines

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Netchiporouk, Elena; Gantchev, Jennifer; Tsang, Matthew

    2017-01-01

    HTLV-1 is estimated to affect ~20 million people worldwide and in ~5% of carriers it produces Adult T-Cell Leukemia/Lymphoma (ATLL), which can often masquerade and present with classic erythematous pruritic patches and plaques that are typically seen in Mycosis Fungoides (MF) and Sézary Syndrome...... (SS), the most recognized variants of Cutaneous T-Cell Lymphomas (CTCL). For many years the role of HTLV- 1 in the pathogenesis of MF/SS has been hotly debated. In this study we analyzed CTCL vs. HTLV-1+ leukemic cells. We performed G-banding/spectral karyotyping, extensive gene expression analysis......, TP53 sequencing in the 11 patient-derived HTLV- 1+ (MJ and Hut102) vs. HTLV-1- (Myla, Mac2a, PB2B, HH, H9, Hut78, SZ4, Sez4 and SeAx) CTCL cell lines. We further tested drug sensitivities to commonly used CTCL therapies and studied the ability of these cells to produce subcutaneous xenograft tumors...

  2. Hairy cell leukemia: current concepts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cannon, Timothy; Mobarek, Dalia; Wegge, Julia; Tabbara, Imad A

    2008-10-01

    Hairy cell Leukemia (HCL) is a chronic lymphoproliferative disorder that was characterized in the late 1950s. HCL is defined, according to the WHO classification, as a mature (peripheral) B-cell neoplasm (1). HCL accounts for between 2-3% of all leukemia cases, with about 600 new cases diagnosed in the U.S. each year (1). HCL occurs more commonly in males, with an overall male to female ratio of approximately 4:1. The median age of onset is 52 years. This disease is seen more commonly in Caucasians and appears to be especially frequent in Ashkenazi Jewish males, with rare occurrence in persons of Asian and African descents (1). Hairy cells are distinct, clonal B cells arrested at a late stage of maturation. They are small B lymphoid cells that possess oval nuclei and abundant cytoplasm with characteristic micro-filamentous ("hairy") projections. They strongly express CD103, CD22, and CD11c (2). These cells typically infiltrate the bone marrow, the spleen, and to a lesser extent the liver, lymph nodes, and skin. Many patients present with splenomegaly and pancytopenia. Other clinical manifestations include recurrent opportunistic infections and vasculitis. Historically, HCL was considered uniformly fatal (2). However, recent treatment advances, using purine analogues such as Cladribine and Pentostatin, led to a significant improvement in prognosis with achievement of high response rates and durable remissions (2).

  3. A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia with abnormal brain CT scan after cranial irradiation for central nervous system leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Sato, Junko; Abe, Takanori; Watanabe, Tsutomu

    1988-01-01

    A 21-year-old woman with acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with central neurologic symptoms immediately after the second irradiation (20 Gy to the brain and 10 Gy to the spinal cord) for central nervous system (CNS)-leukemia 3 years and 2 months after the first cranial irradiation with 20 Gy. White matter was depicted as diffusely high density area on CT; histology revealed necrosis of leukemic cells. In the present patient with repeated recurrent CNS-leukemia, leukemic cells seemed to have been damaged simultaneously after irradiation because of parenchymal widespread involvement of leukemic cells, resulting in brain edema, an increased intracranial pressure and parenchymal disturbance. This finding may have an important implication for the risk of cranial irradiation in the case of widespread involvement of leukemic cells. Re-evaluation of cranial irradiation in such cases is suggested. (Namekawa, K.)

  4. Circumvention of glucocorticoid resistance in childhood leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Haarman, E G; Kaspers, G J L; Pieters, R; Rottier, M M A; Veerman, A J P

    2008-09-01

    In this study, we determined if in vitro resistance to prednisolone and dexamethasone could be circumvented by cortivazol or methylprednisolone, or reversed by meta-iodobenzylguanidine in pediatric lymphoblastic and myeloid leukemia. As there were strong correlations between the LC50 values (drug concentration inducing 50% leukemic cell kill, LCK) of the different glucocorticoids and median prednisolone/methylprednisolone, prednisolone/dexamethasone and prednisolone/cortivazol LC50 ratios did not differ between the leukemia subtypes, we conclude that none of the glucocorticoids had preferential anti-leukemic activity. Meta-iodobenzylguanidine however, partially reversed glucocorticoid resistance in 19% of the lymphoblastic leukemia samples.

  5. Loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 induces resistance to multiple drugs in acute myeloid leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Göllner, Stefanie; Oellerich, Thomas; Agrawal-Singh, Shuchi

    2017-01-01

    In acute myeloid leukemia (AML), therapy resistance frequently occurs, leading to high mortality among patients. However, the mechanisms that render leukemic cells drug resistant remain largely undefined. Here, we identified loss of the histone methyltransferase EZH2 and subsequent reduction...

  6. Resistance to different classes of drugs is associated with impaired apoptosis in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Holleman (Amy); M.L. den Boer (Monique); K.M. Kazemier (Karin); G.E. Janka-Schaub (Gritta); R. Pieters (Rob)

    2003-01-01

    textabstractResistance of leukemic cells to chemotherapeutic agents is associated with an unfavorable outcome in pediatric acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). To investigate the underlying mechanisms of cellular drug resistance, the activation of various apoptotic parameters in

  7. HLA-DR-, CD33+, CD56+, CD16- myeloid/natural killer cell acute leukemia: a previously unrecognized form of acute leukemia potentially misdiagnosed as French-American-British acute myeloid leukemia-M3.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Scott, A A; Head, D R; Kopecky, K J; Appelbaum, F R; Theil, K S; Grever, M R; Chen, I M; Whittaker, M H; Griffith, B B; Licht, J D

    1994-07-01

    We have identified and characterized a previously unrecognized form of acute leukemia that shares features of both myeloid and natural killer (NK) cells. From a consecutive series of 350 cases of adult de novo acute myeloid leukemia (AML), we identified 20 cases (6%) with a unique immunophenotype: CD33+, CD56+, CD11a+, CD13lo, CD15lo, CD34+/-, HLA-DR-, CD16-. Multicolor flow cytometric assays confirmed the coexpression of myeloid (CD33, CD13, CD15) and NK cell-associated (CD56) antigens in each case, whereas reverse transcription polymerase chain reaction (RT-PCR) assays confirmed the identity of CD56 (neural cell adhesion molecule) in leukemic blasts. Although two cases expressed CD4, no case expressed CD2, CD3, or CD8 and no case showed clonal rearrangement of genes encoding the T-cell receptor (TCR beta, gamma, delta). Leukemic blasts in the majority of cases shared unique morphologic features (deeply invaginated nuclear membranes, scant cytoplasm with fine azurophilic granularity, and finely granular Sudan black B and myeloperoxidase cytochemical reactivity) that were remarkably similar to those of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL); particularly the microgranular variant (FAB AML-M3v). However, all 20 cases lacked the t(15;17) and 17 cases tested lacked the promyelocytic/retinoic acid receptor alpha (RAR alpha) fusion transcript in RT-PCR assays; 12 cases had 46,XX or 46,XY karyotypes, whereas 2 cases had abnormalities of chromosome 17q: 1 with del(17)(q25) and the other with t(11;17)(q23;q21) and the promyelocytic leukemia zinc finger/RAR alpha fusion transcript. All cases tested (6/20), including the case with t(11;17), failed to differentiate in vitro in response to all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), suggesting that these cases may account for some APLs that have not shown a clinical response to ATRA. Four of 6 cases tested showed functional NK cell-mediated cytotoxicity, suggesting a relationship between these unique CD33+, CD56+, CD16- acute leukemias and

  8. Cyanobacteria from Terrestrial and Marine Sources Contain Apoptogens Able to Overcome Chemoresistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liu, Liwei; Herfindal, Lars; Jokela, Jouni; Shishido, Tania Keiko; Wahlsten, Matti; Døskeland, Stein Ove; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2014-01-01

    In this study, we investigated forty cyanobacterial isolates from biofilms, gastropods, brackish water and symbiotic lichen habitats. Their aqueous and organic extracts were used to screen for apoptosis-inducing activity against acute myeloid leukemia cells. A total of 28 extracts showed cytotoxicity against rat acute myeloid leukemia (IPC-81) cells. The design of the screen made it possible to eliminate known toxins, such as microcystins and nodularin, or known metabolites with anti-leukemic activity, such as adenosine and its analogs. A cytotoxicity test on human embryonic kidney (HEK293T) fibroblasts indicated that 21 of the 28 extracts containing anti-acute myeloid leukemia (AML) activity showed selectivity in favor of leukemia cells. Extracts L26-O and L30-O were able to partly overcome the chemotherapy resistance induced by the oncogenic protein Bcl-2, whereas extract L1-O overcame protection from the deletion of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In conclusion, cyanobacteria are a prolific resource for anti-leukemia compounds that have potential for pharmaceutical applications. Based on the variety of cellular responses, we also conclude that the different anti-leukemic compounds in the cyanobacterial extracts target different elements of the death machinery of mammalian cells. PMID:24705501

  9. Cyanobacteria from Terrestrial and Marine Sources Contain Apoptogens Able to Overcome Chemoresistance in Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Liwei Liu

    2014-04-01

    Full Text Available In this study, we investigated forty cyanobacterial isolates from biofilms, gastropods, brackish water and symbiotic lichen habitats. Their aqueous and organic extracts were used to screen for apoptosis-inducing activity against acute myeloid leukemia cells. A total of 28 extracts showed cytotoxicity against rat acute myeloid leukemia (IPC-81 cells. The design of the screen made it possible to eliminate known toxins, such as microcystins and nodularin, or known metabolites with anti-leukemic activity, such as adenosine and its analogs. A cytotoxicity test on human embryonic kidney (HEK293T fibroblasts indicated that 21 of the 28 extracts containing anti-acute myeloid leukemia (AML activity showed selectivity in favor of leukemia cells. Extracts L26-O and L30-O were able to partly overcome the chemotherapy resistance induced by the oncogenic protein Bcl-2, whereas extract L1-O overcame protection from the deletion of the tumor suppressor protein p53. In conclusion, cyanobacteria are a prolific resource for anti-leukemia compounds that have potential for pharmaceutical applications. Based on the variety of cellular responses, we also conclude that the different anti-leukemic compounds in the cyanobacterial extracts target different elements of the death machinery of mammalian cells.

  10. Differentiation-inducing effects of small fruit juices on HL-60 leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yoshizawa, Y; Kawaii, S; Urashima, M; Fukase, T; Sato, T; Murofushi, N; Nishimura, H

    2000-08-01

    Epidemiological studies indicate that high intakes of fruits and vegetables are associated with a reduced risk of cancer, and several plant-derived drugs have been developed in medical oncology. Since only a small part of the flora has been tested for any kind of bioactivity, we chose small fruits as sources of differentiation-inducing activity against HL-60 leukemic cells. We have prepared juices from various small fruits that grow mainly in the northern part of Japan. Screening of 43 samples indicated that juices of Actinidia polygama Maxim., Rosa rugosa Thunb., Vaccinium smallii A. Gray, and Sorbus sambucifolia Roem. strongly induced differentiation of HL-60 cells to monocyte/macrophage characteristics in a concentration-dependent manner as indicated by histochemical and biochemical examinations.

  11. Cyclopentenyl cytosine induces apoptosis and increases cytarabine-induced apoptosis in a T-lymphoblastic leukemic cell-line

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Verschuur, A. C.; Brinkman, J.; van Gennip, A. H.; Leen, R.; Vet, R. J.; Evers, L. M.; Voûte, P. A.; van Kuilenburg, A. B.

    2001-01-01

    Cyclopentenyl cytosine (CPEC) is a nucleoside-analogue that decreases the concentrations of cytidine triphosphate (CTP) and deoxycytidine triphosphate (dCTP) in leukemic cells by inhibiting the enzyme CTP synthetase, resulting in a decreased synthesis of RNA and DNA. Low concentrations of dCTP

  12. Heterogeneity of acute myeloblastic leukemia without maturation: an ultrastructural study.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hamamoto, K; Date, M; Taniguchi, H; Nagano, T; Kishimoto, Y; Kimura, T; Fukuhara, S

    1995-01-01

    We demonstrated by ultrastructural examination that the leukemic blasts of 13 patients with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) without maturation (M1 in the French-American-British classification) showed heterogeneous features. In 7 patients, the leukemic blasts had a high level of light microscopic myeloperoxidase positivity (> 50%). Ultrastructurally, the cells were myeloblast-promyelocytes with 100% myeloperoxidase positivity, and these 7 patients appeared to have typical AML. In contrast, the remaining 6 patients had leukemic blasts with a low myeloperoxidase positivity (undifferentiated blasts. The former group had a better prognosis than the latter, indicating that ultrastructural analysis of M1 leukemia may help predict the response to therapy.

  13. Lineage Switching in Acute Leukemias: A Consequence of Stem Cell Plasticity?

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Dorantes-Acosta

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Acute leukemias are the most common cancer in childhood and characterized by the uncontrolled production of hematopoietic precursor cells of the lymphoid or myeloid series within the bone marrow. Even when a relatively high efficiency of therapeutic agents has increased the overall survival rates in the last years, factors such as cell lineage switching and the rise of mixed lineages at relapses often change the prognosis of the illness. During lineage switching, conversions from lymphoblastic leukemia to myeloid leukemia, or vice versa, are recorded. The central mechanisms involved in these phenomena remain undefined, but recent studies suggest that lineage commitment of plastic hematopoietic progenitors may be multidirectional and reversible upon specific signals provided by both intrinsic and environmental cues. In this paper, we focus on the current knowledge about cell heterogeneity and the lineage switch resulting from leukemic cells plasticity. A number of hypothetical mechanisms that may inspire changes in cell fate decisions are highlighted. Understanding the plasticity of leukemia initiating cells might be fundamental to unravel the pathogenesis of lineage switch in acute leukemias and will illuminate the importance of a flexible hematopoietic development.

  14. A novel cell growth-promoting factor identified in a B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Dao, T.; Holan, V.; Minowada, J.

    1993-01-01

    A novel leukemia cell growth-promoting activity has been identified in the culture supernatant from a human B cell leukemia cell line, BALL-1. The supernatant from unstimulated cultures of the BALL-1 cells significantly promoted the growth of 16 out of 24 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines of different lineages (T, B and non-lymphoid) in a minimal concentration of fetal bovine serum (FBS), and 5 out of 12 cases of fresh leukemia cells in FBS-free medium. The growth-promoting sieve filtration and dialysis. The MW of the factor was less than 10 kDa. The growth-promoting activity was heat and acid stable and resistant to trypsin treatment. The factor isolated from the BALL-1 supernatant was distinct from known polypeptide growth factors with MW below 10 kDa, such as epidermal growth factor, transforming growth factor α, insulin-like growth factor I (IGF-I), IGF-II and insulin, as determine by specific antibodies and by cell-growth-promoting tests. The factor is the BALL-1 supernatant did not promote the proliferation of normal human fresh peripheral blood lymphocytes or mouse fibroblast cell line, BALB/C 3T3. In addition to the BALL-1 supernatant, a similar growth-promoting activity was found in the culture supernatant from 13 of 17 leukemia/lymphoma cell lines tested. The activity in these culture supernatant promoted the growth of leukemia/lymphoma cell lines in autocrine and/or paracrine fashions. These observations suggest that the low MW cell growth-promoting activity found in the BALL-1 culture supernatant is mediated by a novel factor which may be responsible for the clonal expansion of particular leukemic clones. (author)

  15. Monitoring Tumour Cell Purge by Long Term Marrow Culture in Acute Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    El-Masry, M.; Hashem, T. M.

    2001-01-01

    Purging of leukemic cells from bone marrow harvested for autologous bone marrow transplantation (ABMT) remains a challenge. This work aimed at evaluating the efficacy of long-term marrow culture (LTMC) on purging leukemic progenitors in acute leukemia. Design and methods: We planned to study the presence of immunoglobulin heavy (lgH) chain gene rearrangements by polymerase chain reaction (PCR) at diagnosis for bone marrow of 23 patients with acute leukemia. LTMC was performed only for patients who showed positive IgH chain gene monoclonality at diagnosis. The efficiency of purge was evaluated by PCR for monoclonal IgH chain gene on weekly basis of LTMC. Results: Of the 23 studied cases, 18 (78.26%) showed positive clonal IgH chain gene at diagnosis. LTMC study showed that 6/]8 (33.33%), 3/18 (16.67%),7/18 (38.89%) and 2/18 (11.11 %) underwent complete purging of the leukemic progenitors at the first, second, third and fourth weeks of culture, respectively. Follow up could be performed for 14 positive ALL cases after induction of remission; 12/14 (85.7%) showed minimal residual disease (MRD) while only two cases did not show MRD. Complete purging of the latter two cases by LTMC occurred on the second and third weeks of culture. Conclusion: LTMC is a useful and successful method for leukemic cell purging. LTMC should be undertaken at initial diagnosis and on an individual basis. Each case should be dealt with solely to determine at which week of culture complete purging could be obtained for subsequent autologous grafting of the purged marrow

  16. Dasatinib accelerates valproic acid-induced acute myeloid leukemia cell death by regulation of differentiation capacity.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Sook-Kyoung Heo

    Full Text Available Dasatinib is a compound developed for chronic myeloid leukemia as a multi-targeted kinase inhibitor against wild-type BCR-ABL and SRC family kinases. Valproic acid (VPA is an anti-epileptic drug that also acts as a class I histone deacetylase inhibitor. The aim of this research was to determine the anti-leukemic effects of dasatinib and VPA in combination and to identify their mechanism of action in acute myeloid leukemia (AML cells. Dasatinib was found to exert potent synergistic inhibitory effects on VPA-treated AML cells in association with G1 phase cell cycle arrest and apoptosis induction involving the cleavage of poly (ADP-ribose polymerase and caspase-3, -7 and -9. Dasatinib/VPA-induced cell death thus occurred via caspase-dependent apoptosis. Moreover, MEK/ERK and p38 MAPK inhibitors efficiently inhibited dasatinib/VPA-induced apoptosis. The combined effect of dasatinib and VPA on the differentiation capacity of AML cells was more powerful than the effect of each drug alone, being sufficiently strong to promote AML cell death through G1 cell cycle arrest and caspase-dependent apoptosis. MEK/ERK and p38 MAPK were found to control dasatinib/VPA-induced apoptosis as upstream regulators, and co-treatment with dasatinib and VPA to contribute to AML cell death through the regulation of differentiation capacity. Taken together, these results indicate that combined dasatinib and VPA treatment has a potential role in anti-leukemic therapy.

  17. Towards The Generation of Functionalized Magnetic Nanowires to Target Leukemic Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Alsharif, Nouf

    2016-04-01

    In recent years, magnetic nanowires (NWs) have been widely used for their therapeutic potential in biomedical applications. The use of iron (Fe) NWs combines two important properties, biocompatibility and remote manipulation by magnetic fields. In addition the NWs can be coated and functionalized to target cells of interest and, upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field, have been shown to induce cell death on several types of adherent cells, including several cancer cell types. For suspension cells, however, using these NWs has been much less effective primarily due to the free-floating nature of the cells minimizing the interaction between them and the NWs. Leukemic cells express higher levels of the cell surface marker CD44 (Braumüller, Gansauge, Ramadani, & Gansauge, 2000), compared to normal blood cells. The goal of this study was to functionalize Fe NWs with a specific monoclonal antibody towards CD44 in order to target leukemic cells (HL-60 cells). This approach is expected to increase the probability of a specific binding to occur between HL-60 cells and Fe NWs. Fe NWs were fabricated with an average diameter of 30-40 nm and a length around 3-4 μm. Then, they were coated with both 3-Aminopropyl-triethoxysilane and bovine serum albumin (BSA) in order to conjugate them with an anti-CD44 antibody (i.e. anti-CD44-iron NWs). The antibody interacts with the amine group in the BSA via the 1-Ethyl-3-3-dimethylaminopropyl-carbodiimide and N-Hydroxysuccinimide coupling. The NWs functionalization was confirmed using a number of approaches including: infrared spectroscopy, Nanodrop to measure the concentration of CD44 antibody, as well as fluorescent-labeled secondary antibody staining to detect the primary CD44 antibody. To confirm that the anti-CD44-iron NWs and bare Fe NWs, in the absence of a magnetic field, were not toxic to HL-60 cells, cytotoxicity assays using XTT (2,3-Bis-2-Methoxy-4-Nitro-5-Sulfophenyl-2H-Tetrazolium-5-Carboxanilide) were performed and

  18. Aberrant Expression of CD19 and CD43 in a Patient With Therapy-Related Acute Myeloid Leukemia and a History of Mantle Cell Lymphoma

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yen-Chuan Hsieh

    2009-07-01

    Full Text Available Mantle cell lymphoma (MCL is an aggressive B cell lymphoma with frequent involvement of the gastrointestinal tract and peripheral blood (PB. In addition to the B cell markers, the neoplastic cells express CD5 and CD43. In patients with a prior history of MCL with PB involvement, the appearance of leukemic cells after chemotherapy usually heralds a relapse, particularly if the leukemic cells express B cell markers and CD43. We report a patient with MCL who presented with multiple lymphomatous polyposis of the intestine. The staging procedures revealed the involvement of lymph nodes, bone marrow and PB. Three years after chemotherapy, thrombocytopenia with the appearance of rare leukemic cells in the PB was noted. Leukemic cells obtained from bone marrow aspirate expressed CD19 and CD43, suggesting a relapse. Detailed cytomorphological and immunophenotypic studies unveiled the myeloid nature of these leukemic cells, and a diagnosis of therapy-related acute myeloid leukemia was made. This case illustrates the importance of morphologic examination and performing a complete antibody panel in the diagnosis of a suspected relapse in patients with a prior history of lymphoma.

  19. Targeted immunotherapy in acute myeloblastic leukemia: from animals to humans.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robin, Marie; Schlageter, Marie-Hélène; Chomienne, Christine; Padua, Rose-Ann

    2005-10-01

    Immunity against acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is demonstrated in humans by the graft-versus-leukemia effect in allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplantation. Specific leukemic antigens have progressively been discovered and circulating specific T lymphocytes against Wilms tumor antigen, proteinase peptide or fusion-proteins produced from aberrant oncogenic chromosomal translocations have been detected in leukemic patients. However, due to the fact that leukemic blasts develop various escape mechanisms, antileukemic specific immunity is not able to control leukemic cell proliferation. The aim of immunotherapy is to overcome tolerance and boost immunity to elicit an efficient immune response against leukemia. We review different immunotherapy strategies tested in preclinical animal models of AML and the human trials that spurred from encouraging results obtained in animal models, demonstrate the feasibility of immunotherapy in AML patients.

  20. Leukemic blasts are present at low levels in spinal fluid in one-third of childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia cases

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Levinsen, Mette; Marquart, Hanne V; Groth-Pedersen, Line

    2016-01-01

    BACKGROUND: Central nervous system (CNS) involvement is associated with relapse in childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) and is a diagnostic challenge. PROCEDURE: In a Nordic/Baltic prospective study, we assessed centralized flow cytometry (FCM) of locally fixed cerebrospinal fluid (CSF......: 45 × 10(9) /l vs. 10 × 10(9) /l, P diagnosis remained so despite at least two doses...

  1. Chemotherapy impedes in vitro microcirculation and promotes migration of leukemic cells with impact on metastasis

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Prathivadhi-Bhayankaram, Sruti V.; Ning, Jianhao; Mimlitz, Michael; Taylor, Carolyn; Gross, Erin; Nichols, Michael; Guck, Jochen; Ekpenyong, Andrew E.

    2016-01-01

    Although most cancer drugs target the proliferation of cancer cells, it is metastasis, the complex process by which cancer cells spread from the primary tumor to other tissues and organs of the body where they form new tumors, that leads to over 90% of all cancer deaths. Thus, there is an urgent need for anti-metastasis therapy. Surprisingly, emerging evidence suggests that certain anti-cancer drugs such as paclitaxel and doxorubicin can actually promote metastasis, but the mechanism(s) behind their pro-metastatic effects are still unclear. Here, we use a microfluidic microcirculation mimetic (MMM) platform which mimics the capillary constrictions of the pulmonary and peripheral microcirculation, to determine if in-vivo-like mechanical stimuli can evoke different responses from cells subjected to various cancer drugs. In particular, we show that leukemic cancer cells treated with doxorubicin and daunorubicin, commonly used anti-cancer drugs, have over 100% longer transit times through the device, compared to untreated leukemic cells. Such delays in the microcirculation are known to promote extravasation of cells, a key step in the metastatic cascade. Furthermore, we report a significant (p < 0.01) increase in the chemotactic migration of the doxorubicin treated leukemic cells. Both enhanced retention in the microcirculation and enhanced migration following chemotherapy, are pro-metastatic effects which can serve as new targets for anti-metastatic drugs. - Highlights: • Doxorubicin enhances migration of leukemic cancer cells before cell death. • Doxorubicin and Daunorubicin stiffen and delay cells in mimicked microcirculation. • Some cancer drugs cause changes in cell mechanics that lead to pro-metastatic effects. • Cell mechanics becomes a new target for anti-metastatic drugs.

  2. Sulforaphane induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Koramit Suppipat

    Full Text Available Acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL is the most common hematological cancer in children. Although risk-adaptive therapy, CNS-directed chemotherapy, and supportive care have improved the survival of ALL patients, disease relapse is still the leading cause of cancer-related death in children. Therefore, new drugs are needed as frontline treatments in high-risk disease and as salvage agents in relapsed ALL. In this study, we report that purified sulforaphane, a natural isothiocyanate found in cruciferous vegetables, has anti-leukemic properties in a broad range of ALL cell lines and primary lymphoblasts from pediatric T-ALL and pre-B ALL patients. The treatment of ALL leukemic cells with sulforaphane resulted in dose-dependent apoptosis and G2/M cell cycle arrest, which was associated with the activation of caspases (3, 8, and 9, inactivation of PARP, p53-independent upregulation of p21(CIP1/WAF1, and inhibition of the Cdc2/Cyclin B1 complex. Interestingly, sulforaphane also inhibited the AKT and mTOR survival pathways in most of the tested cell lines by lowering the levels of both total and phosphorylated proteins. Finally, the administration of sulforaphane to the ALL xenograft models resulted in a reduction of tumor burden, particularly following oral administration, suggesting a potential role as an adjunctive agent to improve the therapeutic response in high-risk ALL patients with activated AKT signaling.

  3. DENTAL CONSIDERATIONS FOR LEUKEMIC PEDIATRIC PATIENTS: AN UPDATED REVIEW FOR GENERAL DENTAL PRACTITIONER.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lowal, Kholoud A; Alaizari, Nader Ahmed; Tarakji, Bassel; Petro, Waleed; Hussain, Khaja Amjad; Altamimi, Mohamed Abdullah Alsakran

    2015-10-01

    The early signs of leukemia can usually manifest in the oral cavity due to infiltration of leukemic cells or due to associated decline in normal marrow elements, especially in the acute phase of leukemia, as common lesions at this stage of the disease can be screened and diagnosed by the dentist. Therefore, the dental community should be aware of the oral manifestations of leukemia and oral complications of anticancer treatment. This can eliminate the oral symptoms of the disease and to improve quality of life for these patients. An extensive search in PubMed line using a combination of terms like "leukemia, children, dental, Acute lymphoblastic leukemia, pediatric" for last ten years was made. Reviews and case reports concerned about acute lymphoblastic leukemia in children were all collected and analyzed and data were extracted. Accordingly, the aim of this review is to highlight on the oral presentations of leukemia in children attending dental clinics and the management of its undesirable side effects.

  4. Shedding of CD9 antigen into cerebrospinal fluid by acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Komada, Y; Ochiai, H; Shimizu, K; Azuma, E; Kamiya, H; Sakurai, M

    1990-07-01

    The accurate identification of small numbers of leukemic cells in the cerebrospinal fluid (CSF) presents a diagnostic problem in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). We demonstrated that soluble CD9 antigen was shed into CSF obtained from children with ALL, using enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay (ELISA), which used the activity of CD9 antigen to bind the Ricinus communis agglutinin (RCA1) and a monoclonal antibody, SJ-9A4, simultaneously. Using RCA1/SJ-9A4 ELISA, CD9 antigen was detectable in CSF but not in plasma from 12 cases of CD9+ ALL in central nervous system (CNS) relapse. However, CD9 antigen was not released into CSF from 11 cases of CD9- ALL with CNS involvement, 136 cases of CD9+ ALL in complete remission (CR), 29 cases of CD9- ALL in CR, or 21 cases of aseptic meningitis. Interestingly, the levels of CD9 antigen were elevated in CSF from 7 of 10 CD9+ ALL patients without cytologically proven CNS involvement at diagnosis, with subsequent return to undetectable levels after initial induction chemotherapy was begun. In addition, sequential analysis of CSF from a 5-year-old boy with CD9+ ALL in CNS relapse showed that levels of CD9 antigen correlated well with the number of leukemic cells in CSF. Serial quantitative analysis of CD9 antigen in CSF could be useful to detect the proliferation of residual leukemic cells before the clinical manifestation.

  5. Autonomous feedback loop of RUNX1-p53-CBFB in acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Morita, Ken; Noura, Mina; Tokushige, Chieko; Maeda, Shintaro; Kiyose, Hiroki; Kashiwazaki, Gengo; Taniguchi, Junichi; Bando, Toshikazu; Yoshida, Kenichi; Ozaki, Toshifumi; Matsuo, Hidemasa; Ogawa, Seishi; Liu, Pu Paul; Nakahata, Tatsutoshi; Sugiyama, Hiroshi; Adachi, Souichi; Kamikubo, Yasuhiko

    2017-11-30

    Although runt-related transcription factor 1 (RUNX1) and its associating core binding factor-β (CBFB) play pivotal roles in leukemogenesis, and inhibition of RUNX1 has now been widely recognized as a novel strategy for anti-leukemic therapies, it has been elusive how leukemic cells could acquire the serious resistance against RUNX1-inhibition therapies and also whether CBFB could participate in this process. Here, we show evidence that p53 (TP53) and CBFB are sequentially up-regulated in response to RUNX1 depletion, and their mutual interaction causes the physiological resistance against chemotherapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells. Mechanistically, p53 induced by RUNX1 gene silencing directly binds to CBFB promoter and stimulates its transcription as well as its translation, which in turn acts as a platform for the stabilization of RUNX1, thereby creating a compensative RUNX1-p53-CBFB feedback loop. Indeed, AML cells derived from relapsed cases exhibited higher CBFB expression levels compared to those from primary AML cells at diagnosis, and these CBFB expressions were positively correlated to those of p53. Our present results underscore the importance of RUNX1-p53-CBFB regulatory loop in the development and/or maintenance of AML cells, which could be targeted at any sides of this triangle in strategizing anti-leukemia therapies.

  6. Sporadic on/off switching of HTLV-1 Tax expression is crucial to maintain the whole population of virus-induced leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mahgoub, Mohamed; Yasunaga, Jun-Ichirou; Iwami, Shingo; Nakaoka, Shinji; Koizumi, Yoshiki; Shimura, Kazuya; Matsuoka, Masao

    2018-02-06

    Viruses causing chronic infection artfully manipulate infected cells to enable viral persistence in vivo under the pressure of immunity. Human T-cell leukemia virus type 1 (HTLV-1) establishes persistent infection mainly in CD4+ T cells in vivo and induces leukemia in this subset. HTLV-1-encoded Tax is a critical transactivator of viral replication and a potent oncoprotein, but its significance in pathogenesis remains obscure due to its very low level of expression in vivo. Here, we show that Tax is expressed in a minor fraction of leukemic cells at any given time, and importantly, its expression spontaneously switches between on and off states. Live cell imaging revealed that the average duration of one episode of Tax expression is ∼19 hours. Knockdown of Tax rapidly induced apoptosis in most cells, indicating that Tax is critical for maintaining the population, even if its short-term expression is limited to a small subpopulation. Single-cell analysis and computational simulation suggest that transient Tax expression triggers antiapoptotic machinery, and this effect continues even after Tax expression is diminished; this activation of the antiapoptotic machinery is the critical event for maintaining the population. In addition, Tax is induced by various cytotoxic stresses and also promotes HTLV-1 replication. Thus, it seems that Tax protects infected cells from apoptosis and increases the chance of viral transmission at a critical moment. Keeping the expression of Tax minimal but inducible on demand is, therefore, a fundamental strategy of HTLV-1 to promote persistent infection and leukemogenesis. Copyright © 2018 the Author(s). Published by PNAS.

  7. Combined Treatment with Low Concentrations of Decitabine and SAHA Causes Cell Death in Leukemic Cell Lines but Not in Normal Peripheral Blood Lymphocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Barbora Brodská

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available Epigenetic therapy reverting aberrant acetylation or methylation offers the possibility to target preferentially tumor cells and to preserve normal cells. Combination epigenetic therapy may further improve the effect of individual drugs. We investigated combined action of demethylating agent decitabine and histone deacetylase inhibitor SAHA (Vorinostat on different leukemic cell lines in comparison with peripheral blood lymphocytes. Large decrease of viability, as well as huge p21WAF1 induction, reactive oxygen species formation, and apoptotic features due to combined decitabine and SAHA action were detected in leukemic cell lines irrespective of their p53 status, while essentially no effect was observed in response to the combined drug action in normal peripheral blood lymphocytes of healthy donors. p53-dependent apoptotic pathway was demonstrated to participate in the wtp53 CML-T1 leukemic cell line response, while significant influence of reactive oxygen species on viability decrease has been detected in p53-null HL-60 cell line.

  8. Leukemia revisited

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Cronkite, E P

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately.

  9. Leukemia revisited

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.

    1980-01-01

    Selected features of the historical development of our knowledge of leukemia are discussed. The use of different methodologies for study of the nature of leukemic cell proliferation are analyzed. The differences between older cell kinetic data using tritiated thymidine and autoradiography and the newer cell culture methods are more apparent than real. It is suggested that tritiated thymidine and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood may be useful for therapeutic agents that have not been given an adequate trial. Radiation leukemogenesis presents an opportunity for study of the nature of leukemogenesis that has not been exploited adequately

  10. Dual effect of LPS on murine myeloid leukemia cells: Pro-proliferation and anti-proliferation

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yu, Lingling [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Zhao, Yingmin [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Gu, Xin; Wang, Jijun; Pang, Lei; Zhang, Yanqing; Li, Yaoyao; Jia, Xiaoqin; Wang, Xin [Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Gu, Jian [Department of Hematology, Yangzhou University School of Clinical Medicine, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Yu, Duonan, E-mail: duonan@yahoo.com [Department of Pediatrics, Jingjiang People' s Hospital, Yangzhou University, Jingjiang 214500 (China); Noncoding RNA Center, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Jiangsu Key Laboratory of Integrated Traditional Chinese and Western Medicine for Prevention and Treatment of Senile Disease, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Institute of Comparative Medicine, Yangzhou University, Yangzhou 225001 (China); Jiangsu Co-Innovation Center for Prevention and Control of Important Animal Infectious Disease and Zoonosis, Yangzhou 225001 (China)

    2016-06-10

    Modification of the bone marrow microenvironment is considered as a promising strategy to control leukemic cell proliferation, diseases progression and relapse after treatment. However, due to the diversity and complexity of the cellular and molecular compartments in the leukemic microenvironment, it is extremely difficult to dissect the role of each individual molecule or cell type in vivo. Here we established an in vitro system to dissect the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), stromal cells and endothelial cells in the growth of mouse myeloid tumor cells and B-lymphoma cells. We found that either LPS or bone marrow stromal cells as a feeder layer in culture is required for the proliferation of myeloid tumor cells. Surprisingly, the growth of myeloid leukemic cells on stromal cells is strongly inhibited when coupled with LPS in culture. This opposing effect of LPS, a complete switch from pro-proliferation to antitumor growth is due, at least in part, to the rapidly increased production of interleukin 12, Fas ligand and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 from stromal cells stimulated by LPS. These results demonstrate that LPS can either facilitate or attenuate tumor cell proliferation, thus changing the disease course of myeloid leukemias through its direct effect or modulation of the tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • LPS alone in culture is required for the proliferation of murine myeloid tumor cells. • Bone marrow stromal cells as a feeder layer is also required for the proliferation of myeloid tumor cells. • However, the growth of myeloid tumor cells is inhibited when LPS and stromal cells are both available in culture. • Thus LPS can either facilitate or attenuate tumor growth through its direct effect or modulation of tumor microenvironment.

  11. Dual effect of LPS on murine myeloid leukemia cells: Pro-proliferation and anti-proliferation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yu, Lingling; Zhao, Yingmin; Gu, Xin; Wang, Jijun; Pang, Lei; Zhang, Yanqing; Li, Yaoyao; Jia, Xiaoqin; Wang, Xin; Gu, Jian; Yu, Duonan

    2016-01-01

    Modification of the bone marrow microenvironment is considered as a promising strategy to control leukemic cell proliferation, diseases progression and relapse after treatment. However, due to the diversity and complexity of the cellular and molecular compartments in the leukemic microenvironment, it is extremely difficult to dissect the role of each individual molecule or cell type in vivo. Here we established an in vitro system to dissect the role of lipopolysaccharide (LPS), stromal cells and endothelial cells in the growth of mouse myeloid tumor cells and B-lymphoma cells. We found that either LPS or bone marrow stromal cells as a feeder layer in culture is required for the proliferation of myeloid tumor cells. Surprisingly, the growth of myeloid leukemic cells on stromal cells is strongly inhibited when coupled with LPS in culture. This opposing effect of LPS, a complete switch from pro-proliferation to antitumor growth is due, at least in part, to the rapidly increased production of interleukin 12, Fas ligand and tissue inhibitor of metalloproteinases-2 from stromal cells stimulated by LPS. These results demonstrate that LPS can either facilitate or attenuate tumor cell proliferation, thus changing the disease course of myeloid leukemias through its direct effect or modulation of the tumor microenvironment. - Highlights: • LPS alone in culture is required for the proliferation of murine myeloid tumor cells. • Bone marrow stromal cells as a feeder layer is also required for the proliferation of myeloid tumor cells. • However, the growth of myeloid tumor cells is inhibited when LPS and stromal cells are both available in culture. • Thus LPS can either facilitate or attenuate tumor growth through its direct effect or modulation of tumor microenvironment.

  12. Proteoglycan biosynthesis in murine monocytic leukemic (M1) cells before and after differentiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    McQuillan, D.J.; Yanagishita, M.; Hascall, V.C.; Bickel, M.

    1989-01-01

    Murine monocytic leukemic (M1) cells were cultured in the presence of [ 3 H]glucosamine and [ 35 S]sulfate. Labeled proteoglycans were purified by anion exchange chromatography and characterized by gel filtration and sodium dodecyl sulfate-polyacrylamide gel electrophoresis in combination with chemical and enzymatic degradation. M1 cells synthesize a single predominant species of proteoglycan which distributes almost equally between the cell and medium after 17 h labeling. The cell-associated proteoglycan has an overall size of about 135 kDa and contains three to five chondroitin sulfate chains (28-31 kDa each) attached to a chondroitinase-generated core protein of 28 kDa. The synthesis and subsequent secretion of this proteoglycan was enhanced 4-5-fold in cells induced to differentiate into macrophages. This was not a phenomenon of arrest in the G0/G1 stage of the cell cycle, since density inhibited undifferentiated cells arrested at this stage did not increase proteoglycan synthesis. The chondroitin sulfate chains contained exclusively chondroitin 4- and 6-sulfate; however, the ratio of these two disaccharides differed between the medium- and cell-associated proteoglycans, and changed during progression of the cells into a fully differentiated phenotype. Pulse-chase kinetics indicate the presence of two distinct pools of proteoglycan; one that is secreted very rapidly from the cell after a approximately 1-h lag, and a second pool that is turned over in the cell with a half-time of approximately 3.5 h. Subtle differences in the glycosylation patterns of the medium- and cell-associated species are consistent with synthesis of two pools. Papain digestion suggests that the chondroitin sulfate chains are clustered on a small protease resistant peptide. The data suggest that this proteoglycan is similar to the serglycin proteoglycan family

  13. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    OpenAIRE

    Tan, Shi Hao; Bertulfo, Fatima Carla; Sanda, Takaomi

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-AL...

  14. Membranes replace irradiated blast cells as growth requirement for leukemic blast progenitors in suspension culture

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nara, N.; McCulloch, E.A.

    1985-01-01

    The blast cells of acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) may be considered as a renewal population, maintained by blast stem cells capable of both self-renewal and the generation of progeny with reduced or absent proliferative potential. This growth requires that two conditions be met: first, the cultures must contain growth factors in media conditioned either by phytohemagglutinin (PHA)-stimulated mononuclear leukocytes (PHA-LCM), or by cells of the continuous bladder carcinoma line HTB9 (HTB9-CM). Second, the cell density must be maintained at 10(6) blasts/ml; this may be achieved by adding irradiated cells to smaller numbers of intact blasts. The authors are concerned with the mechanism of the feeding function. They present evidence that (a) cell-cell contact is required. (b) Blasts are heterogeneous in respect to their capacity to support growth. (c) Fractions containing membranes from blast cells will substitute for intact cells in promoting the generation of new blast progenitors in culture. (d) This membrane function may be specific for AML blasts, since membranes from blasts of lymphoblastic leukemia or normal marrow cells were inactive

  15. Metformin inhibits cell cycle progression of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bruno, Silvia; Ledda, Bernardetta; Tenca, Claudya; Ravera, Silvia; Orengo, Anna Maria; Mazzarello, Andrea Nicola; Pesenti, Elisa; Casciaro, Salvatore; Racchi, Omar; Ghiotto, Fabio; Marini, Cecilia; Sambuceti, Gianmario; DeCensi, Andrea; Fais, Franco

    2015-09-08

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) was believed to result from clonal accumulation of resting apoptosis-resistant malignant B lymphocytes. However, it became increasingly clear that CLL cells undergo, during their life, iterative cycles of re-activation and subsequent clonal expansion. Drugs interfering with CLL cell cycle entry would be greatly beneficial in the treatment of this disease. 1, 1-Dimethylbiguanide hydrochloride (metformin), the most widely prescribed oral hypoglycemic agent, inexpensive and well tolerated, has recently received increased attention for its potential antitumor activity. We wondered whether metformin has apoptotic and anti-proliferative activity on leukemic cells derived from CLL patients. Metformin was administered in vitro either to quiescent cells or during CLL cell activation stimuli, provided by classical co-culturing with CD40L-expressing fibroblasts. At doses that were totally ineffective on normal lymphocytes, metformin induced apoptosis of quiescent CLL cells and inhibition of cell cycle entry when CLL were stimulated by CD40-CD40L ligation. This cytostatic effect was accompanied by decreased expression of survival- and proliferation-associated proteins, inhibition of signaling pathways involved in CLL disease progression and decreased intracellular glucose available for glycolysis. In drug combination experiments, metformin lowered the apoptotic threshold and potentiated the cytotoxic effects of classical and novel antitumor molecules. Our results indicate that, while CLL cells after stimulation are in the process of building their full survival and cycling armamentarium, the presence of metformin affects this process.

  16. Expression of MICA, MICB and NKG2D in human leukemic myelomonocytic and cervical cancer cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Mendoza-Rincon Jorge

    2011-04-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background Cancer cells are known to secrete the stress molecules MICA and MICB that activate cytotoxicity by lymphocytes and NK cells through their NKG2D receptor as a mechanism of immunological defense. This work was undertaken to evaluate if cancer cells can also express this receptor as a possible mechanisms of depletion of MIC molecules and thus interfere with their immune recognition. Methods Myelomonocytic leukemic (TPH-1 and U-937 and cervical cancer (CALO and INBL cell lines were evaluated by Western Blot, ELISA, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry to evaluate their capacity to express and secrete MICA and MICB and to be induced to proliferate by these molecules as well as to express their receptor NKG2D. Statistical analysis was performed by two-way ANOVA for time course analysis and Student's t-test for comparison between groups. Values were considered significantly different if p Results THP-1 and U-937 produce and secrete the stress MICA and MICB as shown by Western Blot of lysed cells and by ELISA of their conditioned media. By Western Blot and flow cytometry we found that these cells also express the receptor NKG2D. When THP-1 and U-937 were cultured with recombinant MICA and MICB they exhibited a dose dependent induction for their proliferation. CALO and INBL also produce MICA and MICB and were induced to proliferate by these stress molecules. By Western Blot, flow cytometry and immunocytochemistry we also found that these cells express NKG2D. Conclusions Our novel results that tumor cells can simultaneously secrete MIC molecules and express their receptor, and to be induced for proliferation by these stress molecules, and that tumor epithelial cells can also express the NKG2D receptor that was thought to be exclusive of NK and cytotoxic lymphocytes is discussed as a possible mechanism of immunological escape and of tumor growth induction.

  17. Long Terminal Repeat CRISPR-CAR-Coupled "Universal" T Cells Mediate Potent Anti-leukemic Effects.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Georgiadis, Christos; Preece, Roland; Nickolay, Lauren; Etuk, Aniekan; Petrova, Anastasia; Ladon, Dariusz; Danyi, Alexandra; Humphryes-Kirilov, Neil; Ajetunmobi, Ayokunmi; Kim, Daesik; Kim, Jin-Soo; Qasim, Waseem

    2018-03-06

    Gene editing can be used to overcome allo-recognition, which otherwise limits allogeneic T cell therapies. Initial proof-of-concept applications have included generation of such "universal" T cells expressing chimeric antigen receptors (CARs) against CD19 target antigens combined with transient expression of DNA-targeting nucleases to disrupt the T cell receptor alpha constant chain (TRAC). Although relatively efficient, transgene expression and editing effects were unlinked, yields variable, and resulting T cell populations heterogeneous, complicating dosing strategies. We describe a self-inactivating lentiviral "terminal" vector platform coupling CAR expression with CRISPR/Cas9 effects through incorporation of an sgRNA element into the ΔU3 3' long terminal repeat (LTR). Following reverse transcription and duplication of the hybrid ΔU3-sgRNA, delivery of Cas9 mRNA resulted in targeted TRAC locus cleavage and allowed the enrichment of highly homogeneous (>96%) CAR + (>99%) TCR - populations by automated magnetic separation. Molecular analyses, including NGS, WGS, and Digenome-seq, verified on-target specificity with no evidence of predicted off-target events. Robust anti-leukemic effects were demonstrated in humanized immunodeficient mice and were sustained longer than by conventional CAR + TCR + T cells. Terminal-TRAC (TT) CAR T cells offer the possibility of a pre-manufactured, non-HLA-matched CAR cell therapy and will be evaluated in phase 1 trials against B cell malignancies shortly. Copyright © 2018 The American Society of Gene and Cell Therapy. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  18. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment Option Overview

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... or a swollen spleen. Certain factors affect treatment options and prognosis (chance of recovery). The treatment options ... cell leukemia has not responded to treatment. Treatment Option Overview Key Points There are different types of ...

  19. Leukemia -- Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... social workers, and patient advocates. Cancer.Net Guide Leukemia - Chronic T-Cell Lymphocytic Introduction Statistics Risk Factors Symptoms and Signs Diagnosis Stages Treatment Options About Clinical Trials Latest Research ...

  20. General Information About Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    ... Other Myeloid Malignancies Treatment . Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia Treatment . Gender and age may affect the risk of hairy ... in the shape of blood cells. Blood chemistry studies : A procedure in which a blood sample is ...

  1. Eliminating Hairy Cell Leukemia Minimal Residual Disease

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have disease-related symptoms that require treatment will be randomly assigned to receive cladribine with either concurrent rituximab or rituximab at least 6 months after completing cladribine therapy.

  2. Metabolism modifications and apoptosis induction after Cellfood™ administration to leukemia cell lines.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalani, Simona; Carbonaro, Valentina; Palma, Francesco; Arshakyan, Marselina; Galati, Rossella; Nuvoli, Barbara; Battistelli, Serafina; Canestrari, Franco; Benedetti, Serena

    2013-09-09

    Cellfood™ (CF) is a nutritional supplement containing deuterium sulphate, minerals, amino acids, and enzymes, with well documented antioxidant properties. Its organic and inorganic components are extracted from the red algae Lithothamnion calcareum, whose mineral extract has shown growth-inhibitory effect both on in vitro and in vivo models. The purpose of this study was to evaluate the antiproliferative effects of CF on leukemic cells. In fact, according to its capacity to modulate O2 availability and to improve mitochondrial respiratory metabolism, we wondered if CF could affect cancer cell metabolism making cells susceptible to apoptosis. Three leukemic cell lines, Jurkat, U937, and K562, were treated with CF 5 μl/ml up to 72 hours. Cell viability, apoptosis (i.e. caspase-3 activity and DNA fragmentation), hypoxia inducible factor 1 alpha (HIF-1α) concentration, glucose transporter 1 (GLUT-1) expression, lactate dehydrogenase (LDH) activity and lactate release in the culture medium were detected and compared with untreated cells. CF significantly inhibited leukemic cell viability by promoting cell apoptosis, as revealed by caspase-3 activation and DNA laddering. In particular, CF treated cells showed lower HIF-1α levels and lower GLUT-1 expression as compared to untreated cells. At the same time, CF was able to reduce LDH activity and, consequently, the amount of lactate released in the extracellular environment. We supplied evidence for an antiproliferative effect of CF on leukemia cell lines by inducing cell death through an apoptotic mechanism and by altering cancer cell metabolism through HIF-1α and GLUT-1 regulation. Thanks to its antioxidative and proapoptotic properties, CF might be a good candidate for cancer prevention.

  3. Acadesine kills chronic myelogenous leukemia (CML cells through PKC-dependent induction of autophagic cell death.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Robert

    Full Text Available CML is an hematopoietic stem cell disease characterized by the t(9;22 (q34;q11 translocation encoding the oncoprotein p210BCR-ABL. The effect of acadesine (AICAR, 5-Aminoimidazole-4-carboxamide-1-beta-D-ribofuranoside a compound with known antileukemic effect on B cell chronic lymphoblastic leukemia (B-CLL was investigated in different CML cell lines. Acadesine triggered loss of cell metabolism in K562, LAMA-84 and JURL-MK1 and was also effective in killing imatinib-resistant K562 cells and Ba/F3 cells carrying the T315I-BCR-ABL mutation. The anti-leukemic effect of acadesine did not involve apoptosis but required rather induction of autophagic cell death. AMPK knock-down by Sh-RNA failed to prevent the effect of acadesine, indicating an AMPK-independent mechanism. The effect of acadesine was abrogated by GF109203X and Ro-32-0432, both inhibitor of classical and new PKCs and accordingly, acadesine triggered relocation and activation of several PKC isoforms in K562 cells. In addition, this compound exhibited a potent anti-leukemic effect in clonogenic assays of CML cells in methyl cellulose and in a xenograft model of K562 cells in nude mice. In conclusion, our work identifies an original and unexpected mechanism by which acadesine triggers autophagic cell death through PKC activation. Therefore, in addition to its promising effects in B-CLL, acadesine might also be beneficial for Imatinib-resistant CML patients.

  4. Rapid Treatment of Leukostasis in Leukemic Mantle Cell Lymphoma Using Therapeutic Leukapheresis: A Case Report

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xuan Duc Nguyen

    2011-01-01

    Full Text Available We describe a case of severe leukocytosis caused by leukemic mantle cell lymphoma (MCL, complicated by leukostasis with myocardial infarction in which leukapheresis was used in the initial management. A 73-year-old male presented to the emergency department because of fatigue and thoracic pain. Blood count revealed 630 × 109/L WBC (white blood cells. The electrocardiogram showed ST-elevation with an increase of troponin and creatinine kinase. The diagnosis was ST-elevation myocardial infarction (STEMI induced and complicated by leukostasis. Immunophenotyping, morphology, cytogenetic and fluorescence-in-situ-hybridization analysis revealed the diagnosis of a blastoid variant of MCL. To remove leukocytes rapidly, leukapheresis was performed in the intensive care unit. Based on the differential blood count with 95% blasts, which were assigned to the lymphocyte population by the automatic hematology analyzer, leukapheresis procedures were then performed with the mononuclear cell standard program on the Spectra cell separator. The patient was treated with daily leukapheresis for 3 days. The WBC count decreased to 174 × 109/L after the third leukapheresis, with a 72% reduction. After the second apheresis, treatment with vincristine, cyclophosphamide, and prednisolone was started. The patient fully recovered in the further course of the treatment. To the best of our knowledge, this is the first report on blastoid MCL with leukostasis associated with a STEMI that was successfully treated by leukapheresis. Effective harvest of circulating lymphoma cells by leukapheresis requires adaptation of instrument settings based on the results of the differential blood count prior to apheresis.

  5. PENGARUH EKSTRAK JAMU TERHADAP AKTIVITAS SEL NATURAL KILLER DALAM MELISIS ALUR SEL LEUKIMIA (K-562 SECARA IN VITRO [The Effects of Commercial “Jamu” Extracts on Natural Killer Cell Activity in Lysing Leukemic Cell Line (K-562 in vitro

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Elisa Veronica D.C. 2

    2002-04-01

    Full Text Available Natural killer (NK cell consitutes white blood cells which specifically functions in lysing tumor and virus invected cells. In this research, a commercial “Jamu” was tested to observe its effect on NK cells activity against leukemic cell lines (K562 in vitro. Jamu was extracted with hot water, diluted and added into cell cultures consisted of a mixture of human peripheric limphocyte cells, as the source of the effector NK cells, and K562 cell line i.e., the target cells which were cell line derived from human leukemia and had been labelled with H3-thymidine. The mixture of the cells were made by culturing the two cells at the ratio of 50:1 and 100 : 1, respectively. The results showed that lysing activity of NK cells in the presence of “Jamu” water extract measured as lysing percentage and lysing index increased only slightly, which were not statiscally significant. It should be considered that the test used in this research represents only a part of the lysing mechanism by NK cells against the target cells. An in vivo test for a period of time will be recessary to elucidate ffurther this NK cell activity.

  6. A radiolabeled antibody targeting CD123+ leukemia stem cells – initial radioimmunotherapy studies in NOD/SCID mice engrafted with primary human AML

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jeffrey V. Leyton

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Radioimmunotherapy (RIT with anti-CD123 monoclonal antibody CSL360 modified with nuclear translocation sequence (NLS peptides and labeled with the Auger electron-emitter, 111In (111In-NLS-CSL360 was studied in the prevalent NOD/SCID mouse AML engraftment assay. Significant decreases in CD123+ leukemic cells and impairment of leukemic stem cell self-renewal were achieved with high doses of RIT. However, NOD/SCID mice were very radiosensitive to these doses. At low non-toxic treatment doses, 111In-NLS-CSL360 demonstrated a trend towards improved survival associated with decreased spleen/body weight ratio, an indicator of leukemia burden, and almost complete eradication of leukemia from the bone marrow in some mice.

  7. DNA released by leukemic cells contributes to the disruption of the bone marrow microenvironment

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Dvořáková, Marta; Karafiát, Vít; Pajer, Petr; Kluzáková, E.; Jarkovská, Karla; Peková, S.; Krutílková, L.; Dvořák, Michal

    2013-01-01

    Roč. 32, č. 44 (2013), s. 5201-5209 ISSN 0950-9232 R&D Projects: GA AV ČR KAN200520801; GA MŠk(CZ) LC06061; GA ČR GA204/06/1728; GA ČR GA301/09/1727 Institutional research plan: CEZ:AV0Z50520514 Institutional support: RVO:68378050 ; RVO:67985904 Keywords : acute leukemia * tumor microenvironment * extracellular nucleosomes * extracellular DNA * DNA damage response * cell death Subject RIV: EB - Genetics ; Molecular Biology Impact factor: 8.559, year: 2013

  8. Alkaloid-rich fraction of Himatanthus lancifolius contains anti-tumor agents against leukemic cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Melissa Pires de Lima

    2010-06-01

    Full Text Available The effects of the alkaloid-rich fraction of Himatanthus lancifolius (Müll. Arg Woodson on normal marrow cells and leukemic cell lines were investigated. After 48 h exposure, the proliferation assay showed significant cell growth inhibition for Daudi (0.1-10 µg/mL, K-562 (1-10 µg/mL, and REH cells (10-100 µg/mL, yet was inert for normal marrow cells. A similar inhibition profile was observed in clonogenic assays. This alkaloid-rich fraction, in which uleine is the main compound, showed no signs of toxicity to any cells up to 10 µg/mL. Cell feature analyses after induction of differentiation showed maintenance of the initial phenotype. Flow cytometric expression of Annexin-V and 7-AAD in K-562 and Daudi cells has indicated that the cells were not undergoing apoptosis or necrosis, suggesting cytostatic activity for tumor cellsOs efeitos da fração rica em alcalóides indólicos de Himatanthus lancifolius (Müll. Arg Woodson sobre células normais de medula óssea e linhagens celulares leucêmicas foram investigados. Após 48 horas de exposição, os ensaios de proliferação demonstraram efeitos inibitórios significativos para as linhagens Daudi (0,1-10 µg/mL, K-562 (1-10 µg/mL e REH (10-100 µg/mL, enquanto mostrou-se inerte sobre células normais de medula óssea. Os perfis de inibição se repetiram nos ensaios clonogênicos. A fração rica em alcalóides, na qual a uleína é a substância majoritária, não demonstrou toxicidade até a dose de 10 µg/mL para nenhuma das células incluídas no estudo. Da mesma forma, não se observou influência dessa fração sobre a diferenciação celular dessas linhagens, mas manutenção de seu estado maturacional inicial. O conjunto de dados descritos associado à baixa co-expressão de anexina-V e 7-AAD sugerem que esta fração exerce atividade citostática para células tumorais.

  9. Aggressive NK-cell leukemia: A rare entity with diagnostic and therapeutic challenge

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Alia Nazarullah

    2016-06-01

    Full Text Available Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia (ANKL is a rare neoplasm of mature natural killer cells, with an extremely poor overall survival, which is almost always EBV related, with majority of cases reported in East Asia. Here we report the case of an ANKL presenting in a young Hispanic male with secondary hemophagocytosis. Aggressive clinical course, high EBV DNA levels and leukemic presentation, often with associated hemophagocytosis, should raise suspicion of an NK/T-cell neoplasm like ANKL. Due to significant diagnostic overlap with extranodal NK/T-cell lymphoma, nasal type (ENKL, accurate diagnostic classification is crucial due to differing treatment and prognosis. L-asparaginase including chemotherapy followed by allogeneic stem cell transplantation appears to slightly prolong overall survival, but relapse is almost inevitable. Clinical monitoring of EBV DNA levels shows good correlation with disease activity.

  10. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Health Professional Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairy cell leukemia treatment options include surveillance, chemotherapy, targeted therapy/immunotherapy, and splenectomy. The decision to treat is based on cytopenias, splenomegaly, or infectious complications. Get detailed information about hairy cell leukemia in this clinician summary.

  11. Changes in T-cell subpopulations and cytokine network during early period of ibrutinib therapy in chronic lymphocytic leukemia patients: the significant decrease in T regulatory cells number.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Podhorecka, Monika; Goracy, Aneta; Szymczyk, Agnieszka; Kowal, Malgorzata; Ibanez, Blanca; Jankowska-Lecka, Olga; Macheta, Arkadiusz; Nowaczynska, Aleksandra; Drab-Urbanek, Elzbieta; Chocholska, Sylwia; Jawniak, Dariusz; Hus, Marek

    2017-05-23

    B cell receptor (BCR) stimulation signal plays an important role in the pathogenesis of chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), and kinase inhibitors directed toward the BCR pathway are now the promising anti-leukemic drugs. Ibrutinib, a Bruton tyrosine kinase inhibitor, demonstrates promising clinical activity in CLL. It is reported that ibrutinib, additionally to directly targeting leukemic cells, also inhibits the interactions of these cells with T cells, macrophages and accessory cells. Assessment of these mechanisms is important because of their non -direct anti-leukemic effects and to identify possible side effects connected with long-term drug administration.The aim of this study was to assess the in vivo effects of ibrutinib on T-cell subpopulations and cytokine network in CLL. The analysis was performed on a group of 19 patients during first month of ibrutinib therapy. The standard multicolor flow cytometry and cytometric bead array methods were used for assessment of T-cell subsets and cytokines/chemokines, respectively.The data obtained indicates that Ibrutinib treatment results in changes in T-cell subpopulations and cytokine network in CLL patients. Particularly, a significant reduction of T regulatory cells in peripheral blood was observed. By targeting these populations of T cells Ibrutinib can stimulate rejection of tumor cells by the immune system.

  12. Changes in the transport of leucine-14C across the red cell membrane in children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stepniewski, M.; Cyklis, R.; Szafran, Z.; Armata, J.; Nawrocka-Kanska, B.

    1981-01-01

    Distribution of leucine- 14 C between intracellular water of red blood cells and incubation medium was significantly higher in 13 children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia than in 22 healthy children. The distribution ratio of leucine- 14 C was significantly lower when measured in the group of 6 children in the period of remission, as compared with children in the acute phase of the disease and only slightly higher than in the control group. The results of this study indicate the existence of structural changes in leukemic red cell membrane responsible for the observed disturbances of leucine transport. (author)

  13. [Effects of PCI-32765 and Dasatinib on the Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemic Cells and Their Mechanisms].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Deng, Yuan; Tao, Shan-Dong; Zhang, Xin; Ma, Jing-Jing; He, Zheng-Mei; Chen, Yue; Deng, Zhi-Kui; Yu, Liang

    2017-02-01

    To investigate the effects of Btk inhibitor (PCI-32765) and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitor (Dasatinib) on proliferation and apoptosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) cell lines (Sup-B15, RS4;11) and the possible mechanism. RS4;11 and Sup-B15 cells were treated with PCI-32765 and Dasatinib, the cell proliferation and apoptosis were detected by CCK-8, the Btk and other apoptotic proteins were detected by Western blot. PCI-32765 could inhibit the proliferation of RS4;11 and Sup-B15 cells in a dose-dependent manner, Sup-B15 cells were more sensitive to PCI-32765 than RS4;11 cells, their IC 50 were 3 µmol/L and 8 µmol/L respectively, the difference between them was statistically significant (PPCI-32765(PPCI-32765 or Dasatinib alone group and the combination group at the different time-point (8, 12, 24, 36, 48 and 72 h), the 2 drugs showed a synergistic effect on cells in a time-dependent manner. After being treated with PCI-32765 and Dasatinib, the RS4;11 and Sup-B15 cells showed that cell shrinkage, increase of cytoplasmic density, nuclear pyknosis, deviation and karyorrhexis, and increase of the apoptotic cells in the combination group, while the promotive effect of low dosage dasatinib on apoptosis of RS4;11 cells was not strong. PCI-32765 and Dasatinib could decrease the expression and activity of BCR-ABL, Btk, Lyn, Src in Sup-B15 and RS4;11 cells. PCI-32765 or Dasatinib can inhibit the proliferation and induce the apoptosis of Sup-B15 and RS4;11 cells, PCI-32765 and Dasatinib displayed the synergistic effects. The possible mechanism may be related with the blocking of B cell receptor(BCR) signal pathway, thereby inhibiting the cell proliferation and promoting the cell apoptosis.

  14. Inhibition of c-Myc overcomes cytotoxic drug resistance in acute myeloid leukemia cells by promoting differentiation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Xiao-Na Pan

    Full Text Available Nowadays, drug resistance still represents a major obstacle to successful acute myeloid leukemia (AML treatment and the underlying mechanism is not fully elucidated. Here, we found that high expression of c-Myc was one of the cytogenetic characteristics in the drug-resistant leukemic cells. c-Myc over-expression in leukemic cells induced resistance to chemotherapeutic drugs, enhanced colony formation capacity and inhibited cell differentiation induced by all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA. Meanwhile, inhibition of c-Myc by shRNA or specific c-Myc inhibitor 10058-F4 rescued the sensitivity to cytotoxic drugs, restrained the colony formation ability and promoted differentiation. RT-PCR and western blotting analysis showed that down-regulation of C/EBPβ contributed to the poor differentiation state of leukemic cells induced by c-Myc over-expression. Importantly, over-expression of C/EBPβ could reverse c-Myc induced drug resistance. In primary AML cells, the c-Myc expression was negatively correlated with C/EBPβ. 10058-F4, displayed anti-proliferative activity and increased cellular differentiation with up-regulation of C/EBPβ in primary AML cells. Thus, our study indicated that c-Myc could be a novel target to overcome drug resistance, providing a new approach in AML therapy.

  15. HUMAN NK CELLS: FROM SURFACE RECEPTORS TO THE THERAPY OF LEUKEMIAS AND SOLID TUMORS

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    LORENZO eMORETTA

    2014-03-01

    Full Text Available Natural Killer (NK cells are major effector cells of the innate immunity. The discovery, over two decades ago, of MHC-class I specific NK receptors and subsequently of activating receptors, recognizing ligands expressed by tumor or virus-infected cells, paved the way to our understanding of the mechanisms of selective recognition and killing of tumor cells. Although NK cells can efficiently kill tumor cells of different histotypes in vitro, their activity may be limited in vivo by their inefficient trafficking to tumor lesions and by the inhibition of their function induced by tumor cells themselves and by the tumor microenvironment. On the other hand, the important role of NK cells has been clearly demonstrated in the therapy of high risk leukemias in the haploidentical hematopoietic cell (HSC transplantation setting. NK cells derived from donor HSC kill leukemic cells residual after the conditioning regimen, thus preventing leukemia relapses. In addition, they also kill residual dendritic cells and T lymphocytes, thus preventing both GvHD and graft rejection.

  16. A micro-Raman spectroscopic investigation of leukemic U-937 cells in aged cultures

    Science.gov (United States)

    Fazio, Enza; Trusso, Sebastiano; Franco, Domenico; Nicolò, Marco Sebastiano; Allegra, Alessandro; Neri, Fortunato; Musolino, Caterina; Guglielmino, Salvatore P. P.

    2016-04-01

    Recently it has been shown that micro-Raman spectroscopy combined with multivariate analysis is able to discriminate among different types of tissues and tumoral cells by the detection of significant alterations and/or reorganizations of complex biological molecules, such as nucleic acids, lipids and proteins. Moreover, its use, being in principle a non-invasive technique, appears an interesting clinical tool for the evaluation of the therapeutical effects and of the disease progression. In this work we analyzed molecular changes in aged cultures of leukemia model U937 cells with respect to fresh cultures of the same cell line. In fact, structural variations of individual neoplastic cells on aging may lead to a heterogeneous data set, therefore falsifying confidence intervals, increasing error levels of analysis and consequently limiting the use of Raman spectroscopy analysis. We found that the observed morphological changes of U937 cells corresponded to well defined modifications of the Raman contributions in selected spectral regions, where markers of specific functional groups, useful to characterize the cell state, are present. A detailed subcellular analysis showed a change in cellular organization as a function of time, and correlated to a significant increase of apoptosis levels. Besides the aforementioned study, Raman spectra were used as input for principal component analysis (PCA) in order to detect and classify spectral changes among U937 cells.

  17. Glucocorticoids and Polyamine Inhibitors Synergize to Kill Human Leukemic CEM Cells1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Miller, Aaron L; Johnson, Betty H; Medh, Rheem D; Townsend, Courtney M; Thompson, E Brad

    2002-01-01

    Abstract Glucocorticoids are well-known apoptotic agents in certain classes of lymphoid cell malignancies. Reduction of intracellular polyamine levels by use of inhibitors that block polyamine synthesis slows or inhibits growth of many cells in vitro. Several such inhibitors have shown efficacy in clinical trials, though the toxicity of some compounds has limited their usefulness. We have tested the effects of combinations of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone (Dex) and two polyamine inhibitors, difluoromethylornithine (DFMO) and methyl glyoxal bis guanylhydrazone (MGBG), on the clonal line of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, CEM-C7-14. Dex alone kills these cells, though only after a delay of at least 24 hours. We also evaluated a partially glucocorticoid-resistant c-Myc-expressing CEM-C7-14 clone. We show that Dex downregulates ornithine decarboxylase (ODC), the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis. Pretreatment with the ODC inhibitor DFMO, followed by addition of Dex, enhances steroid-evoked kill slightly. The combination of pretreatment with sublethal concentrations of both DFMO and the inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, MGBG, followed by addition of Dex, results in strong synergistic cell kill. Both the rapidity and extent of cell kill are enhanced compared to the effects of Dex alone. These results suggest that use of such combinations in vivo may result in apoptosis of malignant cells with lower overall toxicity. PMID:11922393

  18. Glucocorticoids and Polyamine Inhibitors Synergize to Kill Human Leukemic CEM Cells

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    Aaron L. Miller

    2002-01-01

    Full Text Available Glucocorticoids are well-known apoptotic agents in certain classes of lymphoid cell malignancies. Reduction of intracellular polyamine levels by use of inhibitors that block polyamine synthesis slows or inhibits growth of many cells in vitro. Several such inhibitors have shown efficacy in clinical trials, though the toxicity of some compounds has limited their usefulness. We have tested the effects of combinations of the glucocorticoid dexamethasone. (20Dex and two polyamine inhibitors, difluoromethylornithine. (20DFMO and methyl glyoxal bis guanylhydrazone. (20MGBG, on the clonal line of human acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells, CEM-C7-14. Dex alone kills these cells, though only after a delay of at least 24 hours. We also evaluated a partially glucocorticoid-resistant c-Myc-expressing CEM-C7-14 clone. We show that Dex downregulates ornithine decarboxylase. (20ODC, the rate-limiting enzyme in polyamine synthesis. Pretreatment with the ODC inhibitor DFMO, followed by addition of Dex, enhances steroid-evoked kill slightly. The combination of pretreatment with sublethal concentrations of both DFMO and the inhibitor of S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase, MGBG, followed by addition of Dex, results in strong synergistic cell kill. Both the rapidity and extent of cell kill are enhanced compared to the effects of Dex alone. These results suggest that use of such combinations in vivo may result in apoptosis of malignant cells with lower overall toxicity.

  19. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

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    Tan, Shi Hao; Bertulfo, Fatima Carla; Sanda, Takaomi

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC) theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs), which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-ALL patients and animal models, the nature and origin of LICs are largely unknown. In this review, we discuss recent studies on LICs in T-ALL and the potential mechanisms of LIC emergence in this disease. We focus on the oncogenic transcription factors TAL1, LMO2 , and NOTCH1 and highlight the significance of the transcriptional regulatory programs in normal hematopoietic stem cells and T-ALL.

  20. Leukemia-Initiating Cells in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

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    Shi Hao Tan

    2017-09-01

    Full Text Available T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL is a hematological malignancy characterized by the clonal proliferation of immature T-cell precursors. T-ALL has many similar pathophysiological features to acute myeloid leukemia, which has been extensively studied in the establishment of the cancer stem cell (CSC theory, but the CSC concept in T-ALL is still debatable. Although leukemia-initiating cells (LICs, which can generate leukemia in a xenograft setting, have been found in both human T-ALL patients and animal models, the nature and origin of LICs are largely unknown. In this review, we discuss recent studies on LICs in T-ALL and the potential mechanisms of LIC emergence in this disease. We focus on the oncogenic transcription factors TAL1, LMO2, and NOTCH1 and highlight the significance of the transcriptional regulatory programs in normal hematopoietic stem cells and T-ALL.

  1. Ganoderma lucidum extracts inhibited leukemia WEHI-3 cells in BALB/c mice and promoted an immune response in vivo.

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    Chang, Yung-Hsien; Yang, Jai-Sing; Yang, Jiun-Long; Wu, Chang-Lin; Chang, Shu-Jen; Lu, Kung-Wen; Lin, Jen-Jyh; Hsia, Te-Chun; Lin, Yi-Ting; Ho, Chin-Chih; Wood, W Gibson; Chung, Jing-Gung

    2009-12-01

    Ganoderma lucidum (G. lucidum) is a medicinal mushroom having biological effects such as immunomodulation and anti-tumor actions. In China and many other Asian countries, G. lucidum is used as a folk remedy to promote health and longevity. Although many studies have shown that G. lucidum modulates the immune system, including, for example, antigen-presenting cells, natural killer (NK) cells, and the T and B lymphocytes, the effects of G. lucidum on the WEHI-3 leukemic BALB/c mice are unclear. We attempted to determine whether G. lucidum would promote immune responses in BALB/c mice injected with WEHI-3 leukemia cells. The effects of G. lucidum on the survival rate of WEHI-3 leukemia cells injected into BALB/c mice were examined. It increased the percentages of CD3 and CD19, but decreased the percentages of Mac-3 and CD11b markers, suggesting that differentiation of the precursor of T and B cells was promoted but macrophages were inhibited. It decreased the weight of spleens as compared with control mice. It also promoted phagocytosis by macrophage from peripheral blood mononuclear cell (PBMC) and it also promoted natural killer cell activity. It decreased the percentage of leukemia cells in the spleens of mice before they were injected with WEHI-3 cells. Apparently, G. lucidum affects murine leukemia WEHI-3 cells in vivo.

  2. Human Leukemic Cells performing Oxidative Phosphorylation (OXPHOS Generate an Antioxidant Response Independently of Reactive Oxygen species (ROS Production

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    Abrar Ul Haq Khan

    2016-01-01

    Full Text Available Tumor cell metabolism is altered during leukemogenesis. Cells performing oxidative phosphorylation (OXPHOS generate reactive oxygen species (ROS through mitochondrial activity. To limit the deleterious effects of excess ROS, certain gene promoters contain antioxidant response elements (ARE, e.g. the genes NQO-1 and HO-1. ROS induces conformational changes in KEAP1 and releases NRF2, which activates AREs. We show in vitro and in vivo that OXPHOS induces, both in primary leukemic cells and cell lines, de novo expression of NQO-1 and HO-1 and also the MAPK ERK5 and decreases KEAP1 mRNA. ERK5 activates the transcription factor MEF2, which binds to the promoter of the miR-23a–27a–24-2 cluster. Newly generated miR-23a destabilizes KEAP1 mRNA by binding to its 3′UTR. Lower KEAP1 levels increase the basal expression of the NRF2-dependent genes NQO-1 and HO-1. Hence, leukemic cells performing OXPHOS, independently of de novo ROS production, generate an antioxidant response to protect themselves from ROS.

  3. Siglec-7 tetramers characterize B-cell subpopulations and leukemic blasts.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gieseke, Friederike; Mang, Philippa; Viebahn, Susanne; Sonntag, Inga; Kruchen, Anne; Erbacher, Annika; Pfeiffer, Matthias; Handgretinger, Rupert; Müller, Ingo

    2012-08-01

    Cell surface glycosylation has important regulatory functions in the maturation, activation, and homeostasis of lymphocytes. The family of human sialic acid-binding immunoglobulin-like lectins (siglecs) comprises inhibitory as well as activating receptors intimately involved in the regulation of immune responses. Analyses of the interaction between siglecs and glycans are hampered by the low affinity of this interaction. Therefore, we expressed siglec-7 in eukaryotic cells, allowing for glycosylation, and oligomerized the protein in analogy to MHC tetramers. Using this tool, flow cytometric analysis of lymphocytes became possible. Sialic acid-dependent binding of siglec-7 tetramers was confirmed by glycan array analysis and loss of siglec tetramer binding after neuraminidase treatment of lymphocytes. In contrast to most lymphocyte subpopulations, which showed high siglec-7 ligand expression, B-cell subpopulations could be further subdivided according to different siglec-7 ligand expression levels. We also analyzed blasts from acute lymphoblastic leukemias of the B-cell lineage as well as the T-cell lineage, since malignant transformation is often associated with aberrant cell surface glycosylation. While pediatric T-ALL blasts highly expressed siglec-7 ligands, siglec-7 ligands were barely detectable on cALL blasts. Taken together, oligomerization of recombinant soluble siglec-7 enabled flow cytometric identification of physiologic lymphocyte subpopulations and malignant blasts. © 2012 WILEY-VCH Verlag GmbH & Co. KGaA, Weinheim.

  4. Study of the quantitative, functional, cytogenetic, and immunoregulatory properties of bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells in patients with B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pontikoglou, Charalampos; Kastrinaki, Maria-Christina; Klaus, Mirjam; Kalpadakis, Christina; Katonis, Pavlos; Alpantaki, Kalliopi; Pangalis, Gerassimos A; Papadaki, Helen A

    2013-05-01

    The bone marrow (BM) microenvironment has clearly been implicated in the pathogenesis of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). However, the potential involvement of BM stromal progenitors, the mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs), in the pathophysiology of the disease has not been extensively investigated. We expanded in vitro BM-MSCs from B-CLL patients (n=11) and healthy individuals (n=16) and comparatively assessed their reserves, proliferative potential, differentiation capacity, and immunoregulatory effects on T- and B-cells. We also evaluated the anti-apoptotic effect of patient-derived MSCs on leukemic cells and studied their cytogenetic characteristics in comparison to BM hematopoietic cells. B-CLL-derived BM MSCs exhibit a similar phenotype, differentiation potential, and ability to suppress T-cell proliferative responses as compared with MSCs from normal controls. Furthermore, they do not carry the cytogenetic abnormalities of the leukemic clone, and they exert a similar anti-apoptotic effect on leukemic cells and healthy donor-derived B-cells, as their normal counterparts. On the other hand, MSCs from B-CLL patients significantly promote normal B-cell proliferation and IgG production, in contrast to healthy-donor-derived MSCs. Furthermore, they have impaired reserves, defective cellular growth due to increased apoptotic cell death and exhibit aberrant production of stromal cell-derived factor 1, B-cell activating factor, a proliferation inducing ligand, and transforming growth factor β1, cytokines that are crucial for the survival/nourishing of the leukemic cells. We conclude that ex vivo expanded B-CLL-derived MSCs harbor intrinsic qualitative and quantitative abnormalities that may be implicated in disease development and/or progression.

  5. Kaempferol increases apoptosis in human acute promyelocytic leukemia cells and inhibits multidrug resistance genes.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Moradzadeh, Maliheh; Tabarraei, Alijan; Sadeghnia, Hamid Reza; Ghorbani, Ahmad; Mohamadkhani, Ashraf; Erfanian, Saiedeh; Sahebkar, Amirhossein

    2018-02-01

    Acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) is one of the most life-threatening hematological malignancies. Defects in the cell growth and apoptotic pathways are responsible for both disease pathogenesis and treatment resistance. Therefore, pro-apoptotic agents are potential candidates for APL treatment. Kaempferol is a flavonoid with antioxidant and anti-tumor properties. This study was designed to investigate the cytotoxic, pro-apoptotic, and differentiation-inducing effects of kaempferol on HL-60 and NB4 leukemia cells. Resazurin assay was used to determine cell viability following treatment with kaempferol (12.5-100 μM) and all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA; 10 μM; used as a positive control). Apoptosis and differentiation were also detected using propidium iodide and NBT staining techniques, respectively. Furthermore, the expression levels of genes involved in apoptosis (PI3 K, AKT, BCL2, BAX, p53, p21, PTEN, CASP3, CASP8, and CASP9), differentiation (PML-RAR and HDAC1), and multi-drug resistance (ABCB1 and ABCC1) were determined using quantitative real-time PCR. The protein expressions of Bax/Bcl2 and casp3 were confirmed using Western blot. The results showed that kaempferol decreased cell viability and increased subG1 population in the tested leukemic cells. This effect was associated with decreased expression of Akt, BCL2, ABCB1, and ABCC1 genes, while the expression of CASP3 and BAX/BCL-2 ratio were significantly increased at both gene and protein levels. Kaempferol promoted apoptosis and inhibited multidrug resistance in a concentration-dependent manner, without any differential effect on leukemic cells. In conclusion, this study suggested that kaempferol may be utilized as an appropriate alternative for ATRA in APL patients. © 2017 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  6. Effect of low dose radiation on expression of p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Zhang Longzhen; Ding Xin; Li Xiangyang; Cen Jiannong; Shen Hongjie; Chen Zixing

    2010-01-01

    Objective: To investigate the effect of low dose radiation on the expression on p16 gene in chronic myelogenous leukemia. Methods: Leukemic stem cells (LSCs) which expressed CD34 +, CD38 - and CD123 + were isolated from bone marrow cells obtained from twenty patients newly-diagnosedas chronic myeloid leukemia with EasySep TM magnet beads. Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) which expressed CD34 + and CD38 - were isolated from human cord blood cells obtained from twenty full-term deliveries with EasySep TM magnet beads as control. HSCs vs LSCs samples were further divided into three dose groups, including 0, 12.5 and 50 cGy, respectively. RT-PCR and real-time quantitative reverse transcription-polymerase chain reaction methods were used to detect mRNA expression of p16 gene in HSCs and LSCs after irradiation. Cells were harvested at different time for detection of cell cycle and apoptosis by flow cytometer. Results: p16 mRNA level in CML-LSCs was increased slightly at 12.5 cGy, and significantly increased at 50 cGy (Z=-3.39, P 0 /G 1 stagewas increased 48 h after 12.5 cGy irradiation, and 72 h post-irradiation with 50 cGy. The apoptosis rate of CML-LSCs was gradually raised after LDR, especially at 72 h post-irradiation of 50 cGy [(17.75±11.760% vs (6.13±4.71)%, Z=-2.37, P<0.01]. Conclusions: p16 gene transcription could be up-regulated by low dose radiation, which might provide a theoretical evidence for CML therapy and LDR in leukemic clinical application. (authors)

  7. Epigenetics targeted protein-vorinostat nanomedicine inducing apoptosis in heterogeneous population of primary acute myeloid leukemia cells including refractory and relapsed cases.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Chandran, Parwathy; Kavalakatt, Anu; Malarvizhi, Giridharan Loghanathan; Vasanthakumari, Divya Rani Vikraman Nair; Retnakumari, Archana Payickattu; Sidharthan, Neeraj; Pavithran, Keechilat; Nair, Shantikumar; Koyakutty, Manzoor

    2014-05-01

    Aberrant epigenetics play a key role in the onset and progression of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Herein we report in silico modelling based development of a novel, protein-vorinostat nanomedicine exhibiting selective and superior anti-leukemic activity against heterogeneous population of AML patient samples (n=9), including refractory and relapsed cases, and three representative cell lines expressing CD34(+)/CD38(-) stem cell phenotype (KG-1a), promyelocytic phenotype (HL-60) and FLT3-ITD mutation (MV4-11). Nano-vorinostat having ~100nm size exhibited enhanced cellular uptake rendering significantly lower IC50 in AML cell lines and patient samples, and induced enhanced HDAC inhibition, oxidative injury, cell cycle arrest and apoptosis compared to free vorinostat. Most importantly, nanomedicine showed exceptional single-agent activity against the clonogenic proliferative capability of bone marrow derived leukemic progenitors, while remaining non-toxic to healthy bone marrow cells. Collectively, this epigenetics targeted nanomedicine appears to be a promising therapeutic strategy against various French-American-British (FAB) classes of AML. Through the use of a protein-vorinostat agent, exceptional single-agent activity was demonstrated against the clonogenic proliferative capability of bone marrow derived leukemic progenitors, while remaining non-toxic to healthy bone marrow cells. The studied epigenetics targeted nanomedicine approach is a promising therapeutic strategy against various French-American-British classes of acute myeloid leukemia. © 2014 Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  8. NK-like homeodomain proteins activate NOTCH3-signaling in leukemic T-cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nagel, Stefan; Scherr, Michaela; MacLeod, Roderick AF; Venturini, Letizia; Przybylski, Grzegorz K; Grabarczyk, Piotr; Meyer, Corinna; Kaufmann, Maren; Battmer, Karin; Schmidt, Christian A; Drexler, Hans G

    2009-01-01

    Homeodomain proteins control fundamental cellular processes in development and in cancer if deregulated. Three members of the NK-like subfamily of homeobox genes (NKLs), TLX1, TLX3 and NKX2-5, are implicated in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). They are activated by particular chromosomal aberrations. However, their precise function in leukemogenesis is still unclear. Here we screened further NKLs in 24 T-ALL cell lines and identified the common expression of MSX2. The subsequent aim of this study was to analyze the role of MSX2 in T-cell differentiation which may be disturbed by oncogenic NKLs. Specific gene activity was examined by quantitative real-time PCR, and globally by expression profiling. Proteins were analyzed by western blot, immuno-cytology and immuno-precipitation. For overexpression studies cell lines were transduced by lentiviruses. Quantification of MSX2 mRNA in primary hematopoietic cells demonstrated higher levels in CD34+ stem cells as compared to peripheral blood cells and mature CD3+ T-cells. Furthermore, analysis of MSX2 expression levels in T-cell lines after treatment with core thymic factors confirmed their involvement in regulation. These results indicated that MSX2 represents an hematopoietic NKL family member which is downregulated during T-cell development and may functionally substituted by oncogenic NKLs. For functional analysis JURKAT cells were lentivirally transduced, overexpressing either MSX2 or oncogenic TLX1 and NKX2-5, respectively. These cells displayed transcriptional activation of NOTCH3-signaling, including NOTCH3 and HEY1 as analyzed by gene expression profiling and quantitative RT-PCR, and consistently attenuated sensitivity to gamma-secretase inhibitor as analyzed by MTT-assays. Furthermore, in addition to MSX2, both TLX1 and NKX2-5 proteins interacted with NOTCH-pathway repressors, SPEN/MINT/SHARP and TLE1/GRG1, representing a potential mechanism for (de)regulation. Finally, elevated expression of NOTCH3

  9. SB225002 Induces Cell Death and Cell Cycle Arrest in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Cells through the Activation of GLIPR1

    Science.gov (United States)

    Leal, Paulo C.; Bhasin, Manoj K.; Zenatti, Priscila Pini; Nunes, Ricardo J.; Yunes, Rosendo A.; Nowill, Alexandre E.; Libermann, Towia A.; Zerbini, Luiz Fernando; Yunes, José Andrés

    2015-01-01

    Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) is the most frequent childhood malignancy. In the effort to find new anti-leukemic agents, we evaluated the small drug SB225002 (N-(2-hydroxy-4-nitrophenyl)-N’-(2-bromophenyl)urea). Although initially described as a selective antagonist of CXCR2, later studies have identified other cellular targets for SB225002, with potential medicinal use in cancer. We found that SB225002 has a significant pro-apoptotic effect against both B- and T-ALL cell lines. Cell cycle analysis demonstrated that treatment with SB225002 induces G2-M cell cycle arrest. Transcriptional profiling revealed that SB225002-mediated apoptosis triggered a transcriptional program typical of tubulin binding agents. Network analysis revealed the activation of genes linked to the JUN and p53 pathways and inhibition of genes linked to the TNF pathway. Early cellular effects activated by SB225002 included the up-regulation of GLIPR1, a p53-target gene shown to have pro-apoptotic activities in prostate and bladder cancer. Silencing of GLIPR1 in B- and T-ALL cell lines resulted in increased resistance to SB225002. Although SB225002 promoted ROS increase in ALL cells, antioxidant N-Acetyl Cysteine pre-treatment only modestly attenuated cell death, implying that the pro-apoptotic effects of SB225002 are not exclusively mediated by ROS. Moreover, GLIPR1 silencing resulted in increased ROS levels both in untreated and SB225002-treated cells. In conclusion, SB225002 induces cell cycle arrest and apoptosis in different B- and T-ALL cell lines. Inhibition of tubulin function with concurrent activation of the p53 pathway, in particular, its downstream target GLIPR1, seems to underlie the anti-leukemic effect of SB225002. PMID:26302043

  10. ArtinM Mediates Murine T Cell Activation and Induces Cell Death in Jurkat Human Leukemic T Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Oliveira-Brito, Patrícia Kellen Martins; Gonçalves, Thiago Eleutério; Vendruscolo, Patrícia Edivânia; Roque-Barreira, Maria Cristina

    2017-01-01

    The recognition of cell surface glycans by lectins may be critical for the innate and adaptive immune responses. ArtinM, a d-mannose-binding lectin from Artocarpus heterophyllus, activates antigen-presenting cells by recognizing TLR2 N-glycans and induces Th1 immunity. We recently demonstrated that ArtinM stimulated CD4+ T cells to produce proinflammatory cytokines. Here, we further studied the effects of ArtinM on adaptive immune cells. We showed that ArtinM activates murine CD4+ and CD8+ T cells, augmenting their positivity for CD25, CD69, and CD95 and showed higher interleukin (IL)-2 and interferon (IFN)-γ production. The CD4+ T cells exhibited increased T-bet expression in response to ArtinM, and IL-2 production by CD4+ and CD8+ T cells depended on the recognition of CD3εγ-chain glycans by ArtinM. The ArtinM effect on aberrantly-glycosylated neoplastic lymphocytes was studied in Jurkat T cells, in which ArtinM induced IL-2, IFN-γ, and IL-1β production, but decreased cell viability and growth. A higher frequency of AnnexinV- and propidium iodide-stained cells demonstrated the induction of Jurkat T cells apoptosis by ArtinM, and this apoptotic response was reduced by caspases and protein tyrosine kinase inhibitors. The ArtinM effects on murine T cells corroborated with the immunomodulatory property of lectin, whereas the promotion of Jurkat T cells apoptosis may reflect a potential applicability of ArtinM in novel strategies for treating lymphocytic leukemia. PMID:28665310

  11. Anti-proliferative and differentiation-inducing activities of the green tea catechin epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the human eosinophilic leukemia EoL-1 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lung, H L; Ip, W K; Wong, C K; Mak, N K; Chen, Z Y; Leung, K N

    2002-12-06

    A novel approach for the treatment of leukemia is the differentiation therapy in which immature leukemia cells are induced to attain a mature phenotype when exposed to differentiation inducers, either alone or in combinations with other chemotherapeutic or chemopreventive drugs. Over the past decade, numerous studies indicated that green tea catechins (GTC) could suppress the growth and induce apoptosis on a number of human cancer cell lines. However, the differentiation-inducing activity of GTC on human tumors remains poorly understood. In the present study, the effect of the major GTC epigallocatechin-3-gallate (EGCG) on the proliferation and differentiation of a human eosinophilc leukemic cell line, EoL-1, was examined. Our results showed that EGCG suppressed the proliferation of the EoL-1 cells in a dose-dependent manner, with an estimated IC(50) value of 31.5 microM. On the other hand, EGCG at a concentration of 40 microM could trigger the EoL-1 cells to undergo morphological differentiation into mature eosinophil-like cells. Using RT-PCR and flow cytometry, it was found that EGCG upregulated the gene and protein expression of two eosinophil-specific granule proteins, the major basic protein (MBP) and eosinophil peroxidase (EPO), in EoL-1 cells. Taken together, our findings suggest that EGCG can exhibit anti-leukemic activity on a human eosinophilic cell line EoL-1 by suppressing the proliferation and by inducing the differentiation of the leukemia cells.

  12. Auger electron-emitting "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 radioimmunoconjugates are cytotoxic to human acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cells displaying the CD123"+/CD131"− phenotype of leukemia stem cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gao, Catherine; Leyton, Jeffrey V.; Schimmer, Aaron D.; Minden, Mark; Reilly, Raymond M.

    2016-01-01

    Chimeric IgG_1 monoclonal antibody CSL360 recognizes the CD123"+/CD131"− phenotype expressed by leukemic stem cells (LSC). Auger electron-emitting "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 radioimmunoconjugates incorporating nuclear translocation sequence (NLS) peptides bound specifically to Raji cells transfected with CD123 and exhibited a K_D of 11 nmols/L in a competition receptor-binding assay using CD123-transfected CHO cells. "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 was bound, internalized and transported to the nucleus of human AML-5 myeloid leukemia cells. The clonogenic survival of AML-5 cells was reduced by "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 up to 3.7-fold. Isotype control "1"1"1In-DTPA-chIgG_1 was 2-fold less cytotoxic, and unlabeled CSL360, DTPA-NLS-CSL360 or free "1"1"1In acetate did not decrease cell survival. These results are promising for further evaluation of "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 for Auger electron radioimmunotherapy of AML targeting the critical LSC subpopulation. - Highlights: • "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 the CD123"+/CD131"− phenotype of leukemic stem cells (LSC). • "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 was bound, internalized and imported into the nucleus of AML-5 leukemia cells. • "1"1"1In-DTPA-NLS-CSL360 reduced the clonogenic survival of AML-5 leukemia cells by 4-fold.

  13. Inhibition of the NAD-dependent protein deacetylase SIRT2 induces granulocytic differentiation in human leukemia cells.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yoshitaka Sunami

    Full Text Available Sirtuins, NAD-dependent protein deacetylases, play important roles in cellular functions such as metabolism and differentiation. Whether sirtuins function in tumorigenesis is still controversial, but sirtuins are aberrantly expressed in tumors, which may keep cancerous cells undifferentiated. Therefore, we investigated whether the inhibition of sirtuin family proteins induces cellular differentiation in leukemic cells. The sirtuin inhibitors tenovin-6 and BML-266 induce granulocytic differentiation in the acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL cell line NB4. This differentiation is likely caused by an inhibition of SIRT2 deacetylase activity, judging from the accumulation of acetylated α-tubulin, a major SIRT2 substrate. Unlike the clinically used differentiation inducer all-trans retinoic acid, tenovin-6 shows limited effects on promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor α (PML-RAR-α stability and promyelocytic leukemia nuclear body formation in NB4 cells, suggesting that tenovin-6 does not directly target PML-RAR-α activity. In agreement with this, tenovin-6 induces cellular differentiation in the non-APL cell line HL-60, where PML-RAR-α does not exist. Knocking down SIRT2 by shRNA induces granulocytic differentiation in NB4 cells, which demonstrates that the inhibition of SIRT2 activity is sufficient to induce cell differentiation in NB4 cells. The overexpression of SIRT2 in NB4 cells decreases the level of granulocytic differentiation induced by tenovin-6, which indicates that tenovin-6 induces granulocytic differentiation by inhibiting SIRT2 activity. Taken together, our data suggest that targeting SIRT2 is a viable strategy to induce leukemic cell differentiation.

  14. Antileukemic Potential of Momordica charantia Seed Extracts on Human Myeloid Leukemic HL60 Cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ramani Soundararajan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available Momordica charantia (bitter gourd has been used in the traditional system of medicine for the treatment of various diseases. Anticancer activity of M. charantia extracts has been demonstrated by numerous in vitro and in vivo studies. In the present study, we investigated the differentiation inducing potential of fractionated M. charantia seed extracts in human myeloid HL60 cells. We found that the HL60 cells treated with the fractionated seed extracts differentiated into granulocytic lineage as characterized by NBT staining, CD11b expression, and specific esterase activity. The differentiation inducing principle was found to be heat-stable, and organic in nature. The differentiation was accompanied by a downregulation of c-myc transcript, indicating the involvement of c-myc pathway, at least in part, in differentiation. Taken together these results indicate that fractionated extracts of M. charantia seeds possess differentiation inducing activity and therefore can be evaluated for their potential use in differentiation therapy for leukemia in combination with other inducers of differentiation.

  15. Antileukemic Potential of Momordica charantia Seed Extracts on Human Myeloid Leukemic HL60 Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Soundararajan, Ramani; Prabha, Punit; Rai, Umesh; Dixit, Aparna

    2012-01-01

    Momordica charantia (bitter gourd) has been used in the traditional system of medicine for the treatment of various diseases. Anticancer activity of M. charantia extracts has been demonstrated by numerous in vitro and in vivo studies. In the present study, we investigated the differentiation inducing potential of fractionated M. charantia seed extracts in human myeloid HL60 cells. We found that the HL60 cells treated with the fractionated seed extracts differentiated into granulocytic lineage as characterized by NBT staining, CD11b expression, and specific esterase activity. The differentiation inducing principle was found to be heat-stable, and organic in nature. The differentiation was accompanied by a downregulation of c-myc transcript, indicating the involvement of c-myc pathway, at least in part, in differentiation. Taken together these results indicate that fractionated extracts of M. charantia seeds possess differentiation inducing activity and therefore can be evaluated for their potential use in differentiation therapy for leukemia in combination with other inducers of differentiation. PMID:22654956

  16. Biological Therapy in Treating Patients With Advanced Myelodysplastic Syndrome, Acute or Chronic Myeloid Leukemia, or Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Who Are Undergoing Stem Cell Transplantation

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-03-27

    Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With 11q23 (MLL) Abnormalities; Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With Inv(16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(15;17)(q22;q12); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(16;16)(p13;q22); Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia With t(8;21)(q22;q22); B-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; B-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Childhood Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Childhood Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Chronic Myelomonocytic Leukemia; Essential Thrombocythemia; Polycythemia Vera; Previously Treated Myelodysplastic Syndromes; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts; Refractory Anemia With Excess Blasts in Transformation; Relapsing Chronic Myelogenous Leukemia; Secondary Acute Myeloid Leukemia; T-cell Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; T-cell Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  17. The mTOR inhibitor, everolimus (RAD001), overcomes resistance to imatinib in quiescent Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kuwatsuka, Y; Minami, M; Minami, Y; Sugimoto, K; Hayakawa, F; Miyata, Y; Abe, A; Goff, D J; Kiyoi, H; Naoe, T

    2011-01-01

    In Ph-positive (Ph + ) leukemia, the quiescent cell state is one of the reasons for resistance to the BCR-ABL-kinase inhibitor, imatinib. In order to examine the mechanisms of resistance due to quiescence and the effect of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, everolimus, for such a resistant population, we used Ph + acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient cells serially xenotransplanted into NOD/SCID/IL2rγ null (NOG) mice. Spleen cells from leukemic mice showed a higher percentage of slow-cycling G 0 cells in the CD34 + CD38 − population compared with the CD34 + CD38 + and CD34 − populations. After ex vivo imatinib treatment, more residual cells were observed in the CD34 + CD38 − population than in the other populations. Although slow-cycling G 0 cells were insensitive to imatinib in spite of BCR-ABL and CrkL dephosphorylation, combination treatment with everolimus induced substantial cell death, including that of the CD34 + CD38 − population, with p70-S6 K dephosphorylation and decrease of MCL-1 expression. The leukemic non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse system with the in vivo combination treatment with imatinib and everolimus showed a decrease of tumor burden including CD34 + cells. These results imply that treatment with everolimus can overcome resistance to imatinib in Ph + leukemia due to quiescence

  18. Blastic Plasmacytoid Dendritic Cell Leukemia in a Black Malian

    African Journals Online (AJOL)

    2017-06-28

    Jun 28, 2017 ... BPDCN in Mali. KEYWORDS: Acute Leukemia, black african, dendritic cell, Mali ... myeloid neoplasm by the 2008 world health organization classification of .... There are many standardized treatment regimens, and many protocols with ... leukemia chemotherapy regimen[7,11] or chronic leukemia treatment ...

  19. Erythrocyte survival studies in a rat myelogenous leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Derelanko, M.J.; Meagher, R.C.; Lobue, J.; Khouri, J.A.; Gordon, A.S.

    1982-01-01

    To determine the extent intrinsic erythrocyte defects and/or extrinsic factors were involved in anemia of rats bearing Shay chloroleukemia (SCL), survival of 3 H-DFP labeled erythrocytes was studied in leukemic and nonleukemic hosts. Red blood cells labeled before induction of leukemia, were rapidly lost from the peripheral circulation of SCL rats in terminal stages of disease. However, labeled erythrocytes from terminal SCL animals displayed normal lifespans when transfused into nonleukemic controls. Thus the anemia of this leukemia probably resulted from extrinsic factors associated with the leukemic process. Hemorrhage appeared to be primarily responsible for the anemia of this disease

  20. CAR-T cells targeting CLL-1 as an approach to treat acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Jinghua; Chen, Siyu; Xiao, Wei; Li, Wende; Wang, Liang; Yang, Shuo; Wang, Weida; Xu, Liping; Liao, Shuangye; Liu, Wenjian; Wang, Yang; Liu, Nawei; Zhang, Jianeng; Xia, Xiaojun; Kang, Tiebang; Chen, Gong; Cai, Xiuyu; Yang, Han; Zhang, Xing; Lu, Yue; Zhou, Penghui

    2018-01-10

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is one of the most common types of adult acute leukemia. Standard chemotherapies can induce complete remission in selected patients; however, a majority of patients eventually relapse and succumb to the disease. Thus, the development of novel therapeutics for AML is urgently needed. Human C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL-1) is a type II transmembrane glycoprotein, and its expression is restricted to myeloid cells and the majority of AML blasts. Moreover, CLL-1 is expressed in leukemia stem cells (LSCs), but absent in hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs), which may provide a potential therapeutic target for AML treatment. We tested the expression of CLL-1 antigen on peripheral blood cells and bone marrow cells in healthy donor and AML patients. Then, we developed a chimeric antigen receptor (CAR) containing a CLL1-specific single-chain variable fragment, in combination with CD28, 4-1BB costimulatory domains, and CD3-ζ signaling domain. We further investigate the function of CLL-1 CAR-T cells. The CLL-1 CAR-T cells specifically lysed CLL-1 + cell lines as well as primary AML patient samples in vitro. Strong anti-leukemic activity was observed in vivo by using a xenograft model of disseminated AML. Importantly, CLL-1 + myeloid progenitor cells and mature myeloid cells were specifically eliminated by CLL-1 CAR-T cells, while normal HSCs were not targeted due to the lack of CLL-1 expression. CLL-1 CAR-T represents a promising immunotherapy for the treatment of AML.

  1. Imatinib-loaded polyelectrolyte microcapsules for sustained targeting of BCR-ABL+ leukemia stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Palamà, Ilaria E; Leporatti, Stefano; de Luca, Emanuela; Di Renzo, Nicola; Maffia, Michele; Gambacorti-Passerini, Carlo; Rinaldi, Ross; Gigli, Giuseppe; Cingolani, Roberto; Coluccia, Addolorata M L

    2010-04-01

    The lack of sensitivity of chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) stem cells to imatinib mesylate (IM) commonly leads to drug dose escalation or early disease relapses when therapy is stopped. Here, we report that packaging of IM into a biodegradable carrier based on polyelectrolyte microcapsules increases drug retention and antitumor activity in CML stem cells, also improving the ex vivo purging of malignant progenitors from patient autografts. Microparticles/capsules were obtained by layer-by-layer (LbL) self-assembly of oppositely charged polyelectrolyte multilayers on removable calcium carbonate (CaCO(3)) templates and loaded with or without IM. A leukemic cell line (KU812) and CD34(+) cells freshly isolated from healthy donors or CML patients were tested. Polyelectrolyte microcapsules (PMCs) with an average diameter of 3 microm, fluorescently labelled multilayers sensitive to the action of intracellular proteases and 95-99% encapsulation efficiency of IM, were prepared. Cell uptake efficiency of such biodegradable carriers was quantified in KU812, leukemic and normal CD34(+) stem cells (range: 70-85%), and empty PMCs did not impact cell viability. IM-loaded PMCs selectively targeted CML cells, by promoting apoptosis at doses that exert only cytostatic effects by IM alone. More importantly, residual CML cells from patient leukapheresis products were reduced or eliminated more efficiently by using IM-loaded PMCs compared with freely soluble IM, with a purging efficiency of several logs. No adverse effects on normal CD34(+) stem-cell survival and their clonogenic potential was noticed in long-term cultures of hematopoietic progenitors in vitro. This pilot study provides the proof-of-principle for the clinical application of biodegradable IM-loaded PMC as feasible, safe and effective ex vivo purging agents to target CML stem cells, in order to improve transplant outcome of resistant/relapsed patients or reduce IM dose escalation.

  2. Pre leukemic granulocytic sarcoma of vagina: a case report with review of literature

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Lakshminarasimhan, Srinivasan; Doval, D.C.; Rajashekhar, Usha; Mukherjee, Geethashree; Kannan, V.; Lakshmi Devi; Bapsy, P.P.

    1996-01-01

    Granulocytic sarcoma is an extramedullary tumor of malignant granulocytic progenitor cells, that may precede the onset of acute myeloid leukemia or appear during the leukemic manifestation or blastic crisis of chronic myeloproliferative disorders. A case of granulocytic sarcoma of vagina in a 27 year old woman treated with local radiotherapy is described. After seven months of follow up she developed acute myeloid leukemia. The case has been presented in view of its rarity and discussed in light of the available literature. (author). 13 refs., 1 fig

  3. Hypoxia-Activated Prodrug TH-302 Targets Hypoxic Bone Marrow Niches in Preclinical Leukemia Models.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Benito, Juliana; Ramirez, Marc S; Millward, Niki Zacharias; Velez, Juliana; Harutyunyan, Karine G; Lu, Hongbo; Shi, Yue-Xi; Matre, Polina; Jacamo, Rodrigo; Ma, Helen; Konoplev, Sergej; McQueen, Teresa; Volgin, Andrei; Protopopova, Marina; Mu, Hong; Lee, Jaehyuk; Bhattacharya, Pratip K; Marszalek, Joseph R; Davis, R Eric; Bankson, James A; Cortes, Jorge E; Hart, Charles P; Andreeff, Michael; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-04-01

    To characterize the prevalence of hypoxia in the leukemic bone marrow, its association with metabolic and transcriptional changes in the leukemic blasts and the utility of hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302 in leukemia models. Hyperpolarized magnetic resonance spectroscopy was utilized to interrogate the pyruvate metabolism of the bone marrow in the murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) model. Nanostring technology was used to evaluate a gene set defining a hypoxia signature in leukemic blasts and normal donors. The efficacy of the hypoxia-activated prodrug TH-302 was examined in the in vitro and in vivo leukemia models. Metabolic imaging has demonstrated increased glycolysis in the femur of leukemic mice compared with healthy control mice, suggesting metabolic reprogramming of hypoxic bone marrow niches. Primary leukemic blasts in samples from AML patients overexpressed genes defining a "hypoxia index" compared with samples from normal donors. TH-302 depleted hypoxic cells, prolonged survival of xenograft leukemia models, and reduced the leukemia stem cell pool in vivo In the aggressive FLT3/ITD MOLM-13 model, combination of TH-302 with tyrosine kinase inhibitor sorafenib had greater antileukemia effects than either drug alone. Importantly, residual leukemic bone marrow cells in a syngeneic AML model remain hypoxic after chemotherapy. In turn, administration of TH-302 following chemotherapy treatment to mice with residual disease prolonged survival, suggesting that this approach may be suitable for eliminating chemotherapy-resistant leukemia cells. These findings implicate a pathogenic role of hypoxia in leukemia maintenance and chemoresistance and demonstrate the feasibility of targeting hypoxic cells by hypoxia cytotoxins. ©2015 American Association for Cancer Research.

  4. Digitalization of a non-irradiated acute myeloid leukemia model.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, Rudong; Cheng, Hui; Cheng, Tao; Liu, Lei

    2016-08-26

    Computer-aided, interdisciplinary researches for biomedicine have valuable prospects, as digitalization of experimental subjects provide opportunities for saving the economic costs of researches, as well as promoting the acquisition of knowledge. Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is intensively studied over long periods of time. Till nowaday, most of the studies primarily focus on the leukemic cells rather than how normal hematopoietic cells are affected by the leukemic environment. Accordingly, the conventional animal models for AML are mostly myeloablated as leukemia can be induced with short latency and complete penetrance. Meanwhile, most previous computational models focus on modeling the leukemic cells but not the multi-tissue leukemic body resided by both leukemic and normal blood cells. Recently, a non-irradiated AML mouse model has been established; therefore, normal hematopoietic cells can be investigated during leukemia development. Experiments based on the non-irradiated animal model have monitored the kinetics of leukemic and (intact) hematopoietic cells in multiple tissues simultaneously; and thus a systematic computational model for the multi-tissue hematopoiesis under leukemia has become possible. In the present work, we adopted the modeling methods in previous works, but aimed to model the tri-tissue (peripheral blood, spleen and bone marrow) dynamics of hematopoiesis under leukemia. The cell kinetics generated from the non-irradiated experimental model were used as the reference data for modeling. All mathematical formulas were systematically enumerated, and model parameters were estimated via numerical optimization. Multiple validations by additional experimental data were then conducted for the established computational model. In the results, we illustrated that the important fact of functional depression of hematopoietic stem/progenitor cells (HSC/HPC) in leukemic bone marrow (BM), which must require additional experiments to be established, could

  5. Effects of buffers and pH on in vitro binding of 67Ga by L1210 leukemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Glickson, J.D.; Webb, J.; Gams, R.A.

    1974-01-01

    The effect of sodium nitrate and a series of buffers on in vitro 67 Ga binding to L1210 leukemic cells at pH 6.8 +- 0.2 and 37 0 at concentrations of 10 -7 to 10 -2 M has been investigated. The relative ability of these agents to inhibit cellular incorporation of 67 Ga is given. Inhibition probably results from formation of gallium(III) complexes which are either impermeable to the tumor membrane or which compete with intracellular receptor complexes. However, direct interaction of buffers with the cell membrane or with gallium(III) receptors, as well as effects of buffers on cellular metabolism, have not been excluded. A monotonic decrease in the cellular incorporation of 67 Ga occurs between pH 6.2 and 7.8 in the presence of the inert buffer, 10 -2 M morpholinopropane sulfonic acid. (U.S.)

  6. Cytotoxic Effect on Human Myeloma Cells and Leukemic Cells by the Agaricus blazei Murill Based Mushroom Extract, Andosan™

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jon-Magnus Tangen

    2017-01-01

    Full Text Available Agaricus blazei Murill is an edible mushroom of the Basidiomycetes family, which has been found to contain a number of compounds with antitumor properties, such as proteoglycans and ergosterol. In the present investigation, we show that the commercial mushroom product Andosan, which contains 82.4% Agaricus blazei Murill, together with medicinal mushrooms Hericium erinaceus (14.7% and Grifola frondosa (2.9%, has a cytotoxic effect on primary myeloma cells, other myeloma cell lines, and leukemia cell lines in vitro. Although the exact content and hence the mechanisms of action of the Andosan extract are unknown, we have found in this investigation indications of cell cycle arrest when myeloma cell lines are cultivated with Andosan. This may be one of the possible explanations for the cytotoxic effects of Andosan.

  7. shRNA-mediated EMMPRIN silencing inhibits human leukemic monocyte lymphoma U937 cell proliferation and increases chemosensitivity to adriamycin.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gao, Hui; Jiang, Qixiao; Han, Yantao; Peng, Jianjun; Wang, Chunbo

    2015-03-01

    EMMPRIN is a widely distributed cell surface glycoprotein, which plays an important role in tumor progression and confers resistance to some chemotherapeutic drugs. Recent studies have shown that EMMPRIN overexpression indicates poor prognosis in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). However, little was known on the role of EMMPRIN in leukemia. Human leukemia cell line U937 was stably transfected with a EMMPRIN-targeted shRNA-containing vector to investigate the effect of EMMPRIN on cellular functions. EMMPRIN expression was monitored by qRT-PCR and Western blotting. Cell viability and proliferation were determined by trypan blue exclusion and BrdU labeling, respectively. Cell cycle and apoptosis were analyzed by flow cytometry. Cytotoxicity of chemotherapeutic agent adriamycin on cells was assessed by MTT assay. Knockdown of EMMPRIN gene significantly inhibited cell viability and decreased cell proliferation. Fluorescence-activated cell-sorting analysis revealed that the reduced EMMPRIN expression resulted in cell cycle arrest at G1 phase and induced apoptosis. Meanwhile, western blotting analysis showed that EMMPRIN knockdown was associated with downregulation of cell cycle- and apoptosis-related molecules including cyclin D1, cyclin E, as well as increase in cleavage of caspase-3 and PARP. This study also showed that silencing of EMMPRIN sensitized U937 cells to Adriamycin. EMMPRIN is involved in proliferation, growth, and chemosensitivity of human AML line U937, indicating that EMMPRIN may be a promising therapeutic target for AML.

  8. The novel AML stem cell associated antigen CLL-1 aids in discrimination between normal and leukemic stem cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    van Rhenen, Anna; van Dongen, Guus A M S; Kelder, Angèle; Rombouts, Elwin J; Feller, Nicole; Moshaver, Bijan; Stigter-van Walsum, Marijke; Zweegman, Sonja; Ossenkoppele, Gert J; Jan Schuurhuis, Gerrit

    2007-10-01

    In CD34(+) acute myeloid leukemia (AML), the malignant stem cells reside in the CD38(-) compartment. We have shown before that the frequency of such CD34(+)CD38(-) cells at diagnosis correlates with minimal residual disease (MRD) frequency after chemotherapy and with survival. Specific targeting of CD34(+)CD38(-) cells might thus offer therapeutic options. Previously, we found that C-type lectin-like molecule-1 (CLL-1) has high expression on the whole blast compartment in the majority of AML cases. We now show that CLL-1 expression is also present on the CD34(+)CD38(-) stem- cell compartment in AML (77/89 patients). The CD34(+)CLL-1(+) population, containing the CD34(+)CD38(-)CLL-1(+) cells, does engraft in nonobese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mice with outgrowth to CLL-1(+) blasts. CLL-1 expression was not different between diagnosis and relapse (n = 9). In remission, both CLL-1(-) normal and CLL-1(+) malignant CD34(+)CD38(-) cells were present. A high CLL-1(+) fraction was associated with quick relapse. CLL-1 expression is completely absent both on CD34(+)CD38(-) cells in normal (n = 11) and in regenerating bone marrow controls (n = 6). This AML stem-cell specificity of the anti-CLL-1 antibody under all conditions of disease and the leukemia-initiating properties of CD34(+)CLL-1(+) cells indicate that anti-CLL-1 antibody enables both AML-specific stem-cell detection and possibly antigen-targeting in future.

  9. BCR/ABL downregulates DNA-PK(CS)-dependent and upregulates backup non-homologous end joining in leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Poplawski, Tomasz; Blasiak, Janusz

    2010-06-01

    Non-homologous end joining (NHEJ) and homologous recombination repair (HRR) are the main mechanisms involved in the processing of DNA double strand breaks (DSBs) in humans. We showed previously that the oncogenic tyrosine kinase BCR/ABL stimulated DSBs repair by HRR. To evaluate the role of BCR/ABL in DSBs repair by NHEJ we examined the ability of leukemic BCR/ABL-expressing cell line BV173 to repair DNA damage induced by two DNA topoisomerase II inhibitors: etoposide and sobuzoxane. DNA lesions induced by sobuzoxane are repaired by a NHEJ pathway which is dependent on the catalytic subunit of protein kinase dependent on DNA (DNA-PK(CS); D-NHEJ), whereas damage evoked by etoposide are repaired by two distinct NHEJ pathways, dependent on or independent of DNA-PK(CS) (backup NHEJ, B-NHEJ). Cells incubated with STI571, a highly specific inhibitor of BCR/ABL, displayed resistance to these agents associated with an accelerated kinetics of DSBs repair, as measured by the neutral comet assay and pulsed field gel electrophoresis. However, in a functional NHEJ assay, cells preincubated with STI571 repaired DSBs induced by a restriction enzyme with a lower efficacy than without the preincubation and addition of wortmannin, a specific inhibitor of DNA-PK(CS), did not change efficacy of the NHEJ reaction. We suggest that BCR/ABL switch on B-NHEJ which is more error-prone then D-NHEJ and in such manner contribute to the increase of the genomic instability of leukemic cells.

  10. The variable chemotherapeutic response of Malabaricone-A in leukemic and solid tumor cell lines depends on the degree of redox imbalance.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Manna, Alak; De Sarkar, Sritama; De, Soumita; Bauri, Ajay K; Chattopadhyay, Subrata; Chatterjee, Mitali

    2015-07-15

    The 'two-faced' character of reactive oxygen species (ROS) plays an important role in cancer biology by acting as secondary messengers in intracellular signaling cascades, enhancing cell proliferation and survival, thereby sustaining the oncogenic phenotype. Conversely, enhanced generation of ROS can trigger an oxidative assault leading to a redox imbalance translating into an apoptotic cell death. Intrinsically, cancer cells have higher basal levels of ROS which if supplemented by additional oxidative insult by pro-oxidants can be cytotoxic, an example being Malabaricone-A (MAL-A). MAL-A is a plant derived diarylnonanoid, purified from fruit rind of the plant Myristica malabarica whose anti-cancer activity has been demonstrated in leukemic cell lines, the modality of cell death being apoptosis. This study aimed to compare the degree of effectiveness of MAL-A in leukemic vs. solid tumor cell lines. The cytotoxicity of MAL-A was evaluated by the MTS-PMS cell viability assay in leukemic cell lines (MOLT3, K562 and HL-60) and compared with solid tumor cell lines (MCF7, A549 and HepG2); further studies then proceeded with MOLT3 vs. MCF7 and A549. The contribution of redox imbalance in MAL-A induced cytotoxicity was confirmed by pre-incubating cells with an antioxidant, N-acetyl-L-cysteine (NAC) or a thiol depletor, buthionine sulfoximine (BSO). MAL-A induced redox imbalance was quantitated by flow cytometry, by measuring the generation of ROS and levels of non protein thiols using dichlorofluorescein diacetate (CM-H2DCFDA) and 5-chloromethylfluorescein diacetate (CMFDA) respectively. The activities of glutathione peroxidase (GPx), superoxide dismutase, catalase (CAT), NAD(P)H dehydrogenase (quinone 1) NQO1 and glutathione-S-transferase GST were measured spectrophotometrically. The mitochondrial involvement of MAL-A induced cell death was measured by evaluation of cardiolipin peroxidation using 10-N-nonyl acridine orange (NAO), transition pore activity with calcein

  11. Aberrant TAL1 activation is mediated by an interchromosomal interaction in human T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Patel, B; Kang, Y; Cui, K; Litt, M; Riberio, M S J; Deng, C; Salz, T; Casada, S; Fu, X; Qiu, Y; Zhao, K; Huang, S

    2014-02-01

    Long-range chromatin interactions control metazoan gene transcription. However, the involvement of intra- and interchromosomal interactions in development and oncogenesis remains unclear. TAL1/SCL is a critical transcription factor required for the development of all hematopoietic lineages; yet, aberrant TAL1 transcription often occurs in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). Here, we report that oncogenic TAL1 expression is regulated by different intra- and interchromosomal loops in normal hematopoietic and leukemic cells, respectively. These intra- and interchromosomal loops alter the cell-type-specific enhancers that interact with the TAL1 promoter. We show that human SET1 (hSET1)-mediated H3K4 methylations promote a long-range chromatin loop, which brings the +51 enhancer in close proximity to TAL1 promoter 1 in erythroid cells. The CCCTC-binding factor (CTCF) facilitates this long-range enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in erythroid cells while blocking the same enhancer/promoter interaction of the TAL1 locus in human T-cell leukemia. In human T-ALL, a T-cell-specific transcription factor c-Maf-mediated interchromosomal interaction brings the TAL1 promoter into close proximity with a T-cell-specific regulatory element located on chromosome 16, activating aberrant TAL1 oncogene expression. Thus, our study reveals a novel molecular mechanism involving changes in three-dimensional chromatin interactions that activate the TAL1 oncogene in human T-cell leukemia.

  12. Mitochondrial disfunction and apoptosis in leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Annamaria PALLAG

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Apoptosis or programmed cell death is a process which involves the intentional degradation of the cell from the inside, the participation of the mitochondria to propagate the apoptotic signal, the alteration of the phospholipid cell membrane composition, the perturbation and alteration of the cell metabolism.The antineoplastic drugs is inducing the apoptotic process in the sensitive cells.It have been studied acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells. Using Annexin V-PE Apoptosis Detection Kit and flow cytometer, the amount of cells undergoing apoptosis, in various stages of the antineoplasic treatment, was detected. At the same time, were monitored, the serum level of malondialdehyde. The results obtained confirm the alteration of the mitochondrial metabolism. We can observed the mitochondrial dysfunction role in cell apoptosis.

  13. HLA-haploidentical transplantation with regulatory and conventional T-cell adoptive immunotherapy prevents acute leukemia relapse.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Martelli, Massimo F; Di Ianni, Mauro; Ruggeri, Loredana; Falzetti, Franca; Carotti, Alessandra; Terenzi, Adelmo; Pierini, Antonio; Massei, Maria Speranza; Amico, Lucia; Urbani, Elena; Del Papa, Beatrice; Zei, Tiziana; Iacucci Ostini, Roberta; Cecchini, Debora; Tognellini, Rita; Reisner, Yair; Aversa, Franco; Falini, Brunangelo; Velardi, Andrea

    2014-07-24

    Posttransplant relapse is still the major cause of treatment failure in high-risk acute leukemia. Attempts to manipulate alloreactive T cells to spare normal cells while killing leukemic cells have been unsuccessful. In HLA-haploidentical transplantation, we reported that donor-derived T regulatory cells (Tregs), coinfused with conventional T cells (Tcons), protected recipients against graft-versus-host disease (GVHD). The present phase 2 study investigated whether Treg-Tcon adoptive immunotherapy prevents posttransplant leukemia relapse. Forty-three adults with high-risk acute leukemia (acute myeloid leukemia 33; acute lymphoblastic leukemia 10) were conditioned with a total body irradiation-based regimen. Grafts included CD34(+) cells (mean 9.7 × 10(6)/kg), Tregs (mean 2.5 × 10(6)/kg), and Tcons (mean 1.1 × 10(6)/kg). No posttransplant immunosuppression was given. Ninety-five percent of patients achieved full-donor type engraftment and 15% developed ≥grade 2 acute GVHD. The probability of disease-free survival was 0.56 at a median follow-up of 46 months. The very low cumulative incidence of relapse (0.05) was significantly better than in historical controls. These results demonstrate the immunosuppressive potential of Tregs can be used to suppress GVHD without loss of the benefits of graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) activity. Humanized murine models provided insights into the mechanisms underlying separation of GVL from GVHD, suggesting the GVL effect is due to largely unopposed Tcon alloantigen recognition in bone marrow. © 2014 by The American Society of Hematology.

  14. Analysis of the interplay between all-trans retinoic acid and histone deacetylase inhibitors in leukemic cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Noack, Katrin; Mahendrarajah, Nisintha; Hennig, Dorle

    2017-01-01

    The treatment of acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) with all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA) induces granulocytic differentiation. This process renders APL cells resistant to cytotoxic chemotherapies. Epigenetic regulators of the histone deacetylases (HDACs) family, which comprise four classes (I–IV),...

  15. Effect of pentoxifylline on P-glycoprotein mediated vincristine resistance of L1210 mouse leukemic cell line

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Breier, A.; Uhrik, B.; Barancik, M.; Stefankova, Z.; Tribulova, N.

    1994-01-01

    Effect of pentoxifylline (PTX) on vincristine (VCR) resistance of multidrug resistant L1210/VCR mouse leukemic cell line was studied. Reversal effect of PTX (in concentration 50-150 mg dm -3 ) on vincristine resistance, i.e. potentiation of vincristine cytotoxicity on L1210/VCR cells by PTX was found. PTX alone in the above concentration did not exert any significant effect on sensitive or resistant cell lines in the absence of vincristine. Resistance of L1210/VCR cell line was found previously to be accompanied with overexpression of drug transporting P-glycoprotein. Indeed, lower level of 3 H-vincristine accumulation by resistant L1210/VCR cell line in comparison with sensitive L1210 cell line was observed. Accumulation of 3 H-vincristine by L1210/VCR cell line was significantly increased in the presence of PTX. PTX in the same condition did not exert any considerable effect on accumulation of 3 H-vincristine by nonresistant L1210 cells. Observable morphological damage was observed in 1210/VCR cells cultivated in medium containing vincristine (0.2 mg dm -3 ) and pentoxifylline (100 mg dm -3 ) in comparison with the non-damaged cells in the presence of vincristine or pentoxifylline alone. The results obtained indicate that pentoxifylline may be considered as a reversal agent in multidrug resistance. (author)

  16. Delayed expression of apoptosis in X-irradiated human leukemic MOLT-4 cells transfected with mutant p53

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Nakano, Hisako; Yonekawa, Hiromichi; Shinohara, Kunio

    2003-01-01

    The effects of X-rays on cell survival, apoptosis, and long-term response in the development of cell death as measured by the dye exclusion test were studied in human leukemic MOLT-4 cells (p53 wild-type) stably transfected with a mutant p53 cDNA expression vector. Cell survival, as determined from colony-forming ability, was increased in an expression level dependent manner, but the increase was partial even with the highest-expressing clone (B3). This contrasts with the prior observation that cell death and apoptosis in B3 are completely inhibited at 24 h after irradiation with 1.8 Gy of X-rays. The examination of B3 cells incubated for longer than 24 h after X-irradiation showed a delay in the induction of cell death and apoptosis. Western blot analysis revealed that the time required to reach the highest level of wild-type p53 protein in B3 was longer than the time in MOLT-4 and that the p53 may be stabilized by the phosphorylation at Ser-15. These results suggest that the introduction of mutant p53 into MOLT-4 merely delays the development of apoptosis, during which the cells could repair the damage induced by X-rays, and results in the partial increase in cell survival. (author)

  17. House dust mite induces expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 in EoL-1 human eosinophilic leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kwon, Byoung Chul; Sohn, Myung Hyun; Kim, Kyung Won; Kim, Eun Soo; Kim, Kyu-Earn; Shin, Myeong Heon

    2007-10-01

    The house dust mite (HDM) is considered to be the most common indoor allergen associated with bronchial asthma. In this study, we investigated whether crude extract of the HDM Dermatophagoides farinae could activate human eosinophilic leukemic cells (EoL-1) to induce upregulation of cell-surface adhesion molecules. When EoL-1 cells were incubated with D. farinae extract, expression of intercellular adhesion molecule-1 (ICAM-1) significantly increased on the cell surfaces compared to cells incubated with medium alone. In contrast, surface expression of CD11b and CD49d in EoL-1 cells was not affected by D. farinae extract. In addition, pretreatment of cells with NF-kappaB inhibitor (MG-132) or JNK inhibitor (SP600125) significantly inhibited ICAM-1 expression promoted by HDM extract. However, neither p38 MAP kinase inhibitor nor MEK inhibitor prevented HDM-induced ICAM-1 expression in EoL-1 cells. These results suggest that crude extract of D. farinae induces ICAM-1 expression in EoL-1 cells through signaling pathways involving both NF-kappaB and JNK.

  18. Effects of in vitro Brevetoxin Exposure on Apoptosis and Cellular Metabolism in a Leukemic T Cell Line (Jurkat

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    John W. Sleasman

    2008-06-01

    Full Text Available Harmful algal blooms (HABs of the toxic dinoflagellate, Karenia brevis, produce red tide toxins, or brevetoxins. Significant health effects associated with red tide toxin exposure have been reported in sea life and in humans, with brevetoxins documented within immune cells from many species. The objective of this research was to investigate potential immunotoxic effects of brevetoxins using a leukemic T cell line (Jurkat as an in vitro model system. Viability, cell proliferation, and apoptosis assays were conducted using brevetoxin congeners PbTx-2, PbTx-3, and PbTx-6. The effects of in vitro brevetoxin exposure on cell viability and cellular metabolism or proliferation were determined using trypan blue and MTT (1-(4,5-dimethylthiazol-2-yl-3,5- diphenylformazan, respectively. Using MTT, cellular metabolic activity was decreased in Jurkat cells exposed to 5 - 10 μg/ml PbTx-2 or PbTx-6. After 3 h, no significant effects on cell viability were observed with any toxin congener in concentrations up to 10 μg/ml. Viability decreased dramatically after 24 h in cells treated with PbTx-2 or -6. Apoptosis, as measured by caspase-3 activity, was significantly increased in cells exposed to PbTx-2 or PbTx-6. In summary, brevetoxin congeners varied in effects on Jurkat cells, with PbTx-2 and PbTx-6 eliciting greater cellular effects compared to PbTx-3.

  19. HA-1 T TCR T Cell Immunotherapy for the Treating of Patients With Relapsed or Refractory Acute Leukemia After Donor Stem Cell Transplant

    Science.gov (United States)

    2018-04-30

    HLA-A*0201 HA-1 Positive Cells Present; Minimal Residual Disease; Recurrent Acute Biphenotypic Leukemia; Recurrent Acute Undifferentiated Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Adult Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Recurrent Childhood Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Acute Myeloid Leukemia; Refractory Adult Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia; Refractory Childhood Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

  20. DNA repair and DNA synthesis in leukemic and virus infected cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Tuschl, H.; Altmann, H.; Kovac, R.; Topaloglou, A.; Stacher, A.; Fanta, D.

    1978-09-01

    Autoradiographic determinations of unscheduled DNA synthesis in peripheral lymphocytes of leukemic patients showed strongly different results according to various types of disease of different forms of therapy, respectively. Similar investigations performed with lymphocytes of Herpes simplex infected persons during symptom-free intervals revealed imbalances of the repair system caused by virus infection. BND cellulose chromatography and measurement of 3 H-thymidine incorporation into single- and double stranded DNA fractions showed an increase in velocity of the rejoining process, but a decrease in total incorporation. Because of these results and the demonstration of the supercoiled structure of DNA it is suggested that virusinfections cause a faster rejoining of gaps, but at the same time leave a number of failures within DNA unrecognized. (author)

  1. Effects of vinegar–egg on growth inhibition, differentiation human leukemic U937 cells and its immunomodulatory activity

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Shiu-Yu Wang

    2018-04-01

    Full Text Available Vinegar and eggs have rich nutrients. In this study, the mixed form of both derived products, vinegar–egg solution and its products (vinegar–egg concentrate and vinegar–egg condensate were chosen for an assessment of their biological activity. To further our understanding regarding the anticancer and immunomodulatory effects of vinegar–egg, we investigated its effects on the proliferation and differentiation of U937 cells. Vinegar–egg was treated using spray drying, freeze drying and vacuum concentration and used to stimulate human mononuclear cells. The conditioned media obtained from these cultures by filtration were used to treat U937 cells. Three conditioned media inhibited U937 cell growth by 22.1–67.25% more effectively than PHA-treated control (22.53%. CD11b and CD14 expression on the treated U937 cells were 29.1–45.4% and 31.6–47.2%, respectively. High levels of cytokines IL-1β, IFN-γ and TNF-α were detected in the three conditioned media. Vinegar–egg stimulates human mononuclear cells to secrete cytokines, which inhibit the growth of U937 cells and induce their differentiation. Keywords: Cytokines, Differentiation, Immunomodulatory activity, Leukemic U937 cells, Vinegar–egg

  2. The novel anticancer agent JNJ-26854165 is active in chronic myeloid leukemic cells with unmutated BCR/ABL and T315I mutant BCR/ABL through promoting proteosomal degradation of BCR/ABL proteins.

    Science.gov (United States)

    You, Liangshun; Liu, Hui; Huang, Jian; Xie, Wanzhuo; Wei, Jueying; Ye, Xiujin; Qian, Wenbin

    2017-01-31

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a clonal malignant disease caused by the expression of BCR/ABL. MDM2 (human homolog of the murine double minute-2) inhibitors such as Nutlin-3 have been shown to induce apoptosis in a p53-dependent manner in CML cells and sensitize cells to Imatinib. Here, we demonstrate that JNJ-26854165, an inhibitor of MDM2, inhibits proliferation and triggers cell death in a p53-independent manner in various BCR/ABL-expressing cells, which include primary leukemic cells from patients with CML blast crisis and cells expressing the Imatinib-resistant T315I BCR/ABL mutant. The response to JNJ-26854165 is associated with the downregulation of BCR/ABL dependently of proteosome activation. Moreover, in all tested CML cells, with the exception of T315I mutation cells, combining JNJ-26854165 and tyrosine kinase inhibitor (TKI) Imatinib or PD180970 leads to a synergistic effect. In conclusion, our results suggest that JNJ-26854165, used either alone or in combination with TKIs, represents a promising novel targeted approach to overcome TKI resistance and improve patient outcome in CML.

  3. Leukemia-associated activating mutation of Flt3 expands dendritic cells and alters T cell responses.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lau, Colleen M; Nish, Simone A; Yogev, Nir; Waisman, Ari; Reiner, Steven L; Reizis, Boris

    2016-03-07

    A common genetic alteration in acute myeloid leukemia is the internal tandem duplication (ITD) in FLT3, the receptor for cytokine FLT3 ligand (FLT3L). Constitutively active FLT3-ITD promotes the expansion of transformed progenitors, but also has pleiotropic effects on hematopoiesis. We analyzed the effect of FLT3-ITD on dendritic cells (DCs), which express FLT3 and can be expanded by FLT3L administration. Pre-leukemic mice with the Flt3(ITD) knock-in allele manifested an expansion of classical DCs (cDCs) and plasmacytoid DCs. The expansion originated in DC progenitors, was cell intrinsic, and was further enhanced in Flt3(ITD/ITD) mice. The mutation caused the down-regulation of Flt3 on the surface of DCs and reduced their responsiveness to Flt3L. Both canonical Batf3-dependent CD8(+) cDCs and noncanonical CD8(+) cDCs were expanded and showed specific alterations in their expression profiles. Flt3(ITD) mice showed enhanced capacity to support T cell proliferation, including a cell-extrinsic expansion of regulatory T (T reg) cells. Accordingly, these mice restricted alloreactive T cell responses during graft-versus-host reaction, but failed to control autoimmunity without T reg cells. Thus, the FLT3-ITD mutation directly affects DC development, indirectly modulating T cell homeostasis and supporting T reg cell expansion. We hypothesize that this effect of FLT3-ITD might subvert immunosurveillance and promote leukemogenesis in a cell-extrinsic manner. © 2016 Lau et al.

  4. [Prognostic significance of the cyclic AMP concentration in acute leukemias].

    Science.gov (United States)

    Paietta, E; Mittermayer, K; Schwarzmeier, J D

    1979-01-01

    In patients with acute leukemia (myeloblastic, lymphoblastic, undifferentiated) proliferation kinetics and cyclic adenosine-3', 5'-monophosphate (cAMP) concentration of the leukemic cells were studied for their significance in the prediction of responsiveness to cytostatic therapy. Patients with good clinical response had significantly faster turnover and lower cAMP-levels than those who failed to respond to treatment.

  5. Acute respiratory failure in 3 children with juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Gustafsson, Britt; Hellebostad, Marit; Ifversen, Marianne

    2011-01-01

    Juvenile myelomonocytic leukemia is a rare hematopoietic stem cell disease in children with features of both myelodysplasia and myeloproliferation. Extramedullary involvement has been reported and pulmonary involvement secondary to leukemic infiltration is an initial manifestation, which may resu...... in acute respiratory failure....

  6. An AML1-ETO/miR-29b-1 regulatory circuit modulates phenotypic properties of acute myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Zaidi, Sayyed K; Perez, Andrew W; White, Elizabeth S; Lian, Jane B; Stein, Janet L; Stein, Gary S

    2017-06-20

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is characterized by an aggressive clinical course and frequent cytogenetic abnormalities that include specific chromosomal translocations. The 8;21 chromosomal rearrangement disrupts the key hematopoietic RUNX1 transcription factor, and contributes to leukemia through recruitment of co-repressor complexes to RUNX1 target genes, altered subnuclear localization, and deregulation of the myeloid gene regulatory program. However, a role of non-coding microRNAs (miRs) in t(8;21)-mediated leukemogenesis is minimally understood. We present evidence of an interplay between the tumor suppressor miR-29b-1 and the AML1-ETO (also designated RUNX1-RUNX1T1) oncogene that is encoded by the t(8;21). We find that AML1-ETO and corepressor NCoR co-occupy the miR-29a/b-1 locus and downregulate its expression in leukemia cells. Conversely, re-introduction of miR-29b-1 in leukemia cells expressing AML1-ETO causes significant downregulation at the protein level through direct targeting of the 3' untranslated region of the chimeric transcript. Restoration of miR-29b-1 expression in leukemia cells results in decreased cell growth and increased apoptosis. The AML1-ETO-dependent differentiation block and transcriptional program are partially reversed by miR-29b-1. Our findings establish a novel regulatory circuit between the tumor-suppressive miR-29b-1 and the oncogenic AML1-ETO that controls the leukemic phenotype in t(8;21)-carrying acute myeloid leukemia.

  7. Leukemia Mediated Endothelial Cell Activation Modulates Leukemia Cell Susceptibility to Chemotherapy through a Positive Feedback Loop Mechanism.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Bahareh Pezeshkian

    Full Text Available In acute myeloid leukemia (AML, the chances of achieving disease-free survival are low. Studies have demonstrated a supportive role of endothelial cells (ECs in normal hematopoiesis. Here we show that similar intercellular relationships exist in leukemia. We demonstrate that leukemia cells themselves initiate these interactions by directly modulating the behavior of resting ECs through the induction of EC activation. In this inflammatory state, activated ECs induce the adhesion of a sub-set of leukemia cells through the cell adhesion molecule E-selectin. These adherent leukemia cells are sequestered in a quiescent state and are unaffected by chemotherapy. The ability of adherent cells to later detach and again become proliferative following exposure to chemotherapy suggests a role of this process in relapse. Interestingly, differing leukemia subtypes modulate this process to varying degrees, which may explain the varied response of AML patients to chemotherapy and relapse rates. Finally, because leukemia cells themselves induce EC activation, we postulate a positive-feedback loop in leukemia that exists to support the growth and relapse of the disease. Together, the data defines a new mechanism describing how ECs and leukemia cells interact during leukemogenesis, which could be used to develop novel treatments for those with AML.

  8. Differential Effects of Tea Extracts on Growth and Cytokine Production by Normal and Leukemic Human Leukocytes

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Diana Bayer

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Background: Tea is one of the world’s most highly consumed beverages, second only to water. It is affordable and abundant and thus has great potential for improving health of those in both developed and developing areas. Green, oolong, and black teas differ in the extent of fermentation and types of bioactive polyphenols produced. Green tea and its major polyphenol decrease growth of some cancer cells and effect production of immune system cytokines. This study compares the effects of different types of tea extracts on viability and cytokine production by normal and leukemic human T lymphocytes. Generation of the toxic reactive oxygen species H2O2 by extracts was also examined.Methods: The Jurkat T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and mitogen-stimulated normal human peripheral blood mononuclear cells were used in this study. Cell viability was determined by (3-4,5-dimethylthiamizol-2-yl-diphenyltetrazolium bromide assay and production of interleukin-2 by Enzyme-Linked ImmunoSorbent Assay. Levels of H2O2 generated by tea extracts were determined using the xylenol-orange method.Results: We found that green, oolong, and black tea extracts differentially effect the growth and viability of T lymphoblastic leukemia cells and normal peripheral blood mononuclear cells, substantially decreasing both growth and viability of leukemic T lymphocytes and having much lesser effects on their normal counterparts. Tea extracts also had differential effects on the production of the T lymphocyte growth factor interleukin-2, significantly decreasing production by leukemic cells while having only minor effects on normal cells. All three extracts induced H2O2 generation, with green and oolong tea extracts having the greatest effect. Leukemic cells were much more susceptible to growth inhibition and killing by H2O2 than normal lymphocytes.Functional Foods in Health and Disease 2012, 2(4:72-85 Conclusions: The three tea extracts studied altered leukemic T lymphocyte

  9. A scanning electron microscopic study of 34 cases of acute granulocytic, myelomonocytic, monoblastic and histiocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Polliack, A; McKenzie, S; Gee, T; Lampen, N; de Harven, E; Clarkson, B D

    1975-09-01

    This report describes the surface architecture of leukemic cells, as seen by scanning electron microscopy in 34 patients with acute nonlymphoblastic leukemia. Six patients with myeloblastic, 4 with promyelocytic, 10 with myelomonocytic, 8 with monocytic, 4 with histiocytic and 2 with undifferentiated leukemia were studied. Under the scanning electron microscope most leukemia histiocytes and monocytes appeared similar and were characterized by the presence of large, well developed broad-based ruffled membranes or prominent raised ridge-like profiles, resembling ithis respect normal monocytes. Most cells from patients with acute promyelocytic or myeloblastic leukemia exhibited narrower ridge-like profiles whereas some showed ruffles or microvilli. Patients with myelomonocytic leukemia showed mixed populations of cells with ridge-like profiles and ruffled membranes whereas cells from two patients with undifferentiated leukemia had smooth surfaces, similar to those encountered in cells from patients with acute lymphoblastic leukemia. It appears that nonlymphoblastic and lymphoblastic leukemia cells (particularly histiocytes and monocytes) can frequently be distinquished on the basis of their surface architecture. The surface features of leukemic histiocytes and monocytes are similar, suggesting that they may belong to the same cell series. The monocytes seem to have characteristic surface features recognizable with the scanning electron microscope and differ from most cells from patients with acute granulocytic leukemia. Although overlap of surface features and misidentification can occur, scanning electron microscopy is a useful adjunct to other modes of microscopy in the study and diagnosis of acute leukemia.

  10. Leydig cell function in boys following treatment for testicular relapse of acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Blatt, J.; Sherins, R.J.; Niebrugge, D.; Bleyer, W.A.; Poplack, D.G.

    1985-01-01

    Current practice for achieving local control of testicular relapse in males with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) includes the use of 2,400-rad testicular radiation. Although this therapy is known to cause germ cell depletion, it has been assumed that it does not alter testicular secretion of testosterone. To test this assumption, the authors measured gonadotropin and testosterone levels in seven boys with ALL who had been treated with radiation for clinically apparent testicular relapse. In four of seven boys, testicular relapse was bilateral with overt involvement of one testicle and microscopic involvement of the other. Three of these four boys demonstrated delayed sexual maturation, and in addition to elevated follicle-stimulating hormone (FSH) concentrations, testosterone levels were low and luteinizing hormone levels were elevated compared with controls. These data indicate that boys with overt testicular leukemia who are treated with 2,400-rad testicular radiation are at risk for Leydig cell dysfunction. However, the relative contributions of radiation, prior chemotherapy, and leukemic infiltration to this dysfunction remain to be clarified

  11. T cell differentiation stages identified by molecular and immunologic analysis of the T cell receptor complex in childhood lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mirro, J; Kitchingman, G; Behm, F G; Murphy, S B; Goorha, R M

    1987-03-01

    T cell differentiation was investigated by determining the relationship of T cell receptor (Ti) gene rearrangement and transcription to the expression of surface and cytoplasmic T3 antigen using blast cells from five children with acute lymphoblastic leukemia of thymic origin. Patterns of monoclonal antibody (MoAb) reactivity indicated that these cases were representative of the three recognized stages (I, II, III) of human thymocyte development. The T3 antigen, which becomes linked to the Ti to form a functional T cell receptor complex on mature thymocytes, was expressed on the cell surface in two cases (stage III). However, in the remaining three cases that were surface T3 negative (stages I and II), large amounts of T3 were identified in the cytoplasm by immunoperoxidase staining and flow cytometry. Leukemic blasts from all five patients showed rearranged genes encoding the beta-chain portion of the Ti heterodimer. RNA transcripts of Ti beta-chain genes were also evident in lymphoblasts from all five cases, but transcripts coding for the alpha-chain portion of Ti were found only in cases that expressed T3 on the cell surface. Thus the absence of surface T3 (and presumably Ti) coincides with the absence of Ti alpha-chain RNA, suggesting that transcription of alpha-chain genes is a critical regulatory event in the surface expression of the Ti-T3 complex. Leukemic T cells that rearrange and express Ti beta-chain genes but lack Ti alpha-chain messenger RNA (mRNA) may represent a stage of differentiation analogous to pre-B cells, where heavy-chain immunoglobulin (Ig) genes are rearranged and expressed but light-chain Ig genes are not expressed.

  12. Selective host range restriction of goat cells for recombinant murine leukemia virus and feline leukemia virus type A.

    OpenAIRE

    Fischinger, P J; Thiel, H J; Blevins, C S; Dunlop, N M

    1981-01-01

    We isolated a strain of normal goat fibroblasts which was uniquely selective in that it allowed the replication of xenotropic murine leukemia virus but not polytropic recombinant murine leukemia virus. In addition, feline leukemia virus type A replication was severely diminished in these goat cells, whereas feline leukemia virus type B and feline endogenous RD114-CCC viruses replicated efficiently. No other known cells exhibit this pattern of virus growth restriction. These goat cells allow t...

  13. Hairy Cell Leukemia Treatment (PDQ®)—Patient Version

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hairy cell leukemia treatment options include watchful waiting when there are no symptoms, chemotherapy, biologic therapy, surgery, and targeted therapy. Learn more about the diagnosis and treatment of newly diagnosed and recurrent hairy cell leukemia in this expert-reviewed summary.

  14. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1991-06-01

    This document lists the major accomplishments funded by DOE in the period of January 1989 through June 1991. Specific topics covered include: studies of chromosome translocations in patients with Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) de novo; correlation of karyotype and therapeutic response; the relationship of specific chromosomal abnormalities to a patient's occupational history; definition of regions on chromosome 5 involved in leukemogenesis; the influence of pervious chemotherapy on leukemogenesis; identification of genes at or near breakpoints involved in leukemia and lymphoma; identification of the critical rearrangement in the 9;11 translocation; molecular analysis of translocations involving 11q23; identification of other genes (like RAS) involved in leukemogenesis; development of fluorescence in situ hybridization as a cytogenetic tool; and examination of an unequivocal case of radiation induced preleukemia. 26 refs., 8 figs., 6 tabs

  15. Curcumin and Its Analogue Induce Apoptosis in Leukemia Cells and Have Additive Effects with Bortezomib in Cellular and Xenograft Models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    L. I. Nagy

    2015-01-01

    Full Text Available Combination therapy of bortezomib with other chemotherapeutics is an emerging treatment strategy. Since both curcumin and bortezomib inhibit NF-κB, we tested the effects of their combination on leukemia cells. To improve potency, a novel Mannich-type curcumin derivative, C-150, was synthesized. Curcumin and its analogue showed potent antiproliferative and apoptotic effects on the human leukemia cell line, HL60, with different potency but similar additive properties with bortezomib. Additive antiproliferative effects were correlated well with LPS-induced NF-κB inhibition results. Gene expression data on cell cycle and apoptosis related genes, obtained by high-throughput QPCR, showed that curcumin and its analogue act through similar signaling pathways. In correlation with in vitro results similar additive effect could be obsereved in SCID mice inoculated systemically with HL60 cells. C-150 in a liposomal formulation given intravenously in combination with bortezomib was more efficient than either of the drugs alone. As our novel curcumin analogue exerted anticancer effects in leukemic cells at submicromolar concentration in vitro and at 3 mg/kg dose in vivo, which was potentiated by bortezomib, it holds a great promise as a future therapeutic agent in the treatment of leukemia alone or in combination.

  16. Cell biological effects of total body irradiation on growth and differentiation of acute myelogenous leukemia cells compared to normal bone marrow

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Greenberger, J S; Weichselbaum, R R; Botnick, L E; Sakakeeny, M; Moloney, W C

    1979-01-01

    Radiation therapy is used as total body treatment in preparation of the acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) patient for bone marrow transplantation. Many AML patients will have residual leukemia cells at the time of total body irradiation (TBI). In the present study, the effect of TBI on leukemic myeloid cells was compared to the effect on normal marrow granulocytic stem cells (CFUc) in vitro. Little difference from that of normal CFUc was found in the radiosensitivity of two mouse myeloid leukemia cell lines. The effect of TBI on growth of WEHI-3 or J774 cells in millipore diffusion chambers was stimulatory. These AML cell lines as well as others derived from Friend or Abelson virus infected in vitro long term mouse marrow cultures showed some morphologic differentiation by 7 days growth in diffusion chambers in irradiated heterologous rat hosts, but immature cells predominated by day 21. Thus, evidence in murine models of AML indicates that residual AML cells surviving chemotherapy will show no greater susceptibility to radiation killing compared to normal stem cells and will rapidly repopulate the irradiated host.

  17. Oxidative damage of U937 human leukemic cells caused by hydroxyl radical results in singlet oxygen formation.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Marek Rác

    Full Text Available The exposure of human cells to oxidative stress leads to the oxidation of biomolecules such as lipids, proteins and nuclei acids. In this study, the oxidation of lipids, proteins and DNA was studied after the addition of hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reagent to cell suspension containing human leukemic monocyte lymphoma cell line U937. EPR spin-trapping data showed that the addition of hydrogen peroxide to the cell suspension formed hydroxyl radical via Fenton reaction mediated by endogenous metals. The malondialdehyde HPLC analysis showed no lipid peroxidation after the addition of hydrogen peroxide, whereas the Fenton reagent caused significant lipid peroxidation. The formation of protein carbonyls monitored by dot blot immunoassay and the DNA fragmentation measured by comet assay occurred after the addition of both hydrogen peroxide and Fenton reagent. Oxidative damage of biomolecules leads to the formation of singlet oxygen as conformed by EPR spin-trapping spectroscopy and the green fluorescence of singlet oxygen sensor green detected by confocal laser scanning microscopy. It is proposed here that singlet oxygen is formed by the decomposition of high-energy intermediates such as dioxetane or tetroxide formed by oxidative damage of biomolecules.

  18. Piperlongumine induces apoptosis and autophagy in leukemic cells through targeting the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and p38 signaling pathways.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Wang, Hongfei; Wang, Yongqiang; Gao, Hongmei; Wang, Bing; Dou, Lin; Li, Yin

    2018-02-01

    Piperlongumine is an alkaloid compound extracted from Piper longum L. It is a chemical substance with various pharmacological effects and medicinal value, including anti-tumor, lipid metabolism regulatory, antiplatelet aggregation and analgesic properties. The present study aimed to understand whether piperlongumine induces the apoptosis and autophagy of leukemic cells, and to identify the mechanism involved. Cell viability and autophagy were detected using MTT, phenazine methyl sulfate and trypan blue exclusion assays. The apoptosis rate was calculated using flow cytometry. The protein expression levels of microtubule-associated protein 1A/1B-light chain 3, Akt and mechanistic target of rapamycin (mTOR) were measured using western blotting. The cell growth of leukemic cells was completely inhibited following treatment with piperlongumine, and marked apoptosis was also induced. Dead cells as a result of autophagy were stained using immunofluorescence and observed under a light microscope. Phosphoinositide 3-kinase (PI3K)/Akt/mTOR signaling was suppressed by treatment with piperlongumine, while p38 signaling and caspase-3 activity were induced by treatment with piperlongumine. It was concluded that piperlongumine induces apoptosis and autophagy in leukemic cells through targeting the PI3K/Akt/mTOR and p38 signaling pathways.

  19. Hematopoietic growth factors and human acute leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Löwenberg, B; Touw, I

    1988-10-22

    The study of myelopoietic maturation arrest in acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML) has been eased by availability of the human recombinant hemopoietic growth factors, macrophage colony stimulating factor (M-CSF), granulocyte-(G-CSF), granulocyte-macrophage-(GM-CSF) and multilineage stimulating factor (IL-3). Nonphysiological expansion of the leukemic population is not due to escape from control by these factors. Proliferation in vitro of AML cells is dependent on the presence of one or several factors in most cases. The pattern of factor-dependency does not correlate with morphological criteria in individual cases, and may thus offer a new tool for classification of AML. Overproduction of undifferentiated cells is not due to abnormal expression of receptors for the stimulating factors acting at an immature level. Rather, autocrine secretion of early acting lymphokines maintains proliferation of the leukemic clone. When looking at causes of leukemic dysregulation, yet undefined inhibitors of differentiation probably are of equal importance as dysequilibrated stimulation by lymphokines.

  20. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa

    2011-01-01

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D 3 (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML

  1. Differentiation Therapy of Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Gocek, Elzbieta; Marcinkowska, Ewa, E-mail: ema@cs.uni.wroc.pl [Department of Biotechnology, University of Wroclaw, ul Tamka 2, Wroclaw 50-137 (Poland)

    2011-05-16

    Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML) is a predominant acute leukemia among adults, characterized by accumulation of malignantly transformed immature myeloid precursors. A very attractive way to treat myeloid leukemia, which is now called ‘differentiation therapy’, was proposed as in vitro studies have shown that a variety of agents stimulate differentiation of the cell lines isolated from leukemic patients. One of the differentiation-inducing agents, all-trans retinoic acid (ATRA), which can induce granulocytic differentiation in myeloid leukemic cell lines, has been introduced into clinics to treat patients with acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL) in which a PML-RARA fusion protein is generated by a t(15;17)(q22;q12) chromosomal translocation. Because differentiation therapy using ATRA has significantly improved prognosis for patients with APL, many efforts have been made to find alternative differentiating agents. Since 1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D{sub 3} (1,25D) is capable of inducing in vitro monocyte/macrophage differentiation of myeloid leukemic cells, clinical trials have been performed to estimate its potential to treat patients with AML or myelodysplastic syndrome (MDS). Unfortunately therapeutic concentrations of 1,25D can induce potentially fatal systemic hypercalcemia, thus limiting clinical utility of that compound. Attempts to overcome this problem have focused on the synthesis of 1,25D analogs (VDAs) which retain differentiation inducing potential, but lack its hypercalcemic effects. This review aims to discuss current problems and potential solutions in differentiation therapy of AML.

  2. Adult T-cell leukemia on the east coast of Kii Peninsula--presentation of an anti-ATLA-negative case.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karitani, Y; Kobayashi, T; Koh, T; Iwata, Y; Tanaka, I; Minami, N; Shirakawa, S

    1983-01-01

    Nineteen patients with adult T-cell leukemia (ATL) have been found in the last seven years along the east coast of Kii Peninsula in Japan. The leukemic cells were of the immunologically inducer/helper T-cell phenotype. The prognosis was very poor (median survival time, 85 days), and most of the patients had fatal complications of pulmonary infections. Antibody against ATL-associated antigen (anti-ATLA) was detected in sera from 9 of 10 patients who were born along the coast. However, it was not detected in one patient who was born in a district surrounded by mountains. Although he had neither superficial lymphadenopathy nor skin lesions, he showed rapid clinical deterioration. His leukemic cells appeared to be extremely bizarre with marked nuclear deformation compared with those of the other patients. In surface marker studies the leukemic cells reacted positively with OKT3, OKT4 and OKIa-1 monoclonal antibodies. The characteristics of the anti-ATLA-negative case are discussed in comparison with the other ATL cases.

  3. PU.1 cooperates with IRF4 and IRF8 to suppress pre-B cell leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Pang, Swee Heng Milon; Minnich, Martina; Gangatirkar, Pradnya; Zheng, Zhiqiang; Ebert, Anja; Song, Guangchun; Dickins, Ross A; Corcoran, Lynn M; Mullighan, Charles G.; Busslinger, Meinrad; Huntington, Nicholas D; Nutt, Stephen L; Carotta, Sebastian

    2016-01-01

    The Ets family transcription factor PU.1 and the interferon regulatory factor (IRF)4 and IRF8 regulate gene expression by binding to composite DNA sequences known as Ets/interferon consensus elements (EICE). Although all three factors are expressed from the onset of B cell development, single deficiency of these factors in B cell progenitors only mildly impacts on bone marrow B-lymphopoiesis. Here we tested whether PU.1 cooperates with IRF factors in regulating early B cell development. Lack of PU.1 and IRF4 resulted in a partial block in development the pre-B cell stage. The combined deletion of PU.1 and IRF8 reduced recirculating B cell numbers. Strikingly, all PU.1/IRF4 and approximately 50% of PU.1/IRF8 double deficient mice developed pre-B cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) associated with reduced expression of the established B-lineage tumor suppressor genes, Ikaros and Spi-B. These genes are directly regulated by PU.1/IRF4/IRF8, and restoration of Ikaros or Spi-B expression inhibited leukemic cell growth. In summary, we demonstrate that PU.1, IRF4 and IRF8 cooperate to regulate early B cell development and to prevent pre-B-ALL formation. PMID:26932576

  4. Transfer RNA species in human lymphocytes stimulated by mitogens and in leukemic cells. [/sup 3/H, /sup 14/C, /sup 32/P tracer techniques

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Griffin, G.D.; Yang, W.K.; Novelli, G.D.

    1976-01-01

    Transfer ribonucleic acid (tRNA) profiles in human lymphocytes stimulated by various mitogens have been compared with profiles from nonstimulated cells and from leukemic cells using reversed-phase chromatography. Comparisons of (/sup 3/H)- or (/sup 11/C)uridine- or (/sup 32/P)phosphate-labeled tRNAs showed that the greatest changes in tRNA composition upon phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation occurred in the first 8 h after mitogen addition. Stimulation of lymphocytes by pokeweed mitogen, anti-human immunoglobulin, or bacterial lipopolysaccharide resulted in tRNA species which showed distinct differences from each other and also from the tRNAs produced by phytohemagglutinin stimulation. Leukemic lymphocyte tRNAs showed the most extensive differences in profile when compared with chromatograms from non-neoplastic cells stimulated by a variety of mitogens. Specific isoaccepting species of tyrosyl-, aspartyl-, and phenylalanyl-tRNAs were also compared in PHA-stimulated and resting lymphocytes and no differences were found. When these same species were studied in leukemic cells, tyrosyl-tRNA profiles were shifted to elute at a lower salt concentration, while the aspartyl-tRNA profile showed a new peak not present in noncancerous cells.

  5. Central nervous system in leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Phair, J P; Anderson, R E; Namiki, Hideo

    1964-03-12

    The present report summarizes the pertinent clinical and pathologic findings in 165 cases of leukemia in atomic bomb exposed victims autopsied during the period 1949 to 1962 at ABCC in Hiroshima and Nagasaki, Japan. Significant parenchymal hemorrhage occurred most often in acute myelogenous leukemia and was markedly increased in patients dying with high terminal white blood cell counts. Possible mechanisms involved in the pathogenesis of cerebral hemorrhage in leukemia are discussed. Subarachnoid hemorrhage and subdural hematoma were not related to leukocytosis but appeared to be influenced by marked thrombocytopenia. Leukemic infiltrates of a diffuse nature involving the meninges were paradoxically increased in patients receiving adequate chemotherapy. Meningeal tumors did not show this peculiar relationship to therapy and were not found in association with lymphatic leukemia. Infections involving the central nervous system were confined to patients receiving chemotherapy including steroids. 39 references, 3 figures, 4 tables.

  6. Genomic Profiling of a Human Leukemic Monocytic Cell-Line (THP-1 Exposed to Alpha Particle Radiation

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Vinita Chauhan

    2012-01-01

    Full Text Available This study examined alpha (α- particle radiation effects on global changes in gene expression in human leukemic monocytic cells (THP-1 for the purposes of mining for candidate biomarkers that could be used for the development of a biological assessment tool. THP-1 cells were exposed to α-particle radiation at a dose range of 0 to 1.5 Gy. Twenty-four hours and three days after exposure gene expression was monitored using microarray technology. A total of 16 genes were dose responsive and classified as early onset due to their expression 24 h after exposure. Forty-eight transcripts were dose responsive and classified as late-onset as they were expressed 72 h after exposure. Among these genes, 6 genes were time and dose responsive and validated further using alternate technology. These transcripts were upregulated and associated with biological processes related to immune function, organelle stability and cell signalling/communication. This panel of genes merits further validation to determine if they are strong candidate biomarkers indicative of α-particle exposure.

  7. Mutation Pattern of Paired Immunoglobulin Heavy and Light Variable Domains in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ghiotto, Fabio; Marcatili, Paolo; Tenca, Claudya; Calevo, Maria Grazia; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Albesiano, Emilia; Bagnara, Davide; Colombo, Monica; Cutrona, Giovanna; Chu, Charles C; Morabito, Fortunato; Bruno, Silvia; Ferrarini, Manlio; Tramontano, Anna; Fais, Franco; Chiorazzi, Nicholas

    2011-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients display leukemic clones bearing either germline or somatically mutated immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV ) genes. Most information on CLL immunoglobulins (Igs), such as the definition of stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCRs), was derived from germline unmutated Igs. In particular, detailed studies on the distribution and nature of mutations in paired heavy- and light-chain domains of CLL clones bearing mutated Igs are lacking. To address the somatic hyper-mutation dynamics of CLL Igs, we analyzed the mutation pattern of paired IGHV–diversity-joining (IGHV-D-J ) and immunoglobulin kappa/lambda variable-joining (IGK/LV-J ) rearrangements of 193 leukemic clones that displayed ≥2% mutations in at least one of the two immunoglobulin variable (IGV ) genes (IGHV and/or IGK/LV ). The relationship between the mutation frequency in IGHV and IGK/LV complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and framework regions (FRs) was evaluated by correlation analysis. Replacement (R) mutation frequency within IGK/LV chain CDRs correlated significantly with mutation frequency of paired IGHV CDRs in λ but not κ isotype CLL clones. CDRs of IGKV-J rearrangements displayed a lower percentage of R mutations than IGHVs. The frequency/pattern of mutations in kappa CLL Igs differed also from that in κ-expressing normal B cells described in the literature. Instead, the mutation frequency within the FRs of IGHV and either IGKV or IGLV was correlated. Notably, the amount of diversity introduced by replaced amino acids was comparable between IGHVs and IGKVs. The data indicate a different mutation pattern between κ and λ isotype CLL clones and suggest an antigenic selection that, in κ samples, operates against CDR variation. PMID:21785810

  8. Mutation Pattern of Paired Immunoglobulin Heavy and Light Variable Domains in Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Ghiotto, Fabio; Marcatili, Paolo

    2011-01-01

    B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) patients display leukemic clones bearing either germline or somatically mutated immunoglobulin heavy variable (IGHV ) genes. Most information on CLL immunoglobulins (Igs), such as the definition of stereotyped B-cell receptors (BCRs), was derived from germline unmutated Igs. In particular, detailed studies on the distribution and nature of mutations in paired heavy- and light-chain domains of CLL clones bearing mutated Igs are lacking. To address the somatic hyper-mutation dynamics of CLL Igs, we analyzed the mutation pattern of paired IGHV-diversity-joining (IGHV-D-J ) and immunoglobulin kappa/lambda variable-joining (IGK/LV-J ) rearrangements of 193 leukemic clones that displayed ≥ 2% mutations in at least one of the two immunoglobulin variable (IGV ) genes (IGHV and/or IGK/LV ). The relationship between the mutation frequency in IGHV and IGK/LV complementarity determining regions (CDRs) and framework regions (FRs) was evaluated by correlation analysis. Replacement (R) mutation frequency within IGK/LV chain CDRs correlated significantly with mutation frequency of paired IGHV CDRs in λ but not κ isotype CLL clones. CDRs of IGKV-J rearrangements displayed a lower percentage of R mutations than IGHVs. The frequency/pattern of mutations in kappa CLL Igs differed also from that in κ-expressing normal B cells described in the literature. Instead, the mutation frequency within the FRs of IGHV and either IGKV or IGLV was correlated. Notably, the amount of diversity introduced by replaced amino acids was comparable between IGHVs and IGKVs. The data indicate a different mutation pattern between κ and λ isotype CLL clones and suggest an antigenic selection that, in κ samples, operates against CDR variation.

  9. HLA-G Expression on Blasts and Tolerogenic Cells in Patients Affected by Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Grazia Locafaro

    2014-01-01

    Full Text Available Human Leukocyte Antigen-G (HLA-G contributes to cancer cell immune escape from host antitumor responses. The clinical relevance of HLA-G in several malignancies has been reported. However, the role of HLA-G expression and functions in Acute Myeloid Leukemia (AML is still controversial. Our group identified a subset of tolerogenic dendritic cells, DC-10 that express HLA-G and secrete IL-10. DC-10 are present in the peripheral blood and are essential in promoting and maintaining tolerance via the induction of adaptive T regulatory (Treg cells. We investigated HLA-G expression on blasts and the presence of HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4+ T cells in the peripheral blood of AML patients at diagnosis. Moreover, we explored the possible influence of the 3′ untranslated region (3′UTR of HLA-G, which has been associated with HLA-G expression, on AML susceptibility. Results showed that HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4+ T cells are highly represented in AML patients with HLA-G positive blasts. None of the HLA-G variation sites evaluated was associated with AML susceptibility. This is the first report describing HLA-G-expressing DC-10 and CD4+ T cells in AML patients, suggesting that they may represent a strategy by which leukemic cells escape the host’s immune system. Further studies on larger populations are required to verify our findings.

  10. Reprogramming of leukemic cell metabolism through the naphthoquinonic compound Quambalarine B

    Czech Academy of Sciences Publication Activity Database

    Vališ, Karel; Grobárová, Valeria; Hernychová, Lucie; Bugáňová, Martina; Kavan, Daniel; Kalous, M.; Černý, Jiří; Stodůlková, Eva; Kuzma, Marek; Flieger, Miroslav; Černý, J.; Novák, Petr

    2017-01-01

    Roč. 8, č. 61 (2017), s. 103137-103153 ISSN 1949-2553 R&D Projects: GA ČR GA13-16565S; GA ČR(CZ) GP14-21095P; GA MŠk(CZ) ED1.1.00/02.0109; GA MŠk(CZ) LO1509 Grant - others:Nadační fond na podporu vědy(CZ) NEURON 26/2017 Institutional support: RVO:61388971 Keywords : metabolism * leukemia * naphthoquinones Subject RIV: EE - Microbiology, Virology OBOR OECD: Microbiology Impact factor: 5.168, year: 2016

  11. Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mabuchi, Kiyohiko; Kusumi, Shizuyo

    1992-01-01

    Leukemia is the first malignant disease found among A-bomb survivors. Leukemia registration has greatly contributed to epidemiological and hematological studies on A-bomb radiation-related leukemia and other hematopoietic diseases, consisting of community population and the RERF Life Span Study (LSS) sample (approximately 120,000 persons containing A-bomb survivors). Using the fixed LSS cohort, the prevalence rate of leukemia reached the peak during the years 1950-1954, and thereafter, it has been gradually decreased. However, risk patterns for leukemia are still unsolved: has leukemia risk increased in recent years?; are serial changes in leukemia risk influenced by age at the time of exposure (ATE)?; is there variation between Hiroshima and Nagasaki?; and others. To solve these questions, leukemia data are now under analysis using the revised DS86. Relative risk for leukemia, especially chronic myelogenous leukemia and acute lymphocytic leukemia (ALL), is found to be linearly increased with increasing bone marrow doses. Serial patterns of both excess risk and excess relative risk have revealed that leukemia risk is high at 5-10 years after A-bombing in younger A-bomb survivors ATE. The influence of age ATE on serial changes is noticeable in ALL. Another factor involved in the prevalence of leukemia is background (spontaneously developed leukemia), which is the recent interest because young A-bomb survivors ATE reach the cancer-prone age. (N.K.)

  12. Disrupting BCR-ABL in combination with secondary leukemia-specific pathways in CML cells leads to enhanced apoptosis and decreased proliferation.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Woessner, David W; Lim, Carol S

    2013-01-07

    Chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) is a myeloproliferative disorder caused by expression of the fusion gene BCR-ABL following a chromosomal translocation in the hematopoietic stem cell. Therapeutic management of CML uses tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs), which block ABL-signaling and effectively kill peripheral cells with BCR-ABL. However, TKIs are not curative, and chronic use is required in order to treat CML. The primary failure for TKIs is through the development of a resistant population due to mutations in the TKI binding regions. This led us to develop the mutant coiled-coil, CC(mut2), an alternative method for BCR-ABL signaling inhibition by targeting the N-terminal oligomerization domain of BCR, necessary for ABL activation. In this article, we explore additional pathways that are important for leukemic stem cell survival in K562 cells. Using a candidate-based approach, we test the combination of CC(mut2) and inhibitors of unique secondary pathways in leukemic cells. Transformative potential was reduced following silencing of the leukemic stem cell factor Alox5 by RNA interference. Furthermore, blockade of the oncogenic protein MUC-1 by the novel peptide GO-201 yielded reductions in proliferation and increased cell death. Finally, we found that inhibiting macroautophagy using chloroquine in addition to blocking BCR-ABL signaling with the CC(mut2) was most effective in limiting cell survival and proliferation. This study has elucidated possible combination therapies for CML using novel blockade of BCR-ABL and secondary leukemia-specific pathways.

  13. All-trans-retinoic acid enhances apoptosis induction by tyrosine kinase inhibitors in the eosinophilic leukemia-derived EoL-1 cell line.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Robert, Carine; Apàti, Agota; Chomienne, Christine; Papp, Béla

    2008-02-01

    Imatinib and retinoids induce apoptosis in FIP1L1/PDGFRalpha-positive EoL-1 leukemia cells. Although imatinib induces complete remission in most FIP1L1/PDGFRalpha-positive patients, response to imatinib is sometimes suboptimal. In order to enhance the potency of the molecularly targeted therapy of eosinophilic leukemia, we investigated the effect of retinoids combined with tyrosine kinase inhibitors on EoL-1 cells. We demonstrate that retinoids combined with tyrosine kinase inhibitors lead to enhanced apoptosis induction in EoL-1 cells. Our results suggest that tyrosine kinase inhibitors combined with retinoids may constitute a valuable therapeutic approach for sensitive neoplasias that may display enhanced anti-leukemic potency when compared to single drug treatments.

  14. Interleukin-6 and interleukin-1 production in acute leukemia with monocytoid differentiation

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van der Schoot, C. E.; Jansen, P.; Poorter, M.; Wester, M. R.; von dem Borne, A. E.; Aarden, L. A.; van Oers, R. H.

    1989-01-01

    Several authors have reported the in vitro production of colony-stimulating factors (CSF) and interleukin-1 (IL-1) by the neoplastic cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Using a sensitive bioassay for IL-6, the capacity of the leukemic cells of 30 patients with AML to produce IL-6

  15. Inhibition of autophagy as a treatment strategy for p53 wild-type acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Folkerts, Hendrik; Hilgendorf, Susan; Wierenga, Albertus T J; Jaques, Jennifer; Mulder, André B; Coffer, Paul J; Schuringa, Jan Jacob; Vellenga, Edo

    2017-01-01

    Here we have explored whether inhibition of autophagy can be used as a treatment strategy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML). Steady-state autophagy was measured in leukemic cell lines and primary human CD34(+) AML cells with a large variability in basal autophagy between AMLs observed. The autophagy

  16. Pilot Study on Mass Spectrometry–Based Analysis of the Proteome of CD34+CD123+ Progenitor Cells for the Identification of Potential Targets for Immunotherapy in Acute Myeloid Leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Johannes R. Schmidt

    2018-02-01

    Full Text Available Targeting of leukemic stem cells with specific immunotherapy would be an ideal approach for the treatment of myeloid malignancies, but suitable epitopes are unknown. The comparative proteome-level characterization of hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells from healthy stem cell donors and patients with acute myeloid leukemia has the potential to reveal differentially expressed proteins which can be used as surface-markers or as proxies for affected molecular pathways. We employed mass spectrometry methods to analyze the proteome of the cytosolic and the membrane fraction of CD34 and CD123 co-expressing FACS-sorted leukemic progenitors from five patients with acute myeloid leukemia. As a reference, CD34+CD123+ normal hematopoietic progenitor cells from five healthy, granulocyte-colony stimulating factor (G-CSF mobilized stem cell donors were analyzed. In this Tandem Mass Tag (TMT 10-plex labelling–based approach, 2070 proteins were identified with 171 proteins differentially abundant in one or both cellular compartments. This proof-of-principle-study demonstrates the potential of mass spectrometry to detect differentially expressed proteins in two compartment fractions of the entire proteome of leukemic stem cells, compared to their non-malignant counterparts. This may contribute to future immunotherapeutic target discoveries and individualized AML patient characterization.

  17. A novel 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugate induces apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Altenburg, Jeffrey D.; Harvey, Kevin A.; McCray, Sharon; Xu, Zhidong [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Siddiqui, Rafat A., E-mail: rsiddiqu@iuhealth.org [Cellular Biochemistry Laboratory, Methodist Research Institute, Indiana University Health, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Biology, Indiana University-Purdue University, Indianapolis, IN (United States); Department of Medicine, Indiana University School of Medicine, Indianapolis, IN (United States)

    2011-07-29

    Highlights: {yields} 2,6-Diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugates (DIP-DHA) inhibits the proliferation of T-cell leukemic cell lines. {yields} DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. {yields} DIP-DHA significantly downregulated CXCR4 surface expression. -- Abstract: We have previously characterized the effects of 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide (DIP-DHA) conjugates and their analogs on the proliferation and progression of breast cancer cell lines. For this study, we investigated the effects of the DIP-DHA conjugate on 2 representative T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines: CEM and Jurkat. Treatment of both cell lines with DIP-DHA resulted in significantly greater inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis than that of parent compounds, 2,6-diisopropylphenol (DIP) or docosahexaenoate (DHA). Treatment of the cells with DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis in both cell lines was reversed in the presence of a caspase family inhibitor. Treatment with DIP-DHA reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. These observations suggest that the effects are driven by intrinsic apoptotic pathways. DIP-DHA treatment also downregulated surface CXCR4 expression, an important chemokine receptor involved in cancer metastasis that is highly expressed in both CEM and Jurkat cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the DIP-DHA conjugate exhibits significantly more potent effects on CEM and Jurkat cells than that of DIP or DHA alone. These conjugates have potential use for treatment of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  18. A novel 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugate induces apoptosis in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell lines

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Altenburg, Jeffrey D.; Harvey, Kevin A.; McCray, Sharon; Xu, Zhidong; Siddiqui, Rafat A.

    2011-01-01

    Highlights: → 2,6-Diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide conjugates (DIP-DHA) inhibits the proliferation of T-cell leukemic cell lines. → DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. → DIP-DHA significantly downregulated CXCR4 surface expression. -- Abstract: We have previously characterized the effects of 2,6-diisopropylphenyl-docosahexaenoamide (DIP-DHA) conjugates and their analogs on the proliferation and progression of breast cancer cell lines. For this study, we investigated the effects of the DIP-DHA conjugate on 2 representative T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) cell lines: CEM and Jurkat. Treatment of both cell lines with DIP-DHA resulted in significantly greater inhibition of proliferation and induction of apoptosis than that of parent compounds, 2,6-diisopropylphenol (DIP) or docosahexaenoate (DHA). Treatment of the cells with DIP-DHA resulted in increased activation of caspase-3, and caspase-7. Furthermore, induction of apoptosis in both cell lines was reversed in the presence of a caspase family inhibitor. Treatment with DIP-DHA reduced mitochondrial membrane potential. These observations suggest that the effects are driven by intrinsic apoptotic pathways. DIP-DHA treatment also downregulated surface CXCR4 expression, an important chemokine receptor involved in cancer metastasis that is highly expressed in both CEM and Jurkat cells. In conclusion, our data suggest that the DIP-DHA conjugate exhibits significantly more potent effects on CEM and Jurkat cells than that of DIP or DHA alone. These conjugates have potential use for treatment of patients with T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

  19. Human T cell leukemia virus reactivation with progression of adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Ratner

    Full Text Available Human T-cell leukemia virus-associated adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma (ATLL has a very poor prognosis, despite trials of a variety of different treatment regimens. Virus expression has been reported to be limited or absent when ATLL is diagnosed, and this has suggested that secondary genetic or epigenetic changes are important in disease pathogenesis.We prospectively investigated combination chemotherapy followed by antiretroviral therapy for this disorder. Nineteen patients were prospectively enrolled between 2002 and 2006 at five medical centers in a phase II clinical trial of infusional chemotherapy with etoposide, doxorubicin, and vincristine, daily prednisone, and bolus cyclophosphamide (EPOCH given for two to six cycles until maximal clinical response, and followed by antiviral therapy with daily zidovudine, lamivudine, and alpha interferon-2a for up to one year. Seven patients were on study for less than one month due to progressive disease or chemotherapy toxicity. Eleven patients achieved an objective response with median duration of response of thirteen months, and two complete remissions. During chemotherapy induction, viral RNA expression increased (median 190-fold, and virus replication occurred, coincident with development of disease progression.EPOCH chemotherapy followed by antiretroviral therapy is an active therapeutic regimen for adult T-cell leukemia-lymphoma, but viral reactivation during induction chemotherapy may contribute to treatment failure. Alternative therapies are sorely needed in this disease that simultaneously prevent virus expression, and are cytocidal for malignant cells.

  20. Enhancers of Polycomb EPC1 and EPC2 sustain the oncogenic potential of MLL leukemia stem cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Huang, Xu; Spencer, Gary J; Lynch, James T; Ciceri, Filippo; Somerville, Tim D D; Somervaille, Tim C P

    2013-01-01

    Through a targeted knockdown (KD) screen of chromatin regulatory genes we identified the EP400 complex components EPC1 and EPC2 as critical oncogenic co-factors in acute myeloid leukemia (AML). EPC1 and EPC2 were required for the clonogenic potential of human AML cells of multiple molecular subtypes. Focusing on MLL-mutated AML as an exemplar, Epc1 or Epc2 KD induced apoptosis of murine MLL-AF9 AML cells and abolished leukemia stem cell potential. By contrast, normal hematopoietic stem and progenitor cells (HSPC) were spared. Similar selectivity was observed for human primary AML cells versus normal CD34+ HSPC. In keeping with these distinct functional consequences, Epc1 or Epc2 KD induced divergent transcriptional consequences in murine MLL-AF9 granulocyte-macrophage progenitor-like (GMP) cells versus normal GMP, with a signature of increased MYC activity in leukemic but not normal cells. This was caused by accumulation of MYC protein and was also observed following KD of other EP400 complex genes. Pharmacological inhibition of MYC:MAX dimerization, or concomitant MYC KD, reduced apoptosis following EPC1 KD, linking the accumulation of MYC to cell death. Therefore EPC1 and EPC2 are components of a complex which directly or indirectly serves to prevent MYC accumulation and AML cell apoptosis, thus sustaining oncogenic potential. PMID:24166297

  1. MicroRNA-29b mediates altered innate immune development in acute leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mundy-Bosse, Bethany L.; Scoville, Steven D.; Chen, Li; McConnell, Kathleen; Mao, Hsiaoyin C.; Ahmed, Elshafa H.; Zorko, Nicholas; Harvey, Sophia; Cole, Jordan; Zhang, Xiaoli; Costinean, Stefan; Croce, Carlo M.; Larkin, Karilyn; Byrd, John C.; Vasu, Sumithira; Blum, William; Yu, Jianhua; Freud, Aharon G.; Caligiuri, Michael A.

    2016-01-01

    Natural killer (NK) cells can have potent antileukemic activity following haplo-mismatched, T cell–depleted stem cell transplantations for the treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML), but they are not successful in eradicating de novo AML. Here, we have used a mouse model of de novo AML to elucidate the mechanisms by which AML evades NK cell surveillance. NK cells in leukemic mice displayed a marked reduction in the cytolytic granules perforin and granzyme B. Further, as AML progressed, we noted the selective loss of an immature subset of NK cells in leukemic mice and in AML patients. This absence was not due to elimination by cell death or selective reduction in proliferation, but rather to the result of a block in NK cell differentiation. Indeed, NK cells from leukemic mice and humans with AML showed lower levels of TBET and EOMES, transcription factors that are critical for terminal NK cell differentiation. Further, the microRNA miR-29b, a regulator of T-bet and EOMES, was elevated in leukemic NK cells. Finally, deletion of miR-29b in NK cells reversed the depletion of this NK cell subset in leukemic mice. These results indicate that leukemic evasion of NK cell surveillance occurs through miR-mediated dysregulation of lymphocyte development, representing an additional mechanism of immune escape in cancer. PMID:27775550

  2. Cytogenetic basis of acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ford, J H; Pittman, S M; Singh, S; Wass, E J; Vincent, P C; Gunz, F W

    1975-10-01

    The chromosomes of 12 adult patients with acute leukemia were analyzed by conventional means and by Giemsa and centromeric banding techniques. Acute myeloblastic leukemia was diagnosed in 7, acute myelomonocytic leukemia in 2, and acute undifferentiated leukemia in 3. Bone marrow was aspirated from patients when in relapse or remission, and both euploid and aneuploid cells were examined. All patients showed trisomy no. 9 and many showed additional numerical or structural changes in some or all their cells. These changes included monosomy no. 21 and/or monosomy no. 8. The proportion of trisomy no. 9 cells was 30-50% in patients in full remission and up to 100% in patients in relapse; thus trisomy no. 9 might be an important marker of leukemic cells. A mechanism was proposed to explain the induction and selection of the trisomy no. 9 karotype.

  3. TLX1 and NOTCH coregulate transcription in T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lee Norman H

    2010-07-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The homeobox gene TLX1 (for T-cell leukemia homeobox 1, previously known as HOX11 is inappropriately expressed in a major subgroup of T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL where it is strongly associated with activating NOTCH1 mutations. Despite the recognition that these genetic lesions cooperate in leukemogenesis, there have been no mechanistic studies addressing how TLX1 and NOTCH1 functionally interact to promote the leukemic phenotype. Results Global gene expression profiling after downregulation of TLX1 and inhibition of the NOTCH pathway in ALL-SIL cells revealed that TLX1 synergistically regulated more than 60% of the NOTCH-responsive genes. Structure-function analysis demonstrated that TLX1 binding to Groucho-related TLE corepressors was necessary for maximal transcriptional regulation of the NOTCH-responsive genes tested, implicating TLX1 modulation of the NOTCH-TLE regulatory network. Comparison of the dataset to publicly available biological databases indicated that the TLX1/NOTCH-coregulated genes are frequently targeted by MYC. Gain- and loss-of-function experiments confirmed that MYC was an essential mediator of TLX1/NOTCH transcriptional output and growth promotion in ALL-SIL cells, with TLX1 contributing to the NOTCH-MYC regulatory axis by posttranscriptional enhancement of MYC protein levels. Functional classification of the TLX1/NOTCH-coregulated targets also showed enrichment for genes associated with other human cancers as well as those involved in developmental processes. In particular, we found that TLX1, NOTCH and MYC coregulate CD1B and RAG1, characteristic markers of early cortical thymocytes, and that concerted downregulation of the TLX1 and NOTCH pathways resulted in their irreversible repression. Conclusions We found that TLX1 and NOTCH synergistically regulate transcription in T-ALL, at least in part via the sharing of a TLE corepressor and by augmenting expression of MYC. We conclude that

  4. JS-K, a nitric oxide prodrug, induces cytochrome c release and caspase activation in HL-60 myeloid leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Udupi, Vidya; Yu, Margaret; Malaviya, Swati; Saavedra, Joseph E; Shami, Paul J

    2006-10-01

    Nitric oxide (NO) induces differentiation and apoptosis in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) cells. The NO prodrug O2-(2,4-dinitrophenyl)1-[(4-ethoxycarbonyl)piperazin-1-yl]diazen-1-ium-1,2-diolate, or JS-K, has potent antileukemic activity. JS-K induces apoptosis in HL-60 cells by a caspase-dependent mechanism. The purpose of this study was to determine the pathway through which JS-K induces apoptosis. We show that JS-K alters mitochondrial membrane potential (DeltaPsim) and induces cytochrome c release from mitochondria into the cytoplasm. Treatment with JS-K resulted in activation of Caspase (Casp) 9, Casp 3 and Casp 8. JS-K constitutes a promising lead for a new class of anti-leukemic agents.

  5. Thrombocytopenia in leukemia: Pathogenesis and prognosis.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Shahrabi, Saeid; Behzad, Masumeh Maleki; Jaseb, Kaveh; Saki, Najmaldin

    2018-02-20

    Leukemias, a heterogeneous group of hematological disorders, are characterized by ineffective hematopoiesis and morphologic abnormalities of hematopoietic cells. Thrombocytopenia is a common problem among leukemia types that can lead to hemorrhagic complications in patients. The purpose of this review article is to identify the conditions associated with the incidence of thrombocytopenia in leukemias. It can be stated that although translocations have been considered responsible for this complication in many studies, other factors such as bone marrow failure, genes polymorphism, a mutation in some transcription factors, and the adverse effects of treatment could be associated with pathogenesis and poor prognosis of thrombocytopenia in leukemias. Considering the importance of thrombocytopenia in leukemias, it is hoped that the recognition of risk factors increasing the incidence of this complication in leukemic patients would be useful for prevention and treatment of this disorder.

  6. Leukemia cutis in three children: clinical and immunohistochemical studies.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Koga, M; Furukawa, S

    1996-01-01

    We report 3 children with leukemia cutis observed at the initial diagnosis of systemic leukemia. Leukemia subtypes in the three children were congenital monocytic, acute undifferentiated, and acute monocytic, respectively. The patients were girls age 10 days, 14 years, and 11 months, respectively, at diagnosis. We describe the clinical features of the cases and the results of immunohistochemical studies on paraffin-embedded skin biopsy specimens. The skin lesions were tumors and areas of reddish purple erythema in the first child, pigmented erythema in the second, and bright red erythema in the first child, pigmented erythema in the second, and bright red erythema in the third. In the first two patients skin lesion biopsy specimens had dense leukemic infiltrates in the dermis with reactive T lymphocytes scattered among them. In the third patient, the infiltrating cells were almost all reactive T lymphocytes, with a few leukemic cells. A relationship between the leukemic-reactive cell ratio and the prognosis was suggested; dense leukemic cell infiltrates may be associated with a poor prognosis.

  7. Case report 429: Adult T-cell leukemia (ATL)

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Aoki, Jun; Yamamoto, Itsuo; Hino, Megumu; Torizuka, Kanji; Kyoto Univ.; Uchiyama, Takahashi; Uchino, Haruto

    1987-01-01

    The radiological and pathological skeletal manifestations in a case of adult T-cell leukemia are presented. The authors have emphasized the presence of multiple areas of localized subperiosteal resorption as a helpful finding in the differential diagnosis between adult T-cell leukemia and multiple myeloma and hyperparathyroidism. A possible mechanism for these radiological features and its similarity to those of other T-cell malignancies are discussed briefly. (orig./SHA)

  8. Cyanobacteria as a Source for Novel Anti-Leukemic Compounds.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Humisto, Anu; Herfindal, Lars; Jokela, Jouni; Karkman, Antti; Bjørnstad, Ronja; Choudhury, Romi R; Sivonen, Kaarina

    2016-01-01

    Cyanobacteria are an inspiring source of bioactive secondary metabolites. These bioactive agents are a diverse group of compounds which are varying in their bioactive targets, the mechanisms of action, and chemical structures. Cyanobacteria from various environments, especially marine benthic cyanobacteria, are found to be rich sources for the search for novel bioactive compounds. Several compounds with anticancer activities have been discovered from cyanobacteria and some of these have succeeded to enter the clinical trials. Varying anticancer agents are needed to overcome increasing challenges in cancer treatments. Different search methods are used to reveal anticancer compounds from natural products, but cell based methods are the most common. Cyanobacterial bioactive compounds as agents against acute myeloid leukemia are not well studied. Here we examined our new results combined with previous studies of anti-leukemic compounds from cyanobacteria with emphasis to reveal common features in strains producing such activity. We report that cyanobacteria harbor specific anti-leukemic compounds since several studied strains induced apoptosis against AML cells but were inactive against non-malignant cells like hepatocytes. We noted that particularly benthic strains from the Baltic Sea, such as Anabaena sp., were especially potential AML apoptosis inducers. Taken together, this review and re-analysis of data demonstrates the power of maintaining large culture collections for the search for novel bioactivities, and also how anti-AML activity in cyanobacteria can be revealed by relatively simple and low-cost assays.

  9. The role of regulatory T cells during the attenuation of graft-versus-leukemia activity following donor leukocyte infusion in mice.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Mi-Sun; Lim, Ji-Young; Cho, Byung-Sik; Kim, Yoo-Jin; Chung, Nack-Gyun; Jeong, Dae Chul; Youn, Hyewon; Lee, Chulbom; Choi, Eun Young; Min, Chang-Ki

    2011-12-01

    We investigated how the graft-versus-leukemia (GVL) effect is attenuated in the tumor microenvironment using a murine model of non-myeloablative allo-HSCT (NM-HSCT) plus delayed donor leukocyte infusion (DLI) in a haploidentical B6→F1 strain combination. In-line with aggravated leukemia growth, the proportions of effector T cells expressing IFN-γ (Teffs) in spleen were reduced and attenuated GVL activity was found to be accompanied by a rebound in CD4(+)Foxp3(+) regulatory T cells (Tregs) in tumor-draining lymph nodes and tumor tissues. DLI-derived Tregs and Teffs may be potential indicators of presence of leukemic progression after DLI in this GVL model. Copyright © 2011 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  10. Functional expression of P2X family receptors in macrophages is affected by microenvironment in mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chen, Shayan; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Wanzhu; Ru, Yongxin; Liao, Jinfeng; Wang, Lina; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300020 (China); Zheng, Guoguang, E-mail: zhengggtjchn@aliyun.com [State Key Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Institute of Hematology and Blood Diseases Hospital, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences and Peking Union Medical College, Tianjin 300020 (China); Center for Stem Cell Medicine, Chinese Academy of Medical Sciences, Beijing 100730 (China)

    2014-04-18

    Highlights: • We study the impact of leukemic microenvironment on P2X family receptors in Mφs. • Bone marrow and spleen Mφs are studied in Notch1-induced mouse leukemia model. • Increased expression of P2X7R is found in Mφs during the development of leukemia. • Elevated P2X7R-mediated calcium response is found in Mφs at late stage of leukemia. • More apoptotic Mφs are found in bone marrow and spleen at late stage of leukemia. - Abstract: Nucleotides are important players in intercellular signaling communication network. P2X family receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channels with diverse biological functions. Macrophages are important components in the microenvironment of hematopoiesis participating in both physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of P2XRs in macrophages in leukemia has not been established. Here we investigated expression pattern and functions of P2XRs in macrophages from bone marrow (BM) and spleen of Notch1-induced T-ALL mice. Real-time PCR showed that P2XRs except P2X5R were expressed in BM and spleen macrophages. Furthermore, with the development of leukemia, the expression of P2X7R increased in both BM and spleen macrophages whereas expression of P2X1R increased in spleen macrophages. Live cell imaging recoding the Ca{sup 2+} response demonstrated that P2X7R expressed in macrophages was functional. TUNEL and electron microscopy analysis found that apoptotic macrophages were frequently observed in BM and spleen at late stage of leukemia, which was partly contributed by the activation of overexpressed P2X7R. Our results suggested that the intercellular communication mediated by nucleotides might orchestrate in the pathological process of leukemia and could be a potential target for the treatment of leukemia.

  11. Functional expression of P2X family receptors in macrophages is affected by microenvironment in mouse T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Chen, Shayan; Feng, Wenli; Yang, Xiao; Yang, Wanzhu; Ru, Yongxin; Liao, Jinfeng; Wang, Lina; Lin, Yongmin; Ren, Qian; Zheng, Guoguang

    2014-01-01

    Highlights: • We study the impact of leukemic microenvironment on P2X family receptors in Mφs. • Bone marrow and spleen Mφs are studied in Notch1-induced mouse leukemia model. • Increased expression of P2X7R is found in Mφs during the development of leukemia. • Elevated P2X7R-mediated calcium response is found in Mφs at late stage of leukemia. • More apoptotic Mφs are found in bone marrow and spleen at late stage of leukemia. - Abstract: Nucleotides are important players in intercellular signaling communication network. P2X family receptors (P2XRs) are ATP-gated plasma membrane ion channels with diverse biological functions. Macrophages are important components in the microenvironment of hematopoiesis participating in both physiological and pathological processes. However, the role of P2XRs in macrophages in leukemia has not been established. Here we investigated expression pattern and functions of P2XRs in macrophages from bone marrow (BM) and spleen of Notch1-induced T-ALL mice. Real-time PCR showed that P2XRs except P2X5R were expressed in BM and spleen macrophages. Furthermore, with the development of leukemia, the expression of P2X7R increased in both BM and spleen macrophages whereas expression of P2X1R increased in spleen macrophages. Live cell imaging recoding the Ca 2+ response demonstrated that P2X7R expressed in macrophages was functional. TUNEL and electron microscopy analysis found that apoptotic macrophages were frequently observed in BM and spleen at late stage of leukemia, which was partly contributed by the activation of overexpressed P2X7R. Our results suggested that the intercellular communication mediated by nucleotides might orchestrate in the pathological process of leukemia and could be a potential target for the treatment of leukemia

  12. The TPO/c-MPL pathway in the bone marrow may protect leukemia cells from chemotherapy in AML Patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong-Feng, Zeng; Ting, Liu; Yong, Zhang; Cheng, Chang; Xi, Zhang; Pei-Yan, Kong

    2014-04-01

    Accumulating evidence indicates that the interaction of human LSCs (leukemic stem cells) with the hematopoietic microenvironment, mediated by the thrombopoietin (TPO)/c-MPL pathway, may be an underlying mechanism for resistance to cell cycle-dependent cytotoxic chemotherapy. However, the role of TPO/c-MPL signaling in AML (acute myelogenous leukemia) chemotherapy resistance hasn't been fully understood. The c-MPL and TPO levels in different AML samples were measured by flow cytometry and ELISA. We also assessed the TPO levels in the osteoblasts derived from bone mesenchymal stem cells (BMSCs). The survival rate of an AML cell line that had been co-cultured with different BMSC-derived osteoblasts was measured to determine the IC50 of an AML chemotherapy drug daunorubicin (DNR). The levels of TPO/c-MPL in the initial and relapse AML patients were significantly higher than that in the control (P MPL expression was found in the bone marrow mononuclear cells of the relapse AML patients. More importantly, the IC50 of DNR in the HEL + AML-derived osteoblasts was the highest among all co-culture systems. High level of TPO/c-MPL signaling may protect LSCs from chemotherapy in AML. The effects of inhibition of the TPO/c-MPL pathway on enhancing the chemotherapy sensitivity of AML cells, and on their downstream effector molecules that direct the interactions between patient-derived blasts and leukemia repopulating cells need to be further studied.

  13. The rarity of ALDH(+) cells is the key to separation of normal versus leukemia stem cells by ALDH activity in AML patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoang, Van T; Buss, Eike C; Wang, Wenwen; Hoffmann, Isabel; Raffel, Simon; Zepeda-Moreno, Abraham; Baran, Natalia; Wuchter, Patrick; Eckstein, Volker; Trumpp, Andreas; Jauch, Anna; Ho, Anthony D; Lutz, Christoph

    2015-08-01

    To understand the precise disease driving mechanisms in acute myeloid leukemia (AML), comparison of patient matched hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) and leukemia stem cells (LSC) is essential. In this analysis, we have examined the value of aldehyde dehydrogenase (ALDH) activity in combination with CD34 expression for the separation of HSC from LSC in 104 patients with de novo AML. The majority of AML patients (80 out of 104) had low percentages of cells with high ALDH activity (ALDH(+) cells; cells (≥1.9%; ALDH-numerous AML). In patients with ALDH-rare AML, normal HSC could be separated by their CD34(+) ALDH(+) phenotype, whereas LSC were exclusively detected among CD34(+) ALDH(-) cells. For patients with ALDH-numerous AML, the CD34(+) ALDH(+) subset consisted mainly of LSC and separation from HSC was not feasible. Functional analyses further showed that ALDH(+) cells from ALDH-numerous AML were quiescent, refractory to ARA-C treatment and capable of leukemic engraftment in a xenogenic mouse transplantation model. Clinically, resistance to chemotherapy and poor long-term outcome were also characteristic for patients with ALDH-numerous AML providing an additional risk-stratification tool. The difference in spectrum and relevance of ALDH activity in the putative LSC populations demonstrates, in addition to phenotypic and genetic, also functional heterogeneity of leukemic cells and suggests divergent roles for ALDH activity in normal HSC versus LSC. By acknowledging these differences our study provides a new and useful tool for prospective identification of AML cases in which separation of HSC from LSC is possible. © 2014 UICC.

  14. Bone marrow mesenchymal stem cells from infants with MLL-AF4+ acute leukemia harbor and express the MLL-AF4 fusion gene

    Science.gov (United States)

    Catalina, Purificación; Rodríguez, René; Melen, Gustavo J.; Bueno, Clara; Arriero, Mar; García-Sánchez, Félix; Lassaletta, Alvaro; García-Sanz, Ramón

    2009-01-01

    MLL-AF4 fusion is a hallmark genetic abnormality in infant B-acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL) known to arise in utero. The cellular origin of leukemic fusion genes during human development is difficult to ascertain. The bone marrow (BM) microenvironment plays an important role in the pathogenesis of several hematological malignances. BM mesenchymal stem cells (BM-MSC) from 38 children diagnosed with cytogenetically different acute leukemias were screened for leukemic fusion genes. Fusion genes were absent in BM-MSCs of childhood leukemias carrying TEL-AML1, BCR-ABL, AML1-ETO, MLL-AF9, MLL-AF10, MLL-ENL or hyperdiploidy. However, MLL-AF4 was detected and expressed in BM-MSCs from all cases of MLL-AF4+ B-ALL. Unlike leukemic blasts, MLL-AF4+ BM-MSCs did not display monoclonal Ig gene rearrangements. Endogenous or ectopic expression of MLL-AF4 exerted no effect on MSC culture homeostasis. These findings suggest that MSCs may be in part tumor-related, highlighting an unrecognized role of the BM milieu on the pathogenesis of MLL-AF4+ B-ALL. MLL-AF4 itself is not sufficient for MSC transformation and the expression of MLL-AF4 in MSCs is compatible with a mesenchymal phenotype, suggesting a differential impact in the hematopoietic system and mesenchyme. The absence of monoclonal rearrangements in MLL-AF4+ BM-MSCs precludes the possibility of cellular plasticity or de-differentiation of B-ALL blasts and suggests that MLL-AF4 might arise in a population of prehematopoietic precursors. PMID:19995953

  15. Quantitation of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) in blood plasma and leukemia cells of patients receiving the drug.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Seppänen, P; Alhonen-Hongisto, L; Siimes, M; Jänne, J

    1980-11-15

    Methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), a cytostatic compound which apparently interferes with the metabolism and/or functions of the natural polyamines (spermidine and spermine), was effectively taken up by cultured human lymphocytic leukemia cells, rapidly resulting in the formation of a concentration gradient of up to 1,000-fold across the cell membrane in cells grown in the presence of micromolar concentrations of the drug. For an anti-proliferative effect on the leukemia cells, an intracellular concentration of more than 0.5 mM was required. The uptake of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) was critically dependent on the growth rate of the leukemia cells. Low intracellular concentrations of the drug were present in cells growing slowly, whereas in rapidly dividing cells the intracellular concentration of the drug approached 5mM. When given as repeated intravenous infusions to two leukemic children, methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) exhibited sharp and transient peaks of plasma concentration, the drug having an apparent half-life in plasma of only 1-2 h. However, as in cultured cells, the drug was rapidly concentrated in the leukemia cells, reaching concentrations that were distinctly anti-proliferative. In contrast to the rapid disappearance of methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) from plasma, the circulation leukemia cells retained the drug for a period of several days with only minimal decrease in the initial concentrations. Methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) was given to the patients for 1 to 2 months as intravenous infusions, the timing of which was determined by regular assays of the drug concentrations in the leukemia cells. In agreement with the results obtained with the cultured cells, and intracellular concentration of about 0.5 to 1mM was apparently required for growth-inhibitory action to occur. Regular determination of the cellular drug concentrations indicated that methylglyoxal bis(quanylhydrazone) could be given as weekly infusions. This treatment

  16. Concurrent targeting Akt and sphingosine kinase 1 by A-674563 in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Xu, Lin; Zhang, Yanan; Gao, Meng; Wang, Guangping; Fu, Yunfeng

    2016-01-01

    Akt signaling plays a pivotal role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and progression. In the present study, we evaluated the potential anti-AML activity by a novel Akt kinase inhibitor A-674563. Our results showed that A-674563 dose-dependently inhibited survival and proliferation of U937 AML cells and six lines of human AML progenitor cells, yet sparing human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBMCs). A-674563 activated caspase-3/9 and apoptosis in the AML cells. Reversely, the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-CHO dramatically alleviated A-674563-induced AML cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity. For the molecular study, we showed that A-674563 blocked Akt activation in U937 cells and human AML progenitor cells. Further, A-674563 decreased sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) activity in above AML cells to deplete pro-survival sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and boost pro-apoptotic ceramide production. Such an effect on SphK1 signaling by A-674563 appeared independent of Akt blockage. Significantly, K6PC-5, a novel SphK1 activator, or supplement with S1P attenuated A-674563-induced ceramide production, and subsequent U937 cell death and apoptosis. Importantly, intraperitoneal injection of A-674563 at well-tolerated doses suppressed U937 leukemic xenograft tumor growth in nude mice, whiling significantly improving the animal survival. The results of the current study demonstrate that A-674563 exerts potent anti-leukemic activity in vitro and in vivo, possibly via concurrent targeting Akt and SphK1 signalings. - Highlights: • A-674563 is cytotoxic and anti-proliferative in U937 and AML progenitor cells. • A-674563 activates caspase-3/9 and apoptosis in U937 and AML progenitor cells. • Whiling blocking Akt, A-674563 manipulates other signalings in AML cells. • A-674563 inhibits SphK1 activity in AML cells, independent of Akt blockage. • A-674563 injection inhibits U937 xenograft in vivo growth, and improves mice survival.

  17. Concurrent targeting Akt and sphingosine kinase 1 by A-674563 in acute myeloid leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Xu, Lin [Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha (China); Shaoyang Central Hospital, Hunan Province (China); Zhang, Yanan; Gao, Meng [The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410013 (China); Wang, Guangping, E-mail: wangguangping45@sina.com [Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha (China); Fu, Yunfeng, E-mail: fuyunfeng33163@163.com [The Third Xiangya Hospital, Central South University, Changsha, 410013 (China)

    2016-04-15

    Akt signaling plays a pivotal role in acute myeloid leukemia (AML) development and progression. In the present study, we evaluated the potential anti-AML activity by a novel Akt kinase inhibitor A-674563. Our results showed that A-674563 dose-dependently inhibited survival and proliferation of U937 AML cells and six lines of human AML progenitor cells, yet sparing human peripheral blood mononuclear leukocytes (PBMCs). A-674563 activated caspase-3/9 and apoptosis in the AML cells. Reversely, the pan-caspase inhibitor z-VAD-CHO dramatically alleviated A-674563-induced AML cell apoptosis and cytotoxicity. For the molecular study, we showed that A-674563 blocked Akt activation in U937 cells and human AML progenitor cells. Further, A-674563 decreased sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) activity in above AML cells to deplete pro-survival sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) and boost pro-apoptotic ceramide production. Such an effect on SphK1 signaling by A-674563 appeared independent of Akt blockage. Significantly, K6PC-5, a novel SphK1 activator, or supplement with S1P attenuated A-674563-induced ceramide production, and subsequent U937 cell death and apoptosis. Importantly, intraperitoneal injection of A-674563 at well-tolerated doses suppressed U937 leukemic xenograft tumor growth in nude mice, whiling significantly improving the animal survival. The results of the current study demonstrate that A-674563 exerts potent anti-leukemic activity in vitro and in vivo, possibly via concurrent targeting Akt and SphK1 signalings. - Highlights: • A-674563 is cytotoxic and anti-proliferative in U937 and AML progenitor cells. • A-674563 activates caspase-3/9 and apoptosis in U937 and AML progenitor cells. • Whiling blocking Akt, A-674563 manipulates other signalings in AML cells. • A-674563 inhibits SphK1 activity in AML cells, independent of Akt blockage. • A-674563 injection inhibits U937 xenograft in vivo growth, and improves mice survival.

  18. BRAF mutation in hairy cell leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Ahmad Ahmadzadeh

    2014-09-01

    Full Text Available BRAF is a serine/threonine kinase with a regulatory role in the mitogen-activated protein kinase (MAPK signaling pathway. A mutation in the RAF gene, especially in BRAF protein, leads to an increased stimulation of this cascade, causing uncontrolled cell division and development of malignancy. Several mutations have been observed in the gene coding for this protein in a variety of human malignancies, including hairy cell leukemia (HCL. BRAF V600E is the most common mutation reported in exon15 of BRAF, which is observed in almost all cases of classic HCL, but it is negative in other B-cell malignancies, including the HCL variant. Therefore it can be used as a marker to differentiate between these B-cell disorders. We also discuss the interaction between miRNAs and signaling pathways, including MAPK, in HCL. When this mutation is present, the use of BRAF protein inhibitors may represent an effective treatment. In this review we have evaluated the role of the mutation of the BRAF gene in the pathogenesis and progression of HCL.

  19. Proteomic changes in a childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line during the adaptation to vincristine.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guzmán-Ortiz, Ana Laura; Aparicio-Ozores, Gerardo; Valle-Rios, Ricardo; Medina-Contreras, Oscar; Patiño-López, Genaro; Quezada, Héctor

    Relapse occurs in approximately 20% of Mexican patients with childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). In this group, chemoresistance may be one of the biggest challenges. An overview of complex cellular processes like drug tolerance can be achieved with proteomic studies. The B-lineage pediatric ALL cell line CCRF-SB was gradually exposed to the chemotherapeutic vincristine until proliferation was observed at 6nM, control cells were cultured in the absence of vincristine. The proteome from each group was analyzed by nanoHPLC coupled to an ESI-ion trap mass spectrometer. The identified proteins were grouped into overrepresented functional categories with the PANTHER classification system. We found 135 proteins exclusively expressed in the presence of vincristine. The most represented functional categories were: Toll receptor signaling pathway, Ras Pathway, B and T cell activation, CCKR signaling map, cytokine-mediated signaling pathway, and oxidative phosphorylation. Our study indicates that signal transduction and mitochondrial ATP production are essential during adaptation of leukemic cells to vincristine, these processes represent potential therapeutic targets. Copyright © 2017 Hospital Infantil de México Federico Gómez. Publicado por Masson Doyma México S.A. All rights reserved.

  20. Leukemia in AKR mice. III. Size distribution of suppressor T-cells in AKR leukemia and neonatal mice

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Mulder, A.M.; Durdik, J.M.; Toth, P.; Golub, E.S.

    1978-01-01

    Suppression of in vitro antibody forming potential of normal cells by leukemic cells of AKR and normal neonatal mice have many similarities. In both cases the suppression is by cell contact rather than by the elaboration of soluble suppressive factors and the suppression is sensitive to both x-irradiation and mitomycin C treatment. When the size distribution of suppressing cells in thymus and spleen were compared by velocity sedimentation, both leukemic and neonatal suppressing cells had similar size distribution in each organ. Both large and small cells in the thymus suppress but only large cells (sedimentation velocity > 3.5 mm/hr) in the spleen are able to suppress. Leukemic cells in lymph node have a splenic size distribution, viz., only large cells suppress. Both large and small cells of a subcutaneously growing long passage AKR lymphoma are able to suppress. While large cells contain the bulk of cells actively incorporating tritiated thymidine and thus probably in cycle, small but significant amounts of incorporation in small suppressing cells is also seen

  1. Ultrasound and MR Findings of Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis in a Patient with Complete Remission of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kim, Min Sung; Jee, Won Hee; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, So Yeon; Lim, Gye Yeon; Park, Gyeong Sin; Lee, Seok

    2010-01-01

    Aleukemic leukemia cutis is an extremely rare condition characterized by the infiltration of leukemic cells in skin without blasts in the peripheral blood. Leukemia cutis is considered a grave prognostic sign, thus early diagnosis is important. Leukemia cutis usually occurs in patients with myeloid leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report regarding the radiological findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, which is probably due to the presence of the skin changes in most patients. We report the ultrasound and MR findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, even without the skin manifestation in patients with a history of complete remission of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia following an allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

  2. Ultrasound and MR Findings of Aleukemic Leukemia Cutis in a Patient with Complete Remission of Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia: A Case Report

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kim, Min Sung; Jee, Won Hee; Kim, Sun Ki; Lee, So Yeon; Lim, Gye Yeon; Park, Gyeong Sin; Lee, Seok [Catholic University of Korea College of Medicine, Seoul (Korea, Republic of)

    2010-12-15

    Aleukemic leukemia cutis is an extremely rare condition characterized by the infiltration of leukemic cells in skin without blasts in the peripheral blood. Leukemia cutis is considered a grave prognostic sign, thus early diagnosis is important. Leukemia cutis usually occurs in patients with myeloid leukemia. To the best of our knowledge, there has been no report regarding the radiological findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, which is probably due to the presence of the skin changes in most patients. We report the ultrasound and MR findings of aleukemic leukemia cutis, even without the skin manifestation in patients with a history of complete remission of the acute lymphoblastic leukemia following an allogeneic peripheral blood stem cell transplantation

  3. Towards The Generation of Functionalized Magnetic Nanowires to Target Leukemic Cells

    KAUST Repository

    Alsharif, Nouf

    2016-01-01

    . In addition the NWs can be coated and functionalized to target cells of interest and, upon exposure to an alternating magnetic field, have been shown to induce cell death on several types of adherent cells, including several cancer cell types. For suspension

  4. Treating Multiply Relapsed or Refractory Hairy Cell Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    In this trial, patients with hairy cell leukemia who have not responded or relapsed after initial chemotherapy will be randomly assigned to receive rituximab combined with either pentostatin or bendamustine.

  5. Esterase reactions in acute myelomonocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Kass, L

    1977-05-01

    Specific and nonspecific esterase reactions of bone marrow cells from 14 patients with untreated acute myelomonocytic leukemia and six patients with acute histiomonocytic leukemia were examined. The technic for esterase determination permitted simultaneous visualization of both esterases on the same glass coverslip containing the marrow cells. In cases of acute histiomonocytic leukemia, monocytes, monocytoid hemohistioblasts and undifferentiated blasts stained intensely positive for nonspecific esterase, using alpha-naphthyl acetate as the substrate. No evidence of specific esterase activity using naphthol ASD-chloroacetate as the substrate and fast blue BBN as the dye coupler was apparent in these cells. In all of the cases of acute myelomonocytic leukemia, both specific and nonspecific esterases were visualized within monocytes, monocytoid cells, and granulocytic cells that had monocytoid-type nuclei. Nonspecific esterase activity was not observed in polymorphonuclear leukocytes in cases of myelomonocytic leukemia. The results support a current viewpoint that acute myelomonocytic leukemia may be a variant of acute myeloblastic leukemia, and that cytochemically, many of the leukemic cells in myelomonocytic leukemia share properties of both granulocytes and monocytes.

  6. Role of regulatory T cells in acute myeloid leukemia patients undergoing relapse-preventive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sander, Frida Ewald; Nilsson, Malin; Rydström, Anna; Aurelius, Johan; Riise, Rebecca E; Movitz, Charlotta; Bernson, Elin; Kiffin, Roberta; Ståhlberg, Anders; Brune, Mats; Foà, Robin; Hellstrand, Kristoffer; Thorén, Fredrik B; Martner, Anna

    2017-11-01

    Regulatory T cells (T regs ) have been proposed to dampen functions of anti-neoplastic immune cells and thus promote cancer progression. In a phase IV trial (Re:Mission Trial, NCT01347996, http://www.clinicaltrials.gov ) 84 patients (age 18-79) with acute myeloid leukemia (AML) in first complete remission (CR) received ten consecutive 3-week cycles of immunotherapy with histamine dihydrochloride (HDC) and low-dose interleukin-2 (IL-2) to prevent relapse of leukemia in the post-consolidation phase. This study aimed at defining the features, function and dynamics of Foxp3 + CD25 high CD4 + T regs during immunotherapy and to determine the potential impact of T regs on relapse risk and survival. We observed a pronounced increase in T reg counts in peripheral blood during initial cycles of HDC/IL-2. The accumulating T regs resembled thymic-derived natural T regs (nT regs ), showed augmented expression of CTLA-4 and suppressed the cell cycle proliferation of conventional T cells ex vivo. Relapse of AML was not prognosticated by T reg counts at onset of treatment or after the first cycle of immunotherapy. However, the magnitude of T reg induction was diminished in subsequent treatment cycles. Exploratory analyses implied that a reduced expansion of T regs in later treatment cycles and a short T reg telomere length were significantly associated with a favorable clinical outcome. Our results suggest that immunotherapy with HDC/IL-2 in AML entails induction of immunosuppressive T regs that may be targeted for improved anti-leukemic efficiency.

  7. Structural features of nucleoli in blood, leukemic, lymphoma and myeloma cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    K Smetana

    2010-01-01

    Full Text Available At present, it seems clear that the nucleolus is multifunctional and represents one of the key cell organelles that participate directly or indirectly in cell resting, proliferation, differentiation and maturation states, and possibly also in programmed cell death. Thus, the morphology and cytochemistry of nucleoli may represent a very useful tool not only for the evaluation of nucleolar biosynthetic activities but also for the evaluation of various cell states under physiological, experimental and pathological conditions.

  8. STAT5-mediated self-renewal of normal hematopoietic and leukemic stem cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Schepers, Hein; Wierenga, Albertus T. J.; Vellenga, Edo; Schuringa, Jan Jacob

    2012-01-01

    The level of transcription factor activity critically regulates cell fate decisions such as hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation. The balance between hematopoietic stem cell self-renewal and differentiation needs to be tightly controlled, as a shift toward differentiation might

  9. The mTOR inhibitor, everolimus (RAD001), overcomes resistance to imatinib in quiescent Ph-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Kuwatsuka, Y; Minami, M; Minami, Y; Sugimoto, K; Hayakawa, F; Miyata, Y; Abe, A [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan); Goff, D J [Moores Cancer Center, University of California San Diego School of Medicine, La Jolla, CA (United States); Kiyoi, H [Department of Infectious Diseases, Nagoya University Hospital, Nagoya (Japan); Naoe, T [Department of Hematology and Oncology, Nagoya University Graduate School of Medicine, Nagoya (Japan)

    2011-05-01

    In Ph-positive (Ph{sup +}) leukemia, the quiescent cell state is one of the reasons for resistance to the BCR-ABL-kinase inhibitor, imatinib. In order to examine the mechanisms of resistance due to quiescence and the effect of the mammalian target of rapamycin inhibitor, everolimus, for such a resistant population, we used Ph{sup +} acute lymphoblastic leukemia patient cells serially xenotransplanted into NOD/SCID/IL2rγ{sup null} (NOG) mice. Spleen cells from leukemic mice showed a higher percentage of slow-cycling G{sub 0} cells in the CD34{sup +}CD38{sup −} population compared with the CD34{sup +}CD38{sup +} and CD34{sup −} populations. After ex vivo imatinib treatment, more residual cells were observed in the CD34{sup +}CD38{sup −} population than in the other populations. Although slow-cycling G{sub 0} cells were insensitive to imatinib in spite of BCR-ABL and CrkL dephosphorylation, combination treatment with everolimus induced substantial cell death, including that of the CD34{sup +}CD38{sup −} population, with p70-S6 K dephosphorylation and decrease of MCL-1 expression. The leukemic non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID) mouse system with the in vivo combination treatment with imatinib and everolimus showed a decrease of tumor burden including CD34{sup +} cells. These results imply that treatment with everolimus can overcome resistance to imatinib in Ph{sup +} leukemia due to quiescence.

  10. Regulatory T cells in acute myelogenous leukemia: is it time for immunomodulation?

    Science.gov (United States)

    Ustun, Celalettin; Miller, Jeffrey S; Munn, David H; Weisdorf, Daniel J; Blazar, Bruce R

    2011-11-10

    The microenviroment of acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is suppressive for immune effector cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized as a contributor factor and may be recruited and exploited by leukemic cells to evade immunesurveillance. Studies have shown that the frequencies of marrow and blood Tregs are greater in patients with AML than in control patients. Although increased Tregs have been associated with a decreased risk of GVHD after allogeneic HCT and hence may impede the graft-versus-tumor effect, recent findings indicate that that this may not be the case. Because there is a need to improve outcomes of standard treatment (chemotherapy with or without allogeneic HCT) in AML, targeting Tregs present an outstanding opportunity in AML because discoveries may apply throughout its treatment. Here, we review data on the roles of Tregs in mediating immune system-AML interactions. We focused on in vitro, animal, and observational human studies of Tregs in AML biology, development, prognosis, and therapy in different settings (eg, vaccination and HCT). Manipulation of Tregs or other types of immunomodulation may become a part of AML treatment in the future.

  11. GSK-3 Inhibition Sensitizes Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to 1,25D-Mediated Differentiation

    Science.gov (United States)

    Gupta, Kalpana; Stefan, Tammy; Ignatz-Hoover, James; Moreton, Stephen; Parizher, Gary; Saunthararajah, Yogen; Wald, David N.

    2017-01-01

    1,25-dihydroxyvitamin D3 (1,25D), the biologically active form of vitamin D, is widely considered a promising therapy for acute myeloid leukemia (AML) based on its ability to drive differentiation of leukemic cells. However, clinical trials have been disappointing in part to dose-limiting hypercalcemia. Here we show how inhibiting glycogen synthase kinase 3 (GSK3) can improve the differentiation response of AML cells to 1,25D-mediated differentiation. GSK3 inhibition in AML cells enhanced the differentiating effects of low concentrations of 1,25D. In addition, GSK3 inhibition augmented the ability of 1,25D to induce irreversible growth inhibition and slow the progression of AML in mouse models. Mechanistic studies revealed that GSK3 inhibition led to the hyperphosphorylation of the vitamin D receptor (VDR), enabling an interaction between VDR and the coactivator, SRC-3 (NCOA3), thereby increasing transcriptional activity. We also found that activation of JNK-mediated pathways in response to GSK3 inhibition contributed to the potentiation of 1,25D-induced differentiation. Taken together, our findings offer a preclinical rationale to explore the repositioning of GSK3 inhibitors to enhance differentiation-based therapy for AML treatment. PMID:26964622

  12. Effect of cAMP signaling on expression of glucocorticoid receptor, Bim and Bad in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant leukemic and multiple myeloma cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dong, Hongli; Carlton, Michael E; Lerner, Adam; Epstein, Paul M

    2015-01-01

    Stimulation of cAMP signaling induces apoptosis in glucocorticoid-sensitive and resistant CEM leukemic and MM.1 multiple myeloma cell lines, and this effect is enhanced by dexamethasone in both glucocorticoid-sensitive cell types and in glucocorticoid-resistant CEM cells. Expression of the mRNA for the glucocorticoid receptor alpha (GR) promoters 1A3, 1B and 1C, expression of mRNA and protein for GR, and the BH3-only proapoptotic proteins, Bim and Bad, and the phosphorylation state of Bad were examined following stimulation of the cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling pathways. Expression levels of GR promoters were increased by cAMP and glucocorticoid signaling, but GR protein expression was little changed in CEM and decreased in MM.1 cells. Stimulation of these two signaling pathways induced Bim in CEM cells, induced Bad in MM.1 cells, and activated Bad, as indicated by its dephosphorylation on ser112, in both cell types. This study shows that leukemic and multiple myeloma cells, including those resistant to glucocorticoids, can be induced to undergo apoptosis by stimulating the cAMP signaling pathway, with enhancement by glucocorticoids, and the mechanism by which this occurs may be related to changes in Bim and Bad expression, and in all cases, to activation of Bad.

  13. FLT3 mutations in early T-cell precursor ALL characterize a stem cell like leukemia and imply the clinical use of tyrosine kinase inhibitors.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Martin Neumann

    Full Text Available Early T-cell precursor acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ETP-ALL has been identified as high-risk subgroup of acute T-lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL with a high rate of FLT3-mutations in adults. To unravel the underlying pathomechanisms and the clinical course we assessed molecular alterations and clinical characteristics in a large cohort of ETP-ALL (n = 68 in comparison to non-ETP T-ALL adult patients. Interestingly, we found a high rate of FLT3-mutations in ETP-ALL samples (n = 24, 35%. Furthermore, FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL was characterized by a specific immunophenotype (CD2+/CD5-/CD13+/CD33-, a distinct gene expression pattern (aberrant expression of IGFBP7, WT1, GATA3 and mutational status (absence of NOTCH1 mutations and a low frequency, 21%, of clonal TCR rearrangements. The observed low GATA3 expression and high WT1 expression in combination with lack of NOTCH1 mutations and a low rate of TCR rearrangements point to a leukemic transformation at the pluripotent prothymocyte stage in FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL. The clinical outcome in ETP-ALL patients was poor, but encouraging in those patients with allogeneic stem cell transplantation (3-year OS: 74%. To further explore the efficacy of targeted therapies, we demonstrate that T-ALL cell lines transfected with FLT3 expression constructs were particularly sensitive to tyrosine kinase inhibitors. In conclusion, FLT3 mutated ETP-ALL defines a molecular distinct stem cell like leukemic subtype. These data warrant clinical studies with the implementation of FLT3 inhibitors in addition to early allogeneic stem cell transplantation for this high risk subgroup.

  14. Detection of Ca2+-induced acetylcholine released from leukemic T-cells using an amperometric microfluidic sensor.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Akhtar, Mahmood H; Hussain, Khalil K; Gurudatt, N G; Shim, Yoon-Bo

    2017-12-15

    A microfluidic structured-dual electrodes sensor comprising of a pair of screen printed carbon electrodes was fabricated to detect acetylcholine, where one of them was used for an enzyme reaction and another for a detection electrode. The former was coated with gold nanoparticles and the latter with a porous gold layer, followed by electropolymerization of 2, 2:5,2-terthiophene-3-(p-benzoic acid) (pTTBA) on both the electrodes. Then, acetylcholinesterase was covalently attached onto the reaction electrode, and hydrazine and choline oxidase were co-immobilized on the detection electrode. The layers of both modified electrodes were characterized employing voltammetry, field emission scanning electron microscopy, X-ray photoelectron spectroscopy, and quartz crystal microscopy. After the modifications of both electrode surfaces, they were precisely faced each other to form a microfluidic channel structure, where H 2 O 2 produced from the sequential enzymatic reactions was reduced by hydrazine to obtain the analytical signal which was analyzed by the detection electrode. The microfluidic sensor at the optimized experimental conditions exhibited a wide dynamic range from 0.7nM to 1500μM with the detection limit of 0.6 ± 0.1nM based on 3s (S/N = 3). The biomedical application of the proposed sensor was evaluated by detecting acetylcholine in human plasma samples. Moreover, the Ca 2+ -induced acetylcholine released in leukemic T-cells was also investigated to show the in vitro detection ability of the designed microfluidic sensor. Interference due to the real component matrix were also studied and long term stability of the designed sensor was evaluated. The analytical performance of the designed sensor was also compared with commercially available ACh detection kit. Copyright © 2017 Elsevier B.V. All rights reserved.

  15. Transferrin-polycation-mediated introduction of DNA into human leukemic cells: Stimulation by agents that affect the survival of transfected DNA or modulate transferrin receptor levels

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cotten, M.; Laengle-Rouault, F.; Kirlappos, H.; Wagner, E.; Mechtler, K.; Zenke, M.; Beug, H.; Birnstiel, M.L.

    1990-01-01

    The authors have subverted a receptor-mediated endocytosis event to transport genes into human leukemic cells. By coupling the natural iron-delivery protein transferrin to the DNA-binding polycations polylysine or protamine, they have created protein conjugates that bind nucleic acids and carry them into the cell during the normal transferrin cycle. They demonstrate here that this procedure is useful for a human leukemic cell line. They enhanced the rate of gene delivery by (i) increasing the transferrin receptor density through treatment of the cells with the cell permeable iron chelator desferrioxamine, (ii) interfering with the synthesis of heme with succinyl acetone treatment, or (iii) stimulating the degradation of heme with cobalt chloride treatment. Consistent with gene delivery as an endocytosis event, they show that the subsequent expression in K-562 cells of a gene included in the transported DNA depends upon the cellular presence of the lysosomotropic agent chloroquine. By contrast, monensin blocks transferrinfection, as does incubation of the cells at 18 degree C

  16. Extrinsic and intrinsic cues involved in BCR-ABL induced leukemogenesis : Establishing an ectopic humanized niche xenograft model and the study of metabolic alterations in chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Sontakke, Pallavi

    2016-01-01

    Leukemia is defined as the cancer of blood cells. Any defect in properties of hematopoietic stem cells (HSC) i.e. either in self-renewal or differentiation leads to the development of hematopoietic malignancies. The hematological malignancies are considered to arise from leukemic stem cells (LSCs)

  17. Azacitidine augments expansion of regulatory T cells after allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Goodyear, Oliver C; Dennis, Mike; Jilani, Nadira Y; Loke, Justin; Siddique, Shamyla; Ryan, Gordon; Nunnick, Jane; Khanum, Rahela; Raghavan, Manoj; Cook, Mark; Snowden, John A; Griffiths, Mike; Russell, Nigel; Yin, John; Crawley, Charles; Cook, Gordon; Vyas, Paresh; Moss, Paul; Malladi, Ram; Craddock, Charles F

    2012-04-05

    Strategies that augment a GVL effect without increasing the risk of GVHD are required to improve the outcome after allogeneic stem cell transplantation (SCT). Azacitidine (AZA) up-regulates the expression of tumor Ags on leukemic blasts in vitro and expands the numbers of immunomodulatory T regulatory cells (Tregs) in animal models. Reasoning that AZA might selectively augment a GVL effect, we studied the immunologic sequelae of AZA administration after allogeneic SCT. Twenty-seven patients who had undergone a reduced intensity allogeneic transplantation for acute myeloid leukemia were treated with monthly courses of AZA, and CD8(+) T-cell responses to candidate tumor Ags and circulating Tregs were measured. AZA after transplantation was well tolerated, and its administration was associated with a low incidence of GVHD. Administration of AZA increased the number of Tregs within the first 3 months after transplantation compared with a control population (P = .0127). AZA administration also induced a cytotoxic CD8(+) T-cell response to several tumor Ags, including melanoma-associated Ag 1, B melanoma antigen 1, and Wilm tumor Ag 1. These data support the further examination of AZA after transplantation as a mechanism of augmenting a GVL effect without a concomitant increase in GVHD.

  18. B cell markers in Ph1-positive acute lymphoblastic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alimena, G; De Rossi, G; Gastaldi, R; Guglielmi, C; Mandelli, F

    1980-01-01

    A case of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) where the blast cells had B cell markers and displayed the presence of a typical Ph1 chromosome, originated by a standard t (9;22) translocation, is reported. Cytological and clinical aspects during the entire course of the disease were consistent with the diagnosis of ALL. Evidence of differentiation along a well-defined lymphoid cell line in a Ph1-positive cell confirms the presence of the Ph1 chromosome in conditions other than chronic granulocytic leukemia and shows that it possibly does not occur in an exclusively undifferentiated totipotent stem cell.

  19. Modulating Leukemia-Initiating Cell Quiescence to Improve Leukemia Treatment

    Science.gov (United States)

    2015-09-01

    T- cells and in innate immunity (Lacorazza et al., 2002). It controls the proliferation and homing of CD8+ T- cells via the Kruppel-like factors...Lin2Sca12IL7R2Kit1FccRII/ IIIhighCD34high), megakaryocyte-erythroid progenitor cell (MEP) (Lin2Sca12IL7R2Kit1FccRII/IIIlowCD34low), and common lymphoid ...to this model, the first wave gives rise exclusively to innate immune B cells in early embryonic life and may be derived from progenitor cells

  20. Immunogenicity moderation effect of interleukin-24 on myelogenous leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yu, Xin; Miao, Jingcheng; Xia, Wei; Gu, Zong-Jiang

    2018-04-01

    Previous studies have shown that interleukin-24 (IL-24) has tumor-suppressing activity by multiple pathways. However, the immunogenicity moderation effect of IL-24 on malignant cells has not been explored extensively. In this study, we investigated the role of IL-24 in immunogenicity modulation of the myelogenous leukemia cells. Data show that myelogenous leukemia cells express low levels of immunogenicity molecules. Treatment with IL-24 could enhance leukemia cell immunogenicity, predominantly regulate leukemia cells to produce immune-associated cytokines, and improve the cytotoxic sensitivity of these cells to immune effector cells. IL-24 expression could retard transplanted leukemia cell tumor growth in vivo in athymic nude mice. Moreover, IL-24 had marked effects on downregulating the expression of angiogenesis-related proteins vascular endothelial growth factor, cluster of differentiation (CD) 31, CD34, collagen IV and metastasis-related factors CD147, membrane type-1 matrix metalloproteinase (MMP), and MMP-2 and MMP-9 in transplanted tumors. These findings indicated novel functions of this antitumor gene and characterized IL-24 as a promising agent for further clinical trial for hematologic malignancy immunotherapy.

  1. Effects of Malnutrition on Neutrophil/Mononuclear Cell Apoptotic Functions in Children with Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cakir, Fatma Betul; Berrak, Su Gülsün; Aydogan, Gonul; Tulunay, Aysin; Timur, Cetin; Canpolat, Cengiz; Eksioglu Demiralp, Emel

    2017-04-01

    Recent studies claim that apoptosis may explain immune dysfunction observed in malnutrition. The objective of this study was to determine the effect of malnutrition on apoptotic functions of phagocytic cells in acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). Twenty-eight ALL patients (13 with malnutrition) and thirty controls were enrolled. Neutrophil and mononuclear cell apoptosis of ALL patients and the control group were studied on admission before chemotherapy and repeated at a minimum of three months after induction of chemotherapy or when the nutritional status of leukemic children improved. The apoptotic functions of both ALL groups on admission were significantly lower than those of the control group. The apoptotic functions were lower in ALL patients with malnutrition than those in ALL patients without malnutrition, but this was not statistically significant. The repeated apoptotic functions of both ALL groups were increased to similar values with the control group. This increase was found to be statistically significant. The apoptotic functions in ALL patients were not found to be affected by malnutrition. However, after dietary intervention, increased apoptotic functions in both ALL patient groups deserve mentioning. Dietary intervention should always be recommended as malnutrition or cachexia leads to multiple complications. Enhanced apoptosis might originate also from remission state of cancer.

  2. Bilateral proliferative retinopathy in B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Devesh Kumawat

    2018-01-01

    Full Text Available A 4-year-old child with B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia presented with vitreous hemorrhage due to proliferative retinopathy in both eyes. Pars plana vitrectomy was performed in both eyes to clear nonresolving vitreous hemorrhage after systemic stabilization. Visual recovery was limited by the disc drag in the right eye and subfoveal exudation in the left eye. Etiopathogenesis and management of proliferative retinopathy in acute leukemias are discussed.

  3. Antiproliferative and apoptotic effects of butyrolactone lignans from Arctium lappa on leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Matsumoto, T; Hosono-Nishiyama, K; Yamada, H

    2006-02-01

    In the course of screening for pharmacologically active substances from extracts of crude drugs used traditionally in Sino-Japanese herbal medicines, it was found that the 70 % ethanol extract from the fruits of Arctium lappa L. (Compositae) showed potent antiproliferative activity against B cell hybridoma cell, MH60. By bioassay-guided purification, a new lignan, (+)-7,8-didehydroarctigenin, together with the known lignans (-)-arctigenin and (-)-matairesinol were isolated as the active ingredients from an aqueous ethanolic extract of the fruits of A. lappa. Of these active compounds, (-)-arctigenin showed the most potent antiproliferative activity against MH60 cells (IC (50) : 1.0 microM), and the activity was suggested to be due to apoptosis.

  4. Induction of apoptosis by Citrus paradisi essential oil in human leukemic (HL-60) cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hata, Tomona; Sakaguchi, Ikuyo; Mori, Masahiro; Ikeda, Norikazu; Kato, Yoshiko; Minamino, Miki; Watabe, Kazuhito

    2003-01-01

    Limonene is a primary component of citrus essential oils (EOs) and has been reported to induce apoptosis on tumor cells. Little is known about induction of apoptosis by citrus EOs. In this study, we examined induction of apoptosis by Citrus aurantium var. dulcis (sweet orange) EO, Citrus paradisi (grapefruit) EO and Citrus limon (lemon) EO. These EOs induced apoptosis in HL-60 cells and the apoptosis activities were related to the limonene content of the EOs. Moreover, sweet orange EO and grapefruit EO may contain components besides limonene that have apoptotic activity. To identify the components with apoptotic activity, grapefruit EO was fractionated using silica gel columns, and the components were analyzed by GC-MS. The n-hexane fraction contained limonene, and the dichloromethane fraction (DF) contained aldehyde compounds and nootkatone. Decanal, octanal and citral in the DF showed strong apoptotic activity, suggesting that the aldehyde compounds induced apoptosis strongly in HL-60 cells.

  5. Kinetics of phototoxicity of Fischer's medium for L5178Y leukemic cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Griffin, F.M.; Ashland, G.; Capizzi, R.L.

    1981-01-01

    The uncontrolled exposure of Fischer's medium to cool white fluorescent (CWF) light or other sources emitting near-ultraviolet or visible light absorbance by riboflavin is a crucial random variable in experiments which utilize L5178Y cells and this medium. The radiation effects of CWF light result in the rapid development of toxic photoproducts in the medium which are cytostatic at lower doses of radiation and cytotoxic at higher doses. After a 24-hr suspension in medium irradiated for 3 or 48 hr, the cloning efficiencies of cells subsequently plated in light-protected medium were 87 and 3%, respectively. The corresponding near-ultraviolet doses for these periods of exposure to CWF light were 0.22 x 10(4) for a 3-hr exposure and 3.47 x 10(4) J/sq m for a 48-hr exposure. Cells incubated in lightly irradiated medium resumed growth at nearly normal rates following a 24- to 48-hr period in which no increase in cell numbers occurred. Exposure of medium containing riboflavin, but not tryptophan or tyrosine, to CWF light also produces toxic medium. Tryptophan enhances riboflavin-induced phototoxicity, whereas tyrosine diminishes this effect. As photosusceptibility of this system is very high, Fischer's medium must be fully protected from all sources of light absorbable by riboflavin

  6. shRNA screening identifies JMJD1C as being required for leukemia maintenance

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Sroczynska, Patrycja; Cruickshank, V Adam; Bukowski, John-Paul

    2014-01-01

    Epigenetic regulatory mechanisms are implicated in the pathogenesis of acute myeloid and lymphoid leukemia (AML and ALL). Recent progress suggests that proteins involved in epigenetic control are amenable to drug intervention, but little is known about the cancer-specific dependency on epigenetic...... candidate drug targets identified in these screens was Jmjd1c. Depletion of Jmjd1c impairs growth and colony formation of mouse MLL-AF9 cells in vitro, as well as establishment of leukemia after transplantation. Depletion of JMJD1C impairs expansion and colony formation of human leukemic cell lines......, with the strongest effect observed in the MLL-rearranged ALL cell line, SEM. In both mouse and human leukemic cells, the growth defect upon JMJD1C depletion appears to be primarily due to increased apoptosis, which implicates JMJD1C as a potential therapeutic target in leukemia....

  7. Acute myeloid leukemia stem cell markers in prognosis and targeted therapy: potential impact of BMI-1, TIM-3 and CLL-1.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Darwish, Noureldien H E; Sudha, Thangirala; Godugu, Kavitha; Elbaz, Osama; Abdelghaffar, Hasan A; Hassan, Emad E A; Mousa, Shaker A

    2016-09-06

    Acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients show high relapse rates and some develop conventional chemotherapy resistance. Leukemia Stem Cells (LSCs) are the main player for AML relapses and drug resistance. LSCs might rely on the B-cell-specific Moloney murine leukemia virus integration site-1 (BMI-1) in promoting cellular proliferation and survival. Growth of LSCs in microenvironments that are deprived of nutrients leads to up-regulation of the signaling pathways during the progression of the disease, which may illustrate the sensitivity of LSCs to inhibitors of those signaling pathways as compared to normal cells. We analyzed the expression of LSC markers (CD34, CLL-1, TIM-3 and BMI-1) using quantitative RT-PCR in bone marrow samples of 40 AML patients of different FAB types (M1, M2, M3, M4, M5, and M7). We also studied the expression of these markers in 2 AML cell lines (Kasumi-1 and KG-1a) using flow cytometry and quantitative RT-PCR. The overexpression of TIM-3, CLL-1, and BMI-1 was markedly correlated with poor prognosis in these patients. Our in vitro findings demonstrate that targeting BMI-1, which markedly increased in the leukemic cells, was associated with marked decrease in leukemic burden. This study also presents results for blocking LSCs' surface markers CD44, CLL-1, and TIM-3. These markers may play an important role in elimination of AML. Our study indicates a correlation between the expression of markers TIM-3, CLL-1, and especially of BMI-1 and the aggressiveness of AML and thus the potential impact of prognosis and therapies that target LSCs on improving the cure rates.

  8. Metabolic regulation of hematopoietic and leukemic stem/progenitor cells under homeostatic and stress conditions.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Karigane, Daiki; Takubo, Keiyo

    2017-07-01

    Hematopoietic stem cells (HSCs) exhibit multilineage differentiation and self-renewal activities that maintain the entire hematopoietic system during an organism's lifetime. These abilities are sustained by intrinsic transcriptional programs and extrinsic cues from the microenvironment or niche. Recent studies using metabolomics technologies reveal that metabolic regulation plays an essential role in HSC maintenance. Metabolic pathways provide energy and building blocks for other factors functioning at steady state and in stress. Here we review recent advances in our understanding of metabolic regulation in HSCs relevant to cell cycle quiescence, symmetric/asymmetric division, and proliferation following stress and lineage commitment, and discuss the therapeutic potential of targeting metabolic factors or pathways to treat hematological malignancies.

  9. The role of peptide and DNA vaccines in myeloid leukemia immunotherapy

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lin Chen

    2013-02-01

    Full Text Available Abstract While chemotherapy and targeted therapy are successful in inducing the remission of myeloid leukemia as acute myeloid leukemia (AML and chronic myeloid leukemia (CML, the disease remains largely incurable. This observation is likely due to the drug resistance of leukemic cells, which are responsible for disease relapse. Myeloid leukemia vaccines may most likely be beneficial for eradicating minimal residual disease after treatment with chemotherapy or targeted therapy. Several targeted immunotherapies using leukemia vaccines have been heavily investigated in clinical and preclinical trials. This review will focus on peptides and DNA vaccines in the context of myeloid leukemias, and optimal strategies for enhancing the efficacy of vaccines based on myeloid leukemia immunization are also summarized.

  10. Igs expressed by chronic lymphocytic leukemia B cells show limited binding-site structure variability.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Marcatili, Paolo; Ghiotto, Fabio; Tenca, Claudya; Chailyan, Anna; Mazzarello, Andrea N; Yan, Xiao-Jie; Colombo, Monica; Albesiano, Emilia; Bagnara, Davide; Cutrona, Giovanna; Morabito, Fortunato; Bruno, Silvia; Ferrarini, Manlio; Chiorazzi, Nicholas; Tramontano, Anna; Fais, Franco

    2013-06-01

    Ag selection has been suggested to play a role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) pathogenesis, but no large-scale analysis has been performed so far on the structure of the Ag-binding sites (ABSs) of leukemic cell Igs. We sequenced both H and L chain V(D)J rearrangements from 366 CLL patients and modeled their three-dimensional structures. The resulting ABS structures were clustered into a small number of discrete sets, each containing ABSs with similar shapes and physicochemical properties. This structural classification correlates well with other known prognostic factors such as Ig mutation status and recurrent (stereotyped) receptors, but it shows a better prognostic value, at least in the case of one structural cluster for which clinical data were available. These findings suggest, for the first time, to our knowledge, on the basis of a structural analysis of the Ab-binding sites, that selection by a finite quota of antigenic structures operates on most CLL cases, whether mutated or unmutated.

  11. Igs Expressed by Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells Show Limited Binding-Site Structure Variability

    KAUST Repository

    Marcatili, P.

    2013-05-01

    Ag selection has been suggested to play a role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) pathogenesis, but no large-scale analysis has been performed so far on the structure of the Ag-binding sites (ABSs) of leukemic cell Igs. We sequenced both H and L chain V(D)J rearrangements from 366 CLL patients and modeled their three-dimensional structures. The resulting ABS structures were clustered into a small number of discrete sets, each containing ABSs with similar shapes and physicochemical properties. This structural classification correlates well with other known prognostic factors such as Ig mutation status and recurrent (stereotyped) receptors, but it shows a better prognostic value, at least in the case of one structural cluster for which clinical data were available. These findings suggest, for the first time, to our knowledge, on the basis of a structural analysis of the Ab-binding sites, that selection by a finite quota of antigenic structures operates on most CLL cases, whether mutated or unmutated. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  12. Igs Expressed by Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia B Cells Show Limited Binding-Site Structure Variability

    KAUST Repository

    Marcatili, P.; Ghiotto, F.; Tenca, C.; Chailyan, A.; Mazzarello, A. N.; Yan, X.-J.; Colombo, M.; Albesiano, E.; Bagnara, D.; Cutrona, G.; Morabito, F.; Bruno, S.; Ferrarini, M.; Chiorazzi, N.; Tramontano, A.; Fais, F.

    2013-01-01

    Ag selection has been suggested to play a role in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) pathogenesis, but no large-scale analysis has been performed so far on the structure of the Ag-binding sites (ABSs) of leukemic cell Igs. We sequenced both H and L chain V(D)J rearrangements from 366 CLL patients and modeled their three-dimensional structures. The resulting ABS structures were clustered into a small number of discrete sets, each containing ABSs with similar shapes and physicochemical properties. This structural classification correlates well with other known prognostic factors such as Ig mutation status and recurrent (stereotyped) receptors, but it shows a better prognostic value, at least in the case of one structural cluster for which clinical data were available. These findings suggest, for the first time, to our knowledge, on the basis of a structural analysis of the Ab-binding sites, that selection by a finite quota of antigenic structures operates on most CLL cases, whether mutated or unmutated. Copyright © 2013 by The American Association of Immunologists, Inc.

  13. 'Adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma' with bone demineralization

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Ohuchida, Toshiyuki; Nishitani, Hiromu; Matsuura, Keiichi

    1985-01-01

    Two patients with T-cell malignancy having radiographic manifestations of generalized and localized bone demineralization are reported. One, a 53-year-old-man, had marked osteoporosis and severe hypercalcemia, but no clinical evidence of leukemia throughout his illness. At autopsy there was no definite evidence of bone involvement. Histologic proof was obtained from abdominal skin which revealed ''adult T-cell leukemia/lymphoma (ATLL).'' The second case, a 33-year-old man, complained of arthralgia in his hands and feet; radiographs showed severe localized demineralization and pathologic fractures. Specimens of his peripheral blood, cervical lymph nodes, and bone marrow revealed ATLL cells. (orig.)

  14. Effects of Vitamin K3 and K5 on Daunorubicin-resistant Human T Lymphoblastoid Leukemia Cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nakaoka, Eri; Tanaka, Sachiko; Onda, Kenji; Sugiyama, Kentaro; Hirano, Toshihiko

    2015-11-01

    Anticancer efficacy of vitamin K derivatives on multidrug-resistant cancer cells has been scarcely investigated. The effects of vitamins K3 and K5 on proliferation of human leukemia MOLT-4 cells and on daunorubicin-resistant MOLT-4/DNR cells were estimated by a WST assay. Apoptotic cells were detected by Annexin V and propidium iodide staining, followed by flow cytometry. Vitamins K3 and K5 significantly inhibited proliferation of leukemic cells at 10 and 100 μM (pVitamin K3 induced cell apoptosis at 10 and 100 μM in both MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cells (pVitamin K5 also increased apoptotic cells, while rather inducing necrotic cell death. Vitamins K3 and K5 suppress MOLT-4 and MOLT-4/DNR cell-proliferation partially through induction of apoptosis, and these vitamin derivatives can overcome drug resistance due to P-glycoprotein expression. Copyright© 2015 International Institute of Anticancer Research (Dr. John G. Delinassios), All rights reserved.

  15. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells are active participants in microenvironmental cross-talk

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    van Attekum, Martijn H. A.; Eldering, Eric; Kater, Arnon P.

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is widely accepted. Nevertheless, the understanding of the complex interplay between the various types of bystander cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells is incomplete. Numerous studies have indicated that bystander

  16. E-cadherin gene re-expression in chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells by HDAC inhibitors

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Jordaan, Gwen; Liao, Wei; Sharma, Sanjai

    2013-01-01

    The tumor suppressor gene E-cadherin gene is frequently silenced in chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) cells and results in wnt-pathway activation. We analyzed the role of histone epigenetic modifications in E-cadherin gene silencing. CLL specimens were treated with histone deacetylase inhibitor (HDACi) MS-275 and analyzed for E-cadherin expression with western blot and RT-PCR analysis. The downstream effects of HDACi treated leukemic cells were studied by analyzing the effect on wnt-pathway signaling. HDACi induced alterations in E-cadherin splicing were investigated by transcript specific real time PCR analysis. Treatment of CLL specimens with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACi) treatment resulted in an increase of the E-cadherin RNA transcript (5 to 119 fold increase, n=10) in eight out of ten CLL specimens indicating that this gene is down regulated by histone hypoacetylation in a majority of CLL specimens. The E-cadherin re-expression in CLL specimens was noted by western blot analysis as well. Besides epigenetic silencing another mechanism of E-cadherin inactivation is aberrant exon 11 splicing resulting in an alternatively spliced transcript that lacks exon 11 and is degraded by the non-sense mediated decay (NMD) pathway. Our chromatin immunoprecipitation experiments show that HDACi increased the acetylation of histones H3 and H4 in the E-cadherin promoter region. This also affected the E-cadherin exon 11 splicing pattern as HDACi treated CLL specimens preferentially expressed the correctly spliced transcript and not the exon 11 skipped aberrant transcript. The re-expressed E- cadherin binds to β-catenin with inhibition of the active wnt-beta-catenin pathway in these cells. This resulted in a down regulation of two wnt target genes, LEF and cyclinD1 and the wnt pathway reporter. The E-cadherin gene is epigenetically modified and hypoacetylated in CLL leukemic cells. Treatment of CLL specimens with HDACi MS-275 activates transcription from this silent

  17. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells are active participants in microenvironmental cross-talk

    OpenAIRE

    van Attekum, Martijn HA; Eldering, Eric; Kater, Arnon P

    2017-01-01

    The importance of the tumor microenvironment in chronic lymphocytic leukemia is widely accepted. Nevertheless, the understanding of the complex interplay between the various types of bystander cells and chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells is incomplete. Numerous studies have indicated that bystander cells provide chronic lymphocytic leukemia-supportive functions, but it has also become clear that chronic lymphocytic leukemia cells actively engage in the formation of a supportive tumor microenv...

  18. Radioisotope examination of hairy-cell leukemia patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Fortynova, J.; Friedmann, B.; Bakos, K.; Malaskova, V.; Voslarova, Z.; Vopatova, M.

    1983-01-01

    13 patients with hairy-cell leukemia were simultaneously tested using different radioisotope methods (scintiscan of the spleen and bone marrow, total blood volume and erythrocytic pool in the spleen, erythrocyte and platelet kinetics). Some of the methods (bone marrow scintiscan, total blood volume and erythrocytic pool in the spleen, and kinetic studies) produced characteristic results in those patients: they could add precision to the diagnosis of the disease, and they could also be used for better elucidation of the pathogenic mechanisms of other clinical signs characteristic of hairy-cell leukemia. In spite of the undeniably significant value of the said methods for precise diagnosis of hairy-cell leukemia, histological tests of the bioptic material of bone marrow and spleen and bone marrow needle biopsy remain better and indispensable methods. (author)

  19. Parameter estimation and sensitivity analysis for a mathematical model with time delays of leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cândea, Doina; Halanay, Andrei; Rǎdulescu, Rodica; Tǎlmaci, Rodica

    2017-01-01

    We consider a system of nonlinear delay differential equations that describes the interaction between three competing cell populations: healthy, leukemic and anti-leukemia T cells involved in Chronic Myeloid Leukemia (CML) under treatment with Imatinib. The aim of this work is to establish which model parameters are the most important in the success or failure of leukemia remission under treatment using a sensitivity analysis of the model parameters. For the most significant parameters of the model which affect the evolution of CML disease during Imatinib treatment we try to estimate the realistic values using some experimental data. For these parameters, steady states are calculated and their stability is analyzed and biologically interpreted.

  20. Allium compounds, dipropyl and dimethyl thiosulfinates as antiproliferative and differentiating agents of human acute myeloid leukemia cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Faten Merhi

    2008-08-01

    Full Text Available Faten Merhi1, Jacques Auger2, Francine Rendu1, Brigitte Bauvois11UMR 7131 UPMC Paris Universitas/CNRS, Groupe Hospitalier Broussais-HEGP, Paris, France; 2University F. Rabelais, IRBI, UPRESA CNRS 6035, Tours, FranceAbstract: Epidemiologic studies support the premise that Allium vegetables may lower the risk of cancers. The beneficial effects appear related to the organosulfur products generated upon processing of Allium. Leukemia cells from patients with acute myeloid leukemia (AML display high proliferative capacity and have a reduced capacity of undergoing apoptosis and maturation. Whether the sulfur-containing molecules thiosulfinates (TS, diallyl TS (All2TS, dipropyl TS (Pr2TS and dimethyl TS (Me2TS, are able to exert chemopreventative activity against AML is presently unknown. The present study was an evaluation of proliferation, cytotoxicity, differentiation and secretion of AML cell lines (U937, NB4, HL-60, MonoMac-6 in response to treatment with these TS and their related sulfides (diallylsulfide, diallyl disulfide, dipropyl disulfide, dimethyl disulfide. As assessed by flow cytometry, ELISA, gelatin zymogaphy and RT-PCR, we showed that Pr2TS and Me2TS, but not All2TS and sulfides, 1 inhibited cell proliferation in dose- and time-dependent manner and this process was neither due to cytotoxicity nor apoptosis, 2 induced macrophage maturation, and 3 inhibited the levels of secreted MMP-9 (protein and activity and TNF-α protein, without altering mRNA levels. By establishing for the first time that Pr2TS and Me2TS affect proliferation, differentiation and secretion of leukemic cell lines, this study provides the opportunity to explore the potential efficiency of these molecules in AML.Keywords: acute myeloid leukemia, thiosulfinate, proliferation, differentiation, matrix metalloproteinase-9

  1. Generation of B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL)-reactive T-cell lines and clones from HLA class I-matched donors using modified B-CLL cells as stimulators: implications for adoptive immunotherapy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hoogendoorn, M; Wolbers, J Olde; Smit, W M; Schaafsma, M R; Barge, R M Y; Willemze, R; Falkenburg, J H F

    2004-07-01

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation following reduced-intensity conditioning is being evaluated in patients with advanced B-cell chronic lymphocytic leukemia (B-CLL). The curative potential of this procedure is mediated by donor-derived alloreactive T cells, resulting in a graft-versus-leukemia effect. However, B-CLL may escape T-cell-mediated immune reactivity since these cells lack expression of costimulatory molecules. We examined the most optimal method to transform B-CLL cells into efficient antigen-presenting cells (APC) using activating cytokines, by triggering toll-like receptors (TLRs) using microbial pathogens and by CD40 stimulation with CD40L-transfected fibroblasts. CD40 activation in the presence of IL-4 induced strongest upregulation of costimulatory and adhesion molecules on B-CLL cells and induced the production of high amounts of IL-12 by the leukemic cells. In contrast to primary B-CLL cells as stimulator cells, these malignant APCs were capable of inducing the generation of B-CLL-reactive CD8(+) CTL lines and clones from HLA class I-matched donors. These CTL lines and clones recognized and killed primary B-CLL as well as patient-derived lymphoblasts, but not donor cells. These results show the feasibility of ex vivo generation of B-CLL-reactive CD8(+) CTLs. This opens new perspectives for adoptive immunotherapy, following allogeneic stem cell transplantation in patients with advanced B-CLL.

  2. Nuclear accumulation of SHIP1 mutants derived from AML patients leads to increased proliferation of leukemic cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Nalaskowski, Marcus M; Ehm, Patrick; Rehbach, Christoph; Nelson, Nina; Täger, Maike; Modest, Kathrin; Jücker, Manfred

    2018-05-28

    The inositol 5-phosphatase SHIP1 acts as negative regulator of intracellular signaling in myeloid cells and is a tumor suppressor in myeloid leukemogenesis. After relocalization from the cytoplasm to the plasma membrane SHIP1 terminates PI3-kinase mediated signaling processes. Furthermore, SHIP1 is also found in distinct puncta in the cell nucleus and nuclear SHIP1 has a pro-proliferative function. Here we report the identification of five nuclear export signals (NESs) which regulate together with the two known nuclear localization signals (NLSs) the nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SHIP1. Mutation of NLSs reduced the nuclear import and mutation of NESs decreased the nuclear export of SHIP1 in the acute myeloid leukemia (AML) cell line UKE-1. Interestingly, four SHIP1 mutants (K210R, N508D, V684E, Q1153L) derived from AML patients showed a nuclear accumulation after expression in UKE-1 cells. In addition, overexpression of the AML patient-derived mutation N508D caused an increased proliferation rate of UKE-1 cells in comparison to wild type SHIP1. Furthermore, we identified serine and tyrosine phosphorylation as a molecular mechanism for the regulation of nucleocytoplasmic shuttling of SHIP1 where tyrosine phosphorylation of distinct residues i.e. Y864, Y914, Y1021 reduces nuclear localization, whereas serine phosphorylation at S933 enhances nuclear localization of SHIP1. In summary, our data further implicate nuclear SHIP1 in cellular signaling and suggest that enhanced accumulation of SHIP1 mutants in the nucleus may be a contributory factor of abnormally high proliferation of AML cells. Copyright © 2017. Published by Elsevier Inc.

  3. Alantolactone selectively ablates acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yahui Ding

    2016-09-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background The poor outcomes for patients diagnosed with acute myeloid leukemia (AML are largely attributed to leukemia stem cells (LSCs which are difficult to eliminate with conventional therapy and responsible for relapse. Thus, new therapeutic strategies which could selectively target LSCs in clinical leukemia treatment and avoid drug resistance are urgently needed. However, only a few small molecules have been reported to show anti-LSCs activity. Methods The aim of the present study was to identify alantolactone as novel agent that can ablate acute myeloid leukemia stem and progenitor cells from AML patient specimens and evaluate the anticancer activity of alantolactone in vitro and in vivo. Results The present study is the first to demonstrate that alantolactone, a prominent eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactone, could specifically ablate LSCs from AML patient specimens. Furthermore, in comparison to the conventional chemotherapy drug, cytosine arabinoside (Ara-C, alantolactone showed superior effects of leukemia cytotoxicity while sparing normal hematopoietic cells. Alantolactone induced apoptosis with a dose-dependent manner by suppression of NF-kB and its downstream target proteins. DMA-alantolactone, a water-soluble prodrug of alantolactone, could suppress tumor growth in vivo. Conclusions Based on these results, we propose that alantolactone may represent a novel LSCs-targeted therapy and eudesmane-type sesquiterpene lactones offer a new scaffold for drug discovery towards anti-LSCs agents.

  4. Advanced Data Mining of Leukemia Cells Micro-Arrays

    OpenAIRE

    Richard S. Segall; Ryan M. Pierce

    2009-01-01

    This paper provides continuation and extensions of previous research by Segall and Pierce (2009a) that discussed data mining for micro-array databases of Leukemia cells for primarily self-organized maps (SOM). As Segall and Pierce (2009a) and Segall and Pierce (2009b) the results of applying data mining are shown and discussed for the data categories of microarray databases of HL60, Jurkat, NB4 and U937 Leukemia cells that are also described in this article. First, a background section is pro...

  5. Indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase and regulatory T cells in acute myeloid leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mansour, Iman; Zayed, Rania A; Said, Fadwa; Latif, Lamyaa Abdel

    2016-09-01

    The microenvironment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) is suppressive for immune cells. Regulatory T cells (Tregs) have been recognized to play a role in helping leukemic cells to evade immunesurveillance. The mesenchymal stem cells (MSCs) are essential contributors in immunomodulation of the microenvironment as they can promote differentiation of Tregs via the indoleamine 2,3-dioxygenase (IDO) pathway. The aim of the present work was to evaluate the expression of IDO in bone marrow derived MSCs and to study its correlation to percentage of Tregs. Thirty-seven adult bone marrow samples were cultured in appropriate culture medium to isolate MSCs. Successful harvest of MSCs was determined by plastic adherence, morphology, and positive expression of CD271 and CD105; negative expression of CD34 and CD45 using flowcytometry. MSCs were examined for IDO expression by immunocytochemistry using anti-IDO monoclonal antibody. CD4+ CD25+ cells (Tregs) were measured in bone marrow samples by flowcytometry. MSCs were successfully isolated from 20 of the 37 bone marrow samples cultured. MSCs showed higher expression of IDO and Tregs percentage was higher in AML patients compared to control subjects (P = 0.002 and P < 0.001, respectively). A positive correlation was found between IDO expression and Tregs percentage (P value = 0.012, r = 0.5). In this study, we revealed an association between high IDO expression in MSCs and elevated levels of Tregs which could have an important role in the pathogenesis of AML, providing immunosuppressive microenvironment.

  6. Clinical Significance of Immuno phenotypic Markers in Pediatric T-cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    SIDHOM, I.; SHAABAN, Kh.; SOLIMAN, S.; HAMDY, N.; YASSIN, D.; SALEM, Sh.; HASSANEIN, H.; MANSOUR, M.T.; EZZAT, S.; EL-ANWAR, W.

    2008-01-01

    Background: Cell-marker profiling has led to conflicting conclusions about its prognostic significance in T-ALL. Aim: To investigate the prevalence of the expression of CD34, CD10 and myeloid associated antigens (CD13/ CD33) in childhood T-ALL and to relate their presence to initial clinical and biologic features and early response to therapy. Patients and Methods: This study included 67 consecutive patients with newly diagnosed T-ALL recruited from the Children's Cancer Hospital in Egypt during the time period from July 2007 to June 2008. Immuno phenotypic markers and minimal residual disease (MRD) were studied by five-color flow cytometry. Results: The frequency of CD34 was 34.9%, CD10 33.3%, while CD13/CD33 was 18.8%. No significant association was encountered between CD34, CD10 or myeloid antigen positivity and the presenting clinical features as age, sex, TLC and CNS leukemia. Only CD10+ expression had significant association with initial CNS involvement (p=0.039). CD34 and CD13/CD33 expression was significantly associated with T-cell maturation stages (p<0.05). No relationship was observed for age, TLC, gender, NCI risk or CNS involvement with early response to therapy illustrated by BM as well as MRD day 15 and day 42. CD34+, CD13/CD33+ and early T-cell stage had high MRD levels on day 15 that was statistically highly significant (p<0.01), but CD10+ had statistically significant lower MRD level on day 15 (p=0.049). However, only CD34 retained its significance at an MRD cut-off level of 0.01%. Conclusion: CD34, CD10, CD13/CD33 expression, as well as T-cell maturation stages, may have prognostic significance in pediatric T-ALL as they have a significant impact on early clearance of leukemic cells detected by MRD day 15.

  7. Expression, regulation and function of phosphofructo-kinase/fructose-biphosphatases (PFKFBs) in glucocorticoid-induced apoptosis of acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Carlet, Michela; Kofler, Reinhard; Janjetovic, Kristina; Rainer, Johannes; Schmidt, Stefan; Panzer-Grümayer, Renate; Mann, Georg; Prelog, Martina; Meister, Bernhard; Ploner, Christian

    2010-01-01

    Glucocorticoids (GCs) cause apoptosis and cell cycle arrest in lymphoid cells and constitute a central component in the therapy of lymphoid malignancies, most notably childhood acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL). PFKFB2 (6-phosphofructo-2-kinase/fructose-2,6-biphosphatase-2), a kinase controlling glucose metabolism, was identified by us previously as a GC response gene in expression profiling analyses performed in children with ALL during initial systemic GC mono-therapy. Since deregulation of glucose metabolism has been implicated in apoptosis induction, this gene and its relatives, PFKFB1, 3, and 4, were further analyzed. Gene expression analyses of isolated lymphoblasts were performed on Affymetrix HGU133 Plus 2.0 microarrays. GCRMA normalized microarray data were analyzed using R-Bioconductor packages version 2.5. Functional gene analyses of PFKFB2-15A and -15B isoforms were performed by conditional gene over-expression experiments in the GC-sensitive T-ALL model CCRF-CEM. Expression analyses in additional ALL children, non-leukemic individuals and leukemic cell lines confirmed frequent PFKFB2 induction by GC in most systems sensitive to GC-induced apoptosis, particularly T-ALL cells. The 3 other family members, in contrast, were either absent or only weakly expressed (PFKFB1 and 4) or not induced by GC (PFKFB3). Conditional PFKFB2 over-expression in the CCRF-CEM T-ALL in vitro model revealed that its 2 splice variants (PFKFB2-15A and PFKFB2-15B) had no detectable effect on cell survival. Moreover, neither PFKFB2 splice variant significantly affected sensitivity to, or kinetics of, GC-induced apoptosis. Our data suggest that, at least in the model system investigated, PFKFB2 is not an essential upstream regulator of the anti-leukemic effects of GC

  8. Mast cell leukemia associated with undefined morphology and chronic basophilic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Cehreli, Cavit; Alacacioglu, Inci; Piskin, Ozden; Ates, Halil; Cehreli, Ruksan; Calibasi, Gizem; Yuksel, Erdinc; Ozkal, Sermin; Ozsan, Guner H

    2014-01-01

    Mast cell leukemia (MCL) is rare type of neoplasia with an incidence of 1% in a large series of 342 adult patients with systemic mastocytosis (SM). Chronic basophilic leukemia (CBL) is an extremely rare type of leukemia with appearance of 7 cases in the literature. A 73 year-old female patient who presented with weaknes, had a prolonged duration of hematologic remission after treatment of her CBL by hydroxyurea (HU). Evolution of SM occurring as a second neoplasia concurrently with relapse of de novo CBL was demonstrated by mast cells (MCs) infiltration in the bone marrow (BM) biopsy and smear and increase in tryptase level. Transformation to MCL with simultaneous occurrance of accelerated phase of CBL were documented by the appearance of MCs in both BM and peripheral blood (PB) smears, antigen expressions detected by flow cytometry and spesific stains. Sequence analysis of c-kit gene revealed c-kit exon 11 K550N mutation. Undefined associations of MCL with different mast cell morphology, increase in IL-6 level and accelerated phase of de novo CBL was described. Elevations in CRP and IL-6 levels occurring with increases in basophil counts to high levels revealed that febrile episodes with abdominal pain seen in our patient were induced by increase in IL-6 levels released from neoplastic basophils. Neoplastic basophils with diffuse and coarse basophilic granules possibly mimic neutrophils with toxic granules and cause wrong characterization of neoplastic basophils as neutrophils by the automated blood cell counters and misleaded physicians.

  9. Resistance of human and mouse myeloid leukemia cells to UV radiation

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Poljak-Blazi, M.; Osmak, M.; Hadzija, M.

    1989-01-01

    Sensitivity of mouse bone marrow and myeloid leukemia cells and sensitivity of human myeloid leukemia cells to UV light was tested. Criteria were the in vivo colony-forming ability of UV exposed cells and the inhibition of DNA synthesis during post-irradiation incubation for 24 h in vitro. Mouse bone marrow cells irradiated with a small dose of UV light (5 J/m 2 ) and injected into x-irradiated animals did not form hemopoietic colonies on recipient's spleens, and recipients died. However, mouse leukemia cells, after irradiation with higher doses of UV light, retained the ability to form colonies on the spleens, and all recipient mice died with typical symptoms of leukemia. In vitro, mouse bone marrow cells exhibited high sensitivity to UV light compared to mouse myeloid leukemia cells. Human leukemia cells were also resistant to UV light, but more sensitive than mouse leukemia cells. (author)

  10. Overcoming of P-glycoprotein mediated vincristine resistance of L1210/VCR mouse leukemic cells could be induced by pentoxifylline but not by theophylline and caffeine

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Stefankova, Z.; Barancik, M.; Breier, A.

    1996-01-01

    Effects of xanthine derivatives (pentoxifylline (PTX), caffeine, theophylline, 1-methyl-3-isobutylxanthine) on P-glycoprotein mediated vincristine resistance of L1210/VCR mouse leukemic cell sub-line were studied. From the applied xanthines only PTX was found to reverse the vincristine resistance of the above cells. Moreover, only PTX, but not other xanthine, increased the accumulation of [ 3 H]vincristine by L1210/VCR cells. Thus it may be concluded that PTX-induced reversal of vincristine (VCR) resistance could not be explained from the point of known pharmacological effects of PTX that are common for other xanthines such as inhibition of phosphodiesterase activity, calcium mobilizing effect, inhibition of tumor necrosis factor α (TNF), etc. (author)

  11. A study on stability and medical implications for a complex delay model for CML with cell competition and treatment.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Rădulescu, I R; Cândea, D; Halanay, A

    2014-12-21

    We study a mathematical model describing the dynamics of leukemic and normal cell populations (stem-like and differentiated) in chronic myeloid leukemia (CML). This model is a system of four delay differential equations incorporating three types of cell division. The competition between normal and leukemic stem cell populations for the common microenvironment is taken into consideration. The stability of one steady state is investigated. The results are discussed via their medical interpretation. Copyright © 2014 Elsevier Ltd. All rights reserved.

  12. Effects of Newcastle Disease Virus Strains AF2240 and V4-UPM on Cytolysis and Apoptosis of Leukemia Cell Lines

    Science.gov (United States)

    Alabsi, Aied M.; Bakar, Siti Aishah Abu; Ali, Rola; Omar, Abdul Rahman; Bejo, Mohd Hair; Ideris, Aini; Ali, Abdul Manaf

    2011-01-01

    Newcastle disease virus (NDV) is used as an antineoplastic agent in clinical tumor therapy. It has prompted much interest as an anticancer agent because it can replicate up to 10,000 times better in human cancer cells than in most normal cells. This study was carried out to determine the oncolytic potential of NDV strain AF2240 and V4-UPM on WEHI-3B leukemia cell line. Results from MTT cytotoxicity assay showed that the CD50 values for both strains were 2 and 8 HAU for AF2240 and V4-UPM, respectively. In addition, bromodeoxyuridine (BrdU) and trypan blue dye exclusion assays showed inhibition in cell proliferation after different periods. Increase in the cellular level of caspase-3 and detection of DNA laddering using agarose gel electrophoresis on treated cells with NDV confirmed that the mode of cell death was apoptosis. In addition, flow-cytometry analysis of cellular DNA content showed that the virus caused an increase in the sub-G1 region (apoptosis peaks). In conclusion, NDV strains AF2240 and V4-UPM caused cytolytic effects against WEHI-3B leukemic cell line. PMID:22272097

  13. Combined Targeting of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL Tyrosine Kinase Eradicates Chronic Myeloid Leukemia Stem Cells

    Science.gov (United States)

    Mak, Po Yee; Mu, Hong; Zhou, Hongsheng; Mak, Duncan H.; Schober, Wendy; Leverson, Joel D.; Zhang, Bin; Bhatia, Ravi; Huang, Xuelin; Cortes, Jorge; Kantarjian, Hagop; Konopleva, Marina

    2016-01-01

    BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase inhibitors (TKIs) are effective against chronic myeloid leukemia (CML), but they rarely eliminate CML stem cells. Disease relapse is common upon therapy cessation, even in patients with complete molecular responses. Furthermore, once CML progresses to blast crisis (BC), treatment outcomes are dismal. We hypothesized that concomitant targeting of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase could overcome these limitations. We demonstrate increased BCL-2 expression at the protein level in bone marrow cells, particularly in Lin−Sca-1+cKit+ cells of inducible CML in mice as determined by CyTOF mass cytometry. Further, selective inhibition of BCL-2, aided by TKI-mediated MCL-1 and BCL-XL inhibition, markedly decreased leukemic Lin−Sca-1+cKit+ cell numbers and long-term stem cell frequency, and prolonged survival in a murine CML model. Additionally, this combination effectively eradicated CD34+CD38−, CD34+CD38+, and quiescent stem/progenitor CD34+ cells from BC CML patient samples. Our results suggest that BCL-2 is a key survival factor for CML stem/progenitor cells and that combined inhibition of BCL-2 and BCR-ABL tyrosine kinase has the potential to significantly improve depth of response and cure rates of chronic phase and BC CML. PMID:27605552

  14. Establishment of a new human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (KMO-90) with 1;19 translocation carrying p53 gene alterations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sotomatsu, M; Hayashi, Y; Kawamura, M; Yugami, S; Shitara, T

    1993-10-01

    A new human pre-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia cell line (KMO-90) was established from the bone marrow sample of a 12-year-old girl with acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) carrying 1;19 chromosome translocation. KMO-90 cells expressed HLA-DR, CD10, CD19, and CD22 antigens. These cells had also cytoplasmic immunoglobulin lacking surface immunoglobulin, indicating that these had a pre-B phenotype. Chromosome analysis of this cell line showed 48, XX, +8, +19, t(1;19)(q23;p13). Southern blot analysis showed the same sized rearrangements of the E2A gene in KMO-90 cells as those in the original leukemic cells. By means of reverse transcriptase-polymerase chain reaction analysis, we detected E2A/PBX1 fusion transcripts in KMO-90 cells. KMO-90 is useful when studying the role of the 1;19 translocation in the etiology of pre-B ALL. Furthermore, we studied alterations of the p53 gene in this cell line by polymerase chain reaction, single-strand conformation polymorphism analysis. KMO-90 cells were identified to have a point mutation at codon 177 (CCC-->TCC) of the p53 gene, suggesting that alterations of the p53 gene may have an important role in the establishment of this cell line.

  15. Modeling Human Leukemia Immunotherapy in Humanized Mice

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Jinxing Xia

    2016-08-01

    Full Text Available The currently available human tumor xenograft models permit modeling of human cancers in vivo, but in immunocompromised hosts. Here we report a humanized mouse (hu-mouse model made by transplantation of human fetal thymic tissue plus hematopoietic stem cells transduced with a leukemia-associated fusion gene MLL-AF9. In addition to normal human lymphohematopoietic reconstitution as seen in non-leukemic hu-mice, these hu-mice showed spontaneous development of B-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (B-ALL, which was transplantable to secondary recipients with an autologous human immune system. Using this model, we show that lymphopenia markedly improves the antitumor efficacy of recipient leukocyte infusion (RLI, a GVHD-free immunotherapy that induces antitumor responses in association with rejection of donor chimerism in mixed allogeneic chimeras. Our data demonstrate the potential of this leukemic hu-mouse model in modeling leukemia immunotherapy, and suggest that RLI may offer a safe treatment option for leukemia patients with severe lymphopenia.

  16. To the nucleolar bodies (nucleoli) in cells of the lymphocytic lineage in patients suffering from B - chronic lymphocytic leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Smetana, K; Karban, J; Trneny, M

    2010-01-01

    The present study was undertaken to provide more information on nucleoli in lymphocytes of B - chronic lymphocytic leukemia. The computer assisted nucleolar and cytoplasmic RNA image densitometry, reflecting the nucleolar and cytoplasmic RNA concentration at the single cell level, demonstrated a remarkable stability during the differentiation and maturation of B- lymphocytes. In contrast, as it was expected, the nucleolar diameter during the lymphocytic development markedly decreased. Thus the nucleolar RNA content of leukemic B-lymphocytes was apparently related to the nucleolar size. In both immature and mature lymphocytes, the cytostatic treatment increased the incidence of micronucleoli, which represent the "inactive" type of nucleoli. However, the decreased values of the nucleolar diameter were statistically significant only in mature lymphocytes of treated patients. On the other hand, despite such observation, it must be mentioned that "large active" and "ring shaped resting" nucleoli were still present in immature and mature lymphocytes after the cytostatic therapy and such cells might represent a potential pool of proliferating cells. As it is generally accepted "large active nucleoli" with multiple fibrillar centers are known to be characteristic for proliferating cells. "Ring shaped resting nucleoli" are present in sleeping cells, which may be stimulated to return to the cell cycle and to proliferate again. In addition, the nucleolar RNA distribution also indicated that Gumprecht ghosts mostly originated from mature lymphocytes. Increased ratio of the nucleolar to cytoplasmic RNA density in Gumprecht ghosts or apoptotic cells and apoptotic bodies of the lymphocytic origin was related to the decreased cytoplasmic RNA concentration. The increased nucleolar size together with the markedly decreased cytoplasmic RNA concentration characteristic for Gumprecht ghosts just reflected the spreading of lymphocytes during smear preparations. In apoptotic cells or

  17. Cooperativity of CD44 and CD49d in leukemia cell homing, migration, and survival offers a means for therapeutic attack.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Singh, Vibuthi; Erb, Ulrike; Zöller, Margot

    2013-11-15

    A CD44 blockade drives leukemic cells into differentiation and apoptosis by dislodging from the osteogenic niche. Because anti-CD49d also supports hematopoietic stem cell mobilization, we sought to determine the therapeutic efficacy of a joint CD49d/CD44 blockade. To unravel the underlying mechanism, the CD49d(-) EL4 lymphoma was transfected with CD49d or point-mutated CD49d, prohibiting phosphorylation and FAK binding; additionally, a CD44(-) Jurkat subline was transfected with murine CD44, CD44 with a point mutation in the ezrin binding site, or with cytoplasmic tail-truncated CD44. Parental and transfected EL4 and Jurkat cells were evaluated for adhesion, migration, and apoptosis susceptibility in vitro and in vivo. Ligand-binding and Ab-blocking studies revealed CD44-CD49d cooperation in vitro and in vivo in adhesion, migration, and apoptosis resistance. The cooperation depends on ligand-induced proximity such that both CD44 and CD49d get access to src, FAK, and paxillin and via lck to the MAPK pathway, with the latter also supporting antiapoptotic molecule liberation. Accordingly, synergisms were only seen in leukemia cells expressing wild-type CD44 and CD49d. Anti-CD44 together with anti-CD49d efficiently dislodged EL4-CD49d/Jurkat-CD44 in bone marrow and spleen. Dislodging was accompanied by increased apoptosis susceptibility that strengthened low-dose chemotherapy, the combined treatment most strongly interfering with metastatic settlement and being partly curative. Ab treatment also promoted NK and Ab-dependent cellular cytotoxicity activation, which affected leukemia cells independent of CD44/CD49d tail mutations. Thus, mostly owing to a blockade of joint signaling, anti-CD44 and anti-CD49d hamper leukemic cell settlement and break apoptosis resistance, which strongly supports low-dose chemotherapy.

  18. Acute Respiratory Distress Syndrome Caused by Leukemic Infiltration of the Lung

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Yao-Kuang Wu

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Respiratory distress syndrome resulting from leukemic pulmonary infiltrates is seldom diagnosed antemortem. Two 60- and 80-year-old women presented with general malaise, progressive shortness of breath, and hyperleukocytosis, which progressed to acute respiratory distress syndrome (ARDS after admission. Acute leukemia with pulmonary infection was initially diagnosed, but subsequent examinations including open lung biopsy revealed leukemic pulmonary infiltrates without infection. In one case, the clinical condition and chest radiography improved initially after combination therapy with chemotherapy for leukemia and aggressive pulmonary support. However, new pulmonary infiltration on chest radiography and hypoxemia recurred, which was consistent with acute lysis pneumopathy. Despite aggressive treatment, both patients died due to rapidly deteriorating condition. Leukemic pulmonary involvement should be considered in acute leukemia patients with non-infectious diffusive lung infiltration, especially in acute leukemia with a high blast count.

  19. Ethyl acetate extract of Chinese medicinal herb Sarcandra glabra induces growth inhibition on human leukemic HL-60 cells, associated with cell cycle arrest and up-regulation of pro-apoptotic Bax/Bcl-2 ratio.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Li, W Y; Chiu, Lawrence C M; Lam, W S; Wong, W Y; Chan, Y T; Ho, Y P; Wong, Elaine Y L; Wong, Y S; Ooi, Vincent E C

    2007-02-01

    Sarcandra glabra (Thunb.) Nakai, colloquially known as Caoshanhu, is a Chinese medicinal herb with reported anti-tumor, anti-inflammatory, anti-viral and non-specific immunoenhancing properties. Although the plant has been clinically used for treating a variety of diseases, its bioactive ingredients are largely unknown and its mode of action has never been investigated. In this study, the anti-tumor property of ethyl acetate (EA) extract of S. glabra was investigated by determining its in vitro growth-inhibitory effects on a panel of human cancer cell lines of different histotypes. Growth inhibition of the EA extract on the cancer cells seemed to be selective, and the leukemic HL-60 was found to be the most responsive after 48 h of treatment (IC50=58 microg/ml). Flow cytometric studies further illustrated that the extract might interfere with DNA replication and thus arrested the cell cycle at S phase in the leukemic cells, followed by DNA fragmentation and loss of phospholipid asymmetry in the plasma membrane after 72 h of treatment. Concurrently, the pro-apoptotic Bax/Bcl-2 ratio was also up-regulated by more than 178% of the control level. All these findings suggested that the extract had initiated apoptosis to kill the leukemic cells. Results from this pioneer study help to establish a scientific foundation for future research and development of the bioactive ingredients in EA extract of S. glabra as efficacious anti-cancer agents.

  20. C60 Fullerene Effects on Diphenyl-N-(trichloroacetyl)-amidophosphate Interaction with DNA In Silico and Its Cytotoxic Activity Against Human Leukemic Cell Line In Vitro

    Science.gov (United States)

    Grebinyk, A.; Prylutska, S.; Grynyuk, I.; Kolp, B.; Hurmach, V.; Sliva, T.; Amirkhanov, V.; Trush, V.; Matyshevska, O.; Slobodyanik, M.; Prylutskyy, Yu.; Frohme, M.; Ritter, U.

    2018-03-01

    New representative of carbacylamidophosphates - diphenyl-N-(trichloroacetyl)-amidophosphate (HL), which contains two phenoxy substituents near the phosphoryl group, was synthesized, identified by elemental analysis and IR and NMR spectroscopy, and tested as a cytotoxic agent itself and in combination with C60 fullerene. According to molecular simulation results, C60 fullerene and HL could interact with DNA and form a rigid complex stabilized by stacking interactions of HL phenyl groups with C60 fullerene and DNA G nucleotide, as well as by interactions of HL CCl3 group by ion-π bonds with C60 molecule and by electrostatic bonds with DNA G nucleotide. With the use of MTT test, the cytotoxic activity of HL against human leukemic CCRF-CM cells with IC50 value detected at 10 μM concentration at 72 h of cells treatment was shown. Under combined action of 16 μM C60 fullerene and HL, the value of IC50 was detected at lower 5 μM HL concentration and at earlier 48 h period of incubation, besides the cytotoxic effect of HL was observed at a low 2.5 μM concentration at which HL by itself had no influence on cell viability. Binding of C60 fullerene and HL with minor DNA groove with formation of a stable complex is assumed to be one of the possible reasons of their synergistic inhibition of CCRF-CEM cells proliferation. Application of C60 fullerene in combination with 2.5 μM HL was shown to have no harmful effect on structural stability of blood erythrocytes membrane. Thus, combined action of C60 fullerene and HL in a low concentration potentiated HL cytotoxic effect against human leukemic cells and was not followed by hemolytic effect.

  1. Regulation of IFN regulatory factor 4 expression in human T cell leukemia virus-I-transformed T cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Sharma, Sonia; Grandvaux, Nathalie; Mamane, Yael; Genin, Pierre; Azimi, Nazli; Waldmann, Thomas; Hiscott, John

    2002-09-15

    IFN regulatory factor (IRF)-4 is a lymphoid/myeloid-restricted member of the IRF transcription factor family that plays an essential role in the homeostasis and function of mature lymphocytes. IRF-4 expression is tightly regulated in resting primary T cells and is transiently induced at the mRNA and protein levels after activation by Ag-mimetic stimuli such as TCR cross-linking or treatment with phorbol ester and calcium ionophore (PMA/ionomycin). However, IRF-4 is constitutively upregulated in human T cell leukemia virus type I (HTLV-I) infected T cells as a direct gene target for the HTLV-I Tax oncoprotein. In this study we demonstrate that chronic IRF-4 expression in HTLV-I-infected T lymphocytes is associated with a leukemic phenotype, and we examine the mechanisms by which continuous production of IRF-4 is achieved in HTLV-I-transformed T cells. IRF-4 expression in HTLV-1-infected cells is driven through activation of the NF-kappaB and NF-AT pathways, resulting in the binding of p50, p65, and c-Rel to the kappaB1 element and p50, c-Rel, and NF-ATp to the CD28RE element within the -617 to -209 region of the IRF-4 promoter. Furthermore, mutation of either the kappaB1 or CD28RE sites blocks Tax-mediated transactivation of the human IRF-4 promoter in T cells. These experiments constitute the first detailed analysis of human IRF-4 transcriptional regulation within the context of HTLV-I infection and transformation of CD4(+) T lymphocytes.

  2. PHF6 mutations in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    P. van Vlierberghe (Pieter); T. Palomero (Teresa); H. Khiabanian (Hossein); J. van der Meulen (Joni); M. Castillo (Mireia); N. van Roy (Nadine); B. de Moerloose (Barbara); J. Philippé (Jan); S. González-García (Sara); M.L. Toribio (María); T. Taghon (Tom); L.C. Zuurbier (Linda); B. Cauwelier (Barbara); C.J. Harrison (Christine); C. Schwab (Claire); M. Pisecker (Markus); S. Strehl; A.W. Langerak (Anton); J. Gecz (Jozef); E. Sonneveld (Edwin); R. Pieters (Rob); E. Paietta (Elisabeth); J. Rowe (Jacob); P.H. Wiernik (Peter); Y. Benoit (Yves); J. Soulier (Jean); B. Poppe (Bruce); X. Yao (Xiaopan); C. Cordon-Cardo (Carlos); J.P.P. Meijerink (Jules); R. Rabadan (Raul); F. Speleman (Franki); A.A. Ferrando (Adolfo)

    2010-01-01

    textabstractTumor suppressor genes on the X chromosome may skew the gender distribution of specific types of cancer. T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive hematological malignancy with an increased incidence in males. In this study, we report the identification of inactivating

  3. Advanced Data Mining of Leukemia Cells Micro-Arrays

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Richard S. Segall

    2009-12-01

    Full Text Available This paper provides continuation and extensions of previous research by Segall and Pierce (2009a that discussed data mining for micro-array databases of Leukemia cells for primarily self-organized maps (SOM. As Segall and Pierce (2009a and Segall and Pierce (2009b the results of applying data mining are shown and discussed for the data categories of microarray databases of HL60, Jurkat, NB4 and U937 Leukemia cells that are also described in this article. First, a background section is provided on the work of others pertaining to the applications of data mining to micro-array databases of Leukemia cells and micro-array databases in general. As noted in predecessor article by Segall and Pierce (2009a, micro-array databases are one of the most popular functional genomics tools in use today. This research in this paper is intended to use advanced data mining technologies for better interpretations and knowledge discovery as generated by the patterns of gene expressions of HL60, Jurkat, NB4 and U937 Leukemia cells. The advanced data mining performed entailed using other data mining tools such as cubic clustering criterion, variable importance rankings, decision trees, and more detailed examinations of data mining statistics and study of other self-organized maps (SOM clustering regions of workspace as generated by SAS Enterprise Miner version 4. Conclusions and future directions of the research are also presented.

  4. Effects of highly ripened cheeses on HL-60 human leukemia cells: antiproliferative activity and induction of apoptotic DNA damage.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Yasuda, S; Ohkura, N; Suzuki, K; Yamasaki, M; Nishiyama, K; Kobayashi, H; Hoshi, Y; Kadooka, Y; Igoshi, K

    2010-04-01

    To establish cheese as a dairy product with health benefits, we examined the multifunctional role of cheeses. In this report, we clarify whether different types of commercial cheeses may possess antiproliferative activity using HL-60 human promyelocytic leukemia cell lines as a cancer model. Among 12 cheese extracts tested, 6 (Montagnard, Pont-l'Eveque, Brie, Camembert, Danablue, and Blue) revealed strong growth inhibition activity and induction of DNA fragmentation in HL-60 cells. Based on the quantification of nitrogen contents in different cheese samples, a positive correlation between the ripeness of various cheeses and their antiproliferative activity tested in HL-60 cells was displayed. Four varieties of Blue cheese ripened for 0, 1, 2, or 3 mo demonstrated that the Blue cheese ripened for a long term was capable of causing the strong suppression of the cell growth and the induction of apoptotic DNA damage as well as nucleic morphological change in HL-60 cells. Collectively, these results obtained suggest a potential role of highly ripened cheeses in the prevention of leukemic cell proliferation. Copyright (c) 2010 American Dairy Science Association. Published by Elsevier Inc. All rights reserved.

  5. Correlation of chromosome patterns in human leukemic cells with exposure to chemicals and/or radiation. Progress report, January 1, 1981-December 31, 1981

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rowley, J.D.

    1981-08-01

    The overall aim is to determine whether there is a relationship between exposure to radiation, environmental pollutants, and/or genetic background and the development of ANLL or other hematologic malignancies. I will try to define the factors that influence the development of ANLL as a second malignancy in patients who have been exposed to large doses of radiotherapy and/or chemotherapeutic agents. Two long-term goals are (1) to identify the genes that are located at the sites of consistent translocations, and then to determine the alterations in gene function that are associated with these translocations and (2) to establish the baseline frequency of various chromosome changes (mutations) in myeloid cells and then to analyze the influence of various types of environmental exposure or medical treatment on this baseline mutation rate. Ultimately, it may be possible to determine the extent of mutagenic exposure in various populations through an analysis of the leukemic cells of that populations

  6. TAL1/SCL is downregulated upon histone deacetylase inhibition in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Cardoso, B. A.; de Almeida, S. F.; Laranjeira, A. B. A.; Carmo-Fonseca, M.; Yunes, J. A.; Coffer, P. J.; Barata, J. T.

    2011-01-01

    The transcription factor T-cell acute lymphocytic leukemia (TAL)-1 is a major T-cell oncogene associated with poor prognosis in T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL). TAL1 binds histone deacetylase 1 and incubation with histone deacetylase inhibitors (HDACis) promotes apoptosis of leukemia

  7. NALP3 inflammasome upregulation and CASP1 cleavage of the glucocorticoid receptor cause glucocorticoid resistance in leukemia cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    S.W. Paugh (Steven); E.J. Bonten (Erik J.); D. Savic (Daniel); L.B. Ramsey (Laura B.); W.E. Thierfelder (William E.); P. Gurung (Prajwal); R.K.S. Malireddi (R. K. Subbarao); M. Actis (Marcelo); A. Mayasundari (Anand); J. Min (Jaeki); D.R. Coss (David R.); L.T. Laudermilk (Lucas T.); J.C. Panetta (John); J.R. McCorkle (J. Robert); Y. Fan (Yiping); K.R. Crews (Kristine R.); G. Stocco (Gabriele); M.R. Wilkinson (Mark R.); A.M. Ferreira (Antonio M.); C. Cheng (Cheng); W. Yang (Wenjian); S.E. Karol (Seth E.); C.A. Fernandez (Christian A.); B. Diouf (Barthelemy); C. Smith (Colton); J.K. Hicks (J Kevin); A. Zanut (Alessandra); A. Giordanengo (Audrey); D.J. Crona; J.J. Bianchi (Joy J.); L. Holmfeldt (Linda); C.G. Mullighan (Charles); M.L. den Boer (Monique); R. Pieters (Rob); S. Jeha (Sima); T.L. Dunwell (Thomas L.); F. Latif (Farida); D. Bhojwani (Deepa); W.L. Carroll (William L.); C.-H. Pui (Ching-Hon); R.M. Myers (Richard M.); R.K. Guy (R Kiplin); T.-D. Kanneganti (Thirumala-Devi); M.V. Relling (Mary); W.E. Evans (William)

    2015-01-01

    textabstractGlucocorticoids are universally used in the treatment of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL), and resistance to glucocorticoids in leukemia cells confers poor prognosis. To elucidate mechanisms of glucocorticoid resistance, we determined the prednisolone sensitivity of primary leukemia

  8. Chronic lymphocytic leukemia: concepts and observations

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Chandra, P.; Chanana, A.D.; Chikkappa, G.; Cronkite, E.P.

    1977-01-01

    Thirty-five patients with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL) were studied for assessment of total body leukemic mass and abnormality in T-lymphocyte function associated with clinical stages of CLL. Total body potassium (TBK), an indicator of lean body mass, was found to correlate well with increase in the clinical stage of the disease. Use of TBK for monitoring the regression and relapse of leukemic load is suggested. No correlation was found between whole cell and nuclear volumes of lymphocytes in CLL patients and clinical stages of the disease. Blast transformation and proliferation under phytohemagglutinin (PHA) stimulation appeared to be normal in purified T cells of early stages and abnormal in the late stages of disease.

  9. Cell surface antigens of radiation leukemia virus-induced BALB/c leukemias defined by syngeneic cytotoxic T lymphocytes

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Kaneko, Yukio; Oettgen, H.F.; Obata, Yuichi; Nakayama, Eiichi.

    1989-01-01

    Two cell surface antigens of mouse leukemias were defined by BALB/c cytotoxic T lymphocytes (CTL) generated against syngeneic radiation leukemia virus (RadLV)-induced leukemia, BALBRV1 or BALBRVD. Hyperimmunization of BALB/c mice with irradiated leukemias followed by in vitro sensitization of primed spleen cells resulted in the generation of CTL with high killing activity. The specificity of CTL was examined by direct cytotoxicity assays and competitive inhibition assays. A shared cell surface antigen, designated as BALBRV1 antigen, was detected by BALB/c anti-BALBRV1 CTL. BALBRV1 antigen was expressed not only on RadLV-induced BALB/c leukemias except for BALBRVD, but also on spontaneous or X-ray-induced BALB/c leukemias, chemically-induced leukemias with the H-2 d haplotype and some chemically-induced BALB/c sarcomas. In contrast, a unique cell surface antigen, designated as BALBRVD antigen, was detected by BALB/c anti-BALBRVD CTL. BALBRVD antigen was expressed only on BALBRVD, but not on thirty-nine normal lymphoid or tumor cells. These two antigens could be distinguished from those previously defined on Friend, Moloney, Rauscher or Gross murine leukemia virus (MuLV) leukemias, or MuLV-related antigens. Both cytotoxic responses were blocked by antisera against H-2K d , but not H-2D d . The relationship of BALBRV1 antigen and BALBRVD antigen to endogenous MuLV is discussed with regard to the antigenic distribution on tumor cell lines. (author)

  10. Value of different modalities of granulocyte-macrophage colony-stimulating factor applied during or after induction therapy of acute myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Lowenberg, B; Boogaerts, MA; Daenen, SMGJ; Verhoef, GEG; Hagenbeek, A; Vellenga, E; Ossenkoppele, GJ; Huijgens, PC; Verdonck, LF; vanderLelie, J; Wielenga, JJ; Gmur, J; Gratwohl, A; Hess, U; Fey, MF; vanPutten, WLJ

    1997-01-01

    Purpose: The hematopoietic growth factors (HGFs) introduced into induction chemotherapy (CT) of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) might be of benefit to treatment outcome by at least two mechanisms. HGFs given on days simultaneously with CT might sensitize the leukemic cells and enhance their

  11. Translocation of BCR to chromosome 9: A new cytogenetic variant detected by FISH in two Ph-negative, BCR-positive patients with chronic myeloid leukemia

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    A. Hagemeijer (Anne); A. Buijs (Arjan); E.M.E. Smit (Elisabeth); L.A.J. Janssen (Bart); G.J.M. Creemers (Geert-Jan); D. van der Plas (D.); G.C. Grosveld (Gerard)

    1993-01-01

    textabstractLeukemic cells from two patients with Philadelphia-negative chronic myeloid leukemia (CML) were investigated: I) Cytogenetics showed a normal 46.XY karyotype in both cases, 2) molecular studies revealed rearrangement of the M-BCR region and formation of BCR-ABL fusion mRNA with b2a2

  12. The ROS/SUMO Axis Contributes to the Response of Acute Myeloid Leukemia Cells to Chemotherapeutic Drugs

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Guillaume Bossis

    2014-06-01

    Full Text Available Chemotherapeutic drugs used in the treatment of acute myeloid leukemias (AMLs are thought to induce cancer cell death through the generation of DNA double-strand breaks. Here, we report that one of their early effects is the loss of conjugation of the ubiquitin-like protein SUMO from its targets via reactive oxygen species (ROS-dependent inhibition of the SUMO-conjugating enzymes. Desumoylation regulates the expression of specific genes, such as the proapoptotic gene DDIT3, and helps induce apoptosis in chemosensitive AMLs. In contrast, chemotherapeutics do not activate the ROS/SUMO axis in chemoresistant cells. However, pro-oxidants or inhibition of the SUMO pathway by anacardic acid restores DDIT3 expression and apoptosis in chemoresistant cell lines and patient samples, including leukemic stem cells. Finally, inhibition of the SUMO pathway decreases tumor growth in mice xenografted with AML cells. Thus, targeting the ROS/SUMO axis might constitute a therapeutic strategy for AML patients resistant to conventional chemotherapies.

  13. An Urologic Face of Chronic Lymphocytic Leukemia:Sequential Prostatic and Penis Localization

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Giovanni D'Arena

    2013-01-01

    Full Text Available We report a patient with chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL in whom a leukemic involvement of prostate and penis occurred in the advanced phase of his disease. Obstructive urinary symptoms were indicative of prostatic CLL infiltration, followed by the occurrence of an ulcerative lesion on the glans. Histologic examination confirmed  the  neoplastic B-cell infiltration. Both localizations responded to conventional treatments. A review of the literature confirms that leukemic involvement of the genito-urinary system is   uncommon in CLL patients. However, such an involvement should be considered in CLL patients with urologic symptoms and a long history of the disease.

  14. Retroviral expression screening of oncogenes in natural killer cell leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Choi, Young Lim; Moriuchi, Ryozo; Osawa, Mitsujiro; Iwama, Atsushi; Makishima, Hideki; Wada, Tomoaki; Kisanuki, Hiroyuki; Kaneda, Ruri; Ota, Jun; Koinuma, Koji; Ishikawa, Madoka; Takada, Shuji; Yamashita, Yoshihiro; Oshimi, Kazuo; Mano, Hiroyuki

    2005-08-01

    Aggressive natural killer cell leukemia (ANKL) is an intractable malignancy that is characterized by the outgrowth of NK cells. To identify transforming genes in ANKL, we constructed a retroviral cDNA expression library from an ANKL cell line KHYG-1. Infection of 3T3 cells with recombinant retroviruses yielded 33 transformed foci. Nucleotide sequencing of the DNA inserts recovered from these foci revealed that 31 of them encoded KRAS2 with a glycine-to-alanine mutation at codon 12. Mutation-specific PCR analysis indicated that the KRAS mutation was present only in KHYG-1 cells, not in another ANKL cell line or in clinical specimens (n=8).

  15. In Vitro Pre-Clinical Validation of Suicide Gene Modified Anti-CD33 Redirected Chimeric Antigen Receptor T-Cells for Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Kentaro Minagawa

    Full Text Available Approximately fifty percent of patients with acute myeloid leukemia can be cured with current therapeutic strategies which include, standard dose chemotherapy for patients at standard risk of relapse as assessed by cytogenetic and molecular analysis, or high-dose chemotherapy with allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant for high-risk patients. Despite allogeneic hematopoietic stem cell transplant about 25% of patients still succumb to disease relapse, therefore, novel strategies are needed to improve the outcome of patients with acute myeloid leukemia.We developed an immunotherapeutic strategy targeting the CD33 myeloid antigen, expressed in ~ 85-90% of patients with acute myeloid leukemia, using chimeric antigen receptor redirected T-cells. Considering that administration of CAR T-cells has been associated with cytokine release syndrome and other potential off-tumor effects in patients, safety measures were here investigated and reported. We genetically modified human activated T-cells from healthy donors or patients with acute myeloid leukemia with retroviral supernatant encoding the inducible Caspase9 suicide gene, a ΔCD19 selectable marker, and a humanized third generation chimeric antigen receptor recognizing human CD33. ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells had a 75±3.8% (average ± standard error of the mean chimeric antigen receptor expression, were able to specifically lyse CD33+ targets in vitro, including freshly isolated leukemic blasts from patients, produce significant amount of tumor-necrosis-factor-alpha and interferon-gamma, express the CD107a degranulation marker, and proliferate upon antigen specific stimulation. Challenging ΔCD19 selected inducible Caspase9-CAR.CD33 T-cells with programmed-death-ligand-1 enriched leukemia blasts resulted in significant killing like observed for the programmed-death-ligand-1 negative leukemic blasts fraction. Since the administration of 10 nanomolar of a non

  16. Aberrant Signaling Pathways in T-Cell Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia

    Science.gov (United States)

    Bongiovanni, Deborah; Saccomani, Valentina

    2017-01-01

    T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL) is an aggressive disease caused by the malignant transformation of immature progenitors primed towards T-cell development. Clinically, T-ALL patients present with diffuse infiltration of the bone marrow by immature T-cell blasts high blood cell counts, mediastinal involvement, and diffusion to the central nervous system. In the past decade, the genomic landscape of T-ALL has been the target of intense research. The identification of specific genomic alterations has contributed to identify strong oncogenic drivers and signaling pathways regulating leukemia growth. Notwithstanding, T-ALL patients are still treated with high-dose multiagent chemotherapy, potentially exposing these patients to considerable acute and long-term side effects. This review summarizes recent advances in our understanding of the signaling pathways relevant for the pathogenesis of T-ALL and the opportunities offered for targeted therapy. PMID:28872614

  17. Oxidative stress in normal hematopoietic stem cells and leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Samimi, Azin; Kalantari, Heybatullah; Lorestani, Marzieh Zeinvand; Shirzad, Reza; Saki, Najmaldin

    2018-04-01

    Leukemia is developed following the abnormal proliferation of immature hematopoietic cells in the blood when hematopoietic stem cells lose the ability to turn into mature cells at different stages of maturation and differentiation. Leukemia initiating cells are specifically dependent upon the suppression of oxidative stress in the hypoglycemic bone marrow (BM) environment to be able to start their activities. Relevant literature was identified by a PubMed search (2000-2017) of English-language literature using the terms 'oxidative stress,' 'reactive oxygen species,' 'hematopoietic stem cell,' and 'leukemia.' The generation and degradation of free radicals is a main component of the metabolism in aerobic organisms. A certain level of ROS is required for proper cellular function, but values outside this range will result in oxidative stress (OS). Long-term overactivity of reactive oxygen species (ROS) has harmful effects on the function of cells and their vital macromolecules, including the transformation of proteins into autoantigens and increased degradation of protein/DNA, which eventually leads to the change in pathways involved in the development of cancer and several other disorders. According to the metabolic disorders of cancer, the relationship between OS changes, the viability of cancer cells, and their response to chemotherapeutic agents affecting this pathway are undeniable. Recently, studies have been conducted to determine the effect of herbal agents and cancer chemotherapy drugs on oxidative stress pathways. By emphasizing the role of oxidative stress on stem cells in the incidence of leukemia, this paper attempts to state and summarize this subject. © 2018 APMIS. Published by John Wiley & Sons Ltd.

  18. Are there unexploited possibilities for the therapeutic use of radioactive and stable isotopically labeled DNA precursors and extracorporeal irradiation of the blood in treatment of leukemia

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Cronkite, E.P.; Fairchild, R.G.; Miller, M.E.

    1983-01-01

    The radiobiology of tritium and iodine-125 is reviewed. The killing of cells and apparent beneficial effect of tritiated thymidine in human leukemia are described. The reasons for considering the use of tritiated thymidine and/or 125 I deoxyuridine to attack leukemic cells in sanctuaries are discussed. Photon activation therapy as a method to improve effectiveness of extracorporeal irradiation of the blood is presented showing that one can in principle substantially increase the radiation dose to the leukemic cells and reduce the dose to red cells in transit through the irradiator. (orig.)

  19. Reanalysis of atomic bomb survivors' leukemia based on the recent classification for leukemias

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Matsuo, Tatsuki; Tomonaga, Masao.

    1990-01-01

    Four hundred and ninety-three A-bomb survivors developing leukemia, who had been exposed within 9,000 m from the hypocenter, were entered on the study for reanalysis of their disease based on the new classification. Chronic myelocytic leukemia (CML) showed the highest concordance rate (95%) between the previous and new classifications. For 10 survivors previously diagnosed as having chronic lymphocytic leukemia (CLL), a new classification diagnosed CLL as well in 3 and adult T-cell leukemia in the other 7. None of the A-bomb survivors exposed to one Gy or more had subtype M3 of acute myelocytic leukemia (AML), although the exposed group had almost the same distribution pattern of AML subtypes as the naturally induced leukemic group. The incidence of CML was significantly lower than that of AML in Nagasaki A-bomb survivors. As A-bomb survivors were older at the time of A-bombing, the relative risk of acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) was decreased; that of CML and other types of leukemia was increased. An increased relative risk of ALL and CML tended to be associated with larger doses. A significantly shortened interval between A-bomb exposure and the development of leukemia was also associated with larger doses. (N.K.)

  20. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun; Zhuang, Wen-Fang

    2015-01-01

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice

  1. SphK1 inhibitor II (SKI-II) inhibits acute myelogenous leukemia cell growth in vitro and in vivo

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Yang, Li; Weng, Wei; Sun, Zhi-Xin; Fu, Xian-Jie; Ma, Jun, E-mail: majuntongrensh1@126.com; Zhuang, Wen-Fang, E-mail: wenfangzhuangmd@163.com

    2015-05-15

    Previous studies have identified sphingosine kinase 1 (SphK1) as a potential drug target for treatment of acute myeloid leukemia (AML). In the current study, we investigated the potential anti-leukemic activity of a novel and specific SphK1 inhibitor, SKI-II. We demonstrated that SKI-II inhibited growth and survival of human AML cell lines (HL-60 and U937 cells). SKI-II was more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors SK1-I and FTY720 in inhibiting AML cells. Meanwhile, it induced dramatic apoptosis in above AML cells, and the cytotoxicity by SKI-II was almost reversed by the general caspase inhibitor z-VAD-fmk. SKI-II treatment inhibited SphK1 activation, and concomitantly increased level of sphingosine-1-phosphate (S1P) precursor ceramide in AML cells. Conversely, exogenously-added S1P protected against SKI-II-induced cytotoxicity, while cell permeable short-chain ceramide (C6) aggravated SKI-II's lethality against AML cells. Notably, SKI-II induced potent apoptotic death in primary human AML cells, but was generally safe to the human peripheral blood mononuclear cells (PBMCs) isolated from healthy donors. In vivo, SKI-II administration suppressed growth of U937 leukemic xenograft tumors in severe combined immunodeficient (SCID) mice. These results suggest that SKI-II might be further investigated as a promising anti-AML agent. - Highlights: • SKI-II inhibits proliferation and survival of primary and transformed AML cells. • SKI-II induces apoptotic death of AML cells, but is safe to normal PBMCs. • SKI-II is more efficient than two known SphK1 inhibitors in inhibiting AML cells. • SKI-II inhibits SphK1 activity, while increasing ceramide production in AML cells. • SKI-II dose-dependently inhibits U937 xenograft growth in SCID mice.

  2. Diethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone), a potent inhibitor of mammalian S-adenosylmethionine decarboxylase. Effects on cell proliferation and polyamine metabolism in L1210 leukemia cells.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Svensson, F; Kockum, I; Persson, L

    1993-07-21

    The polyamines are cell constituents essential for growth and differentiation. S-Adenosylmethionine decarboxylase (AdoMetDC) catalyzes a key step in the polyamine biosynthetic pathway. Methylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (MGBG) is an anti-leukemic agent with a strong inhibitory effect against AdoMetDC. However, the lack of specificity limits the usefulness of MGBG. In the present report we have used an analog of MGBG, diethylglyoxal bis(guanylhydrazone) (DEGBG), with a much greater specificity and potency against AdoMetDC, to investigate the effects of AdoMetDC inhibition on cell proliferation and polyamine metabolism in mouse L1210 leukemia cells. DEGBG was shown to effectively inhibit AdoMetDC activity in exponentially growing L1210 cells. The inhibition of AdoMetDC was reflected in a marked decrease in the cellular concentrations of spermidine and spermine. The concentration of putrescine, on the other hand, was greatly increased. Treatment with DEGBG resulted in a compensatory increase in the synthesis of AdoMetDC demonstrating an efficient feedback control. Cells seeded in the presence of DEGBG ceased to grow after a lag period of 1-2 days, indicating that the cells contained an excess of polyamines which were sufficient for one or two cell cycles in the absence of polyamine synthesis. The present results indicate that analogs of MGBG, having a greater specificity against AdoMetDC, might be valuable for studies concerning polyamines and cell proliferation.

  3. Antigen Expression on Blast Cells and Hematological Parameters at Presentation in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia Patients

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Naeem, S.; Bukhari, M. H.

    2015-01-01

    Objective: To analyze the expression of various antigens on the leukemic blasts and to determine the hematological parameters, in Acute Lymphoblastic Leukemia (ALL) patients at presentation. Study Design: Observational study. Place and Duration of Study: King Edward Medical University, Lahore and Hameed Latif Hospital, Lahore, from February 2013 to March 2014. Methodology: A total of 50 newly diagnosed and untreated patients of ALL were selected from Mayo Hospital and Hameed Latif Hospital. These patients included both genders and all age groups. Hemoglobin, total leukocyte count and platelet count were determined on hematology analyser-Sysmex-Kx-2I. Blast cell percentage was estimated on Giemsa stained blood smears. Immuno phenotyping was done on bone marrow samples by 5 colour flow cytometery on Beckman Counter Navious Flow cytometer. An acute leukemia panel of 23 antibodies was used. The data was entered and analyzed in SPSS version 22. Results: Of the 50 ALL patients, 36 (72 percentage) were B-ALL and 14 (28 percentage) T-ALL. There were 18 (36 percentage) children and 32 (64 percentage) adults. T-ALL included 22 percentage of the childhood and 31 percentage of the adult cases. Immuno phenotypic analysis showed that CD19, CD79a and CD20 were B-lineage specific markers whereas cCD3, CD3 and CD5 were T-lineage specific. CD10 was the most sensitive marker for B-ALL and CD7 was the most sensitive marker of T-ALL. TdT was expressed in 92 percentage B-ALL and 71 percentage T-ALL cases, CD34 in 58 percentage and 43 percentage cases and CD45 in 83 percentage and 100 percentage respectively. High leukocyte count (> 50 x 109/L) was present in 58 percentage cases. Hemoglobin was < 10 g/dl in 74 percentage patients and platelet count was below 20 x 109/Lin 12 percentage patients. Leukocyte count, hemoglobin, platelet count and blast cell percentage did not show a significant difference in the two ALL immuno types. Conclusion: The frequency of T-ALL is higher in childhood

  4. Regulation of CD95 expression and CD95-mediated cell death by interferon-gamma in acute lymphoblastic leukemia with chromosomal translocation t(4;11).

    Science.gov (United States)

    Dörrie, J; Schuh, W; Keil, A; Bongards, E; Greil, J; Fey, G H; Zunino, S J

    1999-10-01

    The regulatory effects of IFNgamma on CD95 expression and CD95-mediated cell death were investigated in three high-risk pro-B acute lymphoblastic leukemia (ALL) lines that carry the chromosomal translocation t(4;11)(q21;q23). These leukemias are characteristically refractory to conventional chemotherapeutic treatments operating through the induction of apoptosis. However, the mechanisms leading to increased cell survival and resistance to cell death in these leukemias are largely unknown. Interferon-gamma (IFNgamma), a potent inhibitor of hematopoiesis, acts in part by upregulating CD95 and sensitizing cells to CD95-induced apoptosis. The t(4;11) lines SEM, RS4;11, and MV4;11 expressed low levels of CD95, but were completely resistant to CD95-mediated death. Addition of IFNgamma markedly upregulated CD95 expression in SEM (8-9-fold), RS4;11 (2-3-fold), and MV4;11 (2-3-fold) lines. However, after treatment with IFNgamma, only an 11% increase in sensitivity to CD95-mediated cell death was observed in SEM cells, whereas RS4;11 and MV4;11 cells remained resistant. Cycloheximide, but not actinomycin D or brefeldin A, increased CD95-specific cell death only in IFNgamma-treated RS4;11 cells by approximately 12%. Abundant levels of Bcl-2 and Bcl-XL, known to inhibit CD95-signaling in some cells, were present suggesting a possible role for both molecules in the resistance to CD95-mediated cell death. Resistance of the leukemic blasts to CD95-mediated cell death and the failure of IFNgamma to substantially sensitize the CD95-signaling pathway may contribute to the highly malignant phenotype of pro-B ALL with translocation t(4;11).

  5. Peripheral blood changes preceding the development of leukemia in atomic bomb survivors: Hiroshima and Nagasaki, 1947--1962

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Hoshino, T; Finch, S C; Lamphere, J P; Ishimaru, T

    1975-01-01

    The peripheral blood changes in 44 patients who died of either acute leukemia or chronic granulocytic leukemia were evaluated during the preleukemic phase of their clinical illnesses at the time of routine health examination. The most striking finding was the presence of increased numbers of atypical and abnormal lymphocytes in the peripheral blood for periods of 3 to 4 years prior to establishment of the clinical diagnosis of both acute and chronic leukemia. Moderate leukocytosis with left-shifted myeloid cells and basophilia preceded the diagnosis of chronic granulocytic leukemia by 1 or 2 years. Basophilia did not occur in the absence of leukocytosis. The lymphocyte changes suggest the possibility that the host response to underlying clones of leukemic cells may exist for several years prior to the emergence of clinical leukemia. None of the preleukemic hematologic changes which previously have been defined in the preleukemic syndrome for acute leukemia was observed in any of the patients.

  6. Transcriptional activation of prostate specific homeobox gene NKX3-1 in subsets of T-cell lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Stefan Nagel

    Full Text Available Homeobox genes encode transcription factors impacting key developmental processes including embryogenesis, organogenesis, and cell differentiation. Reflecting their tight transcriptional control, homeobox genes are often embedded in large non-coding, cis-regulatory regions, containing tissue specific elements. In T-cell acute lymphoblastic leukemia (T-ALL homeobox genes are frequently deregulated by chromosomal aberrations, notably translocations adding T-cell specific activatory elements. NKX3-1 is a prostate specific homeobox gene activated in T-ALL patients expressing oncogenic TAL1 or displaying immature T-cell characteristics. After investigating regulation of NKX3-1 in primary cells and cell lines, we report its ectopic expression in T-ALL cells independent of chromosomal rearrangements. Using siRNAs and expression profiling, we exploited NKX3-1 positive T-ALL cell lines as tools to investigate aberrant activatory mechanisms. Our data confirmed NKX3-1 activation by TAL1/GATA3/LMO and identified LYL1 as an alternative activator in immature T-ALL cells devoid of GATA3. Moreover, we showed that NKX3-1 is directly activated by early T-cell homeodomain factor MSX2. These activators were regulated by MLL and/or by IL7-, BMP4- and IGF2-signalling. Finally, we demonstrated homeobox gene SIX6 as a direct leukemic target of NKX3-1 in T-ALL. In conclusion, we identified three major mechanisms of NKX3-1 regulation in T-ALL cell lines which are represented by activators TAL1, LYL1 and MSX2, corresponding to particular T-ALL subtypes described in patients. These results may contribute to the understanding of leukemic transcriptional networks underlying disturbed T-cell differentiation in T-ALL.

  7. Colloidal silver nanoparticles improve anti-leukemic drug efficacy via amplification of oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Guo, Dawei; Zhang, Junren; Huang, Zhihai; Jiang, Shanxiang; Gu, Ning

    2015-02-01

    Recently, increased reactive oxygen species (ROS) levels and altered redox status in cancer cells have become a novel therapeutic strategy to improve cancer selectivity over normal cells. It has been known that silver nanoparticles (AgNPs) display anti-leukemic activity via ROS overproduction. Hence, we hypothesized that AgNPs could improve therapeutic efficacy of ROS-generating agents against leukemia cells. In the current study, N-(4-hydroxyphenyl)retinamide (4-HPR), a synthetic retinoid, was used as a drug model of ROS induction to investigate its synergistic effect with AgNPs. The data exhibited that AgNPs with uniform size prepared by an electrochemical method could localize in the lysosomes, mitochondria and cytoplasm of SHI-1 cells. More importantly, AgNPs together with 4-HPR could exhibit more cytotoxicity and apoptosis via overproduction of ROS in comparison with that alone. Taken together, these results reveal that AgNPs combined with ROS-generating drugs could potentially enhance therapeutic efficacy against leukemia cells, thereby providing a novel strategy for AgNPs in leukemia therapy. Copyright © 2015. Published by Elsevier B.V.

  8. Bone marrow stromal elements in murine leukemia; Decreased CSF-producing fibroblasts and normal IL-1 expression by macrophages

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Ben-Ishay, Z [Laboratory of Experimental Hematology, Department of Anatomy and Embryology, Hebrew University-Hadassah Medical School (Israel); Barak, V [Laboratory of Immunology, Department of Oncology, Hadassah University Hospital (Israel); Shoshan, S [Faculty of Dental Medicine, Connective Tissue Research Laboratory, Hebrew University, Jerusalem (Israel); Prindull, G [Department of Pediatrics, University of Gottingen, Gottingen (Germany, F.R.)

    1990-01-01

    A study of bone marrow stromal elements in murine acute myeloid leukemia (AML) was carried out. Our previous studies had indicated marrow stromal deficiency in murine AML. In the current investigation, separate stromal cells were cultured and the results obtained have shown that, while marrow stromal macrophages are normal in leukemia and express adequate amounts of IL-1, the fibroblasts are markedly reduced. However, if sufficient fibroblasts are pooled in vitro, they produce adequate amounts of CSF. Test of TNF{alpha} in leukemic cells CM, as possible cause of marrow stromal inhibition in leukemia, had not disclosed this cytokine. Further, it was observed that total body lethal irradiation of leukemic mice aggravates the stromal deficiency, confirming results of our previous investigations. It is concluded that bone marrow stromal deficiency in murine AML is due to decreased fibroblasts and, implicity, reduced CSF production. (author).

  9. Acute unclassified leukemia: A clinicopathologic study with diagnostic implications of electron microscopy.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Youness, E; Trujillo, J M; Ahearn, M J; McCredie, K B; Cork, A

    1980-01-01

    By rigid cytological and cytochemical criteria, the diagnosis of acute and undifferentiated leukemia was established in 22 patients. According to defined criteria, the leukemic cells could not be classified by conventional light microscopic techniques employed in the study of hematopoietic tissue. Cytochemical studies including peroxidase, periodic acid schiff (PAS) and nonspecific esterase (alpha napthyl butyrate-reacting esterase) stains were done on fresh bone marrow samples, and the percentage of positive leukemia cells for each of these stains was determined on 200 cells. In this series of leukemias, cytochemistry at the light microscope level did not contribute to further classification. Subsequent electron microscopic examination of bone marrow samples from these patients confirmed the immaturity and nuclear/cytoplasmic asynchrony of the leukemic cells. Several in vivo neoplastic markers, such as nuclear blebs, increased nuclear bodies, and cytoplasmic fibrillar bundles could be demonstrated in these cells. Fourteen cases from this series exhibited peroxidase-positive developmental granule formation at the ultrastructural level and were reclassified as acute granulocyte leukemia (AGL). One case was reclassified as lymphoma (poor differentiated type), one case was diagnosed as acute monocytic leukemia (AmonoL), and six cases remained in the undifferentiated category (AUL). Clinical and laboratory features, response to treatment, and survival data were evaluated for these patients. This study demonstrated that electron microscopy is useful in the cytological diagnosis of human leukemia.

  10. KIT D816V Positive Acute Mast Cell Leukemia Associated with Normal Karyotype Acute Myeloid Leukemia.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Lopes, Marta; Teixeira, Maria Dos Anjos; Casais, Cláudia; Mesquita, Vanessa; Seabra, Patrícia; Cabral, Renata; Palla-García, José; Lau, Catarina; Rodrigues, João; Jara-Acevedo, Maria; Freitas, Inês; Vizcaíno, Jose Ramón; Coutinho, Jorge; Escribano, Luis; Orfao, Alberto; Lima, Margarida

    2018-01-01

    Mast cell (MC) leukemia (MCL) is extremely rare. We present a case of MCL diagnosed concomitantly with acute myeloblastic leukemia (AML). A 41-year-old woman presented with asthenia, anorexia, fever, epigastralgia, and diarrhea. She had a maculopapular skin rash, hepatosplenomegaly, retroperitoneal adenopathies, pancytopenia, 6% blast cells (BC) and 20% MC in the peripheral blood, elevated lactate dehydrogenase, cholestasis, hypoalbuminemia, hypogammaglobulinemia, and increased serum tryptase (184  μ g/L). The bone marrow (BM) smears showed 24% myeloblasts, 17% promyelocytes, and 16% abnormal toluidine blue positive MC, and flow cytometry revealed 12% myeloid BC, 34% aberrant promyelocytes, a maturation blockage at the myeloblast/promyelocyte level, and 16% abnormal CD2-CD25+ MC. The BM karyotype was normal, and the KIT D816V mutation was positive in BM cells. The diagnosis of MCL associated with AML was assumed. The patient received corticosteroids, disodium cromoglycate, cladribine, idarubicin and cytosine arabinoside, high-dose cytosine arabinoside, and hematopoietic stem cell transplantation (HSCT). The outcome was favorable, with complete hematological remission two years after diagnosis and one year after HSCT. This case emphasizes the need of an exhaustive laboratory evaluation for the concomitant diagnosis of MCL and AML, and the therapeutic options.

  11. Adaptive immunity to leukemia is inhibited by cross-reactive induced regulatory T cells

    OpenAIRE

    Manlove, Luke S.; Berquam-Vrieze, Katherine E.; Pauken, Kristen E.; Williams, Richard T.; Jenkins, Marc K.; Farrar, Michael A.

    2015-01-01

    BCR-ABL+ acute lymphoblastic leukemia patients have transient responses to current therapies. However, the fusion of BCR to ABL generates a potential leukemia-specific antigen that could be a target for immunotherapy. We demonstrate that the immune system can limit BCR-ABL+ leukemia progression although ultimately this immune response fails. To address how BCR-ABL+ leukemia escapes immune surveillance, we developed a peptide: MHC-II tetramer that labels endogenous BCR-ABL-specific CD4+ T cell...

  12. A micro-Raman spectroscopic investigation of leukemic U-937 cells treated with Crotalaria agatiflora Schweinf and the isolated compound madurensine

    Science.gov (United States)

    le Roux, Karlien; Prinsloo, Linda C.; Hussein, Ahmed A.; Lall, Namrita

    In South Africa traditional medicine plays an important role in primary health care and therefore it is very important that the medicinal use of plants is scientifically tested for toxicity and effectiveness. It was established that the ethanolic extract of the leaves of Crotalaria agatiflora, as well as the isolated compound madurensine, is moderately toxic against leukemic U-937 cells. Light microscopic investigations indicated that symptoms of cell death are induced during treatments, but flow cytometry analysis of treated cells, using annexin-V and propidium iodide, showed that apoptosis and necrosis are insignificantly induced. The Raman results suggested that protein extraction and DNA melting occur in the cells during treatment with the ethanolic extracts (IC50 value 73.9 μg/mL), drastically changing the molecular content of the cells. In contrast, treatment with madurensine (IC50 value 136.5 μg/mL), an isolated pyrrolizidine alkaloid from the ethanolic extract of the leaves, did not have the same effect. The results are also compared to that of cells treated with actinomycin D, a compound known to induce apoptosis. The investigation showed that micro-Raman spectroscopy has great promise to be used for initial screening of samples to determine the effects of different treatments on cancerous cell lines together with conventional methods. The results highlight the fact that for many natural products used for medicinal purposes, the therapeutic effect of the crude plant extract tends to be significantly more effective than the particular action of its individual constituents.

  13. Differential binding activity of the transcription factor LIL-Stat in immature and differentiated normal and leukemic myeloid cells

    NARCIS (Netherlands)

    Tuyt, LML; Bregman, K; Lummen, C; Dokter, WHA; Vellenga, E

    1998-01-01

    Cytokines and growth factors induce activation of the family of signal transducers and activators of transcription (Stats) that directly activate gene expression. Recently, constitutively activated Stat1, Stat3, and Stat5 were identified in nuclear extracts of acute myeloid leukemia (AML) patients,

  14. Cytotoxic Capacity of IL-15-Stimulated Cytokine-Induced Killer Cells Against Human Acute Myeloid Leukemia and Rhabdomyosarcoma in Humanized Preclinical Mouse Models

    Energy Technology Data Exchange (ETDEWEB)

    Rettinger, Eva; Meyer, Vida; Kreyenberg, Hermann [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Volk, Andreas [Chemotherapeutisches Forschungsinstitut, Georg-Speyer-Haus, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Kuçi, Selim; Willasch, Andre [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Koscielniak, Ewa [Department of Pediatric Oncology and Hematology, Olgahospital Stuttgart, Stuttgart (Germany); Fulda, Simone [Institute for Experimental Cancer Research in Pediatrics, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Wels, Winfried S. [Chemotherapeutisches Forschungsinstitut, Georg-Speyer-Haus, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Boenig, Halvard [Institute for Transfusion Medicine and Immunohematology, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Division for Cell Processing, German Red Cross Blood Donor Service Baden-Württemberg-Hessen, Frankfurt/Main (Germany); Klingebiel, Thomas; Bader, Peter, E-mail: eva.rettinger@kgu.de, E-mail: peter.bader@kgu.de [Department of Pediatric Hematology, Oncology and Hemostaseology, University Children’s Hospital of Frankfurt/Main, Goethe-University Frankfurt/Main, Frankfurt/Main (Germany)

    2012-04-09

    Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT) has become an important treatment modality for patients with high-risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML) and is also under investigation for soft tissue sarcomas. The therapeutic success is still limited by minimal residual disease (MRD) status ultimately leading to patients’ relapse. Adoptive donor lymphocyte infusions based on MRD status using IL-15-expanded cytokine-induced killer (CIK) cells may prevent relapse without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD). To generate preclinical data we developed mouse models to study anti-leukemic- and anti-tumor-potential of CIK cells in vivo. Immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/IL-2Rγc{sup −}, NSG) were injected intravenously with human leukemic cell lines THP-1, SH-2 and with human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS) cell lines RH41 and RH30 at minimal doses required for leukemia or tumor engraftment. Mice transplanted with THP-1 or RH41 cells were randomly assigned for analysis of CIK cell treatment. Organs of mice were analyzed by flow cytometry as well as quantitative polymerase chain reaction for engraftment of malignant cells and CIK cells. Potential of CIK cells to induce GvHD was determined by histological analysis. Tissues of the highest degree of THP-1 cell expansion included bone marrow followed by liver, lung, spleen, peripheral blood (PB), and brain. RH30 and RH41 engraftment mainly took place in liver and lung, but was also detectable in spleen and PB. In spite of delayed CIK cell expansion compared with malignant cells, CIK cells injected at equal amounts were sufficient for significant reduction of RH41 cells, whereas against fast-expanding THP-1 cells 250 times more CIK than THP-1 cells were needed to achieve comparable results. Our preclinical in vivo mouse models showed a reliable 100% engraftment of malignant cells which is essential for analysis of anti-cancer therapy. Furthermore our data demonstrated that IL-15-activated CIK cells have potent cytotoxic capacity

  15. Halofuginone has anti-proliferative effects in acute promyelocytic leukemia by modulating the transforming growth factor beta signaling pathway.

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Lorena L de Figueiredo-Pontes

    Full Text Available Promyelocytic leukemia-retinoic acid receptor alpha (PML-RARα expression in acute promyelocytic leukemia (APL impairs transforming growth factor beta (TGFβ signaling, leading to cell growth advantage. Halofuginone (HF, a low-molecular-weight alkaloid that modulates TGFβ signaling, was used to treat APL cell lines and non-obese diabetic/severe combined immunodeficiency (NOD/SCID mice subjected to transplantation with leukemic cells from human chorionic gonadotrophin-PML-RARα transgenic mice (TG. Cell cycle analysis using incorporated bromodeoxyuridine and 7-amino-actinomycin D showed that, in NB4 and NB4-R2 APL cell lines, HF inhibited cellular proliferation (P<0.001 and induced apoptosis (P = 0.002 after a 24-hour incubation. Addition of TGFβ revealed that NB4 cells were resistant to its growth-suppressive effects and that HF induced these effects in the presence or absence of the cytokine. Cell growth inhibition was associated with up-regulation of TGFβ target genes involved in cell cycle regulation (TGFB, TGFBRI, SMAD3, p15, and p21 and down-regulation of MYC. Additionally, TGFβ protein levels were decreased in leukemic TG animals and HF in vivo could restore TGFβ values to normal. To test the in vivo anti-leukemic activity of HF, we transplanted NOD/SCID mice with TG leukemic cells and treated them with HF for 21 days. HF induced partial hematological remission in the peripheral blood, bone marrow, and spleen. Together, these results suggest that HF has anti-proliferative and anti-leukemic effects by reversing the TGFβ blockade in APL. Since loss of the TGFβ response in leukemic cells may be an important second oncogenic hit, modulation of TGFβ signaling may be of therapeutic interest.

  16. Camptothecin and khat (Catha edulis Forsk. induced distinct cell death phenotypes involving modulation of c-FLIPL, Mcl-1, procaspase-8 and mitochondrial function in acute myeloid leukemia cell lines

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Fossan Kjell O

    2009-11-01

    Full Text Available Abstract Background An organic extract of the recreational herb khat (Catha edulis Forsk. triggers cell death in various leukemia cell lines in vitro. The chemotherapeutics camptothecin, a plant alkaloid topoisomerase I inhibitor, was tested side-by-side with khat in a panel of acute myeloid leukemia cell lines to elucidate mechanisms of toxicity. Results Khat had a profound effect on MOLM-13 cells inducing mitochondrial damage, chromatin margination and morphological features of autophagy. The effects of khat on mitochondrial ultrastructure in MOLM-13 correlated with strongly impaired routine respiration, an effect neither found in the khat-resistant MV-4-11 cells nor in camptothecin treated cells. Enforced expression of anti-apoptotic Bcl-2 protein provided protection against camptothecin-induced cell death and partly against khat toxicity. Khat-induced cell death in MOLM-13 cells included reduced levels of anti-apoptotic Mcl-1 protein, while both khat and camptothecin induced c-FLIPL cleavage and procaspase-8 activation. Conclusion Khat activated a distinct cell death pathway in sensitive leukemic cells as compared to camptothecin, involving mitochondrial damage and morphological features of autophagy. This suggests that khat should be further explored in the search for novel experimental therapeutics.

  17. The cathepsin B inhibitor z-FA-CMK induces cell death in leukemic T cells via oxidative stress.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Liow, K Y; Chow, Sek C

    2018-01-01

    The cathepsin B inhibitor benzyloxycarbonyl-phenylalanine-alanine-chloromethyl ketone (z-FA-CMK) was recently found to induce apoptosis at low concentrations in Jurkat T cells, while at higher concentrations, the cells die of necrosis. In the present study, we showed that z-FA-CMK readily depletes intracellular glutathione (GSH) with a concomitant increase in reactive oxygen species (ROS) generation. The toxicity of z-FA-CMK in Jurkat T cells was completely abrogated by N-acetylcysteine (NAC), suggesting that the toxicity mediated by z-FA-CMK is due to oxidative stress. We found that L-buthionine sulfoximine (BSO) which depletes intracellular GSH through the inhibition of GSH biosynthesis in Jurkat T cells did not promote ROS increase or induce cell death. However, NAC was still able to block z-FA-CMK toxicity in Jurkat T cells in the presence of BSO, indicating that the protective effect of NAC does not involve GSH biosynthesis. This is further corroborated by the protective effect of the non-metabolically active D-cysteine on z-FA-CMK toxicity. Furthermore, in BSO-treated cells, z-FA-CMK-induced ROS increased which remains unchanged, suggesting that the depletion of GSH and increase in ROS generation mediated by z-FA-CMK may be two separate events. Collectively, our results demonstrated that z-FA-CMK toxicity is mediated by oxidative stress through the increase in ROS generation.

  18. Cytotoxic capacity of IL-15-stimulated cytokine-induced killer cells against human acute myeloid leukemia and rhabdomyosarcoma in humanized preclinical mouse models

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Eva eRettinger

    2012-04-01

    Full Text Available Allogeneic stem cell transplantation (allo-SCT has become an important treatment modality for patients with high risk acute myeloid leukemia (AML and is also under investigation for soft tissue sarcomas. The therapeutic success is still limited by minimal residual disease (MRD status ultimately leading to patients’ relapse. Adoptive donor lymphocyte infusions (DLI based on MRD status using IL-15-expanded cytokine-induced killer (CIK cells may prevent relapse without causing graft-versus-host-disease (GvHD. To generate preclinical data we developed mouse models to study anti-leukemic- and anti-tumor-potential of CIK cells in vivo. Immunodeficient mice (NOD/SCID/IL2Rγc-, NSG were injected intravenously with human leukemic cell lines THP-1, SH-2 and with human rhabdomyosarcoma (RMS cell lines RH41 and RH30 at minimal doses required for leukemia or tumor engraftment. Mice transplanted with THP-1 or RH41 cells were randomly assigned for analysis of CIK cell treatment. Organs of mice were analyzed by flow cytometry as well as quantitative polymerase chain reaction (qPCR for engraftment of malignant cells and CIK cells. Potential of CIK cells to induce GvHD was determined by histological analysis. Tissues of the highest degree of THP-1 cell expansion included bone marrow (BM followed by liver, lung, spleen, peripheral blood (PB, and brain. RH30 and RH41 engraftment mainly took place in liver and lung, but was also detectable in spleen and PB. In spite of delayed CIK cell expansion compared with malignant cells, CIK cells injected at an effector to target cell (E:T ratio of 1:1 were sufficient for significant reduction of RH41 cells, whereas against fast-expanding THP-1 cells an E:T ratio of 250:1 was needed to achieve comparable results. Our preclinical in vivo mouse models showed a reliably 100% engraftment of malignant cells which is essential for analysis of anti-cancer therapy. Furthermore our data demonstrated that IL-15-activated CIK cells

  19. Lenalidomide-based maintenance therapy reduces TNF receptor 2 on CD4 T cells and enhances immune effector function in acute myeloid leukemia patients.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Govindaraj, Chindu; Madondo, Mutsa; Kong, Ying Ying; Tan, Peter; Wei, Andrew; Plebanski, Magdalena

    2014-08-01

    A major limitation to improved outcomes in acute myelogenous leukemia (AML) is relapse resulting from leukemic cells that persist at clinical remission. Regulatory T cells (Tregs), which are increased in AML patients, can contribute to immune evasion by residual leukemic cells. Tumor necrosis factor (TNF), a pro-inflammatory cytokine present at high levels within patients, can induce TNF receptor-2 (TNFR2) expression on Tregs. We hypothesized that since TNFR2 is required for Treg stabilization and TNFR2+ Tregs are potent suppressors, targeting TNFR2+ Tregs may restore the effectiveness of immune-surveillance mechanisms. In this pilot study, we report AML patients in clinical remission have substantially increased levels of TNFR2+ T cells, including TNFR2+ Tregs and impaired effector CD4 T cell function with reduced IL-2 and IFNγ production. The immunomodulatory drug, lenalidomide, and the demethylating agent, azacitidine have been moderately successful in treating AML patients, but their combined effects on TNFR2+ T cells, including Tregs are currently unknown. Our data indicates that although treatment with lenalidomide and azacitidine increased cytokine production by effector T cells in all patients, durable clinical remissions may be observed in patients with a concomitant reduction in TNFR2+ T cells and TNFR2+ Tregs. In vitro studies further demonstrated that lenalidomide can reduce TNFR2 expression and can augment effector cytokine production by T cells, which can be further enhanced by azacitidine. These results indicate that reduction of TNFR2+ T cells in AML postremission phase may result from combined azacitidine/lenalidomide therapy and may contribute to an improved clinical outcome. © 2014 Wiley Periodicals, Inc.

  20. Andrographolide potentiates the antitumor effect of topotecan in acute myeloid leukemia cells through an intrinsic apoptotic pathway.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Hodroj, Mohammad Hassan; Jardaly, Achraf; Abi Raad, Sarah; Zouein, Annalise; Rizk, Sandra

    2018-01-01

    Topotecan (TP) is an anticancer drug acting as topoisomerase I inhibitor that is used in the treatment of many types of cancers including leukemia, but it has significant side effects. Andrographolide, a compound extracted from Andrographis paniculata , was recently proven to inhibit the growth of cancer cells and can induce apoptosis. The aim of this study is to investigate the possible synergism between TP and andrographolide in acute myeloid cells in vitro. U937 acute myeloid leukemic cells were cultured using Roswell Park Memorial Institute (RPMI) medium and then treated for 24 h with TP and andrographolide prepared through the dilution of dimethyl sulfoxide (DMSO) stocks with RPMI on the day of treatment. Cell proliferation was assessed using cell proliferation assay upon treatment with both compounds separately and in combination. Cell-cycle study and apoptosis detection were performed by staining the cells with propidium iodide (PI) stain and Annexin V/PI stain, respectively, followed by flow cytometry analysis. Western blotting was used to assess the expression of various proteins involved in apoptotic pathways. Both TP and andrographolide showed an antiproliferative effect in a dose-dependent manner when applied on U937 cells separately; however, pretreating the cells with andrographolide before applying TP exhibited a synergistic effect with lower inhibitory concentrations (half-maximal inhibitory concentration). Treating the cells with TP alone led to specific cell-cycle arrest at S phase that was more prominent upon pretreatment combination with andrographolide. Using Annexin V/PI staining to assess the proapoptotic effect following the pretreatment combination showed an increase in the number of apoptotic cells, which was supported by the Western blot results that manifested an upregulation of several proapoptotic proteins expression. The pretreatment of U937 with andrographolide followed by low doses of TP showed an enhancement in inducing apoptosis

  1. RESULTS OF HEMATOPOIETIC CELL TRANSPLANTATION IN PEDIATRIC LEUKEMIA

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    A. Mousavi

    2008-05-01

    Full Text Available Hematopoietic cell transplantation (HCT is an accepted treatment for acute myeloid leukemia (AML in first remission, the treatment of choice for chronic myeloid leukemia (CML and high risk groups of ALL who relapse with conventional chemotherapy. We assessed results of HCT for pediatric leukemia in our center. A total of 92 children, 63 with diagnose of AML, 23 with ALL and 6 with CML received allogeneic transplantation from HLA full matched siblings (57.6% and autologous transplantation (42.4%. Source of hematopoietic cells were peripheral blood 83.7%, bone marrow 15.2% and cord blood 1.6%. The median transplanted nucleated cells were 6.4 ± 4.7 ×108 /Kg (body weight of patients and mononuclear cells were 5.5 ± 2.9×108/Kg. The most common conditioning regimens were cyclophosphamide + busulfan. Prophylaxis regimen for GVHD was cyclosporin ± methotrexate. GVHD occurred in 50 (54.3% patients. Eighty five of children had engraftment, 26 (28.6% relapsed and 57 (62% are alive. The most common cause of death was relapse (68.6%. Five years overall survival of patients with AML and ALL were 49% and 44% respectively and disease free survival of them were 52% and 49%. One year overall survival and disease free survival of CML was 57%. Overall survival increased with increasing age of patients at transplantation time (P = 0.06. Longer survival significantly related to earlier WBC and platelet recovery (P < 0.0001 and P = 0.006 respectively. Considering acceptable overall and disease free survival of patients after HCT, we concluded that is a good modality in treatment of leukemia of children.

  2. Acute leukemia after successful chemotherapy for oat cell carcinoma

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Rose, V.L.; Keppen, M.D.; Eichner, E.R.; Pitha, J.V.; Murray, J.L.

    1983-01-01

    A report of acute myelomonocytic leukemia following successful therapy for oat cell carcinoma is presented. The patient had been treated with extensive cytotoxic and radiation therapy, and was without clinical evidence of disease at one year follow-up. Eighteen months later, a peripheral smear revealed numerous blasts with monocytoid characteristics. This unusual presentation is discussed and compared with several other cases appearing in the recent literature

  3. Allogeneic stem cell transplantation in acute myeloid leukemia

    Directory of Open Access Journals (Sweden)

    Natasha Ali

    2012-11-01

    Full Text Available We report a case series of 12 patients with acute myeloid leukemia who underwent allogeneic stem cell transplant with a matched related donor. Male to female ratio was 1:1. The main complication post-transplant was graft-versus-host disease (n=7 patients. Transplant-related mortality involved one patient; cause of death was multi-organ failure. After a median follow up of 36.0±11.3 months, overall survival was 16%.

  4. Constitutive STAT3-activation in Sezary syndrome: tyrphostin AG490 inhibits STAT3-activation, interleukin-2 receptor expression and growth of leukemic Sezary cells

    DEFF Research Database (Denmark)

    Eriksen, K W; Kaltoft, K; Mikkelsen, G

    2001-01-01

    are IL-2Ralpha negative. An aberrant expression of IL-2Ralpha has recently been described in cutaneous T-cell lymphoma (CTCL). Here, we study the regulation of IL-2Ralpha expression and STATs in a tumor cell line obtained from peripheral blood from a patient with Sezary syndrome (SS), a leukemic variant...... of CTCL. We show that (1) STAT3 (a transcription factor known to regulate IL-2Ralpha transcription) is constitutively tyrosine-phosphorylated in SS tumor cells, but not in non-malignant T cells; (2) STAT3 binds constitutively to a STAT-binding sequence in the promotor of the IL-2Ralpha gene; (3) the Janus...... kinase inhibitor, tyrphostine AG490, inhibits STAT3 activation, STAT3 DNA binding, and IL-2Ralpha mRNA and protein expression in parallel; and (4) tyrphostine AG490 inhibits IL-2 driven mitogenesis and triggers apoptosis in SS tumor cells. In conclusion, we provide the first example of a constitutive...

  5. Decreased cisplatin uptake by resistant L1210 leukemia cells

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Hromas, R.A.; North, J.A.; Burns, C.P.

    1987-01-01

    Cisplatin resistance remains poorly understood compared to other forms of anti-neoplastic drug resistance. In this report radiolabelled cisplatin and rapid separation techniques were used to compare drug uptake by L1210 leukemia cells that are sensitive (K25) or resistant (SCR9) to cisplatin. Uptake of cisplatin by both cell lines was linear without saturation kinetics up to 100 μM. The resistant ZCR9 cells had 36-60% reduced drug uptake as compared to its sensitive parent line, K25. In contrast, there was no difference in the rate of efflux. We conclude that a decreased rate of uptake is one possible mechanism of cellular cisplatin resistance. (Author)

  6. Molecular signatures in childhood acute leukemia and their correlations to expression patterns in normal hematopoietic subpopulations.

    Science.gov (United States)

    Andersson, Anna; Olofsson, Tor; Lindgren, David; Nilsson, Björn; Ritz, Cecilia; Edén, Patrik; Lassen, Carin; Råde, Johan; Fontes, Magnus; Mörse, Helena; Heldrup, Jesper; Behrendtz, Mikael; Mitelman, Felix; Höglund, Mattias; Johansson, Bertil; Fioretos, Thoas

    2005-12-27

    Global expression profiles of a consecutive series of 121 childhood acute leukemias (87 B lineage acute lymphoblastic leukemias, 11 T cell acute lymphoblastic leukemias, and 23 acute myeloid leukemias), six normal bone marrows, and 10 normal hematopoietic subpopulations of different lineages and maturations were ascertained by using 27K cDNA microarrays. Unsupervised analyses revealed segregation according to lineages and primary genetic changes, i.e., TCF3(E2A)/PBX1, IGH@/MYC, ETV6(TEL)/RUNX1(AML1), 11q23/MLL, and hyperdiploidy (>50 chromosomes). Supervised discriminatory analyses were used to identify differentially expressed genes correlating with lineage and primary genetic change. The gene-expression profiles of normal hematopoietic cells were also studied. By using principal component analyses (PCA), a differentiation axis was exposed, reflecting lineages and maturation stages of normal hematopoietic cells. By applying the three principal components obtained from PCA of the normal cells on the leukemic samples, similarities between malignant and normal cell lineages and maturations were investigated. Apart from showing that leukemias segregate according to lineage and genetic subtype, we provide an extensive study of the genes correlating with primary genetic changes. We also investigated the expression pattern of these genes in normal hematopoietic cells of different lineages and maturations, identifying genes preferentially expressed by the leukemic cells, suggesting an ectopic activation of a large number of genes, likely to reflect regulatory networks of pathogenetic importance that also may provide attractive targets for future directed therapies.

  7. Enhancing Natural Killer Cell Mediated Targeting and Responses to Myeloid Leukemias

    Science.gov (United States)

    2017-10-01

    AWARD NUMBER: W81XWH-16-1-0380 TITLE: Enhancing Natural Killer Cell Mediated Targeting and Responses to Myeloid Leukemias PRINCIPAL...2017 4. TITLE AND SUBTITLE 5a. CONTRACT NUMBER Enhancing Natural Killer Cell Mediated Targeting and Responses to Myeloid Leukemias 5b. GRANT NUMBER...leukemias still have poor prognosis, particularly in the elderly, and require hematopoietic cell transplants to fully kill the tumor, which is both

  8. Assay of hybrid ribonuclease using a membrane filter-immobilized synthetic hybrid: application to the human leukemic cell

    International Nuclear Information System (INIS)

    Papaphilis, A.D.; Kamper, E.F.

    1985-01-01

    A method for assaying hybrid ribonuclease has been devised which utilizes as substrate the synthetic hybrid [ 3 H]polyriboadenylic acid [poly(rA)]:polydeoxythymidylic acid [poly(dT)] immobilized on the solid matrix of nitrocellulose filters. The hybridization on filter of [ 3 H]poly(rA) to poly(dT) has been explored in terms of efficacy of the process and the response of the product to RNase H. A pulse of uv irradiation of poly(dT) while in dry state on the filter increased its firm binding to the filter in a concentration-dependent manner, resulting in a concomitant increase of the yield of hybrid formation. The filter-immobilized hybrid was 95% resistant to RNase A but sensitive to RNase H. When stored in toluene in the cold the hybrid maintained its stability for over 6 months, as judged by its resistance to RNase A. The method offers a number of advantages over assays that use solution hybrids as substrates and was readily applicable in the screening of leukemic patients, in the leukocytes of which it has demonstrated increased RNase H levels

  9. Coamplification of human acetylcholinesterase and butyrylcholinesterase genes in blood cells: Correlation with various leukemias and abnormal megakaryocytopoiesis

    International Nuclear Info